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Sample records for crystal optical biosensor

  1. Photonic crystal surface waves for optical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Konopsky, Valery N; Alieva, Elena V

    2007-06-15

    We present a new optical biosensor technique based on registration of dual optical s-polarized modes on a photonic crystal surface. The simultaneous registration of two optical surface waves with different evanescent depths from the same surface spot permits the segregation of the volume and the surface contributions from an analyte, while the absence of metal damping permits an increase in the propagation length of the optical surface waves and the sensitivity of the biosensor. Our technique was tested with the binding of biotin molecules to a streptavidin monolayer that has been detected with signal/noise ratio of approximately 15 at 1-s signal accumulation time. The detection limit is approximately 20 fg of the analyte on the probed spot of the surface.

  2. Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves.

    PubMed

    Konopsky, Valery N; Alieva, Elena V

    2009-01-01

    Optical biosensors have played a key role in the selective recognition of target biomolecules and in biomolecular interaction analysis, providing kinetic data about biological binding events in real time without labeling. The advantages of the label-free concept are the elimination of detrimental effects from labels that may interfere with fundamental interaction and the absence of a time-consuming pretreatment. The disadvantages of all label-free techniques--including the most mature one, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique, are a deficient sensitivity to a specific signal and undesirable susceptibilities to non-specific signals, e.g., to the volume effect of refraction index variations. These variations arise from temperature fluctuations and drifts and they are the limiting factor for many state-of-the-art optical biosensors. Here we describe a new optical biosensor technique based on the registration of dual optical s-polarized waves on a photonic crystal surface. The simultaneous registration of two different optical modes from the same surface spot permits the segregation of the volume and the surface signals, while the absence of metal damping permits an increase in the propagation length of the optical surface waves and the sensitivity of the biosensor. The technique was tested with the binding of biotin molecules to a streptavidin monolayer that has been detected with a signal/noise ratio of about 15 at 1 s signal accumulation time. The detection limit is about 20 fg of the analyte on the probed spot of the surface.

  3. Optical detection of sepsis markers using liquid crystal based biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCamley, Maureen K.; Artenstein, Andrew W.; Opal, Steven M.; Crawford, Gregory P.

    2007-02-01

    A liquid crystal based biosensor for the detection and diagnosis of sepsis is currently in development. Sepsis, a major clinical syndrome with a significant public health burden in the US due to a large elderly population, is the systemic response of the body to a localized infection and is defined as the combination of pathologic infection and physiological changes. Bacterial infections are responsible for 90% of cases of sepsis in the US. Currently there is no bedside diagnostic available to positively identify sepsis. The basic detection scheme employed in a liquid crystal biosensor contains attributes that would find value in a clinical setting, especially for the early detection of sepsis. Utilizing the unique properties of liquid crystals, such as birefringence, a bedside diagnostic is in development which will optically report the presence of biomolecules. In a septic patient, an endotoxin known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is released from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and can be found in the blood stream. It is hypothesized that this long chained molecule will cause local disruptions to the open surface of a sensor containing aligned liquid crystal. The bulk liquid crystal ampli.es these local changes at the surface due to the presence of the sepsis marker, providing an optical readout through polarizing microscopy images. Liquid crystal sensors consisting of both square and circular grids, 100-200 μm in size, have been fabricated and filled with a common liquid crystal material, 5CB. Homeotropic alignment was confirmed using polarizing microscopy. The grids were then contacted with either saline only (control), or saline with varying concentrations of LPS. Changes in the con.guration of the nematic director of the liquid crystal were observed through the range of concentrations tested (5mg/mL - 1pg/mL) which have been confirmed by a consulting physician as clinically relevant levels.

  4. Photonic Crystal Biosensor Based on Optical Surface Waves

    PubMed Central

    Konopsky, Valery N.; Karakouz, Tanya; Alieva, Elena V.; Vicario, Chiara; Sekatskii, Sergey K.; Dietler, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    A label-free biosensor device based on registration of photonic crystal surface waves is described. Angular interrogation of the optical surface wave resonance is used to detect changes in the thickness of an adsorbed layer, while an additional simultaneous detection of the critical angle of total internal reflection provides independent data of the liquid refractive index. The abilities of the device are demonstrated by measuring of biotin molecule binding to a streptavidin monolayer, and by measuring association and dissociation kinetics of immunoglobulin G proteins. Additionally, deposition of PSS/PAH polyelectrolytes is recorded in situ resulting calculation of PSS and PAH monolayer thicknesses separately. PMID:23429517

  5. Photonic crystal biosensor based on optical surface waves.

    PubMed

    Konopsky, Valery N; Karakouz, Tanya; Alieva, Elena V; Vicario, Chiara; Sekatskii, Sergey K; Dietler, Giovanni

    2013-02-19

    A label-free biosensor device based on registration of photonic crystal surface waves is described. Angular interrogation of the optical surface wave resonance is used to detect changes in the thickness of an adsorbed layer, while an additional simultaneous detection of the critical angle of total internal reflection provides independent data of the liquid refractive index. The abilities of the device are demonstrated by measuring of biotin molecule binding to a streptavidin monolayer, and by measuring association and dissociation kinetics of immunoglobulin G proteins. Additionally, deposition of PSS / PAH polyelectrolytes is recorded in situ resulting calculation of PSS and PAH monolayer thicknesses separately.

  6. Optical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Damborský, Pavel; Švitel, Juraj; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-06-30

    Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biosensors, as well as interferometric, ellipsometric and reflectometric interference spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. The optical biosensors discussed here allow the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes including viruses, toxins, drugs, antibodies, tumour biomarkers and tumour cells. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  7. Optical biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Damborský, Pavel; Švitel, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biosensors, as well as interferometric, ellipsometric and reflectometric interference spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. The optical biosensors discussed here allow the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes including viruses, toxins, drugs, antibodies, tumour biomarkers and tumour cells. PMID:27365039

  8. Silicon-based mesoporous photonic crystals: towards single cell optical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Kristopher A.; Magenau, Astrid; Böcking, Till; Gaus, Katharina; Gal, Michael; Gooding, J. Justin

    2009-08-01

    Mesoporous silicon (PSi) photonic crystals have attracted interest as biosensing transducers owing to their high quality optics and sensitivity in optical characteristics to changes in refractive index. We describe progress our group has made derivatizing PSi towards devices for biology and medicine. PSi rugate filters display a high reflectivity resonant line in the reflectance spectrum. As an example for biosensing, immobilization of peptides and biopolymers within the PSi is demonstrated for detecting protease enzymes. Secretion of matrix metalloproteases from live cells was detected as a blue shift in the photonic resonance within hours, demonstrating the promise of this biosensor.

  9. Slotted photonic crystal biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullion, Mark Gerard

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them result in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This thesis presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which engender higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the peak of optical mode within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. High sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than most competing devices in the literature. Initial tests with cellular material for real applications was also performed, and shown to be of promise. In addition, groundwork to make an integrated device that includes the spectrometer function was also carried out showing that slotted photonic crystals themselves can be used for on-chip wavelength specific filtering and spectroscopy, whilst gas-free microvalves for automation were also developed. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study.

  10. Optical biosensor based on liquid crystal droplets for detection of cholic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofang; Luo, Dan; Chen, Rui; Wang, Fei; Sun, Xiaowei; Dai, Haitao

    2016-12-01

    A highly sensitive cholic acid biosensor based on 4-cyano-4‧-penthlbiphenyl (5CB) Liquid crystal droplets in phosphate buffer saline solution was reported. A radial-to-bipolar transition of 5CB droplet would be triggered during competitive reaction of CA at the sodium dodecyl sulfate surfactant-laden 5CB droplet surface. Our liquid crystal droplet sensor is a low-cost, simple and fast method for CA detection. The detection limit (5 μM) of our method is 2.4 times lower than previously report by using liquid crystal film to detection of CA.

  11. Triggered optical biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Song, Xuedong; Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-10-02

    An optical biosensor is provided for the detection of a multivalent target biomolecule, the biosensor including a substrate having a bilayer membrane thereon, a recognition molecule situated at the surface, the recognition molecule capable of binding with the multivalent target biomolecule, the recognition molecule further characterized as including a fluorescence label thereon and as being movable at the surface and a device for measuring a fluorescence change in response to binding between the recognition molecule and the multivalent target biomolecule.

  12. Development of optical biosensor based on photonic crystal made of TiO2 using liquid phase deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aono, Keigo; Aki, Shoma; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Hisamoto, Hideaki; Endo, Tatsuro

    2016-08-01

    We fabricated a titanium dioxide (TiO2)-based photonic crystal (PhC) using liquid phase deposition (LPD) to develop highly sensitive optical biosensors. The optical characteristics of the PhCs in the visible region were sensitive to the change in the refractive index of the surrounding medium due to an antigen-antibody reaction; thus, applications using the optical biosensor are expected to be highly sensitive. However, a base material with a high refractive index is indispensable for the fabrication of the PhC. Here, TiO2, which has optical transparency in the visible region, was selected as the high refractive index base material. The present LPD method allowed fabrication using low-cost apparatus. Furthermore, the mild conditions of the LPD method led to formation of TiO2-based PhC with fewer crack structures. Finally, the anti-neuron-specific enolase antibody was immobilized onto the TiO2-based PhC surface, and 1-1000 ng/mL of the neuron-specific enolase antigen was successfully detected.

  13. Whole Blood Optical Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Lisa M.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2007-01-01

    The future of rapid point-of-care diagnostics depends on the development of cheap, noncomplex, and easily integrated systems to analyze biological samples directly from the patient (eg. blood, urine, saliva). A key concern in diagnostic biosensing is signal differentiation between non-specifically bound material and the specific capture of target molecules. This is a particular challenge for optical detection devices in analyzing complex biological samples. Here we demonstrate a porous silicon (PSi) label-free optical biosensor that has intrinsic size-exclusion filtering capabilities which enhances signal differentiation. We present the first demonstration of highly repeatable, specific detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in serum and whole blood samples over a typical physiological range using the PSi material as both a biosensor substrate and filter. PMID:17720473

  14. Integrated optic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiarski, Anthony A.; Busch, James R.; Bhullar, Ballwant S.; Ridgway, Richard W.; Miller, Larry S.; Zulich, A. W.

    1993-05-01

    A micro-sized biosensor is formed using integrated-optic channel waveguides in a Mach- Zehnder interferometer configuration. The device measures refractive index changes on the waveguide surface, so it is called a biorefractometer. With an appropriate overlay or selective coating, the sensor can monitor proteins in blood or pollutants and bio-warfare agents in water. The waveguides are fabricated in a glass substrate using potassium ion exchange. A patterned glass buffer layer defines the interferometer's sensing and reference arms. A silicone-rubber cell arrangement brings sample analytes into contact with proteins immobilized on the integrated-optical waveguide surface. Data obtained for antigen-antibody binding of the proteins human Immunoglobulin-G and staph enterotoxin-B indicate that a 50 - 100 ng/ml concentration levels can be measured in less than ten minutes.

  15. Guided-Wave Optical Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Passaro, Vittorio M. N.; Dell'Olio, Francesco; Casamassima, Biagio; De Leonardis, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Guided-wave optical biosensors are reviewed in this paper. Advantages related to optical technologies are presented and integrated architectures are investigated in detail. Main classes of bio receptors and the most attractive optical transduction mechanisms are discussed. The possibility to use Mach-Zehnder and Young interferometers, microdisk and microring resonators, surface plasmon resonance, hollow and antiresonant waveguides, and Bragg gratings to realize very sensitive and selective, ultra-compact and fast biosensors is discussed. Finally, CMOS-compatible technologies are proved to be the most attractive for fabrication of guided-wave photonic biosensors.

  16. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qinglan; Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-08-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO{sub 2} dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  17. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinglan; Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-08-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO2 dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  18. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinglan; Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J; Cunningham, Brian T

    2016-08-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO2 dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  19. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-12-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  20. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  1. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  2. Mesoporous silicon photonic crystal microparticles: towards single-cell optical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Guan, Bin; Magenau, Astrid; Kilian, Krisopher A; Ciampi, Simone; Gaus, Katharina; Reece, Peter J; Gooding, J Justin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the possibility of modifying porous silicon (PSi) particles with surface chemistry and recognition molecules (antibodies) such that these devices could potentially be used for single-cell identification or sensing. This is achieved by modifying PSi Rugate filters via hydrosilylation with surface chemistry that serves firstly, to protect the silicon surfaces from oxidation; secondly, renders the surfaces resistant to nonspecific adsorption of proteins and cells and thirdly, allows further functionality to be added such as the coupling of antibodies. The surface chemistry remained unchanged after sonication of the PSi to form PSi microparticles. The ability to monitor the spectroscopic properties of microparticles, and shifts in the optical signature due to changes in the refractive index of the material within the pore space, is demonstrated. The particles are shown to remain stable in physiological buffers and human blood for longer than one week. Finally, the modification of the PSi particles with functional antibodies is achieved.

  3. A transparent nanostructured optical biosensor.

    PubMed

    He, Yuan; Li, Xiang; Que, Long

    2014-05-01

    Herein we report a new transparent nanostructured Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) device. The unique features of the nanostructured optical device can be summarized as the following: (i) optically transparent nanostructured optical device; (ii) simple and inexpensive for fabrication; (iii) easy to be fabricated and scaled up as an arrayed format. These features overcome the existing barriers for the current nanopore-based interferometric optical biosensors by measuring the transmitted optical signals rather than the reflected optical signals, thereby facilitating the optical testing significantly for the arrayed biosensors and thus paving the way for their potential for high throughput biodetection applications. The optically transparent nanostructures (i.e., anodic aluminum oxide nanopores) inside the FPI devices are fabricated from 2.2 microm thick lithographically patterned Al thin film on an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate using a two-step anodization process. Utilizing the binding between Protein A and porcine immunoglobulin G (IgG) as a model, the detection of the bioreaction between biomolecules has been demonstrated successfully. Experiments found that the lowest detection concentration of proteins is in the range of picomolar level using current devices, which can be easily tuned into the range of femtomolar level by optimizing the performance of devices.

  4. Recent Development in Optical Fiber Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, María Espinosa; Sánchez, Antonio Jesús Ruiz; Rojas, Fuensanta Sánchez; Ojeda, Catalina Bosch

    2007-01-01

    Remarkable developments can be seen in the field of optical fibre biosensors in the last decade. More sensors for specific analytes have been reported, novel sensing chemistries or transduction principles have been introduced, and applications in various analytical fields have been realised. This review consists of papers mainly reported in the last decade and presents about applications of optical fiber biosensors. Discussions on the trends in optical fiber biosensor applications in real samples are enumerated.

  5. Photonic crystal biosensors towards on-chip integration.

    PubMed

    Threm, Daniela; Nazirizadeh, Yousef; Gerken, Martina

    2012-08-01

    Photonic crystal technology has attracted large interest in the last years. The possibility to generate highly sensitive sensor elements with photonic crystal structures is very promising for medical or environmental applications. The low-cost fabrication on the mass scale is as advantageous as the compactness and reliability of photonic crystal biosensors. The possibility to integrate microfluidic channels together with photonic crystal structures allows for highly compact devices. This article reviews different types of photonic crystal sensors including 1D photonic crystal biosensors, biosensors with photonic crystal slabs, photonic crystal waveguide biosensors and biosensors with photonic crystal microcavities. Their applications in biomolecular and pathogen detection are highlighted. The sensitivities and the detection limits of the different biosensors are compared. The focus is on the possibilities to integrate photonic crystal biosensors on-chip. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Integrated optical biosensor system (IOBS)

    DOEpatents

    Grace, Karen M.; Sweet, Martin R.; Goeller, Roy M.; Morrison, Leland Jean; Grace, Wynne Kevin; Kolar, Jerome D.

    2007-10-30

    An optical biosensor has a first enclosure with a pathogen recognition surface, including a planar optical waveguide and grating located in the first enclosure. An aperture is in the first enclosure for insertion of sample to be investigated to a position in close proximity to the pathogen recognition surface. A laser in the first enclosure includes means for aligning and means for modulating the laser, the laser having its light output directed toward said grating. Detection means are located in the first enclosure and in optical communication with the pathogen recognition surface for detecting pathogens after interrogation by the laser light and outputting the detection. Electronic means is located in the first enclosure and receives the detection for processing the detection and outputting information on the detection, and an electrical power supply is located in the first enclosure for supplying power to the laser, the detection means and the electronic means.

  7. Optical Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergsten, Ronald

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the production and structure of a sequence of optical crystals which can serve as one-, two-, and three-dimensional diffraction plates to illustrate diffraction patterns by using light rather than x-rays or particles. Applications to qualitative presentations of Laue theory at the secondary and college levels are recommended. (CC)

  8. Optical Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergsten, Ronald

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the production and structure of a sequence of optical crystals which can serve as one-, two-, and three-dimensional diffraction plates to illustrate diffraction patterns by using light rather than x-rays or particles. Applications to qualitative presentations of Laue theory at the secondary and college levels are recommended. (CC)

  9. Renewable Surface Biosensors with Optical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Ackerman, Eric J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Holman, David A.; Grate, Jay W.

    2001-04-30

    One major challenge in the development of biosensors is the limited lifetime of a chemically selective surface that includes biomolecules. Renewable surface biosensors address this issue by using fresh aliquots of derivatized microbeads for each analysis. The analyte detection can then occur on the microbeads, or downstream from the microbeads. In this paper, we will describe two types of renewable surface biosensors. The first renewable biosensor system includes on-column optical detection for monitoring the binding of biomolecules onto protein or DNA-derivatized Sepharose beads. The second renewable biosensor system includes detection downstream from the microparticles and is based on the use of derivatized magnetic particles for selective binding. The magnetic particles are fluidically captured and released in a sequential injection system to allow the automation of an Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay.

  10. Renewable Surface Biosensors With Optical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Ackerman, Eric J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Holman, David A.; Grate, Jay W.

    2001-12-01

    One major challenge in the development of biosensors is the limited lifetime of a chemically selective surface that includes biomolecules. Renewable surface biosensors address this issue by using fresh aliquots of derivatized microbeads for each analysis. The analyte detection can then occur on the microbeads, or downstream from the microbeads. In this paper, we will describe two types of renewable surface biosensors. The first renewable biosensor system includes on-column optical detection for monitoring the binding of biomolecules onto protein or DNA-derivatized Sepharose beads. The second renewable biosensor system includes detection downstream from the microparticles and is based on the use of derivatized magnetic particles for selective binding. The magnetic particles are fluidically captured and released in a sequential injection system to allow the automation of an Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay.

  11. Liquid crystal interfaces: Experiments, simulations and biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Piotr

    Interfacial phenomena are ubiquitous and extremely important in various aspects of biological and industrial processes. For example, many liquid crystal applications start by alignment with a surface. The underlying mechanisms of the molecular organization of liquid crystals at an interface are still under intensive study and continue to be important to the display industry in order to develop better and/or new display technology. My dissertation research has been devoted to studying how complex liquid crystals can be guided to organize at an interface, and to using my findings to develop practical applications. Specifically, I have been working on developing biosensors using liquid-crystal/surfactant/lipid/protein interactions as well as the alignment of low-symmetry liquid crystals for potential new display and optomechanical applications. The biotechnology industry needs better ways of sensing biomaterials and identifying various nanoscale events at biological interfaces and in aqueous solutions. Sensors in which the recognition material is a liquid crystal naturally connects the existing knowledge and experience of the display and biotechnology industries together with surface and soft matter sciences. This dissertation thus mainly focuses on the delicate phenomena that happen at liquid interfaces. In the introduction, I start by defining the interface and discuss its structure and the relevant interfacial forces. I then introduce the general characteristics of biosensors and, in particular, describe the design of biosensors that employ liquid crystal/aqueous solution interfaces. I further describe the basic properties of liquid crystal materials that are relevant for liquid crystal-based biosensing applications. In CHAPTER 2, I describe the simulation methods and experimental techniques used in this dissertation. In CHAPTER 3 and CHAPTER 4, I present my computer simulation work. CHAPTER 3 presents insight of how liquid crystal molecules are aligned by

  12. Thin Hydrogel Films for Optical Biosensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mateescu, Anca; Wang, Yi; Dostalek, Jakub; Jonas, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogel materials consisting of water-swollen polymer networks exhibit a large number of specific properties highly attractive for a variety of optical biosensor applications. This properties profile embraces the aqueous swelling medium as the basis of biocompatibility, non-fouling behavior, and being not cell toxic, while providing high optical quality and transparency. The present review focuses on some of the most interesting aspects of surface-attached hydrogel films as active binding matrices in optical biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance and optical waveguide mode spectroscopy. In particular, the chemical nature, specific properties, and applications of such hydrogel surface architectures for highly sensitive affinity biosensors based on evanescent wave optics are discussed. The specific class of responsive hydrogel systems, which can change their physical state in response to externally applied stimuli, have found large interest as sophisticated materials that provide a complex behavior to hydrogel-based sensing devices. PMID:24957962

  13. Graphene-Based Optical Biosensors and Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhiwen; He, Shijiang; Pei, Hao; Du, Dan; Fan, Chunhai; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-01-13

    This chapter focuses on the design, fabrication and application of graphene based optical nanobiosensors. The emerging graphene based optical nanobiosensors demonstrated the promising bioassay and biomedical applications thanking to the unique optical features of graphene. According to the different applications, the graphene can be tailored to form either fluorescent emitter or efficient fluorescence quencher. The exceptional electronic feature of graphene makes it a powerful platform for fabricating the SPR and SERS biosensors. Today the graphene based optical biosensors have been constructed to detect various targets including ions, small biomolecules, DNA/RNA and proteins. This chapter reviews the recent progress in graphene-based optical biosensors and discusses the opportunities and challenges in this field.

  14. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  15. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  16. A liquid-crystal-based DNA biosensor for pathogen detection

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mashooq; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Soo-Young

    2016-01-01

    A liquid-crystal (LC)-filled transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cell coated with the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), to which a single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNAprobe) was adsorbed at the LC/aqueous interface (TEMDTAB/DNA), was applied for the highly specific detection of target DNA molecules. The DTAB-coated E7 (used LC mixture) in the TEM grid (TEMDTAB) exhibited a homeotropic orientation, and changed to a planar orientation upon adsorption of the ssDNAprobe. The TEMDTAB/DNA was then exposed to complementary (target) ssDNA, which resulted in a planar-to-homeotropic configurational change of E7 that could be observed through a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. The optimum adsorption density (2 μM) of ssDNAprobe enabled the detection of ≥0.05 nM complementary ssDNA. This TEMDTAB/DNA biosensor could differentiate complementary ssDNA from mismatched ssDNA as well as double-stranded DNA. It also successfully detected the genomic DNAs of the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and the fungi Rhazictonia solani. Owe to the high specificity, sensitivity, and label-free detection, this biosensor may broaden the applications of LC-based biosensors to pathogen detection. PMID:26940532

  17. A liquid-crystal-based DNA biosensor for pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mashooq; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Soo-Young

    2016-03-01

    A liquid-crystal (LC)-filled transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cell coated with the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), to which a single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNAprobe) was adsorbed at the LC/aqueous interface (TEMDTAB/DNA), was applied for the highly specific detection of target DNA molecules. The DTAB-coated E7 (used LC mixture) in the TEM grid (TEMDTAB) exhibited a homeotropic orientation, and changed to a planar orientation upon adsorption of the ssDNAprobe. The TEMDTAB/DNA was then exposed to complementary (target) ssDNA, which resulted in a planar-to-homeotropic configurational change of E7 that could be observed through a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. The optimum adsorption density (2 μM) of ssDNAprobe enabled the detection of ≥0.05 nM complementary ssDNA. This TEMDTAB/DNA biosensor could differentiate complementary ssDNA from mismatched ssDNA as well as double-stranded DNA. It also successfully detected the genomic DNAs of the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and the fungi Rhazictonia solani. Owe to the high specificity, sensitivity, and label-free detection, this biosensor may broaden the applications of LC-based biosensors to pathogen detection.

  18. Fiber optic-based regenerable biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Sepaniak, Michael J.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1993-01-01

    A fiber optic-based regenerable biosensor. The biosensor is particularly suitable for use in microscale work in situ. In one embodiment, the biosensor comprises a reaction chamber disposed adjacent the distal end of a waveguide and adapted to receive therein a quantity of a sample containing an analyte. Leading into the chamber is a plurality of capillary conduits suitable for introducing into the chamber antibodies or other reagents suitable for selective interaction with a predetermined analyte. Following such interaction, the contents of the chamber may be subjected to an incident energy signal for developing fluorescence within the chamber that is detectable via the optical fiber and which is representative of the presence, i.e. concentration, of the selected analyte. Regeneration of the biosensor is accomplished by replacement of the reagents and/or the analyte, or a combination of these, at least in part via one or more of the capillary conduits. The capillary conduits extend from their respective terminal ends that are in fluid communication with the chamber, away from the chamber to respective location(s) remote from the chamber thereby permitting in situ location of the chamber and remote manipulation and/or analysis of the activity with the chamber.

  19. Perspective on optical biosensors and integrated sensor systems.

    PubMed

    Ligler, Frances S

    2009-01-15

    Optical biosensors have begun to move from the laboratory to the point of use. This trend will be accelerated by new concepts for molecular recognition, integration of microfluidics and optics, simplified fabrication technologies, improved approaches to biosensor system integration, and dramatically increased awareness of the applicability of sensor technology to improve public health and environmental monitoring. Examples of innovations are identified that will lead to smaller, faster, cheaper optical biosensor systems with capacity to provide effective and actionable information.

  20. A Perspective on Optical Biosensors and Integrated Sensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ligler, Frances S.

    2009-01-01

    Optical biosensors have begun to move from the laboratory to the point of use. This trend will be accelerated by new concepts for molecular recognition, integration of microfluidics and optics, simplified fabrication technologies, improved approaches to biosensor system integration, and dramatically increased awareness of the applicability of sensor technology to improve public health and environmental monitoring. Examples of innovations are identified that will lead to smaller, faster, cheaper optical biosensor systems with capacity to provide effective and actionable information. PMID:19140774

  1. High-density fiber optic biosensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Jason R.; Walt, David R.

    2002-02-01

    Novel approaches are required to coordinate the immense amounts of information derived from diverse genomes. This concept has influenced the expanded role of high-throughput DNA detection and analysis in the biological sciences. A high-density fiber optic DNA biosensor was developed consisting of oligonucleotide-functionalized, 3.1 mm diameter microspheres deposited into the etched wells on the distal face of a 500 micrometers imaging fiber bundle. Imaging fiber bundles containing thousands of optical fibers, each associated with a unique oligonucleotide probe sequence, were the foundation for an optically connected, individually addressable DNA detection platform. Different oligonucleotide-functionalized microspheres were combined in a stock solution, and randomly dispersed into the etched wells. Microsphere positions were registered from optical dyes incorporated onto the microspheres. The distribution process provided an inherent redundancy that increases the signal-to-noise ratio as the square root of the number of sensors examined. The representative amount of each probe-type in the array was dependent on their initial stock solution concentration, and as other sequences of interest arise, new microsphere elements can be added to arrays without altering the existing detection capabilities. The oligonucleotide probe sequences hybridize to fluorescently-labeled, complementary DNA target solutions. Fiber optic DNA microarray research has included DNA-protein interaction profiles, microbial strain differentiation, non-labeled target interrogation with molecular beacons, and single cell-based assays. This biosensor array is proficient in DNA detection linked to specific disease states, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP's) discrimination, and gene expression analysis. This array platform permits multiple detection formats, provides smaller feature sizes, and enables sensor design flexibility. High-density fiber optic microarray biosensors provide a fast

  2. Low-cost label-free biosensors using photonic crystals embedded between crossed polarizers.

    PubMed

    Nazirizadeh, Yousef; Bog, Uwe; Sekula, Sylwia; Mappes, Timo; Lemmer, Uli; Gerken, Martina

    2010-08-30

    There is a strong need for low-cost biosensors to enable rapid, on-site analysis of biological, biomedical, or chemical substances. We propose a platform for label-free optical biosensors based on applying the analyte onto a surface-functionalized photonic crystal slab and performing a transmission measurement with two crossed polarization filters. This dark-field approach allows for efficient background suppression as only the photonic crystal guided-mode resonances interacting with the functionalized surface experience significant polarization rotation. We present a compact biosensor demonstrator using a low-cost light emitting diode and a simple photodiode capable of detecting the binding kinetics of a 2.5 nM solution of the protein streptavidin on a biotin-functionalized photonic crystal surface.

  3. Enhanced efficiency of a capillary-based biosensor over an optical fiber biosensor for detecting calpastatin.

    PubMed

    Bratcher, C L; Grant, S A; Vassalli, J T; Lorenzen, C L

    2008-06-15

    A capillary-based optical biosensor has been developed to detect calpastatin, an indicator of meat tenderness. Longissimus muscle samples (n=11) were extracted from beef carcasses at 0 and 48h post-mortem. These samples were assayed for calpastatin by traditional laboratory methods and with a newly developed capillary tube biosensor as well as for Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) and crude protein and the responses were compared. Additionally, the response from the capillary-based biosensor was compared to a previously developed optical fiber biosensor. When the 0 and 48h sampling periods were combined, the capillary tube biosensor was moderately accurate in predicting calpastatin activity (R(2)=0.6058). There was less variation in the 0h capillary tube biosensor compared to the 0h pre-column (P=0.006) and post-column optical fiber biosensors (P=0.047), therefore the capillary tube biosensor is a more precise system of measurement. This research further advances the development of a calpastatin biosensor and makes online assessment one step closer to reality.

  4. Fiber optic evanescent wave biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duveneck, Gert L.; Ehrat, Markus; Widmer, H. M.

    1991-09-01

    The role of modern analytical chemistry is not restricted to quality control and environmental surveillance, but has been extended to process control using on-line analytical techniques. Besides industrial applications, highly specific, ultra-sensitive biochemical analysis becomes increasingly important as a diagnostic tool, both in central clinical laboratories and in the doctor's office. Fiber optic sensor technology can fulfill many of the requirements for both types of applications. As an example, the experimental arrangement of a fiber optic sensor for biochemical affinity assays is presented. The evanescent electromagnetic field, associated with a light ray guided in an optical fiber, is used for the excitation of luminescence labels attached to the biomolecules in solution to be analyzed. Due to the small penetration depth of the evanescent field into the medium, the generation of luminescence is restricted to the close proximity of the fiber, where, e.g., the luminescent analyte molecules combine with their affinity partners, which are immobilized on the fiber. Both cw- and pulsed light excitation can be used in evanescent wave sensor technology, enabling the on-line observation of an affinity assay on a macroscopic time scale (seconds and minutes), as well as on a microscopic, molecular time scale (nanoseconds or microseconds).

  5. Interferometric optical fiber microcantilever beam biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wavering, Thomas A.; Meller, Scott A.; Evans, Mishell K.; Pennington, Charles; Jones, Mark E.; VanTassell, Roger; Murphy, Kent A.; Velander, William H.; Valdes, E.

    2000-12-01

    With the proliferation of biological weapons, the outbreak of food poisoning occurrences, and the spread of antibiotic resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria, the demand has arisen for portable systems capable of rapid, specific, and quantitative target detection. The ability to detect minute quantities of targets will provide the means to quickly assess a health hazardous situation so that the appropriate response can be orchestrated. Conventional test results generally require hours or even several days to be reported, and there is no change for real-time feedback. An interferometric optical fiber microcantilever beam biosensor has successfully demonstrated real time detection of target molecules. The microcantilever biosensor effectively combines advanced technology from silicon micromachining, optical fiber sensor, and biochemistry to create a novel detection device. This approach utilizes affinity coatings on micromachiend cantilever beams to attract target molecules. The presence of the target molecule causes bending in the cantilever beam, which is monitored using an optical displacement system. Dose-response trials have shown measured responses at nanogram/ml concentrations of target molecules. Sensitivity is expected to extend from the nanogram to the picogram range of total captured mass as the microcantilever sensors are optimized.

  6. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Grant, S.A.

    1999-08-17

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy. 4 figs.

  7. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Grant, Sheila A.

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy.

  8. Silicon-on-Insulator Nanowire Based Optical Waveguide Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingyu; Liu, Yong; Chen, Yangqing; He, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Optical waveguide biosensors based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanowire have been developed for label free molecular detection. This paper reviews our work on the design, fabrication and measurement of SOI nanowire based high-sensitivity biosensors employing Vernier effect. Biosensing experiments using cascaded double-ring sensor and Mach-Zehnder- ring sensor integrated with microfluidic channels are demonstrated

  9. Last Advances in Silicon-Based Optical Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fernández Gavela, Adrián; Grajales García, Daniel; Ramirez, Jhonattan C; Lechuga, Laura M

    2016-02-24

    We review the most important achievements published in the last five years in the field of silicon-based optical biosensors. We focus specially on label-free optical biosensors and their implementation into lab-on-a-chip platforms, with an emphasis on developments demonstrating the capability of the devices for real bioanalytical applications. We report on novel transducers and materials, improvements of existing transducers, new and improved biofunctionalization procedures as well as the prospects for near future commercialization of these technologies.

  10. Optical detection of E. coli bacteria by mesoporous silicon biosensors.

    PubMed

    Massad-Ivanir, Naama; Shtenberg, Giorgi; Segal, Ester

    2013-11-20

    A label-free optical biosensor based on a nanostructured porous Si is designed for rapid capture and detection of Escherichia coli K12 bacteria, as a model microorganism. The biosensor relies on direct binding of the target bacteria cells onto its surface, while no pretreatment (e.g. by cell lysis) of the studied sample is required. A mesoporous Si thin film is used as the optical transducer element of the biosensor. Under white light illumination, the porous layer displays well-resolved Fabry-Pérot fringe patterns in its reflectivity spectrum. Applying a fast Fourier transform (FFT) to reflectivity data results in a single peak. Changes in the intensity of the FFT peak are monitored. Thus, target bacteria capture onto the biosensor surface, through antibody-antigen interactions, induces measurable changes in the intensity of the FFT peaks, allowing for a 'real time' observation of bacteria attachment. The mesoporous Si film, fabricated by an electrochemical anodization process, is conjugated with monoclonal antibodies, specific to the target bacteria. The immobilization, immunoactivity and specificity of the antibodies are confirmed by fluorescent labeling experiments. Once the biosensor is exposed to the target bacteria, the cells are directly captured onto the antibody-modified porous Si surface. These specific capturing events result in intensity changes in the thin-film optical interference spectrum of the biosensor. We demonstrate that these biosensors can detect relatively low bacteria concentrations (detection limit of 10(4) cells/ml) in less than an hour.

  11. Fabrication of Optical Devices Based on Printable Photonics Technology and Its Application for Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Tatsuro; Okuda, Norimichi; Yanagida, Yasuko; Tanaka, Satoru; Hatsuzawa, Takeshi

    The specific optical characteristics which can be observed nanostructured optical device have great potentials for applying to several applications such as lifescience, optical communications, and data storage. Application of nanostrcutured optical device to industry, we suggest “printable photonics technology” for fabrication of nanostructured optical device based on nanoimprint lithography (NIL). In this study, using printable photonics technology, fabrication of flexible photonic crystal (PC) and its application for biosensor was performed. Using printable photonics technology-based PC for biosensing application, high sensitive detection of protein adsorption (detection limit: 1 pg/ml) could be detected.

  12. A photonic crystal biosensor assay for ferritin utilizing iron-oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Ross D; Cunningham, Brian T; Andrade, Juan E

    2014-06-15

    Iron deficiency anemia afflicts 1 in 3 individuals, mostly women and children worldwide. A novel application using iron-oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and a photonic crystal (PC) optical biosensor as an immunodiagnostic platform for detection of serum ferritin, a biomarker for iron deficiency, is presented. Human liver ferritin (450 kDa), clinical serum controls, and three commercially available ferritin ELISA tests were used to evaluate the PC biosensor assay in terms of inter- and intra-assay variability, spike-recovery (%), limit of detection (LOD), and matrix effects on binding. For the PC biosensor, signal response from label-free, sandwich with secondary antibody (pAb), and pAb functionalized with iron-oxide nanoparticles (FpAb) assays were detected using the Biomolecular Interaction Detection (BIND) system. Bland-Altman analysis was used to evaluate agreement between expected values for ferritin in control sera and each of the detection platforms. Inter- and intra-assay variability of the PC biosensor were both <10%. Percent mean recovery (±%RSD) of ferritin from two control sera samples were 94.3% (13.1%) and 96.9% (7.6%). Use of FpAb in PC biosensor resulted in two orders of magnitude increase in sensitivity compared to label-free assay; capable of measuring serum ferritin as low as 26 ng/mL. In comparison to ELISA tests, the PC biosensor assay had the lowest bias (-1.26; 95% CI [-3.0-5.5]) and narrower limit of agreement (-11.6-9.1 ng/mL) when determining ferritin concentrations from control sera. These proof-of-concept studies support the use of IONPs to enhance detection sensitivity of PC biosensors for determination of biomarkers of nutritional status.

  13. Optical biosensors: a revolution towards quantum nanoscale electronics device fabrication.

    PubMed

    Dey, D; Goswami, T

    2011-01-01

    The dimension of biomolecules is of few nanometers, so the biomolecular devices ought to be of that range so a better understanding about the performance of the electronic biomolecular devices can be obtained at nanoscale. Development of optical biomolecular device is a new move towards revolution of nano-bioelectronics. Optical biosensor is one of such nano-biomolecular devices that has a potential to pave a new dimension of research and device fabrication in the field of optical and biomedical fields. This paper is a very small report about optical biosensor and its development and importance in various fields.

  14. Photonic crystal biosensor based on angular spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Hallynck, Elewout; Bienstman, Peter

    2010-08-16

    The need for cost effective and reliable biosensors in e.g. medical applications is an ever growing and everlasting one. Not only do we strive to increase sensitivity and detection limit of such sensors; ease of fabrication or implementation are equally important. In this work, we propose a novel, photonic crystal based biosensor that is able to operate at a single frequency, contrary to resonance based sensors. In a certain frequency range, guided photonic crystal modes can couple to free space modes resulting in a Lorentzian shape in the angular spectrum. This Lorentzian can shift due to refractive index changes and simulations have shown sensitivities of 65 degrees per refractive index unit and more.

  15. Fiber Optic Biosensors for Contaminant Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    3 Biosensor response (as photomultiplier voltage change) following a change in analyte concentration. Figure 2-4 Reactions catalyzed by hydrolytic...biosensor measures small pH changes produced by the reaction of an enzyme with 1,2-DCA and techniques are required to distinguish these pH changes from...layer of the detection element contains bacteria with an enzyme that catalyzes a reaction with the analyte resulting in protons being released. The

  16. A Nanofluidic Biosensor Based on Nanoreplica Molding Photonic Crystal.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wang; Chen, Youping; Ai, Wu; Zhang, Dailin

    2016-12-01

    A nanofluidic biosensor based on nanoreplica molding photonic crystal (PC) was proposed. UV epoxy PC was fabricated by nanoreplica molding on a master PC wafer. The nanochannels were sealed between the gratings on the PC surface and a taped layer. The resonance wavelength of PC-based nanofluidic biosensor was used for testing the sealing effect. According to the peak wavelength value of the sensor, an initial label-free experiment was realized with R6g as the analyte. When the PC-based biosensor was illuminated by a monochromatic light source with a specific angle, the resonance wavelength of the sensor will match with the light source and amplified the electromagnetic field. The amplified electromagnetic field was used to enhance the fluorescence excitation result. The enhancement effect was used for enhancing fluorescence excitation and emission when matched with the resonance condition. Alexa Fluor 635 was used as the target dye excited by 637-nm laser source on a configured photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) setup, and an initial PCEF enhancement factor was obtained.

  17. A Nanofluidic Biosensor Based on Nanoreplica Molding Photonic Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wang; Chen, Youping; Ai, Wu; Zhang, Dailin

    2016-09-01

    A nanofluidic biosensor based on nanoreplica molding photonic crystal (PC) was proposed. UV epoxy PC was fabricated by nanoreplica molding on a master PC wafer. The nanochannels were sealed between the gratings on the PC surface and a taped layer. The resonance wavelength of PC-based nanofluidic biosensor was used for testing the sealing effect. According to the peak wavelength value of the sensor, an initial label-free experiment was realized with R6g as the analyte. When the PC-based biosensor was illuminated by a monochromatic light source with a specific angle, the resonance wavelength of the sensor will match with the light source and amplified the electromagnetic field. The amplified electromagnetic field was used to enhance the fluorescence excitation result. The enhancement effect was used for enhancing fluorescence excitation and emission when matched with the resonance condition. Alexa Fluor 635 was used as the target dye excited by 637-nm laser source on a configured photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) setup, and an initial PCEF enhancement factor was obtained.

  18. Detection of typhoid fever by diatom-based optical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Viji; Muthukumar, Anbazhagi; Nagamony, Ponpandian; Chinnuswamy, Viswanathan

    2017-06-02

    Surface-modified diatom substrates are employed for the development of immunocomplex-based optical biosensor for diagnosis of typhoid. Biosensor has been prepared by covalent immobilization of Salmonella typhi antibody onto the crosslinked diatom substrates via glutaraldehyde. Photoluminescent (PL) studies revealed good specificity and ability of conjugated diatom substrates to distinguish complementary (S. typhi) and non-complementary (Escherichia coli) antigens. The immunocomplexed biosensor showed detection limit of 10 pg. The excellent performance of biosensor is associated to its large surface-to-volume ratio, good photoluminescent property, and biocompatibility of diatom frustules, which enhances the antibody immobilization and facilitates the nucleophilic electron transfer between antibody and conjugated diatom surface. Hence, immunocomplexed diatom substrates are considered to be a suitable platform for the environmental monitoring of water-borne pathogen S. typhi.

  19. Integrated optical biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Dan; Grace, Karen M.; Song, Xuedong; Swanson, Basil I.; Frayer, Daniel; Mendes, Sergio B.; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    1999-12-01

    We have developed a simple, highly sensitive and specific optical waveguide sensor for the detection of multivalent proteins. The optical biosensor is based on optically tagged glycolipid receptors embedded within a fluid phospholipid bilayer membrane formed upon the surface of a planar optical waveguide. Binding of multivalent cholera toxin triggers a fluorescence resonance energy transfer that results in a two-color optical change that is monitored by measurement of emitted luminescence above the waveguide surface. The sensor approach is highly sensitive and specific and requires no additional reagents and washing steps. Demonstration of protein-receptor recognition by use of planar optical waveguides provides a path forward for the development of fieldable miniaturized biosensor arrays. (c) 1999 Optical Society of America.

  20. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride photonic crystals for improved-performance surface electromagnetic wave biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sinibaldi, Alberto; Descrovi, Emiliano; Giorgis, Fabrizio; Dominici, Lorenzo; Ballarini, Mirko; Mandracci, Pietro; Danz, Norbert; Michelotti, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    We exploit the properties of surface electromagnetic waves propagating at the surface of finite one dimensional photonic crystals to improve the performance of optical biosensors with respect to the standard surface plasmon resonance approach. We demonstrate that the hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride technology is a versatile platform for fabricating one dimensional photonic crystals with any desirable design and operating in a wide wavelength range, from the visible to the near infrared. We prepared sensors based on photonic crystals sustaining either guided modes or surface electromagnetic waves, also known as Bloch surface waves. We carried out for the first time a direct experimental comparison of their sensitivity and figure of merit with surface plasmon polaritons on metal layers, by making use of a commercial surface plasmon resonance instrument that was slightly adapted for the experiments. Our measurements demonstrate that the Bloch surface waves on silicon nitride photonic crystals outperform surface plasmon polaritons by a factor 1.3 in terms of figure of merit.

  1. Last Advances in Silicon-Based Optical Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Gavela, Adrián; Grajales García, Daniel; Ramirez, Jhonattan C.; Lechuga, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    We review the most important achievements published in the last five years in the field of silicon-based optical biosensors. We focus specially on label-free optical biosensors and their implementation into lab-on-a-chip platforms, with an emphasis on developments demonstrating the capability of the devices for real bioanalytical applications. We report on novel transducers and materials, improvements of existing transducers, new and improved biofunctionalization procedures as well as the prospects for near future commercialization of these technologies. PMID:26927105

  2. Pathogen detection using evanescent-wave fiber optic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Aldo P.; Werneck, Marcelo M.; Ribeiro, R. M.; Lins, U. G.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a real time optical biosensor that utilizes the evanescent field technique for monitoring microorganisms in hospital environment. The biosensor monitors interactions between the analytic (bacteria) and the evanescent field of an optical fiber passing through the culture media where the bacteria grows. The objective is to monitor atmospheres in hospital areas for the Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results lead us the conclusion that this kind of sensor presents quick response, good performance, easy of construction and low cost. We expect that the sensor will be of great help in controlling the hospital environment.

  3. Polymer integrated waveguide optical biosensor by using spectral splitting effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaonan; Han, Xiuyou; Shao, Yuchen; Wu, Zhenlin; Liang, Yuxin; Teng, Jie; Bo, Shuhui; Morthier, Geert; Zhao, Mingshan

    2017-06-01

    The polymer waveguide optical biosensor based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) by using spectral splitting effect is investigated. The MZI based biosensor has two unequal width sensing arms. With the different mode dispersion responses of the two-arm waveguides to the cladding refractive index change, the spectral splitting effect of the output interference spectrum is obtained, inducing a very high sensitivity. The influence of the different mode dispersions between the two-arm waveguides on the spectral splitting characteristic is analyzed. By choosing different lengths of the two unequal width sensing arms, the initial dip wavelength of the interference spectrum and the spectral splitting range can be controlled flexibly. The polymer waveguide optical biosensor is designed, and its sensing property is analyzed. The results show that the sensitivity of the polymer waveguide optical biosensor by using spectral splitting effect is as high as 104 nm/RIU, with an improvement of 2-3 orders of magnitude compared with the slot waveguide based microring biosensor.

  4. Polymer integrated waveguide optical biosensor by using spectral splitting effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaonan; Han, Xiuyou; Shao, Yuchen; Wu, Zhenlin; Liang, Yuxin; Teng, Jie; Bo, Shuhui; Morthier, Geert; Zhao, Mingshan

    2017-02-01

    The polymer waveguide optical biosensor based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) by using spectral splitting effect is investigated. The MZI based biosensor has two unequal width sensing arms. With the different mode dispersion responses of the two-arm waveguides to the cladding refractive index change, the spectral splitting effect of the output interference spectrum is obtained, inducing a very high sensitivity. The influence of the different mode dispersions between the two-arm waveguides on the spectral splitting characteristic is analyzed. By choosing different lengths of the two unequal width sensing arms, the initial dip wavelength of the interference spectrum and the spectral splitting range can be controlled flexibly. The polymer waveguide optical biosensor is designed, and its sensing property is analyzed. The results show that the sensitivity of the polymer waveguide optical biosensor by using spectral splitting effect is as high as 104 nm/RIU, with an improvement of 2-3 orders of magnitude compared with the slot waveguide based microring biosensor.

  5. Design and application of fiber optic evanescent wave biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huijie; Zhai, Junhui; Zhao, Yongkai; Yang, Ruifu; Ren, Bingqiang; Cheng, Zhaogu; Du, Longlong; Lu, Dunwu

    2003-12-01

    A fiber-optic biosensor is developed based on the principle of evanescent wave while light propagates in optical fiber. The biosensor uses a red laser diode at 636.85 nm for exciting Cy5 fluorescent dye. Sensitivity limit of 0.01 nnmol/l is obtained from the detection of serial Cy5 solutions with various concentrations. In log-to-log plot, excellent linear response characteristic is seen in the Cy5 concentrations ranging from 0.01 nmlo/l to 100 nmol/l. And a good result of signal-to-noise ratio of 4.61 is obtained when the biosensor is used to measure Legionella pneumophila solution of 0.01 μmol/l. All the results are comparable with those that are obtained by a commercial biochip scanner GeneTAC 1000.

  6. Design of highly sensitive multichannel bimetallic photonic crystal fiber biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Mohamed Farhat O.; Alrayk, Yassmin K. A.; Shaalan, Abdelhamid A.; El Deeb, Walid S.; Obayya, Salah S. A.

    2016-10-01

    A design of a highly sensitive multichannel biosensor based on photonic crystal fiber is proposed and analyzed. The suggested design has a silver layer as a plasmonic material coated by a gold layer to protect silver oxidation. The reported sensor is based on detection using the quasi transverse electric (TE) and quasi transverse magnetic (TM) modes, which offers the possibility of multichannel/multianalyte sensing. The numerical results are obtained using a finite element method with perfect matched layer boundary conditions. The sensor geometrical parameters are optimized to achieve high sensitivity for the two polarized modes. High-refractive index sensitivity of about 4750 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) and 4300 nm/RIU with corresponding resolutions of 2.1×10-5 RIU, and 2.33×10-5 RIU can be obtained according to the quasi TM and quasi TE modes of the proposed sensor, respectively. Further, the reported design can be used as a self-calibration biosensor within an unknown analyte refractive index ranging from 1.33 to 1.35 with high linearity and high accuracy. Moreover, the suggested biosensor has advantages in terms of compactness and better integration of microfluidics setup, waveguide, and metallic layers into a single structure.

  7. Optical Biosensors Based on Semiconductor Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Manso, Miguel; Torres-Costa, Vicente

    2009-01-01

    The increasing availability of semiconductor-based nanostructures with novel and unique properties has sparked widespread interest in their use in the field of biosensing. The precise control over the size, shape and composition of these nanostructures leads to the accurate control of their physico-chemical properties and overall behavior. Furthermore, modifications can be made to the nanostructures to better suit their integration with biological systems, leading to such interesting properties as enhanced aqueous solubility, biocompatibility or bio-recognition. In the present work, the most significant applications of semiconductor nanostructures in the field of optical biosensing will be reviewed. In particular, the use of quantum dots as fluorescent bioprobes, which is the most widely used application, will be discussed. In addition, the use of some other nanometric structures in the field of biosensing, including porous semiconductors and photonic crystals, will be presented. PMID:22346691

  8. Kinetics of Antibody Binding to Membranes of Living Bacteria Measured by a Photonic Crystal-Based Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Rostova, Ekaterina; Ben Adiba, Carine; Dietler, Giovanni; Sekatskii, Sergey K

    2016-10-11

    Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves (PC SWs) offer a possibility to study binding interactions with living cells, overcoming the limitation of rather small evanescent field penetration depth into a sample medium that is characteristic for typical optical biosensors. Besides this, simultaneous excitation of s- and p-polarized surface waves with different penetration depths is realized here, permitting unambiguous separation of surface and volume contributions to the measured signal. PC-based biosensors do not require a bulk signal correction, compared to widely used surface plasmon resonance-based devices. We developed a chitosan-based protocol of PC chip functionalization for bacterial attachment and performed experiments on antibody binding to living bacteria measured in real time by the PCSW-based biosensor. Data analysis reveals specific binding and gives the value of the dissociation constant for monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b) against bacterial lipopolysaccharides equal to KD = 6.2 ± 3.4 nM. To our knowledge, this is a first demonstration of antibody-binding kinetics to living bacteria by a label-free optical biosensor.

  9. Kinetics of Antibody Binding to Membranes of Living Bacteria Measured by a Photonic Crystal-Based Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Rostova, Ekaterina; Ben Adiba, Carine; Dietler, Giovanni; Sekatskii, Sergey K.

    2016-01-01

    Optical biosensors based on photonic crystal surface waves (PC SWs) offer a possibility to study binding interactions with living cells, overcoming the limitation of rather small evanescent field penetration depth into a sample medium that is characteristic for typical optical biosensors. Besides this, simultaneous excitation of s- and p-polarized surface waves with different penetration depths is realized here, permitting unambiguous separation of surface and volume contributions to the measured signal. PC-based biosensors do not require a bulk signal correction, compared to widely used surface plasmon resonance-based devices. We developed a chitosan-based protocol of PC chip functionalization for bacterial attachment and performed experiments on antibody binding to living bacteria measured in real time by the PCSW-based biosensor. Data analysis reveals specific binding and gives the value of the dissociation constant for monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b) against bacterial lipopolysaccharides equal to KD = 6.2 ± 3.4 nM. To our knowledge, this is a first demonstration of antibody-binding kinetics to living bacteria by a label-free optical biosensor. PMID:27727183

  10. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-03

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  11. Biosensors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rechnitz, Garry A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes theory and principles behind biosensors that incorporate biological components as part of a sensor or probe. Projects major applications in medicine and veterinary medicine, biotechnology, food and agriculture, environmental studies, and the military. Surveys current use of biosensors. (ML)

  12. Biosensors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rechnitz, Garry A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes theory and principles behind biosensors that incorporate biological components as part of a sensor or probe. Projects major applications in medicine and veterinary medicine, biotechnology, food and agriculture, environmental studies, and the military. Surveys current use of biosensors. (ML)

  13. Athermal optical waveguide microring biosensor with intensity interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiuyou; Shao, Yuchen; Han, Xiaonan; Lu, Zhili; Wu, Zhenlin; Teng, Jie; Ren, Jun; Zhao, Mingshan

    2015-12-01

    The temperature sensitivity of optical waveguide microring (MR) is the critical factor to influence the performance of MR-based biosensor. An athermal MR-based biosensor with intensity interrogation is proposed and analyzed. The integrative biosensor chip is composed of sensing unit MR and interrogation unit Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) with the same temperature sensitivity. The resonant wavelength shift of MR by temperature change is equal to the center wavelength shift of interrogation curve of MZI which cancel with each other during interrogation process. The polymer based integrative biosensor chip is designed and investigated. The simulation results show that the temperature sensitivity of the polymer waveguide biosensor is smaller than 1 pm/K with the temperature change between -10 K to 20 K relative to the reference temperature 20 °C and refractive index change from 0 to 0.05. The intensity interrogation method utilizing the power ratio between the two output ports of MZI has the flexibility of selecting large linear range and high resolution and is immune to output power fluctuations of the light source.

