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Sample records for cryptomonas paramecium reduction

  1. Paramecium

    SciTech Connect

    Gortz, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the current knowledge and research on Paramecium. Scientists find Paramecium a most useful object for the study of basic biological enigmas. To cover all aspects on the cell biology, cell physiology, genetics, developmental biology, ecology, endocytobiology, and molecular biology of Paramecium, specialists were asked to review their own fields. They have also included quite recent studies on the cytoskeleton, endo- and exocytosis, aging, sensory and membrane physiology, electrophysiology and motility.

  2. Nuclear transplant studies on the reduction in numbers of presumptive germ nuclei in exconjugants of Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Mikami, K

    1982-08-01

    Nuclear differentiation in exconjugants of Paramecium caudatum is closely associated with a brief localization of the postzygotic nuclei near the opposite ends of the cell, with the germinal nucleus (micronucleus) in the anterior region and the somatic nuclei (macronuclei) in the posterior region. The posterior nuclei cannot regenerate to produce micronuclei when all four anterior nuclei are removed. There is no difference among the anterior four presumptive micronuclei, because, when any three of them were removed, the remaining nucleus was able to divide at each postconjugational fission and to persist as a micronucleus during the vegetative phase. This conclusion agrees with the results of transplanting a presumptive micronucleus into a vegetative cell. Cells during the vegetative phase, however, normally have only one micronucleus. Micronuclear number must be reduced to arrive at the uni-micronucleate condition after the stage of macro- and micronuclear differentiation. Elimination of supernumerary presumptive micronuclei, which had been indicated by morphological observations, was confirmed by the results of nuclear transplantation studies. PMID:7166576

  3. Homology-dependent Gene Silencing in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Françoise; Vayssié, Laurence; Klotz, Catherine; Sperling, Linda; Madeddu, Luisa

    1998-01-01

    Microinjection at high copy number of plasmids containing only the coding region of a gene into the Paramecium somatic macronucleus led to a marked reduction in the expression of the corresponding endogenous gene(s). The silencing effect, which is stably maintained throughout vegetative growth, has been observed for all Paramecium genes examined so far: a single-copy gene (ND7), as well as members of multigene families (centrin genes and trichocyst matrix protein genes) in which all closely related paralogous genes appeared to be affected. This phenomenon may be related to posttranscriptional gene silencing in transgenic plants and quelling in Neurospora and allows the efficient creation of specific mutant phenotypes thus providing a potentially powerful tool to study gene function in Paramecium. For the two multigene families that encode proteins that coassemble to build up complex subcellular structures the analysis presented herein provides the first experimental evidence that the members of these gene families are not functionally redundant. PMID:9529389

  4. Magnetic field influence on paramecium motility

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.F.; Rosen, A.D. )

    1990-01-01

    The influence of a moderately intense static magnetic field on movement patterns of free swimming Paramecium was studied. When exposed to fields of 0.126 T, these ciliated protozoa exhibited significant reduction in velocity as well as a disorganization of movement pattern. It is suggested that these findings may be explained on the basis of alteration in function of ion specific channels within the cell membrane.

  5. Endosymbionts in paramecium.

    PubMed

    Fujishima, Masahiro; Kodama, Yuuki

    2012-05-01

    Paramecium species are extremely valuable organisms to enable experiments for the reestablishment of endosymbiosis. This is investigated in two different systems, the first with Paramecium caudatum and the endonuclear symbiotic bacterium Holospora species. Although most endosymbiotic bacteria cannot grow outside the host cell as a result of their reduced genome size, Holospora species can maintain their infectivity for a limited time. We found that an 89-kDa periplasmic protein has an important function for Holospora's invasion into the target nucleus, and that Holospora alters the host gene expression; the host thereby acquires resistance against various stresses. The second system is the symbiosis between P. bursaria and symbiotic Chlorella. Alga-free P. bursaria and the algae retain the ability to grow without a partner. Consequently, endosymbiosis between the aposymbiotic host cells and the symbiotic algae can be reestablished easily by mixing them. We now found four checkpoints for the reestablishment of the endosymbiosis between P. bursaria and the algae. The findings in the two systems provide excellent opportunities for us to elucidate not only infection processes but also to assess the associations leading to eukaryotic cell evolution. This paper summarizes recent progresses on reestablishment of the primary and the secondary endosymbiosis in Paramecium.

  6. Is paramecium swimming autonomic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Toplosky, Norman; Hansen, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We seek to explore if the swimming of paramecium has an underlying autonomic mechanism. Such robotic elements may be useful in capturing the disturbance field in an environment in real time. Experimental evidence is emerging that motion control neurons of other animals may be present in paramecium as well. The limit cycle determined using analog simulation of the coupled nonlinear oscillators of olivo-cerebellar dynamics (ieee joe 33, 563-578, 2008) agrees with the tracks of the cilium of a biological paramecium. A 4-motor apparatus has been built that reproduces the kinematics of the cilium motion. The motion of the biological cilium has been analyzed and compared with the results of the finite element modeling of forces on a cilium. The modeling equates applied torque at the base of the cilium with drag, the cilium stiffness being phase dependent. A low friction pendulum apparatus with a multiplicity of electromagnetic actuators is being built for verifying the maps of the attractor basin computed using the olivo-cerebellar dynamics for different initial conditions. Sponsored by ONR 33.

  7. Symbiosis in Paramecium Bursaria.

    PubMed

    Karakashian, M W

    1975-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria normally appears green dut to several hundred symbiotic Chlorella which are dispersed throughout its cytoplasm. The symbionts are situated within individual vacuoles and these alga-vacuole complexes grow and divide at a rate compatible with that of the paramecium. The symbiotic units also persist through conjugation and the subsequent reorganization of the host. Studies of the benefit of the symbiosis to the ciliate hosts have shown that they are able to grow and survive better than aposymbiotic animals in environments deficient in bacteria. The symbionts are also able to extract nourishment from the host when it is well fed and they are deprived of light. The biochemical nature of these exchanges has not been determined. Potential symbionts usually enter the host in food vacuoles. If they are ingested in sufficient numbers, they are able to interfere with the normal course of host digestion, perhaps by preventing the release of digestive enzymes into the food vacuole. All natural symbionts of P. bursaria appear able to reinfect aposymbiotic cells. Some freeliving strains of Chlorella and related algae are also infective, but these associations are relatively unstable and provide little evident benefit to the host. Host susceptibility to infection by certain strains of free-living algae is invariably lost with time. This loss is specific and often rapid, but it does not occur simultaneously in subcultures derived from the original susceptible culture. The basis for these susceptibility changes is still unknown, but they may be related to long-lasting effect of the previous symbionts on the digestive efficiency of the paramecium host. PMID:785659

  8. Effects of light intensity and temperature on Cryptomonas ovata (Cryptophyceae) growth and nutrient uptake rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.

    1977-01-01

    Specific growth rate of Cryptomonas ovata var. palustris Pringsheim was measured in batch culture at 14 light-temperature combinations. Both the maximum growth rate (μm) and optimum light intensity (Iopt) fit an empirical function that increases exponentially with temperature up to an optimum (Topt), then declines rapidly as temperature exceeds Topt. Incorporation of these functions into Steele's growth equation gives a good estimate of specific growth rate over a wide range of temperature and light intensity. Rates of phosphate, ammonium and nitrate uptake were measured separately at 16 combinations of irradiance and temperature and following a spike addition of all starved cells initially took up nutrient at a rapid rate. This transitory surge was followed by a period of steady, substrate-saturated uptake that persisted until external nutrient concentration fell. Substrate-saturated NO3−-uptake proceeded at very slow rates in the dark and was stimulated by both increased temperature and irradiance; NH4+-uptake apparently proceeded at a basal rate at 8 and l4 C and was also stimulated by increased temperature and irradiance. Rates of NH4−-uptake were much higher than NO3−-uptake at all light-temperature combinations. Below 20 C, PO4−3-uptake was more rapid in dark than in light, but was light enhanced at 26 C.

  9. Electron microscopy of Paramecium (Ciliata).

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Klaus; Allen, Richard D

    2010-01-01

    Paramecium may be the best known single-celled organism in existence (Hausmann et al., 2003). Today its image often appears on television programs where the producers use it to illustrate a stereotypic microorganism, be it pathogenic or nonpathogenic, prokaryotic or eukaryotic. Paramecium was probably one of the first single-celled organisms observed with a light microscope by the Dutch cloth vendor and amateur lens maker Antoni van Leuwenhoek (1632-1723) (Dobell, 1932), and it is still being investigated in the 21st century in the days of the modern electron microscopes.

  10. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  11. Paramecium tetraurelia basal body structure.

    PubMed

    Tassin, Anne-Marie; Lemullois, Michel; Aubusson-Fleury, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium is a free-living unicellular organism, easy to cultivate, featuring ca. 4000 motile cilia emanating from longitudinal rows of basal bodies anchored in the plasma membrane. The basal body circumferential polarity is marked by the asymmetrical organization of its associated appendages. The complex basal body plus its associated rootlets forms the kinetid. Kinetids are precisely oriented within a row in correlation with the cell polarity. Basal bodies also display a proximo-distal polarity with microtubule triplets at their proximal ends, surrounding a permanent cartwheel, and microtubule doublets at the transition zone located between the basal body and the cilium. Basal bodies remain anchored at the cell surface during the whole cell cycle. On the opposite to metazoan, there is no centriolar stage and new basal bodies develop anteriorly and at right angle from the base of the docked ones. Ciliogenesis follows a specific temporal pattern during the cell cycle and both unciliated and ciliated docked basal bodies can be observed in the same cell. The transition zone is particularly well organized with three distinct plates and a maturation of its structure is observed during the growth of the cilium. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses have been performed in different organisms including Paramecium to understand the ciliogenesis process. The data have incremented a multi-organism database, dedicated to proteins involved in the biogenesis, composition and function of centrosomes, basal bodies or cilia. Thanks to its thousands of basal bodies and the well-known choreography of their duplication during the cell cycle, Paramecium has allowed pioneer studies focusing on the structural and functional processes underlying basal body duplication. Proteins involved in basal body anchoring are sequentially recruited to assemble the transition zone thus indicating that the anchoring process parallels the structural differentiation of the transition zone. This feature

  12. Swimming of Paramecium in confined channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-02-01

    Many living organisms in nature have developed a few different swimming modes, presumably derived from hydrodynamic advantage. Paramecium is a ciliated protozoan covered by thousands of cilia with a few nanometers in diameter and tens of micro-meters in length and is able to exhibit both ballistic and meandering motions. First, we characterize ballistic swimming behaviors of ciliated microorganisms in glass capillaries of different diameters and explain the trajectories they trace out. We develop a theoretical model of an undulating sheet with a pressure gradient and discuss how it affects the swimming speed. Secondly, investigation into meandering swimmings within rectangular PDMS channels of dimension smaller than Paramecium length. We find that Paramecium executes a body-bend (an elastic buckling) using the cilia while it meanders. By considering an elastic beam model, we estimate and show the universal profile of forces it exerts on the walls. Finally, we discuss a few other locomotion of Paramecium in other extreme environments like gel.

  13. Paramecium swimming in capillary tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Saikat; Um, Soong Ho; Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-04-01

    Swimming organisms in their natural habitat need to navigate through a wide range of geometries and chemical environments. Interaction with boundaries in such situations is ubiquitous and can significantly modify the swimming characteristics of the organism when compared to ideal laboratory conditions. We study the different patterns of ciliary locomotion in glass capillaries of varying diameter and characterize the effect of the solid boundaries on the velocities of the organism. Experimental observations show that Paramecium executes helical trajectories that slowly transition to straight lines as the diameter of the capillary tubes decreases. We predict the swimming velocity in capillaries by modeling the system as a confined cylinder propagating longitudinal metachronal waves that create a finite pressure gradient. Comparing with experiments, we find that such pressure gradient considerations are necessary for modeling finite sized ciliary organisms in restrictive geometries.

  14. Programmed Rearrangement in Ciliates: Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Betermier, Mireille; Duharcourt, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    Programmed genome rearrangements in the ciliate Paramecium provide a nice illustration of the impact of transposons on genome evolution and plasticity. During the sexual cycle, development of the somatic macronucleus involves elimination of ∼30% of the germline genome, including repeated DNA (e.g., transposons) and ∼45,000 single-copy internal eliminated sequences (IES). IES excision is a precise cut-and-close process, in which double-stranded DNA cleavage at IES ends depends on PiggyMac, a domesticated piggyBac transposase. Genome-wide analysis has revealed that at least a fraction of IESs originate from Tc/mariner transposons unrelated to piggyBac. Moreover, genomic sequences with no transposon origin, such as gene promoters, can be excised reproducibly as IESs, indicating that genome rearrangements contribute to the control of gene expression. How the system has evolved to allow elimination of DNA sequences with no recognizable conserved motif has been the subject of extensive research during the past two decades. Increasing evidence has accumulated for the participation of noncoding RNAs in epigenetic control of elimination for a subset of IESs, and in trans-generational inheritance of alternative rearrangement patterns. This chapter summarizes our current knowledge of the structure of the germline and somatic genomes for the model species Paramecium tetraurelia, and describes the DNA cleavage and repair factors that constitute the IES excision machinery. We present an overview of the role of specialized RNA interference machineries and their associated noncoding RNAs in the control of DNA elimination. Finally, we discuss how RNA-dependent modification and/or remodeling of chromatin may guide PiggyMac to its cognate cleavage sites. PMID:26104450

  15. Effect of Paramecium biaurelia cytoplasm transplantation on the duration of the interautogamous interval (IAI) in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Prajer, M

    1994-01-01

    The cytoplasm of Paramecium biaurelia in various stages of IAI was transplanted to Paramecium tetraurelia cells of the same clonal age. Such donor cytoplasm was effective in retardation of the expression of autogamy in the recipient clones. The results suggest that the cytoplasm of Paramecium biaurelia may contain the autogamous immaturity factor whose level changes during the run of IAI and whose specificity is the same as in Paramecium tetraurelia. PMID:7982503

  16. Growth of Paramecium tetraurelia in bacterized, monoxenic cultures.

    PubMed

    Enright, W J; Hennessey, T M

    1987-05-01

    Wild type and mutant Paramecium tetraurelia were grown in monoxenic cultures by first growing Enterobacter aerogenes on a defined medium and then adding the Paramecium to the stationary phase bacterial culture. The bacterial growth was proportional to the concentration of the carbon source (citrate), and the Paramecium growth was dependent upon both the bacterial density and the starting density of Paramecium. The behavior, electrophysiological properties, ciliary lipid composition, and growth characteristics were similar to the commonly used bacterized medium (Cerophyl) except that 5-10 times greater Paramecium yields were reliably obtained.

  17. Evaluation of gravity-dependent membrane potential shift in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Baba, S A; Mogami, Y; Otsu, T

    1999-01-01

    It is still debated whether or not gravity can stimulate unicellular organisms. This question may be settled by revealing changes in the membrane potential in a manner depending on the gravitational forces imposed on the cell. We estimated the gravity-dependent membrane potential shift to be about 1 mV G-1 for Paramecium showing gravikinesis at 1-5 G, on the basis of measurements of gravity-induced changes in active propulsion and those of propulsive velocity in solutions, in which the membrane potential has been measured electrophysiologically. The shift in membrane potential to this extent may occur from mechanoreceptive changes in K+ or Ca2+ conductance by about 1% and might be at the limit of electrophysiological measurement using membrane potential-sensitive dyes. Our measurements of propulsive velocity vs membrane potential also suggested that the reported propulsive force of Paramecium measured in a solution of graded densities with the aid of a video centrifuge microscope at 350 G was 11 times as large as that for -29 mV, i.e., the resting membrane potential at [K+]o = 1 mM and [Ca2+]o = 1 mM, and, by extrapolation, that Paramecium was hyperpolarized to -60 mV by gravity stimulation of 100-G equivalent, the value corrected by considering the reduction of density difference between the interior and exterior of the cell in the graded density solution. The estimated shift of the membrane potential from -29 mV to -60 mV by 100-G equivalent stimulation, i.e., 0.3 mV G -1, could reach the magnitude entirely feasible to be measured more directly.

  18. Accumulation of DNA damages in aging Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Holmes, G E; Holmes, N R

    1986-07-01

    Paramecium tetraurelia cells of ages 4, 15, and 27 days were labeled with [14C]-thymidine. In addition, cells were grown clonally for 27 days (108 generations) and labeled with [14C]-thymidine in the presence of 0.5 or 7.5 micrograms/ml of mitomycin-C (MMC) or no MMC. These cells were gently deposited on a filter membrane, which impedes the passage of DNA strands. The cells were then lysed with detergents and the cellular components washed through the filters, leaving double-stranded DNA intact on the surface. Proteinase K was used to remove histone or DNA-bound proteins. The DNA was then eluted under alkaline conditions, which denatures double-stranded DNA and converts apurinic/apyrimidinic sites into single-strand breaks. The results obtained with the cells of ages 4, 15, and 27 days (16, 60, and 108 generations, respectively) indicate that as Paramecium tetraurelia ages during asexual reproduction, apurinic/apyrimidinic lesions, strand breaks or single-strand gaps accumulate. This accumulation may be the basic mechanism of aging in such cells. In the MMC-treated cells of 27 days (108 generations), the MMC reduced elution of DNA fragments more at the higher than at the lower pH's used; random MMC cross-links should occur more often in longer strands than in shorter strands. The reductions in elution preferentially at higher pH, at which longer single strands would be eluted, confirmed the pH-versus-length relationship for Paramecium DNA eluted under our conditions. PMID:3091993

  19. Orienting Paramecium with intense static magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James M., Jr.; Guevorkian, Karine; Quindel, Carl

    2004-03-01

    Recent experiments on cell division suggest the application of intense static magnetic fields as a novel tool for the manipulation of biological systems [1]. The magnetic field appears to couple to the intrinsic anisotropies in the diamagnetic components of the cells. Here, we present measurements of the intrinsic average diamagnetic anisotropy of the whole single celled ciliate, Paramecium Caudatum. Magnetic fields, 2.5 T < B < 8 T were applied to immobilized (non-swimming) Paramecium Caudatum that were suspended in a density matched medium. The organisms align with their long axis parallel to the applied magnetic field. Their intrinsic diamagnetic anisotropy is 3x10-11 in cgs units. We will discuss the implications of these results for employing magnetic fields to probe the behavior of swimming Paramecium. [1] J. M. Valles, Jr. et al., Expt. Cell Res.274, 112-118 (2002).

  20. Paramecium swimming in a capillary tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Saikat; Jung, Sunghwan

    2010-03-01

    Micro-organisms exhibit different strategies for swimming in complex environments. Many micro-swimmers such as paramecium congregate and tend to live near wall. We investigate how paramecium moves in a confined space as compared to its motion in an unbounded fluid. A new theoretical model based on Taylor's sheet is developed, to study such boundary effects. In experiments, paramecia are put inside capillary tubes and their swimming behavior is observed. The data obtained from experiments is used to test the validity of our theoretical model and understand how the cilia influence the locomotion of paramecia in confined geometries.

  1. Locomotion of Paramecium in patterned environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Eun-Jik; Eddins, Aja; Kim, Junil; Yang, Sung; Jana, Saikat; Jung, Sunghwan

    2011-10-01

    Ciliary organisms like Paramecium Multimicronucleatum locomote by synchronized beating of cilia that produce metachronal waves over their body. In their natural environments they navigate through a variety of environments especially surfaces with different topology. We study the effects of wavy surfaces patterned on the PDMS channels on the locomotive abilities of Paramecium by characterizing different quantities like velocity amplitude and wavelength of the trajectories traced. We compare this result with the swimming characteristics in straight channels and draw conclusions about the effects of various patterned surfaces.

  2. The mechanics of gravitaxis in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Roberts, A M

    2010-12-15

    An analysis of swimming patterns in the ciliate Paramecium shows that the ability to swim preferentially upwards (negative gravitaxis) is primarily the result of upwardly curving trajectories. The trajectory characteristics are consistent with those produced by mechanical orientation. Cell profile measurements from microscope images suggest that the characteristic front-rear body asymmetry accounts for the observed orientation rates. Gravikinesis may result from interactions between the propelling cilia and the sedimentary flow around the cell, and it seems unlikely that an internal physiological gravity receptor exists in Paramecium.

  3. Pharmacological attenuation of Paramecium fluid-phase endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wiejak, Jolanta; Surmacz, Liliana; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2007-01-01

    Spectrophotometric quantification of fluid phase endocytosis in the presence of different pharmacological compounds was performed in the model unicellular eukaryote Paramecium. The kinetics of Lucifer Yellow Carbohydrazide (LY) uptake in cells exposed to forskolin and isoproterenol--known to stimulate phagocytosis in this cell--was analyzed. Reduction in both the rate of endocytosis and total accumulation of fluid phase marker was observed following the treatment. Forskolin diminished total LY accumulation by 11% and 21% after 5 min and 25 min of incubation, respectively, whereas the rate of uptake was lowered by 21% in comparison to control cells. The inhibitory effect ofisoproterenol was less pronounced than that of forskolin. The total accumulation of LY was decreased by 11% in 5 min as compared to the untreated cells and this effect was persistent upon further exposition to this reagent up to 25 min. To better understand these observations, the effect of inhibitors of PKA and cAMP phosphodiesterase on fluid phase uptake was tested. 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine (IBMX) caused 12% decrease in LY accumulation after 5 min of incubation. In combination with isoproterenol or forskolin, IBMX enhanced their inhibitory effect on fluid endocytosis, which was lowered by 25% and 29%, respectively. The strongest inhibitory effect on fluid endocytosis was exerted by the 10 microM PKA inhibitor, which diminished endocytosis by 35% in 5 min. These results suggest that Paramecium fluid phase uptake may be regulated through activation of PKA, although the precise mechanism of this process has not yet been elucidated.

  4. Mutagenicity of fly ash particles in Paramecium

    SciTech Connect

    Smith-Sonneborn, J.; Palizzi, R.A.; Herr, C.; Fisher, G.L.

    1981-01-09

    Paramecium, a protozoan that ingests nonnutritive particulate matter, was used to determine the mutagenicity of fly ash. Heat treatment inactivated mutagens that require metabolic conversion to their active form but did not destroy all mutagenicity. Extraction of particles with hydrochloric acid, but not dimethyl sulfoxide, removed detectable mutagenic activity.

  5. Roll and Yaw of Paramecium swimming in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghwan; Jana, Saikat; Giarra, Matt; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2012-11-01

    Many free-swimming microorganisms like ciliates, flagellates, and invertebrates exhibit helical trajectories. In particular, the Paramecium spirally swims along its anterior direction by the beating of cilia. Due to the oblique beating stroke of cilia, the Paramecium rotates along its long axis as it swims forward. Simultaneously, this long axis turns toward the oral groove side. Combined roll and yaw motions of Paramecium result in swimming along a spiral course. Using Particle Image Velocimetry, we measure and quantify the flow field and fluid stress around Paramecium. We will discuss how the non-uniform stress distribution around the body induces this yaw motion.

  6. Orientation of Paramecium under the conditions of weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Hemmersbach-Krause, R; Briegleb, W; Hader, D P; Vogel, K; Grothe, D; Meyer, I

    1993-01-01

    A cell culture of Paramecium with a precise negative gravitaxis was exposed to 4 x l0(-6) g during a parabolic flight of a sounding rocket for 6 min. Computer image analysis revealed that without gravity stimulus the individual swimming paths remained straight. In addition, three reactions could be distinguished. For about 30 s, paramecia maintained the swimming direction they had before onset of low gravity. During the next 20 s, an approximate reversal of the swimming direction occurred. This period was followed by the expected random swimming pattern. Similar behavior was observed under the condition of simulated weightlessness on a fast-rotating clinostat. Control experiments on the ground under hyper-gravity on a low-speed centrifuge microscope and on a vibration test facility proved that the observed effects were caused exclusively by the reduction of gravity.

  7. A theory of gravikinesis in paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machemer, H.

    The archaic eukaryote unicellular microorganism, Paramecium, is propelled by thousands of cilia, which are regulated by modulation of the membrane potential. Ciliates can successfully cope with gravity, which is the phylogenetically oldest stimulus for living things. One mechanism for overcoming sedimentation is negative gravitaxis, an orientational response antiparallel to the gravity vector. We have postulated the existence of a negative gravikinesis in Paramecium, i.e. a modulation of swimming speed as a function of cellular orientation in space. With negative gravikinesis, an upward oriented cell actively augments the rate of forward swimming and depresses active locomotion during downward orientation. A brief outline of the gravikinesis hypothesis is given on a quantitative basis and experimental data are presented which have confirmed the major assumptions.

  8. Effect of confinements: Bending in Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddins, Aja; Yang, Sung; Spoon, Corrie; Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-02-01

    Paramecium is a unicellular eukaryote which by coordinated beating of cilia, generates metachronal waves which causes it to execute a helical trajectory. We investigate the swimming parameters of the organism in rectangular PDMS channels and try to quantify its behavior. Surprisingly a swimming Paramecium in certain width of channels executes a bend of its flexible body (and changes its direction of swimming) by generating forces using the cilia. Considering a simple model of beam constrained between two walls, we predict the bent shapes of the organism and the forces it exerts on the walls. Finally we try to explain how bending (by sensing) can occur in channels by conducting experiments in thin film of fluid and drawing analogy to swimming behavior observed in different cases.

  9. Somersault of Paramecium in extremely confined environments.

    PubMed

    Jana, Saikat; Eddins, Aja; Spoon, Corrie; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate various swimming modes of Paramecium in geometric confinements and a non-swimming self-bending behavior like a somersault, which is quite different from the previously reported behaviors. We observe that Paramecia execute directional sinusoidal trajectories in thick fluid films, whereas Paramecia meander around a localized region and execute frequent turns due to collisions with adjacent walls in thin fluid films. When Paramecia are further constrained in rectangular channels narrower than the length of the cell body, a fraction of meandering Paramecia buckle their body by pushing on the channel walls. The bucking (self-bending) of the cell body allows the Paramecium to reorient its anterior end and explore a completely new direction in extremely confined spaces. Using force deflection method, we quantify the Young's modulus of the cell and estimate the swimming and bending powers exerted by Paramecium. The analysis shows that Paramecia can utilize a fraction of its swimming power to execute the self-bending maneuver within the confined channel and no extra power may be required for this new kind of self-bending behavior. This investigation sheds light on how micro-organisms can use the flexibility of the body to actively navigate within confined spaces. PMID:26286234

  10. Somersault of Paramecium in extremely confined environments

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Saikat; Eddins, Aja; Spoon, Corrie; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate various swimming modes of Paramecium in geometric confinements and a non-swimming self-bending behavior like a somersault, which is quite different from the previously reported behaviors. We observe that Paramecia execute directional sinusoidal trajectories in thick fluid films, whereas Paramecia meander around a localized region and execute frequent turns due to collisions with adjacent walls in thin fluid films. When Paramecia are further constrained in rectangular channels narrower than the length of the cell body, a fraction of meandering Paramecia buckle their body by pushing on the channel walls. The bucking (self-bending) of the cell body allows the Paramecium to reorient its anterior end and explore a completely new direction in extremely confined spaces. Using force deflection method, we quantify the Young’s modulus of the cell and estimate the swimming and bending powers exerted by Paramecium. The analysis shows that Paramecia can utilize a fraction of its swimming power to execute the self-bending maneuver within the confined channel and no extra power may be required for this new kind of self-bending behavior. This investigation sheds light on how micro-organisms can use the flexibility of the body to actively navigate within confined spaces. PMID:26286234

  11. Somersault of Paramecium in extremely confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Saikat; Eddins, Aja; Spoon, Corrie; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-08-01

    We investigate various swimming modes of Paramecium in geometric confinements and a non-swimming self-bending behavior like a somersault, which is quite different from the previously reported behaviors. We observe that Paramecia execute directional sinusoidal trajectories in thick fluid films, whereas Paramecia meander around a localized region and execute frequent turns due to collisions with adjacent walls in thin fluid films. When Paramecia are further constrained in rectangular channels narrower than the length of the cell body, a fraction of meandering Paramecia buckle their body by pushing on the channel walls. The bucking (self-bending) of the cell body allows the Paramecium to reorient its anterior end and explore a completely new direction in extremely confined spaces. Using force deflection method, we quantify the Young’s modulus of the cell and estimate the swimming and bending powers exerted by Paramecium. The analysis shows that Paramecia can utilize a fraction of its swimming power to execute the self-bending maneuver within the confined channel and no extra power may be required for this new kind of self-bending behavior. This investigation sheds light on how micro-organisms can use the flexibility of the body to actively navigate within confined spaces.

  12. Somersault of Paramecium in extremely confined environments.

    PubMed

    Jana, Saikat; Eddins, Aja; Spoon, Corrie; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-08-19

    We investigate various swimming modes of Paramecium in geometric confinements and a non-swimming self-bending behavior like a somersault, which is quite different from the previously reported behaviors. We observe that Paramecia execute directional sinusoidal trajectories in thick fluid films, whereas Paramecia meander around a localized region and execute frequent turns due to collisions with adjacent walls in thin fluid films. When Paramecia are further constrained in rectangular channels narrower than the length of the cell body, a fraction of meandering Paramecia buckle their body by pushing on the channel walls. The bucking (self-bending) of the cell body allows the Paramecium to reorient its anterior end and explore a completely new direction in extremely confined spaces. Using force deflection method, we quantify the Young's modulus of the cell and estimate the swimming and bending powers exerted by Paramecium. The analysis shows that Paramecia can utilize a fraction of its swimming power to execute the self-bending maneuver within the confined channel and no extra power may be required for this new kind of self-bending behavior. This investigation sheds light on how micro-organisms can use the flexibility of the body to actively navigate within confined spaces.

  13. Structure and evolution of Paramecium hemoglobin genes.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, K; Tada, H; Usuki, I

    1995-10-17

    Hemoglobin (Hb) genes have been cloned from three different species of ciliated protists, P. multimicronucleatum, P. triaurelia and P. jenningsi. Southern blotting of the genomic DNAs using the P. caudatum Hb cDNA showed both intraspecies variation in different stocks of P. caudatum and interspecies variation within the genus Paramecium. The isolated Hb genes were composed of 118, 117 and 117 codons, and interrupted by a short intron with 27, 29 and 29 bp at the same position, in P. multimicronucleatum, P. triaurelia and P. jenningsi, respectively. This suggests that the one-intron and two-exon structure has been conserved in the Hb genes in this genus. The amino acid sequences of the Paramecium Hbs were more than 87% identical to one another and homologous to those from the other ciliated protists Tetrahymena thermophila and T. pyriformis, the green alga Chlamydomonas eugametos, and the cyanobacterium Nostoc commune Hbs, all of which consist of about 120 amino acid residues (120-aa group). In particular, the amino acid sequences of the P. triaurelia and P. jenningsi Hbs were the same, although there were 20 nucleotide differences between the coding regions in the two genes. A maximum likelihood inference as to the phylogenetic relationships among these genes suggests that the Paramecium Hbs genes have evolved more rapidly than the other genes in the 120-aa group, and that P. triaurelia and P. genningsi are sibling species and the P. aurelia complex became a small cell after it separated from P. jenningsi.

  14. Association of Paramecium bursaria Chlorella viruses with Paramecium bursaria cells: ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    Yashchenko, Varvara V; Gavrilova, Olga V; Rautian, Maria S; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2012-05-01

    Paramecium bursaria Chlorella viruses were observed by applying transmission electron microscopy in the native symbiotic system Paramecium bursaria (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea) and the green algae Chlorella (Chlorellaceae, Trebouxiophyceae). Virus particles were abundant and localized in the ciliary pits of the cortex and in the buccal cavity of P. bursaria. This was shown for two types of the symbiotic systems associated with two types of Chlorella viruses - Pbi or NC64A. A novel quantitative stereological approach was applied to test whether virus particles were distributed randomly on the Paramecium surface or preferentially occupied certain zones. The ability of the virus to form an association with the ciliate was investigated experimentally; virus particles were mixed with P. bursaria or with symbiont-free species P. caudatum. Our results confirmed that in the freshwater ecosystems two types of P. bursaria -Chlorella symbiotic systems exist, those without Chlorella viruses and those associated with a large amount of the viruses. The fate of Chlorella virus particles at the Paramecium surface was determined based on obtained statistical data and taking into account ciliate feeding currents and cortical reorganization during cell division. A life cycle of the viruses in the complete symbiotic system is proposed.

  15. Secondary structural analyses of ITS1 in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Hoshina, Ryo

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear ribosomal RNA gene operon is interrupted by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 and ITS2. Although the secondary structure of ITS2 has been widely investigated, less is known about ITS1 and its structure. In this study, the secondary structure of ITS1 sequences for Paramecium and other ciliates was predicted. Each Paramecium ITS1 forms an open loop with three helices, A through C. Helix B was highly conserved among Paramecium, and similar helices were found in other ciliates. A phylogenetic analysis using the ITS1 sequences showed high-resolution, implying that ITS1 is a good tool for species-level analyses.

  16. Organization of ribosomal genes in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The macronuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of the ciliated protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia (stock 51) was analyzed by digestion with restriction endonucleases. The fragments which contained ribosomal RNA (rRNA) coding sequences and spacer sequences were identified. The spacer sequences exhibited some heterogeneity in size. The genes coding for 5.8S RNA, but not for 5S RNA, are linked to the 17S and 25S rRNA genes. Complementary RNA, synthesized from rDNA of stock 51, was hybridized with restriction digests of whole cell DNA from six other allopatric stocks of this species. The restriction patterns of the rDNA from these seven stocks were, in general, very similar, and the sizes of the coding sequences were identical in all seven stocks. Only the restriction pattern of rDNA from stock 127 differed significantly from that of stock 51. The rDNA from stock 127 was isolated and characterized, and with the exception of the restriction pattern of its spacer, it resembled the rDNA from stock 51. It is concluded that the rDNA repeat in Paramecium, including the spacer, has, in general, been conserved during the course of evolution. It is suggested that in some species, even in the absence of genetic exchange among geographically separated populations, selection pressure may act to conserve spacers of tandemly repeated rDNA. The conservation may be related to the number of rDNA copies in the germinal nucleus. PMID:6244317

  17. Malic dehydrogenase locus of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Williams, T J; Smith-Sonneborn, J

    1980-04-01

    A search was undertaken for naturally occurring genetic markers for use in clonal aging studies of Paramecium tetraurelia. Clonal age is defined as the number of cell divisions since the last sexual process. Autogamy (self-fertilization) is a sexual process which can occur in aging lines, resulting in homozygosity and initiation of the next generation. Such "illicit" autogamies must be detected and eliminated from the aged clone. With codominant alleles, heterozygous aging lines can be established which will express a phenotype distinguishable from that of either parental type and autogamy can then be monitored by the appearance of either segregant homozygous phenotype. However, very few codominant alleles are available in this species. Electrophoretic mobilities of malic dehydrogenase (MDH) were assayed in 11 stocks of Paramecium tetraurelia by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Nine stocks showed a single-banded "stock 51" type, while stock 174 and stock 29 each exhibited unique mobility. Crosses between stock 51 and the deviant stocks revealed distinct three-banded patterns indicative of heterozygosity of the F1 generation. In the autogamous F2 generation, 1:1 segregation of the parental types were recovered. The pattern of inheritance is consistent with codominant alleles and Mendelian inheritance. These naturally occurring biochemical markers are stable with increasing clonal age and are therefore useful genetic markers for studies of cellular aging. PMID:6934772

  18. Use of a novel cell adhesion method and digital measurement to show stimulus-dependent variation in somatic and oral ciliary beat frequency in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Bell, Wade E; Hallworth, Richard; Wyatt, Todd A; Sisson, Joseph H

    2015-01-01

    When Paramecium encounters positive stimuli, the membrane hyperpolarizes and ciliary beat frequency increases. We adapted an established immobilization protocol using a biological adhesive and a novel digital analysis system to quantify beat frequency in immobilized Paramecium. Cells showed low mortality and demonstrated beat frequencies consistent with previous studies. Chemoattractant molecules, reduction in external potassium, and posterior stimulation all increased somatic beat frequency. In all cases, the oral groove cilia maintained a higher beat frequency than mid-body cilia, but only oral cilia from cells stimulated with chemoattactants showed an increase from basal levels.

  19. Remembrance of things past retrieved from the Paramecium genome.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Paramecium and other ciliates are the only unicellular eukaryotes that separate germinal and somatic functions. A germline micronucleus transmits the genetic information to sexual progeny, while a somatic macronucleus expresses the genetic information during vegetative growth to determine the phenotype. At each sexual generation, a new macronucleus develops from the zygotic nucleus through programmed rearrangements of the germline genome. Paramecium tetraurelia somatic genome sequencing, reviewed here, has provided insight into the organization and evolution of the genome. A series of at least 3 whole genome duplications was detected in the Paramecium lineage and selective pressures that determine the fate of the gene duplicates analyzed. Variability in the somatic DNA was characterized and could be attributed to the genome rearrangement processes. Since, in Paramecium, alternative genome rearrangement patterns can be inherited across sexual generations by homology-dependent epigenetic mechanisms and can affect phenotype, I discuss the possibility that ciliate nuclear dimorphism buffers genetic variation hidden in the germline.

  20. Methods for Studying Ciliary-Mediated Chemoresponse in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Megan Smith; Van Houten, Judith L

    2016-01-01

    Paramecium is a useful model organism for the study of ciliary-mediated chemical sensing and response. Here we describe ways to take advantage of Paramecium to study chemoresponse.Unicellular organisms like the ciliated protozoan Paramecium sense and respond to chemicals in their environment (Van Houten, Ann Rev Physiol 54:639-663, 1992; Van Houten, Trends Neurosci 17:62-71, 1994). A thousand or more cilia that cover Paramecium cells serve as antennae for chemical signals, similar to ciliary function in a large variety of metazoan cell types that have primary or motile cilia (Berbari et al., Curr Biol 19(13):R526-R535, 2009; Singla V, Reiter J, Science 313:629-633, 2006). The Paramecium cilia also produce the motor output of the detection of chemical cues by controlling swimming behavior. Therefore, in Paramecium the cilia serve multiple roles of detection and response.We present this chapter in three sections to describe the methods for (1) assaying populations of cells for their behavioral responses to chemicals (attraction and repulsion), (2) characterization of the chemoreceptors and associated channels of the cilia using proteomics and binding assays, and (3) electrophysiological analysis of individual cells' responses to chemicals. These methods are applied to wild type cells, mutants, transformed cells that express tagged proteins, and cells depleted of gene products by RNA Interference (RNAi). PMID:27514921

  1. Methods for Studying Ciliary-Mediated Chemoresponse in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Megan Smith; Van Houten, Judith L

    2016-01-01

    Paramecium is a useful model organism for the study of ciliary-mediated chemical sensing and response. Here we describe ways to take advantage of Paramecium to study chemoresponse.Unicellular organisms like the ciliated protozoan Paramecium sense and respond to chemicals in their environment (Van Houten, Ann Rev Physiol 54:639-663, 1992; Van Houten, Trends Neurosci 17:62-71, 1994). A thousand or more cilia that cover Paramecium cells serve as antennae for chemical signals, similar to ciliary function in a large variety of metazoan cell types that have primary or motile cilia (Berbari et al., Curr Biol 19(13):R526-R535, 2009; Singla V, Reiter J, Science 313:629-633, 2006). The Paramecium cilia also produce the motor output of the detection of chemical cues by controlling swimming behavior. Therefore, in Paramecium the cilia serve multiple roles of detection and response.We present this chapter in three sections to describe the methods for (1) assaying populations of cells for their behavioral responses to chemicals (attraction and repulsion), (2) characterization of the chemoreceptors and associated channels of the cilia using proteomics and binding assays, and (3) electrophysiological analysis of individual cells' responses to chemicals. These methods are applied to wild type cells, mutants, transformed cells that express tagged proteins, and cells depleted of gene products by RNA Interference (RNAi).

  2. Bioconvection and front formation of Paramecium tetraurelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsunezaki, So; Komori, Rie; Harumoto, Terue

    2007-10-01

    We have investigated the bioconvection of Paramecium tetraurelia in high-density suspensions made by centrifugal concentration. When a suspension is kept at rest in a Hele-Shaw cell, a crowded front of paramecia is formed in the vicinity of the bottom and it propagates gradually toward the water-air interface. Fluid convection occurs under this front, and it is driven persistently by the upward swimming of paramecia. The roll structures of the bioconvection become turbulent with an increase in the depth of the suspension; they also change rapidly as the density of paramecia increases. Our experimental results suggest that lack of oxygen in the suspension causes the active individual motions of paramecia to induce the formation of this front.

  3. Absence of Detectable Mitochondrial Recombination in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    Adoutte, André; Knowles, Jonathan K.; Sainsard-Chanet, Annie

    1979-01-01

    An extensive search for recombination between mitochondrial markers was carried out in Paramecium tetraurelia. Thirty-two combinations, altogether involving 24 different markers, were studied. The markers belonged to the three main categories of mitochondrial mutations presently available in this organism. (a) Spontaneous or UV-induced antibiotic resistance mutations, most probably affecting mitochondrial ribosomes, (b) nitrosoguanidine-induced antibiotic resistance markers displaying thermosensitivity or slow growth, enabling easy selection of possible wild-type recombinants, and (c) mitochondrial partial suppressors of a nuclear gene, probably corresponding to molecular alterations distinct from the preceding two categories. In addition, different genetic configurations were analyzed (i.e., mutant x mutant, double-mutant x wild-type, etc.).—None of the combinations yielded any evidence for the occurrence of recombined genomes despite the fact that: (1) all of them were studied on a large scale involving the screening of at least several thousand mitochondrial genomes (often several millions), (2) in many of them the detection level was sufficiently high to enable the isolation of spontaneous mutants in control cells, and (3) in several of them, reconstitution experiments carried out in parallel show that the conditions were fully adequate to detect recombinant genotypes. The results are in marked contrast with those obtained on the few other organisms in which mitochondrial recombination has been studied, particularly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which mitochondrial recombination is intense. —The most likely basis for the various manifestations of mitochondrial genetic autonomy in Paramecium, described in this as well as in previous publications, is that the chondriome of this organism is made up of thousands of structurally discrete, noninteracting units. PMID:296761

  4. [Comparative description of macronuclear electrophoretic karyotypes of Paramecium primaurelia and Paramecium novaurelia sibling species].

    PubMed

    Nekrasova, I V; Potekhin, A A; Przybos, E; Rautian, M S

    2008-01-01

    The macronuclear genomes of two sibling species belonging to the Paramecium aurelia complex--P. primaurelia and P. novaurelia--were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Their electrophoretic karyotypes showed a continuous spectrum of different-sized DNA molecules with a species-specific pattern of banding, which was reproducible and did not change with strain senescence. Thus, P. aurelia macronuclear PFGE profiles could be described by an approach analogous to that used for the description of metaphase chromosome banding patterns. At first, well-identifiable regions (size fractions) of a PFGE profile, which can be seen at any resolution, are determined. Then, the bands of the second order of resolution (subfractions) can be defined in some of these regions. The blocks of the first and second orders can be utilized as inner markers of the PFGE profile allowing precise comparison of different PFGE profiles. Such comparative analysis has demonstrated some marking differences in organization of the macronuclear genomes of P. primaurelia and P. novaurelia, and low level of intraspecific polymorphism. Worth noting is that the P. novaurelia strain isolated in USA was different from all other analyzed P. novaurelia strains originating from Europe. The nature of banding of P. aurelia PFGE profiles is discussed. The revealed high order and stability of the macronuclear genome organization makes possible searching for new approaches to study the mechanisms of this non-trivial genome formation and maintenance. Further PFGE analysis of the macronuclear genomes of the other Paramecium species in relation with the Paramecium phylogeny may provide insights into the directions of the evolution of the macronuclear genome in Ciliata.

  5. Simulation of Paramecium Chemotaxis Exposed to Calcium Gradients.

    PubMed

    Sarvestani, Ali N; Shamloo, Amir; Ahmadian, Mohammad Taghi

    2016-06-01

    Paramecium or other ciliates have the potential to be utilized for minimally invasive surgery systems, making internal body organs accessible. Paramecium shows interesting responses to changes in the concentration of specific ions such as K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) in the ambient fluid. Some specific responses are observed as, changes in beat pattern of cilia and swimming toward or apart from the ion source. Therefore developing a model for chemotactic motility of small organisms is necessary in order to control the directional movements of these microorganisms before testing them. In this article, we have developed a numerical model, investigating the effects of Ca(2+) on swimming trajectory of Paramecium. Results for Ca(2+)-dependent chemotactic motility show that calcium gradients are efficient actuators for controlling the Paramecium swimming trajectory. After applying a very low Ca(2+) gradient, a directional chemotaxis of swimming Paramecium is observable in this model. As a result, chemotaxis is shown to be an efficient method for controlling the propulsion of these small organisms. PMID:26983824

  6. Survey of Paramecium duboscqui using three markers and assessment of the molecular variability in the genus Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Boscaro, Vittorio; Fokin, Sergei I; Verni, Franco; Petroni, Giulio

    2012-12-01

    The genus Paramecium (phylum Ciliophora) is one of the best-known among protozoa. Nevertheless, the knowledge on the diversity and distribution of species within this genus was remarkably scarce until recent times. In the last years a constantly growing amount of data has formed, especially on the distribution of species and the characterization of molecular markers. Much effort has been made on detecting clades inside each morphospecies, which could suggest the presence of sibling species complexes as in the famous case of Paramecium aurelia. In this work we present new data on Paramecium duboscqui, one of the morphospecies that have not yet been surveyed employing DNA sequences as markers. We obtained data from nine strains sampled around the world, using the three most commonly employed markers (18S rRNA gene, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and COI gene sequences). Moreover, we compared our results with those already available for other Paramecium species, and performed phylogenetic analyses for the entire genus. We also expanded the knowledge on the ITS2 secondary structure and its usefulness in studies on Paramecium. Our approach, that considers the data of all the species together, highlighted some characteristic patterns as well as some ambiguities that should be further investigated.

  7. Cell proliferation of Paramecium tetraurelia on a slow rotating clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, Satoe; Mogami, Yoshihiro; Baba, Shoji A.

    Paramecium is known to proliferate faster under microgravity conditions, and slower under hypergravity. Experiments using axenic culture medium have demonstrated that hypergravity affected directly on the proliferation of Paramecium itself. In order to assess the mechanisms underlying the physiological effects of gravity on cell proliferation, Paramecium tetraurelia was grown under clinorotation (2.5 rpm) and the time course of the proliferation was investigated in detail on the basis of the logistic analysis. On the basis of the mechanical properties of Paramecium, this slow rate of the rotation appears to be enough to simulate microgravity in terms of the randomization of the cell orientation with respect to gravity. P. tetraurelia was cultivated in a closed chamber in which cells were confined without air bubbles, reducing the shear forces and turbulences under clinorotation. The chamber is made of quartz and silicone rubber film; the former is for the optically-flat walls for the measurement of cell density by means of a non-invasive laser optical-slice method, and the latter for gas exchange. Because of the small dimension for culture space, Paramecium does not accumulate at the top of the chamber in spite of its known negative gravitactic behavior. We measured the cell density at regular time intervals without breaking the configuration of the chamber, and analyzed the proliferation parameters by fitting the data to a logistic equation. As a result, P. tetraurelia showed reduced proliferation under slow clinorotation. The saturation of the cell density as well as the maximum proliferation rate decreased, although we found no significant changes on the half maximal time for proliferation. We also found that the mean swimming velocity decreased under slow clinorotation. These results were not consistent with those under microgravity and fast rotating clinostat. This may suggest that randomization of the cell orientation performed by slow rotating clinostat has

  8. Pb2+ Modulates Ca2+ Membrane Permeability In Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Intracellular recording experiments in current clamp configuration were done to evaluate whether Pb2+ modulates ionic membrane permeability in the fresh water Paramecium tetraurelia. It was found that Pb2+ triggers in a dose-dependent manner, a burst of spontaneous action potentials followed by a robust and sustained after hyper-polarization. In addition, Pb2+ increased the frequency of firing the spontaneous Ca2+-Action Potential and also, the duration of Ca2+-Action Potential, in a dose and reversibly-dependent manner. These results suggest that Pb2+ increases calcium membrane permeability of Paramecium and probably activates a calcium-dependent-potassium conductance in the ciliate.

  9. Secondary symbiosis between Paramecium and Chlorella cells.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    Each symbiotic Chlorella species of Paramecium bursaria is enclosed in a perialgal vacuole (PV) membrane derived from the host digestive vacuole (DV) membrane. Algae-free paramecia and symbiotic algae are capable of growing independently and paramecia can be reinfected experimentally by mixing them. This phenomenon provides an excellent model for studying cell-to-cell interaction and the evolution of eukaryotic cells through secondary endosymbiosis between different protists. However, the detailed algal infection process remains unclear. Using pulse labeling of the algae-free paramecia with the isolated symbiotic algae and chase method, we found four necessary cytological events for establishing endosymbiosis. (1) At about 3 min after mixing, some algae show resistance to the host lysosomal enzymes in the DVs, even if the digested ones are present. (2) At about 30 min after mixing, the alga starts to escape from the DVs as the result of the budding of the DV membrane into the cytoplasm. (3) Within 15 min after the escape, the DV membrane enclosing a single green alga differentiates to the PV membrane, which provides protection from lysosomal fusion. (4) The alga localizes at the primary lysosome-less host cell surface by affinity of the PV to unknown structures of the host. At about 24 h after mixing, the alga multiplies by cell division and establishes endosymbiosis. Infection experiments with infection-capable and infection-incapable algae indicate that the infectivity of algae is based on their ability to localize beneath the host surface after escaping from the DVs. This algal infection process differs from known infection processes of other symbiotic or parasitic organisms to their hosts.

  10. Graviresponses of Paramecium biaurelia during parabolic flights.

    PubMed

    Krause, Martin; Bräucker, Richard; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    2006-12-01

    The thresholds of graviorientation and gravikinesis in Paramecium biaurelia were investigated during the 5th DLR (German Aerospace Center) parabolic-flight campaign at Bordeaux in June 2003. Parabolic flights are a useful tool for the investigation of swimming behaviour in protists at different accelerations. At normal gravity (1 g) and hypergravity (1 g to 1.8 g), precision of orientation and locomotion rates depend linearly on the applied acceleration as seen in earlier centrifuge experiments. After transition from hypergravity to decreased gravity (minimal residual acceleration of <10(-2) g), graviorientation as well as gravikinesis show a full relaxation with different kinetics. The use of twelve independent cell samples per flight guarantees high data numbers and secures the statistical significance of the obtained data. The relatively slow change of acceleration between periods of microgravity and hypergravity (0.4 g/s) enabled us to determine the thresholds of graviorientation at 0.6 g and of gravikinesis at 0.4 g. The gravity-unrelated propulsion rate of the sample was found to be 874 microm/s, exceeding the locomotion rate of horizontally swimming cells (855 microm/s). The measured thresholds of graviresponses were compared with data obtained from earlier centrifuge experiments on the sounding rocket Maxus-2. Measured thresholds of gravireactions indicate that small energies, close to the thermal noise level, are sufficient for the gravitransduction process. Data from earlier hypergravity experiments demonstrate that mechanosensitive ion channels are functioning over a relative wide range of acceleration. From this, we may speculate that gravireceptor channels derive from mechanoreceptor channels.

  11. Calcium regulation in the protozoan model, Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Early in eukaryotic evolution, the cell has evolved a considerable inventory of proteins engaged in the regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations, not only to avoid toxic effects but beyond that to exploit the signaling capacity of Ca(2+) by small changes in local concentration. Among protozoa, the ciliate Paramecium may now be one of the best analyzed models. Ciliary activity and exo-/endocytosis are governed by Ca(2+) , the latter by Ca(2+) mobilization from alveolar sacs and a superimposed store-operated Ca(2+) -influx. Paramecium cells possess plasma membrane- and endoplasmic reticulum-resident Ca(2+) -ATPases/pumps (PMCA, SERCA), a variety of Ca(2+) influx channels, including mechanosensitive and voltage-dependent channels in the plasma membrane, furthermore a plethora of Ca(2+) -release channels (CRC) of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and ryanodine receptor type in different compartments, notably the contractile vacuole complex and the alveolar sacs, as well as in vesicles participating in vesicular trafficking. Additional types of CRC probably also occur but they have not been identified at a molecular level as yet, as is the equivalent of synaptotagmin as a Ca(2+) sensor for exocytosis. Among established targets and sensors of Ca(2+) in Paramecium are calmodulin, calcineurin, as well as Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, all with multiple functions. Thus, basic elements of Ca(2+) signaling are available for Paramecium.

  12. Cell proliferation of Paramecium tetraurelia under simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, S.; Mogami, Y.; Baba, S. A.

    Paramecium is known to proliferate faster under microgravity in space and slower under hypergravity Experiments using axenic culture medium have demonstrated that the hypergravity affected directly on the proliferation of Paramecium itself Kato et al 2003 In order to assess the mechanisms underlying the physiological effects of gravity on cell proliferation Paramecium tetraurelia was grown under simulated microgravity performed by clinorotation and the time course of the proliferation was investigated in detail on the basis of the logistic analysis P tetraurelia was cultivated in a closed chamber in which cells were confined without air babbles reducing the shear stresses and turbulence under the rotation The chamber is made of quartz and silicone rubber film the former is for the optically-flat walls for the measurement of cell density by means of a non-invasive laser optical-slice method and the latter for gas exchange Because the closed chamber has an inner dimension of 3 times 3 times 60 mm Paramecium does not accumulate at the top of the chamber despite its negative gravitactic behavior We measured the cell density at regular time intervals without breaking the configuration of the chamber and analyzed the proliferation parameters by fitting the data to a logistic equation Clinorotation had the effects of reducing the proliferation of P tetraurelia It reduced both the saturation cell density and the maximum proliferation rate although it had little effect on the

  13. Biological effect of paramecium in diffused ultrasonic fields.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shiuh-Kuang; Huang, Yi-Cheng

    2002-04-01

    Since the cell structure or biophysical reaction includes in the interaction between ultrasound and living matter. When multi-cell creature is exposed to ultrasound, this reaction will lead the biological effect becomes complex. Therefore, in this paper, a single cell creature is chosen to study the biological effects induced by ultrasound exposure. The paramecium, which possesses many features typical of higher-order animal cells, was considered an appropriate choice for this study. The ability shown by ultrasound in promoting and/or accelerating many reactions has been shown to be a useful field. The growth phase of paramecium by using the ultrasound irradiation is an important parameter in this study. In our experiment, the exponential and stationary phases were employed. Three important factors must be taken into account when an ultrasonic biological reaction is investigated: the medium system, the bubbles' field, and the acoustic field. The medium system involves the physical parameters of the medium field. The bubbles' field includes the reacting bubble size of the liquid and the resonance frequency of the reaction bubbles. The oscillation of the cells in response to the ultrasound radiation is simulated using Rayleigh-Plesset's bubble activation theory. The resonance frequency of the unicellular creature is then calculated. The acoustic field is about using the diffuse field theory of Sabine to create a uniform sound field for the radiation experiment. The resonance frequency of the paramecium vacuole is among 0.54-1.09 MHz. When the 0.25 and 0.5 MHz frequencies of ultrasound was irradiated in the stationary phase of the paramecium, the relative growth rate was about 20% lower than that of unexposed sample. Therefore, the phenomenon of inhibition and destruction appeared during irradiation. The exponential phase of the paramecium samples appear to be different when irradiated with 1 MHz ultrasound. As can be seen in the results, the maximum relative growth

  14. Calcium-mediated inactivation of calcium current in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Brehm, P; Eckert, R; Tillotson, D

    1980-09-01

    1. The Ca current seen in response to depolarization was investigated in Paramecium caudatum under voltage clamp. Inactivation of the current was measured with the double pulse method; a fixed test pulse of an amplitude sufficient to evoke maximal inward current was preceded by a conditioning pulse of variable amplitude (0-120 mV).2. The amplitude of the current recorded during the test pulse was related to the potential of the conditioning pulse. Reduction of test pulse current was taken as an index of Ca current inactivation. The current recorded during a test pulse showed a progressive decrease to a minimum as the potential of the conditioning pulse approached +10 to +30 mV. Further increase in conditioning pulse amplitude was accompanied by a progressive restoration of the test pulse current. Conditioning pulses near the calcium equilibrium potential had only a slight inactivating effect on the test pulse current.3. Injection of a mixture of Cs and TEA which blocked late outward current had essentially no effect on the inward current or its inactivation.4. Elevation of external Ca from 0.5 to 5 mM was accompanied by increased inactivation of the test pulse current. The enhanced inactivation of the test pulse current was approximately proportional to the increase in current recorded during the conditioning pulse.5. Following injection of the Ca chelating agent, EGTA, the inactivation of the test pulse current was diminished; in addition, the transient inward current relaxed slightly more slowly, and the transient was followed by a steady net inward current.6. The time course of recovery from inactivation in the double pulse experiment approximated a single exponential having a time constant of 80-110 msec. Injection of EGTA shortened the time constant by as much as 50%.7. It is concluded that interference with the entry of Ca or enhanced removal of intracellular free Ca(2+) interferes with the process of Ca current inactivation, while enhanced entry of Ca

  15. Detecting the gravitational sensitivity of Paramecium caudatum using magnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2006-03-01

    Under normal conditions, Paramecium cells regulate their swimming speed in response to the pN level mechanical force of gravity. This regulation, known as gravikinesis, is more pronounced when the external force is increased by methods such as centrifugation. Here we present a novel technique that simulates gravity fields using the interactions between strong inhomogeneous magnetic fields and cells. We are able to achieve variable gravities spanning from 10xg to -8xg; where g is earth's gravity. Our experiments show that the swimming speed regulation of Paramecium caudatum to magnetically simulated gravity is a true physiological response. In addition, they reveal a maximum propulsion force for paramecia. This advance establishes a general technique for applying continuously variable forces to cells or cell populations suitable for exploring their force transduction mechanisms.

  16. Cloning of two genes encoding Rab7 in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Surmacz, Liliana; Wiejak, Jolanta; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2006-01-01

    Rab7 is a small GTPase that plays a crucial role in the regulation of transport from early to late endosomes and lysosomes, phagosome maturation and in lysosomal biogenesis in mammalian cells. It contains conserved and unique sequence elements that mediate its function. Two Rab7 genes, Rab7a (703 bp) and Rab7b (707 bp) were identified in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium by PCR amplification. They contain three short introns of different lengths (28-32 bp) and sequence located at identical positions in both genes. The presence of two Rab7 genes in the Paramecium genome was confirmed by Southern hybridization analysis performed with six different restriction enzymes. Expression of both genes was assessed by Northern blot and RT-PCR. Two transcripts of 1.8 and 2.2 kb were identified by hybridization analysis. The cloned complementary DNAs, both of 618 nucleotides in length, encode polypeptides of 206 amino acids that are 97.6% identical and differ in their C-termini. The predicted protein sequences of Rab7a and Rab7b contain all characteristic domains essential for Rab function: the effector domain (YRATVGADF) and four GTP-binding consensus sequences (GDSGVGKT, WDTAGQ, NKLD, SAK) as well as the prenylation motif (-CC) at the C-terminus indispensable for Rab binding to the membrane. Similarity searches revealed 81.6-82.1% homology of Paramecium Rab7 isoforms to human Rab7 and a lack of an insert typical for the Kinetoplastida - the species that appeared earlier in evolution. Paramecium is the first free-living lower eukaryote in which homologues of Rab7 have been identified that exhibit features similar to those of mammalian Rab7.

  17. Transitions between three swimming gaits in Paramecium escape

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Amandine; Fisch, Cathy; Combettes, Laurent; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale; Baroud, Charles N.

    2011-01-01

    Paramecium and other protists are able to swim at velocities reaching several times their body size per second by beating their cilia in an organized fashion. The cilia beat in an asymmetric stroke, which breaks the time reversal symmetry of small scale flows. Here we show that Paramecium uses three different swimming gaits to escape from an aggression, applied in the form of a focused laser heating. For a weak aggression, normal swimming is sufficient and produces a steady swimming velocity. As the heating amplitude is increased, a higher acceleration and faster swimming are achieved through synchronized beating of the cilia, which begin by producing oscillating swimming velocities and later give way to the usual gait. Finally, escape from a life-threatening aggression is achieved by a “jumping” gait, which does not rely on the cilia but is achieved through the explosive release of a group of trichocysts in the direction of the hot spot. Measurements through high-speed video explain the role of trichocysts in defending against aggressions while showing unexpected transitions in the swimming of microorganisms. These measurements also demonstrate that Paramecium optimizes its escape pattern by taking advantage of its inertia. PMID:21464291

  18. Fine oral filaments in Paramecium: a biochemical and immunological analysis.

    PubMed

    Clerot, J; Iftode, F; Budin, K; Jeanmaire-Wolf, R; Coffe, G; Fleury-Aubusson, A

    2001-01-01

    In Paramecium, several kinds of the oral networks of fine filaments are defined at the ultrastructural level. Using the sodium chloride-treated oral apparatus of Paramecium as an antigen to produce monoclonal antibodies, we have begun to identify the proteins constituting these networks. Immunoblotting showed that all positive antibodies were directed against three bands (70-, 75-and 83-kD), which corresponded to quantitatively minor components of the antigen; there was no antibody specific for the quantitatively major components (58- and 62-kD). Immunolocalization with four of these antibodies directed against one or several of these three bands showed that these proteins are components of the fine filaments supporting the oral area; a decoration of the basal bodies and the outer lattice was also observed on the cortex. Immunofluorescence on interphase cells suggested that the three proteins colocalized on the left side of the oral apparatus, whereas only the 70-kD band was detected on the right side. During division, the antigens of the antibodies were detected at different stages after oral basal body assembly. The antibodies cross-reacted with the tetrins, which are oral filament-forming proteins in Tetrahymena, demonstrating that tetrin-related proteins are quantitatively minor components of the oral and the somatic cytoskeleton of Paramecium. PMID:12095113

  19. Ciliary heterogeneity within a single cell: the Paramecium model.

    PubMed

    Aubusson-Fleury, Anne; Cohen, Jean; Lemullois, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium is a single cell able to divide in its morphologically differentiated stage that has many cilia anchored at its cell surface. Many thousands of cilia are thus assembled in a short period of time during division to duplicate the cell pattern while the cell continues swimming. Most, but not all, of these sensory cilia are motile and involved in two main functions: prey capture and cell locomotion. These cilia display heterogeneity, both in their length and their biochemical properties. Thanks to these properties, as well as to the availability of many postgenomic tools and the possibility to follow the regrowth of cilia after deciliation, Paramecium offers a nice opportunity to study the assembly of the cilia, as well as the genesis of their diversity within a single cell. In this paper, after a brief survey of Paramecium morphology and cilia properties, we describe the tools and the protocols currently used for immunofluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry to analyze cilia, with special recommendations to overcome the problem raised by cilium diversity. PMID:25837404

  20. Ciliary heterogeneity within a single cell: the Paramecium model.

    PubMed

    Aubusson-Fleury, Anne; Cohen, Jean; Lemullois, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium is a single cell able to divide in its morphologically differentiated stage that has many cilia anchored at its cell surface. Many thousands of cilia are thus assembled in a short period of time during division to duplicate the cell pattern while the cell continues swimming. Most, but not all, of these sensory cilia are motile and involved in two main functions: prey capture and cell locomotion. These cilia display heterogeneity, both in their length and their biochemical properties. Thanks to these properties, as well as to the availability of many postgenomic tools and the possibility to follow the regrowth of cilia after deciliation, Paramecium offers a nice opportunity to study the assembly of the cilia, as well as the genesis of their diversity within a single cell. In this paper, after a brief survey of Paramecium morphology and cilia properties, we describe the tools and the protocols currently used for immunofluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry to analyze cilia, with special recommendations to overcome the problem raised by cilium diversity.

  1. A two-locus molecular characterization of Paramecium calkinsi.

    PubMed

    Przyboś, Ewa; Tarcz, Sebastian; Potekhin, Alexey; Rautian, Maria; Prajer, Małgorzata

    2012-03-01

    Paramecium calkinsi (Ciliophora, Protozoa) is a euryhaline species which was first identified in freshwater habitats, but subsequently several strains were also collected from brackish water. It is characterized by clockwise spiral swimming movement and the general morphology of the "bursaria type." The present paper is the first molecular characterization of P. calkinsi strains recently collected in distant regions in Russia using ITS1-5.8S- ITS2-5'LSU rDNA (1100bp) and COI (620bp) mtDNA sequenced gene fragments. For comparison, our molecular analysis includes P. bursaria, exhibiting a similar "bursaria morphotype" as well as species representing the "aurelia type," i.e., P. caudatum, P. multimicronucleatum, P. jenningsi, and P. schewiakoffi, and some species of the P. aurelia species complex (P. primaurelia, P. tetraurelia, P. sexaurelia, and P. tredecaurelia). We also use data from GenBank concerning other species in the genus Paramecium and Tetrahymena (which used as an outgroup). The division of the genus Paramecium into four subgenera (proposed by Fokin et al. 2004) is clearly presented by the trees. There is a clear separation between P. calkinsi strains collected from different regions (races). Consequently, given the molecular distances between them, it seems that these races may represent different syngens within the species.

  2. Transitions between three swimming gaits in Paramecium escape.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Amandine; Fisch, Cathy; Combettes, Laurent; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale; Baroud, Charles N

    2011-05-01

    Paramecium and other protists are able to swim at velocities reaching several times their body size per second by beating their cilia in an organized fashion. The cilia beat in an asymmetric stroke, which breaks the time reversal symmetry of small scale flows. Here we show that Paramecium uses three different swimming gaits to escape from an aggression, applied in the form of a focused laser heating. For a weak aggression, normal swimming is sufficient and produces a steady swimming velocity. As the heating amplitude is increased, a higher acceleration and faster swimming are achieved through synchronized beating of the cilia, which begin by producing oscillating swimming velocities and later give way to the usual gait. Finally, escape from a life-threatening aggression is achieved by a "jumping" gait, which does not rely on the cilia but is achieved through the explosive release of a group of trichocysts in the direction of the hot spot. Measurements through high-speed video explain the role of trichocysts in defending against aggressions while showing unexpected transitions in the swimming of microorganisms. These measurements also demonstrate that Paramecium optimizes its escape pattern by taking advantage of its inertia.

  3. Effects of perfluorinated amphiphiles on backward swimming in Paramecium caudatum

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Eriko; Harada, Kouji; Inoue, Kayoko; Koizumi, Akio . E-mail: koizumi@pbh.med.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-01-13

    PFOS and PFOA are ubiquitous contaminants in the environment. We investigated the effects of fluorochemicals on calcium currents in Paramecium caudatum using its behavioral changes. Negatively charged amphiphiles prolonged backward swimming (BWS) of Paramecium. PFOS significantly prolonged BWS, while PFOA was less potent (EC{sub 5}: 29.8 {+-} 4.1 and 424.1 {+-} 124.0 {mu}M, respectively). The BWS prolongation was blocked by cadmium, indicating that the cellular calcium conductance had been modified. The positively charged amphiphile FOSAPrTMA shortened BWS (EC{sub 5}: 19.1 {+-} 17.3). Nonionic amphiphiles did not affect BWS. The longer-chain perfluorinated carboxylates PFNA and PFDA were more potent than PFOA (EC{sub 5}: 98.7 {+-} 20.1 and 60.4 {+-} 10.1 {mu}M, respectively). However, 1,8-perfluorooctanedioic acid and 1,10-perfluorodecanedioic acid did not prolong BWS. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) and BWS prolongation for negatively charged amphiphiles showed a clear correlation (r {sup 2} = 0.8008, p < 0.001). In summary, several perfluorochemicals and PFOS and PFOA had similar effects in Paramecium, while chain length, CMC, and electric charge were major determinants of BWS duration.