  14. Fluorescence based fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors. A review.

    PubMed

    Benito-Peña, Elena; Valdés, Mayra Granda; Glahn-Martínez, Bettina; Moreno-Bondi, Maria C

    2016-11-02

    The application of optical biosensors, specifically those that use optical fibers and planar waveguides, has escalated throughout the years in many fields, including environmental analysis, food safety and clinical diagnosis. Fluorescence is, without doubt, the most popular transducer signal used in these devices because of its higher selectivity and sensitivity, but most of all due to its wide versatility. This paper focuses on the working principles and configurations of fluorescence-based fiber optic and planar waveguide biosensors and will review biological recognition elements, sensing schemes, as well as some major and recent applications, published in the last ten years. The main goal is to provide the reader a general overview of a field that requires the joint collaboration of researchers of many different areas, including chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, and material science.

  15. Detection of Myoglobin with an Open-Cavity-Based Label-Free Photonic Crystal Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bailin; Tamez-Vela, Juan Manuel; Solis, Steven; Bustamante, Gilbert; Peterson, Ralph; Rahman, Shafiqur; Morales, Andres; Tang, Liang; Ye, Jing Yong

    2013-01-01

    The label-free detection of one of the cardiac biomarkers, myoglobin, using a photonic-crystal-based biosensor in a total-internal-reflection configuration (PC-TIR) is presented in this paper. The PC-TIR sensor possesses a unique open optical microcavity that allows for several key advantages in biomolecular assays. In contrast to a conventional closed microcavity, the open configuration allows easy functionalization of the sensing surface for rapid biomolecular binding assays. Moreover, the properties of PC structures make it easy to be designed and engineered for operating at any optical wavelength. Through fine design of the photonic crystal structure, biochemical modification of the sensor surface, and integration with a microfluidic system, we have demonstrated that the detection sensitivity of the sensor for myoglobin has reached the clinically significant concentration range, enabling potential usage of this biosensor for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. The real-time response of the sensor to the myoglobin binding may potentially provide point-of-care monitoring of patients and treatment effects.

  16. Photonic crystal waveguide-based biosensor for detection of diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Harshita; Kaler, Rajinder S.; Painam, Balveer

    2016-07-01

    A biosensor is a device that is used to detect the analytes or molecules of a sample by means of a binding mechanism. A two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide-based biosensor is designed with a diamond-shaped ring resonator and two waveguides: a bus waveguide and a drop waveguide. The sensing mechanism is based on change in refractive index of the analytes, leading to a shift in the peak resonant wavelength. This mechanism can be used in the field of biomedical treatment where different body fluids such as blood, tears, saliva, or urine can be used as the analyte in which different components of the fluid can be detected. It can also be used to differentiate between the cell lines of a normal and an unhealthy human being. Average value of quality factor for this device comes out to be 1082.2063. For different analytes used, the device exhibits enhanced sensitivity and, hence, it is useful for the detection of diseases.

  17. Diamond-based protective layer for optical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majchrowicz, D.; Ficek, M.; Baran, T.; WÄ sowicz, M.; Struk, P.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.

    2016-09-01

    Optical biosensors have become a powerful alternative to the conventional ways of measurement owing to their great properties, such as high sensitivity, high dynamic range, cost effectiveness and small size. Choice of an optical biosensor's materials is an important factor and impacts the quality of the obtained spectra. Examined biological objects are placed on a cover layer which may react with samples in a chemical, biological and mechanical way, therefore having a negative impact on the measurement reliability. Diamond, a metastable allotrope of carbon with sp3 hybridization, shows outstanding properties such as: great chemical stability, bio-compatibility, high thermal conductivity, wide bandgap and optical transparency. Additionally it possesses great mechanical durability, which makes it a long-lasting material. The protective diamond thin films were deposited on the substrate using Microwave Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW PA CVD) system. The surface morphology and roughness was assessed with atomic force microscopy and profilometry. We have performed a series of measurements to assess the biocompatibility of diamond thin films with whole blood. The results show that thin diamond protective layer does not affect the red blood cells, while retaining the sensors high resolution and dynamic range of measurement. Therefore, we conclude that diamond thin films are a viable protective coating for optical biosensors, which allows to examine many biological elements. We project that it can be particularly useful not only for biological objects but also under extreme conditions like radioactive or chemically aggressive environments and high temperatures.

  18. Emerging applications of label-free optical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchetta, Giuliano; Lanfranco, Roberta; Giavazzi, Fabio; Bellini, Tommaso; Buscaglia, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Innovative technical solutions to realize optical biosensors with improved performance are continuously proposed. Progress in material fabrication enables developing novel substrates with enhanced optical responses. At the same time, the increased spectrum of available biomolecular tools, ranging from highly specific receptors to engineered bioconjugated polymers, facilitates the preparation of sensing surfaces with controlled functionality. What remains often unclear is to which extent this continuous innovation provides effective breakthroughs for specific applications. In this review, we address this challenging question for the class of label-free optical biosensors, which can provide a direct signal upon molecular binding without using secondary probes. Label-free biosensors have become a consolidated approach for the characterization and screening of molecular interactions in research laboratories. However, in the last decade, several examples of other applications with high potential impact have been proposed. We review the recent advances in label-free optical biosensing technology by focusing on the potential competitive advantage provided in selected emerging applications, grouped on the basis of the target type. In particular, direct and real-time detection allows the development of simpler, compact, and rapid analytical methods for different kinds of targets, from proteins to DNA and viruses. The lack of secondary interactions facilitates the binding of small-molecule targets and minimizes the perturbation in single-molecule detection. Moreover, the intrinsic versatility of label-free sensing makes it an ideal platform to be integrated with biomolecular machinery with innovative functionality, as in case of the molecular tools provided by DNA nanotechnology.

  19. An Optical Biosensor for Bacillus Cereus Spore Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengquan; Tom, Harry W. K.

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate a new transduction scheme for optical biosensing. Bacillus cereus is a pathogen that may be found in food and dairy products and is able to produce toxins and cause food poisoning. It is related to Bacillus anthracis (anthrax). A CCD array covered with micro-structured glass coverslip is used to detect the optical resonant shift due to the binding of the antigen (bacillus cereus spore) to the antibody (polyclonal antibody). This novel optical biosensor scheme has the potential for detecting 10˜100 bioagents in a single device as well as the potential to test for antigens with multiple antibody tests to avoid ``false positives.''

  20. Novel multichannel surface plasmon resonance photonic crystal fiber biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Mohamed Farhat O.; Alrayk, Yassmin K. A.; Shaalan, A. A.; El Deeb, Walid S.; Obayya, S. S. A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a novel design of highly sensitive biosensor based on photonic crystal fiber is presented and analyzed using full vectorial finite element method. The suggested design depends on using silver layer as a plasmonic active material coated by a gold layer to protect silver oxidation. The reported sensor is based on the detection using the quasi transverse electric (TE) and quasi transverse magnetic (TM) modes which offers the possibility of multi-channel/multi-analyte sensing. The sensor geometrical parameters are optimized to achieve high sensitivity for the two polarized modes. High refractive index sensitivity of about 4750 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) and 4300 nm/RIU with corresponding resolutions of 2.1×10-5 RIU, and 2.33×10-5 RIU can be obtained for the quasi TM and quasi TE modes, respectively.

  1. Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouno, Tetsuya; Takeshima, Hoshi; Kishino, Katsumi; Sakai, Masaru; Hara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities were demonstrated using room-temperature photoluminescence measurements. The outer diameter, height, and thickness of the GaN nanorings were approximately 750-800, 900, and 130-180 nm, respectively. The nanorings functioned as whispering-gallery-mode (WGM)-type optical cavities and exhibited sharp resonant peaks like lasing actions. The evanescent component of the WGM was strongly affected by the refractive index of the ambient environment, the type of liquid, and the sucrose concentration of the analyzed solution, resulting in shifts of the resonant wavelengths. The results indicate that the GaN nanorings can potentially be used in sugar sensors of the biosensors.

  2. Optical refractometric FBG biosensors: problems of development and decision courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepustchenko, Oleg A.; Morozov, Oleg G.; Sadykov, Iskander R.; Morozov, Gennady A.; Denisenko, Pavel E.; Gorshunova, Anastasiya N.

    2010-12-01

    Problems of refractometric optical biosensors and courses of their fast and technological decision are considered. In particular the resolution and sensitivity increase, formation of stable on amplitude and spectrum cleanliness probing radiation, allocation of refractometric information from a complex of sensor parameters defined by universality of FBG response to changes of pressure, temperature and refraction factor, construction of dot type sensors and the distributed networks on their basis are analyzed.

  3. Nanoporous Anodic Alumina: A Versatile Platform for Optical Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Abel; Kumeria, Tushar; Losic, Dusan

    2014-01-01

    Nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) has become one of the most promising nanomaterials in optical biosensing as a result of its unique physical and chemical properties. Many studies have demonstrated the outstanding capabilities of NAA for developing optical biosensors in combination with different optical techniques. These results reveal that NAA is a promising alternative to other widely explored nanoporous platforms, such as porous silicon. This review is aimed at reporting on the recent advances and current stage of development of NAA-based optical biosensing devices. The different optical detection techniques, principles and concepts are described in detail along with relevant examples of optical biosensing devices using NAA sensing platforms. Furthermore, we summarise the performance of these devices and provide a future perspective on this promising research field. PMID:28788678

  4. Acetylcholinesterase liquid crystal biosensor based on modulated growth of gold nanoparticles for amplified detection of acetylcholine and inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shuzhen; Qiao, Yanan; Han, Wenting; Xie, Zhaoxia; Wu, Zhaoyang; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2012-01-03

    A novel acetylcholinesterase (AChE) liquid crystal (LC) biosensor based on enzymatic growth of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) has been developed for amplified detection of acetylcholine (ACh) and AChE inhibitor. In this method, AChE mediates the hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine (ATCl) to form thiocholine, and the latter further reduces AuCl(4)(-) to Au NPs without Au nanoseeds. This process, termed biometallization, leads to a great enhancement in the optical signal of the LC biosensor due to the large size of Au NPs, which can greatly disrupt the orientational arrangement of LCs. On the other hand, the hydrolysis of ATCl is inhibited in the presence of ACh or organophosphate pesticides (OPs, a AChE inhibitor), which will decrease the catalytic growth of Au NPs and, as a result, reduce the orientational response of LCs. On the basis of such an inhibition mechanism, the AChE LC biosensor can be used as an effective way to realize the detection of ACh and AChE inhibitors. The results showed that the AChE LC biosensor was highly sensitive to ACh with a detection limit of 15 μmol/L and OPs with a detection limit of 0.3 nmol/L. This study provides a simple and sensitive AChE LC biosensing approach and offers effective signal enhanced strategies for the development of enzyme LC biosensors. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  5. Photonic Crystal Biosensor with In-Situ Synthesized DNA Probes for Enhanced Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shuren; Zhao, Y.; Retterer, Scott T; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Weiss, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    We report on a nearly 8-fold increase in multi-hole defect photonic crystal biosensor response by incorporating in-situ synthesis of DNA probes, as compared to the conventional functionalization method employing pre-synthesized DNA probe immobilization.

  6. Photonic crystal nanostructures for optical biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Dorfner, D; Zabel, T; Hürlimann, T; Hauke, N; Frandsen, L; Rant, U; Abstreiter, G; Finley, J

    2009-08-15

    We present the design, fabrication and optical investigation of photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity drop filters for use as optical biosensors. The resonant cavity mode wavelength and Q-factor are studied as a function of the ambient refractive index and as a function of adsorbed proteins (bovine serum albumin) on the sensor surface. Experiments were performed by evanescent excitation of the cavity mode via a PhC waveguide. This in turn is coupled to a ridge waveguide that allows the introduction of a fluid flow cell on a chip. A response of partial delta lambda/delta c=(4.54+/-0.66)x10(5)nm/M is measured leading to a measured detection limit as good as Delta m=4.0+/-0.6 fg or Delta m/Delta A=(4.9+/-0.7)x10(2)pg/mm(2)in the sensitive area.

  7. Piezoelectric optical MEMS scanning fluorescence biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Joe; Kim, Eun S.; Gundersen, Martin A.; Marcu, Laura

    2005-04-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy plays a key role in a broad area of biological and medical applications. Development of fluorescence spectroscopy micro-devices will enable construction of fully integrated platforms for clinical diagnostics. We report the design, microfabrication and testing of a piezoelectric MEMS micro-grating as a part of the development of a combined spectral/time-resolved fluorescence biosensor for tissue characterization. For the design of the device, we simulated its theoretical performance using a piezoelectric multi-morph model with appropriate diffraction geometry. The microfabrication process was based on a SiN diaphragm (formed via KOH bulk-micromachining) on which the supporting layer of the micro-cantilevers was patterned. Piezoelectric ZnO was then magnetron sputtered and patterned on the cantilever as the physical source for linear actuation with low voltage (>32V). E-beam evaporation of aluminum formed the final reflective diffraction pattern as well as the electrode connections to the device units. The device actuation and displacement were characterized using LDDM (Laser Doppler Displacement Meter). Current cantilevers designed with 500 μm wide gratings (20 μm spacing) produced a maximum 38 μm bi-polar deflection at 3.5 kHz, with scanning from 350-650 nm at 26 nm resolution (10 nm with new 10 μm period prototype). The MEMS device was designed to be integrated with a fast response photomultiplier, and thus can be used with time-resolved fluorescence detection. Because in the case of time-resolved measurements, spectral resolution is not a crucial element, this configuration allows for the compensation of the geometric limitations (linear dispersion) of a micro-scale device that require wavelength differentiation and selection.

  8. Miniature fiber optic surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavik, Radan; Brynda, Eduard; Homola, Jiri; Ctyroky, Jiri

    1999-01-01

    A novel design of surface plasmon resonance fiber optic sensor is reported which leads to a compact, highly miniaturized sensing element with excellent sensitivity. The sensing device is based on a side-polished single-mode optical fiber with a thin metal overlayer supporting surface plasmon waves. The strength of interaction between a fiber mode and a surface plasmon wave depends strongly on the refractive index near the sensing surface. Therefore, refractive index changes associated with biospecific interaction between antibodies immobilized on the sensor and antigen molecules can be monitored by measuring light intensity variations. Detection of horse radish peroxidase (HRP) of the concentration of 100 ng/ml has been accomplished using the fiber optic sensor with a matrix of monoclonal antibodies against HRP immobilized on the sensor surface.

  9. Toxin detection using a fiber-optic-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogert, Robert A.; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Ligler, Frances S.

    1993-05-01

    Using an evanescent wave fiber optic-based biosensor developed at Naval Research Laboratory, ricin toxin can be detected in the low ng/ml range. Sensitivity was established at 1 - 5 ng/ml using a two-step assay. The two-step assay showed enhanced signal levels in comparison to a one-step assay. A two-step assay utilizes a 10 minute incubation of an immobilized affinity purified anti-ricin antibody fiber optic probe in the ricin sample before placement in a solution of fluorophore-labeled goat anti-ricin antibodies. The specific fluorescent signal is obtained by the binding of the fluorophore-labeled antibodies to ricin which is bound by the immobilized antibodies on the fiber optic probe. The toxin can be detected directly from urine and river water using this fiber optic assay.

  10. Measuring Protein Interactions by Optical Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huaying; Boyd, Lisa F; Schuck, Peter

    2017-04-03

    This unit gives an introduction to the basic techniques of optical biosensing for measuring equilibrium and kinetics of reversible protein interactions. Emphasis is placed on description of robust approaches that will provide reliable results with few assumptions. How to avoid the most commonly encountered problems and artifacts is also discussed. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Handheld imaging photonic crystal biosensor for multiplexed, label-free protein detection

    PubMed Central

    Jahns, Sabrina; Bräu, Marion; Meyer, Björn-Ole; Karrock, Torben; Gutekunst, Sören B.; Blohm, Lars; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Buhmann, Raymund; Nazirizadeh, Yousef; Gerken, Martina

    2015-01-01

    We present a handheld biosensor system for the label-free and specific multiplexed detection of several biomarkers employing a spectrometer-free imaging measurement system. A photonic crystal surface functionalized with multiple specific ligands forms the optical transducer. The photonic crystal slab is fabricated on a glass substrate by replicating a periodic grating master stamp with a period of 370 nm into a photoresist via nanoimprint lithography and deposition of a 70-nm titanium dioxide layer. Capture molecules are coupled covalently and drop-wise to the photonic crystal surface. With a simple camera and imaging optics the surface-normal transmission is detected. In the transmission spectrum guided-mode resonances are observed that shift due to protein binding. This shift is observed as an intensity change in the green color channel of the camera. Non-functionalized image sections are used for continuous elimination of background drift. In a first experiment we demonstrate the specific and time-resolved detection of 90.0 nm CD40 ligand antibody, 90.0 nM EGF antibody, and 500 nM streptavidin in parallel on one sensor chip. In a second experiment, aptamers with two different spacer lengths are used as receptor. The binding kinetics with association and dissociation of 250 nM thrombin and regeneration of the sensor surface with acidic tris-HCl-buffer (pH 5.0) is presented for two measurement cycles. PMID:26504624

  12. Handheld imaging photonic crystal biosensor for multiplexed, label-free protein detection.

    PubMed

    Jahns, Sabrina; Bräu, Marion; Meyer, Björn-Ole; Karrock, Torben; Gutekunst, Sören B; Blohm, Lars; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Buhmann, Raymund; Nazirizadeh, Yousef; Gerken, Martina

    2015-10-01

    We present a handheld biosensor system for the label-free and specific multiplexed detection of several biomarkers employing a spectrometer-free imaging measurement system. A photonic crystal surface functionalized with multiple specific ligands forms the optical transducer. The photonic crystal slab is fabricated on a glass substrate by replicating a periodic grating master stamp with a period of 370 nm into a photoresist via nanoimprint lithography and deposition of a 70-nm titanium dioxide layer. Capture molecules are coupled covalently and drop-wise to the photonic crystal surface. With a simple camera and imaging optics the surface-normal transmission is detected. In the transmission spectrum guided-mode resonances are observed that shift due to protein binding. This shift is observed as an intensity change in the green color channel of the camera. Non-functionalized image sections are used for continuous elimination of background drift. In a first experiment we demonstrate the specific and time-resolved detection of 90.0 nm CD40 ligand antibody, 90.0 nM EGF antibody, and 500 nM streptavidin in parallel on one sensor chip. In a second experiment, aptamers with two different spacer lengths are used as receptor. The binding kinetics with association and dissociation of 250 nM thrombin and regeneration of the sensor surface with acidic tris-HCl-buffer (pH 5.0) is presented for two measurement cycles.

  13. Optical biosensors: where next and how soon?

    PubMed

    Cooper, Matthew A

    2006-12-01

    From a direct comparison of the technical benefits of labelled reporter assays with the benefits of label-free assays, label-free appears to have significant advantages. Faster assay development times; accurate, high information content data; and less interference from labels. However, optical label-free platforms have not yet made a major impact in the drug discovery technology markets; are often viewed as having poor throughput, limited application; and are difficult to learn and use effectively.

  14. Self assembled monolayer based liquid crystal biosensor for free cholesterol detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Mukta; Chandran, Achu; Joshi, Tilak; Prakash, Jai; Agrawal, V. V.; Biradar, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    A unique cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) liquid crystal (LC) biosensor, based on the disruption of orientation in LCs, is developed for cholesterol detection. A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of Dimethyloctadecyl[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ammonium chloride (DMOAP) and (3-Aminopropyl)trimethoxy-silane (APTMS) is prepared on a glass plate by adsorption. The enzyme (ChOx) is immobilized on SAM surface for 12 h before utilizing the film for biosensing purpose. LC based biosensing study is conducted on SAM/ChOx/LC (5CB) cells for cholesterol concentrations ranging from 10 mg/dl to 250 mg/dl. The sensing mechanism has been verified through polarizing optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and spectrometric techniques.

  15. Self assembled monolayer based liquid crystal biosensor for free cholesterol detection

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, Mukta; Agrawal, V. V.; Chandran, Achu; Joshi, Tilak; Prakash, Jai; Biradar, A. M.

    2014-04-14

    A unique cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) liquid crystal (LC) biosensor, based on the disruption of orientation in LCs, is developed for cholesterol detection. A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of Dimethyloctadecyl[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ammonium chloride (DMOAP) and (3-Aminopropyl)trimethoxy-silane (APTMS) is prepared on a glass plate by adsorption. The enzyme (ChOx) is immobilized on SAM surface for 12 h before utilizing the film for biosensing purpose. LC based biosensing study is conducted on SAM/ChOx/LC (5CB) cells for cholesterol concentrations ranging from 10 mg/dl to 250 mg/dl. The sensing mechanism has been verified through polarizing optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and spectrometric techniques.

  16. FIBER-OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DIRECT DETERMINATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE NERVE AGENTS. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fiber-optic enzyme biosensor for the direct measurement of organophosphate nerve
    agents was developed. The basic element of this biosensor is organophosphorus hydrolase
    immobilized on a nylon membrane and attached to the common end of a bifurcated optical fiber
    bundle....

  17. FIBER-OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DIRECT DETERMINATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE NERVE AGENTS. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fiber-optic enzyme biosensor for the direct measurement of organophosphate nerve
    agents was developed. The basic element of this biosensor is organophosphorus hydrolase
    immobilized on a nylon membrane and attached to the common end of a bifurcated optical fiber
    bundle....

  18. Liquid crystal based biosensors for bile acid detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Sihui; Liang, Wenlang; Tanner, Colleen; Fang, Jiyu; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2013-03-01

    The concentration level of bile acids is a useful indicator for early diagnosis of liver diseases. The prevalent measurement method in detecting bile acids is the chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, which is precise yet expensive. Here we present a biosensor platform based on liquid crystal (LC) films for the detection of cholic acid (CA). This platform has the advantage of low cost, label-free, solution phase detection and simple analysis. In this platform, LC film of 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) was hosted by a copper grid supported with a polyimide-coated glass substrate. By immersing into sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, the LC film was coated with SDS which induced a homeotropic anchoring of 5CB. Addition of CA introduced competitive adsorption between CA and SDS at the interface, triggering a transition from homeotropic to homogeneous anchoring. The detection limit can be tuned by changing the pH value of the solution from 12uM to 170uM.

  19. Microalgal fiber-optic biosensors for water quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Guillermo; Villén, Laura; Haigh, David; Maneiro, Emilia; Marvá, Fernando; Costas, Eduardo

    2007-07-01

    Novel fiber-optic biosensors have been developed for the analysis of pesticides in water based on Chlorophyceae microalgae immobilized into a porous silicone layer as recognition element, and on measurements of the photogenerated O II as chemical transducer. The inhibition of O II production by the photosynthetic green algae in the presence of the pesticide (simazine) was used as the biological signal. Luminescent thin films and a dedicated optoelectronic unit based on emission phase-shift measurements provide the tools for the sensitive O II measurements. Fluctuation analysis allows selection of sensitive and resistant microalgae mutants without genetic manipulation for maximum biosensing selectivity.

  20. Integrated optical biosensor for rapid detection of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathesz, Anna; Valkai, Sándor; Újvárosy, Attila; Aekbote, Badri; Sipos, Orsolya; Stercz, Balázs; Kocsis, Béla; Szabó, Dóra; Dér, András

    2016-02-01

    In medical diagnostics, rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria from body fluids is one of the basic issues. Most state-of-the-art methods require optical labeling, increasing the complexity, duration and cost of the analysis. Therefore, there is a strong need for developing selective sensory devices based on label-free techniques, in order to increase the speed, and reduce the cost of detection. In a recent paper, we have shown that an integrated optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a highly sensitive all-optical device made of a cheap photopolymer, can be used as a powerful lab-on-a-chip tool for specific, labelfree detection of proteins. By proper modifications of this technique, our interferometric biosensor was combined with a microfluidic system allowing the rapid and specific detection of bacteria from solutions, having the surface of the sensor functionalized by bacterium-specific antibodies. The experiments proved that the biosensor was able to detect Escherichia coli bacteria at concentrations of 106 cfu/ml within a few minutes, that makes our device an appropriate tool for fast, label-free detection of bacteria from body fluids such as urine or sputum. On the other hand, possible applications of the device may not be restricted to medical microbiology, since bacterial identification is an important task in microbial forensics, criminal investigations, bio-terrorism threats and in environmental studies, as well.

  1. Integrated optical biosensor for rapid detection of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathesz, Anna; Valkai, Sándor; Újvárosy, Attila; Aekbote, Badri; Sipos, Orsolya; Stercz, Balázs; Kocsis, Béla; Szabó, Dóra; Dér, András

    2015-12-01

    In medical diagnostics, rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria from body fluids is one of the basic issues. Most state-of-the-art methods require optical labeling, increasing the complexity, duration and cost of the analysis. Therefore, there is a strong need for developing selective sensory devices based on label-free techniques, in order to increase the speed, and reduce the cost of detection. In a recent paper, we have shown that an integrated optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a highly sensitive all-optical device made of a cheap photopolymer, can be used as a powerful lab-on-a-chip tool for specific, labelfree detection of proteins. By proper modifications of this technique, our interferometric biosensor was combined with a microfluidic system allowing the rapid and specific detection of bacteria from solutions, having the surface of the sensor functionalized by bacterium-specific antibodies. The experiments proved that the biosensor was able to detect Escherichia coli bacteria at concentrations of 106 cfu/ml within a few minutes, that makes our device an appropriate tool for fast, label-free detection of bacteria from body fluids such as urine or sputum. On the other hand, possible applications of the device may not be restricted to medical microbiology, since bacterial identification is an important task in microbial forensics, criminal investigations, bio-terrorism threats and in environmental studies, as well.

  2. Optical micro-bubble resonators as promising biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannetti, A.; Barucci, A.; Berneschi, S.; Cosci, A.; Cosi, F.; Farnesi, D.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Pelli, S.; Soria, S.; Tombelli, S.; Trono, C.; Righini, G. C.; Baldini, F.

    2015-05-01

    Recently, optical micro-bubble resonators (OMBRs) have gained an increasing interest in many fields of photonics thanks to their particular properties. These hollow microstructures can be suitable for the realization of label - free optical biosensors by combining the whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator properties with the intrinsic capability of integrated microfluidics. In fact, the WGMs are morphology-dependent modes: any change on the OMBR inner surface (due to chemical and/or biochemical binding) causes a shift of the resonance position and reduces the Q factor value of the cavity. By measuring this shift, it is possible to obtain information on the concentration of the analyte to be detected. A crucial step for the development of an OMBR-based biosensor is constituted by the functionalization of its inner surface. In this work we report on the development of a physical and chemical process able to guarantee a good homogeneity of the deposed bio-layer and, contemporary, to preserve a high quality factor Q of the cavity. The OMBR capability of working as bioassay was proved by different optical techniques, such as the real time measurement of the resonance broadening after each functionalization step and fluorescence microscopy.

  3. Low-concentration mechanical biosensor based on a photonic crystal nanowire array.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuerui; Peng, Songming; Luo, Dan; Lal, Amit

    2011-12-06

    The challenge for new biosensors is to achieve detection of biomolecules at low concentrations, which is useful for early-stage disease detection. Nanomechanical biosensors are promising in medical diagnostic applications. For nanomechanical biosensing at low concentrations, a sufficient resonator device surface area is necessary for molecules to bind to. Here we present a low-concentration (500 aM sensitivity) DNA sensor, which uses a novel nanomechanical resonator with ordered vertical nanowire arrays on top of a Si/SiO(2) bilayer thin membrane. The high sensitivity is achieved by the strongly enhanced total surface area-to-volume ratio of the resonator (10(8) m(-1)) and the state-of-the-art mass-per-area resolution (1.8×10(-12) kg m(-2)). Moreover, the nanowire array forms a photonic crystal that shows strong light trapping and absorption over broad-band optical wavelengths, enabling high-efficiency broad-band opto-thermo-mechanical remote device actuation and biosensing on a chip. This method represents a mass-based platform technology that can sense molecules at low concentrations.

  4. Label-free cell-based assays with optical biosensors in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ye

    2006-10-01

    Once viewed solely as a tool for low throughput and kinetic analysis of biomolecular interactions, optical biosensors are gaining widespread uses in drug discovery because of recent advances in instrumentation and experimental design. These advances have expanded the capabilities of optical biosensors to meet the needs at many points in the drug discovery process. Concurrent shifts in drug discovery paradigms have seen the growing use of whole cell systems for drug screens, thus creating both a need in drug discovery and a solution in optical biosensors. This article reviews important advances in optical biosensor instrumentation, and highlights the potential of optical biosensors for drug discovery with an emphasis on whole cell sensing in both high throughput and high content fashions.

  5. Thiol- and Biotin-Labeled Probes for Oligonucleotide Quartz Crystal Microbalance Biosensors of Microalga Alexandrium Minutum

    PubMed Central

    Lazerges, Mathieu; Perrot, Hubert; Rabehagasoa, Niriniony; Compère, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Two quartz crystal microbalance oligonucleotide biosensors of a toxic microalga gene sequence (Alexandrium Minutum) have been designed. Grafting on a gold surface of 20-base thiol- or biotin-labeled probe, and selective hybridization with the complementary 20-base target, have been monitored in situ with a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance under controlled hydrodynamic conditions. The frequency of the set up is stable to within a few hertz, corresponding to the nanogram scale, for three hour experiments. DNA recognition by the two biosensors is efficient and selective. Hybridization kinetic curves indicate that the biosensor designed with the thiol-labeled probe is more sensitive, and that the biosensor designed with the biotin-labeled probe has a shorter time response and a higher hybridization efficiency. PMID:25585927

  6. Thiol- and biotin-labeled probes for oligonucleotide quartz crystal microbalance biosensors of microalga alexandrium minutum.

    PubMed

    Lazerges, Mathieu; Perrot, Hubert; Rabehagasoa, Niriniony; Compère, Chantal

    2012-07-04

    Two quartz crystal microbalance oligonucleotide biosensors of a toxic microalga gene sequence (Alexandrium Minutum) have been designed. Grafting on a gold surface of 20-base thiol- or biotin-labeled probe, and selective hybridization with the complementary 20-base target, have been monitored in situ with a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance under controlled hydrodynamic conditions. The frequency of the set up is stable to within a few hertz, corresponding to the nanogram scale, for three hour experiments. DNA recognition by the two biosensors is efficient and selective. Hybridization kinetic curves indicate that the biosensor designed with the thiol-labeled probe is more sensitive, and that the biosensor designed with the biotin-labeled probe has a shorter time response and a higher hybridization efficiency.

  7. Analysis of an integrated optic micro racetrack resonator based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malathi, S.; Hegde, Gopalkrishna; Srinivas, T.; Roy, Ugra M.

    2014-06-01

    Silicon-On- Insulator (SOI) technology has huge potential in fabricating compact devices for various applications such as integrated optic waveguides, directional couplers, resonators etc. In this work, we present the analysis of a biosensor based on an integrated optic racetrack resonator, interrogated by a bus waveguide. The biomaterial is applied as a cladding layer. Here we analyze the coupling between the resonator and the bus waveguide, and its dependence on the bio layer. In traditional analysis, the effective refractive index and resonator total path length are the factors influencing the resonant wavelength. Our analysis shows that all parametric values decrease with increase in waveguide width and spacing. The inclusion of waveguide mode overlap and perturbation in coupled mode equation results in enhanced resonator sensitivity of an order of magnitude

  8. Multiplex fiber-optic biosensor using multiple particle plasmon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsing-Ying; Huang, Chen-Han; Liu, Yu-Chia; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Chau, Lai-Kwan

    2012-02-01

    Multiplex fiber-optic biosensor implemented by integrating multiple particle plasmon resonances (PPRs), molecular bioassays, and microfluidics is successfully demonstrated. The multiple PPRs are achieved by chemical immobilization of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gold nanorods (AuNRs) separately on two unclad portions of an optical fiber. The difference in morphology and nature of material of AgNPs and AuNRs are exploited to yield multiple plasmonic absorptions at 405 and 780 nm in the absorption spectrum measured from optical fiber by white light source illumination. Through the coaxial excitation of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with 405 and 800 nm wavelengths, the distinct PPRs are advantageous for real-time and simultaneous detection of multiple analyte-probe pairs as AgNPs and AuNRs are separately functionalized with specific bio-probes. Here, the multi-window fiber-optic particle plasmon resonance (FO-PPR) biosensor has been shown to be capable of simultaneously detecting anti-dinitrophenyl antibody (anti-DNP, MW = 220 kDa) via N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-6-aminohexanoic acid (DNP, MW = 297.27 Da) functionalized AgNPs and streptavidin (MW = 75 kDa) via N-(3-aminopropyl)biotinamide trifluoroacetate (biotin, MW = 414.44 Da) functionalized AuNRs. The multiplex sensing chip possesses several advantages, including rapid and parallel detection of multiple analytes on a single chip, minimized sample to sample variation, reduced amount of sensor chip, and reduced analyte volume, hence it is ideally suitable for high-throughput multiplex biochemical sensing applications.

  9. Label-Free Biosensor Imaging on Photonic Crystal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Yue; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    We review the development and application of nanostructured photonic crystal surfaces and a hyperspectral reflectance imaging detection instrument which, when used together, represent a new form of optical microscopy that enables label-free, quantitative, and kinetic monitoring of biomaterial interaction with substrate surfaces. Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscopy (PCEM) has been used to detect broad classes of materials which include dielectric nanoparticles, metal plasmonic nanoparticles, biomolecular layers, and live cells. Because PCEM does not require cytotoxic stains or photobleachable fluorescent dyes, it is especially useful for monitoring the long-term interactions of cells with extracellular matrix surfaces. PCEM is only sensitive to the attachment of cell components within ~200 nm of the photonic crystal surface, which may correspond to the region of most interest for adhesion processes that involve stem cell differentiation, chemotaxis, and metastasis. PCEM has also demonstrated sufficient sensitivity for sensing nanoparticle contrast agents that are roughly the same size as protein molecules, which may enable applications in “digital” diagnostics with single molecule sensing resolution. We will review PCEM’s development history, operating principles, nanostructure design, and imaging modalities that enable tracking of optical scatterers, emitters, absorbers, and centers of dielectric permittivity. PMID:26343684

  10. Label-Free Biosensor Imaging on Photonic Crystal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Yue; Cunningham, Brian T

    2015-08-28

    We review the development and application of nanostructured photonic crystal surfaces and a hyperspectral reflectance imaging detection instrument which, when used together, represent a new form of optical microscopy that enables label-free, quantitative, and kinetic monitoring of biomaterial interaction with substrate surfaces. Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscopy (PCEM) has been used to detect broad classes of materials which include dielectric nanoparticles, metal plasmonic nanoparticles, biomolecular layers, and live cells. Because PCEM does not require cytotoxic stains or photobleachable fluorescent dyes, it is especially useful for monitoring the long-term interactions of cells with extracellular matrix surfaces. PCEM is only sensitive to the attachment of cell components within ~200 nm of the photonic crystal surface, which may correspond to the region of most interest for adhesion processes that involve stem cell differentiation, chemotaxis, and metastasis. PCEM has also demonstrated sufficient sensitivity for sensing nanoparticle contrast agents that are roughly the same size as protein molecules, which may enable applications in "digital" diagnostics with single molecule sensing resolution. We will review PCEM's development history, operating principles, nanostructure design, and imaging modalities that enable tracking of optical scatterers, emitters, absorbers, and centers of dielectric permittivity.

  11. A biosensor based on photonic crystal surface waves with an independent registration of the liquid refractive index.

    PubMed

    Konopsky, Valery N; Alieva, Elena V

    2010-01-15

    A high-precision optical biosensor technique capable of independently determining the refractive index (RI) of liquids is presented. Photonic crystal surface waves were used to detect surface binding events, while an independent registration of the critical angle was used for accurate determination of the liquid RI. This technique was tested using binding of biotin molecules to a streptavidin monolayer at low and high biotin concentrations. The attained baseline noise is 5x10(-13) m/Hz(1/2) for adlayer thickness changes and 9x10(-8) RIU/Hz(1/2) for RI changes. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Integrated planar optical waveguide interferometer biosensors: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Peter; Kehl, Florian; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Stamm, Christoph; Bier, Frank F

    2014-08-15

    Integrated planar optical waveguide interferometer biosensors are advantageous combinations of evanescent field sensing and optical phase difference measurement methods. By probing the near surface region of a sensor area with the evanescent field, any change of the refractive index of the probed volume induces a phase shift of the guided mode compared to a reference field typically of a mode propagating through the reference arm of the same waveguide structure. The interfering fields of these modes produce an interference signal detected at the sensor׳s output, whose alteration is proportional to the refractive index change. This signal can be recorded, processed and related to e.g. the concentration of an analyte in the solution of interest. Although this sensing principle is relatively simple, studies about integrated planar optical waveguide interferometer biosensors can mostly be found in the literature covering the past twenty years. During these two decades, several members of this sensor family have been introduced, which have remarkably advantageous properties. These entail label-free and non-destructive detection, outstandingly good sensitivity and detection limit, cost-effective and simple production, ability of multiplexing and miniaturization. Furthermore, these properties lead to low reagent consumption, short analysis time and open prospects for point-of-care applications. The present review collects the most relevant developments of the past twenty years categorizing them into two main groups, such as common- and double path waveguide interferometers. In addition, it tries to maintain the historical order as it is possible and it compares the diverse sensor designs in order to reveal not only the development of this field in time, but to contrast the advantages and disadvantages of the different approaches and sensor families, as well.

  13. Label-free liquid crystal biosensor for L-histidine: A DNAzyme-based platform for small molecule assay.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shuzhen; Ding, Huazhi; Wu, Yan; Wu, Zhaoyang; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2016-05-15

    We have developed a novel DNAzyme-based liquid crystal (LC) biosensor with high sensitivity for L-histidine, which is based on L-histidine-mediated formation of DNA duplexes by cleaving DNAzyme using L-histidine, resulting in a remarkable optical signal. Firstly, an optimal amount of capture probe is bound to the glass slide, which changes the surface topology as little as possible and shows a zero-background for the sensing system. When the DNAzyme molecule is cleaved by the target, L-histidine, a partial substrate strand is produced, which in turn can hybridize with the capture probe, forming a DNA duplex. The DNA duplexes induce LC molecules to undergo a homeotropic-to-tiled transition, obtaining a remarkable optical signal. The results show that the DNAzyme-based LC biosensor is highly sensitive to L-histidine with a detection limit of 50 nM. Compared with previously reported multi-step amplified methods, this newly designed assay system for L-histidine has no amplified procedures with comparable sensitivity. This method is an unprecedented example of DNAzyme-based LC biosensor for small molecules, which has potential to offer a DNAzyme-based LC model used in various targets.

  14. Research on optical biosensor with up-converting phosphor marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongkai; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Jing; Huang, Lihua; Yan, Zhongqiang; Huang, Huijie; Yang, Ruifu; Liu, Lei; Ren, Bingqiang; Wang, Xiangzhao

    2006-08-01

    An optical biosensor with up-converting phosphor (UCP) marker is developed for the sensitive rapid immunoassay to the specific biomolecule. UCP can emit visible light when excited by infrared light. Through detecting and analyzing the content of UCP particles on the test strip after immunoreaction, the concentration of target analyte in the sample can be obtained. The detection sensitivity to plague IgG is better than 5 ng/ml; to plague FI-Ab is better than 100 pg/ml; to plague Yersinia pestis cell is better than 3*10^(4) CFU/ml. Good linear response characteristics and an excellent correlation (R2>=0.95) have been verified by quantitative detection results. In the practical application, detection results to 167 analytic samples have an excellent consistency with those obtained by reverse hemagglutination test. The up-converting phosphor technology (UPT) based biosensor has stable, reliable, and sensitive performances. It can meet the need of various bioassay applications.

  15. Liquid-Crystal Optical Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1989-01-01

    Optical correlator uses commercially-available liquid-crystal television (LCTV) screen as spatial light modulator. Correlations with this device done at video frame rates, making such operations as bar-code recognition possible at reasonable cost. With further development, such correlator useful in automation, robotic vision, and optical image processing.

  16. Detecting staphylococcal enterotoxin B using an automated fiber optic biosensor.

    PubMed

    King, K D; Anderson, G P; Bullock, K E; Regina, M J; Saaski, E W; Ligler, F S

    1999-02-01

    The Man-portable Analyte Identification System (MANTIS), the first fully automated, self-contained, portable fiber optic biosensor, was utilized for the detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB), a bacterial toxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus that commonly causes food poisoning. Because of its remarkable toxicity and stability, SEB is considered a prime threat as a biological weapon of mass destruction. The assay for SEB was used to evaluate the MANTIS' ability to function in the presence of various environmental interferents. The sensor could reliably detect SEB spiked into liquid samples containing a variety of smoke particles. However, substantial interference occurred when SEB was mixed into matrices capable of adsorbing SEB, such as 1% solutions of clay, topsoil, or pollen. Of equal importance, none of the interferents produced false positives in the MANTIS. The MANTIS demonstrated the capability to perform simultaneous immunoassays rapidly in the field with little or no user intervention.

  17. Recent Advances in Optical Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring and Early Warning

    PubMed Central

    Long, Feng; Zhu, Anna; Shi, Hanchang

    2013-01-01

    The growing number of pollutants requires the development of innovative analytical devices that are precise, sensitive, specific, rapid, and easy-to-use to meet the increasing demand for legislative actions on environmental pollution control and early warning. Optical biosensors, as a powerful alternative to conventional analytical techniques, enable the highly sensitive, real-time, and high-frequency monitoring of pollutants without extensive sample preparation. This article reviews important advances in functional biorecognition materials (e.g., enzymes, aptamers, DNAzymes, antibodies and whole cells) that facilitate the increasing application of optical biosensors. This work further examines the significant improvements in optical biosensor instrumentation and their environmental applications. Innovative developments of optical biosensors for environmental pollution control and early warning are also discussed. PMID:24132229

  18. Electro-optically modulated localized surface plasmon resonance biosensors with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tzyy-Jiann; Lin, Wen-Shao

    2006-10-01

    An integrated-optic biosensor based on electro-optically modulated localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is demonstrated. This biosensor utilizes the electro-optic effect to modulate the wave vector of incident lightwave used to excite localized surface plasmons. Electro-optically modulated LSPR results in the analyte-dependent variation of output intensity with the applied voltage. The linear regression slope of this relation is used to determine the analyte concentration. On the sensing region of LSPR biosensor, human serum albumin is self-assembled on gold nanoparticles in order to sense the beta-blocker concentration. The use of the presented biosensor has the features of no intensity drift problem, no absorption diversity problem in different sample media, and noise reduction by linear regression analysis.

  19. Highly sensitive color-indicating and quantitative biosensor based on cholesteric liquid crystal

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Sung, Yu-Chien; Lee, Mon-Juan; Lee, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based biosensors employ highly sensitive interfaces between the alignment layers and LCs to detect biomolecules and their interactions. Present techniques based on optical texture observation of the homeotropic-to-planar response of nematic LCs are limited by their quantitative reproducibility of results, indicating that both the accuracy and reliability of LC-based detection require further improvements. Here we show that cholesteric LC (CLC) can be used as a novel sensing element in the design of an alternative LC-based biosensing device. The chirality of the vertically anchored (VA) CLC was exploited in the detection of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a protein standard commonly used in protein quantitation. The color appearance and the corresponding transmission spectrum of the cholesteric phase changed with the concentration of BSA, by which a detection limit of 1 fg/ml was observed. The optical response of the VA CLC interface offers a simple and inexpensive platform for highly sensitive and naked-eye color-indicating detection of biomolecules, and, thus, may facilitate the development of point-of-care devices for the detection of disease-related biomarkers. PMID:26713215

  20. Biosensors for hepatitis B virus detection

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chun-Yan; Fu, Wei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    A biosensor is an analytical device used for the detection of analytes, which combines a biological component with a physicochemical detector. Recently, an increasing number of biosensors have been used in clinical research, for example, the blood glucose biosensor. This review focuses on the current state of biosensor research with respect to efficient, specific and rapid detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV). The biosensors developed based on different techniques, including optical methods (e.g., surface plasmon resonance), acoustic wave technologies (e.g., quartz crystal microbalance), electrochemistry (amperometry, voltammetry and impedance) and novel nanotechnology, are also discussed. PMID:25253948

  1. Multiplexed label-free optical biosensor for medical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bottazzi, Barbara; Fornasari, Lucia; Frangolho, Ana; Giudicatti, Silvia; Mantovani, Alberto; Marabelli, Franco; Marchesini, Gerardo; Pellacani, Paola; Therisod, Rita; Valsesia, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a new multiplexed label-free biosensor. The detection technology is based on nanostructured gold-polymer surfaces. These surfaces support surface plasmon resonance modes that can be probed by a miniaturized optical setup. The optical characterization of the sensing chip shows the sensitivity and the limit-of-detection to refractive index changes. Moreover, by studying the progressive adhesion of molecular monolayers of polyelectrolytes, the decay of the plasmonic mode electric field above the surface has been reconstructed. A multiplexed label-free biosensing device is then described and characterized in terms of sensitivity, lateral resolution, and sensitivity to a model biological assay. The sensitivity in imaging mode of the device is of the order of 10-6 refractive index units, while the measured lateral resolution is 6.25 μm within a field of view of several tenths of mm2, making the instrument unique in terms of multiplexing capability. Finally, the proof-of-concept application of the technology as a point-of-care diagnostic tool for an inflammatory marker is demonstrated.

  2. Multiplexed label-free optical biosensor for medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottazzi, Barbara; Fornasari, Lucia; Frangolho, Ana; Giudicatti, Silvia; Mantovani, Alberto; Marabelli, Franco; Marchesini, Gerardo; Pellacani, Paola; Therisod, Rita; Valsesia, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a new multiplexed label-free biosensor. The detection technology is based on nanostructured gold-polymer surfaces. These surfaces support surface plasmon resonance modes that can be probed by a miniaturized optical setup. The optical characterization of the sensing chip shows the sensitivity and the limit-of-detection to refractive index changes. Moreover, by studying the progressive adhesion of molecular monolayers of polyelectrolytes, the decay of the plasmonic mode electric field above the surface has been reconstructed. A multiplexed label-free biosensing device is then described and characterized in terms of sensitivity, lateral resolution, and sensitivity to a model biological assay. The sensitivity in imaging mode of the device is of the order of 10-6 refractive index units, while the measured lateral resolution is 6.25 μm within a field of view of several tenths of mm, making the instrument unique in terms of multiplexing capability. Finally, the proof-of-concept application of the technology as a point-of-care diagnostic tool for an inflammatory marker is demonstrated.

  3. Optical tweezers on biaxial crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Maksimyak, Andrew P.; Maksimyak, Peter P.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we propose optical tweezers based on a biaxial crystal. To control the movement of opaque particles, we use the shift polarization interferometer. The results of experimental study of laser tweezers are shown. We demonstrates movement of a microparticle of toner using singular-optical trap, rotate a particle due to orbital momentum, conversion of two traps when changing the plane of polarizer transmission and converging of two traps.

  4. Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Nanobalance (EQCN) Based Biosensor for Sensitive Detection of Antibiotic Residues in Milk.

    PubMed

    Bhand, Sunil; Mishra, Geetesh K

    2017-01-01

    An electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance (EQCN), which provides real-time analysis of dynamic surface events, is a valuable tool for analyzing biomolecular interactions. EQCN biosensors are based on mass-sensitive measurements that can detect small mass changes caused by chemical binding to small piezoelectric crystals. Among the various biosensors, the piezoelectric biosensor is considered one of the most sensitive analytical techniques, capable of detecting antigens at picogram levels. EQCN is an effective monitoring technique for regulation of the antibiotics below the maximum residual limit (MRL). The analysis of antibiotic residues requires high sensitivity, rapidity, reliability and cost effectiveness. For analytical purposes the general approach is to take advantage of the piezoelectric effect by immobilizing a biosensing layer on top of the piezoelectric crystal. The sensing layer usually comprises a biological material such as an antibody, enzymes, or aptamers having high specificity and selectivity for the target molecule to be detected. The biosensing layer is usually functionalized using surface chemistry modifications. When these bio-functionalized quartz crystals are exposed to a particular substance of interest (e.g., a substrate, inhibitor, antigen or protein), binding interaction occurs. This causes a frequency or mass change that can be used to determine the amount of material interacted or bound. EQCN biosensors can easily be automated by using a flow injection analysis (FIA) setup coupled through automated pumps and injection valves. Such FIA-EQCN biosensors have great potential for the detection of different analytes such as antibiotic residues in various matrices such as water, waste water, and milk.

  5. Optically switchable liquid crystal photonic structures.

    PubMed

    Urbas, Augustine; Tondiglia, Vincent; Natarajan, Lalgudi; Sutherland, Richard; Yu, Haiping; Li, J-H; Bunning, Timothy

    2004-10-27

    Photo-optic materials offer the possibility of light controlled photonic devices, intelligent and environmentally adaptive optical materials. One strategy for creating these materials is the combination of structure formation through holographic photopolymerization and the variable optical properties of liquid crystals. Holographically patterned, polymer stabilized liquid crystals (HPSLCs) have proven to be useful optical materials. By incorporating photo-optic, azobenzene-derived liquid crystal blends into such material systems, we have generated practical photoresponsive optical materials.

  6. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-05-31

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter {approx}200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  7. Label-free detection of cardiac troponin I with a photonic crystal biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bailin; Morales, Andres W; Peterson, Ralph; Tang, Liang; Ye, Jing Yong

    2014-08-15

    A biosensor has been developed with a photonic crystal structure used in a total-internal-reflection (PC-TIR) configuration for label-free detection of a cardiac biomarker: Troponin I (cTnI). In contrast to a conventional optical microcavity that has a closed structure with its cavity layer sandwiched between two high-reflection surfaces, the PC-TIR configuration creates a unique open microcavity, which allows its cavity layer (sensing layer) to be easily functionalized and directly exposed to analyte molecules for bioassays. In this study, a PC-TIR sensor has been used for the label-free measurements of cardiac biomarkers by monitoring the changes in the resonant condition of the cavity due to biomolecular binding processes. Antibodies against cTnI are immobilized on the sensor surface for specific detection of cTnI with a wide range of concentrations. Detection limit of cTnI with a concentration as low as 0.1ngmL(-1) has been achieved.

  8. Photonic crystals as optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevi, P.; Krokhin, A. A.; Arriaga, J.

    1999-11-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have already found numerous applications associated with the photonic band gap. We point out that PCs could be also employed as custom-made optical components in the linear region well below the photonic gap. As an example, we discuss a birefringent PC lens that acts as a polarizing beam splitter. This idea is supported by a precise method of calculation of the optical constants of a transparent two-dimensional (2D) PC. Such a process of homogenization is performed for hexagonal arrays of polymer-based PCs and also for the mammalian cornea. Finally, 2D PCs are classified as optically uniaxial or biaxial.