  4. Species Identity of Commercial Stocks of Paramecium in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Thomas A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes how paramecium can be identified through the use of DNA-binding fluorescent compounds. The authors used these techniques to test the paramecium stocks from 12 commercial sources. The details of the staining procedures and the results of the commercial tests are presented in this article. (PR)

  5. Species of the Paramecium aurelia complex in Russia: new stands and overall distribution.

    PubMed

    Potekhin, Alexey; Przyboś, Ewa; Nekrasova, Irina; Yashchenko, Varvara; Rautian, Maria

    2010-01-01

    New stands of Paramecium biaurelia, P. triaurelia, P. tetraurelia, P. pentaurelia, P. novaurelia, and P. dodecaurelia were recorded in Russia. Especially interesting is the record of P. novaurelia in Vladivostok, Russian Far East, as it is a very rare species outside of Europe. The distribution of species of the Paramecium aurelia complex in Eurasia with emphasis on findings in Russia is discussed.

  6. Paramecium swimming and ciliary beating patterns: a study on four RNA interference mutations.

    PubMed

    Funfak, Anette; Fisch, Cathy; Abdel Motaal, Hatem T; Diener, Julien; Combettes, Laurent; Baroud, Charles N; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium cells swim and feed by beating their thousands of cilia in coordinated patterns. The organization of these patterns and its relationship with cell motility has been the subject of a large body of work, particularly as a model for ciliary beating in human organs where similar organization is seen. However the rapid motion of the cells makes quantitative measurements very challenging. Here we provide detailed measurements of the swimming of Paramecium cells from high-speed video at high magnification, as they move in microfluidic channels. An image analysis protocol allows us to decouple the cell movement from the motion of the cilia, thus allowing us to measure the ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and the spatio-temporal organization into metachronal waves along the cell periphery. Two distinct values of the CBF appear at different regions of the cell: most of the cilia beat in the range of 15 to 45 Hz, while the cilia in the peristomal region beat at almost double the frequency. The body and peristomal CBF display a nearly linear relation with the swimming velocity. Moreover the measurements do not display a measurable correlation between the swimming velocity and the metachronal wave velocity on the cell periphery. These measurements are repeated for four RNAi silenced mutants, where proteins specific to the cilia or to their connection to the cell base are depleted. We find that the mutants whose ciliary structure is affected display similar swimming to the control cells albeit with a reduced efficiency, while the mutations that affect the cilia's anchoring to the cell lead to strongly reduced ability to swim. This reduction in motility can be related to a loss of coordination between the ciliary beating in different parts of the cell. PMID:25383612

  7. Paramecium swimming and ciliary beating patterns: a study on four RNA interference mutations.

    PubMed

    Funfak, Anette; Fisch, Cathy; Abdel Motaal, Hatem T; Diener, Julien; Combettes, Laurent; Baroud, Charles N; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium cells swim and feed by beating their thousands of cilia in coordinated patterns. The organization of these patterns and its relationship with cell motility has been the subject of a large body of work, particularly as a model for ciliary beating in human organs where similar organization is seen. However the rapid motion of the cells makes quantitative measurements very challenging. Here we provide detailed measurements of the swimming of Paramecium cells from high-speed video at high magnification, as they move in microfluidic channels. An image analysis protocol allows us to decouple the cell movement from the motion of the cilia, thus allowing us to measure the ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and the spatio-temporal organization into metachronal waves along the cell periphery. Two distinct values of the CBF appear at different regions of the cell: most of the cilia beat in the range of 15 to 45 Hz, while the cilia in the peristomal region beat at almost double the frequency. The body and peristomal CBF display a nearly linear relation with the swimming velocity. Moreover the measurements do not display a measurable correlation between the swimming velocity and the metachronal wave velocity on the cell periphery. These measurements are repeated for four RNAi silenced mutants, where proteins specific to the cilia or to their connection to the cell base are depleted. We find that the mutants whose ciliary structure is affected display similar swimming to the control cells albeit with a reduced efficiency, while the mutations that affect the cilia's anchoring to the cell lead to strongly reduced ability to swim. This reduction in motility can be related to a loss of coordination between the ciliary beating in different parts of the cell.

  8. Anesthetic action of volatile anesthetics by using Paramecium as a model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Miaomiao; Xia, Huimin; Xu, Younian; Xin, Naixing; Liu, Jiao; Zhang, Shihai

    2012-06-01

    Although empirically well understood in their clinical administration, volatile anesthetics are not yet well comprehended in their mechanism studies. A major conundrum emerging from these studies is that there is no validated model to assess the presumed candidate sites of the anesthetics. We undertook this study to test the hypothesis that the single-celled Paramecium could be anesthetized and served as a model organism in the study of anesthetics. We assessed the motion of Paramecium cells with Expert Vision system and the chemoresponse of Paramecium cells with T-maze assays in the presence of four different volatile anesthetics, including isoflurane, sevoflurane, enflurane and ether. Each of those volatiles was dissolved in buffers to give drug concentrations equal to 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 EC50, respectively, in clinical practice. We could see that after application of volatile anesthetics, the swimming of the Paramecium cells was accelerated and then suppressed, or even stopped eventually, and the index of the chemoresponse of the Paramecium cells (denoted as I ( che )) was decreased. All of the above impacts were found in a concentration-dependent fashion. The biphasic effects of the clinical concentrations of volatile anesthetics on Paramecium simulated the situation of high species in anesthesia, and the inhibition of the chemoresponse also indicated anesthetized. In conclusion, the findings in our studies suggested that the single-celled Paramecium could be anesthetized with clinical concentrations of volatile anesthetics and therefore be utilized as a model organism to study the mechanisms of volatile anesthetics.

  9. Longevity of a Paramecium cell clone in space: Hypergravity experiments as a basis for microgravity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yuko; Mogami, Yoshihiro; Baba, Shoji A.

    We proposed a space experiment aboard International Space Station to explore the effects of microgravity on the longevity of a Paramecium cell clone. Earlier space experiments in CYTOS and Space Lab D-1 demonstrated that Paramecium proliferated faster in space. In combination with the fact that aging process in Paramecium is largely related to the fission age, the results of the proliferation experiment in space may predict that the longevity of Paramecium decreases when measured by clock time. In preparation of the space experiment, we assessed the aging process under hypergravity, which is known to reduce the proliferation rate. As a result, the length of autogamy immaturity increased when measured by clock time, whereas it remained unchanged by fission age. It is therefore expected that autogamy immaturity in the measure of the clock time would be shortened under microgravity. Since the length of clonal life span of Paramecium is related to the length of autogamy immaturity, the result of hypergravity experiment supports the prediction that the clonal longevity of Paramecium under microgravity decreases. Effects of gravity on proliferation are discussed in terms of energetics of swimming during gravikinesis and gravitaxis of Paramecium.

  10. An UPF3-based nonsense-mediated decay in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Julia; Begley, Victoria; Macias, Sandra; Villalobo, Eduardo

    2014-12-01

    Nonsense-mediated decay recognises mRNAs containing premature termination codons. One of its components, UPF3, is a molecular link bridging through its binding to the exon junction complex nonsense-mediated decay and splicing. In protists UPF3 has not been identified yet. We report that Paramecium tetraurelia bears an UPF3 gene and that it has a role in nonsense-mediated decay. Interestingly, the identified UPF3 has not conserved the essential amino acids required to bind the exon junction complex. Though, our data indicates that this ciliate bears genes coding for core proteins of the exon junction complex. PMID:25463387

  11. Analysis of amino acid and codon usage in Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Dohra, Hideo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    The ciliate Paramecium bursaria harbors the green-alga Chlorella symbionts. We reassembled the P. bursaria transcriptome to minimize falsely fused transcripts, and investigated amino acid and codon usage using the transcriptome data. Surface proteins preferentially use smaller amino acid residues like cysteine. Unusual synonymous codon and amino acid usage in highly expressed genes can reflect a balance between translational selection and other factors. A correlation of gene expression level with synonymous codon or amino acid usage is emphasized in genes down-regulated in symbiont-bearing cells compared to symbiont-free cells. Our results imply that the selection is associated with P. bursaria-Chlorella symbiosis. PMID:26341535

  12. An UPF3-based nonsense-mediated decay in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Julia; Begley, Victoria; Macias, Sandra; Villalobo, Eduardo

    2014-12-01

    Nonsense-mediated decay recognises mRNAs containing premature termination codons. One of its components, UPF3, is a molecular link bridging through its binding to the exon junction complex nonsense-mediated decay and splicing. In protists UPF3 has not been identified yet. We report that Paramecium tetraurelia bears an UPF3 gene and that it has a role in nonsense-mediated decay. Interestingly, the identified UPF3 has not conserved the essential amino acids required to bind the exon junction complex. Though, our data indicates that this ciliate bears genes coding for core proteins of the exon junction complex.

  13. Analysis of amino acid and codon usage in Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Dohra, Hideo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    The ciliate Paramecium bursaria harbors the green-alga Chlorella symbionts. We reassembled the P. bursaria transcriptome to minimize falsely fused transcripts, and investigated amino acid and codon usage using the transcriptome data. Surface proteins preferentially use smaller amino acid residues like cysteine. Unusual synonymous codon and amino acid usage in highly expressed genes can reflect a balance between translational selection and other factors. A correlation of gene expression level with synonymous codon or amino acid usage is emphasized in genes down-regulated in symbiont-bearing cells compared to symbiont-free cells. Our results imply that the selection is associated with P. bursaria-Chlorella symbiosis.

  14. Ciliary membranes and mating substances in Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T

    1977-08-01

    Cilia detached from mating reactive cells of Paramecium caudatum were fractionated for the purpose of identifying the structural component bearing mating substances. Purified axoneme fractions had no mating reactivity. The membrane fraction obtained by dialyzing against a solution of Tris-EDTA (0.1 mm EDTA, 1 mM Tris-HCI, pH 7.6) and 0.6 m KCI, and then by centrifuging over 40% (w/v) sucrose was strongly reactive. No mating reactivity was detected in the soluble fractions containing axonemal and matrix proteins. The results indicate that the mating substances in active form are localized only on the ciliary membranes. PMID:915845

  15. Influence of accelerations on the spatial orientation of Loxodes and Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Hemmersbach, R; Voormanns, R; Briegleb, W; Rieder, N; Häder, D P

    1996-06-27

    The gravitactic ciliates Paramecium and Loxodes were cultivated for 15 days in space during the IML-2 spacelab mission. At dedicated times their behavioral responses to different accelerations between 10(-3) x g and 1.5 x g were investigated by using a slow rotating centrifuge microscope (NIZEMI). The threshold for gravitaxis of Paramecium was found to be at > 0.16 x g and < or = 0.3 x g. No adaptation of Paramecium to the conditions of weightlessness was observed over the duration of 15 days. Loxodes showed no graviresponses to increasing accelerations, though it demonstrated gravitaxis after return to earth.

  16. Beta-adrenergic stimulation of phagocytosis in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E

    1989-08-01

    Bete-adrenergic agonists isoproterenol and norepinephrine enhanced phagocytosis in Paramecium. Stimulation was stereospecific, dose-dependent and inhibited by the beta-agonists propranolol and alprenolol. Phorbol ester and forskolin potentiated the stimulatory effect of catecholamines on Paramecium phagocytosis. The dansyl analogue of propranolol (DAPN) was used for fluorescent visualization of the beta-adrenergic receptor sites in Paramecium which have been found to be localized at the cell membrane and within the membrane of the nascent digestive vacuoles. The appearance of the characteristic fluorescent pattern has been blocked by 1-propranolol.

  17. A genetic dissection of the photophobic response of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, Robert; Peters, Christian

    2013-05-01

    Paramecium tetraurelia displayed two behavioral responses upon the initiation of a light stimulus at 7 x 10(4) lux. The cells exhibited a photophobic response in the form of behavioral avoiding reactions, followed by an increase in forward swimming velocity that was significantly higher than prior to the light stimulus activation. It was determined that an intensity of approximately 6.5 x 10(3) lux was required to initiate a moderate avoidance behavioral response. Following the avoiding response, a gradual increase in speed occurred as the intensity increased, indicating that increased swimming speeds are dependent on the light intensity. Two mutants, pawnA and Dancer, were utilized since they affect known Ca(2+)-currents of the cell. The use of pawnA cells, which lack voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel activity, showed that the two responses to light could be genetically separated, in that the cells showed no avoiding reactions, but did increase their swimming speed. The Dancer cells, which display exaggerated Ca(2+) channel activity, exhibited similar initial avoiding responses as the wild type cells, however did not increase their swimming speed as the intensity of the light was increased. This phenotype as replicated in wildtype cells that had been placed in 25 μM 8-Br-cGMP. These data demonstrate that the photophobic light response of Paramecium tetraurelia can be genetically dissected as a means of elucidating the molecular mechanisms of the light response.

  18. Extraordinary genome stability in the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Sung, Way; Tucker, Abraham E; Doak, Thomas G; Choi, Eunjin; Thomas, W Kelley; Lynch, Michael

    2012-11-20

    Mutation plays a central role in all evolutionary processes and is also the basis of genetic disorders. Established base-substitution mutation rates in eukaryotes range between ∼5 × 10(-10) and 5 × 10(-8) per site per generation, but here we report a genome-wide estimate for Paramecium tetraurelia that is more than an order of magnitude lower than any previous eukaryotic estimate. Nevertheless, when the mutation rate per cell division is extrapolated to the length of the sexual cycle for this protist, the measure obtained is comparable to that for multicellular species with similar genome sizes. Because Paramecium has a transcriptionally silent germ-line nucleus, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that natural selection operates on the cumulative germ-line replication fidelity per episode of somatic gene expression, with the germ-line mutation rate per cell division evolving downward to the lower barrier imposed by random genetic drift. We observe ciliate-specific modifications of widely conserved amino acid sites in DNA polymerases as one potential explanation for unusually high levels of replication fidelity. PMID:23129619

  19. Stomatogenic function of the micronucleus in Paramecium jenningsi.

    PubMed

    Chau, M F; F Ng, S

    1988-12-01

    The stomatogenic function of the micronucleus in Paramecium jenningsi is documented in the present report. Amicronucleate cell lines were generated by removal of the micronuclei with a microinjection needle. Such cell lines exhibited a temporary state of growth depression marked by the development of abnormal oral apparatuses, and they gradually recovered to nearnormal. During sexual reproduction, the amicronucleates failed to develop an oral apparatus but resorbed the pre-existing oral apparatus, resulting in astomy. The types of stomatogenic abnormalities exhibited during asexual and sexual reproduction, apart from some unique features, were largely similar to those observed in P. tetraurelia. Reimplantation of the micronucleus into amicronucleates during the depression period likewise promoted stomatogenic recovery, both in speed and in extent. These similarities between the two species indicate that the control of oral development by the micronucleus in them have much in common, suggesting that the stomatogenic function of the micronucleus is a characteristic of the genus Paramecium. Some of the cells in the renucleated cell lines lost the micronuclei during asexual propagation. Some preliminary observations indicated that such amicronucleates arising in the renucleated cell lines were not as abnormal as those amicronucleates derived by enucleation in the early phase of depression, but were comparable to the latter after the latter had recovered. This suggested that such amicronucleates had suffered only a "minor depression". The genetic implications of this was discussed in the context of the mechanism of stomatogenic recovery in amicronucleates. PMID:23195465

  20. A protein called immaturin controlling sexual immaturity in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Haga, N; Hiwatashi, K

    1981-01-15

    As in many metazoans, clones of some species of Paramecium have, after conjugation, a period of immaturity during which the cells cannot mate. The duration of immaturity is measured by the number of cell generations, which remains fairly constant, although duration in time varies with rate of cell reproduction. Genic involvement is shown by mutants with reduced periods of immaturity. In three different groups of Paramecium species, the cytoplasm of immature cells apparently contains the same substance which represses mating activity when injected into sexually mature cells. The immaturity-inducing substance seems to be absent from sexually mature cells, as brei made not only from mature cells in the stationary phase (mating-reactive cells), but also from those in the log phase (mating-non-reactive cells), does not repress mating activity when injected into mature cells. Variations in the amount of the substance during immaturity suggest that it controls the duration of the period. We have isolated and partially characterized the substance-a single protein called immaturin. The activity of immaturin is dose dependent and associated with a heat-labile protein of molecular weight (MW) 10,000. PMID:7453818

  1. Effects of mutagens on the clonal lifespan of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, S; Ogawa, H; Sasagawa, S

    1992-01-01

    There has been interest in the phenomenon that a cell cannot undergo unlimited reproduction under adequate conditions and undergoes senescence. In holotrichous ciliates, Paramecium has a limit of vegetative reproduction without sexual reproduction but Tetrahymena does not always have a limited lifespan. Comparing the two species would increase our knowledge of the mechanism of cellular clonal aging. We previously showed that mutations induced by X-rays shorten clonal lifespan. In this study, we examined whether mutagens shorten the clonal lifespan of Paramecium tetraurelia. P. tetraurelia was exposed to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), 0.045 mg/ml, for 30 min. The animal was exposed to MNNG 6 times in total while young (under 80 divisions from the start of a clonal life cycle) or 4 times during the senescent stage. MNNG shortened the clonal lifespan as expressed by the decrease in fission number from 186 +/- 55 (4 cell lines) to 136 +/- 21 (6 cell lines) with the first two treatments but with further exposures the lifespan increased to 182 +/- 15 (5 cell lines). MNNG had no effect when administered at the older age. Exposure of P. tetraurelia to 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide at 0.021 mg/ml twice for 12 and 15 min at the younger age reduced the mean clonal lifespan from 143 +/- 28 to 125 +/- 21 and the maximum lifespan from 263 +/- 33 to 175 +/- 25. PMID:1372686

  2. Paramecium--a model system for studying cellular graviperception.

    PubMed

    Hemmersbach, R; Bromeis, B; Block, I; Braucker, R; Krause, M; Freiberger, N; Stieber, C; Wilczek, M

    2001-01-01

    Experiments under varied gravitational accelerations as well as in density-adjusted media showed that sensation of gravity in protists may be linked to the known principles of mechanosensation. Paramecium, a ciliate with clear graviresponses (gravitaxis and gravikinesis) is an ideal model system to prove this hypothesis since the ciliary activity and thus the swimming behaviour is controlled by the membrane potential. It has also been assumed that the cytoplasmic mass causes a distinct stimulation of the bipolarly distributed mechano-sensitive K+ and Ca2+ ion channels in the plasma membrane in dependence of the spatial orientation of the cell. In order to prove this hypothesis, different channel blockers are currently under investigation. Gadolinium did not inhibit gravitaxis in Paramecium, showing that it does not specifically block gravireceptors. Further studies concentrated on the question of whether second messengers are involved in the gravity signal transduction chain. Exposure to 5 g for up to 10 min led to a significant increase in cAMP.

  3. Binding of concanavalin A by the cell membrane of a unicellular organism, Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E

    1975-01-01

    As demonstrated by electron microscopy, Concanavalin A receptors exist on the cell membrane of Paramecium aurelia. The interpretation of the cytochemical detection of Con A binding is not very precise because of a slight, unspecific peroxidase adsorption.

  4. Graviresponses in Paramecium biaurelia under different accelerations: studies on the ground and in space.

    PubMed

    Hemmersbach, R; Voormanns, R; Hader, D P

    1996-10-01

    Behavioural responses to different accelerations below 1 g and up to 5 g were investigated in Paramecium biaurelia by using a centrifuge microscope on Earth and in space during a recent space flight. Increased stimulation (hypergravity) enhanced the negative gravitactic and the gravikinetic responses in Paramecium biaurelia within seconds. Cells did not adapt to altered gravitational conditions. Repetitive stimulation did not change the graviresponses. The minimum acceleration found to induce gravitaxis was between 0.16 and 0.3 g.

  5. Comparison of the evolutionary distances among syngens and sibling species of Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Hori, Manabu; Tomikawa, Izumi; Przyboś, Ewa; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2006-03-01

    The morphospecies of the genus Paramecium have several mating type groups, so-called syngens, composed of cells of complementary mating types. The Paramecium aurelia complex is composed of 15 sibling species assigned to the species from the syngen. To increase our understanding of the evolutionary relationships among syngen and sibling species of the genus Paramecium, we investigated the gene sequences of cytosol-type hsp70 from 7 syngens of Paramecium caudatum and 15 sibling species of P. aurelia. Molecular phylogenetic trees indicated that the P. aurelia complex could be divided into four lineages and separated into each sibling species. However, we did not find any obvious genetic distance among syngens of P. caudatum, and they could only be separated into two closely related groups. These results indicated that the concept of syngens in P. caudatum differs quite markedly from that of the P. aurelia complex. In addition, we also discuss the relationships among these species and other species, Paramecium jenningsi and Paramecium multimicronucleatum, which were once classified as varieties of P. aurelia.

  6. Longevity of Paramecium Cell Clone under Microgravity in Space: Hypergravity Experiment as a Ground Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Y.; Mogami, Y.; Baba, S. A.

    We proposed a space experiment aboard International Space Station to explore the effects of the stay under microgravity on the longevity of Paramecium cell clone (Mogami et al., 1999, Adv. Space Res., 23/12, 2087-2090). Former space experiments in CYTOS and Space Lab D-1 demonstrated that Paramecium proliferated faster in space. In combination with the fact that aging process in Paramecium is largely related to the fission age, the results of the proliferation experiment in space may predict that the longevity of Paramecium decreases when measured by clock time. As a ground simulation of the space experiment, we made an experiment to assess the aging process under hypergravity, which is known to reduce the proliferation rate. As a result, the length of autogamy immaturity increased when measured by clock time, whereas it remained unchanged by fission age (Kato et al., 2003, Zool. Sci., 1373-1380). It is therefore expected that autogamy immaturity in the measure of the clock time would be shortened under microgravity. Since the length of clonal life span of Paramecium is related to the length of autogamy immaturity, the result of hypergravity experiment may support the prediction above; i.e. a decrease in the clonal longevity of Paramecium under microgravity in space.

  7. Paramecium BBS genes are key to presence of channels in Cilia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Changes in genes coding for ciliary proteins contribute to complex human syndromes called ciliopathies, such as Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS). We used the model organism Paramecium to focus on ciliary ion channels that affect the beat form and sensory function of motile cilia and evaluate the effects of perturbing BBS proteins on these channels. Methods We used immunoprecipitations and mass spectrometry to explore whether Paramecium proteins interact as in mammalian cells. We used RNA interference (RNAi) and swimming behavior assays to examine the effects of BBS depletion on ciliary ion channels that control ciliary beating. Combining RNA interference and epitope tagging, we examined the effects of BBS depletion of BBS 7, 8 and 9 on the location of three channels and a chemoreceptor in cilia. Results We found 10 orthologs of 8 BBS genes in P. tetraurelia. BBS1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 9 co-immunoprecipitate. While RNAi reduction of BBS 7 and 9 gene products caused loss and shortening of cilia, RNAi for all BBS genes except BBS2 affected patterns of ciliary motility that are governed by ciliary ion channels. Swimming behavior assays pointed to loss of ciliary K+ channel function. Combining RNAi and epitope tagged ciliary proteins we demonstrated that a calcium activated K+ channel was no longer located in the cilia upon depletion of BBS 7, 8 or 9, consistent with the cells’ swimming behavior. The TRPP channel PKD2 was also lost from the cilia. In contrast, the ciliary voltage gated calcium channel was unaffected by BBS depletion, consistent with behavioral assays. The ciliary location of a chemoreceptor for folate was similarly unperturbed by the depletion of BBS 7, 8 or 9. Conclusions The co-immunoprecipitation of BBS 1,2,4,5,7,8, and 9 suggests a complex of BBS proteins. RNAi for BBS 7, 8 or 9 gene products causes the selective loss of K+ and PKD2 channels from the cilia while the critical voltage gated calcium channel and a peripheral receptor protein remain

  8. Restoration of Nucleo-Mitochondrial Compatibility in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    Sainsard-Chanet, Annie; Knowles, Jonathan

    1979-01-01

    In Paramecium, as previously described, the nuclear mutation cl1 is incompatible with wild-type mitochondria (M+); however, all cl1/cl1M+ cells eventually overcome this incompatibility (Sainsard, Claisse and Balmefrezol 1974). We have studied the kinetics and genetic basis of the spontaneous restoration of harmony between nucleus and mitochondria. We also studied the modification of these kinetics following microinjection of compatible mutant mitochondria into cl1/cl1M+ cells. We demonstrate that nucleo-mitochondrial readjustment is always achieved by mitochondrial changes that fall into two classes. The first class corresponds to spontaneous mitochondrial mutations affecting the amount of cytochrome aa3 and is similar to the previously described Mcl and Msu mutations (Sainsard-Chanet 1978; Sainsard 1975). The nature of the second class of modification is not yet understood; it may correspond either to a mitochondrial "adaptation" or to an unusual type of mutation arising and reverting at high frequency. PMID:17248983

  9. Sex recombination, and reproductive fitness: an experimental study using Paramecium

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, D.

    1982-08-01

    The effect of sex and recombination on reproductive fitness are measured using five wild stocks of Paramecium primaurelia. Among the wild stocks there were highly significant differences in growth rates. No hybrid had as low a fitness as the least fit parental stock. Recombination produced genotypes of higher fitness than those of either parent only in the cross between the two stocks of lowest fitness. The increase in variance of fitness as a result of recombination was almost exclusively attributable to the generation lines with low fitness. The fitness consequences of sexuality and mate choice were stock specific; some individuals leaving the most descendants by inbreeding, others by outcrossing. For most crosses the short-term advantage of sex, if any, accrue from the fusion of different gametes (hybrid vigor) and not from recombination. Since the homozygous genotype with the highest fitnes left the most progeny by inbreeding (no recombination), the persistence of conjugation in P. primaurelia is paradoxical. (JMT)

  10. Stimulation of Paramecium phagocytosis by phorbol ester and forskolin.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E

    1987-09-01

    Phorbol ester (PMA) exerted a dose- and time- dependent stimulating effect on phagocytosis in axenic Paramecium aurelia. When cells were exposed to 200-800 nM PMA in the presence of latex beads, the phagocytic coefficient was enhanced 2.25 to 3.14 times, during 10 min of continuous treatment and then rapidly declined. A similar effect was observed when the cells were exposed to a forskolin treatment, which resulted in nearly a twofold increase in phagocytic activity after a 10 min pulse. Both PMA and forskolin strongly stimulated phagocytosis (i.e. fivefold and threefold, respectively) in cells in which such activity had been completely inhibited by pre-exposure to the beta-receptor antagonist 1-propranolol.

  11. Swimming velocity of Paramecium under the conditions of weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Hemmersbach-Krause, R; Briegleb, W; Vogel, K; Hader, D P

    1993-10-01

    During the 6 min-lasting "free-fall conditions" (4 x 10(-6) g) of the parabolic flight of a sounding rocket Paramecium aurelia cells showed an increase of 7.5 % in their mean swimming velocity. A detailed analysis revealed that the kinetic response was transient: after 3 min the velocity decreased to the speed of the former horizontal swimming at 1 g. Control experiments simulating the influence of vibration and hypergravity during launch of the rocket lead to the conclusion that the increase of the velocity during the parabolic flight was exclusively induced by the transition to 0 g. An increased velocity was also observed under the condition of simulated weightlessness on a fast-rotating clinostat microscope.

  12. Programmed DNA under-amplification in Paramecium primaurelia.

    PubMed

    Dubrana, K; Amar, L

    2000-11-01

    Ciliates are unicellular eukaryotic organisms that contain two types of nuclei throughout their vegetative life, transcriptionally active macronuclei governing the cell phenotype, and transcriptionally inert micronuclei. Following sexual reproduction, new macronuclear genomes regularly develop from micronuclear genomes through programmed DNA rearrangements that include DNA splicing, DNA fragmentation and DNA amplification. In the course of characterization of the micronuclear version of the 9.0 kb G gene, which encodes the G surface antigen in Paramecium primaurelia, we characterized a G gene duplicate. Compared with the G gene, the G gene duplicate displays features identifying it as a psi G pseudogene. About 1.6 kb upstream from the G gene, we characterized a new gene, the P gene. A related psi P putative pseudogene lies 1.6 kb upstream from the psi G pseudogene, showing that the duplicated region extends over > 15 kb and putatively defining it as a pseudogene region. Within macronuclear genomes, this region is highly under-amplified; its level never exceeds 20% of that of the corresponding G gene/P gene region in the 11 cell clones we tested. Under-amplification of the psi G pseudogene/psi P putative pseudogene region could be due to its distal position on macronuclear chromosomes, the use of alternative DNA fragmentation domains being frequent in Paramecium species, or to intrinsically lower amplification of a large genomic region. Therefore, the psi G pseudogene/psi P putative pseudogene region presented in this study provides a useful tool for the analysis of DNA fragmentation and/or amplification in eukaryotic genomes. PMID:11151675

  13. Behavior of Paramecium sp. in solutions containing Sr and Pb: Do Paramecium sp. alter chemical forms of those metals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Koka, Masahi; Satoh, Takahiro; Kamiya, Tomihiro

    2011-10-01

    The behavior of Paramecium sp. (Paramecium bursaria) in aqueous solutions containing Sr and Pb was investigated to determine the role of protozoa in the migration of radionuclides in the environment. Precultured living cells of P. bursaria were exposed to aqueous solutions containing 0.01 or 0.05 mM Sr or Pb at pH 7 for 24 h. For comparison, pre-killed cells were treated with the metal solutions in the same way. Two-dimensional elemental mappings of cells were obtained by micro-PIXE. Aquatic species of Sr and Pb were analyzed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled online to ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and inductivity coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The amounts of Sr adsorbed or taken up by the cells surviving for 24 h and adsorbed on pre-killed cells were below the detection limit. Cells of P. bursaria adsorbed or took up a fraction of Pb. The Pb adsorbed or taken up by the cells surviving for 24 h in the Pb solution was barely detectable, while the Pb adsorbed on pre-killed cells was clearly mappable. These findings suggest that living cells of P. bursaria have functions that reduce adsorption or uptake of Pb on the cells. Quantitative and SEC-UV-ICP-MS analyses of the Sr and Pb in aqueous phases showed no clear evidences that living cells of P. bursaria alter the chemical form of Sr or Pb remaining in the aqueous phases after the cell-solution contact.

  14. A new laboratory cultivation of Paramecium bursaria using non-pathogenic bacteria strains.

    PubMed

    Bator, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    In most studies dealing with the laboratory cultivation of paramecia (Paramecium bursaria), Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria are used to inoculate the medium. However, Klebsiella pneumoniae is a typical pathogen, and its use is always associated with a risk of infection. The aim of the present research was to examine non-pathogenic bacteria strains as components of the medium for Paramecium bursaria. The paramecia were incubated on lettuce infusions bacterized with different bacteria strains: Bacillus subtilis DSM 10, Bacillus megaterium DSM 32, Escherichia coli DSM 498, Micrococcus luteus DSM 348. A strain derived from the natural habitat of Paramecium bursaria was used as the control one. Experiments were conducted under constant light and in the dark. Paramecia cells were counted under a stereomicroscope on consecutive days of incubation. The obtained results show that the most intensive growth of Paramecium bursaria occurs in the presence of Escherichia coli DSM 498. The use of this strain as a component of the medium allows one to obtain a high number of ciliates regardless of the light conditions. It can be concluded that the Paramecium bursaria cultivation procedure can be modified by using the non-pathogenic bacteria strain Escherichia coli DSM 498 instead of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

  15. The activity of parafusin is distinct from that of phosphoglucomutase in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Andersen, A P; Wyroba, E; Reichman, M; Zhao, H; Satir, B H

    1994-05-16

    In this paper we identified the presence of a Paramecium phosphoglucomutase enzymatic activity which is clearly distinct from that of parafusin-the exocytosis-related phosphoglycoprotein. Since the recently cloned parafusin showed homology to rabbit muscle phosphoglucomutase, we have designed a specific peptide parafusin antibody-generated to a region not present in any known sequenced phosphoglucomutases-to distinguish parafusin from the Paramecium phosphoglucomutase. Separation of these two proteins was obtained using liquid chromatography, enzymatic activity assay and immunoblotting analysis with the specific parafusin peptide antibody. Parafusin fractions incorporated [B35S]UDP-Glc but not [35S]Glc-1-P whereas Paramecium phosphoglucomutase fractions incorporated [35S]Glc-1-P but not [B35S]UDP-Glc. This indicates that these two proteins are separate entities exhibiting different properties and most likely distinct functions in the cell.

  16. Ciliate Paramecium is a natural reservoir of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kenta; Nakao, Ryo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Tachibana, Masato; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, replicates within alveolar macrophages and free-living amoebae. However, the lifestyle of L. pneumophila in the environment remains largely unknown. Here we established a novel natural host model of L. pneumophila endosymbiosis using the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. We also identified Legionella endosymbiosis-modulating factor A (LefA), which contributes to the change in life stage from endosymbiosis to host lysis, enabling escape to the environment. We isolated L. pneumophila strains from the environment, and they exhibited cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and induced host lysis. Acidification of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) was inhibited, and enlarged LCVs including numerous bacteria were observed in P. caudatum infected with L. pneumophila. An isogenic L. pneumophila lefA mutant exhibited decreased cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and impaired the modification of LCVs, resulting in the establishment of endosymbiosis between them. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila may have a mechanism to switch their endosymbiosis in protistan hosts in the environment. PMID:27079173

  17. Ciliate Paramecium is a natural reservoir of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenta; Nakao, Ryo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Tachibana, Masato; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, replicates within alveolar macrophages and free-living amoebae. However, the lifestyle of L. pneumophila in the environment remains largely unknown. Here we established a novel natural host model of L. pneumophila endosymbiosis using the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. We also identified Legionella endosymbiosis-modulating factor A (LefA), which contributes to the change in life stage from endosymbiosis to host lysis, enabling escape to the environment. We isolated L. pneumophila strains from the environment, and they exhibited cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and induced host lysis. Acidification of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) was inhibited, and enlarged LCVs including numerous bacteria were observed in P. caudatum infected with L. pneumophila. An isogenic L. pneumophila lefA mutant exhibited decreased cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and impaired the modification of LCVs, resulting in the establishment of endosymbiosis between them. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila may have a mechanism to switch their endosymbiosis in protistan hosts in the environment. PMID:27079173

  18. Adaptation of Paramecium caudatum to variable conditions of temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Alison B; Fellous, Simon; Quillery, Elsa; Kaltz, Oliver

    2011-11-01

    The environment is rarely constant and organisms are exposed to spatial and temporal variation that will impact life-histories. It is important to understand how such variation affects the adaptation of organisms to their local environment. We compare the adaptation of populations of the ciliate Paramecium caudatum exposed to constant (23 °C or 35 °C) and temporally variable temperature environments (random daily fluctuations between 23 °C or 35 °C). Consistent with theory, our experiment shows the evolution of specialists when evolution proceeds in constant environments and generalists when the environment is temporally variable. In addition, we demonstrate costs for specialists of being locally adapted through reduced fitness in novel environments. Conversely, we do not find any costs for generalists, as all populations from variable environments had equal or superior performance to specialists in their own environment. The lack of a cost for generalists is emphasised by the presence of a super generalist that has the highest performance at both assay temperatures.

  19. Proliferation kinetics of paramecium tetraurelia in balloon-borne experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Croute, F.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Vidal, S.; Rousseille, R.; Planel, H.

    1982-06-01

    Experiments were carried out to demonstrate the effect of cosmic radiation, at a balloon-flight ceiling of about 36,500 m (120,000 ft) on single-cell organism proliferation. Paramecium tetraurelia were placed in air-tight containers and maintained at 25 degrees +/- 0.1 degrees C. Cellular growth was determined by cell count, either after recovery or during the flight, by means of an automatic fixation device. Dosimetry was performed by a tissue equivalent proportional counter and was of about 0.5 mrad/h. Flight ceiling duration ranged from 48 min - 22 h. A secondary stimulating effect of growth rate, preceded by a temporary decrease, was observed after recovery. Because of the high bacterial concentration in the trans-Mediterranean flight culture medium, the temporary drop of the growth rate, due to the radiolysis products, disappears. Researchers consider that the stimulating effect can be the result of enzymatic intracellular scavenging of radiolysis products generated in the cell.

  20. Ciliate Paramecium is a natural reservoir of Legionella pneumophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kenta; Nakao, Ryo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Tachibana, Masato; Shimizu, Takashi; Watarai, Masahisa

    2016-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, replicates within alveolar macrophages and free-living amoebae. However, the lifestyle of L. pneumophila in the environment remains largely unknown. Here we established a novel natural host model of L. pneumophila endosymbiosis using the ciliate Paramecium caudatum. We also identified Legionella endosymbiosis-modulating factor A (LefA), which contributes to the change in life stage from endosymbiosis to host lysis, enabling escape to the environment. We isolated L. pneumophila strains from the environment, and they exhibited cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and induced host lysis. Acidification of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) was inhibited, and enlarged LCVs including numerous bacteria were observed in P. caudatum infected with L. pneumophila. An isogenic L. pneumophila lefA mutant exhibited decreased cytotoxicity toward P. caudatum and impaired the modification of LCVs, resulting in the establishment of endosymbiosis between them. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila may have a mechanism to switch their endosymbiosis in protistan hosts in the environment.

  1. Mechanics of membrane-cytoskeleton attachment in Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campillo, C.; Jerber, J.; Fisch, C.; Simoes-Betbeder, M.; Dupuis-Williams, P.; Nassoy, P.; Sykes, C.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we assess the role of the protein MKS1 (Meckel syndrome type 1) in the cortical membrane mechanics of the ciliated protist Paramecium. This protein is known to be crucial in the process of cilium formation, and we investigate its putative role in membrane-cytoskeleton attachment. Therefore, we compare cells where the gene coding for MKS1 is silenced to wild-type cells. We found that scanning electron microscopy observation of the cell surface reveals a cup-like structure in wild-type cells that is lost in silenced cells. Since this structure is based on the underlying cytoskeleton, one hypothesis to explain this observation is a disruption of membrane attachment to the cytoskeleton in the absence of MKS1 that should affect plasma membrane mechanics. We test this by probing the mechanics of wild-type and silenced cells by micropipette aspiration. Strikingly, we observe that, at the same aspiration pressure, the membrane of silenced cells is easily aspirated by the micropipette whereas that of wild-type cells enters only at a moderate velocity, an effect that suggests a detachment of the membrane from the underlying cytoskeleton in silenced cells. We quantify this detachment by measuring the deformation of the cell cortex and the rate of cell membrane entry in the micropipette. This study offers a new perspective for the characterization of membrane-cytoskeleton attachment in protists and paves the way for a better understanding of the role of membrane-cortex attachment in cilium formation.

  2. Developmentally programmed excision of internal DNA sequences in Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Gratias, A; Bétermier, M

    2001-01-01

    The development of a new somatic nucleus (macronucleus) during sexual reproduction of the ciliate Paramecium aurelia involves reproducible chromosomal rearrangements that affect the entire germline genome. Macronuclear development can be induced experimentally, which makes P. aurelia an attractive model for the study of the mechanism and the regulation of DNA rearrangements. Two major types of rearrangements have been identified: the fragmentation of the germline chromosomes, followed by the formation of the new macronuclear chromosome ends in association with imprecise DNA elimination, and the precise excision of internal eliminated sequences (IESs). All IESs identified so far are short, A/T rich and non-coding elements. They are flanked by a direct repeat of a 5'-TA-3' dinucleotide, a single copy of which remains at the macronuclear junction after excision. The number of these single-copy sequences has been estimated to be around 60,000 per haploid genome. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the genetic and epigenetic determinants of IES elimination in P. aurelia, the analysis of excision products, and the tightly regulated timing of excision throughout macronuclear development. Several models for the molecular mechanism of IES excision will be discussed in relation to those proposed for DNA elimination in other ciliates. PMID:11879729

  3. Evolutionary conservancy of the endocytic and trafficking machinery in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Surmacz, Liliana; Wiejak, Jolanta; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2003-01-01

    Molecular search for the homologues of the mammalian proteins in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium involved in endocytosis and membrane trafficking is discussed. We cloned and sequenced the gene fragments encoding the following components participating in endosome formation, sorting and maturation of the proprotein precursors, respectively, dynamin 2, Rab7 and furin. There is a proof that all these genes are expressed in this unicellular organism. The function of the identified immunoanalogues of the above described components of Paramecium endocytic machinery as well as a high degree of sequence homology to the respective human counterparts points to the evolutionary conservancy of these pathways.

  4. Simultaneous Evaluation of Life Cycle Dynamics between a Host Paramecium and the Endosymbionts of Paramecium bursaria Using Capillary Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Endosymbioses are driving forces underlying cell evolution. The endosymbiosis exhibited by Paramecium bursaria is an excellent model with which to study symbiosis. A single-cell microscopic analysis of P. bursaria reveals that endosymbiont numbers double when the host is in the division phase. Consequently, endosymbionts must arrange their cell cycle schedule if the culture-condition-dependent change delays the generation time of P. bursaria. However, it remains poorly understood whether endosymbionts keep pace with the culture-condition-dependent behaviors of P. bursaria, or not. Using microscopy and flow cytometry, this study investigated the life cycle behaviors occurring between endosymbionts and the host. To establish a connection between the host cell cycle and endosymbionts comprehensively, multivariate analysis was applied. The multivariate analysis revealed important information related to regulation between the host and endosymbionts. Results show that dividing endosymbionts underwent transition smoothly from the division phase to interphase, when the host was in the logarithmic phase. In contrast, endosymbiont division stagnated when the host was in the stationary phase. This paper explains that endosymbionts fine-tune their cell cycle pace with their host and that a synchronous life cycle between the endosymbionts and the host is guaranteed in the symbiosis of P. bursaria. PMID:27531180

  5. Simultaneous Evaluation of Life Cycle Dynamics between a Host Paramecium and the Endosymbionts of Paramecium bursaria Using Capillary Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Endosymbioses are driving forces underlying cell evolution. The endosymbiosis exhibited by Paramecium bursaria is an excellent model with which to study symbiosis. A single-cell microscopic analysis of P. bursaria reveals that endosymbiont numbers double when the host is in the division phase. Consequently, endosymbionts must arrange their cell cycle schedule if the culture-condition-dependent change delays the generation time of P. bursaria. However, it remains poorly understood whether endosymbionts keep pace with the culture-condition-dependent behaviors of P. bursaria, or not. Using microscopy and flow cytometry, this study investigated the life cycle behaviors occurring between endosymbionts and the host. To establish a connection between the host cell cycle and endosymbionts comprehensively, multivariate analysis was applied. The multivariate analysis revealed important information related to regulation between the host and endosymbionts. Results show that dividing endosymbionts underwent transition smoothly from the division phase to interphase, when the host was in the logarithmic phase. In contrast, endosymbiont division stagnated when the host was in the stationary phase. This paper explains that endosymbionts fine-tune their cell cycle pace with their host and that a synchronous life cycle between the endosymbionts and the host is guaranteed in the symbiosis of P. bursaria. PMID:27531180

  6. Control of development of the oral apparatus of Paramecium during sexual reproduction: an embryological perspective.

    PubMed

    Ng, S F; Fujishima, M

    1989-08-01

    This study shows that development of the new soma during sexual reproduction in ciliates can be conceptualized on the same basis as embryogenesis in multicellular organisms. In conjugating Paramecium, development of a new oral apparatus takes place during fertilization and the first three divisions of the zygotic nucleus and completes well before the postsexual cell undergoes the first cell fission. The control of oral development is analyzed by microsurgical removal of the zygotic nucleus or the postzygotic nuclei from conjugants. The enucleated exconjugants can pass through an early hurdle in oral development (the initiation of oral membranelle assembly) and subsequently develop an oral apparatus. Such oral apparatuses nevertheless exhibit structural and functional abnormalities including fragmentation and misalignment of oral membranelles, absence of the postoral microtubular bundle, reduction in the length of buccal cavity, and impaired phagocytosis. Other stomatogenic aspects, such as the arrangement of basal bodies in the oral membranelles, remain unaffected. The two groups of exconjugants, one derived from cells enucleated at the zygotic stage, and the other at the postzygotic stage, exhibit the same types of oral abnormality. We conclude that (i) the zygotic nucleus is not essential for the initiation of oral membranelle assembly. The existence of zygotic signals for subsequent oral development is not ruled out, but these are insufficient. (ii) Postzygotic nuclei, as well as maternal nuclei (the old somatic nucleus and meiotic derivatives of the germ nucleus), control oral development. This reveals a parallelism between postsexual development in ciliates and the early embryology of multicellular organisms, in their reliance on information provided by maternal, as well as early postzygotic nuclei. (iii) The activity of the old somatic nucleus alone is not sufficient for the later stages of oral development. Probably, some stomatogenic functions of the old

  7. Interactions between genes involved in exocytotic membrane fusion in paramecium.

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, H; Gulik-Krzywicki, T; Grandchamp, C; Cohen, J

    1992-03-01

    Crosses between members of two independent collections of Paramecium tetraurelia mutants blocked in the final membrane fusion step of trichocyst release (nd mutants) allowed us to define 13 complementation groups comprising 23 alleles. The mutant nd9a was then used as a target in a mutagenesis experiment designed to screen both revertants and new mutants in order to identify interacting genes. This mutant was chosen because it is the best known of its class to date and seems to be altered in assembly of the material connecting the trichocyst membrane to the plasma membrane and in assembly of the "rosette," a complex array of intramembranous particles in the plasma membrane at the trichocyst insertion sites. No revertants were obtained but two new mutants deficient for rosette assembly were identified, nd16b and nd18, whose gene products appear to interact with that of nd9. Indeed, the double mutants grown at 18 degrees, a permissive temperature for each of the single mutants, are characterized by a deficiency in exocytosis and in rosette assembly, as are also double mutants combining other allelic forms of the same genes. Moreover, aberrant dominance relationships among alleles of nd9 and of nd16 indicate the existence of interactions between identical subunits, which most likely assemble into multimeric structures. The nd16 gene product was shown by microinjection experiments to be a cytosolic factor, as is the nd9 gene product. It is therefore tempting to propose that the nd16 gene product also belongs to the connecting material and is involved in rosette assembly, in cooperation with nd9 and nd18.

  8. Pdsg1 and Pdsg2, novel proteins involved in developmental genome remodelling in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Arambasic, Miroslav; Sandoval, Pamela Y; Hoehener, Cristina; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic influence of maternal cells on the development of their progeny has long been studied in various eukaryotes. Multicellular organisms usually provide their zygotes not only with nutrients but also with functional elements required for proper development, such as coding and non-coding RNAs. These maternally deposited RNAs exhibit a variety of functions, from regulating gene expression to assuring genome integrity. In ciliates, such as Paramecium these RNAs participate in the programming of large-scale genome reorganization during development, distinguishing germline-limited DNA, which is excised, from somatic-destined DNA. Only a handful of proteins playing roles in this process have been identified so far, including typical RNAi-derived factors such as Dicer-like and Piwi proteins. Here we report and characterize two novel proteins, Pdsg1 and Pdsg2 (Paramecium protein involved in Development of the Somatic Genome 1 and 2), involved in Paramecium genome reorganization. We show that these proteins are necessary for the excision of germline-limited DNA during development and the survival of sexual progeny. Knockdown of PDSG1 and PDSG2 genes affects the populations of small RNAs known to be involved in the programming of DNA elimination (scanRNAs and iesRNAs) and chromatin modification patterns during development. Our results suggest an association between RNA-mediated trans-generational epigenetic signal and chromatin modifications in the process of Paramecium genome reorganization. PMID:25397898

  9. Autonomous replication and addition of telomerelike sequences to DNA microinjected into Paramecium tetraurelia macronuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Gilley, D; Preer, J R; Aufderheide, K J; Polisky, B

    1988-01-01

    Paramecium tetraurelia can be transformed by microinjection of cloned serotype A gene sequences into the macronucleus. Transformants are detected by their ability to express serotype A surface antigen from the injected templates. After injection, the DNA is converted from a supercoiled form to a linear form by cleavage at nonrandom sites. The linear form appears to replicate autonomously as a unit-length molecule and is present in transformants at high copy number. The injected DNA is further processed by the addition of paramecium-type telomeric sequences to the termini of the linear DNA. To examine the fate of injected linear DNA molecules, plasmid pSA14SB DNA containing the A gene was cleaved into two linear pieces, a 14-kilobase (kb) piece containing the A gene and flanking sequences and a 2.2-kb piece consisting of the procaryotic vector. In transformants expressing the A gene, we observed that two linear DNA species were present which correspond to the two species injected. Both species had Paramecium telomerelike sequences added to their termini. For the 2.2-kb DNA, we show that the site of addition of the telomerelike sequences is directly at one terminus and within one nucleotide of the other terminus. These results indicate that injected procaryotic DNA is capable of autonomous replication in Paramecium macronuclei and that telomeric addition in the macronucleus does not require specific recognition sequences. Images PMID:3211128

  10. Molecular identification of 26 syntaxin genes and their assignment to the different trafficking pathways in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Kissmehl, Roland; Schilde, Christina; Wassmer, Thomas; Danzer, Carsten; Nuehse, Kathrin; Lutter, Kaya; Plattner, Helmut

    2007-05-01

    SNARE proteins have been classified as vesicular (v)- and target (t)-SNAREs and play a central role in the various membrane interactions in eukaryotic cells. Based on the Paramecium genome project, we have identified a multigene family of at least 26 members encoding the t-SNARE syntaxin (PtSyx) that can be grouped into 15 subfamilies. Paramecium syntaxins match the classical build-up of syntaxins, being 'tail-anchored' membrane proteins with an N-terminal cytoplasmic domain and a membrane-bound single C-terminal hydrophobic domain. The membrane anchor is preceded by a conserved SNARE domain of approximately 60 amino acids that is supposed to participate in SNARE complex assembly. In a phylogenetic analysis, most of the Paramecium syntaxin genes were found to cluster in groups together with those from other organisms in a pathway-specific manner, allowing an assignment to different compartments in a homology-dependent way. However, some of them seem to have no counterparts in metazoans. In another approach, we fused one representative member of each of the syntaxin isoforms to green fluorescent protein and assessed the in vivo localization, which was further supported by immunolocalization of some syntaxins. This allowed us to assign syntaxins to all important trafficking pathways in Paramecium.

  11. The Use of Paramecium to Observe the Toxic Effect of Cigarette Smoke.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardell, David

    1986-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which Paramecium caudatum was used to demonstrate the toxic effect of cigarette smoke on the cilia of epithelium cells lining the trachea and bronchi of smokers. Provides background information and explains the procedure, including how to make a simple mechanical smoking device. (TW)

  12. Intraspecific genetic variation in Paramecium revealed by mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase I sequences.

    PubMed

    Barth, Dana; Krenek, Sascha; Fokin, Sergei I; Berendonk, Thomas U

    2006-01-01

    Studies of intraspecific genetic diversity of ciliates, such as population genetics and biogeography, are particularly hampered by the lack of suitable DNA markers. For example, sequences of the non-coding ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions are often too conserved for intraspecific analyses. We have therefore identified primers for the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene and applied them for intraspecific investigations in Paramecium caudatum and Paramecium multimicronucleatum. Furthermore, we obtained sequences of the ITS regions from the same strains and carried out comparative sequence analyses of both data sets. The mitochondrial sequences revealed substantially higher variation in both Paramecium species, with intraspecific divergences up to 7% in P. caudatum and 9.5% in P. multimicronucleatum. Moreover, an initial survey of the population structure discovered different mitochondrial haplotypes of P. caudatum in one pond, thereby demonstrating the potential of this genetic marker for population genetic analyses. Our primers successfully amplified the COI gene of other Paramecium. This is the first report of intraspecific variation in free-living protozoans based on mitochondrial sequence data. Our results show that the high variation in mitochondrial DNA makes it a suitable marker for intraspecific and population genetic studies.

  13. Surface interactions affect the toxicity of engineered metal oxide nanoparticles toward Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Li, Kungang; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Wen; Pu, Zhichao; Jiang, Lin; Chen, Yongsheng

    2012-08-20

    To better understand the potential impacts of engineered metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in the ecosystem, we investigated the acute toxicity of seven different types of engineered metal oxide NPs against Paramecium multimicronucleatum, a ciliated protozoan, using the 48 h LC(50) (lethal concentration, 50%) test. Our results showed that the 48 h LC(50) values of these NPs to Paramecium ranged from 0.81 (Fe(2)O(3) NPs) to 9269 mg/L (Al(2)O(3) NPs); their toxicity to Paramecium increased as follows: Al(2)O(3) < TiO(2) < CeO(2) < ZnO < SiO(2) < CuO < Fe(2)O(3) NPs. On the basis of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, interfacial interactions between NPs and cell membrane were evaluated, and the magnitude of interaction energy barrier correlated well with the 48 h LC(50) data of NPs to Paramecium; this implies that metal oxide NPs with strong association with the cell surface might induce more severe cytotoxicity in unicellular organisms.

  14. Pdsg1 and Pdsg2, novel proteins involved in developmental genome remodelling in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Arambasic, Miroslav; Sandoval, Pamela Y; Hoehener, Cristina; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic influence of maternal cells on the development of their progeny has long been studied in various eukaryotes. Multicellular organisms usually provide their zygotes not only with nutrients but also with functional elements required for proper development, such as coding and non-coding RNAs. These maternally deposited RNAs exhibit a variety of functions, from regulating gene expression to assuring genome integrity. In ciliates, such as Paramecium these RNAs participate in the programming of large-scale genome reorganization during development, distinguishing germline-limited DNA, which is excised, from somatic-destined DNA. Only a handful of proteins playing roles in this process have been identified so far, including typical RNAi-derived factors such as Dicer-like and Piwi proteins. Here we report and characterize two novel proteins, Pdsg1 and Pdsg2 (Paramecium protein involved in Development of the Somatic Genome 1 and 2), involved in Paramecium genome reorganization. We show that these proteins are necessary for the excision of germline-limited DNA during development and the survival of sexual progeny. Knockdown of PDSG1 and PDSG2 genes affects the populations of small RNAs known to be involved in the programming of DNA elimination (scanRNAs and iesRNAs) and chromatin modification patterns during development. Our results suggest an association between RNA-mediated trans-generational epigenetic signal and chromatin modifications in the process of Paramecium genome reorganization.

  15. Pdsg1 and Pdsg2, Novel Proteins Involved in Developmental Genome Remodelling in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    Hoehener, Cristina; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C.; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic influence of maternal cells on the development of their progeny has long been studied in various eukaryotes. Multicellular organisms usually provide their zygotes not only with nutrients but also with functional elements required for proper development, such as coding and non-coding RNAs. These maternally deposited RNAs exhibit a variety of functions, from regulating gene expression to assuring genome integrity. In ciliates, such as Paramecium these RNAs participate in the programming of large-scale genome reorganization during development, distinguishing germline-limited DNA, which is excised, from somatic-destined DNA. Only a handful of proteins playing roles in this process have been identified so far, including typical RNAi-derived factors such as Dicer-like and Piwi proteins. Here we report and characterize two novel proteins, Pdsg1 and Pdsg2 (Paramecium protein involved in Development of the Somatic Genome 1 and 2), involved in Paramecium genome reorganization. We show that these proteins are necessary for the excision of germline-limited DNA during development and the survival of sexual progeny. Knockdown of PDSG1 and PDSG2 genes affects the populations of small RNAs known to be involved in the programming of DNA elimination (scanRNAs and iesRNAs) and chromatin modification patterns during development. Our results suggest an association between RNA-mediated trans-generational epigenetic signal and chromatin modifications in the process of Paramecium genome reorganization. PMID:25397898

  16. Mating types in Paramecium and a molecular approach to their determination.

    PubMed

    Sawka, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Mating types are expressed in ciliates for the duration of the mature period of their clonal cycle. During cell conjugation the reciprocal fertilization of complementary mating types takes place. Models of mating type determination in the Paramecium aurelia species complex based on classical genetics are reviewed including molecular aspects of the studies. PMID:22428300

  17. Clonal Age and the Proportion of Defective Progeny after Autogamy in PARAMECIUM AURELIA

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Shinichi

    1975-01-01

    The relation of mortality and the proportion of progeny with reduced fission after autogamy to the clonal age in Paramecium aurelia was investigated. This relation is not linear but the proportion of defective progeny increases stepwise. The observations are in agreement with those expected from the calculations of the number of deleterious mutations in the micronucleus. PMID:1126627

  18. Phagosome maturation in unicellular eukaryote Paramecium: the presence of RILP, Rab7 and LAMP-2 homologues.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E; Surmacz, L; Osinska, M; Wiejak, J

    2007-01-01

    Phagosome maturation is a complex process enabling degradation of internalised particles. Our data obtained at the gene, protein and cellular level indicate that the set of components involved in this process and known up to now in mammalian cells is functioning in unicellular eukaryote. Rab7-interacting partners: homologues of its effector RILP (Rab-interacting lysosomal protein) and LAMP-2 (lysosomal membrane protein 2) as well as alpha7 subunit of the 26S proteasome were revealed in Paramecium phagolysosomal compartment. We identified the gene/transcript fragments encoding RILP-related proteins (RILP1 and RILP2) in Paramecium by PCR/RT-PCR and sequencing. The deduced amino acid sequences of RILP1 and RILP2 show 60.5% and 58.3% similarity, respectively, to the region involved in regulating of lysosomal morphology and dynein-dynactin recruitment of human RILP. RILP colocalised with Rab7 in Paramecium lysosomes and at phagolysosomal membrane during phagocytosis of both the latex beads and bacteria. In the same compartment LAMP-2 was present and its expression during latex internalisation was 2.5-fold higher than in the control when P2 protein fractions (100,000 x g) of equal load were quantified by immunoblotting. LAMP-2 cross-reacting polypeptide of approximately106 kDa was glycosylated as shown by fluorescent and Western analysis of the same blot preceded by PNGase F treatment. The alpha7 subunit of 26S proteasome was detected close to the phagosomal membrane in the small vesicles, in some of which it colocalised with Rab7. Immunoblotting confirmed presence of RILP-related polypeptide and a7 subunit of 26S proteasome in Paramecium protein fractions. These results suggest that Rab7, RILP and LAMP-2 may be involved in phagosome maturation in Paramecium.

  19. PAK Paradox: Paramecium Appears To Have More K+-Channel Genes than Humans†

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, W. John; Ling, Kit-Yin; Saimi, Yoshiro; Kung, Ching

    2003-01-01

    K+-selective ion channels (K+ channels) have been found in bacteria, archaea, eucarya, and viruses. In Paramecium and other ciliates, K+ currents play an essential role in cilia-based motility. We have retrieved and sequenced seven closely related Paramecium K+-channel gene (PAK) sequences by using previously reported fragments. An additional eight unique K+-channel sequences were retrieved from an indexed library recently used in a pilot genome sequencing project. Alignments of these protein translations indicate that while these 15 genes have diverged at different times, they all maintain many characteristics associated with just one subclass of metazoan K+ channels (CNG/ERG type). Our results indicate that most of the genes are expressed, because all predicted frameshifts and several gaps in the homolog alignments contain Paramecium intron sequences deleted from reverse transcription-PCR products. Some of the variations in the 15 genomic nucleotide sequences involve an absence of introns, even between very closely related sequences, suggesting a potential occurrence of reverse transcription in the past. Extrapolation from the available genome sequence indicates that Paramecium harbors as many as several hundred of this one type of K+-channel gene. This quantity is far more numerous than those of K+-channel genes of all types known in any metazoan (e.g., ∼80 in humans, ∼30 in flies, and ∼15 in Arabidopsis). In an effort to understand this plurality, we discuss several possible reasons for their maintenance, including variations in expression levels in response to changes in the freshwater environment, like that seen with other major plasma membrane proteins in Paramecium. PMID:12912893

  20. Variability in secondary structure of 18S ribosomal RNA as topological marker for identification of Paramecium species.

    PubMed

    Shakoori, Farah R; Tasneem, Fareeda; Al-Ghanim, K; Mahboob, S; Al-Misned, F; Jahan, Nusrat; Shakoori, Abdul Rauf

    2014-12-01

    Besides cytological and molecular applications, Paramecium is being used in water quality assessment and for determination of saprobic levels. An unambiguous identification of these unicellular eukaryotes is not only essential, but its ecological diversity must also be explored in the local environment. 18SrRNA genes of all the strains of Paramecium species isolated from waste water were amplified, cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic comparison of the nucleotide sequences of these strains with 23 closely related Paramecium species from GenBank Database enabled identification of Paramecium multimicronucleatum and Paramecium jenningsi. Some isolates did not show significant close association with other Paramecium species, and because of their unique position in the phylogenetic tree, they were considered new to the field. In the present report, these isolates are being designated as Paramecium caudatum pakistanicus. In this article, secondary structure of 18SrRNA has also been analyzed as an additional and perhaps more reliable topological marker for species discrimination and for determining possible phylogenetic relationship between the ciliate species. On the basis of comparison of secondary structure of 18SrRNA of various isolated Paramacium strains, and among Paramecium caudatum pakistanicus, Tetrahymena thermophila, Drosophila melanogaster, and Homo sapiens, it can be deduced that variable regions are more helpful in differentiating the species at interspecific level rather than at intraspecific level. It was concluded that V3 was the least variable region in all the organisms, V2 and V7 were the longest expansion segments of D. melanogaster and there was continuous mutational bias towards G.C base pairing in H. sapiens.

  1. Identification of Paramecium bursaria syngens through molecular markers--comparative analysis of three loci in the nuclear and mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Potekhin, Alexey; Przyboś, Ewa; Rautian, Maria; Skoblo, Inna; Tarcz, Sebastian

    2012-09-01

    This is the first attempt to resolve the phylogenetic relationship between different syngens of Paramecium bursaria and to investigate at a molecular level the intraspecific differentiation of strains originating from very distant geographical locations. Herein we introduce a new collection of five P. bursaria syngens maintained at St Petersburg State University, as the international collection of syngens was lost in the 1960s. To analyze the degree of speciation within Paramecium bursaria, we examined 26 strains belonging to five different syngens from distant and geographically isolated localities using rDNA (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-5'LSU) fragments, mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), and H4 gene fragments. It was shown that P. bursaria strains of the same syngens cluster together in all three inferred molecular phylogenies. The genetic diversity among the studied P. bursaria strains based on rDNA sequences was rather low. The COI divergence of Paramecium bursaria was also definitely lower than that observed in the Paramecium aurelia complex. The nucleotide sequences of the H4 gene analyzed in the present study indicate the extent of genetic differences between the syngens of Paramecium bursaria. Our study demonstrates the diagnostic value of molecular markers, which are important tools in the identification of Paramecium bursaria syngens.

  2. Paramecium species ingest and kill the cells of the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    FRAGER, SHALOM Z.; CHRISMAN, CARA J.; SHAKKED, RACHEL; CASADEVALL, ARTURO

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in the field of medical mycology is the origin of virulence in those fungal pathogens acquired directly from the environment. In recent years, it was proposed that the virulence of certain environmental animal-pathogenic microbes, such as Cryptococcus neoformans , originated from selection pressures caused by species-specific predation. In this study, we analyzed the interaction of C. neoformans with three Paramecium spp., all of which are ciliated mobile protists. In contrast to the interaction with amoebae, some Paramecium spp. rapidly ingested C. neoformans and killed the fungus. This study establishes yet another type of protist-fungal interaction supporting the notion that animal-pathogenic fungi in the environment are under constant selection by predation. PMID:20233022

  3. [Effect of actinomycin D on salinity acclimation of Paramecium calkinsi (Ciliophora, Peniculia)].

    PubMed

    Khlebovich, V V; Kulangieva, L V; Degtiarev, A V

    2004-01-01

    Salinity acclimation of euryhaline ciliate Paramecium calkinsi evaluated by swimming velocity was over in 4-5 days. In two series of the main experiment, the acclimation was over in two and three days when actinomycin D (an inhibitor of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase) was added after various periods of the ciliate incubation at a changed salinity (0, 3, 6, and 24 h). The obtained data indicate that the inhibiting effect of actinomycin D on salinity acclimation of P. calkinsi is manifested only within the first day of the ciliate incubation in an altered environment; by the end of this period their swimming velocity was similar to the control one (acclimation in the absence of the inhibitor). Thus, expression of genes associated with salinity acclimation in paramecium largely completes within the first day, while the acclimation continues for at least 4-5 days. We propose that the acclimation-competent species possess a correspondingly rich genetic program.

  4. Using Magnetic Forces to Probe the Gravi-response of Swimming Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2004-03-01

    Paramecium Caudatum, a single celled ciliate, alters its swimming behavior when subjected to different gravity environments (e.g. centrifugation and micro-gravity). To dissect the mechanisms behind this gravi-response and that of other biological systems, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means of creating a rapidly tunable, simulated variable gravity environment. Since biological materials are weakly diamagnetic, we must subject them to intense inhomogeneous magnetic fields with characteristic field-field gradient products on the order of 16 T^2/cm. We will describe experiments on Paramecium Caudatum in which we adjust their net buoyancy with magnetic forces and measure the resulting changes in their swimming behavior.

  5. Paramecium species ingest and kill the cells of the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Frager, Shalom Z; Chrisman, Cara J; Shakked, Rachel; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-08-01

    A fundamental question in the field of medical mycology is the origin of virulence in those fungal pathogens acquired directly from the environment. In recent years, it was proposed that the virulence of certain environmental animal-pathogenic microbes, such as Cryptococcus neoformans, originated from selection pressures caused by species-specific predation. In this study, we analyzed the interaction of C. neoformans with three Paramecium spp., all of which are ciliated mobile protists. In contrast to the interaction with amoebae, some Paramecium spp. rapidly ingested C. neoformans and killed the fungus. This study establishes yet another type of protist-fungal interaction supporting the notion that animal-pathogenic fungi in the environment are under constant selection by predation.

  6. Alveolar system of Paramecium. I. Trapping polycationic dye as a result of membrane impairment.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E

    1981-01-01

    The function of Paramecium alveolar system underlying the cell membrane has been studied. Permeability and structure of cell membrane, alveolar membranes and alveoli following alpha-amylase, beta-amylase, phospholipase C and hyaluronidase treatment has been examined. It is demonstrated that droplets of polycationic dye, ruthenium red, have been trapped within the alveoli whereas the dye was also bound by the outer and inner alveolar membrane. This suggest the presence of anionic sites capable to bind cationic compounds within the alveoli. It may be concluded that the alveolar system in Paramecium is functioning as a barrier protecting the cell against the chemicals added from the outside when the cell membrane separating the cytoplasm from the medium is impaired.

  7. Clonal lifespans cultured in chemically defined medium and conventional bacterized medium in Paramecium octoaurelia.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, S; Ogawa, H; Nishikawa, T; Sasagawa, S

    1990-06-01

    The unicellular ciliate, paramecium, reproduces by binary fission, but can not continue to divide unlimitedly without sexual reproduction. We examined the clonal life span of Paramecium octaurelia stock 299 cultured in conventional bacterized medium (BM) and a chemically defined medium (DM). The cells that lived in BM divided 300 times. Although the cells in DM divided more slowly, some cells continued to divide more than 100 times. The mean life span of 90 cell lines cultured in BM was 151 +/- 49 fissions and that of 84 cell lines in DM was 68 +/- 28. When some older cells, which had been cultured in DM, were transferred to BM, most of them showed much longer life spans than those remaining in DM. The results showed that the life spans of cell clones were affected by the culture conditions. PMID:2214894

  8. Effects of gravity and cosmic rays on cell proliferation kinetics in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Tixador, R; Richoilley, G; Gasset, G; Planel, H

    1984-01-01

    Space flights resulted in a stimulating effect on kinetics of proliferation in Paramecium tetraurelia. Additional experiments were performed in order to determine the origin of this phenomena. Paramecia were cultivated in balloon flights or in a slow clinostat, or were exposed to different levels of hypergravity. The results suggest that changes in cell proliferation rate are related to cosmic rays and to a direct effect of microgravity.

  9. Respective role of microgravity and cosmic rays on Paramecium tetraurelia cultured aboard Salyut 6.

    PubMed

    Planel, H; Tixador, R; Richoilley, G; Gasset, G; Templier, J

    1985-06-01

    Paramecium tetraurelia cultured aboard Salyut 6 have shown in increase in cell growth rate, cell volume, water content and changes in electrolyte content. Additional experiments, carried out in balloon flight and on earth, showed that the stimulating effect observed on cell proliferation is related to exposure to cosmic rays. Other changes seem to be due to a direct effect of microgravity on cell. Mechanism of gravity action on cell is discussed.

  10. Preliminary results of Cytos experiment flown in Salyut VI: investigations on Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Planel, H; Tixador, R; Nefedov, I G; Gretchko, G; Richoilley, G

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of the Cytos experiment was to investigate a possible effect of space flight on cell proliferation kinetics. Cultures of Paramecium aurelia successively maintained at a temperature of 8 degrees and 25 degrees C were fixed every twelve hours during the orbital flight. Space flight resulted in a stimulating effect on cell proliferation, an increase in cell volume and changes in the ionic components of the culture medium.

  11. Effects of autogamy in Paramecium tetraurelia on catalase activity and on radiosensitivity to natural ionizing radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Croute, F.; Dupouy, D.; Charley, J.P.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Planel, H.

    1980-02-01

    Catalase activity of Paramecium tetraurelia decreased during autogamy and recovered to normal 5 days later. Autogamy also caused changes in the ciliate's sensitivity sensitivity to natural ionizing radiations - the decrease in cell growth rate previously described in shielded cultures did not occur when autogamous cells were used. Maximum effect of shielding was observed in 11-day-old postautogamous cells. The role of the catalase in the mechanism of natural irradiation effect is discussed.

  12. Optical Manipulation of Symbiotic Chlorella in Paramecium Bursaria Using a Fiber Axicon Microlens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, K.; Hirota, S.; Nakayama, H.; Kunugihara, D.; Mihara, Y.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, chemically etched axicon fiber was proposed for laser trapping of symbiotic chlorella from paramecium bursaria. We fabricated axicon micro lenses on a single-mode bare optical fiber by selective chemical etching technique. The laser beam from fiber axicon microlens was strongly focused and optical forces were sufficient to move a symbiotic chlorella. From experimental results, it was found that our proposed fiber axicon microlens was a promising tool for cell trapping without physical contact.

  13. Enhanced membrane fluorescence of CDC-labelled paramecium subsequent to removal of surface components.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E; Bottiroli, G; Giordano, P

    1983-01-01

    Cytofluorimetric analysis of cycloheptaamylose-dansyl chloride (CDC) labelled Paramecium indicates that after mild trypsin removal of surface components the localization of CDC on the outer surface of living cells was not modified by the treatment. After such treatment the intensity of fluorescence emission was found about 3-fold higher in treated single cell than in the untreated one. These findings indicate that CDC labelling can be used to follow alteration occurred on the membrane of the living cell prior to labelling.

  14. Nuclear differentiation in Paramecium tetraurelia. Transplantation of vegetative micronuclei into early exconjugants.

    PubMed

    Mikami, K; Ng, S F

    1983-03-01

    The micronucleus of Paramecium tetraurelia normally gives rise to the macronucleus by going through the series of nuclear events of meiosis, mitosis and fusion during sexual reproduction. By transplanting the micronucleus from vegetative cells into early exconjugants, we have persuaded the micronucleus to take a short cut to differentiate directly into a macronucleus. This demonstrates that the course of development of the micronucleus is flexible and can be altered by stage-specific cytoplasmic factors. PMID:6840210

  15. Feeding of swimming Paramecium with fore-aft asymmetry in viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Jana, Saikat; Giarra, Matthew; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2013-11-01

    Swimming behaviours and feeding efficiencies of Paramecium Multimicronucleatum with fore-aft asymmetric body shapes are studied experimentally and numerically. Among various possible swimming ways, ciliates typically exhibit only one preferred swimming directions in favorable conditions. Ciliates, like Paramecia, with fore-aft asymmetric shapes preferably swim towards the slender anterior while feeding fluid to the oral groove located at the center of the body. Since both feeding and swimming efficiencies are influenced by fluid motions around the body, it is important to reveal the fluid mechanics around a moving object. Experimentally, μ-PIV methods are employed to characterize the source-dipole streamline patterns and fluid motions around Paramecium. Numerical simulations by boundary element methods are also used to evaluate surface stresses and velocities, which give insights into the efficiencies of swimming and feeding depending on body asymmetry. It is concluded that a slender anterior and fat posterior increases the combined efficiency of swimming and feeding, which matches well with actual shapes of Paramecium. Discrepancies between experiments and simulations are also discussed.

  16. Identification of an algal carbon fixation-enhancing factor extracted from Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yutaka; Imamura, Nobutaka

    2011-01-01

    The green ciliate Paramecium bursaria contains several hundred symbiotic Chlorella species. We previously reported that symbiotic algal carbon fixation is enhanced by P. bursaria extracts and that the enhancing factor is a heat-stable, low-molecular-weight, water-soluble compound. To identify the factor, further experiments were carried out. The enhancing activity remained even when organic compounds in the extract were completely combusted at 700 degrees C, suggesting that the factor is an inorganic substance. Measurement of the major cations, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, by an electrode and titration of the extract resulted in concentrations of 0.90 mM, 0.55 mM, and 0.21 mM, respectively. To evaluate the effect of these cations, a mixture of the cations at the measured concentrations was prepared, and symbiotic algal carbon fixation was measured in the solution. The results demonstrated that the fixation was enhanced to the same extent as with the P. bursaria extract, and thus this mixture of K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ was concluded to be the carbon fixation-enhancing factor. There was no effect of the cation mixture on free-living C. vulgaris. Comparison of the cation concentrations of nonsymbiotic and symbiotic Paramecium extracts revealed that the concentrations of K+ and Mg2+ in nonsymbiotic Paramecium extracts were too low to enhance symbiotic algal carbon fixation, suggesting that symbiotic P. bursaria provide suitable cation conditions for photosynthesis to its symbiotic Chlorella.

  17. Genetic and epigenetic factors affecting meiosis induction in eukaryotes revealed in paramecium research.

    PubMed

    Prajer, Małgorzata

    2008-01-01

    This review presents studies of the induction of meiosis undertaken on the ciliate Paramecium, a unicellular model eukaryotic organism. Meiosis in Paramecium, preceding the process of fertilization, appears in starved cells after passing a defined number of divisions (cell generations), starting from the last fertilization. Investigations were performed on clones of cells entering autogamy, a self-fertilization process. Genetic as well as epigenetic factors, i.e. endo- and exogenous factors, affecting the induction ofmeiosis and changing the duration of the interautogamous interval (IAI), were analyzed. The results show that: (1) Meiosis induction is controlled genetically by the somatic macronucleus. However, besides the nuclear factors, the cytoplasmic protein immaturin also affects this process (Haga & Hiwatashi 1981); (2) Epigenetic factors, such as non-genetically disturbed cytoskeleton structures and changes in the cell architecture observed in doublet Paramecium cells, exert internal mechanical stress (Ingber 2003), which constitutes the endogenous impulse accelerating meiosis; (3) Mild osmotic stress, acting as an exogenous factor, can initiate the specific MAP kinases signaling pathway resulting in earlier meiosis induction, as in other unicellular eukaryotes (Seet & Pawson 2004).

  18. Morphological and molecular characterization of Paramecium (Viridoparamecium nov. subgen.) chlorelligerum Kahl (Ciliophora).

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Martin; Stoeck, Thorsten; Foissner, Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    We redescribe Paramecium chlorelligerum, a forgotten species, which Kahl (Tierwelt Dtl., 1935, 30:651) briefly but precisely described in the addendum to his ciliate monographs as a Paramecium with symbiotic green algae. The redescription is based on classical morphological methods and the analysis of the small subunit (SSU) rDNA. Morphologically, P. chlorelligerum differs from P. (C.) bursaria, the second green species in the genus, by having a special swimming shape, the length of the caudal cilia, the size of the micronucleus, the size of the symbiotic algae, the contractile vacuoles (with collecting vesicles vs. collecting canals), and the number of excretory pores/contractile vacuole (1 vs. 2-3). The molecular investigations show that P. chlorelligerum forms a distinct branch distant from the P. (Chloroparamecium) bursaria clade. Thus, we classify P. chlorelligerum in a new subgenus: Paramecium (Viridoparamecium) chlorelligerum. The symbiotic alga belongs to the little-known genus Meyerella, as yet recorded only from the plankton of a North American lake.

  19. Jump if you can't take the heat: three escape gaits of Paramecium swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroud, Charles N.; Hamel, Amandine; Fisch, Cathy; Combettes, Laurent; Dupuys-Williams, Pascale

    2010-11-01

    Paramecium is able to swim at velocities reaching several times its body size per second, by beating its thousands of cilia in an organized fashion. Here we show that Paramecium has in fact three distinct swimming gaits to escape from an aggression in the form of localized heating, depending on the magnitude of the aggression: For a weak agression, normal swimming is sufficient and produces a steady swimming velocity through cilia beating. As the heating amplitude is increased, a higher acceleration and faster swimming are achieved through synchronized beating of the cilia, which later give way to the usual metachronal waves. The synchronized beating yields high initial accelerations but requires the cell to coast through the synchrnized recovery. Finally, escape from a life-threatening agression is achieved by a "jumping" gait which does not rely on the cilia but is achieved from the explosive release of a rod-like organelles in the direction of the hot spot. Measurements through high-speed video explain the role of these rods in defending Paramecium. They also show that the zero-Reynolds number assumption is unverified in most cases.

  20. Immunoanalogue of vertebrate beta-adrenergic receptor in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Wiejak, Jolanta; Surmacz, Liliana; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2002-01-01

    Cell fractionation, SDS-PAGE, quantitative Western blot, confocal immunolocalization and immunogold labelling were performed to find an interpretation of the physiological response of the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium to beta-adrenergic ligands. The 69 kDa polypeptide separated by SDS-PAGE in S2 and P2 Paramecium subcellular fractions cross-reacted with antibody directed against human beta2-adrenergic receptor. This was detected by Western blotting followed by chemiluminescent detection. Quantitative image analysis showed that beta-selective adrenergic agonist (-)-isoproterenol--previously shown to enhance phagocytic activity--evoked redistribution of the adrenergic receptor analogue from membraneous (P2) to cytosolic (S2) fraction. The relative increase in immunoreactive band intensity in S2 reached 80% and was paralleled by a 59% decrease in P2 fraction. Confocal immunofluorescence revealed beta2-adrenergic receptor sites on the cell surface and at the ridge of the cytopharynx--where nascent phagosomes are formed. This localization was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. These results indicate that the 69 kDa Paramecium polypeptide immunorelated to vertebrate beta2-adrenergic receptor appeared in this evolutionary ancient cell as a nutrient receptor.

  1. Uptake and distribution of haematoporphyrin derivative in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Croce, A C; Wyroba, E; Bottiroli, G

    1990-08-01

    Haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) uptake, intracellular distribution and turnover were examined in a free-living protozoan cell, Paramecium aurelia, which had been demonstrated to internalize lipoproteins. A 10 min incubation in HpD completed with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) resulted in the appearance of distinct red-fluorescing vesicles, together with a diffuse fluorescence of the cytoplasm. Fluorescein labelling of LDL demonstrated the intracellular localization of HpD and LDL within the same vesicles. Pretreatment of Paramecium with the β-adrenergic antagonist l-propranolol, which blocked its phagocytotic activity, resulted in an absence of red-fluorescing vesicles; thus these were proved to be endosomes. Fluorescence emission recorded in the endosomes was characterized by a band at about 660-670 nm which was attributed to the partially unfolded oligomers; this emission was present during maintenance of the cells in drug-free culture medium for up to 120 min. Propranolol-pretreated cells exhibited only a diffuse cytoplasmic fluorescence characterized by an emission band at 630 nm, which was attributed to the monomers; this disappeared rapidly on washing. These results suggest the following: (i) HpD monomers enter Paramecium via transmembrane influx and/or fluid phase uptake; (ii) HpD oligomers are mainly internalized via receptor-mediated endocytosis; (iii) the extent of the endocytotic process is increased when HpD is completed with LDL; (iv) after internalization, aggregate species undergo a disaggregating process which accounts for the persistence of the intracellular fluorescence.

  2. Genetic and epigenetic factors affecting meiosis induction in eukaryotes revealed in paramecium research.

    PubMed

    Prajer, Małgorzata

    2008-01-01

    This review presents studies of the induction of meiosis undertaken on the ciliate Paramecium, a unicellular model eukaryotic organism. Meiosis in Paramecium, preceding the process of fertilization, appears in starved cells after passing a defined number of divisions (cell generations), starting from the last fertilization. Investigations were performed on clones of cells entering autogamy, a self-fertilization process. Genetic as well as epigenetic factors, i.e. endo- and exogenous factors, affecting the induction ofmeiosis and changing the duration of the interautogamous interval (IAI), were analyzed. The results show that: (1) Meiosis induction is controlled genetically by the somatic macronucleus. However, besides the nuclear factors, the cytoplasmic protein immaturin also affects this process (Haga & Hiwatashi 1981); (2) Epigenetic factors, such as non-genetically disturbed cytoskeleton structures and changes in the cell architecture observed in doublet Paramecium cells, exert internal mechanical stress (Ingber 2003), which constitutes the endogenous impulse accelerating meiosis; (3) Mild osmotic stress, acting as an exogenous factor, can initiate the specific MAP kinases signaling pathway resulting in earlier meiosis induction, as in other unicellular eukaryotes (Seet & Pawson 2004). PMID:19055018

  3. Delimiting Species Boundaries within a Paraphyletic Species Complex: Insights from Morphological, Genetic, and Molecular Data on Paramecium sonneborni (Paramecium aurelia species complex, Ciliophora, Protozoa).

    PubMed

    Przyboś, Ewa; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria; Sawka, Natalia

    2015-09-01

    The demarcation of boundaries between protist species is often problematic because of the absence of a uniform species definition, the abundance of cryptic diversity, and the occurrence of convergent morphology. The ciliates belonging to the Paramecium aurelia complex, consisting of 15 species, are a good model for such systematic and evolutionary studies. One member of the complex is P. sonneborni, previously known only from one stand in Texas (USA), but recently found in two new sampling sites in Cyprus (creeks running to Salt Lake and Oroklini Lake near Larnaca). The studied Paramecium sonneborni strains (from the USA and Cyprus) reveal low viability in the F1 and F2 generations of interstrain hybrids and may be an example of ongoing allopatric speciation. Despite its molecular distinctiveness, we postulate that P. sonneborni should remain in the P. aurelia complex, making it a paraphyletic taxon. Morphological studies have revealed that some features of the nuclear apparatus of P. sonneborni correspond to the P. aurelia spp. complex, while others are similar to P. jenningsi and P. schewiakoffi. The observed discordance indicates rapid splitting of the P. aurelia-P. jenningsi-P. schewiakoffi group, in which genetic, morphological, and molecular boundaries between species are not congruent.

  4. Delimiting Species Boundaries within a Paraphyletic Species Complex: Insights from Morphological, Genetic, and Molecular Data on Paramecium sonneborni (Paramecium aurelia species complex, Ciliophora, Protozoa).

    PubMed

    Przyboś, Ewa; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria; Sawka, Natalia

    2015-09-01

    The demarcation of boundaries between protist species is often problematic because of the absence of a uniform species definition, the abundance of cryptic diversity, and the occurrence of convergent morphology. The ciliates belonging to the Paramecium aurelia complex, consisting of 15 species, are a good model for such systematic and evolutionary studies. One member of the complex is P. sonneborni, previously known only from one stand in Texas (USA), but recently found in two new sampling sites in Cyprus (creeks running to Salt Lake and Oroklini Lake near Larnaca). The studied Paramecium sonneborni strains (from the USA and Cyprus) reveal low viability in the F1 and F2 generations of interstrain hybrids and may be an example of ongoing allopatric speciation. Despite its molecular distinctiveness, we postulate that P. sonneborni should remain in the P. aurelia complex, making it a paraphyletic taxon. Morphological studies have revealed that some features of the nuclear apparatus of P. sonneborni correspond to the P. aurelia spp. complex, while others are similar to P. jenningsi and P. schewiakoffi. The observed discordance indicates rapid splitting of the P. aurelia-P. jenningsi-P. schewiakoffi group, in which genetic, morphological, and molecular boundaries between species are not congruent. PMID:26277215

  5. Pharmacological characterization of NMDA-like receptors in the single-celled organism Paramecium primaurelia.

    PubMed

    Ramoino, Paola; Candiani, Simona; Pittaluga, Anna Maria; Usai, Cesare; Gallus, Lorenzo; Ferrando, Sara; Milanese, Marco; Faimali, Marco; Bonanno, Giambattista

    2014-02-01

    Paramecium primaurelia is a unicellular eukaryote that moves in freshwater by ciliary beating and responds to environmental stimuli by altering motile behaviour. The movements of the cilia are controlled by the electrical changes of the cell membrane: when the intraciliary Ca(2+) concentration associated with plasma membrane depolarization increases, the ciliary beating reverses its direction, and consequently the swimming direction changes. The ciliary reversal duration is correlated with the amount of Ca(2+) influx. Here, we evaluated the effects due to the activation or blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors on swimming behaviour in Paramecium. Paramecia normally swim forward, drawing almost linear tracks. We observed that the simultaneous administration of NMDA and glycine induced a partial ciliary reversal (PaCR) leading to a continuous spiral-like swim. Furthermore, the duration of continuous ciliary reversal (CCR), triggered by high external KCl concentrations, was longer in NMDA+glycine-treated cells. NMDA action required the presence of Ca(2+), as the normal forward swimming was restored when the ion was omitted from the extracellular milieu. The PaCR and the enhancement of CCR duration significantly decreased when the antagonists of the glutamate site D-AP5 or CGS19755, the NMDA channel blocker MK-801 or the glycine site antagonist DCKA was added. The action of NMDA+glycine was also abolished by Zn(2+) or ifenprodil, the GluN2A and the GluN2B NMDA-containing subunit blockers, respectively. Searches of the Paramecium genome database currently available indicate that the NMDA-like receptor with ligand-binding characteristics of an NMDA receptor-like complex, purified from rat brain synaptic membranes and found in some metazoan genomes, is also present in Paramecium. These results provide evidence that functional NMDA receptors similar to those typical of mammalian neuronal cells are present in the single-celled organism Paramecium and thus

  6. Identification of isoforms of the exocytosis-sensitive phosphoprotein PP63/parafusin in Paramecium tetraurelia and demonstration of phosphoglucomutase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, K; Kissmehl, R; Linder, J; Schultz, J E; Lottspeich, F; Plattner, H

    1997-01-01

    PP63 (parafusin) is a 63 kDa phosphoprotein which is very rapidly (within 80 ms) dephosphorylated (to P63) during triggered trichocyst exocytosis; this occurs selectively in exocytosis-competent Paramecium tetraurelia strains. In the present work, two cDNAs coding for PP63/parafusin have been isolated, one of which is a new isoform. These isoforms are 99.6% identical and are derived from two different genes. Similarity searches revealed 43-51% identity of the deduced amino acid sequences with known phosphoglucomutases from yeast and mammals. The sequences of two proteolytic peptides obtained from PP63/parafusin isolated from Paramecium are identical to parts of the amino acid sequence deduced from the major cDNA. The major cDNA was mutated from the macronuclear ciliate genetic code into the universal genetic code and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein shows the same biochemical and immunological characteristics as the (P)P63/parafusin originally isolated from Paramecium. It has the same specific phosphoglucomutase activity as phosphoglucomutase from chicken muscle. We also show that recombinant P63-1 parafusin 1 is a substrate of an endogenous casein kinase from Paramecium, as is the originally isolated P63/parafusin. Polyclonal antibodies against recombinant P63-1/parafusin 1 were raised which recognized phosphoglucomutases from different sources. Thus we show that PP63/parafusin and phosphoglucomutase in Paramecium are identical. PMID:9173895

  7. Hierarchical paramecium-like hollow and solid Au/Pt bimetallic nanostructures constructed using goethite as template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Repo, Eveliina; Heikkilä, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku; Sillanpää, Mika

    2010-10-01

    Novel hollow and solid paramecium-like hierarchical Au/Pt bimetallic nanostructures were constructed using goethite as template via a seed-mediated growth method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ξ-potential measurement, UV-vis spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), ICP-AES measurement, x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were utilized to systematically characterize the bimetallic nanostructures. It is found that the core structure of the paramecium-like bimetallic nanomaterial is closely related to reducing agent. When ascorbic acid is used as reducing agent, goethite serves as in situ sacrificed template and hollow paramecium-like bimetallic structure is obtained. When NH2OH·HCl is used, solid nanostructure with preserved goethite core is produced. Heating the reaction solution is necessary to obtain the paramecium-like morphology with rough interconnected Pt cilia shell. The thickness of Pt cilia layer can be controlled by adjusting the molar ratio of H2PtCl6 to Au nanoseeds. The overgrowth of the rough Pt cilia is proposed to be via an autocatalytic and three-dimensional heterogeneous nucleation process first through flower-like morphology. Both the hollow and solid hierarchical paramecium-like Au/Pt bimetallic nanostructures show good catalytic activities.

  8. Hierarchical paramecium-like hollow and solid Au/Pt bimetallic nanostructures constructed using goethite as template.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Repo, Eveliina; Heikkilä, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku; Sillanpää, Mika

    2010-10-01

    Novel hollow and solid paramecium-like hierarchical Au/Pt bimetallic nanostructures were constructed using goethite as template via a seed-mediated growth method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), xi-potential measurement, UV-vis spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), ICP-AES measurement, x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were utilized to systematically characterize the bimetallic nanostructures. It is found that the core structure of the paramecium-like bimetallic nanomaterial is closely related to reducing agent. When ascorbic acid is used as reducing agent, goethite serves as in situ sacrificed template and hollow paramecium-like bimetallic structure is obtained. When NH(2)OH.HCl is used, solid nanostructure with preserved goethite core is produced. Heating the reaction solution is necessary to obtain the paramecium-like morphology with rough interconnected Pt cilia shell. The thickness of Pt cilia layer can be controlled by adjusting the molar ratio of H(2)PtCl(6) to Au nanoseeds. The overgrowth of the rough Pt cilia is proposed to be via an autocatalytic and three-dimensional heterogeneous nucleation process first through flower-like morphology. Both the hollow and solid hierarchical paramecium-like Au/Pt bimetallic nanostructures show good catalytic activities.

  9. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) release in the ciliated protozoon Paramecium occurs by neuronal-like exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ramoino, P; Milanese, M; Candiani, S; Diaspro, A; Fato, M; Usai, C; Bonanno, G

    2010-04-01

    Paramecium primaurelia expresses a significant amount of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). Paramecia possess both glutamate decarboxylase (GAD)-like and vesicular GABA transporter (vGAT)-like proteins, indicating the ability to synthesize GABA from glutamate and to transport GABA into vesicles. Using antibodies raised against mammalian GAD and vGAT, bands with an apparent molecular weight of about 67 kDa and 57 kDa were detected. The presence of these bands indicated a similarity between the proteins in Paramecium and in mammals. VAMP, syntaxin and SNAP, putative proteins of the release machinery that form the so-called SNARE complex, are present in Paramecium. Most VAMP, syntaxin and SNAP fluorescence is localized in spots that vary in size and density and are primarily distributed near the plasma membrane. Antibodies raised against mammal VAMP-3, sintaxin-1 or SNAP-25 revealed protein immunoblot bands having molecular weights consistent with those observed in mammals. Moreover, P. primaurelia spontaneously releases GABA into the environment, and this neurotransmitter release significantly increases after membrane depolarization. The depolarization-induced GABA release was strongly reduced not only in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) but also by pre-incubation with bafilomycin A1 or with botulinum toxin C1 serotype. It can be concluded that GABA occurs in Paramecium, where it is probably stored in vesicles capable of fusion with the cell membrane; accordingly, GABA can be released from Paramecium by stimulus-induced, neuronal-like exocytotic mechanisms.

  10. Relationships of new sibling species of Paramecium jenningsi based on sequences of the histone H4 gene fragment.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Agnieszka

    2007-06-01

    Paramecium jenningsi Diller & Earl, 1958 belongs to the "aurelia" subgroup of the genus, together with Paramecium caudatum, Paramecium multimicronucleatum, Paramecium schewiakoffi and species of the Paramecium aurelia complex. The original assumption that the morphospecies P. jenningsi was a single genetic species was questioned because a comparison of genome analyses suggested the possibility that this morphospecies contained two sibling species. To refine understanding of relationships between the strains of P. jenningsi, a molecular phylogenetic analysis was conducted using H4 gene sequences. Some polymorphic sites were found among the compared sequences, and specific patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers characterize two groups of strains of P. jenningsi. Phylogenetic trees constructed by different methods identified two clearly different groups (from Japan and mainland Asia) whatever the method used. The sequences of the H4 gene analyzed in the present study are closely related, and provide a good subject for phylogenetic analysis. The presence of two isolated groups of strains in the P. jenningsi group can reveal the evolutionary relationship between them; it confirms the presence of two sibling species among the known strains of P. jenningsi, and the close relationships between them and species of the P. aurelia complex.

  11. Micro-particle transporting system using galvanotactically stimulated apo-symbiotic cells of Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Shunsuke; Karaki, Chiaki; Kawano, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that Paramecium species including green paramecia (Paramecium bursaria) migrate towards the anode when exposed to an electric field in a medium. This type of a cellular movement is known as galvanotaxis. Our previous study revealed that an electric stimulus given to P bursaria is converted to a galvanotactic cellular movement by involvement of T-type calcium channel on the plasma membrane [Aonuma et al. (2007), Z. Naturforsch. 62c, 93-102]. This phenomenon has attracted the attention of bioengineers in the fields of biorobotics or micro-robotics in order to develop electrically controllable micromachineries. Here, we demonstrate the galvanotactic controls of the cellular migration of P bursaria in capillary tubes (diameter, 1-2 mm; length, 30-240 mm). Since the Paramecium cells take up particles of various sizes, we attempted to use the electrically stimulated cells of P bursaria as the vehicle for transportation of micro-particles in the capillary system. By using apo-symbiotic cells of P bursaria obtained after forced removal of symbiotic algae, the uptake of the particles could be maximized and visualized. Then, electrically controlled transportations of particle-filled apo-symbiotic P bursaria cells were manifested. The particles transported by electrically controlled cells (varying in size from nm to /m levels) included re-introduced green algae, fluorescence-labeled polystyrene beads, magnetic microspheres, emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP)-labeled cells of E. coli, Indian ink, and crystals of zeolite (hydrated aluminosilicate minerals with a micro-porous structure) and some metal oxides. Since the above demonstrations were successful, we concluded that P bursaria has a potential to be employed as one of the micro-biorobotic devices used in BioMEMS (biological micro-electro-mechanical systems).

  12. Non-Mendelian inheritance of macronuclear mutations is gene specific in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Scott, J M; Mikami, K; Leeck, C L; Forney, J D

    1994-04-01

    Paramecium tetraurelia contains two types of nuclei, a diploid germinal micronucleus and a large transcriptionally active macronucleus. The macronuclear genome is formed from the micronuclear DNA during sexual reproduction. Previous studies have shown that the processing of the A-type variable surface protein gene during formation of a new macronucleus is dependent on the presence of the A gene in the old macronucleus. It is not clear if this is a general feature that controls the formation of the Paramecium macronuclear genome or a unique feature of the A locus. Using micronuclear transplantation, we have constructed a strain that has a wild-type micronucleus but has macronuclear deletions of the A- and B-type surface protein genes. Neither the A nor the B gene is incorporated into the new macronucleus after sexual reproduction. Macronuclear transformation of this strain with the B gene rescues the B-gene deletion after formation of the next macronucleus but has not effect on the A deletion. Similarly, transformation with the A gene shows gene-specific rescue for A but not B. The effect of the old macronucleus on the processing of the new macronucleus results in a pattern of non-Mendelian inheritance of both macronuclear deletions. Progeny from the wild-type exconjugant are all wild type, and progeny from the A- B- exconjugant are mutant. The features of this A- B- non-Mendelian mutant demonstrate that the regulation of macronuclear DNA processing is gene specific, and our results open the possibility that this type of regulation affects many regions of the Paramecium genome. PMID:8139550

  13. Calcium-Release Channels in Paramecium. Genomic Expansion, Differential Positioning and Partial Transcriptional Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Ladenburger, Eva-Maria; Plattner, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    The release of Ca2+ from internal stores is a major source of signal Ca2+ in almost all cell types. The internal Ca2+ pools are activated via two main families of intracellular Ca2+-release channels, the ryanodine and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors. Among multicellular organisms these channel types are ubiquitous, whereas in most unicellular eukaryotes the identification of orthologs is impaired probably due to evolutionary sequence divergence. However, the ciliated protozoan Paramecium allowed us to prognosticate six groups, with a total of 34 genes, encoding proteins with characteristics typical of InsP3 and ryanodine receptors by BLAST search of the Paramecium database. We here report that these Ca2+-release channels may display all or only some of the characteristics of canonical InsP3 and ryanodine receptors. In all cases, prediction methods indicate the presence of six trans-membrane regions in the C-terminal domains, thus corresponding to canonical InsP3 receptors, while a sequence homologous to the InsP3-binding domain is present only in some types. Only two types have been analyzed in detail previously. We now show, by using antibodies and eventually by green fluorescent protein labeling, that the members of all six groups localize to distinct organelles known to participate in vesicle trafficking and, thus, may provide Ca2+ for local membrane-membrane interactions. Whole genome duplication can explain radiation within the six groups. Comparative and evolutionary evaluation suggests derivation from a common ancestor of canonical InsP3 and ryanodine receptors. With one group we could ascertain, to our knowledge for the first time, aberrant splicing in one thoroughly analyzed Paramecium gene. This yields truncated forms and, thus, may indicate a way to pseudogene formation. No comparable analysis is available for any other, free-living or parasitic/pathogenic protozoan. PMID:22102876

  14. The Gravikinetic Response of Paramecium is Based on Orientation-Dependent Mechanotransduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, Manuel; Watzke, Daniela; Machemer, Hans

    Paramecium generates persistent shifts of the membrane potential of a few millivolts depending on its orientation with respect to the gravity vector. The resulting potential-induced modulation of the speed of propulsion is called gravikinesis because it acts to neutralize, fully or in part, sedimentation. Gravisensitivity is maximal at neutral orientation, i.e., in horizontally swimming cells, when the gravitational force per unit membrane area is at minimum. Stimulus-response relationships and energetic considerations show that sensing of the gravity vector by a nonspecialized, single-cell organism ranks among the most sensitive mechanoreceptors known in nature.

  15. The ciliate Paramecium shows higher motility in non-uniform chemical landscapes.

    PubMed

    Giuffre, Carl; Hinow, Peter; Vogel, Ryan; Ahmed, Tanvir; Stocker, Roman; Consi, Thomas R; Strickler, J Rudi

    2011-04-11

    We study the motility behavior of the unicellular protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia in a microfluidic device that can be prepared with a landscape of attracting or repelling chemicals. We investigate the spatial distribution of the positions of the individuals at different time points with methods from spatial statistics and Poisson random point fields. This makes quantitative the informal notion of "uniform distribution" (or lack thereof). Our device is characterized by the absence of large systematic biases due to gravitation and fluid flow. It has the potential to be applied to the study of other aquatic chemosensitive organisms as well. This may result in better diagnostic devices for environmental pollutants.

  16. Release of Paramecium immobilization antigen to the non-nutrient medium.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E

    1980-01-01

    The instability of Paramecium aurelia surface components has been shown: after 60 min incubation of dense cell suspension ((1-2 . 10(6) cells per ml) in Tris-Ca buffer at 4 degrees C or 23 degrees C the surface coat was partially stripped off and the proteins were released to the medium. The electrophoretic analysis of the released proteins shows one major band of mol. wt. 280,000--300,000 and some minor bands. The major released protein is the immobilization antigen as proved using immunodiffusion test and antibody precipitation technique.

  17. Studies on the surface coat of Paramecium aurelia. II. Relationship to the immobilization antigen.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E

    1977-07-11

    Correlations between the presence of surface coat and immobilization antigen of Paramecium tetraurelia were studied. Supravital, partial removal of the surface coat resulted in accelerated response of monobacterially and axenically grown cells to the homologous antiserum. Ciliates pretreated with trypsin or pronase (0.5 mg/ml for 45 min at 0-4 degrees C) were immobilized approximately twice as fast as untreated control cells. The probable localization of at least part, of the immobilization antigen within the surface coat of P. tetraurelia is discussed.

  18. Food ingestion and egestion in mating reactive populations of Paramecium primaurelia.

    PubMed

    Ramoino, P

    1992-01-01

    The study of food ingestion and egestion carried out on Paramecium primaurelia mating reactive cells shows that, after their transfer into a medium with suspended particles, the complementary mating type cells exhibit very significant differences in the food vacuole formation and egestion rate. Under the same external environmental conditions, the mating type II cells form and egest a higher number of food vacuoles when compared with mating type I cells. The higher rate of food vacuole formation shown by the mating type II cells is related to their faster growth rate. PMID:1294202

  19. Paramecium tetraurelia pre-screen for hazardous chemicals: a rapid detector system for health hazards. 1977-1983 report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith-Sonneborn, J.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose was to develop and validate a new eukaryotic bioassay system applicable to rapid identification of environmental toxins, mutagens, and carcinogens. The ability of Paramecium to detect potential health hazards, associated with complex environmental mixtures, was demonstrated in association with the finest coal fly ash particles and aqueous waste streams from both oil shale and coal gasification developing technologies. In Paramecium, the cytotoxicity of an agent was determined by altering the survival and/or growth rate of single cells in test agents. Genotoxicity was assayed by a two-tiered approach, utilizing both the Paramecium system and the more established Ames Salmonella assay for mutagen/carcinogen detection. An agent was considered genotoxic in Paramwecium if altered phenotypes were induced in the fertilization progeny of treated parent cells. Since others had shown a significant correlation between agents which were photodynamically active in Paramecium and carcinogenic in mammals, the photodynamic activity versus carcinogenicity of agents was reviewed. Photodynamically active compounds are defined by the immobilization of cells when exposed to both the test agent and black light; neither the agent alone nor light alone affects swimming activity.

  20. A synthetic cadmium metallothionein gene (PMCd1syn) of Paramecium species: expression, purification and characteristics of metallothionein protein.

    PubMed

    Dar, Saira; Shuja, Rukhsana N; Shakoori, Abdul Rauf

    2013-02-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are metal binding proteins that are rich in cysteine residues constituting 10-30 % of the total protein, and in which the thiol groups bind to the metal ions. The increasing amount of metal ions in the medium have shown increased production of MTs by different organisms such as bacteria, protozoa and mammals like humans. PMCd1 is the first gene ever discovered in Paramecium, a ciliated protozoan, that could produce this MT in response to cadmium. In this study the PMCd1syn gene has been cloned in pET41a expression vector and expressed in an Escherichia coli BL21-codonplus strain for the first time. Since the gene PMCd1 amplified from Paramecium contained 10 codons, which could act as stop codons during expression in E. coli, this gene of 612 bps was synthesized to substitute these (stop) codons for the Paramecium sp. specific amino acids. For stability of the expressed protein, glutathione-S-transferase gene was fused with PMCd1syn gene and coexpressed. The cells expressing PMCd1syn demonstrated increased accumulation of cadmium. This is the first report of cadmium MT protein expressed from Paramecium species, particularly from synthetic MT gene (PMCd1syn). This fusion protein, the molecular weight of which has been confirmed to be 53.03 kDa with MALDI analysis, is rich in cysteine residues, and has been shown for the first time in this ciliate to bind to and sequester Cd(2+)-ions.

  1. Paramecium tetraurelia. Pre-screen for hazardous chemicals: a rapid-detector system for health hazards. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith-Sonneborn, J.

    1981-01-01

    Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of dilutions of oil shale process waters from three different retorting processes were evaluated using the Paramecium tetraurelia and the Salmonella assays. Process waters from above-ground, true in situ, and modified retorting process were analyzed. Significant mutagenicity was detected in waste water from both the above-ground and true in situ retorting processes in both the Salmonella and Paramecium bioassays. The Salmonella assay required the addition of the rat liver S9 fraction; the Paramecium bioassay was more sensitive to genotoxic effects from an above-ground retort water without the addition of the rat liver fraction. Mutagenicity of the dilutions tested from the modified retort process was detected only in the Paramecium system. The waste water from the above-ground retort process was the most toxic to both the protozoan and bacteria. Since the chemical composition of oil shale process waters can vary with: 1) the retorting process used, 2) the temperature of the retorting, 3) the composition of the shale rock, and 4) the sampling and storage procedures, the differences in biological activity observed between water can reflect differences in water contamination.

  2. Multiple lines of evidence shed light on the occurrence of paramecium (ciliophora, oligohymenophorea) in bromeliad tank water.

    PubMed

    Buosi, Paulo R B; Cabral, Adalgisa F; Simão, Taiz L L; Utz, Laura R P; Velho, Luiz F M

    2014-01-01

    Phytotelmata are vegetal structures that hold water from the rain, and organic matter from the forest and the soil, resulting in small, compartmentalized bodies of water, which provide an essential environment for the establishment and development of many organisms. These microenvironments generally harbor endemic species, but many organisms that are found in lakes and rivers, are also present. Here, we report, for the first time, the occurrence of the ciliate genus Paramecium in the tank of the bromeliad species Aechmaea distichantha. The identification of the Paramecium species was performed based on live observations, protargol impregnation, scanning electronic microscopy, and sequencing of the 18s rRNA. The absence of Paramecium from bromeliad tank water was highlighted in several earlier investigations, and may be due to the fact that this species is unable to make cysts. The occurrence of Paramecium multimicronucleatum in our samples may be explained by the proximity between the bromeliads and the river, a potential source of the species. Further, we also believe that the counting methodology used in our study provides a more accurate analysis of the species diversity, since we investigated all samples within a maximum period of 6 h after sampling, allowing minimum loss of specimens.

  3. Multiple lines of evidence shed light on the occurrence of paramecium (ciliophora, oligohymenophorea) in bromeliad tank water.

    PubMed

    Buosi, Paulo R B; Cabral, Adalgisa F; Simão, Taiz L L; Utz, Laura R P; Velho, Luiz F M

    2014-01-01

    Phytotelmata are vegetal structures that hold water from the rain, and organic matter from the forest and the soil, resulting in small, compartmentalized bodies of water, which provide an essential environment for the establishment and development of many organisms. These microenvironments generally harbor endemic species, but many organisms that are found in lakes and rivers, are also present. Here, we report, for the first time, the occurrence of the ciliate genus Paramecium in the tank of the bromeliad species Aechmaea distichantha. The identification of the Paramecium species was performed based on live observations, protargol impregnation, scanning electronic microscopy, and sequencing of the 18s rRNA. The absence of Paramecium from bromeliad tank water was highlighted in several earlier investigations, and may be due to the fact that this species is unable to make cysts. The occurrence of Paramecium multimicronucleatum in our samples may be explained by the proximity between the bromeliads and the river, a potential source of the species. Further, we also believe that the counting methodology used in our study provides a more accurate analysis of the species diversity, since we investigated all samples within a maximum period of 6 h after sampling, allowing minimum loss of specimens. PMID:24011017

  4. Functional imaging of living Paramecium by means of confocal and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaspro, Alberto; Fronte, Paola; Raimondo, Marco; Fato, Marco; DeLeo, Gianluca; Beltrame, Francesco; Cannone, Fabio; Chirico, Giberto; Ramoino, Paola

    2002-05-01

    Confocal and Two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy allow gathering three-dimensional and temporal information from biological systems exploiting fluorescence labeling and autofluorescence properties. In this work we study biological events linked to functionality in Paramecium primaurelia. The internalization of material in ciliated one-celled organisms (protozoa) occurs via different mechanisms, even if most of nutrients, particulate or not, is taken up by food vacuoles formed at the bottom of the oral cavity. The endocytosis of small-sized molecules occurs at the parasomal sacs, located next the ciliar basal bodies. Vital fluorescent dyes (BSA-FITC, WGA-FITC, dextran-Texas Red, cholesteryl-Bodipy) and autofluorescence were used to study formation, movement, and fusion of vesicles during endocytosis and phagocytosis of Paramecium primaurelia. By immobilizing living cells pulsed with food vacuole and endosome markers at successive times after chasing in unlabeled medium, the intracellular movement and fusion of food vacuoles and of endosomes were visualized. A temporal analysis of fluorescence images and the false-color technique were used. Starting from time series or 3D data sets composite images were generated by associating with each originally acquired image a different color corresponding to each sampling point in time and along the z-axis. Second Harmonic Generation Imaging attempts are also outlined.

  5. Ciliary metachronal wave propagation on the compliant surface of Paramecium cells.

    PubMed

    Narematsu, Naoki; Quek, Raymond; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2015-12-01

    Ciliary movements in protozoa exhibit metachronal wave-like coordination, in which a constant phase difference is maintained between adjacent cilia. It is at present generally thought that metachronal waves require hydrodynamic coupling between adjacent cilia and the extracellular fluid. To test this hypothesis, we aspirated a Paramecium cell using a micropipette which completely sealed the surface of the cell such that no fluid could pass through the micropipette. Thus, the anterior and the posterior regions of the cell were hydrodynamically decoupled. Nevertheless, we still observed that metachronal waves continued to propagate from the anterior to the posterior ends of the cell, suggesting that in addition to hydrodynamic coupling, there are other mechanisms that can also transmit the metachronal waves. Such transmission was also observed in computational modeling where the fluid was fully decoupled between two partitions of a beating ciliary array. We also imposed cyclic stretching on the surface of live Paramecium cells and found that metachronal waves persisted in the presence of cyclic stretching. This demonstrated that, in addition to hydrodynamic coupling, a compliant substrate can also play a critical role in mediating the propagation of metachronal waves. PMID:26616106

  6. Viruses of symbiotic Chlorella-like algae isolated from Paramecium bursaria and Hydra viridis

    PubMed Central

    Van Etten, James L.; Meints, Russel H.; Kuczmarski, Daniel; Burbank, Dwight E.; Lee, Kit

    1982-01-01

    We previously reported that isolation of symbiotic Chlorella-like algae from the Florida strain of Hydra viridis induced replication of a virus (designated HVCV-1) in the algae. We now report that isolation of symbiotic Chlorella-like algae from four other sources of green hydra and one source of the protozoan Paramecium bursaria also induced virus synthesis. Algae from one of these hydra contained a virus identical to HVCV-1 (based on its rate of sedimentation, buoyant density, reaction to HVCV-1 antiserum, and DNA restriction fragments) whereas algae from the other three hydra contained another similar, but distinct, virus (designated HVCV-2). The virus from the paramecium algae (designated PBCV-1) was distinct from both HVCV-1 and HVCV-2. The symbiotic algae in the hydra could also be distinguished ultrastructurally. Chloroplasts of both algae that produced HVCV-1 lacked a pyrenoid whereas chloroplasts of the other three symbiotic algae contained pyrenoids. Since all symbiotic eukaryotic algae we have examined have had virus, a potential viral role in symbiosis is suggested. Images PMID:16593198

  7. Occurrence of fragmented 16S rRNA in an obligate bacterial endosymbiont of Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed Central

    Springer, N; Ludwig, W; Amann, R; Schmidt, H J; Görtz, H D; Schleifer, K H

    1993-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of Caedibacter caryophila, a so far noncultured killer symbiont of Paramecium caudatum, was elucidated by comparative sequence analysis of in vitro amplified 16S rRNA genes (rDNA). C. caryophila is a member of the alpha subclass of the Proteobacteria phylum. Within this subclass C. caryophila is moderately related to Holospora obtusa, which is another obligate endosymbiont of Paramecium caudatum, and to Rickettsia. A 16S rRNA targeted specific hybridization probe was designed and used for in situ detection of C. caryophila within its host cell. Comparison of the 16S rDNA primary structure of C. caryophila with homologous sequences from other bacteria revealed an unusual insertion of 194 base pairs within the 5'-terminal part of the corresponding gene. The intervening sequence is not present in mature 16S rRNA of C. caryophila. It was demonstrated that C. caryophila contained fragmented 16S rRNA. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8234331

  8. New Stands of Species of the Paramecium aurelia Complex in Yakutia, Russia.

    PubMed

    Rautian, Maria; Przyboś, Ewa; Beliavskaia, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium is one of the most studied genera among ciliates. In particular, it is a model organism for investigation of the sibling species problem (also known as the cryptic species problem), spatial distribution, and its role in speciation. The global distribution of Paramecium species and of sibling species belonging to the P. aurelia species complex (Ciliophora, Protista) still need study, e.g. sampling in some territories has been quite limited, while Europe has been investigated for years with the majority of the P. aurelia species isolated from here. The large territory of Yakutia (republic Sakha in the Russian Federation), known for its climate extremes and continuous permafrost that extended over several glacial and interglacial cycles of the Pleistocene, has not been studied before. In the present study we collected paramecia in the central part of Yakutia. Newly established strains were identified to species according to morphology and, in case of the P. aurelia complex, by crossing with the test strains (the reference strains for the particular species). New stands of P. primaurelia, P. biaurelia and P. novaurelia were described from the territory of Yakutia. PMID:26975144

  9. Epigenetic regulation of serotype expression antagonizes transcriptome dynamics in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Cheaib, Miriam; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Nordström, Karl J V; Schulz, Marcel H; Simon, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Phenotypic variation of a single genotype is achieved by alterations in gene expression patterns. Regulation of such alterations depends on their time scale, where short-time adaptations differ from permanently established gene expression patterns maintained by epigenetic mechanisms. In the ciliate Paramecium, serotypes were described for an epigenetically controlled gene expression pattern of an individual multigene family. Paradoxically, individual serotypes can be triggered in Paramecium by alternating environments but are then stabilized by epigenetic mechanisms, thus raising the question to which extend their expression follows environmental stimuli. To characterize environmental adaptation in the context of epigenetically controlled serotype expression, we used RNA-seq to characterize transcriptomes of serotype pure cultures. The resulting vegetative transcriptome resource is first analysed for genes involved in the adaptive response to the altered environment. Secondly, we identified groups of genes that do not follow the adaptive response but show co-regulation with the epigenetically controlled serotype system, suggesting that their gene expression pattern becomes manifested by similar mechanisms. In our experimental set-up, serotype expression and the entire group of co-regulated genes were stable among environmental changes and only heat-shock genes altered expression of these gene groups. The data suggest that the maintenance of these gene expression patterns in a lineage represents epigenetically controlled robustness counteracting short-time adaptation processes. PMID:26231545

  10. Effects of space balloon flights on reproductive activity in Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Planel, H; Soleilhavoup, J P; Croute, F

    1975-01-01

    Post autogamous Paramecium aurelia cultures were placed in hermetic containers, including a heating device with accuracy kept around +/- 0.1 degrees C. Kinetics of cellular growth was determined by cell count, after recovery, on in-flight cultures and ground control cultures. Dosimetry was performed by thermoluminescent detectors (CaSO4 activated with dysprosium). Flight durations of maximum altitude (ceiling) ranged between 48 min and 15 hours (repeated flights). Conclusions are as follows: short flights result in a secondary stimulating effect, shown by post-flight increase of the growth rate (total dose above 2 mrads); long flights or repeated flights are accompanied by a decrease in growth rate (total dose ranging from 2 to 6 mrads); in the stimulation experiments, cell counts performed immediately after flight permit identification of a temporary decrease of growth rate. The biphasic character of the biological response after flights may be due to an ionization phenomena induced by cosmic rays. Indeed, the temporary drop of growth rate is not observed after recovery if the cells are subcultured in fresh medium and left on the earth's surface. We observe, on the contrary, an increase in growth rate. These findings confirm the great sensitivity of Paramecium aurelia to very low doses of ionizing radiations and demonstrate the biological effect of cosmic radiation.

  11. Modulation of the digestive-lysosomal system in Paramecium caudatum. I. Effects of temperature.

    PubMed

    Fok, A K; Leung, S S; Allen, R D

    1984-07-01

    The heterophagic pathway of the digestive-lysosomal system in axenically grown Paramecium caudatum is divisible into vacuole formation, vacuole acidification-condensation, lysosomal fusion-digestion and defecation. These four processes can be separated in time, thus permitting the study of the effects of temperature on each process. The optimal growth temperature for this cell was 27 degrees C. The rate of digestive vacuole (DV) formation at varying temperatures was represented by a skewed bell-shaped curve having an optimum between 28 and 30 degrees C. The time course for the acidification-condensation step was lengthened below 26 degrees C, but was not accelerated above this temperature. The rate but not the extent of vacuole condensation was decreased at 19 and 22 degrees C. Temperature increase above 22 degrees C shortened, slightly, the duration of the lysosomal fusion-digestion process, whereas below 22 degrees C small temperature decreases greatly extended this period. Within a given experiment the rates of defecation were proportional to temperatures above 17 degrees C. However, these rates varied widely among different experiments. Interestingly, the activation energies for both the formation and defecation processes averaged 19 kcal/mol. Furthermore, Paramecium appeared to readily adapt to environmental temperature changes, since the length of the processing periods and the rates of defecation were similar in cells with or without a 24 h acclimation. These results indicated that the four processes in the digestive cycle in P. caudatum are distinct but each is energy-dependent.

  12. Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Tomishige, Masahiko; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Masao; Shibata, Naho; Kosaka, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-05-01

    Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum was studied by using a superconducting magnet. Around a centre of a round vessel, random swimming at 0 T and aligned swimming parallel to the magnetic field (MF) of 8 T were observed. Near a wall of the vessel, however, swimming round and round along the wall at 0 T and aligned swimming of turning at right angles upon collision with the wall, which was remarkable around 1-4 T, were detected. It was experimentally revealed that the former MF-induced parallel swimming at the vessel centre was caused physicochemically by the parallel magnetic orientation of the cell itself. From magnetic field dependence of the extent of the orientation, the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy (χ ∥-χ ⊥) was first obtained to be 3.4× 10-23 emu cell-1 at 298 K for Paramecium caudatum. The orientation of the cell was considered to result from the magnetic orientation of the cell membrane. On the other hand, although mechanisms of the latter swimming near the vessel wall regardless of the absence and presence of the magnetic field are unclear at present, these experimental results indicate that whether the cell exists near the wall alters the magnetic field effect on the swimming in the horizontal magnetic field.

  13. Insights into three whole-genome duplications gleaned from the Paramecium caudatum genome sequence.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Casey L; Gout, Jean-Francois; Doak, Thomas G; Yanagi, Akira; Lynch, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Paramecium has long been a model eukaryote. The sequence of the Paramecium tetraurelia genome reveals a history of three successive whole-genome duplications (WGDs), and the sequences of P. biaurelia and P. sexaurelia suggest that these WGDs are shared by all members of the aurelia species complex. Here, we present the genome sequence of P. caudatum, a species closely related to the P. aurelia species group. P. caudatum shares only the most ancient of the three WGDs with the aurelia complex. We found that P. caudatum maintains twice as many paralogs from this early event as the P. aurelia species, suggesting that post-WGD gene retention is influenced by subsequent WGDs and supporting the importance of selection for dosage in gene retention. The availability of P. caudatum as an outgroup allows an expanded analysis of the aurelia intermediate and recent WGD events. Both the Guanine+Cytosine (GC) content and the expression level of preduplication genes are significant predictors of duplicate retention. We find widespread asymmetrical evolution among aurelia paralogs, which is likely caused by gradual pseudogenization rather than by neofunctionalization. Finally, cases of divergent resolution of intermediate WGD duplicates between aurelia species implicate this process acts as an ongoing reinforcement mechanism of reproductive isolation long after a WGD event.

  14. Thermo-sensitive response based on the membrane fluidity adaptation in Paramecium multimicronucleatum.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Taichi; Hiramatsu, Yoshinori; Sasaki, Toshiaki; Nakaoka, Yasuo

    2009-09-01

    Relationships between the thermo-sensitive response and membrane lipid fluidity were studied using a ciliated protozoan, Paramecium multimicronucleatum. Paramecium elicits a transient membrane depolarization in response to a cooling stimulus (temperature drop). The depolarization amplitude was largest when the cooling stimulus was started from the culture temperature, whilst when cooling started at a temperature more than 5 degrees C higher or lower than the culture temperature, only a small depolarization was induced. Therefore, the cooling-induced response was dependent on the culture temperature and its sensitivity to the cooling stimulus was highest at the culture temperature. Membrane fluidity measurements of living cells using the fluorescent dye 6-lauroyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (laurdan) showed that the fluidity measured at the culture temperature was almost constant irrespective of the temperature at which the cells had been cultured and adapted, which is consistent with homeoviscous adaptation. The constant fluidity at the culture temperature quickly decreased within a few seconds of application of the cooling stimulus, and the decreased fluidity gradually readapted to a constant level at the decreased temperature within 1 h. When the constant fluidity at culture temperature was modified by the addition of procaine or benzyl alcohol, the cooling-induced depolarization was completely abolished. These results suggest the possibility that the adaptation of fluidity to a constant level and its quick decrease below the constant level activate cooling-sensitive channels to elicit the transient depolarization.

  15. Epigenetic regulation of serotype expression antagonizes transcriptome dynamics in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Cheaib, Miriam; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Nordström, Karl J V; Schulz, Marcel H; Simon, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Phenotypic variation of a single genotype is achieved by alterations in gene expression patterns. Regulation of such alterations depends on their time scale, where short-time adaptations differ from permanently established gene expression patterns maintained by epigenetic mechanisms. In the ciliate Paramecium, serotypes were described for an epigenetically controlled gene expression pattern of an individual multigene family. Paradoxically, individual serotypes can be triggered in Paramecium by alternating environments but are then stabilized by epigenetic mechanisms, thus raising the question to which extend their expression follows environmental stimuli. To characterize environmental adaptation in the context of epigenetically controlled serotype expression, we used RNA-seq to characterize transcriptomes of serotype pure cultures. The resulting vegetative transcriptome resource is first analysed for genes involved in the adaptive response to the altered environment. Secondly, we identified groups of genes that do not follow the adaptive response but show co-regulation with the epigenetically controlled serotype system, suggesting that their gene expression pattern becomes manifested by similar mechanisms. In our experimental set-up, serotype expression and the entire group of co-regulated genes were stable among environmental changes and only heat-shock genes altered expression of these gene groups. The data suggest that the maintenance of these gene expression patterns in a lineage represents epigenetically controlled robustness counteracting short-time adaptation processes.

  16. Ciliary metachronal wave propagation on the compliant surface of Paramecium cells.

    PubMed

    Narematsu, Naoki; Quek, Raymond; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2015-12-01

    Ciliary movements in protozoa exhibit metachronal wave-like coordination, in which a constant phase difference is maintained between adjacent cilia. It is at present generally thought that metachronal waves require hydrodynamic coupling between adjacent cilia and the extracellular fluid. To test this hypothesis, we aspirated a Paramecium cell using a micropipette which completely sealed the surface of the cell such that no fluid could pass through the micropipette. Thus, the anterior and the posterior regions of the cell were hydrodynamically decoupled. Nevertheless, we still observed that metachronal waves continued to propagate from the anterior to the posterior ends of the cell, suggesting that in addition to hydrodynamic coupling, there are other mechanisms that can also transmit the metachronal waves. Such transmission was also observed in computational modeling where the fluid was fully decoupled between two partitions of a beating ciliary array. We also imposed cyclic stretching on the surface of live Paramecium cells and found that metachronal waves persisted in the presence of cyclic stretching. This demonstrated that, in addition to hydrodynamic coupling, a compliant substrate can also play a critical role in mediating the propagation of metachronal waves.

  17. Orientation of paramecium swimming in a static magnetic field: Dependence on membrane lipid fluidity.

    PubMed

    Nakaoka, Yasuo; Itoh, Junya; Shimizu, Kikuo

    2011-01-01

    We studied the swimming orientation of the ciliated protozoan Paramecium aurelia in a static magnetic field (0.78 T). P. aurelia is a complex of species termed syngens, whose cell morphology appears similar on microscopic examination. In the magnetic field, the cells of some syngens gradually changed their swimming orientation so that they were swimming perpendicular or parallel to the magnetic field, although such sensitivity to magnetic fields differs between syngens. When the temperature of the cell suspension was raised, the magnetic sensitivity of the cells was decreased. On the other hand, when the cells were cultured beforehand at a high temperature, their magnetic sensitivity was increased. These results raise the possibility that membrane lipid fluidity, which is inversely proportional to the membrane lipid order, contributes to the magnetic orientation of syngens. In this study, measurements of membrane lipid fluidity obtained using fluorescence image analysis with the lipophilic dye, laurdan (6-lauroyl-2-dimethylaminonaphtalene), showed that the degree of membrane lipid fluidity was correlated with the differences in magnetic orientation between syngens. That is, the syngens with decreased membrane fluidity showed an increased degree of magnetic orientation. Therefore, the membrane lipid order is a key factor in the magnetic orientation of Paramecium swimming.

  18. New stands of species of the Paramecium aurelia complex in Africa and Europe.

    PubMed

    Rautian, Maria; Przyboś, Ewa; Surmacz, Marta; Lebedeva, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    The relevance of geographical distribution and the roles of dispersal and spatial isolation during the speciation of microorganisms are nowadays of great interest. The Paramecium aurelia species complex is a perfect model system to explore these questions given its long history as a study subject and broad distribution. However, the world-wide distribution of the Paramecium aurelia complex (Ciliophora, Protista) still needs study, e.g., sampling in the southern hemisphere has been quite limited, while Europe has been investigated for years, with the majority of aurelia species isolated from here. Recently, new stands of species of the P. aurelia complex were found in southern Europe (Malta, Bulgaria, Cyprus) and in the Czech Republic (P. primaurelia, P. triaurelia, P. octaurelia). In Africa (Republic of South Africa), new stands of P. primaurelia, P. triaurelia, and P. octaurelia were found. Interestingly, the rare species P. triaurelia, and P. octaurelia were found to co-occur both in South Africa (SA 13) and the Czech Republic (CKV 8). Newly established strains were identified to species by crossing with the test strains (the reference strains for the particular species).

  19. Intra-specific differentiation of Paramecium bursaria strains by molecular methods--preliminary studies.

    PubMed

    Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Przyboś, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Ten strains of Paramecium bursaria and also P. caudatum, P. multimicronucleatum, P. tetraurelia strains (as outgroups) were characterized by using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD), Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis (ARDRA) and sequencing of the non-coding ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. RAPD analysis revealed that all Paramecium bursaria strains possessed characteristic band patterns; there was a correlation between the degree of differentiation of DNA revealed by RAPD-fingerprinting and the geographic origin of a particular strain. ARDRA riboprinting (using a fragment of SSU-LSU rDNA, about 3085 bp) with restriction enzymes DraI, EcoRV, HhaI, HindIII, MspI, PstI distinguished groups of P. bursaria strains with characteristic band patterns originating from different sites. Comparison of the 550 bp ITS 1-5.8S-ITS2 fragment showed differentiation (0.9%) of the P. bursaria strains as three main groups of strains connected by site of origin in the constructed tree.

  20. A forward genetic screen reveals essential and non-essential RNAi factors in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Marker, Simone; Carradec, Quentin; Tanty, Véronique; Arnaiz, Olivier; Meyer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, small RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways form complex interacting networks. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, at least two RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms coexist, involving distinct but overlapping sets of protein factors and producing different types of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). One is specifically triggered by high-copy transgenes, and the other by feeding cells with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-producing bacteria. In this study, we designed a forward genetic screen for mutants deficient in dsRNA-induced silencing, and a powerful method to identify the relevant mutations by whole-genome sequencing. We present a set of 47 mutant alleles for five genes, revealing two previously unknown RNAi factors: a novel Paramecium-specific protein (Pds1) and a Cid1-like nucleotidyl transferase. Analyses of allelic diversity distinguish non-essential and essential genes and suggest that the screen is saturated for non-essential, single-copy genes. We show that non-essential genes are specifically involved in dsRNA-induced RNAi while essential ones are also involved in transgene-induced RNAi. One of the latter, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RDR2, is further shown to be required for all known types of siRNAs, as well as for sexual reproduction. These results open the way for the dissection of the genetic complexity, interconnection, mechanisms and natural functions of RNAi pathways in P. tetraurelia. PMID:24860163

  1. Epigenetic regulation of serotype expression antagonizes transcriptome dynamics in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Cheaib, Miriam; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Nordström, Karl J. V.; Schulz, Marcel H.; Simon, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic variation of a single genotype is achieved by alterations in gene expression patterns. Regulation of such alterations depends on their time scale, where short-time adaptations differ from permanently established gene expression patterns maintained by epigenetic mechanisms. In the ciliate Paramecium, serotypes were described for an epigenetically controlled gene expression pattern of an individual multigene family. Paradoxically, individual serotypes can be triggered in Paramecium by alternating environments but are then stabilized by epigenetic mechanisms, thus raising the question to which extend their expression follows environmental stimuli. To characterize environmental adaptation in the context of epigenetically controlled serotype expression, we used RNA-seq to characterize transcriptomes of serotype pure cultures. The resulting vegetative transcriptome resource is first analysed for genes involved in the adaptive response to the altered environment. Secondly, we identified groups of genes that do not follow the adaptive response but show co-regulation with the epigenetically controlled serotype system, suggesting that their gene expression pattern becomes manifested by similar mechanisms. In our experimental set-up, serotype expression and the entire group of co-regulated genes were stable among environmental changes and only heat-shock genes altered expression of these gene groups. The data suggest that the maintenance of these gene expression patterns in a lineage represents epigenetically controlled robustness counteracting short-time adaptation processes. PMID:26231545

  2. Dynamin- and clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway in unicellular eukaryote Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Wiejak, Jolanta; Surmacz, Liliana; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2004-10-01

    The first evidence of dynamin presence and its colocalization with clathrin in the compartment involved in Paramecium receptor-mediated endocytosis is presented. We identified dynamin by cloning, Western blotting, and immunodetection in confocal and electron microscopy. The partial genes, which we have designated ParDyn1 and ParDyn2, are 1091 bp long, 90% identical to one another and encode the N-terminal and middle domains of Paramecium dynamin isoform 1 and isoform 2. The deduced amino acid sequences contain all three guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP)-binding motifs and show 67% homology to mammalian dynamins. Antibodies generated against the cloned GTPase domain revealed dynamin association with endosomes containing transferrin, the marker of receptor-mediated endocytosis. In Western blotting a strong immunoreactive polypeptide of approximately 116 kDa, which seems to be phosphorylated, was accompanied by a faint one of approximately 90 kDa in cytosolic fraction (S2). Dynamin level was correlated with internalization of transferrin and it was significantly decreased upon inhibition of this process. Immunogold labeling in electron microscopy revealed colocalization of dynamin and clathrin in coated pits and endocytic vesicles. Moreover, the polypeptide cross-reaction with 2 different antibodies against mammalian clathrin was identified by immunoblotting. These results indicate that dynamin- and clathrin-dependent pathway exists in this evolutionary ancient cell.

  3. Alterations in the protein pattern of subcellular fractions isolated from Paramecium cells suppressed in phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Surmacz, L; Wiejak, J; Wyroba, E

    2001-01-01

    SDS-PAGE and quantitative densitometric analysis revealed alterations in the protein pattern of subcellular fractions (100,000 x g) isolated from Paramecium aurelia (299s axenic) cells suppressed in phagocytosis as compared with the control. Two different agents were used to block phagocytosis: the beta-adrenergic antagonist-1-propranolol (200 microM) and inhibitor of calmodulin-dependent processes--trifluoperazine (20 microM). More than 40 polypeptides were identified in the cytosolic (soluble) fractions S1 and S2. A considerable decrease in band intensity was found for three polypeptides: by 60% for 87 kDa band, 52% for 75 kDa and 37% for 42 kDa in comparison to the control, when S2 fractions from propranolol-treated cells of equal load were quantified. TFP treatment evoked only a small decrease in the intensity of the same bands: 9%, 10% and 6%, respectively. The 42 kDa band was identified by Western blot analysis and chemiluminiscent detection to be actin. This result suggests that actin may be a primary target of pharmacological agents used in this study to inhibit Paramecium phagocytic activity.