  9. Planar Photonic Crystal Biosensor for Quantitative Label-Free Cell Attachment Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weili; Long, Kenneth D.; Kurniawan, Jonas; Hung, Margaret; Yu, Hojeong; Harley, Brendan A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a planar-surface photonic crystal (PC) biosensor for quantitative, kinetic, label-free imaging of cell–surface interactions is demonstrated. The planar biosensor surface eliminates external stimuli to the cells caused by substrate topography to more accurately reflect smooth surface environment encountered by many cell types in vitro. Here, a fabrication approach that combines nanoreplica molding and a horizontal dipping process is used to planarize the surface of the PC biosensor. The planar PC biosensor maintains a high detection sensitivity that enables the monitoring of live cell–substrate interactions with spatial resolution sufficient for observing intracellular attachment strength gradients and the extensions of filopodia from the cell body. The evolution of cell morphology during the attachment and spreading process of 3T3 fibroblast cells is compared between planar and grating-structured PC biosensors. The planar surface effectively eliminates the directionally biased cellular attachment behaviors that are observed on the grating-structured surface. This work represents an important step forward in the development of label-free techniques for observing cellular processes without unintended external environmental modulation. PMID:26877910

  10. Active layer identification of photonic crystal waveguide biosensor chip for the detection of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painam, Balveer; Kaler, Rajinder S.; Kumar, Mukesh

    2016-07-01

    This work represents experimental and simulation analysis of photonic crystal waveguide (PCW)-based biosensor structures, which is used for detection of the Escherichia coli (E. coli) cell. A method is adopted for E. coli culture to measure length, diameter, and refractive index to finalize the structural design and to verify the suitability of PCW as a biosensor. This method is tested using DH5α strains of E. coli. The typical precisions of measurements are varied in ranges from 1.132 to 1.825 μm and from 0.447 to 0.66 μm for pathogen's length and diameter, respectively. The measured distribution of samples over length and diameter are in correlation with the measurements performed by scanning electron microscope. After obtaining average length and diameter of cylindrical shaped E. coli cell, we consider these values for simulation analysis of designed PCW biosensor. E. coli cell is trapped in the middle of the PCW biosensor having three different types of waveguides, i.e., gallium arsenide/silicon dioxide (GaAs/SiO2), silicon/silicon dioxide (Si/SiO2), or silicon nitride/silicon dioxide (Si3N4/SiO2) to observe the maximum resonance shift and sensitivity. It is observed from the simulation data analysis that GaAs/SiO2 is the preferred PCW biosensor for the identification of E. coli.

  11. An immuno-biosensor system based on quartz crystal microbalance for avian influenza virus detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shengping; Chen, Guoming; Zhou, Qi; Wei, Yunlong

    2007-12-01

    For the quick detection of Avian Influenza Virus (AIV), a biosensor based on Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) was fabricated according to the specific bonding principle between antibody and antigen. Staphylococcal Protein A (SPA) was extracted from Staphylococcus and purified. Then SPA was coated on the surface of QCM for immobilizing AIV monoclonal antibodies. The use of AIV monoclonal antibody could enhance the specificity of the immuno-biosensor. A multi-channel piezoelectricity detection system for the immuno-biosensor was developed. The system can work for the quick detection of AIV antigen in the case of the entirely aqueous status owe to one special oscillating circuit designed in this work. The optimum conditions of SPA coating and AIV monoclonal antibody immobilization were investigated utilizing the multi-channel detection system. The preliminary application of the immuno-biosensor system for detection of AIV was evaluated. Results indicate that the immuno-biosensor system can detect the AIV antigens with a linear range of 3-200ng/ml. The system can accomplish the detection of AIV antigens around 40 minutes.

  12. Investigation of Optical Properties of Biomolecular Materials for Developing a Novel Fiber Optic Biosensor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Harry Hong

    1995-01-01

    Recently considerable efforts have been devoted to the development of optical biosensors for applications such as environmental monitoring and biomedical technology. The research described in this thesis focuses on the development of a novel fiber optic biosensor system for pesticide detection based on enzyme catalyzed chemiluminescence. To optimize the collection efficiency, the tapering effect of a fiber tip has been studied in different cases of light source distribution utilizing fluorescence technique. Our results indicate that a continuously tapered tip with the largest tapering angle is the most efficient configuration when the light source is in a "thick" layer ({> }1 μm) while a combination tapered tip is the best configuration when the light source is either in a thin layer ({<}1 mu m) or is uniformly distributed around the tip. Three immobilization schemes have been investigated. The molecular self assembly approach takes advantage of the strong binding between streptavidin and biotin, with a biotinylated polymer as a support. The sol-gel process has the advantage of encapsulating biomolecules in a transparent glass. A photodynamic protein phycoerythrin has been successfully immobilized on a fiber surface by both techniques. The multilayer enzyme assembly we developed utilizes a bifunctional amino coupling agent to link between different layers of enzyme through chemical bonding. The method offers the flexibility of controlling the number of enzymes on a fiber surface. Multilayer of alkaline phosphatase have been characterized using various techniques including chemiluminescence, ellipsometry and surface plasma resonance. The results indicated that at least 3 layers of enzyme can be assembled on a fiber surface. With this approach, it is possible to immobilize different kinds of enzyme on a fiber surface for biosensors based on a multi-enzyme system. Based on the studies of tapered tip and immobilization schemes, a novel fiber optic biosensor system for

  13. Graphene oxide-based optical biosensor functionalized with peptides for explosive detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Diming; Lu, Yanli; Yao, Yao; Li, Shuang; Liu, Qingjun

    2015-06-15

    A label-free optical biosensor was constructed with biofunctionalized graphene oxide (GO) for specific detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). By chemically binding TNT-specific peptides with GO, the biosensor gained unique optoelectronic properties and high biological sensitivity, with transducing bimolecular bonding into optical signals. Through UV absorption detection, increasing absorbance responses could be observed in presence of TNT at different concentrations, as low as 4.40×10(-9) mM, and showed dose-dependence and stable behavior. Specific responses of the biosensor were verified with the corporation of 2,6-dinitrotoluene (DNT), which had similar molecular structure to TNT. Thus, with high sensitivity and selectivity, the biosensor provided a convenient approach for detection of explosives as miniaturizing and integrating devices.

  14. Optical biosensor for the determination of BOD in seawater.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yaqi; Xiao, Lai-Long; Zhao, Li; Chen, Xi; Wang, Xiaoru; Wong, Kwok-Yin

    2006-08-15

    An automatic sensing system was developed using an optical BOD sensing film. The sensing film consists of an organically modified silicate (ORMOSIL) film embedded with an oxygen-sensitive Ru complex. A multi-microorganisms immobilization method was developed for the BOD sensing film preparation. Three different kinds of microorganisms, Bacillus licheniformis, Dietzia maris and Marinobacter marinus from seawater, were immobilized on a polyvinyl alcohol ORMOSILs. After preconditioning, the BOD biosensor could steadily perform well up to 10 months. The linear fluctuant coefficients (R(2)) in the range of 0.3-40mgL(-1) was 0.985 when a glucose/glutamate BOD standard was applied. The reproducible response for the BOD sensing film could be obtained within +/-2.3% of the mean value in a series of 10 samples in 5.0mgL(-1) BOD standard GGA solution. The effects of temperature, pH and sodium chloride concentration on the two microbial films were studied as well. The BOD sensing system was tested and applied for the BOD determination of seawater.

  15. Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Pospíšilová, Marie; Kuncová, Gabriela; Trögl, Josef

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS) and biosensors (FOBS). Fiber optic sensor (FOS) systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF) to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) (180 nm) up to middle infrared (IR) (10 µm) and modulation of guided light by the parameters of the surrounding environment of the OF core. The introduction of OF in the sensor systems has brought advantages such as measurement in flammable and explosive environments, immunity to electrical noises, miniaturization, geometrical flexibility, measurement of small sample volumes, remote sensing in inaccessible sites or harsh environments and multi-sensing. The review comprises briefly the theory of OF elaborated for sensors, techniques of fabrications and analytical results reached with fiber-optic chemical and biological sensors. PMID:26437407

  16. Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors.

    PubMed

    Pospíšilová, Marie; Kuncová, Gabriela; Trögl, Josef

    2015-09-30

    This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS) and biosensors (FOBS). Fiber optic sensor (FOS) systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF) to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) (180 nm) up to middle infrared (IR) (10 μm) and modulation of guided light by the parameters of the surrounding environment of the OF core. The introduction of OF in the sensor systems has brought advantages such as measurement in flammable and explosive environments, immunity to electrical noises, miniaturization, geometrical flexibility, measurement of small sample volumes, remote sensing in inaccessible sites or harsh environments and multi-sensing. The review comprises briefly the theory of OF elaborated for sensors, techniques of fabrications and analytical results reached with fiber-optic chemical and biological sensors.

  17. Polymer slab waveguides for the optical detection of nanoparticles in evanescent field based biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teigell Beneitez, Nuria; Missinne, Jeroen; Schleipen, Jean; Orsel, Joke; Prins, Menno W. J.; Van Steenberge, Geert

    2014-02-01

    We present a polymer optical waveguide integration technology for the detection of nanoparticles in an evanescent field based biosensor. In the proposed biosensor concept, super-paramagnetic nanoparticles are used as optical contrast labels. The nanoparticles capture target molecules from a sample fluid and bind to the sensor surface with biological specificity. The surface-bound nanoparticles are then detected using frustration of an evanescent field. In the current paper we elaborate on the polymer waveguides which are used to generate a well-defined optical field for nanoparticle detection.

  18. From optical MEMS to photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sukhan; Kim, Jideog; Lee, Hong-Seok; Moon, Il-Kwon; Won, JongHwa; Ku, Janam; Choi, Hyung; Shin, Hyungjae

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents the emergence of photonic crystals as significant optomechatronics components, following optical MEMS. It is predicted that, in the coming years, optical MEMS and photonic crystals may go through dynamic interactions leading to synergy as well as competition. First, we present the Structured Defect Photonic Crystal (SDPCTM) devised by the authors for providing the freedom of designing photonic bandgap structures, such that the application of photonic crystals be greatly extended. Then, we present the applications of optical MEMS and photonic crystals to displays and telecommunications. It is shown that many of the applications that optical MEMS can contribute to telecommunications and displays may be implemented by photonic crystals.

  19. Comparison of the efficiency control of mycotoxins by some optical immune biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slyshyk, N. F.; Starodub, N. F.

    2013-11-01

    It was compared the efficiency of patulin control at the application of such optical biosensors which were based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and nano-porous silicon (sNPS). In last case the intensity of the immune reaction was registered by measuring level of chemiluminescence (ChL) or photocurrent of nPS. The sensitivity of this mycotoxin determination by first type of immune biosensor was 0.05-10 mg/L Approximately the same sensitivity as well as the overall time analysis were demonstrated by the immune biosensor based on the nPS too. Nevertheless, the last type of biosensor was simpler in technical aspect and the cost of analysis was cheapest. That is why, it was recommend the nPS based immune biosensor for wide screening application and SPR one for some additional control or verification of preliminary obtained results. In this article a special attention was given to condition of sample preparation for analysis, in particular, micotoxin extraction from potao and some juices. Moreover, it was compared the efficiency of the above mentioned immune biosensors with such traditional approach of mycotoxin determination as the ELISA-method. In the result of investigation and discussion of obtained data it was concluded that both type of the immune biosensors are able to fulfill modern practice demand in respect sensitivity, rapidity, simplicity and cheapness of analysis.

  20. Optical Magnetometer Incorporating Photonic Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulikov, Igor; Florescu, Lucia

    2007-01-01

    According to a proposal, photonic crystals would be used to greatly increase the sensitivities of optical magnetometers that are already regarded as ultrasensitive. The proposal applies, more specifically, to a state-of-the-art type of quantum coherent magnetometer that exploits the electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) method for determining a small change in a magnetic field indirectly via measurement of the shift, induced by that change, in the hyperfine levels of resonant atoms exposed to the field.

  1. Thermo-optical characteristics of DKDP crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, E. A.; Vyatkin, A. G.; Starobor, A. V.; Palashov, O. V.

    2017-03-01

    This letter presents a theoretical and experimental investigation of thermally induced polarization distortions occurring in an optical element made of c-cut tetragonal crystals. Two material characteristics were defined for this class of crystals: the optical anisotropy parameter ξ and the thermo-optical constant Q. These were generalized with analogous characteristics of elastically isotropic cubic crystals. The experimental investigation of these characteristics for popular tetragonal deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) crystal was carried out.

  2. Optical biosensors based on four different surface plasmon resonance modes: sensitivity comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Fan-Ching; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2004-06-01

    Current surface plasmon resonance (SPR) modes based on the attenuated total reflection (ATR) method can broadly be categorized as: conventional SPR, long-range SPR (LRSPR), coupled plasmon-waveguide resonance (CPWR), and waveguide-coupled SPR (WCSPR). Although the features of optical biosensors are dependent upon their particular SPR mode, a common requirement for all biosensors utilized for biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA) is a high degree of sensitivity. The current paper presents a theoretical analysis and comparison of the sensitivity and resolution of these four types of SPR biosensors when employed in three of the most prevalent detection methods, namely angular interrogation, wavelength interrogation, and intensity measurement. This study develops a detailed understanding of the influences of various biosensor design parameters in order to enhance the sensitivity and detection limit capabilities of such devices.

  3. Fabrication and optimisation of optical biosensor using alcohol oxidase enzyme to evaluate detection of formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachim, A.; Sari, A. P.; Nurlely, Fauzia, V.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, a new and simple biosensor base on alcohol oxidase (AOX)-enzyme for detecting formaldehyde in aqueous solutions has been successfully fabricated. The alcohol oxidase (AOX) enzyme was immobilized on poly-n-butyl acrylic-co-N-acryloxysuccinimide (nBA-NAS) membrane containing chromoionophore. The chemical reaction between AOX and formaldehyde generates a colour change of chromoionophore detected by optical absorbance measured in UV Vis. This paper focuses on the concentration optimization of buffer phosphate solution, response time, the quantity of enzyme and the measurement of the detection range of biosensors. The result shows that the optimum concentration and pH of buffer phosphate solution is 0.05 M and pH 7, respectively. The optimum response time is 3 min, the optimum unit of enzyme for biosensor is 1 unit/sample and the detection range of biosensor is 0.264 mM with R2 = 0.9421.

  4. Optical Biomarker-based Biosensors for Cancer/Infectious Disease Medical Diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Gharatape, Alireza; Yari Khosroushahi, Ahmad

    2017-09-29

    Thousands of billions of dollars have been disbursed worldwide for the diagnosis and therapy of disease. Nanobioscience combined with sensing technology has facilitated the pathway to diagnosis by introducing a novel, highly sensitive and selective detection system known as the nanobiosensor to reduce the overall cost of treatment. Among the many types of biosensors, optical ones are more easily developed because of their low cost, rapid construction, small size, high performance, high sensitivity and selectivity, high signal-to-noise ratio, flexible geometry, and portability properties. This study reviews and discusses nanobiosensors and electrochemical biosensors with the main focus on colorimetric, fluorometric, luminometric, fiber optic, and surface plasmon resonance-based optical biosensors and an emphasis on their applications in medical diagnosis.

  5. A novel fiber optic biosensor for nitric oxide determination based on vicinal diaminobenzozcridine fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Liyun; Huang, Lanfen; Huang, Jun; Zhong, Yunming; Fan, Dian

    2010-04-01

    A novel fiber optic biosensor for the determination of nitric oxide based on vicinal diaminobenzozcridine (VDABA) fluorescent probe was designed and fabricated. The reaction conditions between VDABA and NO, which include concentration of VDABA, temperature and pH, were studied in-depth. The sensitivity of VDABA for NO detection under the optimum conditions and its optical properties were also investigated. The fluorescence responses were concentration-dependent and a good linear relationship (R2=0.9863) was observed over the range 1.8×10-6 to 9×10-6 mol/L NO, the regression equation was F = 3.8889[NO] (mol/L)+217.2. Besides, a complex sensitive film embedding VDABA in cellulose acetate (CA) was prepared, and a fiber optic NO biosensor was fabricated using this film. Then the change of fluorescence phase shift of this biosensor was studied preliminarily by means of the lock-in technology.

  6. Towards a subcutaneous optical biosensor based on thermally hydrocarbonised porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wing Yin; Sweetman, Martin J; Marzouk, Ezzat R; Fraser, Cara; Kuchel, Tim; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2016-01-01

    Advanced biosensors in future medicine hinge on the evolvement of biomaterials. Porous silicon (pSi), a generally biodegradable and biocompatible material that can be fabricated to include environment-responsive optical characteristics, is an excellent candidate for in vivo biosensors. However, the feasibility of using this material as a subcutaneously implanted optical biosensor has never been demonstrated. Here, we investigated the stability and biocompatibility of a thermally-hydrocarbonised (THC) pSi optical rugate filter, and demonstrated its optical functionality in vitro and in vivo. We first compared pSi films with different surface chemistries and observed that the material was cytotoxic despite the outstanding stability of the THC pSi films. We then showed that the cytotoxicity correlates with reactive oxygen species levels, which could be mitigated by pre-incubation of THC pSi (PITHC pSi). PITHC pSi facilitates normal cellular phenotypes and is biocompatible in vivo. Importantly, the material also possesses optical properties capable of responding to microenvironmental changes that are readable non-invasively in cell culture and subcutaneous settings. Collectively, we demonstrate, for the first time, that PITHC pSi rugate filters are both biocompatible and optically functional for lab-on-a-chip and subcutaneous biosensing scenarios. We believe that this study will deepen our understanding of cell-pSi interactions and foster the development of implantable biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel image processing method study for a label-free optical biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenhao; Wei, Li'an; Yang, Rusong; Feng, Ying

    2015-10-01

    Optical biosensor is generally divided into labeled type and label-free type, the former mainly contains fluorescence labeled method and radioactive-labeled method, while fluorescence-labeled method is more mature in the application. The mainly image processing methods of fluorescent-labeled biosensor includes smooth filtering, artificial gridding and constant thresholding. Since some fluorescent molecules may influence the biological reaction, label-free methods have been the main developing direction of optical biosensors nowadays. The using of wider field of view and larger angle of incidence light path which could effectively improve the sensitivity of the label-free biosensor also brought more difficulties in image processing, comparing with the fluorescent-labeled biosensor. Otsu's method is widely applied in machine vision, etc, which choose the threshold to minimize the intraclass variance of the thresholded black and white pixels. It's capacity-constrained with the asymmetrical distribution of images as a global threshold segmentation. In order to solve the irregularity of light intensity on the transducer, we improved the algorithm. In this paper, we present a new image processing algorithm based on a reflectance modulation biosensor platform, which mainly comprises the design of sliding normalization algorithm for image rectification and utilizing the improved otsu's method for image segmentation, in order to implement automatic recognition of target areas. Finally we used adaptive gridding method extracting the target parameters for analysis. Those methods could improve the efficiency of image processing, reduce human intervention, enhance the reliability of experiments and laid the foundation for the realization of high throughput of label-free optical biosensors.

  8. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) as biosensor for the detecting of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Ngo, Vo Ke; Giang Nguyen, Dang; Phuong Uyen Nguyen, Hoang; Tran, Van Man; Nguyen, Thi Khoa My; Phat Huynh, Trong; Lam, Quang Vinh; Dat Huynh, Thanh; Truong, Thi Ngoc Lien

    2014-12-01

    Although Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a commensalism organism in the intestine of humans and warm-blooded animals, it can be toxic at higher density and causes diseases, especially the highly toxic E. coli O157:H7. In this paper a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor was developed for the detection of E. coli O157:H7 bacteria. The anti-E. coli O157:H7 antibodies were immobilized on a self-assembly monolayer (SAM) modified 5 MHz AT-cut quartz crystal resonator. The SAMs were activated with 16-mercaptopropanoic acid, in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and ester N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). The result of changing frequency due to the adsorption of E. coli O157:H7 was measured by the QCM biosensor system designed and fabricated by ICDREC-VNUHCM. This system gave good results in the range of 102-107 CFU mL-1 E. coli O157:H7. The time of bacteria E. coli O157:H7 detection in the sample was about 50 m. Besides, QCM biosensor from SAM method was comparable to protein A method-based piezoelectric immunosensor in terms of the amount of immobilized antibodies and detection sensitivity.

  9. Ultrasensitive detection of streptomycin using flow injection analysis-electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance (FIA-EQCN) biosensor.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Geetesh K; Sharma, Atul; Bhand, Sunil

    2015-05-15

    This work presents the development of an ultrasensitive biosensor for detection of streptomycin residues in milk samples using flow injection analysis-electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance (FIA-EQCN) technique. Monoclonal antibody specific to streptomycin was immobilized on to the thiol modified gold quartz crystal surface. A broad dynamic range (0.3-300 ng/mL) was obtained for streptomycin with a good linearity in the range 0.3-10 ng/mL for PBS and 0.3-50 ng/mL for milk. The correlation coefficient (R(2)) of the biosensor was found to be 0.994 and 0.997 for PBS and milk respectively. Excellent recoveries were obtained from the streptomycin spiked milk samples in the range 98-99.33%, which shows the applicability of the developed biosensor in milk. The reproducibility of the developed biosensor was found satisfactory with % RSD (n=5) 0.351. A good co-relation was observed between the streptomycin recoveries measured through the developed biosensor and the commercial ELISA kit. The analytical figures of merit of the developed biosensor confirm that the developed FIA-EQCN biosensor could be very effective for low-level detection of streptomycin in milk samples.

  10. Silicon on-chip bandpass filters for the multiplexing of high sensitivity photonic crystal microcavity biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Hai Zou, Yi; Yang, Chun-Ju; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Wang, Zheng; Tang, Naimei; Chen, Ray T.; Fan, Donglei

    2015-03-23

    A method for the dense integration of high sensitivity photonic crystal (PC) waveguide based biosensors is proposed and experimentally demonstrated on a silicon platform. By connecting an additional PC waveguide filter to a PC microcavity sensor in series, a transmission passband is created, containing the resonances of the PC microcavity for sensing purpose. With proper engineering of the passband, multiple high sensitivity PC microcavity sensors can be integrated into microarrays and be interrogated simultaneously between a single input and a single output port. The concept was demonstrated with a 2-channel L55 PC biosensor array containing PC waveguide filters. The experiment showed that the sensors on both channels can be monitored simultaneously from a single output spectrum. Less than 3 dB extra loss for the additional PC waveguide filter is observed.

  11. Silicon on-chip bandpass filters for the multiplexing of high sensitivity photonic crystal microcavity biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hai; Zou, Yi; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Yang, Chun-Ju; Wang, Zheng; Tang, Naimei; Fan, Donglei; Chen, Ray T.

    2015-03-01

    A method for the dense integration of high sensitivity photonic crystal (PC) waveguide based biosensors is proposed and experimentally demonstrated on a silicon platform. By connecting an additional PC waveguide filter to a PC microcavity sensor in series, a transmission passband is created, containing the resonances of the PC microcavity for sensing purpose. With proper engineering of the passband, multiple high sensitivity PC microcavity sensors can be integrated into microarrays and be interrogated simultaneously between a single input and a single output port. The concept was demonstrated with a 2-channel L55 PC biosensor array containing PC waveguide filters. The experiment showed that the sensors on both channels can be monitored simultaneously from a single output spectrum. Less than 3 dB extra loss for the additional PC waveguide filter is observed.

  12. Meeting current public health needs: optical biosensors for pathogen detection and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minghui; Sapsford, Kim E.; Sergeev, Nikolay; Sun, Steven; Rasooly, Avraham

    2009-02-01

    Pathogen detection and analysis is critical for medicine, food safety, agriculture, public health and biosecurity. Many current microbial detection approaches are based on century-old culturing methods which, while reliable, are slow, provide relatively little information about the pathogens and are not adaptable to high throughput operations. Optical biodetection represents a potential alternative. Most ELISA and chromatography systems are based on optical methods that are also used for analysis of molecular interactions, such as DNA hybridization and protein-protein interactions (e.g. microarrays or SPR biosensors). Various optical biosensor platforms have been developed that have many of the characteristics essential for modern pathogen molecular analysis including sensitivity, speed of analysis, multi-channel capability, relative simplicity and low cost. Here we provide several examples of the use of optical biosensor technology for pathogen detection and analysis including high throughput DNA microarray analysis, SPR-based rapid direct detection of bacterial toxins, CCD-based fluorescent activity analysis of microbial toxins and a simple ECL-based CCD detection system. However, while effective for molecular analysis, most of these technologies are not as sensitive as traditional culturing methods for detecting microorganisms. There is a need to combine optical biosensors with traditional methods to speed culture-based detection and to provide more information regarding the pathogens.

  13. An Evanescent Wave Fiber Optic Biosensor Based on Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence (MEF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Zheng; Hung, Min-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    Fiber-optic biosensors play a significant role in the development of biosensors because they can provide miniaturized and lowcost systems. Recently, there have been explosive developments in the Metal-Enhanced Fluorescence (MEF) technology to favorably modify the spectral properties and to alleviate photo-physical constraints. We report the development of core/shell nanoparticles with the silver core and silica shell for potential applications in fiber optic biosensor. The fluorescence intensity of the fluorescence probe doped core/shell nanoparticles is approximately 40-fold higher than that without core/shell nanoparticles doping. In addition, the enhanced emission of fluorescence intensity in different solvents changes from 1.2-to 100-fold as compared to the control sample.

  14. A quartz crystal biosensor for measurement in liquids.

    PubMed

    Kösslinger, C; Drost, S; Aberl, F; Wolf, H; Koch, S; Woias, P

    1992-01-01

    The detection of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibodies by means of synthetic HIV peptide immobilized on a piezoelectric quartz sensor is demonstrated. The measurement set-up consists of an oscillator circuit, a suitably modified AT-cut thickness-shear-mode quartz crystal with gold electrodes, which is housed in a special reaction vessel, and a computer-controlled frequency counter for the registration of the measured frequency values. The quartz crystal is adapted for a steady operation in liquids at a frequency of 20 MHz. In phosphate-buffered saline solution the oscillator reaches a stability of about 0.5 Hz within a few seconds, of about 2 Hz within 10 min and about 30 Hz within 1 h. The frequency shift due to the adsorption of various proteins to the uncoated sensor surface has been investigated. It can be shown that a stable adsorptive binding of proteins to an oscillating gold surface is feasible and can be used for the immobilization of a receptor layer (e.g. HIV peptide). Specific binding of the anti-HIV monoclonal antibody to the HIV peptide immobilized on the quartz sensor is demonstrated. Control experiments show, however, additional unspecific binding. According to the experiments, the Sauerbrey formula gives a sufficiently accurate value for the decrease of the resonant frequency due to adsorption or binding of macromolecular proteins on the quartz crystal surface.

  15. Performance of optical biosensor using alcohol oxidase enzyme for formaldehyde detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, A. P.; Rachim, A.; Nurlely, Fauzia, V.

    2017-07-01

    The recent issue in the world is the long exposure of formaldehyde which is can increase the risk of human health, therefore, that is very important to develop a device and method that can be optimized to detect the formaldehyde elements accurately, have a long lifetime and can be fabricated and produced in large quantities. A new and simple prepared optical biosensor for detection of formaldehyde in aqueous solutions using alcohol oxidase (AOX) enzyme was successfully fabricated. The poly-n-butyl acrylic-co-N-acryloxysuccinimide (nBA-NAS) membranes containing chromoionophore ETH5294 were used for immobilization of alcohol oxidase enzyme (AOX). Biosensor response was based on the colour change of chromoionophore as a result of enzymatic oxidation of formaldehyde and correlated with the detection concentration of formaldehyde. The performance of biosensor parameters were measured through the optical absorption value using UV-Vis spectrophotometer including the repeatability, reproducibility, selectivity and lifetime. The results showed that the prepared biosensor has good repeatability (RSD = 1.9 %) and good reproducibility (RSD = 2.1 %). The biosensor was selective formaldehyde with no disturbance by methanol, ethanol, and acetaldehyde, and also stable before 49 days and decrease by 41.77 % after 49 days.

  16. Design of a Fiber Optic Biosensor for Cholesterol Detection in Human Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunianto, M.; Permata, A. N.; Eka, D.; Ariningrum, D.; Wahyuningsih, S.; Marzuki, A.

    2017-02-01

    A fiber optic sensor is to detect the cholesterol content in blood serum-based biosensor using plastic optical fiber that has been designed. The fiber optic sensor designed with sensing area was a fiber optic grated by 5 scratches then given bending treatment by 5 cm. The first test was by UV-Vis spectrometer with linearity of 0.96. The second test was by light spectrometer with linearity in white LED of 0.94. Optical fiber sensors were made to work well on a range of blood serum concentration of 140 mg/dL to 250 mg/dL.

  17. Development of a penicillin biosensor using a single optical imaging fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, Brian G.; Walt, David R.

    1995-05-01

    A penicillin biosensor has been fabricated by photodepositing penicillin-sensitive polymer matrices and pH-sensitive polymer matrices on different regions of an optical imaging fiber. Penicillin is detected by coupling the enzymatic activity of penicillinase with the pH sensitivity of fluorescein. Penicillin concentration is correlated to the pH change in the microenvironment of the penicillin-sensitive matrix relative to the pH of the sample solution. This dual sensor removes the need to maintain a constant solution pH when measuring penicillin and should enhance greatly the application of biosensors.

  18. Optical fiber biosensor based on enzymatic coating matrix for catecholamines assessment in human urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Lurdes I. B.; Freitas, Ana C.; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A. P.; Pereira, M. E.; Duarte, Armando C.

    2010-09-01

    An optical fiber (OF) biosensor has been developed and applied for simultaneous determination of catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine) in human urine. The developed analytical device shows a high potential for catecholamines quantification with a detection limit of 2.1, 2.6 and 3.4 pg mL-1 for dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine, respectively. The analytical performance of the OF biosensor was found to be similar to that of the High Performance Liquid Chromatography - Electrochemical Detector (HPLC-ED) regarding catecholamines determination in samples of human urine.

  19. Multicomponent fiber optical biosensor for use in hemodialysis monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Cord; Schubert, Florian; Scheper, Thomas

    1994-07-01

    In clinical chemistry, sensors are needed that can detect small analyte concentrations in complex physiological media. During hemodialysis it is especially important to determine the urea concentration on line in order to monitor the completion of the purification. In this paper we describe a multicomponent fiberoptical biosensor for use in hemodialysis monitoring. Since no substrate flow is required in the sensor head, this technology is especially suited for monitoring in physiological solutions (no electrical contact to the patient is necessary).

  20. Biosensors technologies: acousto-optic tunable filter-based hyperspectral and polarization imagers for fluorescence and spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neelam

    2009-01-01

    Filters are a critical element in fluorescence detection used by many biosensors. One of the main limitations of the conventional optical filters used in biosensors is that they are limited to a single wavelength operation while numerous wavelengths are used in a typical fluorescence detection used for biosensing. Acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs) have the potential to overcome this limitation and provide both spectral and polarization information because they are wavelength agile and polarization sensitive. Such filters can be used to develop compact hyperspectral/polarization imagers. Such an imager can be readily used for real-time two-dimensional spectral imaging applications. These imagers are small, vibration-insensitive, robust, remotely controlled, and programmable and can be used in the spectral region from the ultraviolet (UV) to the near infrared (NIR). A minimal amount of data processing is required for AOTF imagers because they can acquire images at only select wavelengths of interest, and the selected wavelengths can be changed based on the sensing requirements. We use AOTFs made of KDP, MgF2, and TeO2, with a Si-based CCD camera to cover different spectral regions from the UV to the NIR. A liquid crystal variable retarder (LCVR) is used to obtain two orthogonally polarized images at each wavelength The user can write software to control the operation and image acquisition for an AOTF imager for a fully computer controlled operation.

  1. Design optimization of structural parameters for highly sensitive photonic crystal label-free biosensors.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jonghyun; Han, Yun-ah; Kim, Seok-min

    2013-03-07

    The effects of structural design parameters on the performance of nano-replicated photonic crystal (PC) label-free biosensors were examined by the analysis of simulated reflection spectra of PC structures. The grating pitch, duty, scaled grating height and scaled TiO2 layer thickness were selected as the design factors to optimize the PC structure. The peak wavelength value (PWV), full width at half maximum of the peak, figure of merit for the bulk and surface sensitivities, and surface/bulk sensitivity ratio were also selected as the responses to optimize the PC label-free biosensor performance. A parametric study showed that the grating pitch was the dominant factor for PWV, and that it had low interaction effects with other scaled design factors. Therefore, we can isolate the effect of grating pitch using scaled design factors. For the design of PC-label free biosensor, one should consider that: (1) the PWV can be measured by the reflection peak measurement instruments, (2) the grating pitch and duty can be manufactured using conventional lithography systems, and (3) the optimum design is less sensitive to the grating height and TiO2 layer thickness variations in the fabrication process. In this paper, we suggested a design guide for highly sensitive PC biosensor in which one select the grating pitch and duty based on the limitations of the lithography and measurement system, and conduct a multi objective optimization of the grating height and TiO2 layer thickness for maximizing performance and minimizing the influence of parameter variation. Through multi-objective optimization of a PC structure with a fixed grating height of 550 nm and a duty of 50%, we obtained a surface FOM of 66.18 RIU-1 and an S/B ratio of 34.8%, with a grating height of 117 nm and TiO2 height of 210 nm.

  2. Optical waveguide biosensor based on cascaded Mach-Zehnder interferometer and ring resonator with Vernier effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xianxin; Tang, Longhua; Song, Jinyan; Li, Mingyu; He, Jian-Jun

    2014-03-01

    Optical waveguide biosensors based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) have been extensively investigated owing to its various advantages and many potential applications. In this article, we demonstrate a novel highly sensitive biosensor based on cascaded Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) and ring resonator with the Vernier effect using wavelength interrogation. The experimental results show that the sensitivity reached 1,960 nm/RIU and 19,100 nm/RIU for sensors based on MZI alone and cascaded MZI-ring with Vernier effect, respectively. A biosensing application was also demonstrated by monitoring the interaction between goat and antigoat immunoglobulin G (IgG) pairs. This integrated high sensitivity biosensor has great potential for medical diagnostic applications.

  3. Rapid visual detection of eight meat species using optical thin-film biosensor chips.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yepei; Chen, Ying; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    Adulteration of meat products has become a very serious issue nowadays. To protect consumer rights, food labeling is required in many countries, and efficient and accurate detection methods are essential as well. This paper reports an innovative method for the rapid detection and identification of meat species based on a silicon-based optical thin-film biosensor chip with which color change results can be perceived by the naked eye without any expensive instruments. This biosensor system can simultaneously and specifically detect eight meat species, including deer, rabbit, duck, chicken, beef, horse, sheep, and pork. The absolute detection limit of this method was 0.5 pg of deer/beef DNA, and the practical detection limit was 0.001%. The biosensor detection can be completed within 30 min after PCR amplification. Therefore, this assay permits specific, sensitive, rapid, and simple detection of meat species in raw or cooked meat products.

  4. Na-doped optical Germanium bulk crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekar, G. S.; Singaevsky, A. F.

    2012-09-01

    In an effort to develop a material for infrared (IR) optics with improved parameters, bulk crystals of optical germanium doped with Na have been first grown and studied. Single-crystalline and coarse-crystalline Ge:Na boules of different shapes and dimensions, up to 10 kg by weight, have been grown. Sodium was incorporated into the Ge crystal during the crystal growing from the melt. Despite the fact that Na contamination in the source material was not strictly controlled, the density of Na in the grown crystals determined by the neutron activation analysis as well as by the glow discharge mass spectrometry did not exceed 1015 cm-3. Just this value may be supposed to be close to the solubility limit of Na incorporated in Ge in the course of bulk crystal growth. A first demonstration of donor behavior of Na in bulk Ge crystals is made by means of a thermoelectric type of testing. An interstitial location of Na impurity has been verified by experiments on donor drift in the dc electric field. The crystals are grown with free electron density in the range from 5ṡ1013 to 4ṡ1014 cm-3 which is optimal for using Ge crystals as an optical material for fabricating passive elements of the IR technique. A comparison between the properties of Ge:Na crystals and Ge crystals doped with Sb, a conventional impurity in optical germanium, grown under the same technological conditions and from the same intrinsic Ge as a source material, revealed a number of advantages of Ge:Na crystals; among them, the higher transparency in the IR region, smaller radiation scattering and higher regular optical transmission, lower dislocation density, more uniform distribution of electrical and optical characteristics over the crystal volume, the identity of optical parameters in the single-crystalline, and coarse-crystalline boules. No degradation of optical elements fabricated from Ge:Na crystals was detected in the course of their commercial application, starting from 1998.

  5. Single-walled carbon nanotubes as near-infrared optical biosensors for life sciences and biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Astha; Homayoun, Aida; Bannister, Christopher W; Yum, Kyungsuk

    2015-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that emit photostable near-infrared fluorescence have emerged as near-infrared optical biosensors for life sciences and biomedicine. Since the discovery of their near-infrared fluorescence, researchers have engineered single-walled carbon nanotubes to function as an optical biosensor that selectively modulates its fluorescence upon binding of target molecules. Here we review the recent advances in the single-walled carbon nanotube-based optical sensing technology for life sciences and biomedicine. We discuss the structure and optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, the mechanisms for molecular recognition and signal transduction in single-walled carbon nanotube complexes, and the recent development of various single-walled carbon nanotube-based optical biosensors. We also discuss the opportunities and challenges to translate this emerging technology into biomedical research and clinical use, including the biological safety of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The advances in single-walled carbon nanotube-based near-infrared optical sensing technology open up a new avenue for in vitro and in vivo biosensing with high sensitivity and high spatial resolution, beneficial for many areas of life sciences and biomedicine. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. pH-based fiber optic biosensors for use in clinical and biotechnological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Cord; Hitzmann, Bernd; Schubert, Florian; Scheper, Thomas

    1995-05-01

    The development of pH-based fiber optic biosensors and their uses in clinical and biotechnological applications are described. Based on a pH-sensitive optode, different biosensors for urea, penicillin, glucose and creatinine were developed. A multichannel modular fluorimeter was used to measure signals from up to three optodes simultaneously. The pH value and the buffer capacity are critical factors for biosensors based on pH probes and influence the biosensor signal. A flow injection analysis (FIA) system is used to eliminate the latter influences. With this integrated system, samples can be analyzed sequentially by the injection of a defined volume of each sample into a continuously flowing buffer stream that transports the samples to the sensors. The complex signal is transformed and analyzed by a computer system. Characteristic features of the FIA peak give information about the buffer capacity in the solution. With the help of intelligent computing (neural networks) it is possible to recognize these features and relate them to the respective buffer capacity to obtain more accurate values. Various applications of these biosensors are discussed. The pH optode is also used to monitor enzymatic reactions in non aqueous solvents. In this case the production of acetic acid can be detected on line.

  7. Label-free detection of glycated haemoglobin in human blood using silicon-based photonic crystal nanocavity biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olyaee, Saeed; Seifouri, Mahmood; Mohsenirad, Hamideh

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we describe a two-dimensional photonic crystal-based biosensor that consists of a waveguide and a nanocavity with high sensitivity. A new method is employed for increasing sensitivity of the biosensor. The simulation results show that biosensor is highly sensitive to the refractive index (RI) variations due to injected biomaterials, like glycated haemoglobin, into the sensing surface. The proposed biosensor is designed for the wavelength range of 1514.4-1896.3 nm. The sensitivity and the quality factor are calculated to be 3000 and 272.43 nm/RIU, respectively. The designed structure can detect a 0.002 change in the RI via resonant wavelength shift of 0.9 nm. The band diagram and transmission spectra are computed using plane wave expansion and finite difference time domain methods.

  8. Experimental demonstration of a Fresnel-reflection based optical fiber biosensor coated with polyelectrolyte multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenjie; Lang, Tingting

    2014-11-01

    We report that the end facet of an optical fiber can be coated with polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) of polycation (diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride) and polyanion (styrenesulfonate sodium salt) (PDDA+PSS)n (n is the number of bilayers), which functions effectively as a Fresnel-reflection based biosensor. The experimental setup includes a broadband light source, a 3dB coupler, and an optical spectrum analyzer. Biotin and streptavidin are deposited onto the multilayers-coated end facet sequentially. The light intensity change due to variation of external refractive index is monitored. When the concentrations of streptavidin changes from 0.1mg/ml to 1mg/ml, a linear relationship between the concentration of streptavidin and the reflected optical power at the wavelength of 1530nm is observed. The sensitivity increases from -1.6262×10-3 dB/ppm to -4.7852 ×10-3 dB/ppm, when the number of PEM increases from 1 to 2. Then we confirm the optimized numbers of bilayers of PEM are 5 through experiment. Selectivity and repeatability of our proposed optical fiber biosensor are verified. When bovine serum albumin (BSA) is added instead of streptavidin, the obtained spectra overlaps with that of biotin's. The final end facet coated with PEM and biotin-streptavidin can be cleaned using microwave vibration or aqua regia. The microwave vibration method is utilized due to security concern. The optical spectra changes back to the initial one of the optical fiber in air. In conclusion, a Fresnel-reflection based optical fiber biosensor with good sensitivity, selectivity and repeatability is proposed. This biosensor has the advantages of simple structure, low cost and reliability.

  9. Glucose biosensor based on GOx/HRP bienzyme at liquid-crystal/aqueous interface.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mashooq; Park, Soo-Young

    2015-11-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were co-immobilized to the polyacrylicacid block of a poly(acrylicacid-b-4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-undecylacrylate) (PAA-b-LCP) copolymer in water. PAA-b-LCP was strongly anchored by the LCP block in 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) which was contained in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) grid for glucose detection. The optimal conditions for the performance of the TEM grid glucose biosensor were studied in terms of the activity and stability of the immobilized enzymes. Glucose in water was detected by the 5CB changing from a planar to a homeotropic orientation, as observed through a polarized optical microscope. The TEM biosensor detected glucose concentrations at ⩾0.02 mM, with an optimal GOx/HRP molar ratio of 3/1. This glucose biosensor has characteristics of enzyme sensitivity and stability, reusability, the ease and selective glucose detection which may provide a new way of detecting glucose.

  10. Raman Tensor Formalism for Optically Anisotropic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kranert, Christian; Sturm, Chris; Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger; Grundmann, Marius

    2016-03-25

    We present a formalism for calculating the Raman scattering intensity dependent on the polarization configuration for optically anisotropic crystals. It can be applied to crystals of arbitrary orientation and crystal symmetry measured in normal incidence backscattering geometry. The classical Raman tensor formalism cannot be used for optically anisotropic materials due to birefringence causing the polarization within the crystal to be depth dependent. We show that in the limit of averaging over a sufficiently large scattering depth, the observed Raman intensities converge and can be described by an effective Raman tensor given here. Full agreement with experimental results for uniaxial and biaxial crystals is demonstrated.

  11. Quartz crystal microbalance biosensor for rapid detection of aerosolized microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farka, Zdenĕk.; Kovár, David; Skládal, Petr

    2015-05-01

    Biological warfare agents (BWAs) represent the current menace of the asymmetric war. The early detection of BWAs, especially in the form of bioaerosol, is a challenging task for governments all around the world. Label-free quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) immunosensor and electrochemical immunosensor were developed and tested for rapid detection of BWA surrogate (E. coli) in the form of bioaerosol. Two immobilization strategies for the attachment of antibody were tested; the gold sensor surface was activated by cysteamine and then antibody was covalently linked either using glutaraldehyde, or the reduced antibodies were attached via Sulfo-SMCC. A portable bioaerosol chamber was constructed and used for safe manipulation with aerosolized microorganisms. The dissemination was done using a piezoelectric humidifier, distribution of bioaerosol inside the chamber was ensured using three 12-cm fans. The whole system was controlled remotely using LAN network. The disseminated microbial cells were collected and preconcentrated using the wetted-wall cyclone SASS 2300, the analysis was done using the on-line linked immunosensors. The QCM immunosensor had limit of detection 1×104 CFU·L-1 of air with analysis time 16 min, the whole experiment including dissemination and sensor surface regeneration took 40 min. In case of blank (disseminated sterile buffer), no signal change was observed. The electrochemical immunosensor was able to detect 150 CFU·L-1 of air in 20 min; also in this case, no interferences were observed. Reference measurements were done using particle counter Met One 3400 and by cultivation method on agar plates. The sensors have proved to be applicable for rapid screening of microorganisms in air.

  12. Photonic crystal negative refractive optics.

    PubMed

    Baba, Toshihiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Asatsuma, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) are multi-dimensional periodic gratings, in which the light propagation is dominated by Bragg diffraction that appears to be refraction at the flat surfaces of the PC. The refraction angle from positive to negative, perfectly or only partially obeying Snell's law, can be tailored using photonic band theory. The negative refraction enables novel prism, collimation, and lens effects. Because PCs usually consist of two transparent media, these effects occur at absorption-free frequencies, affording significant design flexibility for free-space optics. The PC slab, a high-index membrane with a two-dimensional airhole array, must be carefully designed to avoid reflection and diffraction losses. Light focusing based on negative refraction forms a parallel image of a light source, facilitating optical couplers and condenser lenses for wavelength demultiplexing. A compact wavelength demultiplexer can be designed by combining the prism and lens effects. The collimation effect is obtainable not only inside but also outside of the PC by optimizing negative refractive condition.

  13. U-bent plastic optical fiber based plasmonic biosensor for nucleic acid detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowri, A.; Sai, V. V. R.

    2017-05-01

    This study presents the development of low cost, rapid and highly sensitive plasmonic sandwich DNA biosensor using U-bent plastic optical fiber (POF) probes with high evanescent wave absorbance sensitivity and gold nanoparticles (AuNP) as labels. Plastic optical fiber (PMMA core and fluorinated polymer as cladding) offer ease in machinability and handling due to which optimum U-bent geometry (with fiber and bend diameter of 0.5 and 1.5 mm respectively) for high sensitivity could be achieved. A sensitive fiber optic DNA biosensor is realized by (i) modifying the PMMA surface using ethylenediamine (EDA) in order to maximize the immobilization of capture oligonucleotides (ONs) and (ii) conjugating probe ONs to AuNP labels of optimum size ( 35 nm) with high extinction coefficient and optimal ON surface density. The sandwich hybridization assay on U-bent POF probes results in increase in optical absorbance through the probe with increase in target ON concentration due to the presence of increased number of AuNPs. The absorbance of light passing through the U-bent probe due to the presence of AuNP labels on its surface as result of sandwich DNA hybridization is measured using a halogen lamp and a fiber optic spectrometer. A picomolar limit of detection of target ON (0.2 pM or 1 pg/ml or 5 attomol in 25 μL) is achieved with this biosensing scheme, indicating its potential for the development of a highly sensitive DNA biosensor.

  14. Optical vortex arrays from smectic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Son, Baeksik; Kim, Sejeong; Kim, Yun Ho; Käläntär, K; Kim, Hwi-Min; Jeong, Hyeon-Su; Choi, Siyoung Q; Shin, Jonghwa; Jung, Hee-Tae; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate large-area, closely-packed optical vortex arrays using self-assembled defects in smectic liquid crystals. Self-assembled smectic liquid crystals in a three-dimensional torus structure are called focal conic domains. Each FCD, having a micro-scale feature size, produces an optical vortex with consistent topological charge of 2. The spiral profile in the interferometry confirms the formation of an optical vortex, which is predicted by Jones matrix calculations.

  15. Sensitivity of a label-free guided-mode resonant optical biosensor with different modes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Zhang, Dawei; Yang, Huiyin; Tao, Chunxian; Huang, Yuanshen; Zhuang, Songlin; Mei, Ting

    2012-01-01

    Sensitivity is a key factor in the performance of a sensor. To achieve maximum guided-mode resonant optical biosensor sensitivity, a comparison of biosensor sensitivity for Transverse Electric (TE) and Transverse Magnetic (TM) modes based on the distribution of electric fields is presented in this article. A label-free guided-mode resonant optical biosensor is designed using the quarter-wave anti-reflection method to reflect only a narrow band of wavelengths modulated by the adsorption of a biochemical material on the sensor surface at the reflected frequency. With the distribution of electric fields simulated according to the Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) theory, it is found that the full width at half maximum of the TM mode is (≈ 4 nm) narrower than that of the TE mode (≈ 20 nm), and the surface sensitivity of the TE mode incident light is three times that of the TM mode. It is proposed in this article that the light mode plays an important role in the sensitivity of guided-mode resonant biosensors.

  16. Low temperature and UV curable sol-gel coatings for long lasting optical fiber biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otaduy, D.; Villar, A.; Gomez-Herrero, E.; Goitandia, A. M.; Gorritxategi, E.; Quintana, I.

    2010-04-01

    The use of optical fibers as sensing element is increasing in clinical, pharmaceutical and industrial applications. Excellent light delivery, long interaction length, low cost and ability not only to excite the target molecules but also to capture the emitted light from the targets are the hallmarks of optical fiber as biosensors. In biosensors based on fiber optics the interaction with the analyte can occur within an element of the optical fiber. One of the techniques for this kind of biosensors is to remove the fiber optic cladding and substitute it for biological coatings that will interact with the parameter to sensorize. The deposition of these layers can be made by sol-gel technology. The sol-gel technology is being increasingly used mainly due to the high versatility to tailor their optical features. Incorporation of suitable chemical and biochemical sensing agents have allowed determining pH, gases, and biochemical species, among others. Nonetheless, the relatively high processing temperatures and short lifetime values mean severe drawbacks for a successful exploitation of sol-gel based coated optical fibres. With regard to the latter, herein we present the design, preparation and characterization of novel sol-gel coated optical fibres. Low temperature and UV curable coating formulations were optimized to achieve a good adhesion and optical performance. The UV photopolymerizable formulation was comprised by glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GLYMO), Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and an initiator. While the thermoset coating was prepared by using 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane, GLYMO, and TEOS as main reagents. Both curable sol-gel coated fibres were analysed by FTIR, SEM and optical characterization. Furthermore, in the present work a new technique for silica cladding removal has been developed by ultra-short pulses laser processing, getting good dimensional accuracy and surface integrity.

  17. A multichannel smartphone optical biosensor for high-throughput point-of-care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ju; Chang, Yu-Chung; Sun, Rongrong; Li, Lei

    2017-01-15

    Current reported smartphone spectrometers are only used to monitor or measure one sample at a time. For the first time, we demonstrate a multichannel smartphone spectrometer (MSS) as an optical biosensor that can simultaneously optical sense multiple samples. In this work, we developed a novel method to achieve the multichannel optical spectral sensing with nanometer resolution on a smartphone. A 3D printed cradle held the smartphone integrated with optical components. This optical sensor performed accurate and reliable spectral measurements by optical intensity changes at specific wavelength or optical spectral shifts. A custom smartphone multi-view App was developed to control the optical sensing parameters and to align each sample to the corresponding channel. The captured images were converted to the transmission spectra in the visible wavelength range from 400nm to 700nm with the high resolution of 0.2521nm per pixel. We validated the performance of this MSS via measuring the concentrations of protein and immunoassaying a type of human cancer biomarker. Compared to the standard laboratory instrument, the results sufficiently showed that this MSS can achieve the comparative analysis detection limits, accuracy and sensitivity. We envision that this multichannel smartphone optical biosensor will be useful in high-throughput point-of-care diagnostics with its minimizing size, light weight, low cost and data transmission function.

  18. Optical Fiber LSPR Biosensor Prepared by Gold Nanoparticle Assembly on Polyelectrolyte Multilayer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yunliang; Xu, Shuping; Zheng, Xianliang; Wang, Ye; Xu, Weiqing

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a novel method of constructing an optical fiber localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) biosensor. A gold nanoparticle (NP) assembled film as the sensing layer was built on the polyelectrolyte (PE) multilayer modified sidewall of an unclad optical fiber. By using a trilayer PE structure, we obtained a monodisperse gold NP assembled film. The preparation procedure for this LSPR sensor is simple and time saving. The optical fiber LSPR sensor has higher sensitivity and outstanding reproducibility. The higher anti-interference ability for response to an antibody makes it a promising method in application as a portable immuno-sensor. PMID:22319313

  19. Optical vortices from liquid crystal droplets.

    PubMed

    Brasselet, Etienne; Murazawa, Naoki; Misawa, Hiroaki; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2009-09-04

    We report on the generation of mono- and polychromatic optical phase singularities from micron-sized birefringent droplets. This is done experimentally by using liquid crystal droplets whose three dimensional architecture of the optical axis is controlled within the bulk by surfactant agents. Because of its microscopic size these optical vortex generators are optically trapped and manipulated at will, thus realizing a robust self-aligned micro-optical device for orbital angular momentum conversion. Experimental observations are supported by a simple model of optical spin-orbit coupling in uniaxial dielectrics that emphasizes the prominent role of the transverse optical anisotropy with respect to the beam propagation direction.

  20. Graphene coated fiber optic surface plasmon resonance biosensor for the DNA hybridization detection: Simulation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shushama, Kamrun Nahar; Rana, Md. Masud; Inum, Reefat; Hossain, Md. Biplob

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a graphene coated optical fiber surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor is presented for the detection of DNA Hybridization. For the proposed sensor, a four layer model (fiber core /metal /sensing layer /sample) where a sheet of graphene (biomolecular recognition elements (BRE)) acting as a sensing layer is coated around the gold film because graphene enhances the sensitivity of fiber optic SPR biosensor. Numerical analysis shows the variation of resonance wavelength and spectrum of transmitted power for mismatched DNA strands and for complementary DNA strands. For mismatched DNA strands variation is negligible whereas for complementary DNA strands is considerably countable. Proposed sensor successfully distinguishes hybridization and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) by observing the variation level of resonance wavelength and spectrum of transmitted power.

  1. Towards a biosensor based on anti resonant reflecting optical waveguide fabricated from porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Hiraoui, M; Haji, L; Guendouz, M; Lorrain, N; Moadhen, A; Oueslati, M

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that Anti Resonant Reflecting Optical Waveguide (ARROW) based on porous silicon (PS) material can be used as a transducer for the development of a new optical biosensor. Compared to a conventional biosensor waveguide based on evanescent waves, the ARROW structure is designed to allow a better overlap between the propagated optical field and the molecules infiltrated in the porous core layer and so to provide better molecular interactions sensitivity. The aim of this work is to investigate the operating mode of an optical biosensor using the ARROW structure. We reported here an extensive study where the antiresonance conditions were adjusted just before the grafting of the studied molecules for a given refractive index range. The interesting feature of the studied ARROW structure is that it is elaborated from the same material which is the porous silicon obtained via a single electrochemical anodization process. After oxidation and preparation of the inner surface of porous silicon by a chemical functionalization process, bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules, were attached essentially in the upper layer. Simulation study indicates that the proposed sensor works at the refractive index values ranging from 1.3560 to 1.3655. The experimental optical detection of the biomolecules was obtained through the modification of the propagated optical field and losses. The results indicated that the optical attenuation decreases after biomolecules attachment, corresponding to a refractive index change Δn(c) of the core. This reduction was of about 2 dB/cm and 3 dB/cm for Transverse Electric (TE) and Transverse Magnetic (TM) polarizations respectively. Moreover, at the detection step, the optical field was almost located inside the core layer. This result was in good agreement with the simulated near field profiles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical surface modifications for the development of silicon-based label-free integrated optical (IO) biosensors: a review.

    PubMed

    Bañuls, María-José; Puchades, Rosa; Maquieira, Ángel

    2013-05-13

    Increasing interest has been paid to label-free biosensors in recent years. Among them, refractive index (RI) optical biosensors enable high density and the chip-scale integration of optical components. This makes them more appealing to help develop lab-on-a-chip devices. Today, many RI integrated optical (IO) devices are made using silicon-based materials. A key issue in their development is the biofunctionalization of sensing surfaces because they provide a specific, sensitive response to the analyte of interest. This review critically discusses the biofunctionalization procedures, assay formats and characterization techniques employed in setting up IO biosensors. In addition, it provides the most relevant results obtained from using these devices for real sample biosensing. Finally, an overview of the most promising future developments in the fields of chemical surface modification and capture agent attachment for IO biosensors follows.

  3. Evaluation of optical excitation conditions for ruthenium complex for biosensor optodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieper, Sean; Zhong, Zhong; Lear, Kevin L.; Reardon, Ken

    2007-03-01

    Development of a fiber optic biosensor incorporating genetically engineered enzymes which catalyze chlorinated ethenes in an oxygen-consuming reaction for in situ monitoring of groundwater contaminants motivates optimization of optode excitation conditions. These conditions affect the sensitivity, signal-to-noise, and optode service life impacting the quality of the overall biosensor. Optodes are generally comprised of a fluorophore conjugated with a polymer as a substrate cross linked at the distal end of a fiber optic. We investigate the excitation conditions of tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) chloride (Ru(dpp)3) conjugated with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH) as an optode. A reported advantage of Ru(dpp)3 is that it has no emission spectral shift occurring under varying chemical and environmental conditions. Photostability degradation due to photobleaching of Ru(dpp)3 with PVOH as a substrate is explored by varying the optical irradiance of the fluorophore containing optode. Other issues relating to practical implementation of Ru(dpp)3 as oxygen sensitive biosensors will be discussed.

  4. On-site detection of explosives in groundwater with a fiber optic biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Van Bergen, S.K.; Bakaltcheva, I.B.; Lundgren, J.S.; Shriver-Lake, L.C.

    2000-02-15

    Two primary explosives involved in groundwater contamination, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), were detected on-site at low ppb levels with a semiautomated fiber optic biosensor. Validation of the Analyte 2000 for TNT and RDX detection was performed at two Superfund sites, Umatilla Army Depot and Naval Surface Weapons Center Crane. Samples from monitoring wells were split for analysis using the fiber optic biosensor on-site and using US EPA SW-846 Method 8330 (reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography) in an offsite laboratory. The Analyte 2000, a multifiber probe fluorimeter, was coupled to a fluidics unit for semiautomated operation. The fiber optic biosensor assay is based on a competitive fluorescent immunoassay performed on the silica core of a fiber probe. From these studies, the limit of detection was determined to be 5 {mu}g/L for both TNT and RDX. In addition to the field samples, extensive laboratory analyses were performed to determine cross-reactivity, matrix effects, and false positive/negative rates.

  5. Investigation of prothrombin time in human whole-blood samples with a quartz crystal biosensor.

    PubMed

    Müller, Lothar; Sinn, Stefan; Drechsel, Hartmut; Ziegler, Christiane; Wendel, Hans-Peter; Northoff, Hinnak; Gehring, Frank K

    2010-01-15

    Monitoring of blood coagulation and fibrinolysis is an important issue in treatment of patients with cardiovascular problems and in surgery when blood gets into contact with artificial surfaces. In this work a new method for measuring the coagulation time (prothrombin time, PT) of human whole-blood samples based on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor is presented. The 10 MHz sensors used in this work respond with a frequency shift to changes in viscosity during blood clot formation. For driving and for readout of the quartz, both a network analyzer and an oscillator circuit were utilized. The sensor surfaces were specifically coated with a thin polyethylene layer. We found that both frequency analysis methods are suitable to measure exact prothrombin times in a very good conformity with a mechanical coagulometer as a reference. The anticoagulant effect of heparin on the prothrombin time was exemplarily shown as well as the reverse effect of the heparin antagonist polybrene. The change of the viscoelastic properties during blood coagulation, reflected by the ratio of frequency and dissipation shifts, is discussed for different dilutions of the whole-blood samples. In conclusion, QCM is a distinguished biosensor technique to determine prothrombin time and to monitor heparin therapy in whole-blood samples. Due to the excellent potential of miniaturization and the availability of direct digital signals, the method is predestinated for incorporation and integration into other devices and is thus opening the field of application for inline coagulation diagnostic in extracorporeal blood circuits.

  6. A theophylline quartz crystal microbalance biosensor based on recognition of RNA aptamer and amplification of signal.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zong-Mu; Zhao, Guang-Chao

    2013-04-21

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor for theophylline was developed by recognition of RNA aptamer and gold nanoparticle amplification technique. Firstly, a designed small single-stranded RNA, RNA1, was immobilized onto the QCM electrode through a thiol linker. Then, the complementary stranded RNA2, which can combine with RNA1 to form a double-stranded RNA with a recognition unit of theophylline, could be self-assembled on the QCM electrode surface through a hybrid reaction in the presence of theophylline. The recognition process could cause a frequency change of QCM to give the signal related to theophylline. When RNA2 was tethered to gold nanoparticles, the signal could be amplified to further enhance the sensitivity of the designed sensor. Under the optimal conditions, the QCM-based biosensor showed excellent sensitivity (limit of detection, 8.2 nM) and specificity with a dissociation constant of Kd = 5.26 × 10(-7) M. The sensor can be used to quantitatively detect theophylline in serum, suggesting that it can be applied in complex biological samples.

  7. Nonlinear Optical Effects in Liquid Crystals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-10

    nematic MBBA is studied. The experiments involve the detection of optical radiation at second- harmonic frequency when aligned thin film liquid crystals...studied. The experiments involve the detection of optical radiation at second-harmonic frequency when aligned thin film liquid crystals sam- ples are...used in our experiments. The shematic circuit diagram is shown in Fig. 7. A resistance sensing bridge network is used with a thermistor sensor and a

  8. Photorefractive Tungsten Bronze Crystals for Optical Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-23

    Science Center SC71041.FR temperature, larger crystals crack on cooling through these phase transitions. Our recent work on SCNN indicates that the...addition of Ba 2 + reduces the cracking of crystals while maintaining reasonably high electro- optic coefficients. We plan to continue BSCNN growth in...are tetragonal at room temperature, cracking of large crystals during cool-down through the ferroelectric phase transition is generally not a problem

  9. Liquid crystal optical fibers for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, P. K.

    2013-09-01

    Propagation characteristics of optical fibers are greatly dependent on materials, which the guides are comprised of. Varieties of materials have been developed and investigated for their usage in fabricating optical fibers for specific applications. Within the context, a liquid crystal medium is both inhomogeneous and optically anisotropic, and fibers made of such mediums are greatly useful. Also, liquid crystals exhibit strong electro-optic behavior, which allows alternation in their optical properties under the influence of external electric fields. These features make liquid crystal fibers greatly important for optical applications. The present communication is aimed at providing a glimpse of the efficacy of liquid crystals and/or fibers made of liquid crystals, followed by the analytical investigation of wave propagation through such guides. The sustainment of modes is explored in these fibers under varying fiber dimensions, and the novelty is discussed. The case of tapered liquid crystal fibers is also briefly discussed highlighting the usefulness. Control on the dispersion characteristics of such fibers may be imposed by making the guide even more complex; the possibility of devising such options is also touched upon.

  10. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on large size square-lattice photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing, Pibin; Li, Zhongyang; Yuan, Sheng; Yao, Jianquan; Lu, Ying

    2016-04-01

    A surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on large size square-lattice photonic crystal fiber has been designed and simulated by finite element method. The square-lattice airholes are first coated with a calcium fluoride layer to provide mode confinement, then a nanoscale gold layer is deposited to excite the plasmon mode, and finally, the sample is infiltrated into the holes. The numerical results reveal that the resonance properties are easily affected by many parameters. The refractive index resolution of corresponding sensor can reach 4.3 × 10-6 RIU when the optimum parameters are set as the radius of curvature of the airhole r = 2 μm, the thickness of the core struts c = 200 nm, the auxiliary dielectric layer s = 1 μm, and the gold film d = 40 nm. In addition, the effective area and nonlinear coefficient are calculated.

  11. Optical detection of different phenolic compounds by means of a novel biosensor based on sol-gel immobilized laccase.

    PubMed

    Lepore, Maria; Portaccio, Marianna

    2016-12-16

    A novel sol-gel based biosensor exploiting the optical absorption properties of sol-gel immobilized laccase has been constructed in the attempt to increase enzyme specificity towards different phenolic substrates. Laccase from Trametes versicolor has been immobilized in optically transparent sol-gel matrices. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and data analysis based on a wavelet algorithm the successful enzyme immobilization has been evidenced. The changes in the optical absorption spectra of laccase reaction products at 425 nm, 375 nm and 400 nm have been used for hydroquinone, resorcinol and catechol concentration determination, respectively. Due to the slow response time of hydroquinone-laccase reaction, our optical biosensor has been tested with resorcinol and catechol. Linear ranges up to 1.4 mM and 0.2 mM, limit-of-detection (LOD) of 4.5 μM and 0.6 μΜ have been evidenced for resorcinol and catechol, respectively. Data for resorcinol concentration determination have been particularly interesting since no other biosensor device has been reported in literature. In comparison with other biosensors using laccase from the same native source our biosensor has been characterized by larger linear ranges, significant sensitivities and good LODs. To challenge our biosensor with real samples, tap water samples spiked with known amount of catechol and resorcinol have been employed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Intrinsic optical modulation mechanism in electro-optic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzarella, A.; Hinton, R. J.; Qadri, S. B.; Wu, Dong Ho

    2008-06-01

    An intrinsic mechanism of optical intensity modulation occurring in electro-optic devices such as field sensors and modulators under applied fields is described. The optical modulation results from interactions between internally generated Fizeau interference patterns and electro-optic effects within the nonlinear crystal. Our results indicate that when phase matched with the conventional polarimetric signal, the intrinsic modulation mechanism can nearly double device sensitivity.

  13. Tailoring the protein adsorption properties of whispering gallery mode optical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Soteropulos, Carol E; Zurick, Kevin M; Bernards, Matthew T; Hunt, Heather K

    2012-11-06

    Label-free biosensor technologies have the potential to revolutionize environmental monitoring, medical diagnostics, and food safety evaluation processes due to their unique combinations of high-sensitivity signal transducers and high-specificity recognition elements. This enables their ability to perform real-time detection of deleterious compounds at extremely low concentrations. However, to further improve the biosensors' performance in complex environments, such as wastewater, blood, and urine, it is necessary to minimize nonspecific binding, which in turn will increase their specificity, and decrease the rate of false positives. In the present work, we illustrate the potential of combining emerging high-sensitivity optical signal transducers, such as whispering gallery mode (WGM) microcavities, with covalently bound poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings of varying thickness, as an effective treatment for the prevention of nonspecific protein adsorption onto the biosensor surface. We monitor the sensitivity of the coated biosensor, and investigate the effect of PEG chain length on minimizing nonspecific adsorption via protein adsorption studies. Experimental results confirm not only that PEG-functionalization reduces nonspecific protein adsorption to the surface of the sensor by as much as a factor of 4 compared to an initialized control surface, but also that chain length significantly impacts the nonfouling character of the microcavity surface. Surprisingly, it is the short chain PEG surfaces that experience the best improvement in specificity, unlike many other systems where longer PEG chains are preferred. The combination of WGM microcavities with PEG coatings tuned specifically to the device will significantly improve the overall performance of biosensor platforms, and enable their wider application in complex, real-world monitoring scenarios.

  14. Single-crystal silicon optical fiber by direct laser crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Xiaoyu; Lei, Shiming; Yu, Shih -Ying; Cheng, Hiu Yan; Liu, Wenjun; Poilvert, Nicolas; Xiong, Yihuang; Dabo, Ismaila; Mohney, Suzanne E.; Badding, John V.; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-12-05

    Semiconductor core optical fibers with a silica cladding are of great interest in nonlinear photonics and optoelectronics applications. Laser crystallization has been recently demonstrated for crystallizing amorphous silicon fibers into crystalline form. Here we explore the underlying mechanism by which long single-crystal silicon fibers, which are novel platforms for silicon photonics, can be achieved by this process. Using finite element modeling, we construct a laser processing diagram that reveals a parameter space within which single crystals can be grown. Utilizing this diagram, we illustrate the creation of single-crystal silicon core fibers by laser crystallizing amorphous silicon deposited inside silica capillary fibers by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The single-crystal fibers, up to 5.1 mm long, have a very welldefined core/cladding interface and a chemically pure silicon core that leads to very low optical losses down to ~0.47-1dB/cm at the standard telecommunication wavelength (1550 nm). Furthermore, tt also exhibits a photosensitivity that is comparable to bulk silicon. Creating such laser processing diagrams can provide a general framework for developing single-crystal fibers in other materials of technological importance.

  15. Single-crystal silicon optical fiber by direct laser crystallization

    DOE PAGES

    Ji, Xiaoyu; Lei, Shiming; Yu, Shih -Ying; ...

    2016-12-05

    Semiconductor core optical fibers with a silica cladding are of great interest in nonlinear photonics and optoelectronics applications. Laser crystallization has been recently demonstrated for crystallizing amorphous silicon fibers into crystalline form. Here we explore the underlying mechanism by which long single-crystal silicon fibers, which are novel platforms for silicon photonics, can be achieved by this process. Using finite element modeling, we construct a laser processing diagram that reveals a parameter space within which single crystals can be grown. Utilizing this diagram, we illustrate the creation of single-crystal silicon core fibers by laser crystallizing amorphous silicon deposited inside silica capillarymore » fibers by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The single-crystal fibers, up to 5.1 mm long, have a very welldefined core/cladding interface and a chemically pure silicon core that leads to very low optical losses down to ~0.47-1dB/cm at the standard telecommunication wavelength (1550 nm). Furthermore, tt also exhibits a photosensitivity that is comparable to bulk silicon. Creating such laser processing diagrams can provide a general framework for developing single-crystal fibers in other materials of technological importance.« less

  16. Optical biosensors for probing at the cellular level: a review of recent progress and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Garcia, M N

    2009-02-01

    New approaches are required to understand the complex processes taking place in the smallest unit of life. Recent years have seen an increasing activity in the use of optical devices and techniques for the investigation of the properties of single cells and also populations of cells including cell to cell communication. This article reviews relevant optical technologies to date as well as new advances in biosensor development, and goes on to explore reported applications in detection of biotargets and cellular signalling pathways inside individual living cells.

  17. Conical refraction in magneto-optical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, E. V.; Merzlikin, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    The paper investigates the influence of an external magnetic field on light propagation through a magneto-optical biaxial, biaxial hyperbolic and anisotropic magnetophotonic crystal. It is demonstrated that the application of a magnetic field results in splitting and reconnection of an isofrequency near the self-intersection point and thus it leads to the disappearance of conical refraction in a crystal. This effect makes it possible to control light propagation by means of a magnetic field. In addition, it is demonstrated that the diffraction divergence of a beam is suppressed in a homogeneous magneto-optical biaxial crystal.

  18. Real-time determination of telomerase activity in cell extracts using an optical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Peter M; Matthes, Eckart; Scheller, Frieder W; Bienert, Michael; Lehmann, Christine; Ehrlich, Angelika; Bier, Frank F

    2002-10-01

    A biosensoric approach has been developed to determine the activity of telomerase in tumor cell lysates. An optical sensor, the grating coupler, was used to monitor the association and dissociation of unlabeled compounds on the sensor surface in real time, by virtue of an evanescent field. An oligonucleotide was immobilized on the surface of the optical biosensor and linked with two other oligonucleotides by complementary sequences in an overlapping manner. The 3'-end of the last one carried the sequence of the telomeric substrate (TS) primer used for elongation by telomerase in the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. This primer sequence was phosphorothioate (PS)-modified, which is known to strongly increase the affinity to the primer binding site of telomerase protein and consequently the velocity of the telomerase reaction. We show that the PS primer binds to the modified biosensor and is elongated effectively by the telomerase from HL-60 cell lysates. A synthesis rate of 1 nucleotide/min was determined. The inhibitory effect of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) was shown by using immobilized TS. The velocity of the telomerase reaction was slowed down and the signal intensity was below the signal-to-noise ratio. Most nucleic acid detection systems use amplification steps such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to increase the amount of the probe. Since telomerase is a polymerase itself amplification of DNA by PCR is not required. Furthermore, no purification steps were required since all measurements were performed with crude cell extract.

  19. Detection of Staphylococcus epidermidis by a Quartz Crystal Microbalance Nucleic Acid Biosensor Array Using Au Nanoparticle Signal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Han; Wang, Feng; Huang, Qing; Huang, Junfu; Chen, Ming; Wang, Jue; Yao, Chunyan; Chen, Qinghai; Cai, Guoru; Fu, Weiling

    2008-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a critical pathogen of nosocomial blood infections, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. A piezoelectric quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) nucleic acid biosensor array using Au nanoparticle signal amplification was developed to rapidly detect S. epidermidis in clinical samples. The synthesized thiolated probes specific targeting S. epidermidis 16S rRNA gene were immobilized on the surface of QCM nucleic acid biosensor arrays. Hybridization was induced by exposing the immobilized probes to the PCR amplified fragments of S. epidermidis, resulting in a mass change and a consequent frequency shift of the QCM biosensor. To further enhance frequency shift results from above described hybridizations, streptavidin coated Au nanoparticles were conjugated to the PCR amplified fragments. The results showed that the lowest detection limit of current QCM system was 1.3×103 CFU/mL. A linear correlation was found when the concentration of S. epidermidis varied from 1.3×103 to 1.3×107 CFU/mL. In addition, 55 clinical samples were detected with both current QCM biosensor system and conventional clinical microbiological method, and the sensitivity and specificity of current QCM biosensor system were 97.14% and 100%, respectively. In conclusion, the current QCM system is a rapid, low-cost and sensitive method that can be used to identify infection of S. epidermidis in clinical samples. PMID:27873880

  20. Highly stable porous silicon-carbon composites as label-free optical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Chun Kwan; Kelly, Timothy L; Sailor, Michael J; Li, Yang Yang

    2012-12-21

    A stable, label-free optical biosensor based on a porous silicon-carbon (pSi-C) composite is demonstrated. The material is prepared by electrochemical anodization of crystalline Si in an HF-containing electrolyte to generate a porous Si template, followed by infiltration of poly(furfuryl) alcohol (PFA) and subsequent carbonization to generate the pSi-C composite as an optically smooth thin film. The pSi-C sensor is significantly more stable toward aqueous buffer solutions (pH 7.4 or 12) compared to thermally oxidized (in air, 800 °C), hydrosilylated (with undecylenic acid), or hydrocarbonized (with acetylene, 700 °C) porous Si samples prepared and tested under similar conditions. Aqueous stability of the pSi-C sensor is comparable to related optical biosensors based on porous TiO(2) or porous Al(2)O(3). Label-free optical interferometric biosensing with the pSi-C composite is demonstrated by detection of rabbit IgG on a protein-A-modified chip and confirmed with control experiments using chicken IgG (which shows no affinity for protein A). The pSi-C sensor binds significantly more of the protein A capture probe than porous TiO(2) or porous Al(2)O(3), and the sensitivity of the protein-A-modified pSi-C sensor to rabbit IgG is found to be ~2× greater than label-free optical biosensors constructed from these other two materials.

  1. Probing the mechanism of material specific peptides for optical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Sathish K.; Estephan, Elias; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Gergely, Csilla

    2013-05-01

    The possibility to engineer bio-nanomaterials with programmed synthesis and controlled immobilization of biomolecules through biomimetic molecular evolution approach has been demonstrated. Material specific peptides with exquisite molecular recognition function were used as a linker for the attachment of biomolecules. Exploring the origin of peptide material specificity not only opens up rational design approach with precise control over biomimetic bio-sensor design, but more importantly provides a new route of functionalizing for various material surfaces with enhanced sensitivity over classical grafting chemistry. To study the fine prints of experimentally obtained peptides, theoretical understanding of surface interactions may serve as important clues for further refinement. By taking advantage of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT), we investigated the origin of this smart recognition function through the strength of interaction of experimentally selected 12mer peptides revealing high binding affinity towards n+-Si(100). Here, we attempt for the very first time to model the interaction of the peptides (in buffer solution) with semiconductors and we calculate their binding energies at the atomic level, enabling thereby linking direct evidence to our experimental evidence. Several peptide conformations have been taken into account simultaneously upon the surface. Our studies demonstrate that the peptides possess certain recognition function and their high interaction energy with the surface makes them unique among the populations. Our work is a step towards the understanding of the interactions between peptides and semiconductor surfaces that is a highly relevant challenge in the development of novel devices with a high degree of biocompatibility as well.

  2. Multidimensional optics and dynamics of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shouping

    2007-12-01

    In this dissertation, we present an alternative description of multidimensional optics in liquid crystals and uniaxial media, and a systematical investigation on the dynamic properties of twist nematic devices and ECB devices including flow. We also present our investigation on the backflow and dynamic properties of nematic liquid crystals in modulated electric fields. Based on the understanding to backflow and dynamics of liquid crystals, the dynamics of colloidal particles dispersed in nematic liquid crystals and the flow-induced dynamic optical crosstalk between pixels in nematic liquid crystal devices are also studied. The alternative description of multidimensional optics combines the geometrical optics approximation (GOA) with the beam propagation method (BPM). The general treatment of this approach is developed both theoretically and numerically. The investigation on the dynamic properties of twist nematic devices and ECB devices with consideration of backflow is done experimentally, theoretically and numerically. The calculation results are compared with the experimental results, and the optical responses due to backflow are discussed in detail. The investigation on the backflow and dynamic properties of a nematic liquid crystal in modulated electric fields includes director, flow and the shift of liquid crystal fluid. Especially, an important phenomenon, reverseswitching, is shown in this investigation. The dynamics of colloidal particles dispersed in a nematic cela is studied experimentally and by computer simulation. The polarity of director distortions determines the direction of lift force, and the backflow is responsible for the horizontal translational motion. The optical crosstalk between pixels demonstrates the significance of switching-induce flow in pixilated devices. The electrical switching of a pixel in a twisted nematic device can induce an optical response in neighboring pixels. These phenomena are studied in detail, both experimentally and

  3. Nonlinear photonic crystal microdevices for optical integration.

    PubMed

    Soljacić, Marin; Luo, Chiyan; Joannopoulos, J D; Fan, Shanhui

    2003-04-15

    A four-port nonlinear photonic crystal system is discussed that exhibits optical bistability with negligible backscattering to the inputs, making it particularly suitable for integration with other active devices on the same chip. Devices based on this system can be made to be small [O(lambda3)] in volume, have a nearly instantaneous response, and consume only a few milliwatts of power. Among many possible applications, we focus on an all-optical transistor and integrated optical isolation.

  4. Optical diagnostics of solution crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yongkee; Reddy, B. R.; George, Tharayil G.; Lal, Ravindra B.

    1995-01-01

    Solution crystal growth monitoring of LAP/TGS crystals by various optical diagnostics systems, such as conventional and Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) interferometers, optical heterodyne technique, and ellipsometry, is under development. The study of the dynamics of the crystal growth process requires a detailed knowledge of crystal growth rate and the concentration gradient near growing crystals in aqueous solution. Crystal growth rate can be measured using conventional interferometry. Laser beam reflections from the crystal front as well as the back surface interfere with each other, and the fringe shift due to the growing crystal yields information about the growth rate. Our preliminary results indicate a growth rate of 6 A/sec for LAP crystals grown from solution. Single wavelength M-Z interferometry is in use to calculate the concentration gradient near the crystal. Preliminary investigation is in progress using an M-Z interferometer with 2 cm beam diameter to cover the front region of the growing crystal. In the optical heterodyne technique, phase difference between two rf signals (250 KHZ) is measured of which one is a reference signal, and the other growth signal, whose phase changes due to a change in path length as the material grows. From the phase difference the growth rate can also be calculated. Our preliminary results indicate a growth rate of 1.5 A/sec. the seed and solution temperatures were 26.46 C and 27.92 C respectively, and the solution was saturated at 29.0 C. an ellipsometer to measure the growth rate and interface layer is on order from JOBIN YVON, France. All these systems are arranged in such a manner that measurements can be made either sequentially or simultaneously. These techniques will be adapted for flight experiment.

  5. Optical diagnostics of solution crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yongkee; Reddy, B. R.; George, Tharayil G.; Lal, Ravindra B.

    1995-01-01

    Solution crystal growth monitoring of LAP/TGS crystals by various optical diagnostics systems, such as conventional and Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) interferometers, optical heterodyne technique, and ellipsometry, is under development. The study of the dynamics of the crystal growth process requires a detailed knowledge of crystal growth rate and the concentration gradient near growing crystals in aqueous solution. Crystal growth rate can be measured using conventional interferometry. Laser beam reflections from the crystal front as well as the back surface interfere with each other, and the fringe shift due to the growing crystal yields information about the growth rate. Our preliminary results indicate a growth rate of 6 A/sec for LAP crystals grown from solution. Single wavelength M-Z interferometry is in use to calculate the concentration gradient near the crystal. Preliminary investigation is in progress using an M-Z interferometer with 2 cm beam diameter to cover the front region of the growing crystal. In the optical heterodyne technique, phase difference between two rf signals (250 KHZ) is measured of which one is a reference signal, and the other growth signal, whose phase changes due to a change in path length as the material grows. From the phase difference the growth rate can also be calculated. Our preliminary results indicate a growth rate of 1.5 A/sec. the seed and solution temperatures were 26.46 C and 27.92 C respectively, and the solution was saturated at 29.0 C. an ellipsometer to measure the growth rate and interface layer is on order from JOBIN YVON, France. All these systems are arranged in such a manner that measurements can be made either sequentially or simultaneously. These techniques will be adapted for flight experiment.

  6. The Role of Transport Phenomena in Whispering Gallery Mode Optical Biosensor Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamba, Jason

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonator sensors have emerged as promising tools for label-free detection of biomolecules in solution. These devices have even demonstrated single-molecule limits of detection in complex biological uids. This extraordinary sensitivity makes them ideal for low-concentration analytical and diagnostic measurements, but a great deal of work must be done toward understanding and optimizing their performance before they are capable of reliable quantitative measurents. The present work explores the physical processes behind this extreme sensitivity and how to best take advantage of them for practical applications of this technology. I begin by examining the nature of the interaction between the intense electromagnetic elds that build up in the optical biosensor and the biomolecules that bind to its surface. This work addresses the need for a coherent and thorough physical model that can be used to predict sensor behavior for a range of experimental parameters. While this knowledge will prove critical for the development of this technology, it has also shone a light on nonlinear thermo-optical and optical phenomena that these devices are uniquely suited to probing. The surprisingly rapid transient response of toroidal WGM biosensors despite sub-femtomolar analyte concentrations is also addressed. The development of asymmetric boundary layers around these devices under ow is revealed to enhance the capture rate of proteins from solution compared to the spherical sensors used previously. These lessons will guide the design of ow systems to minimize measurement time and consumption of precious sample, a key factor in any medically relevant assay. Finally, experimental results suggesting that WGM biosensors could be used to improve the quantitative detection of small-molecule biomarkers in exhaled breath condensate demonstrate how their exceptional sensitivity and transient response can enable the use of this noninvasive method to probe

  7. Hybrid nanoporous silicon optical biosensor architectures for biological sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, Lisa M.; Zheng, Hong; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2010-02-01

    This work focuses on demonstrating proof-of-concept for a novel nanoparticle optical signal amplification scheme employing hybrid porous silicon (PSi) sensors. We are investigating the development of target responsive hydrogels integrated with PSi optical transducers. These hybrid-PSi sensors can be designed to provide a tunable material response to target concentration ranging from swelling to complete chain dissolution. The corresponding refractive index changes are significant and readily detected by the PSi transducer. However, to increase signal to noise, lower the limit of detection, and provide a visual read out capability, we are investigating the incorporation of high refractive index nanoparticles (NP) into the hydrogel for optical signal amplification. These NPs can be nonspecifically encapsulated, or functionalized with bioactive ligands to bind polymer chains or participate in cross linking. In this work, we demonstrate encapsulation of high refractive index QD nanoparticles into a 5wt% polyacrylamide hydrogel crosslinked with N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS) and N,N Bis-acryloyl cystamine (BAC). A QD loading (~0.29 wt%) produced a 2X larger optical shift compared to the control. Dissolution of disulphide crosslinks, using Tris[2-carboxyethyl] phosphine (TCEP) reducing agent, induced gel swelling and efficient QD release. We believe this hybrid sensor concept constitutes a versatile technology platform capable of detecting a wide range of bio/chemical targets provided target analogs can be linked to the polymer backbone and crosslinks can be achieved with target responsive multivalent receptors, such a antibodies. The optical signal amplification scheme will enable a lower limit of detection sensitivity not yet demonstrated with PSi technology and colorimetric readout visible to the naked eye.

  8. Electroacoustic polymer microchip as an alternative to quartz crystal microbalance for biosensor development.

    PubMed

    Gamby, Jean; Lazerges, Mathieu; Girault, Hubert H; Deslouis, Claude; Gabrielli, Claude; Perrot, Hubert; Tribollet, Bernard

    2008-12-01

    Laser photoablation of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), a flexible dielectric organic polymer, was used to design an acoustic miniaturized DNA biosensor. The microchip device includes a 100-microm-thick PET layer, with two microband electrodes patterned in photoablated microchannels on one side and a depressed photoablated disk decorated by gold sputtered layer on the other side. Upon application of an electric signal between the two electrodes, an electroacoustic resonance phenomenon at approximately 30 MHz was established through the microelectrodes/PET/ gold layer interface. The electroacoustic resonance response was fitted with a series RLC motional arm in parallel with a static Co arm of a Buttlerworth-Van Dyke equivalent circuit: admittance spectra recorded after successive cycles of DNA hybridization on the gold surface showed reproducible changes on R, L, and C parameters. The same hybridizations runs were performed concomitantly on a 27-MHz (9 MHz, third overtone) quartz crystal microbalance in order to validate the PET device developed for bioanalysis applications. The electroacoustic PET device, approximately 100 times smaller than a microbalance quartz crystal, is interesting for the large-scale integration of acoustic sensors in biochips.

  9. All-optical phase modulation for integrated interferometric biosensors.

    PubMed

    Dante, Stefania; Duval, Daphné; Sepúlveda, Borja; González-Guerrero, Ana Belen; Sendra, José Ramón; Lechuga, Laura M

    2012-03-26

    We present the theoretical and the experimental implementation of an all-optical phase modulation system in integrated Mach-Zehnder Interferometers to solve the drawbacks related to the periodic nature of the interferometric signal. Sensor phase is tuned by modulating the emission wavelength of low-cost commercial laser diodes by changing their output power. FFT deconvolution of the signal allows for direct phase readout, immune to sensitivity variations and to light intensity fluctuations. This simple phase modulation scheme increases the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurements in one order of magnitude, rendering in a sensor with a detection limit of 1.9·10⁻⁷ RIU. The viability of the all-optical modulation approach is demonstrated with an immunoassay detection as a biosensing proof of concept.

  10. Development of optical biosensor technologies for cardiac troponin recognition.

    PubMed

    Abdolrahim, Mojgan; Rabiee, Mohammad; Alhosseini, Sanaz Naghavi; Tahriri, Mohammadreza; Yazdanpanah, Sara; Tayebi, Lobat

    2015-09-15

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause of death among cardiovascular diseases. Among the numerous attempts to develop coronary marker concepts into clinical strategies, cardiac troponin is known as a specific marker for coronary events. The cardiac troponin concentration level in blood has been shown to rise rapidly for 4-10 days after onset of AMI, making it an attractive approach for a long diagnosis window for detection. The extremely low clinical sensing range of cardiac troponin levels consequently makes the methods of detection highly sensitive. In this review, by taking into consideration optical methods applied for cardiac troponin detection, we discuss the most commonly used methods of optical immunosensing and provide an overview of the various diagnostic cardiac troponin immunosensors that have been employed for determination of cardiac troponin over the last several years.

  11. Optical fibre biosensors using enzymatic transducers to monitor glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, P. J.; Betancor, L.; Bolyo, J.; Dzyadevych, S.; Guisan, J. M.; Fernández-Lafuente, R.; Jaffrezic-Renault, N.; Kuncová, G.; Matejec, V.; O'Kennedy, B.; Podrazky, O.; Rose, K.; Sasek, L.; Young, J. S.

    2007-10-01

    The construction and performance of a novel enzyme based optical sensor for in situ continuous monitoring of glucose in biotechnological production processes is presented. Sensitive optical coatings are formed from inorganic-organic hybrid polymers (ORMOCER®sORMOCER®: Trademark of Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der angewandten Forschung e. V. in Germany.) combined with a flurophore (ruthenium complex) and an enzyme, and applied to lenses, declad polymer optical fibre (POF) and polymer clad silica fibre (PCS). The enzyme, glucose oxidase, catalyzes oxidization of glucose to gluconic acid by depleting oxygen. Oxygen consumption is determined by measuring the fluorescence lifetime of metal organic ruthenium complexes which are quenched by oxygen. The coatings developed were designed to adhere to glass and polymer surfaces, to be compatible with enzymes and ruthenium complexes, and were demonstrated both as double- and single-layer structures. The sensor response to gaseous oxygen, dissolved oxygen and dissolved glucose was measured via fluorescence lifetime changes. A best detection limit of 0.5% (vol) has been determined for gaseous O2 with selected ORMOCER® sensing layers. Glucose concentrations were measured to a detection limit of 0.1 mmol L-1 over a range up to 30 mmol L-1. The sensor was usable for 30 days in a bioreactor. The opto-electronic instrumentation and performance in laboratory bioreactors and in an industrial reactor are evaluated.

  12. Porous Silicon-Based Biosensors: Towards Real-Time Optical Detection of Target Bacteria in the Food Industry

    PubMed Central

    Massad-Ivanir, Naama; Shtenberg, Giorgi; Raz, Nitzan; Gazenbeek, Christel; Budding, Dries; Bos, Martine P.; Segal, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection of target bacteria is crucial to provide a safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. Herein, we present an optical biosensor for identification and quantification of Escherichia coli (E. coli, used as a model indicator bacteria species) in complex food industry process water. The biosensor is based on a nanostructured, oxidized porous silicon (PSi) thin film which is functionalized with specific antibodies against E. coli. The biosensors were exposed to water samples collected directly from process lines of fresh-cut produce and their reflectivity spectra were collected in real time. Process water were characterized by complex natural micro-flora (microbial load of >107 cell/mL), in addition to soil particles and plant cell debris. We show that process water spiked with culture-grown E. coli, induces robust and predictable changes in the thin-film optical interference spectrum of the biosensor. The latter is ascribed to highly specific capture of the target cells onto the biosensor surface, as confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The biosensors were capable of selectively identifying and quantifying the target cells, while the target cell concentration is orders of magnitude lower than that of other bacterial species, without any pre-enrichment or prior processing steps. PMID:27901131

  13. Porous Silicon-Based Biosensors: Towards Real-Time Optical Detection of Target Bacteria in the Food Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massad-Ivanir, Naama; Shtenberg, Giorgi; Raz, Nitzan; Gazenbeek, Christel; Budding, Dries; Bos, Martine P.; Segal, Ester

    2016-11-01

    Rapid detection of target bacteria is crucial to provide a safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. Herein, we present an optical biosensor for identification and quantification of Escherichia coli (E. coli, used as a model indicator bacteria species) in complex food industry process water. The biosensor is based on a nanostructured, oxidized porous silicon (PSi) thin film which is functionalized with specific antibodies against E. coli. The biosensors were exposed to water samples collected directly from process lines of fresh-cut produce and their reflectivity spectra were collected in real time. Process water were characterized by complex natural micro-flora (microbial load of >107 cell/mL), in addition to soil particles and plant cell debris. We show that process water spiked with culture-grown E. coli, induces robust and predictable changes in the thin-film optical interference spectrum of the biosensor. The latter is ascribed to highly specific capture of the target cells onto the biosensor surface, as confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The biosensors were capable of selectively identifying and quantifying the target cells, while the target cell concentration is orders of magnitude lower than that of other bacterial species, without any pre-enrichment or prior processing steps.

  14. Porous Silicon-Based Biosensors: Towards Real-Time Optical Detection of Target Bacteria in the Food Industry.

    PubMed

    Massad-Ivanir, Naama; Shtenberg, Giorgi; Raz, Nitzan; Gazenbeek, Christel; Budding, Dries; Bos, Martine P; Segal, Ester

    2016-11-30

    Rapid detection of target bacteria is crucial to provide a safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. Herein, we present an optical biosensor for identification and quantification of Escherichia coli (E. coli, used as a model indicator bacteria species) in complex food industry process water. The biosensor is based on a nanostructured, oxidized porous silicon (PSi) thin film which is functionalized with specific antibodies against E. coli. The biosensors were exposed to water samples collected directly from process lines of fresh-cut produce and their reflectivity spectra were collected in real time. Process water were characterized by complex natural micro-flora (microbial load of >10(7) cell/mL), in addition to soil particles and plant cell debris. We show that process water spiked with culture-grown E. coli, induces robust and predictable changes in the thin-film optical interference spectrum of the biosensor. The latter is ascribed to highly specific capture of the target cells onto the biosensor surface, as confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The biosensors were capable of selectively identifying and quantifying the target cells, while the target cell concentration is orders of magnitude lower than that of other bacterial species, without any pre-enrichment or prior processing steps.

  15. Growth of crystals in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Ursula; Singer, Wolfgang; Nieminen, Timo; Heckenberg, Norman; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2005-08-01

    We report here on the use of optical tweezers in the growth and manipulation of protein and inorganic crystals. Sodium chloride and hen egg-white lysozyme crystals were grown in a batch process, and then seeds from the solution were introduced into the optical tweezers. The regular and controllable shape and the known optical birefringence in these structures allowed a detailed study of the orientation effects in the beam due to both polarization and gradient forces. Additionally, we determined that the laser tweezers could be used to suspend a crystal for three-dimensional growth under varying conditions. Studies included increasing the protein concentration, thermal cycling, and a diffusion-induced increase in precipitant concentration. Preliminary studies on the use of the tweezers to create a localized seed for growth from polyethylene oxide solutions are also reported.

  16. An optical fiber biosensor for chlorpyrifos using a single sol-gel film containing acetylcholinesterase and bromothymol blue.

    PubMed

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Fikriyah, Chulaifah Indah; Gani, Agus Abdul

    2008-01-15

    An optical fiber biosensor consisting of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and bromothymol blue (BTB) doped sol-gel film was employed to detect organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos. The main advantage of this optical biosensor is the use of a single sol-gel film with immobilized AChE and BTB. The compatibility of this mixture (AChE and BTB) with the sol-gel matrix has prevented leaching of the film. The immobilization of the enzyme and indicator was simple without chemical modification. The biosensing element on single sol-gel film has been placed inside the flow-cell for flow system. In the presence of a constant AChE, a color change of the BTB and the measured reflected signal at wavelength 622nm could be related to the pesticide concentration in the sample solutions. The performance of optical biosensor in the flow system has been optimized, including chemical and physical parameters. The response time of the biosensor is 8min. A linear calibration curve of chlorpyrifos against the percentage inhibition of AChE was obtained from 0.05 to 2.0mg/L of chlorpyrifos (18-80% inhibition, R(2)=0.9869, n=6). The detection limit for chlorpyrifos was 0.04mg/L. The results of the analysis of 0.5-1.5mg/L of chlorpyrifos using this optical biosensor agreed well with chromatographic method.

  17. Rapid detection of Staphylococcus aureus using a membrane fiber optic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jianming; Pivarnik, Philip E.; Senecal, Andre G.; Rand, Arthur G.

    1999-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and rapid chemiluminescent fiber optic biosensor utilizing monoclonal antibodies to S. aureus was developed to detect the pathogen in food. The S. aureus cells were selectively labeled with a monoclonal-horseradish peroxidase (POD) conjugate, collected by membrane filtration, and detected with a luminometer and an enhanced chemiluminescent luminol reagent. Two different diameter membranes, 25 mm and 13 mm, were first tested in a luminometer tube format assay. A hand operated syringe filtration unit was used to capture cells and the membrane was then transferred to a luminometer tube for the chemiluminescent reaction. An improved system utilized a simple but efficient microwell plate vacuum filtration unit with an 8 mm membrane sealed at the bottom of the sample well. The sample was concentrated on the membrane and positioned directly in front of a fiber optic light guide to effectively collect and transmit the signal to the luminometer. Labeling S. aureus in solution proved to be much more effective than on the membrane surface. Using the microwell plate filtration system resulted in less sample handling, better reproducibility, and dramatically reduced assay time. The variability for 25 mm and 13 mm assays were 24.7% and 13.3%, while the microwell plate assay reduced this to 4.0%. The ability of the fiber optic probe to effectively collect the signal meant the sensitivity of the assay was not compromised with smaller membrane and sample size. The sensitivity of the biosensor was 3.8 X 104 CFU/ml, adequate to detect the organism at concentrations lower than the level that could result in food poisoning. The performance of the biosensor was not effected by the food materials and by the presence of other bacteria.

  18. Fiber-Optic Chemiluminescent Biosensors for Monitoring Aqueous Alcohols and Other Water Quality Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verostko, Charles E. (Inventor); Atwater, James E. (Inventor); Akse, James R. (Inventor); DeHart, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Wheeler, Richard R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A "reagentless" chemiluminescent biosensor and method for the determination of hydrogen peroxide, ethanol and D-glucose in water is disclosed. An aqueous stream is basified by passing it through a solid phase base bed. Luminol is then dissolved in the basified effluent at a controlled rate. Oxidation of the luminol is catalyzed by the target chemical to produce emitted light. The intensity of the emitted light is detected as a measure of the target chemical concentration in the aqueous stream. The emitted light can be transmitted by a fiber optic bundle to a remote location from the aqueous stream for a remote reading of the target chemical concentration.

  19. Measuring kinetic rate constants of multiple-component reactions with optical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Edwards, David A; Evans, Ryan M; Li, Wenbin

    2017-09-15

    One may measure the kinetic rate constants associated with biochemical reactions using an optical biosensor: an instrument in which ligand molecules are convected through a flow cell over a surface to which receptors are immobilized. If there are multiple reactants, one is faced with the problem of fitting multiple kinetic rate constants to one signal, since data from all of the reacting species is lumped together. Even in the presence of ambiguous data, one may use a series of experiments to accurately determine the rate constants. Moreover, the true set of rate constants may be identified by either postprocessing the signals or adjusting the ligand inflow concentrations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Optical properties of ladder type single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Babonas, G.J.; Leonyuk, L.; Reza, A.; Dapkus, L.; Szymczak, R.

    1999-12-01

    The optical properties of (M{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub m}(CuO{sub 2}){sub n} (M = Ca, Sr, Y, Bi) crystals containing the ladder-type plane Cu{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry method in the range 0.5--5.0 eV. The experimental data were analyzed in order to reveal the difference in the microstructure between superconducting (SC) and non-superconducting (NSC) single crystals. The contributions to the optical response due to the electronic excitations of free and bound carriers were analyzed.

  1. Chalcogenide Photonic Crystal Filters For Optical Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Suthar, B.; Bhargava, A.

    2011-12-12

    A proper arrangement of photonic crystal waveguide and a point defect cavity gives an important application of photonic filter device in optical communications. We have studied a narrow band filter and a channel drop filter device using 2-D photonic crystal with square lattice structure. A narrow band filter is applied to select a narrow frequency band signal from incoming light, while a channel drop filter is used to drop a particular frequency signal from incoming light. Chalcogenide As{sub 2}S{sub 3} is compared with conventional Si material regarding applications as feasible material for optical devices.

  2. A New Type Of Fiber Optic Biosensor Based On The Intrinsic Fluorescence Of Immobilized Flavoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfbeis, Otto S.; Trettnak, Wolfgang

    1990-02-01

    We describe a new biosensor for monitoring the concentration of enzyme glucose, lactate, and other substrates that are metabolized by an oxidation process. The method is based on the finding that enzymes having FAD as a prosthetic group change their fluorescence during interaction with a substrate. Typical enzymes that have been studied include glucose oxidase (GOD), lactate mono-oxygenase (LMO), and cholesterol oxidase (ChOD). Their fluorescence is monitored via fiber optic light guides at wavelengths above 500 nm, following fluorescence excitation at around 410 - 450 nm. The relative fluorescence intensities of the enzymes vary to a large extent, being highest for LMO, and rather low for ChOD. Typical detection limits are in the 0.5 mM range for lactate and 1.5 mM for glucose at ambient oxygen pressure. A characteristic feature of this sensor is the narrow dynamic range which usually does not exceed 3 mM. This can be explained in terms of enzyme kinetics and diffusional processes. Unlike optical biosensors based on measurement of the intrinsic fluorescence of NADH, this sensor type has the advantages of full reversibility (because reduced FAD-based enzymes accept oxygen as a second substrate) and analytical wavelengths that are compatible with plastic or glass fiber optics. It is fairly simple in construction because the enzyme acts as both the recognition and transduction element. The method also has been applied successfully in an flow injection analysis-like type of arrangement.

  3. Experimental demonstration of plasmonic-grating-assisted optical biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, M. A.; Grande, M.; de Ceglia, D.; Stomeo, T.; De Vittorio, M.; Petruzzelli, V.; D'Orazio, A.; Scalora, M.

    2012-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the possibility to implement an optical bio-sensing platform based on the shift of the plasmonic band edge of a 2D-periodic metal grating. Several 2D arrangements of square gold patches on a silicon substrate were fabricated using electron beam lithography and then optically characterized in reflection. We show that the presence of a small quantity of analyte, i.e. isopropyl alcohol, deposited on the sensor surface causes a dramatic red shift of the plasmonic band edge associated with the leaky surface mode of the grating/analyte interface, reaching sensitivity values of ~650nm/RIU. At the same time, dark field microscopy measurements show that the spectral shift of the plasmonic band edge may also be detected by observing a change in the color of the diffracted field. Calculations of both the spectral shift and the diffracted spectra variations match the experimental results very well, providing an efficient mean for the design of sensing platforms based on color observation.

  4. Optimization and application of reflective LSPR optical fiber biosensors based on silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangping; Shi, Se; Su, Rongxin; Qi, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Wang, Mengfan; Wang, Libing; He, Zhimin

    2015-05-26

    In this study, we developed a reflective localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) optical fiber sensor, based on silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). To enhance the sensitivity of the LSPR optical sensor, two key parameters were optimized, the length of the sensing area and the coating time of the Ag NPs. A sensing length of 1.5 cm and a 1-h coating time proved to be suitable conditions to produce highly sensitive sensors for biosensing. The optimized sensor has a high refractive index sensitivity of 387 nm/RIU, which is much higher than that of other reported individual silver nanoparticles in solutions. Moreover, the sensor was further modified with antigen to act as a biosensor. Distinctive wavelength shifts were found after each surface modification step. In addition, the reflective LSPR optical fiber sensor has high reproducibility and stability.

  5. Sol-gel silica platforms for microalgae-based optical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Perullini, Mercedes; Ferro, Yannis; Durrieu, Claude; Jobbágy, Matías; Bilmes, Sara A

    2014-06-10

    An advanced hybrid biosensing platform with improved optical quality is developed based on the acidic encapsulation of microalgi in silica matrices synthesized by TAFR (tetraethoxysilane derived alcohol free route). The three microalgi (Chlorella vulgaris, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) were previously immobilized in alginate following the two-step procedure. Tuning the alginate protecting function with the aid of Tris-HCl buffer, the sol-gel synthesis was conducted at pH 4.0 well below the tolerance limit imposed by the encapsulated microalgae. The acidic condensation of Si(IV) generates silica matrices with outstanding optical properties that suit the requirements of biosensors based on optical detection methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Development and study the performance of PBA cladding modified fiber optic intrinsic biosensor for urea detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botewad, S. N.; Pahurkar, V. G.; Muley, G. G.

    2016-05-01

    The fabrication and study of a cladding modified fiber optic intrinsic urea biosensor based on evanescent wave absorbance has been presented. The sensor was prepared using cladding modification technique by removing a small portion of cladding of an optical fiber and modifying with an active cladding of porous polyaniline-boric acid (PBA) matrix to immobilize enzyme-urease through cross-linking via glutaraldehyde. The nature of as-synthesized and deposited PBA film on fiber optic sensing element was studied by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The performance of the developed sensor was studied for different urea concentrations in solutions prepared in phosphate buffer.

  7. Development and study the performance of PBA cladding modified fiber optic intrinsic biosensor for urea detection

    SciTech Connect

    Botewad, S. N.; Pahurkar, V. G.; Muley, G. G.

    2016-05-06

    The fabrication and study of a cladding modified fiber optic intrinsic urea biosensor based on evanescent wave absorbance has been presented. The sensor was prepared using cladding modification technique by removing a small portion of cladding of an optical fiber and modifying with an active cladding of porous polyaniline-boric acid (PBA) matrix to immobilize enzyme-urease through cross-linking via glutaraldehyde. The nature of as-synthesized and deposited PBA film on fiber optic sensing element was studied by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The performance of the developed sensor was studied for different urea concentrations in solutions prepared in phosphate buffer.

  8. Fabrication of polyaniline-HCl cladding modified fiber optic intrinsic biosensor for glucose detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahurkar, Vikas; Tamgadge, Yuoraj; Muley, Gajanan

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we have fabricated and studied response of cladding modified fiber optic intrinsic glucose biosensor (FOIGB). The optical fiber was used as a light transforming waveguide and sensing element fabricated over it by applying a thin layer of polymer. The cladding of the sensor was modified with the polyaniline-hydrochloric acid (PANI-HCl) polymer matrix. The PANI-HCl matrix provides an amorphous morphology useful to immobilize glucose oxidase (GOx) biomolecules through cross-linking technique via glutaraldehyde. The present sensor was used to detect the glucose analyte in the solution. In the sensing response study of FOIGB toward glucose, novel modal power distribution (MPD) technique was used. The reaction between GOx and glucose changes the optical properties of prepared FOIGB and hence modify MPD at output as a function of glucose concentration. The nature and surface morphology of PANI-HCl matrix has been studied.

  9. Nonlinear and quantum optics with liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukishova, Svetlana G.

    2014-04-01

    Thermotropic liquid crystals' usual application is display technology. This paper describes experiments on light interaction with pure and doped liquid crystals under for these materials unconventional incident light powers: (1) under high-power laser irradiation, and (2) at the single-photon level. In (1), I will outline several nonlinear optical effects under high-power, nanosecond laser irradiation which should be taken into account in the design of lasers with liquid crystal components and in fabrication of optical power limiters based on liquid crystals: (1.1) athermal helical pitch dilation and unwinding of cholesteric mirrors (both in free space and inside laser resonators); (1.2) some pitfalls in measurements of refractive nonlinearity using z-scan technique under two-photon or linear absorption of liquids; (1.3) the first observation of thermal lens effects in liquid crystals under several-nanosecond, low-pulse-repetition rate (2-10 Hz) laser irradiation in the presence of two-photon absorption; (1.4) feedback-free kaleidoscope of patterns (hexagons, stripes, etc.) in dye-doped liquid crystals. In (2), at the single-photon level, it will be shown that with a proper selection of liquid crystals and a single-emitter dopant spectral range, liquid crystal structures can be used to control emitted single photons (both polarization and count rate). The application of the latter research is absolutely secure quantum communication with polarization coding of information. In particular, in (2.1), definite handedness, circular polarized cholesteric microcavity resonance in quantum dot fluorescence is reported. In (2.2), definite linear polarization of single (antibunched) photons from single-dye-molecules in planar-aligned nematic host is discussed. In (2.3), some results on photon antibunching from NV-color center in nanodiamond in liquid crystal host and circularly polarized fluorescence of definite handedness from nanocrystals doped with trivalent ions of rare

  10. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Pinkel, Daniel; Gray, Joe; Albertson, Donna G.