  4. Effects of space balloon flights on reproductive activity in Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Planel, H; Soleilhavoup, J P; Croute, F

    1975-01-01

    Post autogamous Paramecium aurelia cultures were placed in hermetic containers, including a heating device with accuracy kept around +/- 0.1 degrees C. Kinetics of cellular growth was determined by cell count, after recovery, on in-flight cultures and ground control cultures. Dosimetry was performed by thermoluminescent detectors (CaSO4 activated with dysprosium). Flight durations of maximum altitude (ceiling) ranged between 48 min and 15 hours (repeated flights). Conclusions are as follows: short flights result in a secondary stimulating effect, shown by post-flight increase of the growth rate (total dose above 2 mrads); long flights or repeated flights are accompanied by a decrease in growth rate (total dose ranging from 2 to 6 mrads); in the stimulation experiments, cell counts performed immediately after flight permit identification of a temporary decrease of growth rate. The biphasic character of the biological response after flights may be due to an ionization phenomena induced by cosmic rays. Indeed, the temporary drop of growth rate is not observed after recovery if the cells are subcultured in fresh medium and left on the earth's surface. We observe, on the contrary, an increase in growth rate. These findings confirm the great sensitivity of Paramecium aurelia to very low doses of ionizing radiations and demonstrate the biological effect of cosmic radiation. PMID:11913423

  5. A forward genetic screen reveals essential and non-essential RNAi factors in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Marker, Simone; Carradec, Quentin; Tanty, Véronique; Arnaiz, Olivier; Meyer, Eric

    2014-06-01

    In most eukaryotes, small RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways form complex interacting networks. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, at least two RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms coexist, involving distinct but overlapping sets of protein factors and producing different types of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). One is specifically triggered by high-copy transgenes, and the other by feeding cells with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-producing bacteria. In this study, we designed a forward genetic screen for mutants deficient in dsRNA-induced silencing, and a powerful method to identify the relevant mutations by whole-genome sequencing. We present a set of 47 mutant alleles for five genes, revealing two previously unknown RNAi factors: a novel Paramecium-specific protein (Pds1) and a Cid1-like nucleotidyl transferase. Analyses of allelic diversity distinguish non-essential and essential genes and suggest that the screen is saturated for non-essential, single-copy genes. We show that non-essential genes are specifically involved in dsRNA-induced RNAi while essential ones are also involved in transgene-induced RNAi. One of the latter, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RDR2, is further shown to be required for all known types of siRNAs, as well as for sexual reproduction. These results open the way for the dissection of the genetic complexity, interconnection, mechanisms and natural functions of RNAi pathways in P. tetraurelia. PMID:24860163

  6. The SUMO pathway is developmentally regulated and required for programmed DNA elimination in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Forney, James D

    2006-05-01

    Extensive genome-wide remodeling occurs during the formation of the somatic macronuclei from the germ line micronuclei in ciliated protozoa. This process is limited to sexual reproduction and includes DNA amplification, chromosome fragmentation, and the elimination of internal segments of DNA. Our efforts to define the pathways regulating these events revealed a gene encoding a homologue of ubiquitin activating enzyme 2 (UBA2) that is upregulated at the onset of macronuclear development in Paramecium tetraurelia. Uba2 enzymes are known to activate the protein called small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) that is covalently attached to target proteins. Consistent with this relationship, Northern analysis showed increased abundance of SUMO transcripts during sexual reproduction in Paramecium. RNA interference (RNAi) against UBA2 or SUMO during vegetative growth had little effect on cell survival or fission rates. In contrast, RNAi of mating cells resulted in failure to form a functional macronucleus. Despite normal amplification of the genome, excision of internal eliminated sequences was completely blocked. Additional experiments showed that the homologous UBA2 and SUMO genes in Tetrahymena thermophila are also upregulated during conjugation. These results provide evidence for the developmental regulation of the SUMO pathway in ciliates and suggest a key role for the pathway in controlling genome remodeling. PMID:16682458

  7. Swimming Paramecium in magnetically simulated enhanced, reduced, and inverted gravity environments

    PubMed Central

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Earth's gravity exerts relatively weak forces in the range of 10–100 pN directly on cells in biological systems. Nevertheless, it biases the orientation of swimming unicellular organisms, alters bone cell differentiation, and modifies gene expression in renal cells. A number of methods of simulating different strength gravity environments, such as centrifugation, have been applied for researching the underlying mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate a magnetic force-based technique that is unique in its capability to enhance, reduce, and even invert the effective buoyancy of cells and thus simulate hypergravity, hypogravity, and inverted gravity environments. We apply it to Paramecium caudatum, a single-cell protozoan that varies its swimming propulsion depending on its orientation with respect to gravity, g. In these simulated gravities, denoted by fgm, Paramecium exhibits a linear response up to fgm = 5 g, modifying its swimming as it would in the hypergravity of a centrifuge. Moreover, experiments from fgm = 0 to −5 g show that the response is symmetric, implying that the regulation of the swimming speed is primarily related to the buoyancy of the cell. The response becomes nonlinear for fgm >5 g. At fgm = 10 g, many paramecia “stall” (i.e., swim in place against the force), exerting a maximum propulsion force estimated to be 0.7 nN. These findings establish a general technique for applying continuously variable forces to cells or cell populations suitable for exploring their force transduction mechanisms. PMID:16916937

  8. A large multigene family codes for the polypeptides of the crystalline trichocyst matrix in Paramecium.

    PubMed Central

    Madeddu, L; Gautier, M C; Vayssié, L; Houari, A; Sperling, L

    1995-01-01

    The secretory granules (trichocysts) of Paramecium are characterized by a highly constrained shape that reflects the crystalline organization of their protein contents. Yet the crystalline trichocyst content is composed not of a single protein but of a family of related polypeptides that derive from a family of precursors by protein processing. In this paper we show that a multigene family, of unusually large size for a unicellular organism, codes for these proteins. The family is organized in subfamilies; each subfamily codes for proteins with different primary structures, but within the subfamilies several genes code for nearly identical proteins. For one subfamily, we have obtained direct evidence that the different members are coexpressed. The three subfamilies we have characterized are located on different macronuclear chromosomes. Typical 23-29 nucleotide Paramecium introns are found in one of the regions studied and the intron sequences are more variable than the surrounding coding sequences, providing gene-specific markers. We suggest that this multigene family may have evolved to assure a microheterogeneity of structural proteins necessary for morphogenesis of a complex secretory granule core with a constrained shape and dynamic properties: genetic analysis has shown that correct assembly of the crystalline core is necessary for trichocyst function. Images PMID:7579685

  9. FOOD VACUOLE MEMBRANE GROWTH WITH MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED MEMBRANE TRANSPORT IN PARAMECIUM

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Richard D.

    1974-01-01

    Evidence from a morphological study of the oral apparatus of Paramecium caudatum using electron microscope techniques have shown the existence of an elaborate structural system which is apparently designed to recycle digestive-vacuole membrane. Disk-shaped vesicles are filtered out of the cytoplasm by a group of microtubular ribbons. The vesicles, after being transported to the cytostome-cytopharynx region in association with these ribbons, accumulate next to the cytopharynx before they become fused with the cytopharyngeal membrane. This fusion allows the nascent food vacuole to grow and increase its membrane surface area. The morphology of this cytostome-cytopharynx region is described in detail and illustrated with a three-dimensional drawing of a portion of this region and a clay sculpture of the oral apparatus of Paramecium. Evidence from the literature for the transformation of food vacuole membrane into disk-shaped vesicles both from condensing food vacuoles in the endoplasm and from egested food vacuoles at the cytoproct is presented. This transformation would complete a system of digestive vacuole membrane recycling. PMID:4373478

  10. Protein phosphatase and kinase activities possibly involved in exocytosis regulation in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed Central

    Kissmehl, R; Treptau, T; Hofer, H W; Plattner, H

    1996-01-01

    In Paramecium tetraurelia cells synchronous exocytosis induced by aminoethyldextran (AED) is accompanied by an equally rapid dephosphorylation of a 63 kDa phosphoprotein (PP63) within 80 ms. In vivo, rephosphorylation occurs within a few seconds after AED triggering. In homogenates (P)P63 can be solubilized in all three phosphorylation states (phosphorylated, dephosphorylated and rephosphorylated) and thus tested in vitro. By using chelators of different divalent cations, de- and rephosphorylation of PP63 and P63 respectively can be achieved by an endogenous protein phosphatase/kinase system. Dephosphorylation occurs in the presence of EDTA, whereas in the presence of EGTA this was concealed by phosphorylation by endogenous kinase(s), thus indicating that phosphorylation of P63 is calcium-independent. Results obtained with protein phosphatase inhibitors (okadaic acid, calyculin A) allowed us to exclude a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type I (with selective sensitivity in Paramecium). Protein phosphatase 2C is also less likely to be a candidate because of its requirement for high Mg2+ concentrations. According to previous evidence a protein serine/threonine phosphatase of type 2B (calcineurin; CaN) is possibly involved. We have now found that bovine brain CaN dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro. Taking into account the specific requirements of this phosphatase in vitro, with p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate, we have isolated a cytosolic phosphatase of similar characteristics by combined preparative gel electrophoresis and affinity-column chromatography. In Paramecium this phosphatase also dephosphorylates PP63 in vitro (after 32P labelling in vivo). Using various combinations of ion exchange, affinity and hydrophobic interaction chromatography we have also isolated three different protein kinases from the soluble fraction, i.e. a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and a casein kinase. Among the kinases tested, PKA

  11. A 63 kDa phosphoprotein undergoing rapid dephosphorylation during exocytosis in Paramecium cells shares biochemical characteristics with phosphoglucomutase.

    PubMed Central

    Treptau, T; Kissmehl, R; Wissmann, J D; Plattner, H

    1995-01-01

    We have enriched phosphoglucomutase (PGM; EC 5.4.2.2) approximately 20-fold from Paramecium tetraurelia cells by combined fractional precipitation with (NH4)2SO4, gel filtration and anion-exchange chromatography yielding two PGM peaks. Several parameters affecting PGM enzymic activity, molecular mass and pI were determined. Phosphorylation studies were done with isolated endogenous protein kinases. Like the 63 kDa phosphoprotein PP63, which is dephosphorylated within 80 ms during synchronous trichocyst exocytosis [Höhne-Zell, Knoll, Riedel-Gras, Hofer and Plattner (1992) Biochem. J. 286, 843-849], PGM has a molecular mass of 63 kDa and forms of identical pI. Since mammalian PGM activity depends on the presence of glucose 1,6-bisphosphate (Glc-1,6-P2) (which is lost during anion-exchange chromatography), we analysed this aspect with Paramecium PGM. In this case PGM activity was shown not to be lost, due to p-nitrophenyl phosphate-detectable phosphatase(s) (which we have separated from PGM), but also due to loss of Glc-1,6-P2. Like PGM from various vertebrate species, PGM activity from Paramecium can be fully re-established by addition of Glc-1,6-P2 at 10 nM, and it is also stimulated by bivalent cations and insensitive to chelating or thiol reagents. The PGM which we have isolated can be phosphorylated by endogenous cyclic-GMP-dependent protein kinase or by endogenous casein kinase. This results in three phosphorylated bands of identical molecular mass and pI values, as we have shown to occur with PP63 after phosphorylation in vivo (forms with pI 6.05, 5.95, 5.85). In ELISA, antibodies raised against PGM from rabbit skeletal muscle were reactive not only with original PGM but also with PGM fractions from Paramecium. Therefore, PGM and PP63 seem to be identical with regard to widely different parameters, i.e. co-elution by chromatography, molecular mass, phosphorylation by the two protein kinases tested, pI values of isoforms, and immuno-binding. Recent claims that

  12. Mutational Analysis of Mating Type Inheritance in Syngen 4 of PARAMECIUM AURELIA

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Bruce C.

    1973-01-01

    Six genic mutations restricting clones to mating type VII (O) were isolated in syngen 4, Paramecium aurelia. The only three extensively tested were neither allelic nor closely linked. A second type of mutation, allelic to one of the O restricted mutants, was also found. Clones homozygous for this mutant gene were selfers, producing both O and E (VIII) mating types, but only when they were progeny of mating type E parental clones. While all seven mutant genes behaved as recessives in monohybrid crosses, clones heterozygous at two different loci often demonstrated an unanticipated phenotype: selfing. The significance of the findings is discussed in relation to mating type determination and the evolution of mating type systems. PMID:17248611

  13. External GTP alters the motility and elicits an oscillating membrane depolarization in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Clark, K D; Hennessey, T M; Nelson, D L

    1993-05-01

    Paramecium, a unicellular ciliated protist, alters its motility in response to various stimuli. Externally added GTP transiently induced alternating forward and backward swimming interspersed with whirling at a concentration as low as 0.1 microM. ATP was 1000-fold less active, whereas CTP and UTP produced essentially no response. The response to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analogs guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate and guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imido]triphosphate was indistinguishable from that to GTP. This behavioral response was correlated with an unusual transient and oscillating membrane depolarization in both wild-type cells and the mutant pawn B, which is defective in the voltage-dependent Ca2+ current required for action potentials. This is a specific effect of external GTP on the excitability of a eukaryotic cell and, to our knowledge, is the first purinergic effect to be discovered in a microorganism.

  14. Attempts to retreat from a dead-ended long capillary by backward swimming in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    Kunita, Itsuki; Kuroda, Shigeru; Ohki, Kaito; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    We have observed how the ciliate Paramecium attempts to retreat from the dead-end of a long capillary that is too narrow for turning. After many trial-and-error episodes of short-term backward swimming (SBS), which is the conventional avoidance behavior exhibited in free swimming when an obstacle is faced, long-term backward swimming (LBS) that lasted five to ten times longer was developed. LBS may have a beneficial effect for complete withdrawal from the capillary space, although in our experiment it was impossible for the organism to do so due to the capillary length. In order to identify a physically possible mechanism for LBS, we propose model equations for the membrane potential of Hodgkin–Huxley type, which describe the control of ciliary movement. The physiological implications and physical mechanism of the development of LBS are discussed. PMID:24966852

  15. Performance Analysis of Chemotaxis Controllers: Which has Better Chemotaxis Controller, Escherichia coli or Paramecium caudatum?

    PubMed

    Azuma, Shun-Ichi; Owaki, Katsuya; Shinohara, Nobuhiro; Sugie, Toshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis is the biological phenomenon in which organisms move to a more favorable location in an environment with a chemical attractant or repellent. Since chemotaxis is a typical example of the environmental response of organisms, it is a fundamental topic in biology and related fields. We discuss the performance of the internal controllers that generate chemotaxis. We first propose performance indices to evaluate the controllers. Based on these indices, we evaluate the performance of two controller models of Escherichia coli and Paramecium caudatum. As a result, it is disclosed that the E. coli-type controller achieves chemotaxis quickly but roughly, whereas the P. caudatum-type controller achieves it slowly but precisely. This result will be a biological contribution from a control theoretic point of view. PMID:26336141

  16. Dynamic behaviour of stationary pronuclei during their positioning in Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Shi, Xinbai; Yang, Xianyu

    2011-08-01

    During conjugation of Paramecium caudatum, there are two well-known stages when nuclear migration occurs. What happens to the nuclei is closely related to their localisations in cells. The first of these stages is the entrance of one meiotic product into the paroral region. This nucleus survives, while the remaining three outside this area degenerate. The second stage is the antero-posterior localisation of eight synkaryon division products. Four posterior nuclei are differentiated into macronuclear anlagen, whereas four anterior nuclei remain as the presumptive micronuclei. In this experiment, the process of the third prezygotic division of P. caudatum was studied with the help of protargol staining. Here, a third nuclear migration was discovered. By two spindle turnings and two spindle elongations, stationary pronuclei were positioned near migratory pronuclei. This positioning of stationary pronuclei could shorten the distance for transferred migratory pronuclei to recognise and reach the stationary pronuclei. This fosters the synkaryon formation of P. caudatum.

  17. Identification and cloning of first cadmium metallothionein like gene from locally isolated ciliate, Paramecium sp.

    PubMed

    Shuja, Rukhsana Nighat; Shakoori, Abdul Rauf

    2009-03-01

    First cadmium metallothionein like gene PMCd1 of a ciliate, Paramecium sp., isolated from industrial wastewater has been cloned and sequenced. PMCd1 is an intronless gene, encoding 612 nucleotides, with TAA coding for glutamine. The coding region of PMCd1 comprises 203 amino acids, including 37 cysteine residues with a conserved structural pattern in the form of recurring structural motifs, arranged in 17 x-cys-x-y-cys-x, 1 x-cys-cys-x and x-cys-x contexts. Both, the deduced amino acids and nucleotide sequence differ, not only from other animal metallothioneins (MTs), but also from the previously characterized Tetrahymena Cu and Cd-MTs. The translated protein of PMCd1 contains conserved cysteine residues, peculiar characteristic of stress inducible metallothionein genes of ciliates and other groups of organisms.

  18. Longevity in space; experiment on the life span of Paramecium cell clone in space.

    PubMed

    Mogami, Y; Tokunaga, N; Baba, S A

    1999-01-01

    Life span is the most interesting and also the most important biologically relevant time to be investigated on the space station. As a model experiment, we proposed an investigation to assess the life span of clone generation of the ciliate Paramecium. In space, clone generation will be artificially started by conjugation or autogamy, and the life span of the cell populations in different gravitational fields (microgravity and onboard 1 x g control) will be precisely assessed in terms of fission age as compared with the clock time. In order to perform the space experiment including long-lasting culture and continuous measurement of cell division, we tested the methods of cell culture and of cell-density measurement, which will be available in closed environments under microgravity. The basic design of experimental hardware and a preliminary result of the cultivation procedure are described.

  19. A comparative hybridization analysis of yeast DNA with Paramecium parafusin- and different phosphoglucomutase-specific probes.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E; Satir, B H

    2000-01-01

    Molecular probes designed for the parafusin (PFUS), the Paramecium exocytic-sensitive phosphoglycoprotein, gave distinct hybridization patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic DNA when compared with different phosphoglucomutase specific probes. These include two probes identical to segments of yeast phosphoglucomutase (PGM) genes 1 and 2. Neither of the PGM probes revealed the 7.4 and 5.9 kb fragments in Bgl II-cut yeast DNA digest detected with the 1.6 kb cloned PFUS cDNA and oligonucleotide constructed to the PFUS region (insertion 3--I-3) not found in other species. PCR amplification with PFUS-specific primers generated yeast DNA-species of the predicted molecular size which hybridized to the I-3 probe. A search of the yeast genome database produced an unassigned nucleotide sequence that showed 55% identity to parafusin gene and 37% identity to PGM2 (the major isoform of yeast phosphoglucomutase) within the amplified region.

  20. Stomatogenesis during sexual and asexual reproduction in an amicronucleate strain of Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Mikami, K

    1979-04-01

    Amicronucleate cells of Paramecium caudatum, whose micronuclei have been artifically removed by micropipetting, are characterized by the appearance of a deciliated area at the posterior part of the buccal opening. These cells form food vacuoles at a slightly lower rate than micronucleate cells. Their mean interfission time is longer than that in micronucleates. The exconjugants of amicronucleate cells can not form food vacuoles and eventually die witout fission, though conjugation proceeds normally in them as well as in their micronucleate mate. The oral apparatus of amicronucleate exconjugants seems to be shallower than that of micronucleates. The membranellar cilia, therefore, can be seen through the buccal overture by scanning electron microscope. The results obtained from the cross of micronucleate and amicronucleate strains and from the induction of autogamy in amicronucleate strains suggest that the micronucleus has a primary role in developing the normal oral apparatus after nuclear reorganization. PMID:469476

  1. Effect of Cypermethrin on the Growth of Ciliate Protozoan Paramecium caudatum

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Joydeep

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the effect of cypermethrin on the growth of ciliate protozoan Paramecium caudatum. Materials and Methods: Monoxenic culture of P. caudatum, were exposed to different doses (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.2 µg/L) of cypermethrin along with control for 24, 48, 72, and 96 h time interval. The total numbers of live and dead cells were counted after trypan blue staining in Neubauer hemocytometer. Results: Marked decrease in the number of living cells with the increase in the concentration of cypermethrin and with increasing exposure time intervals was recorded. Conclusion: The results indicate that cypermethrin is toxic to P. caudatum even at low concentrations when it enters in the aquatic system through runoff. PMID:26862268

  2. Toxic effects of antimalarial drugs in Paramecium: role of calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Nori, V S; Barry, S R

    1997-05-01

    The antimalarial drugs, quinacrine, quinine and mefloquine, as well as the structurally-similar compound, W-7, inhibit calcium-dependent backward swimming and calcium currents in Paramecium calkinsi. These drugs are also toxic to paramecia at high concentrations. Therefore, one site of toxic action of the drugs may be the calcium channel. To test this hypothesis, the toxicity of the antimalarials and W-7 was compared in paramecia with and without calcium channels. Since calcium channels are located on the cilia, calcium channels were removed from the paramecia by deciliating the cells. Deciliated cells were found to be less susceptible to the lethal effects of the antimalarials and W-7 than their ciliated counterparts. Moreover, Pawns, mutants of P. tetraurelia that possess cilia but lack functional calcium channels, were also less susceptible to the antimalarials than wild-type cells. Thus, calcium channels may be one site of toxic action of the antimalarial drugs in paramecia and perhaps in other protists.

  3. Temporal variation in temperature determines disease spread and maintenance in Paramecium microcosm populations.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Alison B; Fellous, Simon; Kaltz, Oliver

    2011-11-22

    The environment is rarely constant and organisms are exposed to temporal and spatial variations that impact their life histories and inter-species interactions. It is important to understand how such variations affect epidemiological dynamics in host-parasite systems. We explored effects of temporal variation in temperature on experimental microcosm populations of the ciliate Paramecium caudatum and its bacterial parasite Holospora undulata. Infected and uninfected populations of two P. caudatum genotypes were created and four constant temperature treatments (26°C, 28°C, 30°C and 32°C) compared with four variable treatments with the same mean temperatures. Variable temperature treatments were achieved by alternating populations between permissive (23°C) and restrictive (35°C) conditions daily over 30 days. Variable conditions and high temperatures caused greater declines in Paramecium populations, greater fluctuations in population size and higher incidence of extinction. The additional effect of parasite infection was additive and enhanced the negative effects of the variable environment and higher temperatures by up to 50 per cent. The variable environment and high temperatures also caused a decrease in parasite prevalence (up to 40%) and an increase in extinction (absence of detection) (up to 30%). The host genotypes responded similarly to the different environmental stresses and their effect on parasite traits were generally in the same direction. This work provides, to our knowledge, the first experimental demonstration that epidemiological dynamics are influenced by environmental variation. We also emphasize the need to consider environmental variance, as well as means, when trying to understand, or predict population dynamics or range.

  4. Mendelian and non-mendelian mutations affecting surface antigen expression in Paramecium tetraurelia

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, L.M.; Forney, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    A screening procedure was devised for the isolation of X-ray-induced mutations affecting the expression of the A immobilization antigen (i-antigen) in Paramecium tetraurelia. Two of the mutations isolated by this procedure proved to be in modifier genes. The two genes are unlinked to each other and unlinked to the structural A i-antigen gene. These are the first modifier genes identified in a Paramecium sp. that affect surface antigen expression. Another mutation was found to be a deletion of sequences just downstream from the A i-antigen gene. In cells carrying this mutation, the A i-antigen gene lies in close proximity to the end of a macronuclear chromosome. The expression of the A i-antigen is not affected in these cells, demonstrating that downstream sequences are not important for the regulation and expression of the A i-antigen gene. A stable cell line was also recovered which shows non-Mendelian inheritance of a macronuclear deletion of the A i-antigen gene. This mutant does not contain the gene in its macronucleus, but contains a complete copy of the gene in its micronucleus. In the cytoplasm of wild-type animals, the micronuclear gene is included in the developing macronucleus; in the cytoplasm of the mutant, the incorporation of the A i-antigen gene into the macronucleus is inhibited. This is the first evidence that a mechanism is available in ciliates to control the expression of a gene by regulating its incorporation into developing macronuclei.

  5. A new multigene family encoding calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding membrane proteins of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Chan, C W; Saimi, Y; Kung, C

    1999-04-29

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) regulates various physiological processes in a wide variety of organisms, metazoa and protists alike. To better understand Ca2+/CaM-dependent processes, particularly those with membrane-associated components, we studied Ca2+/CaM-binding membrane proteins in Paramecium tetraurelia, a unicellular model system. A CaM-binding protein, PCM1 (Paramecium CaM-binding membrane-bound protein), from a detergent-solubilized ciliary membrane fraction was identified and purified through Ca2+-dependent CaM-affinity chromatography. PCM1 has an apparent molecular mass of approx. 65kDa. It binds radiolabeled CaM in blot overlay assays and binds to CaM-affinity columns, both only in the presence of 10 microM or higher Ca2+. Three peptide sequences from PCM1 were obtained, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern hybridization experiments were designed accordingly, leading to a partial cDNA clone for PCM1 and the discovery of three homologs: PCM2, PCM3 and PCM4. Amino acid sequences predicted by the full-length coding sequence for PCM3 and partial genes for PCM1, PCM2 and PCM4 are very similar (approx. 85% amino-acid identities). Their sequences indicate that they are hitherto novel proteins with beta/gamma-crystallin domains, cysteine-rich regions and potential CaM-binding domains. These protein motifs are suggested to mediate protein-protein interaction important for Ca2+/CaM signal transduction event(s) through the PCM family of proteins.

  6. Temporal variation in temperature determines disease spread and maintenance in Paramecium microcosm populations

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Alison B.; Fellous, Simon; Kaltz, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    The environment is rarely constant and organisms are exposed to temporal and spatial variations that impact their life histories and inter-species interactions. It is important to understand how such variations affect epidemiological dynamics in host–parasite systems. We explored effects of temporal variation in temperature on experimental microcosm populations of the ciliate Paramecium caudatum and its bacterial parasite Holospora undulata. Infected and uninfected populations of two P. caudatum genotypes were created and four constant temperature treatments (26°C, 28°C, 30°C and 32°C) compared with four variable treatments with the same mean temperatures. Variable temperature treatments were achieved by alternating populations between permissive (23°C) and restrictive (35°C) conditions daily over 30 days. Variable conditions and high temperatures caused greater declines in Paramecium populations, greater fluctuations in population size and higher incidence of extinction. The additional effect of parasite infection was additive and enhanced the negative effects of the variable environment and higher temperatures by up to 50 per cent. The variable environment and high temperatures also caused a decrease in parasite prevalence (up to 40%) and an increase in extinction (absence of detection) (up to 30%). The host genotypes responded similarly to the different environmental stresses and their effect on parasite traits were generally in the same direction. This work provides, to our knowledge, the first experimental demonstration that epidemiological dynamics are influenced by environmental variation. We also emphasize the need to consider environmental variance, as well as means, when trying to understand, or predict population dynamics or range. PMID:21450730

  7. Novel Insights into the Development and Function of Cilia Using the Advantages of the Paramecium Cell and Its Many Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Junji; Valentine, Megan S.; Van Houten, Judith L.

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium species, especially P. tetraurelia and caudatum, are model organisms for modern research into the form and function of cilia. In this review, we focus on the ciliary ion channels and other transmembrane proteins that control the beat frequency and wave form of the cilium by controlling the signaling within the cilium. We put these discussions in the context of the advantages that Paramecium brings to the understanding of ciliary motility: mutants for genetic dissections of swimming behavior, electrophysiology, structural analysis, abundant cilia for biochemistry and modern proteomics, genomics and molecular biology. We review the connection between behavior and physiology, which allows the cells to broadcast the function of their ciliary channels in real time. We build a case for the important insights and advantages that this model organism continues to bring to the study of cilia. PMID:26230712

  8. Novel Insights into the Development and Function of Cilia Using the Advantages of the Paramecium Cell and Its Many Cilia.

    PubMed

    Yano, Junji; Valentine, Megan S; Van Houten, Judith L

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium species, especially P. tetraurelia and caudatum, are model organisms for modern research into the form and function of cilia. In this review, we focus on the ciliary ion channels and other transmembrane proteins that control the beat frequency and wave form of the cilium by controlling the signaling within the cilium. We put these discussions in the context of the advantages that Paramecium brings to the understanding of ciliary motility: mutants for genetic dissections of swimming behavior, electrophysiology, structural analysis, abundant cilia for biochemistry and modern proteomics, genomics and molecular biology. We review the connection between behavior and physiology, which allows the cells to broadcast the function of their ciliary channels in real time. We build a case for the important insights and advantages that this model organism continues to bring to the study of cilia. PMID:26230712

  9. Cross-study analysis of genomic data defines the ciliate multigenic epiplasmin family: strategies for functional analysis in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Damaj, Raghida; Pomel, Sébastien; Bricheux, Geneviève; Coffe, Gérard; Viguès, Bernard; Ravet, Viviane; Bouchard, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Background The sub-membranous skeleton of the ciliate Paramecium, the epiplasm, is composed of hundreds of epiplasmic scales centered on basal bodies, and presents a complex set of proteins, epiplasmins, which belong to a multigenic family. The repeated duplications observed in the P. tetraurelia genome present an interesting model of the organization and evolution of a multigenic family within a single cell. Results To study this multigenic family, we used phylogenetic, structural, and analytical transcriptional approaches. The phylogenetic method defines 5 groups of epiplasmins in the multigenic family. A refined analysis by Hydrophobic Cluster Analysis (HCA) identifies structural characteristics of 51 epiplasmins, defining five separate groups, and three classes. Depending on the sequential arrangement of their structural domains, the epiplasmins are defined as symmetric, asymmetric or atypical. The EST data aid in this classification, in the identification of putative regulating sequences such as TATA or CAAT boxes. When specific RNAi experiments were conducted using sequences from either symmetric or asymmetric classes, phenotypes were drastic. Local effects show either disrupted or ill-shaped epiplasmic scales. In either case, this results in aborted cell division. Using structural features, we show that 4 epiplasmins are also present in another ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Their affiliation with the distinctive structural groups of Paramecium epiplasmins demonstrates an interspecific multigenic family. Conclusion The epiplasmin multigenic family illustrates the history of genomic duplication in Paramecium. This study provides a framework which can guide functional analysis of epiplasmins, the major components of the membrane skeleton in ciliates. We show that this set of proteins handles an important developmental information in Paramecium since maintenance of epiplasm organization is crucial for cell morphogenesis. PMID:19493334

  10. 808-nm laser therapy with a flat-top handpiece photobiomodulates mitochondria activities of Paramecium primaurelia (Protozoa).

    PubMed

    Amaroli, Andrea; Ravera, Silvia; Parker, Steven; Panfoli, Isabella; Benedicenti, Alberico; Benedicenti, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    Photobiomodulation is proposed as a non-linear process, and only low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is assumed to stimulate exposed cells, whereas high powered laser and fluences can cause negative effects, exhausting the cell's energy reserve as a consequence of excessive photon-based stimulation. In our work, we investigated and compared the effects of 808-nm diode laser (CW) with a new flat-top handpiece. To this purpose, we tested the photobiomodulation effects of 1 and 3 J/cm(2) fluence, both generated by 100 mW or 1 W of laser power and of 64 J/cm(2) of fluence generated by 100 mW, 1 W, 1.5 W or 2 W, as expressed through oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis of Paramecium. Data collected indicates the incremental consumption of oxygen through irradiation with 3 J/cm(2)-100 mW or 64 J/cm(2)-1 W correlates with an increase in Paramecium ATP synthesis. The Paramecium respiration was inhibited by fluences 64 J/cm(2)-100 mW or 64 J/cm(2)-2 W and was followed by a decrease in the endogenous ATP concentration. The 1 J/cm(2)-100 mW or 1 W and 3 J/cm(2)-1 W did not affect mitochondrial activity. The results show that the fluence of 64 J/cm(2)-1 W more than the 3 J/cm(2)-100 mW causes greater efficiency in Paramecium mitochondria respiratory chain activity. Our results suggest that thanks to flat-top handpiece we used, high fluences by high-powered laser have to be reconsidered as an effective and non-invasive therapy. Possible associated benefits of deeper tissue penetration would increase treatment effectiveness and reduced irradiation time. PMID:26984347

  11. Influence on cell proliferation of background radiation or exposure to very low, chronic gamma radiation. [Paramecium tetraurelia; Synechococcus lividus

    SciTech Connect

    Planel, H.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Tixador, R.; Richoilley, G.; Conter, A.; Croute, F.; Caratero, C.; Gaubin, Y.

    1987-05-01

    Investigations carried out on the protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia and the cyanobacteria Synechococcus lividus, which were shielded against background radiation or exposed to very low doses of gamma radiation, demonstrated that radiation can stimulate the proliferation of these two single-cell organisms. Radiation hormesis depends on internal factors (age of starting cells) and external factors (lighting conditions). The stimulatory effect occurred only in a limited range of doses and disappeared for dose rates higher than 50 mGy/y.

  12. 808-nm laser therapy with a flat-top handpiece photobiomodulates mitochondria activities of Paramecium primaurelia (Protozoa).

    PubMed

    Amaroli, Andrea; Ravera, Silvia; Parker, Steven; Panfoli, Isabella; Benedicenti, Alberico; Benedicenti, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    Photobiomodulation is proposed as a non-linear process, and only low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is assumed to stimulate exposed cells, whereas high powered laser and fluences can cause negative effects, exhausting the cell's energy reserve as a consequence of excessive photon-based stimulation. In our work, we investigated and compared the effects of 808-nm diode laser (CW) with a new flat-top handpiece. To this purpose, we tested the photobiomodulation effects of 1 and 3 J/cm(2) fluence, both generated by 100 mW or 1 W of laser power and of 64 J/cm(2) of fluence generated by 100 mW, 1 W, 1.5 W or 2 W, as expressed through oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis of Paramecium. Data collected indicates the incremental consumption of oxygen through irradiation with 3 J/cm(2)-100 mW or 64 J/cm(2)-1 W correlates with an increase in Paramecium ATP synthesis. The Paramecium respiration was inhibited by fluences 64 J/cm(2)-100 mW or 64 J/cm(2)-2 W and was followed by a decrease in the endogenous ATP concentration. The 1 J/cm(2)-100 mW or 1 W and 3 J/cm(2)-1 W did not affect mitochondrial activity. The results show that the fluence of 64 J/cm(2)-1 W more than the 3 J/cm(2)-100 mW causes greater efficiency in Paramecium mitochondria respiratory chain activity. Our results suggest that thanks to flat-top handpiece we used, high fluences by high-powered laser have to be reconsidered as an effective and non-invasive therapy. Possible associated benefits of deeper tissue penetration would increase treatment effectiveness and reduced irradiation time.

  13. Differential distribution of calcium stores in paramecium cells. Occurrence of a subplasmalemmal store with a calsequestrin-like protein.

    PubMed

    Plattner, H; Habermann, A; Kissmehl, R; Klauke, N; Majoul, I; Söling, H D

    1997-04-01

    We have analyzed in Paramecium cells the occurrence and intracellular distribution of the high capacity/low affinity calcium-binding proteins, calsequestrin (CS) and calreticulin (CR) using antibodies against CS from rat skeletal muscle and against CR from rat liver, respectively. As revealed by Western blots, a CS-like protein isolated by affinity chromatography from Paramecium cells comigrated with CS isolated from rat skeletal muscle. The immunoreactivity of this 53 kDa protein band was blocked when the antibodies had been preadsorbed with purified rat CS. A band of identical molecular size was shown to bind 45Ca in overlays. By immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling this CS-like protein was localized selectively to the extended subplasmalemmal calcium stores, the "alveolar sacs", which cover almost the entire cell surface. Concomitantly the 53 kDa 45Ca-binding band became increasingly intense in overlays as we increasingly enriched alveolar sacs. Antibodies against rat CR react with a 61 kDa band but do not cross-react with CS-like protein in Paramecium. These antibodies selectively stained intracellular reticular structures, identified bona fide as endoplasmic reticulum.

  14. The membrane skeleton in Paramecium: Molecular characterization of a novel epiplasmin family and preliminary GFP expression results.

    PubMed

    Pomel, Sébastien; Diogon, Marie; Bouchard, Philippe; Pradel, Lydie; Ravet, Viviane; Coffe, Gérard; Viguès, Bernard

    2006-02-01

    Previous attempts to identify the membrane skeleton of Paramecium cells have revealed a protein pattern that is both complex and specific. The most prominent structural elements, epiplasmic scales, are centered around ciliary units and are closely apposed to the cytoplasmic side of the inner alveolar membrane. We sought to characterize epiplasmic scale proteins (epiplasmins) at the molecular level. PCR approaches enabled the cloning and sequencing of two closely related genes by amplifications of sequences from a macronuclear genomic library. Using these two genes (EPI-1 and EPI-2), we have contributed to the annotation of the Paramecium tetraurelia macronuclear genome and identified 39 additional (paralogous) sequences. Two orthologous sequences were found in the Tetrahymena thermophila genome. Structural analysis of the 43 sequences indicates that the hallmark of this new multigenic family is a 79 aa domain flanked by two Q-, P- and V-rich stretches of sequence that are much more variable in amino-acid composition. Such features clearly distinguish members of the multigenic family from epiplasmic proteins previously sequenced in other ciliates. The expression of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-tagged epiplasmin showed significant labeling of epiplasmic scales as well as oral structures. We expect that the GFP construct described herein will prove to be a useful tool for comparative subcellular localization of different putative epiplasmins in Paramecium. PMID:16427359

  15. Different polyamine pathways from bacteria have replaced eukaryotic spermidine biosynthesis in ciliates Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium tetaurelia.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Kim, Sok Ho; Zhang, Yang; Hanfrey, Colin C; Elliott, Katherine A; Ealick, Steven E; Michael, Anthony J

    2015-09-01

    The polyamine spermidine is absolutely required for growth and cell proliferation in eukaryotes, due to its role in post-translational modification of essential translation elongation factor eIF5A, mediated by deoxyhypusine synthase. We have found that free-living ciliates Tetrahymena and Paramecium lost the eukaryotic genes encoding spermidine biosynthesis: S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) and spermidine synthase (SpdSyn). In Tetrahymena, they were replaced by a gene encoding a fusion protein of bacterial AdoMetDC and SpdSyn, present as three copies. In Paramecium, a bacterial homospermidine synthase replaced the eukaryotic genes. Individual AdoMetDC-SpdSyn fusion protein paralogues from Tetrahymena exhibit undetectable AdoMetDC activity; however, when two paralogous fusion proteins are mixed, AdoMetDC activity is restored and spermidine is synthesized. Structural modelling indicates a functional active site is reconstituted by sharing critical residues from two defective protomers across the heteromer interface. Paramecium was found to accumulate homospermidine, suggesting it replaces spermidine for growth. To test this concept, a budding yeast spermidine auxotrophic strain was found to grow almost normally with homospermidine instead of spermidine. Biosynthesis of spermidine analogue aminopropylcadaverine, but not exogenously provided norspermidine, correlated with some growth. Finally, we found that diverse single-celled eukaryotic parasites and multicellular metazoan Schistosoma worms have lost the spermidine biosynthetic pathway but retain deoxyhypusine synthase. PMID:25994085

  16. Different polyamine pathways from bacteria have replaced eukaryotic spermidine biosynthesis in ciliates Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium tetaurelia.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Kim, Sok Ho; Zhang, Yang; Hanfrey, Colin C; Elliott, Katherine A; Ealick, Steven E; Michael, Anthony J

    2015-09-01

    The polyamine spermidine is absolutely required for growth and cell proliferation in eukaryotes, due to its role in post-translational modification of essential translation elongation factor eIF5A, mediated by deoxyhypusine synthase. We have found that free-living ciliates Tetrahymena and Paramecium lost the eukaryotic genes encoding spermidine biosynthesis: S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) and spermidine synthase (SpdSyn). In Tetrahymena, they were replaced by a gene encoding a fusion protein of bacterial AdoMetDC and SpdSyn, present as three copies. In Paramecium, a bacterial homospermidine synthase replaced the eukaryotic genes. Individual AdoMetDC-SpdSyn fusion protein paralogues from Tetrahymena exhibit undetectable AdoMetDC activity; however, when two paralogous fusion proteins are mixed, AdoMetDC activity is restored and spermidine is synthesized. Structural modelling indicates a functional active site is reconstituted by sharing critical residues from two defective protomers across the heteromer interface. Paramecium was found to accumulate homospermidine, suggesting it replaces spermidine for growth. To test this concept, a budding yeast spermidine auxotrophic strain was found to grow almost normally with homospermidine instead of spermidine. Biosynthesis of spermidine analogue aminopropylcadaverine, but not exogenously provided norspermidine, correlated with some growth. Finally, we found that diverse single-celled eukaryotic parasites and multicellular metazoan Schistosoma worms have lost the spermidine biosynthetic pathway but retain deoxyhypusine synthase.

  17. An experimental test of the symbiosis specificity between the ciliate Paramecium bursaria and strains of the unicellular green alga Chlorella.

    PubMed

    Summerer, Monika; Sonntag, Bettina; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2007-08-01

    The ciliate Paramecium bursaria living in mutualistic relationship with the unicellular green alga Chlorella is known to be easily infected by various potential symbionts/parasites such as bacteria, yeasts and other algae. Permanent symbiosis, however, seems to be restricted to Chlorella taxa. To test the specificity of this association, we designed infection experiments with two aposymbiotic P. bursaria strains and Chlorella symbionts isolated from four Paramecium strains, seven other ciliate hosts and two Hydra strains, as well as three free-living Chlorella species. Paramecium bursaria established stable symbioses with all tested Chlorella symbionts of ciliates, but never with symbiotic Chlorella of Hydra viridissima or with free-living Chlorella. Furthermore, we tested the infection specificity of P. bursaria with a 1:1:1 mixture of three compatible Chlorella strains, including the native symbiont, and then identified the strain of the newly established symbiosis by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer region 1 of the 18S rRNA gene. The results indicated that P. bursaria established symbiosis with its native symbiont. We conclude that despite clear preferences for their native Chlorella, the host-symbiont relationship in P. bursaria is flexible.

  18. Revised systematics of Holospora-like bacteria and characterization of "Candidatus Gortzia infectiva", a novel macronuclear symbiont of Paramecium jenningsi.

    PubMed

    Boscaro, Vittorio; Fokin, Sergei I; Schrallhammer, Martina; Schweikert, Michael; Petroni, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    The genus Holospora (Rickettsiales) includes highly infectious nuclear symbionts of the ciliate Paramecium with unique morphology and life cycle. To date, nine species have been described, but a molecular characterization is lacking for most of them. In this study, we have characterized a novel Holospora-like bacterium (HLB) living in the macronuclei of a Paramecium jenningsi population. This bacterium was morphologically and ultrastructurally investigated in detail, and its life cycle and infection capabilities were described. We also obtained its 16S rRNA gene sequence and developed a specific probe for fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments. A new taxon, "Candidatus Gortzia infectiva", was established for this HLB according to its unique characteristics and the relatively low DNA sequence similarities shared with other bacteria. The phylogeny of the order Rickettsiales based on 16S rRNA gene sequences has been inferred, adding to the available data the sequence of the novel bacterium and those of two Holospora species (Holospora obtusa and Holospora undulata) characterized for the purpose. Our phylogenetic analysis provided molecular support for the monophyly of HLBs and showed a possible pattern of evolution for some of their features. We suggested to classify inside the family Holosporaceae only HLBs, excluding other more distantly related and phenotypically different Paramecium endosymbionts.

  19. Calcium signaling in closely related protozoan groups (Alveolata): non-parasitic ciliates (Paramecium, Tetrahymena) vs. parasitic Apicomplexa (Plasmodium, Toxoplasma).

    PubMed

    Plattner, H; Sehring, I M; Mohamed, I K; Miranda, K; De Souza, W; Billington, R; Genazzani, A; Ladenburger, E-M

    2012-05-01

    The importance of Ca2+-signaling for many subcellular processes is well established in higher eukaryotes, whereas information about protozoa is restricted. Recent genome analyses have stimulated such work also with Alveolates, such as ciliates (Paramecium, Tetrahymena) and their pathogenic close relatives, the Apicomplexa (Plasmodium, Toxoplasma). Here we compare Ca2+ signaling in the two closely related groups. Acidic Ca2+ stores have been characterized in detail in Apicomplexa, but hardly in ciliates. Two-pore channels engaged in Ca2+-release from acidic stores in higher eukaryotes have not been stingently characterized in either group. Both groups are endowed with plasma membrane- and endoplasmic reticulum-type Ca2+-ATPases (PMCA, SERCA), respectively. Only recently was it possible to identify in Paramecium a number of homologs of ryanodine and inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate receptors (RyR, IP3R) and to localize them to widely different organelles participating in vesicle trafficking. For Apicomplexa, physiological experiments suggest the presence of related channels although their identity remains elusive. In Paramecium, IP3Rs are constitutively active in the contractile vacuole complex; RyR-related channels in alveolar sacs are activated during exocytosis stimulation, whereas in the parasites the homologous structure (inner membrane complex) may no longer function as a Ca2+ store. Scrutinized comparison of the two closely related protozoan phyla may stimulate further work and elucidate adaptation to parasitic life. See also "Conclusions" section.

  20. Dynamin-association with agonist-mediated sequestration of beta-adrenergic receptor in single-cell eukaryote Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Wiejak, Jolanta; Surmacz, Liliana; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2004-04-01

    Evidence that dynamin is associated with the sequestration of the Paramecium beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) immunoanalogue is presented. We previously reported a dramatic change in the distribution of betaAR analogue in the subcellular fractions upon isoproterenol treatment: it is redistributed from the membraneous to the cytosolic fraction, as revealed by quantitative image analysis of western blots. Here we confirm and extend this observation by laser scanning confocal and immunogold electron microscopy. In the presence of isoproterenol (10 micro mol l(-1)) betaAR translocated from the cell surface into dynamin-positive vesicles in the cytoplasmic compartment, as observed by dual fluorochrome immunolabeling in a series of the confocal optical sections. Colocalization of betaAR and dynamin in the tiny endocytic vesicles was detected by further electron microscopic studies. Generally receptor sequestration follows its desensitization, which is initiated by receptor phosphorylation by G-protein-coupled receptor kinase. We cloned and sequenced the gene fragment of 407 nucleotides homologous to the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (betaARK): its deduced amino acid sequence shows 51.6% homology in 126 amino acids that overlap with the human betaARK2 (GRK3), and may participate in Paramecium betaAR desensitization. These results suggest that the molecular machinery for the desensitization/sequestration of the receptor immunorelated to vertebrate betaAR exists in unicellular PARAMECIUM:

  1. Trichocyst ribbons of a cryptomonads are constituted of homologs of R-body proteins produced by the intracellular parasitic bacterium of Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Takahiro; Kai, Atsushi; Kawai, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Trichocysts are ejectile organelles found in cryptomonads, dinoflagellates, and peniculine ciliates. The fine structure of trichocysts differs considerably among lineages, and their evolutionary relationships are unclear. The biochemical makeup of the trichocyst constituents has been studied in the ciliate Paramecium, but there have been no investigations of cryptomonads and dinoflagellates. Furthermore, morphological similarity between the contents of cryptomonad trichocysts and the R-bodies of the endosymbiotic bacteria of Paramecium has been reported. In this study, we identified the proteins of the trichocyst constituents in a red cryptomonad, Pyrenomonas helgolandii, and found their closest relationships to be with rebB that comprises the R-bodies of Caedibacter taeniospiralis (gammaproteobacteria), which is an endosymbiont of Paramecium. In addition, the biochemical makeups of the trichocysts are entirely different between cryptomonads and peniculine ciliates, and therefore, cryptomonad trichocysts have an evolutionary origin independent from the peniculine ciliate trichocysts.

  2. Sampling strategies for improving tree accuracy and phylogenetic analyses: a case study in ciliate protists, with notes on the genus Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhenzhen; Strüder-Kypke, Michaela; Hu, Xiaozhong; Lin, Xiaofeng; Song, Weibo

    2014-02-01

    In order to assess how dataset-selection for multi-gene analyses affects the accuracy of inferred phylogenetic trees in ciliates, we chose five genes and the genus Paramecium, one of the most widely used model protist genera, and compared tree topologies of the single- and multi-gene analyses. Our empirical study shows that: (1) Using multiple genes improves phylogenetic accuracy, even when their one-gene topologies are in conflict with each other. (2) The impact of missing data on phylogenetic accuracy is ambiguous: resolution power and topological similarity, but not number of represented taxa, are the most important criteria of a dataset for inclusion in concatenated analyses. (3) As an example, we tested the three classification models of the genus Paramecium with a multi-gene based approach, and only the monophyly of the subgenus Paramecium is supported.

  3. Trichocyst ribbons of a cryptomonads are constituted of homologs of R-body proteins produced by the intracellular parasitic bacterium of Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Takahiro; Kai, Atsushi; Kawai, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Trichocysts are ejectile organelles found in cryptomonads, dinoflagellates, and peniculine ciliates. The fine structure of trichocysts differs considerably among lineages, and their evolutionary relationships are unclear. The biochemical makeup of the trichocyst constituents has been studied in the ciliate Paramecium, but there have been no investigations of cryptomonads and dinoflagellates. Furthermore, morphological similarity between the contents of cryptomonad trichocysts and the R-bodies of the endosymbiotic bacteria of Paramecium has been reported. In this study, we identified the proteins of the trichocyst constituents in a red cryptomonad, Pyrenomonas helgolandii, and found their closest relationships to be with rebB that comprises the R-bodies of Caedibacter taeniospiralis (gammaproteobacteria), which is an endosymbiont of Paramecium. In addition, the biochemical makeups of the trichocysts are entirely different between cryptomonads and peniculine ciliates, and therefore, cryptomonad trichocysts have an evolutionary origin independent from the peniculine ciliate trichocysts. PMID:22447322

  4. Variety of serotypes of Paramecium primaurelia: single epitopes are responsible for immunological differentiation.

    PubMed

    Simon, Martin C; Schmidt, Helmut J

    2005-01-01

    Paramecium primaurelia expresses three major types of surface antigens. We report here the identification of the gene for serotype S, which completes the sequence data of expressed serotypes of P. primaurelia. The complete open reading frame of surface antigen S was identified using a novel technique, based upon the presence of conservative regions in the non-coding areas of the multigene family. We were able to isolate the 7194-bp-long open reading frame from the macronuclear DNA for Serotype 156S. The corresponding mRNA was detected in the two serotype S-expressing stocks, 60 and 156, of P. primaurelia, which clarifies that both stocks are using the same S allele. Comparisons of the nucleic acid and the deduced amino-acid sequence showed high identity to surface antigen 51B of P. tetraurelia, sufficient to cause an immunological cross-reaction in vivo. Immunologically relevant epitopes in vivo were identified in the central regions of the genes, constructed of nearly perfect tandem repeats.

  5. The Evolutionary Relationships between Endosymbiotic Green Algae of Paramecium bursaria Syngens Originating from Different Geographical Locations.

    PubMed

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria (Ehrenberg 1831), a freshwater ciliate, typically harbors hundreds of green algal symbionts inside the cell. The aim of present study was the molecular identification of newly analyzed P. bursaria symbionts. The second aspect of the present survey was testing a hypothesis whether endosymbionts prefer the specified syngen of the host, and the specified geographical distribution. Ten strains of endosymbionts isolated from strains of P. bursaria originating from different geographical locations were studied. We analyzed for the first time, both the fragment of plastid genome containing 3'rpl36-5' infA genes and a fragment of a nuclear gene encoding large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rDNA). The analysis of the LSU rDNA sequences showed the existence of 3 haplotypes and the haplotype diversity of 0.733, and 8 haplotypes for the 3'rpl36-5' infA gene fragment and haplotype diversity of 0.956. The endosymbionts isolated from P. bursaria strains were identified as Chlorella vulgaris, Ch. variabilis and Micractinium conductrix. There was no correlation between the syngen of P. bursaria and the species of endosymbiont.

  6. Oscillating response to a purine nucleotide disrupted by mutation in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed Central

    Mimikakis, J L; Nelson, D L; Preston, R R

    1998-01-01

    The purine nucleotide GTP, when added extracellularly, induces oscillations in the swimming behaviour of the protist Paramecium tetraurelia. For periods as long as 10 min the cell swims backwards and forwards repetitively. The oscillations in swimming behaviour are driven by changes in membrane potential of the cell, which in turn are caused by periodic activation of inward Mg2+- and Na+-specific currents. We screened for and isolated mutants that are defective in this response, exploiting the fact that the net result of GTP on a population of cells is repulsion. One mutant, GTP-insensitive (gin A), is not repelled by GTP. In addition, GTP fails to induce repetitive backwards swimming in gin A mutants, although they swim backwards normally in response to other stimuli. GTP fails to evoke oscillations in membrane potential or Mg2+ and Na+ currents in the mutant, although the Mg2+ and Na+ conductances are not themselves measurably affected. A small, oscillating Ca2+ current induced by GTP in the wild type, which might be part of the mechanism that generates oscillations, is also missing from gin A cells. To our knowledge, gin A is the first example of a mutant defective in a purinergic response. We discuss the possibility that the gin A lesion affects the oscillator itself. PMID:9461502

  7. The cloning and molecular analysis of pawn-B in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, W J; Ling, K Y; Preston, R R; Saimi, Y; Kung, C

    2000-01-01

    Pawn mutants of Paramecium tetraurelia lack a depolarization-activated Ca(2+) current and do not swim backward. Using the method of microinjection and sorting a genomic library, we have cloned a DNA fragment that complements pawn-B (pwB/pwB). The minimal complementing fragment is a 798-bp open reading frame (ORF) that restores the Ca(2+) current and the backward swimming when expressed. This ORF contains a 29-bp intron and is transcribed and translated. The translated product has two putative transmembrane domains but no clear matches in current databases. Mutations in the available pwB alleles were found within this ORF. The d4-95 and d4-96 alleles are single base substitutions, while d4-662 (previously pawn-D) harbors a 44-bp insertion that matches an internal eliminated sequence (IES) found in the wild-type germline DNA except for a single C-to-T transition. Northern hybridizations and RT-PCR indicate that d4-662 transcripts are rapidly degraded or not produced. A second 155-bp IES in the wild-type germline ORF excises at two alternative sites spanning three asparagine codons. The pwB ORF appears to be separated from a 5' neighboring ORF by only 36 bp. The close proximity of the two ORFs and the location of the pwB protein as indicated by GFP-fusion constructs are discussed. PMID:10880473

  8. RECONSTITUTION OF METACHRONAL WAVES IN CILIATED CORTICAL SHEETS OF PARAMECIUM - ASYMMETRY OF THE CILIARY MOVEMENTS

    PubMed

    Okamoto; Nakaoka

    1994-07-01

    In conditions in which ciliated cortical sheets prepared from detergent-extracted Paramecium multimicronucleatum cells adhered to glass coverslips on a microscope stage, perfusion of a reactivation medium containing ATP plus cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP generated metachronal waves. An analysis of the ciliary movements that generate these metachronal waves yielded the following results. During the generation of metachronal waves, there were phase differences in the ciliary orientation of adjacent cilia in the direction of wave propagation. Addition of cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP increased the rotational angular velocities during the effective stroke of ciliary beating, but did not increase the rotational angular velocity of the recovery stroke. When the ATP concentration in the cyclic GMP reactivation medium was increased, the rotational angular velocity during the effective stroke rose steeply and saturated at 0.8 mmol l-1 ATP, whereas that during the recovery stroke rose gradually. Addition of cyclic nucleotides caused a single cilium isolated from neighbouring cilia on the cortical sheet to incline almost parallel to the cortical surface during the recovery stroke. Addition of cyclic GMP increased the amplitude of bending of cilia detached from the cortical sheet. From these results, it was concluded that increases in the asymmetrical movement of individual cilia, caused by the addition of cyclic nucleotides, create the ciliary interaction that generates the metachronal waves.

  9. Photoreactivation in Paramecium tetraurelia under conditions of various degrees of ozone layer depletion.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Kumatani, Toshihiro; Usui, Saori; Tsujimura, Ryoko; Seki, Takaharu; Morimoto, Kouichi; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2005-01-01

    Photoreactivation (PR) is an efficient survival mechanism that helps protect cells against the harmful effects of solar-ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The PR mechanism involves photolyase, just one enzyme, and can repair DNA damage, such as cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimers (CPD) induced by near-UV/blue light, a component of sunlight. Although the balance of near-UV/blue light and far-UV light reaching the Earth's surface could be altered by the atmospheric ozone layer's depletion, experiments simulating this environmental change and its possible effects on life have not yet been performed. To quantify the strength of UVB in sunlight reaching the Earth's surface, we measured the number of CPD generated in plasmid DNA after UVB irradiation or exposure to sunlight. To simulate the increase of solar-UV radiation resulting from the ozone layer depletion, Paramecium tetraurelia was exposed to UVB and/or sunlight in clear summer weather. PR recovery after exposure to sunlight was complete at a low dose rate of 0.2 J/m2 x s, but was less efficient when the dose rate was increased by a factor of 2.5 to 0.5 J/m2 x s. It is suggested that solar-UV radiation would not influence the cell growth of P. tetraurelia for the reason of high PR activity even when the ozone concentration was decreased 30% from the present levels.

  10. Epiplasmins and epiplasm in paramecium: the building of a submembraneous cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Aubusson-Fleury, Anne; Bricheux, Geneviève; Damaj, Raghida; Lemullois, Michel; Coffe, Gérard; Donnadieu, Florence; Koll, France; Viguès, Bernard; Bouchard, Philippe

    2013-07-01

    In ciliates, basal bodies and associated appendages are bound to a submembrane cytoskeleton. In Paramecium, this cytoskeleton takes the form of a thin dense layer, the epiplasm, segmented into regular territories, the units where basal bodies are inserted. Epiplasmins, the main component of the epiplasm, constitute a large family of 51 proteins distributed in 5 phylogenetic groups, each characterized by a specific molecular design. By GFP-tagging, we analyzed their differential localisation and role in epiplasm building and demonstrated that: 1) The epiplasmins display a low turnover, in agreement with the maintenance of an epiplasm layer throughout the cell cycle; 2) Regionalisation of proteins from different groups allows us to define rim, core, ring and basal body epiplasmins in the interphase cell; 3) Their dynamics allows definition of early and late epiplasmins, detected early versus late in the duplication process of the units. Epiplasmins from each group exhibit a specific combination of properties. Core and rim epiplasmins are required to build a unit; ring and basal body epiplasmins seem more dispensable, suggesting that they are not required for basal body docking. We propose a model of epiplasm unit assembly highlighting its implication in structural heredity in agreement with the evolutionary history of epiplasmins. PMID:23837920

  11. Cis-acting signals modulate the efficiency of programmed DNA elimination in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Diana; Lepennetier, Gildas; Catania, Francesco

    2015-09-30

    In Paramecium, the regeneration of a functional somatic genome at each sexual event relies on the elimination of thousands of germline DNA sequences, known as Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs), from the zygotic nuclear DNA. Here, we provide evidence that IESs' length and sub-terminal bases jointly modulate IES excision by affecting DNA conformation in P. tetraurelia. Our study reveals an excess of complementary base pairing between IESs' sub-terminal and contiguous sites, suggesting that IESs may form DNA loops prior to cleavage. The degree of complementary base pairing between IESs' sub-terminal sites (termed Cin-score) is positively associated with IES length and is shaped by natural selection. Moreover, it escalates abruptly when IES length exceeds 45 nucleotides (nt), indicating that only sufficiently large IESs may form loops. Finally, we find that IESs smaller than 46 nt are favored targets of the cellular surveillance systems, presumably because of their relatively inefficient excision. Our findings extend the repertoire of cis-acting determinants for IES recognition/excision and provide unprecedented insights into the distinct selective pressures that operate on IESs and somatic DNA regions. This information potentially moves current models of IES evolution and of mechanisms of IES recognition/excision forward. PMID:26304543

  12. Virus-host interactions: insights from the replication cycle of the large Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus.

    PubMed

    Milrot, Elad; Mutsafi, Yael; Fridmann-Sirkis, Yael; Shimoni, Eyal; Rechav, Katya; Gurnon, James R; Van Etten, James L; Minsky, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    The increasing interest in cytoplasmic factories generated by eukaryotic-infecting viruses stems from the realization that these highly ordered assemblies may contribute fundamental novel insights to the functional significance of order in cellular biology. Here, we report the formation process and structural features of the cytoplasmic factories of the large dsDNA virus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1). By combining diverse imaging techniques, including scanning transmission electron microscopy tomography and focused ion beam technologies, we show that the architecture and mode of formation of PBCV-1 factories are significantly different from those generated by their evolutionary relatives Vaccinia and Mimivirus. Specifically, PBCV-1 factories consist of a network of single membrane bilayers acting as capsid templates in the central region, and viral genomes spread throughout the host cytoplasm but excluded from the membrane-containing sites. In sharp contrast, factories generated by Mimivirus have viral genomes in their core, with membrane biogenesis region located at their periphery. Yet, all viral factories appear to share structural features that are essential for their function. In addition, our studies support the notion that PBCV-1 infection, which was recently reported to result in significant pathological outcomes in humans and mice, proceeds through a bacteriophage-like infection pathway. PMID:26248343

  13. Maintenance of algal endosymbionts in Paramecium bursaria: a simple model based on population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Sosuke; Fujiwara, Kenji; Tamura, Takuro

    2016-09-01

    Algal endosymbiosis is widely distributed in eukaryotes including many protists and metazoans, and plays important roles in aquatic ecosystems, combining phagotrophy and phototrophy. To maintain a stable symbiotic relationship, endosymbiont population size in the host must be properly regulated and maintained at a constant level; however, the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of algal endosymbionts are still largely unknown. Here we investigate the population dynamics of the unicellular ciliate Paramecium bursaria and its Chlorella-like algal endosymbiont under various experimental conditions in a simple culture system. Our results suggest that endosymbiont population size in P. bursaria was not regulated by active processes such as cell division coupling between the two organisms, or partitioning of the endosymbionts at host cell division. Regardless, endosymbiont population size was eventually adjusted to a nearly constant level once cells were grown with light and nutrients. To explain this apparent regulation of population size, we propose a simple mechanism based on the different growth properties (specifically the nutrient requirements) of the two organisms, and based from this develop a mathematical model to describe the population dynamics of host and endosymbiont. The proposed mechanism and model may provide a basis for understanding the maintenance of algal endosymbionts. PMID:26625979

  14. The Evolutionary Relationships between Endosymbiotic Green Algae of Paramecium bursaria Syngens Originating from Different Geographical Locations.

    PubMed

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria (Ehrenberg 1831), a freshwater ciliate, typically harbors hundreds of green algal symbionts inside the cell. The aim of present study was the molecular identification of newly analyzed P. bursaria symbionts. The second aspect of the present survey was testing a hypothesis whether endosymbionts prefer the specified syngen of the host, and the specified geographical distribution. Ten strains of endosymbionts isolated from strains of P. bursaria originating from different geographical locations were studied. We analyzed for the first time, both the fragment of plastid genome containing 3'rpl36-5' infA genes and a fragment of a nuclear gene encoding large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rDNA). The analysis of the LSU rDNA sequences showed the existence of 3 haplotypes and the haplotype diversity of 0.733, and 8 haplotypes for the 3'rpl36-5' infA gene fragment and haplotype diversity of 0.956. The endosymbionts isolated from P. bursaria strains were identified as Chlorella vulgaris, Ch. variabilis and Micractinium conductrix. There was no correlation between the syngen of P. bursaria and the species of endosymbiont. PMID:27172712

  15. Vitamin E supplementation and intense selection increase clonal life span in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J; Nyberg, D

    1988-01-01

    Vitamin E added to standard Cerophyl medium at 0.025 mg/ml significantly increased the mean clonal life span of 32 lines of Paramecium tetraurelia from 52.5 days and 187 fissions to 59.9 days and 209 fissions (p less than .05) when compared to unsupplemented, paired controls. The age-specific death rates increased exponentially. Regression analyses found a significantly lower rate of increasing mortality for the supplemented lines compared to controls. Weekly fission rates of supplemented lines declined linearly; more slowly than controls, but not significantly so. A second experiment tested two higher levels of supplemental vitamin E (0.10 and 1.00 mg/ml). Sublines receiving 1.00 mg/ml of supplemental vitamin E had higher rates of mortality and lower fission rates initially, but the mortality rates increased and the fission rates decreased more slowly than in sublines receiving 0.10 mg/ml supplemental vitamin E, resulting in maximum clonal life spans of 141 days and 330 fissions (1.00 mg/ml sublines), compared to 74 days and 271 fissions (0.10 mg/ml sublines). Survivorship of the last individual cells (nondividing) of each clone followed an exponential decline, with a significant increase in mean survival time for supplemented compared to unsupplemented cells (p less than .05).

  16. Morphological apoptotic characteristics of the post-meiotic micronuclei in Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Zhang, Xinjiong; Yang, Xianyu

    2010-08-01

    In a previous study, the apoptotic degeneration of meiotic products outside the paroral region of Paramecium caudatum was indirectly demonstrated by means of "apofluor" staining. In this experiment, conjugating pairs and exconjugants of P. caudatum were stained with either "apofluor" or carbol fuchsin or both to find some direct evidence to demonstrate the apoptotic characteristics of this process. As a result, asynchronous meiotic nuclear degeneration was observed. Furthermore, a number of additional meiotic nuclei were found. Disintegrating/dividing meiotic nuclei outside the paroral region were observed, which might be the origin of these additional meiotic nuclei. Condensed chromatin and disintegrated chromatin attached to the nuclear membrane were also observed in degenerating nuclei, which are the typical morphological characteristics of apoptosis. Comparison of the cells stained by the above two methods indicated that "apofluor"-stained meiotic nuclei could not be detected by carbol fuchsin in some cells, which suggests a time lag between meiotic nuclear DNA degradation and their eventual disappearance. In this study, some direct evidence was found to show that the meiotic nuclear degeneration in P. caudatum is of apoptotic nature, which further confirmed our previous study (Yang et al. 2007) and indicated that morphological apoptotic characteristics discovered in multicellular organisms do exist in unicellular eukaryotic ciliate protozoa.

  17. Silencing-associated and meiosis-specific small RNA pathways in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Lepère, Gersende; Nowacki, Mariusz; Serrano, Vincent; Gout, Jean-François; Guglielmi, Gérard; Duharcourt, Sandra; Meyer, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Distinct small RNA pathways are involved in the two types of homology-dependent effects described in Paramecium tetraurelia, as shown by a functional analysis of Dicer and Dicer-like genes and by the sequencing of small RNAs. The siRNAs that mediate post-transcriptional gene silencing when cells are fed with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) were found to comprise two subclasses. DCR1-dependent cleavage of the inducing dsRNA generates ∼23-nt primary siRNAs from both strands, while a different subclass of ∼24-nt RNAs, characterized by a short untemplated poly-A tail, is strictly antisense to the targeted mRNA, suggestive of secondary siRNAs that depend on an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. An entirely distinct pathway is responsible for homology-dependent regulation of developmental genome rearrangements after sexual reproduction. During early meiosis, the DCL2 and DCL3 genes are required for the production of a highly complex population of ∼25-nt scnRNAs from all types of germline sequences, including both strands of exons, introns, intergenic regions, transposons and Internal Eliminated Sequences. A prominent 5′-UNG signature, and a minor fraction showing the complementary signature at positions 21–23, indicate that scnRNAs are cleaved from dsRNA precursors as duplexes with 2-nt 3′ overhangs at both ends, followed by preferential stabilization of the 5′-UNG strand. PMID:19103667

  18. Virus-host interactions: insights from the replication cycle of the large Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus.

    PubMed

    Milrot, Elad; Mutsafi, Yael; Fridmann-Sirkis, Yael; Shimoni, Eyal; Rechav, Katya; Gurnon, James R; Van Etten, James L; Minsky, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    The increasing interest in cytoplasmic factories generated by eukaryotic-infecting viruses stems from the realization that these highly ordered assemblies may contribute fundamental novel insights to the functional significance of order in cellular biology. Here, we report the formation process and structural features of the cytoplasmic factories of the large dsDNA virus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1). By combining diverse imaging techniques, including scanning transmission electron microscopy tomography and focused ion beam technologies, we show that the architecture and mode of formation of PBCV-1 factories are significantly different from those generated by their evolutionary relatives Vaccinia and Mimivirus. Specifically, PBCV-1 factories consist of a network of single membrane bilayers acting as capsid templates in the central region, and viral genomes spread throughout the host cytoplasm but excluded from the membrane-containing sites. In sharp contrast, factories generated by Mimivirus have viral genomes in their core, with membrane biogenesis region located at their periphery. Yet, all viral factories appear to share structural features that are essential for their function. In addition, our studies support the notion that PBCV-1 infection, which was recently reported to result in significant pathological outcomes in humans and mice, proceeds through a bacteriophage-like infection pathway.

  19. Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 proteome reveals novel architectural and regulatory features of a giant virus.

    PubMed

    Dunigan, David D; Cerny, Ronald L; Bauman, Andrew T; Roach, Jared C; Lane, Leslie C; Agarkova, Irina V; Wulser, Kurt; Yanai-Balser, Giane M; Gurnon, James R; Vitek, Jason C; Kronschnabel, Bernard J; Jeanniard, Adrien; Blanc, Guillaume; Upton, Chris; Duncan, Garry A; McClung, O William; Ma, Fangrui; Van Etten, James L

    2012-08-01

    The 331-kbp chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1) genome was resequenced and annotated to correct errors in the original 15-year-old sequence; 40 codons was considered the minimum protein size of an open reading frame. PBCV-1 has 416 predicted protein-encoding sequences and 11 tRNAs. A proteome analysis was also conducted on highly purified PBCV-1 virions using two mass spectrometry-based protocols. The mass spectrometry-derived data were compared to PBCV-1 and its host Chlorella variabilis NC64A predicted proteomes. Combined, these analyses revealed 148 unique virus-encoded proteins associated with the virion (about 35% of the coding capacity of the virus) and 1 host protein. Some of these proteins appear to be structural/architectural, whereas others have enzymatic, chromatin modification, and signal transduction functions. Most (106) of the proteins have no known function or homologs in the existing gene databases except as orthologs with proteins of other chloroviruses, phycodnaviruses, and nuclear-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses. The genes encoding these proteins are dispersed throughout the virus genome, and most are transcribed late or early-late in the infection cycle, which is consistent with virion morphogenesis.