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its "sensor end" biological "binding partners" (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor.

  11. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Pinkel, D.; Gray, J.

    1997-11-25

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its ``sensor end`` biological ``binding partners`` (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor. 9 figs.

  12. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Pinkel, Daniel; Gray, Joe; Albertson, Donna G.

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its "sensor end" biological "binding partners" (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor.

  13. High density array fabrication and readout method for a fiber optic biosensor

    DOEpatents

    Pinkel, Daniel; Gray, Joe

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates to the fabrication and use of biosensors comprising a plurality of optical fibers each fiber having attached to its "sensor end" biological "binding partners" (molecules that specifically bind other molecules to form a binding complex such as antibody-antigen, lectin-carbohydrate, nucleic acid-nucleic acid, biotin-avidin, etc.). The biosensor preferably bears two or more different species of biological binding partner. The sensor is fabricated by providing a plurality of groups of optical fibers. Each group is treated as a batch to attach a different species of biological binding partner to the sensor ends of the fibers comprising that bundle. Each fiber, or group of fibers within a bundle, may be uniquely identified so that the fibers, or group of fibers, when later combined in an array of different fibers, can be discretely addressed. Fibers or groups of fibers are then selected and discretely separated from different bundles. The discretely separated fibers are then combined at their sensor ends to produce a high density sensor array of fibers capable of assaying simultaneously the binding of components of a test sample to the various binding partners on the different fibers of the sensor array. The transmission ends of the optical fibers are then discretely addressed to detectors--such as a multiplicity of optical sensors. An optical signal, produced by binding of the binding partner to its substrate to form a binding complex, is conducted through the optical fiber or group of fibers to a detector for each discrete test. By examining the addressed transmission ends of fibers, or groups of fibers, the addressed transmission ends can transmit unique patterns assisting in rapid sample identification by the sensor.

  14. Novelty filtered optical correlator using photorefractive crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Duncan T. H.; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1992-01-01

    We demonstrate a new optical correlator in which the correlation peak intensity is increased when the matched input object is moving. The basic configuration of the correlator is the same as a VanderLugt optical correlator consisting of a photorefractive crystal. The principal of this new correlator is based on the dynamic grating erasure property of photorefractive materials. The detail of this principle is described.

  15. Optical monitoring of protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudry, A.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of using various optical techniques for detecting the onset of nucleation in protein crystal growth was investigated. Direct microscopy, general metrologic techniques, light scattering, ultraviolet absorption, and interferometry are addressed along with techniques for determining pH value. The necessity for collecting basic data on the optical properties of the growth solution as a prerequisite to the evaluation of monitoring techniques is pointed out.

  16. DNA-Aptamer optical biosensors based on a LPG-SPR optical fiber platform for point-of-care diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, L.; Queirós, R. B.; Santos, J. L.; Martins, M. Cristina L.; Viegas, D.; Jorge, P. A. S.

    2014-03-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is the base for some of the most sensitive label free optical fiber biosensors. However, most solutions presented to date require the use of fragile fiber optic structure such as adiabatic tapers or side polished fibers. On the other hand, long-period fiber gratings (LPG) present themselves as an interesting solution to attain an evanescent wave refractive index sensor platform while preserving the optical fiber integrity. The combination of these two approaches constitute a powerful platform that can potentially reach the highest sensitivities as it was recently demonstrated by detailed theoretical study [1, 2]. In this work, a LPG-SPR platform is explored in different configurations (metal coating between two LPG - symmetric and asymmetric) operating in the telecom band (around 1550 nm). For this purpose LPGs with period of 396 μm are combined with tailor made metallic thin films. In particular, the sensing regions were coated with 2 nm of chromium to improve the adhesion to the fiber and 16 nm of gold followed by a 100 nm thick layer of TiO2 dielectric material strategically chosen to attain plasmon resonance in the desired wavelength range. The obtained refractometric platforms were then validated as a biosensor. For this purpose the detection of thrombin using an aptamer based probe was used as a model system for protein detection. The surface of the sensing fibers were cleaned with isopropanol and dried with N2 and then the aminated thrombin aptamer (5'-[NH2]- GGTTGGTGTGGTTGG-3') was immobilized by physisorption using Poly-L-Lysine (PLL) as cationic polymer. Preliminary results indicate the viability of the LPFG-SPR-APTAMER as a flexible platforms point of care diagnostic biosensors.

  17. Evaluation of a novel label-free photonic-crystal biosensor imaging system for the detection of prostate cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuna, Frank; Ding, XiaoFie; Sun, Lu-Zhe; Ye, Jing Yong

    2017-02-01

    Biomarker screening for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the current clinical standard for detection of prostate cancer. However this method has shown many limitations, mainly in its specificity, which can lead to a high false positive rate. Thus, there is a growing need in developing a more specific detection system for prostate cancer. Using a Photonic- Crystal-based biosensor in a Total-Internal-Reflection (PC-TIR) configuration, we demonstrate the use of refractive index (RI) to accomplish label-free detection of prostate cancer cells against non-cancerous prostate epithelial cells. The PC-TIR biosensor possesses an open microcavity, which in contrast to traditional closed microcavities, allows for easier access of analyte molecules or cells to interact with its sensing surface. In this study, an imaging system was designed using the PC-TIR biosensor to quantify cell RI as the contrast parameter for prostate cancer detection. Non-cancerous BPH-1 prostate epithelial cells and prostate cancer PC-3 cells were placed on a single biosensor and measured concurrently. Recorded image data was then analyzed through a home-built MatLab program. Results demonstrate that RI is a suitable variable for differentiation between prostate cancer cells and non-cancerous prostate epithelial cells. Our study shows clinical potential in utilizing RI test for the detection of prostate cancer.

  18. A fiber-optic sorbitol biosensor based on NADH fluorescence detection toward rapid diagnosis of diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Gessei, Tomoko; Arakawa, Takahiro; Kudo, Hiroyuki; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-09-21

    Accumulation of sorbitol in the tissue is known to cause microvascular diabetic complications. In this paper, a fiber-optic biosensor for sorbitol which is used as a biomarker of diabetic complications was developed and tested. The biosensor used a sorbitol dehydrogenase from microorganisms of the genus Flavimonas with high substrate specificity and detected the fluorescence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) by the enzymatic reaction. An ultraviolet light emitting diode (UV-LED) was used as the excitation light source of NADH. The fluorescence of NADH was detected using a spectrometer or a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The UV-LED and the photodetector were coupled using a Y-shaped optical fiber. In the experiment, an optical fiber probe with a sorbitol dehydrogenase immobilized membrane was placed in a cuvette filled with a phosphate buffer containing the oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)). The changes in NADH fluorescence intensity were measured after adding a standard sorbitol solution. According to the experimental assessment, the calibration range of the sorbitol biosensor systems using a spectrometer and a PMT was 5.0-1000 μmol L(-1) and 1.0-1000 μmol L(-1), respectively. The sorbitol biosensor system using the sorbitol dehydrogenase from microorganisms of the genus Flavimonas has high selectivity and sensitivity compared with that from sheep liver. The sorbitol biosensor allows for point-of-care testing applications or daily health care tests for diabetes patients.

  19. Use of label-free optical biosensors to detect modulation of potassium channels by G-protein coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Matthew R; Shamah, Steven M; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2014-02-10

    Ion channels control the electrical properties of neurons and other excitable cell types by selectively allowing ions to flow through the plasma membrane(1). To regulate neuronal excitability, the biophysical properties of ion channels are modified by signaling proteins and molecules, which often bind to the channels themselves to form a heteromeric channel complex(2,3). Traditional assays examining the interaction between channels and regulatory proteins require exogenous labels that can potentially alter the protein's behavior and decrease the physiological relevance of the target, while providing little information on the time course of interactions in living cells. Optical biosensors, such as the X-BODY Biosciences BIND Scanner system, use a novel label-free technology, resonance wavelength grating (RWG) optical biosensors, to detect changes in resonant reflected light near the biosensor. This assay allows the detection of the relative change in mass within the bottom portion of living cells adherent to the biosensor surface resulting from ligand induced changes in cell adhesion and spreading, toxicity, proliferation, and changes in protein-protein interactions near the plasma membrane. RWG optical biosensors have been used to detect changes in mass near the plasma membrane of cells following activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases, and other cell surface receptors. Ligand-induced changes in ion channel-protein interactions can also be studied using this assay. In this paper, we will describe the experimental procedure used to detect the modulation of Slack-B sodium-activated potassium (KNa) channels by GPCRs.

  20. Optical crystal temperature gauge with fiber optic connections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, M. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An optical temperature gauge uses a semiconductor crystal with a band-edge shift property which is temperature dependent. An external narrow band light source provides optical excitation through a optical fiber and light energy thus passed through the crystal is conveyed by a second optical fiber to a light-to-electric transducers at an external location. The crystal can be located in cryogenic or other systems, to provide remote read-out. The light wavelength is varied (scanned) in a repetitive pattern in source with the instantaneous wavelength passing over the band-edge wavelength during each cycle of the scan. The timing of the crossover is related to the temperature of the crystal by electronic means. Several alternative elements of instrumentation are disclosed. A variation in the basic measurement apparatus is also disclosed, in which the band gap voltage of a light source such as a laser diode is evaluated at the time of band-edge crossover in the crystal and converted to a temperature value.

  1. Diatom-based label-free optical biosensor for biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Viji, S; Anbazhagi, M; Ponpandian, N; Mangalaraj, D; Jeyanthi, S; Santhanam, P; Devi, A Shenbaga; Viswanathan, C

    2014-10-01

    Diatoms are unicellular algae, which fabricates ornate biosilica shells called frustules that possess a surface rich in reactive silanol (Si-OH) groups. The intrinsic patterned porous structure of diatom frustules at nanoscale can be exploited in the effective detection of biomolecules. In this study, the frustules of a specific diatom Amphora sp. has been functionalized to detect bovine serum albumin (BSA). The functionalization of the diatom frustule substrate is achieved by using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APES). The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) results showed an ornately patterned surface of the frustule valve ordered at nanoscale. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra confirmed the N-H bending and stretching of the amine group after amine functionalization. The emission peaks in the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the amine-functionalized diatom biosilica selectively enhanced the intensity by a factor of ten when compared to that of a bare diatom biosilica. The result showed a significant quenching of PL intensity of BSA at around 445 nm due to the interaction of amine-functionalized diatom-BSA protein complex. The detection limit was found to be 3 × 10(-5) M of BSA protein. Hence, the study proves that the functionalized frustule of Amphora sp. is an effective quantitative analytical tool for optical label-free biosensing applications.

  2. Optical Properties of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosla, Samriti; Lal, Suman; Tripathi, S. K.; Sood, Nitin; Singh, Darshan

    2011-12-01

    The linking of liquid crystals polymer chains together into gel network fixes their topology, and melt becomes an elastic solid. These materials are called liquid crystals elastomers. Liquid crystal elastomers possess properties of soft elasticity and spontaneous shape change. The constituent molecules of LCEs are orientationally ordered and there exist a strong coupling between the orientational order and mechanical strain. In LCEs the molecules start elongate when their component rods orient and reversibly contract when the order is lost (typically by heating). So there is a change of average molecular shape from spherical to spheroidal. These unique properties make these materials suitable for future biological applications. Various research groups have studied different properties of LCEs in which optical properties are predominant. LCE has been synthesized in our laboratory. In this paper, we report on the optical behavior of this material.

  3. Non-invasive, in vitro analysis of islet insulin production enabled by an optical porous silicon biosensor.

    PubMed

    Chhasatia, Rinku; Sweetman, Martin J; Harding, Frances J; Waibel, Michaela; Kay, Tom; Thomas, Helen; Loudovaris, Thomas; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2017-05-15

    A label-free porous silicon (pSi) based, optical biosensor, using both an antibody and aptamer bioreceptor motif has been developed for the detection of insulin. Two parallel biosensors were designed and optimised independently, based on each bioreceptor. Both bioreceptors were covalently attached to a thermally hydrosilylated pSi surface though amide coupling, with unreacted surface area rendered stable and low fouling by incorporation of PEG moieties. The insulin detection ability of each biosensor was determined using interferometric reflectance spectroscopy, using a range of different media both with and without serum. Sensing performance was compared in terms of response value, response time and limit of detection (LOD) for each platform. In order to demonstrate the capability of the best performing biosensor to detect insulin from real samples, an in vitro investigation with the aptamer-modified surface was performed. This biosensor was exposed to buffer conditioned by glucose-stimulated human islets, with the result showing a positive response and a high degree of selectivity towards insulin capture. The obtained results correlated well with the ELISA used in the clinic for assaying glucose-stimulated insulin release from donor islets. We anticipate that this type of sensor can be applied as a rapid point-of-use biosensor to assess the quality of donor islets in terms of their insulin production efficiency, prior to transplantation.

  4. High sensitive photonic crystal multiplexed biosensor array using H0 sandwiched cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafa, Safia; Bouchemat, Mohamed; Bouchemat, Touraya; Benmerkhi, Ahlem

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically investigate a high sensitive photonic crystal integrated biosensor array structure which is potentially used for label-free multiplexed sensing. The proposed device consists of an array of three sandwiched H0 cavities patterned above silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate; each cavity has been designed for different cavity spacing and different resonant wavelength. Results obtained by performing finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations, indicate that the response of each detection unit shifts independently in terms of refractive index variations. The optimized design makes possible the combination of sensing as a function of location, as well as a function of time in the same platform. A refractive index sensitivity of 520nm/RIU and a quality factor over 104 are both achieved with an accompanied crosstalk of less than -26 dB. In addition, the device presents an improved detection limit (DL) of 1.24.10-6 RIU and a wide measurement range. These features make the designed device a promising element for performing label-free multiplexed detection in monolithic substrate for medical diagnostics and environmental monitoring.

  5. Optical fiber LPG biosensor integrated microfluidic chip for ultrasensitive glucose detection

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ming-jie; Huang, Bobo; Gao, Shaorui; Zhang, A. Ping; Ye, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    An optical fiber sensor integrated microfluidic chip is presented for ultrasensitive detection of glucose. A long-period grating (LPG) inscribed in a small-diameter single-mode fiber (SDSMF) is employed as an optical refractive-index (RI) sensor. With the layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique, poly (ethylenimine) (PEI) and poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) multilayer film is deposited on the SDSMF-LPG sensor for both supporting and signal enhancement, and then a glucose oxidase (GOD) layer is immobilized on the outer layer for glucose sensing. A microfluidic chip for glucose detection is fabricated after embedding the SDSMF-LPG biosensor into the microchannel of the chip. Experimental results reveal that the SDSMF-LPG biosensor based on such a hybrid sensing film can ultrasensitively detect glucose concentration as low as 1 nM. After integration into the microfluidic chip, the detection range of the sensor is extended from 2 µM to 10 µM, and the response time is remarkablely shortened from 6 minutes to 70 seconds. PMID:27231643

  6. Novel FIA chemiluminescence fiber optic biosensor for urinary and blood glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, Maurice V.; Luong, J. H. T.

    1993-05-01

    A chemiluminescence fiber optic biosensor system coupled to FIA was developed to measure glucose in bodily fluids. Glucose oxidase was immobilized on a preactivated nylon membrane and attached to the tip of a fiber optic bundle. This enzyme acts on (beta) -D-glucose to produce hydrogen peroxide which was then reacted with luminol in the presence of ferricyanide to produce a light signal. The sensitivity of the biosensor was determined to be 32 +/- 0.65 nV (mu) M-1 with a minimum detectable level of 5 (mu) M. The addition of a glucose oxidase column with a higher enzyme loading improved the sensitivity by at least 25-fold thus permitting the measurement of the lower glucose levels found in urine. The enzyme membrane could be reused for at least 50 analyses while the glucose oxidase column could be reused for over 500 analyses without losing the original activity. Endogenous ascorbate and urate usually present in urine samples which interfere with the chemiluminescence signal were effectively retained by an upstream ion exchange column. When applied for the determination of urinary and blood glucose levels, the results obtained compared well with those of the widely accepted hexokinase assay.

  7. Optical biosensor consisting of glutathione-S-transferase for detection of captan.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Young-Kee; Song, Sun-Young; Lee, In-ho; Lee, Won-Hong

    2003-10-15

    The optical biosensor consisting of a glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-immobilized gel film was developed to detect captan in contaminated water. The sensing scheme was based on the decrease of yellow product, s-(2,4-dinitrobenzene) glutathione, produced from substrates, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and glutathione (GSH), due to the inhibition of GST reaction by captan. Absorbance of the product as the output of enzyme reaction was detected and the light was guided through the optical fibers. The enzyme reactor of the sensor system was fabricated by the gel entrapment technique for the immobilized GST film. The immobilized GST had the maximum activity at pH 6.5. The optimal concentrations of substrates were determined with 1 mM for both of CDNB and GSH. The optimum concentration of enzyme was also determined with 100 microg/ml. The activity of immobilized enzyme was fairly sustained during 30 days. The proposed biosensor could successfully detect the captan up to 2 ppm and the response time to steady signal was about 15 min.

  8. Optical sharper focusing in an anisotropic crystal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sicong; Xie, Xiangsheng; Gu, Min; Zhou, Jianying

    2015-06-01

    Optical super-resolution technique through tight focusing is a widely used technique to image material samples with anisotropic optical properties. The knowledge of the field distribution of a tightly focused beam in anisotropic media is both scientifically interesting and technologically important. In this paper, the optical properties of a uniaxial crystal with the optic axis perpendicular to the interface under a tight focusing configuration are studied with rigorous theoretical and numerical analysis. The significant effect of the Poynting vector on the focal position introduces an obvious displacement of the focal spot formed by the extraordinary waves (e-ray). Moreover, a sharper focus with a lateral size of 0.22λ is obtained as a result of the effective separation of the ordinary waves (o-ray) and the e-ray. It provides a new tool to fabricate optical structures with higher resolutions than that in an isotropic medium through the far-field method.

  9. A disposable microfluidic biochip with on-chip molecularly imprinted biosensors for optical detection of anesthetic propofol.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chien-Chong; Chang, Po-Hsiang; Lin, Chih-Chung; Hong, Chian-Lang

    2010-05-15

    This paper presents a disposable microfluidic biochip with on-chip molecularly imprinted biosensors for optical detection of anesthetic propofol. So far, the methods to detect anesthetic propofol in hospitals are liquid chromatography (LC), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). These conventional instruments are bulky, expensive, and not ease of access. In this work, a novel plastic microfluidic biochip with on-chip anesthetic biosensor has been developed and characterized for rapid detection of anesthetic propofol. The template-molecule imprinted polymers were integrated into microfluidic biochips to be used for detecting anesthetic propofol optically at 655 nm wavelength after the reaction of propofol with color reagent. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the microfluidic biochip with on-chip molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) biosensor is 6.47 mV/(ppm mm(2)). The specific binding of MIP to non-imprinted polymer (NIP) is up to 456%. And the detection limit of the microsystem is 0.25 ppm with a linear detection range from 0.25 to 10 ppm. The disposable microfluidic biochip with on-chip anesthetic biosensor using molecularly imprinted polymers presented in this work showed excellent performance in separation and sensing of anesthetic propofol molecules. While compared to large-scale conventional instruments, the developed microfluidic biochips with on-chip MIP biosensors have the advantages of compact size, high sensitivity, high selectivity, low cost, and fast response.

  10. SPR-based plastic optical fibre biosensor for the detection of C-reactive protein in serum.

    PubMed

    Aray, Ayda; Chiavaioli, Francesco; Arjmand, Mojtaba; Trono, Cosimo; Tombelli, Sara; Giannetti, Ambra; Cennamo, Nunzio; Soltanolkotabi, Mahmood; Zeni, Luigi; Baldini, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    A plastic optical fibre biosensor based on surface plasmon resonance for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) in serum is proposed. The biosensor was integrated into a home-made thermo-stabilized microfluidic system that allows avoiding any thermal and/or mechanical fluctuation and maintaining the best stable conditions during the measurements. A working range of 0.006-70 mg L(-1) and a limit of detection of 0.009 mg L(-1) were achieved. These results are among the best compared to other SPR-based biosensors for CRP detection, especially considering that they were achieved in a real and complex medium, i.e. serum. In addition, since the sensor performances satisfy those requested in physiologically-relevant clinical applications, the whole biosensing platform could well address high sensitive, easy to realize, real-time, label-free, portable and low cost diagnosis of CRP for future lab-on-a-chip applications. 3D sketch (left) of the thermo-stabilized home-made flow cell developed to house the SPR-based plastic optical fibre biosensor. Exemplary response curve (shift of the SPR wavelength versus time) of the proposed biosensor (right) for the detection of C-reactive protein in serum. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. An Optical Biosensor from Green Fluorescent Escherichia coli for the Evaluation of Single and Combined Heavy Metal Toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Futra, Dedi; Heng, Lee Yook; Ahmad, Asmat; Surif, Salmijah; Ling, Tan Ling

    2015-01-01

    A fluorescence-based fiber optic toxicity biosensor based on genetically modified Escherichia coli (E. coli) with green fluorescent protein (GFP) was developed for the evaluation of the toxicity of several hazardous heavy metal ions. The toxic metals include Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), Co(II), Ni(II), Ag(I) and Fe(III). The optimum fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths of the optical biosensor were 400 ± 2 nm and 485 ± 2 nm, respectively. Based on the toxicity observed under optimal conditions, the detection limits of Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), Co(II), Ni(II), Ag(I) and Fe(III) that can be detected using the toxicity biosensor were at 0.04, 0.32, 0.46, 2.80, 100, 250, 400, 720 and 2600 μg/L, respectively. The repeatability and reproducibility of the proposed biosensor were 3.5%–4.8% RSD (relative standard deviation) and 3.6%–5.1% RSD (n = 8), respectively. The biosensor response was stable for at least five weeks, and demonstrated higher sensitivity towards metal toxicity evaluation when compared to a conventional Microtox assay. PMID:26029952

  12. Optical amplification enhancement in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza, R.; Leonetti, M.; Froufe-Perez, L. S.; Galisteo-Lopez, J. F.; Lopez, C.; Conti, C.

    2011-02-15

    Improving and controlling the efficiency of a gain medium is one of the most challenging problems of laser research. By measuring the gain length in an opal-based photonic crystal doped with laser dye, we demonstrate that optical amplification is more than twenty-fold enhanced along the {Gamma}-K symmetry directions of the face-centered-cubic photonic crystal. These results are theoretically explained by directional variations of the density of states, providing a quantitative connection between density of the states and light amplification.

  13. Immunodetection of salivary biomarkers by an optical microfluidic biosensor with polyethylenimine-modified polythiophene-C70 organic photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Tao; Pires, Nuno Miguel Matos

    2017-03-06

    This work reports a novel optical microfluidic biosensor with highly sensitive organic photodetectors (OPDs) for absorbance-based detection of salivary protein biomarkers at the point of care. The compact and miniaturized biosensor has comprised OPDs made of polythiophene-C70 bulk heterojunction for the photoactive layer; whilst a calcium-free cathode interfacial layer, made of linear polyethylenimine, was incorporated to the photodetectors to enhance the low cost. The OPDs realized onto a glass chip were aligned to antibody-functionalized chambers of a poly(methyl methacrylate) microfluidic chip, in where immunogold-silver assays were conducted. The biosensor has detected IL-8, IL-1β and MMP-8 protein in spiked saliva with high detection specificity and short analysis time exhibiting detection limits between 80pgmL(-1) and 120pgmL(-1). The result for IL-8 was below the clinical established cut-off of 600pgmL(-1), which revealed the potential of the biosensor to early detection of oral cancer. The detection limit was also comparable to other previously reported immunosensors performed with bulky instrumentation or using inorganic photodetectors. The optical detection sensitivity of the polythiophene-C70 OPD was enhanced by optimizing the thickness of the photoactive layer and anode interfacial layer prior to the saliva immunoassays. Further, the biosensor was tested with unspiked human saliva samples, and the results of measuring IL-8 and IL-1β were in statistical agreement with those provided by two commercial assays of ELISA. The optical microfluidic biosensor reported hereby offers an attractive and cost-effective tool to diagnostics or screening purposes at the point of care.

  14. Interfacing whispering gallery mode optical microresonator biosensors with the plant defense elicitor chitin.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Jeremy L; Yang, Yongqiang; Greenlief, C Michael; Stacey, Gary; Hunt, Heather K

    2014-10-01

    The biomaterial class of chitooligosaccharides (chitin), commonly found in insects and fungi, is one of the most abundant on earth. Substantial evidence implicates chitin in mediating a diverse array of plant cellular signaling events, including the induction of plant defense mechanisms against invading pests. However, these recognition and mediation mechanisms, including the binding kinetics between chitin and their plant recognition receptors, are not fully understood. Therefore, the creation of a platform capable of both interfacing with chitin and plant cell receptors, and monitoring their interactions, would significantly advance our understanding of this plant defense elicitor. Recently, a label-free, highly sensitive biosensor platform, based on Whispering Gallery Mode optical microresonators, has been developed to study such biomolecular interactions. Here, we demonstrate how this unique platform can be interfaced with chitin using simple carbohydrate chemistry. The surface chemistry is demonstrated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, optical profilometry, ellipsometry, and contact angle measurements. The resulting surface is uniform, with an average surface roughness of 1.25nm, and is active toward chitin recognition elements. Optical loss measurements using standard quantitative cavity analysis techniques demonstrate that the bioconjugated platforms maintain the high performance (Q>10(6)) required to track binding interactions in this system. The platform is able to detect lectin, which binds COs, at 10μg/mL concentration. This biosensor platform's unique capabilities for label-free, high sensitivity biodetection, when properly interfaced with the biomaterials of interest, could provide the basis for a robust analytical technique to probe the binding dynamics of chitin-plant cell receptors.

  15. Microplate based optical biosensor for L-Dopa using tyrosinase from Amorphophallus campanulatus.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amardeep Singh; Kumar, Jitendra; Melo, Jose Savio

    2014-11-07

    Developing a biosensor which is capable of simultaneously monitoring l-Dopa levels in multiple samples besides requiring small reaction volume is of great value. The present study describes the detection of l-Dopa using tyrosinase enzyme extracted from Amorphophallus campanulatus and immobilized on the surface of the microplate wells. Among the different approaches used for immobilizing tyrosinase onto the microplate wells, glutaraldehyde treatment was found to be most effective. Besides enzyme activity, ESEM-EDS (environmental scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive system) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) were also carried out to confirm the immobilization of tyrosinase enzyme onto the microplate well surface. This immobilized biocomponent was then integrated with an optical transducer for l-Dopa detection and it showed good reproducibility. The sensing property of the system was studied by measuring the initial rate of dopachrome formation at 475 nm. The calibration plot gave a linear range of detection from 10-1000 μM and the detection limit was calculated to be 3 μM. The immobilized biocomponent was stable for 41 days and was reused up to nine times. Spiked samples (blood plasma) were also analyzed using this biocomponent. This microplate based biosensor thus provides a convenient system for detection of multiple samples in a single run. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of an optical biosensor for the detection of antibiotics in the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Patricia; Vogler, Julian; Gauglitz, Günter

    2017-05-01

    Pharmacologically active substances like antibiotics, hormones, x-ray contrast media, antirheumatic drugs or beta blockers are increasingly accumulating in the environment. These pharmacologically active substances can be found in surface waters as well as in food products. In the case of surface waters, the contamination with pharmacologically active substances is primary caused by incorrect disposal of drugs and by human and animal feaces. This is due to the fact that, drugs are only removed incompletely during the wastewater treatment. Furthermore, food of animal origin like milk, cheese, eggs or meat are potentially frequently concerned. The use of animal drugs in animal husbandry and food industry is permitted legal and a standard practice. However, it is possible that after drug application to animals drug residues or decomposition products remain in the animal carcasses. In this work we will present the first steps of the development of an optical biosensor sensitive for the antibiotic penicillin G. This biosensor is principle of the label-free and time resolved method Reflectometric Interference Spectroscopy (RIfS). The method uses interference of white light at thin layers to observe molecular interactions. The required surface modifications for the sensor were developed and optimized. Moreover, common commercial antibodies were chosen and concentration dependent measurements in buffer were performed.

  17. Bond characterization by detection and manipulation of particle mobility in an optical evanescent field biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ommering, Kim; Koets, Marjo; Paesen, Rik; van IJzendoorn, Leo J.; Prins, Menno W. J.

    2010-09-01

    We present an optical biosensor technology that integrates the tethered particle motion technique and the magnetic tweezer technique. The goal is to quantify the three-dimensional mobility of bound particle labels and to characterize the bond between the particle and the surface. We show, using a series of four different lengths of dsDNA (105-590 bp), that plots of the height as a function of the in-plane particle position reflect the bond length and bond flexibility. We analyse ensembles of bound particles and show that the height displacement is at maximum the bond length, but that non-specific sticking causes large variations between particles. We also measured the height of bound particles under the influence of magnetic forces. A magnetic gradient force towards the surface brought particles on average closer to the surface, but a magnetic gradient force away from the surface did not bring all particles away from the surface. We show that the latter can be explained by magnetic anisotropy in the particles. Our results demonstrate that mobility detection of bound particle labels in an evanescent field is a promising technique to characterize the bond between a particle and a surface in a biosensor system.

  18. Plasmonic Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Ryan T.

    2015-01-01

    The unique optical properties of plasmon resonant nanostructures enable exploration of nanoscale environments using relatively simple optical characterization techniques. For this reason, the field of plasmonics continues to garner the attention of the biosensing community. Biosensors based on propagating surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) in films are the most well-recognized plasmonic biosensors, but there is great potential for the new, developing technologies to surpass the robustness and popularity of film-based SPR sensing. This review surveys the current plasmonic biosensor landscape with emphasis on the basic operating principles of each plasmonic sensing technique and the practical considerations when developing a sensing platform with the various techniques. The “gold standard” film SPR technique is reviewed briefly, but special emphasis is devoted to the up-and-coming LSPR-based and plasmonically coupled sensor technology. PMID:25377594

  19. Optical Restoration of Lead Fluoride Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, A.; Cole, P. L.; Bertin, P.; Forest, T. A.; Mestari, M.; Naeem, S.; Roche, J.; Camacho, C. Muñoz; LeBaron, N.

    2009-03-01

    Due to its relatively high resistance to high radiation, lead fluoride (PbF2) crystals are becoming an increasingly popular material of choice for electromagnetic calorimetry, such as for experiments requiring the measurement of high-energy photons in Hall A of Jefferson Lab. For our studies we irradiated the PbF2 crystals using an electron linear accelerator (LINAC) followed by exposing the crystals to blue light so as to restore the nominal optical properties. This technique of optical bleaching with blue light affords an efficient and low-cost means for reversing the deleterious effects of optical transmission loss in radiation-damaged lead fluoride crystals. Whereas earlier experiments irradiated the PbF2 samples with 1.1 and 1.3 MeV gammas from 60Co, we used pulsed beams of energetic electrons from the tunable 25-MeV LINAC at Idaho Accelerator Center of Idaho State University in Pocatello, Idaho. A 20-MeV beam of electrons was targeted onto four separate 19 cm length samples of lead fluoride over periods of 1, 2, and 4 hours yielding doses between 7 kGy and 35 kGy. Samples were then bleached with blue light of wavelength 410-450 nm for periods between 19.5 and 24 hours. We performed this process twice—radiation, bleaching, radiation, and then followed by bleaching again—for each of these four PbF2 samples. We shall discuss the efficacy of blue light curing on samples that have undergone two cycles of electron irradiation and optical bleaching.

  20. Optical Restoration of Lead Fluoride Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Spilker, A.; Cole, P. L.; Forest, T. A.; Mestari, M.; Naeem, S.; LeBaron, N.; Bertin, P.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Roche, J.

    2009-03-10

    Due to its relatively high resistance to high radiation, lead fluoride (PbF{sub 2}) crystals are becoming an increasingly popular material of choice for electromagnetic calorimetry, such as for experiments requiring the measurement of high-energy photons in Hall A of Jefferson Lab. For our studies we irradiated the PbF{sub 2} crystals using an electron linear accelerator (LINAC) followed by exposing the crystals to blue light so as to restore the nominal optical properties. This technique of optical bleaching with blue light affords an efficient and low-cost means for reversing the deleterious effects of optical transmission loss in radiation-damaged lead fluoride crystals. Whereas earlier experiments irradiated the PbF{sub 2} samples with 1.1 and 1.3 MeV gammas from {sup 60}Co, we used pulsed beams of energetic electrons from the tunable 25-MeV LINAC at Idaho Accelerator Center of Idaho State University in Pocatello, Idaho. A 20-MeV beam of electrons was targeted onto four separate 19 cm length samples of lead fluoride over periods of 1, 2, and 4 hours yielding doses between 7 kGy and 35 kGy. Samples were then bleached with blue light of wavelength 410-450 nm for periods between 19.5 and 24 hours. We performed this process twice - radiation, bleaching, radiation, and then followed by bleaching again - for each of these four PbF{sub 2} samples. We shall discuss the efficacy of blue light curing on samples that have undergone two cycles of electron irradiation and optical bleaching.

  1. Impurities in nonlinear optical oxide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Patricia A.

    1990-11-01

    Impurities in nonlinear optical oxide crystals can affect many of the properties for device applications. The structures of typical crystals are tolerant with respect to occupancy and are nonstoichiometric on the cation sublattices (e.g. the A sublattice in crystals with the general formula AMO 3). This may, at least in part, be due to the presence of the relatively strong covalent nature of the acentric oxide groups determining the nonlinear optical properties. These circumstances make the incorporation of impurities into the lattice relatively easy and result in large distribution coefficients for many impurities. Generally, little purification during growth will occur with respect to these impurities and therefore, it is usually necessary to purify the starting materials of any unwanted ions. Chemical or powder processing and firing procedures can be used to prevent any contamination of the crystal growth precursors by common impurities (e.g. Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Na, K, Mg, Cl, and S) at a level of <10 parts per million total concentration. A combination of analytical techniques, including those which require little or no sample preparation (e.g. secondary ion mass spectrometry, neutron activation analysis, or laser microprobe mass spectrometry), should be used to determine the impurities present in a material. For example, the effects of protons incorporated (OH -) in the lattice of these crystals can be very detrimental and can be detected using infrared spectroscopy. The growth of many of these crystals requires flux techniques, but the temperature dependence of any nonstoichiometry present and of the distribution coefficients make the use of slow cooling techniques generally not recommended when uniformity of properties is required.

  2. Liquid crystals for holographic optical data storage.

    PubMed

    Matharu, Avtar S; Jeeva, Shehzad; Ramanujam, P S

    2007-12-01

    A tutorial review is presented to inform and inspire the reader to develop and integrate strong scientific links between liquid crystals and holographic data storage, from a materials scientist's viewpoint. The principle of holographic data storage as a means of providing a solution to the information storage demands of the 21st century is detailed. Holography is a small subset of the much larger field of optical data storage and similarly, the diversity of materials used for optical data storage is enormous. The theory of polarisation holography which produces holograms of constant intensity, is discussed. Polymeric liquid crystals play an important role in the development of materials for holographic storage and photoresponsive materials based on azobenzene are targeted for discussion due to their ease of photo-reversion between trans- and cis-states. Although the final polymer may not be liquid crystalline, irradiation can induce ordered domains. The mesogens act in a co-operative manner, enhancing refractive indices and birefringences. Surface relief gratings are discussed as a consequence of holographic storage. Cholesteric polymers comprising azobenzene are briefly highlighted. Irradiation causing cis-trans-isomerisation can be used to control helix pitch. A brief mention of liquid crystals is also made since these materials may be of future interest since they are optically transparent and amenable to photo-induced anisotropy.

  3. Label-free methods of reporting biomolecular interactions by optical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Citartan, Marimuthu; Gopinath, Subash C B; Tominaga, Junji; Tang, Thean-Hock

    2013-07-07

    Reporting biomolecular interactions has become part and parcel of many applications of science towards an in-depth understanding of disease and gene regulation. Apart from that, in diagnostic applications where biomolecules (antibodies and aptamers) are vastly applied, meticulous monitoring of biomolecular interaction is vital for clear-cut diagnosis. Several currently available methods of analyzing the interaction of the ligands with the appropriate analytes are aided by labeling using fluorescence or luminescence techniques. However, labeling is cumbersome and can occupy important binding sites of interactive molecules to be labeled, which may interfere with the conformational changes of the molecules and increase non-specificity. Optical-based sensing can provide an alternative way as a label-free procedure for monitoring biomolecular interactions. Optical sensors affiliated with different operating principles, including surface plasmon changes, scattering and interferometry, can impart a huge impact for in-house and point-of-care applications. This optical-based biosensing permits real-time monitoring, obviating the use of hazardous labeling molecules such as radioactive tags. Herein, label-free ways of reporting biomolecular interactions by various optical biosensors were gleaned.

  4. Optical power-based interrogation of plasmonic tilted fiber Bragg grating biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Vila, Á.; Lopez-Aldaba, A.; Kinet, D.; Mégret, P.; Lopez-Amo, M.; Caucheteur, C.

    2017-04-01

    Two interrogation techniques for plasmonic tilted fiber Bragg grating sensors are reported and experimentally tested. Typical interrogation methods are usually based on tracking the wavelength shift of the most sensitive cladding mode, but for biosensing applications, spectrometer-based methods can be replaced by more efficient solutions. The proposed techniques thus rely on the measurement of the induced changes in optical power. The first one consists of a properly polarized tunable laser source set to emit at the wavelength of the sensor most sensitive mode and an optical power meter to measure the transmitted response. For the second method, a uniform fiber Bragg grating is photo-inscribed beyond the sensor in such a way that its central wavelength matches the sensor most sensitive mode, acting as an optical filter. Using a LED source, light reflected backwards by this grating is partially attenuated when passing through the sensor due to plasmon wave excitation and the power changes are quantified once again with an optical power meter. A performance analysis of the techniques is carried out and they both result competitive interrogation solutions. The work thus focuses on the development of cost-effective alternatives for monitoring this kind of biosensors in practical situations.

  5. Microalgae dual-head biosensors for selective detection of herbicides with fiber-optic luminescent O2 transduction.

    PubMed

    Haigh-Flórez, David; de la Hera, Cristina; Costas, Eduardo; Orellana, Guillermo

    2014-04-15

    The microalgal species Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides (D. c.) was immobilized into porous silicone films and their photosynthetic activity was monitored with an integrated robust luminescent O2 sensor. The biosensor specificity towards a particular pesticide has been achieved by manufacturing a fiber-optic dual-head device containing both analyte-sensitive and analyte-resistant D. c. strains. The latter are not genetically modified microalgae, but a product of modified Luria-Delbrück fluctuation analysis followed by ratchet selection cycles. In this way the target herbicide decreases the O2 production of the analyte-sensitive immobilized strain without affecting the analyte-resistant population response; any other pollutant will lower the O2 production of both strains. The effect of the sample flow-rate, exposure time to the herbicide, biomass loading, biosensor film thickness, intensity of the actinic light, illumination cycle, and temperature on the biosensor response has been evaluated using waterborne simazine as test bench. The biosensing device is able to provide in situ measurements of the herbicide concentration every 180 min. The biosensor limit of detection for this herbicide was 12 μg L(-1), with a working range of 50-800 μg L(-1). The biosensor specificity to simazine has been assessed by comparing its response to that of isoproturon.

  6. Optical refractive index biosensor using evanescently coupled lateral Bragg gratings on silicon-on-insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez-Astudillo, Manuel; Takahisa, Hiroki; Okayama, Hideaki; Nakajima, Hirochika

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a compact silicon-on-insulator optical biosensor based on lateral Bragg gratings evanescently coupled to a waveguide. The device is fabricated by electron-beam lithography and dry-etched in a single step with inductive coupled plasma reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE). Fully etched grating couplers are used to couple the light in and out of the chip, while lateral Bragg gratings are used as the sensing element of the device. A sensitivity of 22 nm/RIU is obtained by exposing the device to deionized water with different NaCl concentrations with a footprint area of 15 × 4 µm2 that allows for densely multiplexed solutions.

  7. Measuring binding kinetics of biomolecular interactions using a localized surface plasmon couple fluorescence fiber optic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ying-Feng; Hsieh, Jo-Ping; Su, Li-Chen; Li, Ying-Chang; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Chou, Chien

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we describe a novel method for analyzing protein-protein binding kinetics at ultra-low concentration (1 pg/mL) using a localized surface plasmon coupled fluorescence fiber-optic biosensor (LSPCF-FOB). The association and dissociation rate constants, ka and kd, respectively, for the binding kinetics of the mouse IgG/ anti-mouse IgG interaction have been calculated to be ka = (5.9928+/-3.1540)x106 M-1s-1 and kd = (1.0587+/-0.5572)x10-3 s-1. The theoretical basis of this analytical approach is a rapid-mixing model integrated with a two-compartment model; has been experimentally verified in this study as well. The LSPCF-FOB provides a potentially alternative option for characterizing the interaction of biomolecules at ultra-low concentrations.

  8. Trends in porous silicon biomedical devices: tuning microstructure and performance trade-offs in optical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLouise, Lisa A.; Miller, Ben L.

    2004-07-01

    High surface area mesoporous silicon microcavities are investigated for direct detect optical biosensor applications. Device quality is reported as a function of fabrication parameters. A dilute KOH etch process is utilized to modify the intrinsic 3D microstructure to enable enhanced pore infiltration of large biomolecules. Results suggest that the KOH etch mechanism is a two step process consisting of a fast step where high surface area nanostructures are rapidly removed. This is followed by a slower step where silicon is removed from the pore channel walls. The enzyme, Glutathione-S-Transferase (50kDa), is utilized to probe pore infiltration. Results from a solid phase immobilized enzyme assay support our conclusions on the impact the KOH etch step has on modifying the porous silicon microstructure. Preliminary findings point to trade-offs that exists between optimizing microstructure with microcavity operation mode and device sensitivity.

  9. Microfabricated Optical Cavities and Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lončar, Marko; Scherer, Axel

    Microfabricated periodic structures with a high refractive index contrast have recently become very interesting geometries for the manipulation of light. The existence of a photonic bandgap, a frequency range within which propagation of light is prevented in all directions, is very useful where spatial localization of light is required. Ideally, by constructing three-dimensional confinement geometries, light propagation can be controlled in all three dimensions. However, since the fabrication of 3D photonic crystals is difficult, a more manufacturable approach is based on the use of one- or two-dimensional geometries. Here we describe the evolution of microcavities from 1D Bragg reflectors to 2D photonic crystals. The 1D microcavity laser (VCSEL) has already found widespread commercial use in data communications, and the equivalent 2D geometry has recently attracted a lot of research attention. 2D photonic crystal lasers, fabricated within a thin dielectric membrane and perforated with a two-dimensional lattice of holes, are very appealing for dense integration of photonic devices in telecommunications and optical sensing systems. In this chapter, we describe theory and experiments of planar photonic crystals as well as their applications towards lasers and super-dispersive elements. Low-threshold 2D photonic crystal lasers were recently demonstrated both in air and in different chemical solutions and can now be used to perform spectroscopic tests on ultra-small volumes of analyte.

  10. Species-dependent binding of new synthesized bicalutamide analogues to albumin by optical biosensor analysis.

    PubMed

    Fortugno, Cecilia; van der Gronde, Toon; Varchi, Greta; Guerrini, Andrea; Bertucci, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The binding of some novel bicalutamide analogues to human serum albumin (HSA) and rat serum albumin (RSA) was investigated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based optical biosensor technique. The serum protein binding of the bicalutamide analogues was determined and compared to that of the parent compound. Furthermore, HSA and RSA were used as target plasma proteins, in order to highlight possible differences among species when performing pharmacokinetic studies. HSA and RSA were covalently immobilized on carboxymethyl dextran matrixes, using an amine coupling procedure. The anchoring method was validated by determining the dissociation constant (KD) of a standard analyte to confirm that the binding properties of the proteins were maintained. The ranking of the bicalutamide analogues for their HSA and RSA bound fractions was used to compare the behaviour of the two albumins. Most of the bicalutamide analogues showed higher binding levels with respect to the lead compound, (R)-bicalutamide. Further, meaningful differences in the binding level to the two serum proteins were obtained. The dissociation constants (KD) of the interaction between the lead compound, (R)-bicalutamide, and the two proteins were calculated. As a result, the KD obtained with HSA was one order of magnitude higher than that obtained with RSA. The observed differences in the HSA and RSA bonding of the bicalutamide analogues increase the knowledge on the possible low reliability in extrapolating the distribution data obtained on animals to humans. This work demonstrates that SPR based optical biosensor technique is well suited for the medium-high throughput screening of compounds' ligand binding to serum albumins.

  11. Submicron diameter single crystal sapphire optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Cary; Homa, Daniel; Liu, Bo; Yu, Zhihao; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary

    2014-10-02

    In this work, a submicron-diameter single crystal sapphire optical fiber was demonstrated via wet acid etching at elevated temperatures. Etch rates on the order 2.3 µm/hr were achievable with a 3:1 molar ratio sulfuric-phosphoric acid solution maintained at a temperature of 343°C. A sapphire fiber with an approximate diameter of 800 nm was successfully fabricated from a commercially available fiber with an original diameter of 50 µm. The simple and controllable etching technique provides a feasible approach to the fabrication of unique waveguide structures via traditional silica masking techniques. The ability to tailor the geometry of sapphire optical fibers is the first step in achieving optical and sensing performance on par with its fused silica counterpart.

  12. Submicron diameter single crystal sapphire optical fiber

    DOE PAGES

    Hill, Cary; Homa, Daniel; Liu, Bo; ...

    2014-10-02

    In this work, a submicron-diameter single crystal sapphire optical fiber was demonstrated via wet acid etching at elevated temperatures. Etch rates on the order 2.3 µm/hr were achievable with a 3:1 molar ratio sulfuric-phosphoric acid solution maintained at a temperature of 343°C. A sapphire fiber with an approximate diameter of 800 nm was successfully fabricated from a commercially available fiber with an original diameter of 50 µm. The simple and controllable etching technique provides a feasible approach to the fabrication of unique waveguide structures via traditional silica masking techniques. The ability to tailor the geometry of sapphire optical fibers ismore » the first step in achieving optical and sensing performance on par with its fused silica counterpart.« less

  13. Photonic crystal cavities and integrated optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Lin; Li, ZhiYuan

    2015-11-01

    This paper gives a brief introduction to our recent works on photonic crystal (PhC) cavities and related integrated optical structures and devices. Theoretical background and numerical methods for simulation of PhC cavities are first presented. Based on the theoretical basis, two relevant quantities, the cavity mode volume and the quality factor are discussed. Then the methods of fabrication and characterization of silicon PhC slab cavities are introduced. Several types of PhC cavities are presented, such as the usual L3 missing-hole cavity, the new concept waveguide-like parallel-hetero cavity, and the low-index nanobeam cavity. The advantages and disadvantages of each type of cavity are discussed. This will help the readers to decide which type of PhC cavities to use in particular applications. Furthermore, several integrated optical devices based on PhC cavities, such as optical filters, channel-drop filters, optical switches, and optical logic gates are described in both the working principle and operation characteristics. These devices designed and realized in our group demonstrate the wide range of applications of PhC cavities and offer possible solutions to some integrated optical problems.

  14. Optics in Microstructured and Photonic Crystal Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J. C.

    2008-10-01

    The development of optical fibers with two-dimensional patterns of air holes running down their length has reinvigorated research in the field of fiber optics. It has greatly—and fundamentally—broadened the range of specialty optical fibers, by demonstrating that optical fibers can be more "special" than previously thought. Fibers with air cores have made it possible to deliver energetic femtosecond-scale optical pulses, transform limited, as solitons, using single-mode fiber. Other fibers with anomalous dispersion at visible wavelengths have spawned a new generation of single-mode optical supercontinuum sources, spanning visible and near-infrared wavelengths and based on compact pump sources. A third example is in the field of fiber lasers, where the use of photonic crystal fiber concepts has led to a new hybrid laser technology, in which the very high numerical aperture available sing air holes have enabled fibers so short they are more naturally held straight than bent. This paper describes some of the basic physics and technology behind these developments, illustrated with some of the impressive demonstrations of the past 18 months.

  15. Analysis of optical sensing behavior of a novel optical bean-shaped resonator biosensor integrated with MZI configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuoran; Yao, Jia; Yuan, Guohui; Yang, Li

    2014-07-01

    A novel optical bean-shaped resonator (BR) biosensor integrated with Mach-Zehnder Interferometer structure based on a silicon-on-isolator platform has been proposed and investigated theoretically and numerically. By characterizing and optimizing the structure, our bean-shaped device exhibits a high extinction ratio over 50 dB and a high Q factor of about 5.46 × 104 in a wide wavelength span. The quasi-free spectral range (FSR) is about 469 nm. The sensitivity of 688.6 nm/refractive index unit (RIU) is achieved for bulk changes of refractive index and the detection range varies from 10-6 to 0.689 RIU. More complex bean-shaped structures can also be cascaded by adding more bending waveguides in BR to obtain wider quasi-FSR range.

  16. Optical biosensor with poly[N-nonyl-3,6-bis(ethylenedioxythiophene)carbazole] matrix for monitoring of phenol derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrychowska, Agnieszka; Malecha, Karol; Cabaj, Joanna; Sołoducho, Jadwiga

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the research was to develop an enzymatic, optical biosensor which provides quick and convenient determination of phenolic compounds in aqueous solutions. The biosensing strategy concerns design, fabrication and testing of a miniature ceramic-based biosensor which is destined for in-situ substrate monitoring. The base of the measuring system was fabricated using low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) technology. The biocatalyst - laccase- was immobilized on the thin film of poly[N-nonyl-3,6-bis(ethylenedioxythiophene)carbazole] which provided good binding of the enzyme to the substrate and positively affected on the catalytic activity of the protein. In order to evaluate properties of the designed biosensor, its response for various concentrations of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diamonnium sal (ABTS) was measured. The optical biosensor produced by presented method could find applications in many fields, i.e. for detection of phenolic compounds in food products and beverages, in industry for control of technological processes or for environmental monitoring

  17. Sensitivity control of optical fiber biosensors utilizing turnaround point long period gratings with self-assembled polymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Erika; Wang, Z.; Ramachandran, S.; Heflin, J. R.

    2007-09-01

    Ionic self-assembled multilayers (ISAMs) adsorbed on long period fiber gratings (LPGs) can serve as an inexpensive, robust, portable, biosensor platform. The ISAM technique is a layer-by-layer deposition technique that creates thin films on the nanoscale level. The combination of ISAMs with LPGs yields exceptional sensitivity of the optical fiber transmission spectrum. We have shown theoretically that the resonant wavelength shift for a thin-film coated LPG can be caused by the variation of the film's refractive index and/or the variation of the thickness of the film. We have experimentally demonstrated that the deposition of nm-thick ISAM films on LPGs induces shifts in the resonant wavelength of > 1.6 nm per nm of thin film. It has also been shown that the sensitivity of the LPG to the thickness of the ISAM film increases with increased film thickness. We have further demonstrated that ISAM-coated LPGs can function effectively as biosensors by using the biotin-streptavidin system and by using the Bacillus anthracis (Anthrax) antibody- PA (Protective Antigen) system. Experiments have been successfully performed in both air and solution, which illustrates the versatility of the biosensor. The results confirm that ISAM-LPGs yield a reusable, thermally-stable, and robust platform for designing and building efficient optical biosensors.

  18. Thermally Engineered Blue Photoluminescence of Porous Anodic Alumina Membranes for Promising Optical Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Sang Don; Cho, Sam Yeon; Choi, Yong Chan; Kim, Jin Woo; Han, Jin Kyu; Kwak, Jin Ho; Yang, Sun A.