  20. Characteristics of the digestive vacuole membrane of the alga-bearing ciliate Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2012-07-01

    Cells of the ciliate Paramecium bursaria harbor symbiotic Chlorella spp. in their cytoplasm. To establish endosymbiosis with alga-free P. bursaria, symbiotic algae must leave the digestive vacuole (DV) to appear in the cytoplasm by budding of the DV membrane. This budding was induced not only by intact algae but also by boiled or fixed algae. However, this budding was not induced when food bacteria or India ink were ingested into the DVs. These results raise the possibility that P. bursaria can recognize sizes of the contents in the DVs. To elucidate this possibility, microbeads with various diameters were mixed with alga-free P. bursaria and traced their fate. Microbeads with 0.20μm diameter did not induce budding of the DVs. Microbeads with 0.80μm diameter produced DVs of 5-10μm diameter at 3min after mixing; then the DVs fragmented and became vacuoles of 2-5μm diameter until 3h after mixing. Each microbead with a diameter larger than 3.00μm induced budding similarly to symbiotic Chlorella. These observations reveal that induction of DV budding depends on the size of the contents in the DVs. Dynasore, a dynamin inhibitor, greatly inhibited DV budding, suggesting that dynamin might be involved in DV budding.

  1. Epiplasmins and epiplasm in paramecium: the building of a submembraneous cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Aubusson-Fleury, Anne; Bricheux, Geneviève; Damaj, Raghida; Lemullois, Michel; Coffe, Gérard; Donnadieu, Florence; Koll, France; Viguès, Bernard; Bouchard, Philippe

    2013-07-01

    In ciliates, basal bodies and associated appendages are bound to a submembrane cytoskeleton. In Paramecium, this cytoskeleton takes the form of a thin dense layer, the epiplasm, segmented into regular territories, the units where basal bodies are inserted. Epiplasmins, the main component of the epiplasm, constitute a large family of 51 proteins distributed in 5 phylogenetic groups, each characterized by a specific molecular design. By GFP-tagging, we analyzed their differential localisation and role in epiplasm building and demonstrated that: 1) The epiplasmins display a low turnover, in agreement with the maintenance of an epiplasm layer throughout the cell cycle; 2) Regionalisation of proteins from different groups allows us to define rim, core, ring and basal body epiplasmins in the interphase cell; 3) Their dynamics allows definition of early and late epiplasmins, detected early versus late in the duplication process of the units. Epiplasmins from each group exhibit a specific combination of properties. Core and rim epiplasmins are required to build a unit; ring and basal body epiplasmins seem more dispensable, suggesting that they are not required for basal body docking. We propose a model of epiplasm unit assembly highlighting its implication in structural heredity in agreement with the evolutionary history of epiplasmins.

  2. Spliced DNA sequences in the Paramecium germline: their properties and evolutionary potential.

    PubMed

    Catania, Francesco; McGrath, Casey L; Doak, Thomas G; Lynch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Despite playing a crucial role in germline-soma differentiation, the evolutionary significance of developmentally regulated genome rearrangements (DRGRs) has received scant attention. An example of DRGR is DNA splicing, a process that removes segments of DNA interrupting genic and/or intergenic sequences. Perhaps, best known for shaping immune-system genes in vertebrates, DNA splicing plays a central role in the life of ciliated protozoa, where thousands of germline DNA segments are eliminated after sexual reproduction to regenerate a functional somatic genome. Here, we identify and chronicle the properties of 5,286 sequences that putatively undergo DNA splicing (i.e., internal eliminated sequences [IESs]) across the genomes of three closely related species of the ciliate Paramecium (P. tetraurelia, P. biaurelia, and P. sexaurelia). The study reveals that these putative IESs share several physical characteristics. Although our results are consistent with excision events being largely conserved between species, episodes of differential IES retention/excision occur, may have a recent origin, and frequently involve coding regions. Our findings indicate interconversion between somatic--often coding--DNA sequences and noncoding IESs, and provide insights into the role of DNA splicing in creating potentially functional genetic innovation.

  3. The native structure of cytoplasmic dynein at work translocating vesicles in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Masaki; Aihara, Marilynn S; Allen, Richard D; Fok, Agnes K

    2011-01-01

    In Paramecium multimicronucleatum, the discoidal vesicles, the acidosomes and the 100-nm carrier vesicles are involved in phagosome formation, phagosome acidification and endosomal processing, respectively. Numerous cross bridges link these vesicles to the kinetic side of the microtubules of a cytopharyngeal microtubular ribbon. Vesicles are translocated along these ribbons in a minus-end direction towards the cytopharynx. A monoclonal antibody specific for the light vanadate-photocleaved fragment of the heavy chain of cytoplasmic dynein was used to show that this dynein is located between the discoidal vesicles and the ribbons as well as on the cytosolic surface of the acidosomes and the 100-nm carrier vesicles. This antibody inhibited the docking of the vesicles to the microtubular ribbons so that the transport of discoidal vesicles and acidosomes were reduced by 60% and 70%, respectively. It had little effect on the dynein's velocity of translocation. These results show that cytoplasmic dynein is the motor for vesicle translocation and its location, between the vesicles and the ribbons, indicates that the cross bridges seen at this location in thin sections and in quick-frozen, deep-etched replicas are apparently the working dyneins. Such a working dynein cross bridge, as preserved by ultra-rapid freezing, is 54 nm long and has two legs arising from a globular head that appears to be firmly bound to its cargo vesicle and each leg consists of ≥3 beaded subunits with the last subunit making contact with the microtubular ribbon.

  4. A Ca sup 2+ influx associated with exocytosis is specifically abolished in a Paramecium exocytotic mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Kerboeuf, D.; Cohen, J. )

    1990-12-01

    A Paramecium possesses secretory organelles called trichocysts which are docked beneath the plasma membrane awaiting an external stimulus that triggers their exocytosis. Membrane fusion is the sole event provoked by the stimulation and can therefore be studied per se. Using 3 microM aminoethyl dextran as a vital secretagogue, we analyzed the movements of calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) during the discharge of trichocysts. We showed that (a) external Ca{sup 2+}, at least at 3 X 10(-7) M, is necessary for AED to induce exocytosis; (b) a dramatic and transient influx of Ca{sup 2+} as measured from {sup 45}Ca uptake is induced by AED; (c) this influx is independent of the well-characterized voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels of the ciliary membranes since it persists in a mutant devoid of these channels; and (d) this influx is specifically abolished in one of the mutants unable to undergo exocytosis, nd12. We propose that the Ca{sup 2+} influx induced by AED reflects an increase in membrane permeability through the opening of novel Ca{sup 2+} channel or the activation of other Ca{sup 2+} transport mechanism in the plasma membrane. The resulting rise in cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration would in turn induce membrane fusion. The mutation nd12 would affect a gene product involved in the control of plasma membrane permeability to Ca{sup 2+}, specifically related to membrane fusion.

  5. Microtubules mediate germ-nuclear behavior after meiosis in conjugation of Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuka; Ishida, Masaki; Mikami, Kazuyuki

    2002-01-01

    Microtubule dynamics in Paramecium caudatum were investigated with an anti-alpha-tubulin antibody and a microinjection technique to determine the function of microtubules on micronuclear behavior during conjugation. After meiosis, all four haploid micronuclei were connected by microtubular filaments to the paroral region and moved close to this region. This nuclear movement was micronucleus-specific, because some small macronuclear fragments transplanted from exconjugants never moved to the region. Only one of the four germ nuclei moved into the paroral cone and was covered by microtubule assembly (the so-called first assembly of microtubules, AM-I). This nucleus survived there, while the other three not in this region degenerated. The movement of germ nucleus was inhibited by the injection of the anti-alpha-tubulin antibody. The surviving germ nucleus divided once and produced a migratory pronucleus and a stationary pronucleus. Prior to the reciprocal exchange of the migratory nuclei, microtubules assembled around the migratory pronuclei again (the so-called second assembly of microtubules, AM-II). Then, the migratory pronucleus moved into the partner cell and fused with the stationary pronucleus. Thus, microtubules appear to be indispensable for nuclear behavior: they enable migration of postmeiotic nuclei to the paroral region and they permit the survival of the nucleus at the paroral cone. PMID:11908901

  6. The molecular basis for the alternative stable phenotype in a behavioral mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, A; Takahashi, M

    2001-10-01

    In the sexual reproduction of Paramecium tetraurelia, the somatic nucleus (macronucleus) undergoes massive genomic rearrangement, including gene amplification and excision of internal eliminated sequences (IESs), in its normal developmental process. Strain d4-662, one of the pawn mutants, is a behavioral mutant of P. tetraurelia that carries a recessive allele of pwB662. ThepwB gene in the macronucleus of the strain has an insertion of the IES because a base substitution within the IES prevents its excision during gene rearrangement. Cultures of this strain frequently contain cells reverting to the wild type in the behavioral phenotype. The mutant and revertant cells maintained stable clonal phenotypes under the various environmental conditions examined unless they underwent sexual reproduction. After sexual reproduction, both mutant and revertant produced 2.7-7.1% reverted progeny. A molecular analysis performed on the macronuclear DNA of the mutant and revertant of d4-662 showed that much less than 1% of the mutant IES was precisely excised at every sexual reproduction of the strain. Therefore, the alternative phenotype of strain d4-662 seems to be caused by an alternative excision of the mutant IES. PMID:11817644

  7. Epigenetic self-regulation of developmental excision of an internal eliminated sequence on Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Duharcourt, S; Butler, A; Meyer, E

    1995-08-15

    Differentiation of the somatic macronucleus of ciliates after sexual events involves the programmed excision of thousands of single-copy internal eliminated sequences (IESs) from the germ-line genome. We have studied two cell lines of Paramecium tetraurelia that have identical germ-line genomes but differ in their macronuclear genomes. In the IES- cell line, a 222-bp IES interrupting a coding sequence is reproducibly excised during macronuclear differentiation, whereas it is not in the IES+ cell line. In a cross between the two lines, the developmental alternative in maternally inherited, suggesting that it is epigenetically controlled by the old (prezygotic) macronucleus in each cell. Transformation of the macronucleus of both lines with plasmids carrying fragments of either version of the gene shows that the presence of the IES sequence in the old macronucleus results in retention of the IES in the new macronuclear genome of sexual progeny. This could be attributable to (1) inhibition of excision, or (2) repair of a double-strand gap left in the genomic sequence after constitutive excision of the IES, by a polymerization mechanism using a homologous IES+ template from the old macronucleus. The latter possibility is ruled out by experiments showing that modified IESs can inhibit excision without being copied in the new macronuclear genome. Possible mechanisms are discussed in the light of a quantitative analysis of excision inhibition by the maternal IES sequence. PMID:7649484

  8. Vitamin E supplementation and intense selection increase clonal life span in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J; Nyberg, D

    1988-01-01

    Vitamin E added to standard Cerophyl medium at 0.025 mg/ml significantly increased the mean clonal life span of 32 lines of Paramecium tetraurelia from 52.5 days and 187 fissions to 59.9 days and 209 fissions (p less than .05) when compared to unsupplemented, paired controls. The age-specific death rates increased exponentially. Regression analyses found a significantly lower rate of increasing mortality for the supplemented lines compared to controls. Weekly fission rates of supplemented lines declined linearly; more slowly than controls, but not significantly so. A second experiment tested two higher levels of supplemental vitamin E (0.10 and 1.00 mg/ml). Sublines receiving 1.00 mg/ml of supplemental vitamin E had higher rates of mortality and lower fission rates initially, but the mortality rates increased and the fission rates decreased more slowly than in sublines receiving 0.10 mg/ml supplemental vitamin E, resulting in maximum clonal life spans of 141 days and 330 fissions (1.00 mg/ml sublines), compared to 74 days and 271 fissions (0.10 mg/ml sublines). Survivorship of the last individual cells (nondividing) of each clone followed an exponential decline, with a significant increase in mean survival time for supplemented compared to unsupplemented cells (p less than .05). PMID:3250885

  9. Reverse evolution: selection against costly resistance in disease-free microcosm populations of Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Alison B; Fellous, Simon; Kaltz, Oliver

    2011-12-01

    Evolutionary costs of parasite resistance arise if genes conferring resistance reduce fitness in the absence of parasites. Thus, parasite-mediated selection may lead to increased resistance and a correlated decrease in fitness, whereas relaxed parasite-mediated selection may lead to reverse evolution of increased fitness and a correlated decrease in resistance. We tested this idea in experimental populations of the protozoan Paramecium caudatum and the parasitic bacterium Holospora undulata. After eight years, resistance to infection and asexual reproduction were compared among paramecia from (1) "infected" populations, (2) uninfected "naive" populations, and (3) previously infected, parasite-free "recovered" populations. Paramecia from "infected" populations were more resistant (+12%), but had lower reproduction (-15%) than "naive" paramecia, indicating an evolutionary trade-off between resistance and fitness. Recovered populations showed similar reproduction to naive populations; however, resistance of recently (<3 years) recovered populations was similar to paramecia from infected populations, whereas longer (>3 years) recovered populations were as susceptible as naive populations. This suggests a weak, convex trade-off between resistance and fitness, allowing recovery of fitness, without complete loss of resistance, favoring the maintenance of a generalist strategy of intermediate fitness and resistance. Our results indicate that (co)evolution with parasites can leave a genetic signature in disease-free populations. PMID:22133218

  10. Non-Mendelian inheritance induced by gene amplification in the germ nucleus of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Takahashi, Mihoko

    2005-01-01

    A genetic investigation of strain d4-95, which carries a recessive mutant allele (pwB(95)) of pawn-B, one of the controlling elements of voltage-dependent calcium channels in Paramecium tetraurelia, revealed a non-Mendelian feature. Progeny of the cross between d4-95 and wild type often expressed a clonally stable mutant phenotype, even when they had a wild-type gene. The mutant phenotype was also expressed after self-fertilization of theoretical wild-type homozygotes recovered from the cross. Our molecular analysis demonstrated that the copy number of the mutant pwB gene in the micro- and macronucleus of d4-95 was much greater than that of the wild type. Most of the amplified, extra pwB gene copies in d4-95 were heritable independently from the original pwB locus. Repeated backcrossing of d4-95 with the wild type to dilute extra pwB genes in the strain produced segregants with a completely normal Mendelian trait in testcrosses. These results strongly suggest that a non-Mendelian inheritance of d4-95 was induced by gene amplification in the micronucleus. PMID:15371356

  11. Variability of autogamy-maturation pattern in genetically identical populations of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Komori, Rie; Harumoto, Terue; Fujisawa, Hiromi; Takagi, Yoshiomi

    2002-11-01

    Autogamy in Paramecium tetraurelia is a form of sexual reproduction in a single cell that results in homozygosity in every genetic locus. Autogamy becomes inducible by natural starvation several fissions after the previous autogamy, and percent autogamy increases gradually with clonal age to reach 100%. We here report the degree of variability of the autogamy-maturation pattern, and how it is inherited through autogamous generations. We assessed the autogamy-maturation pattern by monitoring percent autogamy at the ages of 9, 18 and 27 fissions in the wild-type stock 51. To determine how the autogamy-maturation pattern is inherited, clones that showed the lowest and the highest percent autogamy at age 18 in a given autogamous generation (Gn) were examined for their percent autogamy in the next autogamous generation (Gn+1). This procedure was repeated through successive autogamous generations. We found that percent autogamy at ages 9 and 27 was rather stable (low and high, respectively), while it was extremely variable at age 18 ranging from 3% to 100%. We also found that percent autogamy at age 18 in the progeny clones was variable irrespective of percent autogamy at age 18 in the parental clones; there was no regular rule such as producing progeny with higher (or lower) percent autogamy from parents with lower (or higher) percent autogamy. PMID:12499668

  12. Spliced DNA sequences in the Paramecium germline: their properties and evolutionary potential.

    PubMed

    Catania, Francesco; McGrath, Casey L; Doak, Thomas G; Lynch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Despite playing a crucial role in germline-soma differentiation, the evolutionary significance of developmentally regulated genome rearrangements (DRGRs) has received scant attention. An example of DRGR is DNA splicing, a process that removes segments of DNA interrupting genic and/or intergenic sequences. Perhaps, best known for shaping immune-system genes in vertebrates, DNA splicing plays a central role in the life of ciliated protozoa, where thousands of germline DNA segments are eliminated after sexual reproduction to regenerate a functional somatic genome. Here, we identify and chronicle the properties of 5,286 sequences that putatively undergo DNA splicing (i.e., internal eliminated sequences [IESs]) across the genomes of three closely related species of the ciliate Paramecium (P. tetraurelia, P. biaurelia, and P. sexaurelia). The study reveals that these putative IESs share several physical characteristics. Although our results are consistent with excision events being largely conserved between species, episodes of differential IES retention/excision occur, may have a recent origin, and frequently involve coding regions. Our findings indicate interconversion between somatic--often coding--DNA sequences and noncoding IESs, and provide insights into the role of DNA splicing in creating potentially functional genetic innovation. PMID:23737328

  13. Silencing-associated and meiosis-specific small RNA pathways in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Lepère, Gersende; Nowacki, Mariusz; Serrano, Vincent; Gout, Jean-François; Guglielmi, Gérard; Duharcourt, Sandra; Meyer, Eric

    2009-02-01

    Distinct small RNA pathways are involved in the two types of homology-dependent effects described in Paramecium tetraurelia, as shown by a functional analysis of Dicer and Dicer-like genes and by the sequencing of small RNAs. The siRNAs that mediate post-transcriptional gene silencing when cells are fed with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) were found to comprise two subclasses. DCR1-dependent cleavage of the inducing dsRNA generates approximately 23-nt primary siRNAs from both strands, while a different subclass of approximately 24-nt RNAs, characterized by a short untemplated poly-A tail, is strictly antisense to the targeted mRNA, suggestive of secondary siRNAs that depend on an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. An entirely distinct pathway is responsible for homology-dependent regulation of developmental genome rearrangements after sexual reproduction. During early meiosis, the DCL2 and DCL3 genes are required for the production of a highly complex population of approximately 25-nt scnRNAs from all types of germline sequences, including both strands of exons, introns, intergenic regions, transposons and Internal Eliminated Sequences. A prominent 5'-UNG signature, and a minor fraction showing the complementary signature at positions 21-23, indicate that scnRNAs are cleaved from dsRNA precursors as duplexes with 2-nt 3' overhangs at both ends, followed by preferential stabilization of the 5'-UNG strand. PMID:19103667

  14. Rapid and sensitive assays for phagosomal acidification in Paramecium and Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Fok, A K; Ueno, M S; Azada, E A

    1985-09-01

    Biochemical and cytochemical procedures were developed to measure the rate of phagosomal acidification for phagosomal pH ranging from 5 to 2.5. These assays were based on the pH-dependent inactivation with time of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) activity, a result attributable to the dissociation of this enzyme to a colorless protein and ferriprotoporphyrin in acidic solutions. When preincubated in buffers of varying pH, the rate of HRP inactivation followed a sigmoid curve, with the highest rate of inactivation between 4.3 and 3.5 when using citrate-phosphate buffer and between pH 3.4 and 2.8 when using the universal ABC buffer. This inactivation was temperature but not concentration dependent. When Paramecium caudatum, members of the P. aurelia complex or Tetrahymena thermophila was pulsed briefly with HRP and small fluorescent beads, the loss of HRP activity, measured biochemically in cell homogenates and/or cytochemically in phagosomes, was rapid and followed the kinetics of a first-order rate reaction. Both assays gave similar values for the rate constant for acidification and similar rates of inhibition when P. caudatum was exposed to a proton ionophore, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone. These assays can readily be adapted to other phagocytic cells as long as a rapid procedure is available for removing all unphagocytosed HRP and latex beads. These procedures are sensitive and rapid thus allowing many samples to be quickly prepared and analyzed.

  15. Cis-acting signals modulate the efficiency of programmed DNA elimination in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Diana; Lepennetier, Gildas; Catania, Francesco

    2015-09-30

    In Paramecium, the regeneration of a functional somatic genome at each sexual event relies on the elimination of thousands of germline DNA sequences, known as Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs), from the zygotic nuclear DNA. Here, we provide evidence that IESs' length and sub-terminal bases jointly modulate IES excision by affecting DNA conformation in P. tetraurelia. Our study reveals an excess of complementary base pairing between IESs' sub-terminal and contiguous sites, suggesting that IESs may form DNA loops prior to cleavage. The degree of complementary base pairing between IESs' sub-terminal sites (termed Cin-score) is positively associated with IES length and is shaped by natural selection. Moreover, it escalates abruptly when IES length exceeds 45 nucleotides (nt), indicating that only sufficiently large IESs may form loops. Finally, we find that IESs smaller than 46 nt are favored targets of the cellular surveillance systems, presumably because of their relatively inefficient excision. Our findings extend the repertoire of cis-acting determinants for IES recognition/excision and provide unprecedented insights into the distinct selective pressures that operate on IESs and somatic DNA regions. This information potentially moves current models of IES evolution and of mechanisms of IES recognition/excision forward.

  16. Photoadaptation Alters the Ingestion Rate of Paramecium bursaria, a Mixotrophic Ciliate.

    PubMed

    Berk, S G; Parks, L H; Ting, R S

    1991-08-01

    Bacteriovorous protozoa harboring symbiotic algae are abundant in aquatic ecosystems, yet despite a recent interest in protozoan bacterivory, the influence of light on their ingestion rates has not been investigated. In this study, Paramecium bursaria containing endosymbiotic Chlorella was tested for the effect of light on its ingestion rate. P. bursaria was grown for 4 to 6 days under five different light fluxes ranging from 1 to 90 microeinsteins s m. Ingestion rates were determined by using 0.77-mum-diameter fluorescent microspheres. 4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride-labeled Enterobacter cloacae was used in one experiment to confirm differences in uptake rates of bacteria by P. bursaria. Unlike phagotrophic phytoflagellates, the ciliates demonstrated different ingestion rates in response to different light intensities. Although symbionts contribute carbon to their host via photosynthesis, the paramecia of the present study fed faster after exposure to higher light intensities, whereas their aposymbiotic counterparts (lacking endosymbionts) were unaffected. Light-induced changes in ingestion rates were not immediate, but corresponded to the period of time required for endosymbiont populations to change significantly. This strongly suggests that the symbionts, stimulated by higher light levels, may dictate the feeding rates of their hosts. Thus, light, apart from temperature, may influence the impact of certain protists on natural bacteria and may affect laboratory-based determinations of protistan feeding rates.

  17. Maintenance of algal endosymbionts in Paramecium bursaria: a simple model based on population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Sosuke; Fujiwara, Kenji; Tamura, Takuro

    2016-09-01

    Algal endosymbiosis is widely distributed in eukaryotes including many protists and metazoans, and plays important roles in aquatic ecosystems, combining phagotrophy and phototrophy. To maintain a stable symbiotic relationship, endosymbiont population size in the host must be properly regulated and maintained at a constant level; however, the mechanisms underlying the maintenance of algal endosymbionts are still largely unknown. Here we investigate the population dynamics of the unicellular ciliate Paramecium bursaria and its Chlorella-like algal endosymbiont under various experimental conditions in a simple culture system. Our results suggest that endosymbiont population size in P. bursaria was not regulated by active processes such as cell division coupling between the two organisms, or partitioning of the endosymbionts at host cell division. Regardless, endosymbiont population size was eventually adjusted to a nearly constant level once cells were grown with light and nutrients. To explain this apparent regulation of population size, we propose a simple mechanism based on the different growth properties (specifically the nutrient requirements) of the two organisms, and based from this develop a mathematical model to describe the population dynamics of host and endosymbiont. The proposed mechanism and model may provide a basis for understanding the maintenance of algal endosymbionts.

  18. On the nature of species: insights from Paramecium and other ciliates

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Meaghan S.; Katz, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    The multiple species concepts currently in use by the scientific community (e.g. Morphological, Biological, Phylogenetic) are united in that they all aim to capture the process of divergence between populations. For example, the Biological Species Concept (BSC) defines a species as a natural group of organisms that is reproductively isolated from other such groups. Here we synthesize nearly a century of research on the ciliate genus Paramecium that highlights the shortcomings of our prevailing notions on the nature of species. In this lineage, there is discordance between morphology, mating behavior, and genetics, features assumed to be correlated, at least after sufficient time has passed, under all species concepts. Intriguingly, epigenetic phenomena are well documented in ciliates where they influence features such as germline/soma differentiation and mating type determination. Consequently, we hypothesize that divergence within ciliate populations is due to a dynamic interaction between genetic and epigenetic factors. The growing list of examples of epigenetic phenomena that potentially impact speciation (i.e. by influencing the dynamics of sex chromosomes, fate of hybrids, zygotic drive and genomic conflicts) suggests that interactions between genetics and epigenetics may also drive divergence in other eukaryotic lineages. PMID:21505762

  19. The Paramecium germline genome provides a niche for intragenic parasitic DNA: evolutionary dynamics of internal eliminated sequences.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Baudry, Céline; Malinsky, Sophie; Aury, Jean-Marc; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Garnier, Olivier; Labadie, Karine; Lauderdale, Benjamin E; Le Mouël, Anne; Marmignon, Antoine; Nowacki, Mariusz; Poulain, Julie; Prajer, Malgorzata; Wincker, Patrick; Meyer, Eric; Duharcourt, Sandra; Duret, Laurent; Bétermier, Mireille; Sperling, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Insertions of parasitic DNA within coding sequences are usually deleterious and are generally counter-selected during evolution. Thanks to nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide unique models to study the fate of such insertions. Their germline genome undergoes extensive rearrangements during development of a new somatic macronucleus from the germline micronucleus following sexual events. In Paramecium, these rearrangements include precise excision of unique-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IES) from the somatic DNA, requiring the activity of a domesticated piggyBac transposase, PiggyMac. We have sequenced Paramecium tetraurelia germline DNA, establishing a genome-wide catalogue of -45,000 IESs, in order to gain insight into their evolutionary origin and excision mechanism. We obtained direct evidence that PiggyMac is required for excision of all IESs. Homology with known P. tetraurelia Tc1/mariner transposons, described here, indicates that at least a fraction of IESs derive from these elements. Most IES insertions occurred before a recent whole-genome duplication that preceded diversification of the P. aurelia species complex, but IES invasion of the Paramecium genome appears to be an ongoing process. Once inserted, IESs decay rapidly by accumulation of deletions and point substitutions. Over 90% of the IESs are shorter than 150 bp and present a remarkable size distribution with a -10 bp periodicity, corresponding to the helical repeat of double-stranded DNA and suggesting DNA loop formation during assembly of a transpososome-like excision complex. IESs are equally frequent within and between coding sequences; however, excision is not 100% efficient and there is selective pressure against IES insertions, in particular within highly expressed genes. We discuss the possibility that ancient domestication of a piggyBac transposase favored subsequent propagation of transposons throughout the germline by allowing insertions in coding sequences, a fraction of the

  20. The conjugation-specific Die5 protein is required for development of the somatic nucleus in both Paramecium and Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Shieh, Annie Wan-Yi; Chalker, Douglas L; Forney, James D

    2010-07-01

    Development in ciliated protozoa involves extensive genome reorganization within differentiating macronuclei, which shapes the somatic genome of the next vegetative generation. Major events of macronuclear differentiation include excision of internal eliminated sequences (IESs), chromosome fragmentation, and genome amplification. Proteins required for these events include those with homology throughout eukaryotes as well as proteins apparently unique to ciliates. In this study, we identified the ciliate-specific Defective in IES Excision 5 (DIE5) genes of Paramecium tetraurelia (PtDIE5) and Tetrahymena thermophila (TtDIE5) as orthologs that encode nuclear proteins expressed exclusively during development. Abrogation of PtDie5 protein (PtDie5p) function by RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing or TtDie5p by gene disruption resulted in the failure of developing macronuclei to differentiate into new somatic nuclei. Tetrahymena DeltaDIE5 cells arrested late in development and failed to complete genome amplification, whereas RNAi-treated Paramecium cells highly amplified new macronuclear DNA before the failure in differentiation, findings that highlight clear differences in the biology of these distantly related species. Nevertheless, IES excision and chromosome fragmentation failed to occur in either ciliate, which strongly supports that Die5p is a critical player in these processes. In Tetrahymena, loss of zygotic expression during development was sufficient to block nuclear differentiation. This observation, together with the finding that knockdown of Die5p in Paramecium still allows genome amplification, indicates that this protein acts late in macronuclear development. Even though DNA rearrangements in these two ciliates look to be quite distinct, analysis of DIE5 establishes the action of a conserved mechanism within the genome reorganization pathway.

  1. "Candidatus Paraholospora nucleivisitans", an intracellular bacterium in Paramecium sexaurelia shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus of its host.

    PubMed

    Eschbach, Erik; Pfannkuchen, Martin; Schweikert, Michael; Drutschmann, Denja; Brümmer, Franz; Fokin, Sergei; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Görtz, Hans-Dieter

    2009-10-01

    An intracellular bacterium was discovered in two isolates of Paramecium sexaurelia from an aquarium with tropical fish in Münster (Germany) and from a pond in the Wilhelma zoological-botanical garden, Stuttgart (Germany). The bacteria were regularly observed in the cytoplasm of the host, but on some occasions they were found in the macronucleus of the host cell. In these cases, only a few, if any, bacteria were observed remaining in the cytoplasm. The bacterium was not infectious to P. sexaurelia or other species of Paramecium and appeared to be an obligate intracellular bacterium, while bacteria-free host cells were completely viable. The fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and comparative 16SrDNA sequence analyses showed that the bacterium belonged to a new genus, and was most closely, yet quite distantly, related to Holospora obtusa. In spite of this relationship, the new bacteria differed from Holospora by at least two biological features. Whereas all Holospora species reside exclusively in the nuclei of various species of Paramecium and show a life cycle with a morphologically distinct infectious form, for the new bacterium no infectious form and no life cycle have been observed. For the new bacterium, the name Candidatus Paraholospora nucleivisitans is suggested. The host P. sexaurelia is usually known from tropical and subtropical areas and is not a species typically found in Germany and central Europe. Possibly, it had been taken to Germany with fish or plants from tropical or subtropical waters. Candidatus Paraholospora nucleivisitans may therefore be regarded as an intracellular neobacterium for Germany.

  2. Internalization of cycloheptaamylose-dansyl chloride complex during labelling of surface membrane in living Paramecium aurelia cells.

    PubMed

    Giordano, P A; Wyroba, E; Bottiroli, G

    1985-01-01

    Internalization of cycloheptaamylose-dansyl chloride complex during surface labelling of living long-term starved Paramecium aurelia cells has been observed. This process may be inhibited by pretreatment of the ciliates with dichloroisoproterenol. Uptake of cycloheptaamylose-dansyl chloride may be visualized only after UV preirradiation: the appearance of orange-fluorescing vacuoles of diameter 2.3-4.5 micron may then be observed. Microspectrographic analysis performed on the cells and dansyl derivatives indicates that this fluorescence is produced by a photochemical reaction of dansyl chloride - released from CDC complex inside the digestive vacuoles-under the influence of UV irradiation.

  3. Imaging of Ca2+ transients induced in Paramecium cells by a polyamine secretagogue.

    PubMed

    Klauke, N; Plattner, H

    1997-04-01

    In Paramecium tetraurelia cells analysis of transient changes in Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, during aminoethyldextran (AED) stimulated synchronous (<1 second) trichocyst exocytosis has been hampered by various technical problems which we now have overcome. While Fura Red was found appropriate for quantitative double wavelength recordings, Fluo-3 allowed to follow, semi-quantitatively but with high time resolution, [Ca2+]i changes by rapid confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Resting values are between 50 and 70 nM in the strains analysed (7S wild type, as well as a non-discharge and a trichocyst-free mutant, nd9-28 degrees C and tl). In all strains [Ca2+]i first increases at the site of AED application, up to 10-fold above basal values, followed by a spillover into deeper cell regions. This might: (i) allow a vigorous Ca2+ flush during activation, and subsequently (ii) facilitate re-establishment of Ca2+ homeostasis within > or =20 seconds. Because of cell dislocation during vigorous trichocyst exocytosis, 7S cells could be reasonably analysed only by CLSM after Fluo-3 injection. In 7S cells cortical [Ca2+]i transients are strictly parallelled by trichocyst exocytosis, i.e. in the subsecond time range and precisely at the site of AED application. Injection of Ca2+ is a much less efficient trigger for exocytosis. Ca2+-buffer injections suggest a requirement of [Ca2+]i >1 to 10 microM for exocytosis to occur in response to AED. In conclusion, our data indicate: (i) correlation of cortical [Ca2+]i transients with exocytosis, as well as (ii) occurrence of a similar signal transduction mechanism in mutant cells where target structures may be defective or absent.

  4. Ca2+ release from subplasmalemmal stores as a primary event during exocytosis in Paramecium cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A correlated electrophysiological and light microscopic evaluation of trichocyst exocytosis was carried out the Paramecium cells which possess extensive cortical Ca stores with footlike links to the plasmalemma. We used not only intra- but also extracellular recordings to account for polar arrangement of ion channels (while trichocysts can be released from all over the cell surface). With three widely different secretagogues, aminoethyldextran (AED), veratridine and caffeine, similar anterior Nain and posterior Kout currents (both known to be Ca(2+)-dependent) were observed. Direct de- or hyperpolarization induced by current injection failed to trigger exocytosis. For both, exocytotic membrane fusion and secretagogue-induced membrane currents, sensitivity to or availability of Ca2+ appears to be different. Current responses to AED were blocked by W7 or trifluoperazine, while exocytosis remained unaffected. Reducing [Ca2+]o to < or = 0.16 microM (i.e., resting [Ca2+]i) suppressed electrical membrane responses triggered with AED, while we had previously documented normal exocytotic membrane fusion. From this we conclude that the primary effect of AED (as of caffeine) is the mobilization of Ca2+ from the subplasmalemmal pools which not only activates exocytosis (abolished by iontophoretic EGTA injection) but secondarily also spatially segregated plasmalemmal Ca(2+)-dependent ion channels (indicative of subplasmalemmal [Ca2+]i increase, but irrelevant for Ca2+ mobilization). The 45Ca2+ influx previously observed during AED triggering may serve to refill depleted stores. Apart from the insensitivity of our system to depolarization, the mode of direct Ca2+ mobilization from stores by mechanical coupling to the cell membrane (without previous Ca(2+)-influx from outside) closely resembles the model currently discussed for skeletal muscle triads. PMID:7525605

  5. Ultrastructure and motion analysis of permeabilized Paramecium capable of motility and regulation of motility.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, S J; Hamasaki, T; Satir, P

    1988-01-01

    Structural and behavioral features of intact and permeabilized Paramecium tetraurelia have been defined as a basis for study of Ca2+ control of ciliary reversal. Motion analysis of living paramecia shows that all the cells in a population swim forward with gently curving spirals at speeds averaging 369 +/- 19 microns/second. Ciliary reversal occurs in 10% of the cell population per second. Living paramecia, quick-fixed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM), show metachronal waves and an effective stroke obliquely toward the posterior end of the cell. Upon treatment with Triton X-100, swimming ceases and both scanning and transmission electron microscopy reveal cilia that uniformly project perpendicularly from the cell surface. Thin sections of these cells indicate that the ciliary, cell, and outer alveolar membranes are greatly disrupted or entirely missing and that the cytoplasm is also disrupted. These permeabilized paramecia can be reactivated and are capable of motility and regulation of motility. Motion analysis of cells reactivated with Mg2+ and ATP in low Ca2+ buffer (pCa greater than 7) shows that 71% swim forward in straight or curved paths at speeds averaging 221 +/- 20 microns/second. When these cells are quick-fixed for SEM the metachronal wave patterns of living, forward swimming cells reappear. Motion analysis of permeabilized cells reactivated in high Ca2+ buffers (pCa 5.5) shows that 94% swim backward in tight spirals at a velocity averaging 156 +/- 7 microns/second. SEM reveals a metachronal wave pattern with an effective stroke toward the anterior region. Although the permeabilized cells do not reverse spontaneously, the pCa response is preserved and the Ca2+ switch remains intact. The ciliary axonemes are largely exposed to the external environment. Therefore, the behavioral responses of these permeabilized cells depend on interaction of Ca2+ with molecules that remain bound to the axonemes throughout the extraction and reactivation procedures.

  6. Identification and functional characterization of an uncharacterized antimicrobial peptide from a ciliate Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Cui, Pengfei; Dong, Yuan; Li, Zhijian; Zhang, Yubo; Zhang, Shicui

    2016-07-01

    The global ever-growing concerns about multi-drug resistant (MDR) microbes leads to urgent demands for exploration of new antibiotics including antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Here we demonstrated that a cDNA from Ciliata Paramecium caudatum, designated Pcamp1, coded for a protein with features characteristic of AMPs, which is not homologous to any AMPs currently known. Both the C-terminal 91 amino acid residues of PcAMP1, cPcAMP1, expressed in Escherichia coli and the C-terminal 26 amino acid residues (predicted mature AMP), cPcAMP1/26, synthesized, underwent a coil-to-helix transition in the presence of TFE, SDS or DPC. Functional assays revealed that cPcAMP1 and cPcAMP1/26 were both able to kill Aeromonas hydrophila and Staphylococcus aureus. ELISA showed that cPcAMP1 and cPcAMP1/26 were able to bind to microbe-associated molecular pattern molecules LPS and LTA, which was further corroborated by the observations that cPcAMP1 could deposit onto the bacterial membranes. Importantly, both cPcAMP1 and cPcAMP1/26 were able to induce bacterial membrane permeabilization and depolarization, and to increase intracellular ROS levels. Additionally, cPcAMP1 and cPcAMP1/26 were not cytotoxic to mammalian cells. Taken together, our results show that PcAMP1 is a potential AMP with a membrane selectivity towards bacterial cells, which renders it a promising template for the design of novel peptide antibiotics against MDR microbes. It also shows that use of signal conserved sequence of AMPs can be an effective tool to identify potential AMPs across different animal classes. PMID:26883426

  7. The ts111 Mutation of Paramecium tetraurelia Affects a Member of the Protein Palmitoylation Family.

    PubMed

    Prajer, Małgorzata; Tarcz, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The thermosensitive ts111 mutant of Parameciun tetraurelia carries a recessive mutation which causes cell death after 2-8 divisions at the restrictive temperature of 35 degrees C. Expression at 35 degrees C induces disassembly of the infraciliary lattice (ICL). In this study, we found that the ts111 mutation also results in significant abnormalities in the number and structure of contractile vacuole complexes (CVCs) and in their functioning at the restrictive temperature. In order to characterize the ts111 gene, the complementation cloning was performed by microinjection into the macronucleus of an indexed genomic DNA library. The mutation was complemented by a sequence of 852 bp, which differed from the mutant sequence by a single nucleotide substitution. The deduced protein sequence is 284 amino acids long. It contains a domain referred to as the DHHC domain, associated with 2 trans-membrane helices. The DHHC proteins belong to the Palmitoyl-Acyl Transferases (PATs) protein family, which is implicated in the protein palmitoylation process playing the role in protein addressing. The ts111 mutation induces the amino acid change, localized before the first membrane helix. Transformation of ts111 mutant cells with the TS111-GFP gene fusion showed the expected reparation restoring thermoresistance and also demonstrated a localization of the protein in contractile vacuoles, but not in the ICL. The entire gene silencing in wild type cells at restrictive temperature caused the same effect as the expression of a point mutation in ts111 mutant. The authors propose the following hypotheses: (i) function of CVCs at the restrictive temperature depends in Paramecium on the TS111 protein--a member of the PAT family, and the primary effect of the termosensitive ts111 mutation are morphological abnormalities and dysfunction of CVCs, (ii) disassembly of the ICL is a secondary effect of the ts111 mutation, which results from disturbed regulation of the intracellular concentration

  8. Experimental evolution of resistance in Paramecium caudatum against the bacterial parasite Holospora undulata.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Konrad; Gutierrez, Arnaud; Kaltz, Oliver

    2006-06-01

    Host-parasite coevolution is often described as a process of reciprocal adaptation and counter adaptation, driven by frequency-dependent selection. This requires that different parasite genotypes perform differently on different host genotypes. Such genotype-by-genotype interactions arise if adaptation to one host (or parasite) genotype reduces performance on others. These direct costs of adaptation can maintain genetic polymorphism and generate geographic patterns of local host or parasite adaptation. Fixation of all-resistant (or all-infective) genotypes is further prevented if adaptation trades off with other host (or parasite) life-history traits. For the host, such indirect costs of resistance refer to reduced fitness of resistant genotypes in the absence of parasites. We studied (co)evolution in experimental microcosms of several clones of the freshwater protozoan Paramecium caudatum, infected with the bacterial parasite Holospora undulata. After two and a half years of culture, inoculation of evolved and naive (never exposed to the parasite) hosts with evolved and founder parasites revealed an increase in host resistance, but not in parasite infectivity. A cross-infection experiment showed significant host clone-by-parasite isolate interactions, and evolved hosts tended to be more resistant to their own (local) parasites than to parasites from other hosts. Compared to naive clones, evolved host clones had lower division rates in the absence of the parasite. Thus, our study indicates de novo evolution of host resistance, associated with both direct and indirect costs. This illustrates how interactions with parasites can lead to the genetic divergence of initially identical populations.

  9. Highly precise and developmentally programmed genome assembly in Paramecium requires ligase IV-dependent end joining.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, Aurélie; Matsuda, Atsushi; Marmignon, Antoine; Ku, Michael; Silve, Aude; Meyer, Eric; Forney, James D; Malinsky, Sophie; Bétermier, Mireille

    2011-04-01

    During the sexual cycle of the ciliate Paramecium, assembly of the somatic genome includes the precise excision of tens of thousands of short, non-coding germline sequences (Internal Eliminated Sequences or IESs), each one flanked by two TA dinucleotides. It has been reported previously that these genome rearrangements are initiated by the introduction of developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which depend on the domesticated transposase PiggyMac. These DSBs all exhibit a characteristic geometry, with 4-base 5' overhangs centered on the conserved TA, and may readily align and undergo ligation with minimal processing. However, the molecular steps and actors involved in the final and precise assembly of somatic genes have remained unknown. We demonstrate here that Ligase IV and Xrcc4p, core components of the non-homologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ), are required both for the repair of IES excision sites and for the circularization of excised IESs. The transcription of LIG4 and XRCC4 is induced early during the sexual cycle and a Lig4p-GFP fusion protein accumulates in the developing somatic nucleus by the time IES excision takes place. RNAi-mediated silencing of either gene results in the persistence of free broken DNA ends, apparently protected against extensive resection. At the nucleotide level, controlled removal of the 5'-terminal nucleotide occurs normally in LIG4-silenced cells, while nucleotide addition to the 3' ends of the breaks is blocked, together with the final joining step, indicative of a coupling between NHEJ polymerase and ligase activities. Taken together, our data indicate that IES excision is a "cut-and-close" mechanism, which involves the introduction of initiating double-strand cleavages at both ends of each IES, followed by DSB repair via highly precise end joining. This work broadens our current view on how the cellular NHEJ pathway has cooperated with domesticated transposases for the emergence of new mechanisms

  10. Biochemical studies of the excitable membrane of paramecium tetraurelia. IX. Antibodies against ciliary membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The excitable ciliary membrane of Paramecium regulates the direction of the ciliary beat, and thereby the swimming behavior of this organism. One approach to the problem of identifying the molecular components of the excitable membrane is to use antibodies as probes of function. We produced rabbit antisera against isolated ciliary membranes and against partially purified immobilization antigens derived from three serotypes (A, B, and H), and used these antisera as reagents to explore the role of specific membrane proteins in the immobilization reaction and in behavior. The immobilization characteristics and serotype cross- reactivities of the antisera were examined. We identified the antigens recognized by these sera using immunodiffusion and immunoprecipitation with 35S-labeled ciliary membranes. The major antigen recognized in homologous combinations of antigen-antiserum is the immobilization antigen (i-antigen), approximately 250,000 mol wt. Several secondary antigens, including a family of polypeptides of 42,000-45,000 mol wt, are common to the membranes of serotypes A, B, and H, and antibodies against these secondary antigens can apparently immobilize cells. This characterization of antiserum specificity has provided the basis for our studies on the effects of the antibodies on electrophysiological properties of cells and electron microscopic localization studies, which are reported in the accompanying paper. We have also used these antibodies to study the mechanism of cell immobilization by antibodies against the i-antigen. Monovalent fragments (Fab) against purified i- antigens bound to, but did not immobilize, living cells. Subsequent addition of goat anti-Fab antibodies caused immediate immobilization, presumably by cross-linking Fab fragments already bound to the surface. We conclude that antigen-antibody interaction per se is not sufficient for immobilization, and that antibody bivalency, which allows antigen cross-linking, is essential. PMID:6415066

  11. 5-Azacytidine affects the programming of expression of the somatic nucleus of Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Kwok, F W; Ng, S F

    1989-03-01

    This report introduces a new system in the study of programming of genomic function during development of the somatic nucleus of Paramecium tetraurelia. Previous works have established a definite, but replaceable, role of the germ nuclei (micronuclei) in oral development in the asexual cycle; their removal from the cell generates viable amicronucleate cell lines, which characteristically suffer a transient period of growth depression marked by abnormal oral development. Such cell lines gradually recover, showing that a compensatory mechanism is activated in the absence of the germ nuclei to bring the cell back to near-normal. To test the notion that the somatic nucleus (macronucleus) is involved in this compensation, cells possessing micronuclei were treated with 5-azacytidine during sexual reproduction when new somatic nuclei develop. These cells were then propagated asexually for a number of fissions in the absence of the drug, and thereafter micronuclei were removed from them. The amicronucleate cell lines generated in this manner clearly did not suffer a depression as severe as the untreated controls did in terms of growth rate and oral development, and they recovered much sooner. This supports the notion that the somatic nucleus is the physical basis of the compensatory mechanism. This study suggests that the stomatogenic sequences in question normally become repressed in the somatic nucleus developing in sexual reproduction, and that 5-azacytidine administered to the cells at this time could alter this programme which then persists during subsequent asexual propagation. The possibility that the somatic nucleus is programmed by methylation of cytosine at the 5' position is discussed. PMID:2482165

  12. Functional study of genes essential for autogamy and nuclear reorganization in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jacek K; Gromadka, Robert; Juszczuk, Marek; Jerka-Dziadosz, Maria; Maliszewska, Kamila; Mucchielli, Marie-Hélène; Gout, Jean-François; Arnaiz, Olivier; Agier, Nicolas; Tang, Thomas; Aggerbeck, Lawrence P; Cohen, Jean; Delacroix, Hervé; Sperling, Linda; Herbert, Christopher J; Zagulski, Marek; Bétermier, Mireille

    2011-03-01

    Like all ciliates, Paramecium tetraurelia is a unicellular eukaryote that harbors two kinds of nuclei within its cytoplasm. At each sexual cycle, a new somatic macronucleus (MAC) develops from the germ line micronucleus (MIC) through a sequence of complex events, which includes meiosis, karyogamy, and assembly of the MAC genome from MIC sequences. The latter process involves developmentally programmed genome rearrangements controlled by noncoding RNAs and a specialized RNA interference machinery. We describe our first attempts to identify genes and biological processes that contribute to the progression of the sexual cycle. Given the high percentage of unknown genes annotated in the P. tetraurelia genome, we applied a global strategy to monitor gene expression profiles during autogamy, a self-fertilization process. We focused this pilot study on the genes carried by the largest somatic chromosome and designed dedicated DNA arrays covering 484 genes from this chromosome (1.2% of all genes annotated in the genome). Transcriptome analysis revealed four major patterns of gene expression, including two successive waves of gene induction. Functional analysis of 15 upregulated genes revealed four that are essential for vegetative growth, one of which is involved in the maintenance of MAC integrity and another in cell division or membrane trafficking. Two additional genes, encoding a MIC-specific protein and a putative RNA helicase localizing to the old and then to the new MAC, are specifically required during sexual processes. Our work provides a proof of principle that genes essential for meiosis and nuclear reorganization can be uncovered following genome-wide transcriptome analysis. PMID:21257794

  13. Posttranscriptional control is a strong factor enabling exclusive expression of surface antigens in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Simon, Martin C; Marker, Simone; Schmidt, Helmut J

    2006-01-01

    Variable antigens are large proteins located on the outer membrane of parasitic but also of free-living protists. Multigene families encoding surface antigens demonstrate an exclusive expression of proteins. The resulting presence of just one protein species on the cell surface is required for surface antigen function; therefore, the molecular mechanism of exclusive expression is of main interest. Regulation of gene expression and mechanisms establishing switching of antigens are hardly understood in any organism. Here we report on the reaction of Paramecium to the artificial knock down of surface antigen 51A expression by bacteria-mediated RNAi. This technique involves the feeding of dsRNA-producing bacteria. We analyzed different fragments of the target gene for dsRNA template regarding their specific knock down efficiency and found great differences. Treatment of Paramecia with RNAi against the 51A antigen demonstrated that although a massive amount of mRNA was present, the protein was not detected on the cell surface. Moreover, a minor abundance of 51D transcripts resulted in an exclusive presence of 51D proteins on the cell surface. This posttranscriptional regulation was confirmed by the transcript ratio (51A/51D) determined by real-time (RT) PCR of single cells. Because we were able to document unexclusive transcription also in wild-type cells our results indicate that this posttranscriptional regulation is a main factor of enabling exclusive gene expression. The comparison of serotype shifts, caused by efficient and inefficient knock down, indicates an involvement of full-length transcripts in regulation of gene expression. Thus, our study gives new insights into the mechanism of exclusive expression on the molecular level: (i) exclusive transcription does not occur, (ii) posttranscriptional regulation is a powerful factor enabling exclusive antigen expression, and (iii) surface antigen mRNA is shown to be involved in this mechanism in a regulating way.

  14. Characterization of multigene families in the micronuclear genome of Paramecium tetraurelia reveals a germline specific sequence in an intron of a centrin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Vayssié, L; Sperling, L; Madeddu, L

    1997-01-01

    In Paramecium, as in other ciliates, the transcriptionally active macronucleus is derived from the germline micronucleus by programmed DNA rearrangements, which include the precise excision of thousands of germline-specific sequences (internal eliminated sequences, IESs). We report the characterization of micronuclear versions of genes encoding Paramecium secretory granule proteins (trichocyst matrix proteins, TMPs) and Paramecium centrins. TMP and centrin multigene families, previously studied in the macronuclear genome, consist of genes that are co-expressed to provide mixtures of related polypeptides that co-assemble to form respectively the crystalline trichocyst matrix and the infraciliary lattice, a contractile cytoskeletal network. We present evidence that TMP and centrin genes identified in the macronucleus are also present in the micronucleus, ruling out the possibility that these novel multigene families are generated by somatic rearrangements during macronuclear development. No IESs were found in TMP genes, however, four IESs in or near germline centrin genes were characterized. The only intragenic IES is 75 bp in size, interrupts a 29 bp intron and is absent from at least one other closely related centrin gene. This is the first report of an IES in an intron in Paramecium. PMID:9023115

  15. Forced symbiosis between Synechocystis spp. PCC 6803 and apo-symbiotic Paramecium bursaria as an experimental model for evolutionary emergence of primitive photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Naoko; Furukawa, Shunsuke; Kadono, Takashi; Kawano, Tomonori

    2011-06-01

    Single-cell green paramecia (Paramecium bursaria) is a swimming vehicle that carries several hundred cells of endo-symbiotic green algae. Here, a novel model for endo-symbiosis, prepared by introducing and maintaining the cells of cyanobacterium (Synechocystis spp. PCC 6803) in the apo-symbiotic cells of P. bursaria is described.

  16. Identification, Localization, and Functional Implications of the Microdomain-Forming Stomatin Family in the Ciliated Protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Stuermer, Claudia A. O.; Plattner, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    The SPFH protein superfamily is assumed to occur universally in eukaryotes, but information from protozoa is scarce. In the Paramecium genome, we found only Stomatins, 20 paralogs grouped in 8 families, STO1 to STO8. According to cDNA analysis, all are expressed, and molecular modeling shows the typical SPFH domain structure for all subgroups. For further analysis we used family-specific sequences for fluorescence and immunogold labeling, gene silencing, and functional tests. With all family members tested, we found a patchy localization at/near the cell surface and on vesicles. The Sto1p and Sto4p families are also associated with the contractile vacuole complex. Sto4p also makes puncta on some food vacuoles and is abundant on vesicles recycling from the release site of spent food vacuoles to the site of nascent food vacuole formation. Silencing of the STO1 family reduces mechanosensitivity (ciliary reversal upon touching an obstacle), thus suggesting relevance for positioning of mechanosensitive channels in the plasmalemma. Silencing of STO4 members increases pulsation frequency of the contractile vacuole complex and reduces phagocytotic activity of Paramecium cells. In summary, Sto1p and Sto4p members seem to be involved in positioning specific superficial and intracellular microdomain-based membrane components whose functions may depend on mechanosensation (extracellular stimuli and internal osmotic pressure). PMID:23376944

  17. The dynein genes of Paramecium tetraurelia: the structure and expression of the ciliary beta and cytoplasmic heavy chains.

    PubMed Central

    Kandl, K A; Forney, J D; Asai, D J

    1995-01-01

    The genes encoding two Paramecium dynein heavy chains, DHC-6 and DHC-8, have been cloned and sequenced. Sequence-specific antibodies demonstrate that DHC-6 encodes ciliary outer arm beta-chain and DHC-8 encodes a cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain. Therefore, this study is the first opportunity to compare the primary structures and expression of two heavy chains representing the two functional classes of dynein expressed in the same cell. Deciliation of paramecia results in the accumulation of mRNA from DHC-6, but not DHC-8. Nuclear run-on transcription experiments demonstrate that this increase in the steady state concentration of DHC-6 mRNA is a consequence of a rapid induction of transcription in response to deciliation. This is the first demonstration that dynein, like other axonemal components, is transcriptionally regulated during reciliation. Analyses of the sequences of the two Paramecium dyneins and the dynein heavy chains from other organisms indicate that the heavy chain can be divided into three regions: 1) the sequence of the central catalytic domain is conserved among all dyneins; 2) the tail domain sequence, consisting of the N-terminal 1200 residues, differentiates between axonemal and cytoplasmic dyneins; and 3) the N-terminal 200 residues are the most divergent and appear to classify the isoforms. The organization of the heavy chain predicts that the variable tail domain may be sufficient to target the dynein to the appropriate place in the cell. Images PMID:8589455

  18. Parafusin, an exocytic-sensitive phosphoprotein, is the primary acceptor for the glucosylphosphotransferase in Paramecium tetraurelia and rat liver.

    PubMed

    Satir, B H; Srisomsap, C; Reichman, M; Marchase, R B

    1990-09-01

    Parafusin, the major protein in Paramecium tetraurelia to undergo dephosphorylation in response to secretory stimuli, appears to be the primary acceptor for the glucosylphosphotransferase in this species based on five independent criteria: identical molecular size of 63 kD; identical isoelectric points in the phosphorylated state of pH 5.8 and 6.2; identical behavior in reverse-phase chromatography; immunological cross-reactivity with an affinity-purified anti-parafusin antibody; the presence of a phosphorylated sugar after acid hydrolysis. It appears likely that the dephosphorylation observed with secretion reflects the removal of alpha Glc-1-P from parafusin's oligosaccharides and is consistent, therefore, with a regulatory role for this cytoplasmic glycosylation event. The glucosylphosphotransferase acceptor in rat liver is also immunoprecipitated by the anti-parafusin antibody and is very similar in physical characteristics to the paramecium protein. This conservation suggests a role for parafusin in mammalian exocytosis as well, at a step common to both the regulated and constitutive secretory pathways. PMID:2167899

  19. Primary and secondary siRNA synthesis triggered by RNAs from food bacteria in the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Carradec, Quentin; Götz, Ulrike; Arnaiz, Olivier; Pouch, Juliette; Simon, Martin; Meyer, Eric; Marker, Simone

    2015-02-18

    In various organisms, an efficient RNAi response can be triggered by feeding cells with bacteria producing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) against an endogenous gene. However, the detailed mechanisms and natural functions of this pathway are not well understood in most cases. Here, we studied siRNA biogenesis from exogenous RNA and its genetic overlap with endogenous RNAi in the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia by high-throughput sequencing. Using wild-type and mutant strains deficient for dsRNA feeding we found that high levels of primary siRNAs of both strands are processed from the ingested dsRNA trigger by the Dicer Dcr1, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases Rdr1 and Rdr2 and other factors. We further show that this induces the synthesis of secondary siRNAs spreading along the entire endogenous mRNA, demonstrating the occurrence of both 3'-to-5' and 5'-to-3' transitivity for the first time in the SAR clade of eukaryotes (Stramenopiles, Alveolates, Rhizaria). Secondary siRNAs depend on Rdr2 and show a strong antisense bias; they are produced at much lower levels than primary siRNAs and hardly contribute to RNAi efficiency. We further provide evidence that the Paramecium RNAi machinery also processes single-stranded RNAs from its bacterial food, broadening the possible natural functions of exogenously induced RNAi in this organism. PMID:25593325

  20. Inactivation of Ca2+-induced ciliary reversal by high-salt extraction in the cilia of Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Kutomi, Osamu; Seki, Makoto; Nakamura, Shogo; Kamachi, Hiroyuki; Noguchi, Munenori

    2013-10-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) induces ciliary reversal and backward swimming in Paramecium. However, it is not known how the Ca(2+) signal controls the motor machinery to induce ciliary reversal. We found that demembranated cilia on the ciliated cortical sheets from Paramecium caudatum lost the ability to undergo ciliary reversal after brief extraction with a solution containing 0.5 M KCl. KNO(3), which is similar to KCl with respect to chaotropic effect; it had the same effect as that of KCl on ciliary response. Cyclic AMP antagonizes Ca(2+)-induced ciliary reversal. Limited trypsin digestion prevents endogenous A-kinase and cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of an outer arm dynein light chain and induces ciliary reversal. However, the trypsin digestion prior to the high-salt extraction did not affect the inhibition of Ca(2+)-induced ciliary reversal caused by the high-salt extraction. Furthermore, during the course of the high-salt extraction, some axonemal proteins were extracted from ciliary axonemes, suggesting that they may be responsible for Ca(2+)-induced ciliary reversal.

  1. Synchronous induction of detachment and reattachment of symbiotic Chlorella spp. from the cell cortex of the host Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    Paramecium bursaria harbor several hundred symbiotic Chlorella spp. Each alga is enclosed in a perialgal vacuole membrane, which can attach to the host cell cortex. How the perialgal vacuole attaches beneath the host cell cortex remains unknown. High-speed centrifugation (> 1000×g) for 1min induces rapid detachment of the algae from the host cell cortex and concentrates the algae to the posterior half of the host cell. Simultaneously, most of the host acidosomes and lysosomes accumulate in the anterior half of the host cell. Both the detached algae and the dislocated acidic vesicles recover their original positions by host cyclosis within 10min after centrifugation. These recoveries were inhibited if the host cytoplasmic streaming was arrested by nocodazole. Endosymbiotic algae during the early reinfection process also show the capability of desorption after centrifugation. These results demonstrate that adhesion of the perialgal vacuole beneath the host cell cortex is repeatedly inducible, and that host cytoplasmic streaming facilitates recovery of the algal attachment. This study is the first report to illuminate the mechanism of the induction to desorb for symbiotic algae and acidic vesicles, and will contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of algal and organelle arrangements in Paramecium.

  2. Intraspecific differentiation of Paramecium novaurelia strains (Ciliophora, Protozoa) inferred from phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Tarcz, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Paramecium novaurelia Beale and Schneller, 1954, was first found in Scotland and is known to occur mainly in Europe, where it is the most common species of the P. aurelia complex. In recent years, two non-European localities have been described: Turkey and the United States of America. This article presents the analysis of intraspecific variability among 25 strains of P. novaurelia with the application of ribosomal and mitochondrial loci (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2, 5' large subunit rDNA (5'LSU rDNA) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) mtDNA). The mean distance observed for all of the studied P. novaurelia sequence pairs was p=0.008/0.016/0.092 (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2/5'LSU rDNA/COI). Phylogenetic trees (NJ/MP/BI) based on a comparison of all of the analysed sequences show that the studied strains of P. novaurelia form a distinct clade, separate from the P. caudatum outgroup, and are divided into two clusters (A and B) and two branches (C and D). The occurrence of substantial genetic differentiation within P. novaurelia, confirmed by the analysed DNA fragments, indicates a rapid evolution of particular species within the Paramecium genus.

  3. Polymorphism of Paramecium pentaurelia (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea) strains revealed by rDNA and mtDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Przyboś, Ewa; Tarcz, Sebastian; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Surmacz, Marta

    2011-05-01

    Paramecium pentaurelia is one of 15 known sibling species of the Paramecium aurelia complex. It is recognized as a species showing no intra-specific differentiation on the basis of molecular fingerprint analyses, whereas the majority of other species are polymorphic. This study aimed at assessing genetic polymorphism within P. pentaurelia including new strains recently found in Poland (originating from two water bodies, different years, seasons, and clones of one strain) as well as strains collected from distant habitats (USA, Europe, Asia), and strains representing other species of the complex. We compared two DNA fragments: partial sequences (349 bp) of the LSU rDNA and partial sequences (618 bp) of cytochrome B gene. A correlation between the geographical origin of the strains and the genetic characteristics of their genotypes was not observed. Different genotypes were found in Kraków in two types of water bodies (Opatkowice-natural pond; Jordan's Park-artificial pond). Haplotype diversity within a single water body was not recorded. Likewise, seasonal haplotype differences between the strains within the artificial water body, as well as differences between clones originating from one strain, were not detected. The clustering of some strains belonging to different species was observed in the phylogenies.

  4. Primary and secondary siRNA synthesis triggered by RNAs from food bacteria in the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Carradec, Quentin; Götz, Ulrike; Arnaiz, Olivier; Pouch, Juliette; Simon, Martin; Meyer, Eric; Marker, Simone

    2015-01-01

    In various organisms, an efficient RNAi response can be triggered by feeding cells with bacteria producing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) against an endogenous gene. However, the detailed mechanisms and natural functions of this pathway are not well understood in most cases. Here, we studied siRNA biogenesis from exogenous RNA and its genetic overlap with endogenous RNAi in the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia by high-throughput sequencing. Using wild-type and mutant strains deficient for dsRNA feeding we found that high levels of primary siRNAs of both strands are processed from the ingested dsRNA trigger by the Dicer Dcr1, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases Rdr1 and Rdr2 and other factors. We further show that this induces the synthesis of secondary siRNAs spreading along the entire endogenous mRNA, demonstrating the occurrence of both 3′-to-5′ and 5′-to-3′ transitivity for the first time in the SAR clade of eukaryotes (Stramenopiles, Alveolates, Rhizaria). Secondary siRNAs depend on Rdr2 and show a strong antisense bias; they are produced at much lower levels than primary siRNAs and hardly contribute to RNAi efficiency. We further provide evidence that the Paramecium RNAi machinery also processes single-stranded RNAs from its bacterial food, broadening the possible natural functions of exogenously induced RNAi in this organism. PMID:25593325

  5. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis in search for a putative Paramecium beta-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Płatek, A; Wiejak, J; Wyroba, E

    1999-01-01

    RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis were performed in order to search for a putative beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) in Paramecium using several beta2-adrenergic-specific molecular probes. Under strictly defined RT-PCR conditions DNA species of expected molecular size about 360 bp were generated with the primers corresponding to the universal mammalian beta2-AR sequence tagged sites (located within the 4th and the 6th transmembrane regions of the receptor). This RT-PCR product hybridized in Southern blot analysis with the oligonucleotide probe designed to the highly conservative beta2-AR region involved in G-proteins interaction and located within the amplified region. Northern hybridization was performed on Paramecium total RNA and mRNA with human beta2-AR cDNA and two oligonucleotide probes: the first included Phe 290 involved in agonist binding (Strader et al., 1995) and the second was the backward RT-PCR primer. All these probes revealed the presence of about 2 kb mRNA which is consistent with the size of beta2-AR transcripts found in higher eukaryotes.

  6. Functional specialization of Piwi proteins in Paramecium tetraurelia from post-transcriptional gene silencing to genome remodelling.

    PubMed

    Bouhouche, Khaled; Gout, Jean-François; Kapusta, Aurélie; Bétermier, Mireille; Meyer, Eric

    2011-05-01

    Proteins of the Argonaute family are small RNA carriers that guide regulatory complexes to their targets. The family comprises two major subclades. Members of the Ago subclade, which are present in most eukaryotic phyla, bind different classes of small RNAs and regulate gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Piwi subclade members appear to have been lost in plants and fungi and were mostly studied in metazoa, where they bind piRNAs and have essential roles in sexual reproduction. Their presence in ciliates, unicellular organisms harbouring both germline micronuclei and somatic macronuclei, offers an interesting perspective on the evolution of their functions. Here, we report phylogenetic and functional analyses of the 15 Piwi genes from Paramecium tetraurelia. We show that four constitutively expressed proteins are involved in siRNA pathways that mediate gene silencing throughout the life cycle. Two other proteins, specifically expressed during meiosis, are required for accumulation of scnRNAs during sexual reproduction and for programmed genome rearrangements during development of the somatic macronucleus. Our results indicate that Paramecium Piwi proteins have evolved to perform both vegetative and sexual functions through mechanisms ranging from post-transcriptional mRNA cleavage to epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. PMID:21216825

  7. A scanning electron-microscopic study of the local degeneration of cilia during sexual reproduction in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T

    1978-08-01

    The location and extent of local degeneration of cilia during sexual reproduction of Paramecium was studied using scanning electron microscopy to examine cells undergoing conjugation and autogamy. At some time during the mating reaction, but prior to conjugant pair formation, ciliary degeneration begins at the antero-ventral tip of cells and proceeds posteriorly along the suture. In the anterior part of the cell, degeneration occurs on both sides of the suture, but in the posterior part it is restricted to the right side of the suture. In 5 species of Paramecium examined, degeneration occurred in nearly the same region. No degeneration of cilia is observed in natural autogamy of P. tetraurelia, whereas in chemically induced autogamy of P. caudatum degeneration occurs as in ordinary conjugation. Conjugant pairs never expose any deciliated cell surface except at the postero-ventral tip. The maximum extent of ciliary degeneration is best seen in the chemically induced autogamous cells: 7 kinetics (rows of unit teritories) at the anterior-left, 4 kinetics at the anterior-right, 10 or more kinetics at the posterior-right and the right wall of the vestibule of the mouth. Before complete disappearance of the cilia, many short cilia are observed. This suggests that ciliary degeneration is due to resorption. Degeneration extends more rapidly in cells with stronger mating reactivity. The relations between mating reactivity, ciliary degeneration and nuclear activation are discussed. PMID:701405

  8. Deletion endpoint allele-specificity in the developmentally regulated elimination of an internal sequence (IES) in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Dubrana, K; Le Mouël, A; Amar, L

    1997-06-15

    Ciliated protozoa undergo thousands of site-specific DNA deletion events during the programmed development of micronuclear genomes to macronuclear genomes. Two deletion elements, W1 and W2, were identified in the Paramecium primaurelia wild-type 156 strain. Here, we report the characterization of both elements in wild-type strain 168 and show that they display variant deletion patterns when compared with those of strain 156. The W1 ( 168 ) element is defective for deletion. The W2 ( 168 ) element is excised utilizing two alternative boundaries on one side, both are different from the boundary utilized to excise the W2156 element. By crossing the 156 and 168 strains, we demonstrate that the definition of all deletion endpoints are each controlled by cis -acting determinant(s) rather than by strain-specific trans-acting factor(s). Sequence comparison of all deleted DNA segments indicates that the 5'-TA-3'terminal sequence is strictly required at their ends. Furthermore the identity of the first eight base pairs of these ends to a previously established consensus sequence correlates with the frequency of the corresponding deletion events. Our data implies the existence of an adaptive convergent evolution of these Paramecium deleted DNA segment end sequences. PMID:9171098

  9. Tolerance of ciliated protozoan Paramecium bursaria (Protozoa, Ciliophora) to ammonia and nitrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Henglong; Song, Weibo; Lu, Lu; Alan, Warren

    2005-09-01

    The tolerance to ammonia and nitrites in freshwater ciliate Paramecium bursaria was measured in a conventional open system. The ciliate was exposed to different concentrations of ammonia and nitrites for 2h and 12h in order to determine the lethal concentrations. Linear regression analysis revealed that the 2h-LC50 value for ammonia was 95.94 mg/L and for nitrite 27.35 mg/L using probit scale method (with 95% confidence intervals). There was a linear correlation between the mortality probit scale and logarithmic concentration of ammonia which fit by a regression equation y=7.32 x 9.51 ( R 2=0.98; y, mortality probit scale; x, logarithmic concentration of ammonia), by which 2 h-LC50 value for ammonia was found to be 95.50 mg/L. A linear correlation between mortality probit scales and logarithmic concentration of nitrite is also followed the regression equation y=2.86 x+0.89 ( R 2=0.95; y, mortality probit scale; x, logarithmic concentration of nitrite). The regression analysis of toxicity curves showed that the linear correlation between exposed time of ammonia-N LC50 value and ammonia-N LC50 value followed the regression equation y=2 862.85 e -0.08 x ( R 2=0.95; y, duration of exposure to LC50 value; x, LC50 value), and that between exposed time of nitrite-N LC50 value and nitrite-N LC50 value followed the regression equation y=127.15 e -0.13 x ( R 2=0.91; y, exposed time of LC50 value; x, LC50 value). The results demonstrate that the tolerance to ammonia in P. bursaria is considerably higher than that of the larvae or juveniles of some metozoa, e.g. cultured prawns and oysters. In addition, ciliates, as bacterial predators, are likely to play a positive role in maintaining and improving water quality in aquatic environments with high-level ammonium, such as sewage treatment systems.