    Optical biosensors based on porous anodic alumina membranes (PAAMs) have shown to be an effective device because of their unique optical properties and biocompatibility. Among various optical properties, photoluminescence (PL) emission derived from PAAMs is one of the most suitable characteristics. However, the origin of PL from PAA is unclear and still in doubt. Therefore, it is essential for further potential practical applications to understand the origin of PL and PL variations. Here, we investigate the effects of post-annealing temperatures on the blue PL of amorphous PAAMs fabricated in oxalic acid. We find that the blue PL emission is strongly dependent on the thermal properties. A strong blue PL at a peak of ~460 nm is observed from the initial PAAM (not annealed PAAM) and this PL band can be divided into two Gaussian components at 458 ~ +/- ~ 4 nm (P1 band) and 517 ~ +/- 7nm (P2 band). As the temperature increases to 600 ° C , the intensities of two PL bands gradually increase. During temperature increases from 600 to 700 ° C , the P2 band increases but the P1 band decreases. The analyses of electron paramagnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy show that the P1 and P2 bands originate from the unstable carboxylates and the stable carboxylates, respectively.

  19. Towards a Uniform Metrological Assessment of Grating-Based Optical Fiber Sensors: From Refractometers to Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Chiavaioli, Francesco; Gouveia, Carlos A. J.; Jorge, Pedro A. S.; Baldini, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    A metrological assessment of grating-based optical fiber sensors is proposed with the aim of providing an objective evaluation of the performance of this sensor category. Attention was focused on the most common parameters, used to describe the performance of both optical refractometers and biosensors, which encompassed sensitivity, with a distinction between volume or bulk sensitivity and surface sensitivity, resolution, response time, limit of detection, specificity (or selectivity), reusability (or regenerability) and some other parameters of generic interest, such as measurement uncertainty, accuracy, precision, stability, drift, repeatability and reproducibility. Clearly, the concepts discussed here can also be applied to any resonance-based sensor, thus providing the basis for an easier and direct performance comparison of a great number of sensors published in the literature up to now. In addition, common mistakes present in the literature made for the evaluation of sensor performance are highlighted, and lastly a uniform performance assessment is discussed and provided. Finally, some design strategies will be proposed to develop a grating-based optical fiber sensing scheme with improved performance. PMID:28635665

  20. Towards a Uniform Metrological Assessment of Grating-Based Optical Fiber Sensors: From Refractometers to Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Chiavaioli, Francesco; Gouveia, Carlos A J; Jorge, Pedro A S; Baldini, Francesco

    2017-06-21

    A metrological assessment of grating-based optical fiber sensors is proposed with the aim of providing an objective evaluation of the performance of this sensor category. Attention was focused on the most common parameters, used to describe the performance of both optical refractometers and biosensors, which encompassed sensitivity, with a distinction between volume or bulk sensitivity and surface sensitivity, resolution, response time, limit of detection, specificity (or selectivity), reusability (or regenerability) and some other parameters of generic interest, such as measurement uncertainty, accuracy, precision, stability, drift, repeatability and reproducibility. Clearly, the concepts discussed here can also be applied to any resonance-based sensor, thus providing the basis for an easier and direct performance comparison of a great number of sensors published in the literature up to now. In addition, common mistakes present in the literature made for the evaluation of sensor performance are highlighted, and lastly a uniform performance assessment is discussed and provided. Finally, some design strategies will be proposed to develop a grating-based optical fiber sensing scheme with improved performance.

  1. Light-directed functionalization methods for high-resolution optical fiber based biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahyaoglu, Leyla Nesrin; Madangopal, Rajtarun; Stensberg, Matthew; Rickus, Jenna L.

    2005-05-01

    Recent advances in miniaturization and analyte-sensitive fluorescent indicators make optical fiber biosensors promising alternatives to microelectrodes. Optical sensing offers several advantages over electrochemical methods including increased stability and better spatial control to monitor physiological processes at cellular resolutions. The distal end of an optical fiber can be functionalized with different fluorophore/polymer combinations through mechanical, dip-coating or photopolymerization techniques. Unlike mechanical and dip-coating schemes, photopolymerization can spatially confine the sensing layer in the vicinity of light in a more reproducible and controllable manner. The objective of this study was to fabricate microscale fluorescence lifetime based optrodes using UV-induced photopolymerization. Six commercially available acrylate based monomers were investigated for stable entrapment of the oxygen sensitive porphyrin dye (PtTFPP) dye via photopolymerization at the end of optical fibers. Of these, the acrylate-functionalized alkoxysilane monomer, 3-methacryloxypropyl-trimethoxysilane (tradename Dynasylan MEMO) showed maximal response to changes in oxygen concentration. Dye-doped polymer microtips were grown at the ends 50 μm optical fibers and sensitivity and response time were optimized by varying both the concentration of doped dye and the excitation power used for polymerization. The resulting sensors showed linear response within the physiologically relevant range of oxygen concentrations and fast response times. While applied here to oxygen sensing, the photopolymer formulation and process parameters described are compatible with a wide range of available organic dyes and can be used to pattern arrays of spots, needles or more complex shapes at high spatial resolution.

  2. Plastic optical fiber-based biosensor platform for rapid cell detection.

    PubMed

    Wandermur, Gisele; Rodrigues, Domingos; Allil, Regina; Queiroz, Vanessa; Peixoto, Raquel; Werneck, Marcelo; Miguel, Marco

    2014-04-15

    This work presents a novel, fast response time, plastic optic fiber (POF) biosensor to detect Escherichia coli. It discloses the technique for the development, calibration and measurement of this robust and simple-to-construct POF biosensor. The probes in U-shaped format were manufactured with a specially developed device. The calibration process led to the evaluation of the sensitivity, accuracy and repeatability by using solutions of sucrose for obtaining refractive indices (RI) in the range 1.33-1.39 IR equivalent of water and bacteria, respectively. The POF probes were functionalized with antibody anti-E. coli serotype O55 and tested firstly with saline and then with bacterial concentrations of 10(4), 10(6), and 10(8) colony forming units/ml (CFU/ml). The optoelectronic setup consists of an 880 nm LED connected to the U-shaped probe driven by a sine waveform generated by the Simulink (from Matlab(®)). On the other side of the probe a photodetector generates a photocurrent which is amplified by a transconductance amplifier. The output voltage signal is read by the analog-to-digital (A/D) input of the microcontroller. In all tested concentrations, the results presented a tendency of a decrease in the output signal with time, due to the attachment of the bacteria to the POF probe and consequent increase in the RI close to the sensitive area of the fiber surface. It has been shown that the system is capable of providing positive response to the bacterial concentration in less than 10 min, demonstrating good possibilities to be commercially developed as a portable field sensor. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Optical trapping apparatus, methods and applications using photonic crystal resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, David; Chen, Yih-Fan

    2015-06-16

    A plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses and a plurality optical trapping methods using the plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses include located and formed over a substrate a photonic waveguide that is coupled (i.e., either separately coupled or integrally coupled) with a photonic crystal resonator. In a particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a monocrystalline silicon (or other) photonic material absent any chemical functionalization. In another particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a silicon nitride material which when actuating the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus with a 1064 nanometer resonant photonic radiation wavelength (or other resonant photonic radiation wavelength in a range from about 700 to about 1200 nanometers) provides no appreciable heating of an aqueous sample fluid that is analyzed by the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus.

  4. Wide Angle Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xing-Hua; Wang, Bin; Bos, Philip J.; Anderson, James E.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; McManamon, Paul F.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate modeling of a high resolution, liquid crystal (LC) based, optical phased array (OPA) is shown. The simulation shows excellent agreement with a test 2-D LC OPA. The modeling method is extendable to cases where the array element size is close to the wavelength of light. The fringing fields of such a device are first studied, and subsequently reduced. This results in a device that demonstrates plus or minus 7.4 degrees of continuous beam steering at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and a diffraction efficiency (DE) higher than 72%.

  5. Optical properties of lithium niobate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palatnikov, M. N.; Sidorov, N. V.; Biryukova, I. V.; Kalinnikov, V. T.; Bormanis, K.

    2005-01-01

    Studies of thermal and -irradiation effects on the optical properties in congruous lithium niobate single crystals containing Y, Mg, Gd, B, and Zn dopants including samples with double dopants Y, Mg and Gd, Mg are reported. Formation of defects at irradiation and thermal treatment of the samples is explored by electron absorption spectra. Considerable increase of absorption with the dose of -radiation is observed at 500 nm. The changes of absorption examined under different conditions are explained by creation and destruction of Nb4+ defects.

  6. Development and Testing of a Plastic Optical Fiber Grating Biosensor for Detection of Glucose in the Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunianto, M.; Eka, D.; Permata, A. N.; Ariningrum, D.; Wahyuningsih, S.; Marzuki, A.

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study is to detect glucose content in human blood serum using optical fiber grating with LED wavelength corresponding to the absorption of glucose content in blood serum. The testing used a UV-Vis spectrometer and Rays spectrometers, in which in the ray spectrometer it was used optical fiber biosensor using optical fiber grating. The result obtained is the typical peak of glucose absorption in UV-Vis at 581 nm wavelength and rays spectrometer on green LED at 514.2 nm wavelength with linear regression result by 0.97 and 0.94, respectively.

  7. Benzothiazolium Single Crystals: A New Class of Nonlinear Optical Crystals with Efficient THz Wave Generation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Heon; Lu, Jian; Lee, Seung-Jun; Han, Jae-Hyun; Jeong, Chan-Uk; Lee, Seung-Chul; Li, Xian; Jazbinšek, Mojca; Yoon, Woojin; Yun, Hoseop; Kang, Bong Joo; Rotermund, Fabian; Nelson, Keith A; Kwon, O-Pil

    2017-08-01

    Highly efficient nonlinear optical organic crystals are very attractive for various photonic applications including terahertz (THz) wave generation. Up to now, only two classes of ionic crystals based on either pyridinium or quinolinium with extremely large macroscopic optical nonlinearity have been developed. This study reports on a new class of organic nonlinear optical crystals introducing electron-accepting benzothiazolium, which exhibit higher electron-withdrawing strength than pyridinium and quinolinium in benchmark crystals. The benzothiazolium crystals consisting of new acentric core HMB (2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxystyryl)-3-methylbenzo[d]thiazol-3-ium) exhibit extremely large macroscopic optical nonlinearity with optimal molecular ordering for maximizing the diagonal second-order nonlinearity. HMB-based single crystals prepared by simple cleaving method satisfy all required crystal characteristics for intense THz wave generation such as large crystal size with parallel surfaces, moderate thickness and high optical quality with large optical transparency range (580-1620 nm). Optical rectification of 35 fs pulses at the technologically very important wavelength of 800 nm in 0.26 mm thick HMB crystal leads to one order of magnitude higher THz wave generation efficiency with remarkably broader bandwidth compared to standard inorganic 0.5 mm thick ZnTe crystal. Therefore, newly developed HMB crystals introducing benzothiazolium with extremely large macroscopic optical nonlinearity are very promising materials for intense broadband THz wave generation and other nonlinear optical applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Water quality monitoring using an automated portable fiber optic biosensor: RAPTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, George P.; Rowe-Taitt, Chris A.

    2001-03-01

    The RAPTOR is a portable, automated biosensor capable of performing rapid, ten-minute assays on a sample for four target analytes simultaneously. Samples are analyzed using a fluorescent sandwich immunoassay on the surface of short polystyrene optical probes with capture antibody adsorbed to the probe surface. Target analytes bound to the fiber by capture antibodies are detected with fluorescently labeled tracer antibodies, which are held in a separate reservoir. Since target recognition is a two-step process, selectivity is enhanced, and the optical probes can be reused up to forty times, or until a positive result is obtained. This greatly reduces the logistical burden for field operations. Numerous assays for toxins, such as SEB and ricin, and bacteria, such as Bacillus anthracis and Francisella tularensis, have been developed for the RAPTOR. An assay of particular interest for water quality monitoring and the screening of fruits and vegetables is detection of Giardia cysts. Giardia lamblia is a parasitic protozoan common in the developing world that causes severe intestinal infections. Thus, a simple field assay for screening water supplies would be highly useful. Such an assay has been developed using the RAPTOR. The detection limit for Giardia cysts was 5x104/ml for a 10-minute assay.

  9. Fiber surface modification technology for fiber-optic localized surface plasmon resonance biosensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Xue, Chenyang; Yuan, Yanling; Lee, Junyang; Sun, Dong; Xiong, Jijun

    2012-01-01

    Considerable studies have been performed on the development of optical fiber sensors modified by gold nanoparticles based on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) technique. The current paper presents a new approach in fiber surface modification technology for biosensors. Star-shaped gold nanoparticles obtained through the seed-mediated solution growth method were found to self-assemble on the surface of tapered optical fibers via amino- and mercapto-silane coupling agents. Transmitted power spectra of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxy silane (APTMS)-modified fiber were obtained, which can verify that the silane coupling agent surface modification method is successful. Transmission spectra are characterized in different concentrations of ethanol and gentian violet solutions to validate the sensitivity of the modified fiber. Assembly using star-shaped gold nanoparticles and amino/mercapto silane coupling agent are analyzed and compared. The transmission spectra of the gold nanoparticles show that the nanoparticles are sensitive to the dielectric properties of the surrounding medium. After the fibers are treated in t-dodecylmercaptan to obtain their transmission spectra, APTMS-modified fiber becomes less sensitive to different media, except that modified by 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxy silane (MPTMS). Experimental results of the transmission spectra show that the surface modified by the gold nanoparticles using MPTMS is firmer compared to that obtained using APTMS.

  10. A polydopamine-modified optical fiber SPR biosensor using electroless-plated gold films for immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Shi, Se; Wang, Libing; Su, Rongxin; Liu, Boshi; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2015-12-15

    A sensitive and stable electroless-plated gold film for the preparation of an optical fiber surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is presented in this work, together with a facile antibody immobilization method. Gold nanoparticles were uniformly adsorbed onto the surface of an optical fiber forming a film with a thickness of approximately 56.3 nm. The sensor had a high sensitivity with 2054 nm/RIU and 3980 nm/RIU in the refractive index ranges of 1.333-1.359 and 1.359-1.386, respectively. An SPR biosensor was developed based on polydopamine-modified gold film (PDA-Au), which was fabricated by a simple and quick spontaneous polymerization of dopamine (DA) on the gold film. When goat anti-human IgG antibodies were immobilized, the PDA-Au surface had a larger resonant wavelength shift of 66.21 nm compared with the traditional 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid-modified gold film (MUA-Au) surface. In addition, the PDA-Au surface enabled the sensitive and selective determination of human IgG down to a concentration of 2 μg mL(-1) with a high sensitivity of 0.41 nm per μg mL(-1). The PDA-Au surface exhibited an approximately four fold higher sensitivity and an about seven fold lower LOD than the MUA-Au surface to human IgG. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A fiber optic biosensor for fluorimetric detection of triple-helical DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, A H; Piunno, P A; Hudson, R H; Damha, M J; Krull, U J

    1997-01-01

    A fiber optic biosensor was used for the fluorimetric detection of T/AT triple-helical DNA formation. The surfaces of two sets of fused silica optical fibers were functionalized with hexaethylene oxide linkers from which decaadenylic acid oligonucleotides were grown in the 3'to 5'and 5'to 3'direction, respectively, using a DNA synthesizer. Fluorescence studies of hybridization showed unequivocal hybridization between oligomers immobilized on the fibers and complementary oligonucleotides from the solution phase, as detected by fluorescence from intercalated ethidium bromide. The complementary oligonucleotide, dT10, which was expected to Watson-Crick hybridize upon cooling the system below the duplex melting temperature ( T m), provided a fluorescence intensity with a negative temperature coefficient. Upon further cooling, to the point where the pyrimidine motif T*AT triple-helix formation occurred, a fluorescence intensity change with a positive temperature coefficient was observed. The reverse-Hoogsteen T.AT triplex, which is known to form with branched nucleic acids, provided a corresponding decrease in fluorescence intensity with decreasing temperature. Full analytical signal evolution was attainable in minutes. PMID:9321670

  12. A Novel Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensors with Special Boronic Acid Derivative to Detect Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Wang, Fang; Qian, Siyu; Liu, Zexu; Wang, Qiao; Gu, Yiying; Wu, Zhenlin; Jing, Zhenguo; Sun, Changsen; Peng, Wei

    2017-10-01

    We proposed and demonstrated a novel tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG)-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) label-free biosensor via a special boronic acid derivative to detect glycoprotein with high sensitivity and selectivity. TFBG, as an effective sensing element for optical sensing in near-infrared wavelengths, possess the unique capability of easily exciting the SPR effect on fiber surface which coated with a nano-scale metal layer. SPR properties can be accurately detected by measuring the variation of transmitted spectra at optical communication wavelengths. In our experiment, a 10° TFBG coated with a 50 nm gold film was manufactured to stimulate SPR on a sensor surface. To detect glycoprotein selectively, the sensor was immobilized using designed phenylboronic acid as the recognition molecule, which can covalently bond with 1,2- or 1,3-diols to form five- or six-membered cyclic complexes for attaching diol-containing biomolecules and proteins. The phenylboronic acid was synthetized with long alkyl groups offering more flexible space, which was able to improve the capability of binding glycoprotein. The proposed TFBG-SPR sensors exhibit good selectivity and repeatability with a protein concentration sensitivity up to 2.867 dB/ (mg/mL) and a limit of detection (LOD) of 15.56 nM.

  13. Plasmonic biosensor based on a birefringent partial-solid-core microstructured optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, V. A.; Puscas, N. N.; Perrone, G.

    2017-07-01

    We propose a new plasmonic biosensor based on a birefringent partial-solid-core microstructured optical fiber where a single core mode can interact resonantly with the corresponding plasmon mode. This structure can be scaled to a larger radius of the gold layer with simultaneous increase in the number of rings and thus of the holes. The different configurations obtained by changing the geometry and relative positions of the holes can be best exploited depending on the analyte refractive index value n a. Thus, for n a = 1.35, the advantages of the proposed plasmonic sensor are larger values of the signal-to-noise ratio, maximum value of the amplitude sensitivity, power fraction in the gold layer and transmission loss as compared with that for a solid-core microstructured optical fiber. Another advantage of the proposed plasmonic sensor for n a = 1.35 is related to the smaller values of the resonance spectral width and the difference between maximal amplitude sensitivity and resonant wavelengths.

  14. Improved fluoroimmunoassays using the dye Alexa Fluor 647 with the RAPTOR, a fiber optic biosensor.

    PubMed

    Anderson, George P; Nerurkar, Nandan L

    2002-12-20

    The performance of the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor 647 (AF647) was explored as an alternative to Cy5 for immunoassays on the RAPTOR, a fiber optic biosensor. The RAPTOR performs sandwich fluoroimmunoassays on the surface of small polystyrene optical waveguides for analyte detection. Fluorescence and immunoassay data were examined at various dye-to-protein (D/P) ratios for both Cy5 and Alexa Fluor 647. Primarily, due to the self-quenching characteristics of Cy5, Alexa Fluor 647 is substantially more effective in fluoroimmunoassays, yielding over twice the signal for any given analyte concentration. Alexa Fluor 647 can be attached to antibodies at higher ratios, D/P=6, before self-quenching begins to limit the dye's effectiveness. Furthermore, while Alexa Fluor 647 becomes quenched at high dye-to-protein ratios, D/P=9, the net fluorescence yield reaches a maximum, as opposed to Cy5-labeled proteins, which become nearly nonfluorescent at high labeling ratios, D/P> or =6. The limitations of Cy5 were elucidated with an immunoassay for ricin, while the advantages of Alexa Fluor 647 were demonstrated in both direct binding assays as well as in a sandwich immunoassay for staphylococcal enterotoxin B.

  15. Flow injection analysis with bioluminescence-based fiber-optic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Loic J.; Gautier, Sabine; Coulet, Pierre R.

    1991-09-01

    Fiber optic biosensors based on the firefly and the bacterial bioluminescence reactions have been constructed and incorporated in a specially designed flow-cell for the sensitive determination of ATP and NADH, respectively. The bioluminescence enzymes were immobilized on preactivated polyamide membranes which were placed in close contact with the surface on one end of a glass-fiber bundle, the other end being connected to the photomultiplier tube of a luminometer. When using the continuous-flow device with the firefly luciferase or the bacterial system immobilized separately on different membranes, the detection limit for ATP and NADH were 0.25 and 2 pmol, respectively. The versatility of the fiber optic probe has been improved by co-immobilizing the bacterial bioluminescent system and the firefly luciferase on the same support enabling the use of a single sensor for the selective, specific, and alternate determination of these two analytes. Compatible reaction conditions preserving the activity of each co-immobilized enzyme without impairing its stability were found. The selection of the appropriate reaction medium was done using a four port valve. Alternate quantification of ATP and NADH could then be performed in the linear ranges 0.25 pmol - 3 nmol and 5 pmol - 1 nmol, respectively with a RSD of 4.0 - 4.5%.

  16. Optical biosensor technologies for molecular diagnostics at the point-of-care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schotter, Joerg; Schrittwieser, Stefan; Muellner, Paul; Melnik, Eva; Hainberger, Rainer; Koppitsch, Guenther; Schrank, Franz; Soulantika, Katerina; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang; Ludwig, Frank; Dieckhoff, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Label-free optical schemes for molecular biosensing hold a strong promise for point-of-care applications in medical research and diagnostics. Apart from diagnostic requirements in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and multiplexing capability, also other aspects such as ease of use and manufacturability have to be considered in order to pave the way to a practical implementation. We present integrated optical waveguide as well as magnetic nanoparticle based molecular biosensor concepts that address these aspects. The integrated optical waveguide devices are based on low-loss photonic wires made of silicon nitride deposited by a CMOS compatible plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process that allows for backend integration of waveguides on optoelectronic CMOS chips. The molecular detection principle relies on evanescent wave sensing in the 0.85 μm wavelength regime by means of Mach-Zehnder interferometers, which enables on-chip integration of silicon photodiodes and, thus, the realization of system-on-chip solutions. Our nanoparticle-based approach is based on optical observation of the dynamic response of functionalized magneticcore/ noble-metal-shell nanorods (`nanoprobes') to an externally applied time-varying magnetic field. As target molecules specifically bind to the surface of the nanoprobes, the observed dynamics of the nanoprobes changes, and the concentration of target molecules in the sample solution can be quantified. This approach is suitable for dynamic real-time measurements and only requires minimal sample preparation, thus presenting a highly promising point-of-care diagnostic system. In this paper, we present a prototype of a diagnostic device suitable for highly automated sample analysis by our nanoparticle-based approach.

  17. Microstructured Optical Fiber-based Biosensors: Reversible and Nanoliter-Scale Measurement of Zinc Ions.

    PubMed

    Heng, Sabrina; McDevitt, Christopher A; Kostecki, Roman; Morey, Jacqueline R; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Monro, Tanya M; Abell, Andrew D

    2016-05-25

    Sensing platforms that allow rapid and efficient detection of metal ions would have applications in disease diagnosis and study, as well as environmental sensing. Here, we report the first microstructured optical fiber-based biosensor for the reversible and nanoliter-scale measurement of metal ions. Specifically, a photoswitchable spiropyran Zn(2+) sensor is incorporated within the microenvironment of a liposome attached to microstructured optical fibers (exposed-core and suspended-core microstructured optical fibers). Both fiber-based platforms retains high selectivity of ion binding associated with a small molecule sensor, while also allowing nanoliter volume sampling and on/off switching. We have demonstrated that multiple measurements can be made on a single sample without the need to change the sensor. The ability of the new sensing platform to sense Zn(2+) in pleural lavage and nasopharynx of mice was compared to that of established ion sensing methodologies such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and a commercially available fluorophore (Fluozin-3), where the optical-fiber-based sensor provides a significant advantage in that it allows the use of nanoliter (nL) sampling when compared to ICP-MS (mL) and FluoZin-3 (μL). This work paves the way to a generic approach for developing surface-based ion sensors using a range of sensor molecules, which can be attached to a surface without the need for its chemical modification and presents an opportunity for the development of new and highly specific ion sensors for real time sensing applications.

  18. Highly specific detection of IL-8 protein using combination tapered fiber-optic biosensor dip-probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Wei; Kapoor, Rakesh

    2010-02-01

    We are reporting detection of IL-8 in a mixed protein solution, using combination tapered fiber-optic biosensor (CTFOB) dip-probe. Sandwich immunoassay was used as the detection technique. The specificity of the sensor was established by using two types of negative control probes. It is demonstrated that with the help of these CTFOB dipprobe we could successfully detect IL-8 with high specificity in protein mixture. The lowest detected concentration of IL-8 was 150 pM.

  19. Optical Investigation of Nanoconfined Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, F.; Dysthe, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Crystals growing in a confined space exert forces on their surroundings. This crystallization force causes deformation of solids and is therefore particularly relevant for the comprehension of geological processes such as replacement and weathering [1]. In addition, these forces are relevant for the understanding of damages in porous building materials caused by crystallization, which is of great economical importance and fundamental for methods that can help to preserve our cultural heritage [2,3]. However, the exact behavior of the growth and the dissolution process in close contact to an interface are still not known in detail. The crystallization, the dissolution and the transport of material is mediated by a nanoconfined water film. We observe brittle NaClO3 crystals growing against a glass surface by optical methods such as reflective interference contrast microscopy (RICM) [4]. In order to carefully control the supersaturation of the fluid close to the crystal interface, a temperature regulated microfluidic system is used (fig. A). The interference based precision of RICM enables to resolve distance variations down to the sub nanometer range without any unwanted disturbances by the measuring method. The combination of RICM with a sensitive camera allows us to observe phenomena such as periodic, wavelike growth of atomic layers. These waves are particularly obvious when observing the difference between two consecutive images (fig. B). In contradiction to some theoretical results, which predict a smooth interface, some recent experiments have shown that the nanoconfined growth surfaces are rough. In combination with theoretical studies and Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations we aim at providing more realistic descriptions of surface energies and energy barriers which are able to explain the discrepancies between experiments and current theory. References:[1] Maliva, Diagenetic replacement controlled by force of crystallization, Geology, August (1988), v. 16 [2] G

  20. An optical microbial biosensor for detection of methyl parathion using Sphingomonas sp. immobilized on microplate as a reusable biocomponent.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitendra; D'Souza, S F

    2010-12-15

    Organophosphorus pesticides such as methyl parathion have been widely used in the field of agriculture for insect pest control. These pesticides and their degradation products cause environmental pollution and ecological problem. With a view to monitor these pesticides biosensors are being developed. A bacterium Sphingomonas sp. from field soil has been isolated and identified in our laboratory that hydrolyzes the methyl parathion upto a chromophoric product, p-nitrophenol (PNP). PNP can be detected by electrochemical and colorimetric methods, which can be exploited to develop a biosensor for detection of the organophosphate pesticide. Whole cells of Sphingomonas bacteria were immobilized directly onto the surface of the wells of polystyrene microplates (96 wells) using glutaraldehyde as the cross-linker. SEM study confirmed the immobilization of Sphingomonas sp. Immobilized bacterial microplate was associated directly with the optical transducer, microplate reader. The microplate-based biosensor is having advantages as it has 96 reaction vessels and therefore it provides a convenient system for detecting multiple numbers of samples in a single platform. Detection range of the biosensor from the linear range was determined to be 4-80 μM methyl parathion. Cells-immobilized microplates were having reusability upto 75 reactions. Present study reports an innovative concept where the microplate can be used as immobilizing support for development of reusable microbial biocomponent.

  1. Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxin binders for optical biosensor technology: problems and possibilities for the future: a review

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, K.; Rawn, D.F.K.; Niedzwiadek, B.; Elliott, C.T.

    2011-01-01

    This review examines the developments in optical biosensor technology, which uses the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance, for the detection of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins. Optical biosensor technology measures the competitive biomolecular interaction of a specific biological recognition element or binder with a target toxin immobilised onto a sensor chip surface against toxin in a sample. Different binders such as receptors and antibodies previously employed in functional and immunological assays have been assessed. Highlighted are the difficulties in detecting this range of low molecular weight toxins, with analogues differing at four chemical substitution sites, using a single binder. The complications that arise with the toxicity factors of each toxin relative to the parent compound, saxitoxin, for the measurement of total toxicity relative to the mouse bioassay are also considered. For antibodies, the cross-reactivity profile does not always correlate to toxic potency, but rather to the toxin structure to which it was produced. Restrictions and availability of the toxins makes alternative chemical strategies for the synthesis of protein conjugate derivatives for antibody production a difficult task. However, when two antibodies with different cross-reactivity profiles are employed, with a toxin chip surface generic to both antibodies, it was demonstrated that the cross-reactivity profile of each could be combined into a single-assay format. Difficulties with receptors for optical biosensor analysis of low molecular weight compounds are discussed, as are the potential of alternative non-antibody-based binders for future assay development in this area. PMID:21623494

  2. Methods of making composite optical devices employing polymer liquid crystal

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Stephen D.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Cerqua, Kathleen A.

    1991-01-01

    Composite optical devices using polymer liquid crystal materials both as optical and adhesive elements. The devices are made by assembling a heated polymer liquid crystal compound, while in a low viscosity form between optically transparent substrates. The molecules of the polymer are oriented, while in the liquid crystalline state and while above the glass transition temperature (T.sub.g) of the polymer, to provide the desired optical effects, such as polarization, and selective reflection. The liquid crystal polymer cements the substrates together to form an assembly providing the composite optical device.

  3. Methods of making composite optical devices employing polymer liquid crystal

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, S.D.; Marshall, K.L.; Cerqua, K.A.

    1991-10-08

    Composite optical devices are disclosed using polymer liquid crystal materials both as optical and adhesive elements. The devices are made by assembling a heated polymer liquid crystal compound, while in a low viscosity form between optically transparent substrates. The molecules of the polymer are oriented, while in the liquid crystalline state and while above the glass transition temperature (T[sub g]) of the polymer, to provide the desired optical effects, such as polarization, and selective reflection. The liquid crystal polymer cements the substrates together to form an assembly providing the composite optical device. 7 figures.

  4. Extreme Nonlinear Optics With Liquid Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-31

    Photorefractive CdSe and gold nanowire -doped liquid crystals and polymer-dispersed-liquid-crystal photonic crystals,” Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 446: 233...Mallouk, “ Photorefractive CdSe and gold nanowire -doped liquid crystals and polymer-dispersed-liquid-crystal photonic crystals,” Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst...Williams, B. Lewis and T. Mallouk, “Photorefractive CdSe and gold nanowire -doped liquid crystals and polymer-dispersed-liquid-crystal photonic

  5. Thermo optical study of nematic liquid crystal doped with ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessy P., J.; Shalini, M.; Patel, Nainesh; Sarawade, Pradip; Radha, S.

    2017-05-01

    Liquid crystal composite materials with tunable physical properties are of great scientific interest because of optoelectronic and biomedical applications. We report our study of modified optical properties of 5CB Nematic Liquid Crystal (NLC) by doping with ferrofluid at low concentrations of 0.1% by the investigation of thermo optic behaviour. The observed sensitivity of optical response in ferrofluid doped NLC is expected to pave way for several thermo-optic applications.

  6. Silicon Photonic Crystal Nanocavity-Coupled Waveguides for Error-Corrected Optical Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sudeshna; Guillermain, Elisa; Sriram, Rashmi; Miller, Benjamin L.; Fauchet, Philippe M.

    2011-01-01

    A photonic crystal (PhC) waveguide based optical biosensor capable of label-free and error-corrected sensing was investigated in this study. The detection principle of the biosensor involved shifts in the resonant mode wavelength of nanocavities coupled to the silicon PhC waveguide due to changes in ambient refractive index. The optical characteristics of the nanocavity structure were predicted by FDTD theoretical methods. The device was fabricated using standard nanolithography and reactive-ion-etching techniques. Experimental results showed that the structure had a refractive index sensitivity of 10−2 RIU. The biosensing capability of the nanocavity sensor was tested by detecting human IgG molecules. The device sensitivity was found to be 2.3 ± 0.24 × 105 nm/M with an achievable lowest detection limit of 1.5 fg for human IgG molecules. Additionally, experimental results demonstrated that the PhC devices were specific in IgG detection and provided concentration-dependent responses consistent with Langmuir behavior. The PhC devices manifest outstanding potential as microscale label-free error-correcting sensors, and may have future utility as ultrasensitive multiplex devices. PMID:21524903

  7. Silicon photonic crystal nanocavity-coupled waveguides for error-corrected optical biosensing.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sudeshna; Guillermain, Elisa; Sriram, Rashmi; Miller, Benjamin L; Fauchet, Philippe M

    2011-06-15

    A photonic crystal (PhC) waveguide based optical biosensor capable of label-free and error-corrected sensing was investigated in this study. The detection principle of the biosensor involved shifts in the resonant mode wavelength of nanocavities coupled to the silicon PhC waveguide due to changes in ambient refractive index. The optical characteristics of the nanocavity structure were predicted by FDTD theoretical methods. The device was fabricated using standard nanolithography and reactive-ion-etching techniques. Experimental results showed that the structure had a refractive index sensitivity of 10(-2) RIU. The biosensing capability of the nanocavity sensor was tested by detecting human IgG molecules. The device sensitivity was found to be 2.3±0.24×10(5) nm/M with an achievable lowest detection limit of 1.5 fg for human IgG molecules. Additionally, experimental results demonstrated that the PhC devices were specific in IgG detection and provided concentration-dependent responses consistent with Langmuir behavior. The PhC devices manifest outstanding potential as microscale label-free error-correcting sensors, and may have future utility as ultrasensitive multiplex devices.

  8. Optically rewritable 3D liquid crystal displays.

    PubMed

    Sun, J; Srivastava, A K; Zhang, W; Wang, L; Chigrinov, V G; Kwok, H S

    2014-11-01

    Optically rewritable liquid crystal display (ORWLCD) is a concept based on the optically addressed bi-stable display that does not need any power to hold the image after being uploaded. Recently, the demand for the 3D image display has increased enormously. Several attempts have been made to achieve 3D image on the ORWLCD, but all of them involve high complexity for image processing on both hardware and software levels. In this Letter, we disclose a concept for the 3D-ORWLCD by dividing the given image in three parts with different optic axis. A quarter-wave plate is placed on the top of the ORWLCD to modify the emerging light from different domains of the image in different manner. Thereafter, Polaroid glasses can be used to visualize the 3D image. The 3D image can be refreshed, on the 3D-ORWLCD, in one-step with proper ORWLCD printer and image processing, and therefore, with easy image refreshing and good image quality, such displays can be applied for many applications viz. 3D bi-stable display, security elements, etc.

  9. Optical vortex converter with helical-periodically poled ferroelectric crystal.

    PubMed

    Tian, Linghao; Ye, Fangwei; Chen, Xianfeng

    2011-06-06

    A kind of optical vortex converter is proposed in helical-periodically poled ferroelectric crystal based on transverse electro-optics effect. It can be used to generate optical vortex from non-vortex beam and transform the topological charge of optical vortex. An optical vortex adder or substrator is proposed under the control of electric filed. This device will find its applications in high dimensional communication system for signal processing and optical manipulation in micro and mesoscopic scale.

  10. Optical biosensor system for the quick and reliable detection of virus infections: VIROSENS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proll, Günther; Hartjes, Anja; Sinclair, Alexander; Markovic, Goran; Pröll, Florian; Patel, Pranav; Niedrig, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    Viral infections are of special threat because they can induce severe courses of disease but only few medical treatments are available. Because of socio-economic and climate changes, increased worldwide mobility and population growth, the risk of newly occurring and quickly spreading viral pathogens has increased. A diagnosis of these diseases at an early stage is essential for a quick risk assessment and a proper health management as well as patient's treatment in an optimal way. Currently, the diagnosis of such diseases is based on time consuming and costly detection methods that can only be performed by specially trained personnel in laboratories at specific security levels. Aim of the project VIROSENS is the development of a biosensor platform that can specifically detect virus particles as well as virus-specific antibodies out of biological matrices like blood, serum, plasma and other body fluids. For this purpose, a disposable cartridge for such antibody- and virus-arrays is designed and developed within the project. The optical detection of viruses is performed with a portable device that will be benchmarked and evaluated concerning currently used standard detection methods in terms of its analytical performance. Within this project, a novel combination of serological tests and direct detection of virus particles will be developed, which will provide faster and more reliable results than presently available and used test systems.

  11. Optical biosensor analysis in studying new synthesized bicalutamide analogs binding to androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Fortugno, Cecilia; Varchi, Greta; Guerrini, Andrea; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Bertucci, Carlo

    2014-07-01

    Bicalutamide (Casodex®) is a non-steroidal anti-androgen drug used in the treatment of prostate cancer, which represents the second most common malignancy diagnosed in men worldwide. In this work, we analyze the ability of some novel bicalutamide analogs to bind the androgen receptor, by using an optical biosensor. Androgen receptor was covalently immobilized on a carboxy methyl dextran matrix. The immobilized receptor chip was then used for the binding experiments of the bicalutamide analogs. The (R)-bicalutamide dissociation constant was in good agreement to the value reported in literature obtained by using radiolabeled targets. Most of the new synthesized compounds showed higher androgen receptor binding level, when compared to the reference. Our results clearly indicate that the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique offers many advantages with respect to other available technologies in terms of studying biomolecular interactions. Moreover, this study provides an effective methodology for determining the binding affinity of novel chemical entities for the isolated androgen receptor, thus excluding possible off-target interactions occurring in conventional cell-based techniques.

  12. Combining an Optical Resonance Biosensor with Enzyme Activity Kinetics to Understand Protein Adsorption and Denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kerry A.; Finch, Craig A.; Anderson, Phillip; Vollmer, Frank; Hickman, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding protein adsorption and resultant conformation changes on modified and unmodified silicon dioxide surfaces is a subject of keen interest in biosensors, microfluidic systems and for medical diagnostics. However, it has been proven difficult to investigate the kinetics of the adsorption process on these surfaces as well as understand the topic of the denaturation of proteins and its effect on enzyme activity. A highly sensitive optical whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator was used to study a catalytic enzyme’s adsorption processes on different silane modified glass substrates (plain glass control, DETA, 13F, and SiPEG). The WGM sensor was able to obtain high resolution kinetic data of glucose oxidase (GO) adsorption with sensitivity of adsorption better than that possible with SPR. The kinetic data, in combination with a functional assay of the enzyme activity, was used to test hypotheses on adsorption mechanisms. By fitting numerical models to the WGM sensograms for protein adsorption, and by confirming numerical predictions of enzyme activity in a separate assay, we were able to identify mechanisms for GO adsorption on different alkylsilanes and infer information about the adsorption of protein on nanostructured surfaces. PMID:25453976

  13. Combining an optical resonance biosensor with enzyme activity kinetics to understand protein adsorption and denaturation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kerry A; Finch, Craig A; Anderson, Phillip; Vollmer, Frank; Hickman, James J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding protein adsorption and resultant conformation changes on modified and unmodified silicon dioxide surfaces is a subject of keen interest in biosensors, microfluidic systems and for medical diagnostics. However, it has been proven difficult to investigate the kinetics of the adsorption process on these surfaces as well as understand the topic of the denaturation of proteins and its effect on enzyme activity. A highly sensitive optical whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator was used to study a catalytic enzyme's adsorption processes on different silane modified glass substrates (plain glass control, DETA, 13 F, and SiPEG). The WGM sensor was able to obtain high resolution kinetic data of glucose oxidase (GO) adsorption with sensitivity of adsorption better than that possible with SPR. The kinetic data, in combination with a functional assay of the enzyme activity, was used to test hypotheses on adsorption mechanisms. By fitting numerical models to the WGM sensograms for protein adsorption, and by confirming numerical predictions of enzyme activity in a separate assay, we were able to identify mechanisms for GO adsorption on different alkylsilanes and infer information about the adsorption of protein on nanostructured surfaces. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection of six genetically modified maize lines using optical thin-film biosensor chips.

    PubMed

    Bai, Sulan; Zhang, Jie; Li, Shucheng; Chen, Haodong; Terzaghi, William; Zhang, Xin; Chi, Xiurong; Tian, Jin; Luo, Hongxia; Huang, Wensheng; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Yaochuan

    2010-08-11

    As more and more genetically modified organisms (GMO) are commercialized, efficient and inexpensive assays are required for their quick detection. An event-specific detection strategy based on the unique and specific sequences of integration junctions is useful because of its high specificity. This study developed a system for detecting six GM maize lines (Bt11, Bt176, GA21, MON810, NK603, and T25) using optical silicon thin-film biosensor chips. Aldehyde-labeled probes were arrayed and covalently attached to a hydrazine-derivatized chip surface. Biotinylated PCR amplicons were then hybridized with the probes. After washing and brief incubation with an anti-biotin IgG horseradish peroxidase conjugate and a precipitable horseradish peroxidase substrate, biotinylated PCR amplicons perfectly matched with the probes can be visualized by the color change on the chip surface (gold to blue/purple). This assay is extremely robust, exhibits high sensitivity and specificity, and is flexible from low through moderate to high throughput.

  15. Single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping on optical thin-film biosensor chips.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiao-Bo; Reynolds, Robert; Kidd, Judith R; Kidd, Kenneth K; Jenison, Robert; Marlar, Richard A; Ward, David C

    2003-09-30

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) constitute the bulk of human genetic variation and provide excellent markers to identify genetic factors contributing to complex disease susceptibility. A rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive assay is important for large-scale SNP scoring. Here we report the development of a multiplex SNP detection system using silicon chips coated to create a thin-film optical biosensor. Allele-discriminating, aldehyde-labeled oligonucleotides are arrayed and covalently attached to a hydrazinederivatized chip surface. Target sequences (e.g., PCR amplicons) then are hybridized in the presence of a mixture of biotinylated detector probes, one for each SNP, and a thermostable DNA ligase. After a stringent wash (0.01 M NaOH), ligation of biotinylated detector probes to perfectly matched capture oligomers is visualized as a color change on the chip surface (gold to blue/purple) after brief incubations with an anti-biotin IgG-horseradish peroxidase conjugate and a precipitable horseradish peroxidase substrate. Testing of PCR fragments is completed in 30-40 min. Up to several hundred SNPs can be assayed on a 36-mm2 chip, and SNP scoring can be done by eye or with a simple digital-camera system. This assay is extremely robust, exhibits high sensitivity and specificity, and is format-flexible and economical. In studies of mutations associated with risk for venous thrombosis and genotyping/haplotyping of African-American samples, we document high-fidelity analysis with 0 misassignments in 500 assays performed in duplicate.

  16. Optical biosensor for environmental on-line monitoring of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability with an immobilized bioluminescent catabolic reporter bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzer, A.; Malachowsky, K.; Thonnard, J.E.

    1994-05-01

    An optical whole-cell biosensor based on a genetically engineered bioluminescent catabolic reporter bacterium was developed for continuous on-line monitoring of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability and microbial catabolic activity potential in waste streams. The bioluminescent reporter bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44, carries a transcriptional nahG-luxCDABE fusion for naphthalene and salicylate catabolism. Exposure to either compound resulted in inducible bioluminescence. The reporter culture was immobilized onto the surface of an optical guide by using strontium alginate. The biosensor probe was then inserted into a measurement cell which simultaneously received the waste stream solution and a maintenance medium. Exposure under defined conditions to both naphthalene and salicylate resulted in a rapid increase in bioluminescence. The magnitude of the response and the response time were concentration dependent. Good reproducibility of the response was observed during repetitive perturbations with either napthalene or salicylate. Exposure to other compounds, such as glucose and complex nutrient medium or toluene, resulted in either minor bioluminescence increases after significantly longer response times compared with naphthalene or no response, respectively. The environmental utility of the biosensor was tested by using real pollutant mixtures. A specific bioluminescence response was obtained after exposure to either an aqueous solution saturated with JP-4 fuel or an aqueous leachate from a manufactured-gas plant soil, since napthalene was present in both pollutant mixtures. 43 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Optical biosensor for environmental on-line monitoring of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability with an immobilized bioluminescent catabolic reporter bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Heitzer, A; Malachowsky, K; Thonnard, J E; Bienkowski, P R; White, D C; Sayler, G S

    1994-01-01

    An optical whole-cell biosensor based on a genetically engineered bioluminescent catabolic reporter bacterium was developed for continuous on-line monitoring of naphthalene and salicylate bioavailability and microbial catabolic activity potential in waste streams. The bioluminescent reporter bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44, carries a transcriptional nahG-luxCDABE fusion for naphthalene and salicylate catabolism. Exposure to either compound resulted in inducible bioluminescence. The reporter culture was immobilized onto the surface of an optical light guide by using strontium alginate. This biosensor probe was then inserted into a measurement cell which simultaneously received the waste stream solution and a maintenance medium. Exposure under defined conditions to both naphthalene and salicylate resulted in a rapid increase in bioluminescence. The magnitude of the response and the response time were concentration dependent. Good reproducibility of the response was observed during repetitive perturbations with either naphthalene or salicylate. Exposure to other compounds, such as glucose and complex nutrient medium or toluene, resulted in either minor bioluminescence increases after significantly longer response times compared with naphthalene or no response, respectively. The environmental utility of the biosensor was tested by using real pollutant mixtures. A specific bioluminescence response was obtained after exposure to either an aqueous solution saturated with JP-4 jet fuel or an aqueous leachate from a manufactured-gas plant soil, since naphthalene was present in both pollutant mixtures. PMID:8017932

  18. Planar optics with patterned chiral liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Reflective metasurfaces based on metallic and dielectric nanoscatterers have attracted interest owing to their ability to control the phase of light. However, because such nanoscatterers require subwavelength features, the fabrication of elements that operate in the visible range is challenging. Here, we show that chiral liquid crystals with a self-organized helical structure enable metasurface-like, non-specular reflection in the visible region. The phase of light that is Bragg-reflected off the helical structure can be controlled over 0-2π depending on the spatial phase of the helical structure; thus planar elements with arbitrary reflected wavefronts can be created via orientation control. The circular polarization selectivity and external field tunability of Bragg reflection open a wide variety of potential applications for this family of functional devices, from optical isolators to wearable displays.

  19. Development of a Mass Sensitive Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM)-Based DNA Biosensor Using a 50 MHz Electronic Oscillator Circuit

    PubMed Central

    García-Martinez, Gonzalo; Bustabad, Enrique Alonso; Perrot, Hubert; Gabrielli, Claude; Bucur, Bogdan; Lazerges, Mathieu; Rose, Daniel; Rodriguez-Pardo, Loreto; Fariña, Jose; Compère, Chantal; Vives, Antonio Arnau

    2011-01-01

    This work deals with the design of a high sensitivity DNA sequence detector using a 50 MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) electronic oscillator circuit. The oscillator circuitry is based on Miller topology, which is able to work in damping media. Calibration and experimental study of frequency noise are carried out, finding that the designed sensor has a resolution of 7.1 ng/cm2 in dynamic conditions (with circulation of liquid). Then the oscillator is proved as DNA biosensor. Results show that the system is able to detect the presence of complementary target DNAs in a solution with high selectivity and sensitivity. DNA target concentrations higher of 50 ng/mL can be detected. PMID:22164037

  20. A biosensor of high-density lipoprotein of human serum on a liquid crystal and polymer composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Hsin; Chang, Kai-Han; Chu, Wei-Lin; Tsou, Yu-Shih; Wu, Li-Ching; Li, Chien-Feng

    2013-10-01

    A biosensor for the concentration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in human serum on a liquid crystal and polymer composite film (LCPCF) is demonstrated. The sensing mechanism is based on a polar-polar interaction between orientation of LC directors and HDL in human serum. The concentration of polar HDL in human serum affects the orientations of LC directors at the interface between LCPCF and the human serum. In addition, the surface free energy of LCPCF changes with the applied voltage due to the electrically tunable orientations of LC directors anchored among the polymer grains of LCPCF. As a result, the droplet motion of human serum on LCPCF under applied voltages can sense the concentration of HDL in human serum.

  1. Development of a mass sensitive quartz crystal microbalance (QCM)-based DNA biosensor using a 50 MHz electronic oscillator circuit.

    PubMed

    García-Martinez, Gonzalo; Bustabad, Enrique Alonso; Perrot, Hubert; Gabrielli, Claude; Bucur, Bogdan; Lazerges, Mathieu; Rose, Daniel; Rodriguez-Pardo, Loreto; Fariña, Jose; Compère, Chantal; Vives, Antonio Arnau

    2011-01-01

    This work deals with the design of a high sensitivity DNA sequence detector using a 50 MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) electronic oscillator circuit. The oscillator circuitry is based on Miller topology, which is able to work in damping media. Calibration and experimental study of frequency noise are carried out, finding that the designed sensor has a resolution of 7.1 ng/cm(2) in dynamic conditions (with circulation of liquid). Then the oscillator is proved as DNA biosensor. Results show that the system is able to detect the presence of complementary target DNAs in a solution with high selectivity and sensitivity. DNA target concentrations higher of 50 ng/mL can be detected.

  2. Label-free optical biosensor with microfluidics for sensing ligand-directed functional selectivity on trafficking of thrombin receptor.

    PubMed

    Goral, Vasiliy; Wu, Qi; Sun, Haiyan; Fang, Ye

    2011-04-06

    Ligand-directed functional selectivity has stimulated much interest in the molecular delineation of drug pharmacology and the process of drug discovery. Here we describe the development of a label-free optical biosensor with microfluidics for whole cell sensing. The microfluidics controls the duration of agonist exposure and of the functional recovery of activated protease activated receptor-1 (PAR(1)). The biosensor manifests that the persistency of PAR(1) signaling is dependent on the agonists, which, in turn, affects the receptor resensitization process. This study demonstrates a new means to differentiate ligand-directed functional selectivity on trafficking of receptors. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Electro-optic phase modulation by polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicari, L.

    1997-05-01

    We present a mathematical model to describe the optical phase shift induced by polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs) on light impinging transversely on the sample. PDLCs are dispersions of liquid crystal microdroplets in a polymeric binder. Droplets appear as optically uniaxial spheres randomly oriented so that the material is optically isotropic. The application of an external electric field results in a reorientation of the liquid crystal and therefore in an electrically controllable optical uniaxicity of the material. The model is discussed by comparison with experimental data and with previous theory [F. Basile, F. Bloisi, L. Vicari, and F. Simoni, Phys. Rev. E 48, 432 (1993)].

  4. Evaluation of nucleic acid duplex formation on gold over layers in biosensor fabricated using Czochralski-grown single-crystal silicon substrate.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Kumaresan, Ramanujam; Awazu, Koichi; Fujimaki, Makoto; Mizuhata, Minoru; Tominaga, Junji; Kumar, Penmetcha K R

    2010-09-01

    With a view to developing an economical and elegant biosensor chip, we compared the efficiencies of biosensors that use gold-coated single-crystal silicon and amorphous glass substrates. The reflectivity of light over a wide range of wavelengths was higher from gold layer coated single-crystal silicon substrates than from glass substrates. Furthermore, the efficiency of reflection from gold layers of two different thicknesses was examined. The thicker gold layer (100 nm) on the single-crystal silicon showed a higher reflectivity than the thinner gold film (10 nm). The formation of a nucleic acid duplex and aptamer-ligand interactions were evaluated on these gold layers, and a crystalline silicon substrate coated with the 100-nm-thick gold layer is proposed as an alternative substrate for studies of interactions of biomolecules.

  5. Electrochemical and optical biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanostructures: a review.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Li, Rui; Li, Chang Ming; Wu, Nianqiang

    2011-06-01

    Nanomaterials and nanostructures exhibit unique size-tunable and shape-dependent physicochemical properties that are different from those of bulk materials. Advances of nanomaterials and nanostructures open a new door to develop various novel biosensors. The present work has reviewed the recent progress in electrochemical, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescent biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanostructures. An emphasis is put on the research that demonstrates how the performance of biosensors such as the limit of detection, sensitivity and selectivity is improved by the use of nanomaterials and nanostructures.

  6. Optical dephasing in semiconductor mixed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegner, U.; Weber, D.; Göbel, E. O.; Bennhardt, D.; Heuckeroth, V.; Saleh, R.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Thomas, P.; Schwab, H.; Klingshirn, C.; Hvam, J. M.; Lyssenko, V. G.

    1992-08-01

    The influence of disorder and localization on optical dephasing of excitons in the semiconductor mixed crystals CdS1-xSex and AlxGa1-xAs has been investigated by means of time-resolved four-wave mixing and photon echo experiments. A dephasing time of several hundreds of picoseconds is found for resonantly excited localized excitons in CdS1-xSex while the dephasing time in AlxGa1-xAs amounts to only a few picoseconds. In CdS1-xSex dephasing results mainly from hopping processes, i.e., exciton-phonon interaction. The contribution of disorder is negligible in terms of phase relaxation in CdS1-xSex. In contrast, in AlxGa1-xAs elastic disorder scattering yields an essential contribution to the dephasing rate. We present a theoretical model, which treats dephasing of optical excitations in a disordered semiconductor, including the influence of disorder as well as exciton-phonon interaction. On the base of this model, the experimentally observed differences in the dephasing behavior of excitons in CdS1-xSex and AlxGa1-xAs are related to the microscopic structure of the disorder potential and the mechanism of exciton localization.