  10. Highly Precise and Developmentally Programmed Genome Assembly in Paramecium Requires Ligase IV–Dependent End Joining

    PubMed Central

    Marmignon, Antoine; Ku, Michael; Silve, Aude; Meyer, Eric; Forney, James D.; Malinsky, Sophie; Bétermier, Mireille

    2011-01-01

    During the sexual cycle of the ciliate Paramecium, assembly of the somatic genome includes the precise excision of tens of thousands of short, non-coding germline sequences (Internal Eliminated Sequences or IESs), each one flanked by two TA dinucleotides. It has been reported previously that these genome rearrangements are initiated by the introduction of developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which depend on the domesticated transposase PiggyMac. These DSBs all exhibit a characteristic geometry, with 4-base 5′ overhangs centered on the conserved TA, and may readily align and undergo ligation with minimal processing. However, the molecular steps and actors involved in the final and precise assembly of somatic genes have remained unknown. We demonstrate here that Ligase IV and Xrcc4p, core components of the non-homologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ), are required both for the repair of IES excision sites and for the circularization of excised IESs. The transcription of LIG4 and XRCC4 is induced early during the sexual cycle and a Lig4p-GFP fusion protein accumulates in the developing somatic nucleus by the time IES excision takes place. RNAi–mediated silencing of either gene results in the persistence of free broken DNA ends, apparently protected against extensive resection. At the nucleotide level, controlled removal of the 5′-terminal nucleotide occurs normally in LIG4-silenced cells, while nucleotide addition to the 3′ ends of the breaks is blocked, together with the final joining step, indicative of a coupling between NHEJ polymerase and ligase activities. Taken together, our data indicate that IES excision is a “cut-and-close” mechanism, which involves the introduction of initiating double-strand cleavages at both ends of each IES, followed by DSB repair via highly precise end joining. This work broadens our current view on how the cellular NHEJ pathway has cooperated with domesticated transposases for the emergence of new

  11. Three Group-I introns in 18S rDNA of Endosymbiotic Algae of Paramecium bursaria from Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Ryo; Kamako, Shin-ichiro; Imamura, Nobutaka

    2004-08-01

    In the nuclear encoded small subunit ribosomal DNA (18S rDNA) of symbiotic alga of Paramecium bursaria (F36 collected in Japan) possesses three intron-like insertions (Hoshina et al., unpubl. data, 2003). The present study confirmed these exact lengths and insertion sites by reverse transcription-PCR. Two of them were inserted at Escherichia coli 16S rRNA genic position 943 and 1512 that are frequent intron insertion positions, but another insertion position (nearly 1370) was the first finding. Their secondary structures suggested they belong to Group-I intron; one belongs to subgroup IE, others belong to subgroup IC1. Similarity search indicated these introns are ancestral ones.

  12. Molecular Identification of Paramecium bursaria Syngens and Studies on Geographic Distribution using Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit I (COI).

    PubMed

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria is composed of five syngens that are morphologically indistinguishable but sexually isolated. The aim of the present study was to confirm by molecular methods (analyses of mitochondrial COI) the identification of P. bursaria syngens originating from different geographical locations. Phylograms constructed using both the neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood methods based on a comparison of 34 sequences of P. bursaria strains and P. multimicronucleatum, P. caudatum and P.calkinsi strains used as outgroups revealed five clusters which correspond to results obtained previously by mating reaction. Our analysis shows the existence of 24 haplotypes for the COI gene sequence in the studied strains. The interspecies haplotype diversity was Hd = 0.967. We confirmed genetic differentiation between strains of P. bursaria and the occurrence of a correlation between geographical distribution and the correspondent syngen. PMID:26103689

  13. Molecular Identification of Paramecium bursaria Syngens and Studies on Geographic Distribution using Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit I (COI).

    PubMed

    Zagata, Patrycja; Greczek-Stachura, Magdalena; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria is composed of five syngens that are morphologically indistinguishable but sexually isolated. The aim of the present study was to confirm by molecular methods (analyses of mitochondrial COI) the identification of P. bursaria syngens originating from different geographical locations. Phylograms constructed using both the neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood methods based on a comparison of 34 sequences of P. bursaria strains and P. multimicronucleatum, P. caudatum and P.calkinsi strains used as outgroups revealed five clusters which correspond to results obtained previously by mating reaction. Our analysis shows the existence of 24 haplotypes for the COI gene sequence in the studied strains. The interspecies haplotype diversity was Hd = 0.967. We confirmed genetic differentiation between strains of P. bursaria and the occurrence of a correlation between geographical distribution and the correspondent syngen.

  14. X-ray microanalysis in cryosections of natively frozen Paramecium caudatum with regard to ion distribution in ciliates

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, M.; Meyer, R.; Zierold, K.

    1985-01-01

    Cells of Paramecium caudatum were shock-frozen without pretreatment for cryoultramicrotomy and freeze-dried for subsequent X-ray microanalysis. Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, and Ca were detected in different amounts in several subcellular compartments. In particular, calcium was localized below the cell surface (pellicle). Trichocysts were found to contain significant amounts of Na in their base but not in the tip. Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca were found in electron dense deposits within the lumen of the contractile vacuole. A small K concentration was found in the cytoplasm and in the mitochondria. X-ray microanalysis of the element distribution in different subcellular compartments provides information for the understanding of cellular functions such as exocytosis, locomotion, and ion regulation.

  15. Phylogenetic placement of two previously described intranuclear bacteria from the ciliate Paramecium bursaria (Protozoa, Ciliophora): 'Holospora acuminata' and 'Holospora curviuscula'.

    PubMed

    Rautian, Maria S; Wackerow-Kouzova, Natalia D

    2013-05-01

    'Holospora acuminata' infects micronuclei of Paramecium bursaria (Protozoa, Ciliophora), whereas 'Holospora curviuscula' infects the macronucleus in other clones of the same host species. Because these micro-organisms have not been cultivated, their description has been based only on some morphological properties and host and nuclear specificities. One16S rRNA gene sequence of 'H. curviuscula' is present in databases. The systematic position of the representative strain of 'H. curviuscula', strain MC-3, was determined in this study. Moreover, for the first time, two strains of 'H. acuminata', KBN10-1 and AC61-10, were investigated. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that all three strains belonged to the genus Holospora, family Holosporaceae, order Rickettsiales within the Alphaproteobacteria.

  16. Commitment to autogamy in Paramecium blocks mating reactivity: implications for regulation of the sexual pathway and the breeding system.

    PubMed

    Berger, J D; Rahemtullah, S

    1990-03-01

    Commitment to autogamy blocks mating reactivity in Paramecium. Cells which had previously developed mating reactivity, lost reactivity 30-90 min prior to the preautogamous fission. Mating reactivity develops at a standard level of starvation when cells are allowed to exhaust their food supply naturally. In abruptly starved cultures, mating reactivity appears 3.3 h after downshift. Autogamy is also triggered by starvation. The level of starvation required for initiation of autogamy decreases progressively as cells age. When the autogamy starvation threshold drops to such a low level that all cells become committed to autogamy before any of them develop mating reactivity, reactivity does not occur under natural starvation conditions and the period of maturity for conjugation has come to an end. There is no absolute immature period for autogamy. PMID:2298253

  17. Nucleogenesis and stomatogenesis in sexual reproduction of Paramecium tetraurelia may be controlled by chromosomal factors of the germ nucleus (micronucleus).

    PubMed

    Chau, M F; F Ng, S

    1989-02-24

    The nature of control of development of the nucleus and the oral apparatus by the germ nucleus (micronucleus) during sexual reproduction in Paramecium tetraurelia was analyzed by studying nine euploid (mostly haploid) clones. These clones were generated by conjugation between cells lacking micronuclei (amicronucleates) and micronucleates with diploid micronuclei. All except two of the euploid clones were normal in stomatogenesis in asexual reproduction. In contrast, during subsequent sexual reproduction (autogamy), eight of the euploid clones showed correlative abnormalities in nucleogenesis and stomatogenesis. The former involves the generation of gametic nuclei and the postzygotic development of micronuclei and macronuclear anlagen. The latter involves the crucial stomatogenic step of initiation of oral membraneile assembly, as well as the specification of the normal pattern of the oral apparatus. Since during autogamy haploid nuclei underwent meiosis giving rise to aneuploid nuclei and thus genomic imbalance, the present findings support the notion that micronuclear chromosomal factors contribute to both nucleogenesis and stomatogenesis in the sexual cycle. PMID:23195561

  18. Effect of wortmannin and phorbol ester on Paramecium fluid-phase uptake in the presence of transferrin.

    PubMed

    Wiejak, J; Surmacz, L; Wyroba, E

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of the uptake of the fluid phase marker Lucifer Yellow (LY), and its alteration by wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI-3K), and the PKC modulators: GF 109203 X, an inhibitor, and phorbol ester, an activator was studied in eukaryotic model Paramecium aurelia. Spectrophotometric quantification of LY accumulation was performed in the presence or absence of transferrin, a marker of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Internalization of LY showed a curvilinear kinetics: the high initial rate of LY uptake (575 ng LY/mg protein/hr) decreased almost 5-fold within 15 min, reaching plateau at 126 ng/mg protein/hr. Transferrin induced a small increase (7.5%) in the fluid phase uptake rate (after 5 min) followed by a small decrease at longer incubation times. Lucifer Yellow and transferrin (visualized by streptavidin-FITC) were localized in Paramecium by 3-D reconstruction by confocal microscopy. LY showed a scattered, diffuse fluorescence typical of fluid phase uptake whereas transferrin accumulated in membrane-surrounded endosomes. Wortmannin did not affect LY accumulation but decreased it when transferrin was present in the incubation medium. This suggests an effect on the transferrin uptake pathway, presumably on the stage of internalization in "mixing" endosomes to which transferrin and LY were targeted. Phorbol ester diminished LY accumulation by 22% and this effect persisted up to 25 min of incubation. PKC inhibitor did not affect LY uptake. However, in the presence of transferrin, the LY uptake increased within the first 15 minutes followed by a rapid 20% decrease in comparison to the control. Such an effect of PKC modulators suggests that PMA action on fluid phase uptake is not directly mediated by PKC.

  19. Molecular identification of a calcium-inhibited catalytic subunit of casein kinase type 2 from Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Daniel; Kissmehl, Roland; Treptau, Tilman; Hauser, Karin; Kellermann, Josef; Plattner, Helmut

    2003-12-01

    We have previously described the occurrence in Paramecium of a casein kinase (CK) activity (EC 2.7.1.37) with some unusual properties, including inhibition by Ca(2+) (R. Kissmehl, T. Treptau, K. Hauser, and H. Plattner, FEBS Lett. 402:227-235, 1995). We now have cloned four genes, PtCK2alpha1 to PtCK2alpha4, all of which encode the catalytic alpha subunit of type 2 CK (CK2) with calculated molecular masses ranging from 38.9 to 39.4 kDa and pI values ranging from 8.8 to 9.0. They can be classified into two groups, which differ from each other by 28% on the nucleotide level and by 18% on the derived amino acid level. One of them, PtCK2alpha3, has been expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized in vitro. As we also have observed with the isolated CK, the recombinant protein preferentially phosphorylates casein but also phosphorylates some Paramecium-specific substrates, including the exocytosis-sensitive phosphoprotein pp63/parafusin. Characteristically, Ca(2+) inhibits the phosphorylation at elevated concentrations occurring during stimulation of a cell. Reconstitution with a recombinant form of the regulatory subunit from Xenopus laevis, XlCK2beta, confirms Ca(2+) sensitivity also under conditions of autophosphorylation. This is unusual for CK2 but correlates with the presence of two EF-hand calcium-binding motifs, one of which is located in the N-terminal segment essential for constitutive activity, as well as with an aberrant composition of normally basic domains recognizing acidic substrate domains. Immunogold localization reveals a considerable enrichment in the outermost cell cortex layers, excluding cilia. We discuss a potential role of this Ca(2+)-inhibited PtCK2alpha species in a late step of signal transduction. PMID:14665457

  20. Ku-Mediated Coupling of DNA Cleavage and Repair during Programmed Genome Rearrangements in the Ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Marmignon, Antoine; Bischerour, Julien; Silve, Aude; Fojcik, Clémentine; Dubois, Emeline; Arnaiz, Olivier; Kapusta, Aurélie; Malinsky, Sophie; Bétermier, Mireille

    2014-01-01

    During somatic differentiation, physiological DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) can drive programmed genome rearrangements (PGR), during which DSB repair pathways are mobilized to safeguard genome integrity. Because of their unique nuclear dimorphism, ciliates are powerful unicellular eukaryotic models to study the mechanisms involved in PGR. At each sexual cycle, the germline nucleus is transmitted to the progeny, but the somatic nucleus, essential for gene expression, is destroyed and a new somatic nucleus differentiates from a copy of the germline nucleus. In Paramecium tetraurelia, the development of the somatic nucleus involves massive PGR, including the precise elimination of at least 45,000 germline sequences (Internal Eliminated Sequences, IES). IES excision proceeds through a cut-and-close mechanism: a domesticated transposase, PiggyMac, is essential for DNA cleavage, and DSB repair at excision sites involves the Ligase IV, a specific component of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. At the genome-wide level, a huge number of programmed DSBs must be repaired during this process to allow the assembly of functional somatic chromosomes. To understand how DNA cleavage and DSB repair are coordinated during PGR, we have focused on Ku, the earliest actor of NHEJ-mediated repair. Two Ku70 and three Ku80 paralogs are encoded in the genome of P. tetraurelia: Ku70a and Ku80c are produced during sexual processes and localize specifically in the developing new somatic nucleus. Using RNA interference, we show that the development-specific Ku70/Ku80c heterodimer is essential for the recovery of a functional somatic nucleus. Strikingly, at the molecular level, PiggyMac-dependent DNA cleavage is abolished at IES boundaries in cells depleted for Ku80c, resulting in IES retention in the somatic genome. PiggyMac and Ku70a/Ku80c co-purify as a complex when overproduced in a heterologous system. We conclude that Ku has been integrated in the Paramecium DNA cleavage

  1. A virus-encoded potassium ion channel is a structural protein in the chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 virion

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Giulia; Piotrowski, Adrianna; Hillmer, Stefan; Gurnon, James; Van Etten, James L.; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Most chloroviruses encode small K+ channels, which are functional in electrophysiological assays. The experimental finding that initial steps in viral infection exhibit the same sensitivity to channel inhibitors as the viral K+ channels has led to the hypothesis that the channels are structural proteins located in the internal membrane of the virus particles. This hypothesis was questioned recently because proteomic studies failed to detect the channel protein in virions of the prototype chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1). Here, we used a mAb raised against the functional K+ channel from chlorovirus MA-1D to search for the viral K+ channel in the virus particle. The results showed that the antibody was specific and bound to the tetrameric channel on the extracellular side. The antibody reacted in a virus-specific manner with protein extracts from chloroviruses that encoded channels similar to that from MA-1D. There was no cross-reactivity with chloroviruses that encoded more diverse channels or with a chlorovirus that lacked a K+ channel gene. Together with electron microscopic imaging, which revealed labelling of individual virus particles with the channel antibody, these results establish that the viral particles contain an active K+ channel, presumably located in the lipid membrane that surrounds the DNA in the mature virions. PMID:23918407

  2. Purification, in vitro reassembly, and preliminary sequence analysis of epiplasmins, the major constituent of the membrane skeleton of Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Coffe, G; Le Caer, J P; Lima, O; Adoutte, A

    1996-01-01

    The epiplasmic layer, a continuous rigid granulo-fibrillar sheet directly subtending the surface membranes of Paramecium, is one of the outermost of the various cytoskeletal networks that compose it cortex. We have previously shown that the epiplasm consists of a set of 30 to 50 protein bands on SDS-PAGE in the range 50 to 33 kDa, the epiplasmins. We report a purification procedure for the set of epiplasmic proteins, a description of their physicochemical and reassembly properties, and a preliminary characterization of their sequence. The conditions for solubilization of the epiplasm and for in vitro reassembly of its purified constituents ar described. Reassembly of the entire set of proteins and of some (but not all) subsets are shown to yield filamentous aggregates. Microsequences of two purified bands of epiplasmins reveal a striking amino acid sequence consisting of heptad repeats of only three main amino acids, P, V, and Q. These repeats were confirmed by DNA sequencing of polymerase chain reaction products. The motif is QPVQ-h, in which h is a hydrophobic residue. This may constitute the core of the epiplasmin sequence and, in view of the tendency of such a sequence to form a coiled-coil, may account for the remarkable self-aggregation properties of epiplasmins. PMID:8769725

  3. New Stands of Species of the Paramecium aurelia Complex; is the Occurrence of Particular Species Limited by Temperature Barriers?

    PubMed

    Przyboś, Ewa; Prajer, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of ciliates, especially the Paramecium aurelia complex, has not yet been studied in many parts of the world, or sampling was done only occasionally. Generally, the southern hemisphere still awaits investigation. In North America only the USA was studied in greater detail; the majority of species of the complex were there recorded. In Asia, more frequent sampling was performed only in Japan and Asiatic Russia. Europe was studied more carefully, however, a different number of habitats was studied in particular zones of Europe, the least in the southern zone. New stands of P. tetraurelia , P. sexaurelia, P. octaurelia, and P. novaurelia were revealed as a result of the present investigations carried out in Africa (Mozambique--P. tetraurelia, P. sexaurelia), Asia (Indonesia--P. sexaurelia), borderland of Asia and Europe (Georgia--P. octaurelia), and Europe (Macedonia--P. tetraurelia and Romania--P. novaurelia). Are climatic zones the main factor limiting the occurrence of species of the P. aurelia complex? Analysis of data on the distribution of the P. aurelia species complex in warm "tropical" zones on different continents may suggest such preferences for some species, including P. sexaurelia, P. octaurelia, P. tredecaurelia, P. quadecaurelia. The first two of these species were recorded herein in warm or "tropical" zone. PMID:26462333

  4. Photosynthetic Shutdown in Chlorella NC64A Associated with the Infection Cycle of Paramecium bursaria Chlorella Virus-1.

    PubMed

    Seaton, GGR.; Lee, K.; Rohozinski, J.

    1995-08-01

    The effects of the algal virus Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus-1 on the photosynthetic physiology of its host, Chlorella NC64A, was studied by observing changes in Chl fluorescence quenching and O2 exchange. Metabolic changes were calibrated against electron microscopic analysis of the morphological changes that occur during the infection cycle. It takes approximately 10 h from attachment of the virus to final lysis of the host cell, so a complete infection cycle can be observed continuously in one experiment. During the early stages of the infection cycle many rapid changes occurred in the host cell's metabolism and these were reflected in changes of photosynthetic and respiratory rates. The dramatic inhibition of photosynthesis in Chlorella NC64A cells by P. bursaria Chlorella virus-1 has facilitated the use of fluorescence quenching as an accurate measure of the first phase of viral infection (attachment and penetration of the host cell) and the extent to which a population of host cells is infected. Effects of temperature and cation requirement of the infection cycle are described. The relevance of our observations to the events observed during viral infection of higher plants is discussed.

  5. The first European stand of Paramecium sonneborni (P. aurelia complex), a species known only from North America (Texas, USA).

    PubMed

    Przyboś, Ewa; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria; Lebedeva, Natalia

    2014-06-01

    P. aurelia is currently defined as a complex of 15 sibling species including 14 species designated by Sonneborn (1975) and one, P. sonneborni, by Aufderheide et al. (1983). The latter was known from only one stand (Texas, USA). The main reason for the present study was a new stand of Paramecium in Cyprus, with strains recognized as P. sonneborni based on the results of strain crosses, cytological slides, and molecular analyses of three loci (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-5'LSU rDNA, COI, CytB). The new stand of P. sonneborni in Europe shows that the species, previously considered endemic, may have a wider range. This demonstrates the impact of under-sampling on the knowledge of the biogeography of microbial eukaryotes. Phylogenetic trees based on all the studied fragments revealed that P. sonneborni forms a separate cluster that is closer to P. jenningsi and P. schewiakoffi than to the other members of the P. aurelia complex.

  6. Variation in ribosomal and mitochondrial DNA sequences demonstrates the existence of intraspecific groups in Paramecium multimicronucleatum (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea).

    PubMed

    Tarcz, Sebastian; Potekhin, Alexey; Rautian, Maria; Przyboś, Ewa

    2012-05-01

    This is the first phylogenetic study of the intraspecific variability within Paramecium multimicronucleatum with the application of two-loci analysis (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-5'LSU rDNA and COI mtDNA) carried out on numerous strains originated from different continents. The species has been shown to have a complex structure of several sibling species within taxonomic species. Our analysis revealed the existence of 10 haplotypes for the rDNA fragment and 15 haplotypes for the COI fragment in the studied material. The mean distance for all of the studied P. multimicronucleatum sequence pairs was p=0.025/0.082 (rDNA/COI). Despite the greater variation of the COI fragment, the COI-derived tree topology is similar to the tree topology constructed on the basis of the rDNA fragment. P. multimicronucleatum strains are divided into three main clades. The tree based on COI fragment analysis presents a greater resolution of the studied P. multimicronucleatum strains. Our results indicate that the strains of P. multimicronucleatum that appear in different clades on the trees could belong to different syngens.

  7. Paramecium tetraurelia growth stimulation under low-level chronic irradiation: investigations on a possible mechanism. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Croute, F.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Vidal, S.; Dupouy, D.; Planel, H.

    1982-12-01

    Experiments were carried out to demonstrate the effects of low-level chronic irradiation on Paramecium tetraurelia proliferation. Biological effects were strongly dependent on the bacterial density of culture medium and more exactly on the catalase content of the medium. Significant growth stimulation was found under /sup 60/Co chronic irradiation at a dose rate of 2 rad/year when paramecia were grown in a medium containing a high bacterial concentration (2.5 x 10/sup 2/ cells/m) or supplemented with catalase (300 U/ml). In a medium with a low bacterial density (1 x 10/sup 6/ cell/ml) or supplemented with a catalase activity inhibitor, growth simulation was preceded by a transitory inhibiting effect which could be correlated with extracellularly radioproduced H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ addition appeared to be able to simulate the biological effects of chronic irradiation. A possible mechanism is discussed.We proposed that the stimulating effects were the result of intracellular enzymatic scavenging of radioproduced H/sub 2/O/sub 2/.

  8. Stage-specific appearance of cytoplasmic microtubules around the surviving nuclei during the third prezygotic division of Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Wen; Yuan, Jin-Qiang; Gao, Xin; Yang, Xian-Yu

    2012-12-01

    There are six micronuclear divisions during conjugation of Paramecium caudatum: three prezygotic and three postzygotic divisions. Four haploid nuclei are formed during the first two meiotic prezygotic divisions. Usually only one meiotic product is located in the paroral cone (PC) region at the completion of meiosis, which survives and divides mitotically to complete the third prezygotic division to yield a stationary and a migratory pronucleus. The remaining three located outside of the PC degenerate. The migratory pronuclei are then exchanged between two conjugants and fuse with the stationary pronuclei to form synkarya, which undergo three successive divisions (postzygotic divisions). However, little is known about the surviving mechanism of the PC nuclei. In the current study, stage-specific appearance of cytoplasmic microtubules (cMTs) was indicated during the third prezygotic division by immunofluorescence labeling with anti-alpha tubulin antibodies surrounding the surviving nuclei, including the PC nuclei and the two types of prospective pronuclei. This suggested that cMTs were involved in the formation of a physical barrier, whose function may relate to sequestering and protecting the surviving nuclei from the major cytoplasm, where degeneration of extra-meiotic products occurs, another important nuclear event during the third prezygotic division.

  9. A virus-encoded potassium ion channel is a structural protein in the chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 virion.

    PubMed

    Romani, Giulia; Piotrowski, Adrianna; Hillmer, Stefan; Gurnon, James; Van Etten, James L; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard; Hertel, Brigitte

    2013-11-01

    Most chloroviruses encode small K(+) channels, which are functional in electrophysiological assays. The experimental finding that initial steps in viral infection exhibit the same sensitivity to channel inhibitors as the viral K(+) channels has led to the hypothesis that the channels are structural proteins located in the internal membrane of the virus particles. This hypothesis was questioned recently because proteomic studies failed to detect the channel protein in virions of the prototype chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1). Here, we used a mAb raised against the functional K(+) channel from chlorovirus MA-1D to search for the viral K(+) channel in the virus particle. The results showed that the antibody was specific and bound to the tetrameric channel on the extracellular side. The antibody reacted in a virus-specific manner with protein extracts from chloroviruses that encoded channels similar to that from MA-1D. There was no cross-reactivity with chloroviruses that encoded more diverse channels or with a chlorovirus that lacked a K(+) channel gene. Together with electron microscopic imaging, which revealed labelling of individual virus particles with the channel antibody, these results establish that the viral particles contain an active K(+) channel, presumably located in the lipid membrane that surrounds the DNA in the mature virions.

  10. Symbiotic Chlorella vulgaris of the ciliate Paramecium bursaria plays an important role in maintaining perialgal vacuole membrane functions.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuuki; Inouye, Isao; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    Treatment of symbiotic alga-bearing Paramecium bursaria cells with a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, induces synchronous swelling of all perialgal vacuoles at about 24h after treatment under a constant light condition. Subsequently, the vacuoles detach from the host cell cortex. The algae in the vacuoles are digested by the host's lysosomal fusion to the vacuoles. To elucidate the timing of algal degeneration, P. bursaria cells were treated with cycloheximide under a constant light condition. Then the cells were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Results show that algal chloroplasts and nuclei degenerated within 9h after treatment, but before the synchronous swelling of the perialgal vacuole and appearance of acid phosphatase activity in the perialgal vacuole by lysosomal fusion. Treatment with cycloheximide under a constant dark condition and treatment with chloramphenicol under a constant light condition induced neither synchronous swelling of the vacuoles nor digestion of the algae inside the vacuoles. These results demonstrate that algal proteins synthesized during photosynthesis are necessary to maintain chloroplastic and nuclear structures, and that inhibition of protein synthesis induces rapid lysis of these organelles, after which synchronous swelling of the perialgal vacuole and fusion occur with the host lysosomes.

  11. Basal body duplication in Paramecium: the key role of Bld10 in assembly and stability of the cartwheel.

    PubMed

    Jerka-Dziadosz, Maria; Gogendeau, Delphine; Klotz, Catherine; Cohen, Jean; Beisson, Janine; Koll, France

    2010-03-01

    Basal bodies which nucleate cilia and flagella, and centrioles which organize centrosomes share the same architecture characterized by the ninefold symmetry of their microtubular shaft. Among the conserved proteins involved in the biogenesis of the canonical 9-triplet centriolar structures, Sas-6 and Bld10 proteins have been shown to play central roles in the early steps of assembly and in establishment/stabilization of the ninefold symmetry. Using fluorescent tagged proteins and RNAi to study the localization and function of these two proteins in Paramecium, we focused on the early effects of their depletion, the consequences of their overexpression and their functional interdependence. We find that both genes are essential and their depletion affects cartwheel assembly and hence basal body duplication. We also show that, contrary to Sas6p, Bld10p is not directly responsible for the establishment of the ninefold symmetry, but is required not only for new basal body assembly and stability but also for Sas6p maintenance at mature basal bodies. Finally, ultrastructural analysis of cells overexpressing either protein revealed two types of early assembly intermediates, hub-like structures and generative discs, suggesting a conserved scaffolding process.

  12. Ectosymbiotic role of food bacteria for paramecium: bacterial detoxification of paramecia-killing toxin contained in wheat grass powder.

    PubMed

    Tokusumi, Y; Takagi, Y

    2000-04-01

    Bacterized plant infusion is a popular culture medium for Paramecium, using Klebsiella pneumoniae for the bacterium and Wheat Grass Powder (WGP) for the plant. It has been thought that WGP plays a role in the growth of bacteria, which in turn serve as the direct food for paramecia. However, we found that bacteria suspended in saline solution were unable to support the growth of paramecia. WGP including no bacteria was able to support neither the growth nor the survival of paramecia; instead, it killed paramecia. The killing effect of the WGP-derived substance(s), estimated to be of molecular weight less than 1,000, was abolished when bacteria were once grown in the WGP and then eliminated, suggesting that bacteria might change the toxic substance into an inactive form. This inactivation of the toxic substance may be caused either by metabolization inside of the bacteria or by neutralization by means of bacteria-derived substance outside of the bacteria. The second alternative is likely, because paramecia were able to survive and grow in the WGP medium containing a sufficient amount of dead bacteria killed by formalin or kanamycin. Dead bacteria killed by autoclaving were ineffective, probably because bacterial contents were lost. These findings revealed an ectosymbiotic role of bacteria; they confer benefits upon paramecia not only as food but also as machinery to detoxicate a plant toxin.

  13. Glycosylinositol-phosphoceramide in the free-living protozoan Paramecium primaurelia: modification of core glycans by mannosyl phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Azzouz, N; Striepen, B; Gerold, P; Capdeville, Y; Schwarz, R T

    1995-01-01

    Glycolipids synthesized in a cell-free system prepared from the free-living protozoan Paramecium primaurelia and labelled with [3H]mannose and [3H]glucosamine using GDP-[3H]mannose and UDP-[3H]N-acetyl glucosamine, respectively, were identified and structurally characterized as glycosylinositol-phosphoceramides (GIP-ceramides). The ceramide-based lipid was also found in the GIP membrane anchor of the G surface antigen of P.primaurelia, strain 156. Using a combination of in vitro labelling with GDP-[3H]mannose and in vivo labelling with 33P, we found that the core glycans of the P.primaurelia GIP-ceramides were substituted with an acid-labile modification identified as mannosyl phosphate. The modification of the glycosylinositol-phospholipid core glycan by mannosyl phosphate has not been described to date in other organisms. The biosynthesis of GIP-ceramide intermediates in P.primaurelia was studied by a pulse-chase analysis. Their structural characterization is reported. We propose the following structure for the putative GIP-ceramide membrane anchor precursor of P.primaurelia surface proteins: ethanolamine phosphate-6Man-alpha 1-2Man-alpha 1-6Man-(mannosyl phosphate)-alpha 1-4glucosamine-inositol-phosphoceramide. PMID:7556085

  14. Identification and characterization of a 38 kDa glycoprotein functionally associated with mating activity of Paramecium primaurelia.

    PubMed

    Ognibene, Marzia; Della Giovampaola, Cinzia; Trielli, Francesca; Focarelli, Riccardo; Rosati, Floriana; Umberta Delmonte Corrado, Maria

    2008-05-01

    In Paramecium primaurelia mating interactions take place immediately after mixing mating-competent cells of opposite mating types. The cells clump in clusters (mating reaction) and then separate in pairs. Previous results have shown that sialic acid-containing glycoconjugates are present on the cell surface and are involved in mating-cell pairing. In order to identify the sialic acid-containing glycoprotein(s), we first metabolically radiolabelled non-mating-competent cells with D-[6-(3)H]galactose, and then analyzed the radiolabelled proteins by anion exchange chromatography. We characterized a 38 kDa (gp38) sialic acid-containing glycoprotein and raised the corresponding polyclonal antibody by means of which we localized the antigen at the level of the oral region of non-mating-competent cells and on the ciliary surface of mating-competent cells. Immunoblot analysis of the ciliary protein fraction showed that the anti-gp38 serum interacted with a 38 kDa protein in both mating types I and II cells. We also demonstrated the functional activity of gp38 in the mating reaction by means of anti-gp38 antibody competition assays. PMID:17870426

  15. Evidence for the presence of a mammalian-like cholinesterase in Paramecium primaurelia (Protista, Ciliophora) developmental cycle.

    PubMed

    Delmonte Corrado, M U; Politi, H; Trielli, F; Angelini, C; Falugi, C

    1999-01-01

    By histochemical and immunohistochemical methods, the presence of cholinergic-like molecules has previously been demonstrated in Paramecium primaurelia, and their functional role in mating-cell pairing was suggested. In this work, both true acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activities were electrophoretically investigated, and the presence of molecules immunologically related to BuChE was checked by immunoblotting. The AChE activity, shown in the membrane protein fraction of mating-competent cells and in the cytoplasmic fraction of immature cells, is due to a 260-kDa molecular form, similar to the membrane-bound tetrameric form present in human erythrocytes. This AChE activity does not appear in either the cytoplasmic fraction of mating-competent cells or in the membrane protein fraction of immature cells. No evidence was found for the presence or the activity of BuChE-like molecules. The role of AChE in P. primaurelia developmental cycle is discussed. PMID:9990739

  16. Developmentally regulated excision of a 28-base-pair sequence from the Paramecium genome requires flanking DNA.

    PubMed

    Ku, M; Mayer, K; Forney, J D

    2000-11-01

    The micronuclear DNA of Paramecium tetraurelia is estimated to contain over 50,000 short DNA elements that are precisely removed during the formation of the transcriptionally active macronucleus. Each internal eliminated sequence (IES) is bounded by 5'-TA-3' dinucleotide repeats, a feature common to some classes of DNA transposons. We have developed an in vivo assay to analyze these highly efficient and precise DNA excision events. The microinjection of a cloned IES into mating cells results in accurately spliced products, and the transformed cells maintain the injected DNA as extrachromosomal molecules. A series of deletions flanking one side of a 28-bp IES were constructed and analyzed with the in vivo assay. Whereas 72 bp of DNA flanking the eliminated region is sufficient for excision, lengths of 31 and 18 bp result in reduced excision and removal of all wild-type sequences adjacent to the TA results in complete failure of excision. In contrast, nucleotide mutations within the middle of the 28-bp IES do not prevent excision. The results are consistent with a functional role for perfect inverted repeats flanking the IES. PMID:11046136

  17. Odd mating-type substances may work as precursor molecules of even mating-type substances in Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Kumakura, M; Kaku, E; Takahashi, M

    2001-01-01

    Mating-type substances are key molecules in the sexual recognition of the odd (O) and even (E) complementary mating-type cells in Paramecium caudatum. Indirect evidence suggested that the substances were proteins and were located on ventral surface cilia. Monoclonal antibodies inhibiting the mating reactivity of the O cells have been obtained. Using these antibodies, we tried to detect antigen molecules as dot-blot signals. Strong dot-blot signals of antigens were only detected from the mating reactive cells, but they were not detected from the well-fed and starved cells without mating reactivity. In addition to identifying the antigen on cilia and cytoplasm of the O cell, the antigen was detected from the cytoplasm of the E cells but never from their cilia. Furthermore, extracts of the E cells induced mating reaction with the living E cells but not with O cells. Thus, the O mating-type substances exist in the cytoplasm of the E mating-type cells, supporting strongly the hypothesis that O mating-type substances are precursor molecules of the E mating-type substances. PMID:11831778

  18. [Heat shock protein of Hsp70 in Paramecium nephridiatum and its role in adaptation to environmental salinity changes].

    PubMed

    Smurov, A O; Podlipaeva, Iu I; Gudkov, A V

    2007-01-01

    The level of Hsp70 was studied in the cells of eurihaline ciliate Paramecium nephridiatum after the environmental salinity changes. Two types of treatment were applied. "Shock": ciliates were placed for 1 h to the medium with stress salinity, then transferred back to the medium, they were acclimated to, for 2 h; "adaptation": ciliates were placed for 3 h into stress salinity. It has been shown, that ciliates, acclimated to fresh water (0%) have the higher constitutive level of Hsp70, than those, acclimated to 10%. Transfer from fresh water to 10% does not cause the increase of Hsp70 synthesis in protists, whereas the reciprocal transfer results in induction of Hsp70 in the cells. "Adaptation" results in induction of Hsp70 in both "directions" of salinity changes. The results obtained allow to presume that the possibility to survive in the media of various salinity in eurihaline ciliates is somehow determined by the higher initial level of Hsp70 in their cells, than in stenohaline representatives of the same genus.

  19. Parasite-mediated protection against osmotic stress for Paramecium caudatum infected by Holospora undulata is host genotype specific.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Alison B; Fellous, Simon; Accot, Robin; Alart, Marie; Chantung Sobandi, Kevin; Cosiaux, Ariane; Kaltz, Oliver

    2010-11-01

    Under certain conditions, otherwise parasitic organisms may become beneficial to their host. Parasite-mediated heat and osmotic stress resistance have been demonstrated for Paramecium caudatum, infected by several species of parasitic bacteria of the genus Holospora. Here, using the micronucleus-specific bacterium Holospora undulata, we investigate how infection mediates the response of two genotypes (clones 'K8' and 'VEN') of P. caudatum to heat (35 °C) and osmotic (0.24% NaCl) stress. In contrast to previous findings, we find no evidence for heat stress protection in infected individuals. We do, however, show an effect of symbiont-mediated osmotic stress resistance for the K8 clone, with infected individuals having higher survival than their uninfected counterparts up to 24 h after the onset of salt exposure. Despite this, both infected and uninfected individuals of the VEN clone showed higher survival rates than clone K8 individuals under osmotic stress. Thus, it would seem that parasite-mediated stress protection is restricted to certain combinations of host genotypes and types of stress and does not represent a general phenomenon in this system.

  20. Photosynthetic Shutdown in Chlorella NC64A Associated with the Infection Cycle of Paramecium bursaria Chlorella Virus-1.

    PubMed Central

    Seaton, GGR.; Lee, K.; Rohozinski, J.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of the algal virus Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus-1 on the photosynthetic physiology of its host, Chlorella NC64A, was studied by observing changes in Chl fluorescence quenching and O2 exchange. Metabolic changes were calibrated against electron microscopic analysis of the morphological changes that occur during the infection cycle. It takes approximately 10 h from attachment of the virus to final lysis of the host cell, so a complete infection cycle can be observed continuously in one experiment. During the early stages of the infection cycle many rapid changes occurred in the host cell's metabolism and these were reflected in changes of photosynthetic and respiratory rates. The dramatic inhibition of photosynthesis in Chlorella NC64A cells by P. bursaria Chlorella virus-1 has facilitated the use of fluorescence quenching as an accurate measure of the first phase of viral infection (attachment and penetration of the host cell) and the extent to which a population of host cells is infected. Effects of temperature and cation requirement of the infection cycle are described. The relevance of our observations to the events observed during viral infection of higher plants is discussed. PMID:12228553

  1. Evolution of the α-Subunit of Na/K-ATPase from Paramecium to Homo sapiens: Invariance of Transmembrane Helix Topology.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Liu, Lijun; Gupta, Raj K; Askari, Amir

    2016-05-01

    Na/K-ATPase is a key plasma membrane enzyme involved in cell signaling, volume regulation, and maintenance of electrochemical gradients. The α-subunit, central to these functions, belongs to a large family of P-type ATPases. Differences in transmembrane (TM) helix topology, sequence homology, helix-helix contacts, cell signaling, and protein domains of Na/K-ATPase α-subunit were compared in fungi (Beauveria), unicellular organisms (Paramecia), primitive multicellular organisms (Hydra), and vertebrates (Xenopus, Homo sapiens), and correlated with evolution of physiological functions in the α-subunit. All α-subunits are of similar length, with groupings of four and six helices in the N- and C-terminal regions, respectively. Minimal homology was seen for protein domain patterns in Paramecium and Hydra, with high correlation between Hydra and vertebrates. Paramecium α-subunits display extensive disorder, with minimal helix contacts. Increases in helix contacts in Hydra approached vertebrates. Protein motifs known to be associated with membrane lipid rafts and cell signaling reveal significant positional shifts between Paramecium and Hydra vulgaris, indicating that regional membrane fluidity changes occur during evolution. Putative steroid binding sites overlapping TM-3 occurred in all species. Sites associated with G-protein-receptor stimulation occur both in vertebrates and amphibia but not in Hydra or Paramecia. The C-terminus moiety "KETYY," necessary for the Na(+) activation of pump phosphorylation, is not present in unicellular species indicating the absence of classical Na(+)/K(+)-pumps. The basic protein topology evolved earliest, followed by increases in protein domains and ordered helical arrays, correlated with appearance of α-subunit regions known to involve cell signaling, membrane recycling, and ion channel formation. PMID:26961431

  2. Phylogenetically close group I introns with different positions among Paramecium bursaria photobionts imply a primitive stage of intron diversification.

    PubMed

    Hoshina, Ryo; Imamura, Nobutaka

    2009-06-01

    Group I introns are a distinct RNA group that catalyze their excision from precursor RNA transcripts and ligate the exons. Group I introns have a sporadic and highly biased distribution due to the two intron transfer mechanisms of homing and reverse splicing. These transfer pathways recognize assigned sequences even when introns are transferred beyond the species level. Consequently, introns at homologous gene sites between different host organisms are more related than those at heterologous sites within an organism. We describe the subgroup IE introns of two Chlorella species that are symbiotic green algae (photobionts) of a ciliate, Paramecium bursaria. One strain Chlorella sp. SW1-ZK (Csw.) had two IE introns at S651 and L2449, and the other strain Chlorella sp. OK1-ZK (Cok.) had four IE introns at S943, L1688, L1926, and L2184 (numbering reflects their homologous position in Escherichia coli rRNA gene: S = small subunit rRNA, L = large subunit rRNA). Despite locating on six heterologous sites, the introns formed a monophyletic clade independent of other groups. Phylogenetic and structural analyses of the introns indicated that Csw.L2449 has an archaic state, and the other introns are assumed to be originated from this intron. Some of the introns shared common internal guide sequences, which are necessary for misdirected transfer (i.e., transposition) via reverse splicing. Other introns, however, shared similar sequence fragments further upstream, after the insertions. We propose a hypothetical model to explain how these intron transpositions may have occurred in these photobionts; they transposed by a combination of homing-like event requiring relaxed sequence homology of recognition sequences and reverse splicing. This case study may represent a key to describe how group I intron explores new insertion sites.

  3. Coping with Temperature at the Warm Edge – Patterns of Thermal Adaptation in the Microbial Eukaryote Paramecium caudatum

    PubMed Central

    Krenek, Sascha; Petzoldt, Thomas; Berendonk, Thomas U.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ectothermic organisms are thought to be severely affected by global warming since their physiological performance is directly dependent on temperature. Latitudinal and temporal variations in mean temperatures force ectotherms to adapt to these complex environmental conditions. Studies investigating current patterns of thermal adaptation among populations of different latitudes allow a prediction of the potential impact of prospective increases in environmental temperatures on their fitness. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, temperature reaction norms were ascertained among 18 genetically defined, natural clones of the microbial eukaryote Paramecium caudatum. These different clones have been isolated from 12 freshwater habitats along a latitudinal transect in Europe and from 3 tropical habitats (Indonesia). The sensitivity to increasing temperatures was estimated through the analysis of clone specific thermal tolerances and by relating those to current and predicted temperature data of their natural habitats. All investigated European clones seem to be thermal generalists with a broad thermal tolerance and similar optimum temperatures. The weak or missing co-variation of thermal tolerance with latitude does not imply local adaptation to thermal gradients; it rather suggests adaptive phenotypic plasticity among the whole European subpopulation. The tested Indonesian clones appear to be locally adapted to the less variable, tropical temperature regime and show higher tolerance limits, but lower tolerance breadths. Conclusions/Significance Due to the lack of local temperature adaptation within the European subpopulation, P. caudatum genotypes at the most southern edge of their geographic range seem to suffer from the predicted increase in magnitude and frequency of summer heat waves caused by climate change. PMID:22427799

  4. Identification of Two Nickel Ion-Induced Genes, NCI16 and PcGST1, in Paramecium caudatum

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Nobuyuki; Nakano, Takanari; Ikeda, Masaaki; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe the isolation of two nickel-induced genes in Paramecium caudatum, NCI16 and PcGST1, by subtractive hybridization. NCI16 encoded a predicted four-transmembrane domain protein (∼16 kDa) of unknown function, and PcGST1 encoded glutathione S-transferase (GST; ∼25 kDa) with GST and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Exposing cells to cobalt chloride also caused the moderate upregulation of NCI16 and PcGST1 mRNAs. Both nickel sulfate and cobalt chloride dose dependently induced NCI16 and PcGST1 mRNAs, but with different profiles. Nickel treatment caused a continuous increase in PcGST1 and NCI16 mRNA levels for up to 3 and 6 days, respectively, and a notable increase in H2O2 concentrations in P. caudatum. NCI16 expression was significantly enhanced by incubating cells with H2O2, implying that NCI16 induction in the presence of nickel ions is caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). On the other hand, PcGST1 was highly induced by the antioxidant tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) but not by H2O2, suggesting that different mechanisms mediate the induction of NCI16 and PcGST1. We introduced a luciferase reporter vector with an ∼0.42-kb putative PcGST1 promoter into cells and then exposed the transformants to nickel sulfate. This resulted in significant luciferase upregulation, indicating that the putative PcGST1 promoter contains a nickel-responsive element. Our nickel-inducible system also may be applicable to the efficient expression of proteins that are toxic to host cells or require temporal control. PMID:25001407

  5. Crystal structure analysis of the exocytosis-sensitive phosphoprotein, pp63/parafusin (phosphoglucomutase), from Paramecium reveals significant conformational variability.

    PubMed

    Müller, Simone; Diederichs, Kay; Breed, Jason; Kissmehl, Roland; Hauser, Karin; Plattner, Helmut; Welte, Wolfram

    2002-01-11

    During exocytosis of dense-core secretory vesicles (trichocysts) in Paramecium, the protein pp63/parafusin (pp63/pf) is transiently dephosphorylated. We report here the structures of two crystal forms of one isoform of this protein which has a high degree of homology with rabbit phosphoglucomutase, whose structure has been reported. As expected, both proteins possess highly similar structures, showing the same four domains forming two lobes with an active-site crevice in between. The two X-ray structures that we report here were determined after crystallization in the presence of sulfate and tartrate, and show the lobes arranged as a closed and an open conformation, respectively. While both conformations possess a bound divalent cation, only the closed (sulfate-bound) conformation shows bound sulfate ions in the "phosphate-transfer site" near the catalytic serine residue and in the "phosphate-binding site". Comparison with the open form shows that the latter dianion is placed in the centre of three arginine residues, one contributed by subunit II and two by subunit IV, suggesting that it causes a contraction of the arginine triangle, which establishes the observed conformational closure of the lobes. It is therefore likely that the closed conformation forms only when a phosphoryl group is bound to the phosphate-binding site. The previously published structure of rabbit phosphoglucomutase is intermediate between these two conformers. Several of the known reversible phosphorylation sites of pp63/pf-1 are at positions critical for transition between the conformations and for binding of the ligands and thus give hints as to possible roles of pp63/pf-1 in the course of exocytosis.

  6. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) but not perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) showed DNA damage in comet assay on Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Kosuke; Oashi, Takahiro; Oami, Kazunori; Liu, Wei; Jin, Yihe; Saito, Norimitsu; Sato, Itaru; Tsuda, Shuji

    2010-12-01

    Persistent perfluorinated organic compounds such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are distributed widely in the global environment including wildlife and human. In this study, we investigated the genotoxicity of PFOS and PFOA using the novel in vivo comet assay developed for Paramecium caudatum. For the comet assay, large nuclei squeezed out of the paramecia with 0.25 M sucrose containing 0.6% Triton X-100 were embedded in a layer of agarose gel placed over the slide glass. N-methyl-N´-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) were successfully used for positive controls. Productions of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also measured in paramecia. PFOS did not cause DNA damage on any conditions examined. On the other hand, 12 and 24 hr exposure to PFOA (100 µM) increased DNA migration in electrophoresis condition at pH 13, but not at pH 12.1, suggesting that the DNA damage may be alkali labile site (such as apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site). Exposure of paramecia to 100 µM PFOA for 1, 3 and 24 hr and to 10 µM PFOA for 24 hr significantly increased intracellular ROS. Under the same condition, however, 8-OH-dG level was not affected by PFOA. The PFOA-induced DNA damage was not abolished by the application of 100 µM GSH which completely inhibited the increase of intracellular ROS. In conclusion, the PFOA-induced in vivo DNA damage was first shown in paramecia, and the DNA damage might not be directly attributable to increase in intracellular ROS.

  7. Distinct RNA-dependent RNA polymerases are required for RNAi triggered by double-stranded RNA versus truncated transgenes in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Marker, Simone; Le Mouël, Anne; Meyer, Eric; Simon, Martin

    2010-01-01

    In many eukaryotes, RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) play key roles in the RNAi pathway. They have been implicated in the recognition and processing of aberrant transcripts triggering the process, and in amplification of the silencing response. We have tested the functions of RdRP genes from the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia in experimentally induced and endogenous mechanisms of gene silencing. In this organism, RNAi can be triggered either by high-copy, truncated transgenes or by directly feeding cells with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Surprisingly, dsRNA-induced silencing depends on the putatively functional RDR1 and RDR2 genes, which are required for the accumulation of both primary siRNAs and a distinct class of small RNAs suggestive of secondary siRNAs. In contrast, a third gene with a highly divergent catalytic domain, RDR3, is required for siRNA accumulation when RNAi is triggered by truncated transgenes. Our data further implicate RDR3 in the accumulation of previously described endogenous siRNAs and in the regulation of the surface antigen gene family. While only one of these genes is normally expressed in any clonal cell line, the knockdown of RDR3 leads to co-expression of multiple antigens. These results provide evidence for a functional specialization of Paramecium RdRP genes in distinct RNAi pathways operating during vegetative growth. PMID:20200046

  8. Distinct RNA-dependent RNA polymerases are required for RNAi triggered by double-stranded RNA versus truncated transgenes in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Marker, Simone; Le Mouël, Anne; Meyer, Eric; Simon, Martin

    2010-07-01

    In many eukaryotes, RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) play key roles in the RNAi pathway. They have been implicated in the recognition and processing of aberrant transcripts triggering the process, and in amplification of the silencing response. We have tested the functions of RdRP genes from the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia in experimentally induced and endogenous mechanisms of gene silencing. In this organism, RNAi can be triggered either by high-copy, truncated transgenes or by directly feeding cells with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Surprisingly, dsRNA-induced silencing depends on the putatively functional RDR1 and RDR2 genes, which are required for the accumulation of both primary siRNAs and a distinct class of small RNAs suggestive of secondary siRNAs. In contrast, a third gene with a highly divergent catalytic domain, RDR3, is required for siRNA accumulation when RNAi is triggered by truncated transgenes. Our data further implicate RDR3 in the accumulation of previously described endogenous siRNAs and in the regulation of the surface antigen gene family. While only one of these genes is normally expressed in any clonal cell line, the knockdown of RDR3 leads to co-expression of multiple antigens. These results provide evidence for a functional specialization of Paramecium RdRP genes in distinct RNAi pathways operating during vegetative growth.

  9. Isolation and characterization of a virus (CvV-BW1) that infects symbiotic algae of Paramecium bursaria in Lake Biwa, Japan

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We performed an environmental study of viruses infecting the symbiotic single-celled algae of Paramecium bursaria (Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus, PBCV) in Lake Biwa, the largest lake in Japan. The viruses detected were all Chlorella variabilis virus (CvV = NC64A virus). One of them, designated CvV-BW1, was subjected to further characterization. Results CvV-BW1 formed small plaques and had a linear DNA genome of 370 kb, as judged by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Restriction analysis indicated that CvV-BW1 DNA belongs to group H, one of the most resistant groups among CvV DNAs. Based on a phylogenetic tree constructed using the dnapol gene, CvV was classified into two clades, A and B. CvV-BW1 belonged to clade B, in contrast to all previously identified virus strains of group H that belonged to clade A. Conclusions We conclude that CvV-BW1 composes a distinct species within C. variabilis virus. PMID:20831832

  10. The protozoan, Paramecium primaurelia, as a non-sentient model to test laser light irradiation: The effects of an 808nm infrared laser diode on cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Amaroli, Andrea; Ravera, Silvia; Parker, Steven; Panfoli, Isabella; Benedicenti, Alberico; Benedicenti, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) has been used in clinical practice for more than 40 years. Unfortunately, conflicting literature has led to the labelling of PBM as a complementary or alternative medicine approach. However, past and ongoing clinical and research studies by reputable investigators have re-established the merits of PBM as a genuine medical therapy, and the technique has, in the last decade, seen an exponential increase in the numbers of clinical instruments available, and their applications. This resurgence has led to a clear need for appropriate experimental models to test the burgeoning laser technology being developed for medical applications. In this context, an ethical model that employs the protozoan, Paramecium primaurelia, is proposed. We studied the possibility of using the measure of oxygen consumption to test PBM by irradiation with an infrared or near-infrared laser. The results show that an 808nm infrared laser diode (1W; 64J/cm²) affects cellular respiration in P. primaurelia, inducing, in the irradiated cells, a significantly (p < 0.05) increased oxygen consumption of about 40%. Our findings indicate that Paramecium can be an excellent tool in biological assays involving infrared and near-infrared PBM, as it combines the advantages of in vivo results with the practicality of in vitro testing. This test represents a fast, inexpensive and straightforward assay, which offers an alternative to both traditional in vivo testing and more expensive mammalian cellular cultures. PMID:26256394

  11. Effect of 808 nm Diode Laser on Swimming Behavior, Food Vacuole Formation and Endogenous ATP Production of Paramecium primaurelia (Protozoa).

    PubMed

    Amaroli, Andrea; Ravera, Silvia; Parker, Steven; Panfoli, Isabella; Benedicenti, Alberico; Benedicenti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) has been used in clinical practice for more than 40 years. To clarify the mechanisms of action of PBM at cellular and organism levels, we investigated its effect on Paramecium primaurelia (Protozoa) irradiated by an 808 nm infrared diode laser with a flat-top handpiece (1 W in CW). Our results led to the conclusion that: (1) the 808 nm laser stimulates the P. primaurelia without a thermal effect, (2) the laser effect is demonstrated by an increase in swimming speed and in food vacuole formation, (3) the laser treatment affects endogenous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in a positive way, (4) the effects of irradiation dose suggest an optimum exposure time of 50 s (64 J cm(-2) of fluence) to stimulate the Paramecium cells; irradiation of 25 s shows no effect or only mild effects and irradiation up to 100 s does not increase the effect observed with 50 s of treatment, (5) the increment of endogenous ATP concentration highlights the positive photobiomodulating effect of the 808 nm laser and the optimal irradiation conditions by the flat-top handpiece. PMID:26118482

  12. A set of SNARE proteins in the contractile vacuole complex of Paramecium regulates cellular calcium tolerance and also contributes to organelle biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schönemann, Barbara; Bledowski, Alexander; Sehring, Ivonne M; Plattner, Helmut

    2013-03-01

    The contractile vacuole complex (CVC) of freshwater protists serves the extrusion of water and ions, including Ca(2+). No vesicle trafficking based on SNAREs has been detected so far in any CVC. SNAREs (soluble NSF [N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor] attachment protein receptors) are required for membrane-to-membrane interaction, i.e. docking and fusion also in Paramecium. We have identified three v-/R- and three t/Q-SNAREs selectively in the CVC. Posttranscriptional silencing of Syb2, Syb6 or Syx2 slows down the pumping cycle; silencing of the latter two also causes vacuole swelling. Increase in extracellular Ca(2+) after Syb2, Syb6 or Syx2 silencing causes further swelling of the contractile vacuole and deceleration of its pulsation. Silencing of Syx14 or Syx15 entails lethality in the Ca(2+) stress test. Thus, the effects of silencing strictly depend on the type of the silenced SNARE and on the concentration of Ca(2+) in the medium. This shows the importance of organelle-resident SNARE functions (which may encompass the vesicular delivery of other organelle-resident proteins) for Ca(2+) tolerance. A similar principle may be applicable also to the CVC in widely different unicellular organisms. In addition, in Paramecium, silencing particularly of Syx6 causes aberrant positioning of the CVC during de novo biogenesis before cytokinesis.

  13. An ion-current mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia with defects in the primary structure and post-translational N-methylation of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Wallen-Friedman, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    My work on pantophobiac A{sup 2} (pntA{sup 2}), a behavioral mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia, suggest that the Ca{sup ++}-binding protein calmodulin (CaM), and post-translation N-methylation of CaM, are important for Ca{sup ++}-related ion-current function. Calmodulin from wild-type Paramecium has two sites of lysine-N-methylation. Both of these sites are almost fully methylated in vivo; thus wild-type calmodulin is a poor substrate for N-methylation in vitro. In contrast, pntA/{sup 2} CaM can be heavily N-methylated in vitro, suggesting that the mutant calmodulin is under-methylated in vivo. Amino-acid composition analysis showed that CaM lysine 115 is undermethylated in pntA{sup 2}. Once pntA{sup 2} CaM is N-methylated, the (methyl-{sup 3}H) group does not turn over in either wild-type or pntA{sup 2} cytoplasmic fractions. The methylating enzymes in pntA{sup 2} high-speed supernatant fractions are active, but may be less robust than those of the wild type, suggesting a possible control of these enzymes by CaM.

  14. Bug22p, a conserved centrosomal/ciliary protein also present in higher plants, is required for an effective ciliary stroke in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Laligné, C; Klotz, C; de Loubresse, N Garreau; Lemullois, M; Hori, M; Laurent, F X; Papon, J F; Louis, B; Cohen, J; Koll, F

    2010-04-01

    Centrioles, cilia, and flagella are ancestral conserved organelles of eukaryotic cells. Among the proteins identified in the proteomics of ciliary proteins in Paramecium, we focus here on a protein, Bug22p, previously detected by cilia and basal-body high-throughput studies but never analyzed per se. Remarkably, this protein is also present in plants, which lack centrioles and cilia. Bug22p sequence alignments revealed consensus positions that distinguish species with centrioles/cilia from plants. In Paramecium, antibody and green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion labeling localized Bug22p in basal bodies and cilia, and electron microscopy immunolabeling refined the localization to the terminal plate of the basal bodies, the transition zone, and spots along the axoneme, preferentially between the membrane and the microtubules. RNA interference (RNAi) depletion of Bug22p provoked a strong decrease in swimming speed, followed by cell death after a few days. High-speed video microscopy and morphological analysis of Bug22p-depleted cells showed that the protein plays an important role in the efficiency of ciliary movement by participating in the stroke shape and rigidity of cilia. The defects in cell swimming and growth provoked by RNAi can be complemented by expression of human Bug22p. This is the first reported case of complementation by a human gene in a ciliate.

  15. Paramecium tetraurelia chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein PtCAF-1 is involved in RNA-mediated control of DNA elimination.

    PubMed

    Ignarski, Michael; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C; Arambasic, Miroslav; Sandoval, Pamela Y; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-10-29

    Genome-wide DNA remodelling in the ciliate Paramecium is ensured by RNA-mediated trans-nuclear crosstalk between the germline and the somatic genomes during sexual development. The rearrangements include elimination of transposable elements, minisatellites and tens of thousands non-coding elements called internally eliminated sequences (IESs). The trans-nuclear genome comparison process employs a distinct class of germline small RNAs (scnRNAs) that are compared against the parental somatic genome to select the germline-specific subset of scnRNAs that subsequently target DNA elimination in the progeny genome. Only a handful of proteins involved in this process have been identified so far and the mechanism of DNA targeting is unknown. Here we describe chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein (PtCAF-1), which we show is required for the survival of sexual progeny and localizes first in the parental and later in the newly developing macronucleus. Gene silencing shows that PtCAF-1 is required for the elimination of transposable elements and a subset of IESs. PTCAF-1 depletion also impairs the selection of germline-specific scnRNAs during development. We identify specific histone modifications appearing during Paramecium development which are strongly reduced in PTCAF-1 depleted cells. Our results demonstrate the importance of PtCAF-1 for the epigenetic trans-nuclear cross-talk mechanism.

  16. The protozoan, Paramecium primaurelia, as a non-sentient model to test laser light irradiation: The effects of an 808nm infrared laser diode on cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Amaroli, Andrea; Ravera, Silvia; Parker, Steven; Panfoli, Isabella; Benedicenti, Alberico; Benedicenti, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) has been used in clinical practice for more than 40 years. Unfortunately, conflicting literature has led to the labelling of PBM as a complementary or alternative medicine approach. However, past and ongoing clinical and research studies by reputable investigators have re-established the merits of PBM as a genuine medical therapy, and the technique has, in the last decade, seen an exponential increase in the numbers of clinical instruments available, and their applications. This resurgence has led to a clear need for appropriate experimental models to test the burgeoning laser technology being developed for medical applications. In this context, an ethical model that employs the protozoan, Paramecium primaurelia, is proposed. We studied the possibility of using the measure of oxygen consumption to test PBM by irradiation with an infrared or near-infrared laser. The results show that an 808nm infrared laser diode (1W; 64J/cm²) affects cellular respiration in P. primaurelia, inducing, in the irradiated cells, a significantly (p < 0.05) increased oxygen consumption of about 40%. Our findings indicate that Paramecium can be an excellent tool in biological assays involving infrared and near-infrared PBM, as it combines the advantages of in vivo results with the practicality of in vitro testing. This test represents a fast, inexpensive and straightforward assay, which offers an alternative to both traditional in vivo testing and more expensive mammalian cellular cultures.

  17. Cycloheximide induces synchronous swelling of perialgal vacuoles enclosing symbiotic Chlorella vulgaris and digestion of the algae in the ciliate Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2008-07-01

    Cycloheximide is known to inhibit preferentially protein synthesis of symbiotic Chlorella of the ciliate Paramecium bursaria, but to hardly host protein synthesis. Treatment of algae-bearing Paramecium cells with cycloheximide induces synchronous swelling of all perialgal vacuoles that are localized immediately beneath the host's cell membrane. In this study, the space between the symbiotic algal cell wall and the perialgal vacuole membrane widened to about 25 times its normal width 24 h after treatment with cycloheximide. Then, the vacuoles detached from beneath the host's cell membrane, were condensed and stained with Gomori's solution, and the algae in the vacuoles were digested. Although this phenomenon is induced only under a fluorescent light condition, and not under a constant dark condition, this phenomenon was not induced in paramecia treated with cycloheximide in the light in the presence of the photosynthesis inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. These results indicate that algal proteins synthesized in the presence of algal photosynthesis serve some important function to prevent expansion of the perialgal vacuole and to maintain the ability of the perialgal vacuole membrane to protect itself from host lysosomal fusion.

  18. Effect of 808 nm Diode Laser on Swimming Behavior, Food Vacuole Formation and Endogenous ATP Production of Paramecium primaurelia (Protozoa).

    PubMed

    Amaroli, Andrea; Ravera, Silvia; Parker, Steven; Panfoli, Isabella; Benedicenti, Alberico; Benedicenti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) has been used in clinical practice for more than 40 years. To clarify the mechanisms of action of PBM at cellular and organism levels, we investigated its effect on Paramecium primaurelia (Protozoa) irradiated by an 808 nm infrared diode laser with a flat-top handpiece (1 W in CW). Our results led to the conclusion that: (1) the 808 nm laser stimulates the P. primaurelia without a thermal effect, (2) the laser effect is demonstrated by an increase in swimming speed and in food vacuole formation, (3) the laser treatment affects endogenous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in a positive way, (4) the effects of irradiation dose suggest an optimum exposure time of 50 s (64 J cm(-2) of fluence) to stimulate the Paramecium cells; irradiation of 25 s shows no effect or only mild effects and irradiation up to 100 s does not increase the effect observed with 50 s of treatment, (5) the increment of endogenous ATP concentration highlights the positive photobiomodulating effect of the 808 nm laser and the optimal irradiation conditions by the flat-top handpiece.

  19. Paramecium putrinum (Ciliophora, Protozoa): the first insight into the variation of two DNA fragments - molecular support for the existence of cryptic species.

    PubMed

    Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria; Potekhin, Alexey; Sawka, Natalia; Beliavskaya, Alexandra; Kiselev, Andrey; Nekrasova, Irina; Przyboś, Ewa

    2014-04-01

    Paramecium putrinum (Claparede & Lachmann 1858) is one of the smallest (80-140 μm long) species of the genus Paramecium. Although it commonly occurs in freshwater reservoirs, no molecular studies of P. putrinum have been conducted to date. Herein we present an assessment of molecular variation in 27 strains collected from widely separated populations by using two selected DNA fragments (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-5'LSU rDNA and COI mtDNA). Both the trees and haplotype networks reconstructed for both genome fragments show that the studied strains of P. putrinum form five main haplogroups. The mean distance between the studied strains is p-distance=0.007/0.068 (rDNA/COI) and exhibits similar variability as that between P. bursaria syngens. Based on these data, one could hypothesize that the clusters revealed in the present study may correspond to previously reported syngens and that there are at least five cryptic species within P. putrinum.

  20. Paramecium tetraurelia chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein PtCAF-1 is involved in RNA-mediated control of DNA elimination

    PubMed Central

    Ignarski, Michael; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C.; Arambasic, Miroslav; Sandoval, Pamela Y.; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide DNA remodelling in the ciliate Paramecium is ensured by RNA-mediated trans-nuclear crosstalk between the germline and the somatic genomes during sexual development. The rearrangements include elimination of transposable elements, minisatellites and tens of thousands non-coding elements called internally eliminated sequences (IESs). The trans-nuclear genome comparison process employs a distinct class of germline small RNAs (scnRNAs) that are compared against the parental somatic genome to select the germline-specific subset of scnRNAs that subsequently target DNA elimination in the progeny genome. Only a handful of proteins involved in this process have been identified so far and the mechanism of DNA targeting is unknown. Here we describe chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein (PtCAF-1), which we show is required for the survival of sexual progeny and localizes first in the parental and later in the newly developing macronucleus. Gene silencing shows that PtCAF-1 is required for the elimination of transposable elements and a subset of IESs. PTCAF-1 depletion also impairs the selection of germline-specific scnRNAs during development. We identify specific histone modifications appearing during Paramecium development which are strongly reduced in PTCAF-1 depleted cells. Our results demonstrate the importance of PtCAF-1 for the epigenetic trans-nuclear cross-talk mechanism. PMID:25270876

  1. Paramecium tetraurelia chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein PtCAF-1 is involved in RNA-mediated control of DNA elimination.