  7. Optical defect modes in chiral liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Belyakov, V. A.; Semenov, S. V.

    2011-04-15

    An analytic approach to the theory of optical defect modes in chiral liquid crystals (CLCs) is developed. The analytic study is facilitated by the choice of the problem parameters. Specifically, an isotropic layer (with the dielectric susceptibility equal to the average CLC dielectric susceptibility) sandwiched between two CLC layers is studied. The chosen model allows eliminating the polarization mixing and reducing the corresponding equations to the equations for light of diffracting polarization only. The dispersion equation relating the defect mode (DM) frequency to the isotropic layer thickness and an analytic expression for the field distribution in the DM structure are obtained and the corresponding dependences are plotted for some values of the DM structure parameters. Analytic expressions for the transmission and reflection coefficients of the DM structure (CLC-defect layer-CLC) are presented and analyzed for nonabsorbing, absorbing, and amplifying CLCs. The anomalously strong light absorption effect at the DM frequency is revealed. The limit case of infinitely thick CLC layers is considered in detail. It is shown that for distributed feedback lasing in a defect structure, adjusting the lasing frequency to the DM frequency results in a significant decrease in the lasing threshold. The DM dispersion equations are solved numerically for typical values of the relevant parameters. Our approach helps clarify the physics of the optical DMs in CLCs and completely agrees with the corresponding results of the previous numerical investigations.

  8. Recent advances in liquid-crystal fiber optics and photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woliński, T. R.; Siarkowska, A.; Budaszewski, D.; Chychłowski, M.; Czapla, A.; Ertman, S.; Lesiak, P.; Rutkowska, K. A.; Orzechowski, K.; Sala-Tefelska, M.; Sierakowski, M.; DÄ browski, R.; Bartosewicz, B.; Jankiewicz, B.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Mergo, P.

    2017-02-01

    Liquid crystals over the last two decades have been successfully used to infiltrate fiber-optic and photonic structures initially including hollow-core fibers and recently micro-structured photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). As a result photonic liquid crystal fibers (PLCFs) have been created as a new type of micro-structured fibers that benefit from a merge of "passive" PCF host structures with "active" LC guest materials and are responsible for diversity of new and uncommon spectral, propagation, and polarization properties. This combination has simultaneously boosted research activities in both fields of Liquid Crystals Photonics and Fiber Optics by demonstrating that optical fibers can be more "special" than previously thought. Simultaneously, photonic liquid crystal fibers create a new class of fiber-optic devices that utilize unique properties of the photonic crystal fibers and tunable properties of LCs. Compared to "classical" photonic crystal fibers, PLCFs can demonstrate greatly improved control over their optical properties. The paper discusses the latest advances in this field comprising PLCFs that are based on nanoparticles-doped LCs. Doping of LCs with nanoparticles has recently become a common method of improving their optical, magnetic, electrical, and physical properties. Such a combination of nanoparticles-based liquid crystals and photonic crystal fibers can be considered as a next milestone in developing a new class of fiber-based optofluidic systems.

  9. Optical characterization of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui

    Lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals (LCLCs) represent a special class of lyotropic mesophases markedly different from conventional amphiphilic mesogens. Materials forming LCLCs are composed of plank-like molecules with a polyaromatic central core and hydrophilic ionic groups at the periphery. The individual molecules tend to assemble into rodlike aggregates that form the N phase once the concentration exceeds about 0.1M. The LCLC materials show a tremendous potential for applications in optics as self-assembling polarizing and compensating films and in the area of real-time biological sensing. The emerging applications require an understanding of basic properties of LCLC. This work addresses these needs by providing the optical characterization of LCLC. We studied in detail the optical anisotropic properties of three different nematic LCLCs: disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), Blue 27, and Violet 20. We determined the birefringence of these three materials as the function of the temperature T and wavelength lambda and the corresponding dependencies of the absorption coefficients for Blue 27 and Violet 20. The birefringence is negative and significantly lower in the absolute value as compared to the birefringence of typical thermotropic N materials. We determined the scalar order parameter of the nematic phase of Blue 27 and its temperature dependence. The scalar order parameter is close to the one predicted by the classic Onsager theory for solutions of rigid rods. However, this similarity is not complete, as the measured scalar order parameter depends on temperature. The I-N pretransitional fluctuations in an aqueous solution of DSCG were studied by light scattering. We obtained the correlation length of the orientational order-parameter fluctuations of isotropic DSCG solution. The pretransitional behavior of light scattering does not completely follow the classic Landau-de Gennes model. This feature is explained by the variable length of DSCG aggregates as a function

  10. Utilizing a high fundamental frequency quartz crystal resonator as a biosensor in a digital microfluidic platform

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, Thomas; Stehrer, Brigitte P.; Bauer, Siegfried; Jakoby, Bernhard; Hilber, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the operation of a digital microfluidic lab-on-a-chip system utilizing Electro Wetting on Dielectrics (EWOD) as the actuation principle and a High Fundamental Frequency (HFF; 50 MHz) quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) resonator as a mass-sensitive sensor. In a first experiment we have tested the reversible formation of a phosphor-lipid monolayer of phospholipid vesicles out of an aqueous buffer suspension onto a bio-functionalized integrated QCM sensor. A binding of bio-molecules results in an altered mass load of the resonant sensor and a shift of the resonance frequency can be measured. In the second part of the experiment, the formation of a protein multilayer composed of the biomolecule streptavidin and biotinylated immunoglobulin G was monitored. Additionally, the macroscopic contact angle was optically measured in order to verify the bio-specific binding and to test the implications onto the balance of the surface tensions. Using these sample applications, we were able to demonstrate and to verify the feasibility of integrating a mass-sensitive QCM sensor into a digital microfluidic chip. PMID:22241942

  11. Long-period gratings in photonic crystal fiber as an optofluidic label-free biosensor.

    PubMed

    He, Zonghu; Tian, Fei; Zhu, Yinian; Lavlinskaia, Nina; Du, Henry

    2011-08-15

    Using long-period gratings (LPG) inscribed in photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and coupling this structure with an optically aligned flow cell, we have developed an optofluidic refractive index transduction platform for label-free biosensing. The LPG-PCF scheme possesses extremely high sensitivity to the change in refractive index induced by localized binding event in different solution media. A model immunoassay experiment was carried out inside the air channels of PCF by a series of surface modification steps in sequence that include adsorption of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) monolayer, immobilization of anti-rat bone sialoprotein monoclonal primary antibody, and binding interactions with non-specific goat anti-rabbit IgG (H+L) and specific secondary goat anti-mouse IgG (H+L) antibodies. These adsorption and binding events were monitored in situ using the LPG-PCF by measuring the shift of the core-to-cladding mode coupling resonance wavelength. Steady and significant resonance changes, about 0.75 nm per nanometer-thick adsorbed/bound bio-molecules, have been observed following the sequence of the surface events with monolayer sensitivity, suggesting the promising potential of LPG-PCF for biological sensing and evaluation.

  12. Use of a photonic crystal for optical amplifier gain control

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; El-Kady, Ihab

    2006-07-18

    An optical amplifier having a uniform gain profile uses a photonic crystal to tune the density-of-states of a gain medium so as to modify the light emission rate between atomic states. The density-of-states of the gain medium is tuned by selecting the size, shape, dielectric constant, and spacing of a plurality of microcavity defects in the photonic crystal. The optical amplifier is particularly useful for the regeneration of DWDM signals in long optical fibers.

  13. Lightweight optical mirrors formed in single crystal substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bly, Vincent T. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    This invention is directed to a process for manufacturing a lightweight mirror from a single crystal material, such as single crystal silicon. As a near perfect single crystal material, single crystal silicon has much lower internal stress than a conventional material. This means much less distortion of the optical surface during the light weighting process. After being ground and polished, a single crystal silicon mirror is light weighted by removing material from the back side using ultrasonic machining. After the light weighting process, the single crystal silicon mirror may be used as-is or further figured by conventional polishing or ion milling, depending on the application and the operating wavelength.

  14. Autoindicating optical properties of laccase as the base of an optical biosensor film for phenol determination.

    PubMed

    Sanz, J; de Marcos, S; Galbán, J

    2012-08-01

    In the context of sustainable analytical chemistry, phenol has been determined through its enzymatic reaction with laccase. The method has been studied and optimized through the autoindicating optical properties of laccase both by intrinsic molecular absorption and fluorescence. The method shows a linear range from 9.79·10(-6) to 7.50·10(-4) M with a relative standard deviation of 1.07 %. The molecular absorption methodology has been implemented in a polyacrylamide film for the design of an autoindicating optical sensor. In order to increase the lifetime of the sensor, the reversibility study of the enzymatic reaction has proposed, as a novelty, the regeneration of laccase with an oxidase-type enzyme (glucose oxidase). The lifetime of the sensor film has improved from 15 to 30 measurements. The reaction mechanism has also been studied and confirmed by fluorescence and molecular absorption. The method leads to the determination of phenol in environmental samples.

  15. Microalgae fiber optic biosensors for herbicide monitoring using sol-gel technology.

    PubMed

    Peña-Vázquez, Elena; Maneiro, Emilia; Pérez-Conde, Concepción; Moreno-Bondi, Maria Cruz; Costas, Eduardo

    2009-08-15

    Three microalgal species (Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides (D.c.), Scenedesmus intermedius (S.i.) and Scenedesmus sp. (S.s.)) were encapsulated in silicate sol-gel matrices and the increase in the amount of chlorophyll fluorescence signal was used to quantify simazine. Influence of several parameters on the preparation of the sensing layers has been evaluated: effect of pH on sol-gel gelation time; effect of algae density on sensor response; influence of glycerol (%) on the membrane stability. Long term stability was also tested and the fluorescence signal from biosensors remained stable for at least 3 weeks. D.c. biosensor presented the lowest detection limits for simazine (3.6 microg L(-1)) and the broadest dynamic calibration range (19-860 microg L(-1)) with IC(50) 125+/-14 microg L(-1). Biosensor was validated by HPLC with UV/DAD detection. The biosensor showed response to those herbicides that inhibit the photosynthesis at photosystem II (triazines: simazine, atrazine, propazine, terbuthylazine; urea based herbicides: linuron). However, no significant increases of fluorescence response was obtained for similar concentrations of 2,4-D (hormonal herbicide) or Cu(II). The combined use of two biosensors that use two different genotypes, sensitive and resistant to simazine, jointly allowed improving microalgae biosensor specificity.

  16. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D.W.; Bennett, B.L.; Cockroft, N.J.

    1998-09-08

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal. 5 figs.

  17. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cockroft, Nigel J.

    1998-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal.

  18. Gelled colloidal crystals as tunable optical filters for spectrophotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugao, Yukihiro; Onda, Sachiko; Toyotama, Akiko; Takiguchi, Yoshihiro; Sawada, Tsutomu; Hara, Shigeo; Nishikawa, Suguru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-08-01

    We examined the performance of charged colloidal crystals immobilized in a polymer gel as tunable optical filters. The colloidal crystals of charged silica particles (particle diameter = 121 nm; particle concentration = 3.5 vol %; and Bragg wavelength λB = 630-720 nm) were produced by unidirectional crystallization under a temperature gradient. Photocurable gelation reagents were dissolved in the sample beforehand; this enabled gel immobilization of the crystals under ultraviolet illumination. The crystals had dimensions of more than 25 mm2 in area and 1 mm in thickness, and spatial λB variations of less than 1%. Upon mechanical compression, λB values shifted linearly and reversibly over almost the entire visible spectrum. Using the gelled crystals as tunable optical filters, we measured the transmittance spectra of various samples and found them to be in close agreement with those determined using a spectrophotometer equipped with optical gratings.

  19. Interference of convergent polarized light to test crystal optical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Cun-li; Zhang, Su-juan; Hu, Xiao-ying; Lu, Shao-jun

    2010-10-01

    Due to properties required of optical elements, it is very important to detect the surface of non-contact object in modern science and technology fields. There are so many methods for detection of object surface, most of which are for isotropic and optical uniform media devices, and mainly utilize optical plane reflection of device under test to obtain. But ones for crystal optical surface are few. The method is put forward to use interference of convergent polarized light to measure optical surface of uniaxial and biaxial crystal in the paper. The basic principle is analyzed that is about interference of polarized light, and the relationship is derivate that is between interference pattern of polarized light formed after spherical light via crystal devices and crystal optical surface. The numerical computation is done by means of MATLAB. Data processing software is programmed. The data relationship is simulated and calculated between interference pattern of polarized light and crystal optical surface. And corresponding curve is plotted out. The testing experimental equipment is designed and set up, which can measure the surface of uniaxial crystal (wave-plate) and biaxial crystal (KTP) whose accuracy may come up to 0.5μm.

  20. Terahertz generation by optical rectification in uniaxial birefringent crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley, J. D.; Wahlstrand, J. K.; Zawilski, K. T.; Schunemann, P. G.; Giles, N. C.; Bristow, A. D.

    2012-07-01

    The angular dependence of terahertz (THz) emission from birefringent crystals can differ significantly from that of cubic crystals. Here we consider optical rectification in uniaxial birefringent materials, such as chalcopyrite crystals. The analysis is verified in (110)-cut ZnGeP_2 and compared to (zincblende) GaP. Although the crystals share the same nonzero second-order tensor elements, the birefringence in chalcopyrite crystals cause the pump pulse polarization to evolve as it propagates through the crystal, resulting in a drastically different angular dependence in chalcopyrite crystals. The analysis is extended to {012}- and {114}-cut chalcopyrite crystals and predicts more efficient conversion for the {114} crystal cut over the {012}- and {110}-cuts.

  1. Development of a fast and sensitive glucose biosensor using iridium complex-doped electrospun optical fibrous membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cuisong; Shi, Yalin; Ding, Xiaodong; Li, Ming; Luo, Jiaojiao; Lu, Zhiyun; Xiao, Dan

    2013-01-15

    Polystyrene electrospun optical fibrous membrane (EOF) was fabricated using a one-step electrospinning technique, functionalized with glucose oxidases (GOD/EOF), and used as a quick and highly sensitive optical biosensor. Because of the doped iridium complex, the fibrous membrane emitted yellow luminescence (562 nm) when excited at 405 nm. Its luminescence was significantly enhanced with the presence of extremely low concentration glucose. The detection limit was of 1.0 × 10(-10) M (S/N = 3), superior to that of reported glucose biosensor with 1.2 × 10(-10) M. A linear range between the relative intensity increase and the logarithm of glucose concentration was exhibited from 3.0 × 10(-10) M to 1.3 × 10(-4) M, which was much wider than reported results. Notably, the response time was less than 1 s. These high sensitivity and fast response were attributed to the high surface-area-to-volume of the porous fibrous membrane, the efficient GOD biocatalyst reaction on the fibers surface, as well as the fast electron or energy transfer between dissolved oxygen and the optical fibrous membrane.

  2. Piezo-optic coefficients of CaWO4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mytsyk, B. G.; Kost', Ya. P.; Demyanyshyn, N. M.; Andrushchak, A. S.; Solskii, I. M.

    2015-01-01

    All components of the piezo-optic coefficient matrix of calcium tungstate crystals, belonging to the 4/ m symmetry class, are determined. The reliability of the piezo-optic effect measurements in CaWO4 crystals is achieved by determining each piezo-optic coefficient from several experimental geometries and is also based on the correlation of the absolute piezo-electric coefficients and the path-difference coefficients. The rotation-shear diagonal coefficients π44 and π66 and three principal piezo-optic coefficients π11, π13, and π31 are refined by the polarization-optical method. It is confirmed that both the interferometric and polarization-optical methods should be used to study the piezo-optic effect with high accuracy. The results show that calcium tungstate is a promising material for acousto-optical and photoelastic modulation.

  3. Optical limiter based on two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belabbas, Amirouche; Lazoul, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The aim behind this work is to investigate the capabilities of nonlinear photonic crystals to achieve ultra-fast optical limiters based on third order nonlinear effects. The purpose is to combine the actions of nonlinear effects with the properties of photonic crystals in order to activate the photonic band according to the magnitude of the nonlinear effects, themselves a function of incident laser power. We are interested in designing an optical limiter based nonlinear photonic crystal operating around 1064 nm and its second harmonic at 532 nm. Indeed, a very powerful solid-state laser that can blind or destroy optical sensors and is widely available and easy to handle. In this work, we perform design and optimization by numerical simulations to determine the better structure for the nonlinear photonic crystal to achieve compact and efficient integrated optical limiter. The approach consists to analyze the band structures in Kerr-nonlinear two-dimensional photonic crystals as a function of the optical intensity. We confirm that these bands are dynamically red-shifted with regard to the bands observed in linear photonic crystals or in the case of weak nonlinear effects. The implemented approach will help to understand such phenomena as intensitydriven optical limiting with Kerr-nonlinear photonic crystals.

  4. Thermo-optical and magneto-optical characteristics of CeF3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, Evgeniy A.; Starobor, Aleksey V.; Snetkov, Ilya L.; Palashov, Oleg V.; Furuse, Hiroaki; Tokita, Shigeki; Yasuhara, Ryo

    2017-07-01

    Thermo-optical and magneto-optical characteristics of a uniaxial CeF3 crystal have been investigated. Its optical anisotropy parameter, magneto-optical figure of merit, and the ratio of the thermo-optical constants P and Q have been measured. The found characteristics have been compared with the corresponding values for the TGG crystal. Based on the obtained results it has been concluded that, despite its anisotropy, the CeF3 crystal is promising material for the development of Faraday isolators for high-power lasers.

  5. Crystal-free Formation of Non-Oxide Optical Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have devised a method for the creation of crystal-free nonoxide optical fiber preforms. Non-oxide fiber optics are extensively used in infrared transmitting applications such as communication systems, chemical sensors, and laser fiber guides for cutting, welding and medical surgery. However, some of these glasses are very susceptible to crystallization. Even small crystals can lead to light scatter and a high attenuation coefficient, limiting their usefulness. NASA has developed a new method of non-oxide fiber formation that uses axial magnetic fields to suppress crystallization. The resulting non-oxide fibers are crystal free and have lower signal attenuation rates than silica based optical fibers.

  6. Demonstrating Crystal Optics Using Microwaves on Wood Targets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkalskis, Benjamin S.; Freeman, J. Reuben

    1995-01-01

    Presents a simple yet effective means for demonstrating crystal optics using a microwave beam on wood targets. Describes a method to quantitatively examine the separation of ordinary and extraordinary waves. (JRH)

  7. All-optical gates based on photonic crystal resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moille, Grégory; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    We briefly review the technology of advanced nonlinear resonators for all-optical gating with a specific focus on the application of high-performance signal sampling and on the properties of III-V semiconductor photonic crystals

  8. Detection of Salmonella enteritidis Using a Miniature Optical Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, J. R.; Kim, G.; Kothapalli, A.; Morgan, M. T.; Ess, D.

    2007-04-01

    The frequent outbreaks of foodborne illness demand rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. Unfortunately, conventional methods for pathogen detection and identification are labor-intensive and take days to complete. Biosensors have shown great potential for the rapid detection of foodborne pathogens. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors have been widely adapted as an analysis tool for the study of various biological binding reactions. SPR biosensors could detect antibody-antigen bindings on the sensor surface by measuring either a resonance angle or refractive index value. In this study, the feasibility of a miniature SPR sensor (Spreeta, TI, USA) for detection of Salmonella enteritidis has been evaluated. Anti-Salmonella antibodies were immobilized on the gold sensor surface by using neutravidin. Salmonella could be detected by the Spreeta biosensor at concentrations down to 105 cfu/ml.

  9. Orientation of optic axis in wedged photorefractive crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, Konstantine; Siahmakoun, Azad Z.

    1996-02-01

    A holographic method for finding the orientation of the optic axis of uniaxial photorefractive crystals is proposed. A theoretical procedure for determining the wedge angle of such crystals has also been developed. Two BaTiO 3 crystals grown by the same vender are examined and the resulting measurements lead to the values of wedge angle with an accuracy of about ±0.1°.

  10. Conventional and nonlinear optical microscopy of liquid crystal colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoo; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    The fast-growing field of liquid crystal colloids requires increasingly sophisticated optical microscopy tools for experimental studies. Recent technological advances have resulted in a vast body of new imaging modalities, such as nonlinear optical microscopy techniques, that were developed to achieve high resolution while probing director structures and material composition at length scales ranging from hundreds of nanometers to oscopic. These techniques are ideally suited for experimental exploration of liquid crystal colloids. The goal of this chapter is to introduce a variety of optical microscopy techniques available to researchers in the field, starting from basic principles and finishing with a discussion of the most advanced microscopy systems. We describe traditional imaging tools, such as bright field and polarizing optical microscopy, along with state-of-the-art orientationsensitive three-dimensional imaging techniques, such as various nonlinear optical microscopies. Applications of these different imaging approaches are illustrated by providing specific examples of imaging of liquid crystal colloids and other soft matter systems.

  11. Label-free optical detection of bacteria on a 1-D photonic crystal of porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chia-Chen; Alvarez, Sara D.; Rang, Camilla U.; Chao, Lin; Sailor, Michael J.

    2009-02-01

    The construction of a specific, label-free, bacteria biosensor using porous silicon 1-D photonic crystals will be described. Bacteria resident on the surface of porous silicon act as scattering centers for light resonant with the photonic crystal; the diffusely scattered light possesses the optical spectrum of the underlying photonic crystal. Using a spectrometer fitted to a light microscope, the bacteria are imaged without using exogenous dyes or labels and are quantified by measuring the intensity of scattered light. In order to selectively bind and identify bacteria using porous Si, we use surface modifications to reduce nonspecific binding to the surface and to engineer bacteria specificity onto the surface. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was adsorbed to the porous Si surface to reduce nonspecific binding of bacteria. The coatings were then chemically activated to immobilize polyclonal antibodies specific to Escherichia coli. Two E. coli strains were used in our study, E. coli DH5α and non-pathogenic enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strain. The nonpathogenic Vibrio cholerae O1 strain was used to test for antibody specificity. Successful attachment of antibodies was measured using fluorescence microscopy and the scattering method was used to test for bacteria binding specificity.

  12. A compact two-wave dichrometer of an optical biosensor analytical system for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulkov, D. P.; Gusev, V. M.; Kompanets, O. N.; Vereschagin, F. V.; Skuridin, S. G.; Yevdokimov, Yu. M.

    2016-12-01

    An experimental model has been developed of a compact two-wave dichrometer on the base of LEDs that is well-suited to work with "liquid" DNA nanoconstructions as biosensing units. The mobile and inexpensive device is intended for use in a biosensor analytical system for rapid determination of biologically active compounds in liquids to solve practical problems of clinic medicine and pharmacology.

  13. A compact two-wave dichrometer of an optical biosensor analytical system for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulkov, D. P.; Gusev, V. M.; Kompanets, O. N.; Vereschagin, F. V.; Skuridin, S. G.; Yevdokimov, Yu. M.

    2017-01-01

    An experimental model has been developed of a compact two-wave dichrometer on the base of LEDs that is well-suited to work with "liquid" DNA nanoconstructions as biosensing units. The mobile and inexpensive device is intended for use in a biosensor analytical system for rapid determination of biologically active compounds in liquids to solve practical problems of clinic medicine and pharmacology.

  14. Impact of Liquid Crystals in Active and Adaptive Optics

    PubMed Central

    Arines, Justo

    2009-01-01

    Active and dynamic modulation of light has been one of major contributions of liquid crystals to Optics. The spectrum of application range from signposting panels to high resolution imaging. The development of new materials is the key to continued progress in this field. To promote this we will present in this paper recent uses of liquid crystals as active or adaptive modulators of light. Besides, we will reflect on their current limitations. We expect with this to contribute to the progress in the field of liquid crystals and thus the development of new useful tools for Active and Adaptive Optics.

  15. Acousto-optics of liquid crystals: Yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapustina, O. A.

    2014-09-01

    The most important results of the recent theoretical and experimental studies in the field of acousto-optics of liquid crystals (LCs) in research lines initiated by the pioneering studies of Professor A.P. Kapustin at the Institute of Crystallography of the Russian Academy of Sciences and carried out at the Acoustic Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences are generalized and analyzed. These lines include the study of the nature of acoustically induced supramolecular structures in nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) and cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) and the development of physical bases of practical LC acousto-optics, related to the detection of acoustic signals.

  16. Optical stress sensor based on electro-optic compensation for photoelastic birefringence in a single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Li Changsheng

    2011-09-20

    An optical stress sensor is proposed by using a single crystal with both electro-optic and photoelastic effects. Different from previous crystal-based stress sensors, the proposed sensor is based on electro-optic compensation for stress-induced birefringence and does not need an additional quarter-wave plate or modulator, because the stress-sensing element is simultaneously used as an electro-optic compensator. Candidate sensing materials include electro-optic crystals of the 3 m symmetry group and all glass with large Kerr coefficients. A primary experiment has demonstrated that the stress-induced birefringence in lithium niobate crystal can be compensated by its electro-optic birefringence. The proposed stress sensor is compact and low cost, and it is possible to achieve closed-loop stress measurement.

  17. Optical and electrical properties of glycine manganese chloride crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, G.; Kathiravan, V.; Pari, S.

    2017-06-01

    The organo-metal material of Glycine Manganese Chloride has been grown by solvent evaporation solution growth method. Single crystal XRD study has been carried out to confirm the grown crystal. FT-IR was recorded to identify the functional groups present in the crystal. The linear optical property of the grown crystal was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrum. Third order nonlinear optical properties was measured by Z-scan technique using Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm. Fluorescence emission revealed that can serve as a photo active material. Impedance and dielectric studies were also carried out for the material. Thermal property of the sample was analyzed by TG and DTA studies. The predicted NLO properties, UV-Vis absorbance and Z-scan studies indicate that the attractive material for optical applications.

  18. Protein crystallization and biosensor applications of hydrogel-based molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Subrayal M; Phan, Quan T; El-Sharif, Hazim; Govada, Lata; Stevenson, Derek; Chayen, Naomi E

    2012-12-10

    We have characterized the imprinting capability of a family of acrylamide polymer-based molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for bovine hemoglobin (BHb) and trypsin (Tryp) using spectrophotometric and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor techniques. Bulk gel characterization on acrylamide (AA), N-hydroxymethylacrylamide (NHMA), and N-isopropylacrylamide (NiPAM) gave varied selectivities when compared with nonimprinted polymers. We have also harnessed the ability of the MIPs to facilitate protein crystallization as a means of evaluating their selectivity for cognate and noncognate proteins. Crystallization trials indicated improved crystal formation in the order NiPAMcrystallization studies validated the hydrophilic efficacy of MIPS indicated in the QCM studies.

  19. A novel organic nonlinear optical crystal: Creatininium succinate

    SciTech Connect

    Thirumurugan, R.; Anitha, K.

    2015-06-24

    A novel organic material complex of creatininium succinate (CS) has been synthesized and single crystals were grown by the reaction of creatinine and succinic acid from aqueous solution by employing the technique of slow evaporation at room temperature. The structure of the grown crystal has been elucidated using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and the structure was refined by least-squares method to R = 0.027 for 1840 reflections. FT-IR spectral investigation has been carried out to identify the various functional groups in the title compound. UV–Vis transmission was carried out which shows the crystal has a good optical transmittance in the visible region with lower cutoff wavelength around 220 nm. Nonlinear optical property of the crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique.

  20. A novel organic nonlinear optical crystal: Creatininium succinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumurugan, R.; Anitha, K.

    2015-06-01

    A novel organic material complex of creatininium succinate (CS) has been synthesized and single crystals were grown by the reaction of creatinine and succinic acid from aqueous solution by employing the technique of slow evaporation at room temperature. The structure of the grown crystal has been elucidated using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and the structure was refined by least-squares method to R = 0.027 for 1840 reflections. FT-IR spectral investigation has been carried out to identify the various functional groups in the title compound. UV-Vis transmission was carried out which shows the crystal has a good optical transmittance in the visible region with lower cutoff wavelength around 220 nm. Nonlinear optical property of the crystal was confirmed by Kurtz-Perry powder technique.

  1. Evolution of molecular crystal optical phonons near structural phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michki, Nigel; Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Markelz, Andrea

    Molecular crystals are increasingly important photonic and electronic materials. For example organic semiconductors are lightweight compared to inorganic semiconductors and have inexpensive scale up processing with roll to roll printing. However their implementation is limited by their environmental sensitivity, in part arising from the weak intermolecular interactions of the crystal. These weak interactions result in optical phonons in the terahertz frequency range. We examine the evolution of intermolecular interactions near structural phase transitions by measuring the optical phonons as a function of temperature and crystal orientation using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The measured orientation dependence of the resonances provides an additional constraint for comparison of the observed spectra with the density functional calculations, enabling us to follow specific phonon modes. We observe crystal reorganization near 350 K for oxalic acid as it transforms from dihydrate to anhydrous form. We also report the first THz spectra for the molecular crystal fructose through its melting point.

  2. Crystal growth of organics for nonlinear optical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Mazelsky, R.

    1993-01-01

    The crystal growth and characterization of organic and inorganic nonlinear optical materials were extensively studied. For example, inorganic crystals such as thallium arsenic selenide were studied in our laboratory for several years and crystals in sizes over 2.5 cm in diameter are available. Organic crystals are suitable for the ultraviolet and near infrared region, but are relatively less developed than their inorganic counterparts. Very high values of the second harmonic conversion efficiency and the electro-optic coefficient were reported for organic compounds. Single crystals of a binary organic alloy based on m.NA and CNA were grown and higher second harmonic conversion efficiency than the values reported for m.NA were observed.

  3. Crystal growth of organics for nonlinear optical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Mazelsky, R.

    1993-01-01

    The crystal growth and characterization of organic and inorganic nonlinear optical materials were extensively studied. For example, inorganic crystals such as thallium arsenic selenide were studied in our laboratory for several years and crystals in sizes over 2.5 cm in diameter are available. Organic crystals are suitable for the ultraviolet and near infrared region, but are relatively less developed than their inorganic counterparts. Very high values of the second harmonic conversion efficiency and the electro-optic coefficient were reported for organic compounds. Single crystals of a binary organic alloy based on m.NA and CNA were grown and higher second harmonic conversion efficiency than the values reported for m.NA were observed.

  4. Observation of extraordinary optical activity in planar chiral photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Kuniaki; Bai, Benfeng; Meng, Xiangfeng; Karvinen, Petri; Turunen, Jari; Svirko, Yuri P; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2008-05-12

    Control of light polarization is a key technology in modern photonics including application to optical manipulation of quantum information. The requisite is to obtain large rotation in isotropic media with small loss. We report on extraordinary optical activity in a planar dielectric on-waveguide photonic crystal structure, which has no in-plane birefringence and shows polarization rotation of more than 25 degrees for transmitted light. We demonstrate that in the planar chiral photonic crystal, the coupling of the normally incident light wave with low-loss waveguide and Fabry-Pérot resonance modes results in a dramatic enhancement of the optical activity.

  5. Process of making cryogenically cooled high thermal performance crystal optics

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-06-23

    A method is disclosed for constructing a cooled optic wherein one or more cavities are milled, drilled or formed using casting or ultrasound laser machining techniques in a single crystal base and filled with porous material having high thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. A non-machined strain-free single crystal can be bonded to the base to produce superior optics. During operation of the cooled optic, N[sub 2] is pumped through the porous material at a sub-cooled cryogenic inlet temperature and with sufficient system pressure to prevent the fluid bulk temperature from reaching saturation. 7 figs.

  6. Process of making cryogenically cooled high thermal performance crystal optics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1990-06-29

    A method for constructing a cooled optic wherein one or more cavities are milled, drilled or formed using casting or ultrasound laser machining techniques in a single crystal base and filled with porous material having high thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. A non-machined strain-free single crystal can be bonded to the base to produce superior optics. During operation of the cooled optic, N{sub 2} is pumped through the porous material at a sub-cooled cryogenic inlet temperature and with sufficient system pressure to prevent the fluid bulk temperature from reaching saturation.

  7. Process of making cryogenically cooled high thermal performance crystal optics

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    1992-01-01

    A method for constructing a cooled optic wherein one or more cavities are milled, drilled or formed using casting or ultrasound laser machining techniques in a single crystal base and filled with porous material having high thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. A non-machined strain-free single crystal can be bonded to the base to produce superior optics. During operation of the cooled optic, N.sub.2 is pumped through the porous material at a sub-cooled cryogenic inlet temperature and with sufficient system pressure to prevent the fluid bulk temperature from reaching saturation.

  8. Multicolor filter all-garnet magneto-optical photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Ansari, N; Khartsev, S I; Grishin, A M

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate a multicolor optical filter and isolator based on a double-cavity magneto-optical (MO) photonic crystal. Being grown as a heteroepitaxial all-garnet multilayer, it compromises a strong MO response and high optical transmittance. Low-loss, high Faraday rotation passbands as well as strong light rejection within the stop band were achieved by optimization of distance between cavities and repetition number of distributed Bragg reflectors.

  9. Detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci by biosensor assay consisting of nanoscale films on optical fiber long-period gratings.

    PubMed

    Bandara, Aloka B; Zuo, Ziwei; Ramachandran, Siddharth; Ritter, Alfred; Heflin, James R; Inzana, Thomas J

    2015-08-15

    Methicillin-resistance among Staphylococcus species is a major health problem in hospitals, communities, and animals. There is a need for culture-free diagnostic assays that can be carried out rapidly, and maintain a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. To address this need an ionic self-assembled multilayer (ISAM) film was deposited on the surface of a long-period grating (LPG) optical fiber by immersion alternately in poly-allylamine hydrochloride and in poly-1-[p-(3'-carboxy-4'-hydroxyphenylazo) benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethandiyl (PCBS), resulting in terminal carboxyl groups on the LPG-ISAM. The terminal carboxyl groups were covalently conjugated to monoclonal antibodies (MAb) specific to penicillin-binding-protein 2a of methicillin resistant (MR) staphylococci. After exposure of the LPG-ISAM to 10(2) colony forming units (CFU)/ml of MR S. aureus (MRSA) for 50 min., light transmission was reduced by 19.7%. In contrast, after exposure to 10(6) CFU/ml of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) attenuation of light transmission was less than 1.8%. Exposure of the LPG-ISAM to extracts of liver, lungs, or spleen from mice infected with MRSA attenuated light transmission by 11.7-73.5%. In contrast, exposure of the biosensor to extracts from MSSA-infected mice resulted in 5.6% or less attenuation of light transmission. When the sensor was tested with 36 strains of MR staphylococci, 15 strains of methicillin-sensitive staphylococci, 10 strains of heterologous genera (all at 10(4) CFU/ml), or tissue samples from mice infected with MRSA, there was complete agreement between MR and non-MR bacteria determined by antibiotic susceptibility testing and the biosensor assay when the cutoff value for attenuation of light transmission was 6.3%. Thus, the biosensor described has the potential to detect MR staphylococci in clinical samples with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity.

  10. Immunoassay for Detection of Infliximab in Whole Blood Using a Fiber-Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiadi; Spasic, Dragana; Delport, Filip; Van Stappen, Thomas; Detrez, Iris; Daems, Devin; Vermeire, Séverine; Gils, Ann; Lammertyn, Jeroen

    2017-03-21

    Monitoring the concentration of a therapeutic drug antibody, infliximab (IFX), is recommended for enhancing its efficacy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, IFX concentrations are currently determined in patients' serum/plasma, which requires sample preparation from blood, hence hampering the turnaround time. In this paper, we present a short immunoassay (10 min) using a fiber-optic surface plasmon resonance (FO-SPR) biosensor for detection of IFX spiked in 100-fold diluted serum, plasma, and whole blood. The calculated limits of detection (LOD) based on calibration curves were 1.42, 1.00, and 1.34 ng/mL, respectively, which coincides with expected IFX concentrations in diluted samples from IBD patients. A linear correlation was established among different matrixes, indicating that the matrix effect was insignificant. The established point-of-care (POC) FO-SPR bioassay was also used to measure IFX in 100-fold diluted extracts of dried blood spots (DBS), and LOD achieved was below 2 ng/mL. Although DBS might be ideal for POC, this is the first report of using an SPR biosensor for measuring DBS samples. Finally, the POC FO-SPR immunoassay was validated by using matching serum and plasma samples from five IBD patients. A Pearson correlation of 0.968 was obtained between serum and plasma samples. IFX concentrations determined with FO-SPR were compared to a clinically validated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), resulting in excellent Pearson correlation and intraclass correlation coefficient, both being 0.99 for serum and plasma samples. In conclusion, this paper demonstrates that our FO-SPR biosensor can be used as a true POC diagnostic tool for determining IFX concentrations in a variety of matrixes.

  11. Electrothermo-optical effect in liquid crystals and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Lee, Wei

    2017-02-01

    Electro-optical effects in liquid crystals (LCs) have been widely utilized in many optical components and photonic devices, thanks to the anisotropic media that can be easily manipulated by an electric field to modulate the light. In general, dielectric heating in LC applications is negligible because their orientational dielectric relaxations occur at high frequencies. Here we focus on a dual-frequency LC characterized by its much lower relaxation frequency. The fieldinduced heat strongly affects the LC ordering and optical properties. The electrothermo-optical effect reveals an unusual behavior compared with the well-known electro-optical effect in regular LCs. Based on the electrothermo-optical effect, some applications such as optical modulators or tunable optical shutters are demonstrated.

  12. Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Imaging of Chiral Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Kissick, David J.; Wanapun, Debbie; Simpson, Garth J.

    2012-01-01

    Second-order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC) is an emerging technique for crystal imaging and characterization. We provide a brief overview of the origin of second harmonic generation signals in SONICC and discuss recent studies using SONICC for biological applications. Given that they provide near-complete suppression of any background, SONICC images can be used to determine the presence or absence of protein crystals through both manual inspection and automated analysis. Because SONICC creates high-resolution images, nucleation and growth kinetics can also be observed. SONICC can detect metastable, homochiral crystalline forms of amino acids crystallizing from racemic solutions, which confirms Ostwald’s rule of stages for crystal growth. SONICC’s selectivity, based on order, and sensitivity, based on background suppression, make it a promising technique for numerous fields concerned with chiral crystal formation. PMID:21469954

  13. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, R.

    1994-08-09

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device including a photorefractive crystal and a laser is disclosed. The laser produces a coherent light beam which is split by a beam splitter into a first laser beam and a second laser beam. After passing through the crystal the first laser beam is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror, creating a third laser beam. The laser beams are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal by vibration of the crystal. In the third laser beam, modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal. 3 figs.

  14. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Kalibjian, Ralph

    1994-01-11

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device (10) including a photorefractive crystal (26) and a laser (12). The laser (12 ) produces a coherent light beam (14) which is split by a beam splitter (18) into a first laser beam (20) and a second laser beam (22). After passing through the crystal (26) the first laser beam (20) is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror (32), creating a third laser beam (30). The laser beams (20, 22, 30) are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal (26) by vibration of the crystal (30). In the third laser beam (30), modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector (34) into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal (26).

  15. Assessment of specific binding proteins suitable for the detection of paralytic shellfish poisons using optical biosensor technology.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Katrina; Stewart, Linda D; Doucette, Gregory J; Fodey, Terence L; Haughey, Simon A; Vilariño, Natalia; Kawatsu, Kentaro; Elliott, Christopher T

    2007-08-01

    Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxin monitoring in shellfish is currently performed using the internationally accredited AOAC mouse bioassay. Due to ethical and performance-related issues associated with this bioassay, the European Commission has recently published directives extending procedures that may be used for official PSP control. The feasibility of using a surface plasmon resonance optical biosensor to detect PSP toxins in shellfish tissue below regulatory levels was examined. Three different PSP toxin protein binders were investigated: a sodium channel receptor (SCR) preparation derived from rat brains, a monoclonal antibody (GT13-A) raised to gonyautoxin 2/3, and a rabbit polyclonal antibody (R895) raised to saxitoxin (STX). Inhibition assay formats were used throughout. Immobilization of STX to the biosensor chip surface was achieved via amino-coupling. Specific binding and inhibition of binding to this surface was achieved using all proteins tested. For STX calibration curves, 0-1000 ng/mL, IC50 values for each binder were as follows: SCR 8.11 ng/mL; GT13-A 5.77 ng/mL; and R895 1.56 ng/mL. Each binder demonstrated a different cross-reactivity profile against a range of STX analogues. R895 delivered a profile that was most likely to detect the widest range of PSP toxins at or below the internationally adopted regulatory limits.

  16. A simple and reliable assay for detecting specific nucleotide sequences in plants using optical thin-film biosensor chips.

    PubMed

    Bai, Su-Lan; Zhong, Xiaobo; Ma, Ligeng; Zheng, Wenjie; Fan, Liu-Min; Wei, Ning; Deng, Xing Wang

    2007-01-01

    Here we report the adaptation and optimization of an efficient, accurate and inexpensive assay that employs custom-designed silicon-based optical thin-film biosensor chips to detect unique transgenes in genetically modified (GM) crops and SNP markers in model plant genomes. Briefly, aldehyde-attached sequence-specific single-stranded oligonucleotide probes are arrayed and covalently attached to a hydrazine-derivatized biosensor chip surface. Unique DNA sequences (or genes) are detected by hybridizing biotinylated PCR amplicons of the DNA sequences to probes on the chip surface. In the SNP assay, target sequences (PCR amplicons) are hybridized in the presence of a mixture of biotinylated detector probes and a thermostable DNA ligase. Only perfect matches between the probe and target sequences, but not those with even a single nucleotide mismatch, can be covalently fixed on the chip surface. In both cases, the presence of specific target sequences is signified by a color change on the chip surface (gold to blue/purple) after brief incubation with an anti-biotin IgG horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to generate a precipitable product from an HRP substrate. Highly sensitive and accurate identification of PCR targets can be completed within 30 min. This assay is extremely robust, exhibits high sensitivity and specificity, and is flexible from low to high throughput and very economical. This technology can be customized for any nucleotide sequence-based identification assay and widely applied in crop breeding, trait mapping, and other work requiring positive detection of specific nucleotide sequences.

  17. Crystal growth and characterization of new semiorganic nonlinear optical single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulshrestha, Shobha; Shrivastava, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    An organic material of a L-histidine monohydrochloride single crystal was grown in a distilled water solution using the slow evaporation method at 40-45°C. The grown crystal was transparent and colourless, with a size of about 20 × 9 × 5 mm3, obtained within a period of 21 days. The solubility of grown crystals have found out at various temperatures. The UV-visible transmittance studies show that the grown crystals have wide optical transparency in the entire visible region It is observed that the crystal has transparency window from 255nm to 700nm and its energy gap (Eg) found to be is 3.1eV. The grown crystal was subjected to powder X-ray diffraction analysis, confirming that the orthorhombic crystalline nature of the crystal. To identify the surface morphology, the as grown crystal was subjected to FE-SEM technique. The chemical composition of the grown crystal was estimated by Energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The optical behaviour of the grown crystal was analyzed by PL study.

  18. Crystal growth and characterization of new semiorganic nonlinear optical single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kulshrestha, Shobha Shrivastava, A. K.

    2016-05-06

    An organic material of a L-histidine monohydrochloride single crystal was grown in a distilled water solution using the slow evaporation method at 40–45°C. The grown crystal was transparent and colourless, with a size of about 20 × 9 × 5 mm{sup 3}, obtained within a period of 21 days. The solubility of grown crystals have found out at various temperatures. The UV-visible transmittance studies show that the grown crystals have wide optical transparency in the entire visible region It is observed that the crystal has transparency window from 255nm to 700nm and its energy gap (Eg) found to be is 3.1eV. The grown crystal was subjected to powder X-ray diffraction analysis, confirming that the orthorhombic crystalline nature of the crystal. To identify the surface morphology, the as grown crystal was subjected to FE-SEM technique. The chemical composition of the grown crystal was estimated by Energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The optical behaviour of the grown crystal was analyzed by PL study.

  19. Synthesis, crystal growth and characterization of nonlinear optical organic crystal: p-Toluidinium p-toluenesulphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, P.; Anandha Babu, G.; Ramasamy, P.

    2012-04-15

    Graphical abstract: p-Toluidinium p-toluenesulphonate (p-TTS) an organic nonlinear optical crystal has been grown from the aqueous solution by slow evaporation solution growth technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that p-TTS crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system. p-TTS single crystal belongs to negative birefringence crystal. Second harmonic conversion efficiency of p-TTS has been found to be 1.3 times higher than that of KDP. Multiple shot surface laser damage threshold is determined to be 0.30 GW/cm{sup 2} at 1064 nm laser radiation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It deals with the synthesis, growth and characterization of p-TTS an organic NLO crystal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wide optical transparency window between 280 nm and 1100 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Negative birefringence crystal and dispersion of birefringence is negligibly small. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal study reveals that the grown crystal is stable up to 210 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple shot surface laser damage threshold is 0.30 GW/cm{sup 2} at 1064 nm laser radiation. -- Abstract: p-Toluidinium p-toluenesulphonate (p-TTS) an organic nonlinear optical crystal has been grown from the aqueous solution by slow evaporation solution growth technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that p-TTS crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system. The structural perfection of the grown p-TTS single crystal has been analyzed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction rocking curve measurements. Fourier transform infrared spectral studies have been performed to identify the functional groups. The optical transmittance window and the lower cutoff wavelength of the grown crystals have been identified by UV-vis-IR studies. Birefringence of p-TTS crystal has been studied using channel spectrum measurement. The laser damage threshold value was measured using Nd:YAG laser. The second harmonic conversion efficiency of p-TTS has

  20. Ultrafast optical switching in Kerr nonlinear photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ye; Qin, Fei; Zhou, Fei; Meng, Qing-Bo; Zhang, Dao-Zhong; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2010-09-01

    Nonlinear photonic crystals made from polystyrene materials that have Kerr nonlinearity can exhibit ultrafast optical switching when the samples are pumped by ultrashort optical pulses with high intensity due to the change of the refractive index of polystyrene and subsequent shift of the band gap edge or defect state resonant frequency. Polystyrene has a large Kerr nonlinear susceptibility and almost instantaneous response to pump light, making it suitable for the realization of ultrafast optical switching with a response time as short as a few femtoseconds. In this paper, we review our experimental progress on the continual improvement of all-optical switching speed in two-dimensional and three-dimensional polystyrene nonlinear photonic crystals in the past years. Several relevant issues are discussed and analyzed, including different mechanisms for all-optical switching, preparation of nonlinear photonic crystal samples by means of microfabrication and self-assembly techniques, characterization of optical switching performance by means of femtosecond pump-probe technique, and different ways to lower the pump power of optical switching to facilitate practical applications in optical information processing. Finally, a brief summary and a perspective of future work are provided.

  1. Using the angle-dependent resonances of molded plasmonic crystals to improve the sensitivities of biosensors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hanwei; Yang, Jiun-Chan; Lin, Julia Y; Stuparu, Andreea D; Lee, Min Hyung; Mrksich, Milan; Odom, Teri W

    2010-07-14

    This paper describes how angle-dependent resonances from molded plasmonic crystals can be used to improve real-time biosensing. First, an inexpensive and massively parallel approach to create single-use, two-dimensional metal nanopyramidal gratings was developed. Second, although constant in bulk dielectric environments, the sensitivities (resonance wavelength shift and resonance width) of plasmonic crystals to adsorbed molecular layers of varying thickness were found to depend on incident excitation angle. Third, protein binding at dilute concentrations of protein was carried out at an angle that optimized the signal to noise of our plasmonic sensing platform. This angle-dependent sensitivity, which is intrinsic to grating-based sensors, is a critical parameter that can assist in maximizing signal to noise.

  2. Compositional variations in optical characteristics of Mn doped spinel crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsumata, Toru; Mitomi, Hiromasa; Nagayama, Hijiri; Orihara, Yuka; Aoki, Mina; Yoshida, Ayaka; Shiratake, Kasumi; Minowa, Shunsuke; Sakuma, Takashi; Aizawa, Hiroaki; Komuro, Shuji

    2017-06-01

    Mn doped spinel (MgAl2O4) crystals have been grown by floating zone (FZ) techniques with various conditions of O2 concentrations in the growth atmosphere from 0 to 75 vol%, with a starting composition of molar ratio x=MgO/(MgO+Al2O3) from 0.3 to 1.0 and/or Mn concentrations from 1.0 to 6.0 at%. Optical absorption spectra and photoluminescence spectra were evaluated using crystals grown under various growth conditions. The color of the crystals is found to vary with their composition and the O2 concentration in the atmosphere. Crystals grown under a 100 vol% Ar atmosphere, were a pale green color and emitted a strong green luminescence at λ=520 nm. Colors of stoichiometric crystals, x=1.0, and Mg-poor crystals grown under an oxidizing atmosphere are yellow and red, respectively. Both optical absorption spectra and photoluminescence spectra of Mg-poor, x<1.0 crystals grown under an oxidizing (O2-Ar) atmosphere are found to vary greatly from those of the stoichiometric crystals.

  3. Electro-optic crystal mosaics for the generation of terahertz radiation

    DOEpatents

    Carrig, T.J.; Taylor, A.J.; Stewart, K.R.

    1996-08-06

    Apparatus for the generation of high energy terahertz radiation is presented and comprises laser means effective to produce subpicosecond optical pulses and a mosaic comprising a plurality of planar electro-optic crystals fastened together edge to edge in the form of a grid. The electro-optic crystals are in optical communication with the subpicosecond optical pulses, and behave as a single large electro-optic crystal, producing high energy terahertz radiation by way of optical rectification. 5 figs.

  4. Electro-optic crystal mosaics for the generation of terahertz radiation

    DOEpatents

    Carrig, Timothy J.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Stewart, Kevin R.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for the generation of high energy terahertz radiation is presented and comprises laser means effective to produce subpicosecond optical pulses and a mosaic comprising a plurality of planar electro-optic crystals fastened together edge to edge in the form of a grid. The electro-optic crystals are in optical communication with the subpicosecond optical pulses, and behave as a single large electro-optic crystal, producing high energy terahertz radiation by way of optical rectification.

  5. Effect of hydrogen bonds on optical nonlinearities of inorganic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Dongfeng; Zhang, Siyuan

    1999-03-01

    This work probes the role of hydrogen bonds (such as O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O) in some inorganic nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals, such as HIO 3, NH 4H 2PO 4 (ADP), K[B 5O 6(OH) 4]·2H 2O (KB 5) and K 2La(NO 3) 5·2H 2O (KLN), from the chemical bond standpoint. Second order NLO behaviors of these four typical inorganic crystals have been quantitatively studied, results show hydrogen bonds play a very important role in NLO contributions to the total nonlinearity. Conclusions derived here concerning the effect of hydrogen bonds on optical nonlinearities of inorganic crystals have important implications with regard to the utilization of hydrogen bonds in the structural design of inorganic NLO crystals.

  6. Optical properties of borate crystals in terahertz region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antsygin, V. D.; Mamrashev, A. A.; Nikolaev, N. A.; Potaturkin, O. I.; Bekker, T. B.; Solntsev, V. P.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we study the optical properties of a family of borate crystals comprising alpha and beta barium borates, barium fluoroborate, lithium triborate, and lithium tetraborate in the frequency range from 0.3 to 2.0 THz. We extract the refractive indices and absorption coefficients for both ordinary and extraordinary beams from terahertz time-domain spectroscopy data. All of the investigated crystals exhibit substantial birefringence and dichroism, which qualifies them as potential materials for terahertz polarization-optical devices. We also find an additional absorption band in barium borate crystals, which is not defined by the group of phonon modes lying above 2 THz. We argue that this phenomenon may be caused by excessive sodium atoms and ions in the crystal lattice.

  7. Possibility of increasing the optical breakdown threshold in KDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bredikhin, V I; Ershov, V P; Burenina, V N; Mal'shakov, A N; Potemkin, A K

    2007-05-31

    The effect of various technological factors like the direction of crystal growth [(100) or (101)], acidity of the mother solution, growth rate, degree of filtration of the mother solution, purity of the starting raw material, specially introduced impurity (Pb), as well as after-growth thermal annealing, on the optical breakdown threshold of KDP crystals grown by the technique of rapid growth of profiled crystals is studied. It is shown that by using initial high-purity salts and fine filtration of solutions followed by after-growth annealing, it is possible to increase the optical breakdown threshold of profiled rapidly grown KDP crystals to values corresponding to the requirements of modern laser designs. (laser devices and elements)

  8. Crystal structure, growth and nonlinear optical studies of isonicotinamide p-nitrophenol: A new organic crystal for optical limiting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayalakshmi, A.; Vidyavathy, B.; Vinitha, G.