    PubMed

    Ignarski, Michael; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C; Arambasic, Miroslav; Sandoval, Pamela Y; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-10-29

    Genome-wide DNA remodelling in the ciliate Paramecium is ensured by RNA-mediated trans-nuclear crosstalk between the germline and the somatic genomes during sexual development. The rearrangements include elimination of transposable elements, minisatellites and tens of thousands non-coding elements called internally eliminated sequences (IESs). The trans-nuclear genome comparison process employs a distinct class of germline small RNAs (scnRNAs) that are compared against the parental somatic genome to select the germline-specific subset of scnRNAs that subsequently target DNA elimination in the progeny genome. Only a handful of proteins involved in this process have been identified so far and the mechanism of DNA targeting is unknown. Here we describe chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein (PtCAF-1), which we show is required for the survival of sexual progeny and localizes first in the parental and later in the newly developing macronucleus. Gene silencing shows that PtCAF-1 is required for the elimination of transposable elements and a subset of IESs. PTCAF-1 depletion also impairs the selection of germline-specific scnRNAs during development. We identify specific histone modifications appearing during Paramecium development which are strongly reduced in PTCAF-1 depleted cells. Our results demonstrate the importance of PtCAF-1 for the epigenetic trans-nuclear cross-talk mechanism. PMID:25270876

  2. The nature of control of oral development by the micronucleus in sexual reproduction of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Chau, M F; Ng, S F

    1988-07-01

    Twelve laser-irradiated cell lines and eight cis. platin-treated cultures possessing defective micronuclei exhibited micronuclear and oral abnormalities during autogamy. Micronuclear abnormalities were characterized by the failure of some of the cells to complete the micronuclear cycle resulting in the absence of either micronuclei or macronuclear anlagen, or both. Oral abnormalities included reduction in the length of the buccal cavity and oral membranelles, abnormal oral membranellar patterns and arrest of oral development at early and late stages. The present study demonstrated a close relationship between micronuclear and stomatogenic abnormalities during sexual reproduction. It is concluded that the micronucleus plays an important role in the specification of a normal oral pattern during sexual reproduction. The participation of postzygotic micronuclear activities in the control of sexual stomatogenesis is discussed. In contrast to the situation in sexual reproduction, the development of the oral apparatus was normal during asexual propagation of the cell lines possessing defective micronuclei. This paradoxical situation forms the basis of speculations on the nature of micronuclear control of oral development in sexual reproduction. It is probable that micronuclear genes are involved. PMID:23195213

  3. Dynamic chromatin remodelling of ciliate macronuclear DNA as determined by an optimized chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) method for Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Cheaib, Miriam; Simon, Martin

    2013-03-01

    We report the detailed evaluation of crucial parameters for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) of macronuclear DNA in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium tetraurelia. Optimized parameters include crosslinking conditions, chromatin sonication and antibody titration thus providing a detailed protocol for successful ChIP in P. tetraurelia. As this ciliate is bacterivorous and RNAi by feeding represents a powerful tool for analysis of gene function, we moreover determined the effects of ingested nucleic acids by food bacteria. Feasibility of our protocol is demonstrated by characterisation of chromatin remodelling at promoters of cytosolic HSP70 isoforms during transcriptional activation under heat shock conditions by analyzing RNA abundance, nucleosome occupancy and levels of H3 lysine 9 acetylation.

  4. [Macronuclear DNA and total protein contents of mating types I and II of Paramecium primaurelia, during the phase of maturity and the transition to senescence. Preliminary observations].

    PubMed

    Delmonte Corrado, M U; Crippa Franceschi, T

    1992-01-01

    Concerning the studies on mating type differentiation and life cycle development in Paramecium primaurelia stock 90, both macronuclear DNA and total protein contents have been measured cytofluorometrically in mating type I and mating type II isogenic cell lines growing in logarithmic phase, throughout their maturity period and transition to senescence. The target was to investigate whether the two mating types undergo clonal decline in different times, as the previous studies suggested. The results indicate that, throughout the maturity period, macronuclear DNA and total protein contents vary both in mating type I and mating type II cell lines; moreover, aged phenotypes as the dramatic decrease of both contents, firstly occur in mating type II which, therefore, appears to be submitted to clonal decline before mating type I. PMID:1294201

  5. Microsurgical analysis of the clonal age and the cell-cycle stage required for the onset of autogamy in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Mikami, K; Koizumi, S

    1983-11-01

    When autogamy was induced in competent cells of Paramecium tetraurelia by depriving them of food, the onset of autogamy was preceded by a critical fission which occurred in the starvation medium. When the cells were fed again immediately after the fission, they did not undergo autogamy. However, they did undergo autogamy when they were fed later than 1 hr after the critical fission. The irreversible differentiation for autogamy seems to be at about 1 hr after the critical fission. This procedure thus provides the opportunity to induce autogamy synchronously. The result of macronuclear transplantation demonstrated that autogamy was under the control of macronucleus. Moreover, the clonal age required for autogamy was found to be shortened by repetitive elimination of a part of the macronucleus. The result can be explained by the hypothesis that clonal age is measured in rounds of chromosome replication or DNA synthesis rather than cell divisions. PMID:6617988

  6. Cellular membranes that undergo cyclic changes in tension: Direct measurement of force generation by an in vitro contractile vacuole of Paramecium multimicronucleatum.

    PubMed

    Tani, T; Allen, R D; Naitoh, Y

    2001-02-01

    The contractile vacuole of the fresh water protozoan Paramecium is a membrane-bound vesicle that expels excess cytosolic water, acquired osmotically, through its periodic exocytotic activity. The in vitro contractile vacuole, isolated in a small amount of cytosol from the Paramecium cell and confined under mineral oil, showed periodic rounding and slackening at regular intervals for an extended time. The contractile vacuole rounded against the cytosol-mineral oil boundary tension. The tension at the surface of the contractile vacuole is, therefore, assumed to increase during the rounding phase. We first estimated the tension relative to the boundary tension from the degree of compression of the contractile vacuole by the boundary. We then determined the absolute value for the tension at the surface of the contractile vacuole from the degree of bending of an elastic carbon fiber microcantilever (8 microm thick; 2 mm long), whose free end was placed at the surface of an in vitro contractile vacuole. The tension was found to increase to its maximum value of approximately 5 mN m(-)(1) when the contractile vacuole rounded. This value was more than 35 times higher than that for the slackened contractile vacuole. Electron micrographs of conventional thin sections of chemically fixed in vitro contractile vacuoles as well as those of in vivo contractile vacuoles obtained from rapid frozen and cryosubstituted cells revealed the lack of any ultrastructural evidence for the presence of a fibrous network system surrounding the contractile vacuole. Thus we conclude that the mechanism(s) by which tension is developed at the surface of the contractile vacuole membrane resides in the contractile vacuole membrane itself. We propose a hypothesis that periodic changes in the spontaneous curvature of the contractile vacuole's lipid bilayer membrane is involved in the periodic development of higher contractile vacuole membrane tension. The isolated CV promises to be an excellent model

  7. Microdomain Ca2+ Activation during Exocytosis in Paramecium Cells. Superposition of Local Subplasmalemmal Calcium Store Activation by Local Ca2+ Influx

    PubMed Central

    Erxleben, Christian; Klauke, Norbert; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Braun, Claudia; Plattner, Helmut

    1997-01-01

    In Paramecium tetraurelia, polyamine-triggered exocytosis is accompanied by the activation of Ca2+-activated currents across the cell membrane (Erxleben, C., and H. Plattner. 1994. J. Cell Biol. 127:935– 945). We now show by voltage clamp and extracellular recordings that the product of current × time (As) closely parallels the number of exocytotic events. We suggest that Ca2+ mobilization from subplasmalemmal storage compartments, covering almost the entire cell surface, is a key event. In fact, after local stimulation, Ca2+ imaging with high time resolution reveals rapid, transient, local signals even when extracellular Ca2+ is quenched to or below resting intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]e ⩽ [Ca2+]i). Under these conditions, quenched-flow/freeze-fracture analysis shows that membrane fusion is only partially inhibited. Increasing [Ca2+]e alone, i.e., without secretagogue, causes rapid, strong cortical increase of [Ca2+]i but no exocytosis. In various cells, the ratio of maximal vs. minimal currents registered during maximal stimulation or single exocytotic events, respectively, correlate nicely with the number of Ca stores available. Since no quantal current steps could be observed, this is again compatible with the combined occurrence of Ca2+ mobilization from stores (providing close to threshold Ca2+ levels) and Ca2+ influx from the medium (which per se does not cause exocytosis). This implies that only the combination of Ca2+ flushes, primarily from internal and secondarily from external sources, can produce a signal triggering rapid, local exocytotic responses, as requested for Paramecium defense. PMID:9024690

  8. Molecular aspects of calcium signalling at the crossroads of unikont and bikont eukaryote evolution--the ciliated protozoan Paramecium in focus.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut

    2015-03-01

    The ciliated protozoan, Paramecium tetraurelia has a high basic Ca(2+) leakage rate which is counteracted mainly by export through a contractile vacuole complex, based on its V-type H(+)-ATPase activity. In addition Paramecium cells dispose of P-type Ca(2+)-ATPases, i.e. a plasmamembrane and a sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA, SERCA). Antiporter systems are to be expected, as inferred from indirect evidence. Among the best known cytosolic Ca(2+)-binding proteins, calmodulin activates Ca(2+) influx channels in the somatic cell membrane, but inactivates Ca(2+) influx channels in cilia, where it, thus, ends ciliary reversal induced by depolarization via channels in the somatic cell membrane. Centrin inactivates Ca(2+) signals after stimulation by its high capacity/low affinity binding sites, whereas its high affinity sites regulate some other functions. Cortical Ca(2+) stores (alveolar sacs) are activated during stimulated trichocyst exocytosis and thereby mediate store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). Ca(2+) release channels (CRCs) localised to alveoli and underlying SOCE are considered as Ryanodine receptor-like proteins (RyR-LPs) which are members of a CRC family with 6 subfamilies. These also encompass genuine inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and intermediates between the two channel types. All IP3R/RyR-type CRCs possess six carboxyterminal transmembrane domains (TMD), with a pore domain between TMD 5 and 6, endowed with a characteristic selectivity filter. There are reasons to assume a common ancestor molecule for such channels and diversification further on in evolution. The distinct distribution of specific CRCs in the different vesicles undergoing intracellular trafficking suggests constitutive formation of very locally restricted Ca(2+) signals during vesicle-vesicle interaction. In summary, essential steps of Ca(2+) signalling already occur at this level of evolution, including an unexpected multitude of CRCs. For dis

  9. Calcium signalling in the ciliated protozoan model, Paramecium: strict signal localisation by epigenetically controlled positioning of different Ca²⁺-channels.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut

    2015-03-01

    The Paramecium tetraurelia cell is highly organised, with regularly spaced elements pertinent to Ca(2+) signalling under epigenetic control. Vesicles serving as stationary Ca(2+) stores or undergoing trafficking contain Ca(2+)-release channels (PtCRCs) which, according to sequence and domain comparison, are related either to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors (IP3R) or to ryanodine receptor-like proteins (RyR-LP) or to both, with intermediate characteristics or deviation from conventional domain structure. Six groups of such PtCRCs have been found. The ryanodine-InsP3-receptor homology (RIH) domain is not always recognisable, in contrast to the channel domain with six trans-membrane domains and the pore between transmembrane domain 5 and 6. Two CRC subtypes tested more closely, PtCRC-II and PtCRC-IV, with and without an InsP3-binding domain, reacted to InsP3 and to caffeine, respectively, and hence represent IP3Rs and RyR-LPs. IP3Rs occur in the contractile vacuole complex where they allow for stochastic constitutive Ca(2+) reflux into the cytosol. RyR-LPs are localised to cortical Ca(2+) stores; they are engaged in dense core-secretory vesicle exocytosis by Ca(2+) release, superimposed by Ca(2+)-influx via non-ciliary Ca(2+)-channels. One or two different types of PtCRCs also occur in other vesicles undergoing trafficking. Since the PtCRCs described combine different features they are considered derivatives of primitive precursors. The highly regular, epigenetically controlled design of a Paramecium cell allows it to make Ca(2+) available very locally, in a most efficient way, along predetermined trafficking pathways, including regulation of exocytosis, endocytosis, phagocytosis and recycling phenomena. The activity of cilia is also regulated by Ca(2+), yet independently from any CRCs, by de- and hyperpolarisation of the cell membrane potential.

  10. Molecular aspects of calcium signalling at the crossroads of unikont and bikont eukaryote evolution--the ciliated protozoan Paramecium in focus.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut

    2015-03-01

    The ciliated protozoan, Paramecium tetraurelia has a high basic Ca(2+) leakage rate which is counteracted mainly by export through a contractile vacuole complex, based on its V-type H(+)-ATPase activity. In addition Paramecium cells dispose of P-type Ca(2+)-ATPases, i.e. a plasmamembrane and a sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA, SERCA). Antiporter systems are to be expected, as inferred from indirect evidence. Among the best known cytosolic Ca(2+)-binding proteins, calmodulin activates Ca(2+) influx channels in the somatic cell membrane, but inactivates Ca(2+) influx channels in cilia, where it, thus, ends ciliary reversal induced by depolarization via channels in the somatic cell membrane. Centrin inactivates Ca(2+) signals after stimulation by its high capacity/low affinity binding sites, whereas its high affinity sites regulate some other functions. Cortical Ca(2+) stores (alveolar sacs) are activated during stimulated trichocyst exocytosis and thereby mediate store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). Ca(2+) release channels (CRCs) localised to alveoli and underlying SOCE are considered as Ryanodine receptor-like proteins (RyR-LPs) which are members of a CRC family with 6 subfamilies. These also encompass genuine inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and intermediates between the two channel types. All IP3R/RyR-type CRCs possess six carboxyterminal transmembrane domains (TMD), with a pore domain between TMD 5 and 6, endowed with a characteristic selectivity filter. There are reasons to assume a common ancestor molecule for such channels and diversification further on in evolution. The distinct distribution of specific CRCs in the different vesicles undergoing intracellular trafficking suggests constitutive formation of very locally restricted Ca(2+) signals during vesicle-vesicle interaction. In summary, essential steps of Ca(2+) signalling already occur at this level of evolution, including an unexpected multitude of CRCs. For dis

  11. Functional and fluorochrome analysis of an exocytotic mutant yields evidence of store-operated Ca2+ influx in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, I; Klauke, N; Hentschel, J; Cohen, J; Plattner, H

    2002-05-01

    A non-discharge mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia (nd12-35 degrees C, lacking exocytotic response upon stimulation with the nonpermeable polycationic secretagogue aminoethyldextran, AED), in the pawnA genetic context (d4-500r, lacking ciliary voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx), was shown to lack (45)Ca2+ entry from outside upon AED stimulation. In contrast, cells grown at 25 degrees C behave like the wildtype. To check the functional properties in more detail, fluorochrome-loaded 35 degrees C cells were stimulated, not only with AED (EC(100) = 10(-6) M in wildtype cells), but also with 4-chloro-meta-cresol, (4CmC, 0.5 mM), a permeable activator of ryanodine receptor-type Ca2+ release channels, usually at extracellular [Ca2+] of 50 microM, and eventually with a Ca2+ chelator added. We confirm that pwA-nd12(35 degrees C) cells lack any Ca2+ influx and any exocytosis of trichocysts in response to any stimulus. As we determined by x-ray microanalysis, total calcium content in alveolar sacs (subplasmalemmal stores) known to be mobilized upon exocytosis stimulation in wild-type cells, contain about the same total calcium in 35 degrees C as in 25 degrees C cells, and Ca2+ mobilization from alveoli by AED or 4CmC is also nearly the same. Due to the absence of any AED-induced Ca2+ influx in 35 degrees C cells and normal Ca2+ release from stores found by x-ray microanalysis one can exclude a "CICR"-type mechanism (Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release) and imply that normally a store-operated Ca2+ ("SOC") influx would occur (as in 25 degrees C cells). Furthermore, 35 degrees C cells display a significantly lower basal intracellular [Ca2+], so that any increase upon stimulation may be less expressed or even remain undetected. Under these conditions, any mobilization of Ca2+ from stores cannot compensate for the lack of Ca2+ influx, particularly since normally both components have to cooperate to achieve full exocytotic response. Also striking is our finding that 35 degrees C cells are unable

  12. Repressive function of the micronucleus during asexual reproduction in Paramecium tetraurelia: Experimental analysis with defective-micronucleates generated by laser microbeam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Au, K Y; Ho, W S; Ng, S F

    1990-10-19

    The present paper reports on the experimental analysis of a novel regulatory function of the micronucleus of Paramecium tetraurelia. Previous studies have made clear that amicronucleate cell lines shortly after their generation generally suffer depression, in exhibiting low viability, slow growth and abnormal oral development in binary fission, but they eventually recover to near-normal. A compensatory mechanism is thus activated in the absence of the micronucleus, to allow recovery of the amicronucleate cell line. Implicit in this conclusion is the role of the micronucleus in repression of the compensatory mechanism. The present study tested this notion by perturbing the micronucleus with laser microbeam irradiation. This operation generated cell lines possessing defective micronuclei; during their asexual propagation, some cells lost the micronucleus and gave rise to amicronucleates. The viability of amicronucleate cell lines derived in this manner was found to be higher, compared to others generated by a different operation involving instantaneous removal of normal micronuclei from the cell with a microinjection needle. Some evidence also suggested that their oral development was less abnormal during the initial depression period. Hence, damage of the micronucleus has apparently facilitated the activation of the compensatory function, and the latter might have occurred even before the loss of the defective micronucleus. The present findings provide support for a regulatory role of the micronucleus during asexual propagation. Previous studies have indicated that the physical basis of the compensatory mechanism resides with the macronucleus. The micronuclear repressive function may be directed against this compensatory mechanism of the macronucleus.

  13. Green fluorescent protein-tagged sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase overexpression in Paramecium cells: isoforms, subcellular localization, biogenesis of cortical calcium stores and functional aspects.

    PubMed

    Hauser, K; Pavlovic, N; Klauke, N; Geissinger, D; Plattner, H

    2000-08-01

    We have followed the time-dependent transfection of Paramecium cells with a vector containing the gene of green fluorescent protein (GFP) attached to the C-terminus of the PtSERCA1 gene. The outlines of alveolar sacs (ASs) are labelled, as is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) throughout the cell. When GFP fluorescence is compared with previous anti-PtSERCA1 antibody labelling, the much wider distribution of GFP (ER+ASs) indicates that only a small amount of SERCA molecules is normally retained in the ER. A second isoform, PtSERCA2, also occurs and its C-terminal GFP-tagging results in the same distribution pattern. However, when GFP is inserted in the major cytoplasmic loop, PtSERCA1 and two fusion proteins are mostly retained in the ER, probably because of the presence of the overt C-terminal KKXX ER-retention signal and/or masking of a signal for transfer into ASs. On the overall cell surface, new SERCA molecules seem to be permanently delivered from the ER to ASs by vesicle transport, whereas in the fission zone of dividing cells ASs may form anew. In cells overexpressing PtSERCA1 (with C-terminal GFP) in ASs, [Ca2+]i regulation during exocytosis is not significantly different from controls, probably because their Ca2+ pump has to mediate only slow reuptake.

  14. One-way calcium spill-over during signal transduction in Paramecium cells: from the cell cortex into cilia, but not in the reverse direction.

    PubMed

    Husser, Marc R; Hardt, Martin; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Hentschel, Joachim; Klauke, Norbert; Plattner, Helmut

    2004-11-01

    We asked to what extent Ca(2+) signals in two different domains of Paramecium cells remain separated during different stimulations. Wild-type (7S) and pawn cells (strain d4-500r, without ciliary voltage-dependent Ca(2+)-channels) were stimulated for trichocyst exocytosis within 80 ms by quenched-flow preparation and analysed by energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), paralleled by fast confocal fluorochrome analysis. We also analysed depolarisation-dependent calcium signalling during ciliary beat rerversal, also by EDX, after 80-ms stimulation in the quenched-flow mode. EDX and fluorochrome analysis enable to register total and free intracellular calcium concentrations, [Ca] and [Ca(2+)], respectively. After exocytosis stimulation we find by both methods that the calcium signal sweeps into the basis of cilia, not only in 7S but also in pawn cells which then also perform ciliary reversal. After depolarisation we see an increase of [Ca] along cilia selectively in 7S, but not in pawn cells. Opposite to exocytosis stimulation, during depolarisation no calcium spill-over into the nearby cytosol and no exocytosis occurs. In sum, we conclude that cilia must contain a very potent Ca(2+) buffering system and that ciliary reversal induction, much more than exocytosis stimulation, involves strict microdomain regulation of Ca(2+) signals.

  15. Molecular characterization of a sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase gene from Paramecium tetraurelia and localization of its gene product to sub-plasmalemmal calcium stores.

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, K; Pavlovic, N; Kissmehl, R; Plattner, H

    1998-01-01

    A cDNA encoding the gene for a sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum-type Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) was isolated from a cDNA library of Paramecium tetraurelia by using degenerated primers according to conserved domains of SERCA-type ATPases. The identified nucleotide sequence (PtSERCA) is 3114 nucleotides in length with an open reading frame of 1037 amino acids. An intron of only 22 nucleotides occurs. Homology searches for the deduced amino acid sequence revealed 38-49% similarity to SERCA-type ATPases from organisms ranging from protozoans to mammals, with no more similarity to some parasitic protozoa of the same phylum. The calculated molecular mass of the encoded protein is 114.7 kDa. It contains the typical 10 transmembrane domains of SERCA-type ATPases and other conserved domains, such as the phosphorylation site and the ATP binding site. However, there are no binding sites for phospholamban and thapsigargin present in the PtSERCA. Antibodies raised against a cytoplasmic loop peptide between the phosphorylation site and the ATP binding site recognize on Western blots a protein of 106 kDa, exclusively in the fraction of sub-plasmalemmal calcium stores ('alveolar sacs'). In immunofluorescence studies the antibodies show labelling exclusively in the cell cortex of permeabilized cells in a pattern characteristic of the arrangement of alveolar sacs. When alveolar sacs where tested for phosphoenzyme-intermediate formation a phosphoprotein of the same molecular mass (106 kDa) could be identified. PMID:9693098

  16. Genomic Characterization of Variable Surface Antigens Reveals a Telomere Position Effect as a Prerequisite for RNA Interference-Mediated Silencing in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Baranasic, Damir; Oppermann, Timo; Cheaib, Miriam; Cullum, John; Schmidt, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antigenic or phenotypic variation is a widespread phenomenon of expression of variable surface protein coats on eukaryotic microbes. To clarify the mechanism behind mutually exclusive gene expression, we characterized the genetic properties of the surface antigen multigene family in the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia and the epigenetic factors controlling expression and silencing. Genome analysis indicated that the multigene family consists of intrachromosomal and subtelomeric genes; both classes apparently derive from different gene duplication events: whole-genome and intrachromosomal duplication. Expression analysis provides evidence for telomere position effects, because only subtelomeric genes follow mutually exclusive transcription. Microarray analysis of cultures deficient in Rdr3, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, in comparison to serotype-pure wild-type cultures, shows cotranscription of a subset of subtelomeric genes, indicating that the telomere position effect is due to a selective occurrence of Rdr3-mediated silencing in subtelomeric regions. We present a model of surface antigen evolution by intrachromosomal gene duplication involving the maintenance of positive selection of structurally relevant regions. Further analysis of chromosome heterogeneity shows that alternative telomere addition regions clearly affect transcription of closely related genes. Consequently, chromosome fragmentation appears to be of crucial importance for surface antigen expression and evolution. Our data suggest that RNAi-mediated control of this genetic network by trans-acting RNAs allows rapid epigenetic adaptation by phenotypic variation in combination with long-term genetic adaptation by Darwinian evolution of antigen genes. PMID:25389173

  17. Elucidation of nucleus-cytoplasm interaction: change in ability of the nucleus to express sexuality according to clonal age in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Haga, N

    1995-12-01

    The expression of sexual activity in Paramecium caudatum is repressed for about 50 fissions after conjugation. The ability of the macronucleus to affect the expression of sexual activity according to the age of clonal development was investigated using the macronuclear fusion-reorganization method. When a mature macronucleus was transplanted into an immature cell and fused with a macronucleus in the immature cell, the clones derived from the recipient showed sexual immaturity. In a reverse experiment, an immature macronucleus was transplanted into a mature cell, and the clones also showed sexual immaturity. The ability of the macronucleus to transform mature cells to immature cells was clonal age-dependent. The characteristics of the immature-mature hybrid macronucleus indicate that the immature macronucleus is dominant over the mature macronucleus with respect to the ability to express sexual activity. On the other hand, in cells of the early immaturity period, the micronucleus, known as the germ nucleus, shows the ability to undergo meiosis and eventually to produce progeny under control of the mature macronucleus. The expression of sexual activity is thought to be governed by the clonal age of the macronucleus and not by the clonal age of the micronucleus or cytoplasm. The macronucleus seems to determine the ability to express sexual activity by counting post-conjugation divisions and keeping track of the age of the clone.

  18. Timing of initiation of macronuclear DNA synthesis is set during the preceding cell cycle in Paramecium tetraurelia: analysis of the effects of abrupt changes in nutrient level

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, A.S.L.; Berger, J.D.

    1986-11-01

    In many eukaryotic organisms, initiation of DNA synthesis is associated with a major control point within the cell cycle and reflects the commitment of the cell to the DNA replication-division portion of the cell cycle. In paramecium, the timing of DNA synthesis initiation is established prior to fission during the preceding cell cycle. DNA synthesis normally starts at 0.25 in the cell cycle. When dividing cells are subjected to abrupt nutrient shift-up by transfer from a chemostat culture to medium with excess food, or shift-down from a well-fed culture to exhausted medium, DNA synthesis initiation in the post-shift cell cycle occurs at 0.25 of the parental cell cycle and not at either 0.25 in the post-shift cell cycle or at 0.25 in the equilibrium cell cycle produced under the post-shift conditions. The long delay prior to initiation of DNA synthesis following nutritional shift-up is not a consequence of continued slow growth because the rate of protein synthesis increases rapidly to the normal level after shift-up. Analysis of the relation between increase in cell mass and initiation of DNA synthesis following nutritional shifts indicates that increase in cell mass, per se, is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for initiation of DNA synthesis, in spite of the strong association between accumulation of cell mass and initiation of DNA synthesis in cells growing under steady-state conditions.

  19. Endosymbiosis of Chlorella species to the ciliate Paramecium bursaria alters the distribution of the host's trichocysts beneath the host cell cortex.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    Each symbiotic Chlorella of the ciliate Paramecium bursaria is enclosed in a perialgal vacuole membrane derived from the host digestive vacuole membrane. Alga-free paramecia and symbiotic algae can grow independently. Mixing them experimentally can cause reinfection. Earlier, we reported that the symbiotic algae appear to push the host trichocysts aside to become fixed beneath the host cell cortex during the algal reinfection process. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy with a monoclonal antibody against the trichocysts demonstrates that the trichocysts change their locality to form algal attachment sites and decrease their density beneath the host cell cortex through algal reinfection. Transmission electron microscopy to detect acid phosphatase activity showed that some trichocysts near the host cell cortex are digested by the host lysosomal fusion during algal reinfection. Removal of algae from the host cell using cycloheximide recovers the trichocyst's arrangement and number near the host cell cortex. These results indicate that symbiotic algae compete for their attachment sites with preexisting trichocysts and that the algae have the ability to ensure algal attachment sites beneath the host cell cortex.

  20. Cell division and density of symbiotic Chlorella variabilis of the ciliate Paramecium bursaria is controlled by the host's nutritional conditions during early infection process.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2012-10-01

    The association of ciliate Paramecium bursaria with symbiotic Chlorella sp. is a mutualistic symbiosis. However, both the alga-free paramecia and symbiotic algae can still grow independently and can be reinfected experimentally by mixing them. Effects of the host's nutritional conditions against the symbiotic algal cell division and density were examined during early reinfection. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that algal cell division starts 24 h after mixing with alga-free P. bursaria, and that the algal mother cell wall is discarded from the perialgal vacuole membrane, which encloses symbiotic alga. Labelling of the mother cell wall with Calcofluor White Stain, a cell-wall-specific fluorochrome, was used to show whether alga had divided or not. Pulse labelling of alga-free P. bursaria cells with Calcofluor White Stain-stained algae with or without food bacteria for P. bursaria revealed that the fluorescence of Calcofluor White Stain in P. bursaria with bacteria disappeared within 3 days after mixing, significantly faster than without bacteria. Similar results were obtained both under constant light and dark conditions. This report is the first describing that the cell division and density of symbiotic algae of P. bursaria are controlled by the host's nutritional conditions during early infection.

  1. "Candidatus Sonnebornia yantaiensis", a member of candidate division OD1, as intracellular bacteria of the ciliated protist Paramecium bursaria (Ciliophora, Oligohymenophorea).

    PubMed

    Gong, Jun; Qing, Yao; Guo, Xiaohong; Warren, Alan

    2014-02-01

    An intracellular bacterium was discovered in an isolate of Paramecium bursaria from a freshwater pond in Yantai, China. The bacteria were abundant and exclusively found in the cytoplasm of the host which, along with the green alga Chlorella, formed a three-partner consortium that could survive in pure water for at least one week. Cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene showed that the bacterium belonged to the uncultured candidate division OD1, which usually forms part of the rare biosphere. Transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with specific probes showed that the bacteria were usually located close to the perialgal membranes of endosymbiotic Chlorella cells, and occasionally irregularly distributed throughout the host cytoplasm. The name "Candidatus Sonnebornia yantaiensis" gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed for the new bacterium. A strongly supported monophyletic subclade, OD1-p, which included the new species, was recognized and this study highlights that protists can be important hosts for rare bacterial taxa.

  2. Repressive function of the micronucleus during asexual reproduction in Paramecium tetraurelia: Experimental analysis with defective-micronucleates generated by laser microbeam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Au, K Y; Ho, W S; Ng, S F

    1990-10-19

    The present paper reports on the experimental analysis of a novel regulatory function of the micronucleus of Paramecium tetraurelia. Previous studies have made clear that amicronucleate cell lines shortly after their generation generally suffer depression, in exhibiting low viability, slow growth and abnormal oral development in binary fission, but they eventually recover to near-normal. A compensatory mechanism is thus activated in the absence of the micronucleus, to allow recovery of the amicronucleate cell line. Implicit in this conclusion is the role of the micronucleus in repression of the compensatory mechanism. The present study tested this notion by perturbing the micronucleus with laser microbeam irradiation. This operation generated cell lines possessing defective micronuclei; during their asexual propagation, some cells lost the micronucleus and gave rise to amicronucleates. The viability of amicronucleate cell lines derived in this manner was found to be higher, compared to others generated by a different operation involving instantaneous removal of normal micronuclei from the cell with a microinjection needle. Some evidence also suggested that their oral development was less abnormal during the initial depression period. Hence, damage of the micronucleus has apparently facilitated the activation of the compensatory function, and the latter might have occurred even before the loss of the defective micronucleus. The present findings provide support for a regulatory role of the micronucleus during asexual propagation. Previous studies have indicated that the physical basis of the compensatory mechanism resides with the macronucleus. The micronuclear repressive function may be directed against this compensatory mechanism of the macronucleus. PMID:23196191

  3. Marked amplification and diversification of products of ras genes from rat brain, Rab GTPases, in the ciliates Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Nakahara, Tohru; Nakano, Kentaro; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Numata, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    Small GTPase Rab (products of ras genes from rat brain) is a widely conserved molecular switch among eukaryotes and regulates membrane trafficking pathways. It is generally considered that the number of Rab encoded in the genome correlates with multicellularity; however, we found that unicellular ciliates Tetrahymena thermophila (Tt) and Paramecium tetraurelia (Pt) possess many more Rab genes in their genome than the 64 HsRab genes in the human genome. We succeeded in isolating 86 cDNA clones of 88 TtRab genes in the Tetrahymena genome. By comparing the amino acid sequence of Rab in humans and the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 42 TtRab belonged to subfamilies functionally characterized and designated as conventional Rab, while the remaining 44 TtRab were considered to be species-specific. To examine the diversity of Rab in ciliates, we searched for Rab genes in the genome database of P. tetraurelia. Overall, 229 PtRab genes were found and categorized as 157 conventional and 72 species-specific PtRab, respectively. Among them, nine PtRab genes showed high homology to seven TtRab, suggesting the conservation of ciliate-specific Rab. These data suggested that the range of Rab is markedly amplified and diversified in ciliates, which may support the elaborate cellular structures and vigorous phagocytosis of those organisms.

  4. Genetic evidence for a role of centrin-associated proteins in the organization and dynamics of the infraciliary lattice in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Klotz, C; Garreau de Loubresse, N; Ruiz, F; Beisson, J

    1997-01-01

    Within the superfamily of "EF-hand Ca2+-modulated proteins," centrins constitute a family of cytoskeletal proteins that are highly conserved from lower eukaryotes to man. Their cytoskeletal specialization is manifest in their capacity to form filamentous contractile arrays of various shapes and functions and by their association with microtubule organizing centres (MTOCs). While the latter property has been conserved throughout the evolution of eukaryotes, centrin-based contractile structures are only found in protists where they form arrays of widely diverse organization and function. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, three centrin genes have been characterized, which may be part of a larger centrin gene family [Madeddu et al., 1996: Eur J. Biochem. 238:121-128]. The products of these genes were originally identified as components of the infraciliary lattice, a contractile cytoskeletal network [Garreau de Loubresse et al., 1991: Biol. Cell 71:217-225]. We show here that centrins are localized not only in this lattice but also in basal bodies and in the cord, a filamentous structure associated with the oral apparatus. We demonstrate that in the infraciliary lattice, but not in basal bodies, centrins are associated with high-molecular-weight proteins (ca. 350 kD). Their role in the biogenesis of the infraciliary lattice is documented by cytological and biochemical properties of the mutant "démaillé" (dem1) characterized by altered centrin-associated proteins and abnormal organization and dynamics of the infraciliary lattice.

  5. Timing of perialgal vacuole membrane differentiation from digestive vacuole membrane in infection of symbiotic algae Chlorella vulgaris of the ciliate Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2009-02-01

    Each symbiotic Chlorella of the ciliate Paramecium bursaria is enclosed in a perialgal vacuole derived from the host digestive vacuole to protect from lysosomal fusion. To understand the timing of differentiation of the perialgal vacuole from the host digestive vacuole, algae-free P. bursaria cells were fed symbiotic C. vulgaris cells for 1.5min, washed, chased and fixed at various times after mixing. Acid phosphatase activity in the vacuoles enclosing the algae was detected by Gomori's staining. This activity appeared in 3-min-old vacuoles, and all algae-containing vacuoles demonstrated activity at 30min. Algal escape from these digestive vacuoles began at 30min by budding of the digestive vacuole membrane into the cytoplasm. In the budded membrane, each alga was surrounded by a Gomori's thin positive staining layer. The vacuoles containing a single algal cell moved quickly to and attached just beneath the host cell surface. Such vacuoles were Gomori's staining negative, indicating that the perialgal vacuole membrane differentiates soon after the algal escape from the host digestive vacuole. This is the first report demonstrating the timing of differentiation of the perialgal vacuole membrane during infection of P. bursaria with symbiotic Chlorella.

  6. Waste Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Marilyn; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that focus on waste reduction in the school and community. The ideas are divided into grade level categories. Sample activities include Techno-Trash, where children use tools to take apart broken appliances or car parts, then reassemble them or build new creations. Activities are suggested for areas including language arts and…

  7. Nitrate reduction

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  8. Programming of the macronucleus of Paramecium during asexual and sexual reproduction: A further study with cytidine analogues, dimethylsulfoxide, L-ethionine and N-butyric acid.

    PubMed

    Au, K Y; Yao, C M; Cowan, R; Ng, S F

    1990-08-31

    The control of the function of the macronucleus of Paramecium is studied, in connection with its role in the compensation for the asexual somatic function of the micronucleus. Following removal of the micronuclei, amicronucleate cell lines as a rule suffer a transient period of growth and developmental depression in the initial phase of asexual propagation. But they gradually recover to near-normal. Previous studies of treatment of amicronucleate cells with cytidine analogues have implicated the macronucleus in compensating for the somatic function of the micronucleus following the loss of the micronucleus, and the activation of this macronuclear function probably involves DNA-demethylation. The present study further tests this notion, by treating micronucleate cells with agents known to promote demethylation of 5-methylcytosine. After treatment, the cells were vegetatively propagated, and then enucleated to give rise to amicronucleate cell lines. Treatments with dimethylsulfoxide, L-ethionine, and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine promoted recovery in amicronucleate cell lines thus derived. Cells treated with 6-azacytidine did not produce such an effect. Hence, the compensatory mechanism, presumably residing in a repressed state in the macronucleus, can be activated or primed to activate by demethylating agents even before the loss of the micronucleus, and once established the new macronuclear programme perpetuates in succeeding asexual cell generations. This shows that during asexual propagation the macronuclear programme can be altered to 'pre-adapt' the cells for amicronuclearity. Treatment of micronucleate conjugants with 5-azacytidine, when the macronuclear anlagen develop, produced clones that had become similarly pre-adapted. There were also some indication of persistence of such effects of the analogue into the next clonal cycle following autogamy. The notion of macronuclear DNA-demethylation as a basis for the activation and maintenance of the compensatory mechanism

  9. Synthesis of the signal molecule acetylcholine during the developmental cycle of Paramecium primaurelia (Protista, Ciliophora) and its possible function in conjugation.

    PubMed

    Delmonte Corrado, M U; Politi, H; Ognibene, M; Angelini, C; Trielli, F; Ballarini, P; Falugi, C

    2001-06-01

    We recently discovered, in mating-competent Paramecium primaurelia, the presence of functionally related molecules of the cholinergic system: the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh), both its nicotinic and muscarinic receptors and its lytic enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Our results on the inhibition of mating-cell pairing in vivo in mating-competent cells treated with cholinomimetic drugs support the hypothesis that the cholinergic system plays a role in cell-to-cell adhesion. To investigate the possible function of the signal molecule ACh in conjugation in P. primaurelia, we attempted to detect the intracellular sites of ACh synthesis by localizing the ACh biosynthetic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Using immunocytochemical and histochemical methods, we have demonstrated the presence and activity of ChAT principally on the surface membrane of mating-competent cells and of mature but non-mating-competent cells. No evidence for ChAT activity was found in immature cells. Immunoblot analysis revealed the presence of immunoreactive bands, ranging in molecular mass from 42 to 133 kDa, as reported for ChAT isolated from higher organisms. In vivo experiments showed that inhibition of ChAT activity by Congo Red, known to be a potent competitive inhibitor of acetyl coenzyme A, did not affect mating-cell pairing. Conversely, inhibition of AChE with BW 284c51 or eserine, which block enzyme activity by reacting with a specific serine within the catalytic centre, significantly inhibited mating-cell pairing. Our results suggest that ACh has a negative modulating effect on conjugation in P. primaurelia. PMID:11441032

  10. Programming of the macronucleus of Paramecium during asexual and sexual reproduction: A further study with cytidine analogues, dimethylsulfoxide, L-ethionine and N-butyric acid.

    PubMed

    Au, K Y; Yao, C M; Cowan, R; Ng, S F

    1990-08-31

    The control of the function of the macronucleus of Paramecium is studied, in connection with its role in the compensation for the asexual somatic function of the micronucleus. Following removal of the micronuclei, amicronucleate cell lines as a rule suffer a transient period of growth and developmental depression in the initial phase of asexual propagation. But they gradually recover to near-normal. Previous studies of treatment of amicronucleate cells with cytidine analogues have implicated the macronucleus in compensating for the somatic function of the micronucleus following the loss of the micronucleus, and the activation of this macronuclear function probably involves DNA-demethylation. The present study further tests this notion, by treating micronucleate cells with agents known to promote demethylation of 5-methylcytosine. After treatment, the cells were vegetatively propagated, and then enucleated to give rise to amicronucleate cell lines. Treatments with dimethylsulfoxide, L-ethionine, and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine promoted recovery in amicronucleate cell lines thus derived. Cells treated with 6-azacytidine did not produce such an effect. Hence, the compensatory mechanism, presumably residing in a repressed state in the macronucleus, can be activated or primed to activate by demethylating agents even before the loss of the micronucleus, and once established the new macronuclear programme perpetuates in succeeding asexual cell generations. This shows that during asexual propagation the macronuclear programme can be altered to 'pre-adapt' the cells for amicronuclearity. Treatment of micronucleate conjugants with 5-azacytidine, when the macronuclear anlagen develop, produced clones that had become similarly pre-adapted. There were also some indication of persistence of such effects of the analogue into the next clonal cycle following autogamy. The notion of macronuclear DNA-demethylation as a basis for the activation and maintenance of the compensatory mechanism

  11. Simulation model of Cryptomonas ovata population dynamics in southern Kootenay Lake, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.

    1978-01-01

    The model simulates well the timing and magnitude of all observed population changes and, more importantly, it gives insight into the important mechanisms which regulate population density of C. ovata in this natural system.

  12. Selective reduction.

    PubMed

    Evans, Mark I; Krivchenia, Eric L; Gelber, Shari E; Wapner, Ronald J

    2003-03-01

    Multifetal pregnancy reduction continues to be controversial. Attitudes about MFPR have not, in our experience, followed a simple "pro-choice/pro-life" dichotomy. As far back as the mid to late 1980s, opinions about the subject were varied. Even then, when much less was known about the subject, opinions did not always parallel the usual pro-choice/theological boundaries. We believe that the real debate over the next 5 to 10 years will not be whether or not MFPR should be performed with triplets or more. The fact is that MFPR does improve those outcomes. A serious debate will emerge over whether or not it is appropriate to offer MFPR routinely for twins, even natural ones, for whom the outcome is commonly considered "good enough." Our data suggest that reduction of twins to a singleton improves the outcome of the remaining fetus. No consensus on appropriateness of routine 2-1 reductions is ever likely to emerge. The ethical issues surrounding MFPR will always be controversial. Over the years, much has been written on the subject. Opinions will always vary from outraged condemnation to complete acceptance. No short paragraph could do justice to the subject other than to state that most proponents do not believe this is a frivolous procedure but do believe in the principle of proportionality ie, therapy to achieve the most good for the least harm). Over the past 15 years, MFPR has become a well-established and integral part of infertility therapy and attempts to deal with the sequelae of aggressive infertility management. In the mid 1980s, the risks and benefits of the procedure could only be guessed. We now have clear and precise data on the risks and benefits of the procedure and an understanding that the risks increase substantially with the starting and finishing number of fetuses in multifetal pregnancies. The collaborative loss rate numbers (ie, 4.5% for triplets, 8% for quadruplets. 11% for quintuplets, and 15% for sextuplets or more) seem reasonable to present

  13. Caffeine-induced Ca2+ transients and exocytosis in Paramecium cells. A correlated Ca2+ imaging and quenched-flow/freeze-fracture analysis.

    PubMed

    Klauke, N; Plattner, H

    1998-01-01

    Caffeine causes a [Ca2+]i increase in the cortex of Paramecium cells, followed by spillover with considerable attenuation, into central cell regions. From [Ca2+]resti approximately 50 to 80 nm, [Ca2+]acti rises within /=2 sec. Chelation of Ca2+o considerably attenuated [Ca2+]i increase. Therefore, caffeine may primarily mobilize cortical Ca2+ pools, superimposed by Ca2+ influx and spillover (particularly in tl cells with empty trichocyst docking sites). In nd cells, caffeine caused trichocyst contents to decondense internally (Ca2+-dependent stretching, normally occurring only after membrane fusion). With 7S cells this usually occurred only to a small extent, but with increasing frequency as [Ca2+]i signals were reduced by [Ca2+]o chelation. In this case, quenched-flow and ultrathin section or freeze-fracture analysis revealed dispersal of membrane components (without fusion) subsequent to internal contents decondensation, opposite to normal membrane fusion when a full [Ca2+]i signal was generated by caffeine stimulation (with Ca2+i and Ca2+o available). We conclude the following. (i) Caffeine can mobilize Ca2+ from cortical stores independent of the presence of Ca2+o. (ii) To yield adequate signals for normal exocytosis, Ca2+ release and Ca2+ influx both have to occur during caffeine stimulation. (iii) Insufficient [Ca2+]i increase entails caffeine-mediated access of Ca2+ to the secretory contents, thus causing their decondensation before membrane fusion can occur. (iv) Trichocyst decondensation in turn gives a signal for an unusual dissociation of docking/fusion components at the cell membrane. These observations imply different threshold [Ca2+]i-values for membrane fusion

  14. Effects of diuron and carbofuran pesticides in their pure and commercial forms on Paramecium caudatum: The use of protozoan in ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Mansano, Adrislaine S; Moreira, Raquel A; Pierozzi, Mayara; Oliveira, Thiessa M A; Vieira, Eny M; Rocha, Odete; Regali-Seleghim, Mirna H

    2016-06-01

    Toxic effects of diuron and carbofuran on Paramecium caudatum were evaluated. Acute and chronic tests were conducted with diuron and carbofuran active ingredients and their commercial formulations, Diuron Nortox(®) 500 SC and Furadan(®) 350 SC, respectively. The sensitivity range of P. caudatum to reference substance sodium chloride was established. A preliminary risk assessment of diuron and carbofuran for Brazilian water bodies was performed. The tests indicated that toxicity of pure diuron and its commercial formulation was similar, while the commercial product carbofuran was more toxic than its pure form. In acute tests, readings were carried out at 2, 3, 4 and 6 h and showed an increase of mortality with increasing exposure time. The sensitivity of P. caudatum to NaCl ranged from 3.31 to 4.44 g L(-1), averaging 3.88 g L(-1). For diuron, the 6 h LC50 was 64.6 ± 3.3 mg L(-1) for its pure form and 62.4 ± 2.5 mg L(-1) for its commercial formulation. Carbofuran active ingredient was less toxic than that of diuron, presenting a 6 h LC50 of 142.0 ± 2.4 mg L(-1) for its pure form and 70.4 ± 2.2 mg L(-1) for its commercial product. Chronic tests showed that these pesticides cause significant decrease on population growth, generation number and biomass of P. caudatum. The 24 h IC50 was 7.10 ± 0.58 mg L(-1) for pure diuron, 6.78 ± 0.92 mg L(-1) for commercial diuron, 22.95 ± 3.57 mg L(-1) for pure carbofuran and 4.98 ± 0.62 mg L(-1) for commercial carbofuran. Preliminary risk assessment indicated that diuron and carbofuran present potential ecological risks for Brazilian water bodies. P. caudatum was a suitable and sensitive test organism to evaluate diuron and carbofuran toxicity to freshwater protozooplankton and, taking into account the relevant role of protozoans in aquatic environments, we strongly recommend its inclusion in ecotoxicological studies. PMID:26890484

  15. The role of the micronucleus in stomatogenesis in sexual reproduction of Paramecium tetraurelia: laser microbeam irradiation of the micronucleus.

    PubMed

    Tam, L W; Ng, S F

    1986-12-01

    Fifteen amicronucleate cell lines and 22 cell lines with defective micronuclei were obtained following selective laser microbeam irradiation of the micronucleus. The amicronucleate cell lines showed reduced growth rate and formed abnormal oral apparatuses in asexual reproduction, and failed to produce any oral apparatus in autogamy, in agreement with previous observations on amicronucleate cells obtained by micropipetting. The 22 cell lines with defective micronucleus exhibited various abnormalities of the oral apparatus newly formed during autogamy. These abnormalities included the arrest of membranelle assembly, reduction in the length of the buccal cavity and oral membranelles, disruption of the organization of the membranelles, quadrulation of the dorsal peniculus, and failure of addition of membranellar basal body rows. Hence the micronucleus plays multiple roles in sexual stomatogenesis, deciding early steps of oral membranelle assembly and affecting their subsequent patterning. Our results agree with the notion that the micronucleus acts during a critical period between the second meiotic division and up to the formation of the zygotic nucleus to control the early stage of oral membranelle assembly. Laser microbeam irradiation might have created recessive mutations and/or chromosomal aberrations, which were expressed during this critical period with the formation of abnormal postmeiotic nuclei. PMID:3654781

  16. Polyamine triggering of exocytosis in Paramecium involves an extracellular Ca(2+)/(polyvalent cation)-sensing receptor, subplasmalemmal Ca-store mobilization and store-operated Ca(2+)-influx via unspecific cation channels.

    PubMed

    Klauke, N; Blanchard, M; Plattner, H

    2000-03-15

    The polyamine secretagogue, aminoethyldextran (AED), causes a cortical [Ca(2+)] transient in Paramecium cells, as analyzed by fluorochrome imaging. Our most essential findings are: (i) Cortical Ca(2+) signals also occur when AED is applied in presence of the fast Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA. (ii) Extracellular La(3+) application causes within seconds a rapid, reversible fluorescence signal whose reversibility can be attributed to a physiological [Ca(2+)](i) transient (while injected La(3+) causes a sustained fluorescence signal). (iii) Simply increasing [Ca(2+)](o) causes a similar rapid, short-lived [Ca(2+)](i) transient. All these phenomena, (i-iii), are compatible with activation of an extracellular "Ca(2+)/(polyvalent cation)-sensing receptor" known from some higher eukaryotic systems, where this sensor (responding to Ca(2+), La(3+) and some multiply charged cations) is linked to cortical calcium stores which, thus, are activated. In Paramecium, such subplasmalemmal stores ("alveolar sacs") are physically linked to the cell membrane and they can also be activated by the Ca(2+) releasing agent, 4-chloro-m-cresol, just like in Sarcoplasmic Reticulum. Since this drug causes a cortical Ca(2+) signal also in absence of Ca(2+)(o) we largely exclude a "Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release" (CICR) mechanism. Our finding of increased cortical Ca(2+) signals after store depletion and re-addition of extracellular Ca(2+) can be explained by a "store-operated Ca(2+) influx" (SOC), i.e., a Ca(2+) influx superimposing store activation. AED stimulation in presence of Mn(2+)(o) causes fluorescence quenching in Fura-2 loaded cells, indicating involvement of unspecific cation channels. Such channels, known to occur in Paramecium, share some general characteristics of SOC-type Ca(2+) influx channels. In conclusion, we assume the following sequence of events during AED stimulated exocytosis: (i) activation of an extracellular Ca(2+)/polyamine-sensing receptor, (ii) release of Ca(2+) from

  17. Site-Directed Mutagenesis, in Vivo Electroporation and Mass Spectrometry in Search for Determinants of the Subcellular Targeting of Rab7b Paralogue in the Model Eukaryote Paramecium Octaurelia

    PubMed Central

    Wyroba, E.; Kwaśniak, P.; Miller, K.; Kobyłecki, K.; Osińska, M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein products of paralogous genes resulting from whole genome duplication may acquire new functions. The role of post-translational modifications (PTM) in proper targeting of Paramecium Rab7b paralogue (distinct from that of Rab7a directly involved in phagocytosis) was studied using point mutagenesis, proteomic analysis and double immunofluorescence after in vivo electroporation of the mutagenized protein. Here we show that substitution of Thr200 by Ala diminished the incorporation of [P32] by 37% and of [C14-]UDP-glucose by 24% into recombinant Rab7b_200 in comparison to the non-mutagenized control. Double confocal imaging revealed that Rab7b_200 was mistargeted upon electroporation into living cells in contrast to non-mutagenized recombinant Rab7b correctly incorporated in the cytostome area. Using nano LC-MS/MS to compare the peptide map of Rab7b with that after deglycosylation with a mixture of five enzymes of different specificity we identified a peptide ion at m/z=677.63+ representing a glycan group attached to Thr200. Based on its mass and quantitative assays with [P32] and [C14]UDP-glucose, the suggested composition of the adduct attached to Thr200 is (Hex)1(HexNAc)1(Phos)3 or (HexNAc)1 (Deoxyhexose)1 (Phos)1 (HexA)1. These data indicate that PTM of Thr200 located in the hypervariable C-region of Paramecium octaurelia Rab7b is crucial for the proper localization/function of this protein. Moreover, the two Rab7 paralogues differ also in another PTM: substantially more phosphorylated amino acid residues are in Rab7b than in Rab7a. PMID:27349314

  18. Site-directed mutagenesis, in vivo electroporation and mass spectrometry in search for determinants of the subcellular targeting of Rab7b paralogue in the model eukaryote Paramecium octaurelia.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E; Kwaśniak, P; Miller, K; Kobyłecki, K; Osińska, M

    2016-01-01

    Protein products of the paralogous genes resulting from the whole genome duplication may acquire new function. The role of post-translational modifications (PTM) in proper targeting of Paramecium Rab7b paralogue - distinct from that of Rab7a directly involved in phagocytosis - was studied using point mutagenesis, proteomic analysis and double immunofluorescence after in vivo electroporation of the mutagenized protein. Here we show that substitution of Thr200 by Ala200 resulted in diminished incorporation of [P32] by 37.4% and of 32 [C14-]UDP-glucose by 24%, respectively, into recombinant Rab7b_200 in comparison to the non-mutagenized control. Double confocal imaging revealed that Rab7b_200 was mistargeted upon electroporation into living cells contrary to non- mutagenized recombinant Rab7b correctly incorporated in the cytostome area. We identified the peptide ion at m/z=677.63+ characteristic for the glycan group attached to Thr200 in Rab7b using nano LC-MS/MS and comparing the peptide map of this protein with that after deglycosylation with the mixture of five enzymes of different specificity. Based on the mass of this peptide ion and quantitative radioactive assays with [P32]and  [C14-]UDP- glucose, the suggested composition of the adduct attached to Thr200 might be (Hex)1(HexNAc)1(Phos)3 or (HexNAc)1 (Deoxyhexose)1 (Phos)1 (HexA)1. These data indicate that PTM of Thr200 located in the hypervariable C-region of Rab7b in Paramecium is crucial for the proper localization/function of this protein. Moreover, these proteins differ also in other PTM: the number of phosphorylated amino acids in Rab7b is much higher than in Rab7a. PMID:27349314

  19. Site-directed mutagenesis, in vivo electroporation and mass spectrometry in search for determinants of the subcellular targeting of Rab7b paralogue in the model eukaryote Paramecium octaurelia.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E; Kwaśniak, P; Miller, K; Kobyłecki, K; Osińska, M

    2016-01-01

    Protein products of the paralogous genes resulting from the whole genome duplication may acquire new function. The role of post-translational modifications (PTM) in proper targeting of Paramecium Rab7b paralogue - distinct from that of Rab7a directly involved in phagocytosis - was studied using point mutagenesis, proteomic analysis and double immunofluorescence after in vivo electroporation of the mutagenized protein. Here we show that substitution of Thr200 by Ala200 resulted in diminished incorporation of [P32] by 37.4% and of 32 [C14-]UDP-glucose by 24%, respectively, into recombinant Rab7b_200 in comparison to the non-mutagenized control. Double confocal imaging revealed that Rab7b_200 was mistargeted upon electroporation into living cells contrary to non- mutagenized recombinant Rab7b correctly incorporated in the cytostome area. We identified the peptide ion at m/z=677.63+ characteristic for the glycan group attached to Thr200 in Rab7b using nano LC-MS/MS and comparing the peptide map of this protein with that after deglycosylation with the mixture of five enzymes of different specificity. Based on the mass of this peptide ion and quantitative radioactive assays with [P32]and  [C14-]UDP- glucose, the suggested composition of the adduct attached to Thr200 might be (Hex)1(HexNAc)1(Phos)3 or (HexNAc)1 (Deoxyhexose)1 (Phos)1 (HexA)1. These data indicate that PTM of Thr200 located in the hypervariable C-region of Rab7b in Paramecium is crucial for the proper localization/function of this protein. Moreover, these proteins differ also in other PTM: the number of phosphorylated amino acids in Rab7b is much higher than in Rab7a.

  20. Differences in infectivity between endosymbiotic Chlorella variabilis cultivated outside host Paramecium bursaria for 50 years and those immediately isolated from host cells after one year of reendosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Y; Fujishima, M

    2015-12-30

    Chlorella variabilis strain NC64A is an intracellular photobiont of the ciliate Paramecium bursaria. NC64A was isolated from P. bursaria nearly 50 years ago and was thereafter cultivated outside the host. This study was undertaken to detect changes in its infectivity to P. bursaria and its auxotrophy for growth outside the host induced during long-term cultivation. NC64A can grow in Modified Bold's Basal Medium but not in C medium, whereas another symbiotic Chlorella variabilis strain, 1N, that was recently isolated from the host grew in C medium but not in Modified Bold's Basal Medium. With regards infectivity, NC64A in the logarithmic phase of growth showed low infectivity to alga-removed P. bursaria cells, whereas those in the early stationary phase showed high infectivity of about 30%. Those in the decay phase of growth showed no infectivity. Results show that NC64A has infectivity, but the infection rate depends on their culture age in the growth curve. Furthermore, NC64A that had been re-infected to P. bursaria for more than one year and isolated from the host showed a nearly 100% infection rate, which indicates that NC64A can recover its infectivity by re-infection to P. bursaria.

  1. Differences in infectivity between endosymbiotic Chlorella variabilis cultivated outside host Paramecium bursaria for 50 years and those immediately isolated from host cells after one year of reendosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Y; Fujishima, M

    2015-01-01

    Chlorella variabilis strain NC64A is an intracellular photobiont of the ciliate Paramecium bursaria. NC64A was isolated from P. bursaria nearly 50 years ago and was thereafter cultivated outside the host. This study was undertaken to detect changes in its infectivity to P. bursaria and its auxotrophy for growth outside the host induced during long-term cultivation. NC64A can grow in Modified Bold's Basal Medium but not in C medium, whereas another symbiotic Chlorella variabilis strain, 1N, that was recently isolated from the host grew in C medium but not in Modified Bold's Basal Medium. With regards infectivity, NC64A in the logarithmic phase of growth showed low infectivity to alga-removed P. bursaria cells, whereas those in the early stationary phase showed high infectivity of about 30%. Those in the decay phase of growth showed no infectivity. Results show that NC64A has infectivity, but the infection rate depends on their culture age in the growth curve. Furthermore, NC64A that had been re-infected to P. bursaria for more than one year and isolated from the host showed a nearly 100% infection rate, which indicates that NC64A can recover its infectivity by re-infection to P. bursaria. PMID:26718931

  2. Differences in infectivity between endosymbiotic Chlorella variabilis cultivated outside host Paramecium bursaria for 50 years and those immediately isolated from host cells after one year of reendosymbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Y.; Fujishima, M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chlorella variabilis strain NC64A is an intracellular photobiont of the ciliate Paramecium bursaria. NC64A was isolated from P. bursaria nearly 50 years ago and was thereafter cultivated outside the host. This study was undertaken to detect changes in its infectivity to P. bursaria and its auxotrophy for growth outside the host induced during long-term cultivation. NC64A can grow in Modified Bold's Basal Medium but not in C medium, whereas another symbiotic Chlorella variabilis strain, 1N, that was recently isolated from the host grew in C medium but not in Modified Bold's Basal Medium. With regards infectivity, NC64A in the logarithmic phase of growth showed low infectivity to alga-removed P. bursaria cells, whereas those in the early stationary phase showed high infectivity of about 30%. Those in the decay phase of growth showed no infectivity. Results show that NC64A has infectivity, but the infection rate depends on their culture age in the growth curve. Furthermore, NC64A that had been re-infected to P. bursaria for more than one year and isolated from the host showed a nearly 100% infection rate, which indicates that NC64A can recover its infectivity by re-infection to P. bursaria. PMID:26718931

  3. Symbiotic Chlorella variabilis incubated under constant dark conditions for 24 hours loses the ability to avoid digestion by host lysosomal enzymes in digestive vacuoles of host ciliate Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Endosymbiosis between symbiotic Chlorella and alga-free Paramecium bursaria cells can be induced by mixing them. To establish the endosymbiosis, algae must acquire temporary resistance to the host lysosomal enzymes in the digestive vacuoles (DVs). When symbiotic algae isolated from the alga-bearing paramecia are kept under a constant dark conditions for 24 h before mixing with the alga-free paramecia, almost all algae are digested in the host DVs. To examine the cause of algal acquisition to the host lysosomal enzymes, the isolated algae were kept under a constant light conditions with or without a photosynthesis inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea for 24 h, and were mixed with alga-free paramecia. Unexpectedly, most of the algae were not digested in the DVs irrespective of the presence of the inhibitor. Addition of 1 mM maltose, a main photosynthetic product of the symbiotic algae or of a supernatant of the isolated algae kept for 24 h under a constant light conditions, did not rescue the algal digestion in the DVs. These observations reveal that unknown factors induced by light are a prerequisite for algal resistance to the host lysosomal enzymes.

  4. MCNP variance reduction overview

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.; Booth, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    The MCNP code is rich in variance reduction features. Standard variance reduction methods found in most Monte Carlo codes are available as well as a number of methods unique to MCNP. We discuss the variance reduction features presently in MCNP as well as new ones under study for possible inclusion in future versions of the code.

  5. Optimizing parallel reduction operations

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    A parallel program consists of sets of concurrent and sequential tasks. Often, a reduction (such as array sum) sequentially combines values produced by a parallel computation. Because reductions occur so frequently in otherwise parallel programs, they are good candidates for optimization. Since reductions may introduce dependencies, most languages separate computation and reduction. The Sisal functional language is unique in that reduction is a natural consequence of loop expressions; the parallelism is implicit in the language. Unfortunately, the original language supports only seven reduction operations. To generalize these expressions, the Sisal 90 definition adds user-defined reductions at the language level. Applicable optimizations depend upon the mathematical properties of the reduction. Compilation and execution speed, synchronization overhead, memory use and maximum size influence the final implementation. This paper (1) Defines reduction syntax and compares with traditional concurrent methods; (2) Defines classes of reduction operations; (3) Develops analysis of classes for optimized concurrency; (4) Incorporates reductions into Sisal 1.2 and Sisal 90; (5) Evaluates performance and size of the implementations.

  6. Drag reduction in nature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Moore, K. J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies on the drag-reducing shapes, structures, and behaviors of swimming and flying animals are reviewed, with an emphasis on potential analogs in vehicle design. Consideration is given to form drag reduction (turbulent flow, vortex generation, mass transfer, and adaptations for body-intersection regions), skin-friction drag reduction (polymers, surfactants, and bubbles as surface 'additives'), reduction of the drag due to lift, drag-reduction studies on porpoises, and drag-reducing animal behavior (e.g., leaping out of the water by porpoises). The need for further research is stressed.

  7. Principles of harm reduction. Harm Reduction Coalition.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    Harm reduction is a set of practical strategies used for working with drug users to help them choose behaviors that are less risky. The harm reduction approach accepts that illicit drug use occurs, and encourages input from drug users in designing programs and services to help educate themselves. Drug use is a complex problem related to poverty, class, racism, social isolation, and discrimination, and calls for non-judgmental, non-coercive services for the drug using population. Federal money for drug interventions is more often spent on incarcerations and prosecutions, than on education, research, prevention, or treatment. Public policy changes, such as teaching drug users how to lower their risks, may reduce the number of deaths and HIV transmissions among drug users and their partners.

  8. Microbial reductive dehalogenation.

    PubMed Central

    Mohn, W W; Tiedje, J M

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of compounds can be biodegraded via reductive removal of halogen substituents. This process can degrade toxic pollutants, some of which are not known to be biodegraded by any other means. Reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds has been found primarily in undefined, syntrophic anaerobic communities. We discuss ecological and physiological principles which appear to be important in these communities and evaluate how widely applicable these principles are. Anaerobic communities that catalyze reductive dehalogenation appear to differ in many respects. A large number of pure cultures which catalyze reductive dehalogenation of aliphatic compounds are known, in contrast to only a few organisms which catalyze reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds. Desulfomonile tiedjei DCB-1 is an anaerobe which dehalogenates aromatic compounds and is physiologically and morphologically unusual in a number of respects, including the ability to exploit reductive dehalogenation for energy metabolism. When possible, we use D. tiedjei as a model to understand dehalogenating organisms in the above-mentioned undefined systems. Aerobes use reductive dehalogenation for substrates which are resistant to known mechanisms of oxidative attack. Reductive dehalogenation, especially of aliphatic compounds, has recently been found in cell-free systems. These systems give us an insight into how and why microorganisms catalyze this activity. In some cases transition metal complexes serve as catalysts, whereas in other cases, particularly with aromatic substrates, the catalysts appear to be enzymes. Images PMID:1406492

  9. Intelligent Data Reduction (IDARE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, D. Michael; Ford, Donnie R.

    1990-01-01

    A description of the Intelligent Data Reduction (IDARE) expert system and an IDARE user's manual are given. IDARE is a data reduction system with the addition of a user profile infrastructure. The system was tested on a nickel-cadmium battery testbed. Information is given on installing, loading, maintaining the IDARE system.

  10. Microbial reduction of uranium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Gorby, Y.A.; Landa, E.R.

    1991-01-01

    REDUCTION of the soluble, oxidized form of uranium, U(VI), to insoluble U(IV) is an important mechanism for the immobilization of uranium in aquatic sediments and for the formation of some uranium ores1-10. U(VI) reduction has generally been regarded as an abiological reaction in which sulphide, molecular hydrogen or organic compounds function as the reductant1,2,5,11. Microbial involvement in U(VI) reduction has been considered to be limited to indirect effects, such as microbial metabolism providing the reduced compounds for abiological U(VI) reduction and microbial cell walls providing a surface to stimulate abiological U(VI) reduction1,12,13. We report here, however, that dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can obtain energy for growth by electron transport to U(VI). This novel form of microbial metabolism can be much faster than commonly cited abiological mechanisms for U(VI) reduction. Not only do these findings expand the known potential terminal electron acceptors for microbial energy transduction, they offer a likely explanation for the deposition of uranium in aquatic sediments and aquifers, and suggest a method for biological remediation of environments contaminated with uranium.

  11. Reduction of astrometric plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, J.

    1984-01-01

    A rapid and accurate method for the reduction of comet or asteroid plates is described. Projection equations, scale length correction, rotation of coordinates, linearization, the search for additional reference stars, and the final solution are examined.

  12. Active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J.

    1984-01-01

    Active Noise Reduction (ANR) techniques, singly and in combination with passive hearing protectors, offer the potential for increased sound protection, enhanced voice communications and improved wearability features for personnel exposed to unacceptable noise conditions. An enhanced closed loop active noise reduction system was miniaturized and incorporated into a standard Air Force flight helmet (HGU-26/P). This report describes the theory of design and operation, prototype configuration and operation, and electroacoustic performance and specifications for the ANR system. This system is theoretically capable of producing in excess of 30 decibels of active noise reduction. Electroacoustic measurements on a flat plate coupler demonstrated approximately 20 decibels of active noise reduction with the prototype unit. A performance evaluation of the integrated ANR unit will be conducted under laboratory and field conditions by government personnel to determine the feasibility of the system for use in military applications.

  13. Quantization of Algebraic Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Sniatycki, Jeodrzej

    2007-11-14

    For a Poisson algebra obtained by algebraic reduction of symmetries of a quantizable system we develop an analogue of geometric quantization based on the quantization structure of the original system.

  14. AMBER data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatulli, E.; Duvert, G.

    2007-10-01

    This course describes the data reduction process of the AMBER instrument, the three beam-recombiner of the very large telescope interferometer (VLTI). In body of this paper, we develop its principles from a theoretical point of view and we illustrate the main points with examples taken from the practical AMBER data reduction session given during school. The detailed practical application making use of the ESO gasgano tool is then presented. In this lecture, we particularly emphasize what the AMBER data reduction process is (i) a fit of the interferogram in the detector plane, (ii) using an a priori calibration of the instrument, where (iii) the complex visibility of the source is estimated from a least-square determination of a linear inverse problem, and where (iv) the derived AMBER observables are the squared visibility, the closure phase, and the spectral differential phase.

  15. Delay reduction: current status.

    PubMed

    Fantino, E; Preston, R A; Dunn, R

    1993-07-01

    Delay-reduction theory states that the effectiveness of a stimulus as a conditioned reinforcer may be predicted most accurately by the reduction in time to primary reinforcement correlated with its onset. We review support for the theory and then discuss two new types of experiments that assess it. One compares models of choice in situations wherein the less preferred outcome is made more accessible; the other investigates whether frequency of conditioned reinforcement affects choice beyond the effect exerted by frequency of primary reinforcement.

  16. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-16

    This paper briefly summarizes the series in which we consider the possibilities for losing, or compromising, key capabilities of the U.S. nuclear force in the face of modernization and reductions. The first of the three papers takes an historical perspective, considering capabilities that were eliminated in past force reductions. The second paper is our attempt to define the needed capabilities looking forward in the context of the current framework for force modernization and the current picture of the evolving challenges of deterrence and assurance. The third paper then provides an example for each of our undesirable outcomes: the creation of roach motels, box canyons, and wrong turns.

  17. Discrete reductive perturbation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, Decio; Petrera, Matteo

    2006-04-15

    We expand a partial difference equation (P{delta}E) on multiple lattices and obtain the P{delta}E which governs its far field behavior. The perturbative-reductive approach is here performed on well-known nonlinear P{delta}Es, both integrable and nonintegrable. We study the cases of the lattice modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation, the Hietarinta equation, the lattice Volterra-Kac-Van Moerbeke equation and a nonintegrable lattice KdV equation. Such reductions allow us to obtain many new P{delta}Es of the nonlinear Schroedinger type.

  18. Financing Class Size Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Class size reduction has been shown to, among other things, improve academic achievement for all students and particularly for low-income and minority students. With the No Child Left Behind Act's heavy emphasis on scientifically based research, adequate yearly progress, and disaggregated results, one wonders why all children aren't enrolled in…

  19. Propulsion system noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiler, C. E.; Heidelberg, L. J.; Karchmer, A. M.; Lansing, D. L.; Miller, B. A.; Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    The progress in propulsion system noise reduction is reviewed. The noise technology areas discussed include: fan noise; advances in suppression including conventional acoustic treatment, high Mach number inlets, and wing shielding; engine core noise; flap noise from both under-the-wing and over-the-wing powered-lift systems; supersonic jet noise suppression; and the NASA program in noise prediction.

  20. Industrial Waste Reduction Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-24

    US industry generates over 12 billion tons of wastes each year. These wastes consist of undesirable by-products of industrial production that are discarded into our environment. Energy is an integral part of these wastes; it is found in the embodied energy of industrial feedstocks not optimally used, in the energy content of the wastes themselves, and in the energy needed to transport, treat, and dispose of wastes. Estimates of the potential energy savings from reducing industrial wastes range from three to four quadrillion Btu per year -- enough to meet the annual energy needs of 30 million American homes. This document presents a plan for the Industrial Waste Reduction Program, which has been designed to help achieve national goals for energy efficiency and waste minimization. The objective of the program is to improve the energy efficiency of industrial processes through cost-effective waste reduction. The initial program focus is on waste reduction opportunities in the production and use of chemicals, due to the significant amount of energy used in these activities and the large amounts of hazardous and toxic wastes they generate. The chemical industry will be the initial subject of a series of waste reduction opportunity assessments conducted as part of the program. Assessments of other industries and waste problems will follow.

  1. Exercise and Fat Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    This document analyzes the problems encountered by the obese individual and the effects of regular exercise on weight loss and fat reduction. Part one compares the psychological traits of obese children with age groups of normal weight and discusses the organic disorders and social attitudes which plague the overweight individual. Part two states…

  2. Imino Transfer Hydrogenation Reductions.

    PubMed

    Wills, Martin

    2016-04-01

    This review contains a summary of recent developments in the transfer hydrogenation of C=N bonds, with a particularly focus on reports from within the last 10 years and asymmetric transformations. However, earlier work in the area is also discussed in order to provide context for the more recent results described. I focus strongly on the Ru/TsDPEN class of asymmetric transfer hydrogenation reactions originally reported by Noyori et al., together with examples of their applications, particularly to medically valuable target molecules. The recent developments in the area of highly active imine-reduction catalysts, notably those based on iridium, are also described in some detail. I discuss diastereoselective reduction methods as a route to the synthesis of chiral amines using transfer hydrogenation. The recent development of a methodology for positioning reduction complexes within chiral proteins, permitting the generation of asymmetric reduction products through a directed modification of the protein environment in a controlled manner, is also discussed. PMID:27573139

  3. Nagel on reduction.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sahotra

    2015-10-01

    This paper attempts a critical reappraisal of Nagel's (1961, 1970) model of reduction taking into account both traditional criticisms and recent defenses. This model treats reduction as a type of explanation in which a reduced theory is explained by a reducing theory after their relevant representational items have been suitably connected. In accordance with the deductive-nomological model, the explanation is supposed to consist of a logical deduction. Nagel was a pluralist about both the logical form of the connections between the reduced and reducing theories (which could be conditionals or biconditionals) and their epistemological status (as analytic connections, conventions, or synthetic claims). This paper defends Nagel's pluralism on both counts and, in the process, argues that the multiple realizability objection to reductionism is misplaced. It also argues that the Nagel model correctly characterizes reduction as a type of explanation. However, it notes that logical deduction must be replaced by a broader class of inferential techniques that allow for different types of approximation. Whereas Nagel (1970), in contrast to his earlier position (1961), recognized the relevance of approximation, he did not realize its full import for the model. Throughout the paper two case studies are used to illustrate the arguments: the putative reduction of classical thermodynamics to the kinetic theory of matter and that of classical genetics to molecular biology.

  4. Intracellular chromium reduction.

    PubMed

    Arslan, P; Beltrame, M; Tomasi, A

    1987-10-22

    Two steps are involved in the uptake of Cr(VI): (1) the diffusion of the anion CrO4(2-) through a facilitated transport system, presumably the non-specific anion carrier and (2) the intracellular reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The intracellular reduction of Cr(VI), keeping the cytoplasmic concentration of Cr(VI) low, facilitates accumulation of chromate from extracellular medium into the cell. In the present paper, a direct demonstration of intracellular chromium reduction is provided by means of electron paramagnetic (spin) resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Incubation of metabolically active rat thymocytes with chromate originates a signal which can be attributed to a paramagnetic species of chromium, Cr(V) or Cr(III). The EPR signal is originated by intracellular reduction of chromium since: (1) it is observed only when cells are incubated with chromate, (2) it is present even after extensive washings of the cells in a chromium-free medium; (3) it is abolished when cells are incubated with drugs able to reduce the glutathione pool, i.e., diethylmaleate or phorone; and (4) it is abolished when cells are incubated in the presence of a specific inhibitor of the anion carrier, 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2-2'-disulfonic acid. PMID:2820507

  5. Nagel on reduction.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sahotra

    2015-10-01

    This paper attempts a critical reappraisal of Nagel's (1961, 1970) model of reduction taking into account both traditional criticisms and recent defenses. This model treats reduction as a type of explanation in which a reduced theory is explained by a reducing theory after their relevant representational items have been suitably connected. In accordance with the deductive-nomological model, the explanation is supposed to consist of a logical deduction. Nagel was a pluralist about both the logical form of the connections between the reduced and reducing theories (which could be conditionals or biconditionals) and their epistemological status (as analytic connections, conventions, or synthetic claims). This paper defends Nagel's pluralism on both counts and, in the process, argues that the multiple realizability objection to reductionism is misplaced. It also argues that the Nagel model correctly characterizes reduction as a type of explanation. However, it notes that logical deduction must be replaced by a broader class of inferential techniques that allow for different types of approximation. Whereas Nagel (1970), in contrast to his earlier position (1961), recognized the relevance of approximation, he did not realize its full import for the model. Throughout the paper two case studies are used to illustrate the arguments: the putative reduction of classical thermodynamics to the kinetic theory of matter and that of classical genetics to molecular biology. PMID:26386529

  6. Teaching Reductive Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armoni, Michal; Gal-Ezer, Judith

    2005-01-01

    When dealing with a complex problem, solving it by reduction to simpler problems, or problems for which the solution is already known, is a common method in mathematics and other scientific disciplines, as in computer science and, specifically, in the field of computability. However, when teaching computational models (as part of computability)…

  7. Reduction/Transformation Operators

    2006-09-01

    RTOp (reduction/transformation operators) is a collection of C++ software that provides the basic mechanism for implementinig vector operations in a flexible and efficient manner. This is the main interface utilized by Thyra to allow for the specification of specific vector reduction and/or transformation operations. The RTOp package contains three different types of software. (a) a small number of interoperability interfaces. (b) support software including code for the parallel SPMD mode based on only Teuchos::Comm(and notmore » MPl directly(, and (c) a library of pre-implemented RTOp subclasses for everything from simple AXPYs and norms, to more specialized vector operations. RTOp allows an algorithm developer to implement their own RTOp subclasses in a way that is independent from any specific serial, parallel, out-of-core or other type of vector implementation. RTOp is a required package by Thyra and MOOCHO. (c)« less

  8. Tensor sufficient dimension reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wenxuan; Xing, Xin; Suslick, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Tensor is a multiway array. With the rapid development of science and technology in the past decades, large amount of tensor observations are routinely collected, processed, and stored in many scientific researches and commercial activities nowadays. The colorimetric sensor array (CSA) data is such an example. Driven by the need to address data analysis challenges that arise in CSA data, we propose a tensor dimension reduction model, a model assuming the nonlinear dependence between a response and a projection of all the tensor predictors. The tensor dimension reduction models are estimated in a sequential iterative fashion. The proposed method is applied to a CSA data collected for 150 pathogenic bacteria coming from 10 bacterial species and 14 bacteria from one control species. Empirical performance demonstrates that our proposed method can greatly improve the sensitivity and specificity of the CSA technique. PMID:26594304

  9. Injury reduction at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Griffing, Bill; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    In a recent DOE Program Review, Fermilab's director presented results of the laboratory's effort to reduce the injury rate over the last decade. The results, shown in the figure below, reveal a consistent and dramatic downward trend in OSHA recordable injuries at Fermilab. The High Energy Physics Program Office has asked Fermilab to report in detail on how the laboratory has achieved the reduction. In fact, the reduction in the injury rate reflects a change in safety culture at Fermilab, which has evolved slowly over this period, due to a series of events, both planned and unplanned. This paper attempts to describe those significant events and analyze how each of them has shaped the safety culture that, in turn, has reduced the rate of injury at Fermilab to its current value.

  10. Reduction of astrographic catalogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, J.; Prugna, F. D.; Cova, J.

    1984-01-01

    An automatic program for the reduction of overlapping Carte du Ciel plates is described. The projection and transformation equations are given and the RAA subprogram flow is outlined. The program was applied to two different sets of data, namely to nine overlapping plates of the Cape Zone of the CdC, and to fifteen plates taken with the CIDA-refractor of the open cluster Tr10.

  11. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Goodnow, Warren H.; Payne, John R.

    1982-01-01

    The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB.sub.2, for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints.

  12. Emissions reductions strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Sirois, R.H.

    1996-12-31

    This paper consists of the series of viewgraphs used by the author during his presentation. They tabulate nitrogen oxide reduction techniques, technical evaluation of NOx control techniques, critical system design parameters for SNCR processes, major concerns for SCR retrofit applications, integrating technologies, sulfur dioxide control for a coal fired power plant, heavy metals on US EPA`s HAPs list, and mercury emissions. Other slides show flow charts of some of these processes, as well as diagrams of equipment.

  13. [Aware and cooperative reduction].

    PubMed

    Tambone, V; Ghilardi, G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to address the question of reduction in the scientific method, to evaluate its legitimacy as well as its pro and contra from an epistemological point of view. In the first paragraph we classify some kinds of reductionism, analysing their presuppositions and epistemological status and showing some examples of scientific reduction. The presentation includes a classificatory table that shows some of the different forms of biological reductionism. In the second paragraph we study the epistemology of science starting from its modern beginning: the Vienna Circle, focusing on the meaning of methodological reductionism. What did it mean for science to define itself mainly as method, which effects did this new concept of science have on methodology and what kind of problems did this movement bring about. In the third paragraph we examine the reactions triggered by methodological reductionism, we analyze the theoretical consistency of these answers, trying to offer a balanced view. We show how complexity can be seen as a paradigm of the anti-reductionism effort, and we study its epistemological basis. In the fourth paragraph we outline our operative proposal: the reduction that is both aware and cooperative. We point out the main reasons why science cannot avoid being reductive in some way, and therefore how we need to deal with this feature in order to prevent it to degenerate into reductionism. We show some examples of this new proposal taken from the practical realm and from literature, where it is possible to discern the spirit of this alternative methodology. PMID:22964706

  14. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Goodnow, W.H.; Payne, J.R.

    1982-09-14

    The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB[sub 2], for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints. 9 figs.

  15. Television noise reduction device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, B. L.; Stamps, J. C. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A noise reduction system that divides the color video signal into its luminance and chrominance components is reported. The luminance component of a given frame is summed with the luminance component of at least one preceding frame which was stored on a disc recorder. The summation is carried out so as to achieve a signal amplitude equivalent to that of the original signal. The averaged luminance signal is then recombined with the chrominance signal to achieve a noise-reduced television signal.

  16. Oxidation, Reduction, and Deoxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Robert

    In this chapter, methods for oxidation, reduction, and deoxygenation of carbohydrates are presented. In most cases, the reactions have been used on aldoses and their derivatives including glycosides, uronic acids, glycals, and other unsaturated monosaccharides. A number of reactions have also been applied to aldonolactones. The methods include both chemical and enzymatic procedures and some of these can be applied for regioselective transformation of unprotected or partially protected carbohydrates.

  17. Somatic reduction in cycads.

    PubMed

    Storey, W B

    1968-02-01

    Recurrent somatic reduction is a normal ontogenetic process in apogeotropic roots of cycads, which develop into dichotomously branching coralloid masses. The reduced cells make up part of a ring of differentiated cortical tissue lying midway between the pericycle and the epidermis; they serve as fillers among the large cells and become charged with slime. The differentiated tissue is colonized by a species of blue-green algae.

  18. Thermochemical nitrate reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1992-09-01

    A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with {approximately}3 wt% NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200{degrees}C to 350{degrees}C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia {approx} methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics.

  19. Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.

    2006-04-05

    The FRC groundwater and sediment contain significant concentrations of U and Tc and are dominated by low pH, and high nitrate and Al concentrations where dissimilatory metal reducing bacterial activity may be limited. The presence of Clostridia in Area 3 at the FRC site has been confirmed and their ability to reduce uranium under site conditions will be determined. Although the phenomenon of uranium reduction by Clostridia has been firmly established, the molecular mechanisms underlying such a reaction are not very clear. The authors are exploring the hypothesis that U(VI) reduction occurs through hydrogenases and other enzymes (Matin and Francis). Fundamental knowledge of metal reduction using Clostridia will allow us to exploit naturally occurring processes to attenuate radionuclide and metal contaminants in situ in the subsurface. The outline for this report are as follows: (1) Growth of Clostridium sp. under normal culture conditions; (2) Fate of metals and radionuclides in the presence of Clostridia; (3) Bioreduction of uranium associated with nitrate, citrate, and lepidocrocite; and (4) Utilization of Clostridium sp. for immobilization of uranium at the FRC Area 3 site.

  20. Reduction of turbomachinery noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A. (Inventor); Brookfield, John M. (Inventor); Sell, Julian (Inventor); Hayden, Belva J. (Inventor); Ingard, K. Uno (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    In the invention, propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise characteristic of interaction of a turbomachine blade wake, produced by a turbomachine blade as the blade rotates, with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade, are reduced. This is accomplished by injection of fluid into the blade wake through a port in the rotor blade. The mass flow rate of the fluid injected into the blade wake is selected to reduce the momentum deficit of the wake to correspondingly increase the time-mean velocity of the wake and decrease the turbulent velocity fluctuations of the wake. With this fluid injection, reduction of both propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise produced by interaction of the blade wake with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade is achieved. In a further noise reduction technique, boundary layer fluid is suctioned into the turbomachine blade through a suction port on the side of the blade that is characterized as the relatively low-pressure blade side. As with the fluid injection technique, the mass flow rate of the fluid suctioned into the blade is here selected to reduce the momentum deficit of the wake to correspondingly increase the time-mean velocity of the wake and decrease the turbulent velocity fluctuations of the wake; reduction of both propagating broad band and tonal acoustic components of noise produced by interaction of the blade wake with a turbomachine component downstream of the rotating blade is achieved with this suction technique. Blowing and suction techniques are also provided in the invention for reducing noise associated with the wake produced by fluid flow around a stationary blade upstream of a rotating turbomachine.

  1. Electrolytic oxide reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Barnes, Laurel A; Williamson, Mark A; Willit, James L; Berger, John F

    2015-04-28

    An electrolytic oxide reduction system according to a non-limiting embodiment of the present invention may include a plurality of anode assemblies, a plurality of cathode assemblies, and a lift system configured to engage the anode and cathode assemblies. The cathode assemblies may be alternately arranged with the anode assemblies such that each cathode assembly is flanked by two anode assemblies. The lift system may be configured to selectively engage the anode and cathode assemblies so as to allow the simultaneous lifting of any combination of the anode and cathode assemblies (whether adjacent or non-adjacent).

  2. Reductive Desulfurization of Dibenzyldisulfide

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kathleen W.

    1992-01-01

    Dibenzyldisulfide was reductively degraded by a methanogenic mixed culture derived from a sewage digestor. Toluene was produced with benzyl mercaptan as an intermediate in sulfur-limited medium. Toluene production was strictly associated with biological activity; however, the reducing agent for the culture medium, Ti(III), was partially responsible for production of benzyl mercaptan. Sulfide was not detected. Additions of sodium sulfide did not inhibit toluene production. Additions of 2-bromoethane sulfonic acid prevented methanogenesis but did not adversely affect toluene yields. PMID:16348733

  3. NSF grant reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R.

    Many National Science Foundation grants will be reduced this year as a result of a provision in H.R. 3299. The provision stems from disagreement between the Congress and the administration on how to make budget deficit cuts required by the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings budget law. An agreement was made to cut $4.55 billion through a reduction in discretionary spending, by what amounts to 1.4% across-the-board. The cuts will affect all discretionary federal domestic and defense programs.

  4. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Payne, John R.

    1983-09-20

    The invention is directed to an anode-cathode structure for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the structure is comprised of a carbon anode assembly which straddles a wedge-shaped refractory hard metal cathode assembly having steeply sloped cathodic surfaces, each cathodic surface being paired in essentially parallel planar relationship with an anode surface. The anode-cathode structure not only takes into account the structural weakness of refractory hard metal materials but also permits the changing of the RHM assembly during operation of the cell. Further, the anode-cathode structure enhances the removal of anode gas from the interpolar gap between the anode and cathode surfaces.

  5. Reduction operators of Burgers equation

    PubMed Central

    Pocheketa, Oleksandr A.; Popovych, Roman O.

    2013-01-01

    The solution of the problem on reduction operators and nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation is systematically treated and completed. A new proof of the theorem on the special “no-go” case of regular reduction operators is presented, and the representation of the coefficients of operators in terms of solutions of the initial equation is constructed for this case. All possible nonclassical reductions of the Burgers equation to single ordinary differential equations are exhaustively described. Any Lie reduction of the Burgers equation proves to be equivalent via the Hopf–Cole transformation to a parameterized family of Lie reductions of the linear heat equation. PMID:23576819

  6. Islam and harm reduction.

    PubMed

    Kamarulzaman, A; Saifuddeen, S M

    2010-03-01

    Although drugs are haram and therefore prohibited in Islam, illicit drug use is widespread in many Islamic countries throughout the world. In the last several years increased prevalence of this problem has been observed in many of these countries which has in turn led to increasing injecting drug use driven HIV/AIDS epidemic across the Islamic world. Whilst some countries have recently responded to the threat through the implementation of harm reduction programmes, many others have been slow to respond. In Islam, The Quran and the Prophetic traditions or the Sunnah are the central sources of references for the laws and principles that guide the Muslims' way of life and by which policies and guidelines for responses including that of contemporary social and health problems can be derived. The preservation and protection of the dignity of man, and steering mankind away from harm and destruction are central to the teachings of Islam. When viewed through the Islamic principles of the preservation and protection of the faith, life, intellect, progeny and wealth, harm reduction programmes are permissible and in fact provide a practical solution to a problem that could result in far greater damage to the society at large if left unaddressed.

  7. Microbial reduction of iodate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Councell, T.B.; Landa, E.R.; Lovley, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    The different oxidation species of iodine have markedly different sorption properties. Hence, changes in iodine redox states can greatly affect the mobility of iodine in the environment. Although a major microbial role has been suggested in the past to account for these redox changes, little has been done to elucidate the responsible microorganisms or the mechanisms involved. In the work presented here, direct microbial reduction of iodate was demonstrated with anaerobic cell suspensions of the sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans which reduced 96% of an initial 100 ??M iodate to iodide at pH 7 in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer, whereas anaerobic cell suspensions of the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens were unable to reduce iodate in 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer (pH 7). Both D. desulfuricans and S. putrefaciens were able to reduce iodate at pH 7 in 10 mM HEPES buffer. Both soluble ferrous iron and sulfide, as well as iron monosulfide (FeS) were shown to abiologically reduce iodate to iodide. These results indicate that ferric iron and/or sulfate reducing bacteria are capable of mediating both direct, enzymatic, as well as abiotic reduction of iodate in natural anaerobic environments. These microbially mediated reactions may be important factors in the fate and transport of 129I in natural systems.

  8. Harm Reduction From Below

    PubMed Central

    Van Schipstal, Inge; Berning, Moritz; Murray, Hayley

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on how recreational drug users in the Netherlands and in online communities navigate the risks and reduce the harms they associate with psychoactive drug use. To do so, we examined the protective practices they invent, use, and share with their immediate peers and with larger drug experimenting communities online. The labor involved in protective practices and that which ultimately informs harm reduction from below follows three interrelated trajectories: (1) the handling and sharing of drugs to facilitate hassle-free drug use, (2) creating pleasant and friendly spaces that we highlight under the practices of drug use attunements, and (3) the seeking and sharing of information in practices to spread the good high. We focus not only on users’ concerns but also on how these concerns shape their approach to drugs, what young people do to navigate uncertainties, and how they reach out to and create different sources of knowledge to minimize adversities and to improve highs. Harm reduction from below, we argue, can best be seen in the practices of sharing around drug use and in the caring for the larger community of drug-using peers. PMID:27721525

  9. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  10. Reductant injection and mixing system

    DOEpatents

    Reeves, Matt; Henry, Cary A.; Ruth, Michael J.

    2016-02-16

    A gaseous reductant injection and mixing system is described herein. The system includes an injector for injecting a gaseous reductant into an exhaust gas stream, and a mixer attached to a surface of the injector. The injector includes a plurality of apertures through which the gaseous reductant is injected into an exhaust gas stream. The mixer includes a plurality of fluid deflecting elements.

  11. Active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Carolyn R.

    Active noise reduction (ANR) techniques are described with reference to their application to crewmembers during aircraft operation to enhance productivity and safety. ANR concepts and theory are explained, and the development of protective ANR systems for direct implementation are described. Sound attenuation testing was conducted to study the feasibility of aircraft-powered ANR systems, and the positive results spurred their development for compatibility with flight helmets. The Helmets Limited ANR system uses a bypass mode at times of limited available power and complements the use of passive sound attenuation. Subjective testing results show that the device is effective, and a planned program of intensive evaluation is discussed. The aircraft that require an ANR system are listed, and key areas of implementation include battery power and the combination of ANR circuitry and helmet oxygen masks. It is suggested that ANR techniques can positively impact the efficiency and performance of crewmembers in high-noise-level aircraft.

  12. Hazardous solvent source reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, M.S.; Green, B.

    1995-09-01

    This book is written for the managers, production leaders, and operations staff tasked with the job of eliminating hazardous cleaning solvents from their workplace. Information regarding the location, evaluation, and implementation of environmentally preferred cleaning technologies is offered for a broad range of applications. These include: removal of grease and grime from a piece of equipment during maintenance, cleaning small parts before assembly, defluxing printed circuit boards and assemblies, and stripping paint from field vehicles and aircraft. Moving beyond the limits of source reduction alone, this book provides complete information on the planning, staffing, and execution of a pollution prevention program, alternative and in-use cleaner testing, waste recycling and treatment, air emission control, replacement system design, and system economics. For the environmental specialist, this book helps to bridge the gap between regulatory requirements and shop-floor constraints.

  13. Aircraft engine pollution reduction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of engine operation on the types and levels of the major aircraft engine pollutants is described and the major factors governing the formation of these pollutants during the burning of hydrocarbon fuel are discussed. Methods which are being explored to reduce these pollutants are discussed and their application to several experimental research programs are pointed out. Results showing significant reductions in the levels of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, and oxides of nitrogen obtained from experimental combustion research programs are presented and discussed to point out potential application to aircraft engines. An experimental program designed to develop and demonstrate these and other advanced, low pollution combustor design methods is described. Results that have been obtained to date indicate considerable promise for reducing advanced engine exhaust pollutants to levels significantly below current engines.

  14. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Payne, J.R.

    1983-09-20

    The invention is directed to an anode-cathode structure for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the structure is comprised of a carbon anode assembly which straddles a wedge-shaped refractory hard metal cathode assembly having steeply sloped cathodic surfaces, each cathodic surface being paired in essentially parallel planar relationship with an anode surface. The anode-cathode structure not only takes into account the structural weakness of refractory hard metal materials but also permits the changing of the RHM assembly during operation of the cell. Further, the anode-cathode structure enhances the removal of anode gas from the interpolar gap between the anode and cathode surfaces. 10 figs.

  15. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  16. Setting goals for drug policy: harm reduction or use reduction?

    PubMed

    Caulkins, J P; Reuter, P

    1997-09-01

    Historically, United States drug policy has focused on use reduction; harm reduction is a prominent alternative. This paper aims to provoke and inform more debate about the relative merits of these two. Since harm is not necessarily proportional to use, use reduction and harm reduction differ. Both terms are somewhat ambiguous; precisely defining them clarifies thinking and policy implications. Measures associated with use reduction goals are poor; those associated with harm reduction are even worse. National goals influence the many decentralized individuals who collectively make drug policy; clearly enunciating goals makes some policy choices transparent and goals serve a variety of purposes besides guiding programmatic decisions. We recommend that the overall objective be to minimize the total harm associated with drug production, distribution, consumption and control. Reducing use should be seen as a principal means of attaining that end.

  17. Size reduction machine

    SciTech Connect

    Fricke, V.

    1999-12-15

    The Size Reduction Machine (SRM) is a mobile platform capable of shearing various shapes and types of metal components at a variety of elevations. This shearing activity can be performed without direct physical movement and placement of the shear head by the operator. The base unit is manually moved and roughly aligned to each cut location. The base contains the electronics: hydraulic pumps, servos, and actuators needed to move the shear-positioning arm. The movable arm allows the shear head to have six axes of movement and to cut to within 4 inches of a wall surface. The unit has a slick electrostatic capture coating to assist in external decontamination. Internal contamination of the unit is controlled by a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter on the cooling inlet fan. The unit is compact enough to access areas through a 36-inch standard door opening. This paper is an Innovative Technology Summary Report designed to provide potential users with the information they need to quickly determine if a technology would apply to a particular environmental management problem. They also are designed for readers who may recommend that a technology be considered by prospective users.

  18. Topical fat reduction.

    PubMed

    Greenway, F L; Bray, G A; Heber, D

    1995-11-01

    The fat on women's thighs is more difficult to mobilize due to increased alpha-2 adrenergic receptor activity induced by estrogen. Lipolysis can be initiated through adipocyte receptor stimulation (beta adrenergic) or inhibition (adenosine or alpha-2 adrenergic) or by inhibition of phosphodiesterase. Since many women desire regional thigh fat loss, a series of clinical trials were initiated using one thigh as a double-blinded control. Trial #1: Five overweight women had injections of isoproterenol at intervals around the thigh three times a week for 4 weeks with diet and walking. Trial #2: Five overweight woman had ointment containing forskolin, yohimbine and aminophylline applied to the thigh five times a week for 4 weeks after hypertonic warm soaks with a diet and walking. Trial #3: Eighteen overweight women were divided into three groups of six and trial #2 was repeated with each agent alone vs. placebo using forskolin, yohimbine or aminophylline in separate ointments. Trial #4: Thirty overweight women had 10% aminophylline ointment applied to the thigh five times a week for 6 weeks with diet and walking. Chemistry panel, theophylline level and patch testing were performed. Trial #5: Twelve women had trial #4 repeated with 2% aminophylline cream without a diet or walking. Trial #6: Trial #5 was repeated with 0.5% aminophylline cream. All trials except yohimbine ointment gave significantly more girth loss from the treated thigh (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001). Chemistry panel showed no toxicity. Theophylline was undetectable and patch testing was negative. We conclude that topical fat reduction for women's thighs can be achieved without diet or exercise. PMID:8697059

  19. Model reduction for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, Wodek; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1990-01-01

    Several conditions for a near-optimal reduction of general dynamic systems are presented focusing on the reduction in balanced and modal coordinates. It is shown that model and balanced reductions give very different results for the flexible structure with closely-spaced natural frequencies. In general, balanced reduction is found to give better results. A robust model reduction technique was developed to study the sensitivity of modeling error to variations in the damping of a structure. New concepts of grammians defined over a finite time and/or a frequency interval are proposed including computational procedures for evaluating them. Application of the model reduction technique to these grammians is considered to lead to a near-optimal reduced model which closely reproduces the full system output in the time and/or frequency interval.

  20. Emerging Community Noise Reduction Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current NASA research portfolio in the area of aircraft noise reduction is presented. The emphasis of the research described herein is on meeting the aggressive near- and mid-term national goals for reducing aircraft noise emissions, which NASA internal studies have shown to be feasible using noise reduction technologies currently being developed in-house or in partnership with NASA s industry and academic partners. While NASA has an active research effort in airframe noise reduction, this overview focuses on propulsion noise reduction only.

  1. Cochlear implant optimized noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Stefan J; Arora, Komal; Dawson, Pam W

    2012-12-01

    Noise-reduction methods have provided significant improvements in speech perception for cochlear implant recipients, where only quality improvements have been found in hearing aid recipients. Recent psychoacoustic studies have suggested changes to noise-reduction techniques specifically for cochlear implants, due to differences between hearing aid recipient and cochlear implant recipient hearing. An optimized noise-reduction method was developed with significantly increased temporal smoothing of the signal-to-noise ratio estimate and a more aggressive gain function compared to current noise-reduction methods. This optimized noise-reduction algorithm was tested with 12 cochlear implant recipients over four test sessions. Speech perception was assessed through speech in noise tests with three noise types; speech-weighted noise, 20-talker babble and 4-talker babble. A significant speech perception improvement using optimized noise reduction over standard processing was found in babble noise and speech-weighted noise and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted noise. Speech perception in quiet was not degraded. Listening quality testing for noise annoyance and overall preference found significant improvements over the standard processing and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted and babble noise types. This optimized method has shown significant speech perception and quality improvements compared to the standard processing and a current noise-reduction method.

  2. Optimising resources by reduction: the FRAME Reduction Committee.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sylvia

    2004-06-01

    The Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical Experiments (FRAME) Reduction Committee, formed in 1998, comprises experienced professionals in the fields of statistics, experimental design, animal welfare and alternatives. The committee undertakes projects designed to contribute to reduction by addressing the implementation of recommendations made at an European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) workshop on reducing the use of laboratory animals. The use of improved experimental design and statistical analysis techniques are key means of achieving reduction. Literature surveys have shown that there is scope for improvement in these areas. Projects include organising workshops that explain how these techniques can be used to achieve reduction, the creation of guidelines for journal editors and the compilation of a directory of training material on experimental design and statistical analysis. The first FRAME Reduction Committee international symposium will be held in October 2002. PMID:23577468

  3. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  4. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  5. Reduction-Fired Seedpod Bowls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyke, Rod

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on a reduction-firing process with an aim of producing high-quality blackware similar to the black-on-black pottery of Maria Martinez and other American Indian potters. Includes a lesson on creating reduction-fired seedpod bowls, lists of instructional resources and materials, and the objectives and evaluation. (CMK)

  6. Nitrite reduction in Veillonella alcalescens.

    PubMed Central

    Yordy, D M; Delwiche, E A

    1979-01-01

    Nitrite reduction was examined in Veillonella alcalescens C-1, and obligate anaerobe with an ATP-yielding nitrate-reducing system. Hydrogen donors for nitrite reduction included hydrosulfite, hydrogen gas, and pyruvate, but not pyridine nucleotides, in the presnece or absence of flavins. Pyruvate-linked nitrite reduction was not inhibited by 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(2-thienyl) 1,3-butanedione, dicoumarol, or 2-heptyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline-N-oxide. The noninvolvement of membrane-bound factors was supported by the fact that 100% of pyruvate-linked activity remained in the soluble fraction after fractionation of crude extracts by ultracentrifugation. Using DEAE-cellulose column chromatography, however, the participation of ferredoxin in nitrite reduction was demonstrated. The product of nitrite reduction appeared to be ammonia, as determined from H2-to-NO2- ratios. Nitrite reductase was induced by nitrate or nitrite and was repressed by increased levels of reduced nitrogenous compounds. PMID:422515

  7. Reduction of meckelin leads to general loss of cilia, ciliary microtubule misalignment and distorted cell surface organization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Meckelin (MKS3), a conserved protein linked to Meckel Syndrome, assists in the migration of centrioles to the cell surface for ciliogenesis. We explored for additional functions of MKS3p using RNA interference (RNAi) and expression of FLAG epitope tagged protein in the ciliated protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia. This cell has a highly organized cell surface with thousands of cilia and basal bodies that are grouped into one or two basal body units delineated by ridges. The highly systematized nature of the P. tetraurelia cell surface provides a research model of MKS and other ciliopathies where changes in ciliary structure, subcellular organization and overall arrangement of the cell surface can be easily observed. We used cells reduced in IFT88 for comparison, as the involvement of this gene’s product with cilia maintenance and growth is well understood. Results FLAG-MKS3p was found above the plane of the distal basal body in the transition zone. Approximately 95% of those basal bodies observed had staining for FLAG-MKS3. The RNAi phenotype for MKS3 depleted cells included global shortening and loss of cilia. Basal body structure appeared unaffected. On the dorsal surface, the basal bodies and their associated rootlets appeared rotated out of alignment from the normal anterior-posterior rows. Likewise, cortical units were abnormal in shape and out of alignment from normal rows. A GST pull down using the MKS3 coiled-coil domain suggests previously unidentified interacting partners. Conclusions Reduction of MKS3p shows that this protein affects development and maintenance of cilia over the entire cell surface. Reduction of MKS3p is most visible on the dorsal surface. The anterior basal body is attached to and moves along the striated rootlet of the posterior basal body in preparation for duplication. We propose that with reduced MKS3p, this attachment and guidance of the basal body is lost. The basal body veers off course, causing basal body rows to be

  8. DRAG REDUCTION WITH SUPERHYDROPHOBIC RIBLETS

    SciTech Connect

    Barbier, Charlotte N; D'Urso, Brian R; Jenner, Elliot

    2012-01-01

    Samples combining riblets and superhydrophobic surfaces are fabricated at University of Pittsburgh and their drag reduction properties are studied at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory with a commercial cone-and-plate rheometer. In parallel to the experiments, numerical simulations are performed in order to estimate the slip length at high rotational speed. For each sample, a drag reduction of at least 5% is observed in both laminar and turbulent regime. At low rotational speed, drag reduction up to 30% is observed with a 1 mm deep grooved sample. As the rotational speed increases, a secondary flow develops causing a slight decrease in drag reductions. However, drag reduction above 15% is still observed for the large grooved samples. In the turbulent regime, the 100 microns grooved sample becomes more efficient than the other samples in drag reduction and manages to sustain a drag reduction above 15%. Using the simulations, the slip length of the 100 micron grooved sample is estimated to be slightly above 100 micron in the turbulent regime.

  9. Technologies for Aircraft Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.

    2006-01-01

    Technologies for aircraft noise reduction have been developed by NASA over the past 15 years through the Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program and the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) project. This presentation summarizes highlights from these programs and anticipated noise reduction benefits for communities surrounding airports. Historical progress in noise reduction and technologies available for future aircraft/engine development are identified. Technologies address aircraft/engine components including fans, exhaust nozzles, landing gear, and flap systems. New "chevron" nozzles have been developed and implemented on several aircraft in production today that provide significant jet noise reduction. New engines using Ultra-High Bypass (UHB) ratios are projected to provide about 10 EPNdB (Effective Perceived Noise Level in decibels) engine noise reduction relative to the average fleet that was flying in 1997. Audio files are embedded in the presentation that estimate the sound levels for a 35,000 pound thrust engine for takeoff and approach power conditions. The predictions are based on actual model scale data that was obtained by NASA. Finally, conceptual pictures are shown that look toward future aircraft/propulsion systems that might be used to obtain further noise reduction.

  10. Geometric Quantization and Foliation Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skerritt, Paul

    A standard question in the study of geometric quantization is whether symplectic reduction interacts nicely with the quantized theory, and in particular whether "quantization commutes with reduction." Guillemin and Sternberg first proposed this question, and answered it in the affirmative for the case of a free action of a compact Lie group on a compact Kahler manifold. Subsequent work has focused mainly on extending their proof to non-free actions and non-Kahler manifolds. For realistic physical examples, however, it is desirable to have a proof which also applies to non-compact symplectic manifolds. In this thesis we give a proof of the quantization-reduction problem for general symplectic manifolds. This is accomplished by working in a particular wavefunction representation, associated with a polarization that is in some sense compatible with reduction. While the polarized sections described by Guillemin and Sternberg are nonzero on a dense subset of the Kahler manifold, the ones considered here are distributional, having support only on regions of the phase space associated with certain quantized, or "admissible", values of momentum. We first propose a reduction procedure for the prequantum geometric structures that "covers" symplectic reduction, and demonstrate how both symplectic and prequantum reduction can be viewed as examples of foliation reduction. Consistency of prequantum reduction imposes the above-mentioned admissibility conditions on the quantized momenta, which can be seen as analogues of the Bohr-Wilson-Sommerfeld conditions for completely integrable systems. We then describe our reduction-compatible polarization, and demonstrate a one-to-one correspondence between polarized sections on the unreduced and reduced spaces. Finally, we describe a factorization of the reduced prequantum bundle, suggested by the structure of the underlying reduced symplectic manifold. This in turn induces a factorization of the space of polarized sections that agrees

  11. Fan Noise Reduction: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2001-01-01

    Fan noise reduction technologies developed as part of the engine noise reduction element of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program are reviewed. Developments in low-noise fan stage design, swept and leaned outlet guide vanes, active noise control, fan flow management, and scarfed inlet are discussed. In each case, a description of the method is presented and, where available, representative results and general conclusions are discussed. The review concludes with a summary of the accomplishments of the AST-sponsored fan noise reduction research and a few thoughts on future work.

  12. Subsolidus reduction of lunar spinels.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of evidence that some lunar basalts must have exceeded the lower limit of crystallization oxygen fugacity (fO2) by several orders of magnitude. The evidence is based primarily on the decomposition of Cr-Al-ulvospinel, and is further supported in one case by the decomposition of olivine. The data suggest that some rocks have undergone intense nonequilibrium subsolidus reduction. The reduction phenomenon is widespread, and is considered to have developed either during initial deuteric cooling or as a result of a postcrystallization reduction event.

  13. Reductive Degradation: Versatile, Low Cost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Water and Sewage Works, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This article discusses the use of reductive degradation as an economical and effective treatment of chlorinated hydrocarbons. Comparisons with activated carbon treatment show lower capital equipment and treatment costs. (CS)

  14. Biological effects of ozone reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The effects of increased UV radiation on the biosphere are described with ongoing research, and research areas that should be investigated. Some mention is also made of the potential climatic effects of ozone reduction on agriculture and the biosphere.

  15. 2dfdr: Data reduction software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AAO software Team

    2015-05-01

    2dfdr is an automatic data reduction pipeline dedicated to reducing multi-fibre spectroscopy data, with current implementations for AAOmega (fed by the 2dF, KOALA-IFU, SAMI Multi-IFU or older SPIRAL front-ends), HERMES, 2dF (spectrograph), 6dF, and FMOS. A graphical user interface is provided to control data reduction and allow inspection of the reduced spectra.

  16. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Y; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells. PMID:2389940

  17. Rapid reduction of titanium dioxide nano-particles by reduction with a calcium reductant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Masumi; Matsuura, Shiki; Natsui, Shungo; Tsuji, Etsuji; Habazaki, Hiroki; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2014-09-01

    Micro-, submicron-, and nano-scale titanium dioxide particles were reduced by reduction with a metallic calcium reductant in calcium chloride molten salt at 1173 K, and the reduction mechanism of the oxides by the calcium reductant was explored. These oxide particles, metallic calcium as a reducing agent, and calcium chloride as a molten salt were placed in a titanium crucible and heated under an argon atmosphere. Titanium dioxide was reduced to metallic titanium through a calcium titanate and lower titanium oxide, and the materials were sintered together to form a micro-porous titanium structure in molten salt at high temperature. The reduction rate of titanium dioxide was observed to increase with decreasing particle size; accordingly, the residual oxygen content in the reduced titanium decreases. The obtained micro-porous titanium appeared dark gray in color because of its low surface reflection. Micro-porous metallic titanium with a low oxygen content (0.42 wt%) and a large surface area (1.794 m2 g-1) can be successfully obtained by reduction under optimal conditions.

  18. Different phycobilin antenna organisations affect the balance between light use and growth rate in the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and in the cryptophyte Cryptomonas ovata.

    PubMed

    Kunath, Christfried; Jakob, Torsten; Wilhelm, Christian

    2012-03-01

    During the recent years, wide varieties of methodologies have been developed up to the level of commercial use to measure photosynthetic electron transport by modulated chlorophyll a-in vivo fluorescence. It is now widely accepted that the ratio between electron transport rates and new biomass (P (Fl)/B (C)) is not fixed and depends on many factors that are also taxonomically variable. In this study, the balance between photon absorption and biomass production has been measured in two phycobilin-containing phototrophs, namely, a cyanobacterium and a cryptophyte, which differ in their antenna organization. It is demonstrated that the different antenna organization exerts influence on the regulation of the primary photosynthetic reaction and the dissipation of excessively absorbed radiation. Although, growth rates and the quantum efficiency of biomass production of both phototrophs were comparable, the ratio P (Fl)/B (C) was twice as high in the cryptophyte in comparison to the cyanobacterium. It is assumed that this discrepancy is because of differences in the metabolic regulation of cell growth. In the cryptophyte, absorbed photosynthetic energy is used to convert assimilated carbon directly into proteins and lipids, whereas in the cyanobacterium, the photosynthetic energy is preferentially stored as carbohydrates.

  19. A Virtual Aluminum Reduction Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Zhou, Chenn Q.; Wu, Bing; Li, Jie

    2013-11-01

    The most important component in the aluminum industry is the aluminum reduction cell; it has received considerable interests and resources to conduct research to improve its productivity and energy efficiency. The current study focused on the integration of numerical simulation data and virtual reality technology to create a scientifically and practically realistic virtual aluminum reduction cell by presenting complex cell structures and physical-chemical phenomena. The multiphysical field simulation models were first built and solved in ANSYS software (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA, USA). Then, the methodology of combining the simulation results with virtual reality was introduced, and a virtual aluminum reduction cell was created. The demonstration showed that a computer-based world could be created in which people who are not analysis experts can see the detailed cell structure in a context that they can understand easily. With the application of the virtual aluminum reduction cell, even people who are familiar with aluminum reduction cell operations can gain insights that make it possible to understand the root causes of observed problems and plan design changes in much less time.

  20. Toxicity reduction in industrial effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Lankford, P.W.; Eckenfelder, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    The toxicity of manufacturing wastewaters to fish and other aquatic organisms is now being used by state and federal regulators to monitor and restrict industrial wastewater discharges. As a result, there is a great need for guidance on the subject of aquatic toxicity reduction in the field of industrial water pollution control. This book is a comprehensive reference source on the testing protocols, comparative data, and treatment techniques for effective toxicity reduction. Included in this book are detailed chapters covering various methods for toxicity reduction, such as the removal of metals, aerobic biological treatment, stripping of volatile organics, and management of sludges from toxic wastewater treatment. The book features: a complete overview of the subject, including background material for newcomers to the field; a basic summary and comparison of alternate treatment procedures; the latest methods for the identification of toxic components that readers can use for testing in their own laboratories; a description of applicable technologies for toxicity reduction; actual data from the use of processes that allow readers to compare technologies; solids management requirements including handling and disposal; useful economic comparisons of technologies; and illustrative case studies that demonstrate the application of the latest toxicity reduction technology and data to specific situations. Eleven chapters are processed separately in the appropriate data bases.

  1. Model reduction by manifold boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Transtrum, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Mathemtical models of physical systems can be interpreted as manifolds of predictions embedded in the space of data. For models of complex systems with many parameters, the corresponding model manifold is very high-dimensional but often very thin. This ``low effective dimensionality'' has been described as a hyper-ribbon and is characteristic of systems exhibiting simple, emergent behavior. I discuss a new model reduction method, the manifold boundary approximation method, which constructs a series of models by iteratively approximating the high-dimensional, thin manifold by its boundary. This model reduction method unifies many different model reduction techniques, such as renormalization group and continuum limits, while greatly expanding the domain of tractable models. I demonstrate with a model of a complex signaling network from systems biology. The method produces a series of approximations which reveal how microscopic parameters are systematically ``compressed'' into a few macroscopic degrees of freedom, effectively building a bridge between the microscopic and the macroscopic descriptions.

  2. The voice use reduction program.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Anita

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a structured behavior modification approach to the reduction of voice use by clients with voice disorders. The Voice Use Reduction (VUR) Program is conceptualized as part of a comprehensive approach to the treatment of voice. The VUR Program provides guidelines for the classification of voice use situations, the assignment of voice use units to different situations, and the calculation of the maximum number of units per day and per week in a severe, moderate, and low voice use reduction program. Two case examples are described to illustrate the application of the VUR Program. The results of an evaluation of the VUR Program by 10 female students who presented with vocal nodules and applied the program also are included.

  3. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  4. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, Michael R.; Arnold, Robert G.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  5. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.

  6. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U),more » i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.« less

  7. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction.

    PubMed

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth's history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth's crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.

  8. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    PubMed Central

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. Additionally, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium. PMID:25902522

  9. Closed reduction of a fractured bone

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture reduction - closed ... pain medicine you receive. There may be new fractures that occur with the reduction. If the reduction ... BD, Jupiter JBl, Krettek C, Anderson PA. Closed fracture management. In: Browner BD, Jupiter JB, Krettek C, ...

  10. 2008 world direct reduction statistics

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-01

    This supplement discusses total direct reduced iron (DRI) production for 2007 and 2008 by process. Total 2008 production by MIDREX(reg sign) direct reduction process plants was over 39.8 million tons. The total of all coal-based processes was 17.6 million tons. Statistics for world DRI production are also given by region for 2007 and 2008 and by year (1970-2009). Capacity utilization for 2008 by process is given. World DRI production by region and by process is given for 1998-2008 and world DRI shipments are given from the 1970s to 2008. A list of world direct reduction plants is included.

  11. EDRS: Electronography Data Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren-Smith, Rodney F.; Berry, David S.

    2015-12-01

    The Electronography Data Reduction System (EDRS) reduces and analyzes large format astronomical images and was written to be used from within ASPIC (ascl:1510.006). In its original form it specialized in the reduction of electronographic data but was built around a set of utility programs which were widely applicable to astronomical images from other sources. The programs align and calibrate images, handle lists of (X,Y) positions, apply linear geometrical transformations and do some stellar photometry. This package is now obsolete.

  12. Background Reduction in Cryogenic Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.

    2005-09-08

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  13. Poverty Reduction Begins with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.

    This report describes how children bear the brunt of poverty and explains why they are central to poverty reduction in developing nations. The report also illustrates UNICEF's support for the process of improving access to, and quality of, health care, education, water and sanitation, and child protection. It describes how the participation of the…

  14. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction: a review.

    PubMed

    Bardiya, Nirmala; Bae, Jae-Ho

    2011-05-20

    In the United States anthropogenic activities are mainly responsible for the wide spread perchlorate contamination of drinking water, surface water, groundwater, and soil. Even at microgram levels, perchlorate causes toxicity to flora and fauna and affects growth, metabolism and reproduction in humans and animals. Reports of antithyroid effects of perchlorate and its detection in common food items have raised serious public health concerns, leading to extensive decontamination efforts in recent years. Several physico-chemical removal and biological decontamination processes are being developed. Although promising, ion exchange is a non-selective and incomplete process as it merely transfers perchlorate from water to the resin. The perchlorate-laden spent resins (perchlorate 200-500 mg L(-1)) require regeneration resulting in production of concentrated brine (6-12% NaCl) or caustic waste streams. On the contrary, biological reduction completely degrades perchlorate into O(2) and innocuous Cl(-). High reduction potential of ClO(4)(-)/Cl(-) (E° =∼ 1.28 V) and ClO(3)(-)/Cl(-) pairs (E° =1.03 V) makes these contaminants thermodynamically ideal e(-) acceptors for microbial reduction. In recent years unique dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria have been isolated and detailed studies pertaining to their microbiological, biochemical, genetics and phylogenetic aspects have been undertaken which is the subject of this review article while the various physico-chemical removal and biological reduction processes have been reviewed by others.

  15. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  16. Gaseous reduction of laterite ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utigard, T.; Bergman, R. A.

    1993-04-01

    Lateritic nickel ores have been reduced under laboratory conditions. The reduction experiments were carried out at temperatures from 500 °C to 1100 °C in a horizontal tube furnace using various mixtures of H2 and CO2. The hydrogen evolution method was used to measure the degree of metallization of the reduced ore. It was found that the rate of reduction was very low at 500 °C but then increased rapidly upon heating the ore to 600 °C. The percent metallics increased with increasing H2 to CO2 ratios in the reducing gas. At temperatures between 600 °C and 1100 °C, a H2 to CO2 ratio of 3 leads to the formation of 5 to 6 pct metallics in the reduced calcine was shown. Heating the ore in air or nitrogen prior to reduction does not affect the degree of metallization. A H2 to CO2 ratio of at least 4 is required to obtain a ferronickel product analyzing 36 pct nickel if no further reduction is carried out during the subsequent smelting operation.

  17. Workforce Reductions. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickok, Thomas A.; Hickok, Thomas A.

    This report, which is based on a review of practitioner-oriented sources and scholarly journals, uses a three-part framework to organize annotated bibliographies that, together, list a total of 104 sources that provide the following three perspectives on work force reduction issues: organizational, organizational-individual relationship, and…

  18. Dimensional Reduction and Hadronic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Signer, Adrian; Stoeckinger, Dominik

    2008-11-23

    We consider the application of regularization by dimensional reduction to NLO corrections of hadronic processes. The general collinear singularity structure is discussed, the origin of the regularization-scheme dependence is identified and transition rules to other regularization schemes are derived.

  19. Palladium Catalyzed Reduction of Nitrobenzene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangravite, John A.

    1983-01-01

    Compares two palladium (Pd/C) reducing systems to iron/tin-hydrochloric acid (Fe/HCl and Sn/HCl) reductions and suggests an efficient, clean, and inexpensive procedures for the conversion of nitrobenzene to aniline. Includes laboratory procedures used and discussion of typical results obtained. (JN)

  20. APPLICATION OF RADON REDUCTION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is intended to aid homeowners and contractors in diagnosing and solving indoor radon problems. It will also be useful to State and Federal regulatory officials and many other persons who provide advice on the selection, design and operation of radon reduction methods...

  1. Flavin reduction activates Drosophila cryptochrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Anand T.; Top, Deniz; Manahan, Craig C.; Tokuda, Joshua M.; Zhang, Sheng; Pollack, Lois; Young, Michael W.; Crane, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Entrainment of circadian rhythms in higher organisms relies on light-sensing proteins that communicate to cellular oscillators composed of delayed transcriptional feedback loops. The principal photoreceptor of the fly circadian clock, Drosophila cryptochrome (dCRY), contains a C-terminal tail (CTT) helix that binds beside a FAD cofactor and is essential for light signaling. Light reduces the dCRY FAD to an anionic semiquinone (ASQ) radical and increases CTT proteolytic susceptibility but does not lead to CTT chemical modification. Additional changes in proteolytic sensitivity and small-angle X-ray scattering define a conformational response of the protein to light that centers at the CTT but also involves regions remote from the flavin center. Reduction of the flavin is kinetically coupled to CTT rearrangement. Chemical reduction to either the ASQ or the fully reduced hydroquinone state produces the same conformational response as does light. The oscillator protein Timeless (TIM) contains a sequence similar to the CTT; the corresponding peptide binds dCRY in light and protects the flavin from oxidation. However, TIM mutants therein still undergo dCRY-mediated degradation. Thus, photoreduction to the ASQ releases the dCRY CTT and promotes binding to at least one region of TIM. Flavin reduction by either light or cellular reductants may be a general mechanism of CRY activation. PMID:24297896

  2. Operating Cost Reduction from Large Bore Snubber Reduction/Elimination

    SciTech Connect

    Brice-Nash, Richard; Dowdell, Michael; Swamy, Seth

    2006-07-01

    Large bore snubbers have typically been used in Nuclear Power plants to support the reactor coolant piping and equipment during dynamic loadings (seismic and postulated pipe break events) while also allowing free thermal expansion. However, these large bore snubbers require frequent inspection and testing to demonstrate operability. This paper will discuss the typical costs associated with maintenance and inspection and show how reduction in O and M costs can be achieved by reducing or eliminating the number of large bore snubbers in the nuclear power plant. This paper will also explain the basis for the reduction and/or elimination of these large bore snubbers and how alternate means of support may be provided, without compromising plant safety. Briefly stated, advances in fracture mechanics technology, developments in computational techniques, advancements in computer technology, and developments in industry standards and practices enable this application. (authors)

  3. Warped Ricci-flat reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgáin, E. Ó.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.; Vázquez-Poritz, J. F.; Yavartanoo, H.; Zhang, Z.

    2014-08-01

    We present a simple class of warped-product vacuum (Ricci-flat) solutions to ten- and eleven-dimensional supergravity, where the internal space is flat and noncompact and the warp factor supports de Sitter (dS) and anti-de Sitter (AdS) vacua, in addition to trivial Minkowski vacua with compact internal spaces. We outline the construction of consistent Kaluza-Klein reductions and show that, although our vacuum solutions are nonsupersymmetric, these are closely related to the bosonic part of well-known maximally supersymmetric reductions on spheres. We comment on the stability of our solutions, noting that (A)dS3 vacua pass routine stability tests.

  4. Americium recovery from reduction residues

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.; Proctor, S.G.

    1973-12-25

    A process for separation and recovery of americium values from container or bomb'' reduction residues comprising dissolving the residues in a suitable acid, adjusting the hydrogen ion concentration to a desired level by adding a base, precipitating the americium as americium oxalate by adding oxalic acid, digesting the solution, separating the precipitate, and thereafter calcining the americium oxalate precipitate to form americium oxide. (Official Gazette)

  5. Insular volume reduction in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Saze, Teruyasu; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Namiki, Chihiro; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Hayashi, Takuji; Murai, Toshiya

    2007-12-01

    Structural and functional abnormalities of the insular cortex have been reported in patients with schizophrenia. Most studies have shown that the insular volumes in schizophrenia patients are smaller than those of healthy people. As the insular cortex is functio-anatomically divided into anterior and posterior subdivisons, recent research is focused on uncovering a specific subdivisional abnormality of the insula in patients with schizophrenia. A recent ROI-based volumetric MRI study demonstrated specific left anterior insular volume reduction in chronic schizophrenia patients (Makris N, Goldstein J, Kennedy D, Hodge S, Caviness V, Faraone S, Tsuang M, Seidman L (2006) Decreased volume of left and total anterior insular lobule in schizophrenia. Schizophr Res 83:155-171). On the other hand, our VBM-based volumetric study revealed a reduction in right posterior insular volume (Yamada M, Hirao K, Namiki C, Hanakawa T, Fukuyama H, Hayashi T, Murai T (2007) Social cognition and frontal lobe pathology in schizophrenia: a voxel-based morphometric study. NeuroImage 35:292-298). In order to address these controversial results, ROI-based subdivisional volumetry was performed using the MRI images from the same population we analyzed in our previous VBM-study. The sample group comprised 20 schizophrenia patients and 20 matched healthy controls. Patients with schizophrenia showed a global reduction in insular gray matter volumes relative to healthy comparison subjects. In a simple comparison of the volumes of each subdivision between the groups, a statistically significant volume reduction in patients with schizophrenia was demonstrated only in the right posterior insula. This study suggests that insular abnormalities in schizophrenia would include anterior as well as posterior parts. Each subdivisional abnormality may impact on different aspects of the pathophysiology and psychopathology of schizophrenia; these relationships should be the focus of future research.

  6. The Airframe Noise Reduction Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhard, David P.; Lilley, Geoffrey M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA goal of reducing external aircraft noise by 10 dB in the near-term presents the acoustics community with an enormous challenge. This report identifies technologies with the greatest potential to reduce airframe noise. Acoustic and aerodynamic effects will be discussed, along with the likelihood of industry accepting and implementing the different technologies. We investigate the lower bound, defined as noise generated by an aircraft modified with a virtual retrofit capable of eliminating all noise associated with the high lift system and landing gear. However, the airframe noise of an aircraft in this 'clean' configuration would only be about 8 dB quieter on approach than current civil transports. To achieve the NASA goal of 10 dB noise reduction will require that additional noise sources be addressed. Research shows that energy in the turbulent boundary layer of a wing is scattered as it crosses trailing edge. Noise generated by scattering is the dominant noise mechanism on an aircraft flying in the clean configuration. Eliminating scattering would require changes to much of the aircraft, and practical reduction devices have yet to receive serious attention. Evidence suggests that to meet NASA goals in civil aviation noise reduction, we need to employ emerging technologies and improve landing procedures; modified landing patterns and zoning restrictions could help alleviate aircraft noise in communities close to airports.

  7. Model Reduction by Manifold Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Transtrum, Mark K.; Qiu, Peng

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the collective behavior of complex systems from their basic components is a difficult yet fundamental problem in science. Existing model reduction techniques are either applicable under limited circumstances or produce "black boxes" disconnected from the microscopic physics. We propose a new approach by translating the model reduction problem for an arbitrary statistical model into a geometric problem of constructing a low-dimensional, submanifold approximation to a high-dimensional manifold. When models are overly complex, we use the observation that the model manifold is bounded with a hierarchy of widths and propose using the boundaries as submanifold approximations. We refer to this approach as the manifold boundary approximation method. We apply this method to several models, including a sum of exponentials, a dynamical systems model of protein signaling, and a generalized Ising model. By focusing on parameters rather than physical degrees of freedom, the approach unifies many other model reduction techniques, such as singular limits, equilibrium approximations, and the renormalization group, while expanding the domain of tractable models. The method produces a series of approximations that decrease the complexity of the model and reveal how microscopic parameters are systematically "compressed" into a few macroscopic degrees of freedom, effectively building a bridge between the microscopic and the macroscopic descriptions.

  8. Measuring Substantial Reductions in Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Charles; Evans, Meredyth; Jason, Leonard A.; So, Suzanna; Brown, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The case definitions for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) each include a disability criterion requiring substantial reductions in activity in order to meet diagnostic criteria. Difficulties have been encountered in defining and operationalizing the substantial reduction disability criterion within these various illness definitions. The present study sought to relate measures of past and current activities in several domains including the SF-36, an objective measure of activity (e.g. actigraphy), a self-reported quality of life scale, and measures of symptom severity. Results of the study revealed that current work activities had the highest number of significant associations with domains such as the SF-36 subscales, actigraphy, and symptom scores. As an example, higher self-reported levels of current work activity were associated with better health. This suggests that current work related activities may provide a useful domain for helping operationalize the construct of substantial reductions in activity. PMID:25584524

  9. The reduction of packaging waste

    SciTech Connect

    Raney, E.A.; Hogan, J.J.; McCollom, M.L.; Meyer, R.J.

    1994-04-01

    Nationwide, packaging waste comprises approximately one-third of the waste disposed in sanitary landfills. the US Department of Energy (DOE) generated close to 90,000 metric tons of sanitary waste. With roughly one-third of that being packaging waste, approximately 30,000 metric tons are generated per year. The purpose of the Reduction of Packaging Waste project was to investigate opportunities to reduce this packaging waste through source reduction and recycling. The project was divided into three areas: procurement, onsite packaging and distribution, and recycling. Waste minimization opportunities were identified and investigated within each area, several of which were chosen for further study and small-scale testing at the Hanford Site. Test results, were compiled into five ``how-to`` recipes for implementation at other sites. The subject of the recipes are as follows: (1) Vendor Participation Program; (2) Reusable Containers System; (3) Shrink-wrap System -- Plastic and Corrugated Cardboard Waste Reduction; (4) Cardboard Recycling ; and (5) Wood Recycling.

  10. Photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1993-10-20

    The photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate solutions to tetravalent uranium was investigated as a means of producing uranium dioxide feed for the saltless direct oxide reduction (SDOR) process. At high uranium concentrations, reoxidation of U{sup +4} occurs rapidly. The kinetics of the nitric oxidation of tetravalent uranium depend on the concentrations of hydrogen ion, nitrate ion, nitrous acid, and tetravalent uranium in the same manner as was reported elsewhere for the nitrate oxidation of PU{sup +3}. Reaction rate data were successfully correlated with a mechanism in which nitrogen dioxide is the reactive intermediate. Addition of a nitrous acid scavenger suppresses the reoxidation reaction. An immersion reactor employing a mercury vapor lamp gave reduction times fast enough for routine production usage. Precipitation techniques for conversion of aqueous U(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} to hydrous UO{sub 2} were evaluated. Prolonged dewatering times tended to make the process time consuming. Use of 3- to 4-M aqueous NaOH gave the best dewatering times observed. Reoxidation of the UO{sub 2} by water of hydration was encountered, which required the drying process to be carried out under a reducing atmosphere.

  11. Structural dynamics system model reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. C.; Rose, T. L.; Wada, B. K.

    1987-01-01

    Loads analysis for structural dynamic systems is usually performed by finite element models. Because of the complexity of the structural system, the model contains large number of degree-of-freedom. The large model is necessary since details of the stress, loads and responses due to mission environments are computed. However, a simplified model is needed for other tasks such as pre-test analysis for modal testing, and control-structural interaction studies. A systematic method of model reduction for modal test analysis is presented. Perhaps it will be of some help in developing a simplified model for the control studies.

  12. XRT -- ROSAT XRT Data Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenhall, A. C.; Platon, R. T.

    XRT is a package for reducing data acquired with the ROSAT XRT instruments. The XRT (X-Ray Telescope) was the principal scientific payload of the ROSAT X-ray astronomy satellite. The XRT had two instruments: the PSPC (Position Sensitive Proportional Counter) and the HRI (High Resolution Imager). The XRT package operates on data produced by these instruments and can be used to transform them into calibrated images, spectra, time-series etc. XRT was created by taking the ROSAT XRT-specific functions in the ASTERIX general X-ray astronomy data reduction system and re-packaging them as stand-alone applications.

  13. Noise reduction of spiral ducts.

    PubMed

    Lapka, Wojciech; Cempel, Czesław

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents noise reduction (NR) of spiral ducts as a result of computational modeling of acoustic wave propagation. Three-dimensional models were created with the finite element method in COMSOL Multiphysics version 3.3. Nine models of spiral ducts with 1-9 spiral leads were considered. Time-harmonic analysis was used to predict NR, which was shown in spectral and interval frequency bands. Spiral duct performance can be seen as a comparison of NR before and after a change from a circular to a spiral duct.

  14. Reduction of nitrate in Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin Koo; Barua, Sumitra; Reed, SB; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrikson, JK; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, a napDAGHB gene cluster encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) and accessory proteins and an nrfA gene encoding periplasmic nitrite reductase (NrfA) have been identified. These two systems seem to be atypical because the genome lacks genes encoding cytoplasmic membrane electron transport proteins, NapC for NAP and NrfBCD/NrfH for NRF, respectively. Here, we present evidence that reduction of nitrate to ammonium in S. oneidensis is carried out by these atypical systems in a two-step manner. Transcriptional and mutational analyses suggest that CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane electron transport protein, is likely to be the functional replacement of both NapC and NrfH in S. oneidensis. Surprisingly, a strain devoid of napB encoding the small subunit of nitrate reductase exhibited the maximum cell density sooner than the wild type. Further characterization of this strain showed that nitrite was not detected as a free intermediate in its culture and NapB provides a fitness gain for S. oneidensis to compete for nitrate in the environments. On the basis results from mutational analyses of napA, napB, nrfA and napBnrfA in-frame deletion mutants, we propose that NapB is able to favor nitrate reduction by routing electrons to NapA exclusively.

  15. NOX REMOVAL WITH COMBINED SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION AND SELECTIVE NONCATALYTIC REDUCTION: PILOT- SCALE TEST RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot-scale tests were conducted to develop a combined nitrogen oxide (NOx) reduction technology using both selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR). A commercially available vanadium-and titatnium-based composite honeycomb catalyst and enh...

  16. Model reduction methods for control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunipace, K. R.

    1988-01-01

    Several different model reduction methods are developed and detailed implementation information is provided for those methods. Command files to implement the model reduction methods in a proprietary control law analysis and design package are presented. A comparison and discussion of the various reduction techniques is included.

  17. The connector space reduction mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The Connector Space Reduction Mechanism (CSRM) is a simple device that can reduce the number of electromechanical devices on the Payload Interface Adapter/Station Interface Adapter (PIA/SIA) from 4 to 1. The device uses simplicity to attack the heart of the connector mating problem for large interfaces. The CSRM allows blind mate connector mating with minimal alignment required over short distances. This eliminates potential interface binding problems and connector damage. The CSRM is compatible with G and H connectors and Moog Rotary Shutoff fluid couplings. The CSRM can be used also with less forgiving connectors, as was demonstrated in the lab. The CSRM is NASA-Goddard exclusive design with patent applied for. The CSRM is the correct mechanism for the PIA/SIA interface as well as other similar berthing interfaces.

  18. Electrolyte treatment for aluminum reduction

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2002-01-01

    A method of treating an electrolyte for use in the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum employing an anode and a cathode, the alumina dissolved in the electrolyte, the treating improving wetting of the cathode with molten aluminum during electrolysis. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten electrolyte comprised of ALF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF and LiF, and treating the electrolyte by providing therein 0.004 to 0.2 wt. % of a transition metal or transition metal compound for improved wettability of the cathode with molten aluminum during subsequent electrolysis to reduce alumina to aluminum.

  19. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  20. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Edward N. Steadman

    2004-07-01

    The Plains Co{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) activities have focused on developing information on deployment issues to support Task 5 activities by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) activities have focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) has included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) activities have focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.