    2016-08-01

    Isonicotinamide p-nitrophenol (ICPNP), a new organic material, was synthesized using methanol solvent. Single crystals of ICPNP were grown using a slow evaporation solution growth technique. Crystal structure of ICPNP is elucidated by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. It belongs to monoclinic crystal system with space group of P21/c. It forms two dimensional networks by O-H…O, N-H…O and C-H…O hydrogen bonds. The molecular structure of ICPNP was further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral analysis. The optical transmittance range and the lower cut-off wavelength (421 nm) with the optical band gap (2.90 eV) of the ICPNP crystal were determined by UV-vis-NIR spectral study. Thermal behavior of ICPNP was studied by thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TG/DTA). The relative dielectric permittivity was calculated for various temperature ranges. Laser damage threshold of ICPNP crystal was found to be 1.9 GW/cm2 using an Nd:YAG laser. A Z-scan technique was employed to measure the nonlinear absorption coefficient, nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear optical susceptibility. Optical limiting behavior of ICPNP was observed at 35 mW input power.

  9. Optic properties of bile liquid crystals in human body

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hai Ming; Wu, Jie; Li, Jin Yi; Zhou, Jian Li; He, Li Jun; Xu, Xian Fang

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To further study the properties of bile liquid crystals, and probe into the relationship between bile liquid crystals and gallbladder stone formation, and provide evidence for the prevention and treatment of cholecystolithiasis. METHODS: The optic properties of bile liquid crystals in human body were determined by the method of crystal optics under polarizing microscope with plane polarized light and perpendicular polarized light. RESULTS: Under a polarizing microscope with plane polarized light, bile liquid crystals scattered in bile appeared round, oval or irregularly round. The color of bile liquid crystals was a little lighter than that of the bile around. When the stage was turned round, the color of bile liquid crystals or the darkness and lightness of the color did not change obviously. On the border between bile liquid crystals and the bile around, brighter Becke-Line could be observed. When the microscope tube is lifted, Becke-Line moved inward, and when lowered, Becke-Line moved outward. Under a perpendicular polarized light, bile liquid crystals showd some special interference patterns, called Malta cross. When the stage was turning round at an angle of 360°, the Malta cross showed four times of extinction. In the vibrating direction of 45° angle of relative to upper and lower polarizing plate, gypsum test-board with optical path difference of 530 nm was inserted, the first and the third quadrants of Malt a cross appeared to be blue, and the second and the fourth quadrants appeared orange. When mica test-board with optical path difference of 147 nm was inserted, the first and the third quadrants of Malta cross appeared yellow, and the second and the fourth quadrants appeared dark grey. CONCLUSION: The bile liquid crystals were distributed in bile in the form of global grains. Their polychroism and absorption were slight, but the edge and Becke*Line were very clear. Its refractive index was larger than that of the bile. These liquid crystals were

  10. All-optical image processing with nonlinear liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kuan-Lun

    Liquid crystals are fascinating materials because of several advantages such as large optical birefringence, dielectric anisotropic, and easily compatible to most kinds of materials. Compared to the electro-optical properties of liquid crystals widely applied in displays and switching application, transparency through most parts of wavelengths also makes liquid crystals a better candidate for all-optical processing. The fast response time of liquid crystals resulting from multiple nonlinear effects, such as thermal and density effect can even make real-time processing realized. In addition, blue phase liquid crystals with spontaneously self-assembled three dimensional cubic structures attracted academic attention. In my dissertation, I will divide the whole contents into six parts. In Chapter 1, a brief introduction of liquid crystals is presented, including the current progress and the classification of liquid crystals. Anisotropy and laser induced director axis reorientation is presented in Chapter 2. In Chapter 3, I will solve the electrostrictive coupled equation and analyze the laser induced thermal and density effect in both static and dynamic ways. Furthermore, a dynamic simulation of laser induced density fluctuation is proposed by applying finite element method. In Chapter 4, two image processing setups are presented. One is the intensity inversion experiment in which intensity dependent phase modulation is the mechanism. The other is the wavelength conversion experiment in which I can read the invisible image with a visible probe beam. Both experiments are accompanied with simulations to realize the matching between the theories and practical experiment results. In Chapter 5, optical properties of blue phase liquid crystals will be introduced and discussed. The results of grating diffractions and thermal refractive index gradient are presented in this chapter. In addition, fiber arrays imaging and switching with BPLCs will be included in this chapter

  11. Modeling of Optical Aberration Correction using a Liquid Crystal Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xinghua, Wang; Bin, Wang; McManamon, Paul F.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    Gruneisen (sup 1-3), has shown that small, light weight, liquid crystal based devices can correct for the optical distortion caused by an imperfect primary mirror in a telescope and has discussed the efficiency of this correction. In this paper we expand on that work and propose a semi-analytical approach for quantifying the efficiency of a liquid crystal based wavefront corrector for this application.

  12. Integrated optofluidic label-free biosensors using a silicon-nitride-based coupled-resonator optical waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiawei; Yao, Zhanshi; Poon, Andrew W.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we report our recent progress in silicon-nitride-based optofluidic label-free biosensors using a surfacefunctionalized coupled-resonator optical waveguide (CROW) in the visible wavelengths. The working principle is based on far-field imaging of the CROW mode-field intensity distributions at a fixed probe wavelength. The imaged pattern variation reflects real-time analyte-binding information on the CROW surfaces. Our surface-functionalized 16- microring CROW reveals six eigenstates with distinctive mode-field intensity distributions. Our proof-of-concept sensing experiment at an arbitrarily chosen probe wavelength within the CROW transmission band shows a detection of streptavidin concentration down to 40 ng/ml.

  13. Development of a plate-based optical biosensor fragment screening methodology to identify phosphodiesterase 10A inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Geschwindner, Stefan; Dekker, Niek; Horsefield, Rob; Tigerström, Anna; Johansson, Patrik; Scott, Clay W; Albert, Jeffrey S

    2013-04-25

    We describe the development of a novel fragment screening methodology employing a plate-based optical biosensor system that can operate in a 384-well format. The method is based on the "inhibition in solution assay" (ISA) approach using an immobilized target definition compound (TDC) that has been specifically designed for this purpose by making use of available structural information. We demonstrate that this method is robust and is sufficiently sensitive to detect fragment hits as weak as KD 500 μM when confirmed in a conventional surface plasmon resonance approach. The application of the plate-based screen, the identification of fragment inhibitors of PDE10A, and their structural characterization are all discussed in a forthcoming paper.

  14. Wireless-electrodeless quartz-crystal-microbalance biosensors for studying interactions among biomolecules: A review

    PubMed Central

    OGI, Hirotsugu

    2013-01-01

    The mass sensitivity of quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) was drastically improved by removing electrodes and wires attached on the quartz surfaces. Instead of wire connections, intended vibrations of quartz oscillators were excited and detected by antennas through electromagnetic waves. This noncontacting measurement is the key for ultrahigh-sensitive detection of proteins in liquids as well as quantitative measurements. This review shows the principle of wireless QCMs, their applications to studying interactions among biomolecules and aggregation reactions of amyloid β peptides, and the next-generation MEMS QCM, the resonance acoustic microbalance with naked embedded quartz (RAMNE-Q). PMID:24213205

  15. Optical and physical properties of ceramic crystal laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Jed A.

    Historically ceramic crystal laser material has had disadvantages compared to single crystal laser material. However, progress has been made in the last decade and a half to overcome the disadvantages associated with ceramic crystal. Today, because of the promise of ceramic crystal as a high power laser material, investigation into its properties, both physical and optical, is warranted and important. Thermal expansion was measured in this thesis for Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) ceramic crystal using an interferometric method. The interferometer employed a spatially filtered HeNe at 633 nm wavelength. Thermal expansion coefficients measured for the ceramic crystal samples were near the reported values for single crystal Nd:YAG. With a similar experimental setup as that for the thermal expansion measurements, dn/dT for ceramic crystal Nd:YAG was measured and found to be slightly higher than the reported value for single crystal. Depolarization loss due to thermal gradient induced stresses can limit laser performance. As a result this phenomenon was modeled for ceramic crystal materials and compared to single crystals for slab and rod shaped gain media. This was accomplished using COMSOL Multiphysics, and MATLAB. Results indicate a dependence of the depolarization loss on the grain size where the loss decreases with decreased grain size even to the point where lower loss may be expected in ceramic crystals than in single crystal samples when the grain sizes in the ceramic crystal are sufficiently small. Deformation-induced thermal lensing was modeled for a single crystal slab and its relevance to ceramic crystal is discussed. Data indicates the most notable cause of deformation-induced thermal lensing is a consequence of the deformation of the top and bottom surfaces. Also, the strength of the lensing along the thickness is greater than the width and greater than that due to other causes of lensing along the thickness of the slab. Emission spectra, absorption

  16. Optical model of transient light scattering in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Loiko, V. A. Konkolovich, A. V.; Miskevich, A. A.

    2009-03-15

    A static optical model is developed for the effect of field-induced transient scattering on coherent light transmission through ferroelectric liquid crystals. Scattering processes are described by introducing an optically anisotropic medium containing scatterers (transient domains). The results presented in the paper are obtained for a plane parallel layer of ferroelectric liquid crystals with a planar helicoidal structure under normal illumination with a linearly polarized plane wave. An analysis is presented of the coherent transmittance of the layer in static applied electric fields.

  17. Optical vortices generated by dislocations in a cholesteric liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Voloschenko, D; Lavrentovich, O D

    2000-03-01

    We report the observation of optical vortices in a laser beam propagating through the stripe pattern of a cholesteric liquid crystal. The liquid crystal is confined in a cell with homogeneous boundary conditions and forms a diffraction phase grating. Optical vortices are produced by edge dislocations of the cholesteric grating. The vortices show up as spots of zero light intensity in the diffraction maxima. There is one spot in each +1 and -1 diffraction maximum and two spots in diffraction maxima +2 and -2.

  18. Thermo - optical studies of nematic liquid crystal elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharde, Rita A.; Mani, Santosh A.; Lal, Suman; Tripathi, S. K.; Khosla, Samriti

    2014-10-01

    The influences of structural parameter on thermo - optical properties of Nematic Liquid Crystal Elastomer (NLCE) were studied using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy and Polarizing Microscopy Studies (PMS). Dielectric Measurement was also performed in addition to these measurements. The NLCE used in the present study were synthesized, has a unique coupling between anisotropic order of Liquid crystal component and elasticity of polymer network. The investigations were performed as function of temperature during heating and cooling processes. The study revealed the correlation of thermo - optical behavior of NLCE with the crosslinking agent and temperature.

  19. Optical fiber tips functionalized with semiconductor photonic crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shambat, Gary; Provine, J.; Rivoire, Kelley; Sarmiento, Tomas; Harris, James; Vučković, Jelena

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate a simple and rapid epoxy-based method for transferring photonic crystal (PC) cavities to the facets of optical fibers. Passive Si cavities were measured via fiber taper coupling as well as direct transmission from the fiber facet. Active quantum dot containing GaAs cavities showed photoluminescence that was collected both in free space and back through the original fiber. Cavities maintain a high quality factor (2000-4000) in both material systems. This design architecture provides a practical mechanically stable platform for the integration of photonic crystal cavities with macroscale optics and opens the door for innovative research on fiber-coupled cavity devices.

  20. Selective Virus Detection in Complex Sample Matrices with Photonic Crystal Optical Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sudeshna; Yadav, Amrita R.; Lifson, Mark A.; Baker, James E.; Fauchet, Philippe M.; Miller, Benjamin L.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid, sensitive, and selective detection of viruses is critical for applications in medical diagnostics, biosecurity, and environmental safety. In this article, we report the application of a point-defect-coupled W1 photonic crystal (PhC) waveguide biosensor to label-free optical detection of viruses. Fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate using electron-beam (e-beam) lithography and reactive-ion-etching, the PhC sensing platform allows optical detection based on resonant mode shifts in response to ambient refractive index changes produced by infiltration of target biomaterial within the holes of the PhC structure. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations were performed to assist with design of the sensor, and to serve as a theoretical benchmark against which experimental results could be compared. Using Human Papillomavirus virus-like particles (VLPs) spiked in 10% fetal bovine serum as a model system, we observed a limit of detection of 1.4 nM in simple (buffer only) or complex (10% serum) sample matrices. The use of anti-VLP antibodies specific for intact VLPs with the PhC sensors provided highly selective VLP detection. PMID:23434758

  1. Selective virus detection in complex sample matrices with photonic crystal optical cavities.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sudeshna; Yadav, Amrita R; Lifson, Mark A; Baker, James E; Fauchet, Philippe M; Miller, Benjamin L

    2013-06-15

    Rapid, sensitive, and selective detection of viruses is critical for applications in medical diagnostics, biosecurity, and environmental safety. In this article, we report the application of a point-defect-coupled W1 photonic crystal (PhC) waveguide biosensor to label-free optical detection of viruses. Fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate using electron-beam (e-beam) lithography and reactive-ion-etching, the PhC sensing platform allows optical detection based on resonant mode shifts in response to ambient refractive index changes produced by infiltration of target biomaterial within the holes of the PhC structure. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations were performed to assist with design of the sensor, and to serve as a theoretical benchmark against which experimental results could be compared. Using Human Papillomavirus virus-like particles (VLPs) spiked in 10% fetal bovine serum as a model system, we observed a limit of detection of 1.5 nM in simple (buffer only) or complex (10% serum) sample matrices. The use of anti-VLP antibodies specific for intact VLPs with the PhC sensors provided highly selective VLP detection.

  2. Nucleation kinetics, crystal growth and optical studies on lithium hydrogen oxalate monohydrate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Senthilkumar; Paulraj, Rajesh; Ramasamy, P.

    2017-06-01

    Semi-organic lithium hydrogen oxalate monohydrate non-linear optical single crystals have been grown by slow evaporation solution technique at 40 °C. The nucleation parameters such as critical radius, interfacial tension, and critical free energy change have been evaluated using the experimental data. The solubility and the nucleation curve of the crystal at different temperatures have been analyzed. The crystal has a positive temperature coefficient of solubility. The metastable zone width and induction period have been determined for the aqueous solution growth of lithium hydrogen oxalate monohydrate. The UV-vis-NIR spectrum showed this crystal has high transparency. The photoconductivity studies indicate lithium hydrogen oxalate monohydrate has positive photoconductivity behaviour. The low etch pit density observed on (0 0 1) crystal surface and the high resolution x-ray difraction analysis indicate the good quality of the grown crystals

  3. Highly Non-Linear Optical (NLO) organic crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. Milton

    1987-01-01

    This research project involves the synthesis and characterization of organic materials having powerful nonlinear optical (NLO) properties and the growth of highly ordered crystals and monomolecular films of these materials. Research in four areas is discussed: theoretical design of new materials, characterization of NLO materials, synthesis of new materials and development of coupling procedures for forming layered films, and improvement of the techniques for vapor phase and solution phase growth of high quality organic crystals. Knowledge gained from these experiments will form the basis for experiments in the growth of these crystals.

  4. Optical-diffraction method for determining crystal orientation

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1982-05-07

    Disclosed is an optical diffraction technique for characterizing the three-dimensional orientation of a crystal sample. An arbitrary surface of the crystal sample is texture etched so as to generate a pseudo-periodic diffraction grating on the surface. A laser light beam is then directed onto the etched surface, and the reflected light forms a farfield diffraction pattern in reflection. Parameters of the diffraction pattern, such as the geometry and angular dispersion of the diffracted beam are then related to grating shape of the etched surface which is in turn related to crystal orientation. This technique may be used for examining polycrystalline silicon for use in solar cells.

  5. Phenomenological study of binding in optically trapped photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maystre, D.; Vincent, P.

    2007-08-01

    We describe a phenomenological theory of the phenomenon of binding observed both experimentally and numerically when particles are trapped by an interference system in order to make a structure close to a photonic crystal. This theory leads to a very simple conclusion, which links the binding phenomenon to the bottom of the lowest bandgap of the trapped crystal in a given direction. The phenomenological theory allows one to calculate the period of the trapped crystal by using numerical tools on dispersion diagrams of photonic crystals. It emerges that the agreement of our theory with our rigorous numerical results given in a previous paper [J. Opt A8, 1059 (2006)] is better than 2% on the crystal period. Furthermore, it is shown that in two-dimensional problems and s polarization, all the optical forces derive from a scalar potential.

  6. The optical properties of alkali nitrate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan'ev, Vladimir; Miklin, Mikhail

    2000-08-01

    Absorption of non-polarized light by a uniaxial crystal has been studied. The degree of absorption polarization has been calculated as a function of the ratio of optical densities in the region of low and high absorbances. This function is proposed for analysis of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of uniaxial crystal absorption spectra. Non-polarized light spectra of alkali nitrate single crystals, both pure and doped with thallium, have been studied. It is shown that the absorption band at 300 nm is due to two transitions, whose intensities depend on temperature in various ways. There is a weak band in a short wavelength range of the absorption spectrum of potassium nitrate crystal, whose intensity increases with thallium doping. The band parameters of alkali nitrate single crystals have been calculated. Low-energy transitions in the nitrate ion have been located.

  7. Genomagnetic Electrochemical Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Joseph; Erdem, Arzum

    The use of nucleic acid technologies has significantly improved preparation and diagnostic procedures in life sciences. Nucleic acid layers combined with electrochemical or optical transducers produce a new kind of affinity biosensors as DNA Biosensor for small molecular weight molecules. Electrochemical DNA biosensors are attractive devices for converting the hybridization event into an analytical signal for obtaining sequence-specific information in connection with clinical, environmental or forensic investigations. DNA hybridization biosensors, based on electrochemical transduction of hybridization, couple the high specificity of hybridization reactions with the excellent sensitivity and portability of electrochemical transducers. The main goal in all researches is to design DNA biosensors for preparing a basis for the future DNA microarray system. DNA chip has now become a powerful tool in biological research, however the real clinic assay is still under development. Recently, there has been a great interest to the magnetic beads and/or nanoparticles labelled with metals such as gold, cadmium, silver, etc. for designing of novel electrochemical DNA biosensor approaches resulting in efficient separation. The attractive features of this technology include simple approach, rapid results, multi-analyte detection, low-cost per measurument, stable, and non-hazardous reagents, and reduced waste handling. Some of these new approaches and applications of the electrochemical DNA biosensors based on magnetic beads and its combining with nanoparticles labelled with metals are described and discussed.

  8. The evaluation of loop-mediated isothermal amplification-quartz crystal microbalance (LAMP-QCM) biosensor as a real-time measurement of HPV16 DNA.

    PubMed

    Jearanaikoon, Patcharee; Prakrankamanant, Preeda; Leelayuwat, Chanvit; Wanram, Surasak; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Promptmas, Chamras

    2016-03-01

    We have previously developed quartz crystal microbalance biosensor integrated with loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP-QCM) for human papillomavirus (HPV) type58 DNA detection. Infection with HPV, particularly HPV16, remains a serious health problem due to its major risk factor contributing to cervical cancer. In the present study, LAMP-QCM biosensor was evaluated in terms of a quantitative assay for copy number of HPV16 DNA in cervical samples compared to quantitative PCR using TaqMan assay (TaqMan-qPCR). The detection limit of LAMP-QCM was found to be 10 fold more sensitive than TaqMan-qPCR with 100% specificity and 7.6% imprecision. Different plot of HPV16 DNA copy number using Bland-Altman analysis revealed 94% correlation between LAMP-QCM and qPCR. We therefore concluded that the developed LAMP-QCM biosensor provides a possible rapid and sensitive assay for HPV16 DNA quantification in a routine laboratory.

  9. Circularly polarized optical heterodyne interferometer for optical activity measurement of a quartz crystal.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chien; Kuo, Wen-Chuan; Han, Chien-Yuan

    2003-09-01

    Phase retardation between two orthogonal circularly polarized light waves that propagate in an optical active medium is proportional to its optical activity. The measurement of optical activity of a quartz depolarizer in terms of the phase difference of two orthogonal circularly polarized waves is proposed. A circularly polarized optical heterodyne interferometer with a Zeeman laser to measure the optical activity of a quartz crystal is demonstrated experimentally. The accuracy of the measurement is discussed. In addition, the effect of elliptical polarization and nonorthogonality of linearly polarized light waves of a Zeeman laser on the optical activity measurement is analyzed.

  10. Polychromatic Optical Vortex Generation from Patterned Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Generation of optical vortices is described in cholesteric liquid crystals with a singular point in the spatial distribution of a helix phase. The phenomenon uses the fact that a Bragg reflected light phase varies in proportion to the spatial phase of the helix, both at normal and oblique incidences. Our proposal enables high-efficiency, polychromatic generation of optical vortices without the need of a cumbersome fabrication process and fine-tuning.

  11. Photonic crystal based biosensor for the detection of glucose concentration in urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Savarimuthu; Dhanlaksmi, Nagaraj

    2017-03-01

    Photonic sensing technology is a new and accurate measurement technology for bio-sensing applications. In this paper, a two-dimensional photonic crystal ring resonator based sensor is proposed and designed to detect the glucose concentration in urine over the range of 0 gm/dl-15 gm/dl. The proposed sensor is consisted of two inverted "L" waveguides and a ring resonator. If the glucose concentration in urine is varied, the refractive index of the urine is varied, which in turn the output response of sensor will be varied. By having the aforementioned principle, the glucose concentration in urine, glucose concentration in blood, albumin, urea, and bilirubin concentration in urine are predicted. The size of the proposed sensor is about 11.4 µm×11.4 µm, and the sensor can predict the result very accurately without any delay, hence, this attempt could be implemented for medical applications.

  12. Photonic crystal based biosensor for the detection of glucose concentration in urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Savarimuthu; Dhanlaksmi, Nagaraj

    2016-10-01

    Photonic sensing technology is a new and accurate measurement technology for bio-sensing applications. In this paper, a two-dimensional photonic crystal ring resonator based sensor is proposed and designed to detect the glucose concentration in urine over the range of 0 gm/dl-15 gm/dl. The proposed sensor is consisted of two inverted "L" waveguides and a ring resonator. If the glucose concentration in urine is varied, the refractive index of the urine is varied, which in turn the output response of sensor will be varied. By having the aforementioned principle, the glucose concentration in urine, glucose concentration in blood, albumin, urea, and bilirubin concentration in urine are predicted. The size of the proposed sensor is about 11.4 µm×11.4 µm, and the sensor can predict the result very accurately without any delay, hence, this attempt could be implemented for medical applications.

  13. Reporter Proteins in Whole-Cell Optical Bioreporter Detection Systems, Biosensor Integrations, and Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Close, Dan M.; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary S.

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell, genetically modified bioreporters are designed to emit detectable signals in response to a target analyte or related group of analytes. When integrated with a transducer capable of measuring those signals, a biosensor results that acts as a self-contained analytical system useful in basic and applied environmental, medical, pharmacological, and agricultural sciences. Historically, these devices have focused on signaling proteins such as green fluorescent protein, aequorin, firefly luciferase, and/or bacterial luciferase. The biochemistry and genetic development of these sensor systems as well as the advantages, challenges, and common applications of each one will be discussed. PMID:22291559

  14. An optical biosensor based on His6-OPH for organophosphate detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frančič, Nina; Lyagini, Ilya V.; Efremenko, Elena N.; Košak, Aljoša; Lobnik, Aleksandra

    2011-05-01

    In this work we describe a method for immobilizing the hexahistidine-modified OPH (His6-OPH) enzyme via sol-gel technology in a porous material while retaining its catalytic activity. The potential use of each bio-sensing material was checked by quantifying the enzymatic properties, such as the relative activity of the immobilized enzyme, its Michaelis- Menten equation parameters and its stability under extreme working conditions (pH, T). The bio-sensor material was also characterised by SEM as well as in terms of its reversibility and sensitivity.

  15. Optical reflectance, optical refractive index and optical conductivity measurements of nonlinear optics for L-aspartic acid nickel chloride single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbazhagan, G.; Joseph, P. S.; Shankar, G.

    2013-03-01

    Single crystals of L-aspartic acid nickel chloride (LANC) were grown by the slow evaporation technique at room temperature. The grown crystals were subjected to Powder X-ray diffraction studies to confirm the crystal structure. The modes of vibration of different molecular groups present in LANC have been identified by FTIR spectral analysis. Optical transferency of the grown crystal was investigated by UV-Vis-NIR spectrum. The lower optical cut off wavelength for this crystal is observed at 240 nm and energy band gap 5.179 eV. The optical reflectance and optical refractive index studies have been carried out in this crystal. Finally, the optical conductivity and electrical conductivity studies have been carried out on LANC single crystal.

  16. Comments on the paper: 'Optical reflectance, optical refractive index and optical conductivity measurements of nonlinear optics for L-aspartic acid nickel chloride single crystal'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.; Naik, Suvidha G.; Dhavskar, Kiran T.

    2016-02-01

    We argue that the 'L-aspartic acid nickel chloride' crystal reported by the authors of the title paper (Optics Communications, 291 (2013) 304-308) is actually the well-known diaqua(L-aspartato)nickel(II) hydrate crystal.

  17. SINGLE-CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    A. Wang; G. Pickrell; R. May

    2002-09-10

    In this research program, several optical instruments for high temperature measurement based on single crystal sapphire material are introduced and tested for real-time, reliable, long-term monitoring of temperatures for coal gasifier. These are sapphire fiber extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) sensor; intensity-measurement based polarimetric sapphire sensor and broadband polarimetric differential interferometric (BPDI) sapphire sensor. Based on current evaluation and analysis of the experimental results, the broadband polarimetric differential interferometric (BPDI) sensor system was chosen for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the self-calibrating measurement of optical path differences (OPD) in a single-crystal sapphire disk, which is a function of both the temperature dependent birefringence and the temperature dependent dimensional changes. The BPDI sensor system extracts absolute temperature information by absolute measurement of phase delays. By encoding temperature information in optical spectrum instead of optical intensity, this sensor guarantees its relative immunity to optical source power fluctuations and fiber losses, thus providing a high degree of long-term measurement stability which is highly desired in industrial applications. The entire prototype for BPDI system including the single crystal sapphire probe, zirconia prism, alumina extension tube, optical components and signal processing hardware and software have shown excellent performance in the laboratory experiments shown in this report.

  18. Optical Properties of Irradiated Topaz Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvortsova, V.; Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Trinkler, L.

    2015-04-01

    The results of an investigation of UV-Visible absorption and photoluminescence spectra of colorless topaz before and after neutron irradiation, natural blue topaz from Ukraine, and yellow topaz are presented. We assume that the absorption band ∼ 620 nm and broad emission band 300-700 nm in topaz crystals are associated with exchange interaction between a radiation defect (anion vacancies, which capture one or two electrons) and impurity ions Cr3+, Fe3+ and Mn2+.

  19. Label-free optical biosensor for detection and quantification of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in milk without any sample pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Rau, Sabrina; Hilbig, Urs; Gauglitz, Günter

    2014-05-01

    A label-free optical biosensor for detection and quantification of diclofenac in bovine milk has been developed. This was achieved by using reflectometric interference spectroscopy as detection method. In a first step, the immunosensor was developed and optimised in buffer concerning sensitivity, selectivity, stability and reproducibility. By comparing recovery rates—not only the good intra- but also the good inter-chip—reproducibility could be proven. Consequently, the assay was transferred in the more complex matrix milk. By utilising an optimised surface modification and evaluation method, matrix effects could successfully be prevented or circumvented. As a result, the developed immunosensor does not need sample pretreatment at all. By obtaining a limit of detection of 0.112 μg L(−1) (0.108 μg kg(−1)), the capability of the developed biosensor is comparable or better than those of standard detection methods. Moreover, the presented biosensor reaches the range of the maximum residue limit (0.1 μg kg(−1)) set by the European Union. Thus, for the first time, diclofenac was successfully quantified at relevant levels in milk by using an optical biosensor.

  20. Label-free optical detection of C-reactive protein by nanoimprint lithography-based 2D-photonic crystal film.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tatsuro; Kajita, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Yukio; Kosaka, Terumasa; Himi, Toshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    The development of high-sensitive, and cost-effective novel biosensors have been strongly desired for future medical diagnostics. To develop novel biosensor, the authors focused on the specific optical characteristics of photonic crystal. In this study, a label-free optical biosensor, polymer-based two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D-PhC) film fabricated using nanoimprint lithography (NIL), was developed for detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) in human serum. The nano-hole array constructed NIL-based 2D-PhC (hole diameter: 230 nm, distance: 230, depth: 200 nm) was fabricated on a cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) film (100 µm) using thermal NIL and required surface modifications to reduce nonspecific adsorption of target proteins. Antigen-antibody reactions on the NIL-based 2D-PhC caused changes to the surrounding refractive index, which was monitored as reflection spectrum changes in the visible region. By using surface modified 2D-PhC, the calculated detection limit for CRP was 12.24 pg/mL at an extremely short reaction time (5 min) without the need for additional labeling procedures and secondary antibody. Furthermore, using the dual-functional random copolymer, CRP could be detected in a pooled blood serum diluted 100× with dramatic reduction of nonspecific adsorption. From these results, the NIL-based 2D-PhC film has great potential for development of an on-site, high-sensitivity, cost-effective, label-free biosensor for medical diagnostics applications.

  1. Photo-thermo-refractive glasses: Crystallization mechanism for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois-Saint-Cyr, Hugues Gilbert

    Due to their ability to undergo a refractive index change (Deltan) induced by appropriate UV irradiation and thermal development, Photo-Thermo-Refractive (PTR) glass is a candidate material for use in optical applications such as hologram recording, optical data storage, or spectral filters. Although this refractive index modulation (Deltan) has been characterized in terms of its optical ramifications, glass scientists are working to understand more clearly the underlying mechanisms associated with the photo-induced crystallization process. Despite numerous difficulties such as the insulating nature of PTR glass, low concentration levels of photosensitive species, nanometer size of the resulting crystalline phase, and reactivity of these crystals to ion and electron beam radiation and temperature, characterization techniques have been successfully used, resulting in an improved understanding of the photo-induced crystallization mechanism. Results of absorption spectroscopy, interferometry, thermal analysis, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy have allowed detailing a self-consistent mechanism to describe the multiple steps of this complex process. The photo-induced crystallization process has been experimentally verified, step-by-step. Additionally, the evolution of the heterogeneous phase has been quantified. Sodium fluoride precipitates that resulted from bulk crystallization were determined to be less than 0.25% of the total volume and were within the range of 8 to 14 nm in size. Experiments combining interferometry and x-ray diffraction analyses of glasses heterogeneously crystallized at 520°C for 1 hour led to a linear correlation between (Deltan) decrement and UV exposure doses. A kinetic study of the heterogeneous crystallization using thermal analysis revealed an exponential decay law linking the activation energy for heterogeneous crystallization as a function of the UV dose for given heat-treatments.

  2. Real-time association rate constant measurement using combination tapered fiber-optic biosensor (CTFOB) dip-probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmonds, Boris; Wang, Chun-Wei; Kapoor, Rakesh

    2010-02-01

    This document reports a novel method of measuring association rate constant (ka) for antibody-antigen interaction using evanescent wave-based combination tapered fiber-optic biosensor (CTFOB) dip-probes. The method was demonstrated by measuring association rate constant for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anti-BSA antibody interaction. "Direct method" was used for detection; goat anti-BSA "capture" antibodies were immobilized on the probe surfaces while the antigen (BSA) was directly labeled with Alexa 488 dye. The probes were subsequently submerged in 3nM Labeled BSA in egg albumin (1 mg/ml). The fluorescence signal recorded was proportional to BSA anti-BSA conjugates and continuous signal was acquired suing a fiber optic spectrometer (Ocean Optics, Inc.). A 476 nm diode laser was use as an excitation source. Association constant was estimated from a plot of signal as a function of time. Measured association rate constant ka for the binding of BSA with anti-BSA at room temperature is (8.33 +/- 0.01) x 104 M-1s-1.

  3. Enhanced sandwich immunoassay using antibody-functionalized magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles for extraction and detection of soluble transferrin receptor on a photonic crystal biosensor.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Ross D; Chen, Weili; Cunningham, Brian T; Andrade, Juan E

    2015-12-15

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has detrimental effects on individuals and societies worldwide. A standard sandwich assay (SA) for the detection of soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), a biomarker of IDA, on a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor was established, but it was susceptible to non-specific signals from complex matrixes. In this study, iron-oxide nanoparticles (fAb-IONs) were used as magnetic immuno-probes to bind sTfR and minimize non-specific signals, while enhancing detection on the PC biosensor. This inverse sandwich assay (IA) method completely bound sTfR with low variability (<4% RSD) in buffer and allowed for its accurate and precise detection in sera (Liquichek™ control sera) on the PC biosensor using two certified ELISAs as reference methods. A linear dose-response curve was elicited at the fAb-IONs concentration in which the theoretical binding ratio (sTfR:fAb-IONs) was calculated to be <1 on the IA. The LoDs for sTfR in the SA and IA were similar (P>0.05) at 14 and 21 μg/mL, respectively. The inherent imprecision of the IA and reference ELISAs was σ(δ)=0.45 µg/mL and the mean biases for Liquichek™ 1, 2 and 3 were 0.18, 0.19 and -0.04 µg/mL, respectively. Whereas the inherent imprecision of the SA and reference ELISAs was σ(δ)=0.52 µg/mL and the biases for Liquichek™ 1, 2 and 3 were 0.66, 0.14 and -0.67 µg/mL, respectively. Thus, unlike the SA, the IA method measures sTfR with the same bias as the reference ELISAs. Combined magnetic separation and detection of nutrition biomarkers on PC biosensors represents a facile method for their accurate and reliable quantification in complex matrixes.

  4. Crystallization of inorganic nonlinear optical zinc di-magnesium chloro sulphate (ZDMCS) single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arivuselvi, R.; Ruban Kumar, A.

    2017-02-01

    The growth of inorganic zinc di-magnesium chloro sulphate (ZDMCS) nonlinear optical material from low temperature evaporation technique at ambient temperature has been reported. The dimension of harvested crystal is 28×10×2 mm3 and is possess rectangular shape morphology. The single crystal X-ray diffraction studies confirmed that the grown crystal belongs to the system of trigonal. The S-Cl stretching vibrations and Mg2+ ions present in the sample were observed by FTIR spectrometer. The cut-off wavelength of the grown crystal is about 203 nm is found by UV-visible absorption spectrum. The nonlinear optical efficiency was determined by powder Kurtz Perry technique. EDAX spectrum confirms the presence of elements within the material. Dielectric nature of the sample was analyzed for the frequency range 50 Hz to 5 MHz at different temperatures. The mechanical behaviour of the title compound was investigated using Vicker's microhardness tester.

  5. Quantum-dot-conjugated graphene oxide as an optical tool for biosensor.

    PubMed

    Jenrette, Erin; Pradhan, Sangram K; Rutherford, Gugu; Flowers, Jasmin; Ha, Duc; Pradhan, Aswini K

    2015-09-21

    We have demonstrated a novel platform of quantum dots (QDs) core-shell conjugated graphene oxide (GO) biosensor for effective protein detection. The advantage in making core shell nanostructure allows preserving stable QDs, by improving quantum yield, and lowering the toxicity of the core. Both QDs and GO are efficient nanoparticle systems that can potentially be used for drug delivery, diagnosis, and biosensors scaffolds. However, our study indicates that the conjugation between these two nanoparticle systems makes their properties even more effective. The change in fluorescent intensity through fluorescence resonance energy transfer from quantum dots to GO produced a novel method for detection of the target and allows for the optimization of the recognition limit of Bovine serum albumin (BSA) due to efficient fluorescence resonance energy transfer as observed through time resolved relaxation spectroscopy. It is observed that the quenching of photoluminescence peak of QDs due to GO shell produced an applicable strategy and could be conveniently extended for detection of other biomolecules. We obtained significantly enhanced spectral signal through successful conjugation of GO with CdSe/CdS core shell, which can potentially be used for the detection of biomolecules with high sensitivity and selectivity. Our study underlines the efficiency of QD conjugated GO core shell in spectral detection of proteins even at very low concentration (0.25 mmol).

  6. Biosensors in clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Paul

    2003-08-01

    Biosensors are analytical devices composed of a recognition element of biological origin and a physico-chemical transducer. The biological element is capable of sensing the presence, activity or concentration of a chemical analyte in solution. The sensing takes place either as a binding event or a biocatalytical event. These interactions produce a measurable change in a solution property, which the transducer converts into a quantifiable electrical signal. Present-day applications of biosensors to clinical chemistry are reviewed, including basic and applied research, commercial applications and fabrication techniques. Recognition elements include enzymes as biocatalytic recognition elements and immunoagents and DNA segments as affinity ligand recognition elements, coupled to electrochemical and optical modes of transduction. The future will include biosensors based on synthetic recognition elements to allow broad applicability to different classes of analytes and modes of transduction extending lower limits of sensitivity. Microfabrication will permit biosensors to be constructed as arrays and incorporated into lab-on-a-chip devices.

  7. Optical Characteristics of Liquid Crystal Displays and Modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kanghua

    The viewing-angle characteristics of liquid crystal displays (LCD) and the performance of liquid crystal spatial light modulators (SLM) are studied. The main contributions can be summarized as follows: (1) We have developed a new theory for LCD optics based on a generalized 2 x 2 Jones calculus. This new theory permits us to compute the transmittance of polarized light of arbitrary incident angles and wavelengths through the LCD at much higher speeds than has been possible with previous approaches. (2) We have developed a CAD software based on this theory. We used it to study the viewing-angle problem and to examine the effect of using birefringent compensation films of various types. We found that improvements can be indeed achieved. In the process we introduced a new method for display of color and viewing -angle characteristics. (3) We invented a new experimental single-step method of observing the viewing-angle characteristics based on Fourier optics. Previous methods were typically based on the use of cumbersome scanning techniques. Using our new apparatus we have verified the consistency between the experimental viewing-angle patterns and our theoretical predictions. (4) We also developed a simplified analytical model for the liquid crystal SLM, and used it to successfully interpret and improve the operation of liquid crystal light valves and liquid crystal televisions, especially when they are used as optical phase-only modulators.

  8. Propagation optical quarks after an uniaxial crystal: the experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Yu. A.; Konovalenko, V. L.; Zinovev, A. O.; Anischenko, P. M.; Glumova, M. V.

    2013-12-01

    There is a lots of different papers reporting about the propagation of the different types of an optical beams in a uniaxial crystals are known by that time. This beams are: Lager-Gaussian and Bessel- Gaussian beams. It is common for all this types of beams, that if propagation axis and crystal axis coincides, and accident beam had a circular polarization, are can get type spiral type degenerated umbilici, which corresponds to the charge 2 optical vortex in the orthogonal polarized beam component, generated by crystal [1] (Fig 1). This generation accurse due to total angular momentum conservation law symmetry axis of the crystal. One to the changing of the spin momentum which is associated with the beam polarization, this leads to the orbital momentum changes that associated with topological charge of formed orthogonal circular component. Double charged optical vortex could be easily perturbed by tilting beam axis with respect to the crystal axis. If the tilt angles are small (<0.1°) central umbilici splits on two lemons and the surrounding ring umbilici splits on two pairs of monster-star. The further increasing of the tilt angle leads to the topological charge of circular components becomes, equal, and additional orbital moment correspond to the beam mass center displacement.

  9. Imaging birefringent crystals using micro optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gargi; Singh, Kanwarpal; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2017-02-01

    Background: Uric acid crystals have recently been identified as a possible therapeutic target for coronary artery disease. Being subcellular in size, it is difficult to identify these crystals in situ. Micro optical coherence tomography (Micro-OCT) allows one to image subcellular structures with 1-micron resolution. Even though Micro-OCT should be capable of resolving urate crystals, it's difficult to differentiate these structures from other scattering particles within tissue. In this work we developed a novel polarization sensitive micro OCT (ps-Micro-OCT) system for identification of uric acid crystals. Methods: A spectrometer based ps-Micro-OCT system was developed using a broadband light source. The broadband input light was divided into reference and sample signals using a beam splitter. The reference signal was further divided into two polarized signals with different polarization states. Reflected reference and sample signals were combined and sent to a spectrometer that recorded the interference signal. Results: To test the performance of system, a mirror was used as sample and a quarter wave-plate was placed in the sample path. The measured quarter wave-plate angle values matched closely to actual angle values. Next we prepared uric acid crystals in our lab and imaged them using this system.We were able to image and identify these crystals based on polarization measurements. Conclusion: In this work we imaged and identified uric acid crystals using a newly developed ps-Micro-OCT system. The proposed technique will enable imaging uric acid crystals in coronary artery.

  10. Screening of Protein Crystallization Trials by Second Order Nonlinear Optical Imaging of Chiral Crystals (SONICC)

    PubMed Central

    Haupert, Levi; Simpson, Garth

    2011-01-01

    Second order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC) is a promising new method for the sensitive and selective detection of protein crystals. Relevant general principles of second harmonic generation, which underpins SONICC, are reviewed. Instrumentation and methods for SONICC measurements are described and critically assessed in terms of performance trade-offs. Potential origins of false-positives and false-negatives are also discussed. PMID:22101350

  11. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) affinity biosensor for genetically modified organisms (GMOs) detection.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Ilaria; Minunni, Maria; Tombelli, Sara; Mascini, Marco

    2003-03-01

    A DNA piezoelectric sensor has been developed for the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Single stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes were immobilised on the sensor surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) device and the hybridisation between the immobilised probe and the target complementary sequence in solution was monitored. The probe sequences were internal to the sequence of the 35S promoter (P) and Nos terminator (T), which are inserted sequences in the genome of GMOs regulating the transgene expression. Two different probe immobilisation procedures were applied: (a) a thiol-dextran procedure and (b) a thiol-derivatised probe and blocking thiol procedure. The system has been optimised using synthetic oligonucleotides, which were then applied to samples of plasmidic and genomic DNA isolated from the pBI121 plasmid, certified reference materials (CRM), and real samples amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The analytical parameters of the sensor have been investigated (sensitivity, reproducibility, lifetime etc.). The results obtained showed that both immobilisation procedures enabled sensitive and specific detection of GMOs, providing a useful tool for screening analysis in food samples.

  12. Demonstrations of Some Optical Properties of Liquid Crystals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicastro, Anthony J.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses several properties of liquid crystal displays. Includes instructions for demonstrating liquid crystalline phase, ordering of the long axes of molecules along one direction, and electro-optic effects. The latter is accomplished with the use of an overhead projector following preparation of a sandwich cell. (JN)

  13. Demonstrations of Some Optical Properties of Liquid Crystals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicastro, Anthony J.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses several properties of liquid crystal displays. Includes instructions for demonstrating liquid crystalline phase, ordering of the long axes of molecules along one direction, and electro-optic effects. The latter is accomplished with the use of an overhead projector following preparation of a sandwich cell. (JN)

  14. Configuration of singular optical cones in gyrotropic crystals with dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Merkulov, V. S.

    2015-02-15

    Optical conic singularities in crystals with linear dichroism and natural optical activity at the point of intersection of dispersion curves for the main refractive indices are considered. The possible existence of singularities like a nodal point, tangency point, triple point, and cusps of the first and second order is demonstrated. Forty-nine different types of irreducible fourth-order optical cones obtained by sequential bifurcations of eight main singular cones are established. The classification is based on the concept of roughness of systems depending on parameters.

  15. Resonance-enhanced optical forces between coupled photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Victor; Povinelli, Michelle; Fan, Shanhui

    2009-11-23

    The behaviors of lateral and normal optical forces between coupled photonic crystal slabs are analyzed. We show that the optical force is periodic with displacement, resulting in stable and unstable equilibrium positions. Moreover, the forces are strongly enhanced by guided resonances of the coupled slabs. Such enhancement is particularly prominent near dark states of the system, and the enhancement effect is strongly dependent on the types of guided resonances involved. These structures lead to enhancement of light-induced pressure over larger areas, in a configuration that is directly accessible to externally incident, free-space optical beams.

  16. Optical manipulation and imaging of assemblies of topological defects and colloids in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Rahul P.

    Liquid Crystals (LCs) have proven to be important for electro-optic device applications such as displays, spatial light modulators, non-mechanical beam-steerers, etc. Owing to their unique mechanical, electrical, and optical properties, they are also being explored for wide array of advanced technological applications such as biosensors, tunable lenses, distributed feedback lasers, muscle-like actuators, etc. The thesis explores LC media from the standpoint of controlling their elastic and optical properties by generating and manipulating assemblies of defects and colloidal particles. To achieve the goal of optically manipulating these configurations comprising defects and particles at microscale with an unprecedented control, and then to visualize the resultant molecular director patterns, requires development of powerful optical system. The thesis discusses design and implementation of such an integrated system capable of 3D holographic optical manipulation and multi-modal 3D imaging (in nonlinear optical modes like multiphoton fluorescence, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, etc.) and how they are used to extensively study a vast number of LC based systems. Understanding of LCs and topological defects go hand in hand. Appreciation of defects leads to their precise control, which in turn can lead to applications. The thesis describes discovery of optically generated stable, quasiparticle-like, localized defect structures in a LC cell, that we call "Torons". Torons enable twist of molecules in three dimensions and resemble both Skyrmion-like and Hopf fibration features. Under different conditions of generation, we optically realize an intriguing variety of novel solitonic defect structures comprising rather complicated configurations of point and line topological defects. Introducing colloidal particles to LC systems imparts to these hybrid material system a fascinating degree of richness of properties on account of colloidal assemblies supported by networks

  17. Single crystal optic elements for helium atom microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, D. A.; Allison, W.; Holst, B.

    2000-07-01

    Focusing characteristics of asymmetrically bent single crystal mirrors are discussed in the context of fabricating an optic element for an helium atom microscope. We demonstrate the principle that deforming a clamped, elliptical, single crystal under electrostatic pressure can produce submicron focusing of an helium beam. We present a systematic procedure that may be used to fabricate high precision mirrors close to the Cartesian ideal of any chosen optical configuration. In particular, imaging systems with asymmetric mirror profiles are discussed. Results are independent of crystal characteristics and can be adapted to fit a range of experimental geometries. The calculations indicate that mirror-induced aberrations can be eliminated to fourth order by use of a single actuation electrode in an ideal system.

  18. Magnetite nanorod thermotropic liquid crystal colloids: synthesis, optics and theory.

    PubMed

    Podoliak, Nina; Buchnev, Oleksandr; Bavykin, Dmitry V; Kulak, Alexander N; Kaczmarek, Malgosia; Sluckin, Timothy J

    2012-11-15

    We have developed a facile method for preparing magnetic nanoparticles which couple strongly with a liquid crystal (LC) matrix, with the aim of preparing ferronematic liquid crystal colloids for use in magneto-optical devices. Magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by oxidising colloidal Fe(OH)(2) with air in aqueous media, and were then subject to alkaline hydrothermal treatment with 10 mol dm(-3) NaOH at 100°C, transforming them into a polydisperse set of domain magnetite nanorods with maximal length ~500 nm and typical diameter ~20 nm. The nanorods were coated with 4-n-octyloxybiphenyl-4-carboxylic acid (OBPh) and suspended in nematic liquid crystal E7. As compared to the conventional oleic acid coating, this coating stabilizes LC-magnetic nanorod suspensions. The suspension acts as a ferronematic system, using the colloidal particles as intermediaries to amplify magnetic field-LC director interactions. The effective Frederiks magnetic threshold field of the magnetite nanorod-liquid crystal composite is reduced by 20% as compared to the undoped liquid crystal. In contrast with some previous work in this field, the magneto-optical effects are reproducible on time scales of months. Prospects for magnetically switched liquid crystal devices using these materials are good, but a method is required to synthesize single magnetic domain nanorods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular Optics Nonlinear Optical Processes in Organic and Polymeric Crystals and Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    LAr 9B L Appr 1~ forjIbi1893 2 8 I I IE2 Molecular Optics: Nonlinear Optical Processes in Organic and Polymeric Crystals and Films i Professor A. F...frequency dependent local field factors. While there are various prevalent models (Lorentz- Lorenz, Onsager ) all of them give the field factors in terms of

  20. Ferroic Crystals for Electro-Optic and Acousto-Optic Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    properties for potential application in acousto - optic devices; and, (2) A systematic examination of the role of domain structures in modifying the...macroscopic properties of all types of ferroic crystals and the manner in which these property modifications could be exploited in acousto - optic , electro

  1. A simple and rapid optical biosensor for detection of aflatoxin B1 based on competitive dispersion of gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xia; Liu, Xiangjiang; Li, Yanbin; Ying, Yibin

    2013-09-15

    This report illustrates a promising one-step and label-free optical biosensor for determination of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) that is most commonly found in foods and highly dangerous even at very low concentrations. In this research, gold nanorods (GNRs) were employed as a sensing platform, which showed high stability under high ionic strength conditions without addition of any stabilizing agent. GNR-AFB1-BSA (bovine serum albumin) conjugates aggregated after mixing with free antibodies, resulting in significant changes in absorption intensity. At the same time the existence of AFB1 molecules in samples caused dispersion of nanorods, as a result of competitive immune-reaction with antibodies. By taking advantages of the competitive dispersion of GNRs, the developed method could effectively reduce false results caused by undesirable aggregation, which is a big problem for spherical gold nanoparticles. Absorption intensity of UV-vis spectra served as the sensing indicator, with dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement as another sensing tool. The designed biosensing system could detect AFB1 in a linear range from 0.5 to 20ngmL(-1), with a good correlation coefficient of 0.99. And the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.16ngmL(-1), indicating an excellent sensitivity with absorbance result. The recoveries of the spiked AFB1 in real peanut samples ranged from 94.2% to 117.3%. Therefore the proposed nano-biosensor was demonstrated to be sensitive, selective, and simple, providing a viable alternative for rapid screening of toxins in agriculture products and foods.

  2. A novel method of adrenaline concentration detection using fiber optical biosensor based on the catalysis of iron(II) phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xuan; Huang, Jun; Li, Mingtian; Wang, Bin

    2008-12-01

    As an effective alternative to the nature enzyme, metallophthalocyanine (MPc), having the advantages of easy accessibility, good stability and low cost, are used as catalyzer for the adrenaline (AD) oxidation. In this paper, the oxidation of AD by dioxygen using iron(II) phthalocyanine (FePc) as the catalyst was studied by electronic absorption spectra. The experimental results indicate that the oxidation product of AD catalyzed by FePc is adrenochrome with characteristic peaks at 298 nm and 267 nm. The catalytic activities of FePc are evaluated by the ratios of the absorbance at 298 nm of adrenochrome. The optimal concentration, pH and temperature for the oxidation of AD are 5.0×10-5 M, 8.0 and 55 oC, respectively. By using lock-in technology, the fiber optic adrenaline biosensor based on FePc catalysis and fluorescence quenching was fabricated and studied. A linear relationship between φ, the phase delay of the sensor head, and AD concentration was observed in the range of 2.0×10-6 to 9.0×10-6 M and 2.0×10-5 to 9.0×10-5 M. The standard deviation (SD) values are 4.7×10-8 (n = 5) and 5.9×10-7 (n = 5) M, respectively, while the detection limit is 4.0×10-7 M. The biosensor has the response time of about 15 min and the preferred reproducibility and stability.

  3. Development of an optical biosensor based immunoassay to screen infant formula milk samples for adulteration with melamine.

    PubMed

    Fodey, Terence L; Thompson, Colin S; Traynor, Imelda M; Haughey, Simon A; Kennedy, D Glenn; Crooks, Steven R H

    2011-06-15

    The illegal adulteration of milk with melamine in 2008 in China led to adverse kidney and urinary tract effects in hundreds of thousands of children and the reported deaths of six. The milk had been deliberately adulterated to elevate the apparent protein content, and subsequently melamine was detected in many milk-related products which had been exported. This led to the banning of imports of milk and milk products from China intended for the nutritional use of children and to the implementation of analytical methods to test products containing milk products. An optical biosensor inhibition immunoassay has been developed as a rapid and robust method for the analysis of infant formula and infant liquid milk samples. A compound with a chemical structure similar to that of melamine was employed as a hapten to raise a polyclonal antibody and as the immobilized antigen on the surface of a biosensor chip. The sensitivity of the assay, given as an IC(50), was calculated to be 67.9 ng mL(-1) in buffer. The antibody did not cross-react with any of the byproducts of melamine manufacture; however, significant cross-reactivity was observed with the insecticide cyromazine of which melamine is a metabolite. When sample matrix was applied to the assay, a limit of detection of <0.5 μg mL(-1) was determined in both infant formula and infant liquid milk. The development of the immunoassay and validation data for the detection of melamine is presented together with the results obtained following the analysis of melamine-contaminated milk powder.

  4. Graphene Oxide Liquid Crystals for Reflective Display without Polarizing Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhuan; He, Liqun; Ye, Jian; Shuai, Min; Zhou, Xufeng; Wang, Yanan; Li, Yang; Su, Zhihua; Zhang, Haiyan; Chen, Ying; Liu, Zhaoping; Cheng, Zhengdong; Bao, Jiming

    2015-03-01

    The recent emergence of liquid crystals of atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) materials not only has allowed us to explore novel phenomena of macroscopically aligned 2D nanomaterials but also has provided a route toward their controlled assembly into three-dimensional functional macrostructures. Using flow-induced mechanical alignment, we prepared flakes of graphene oxide (GO) in different orientational orders and demonstrated that GO liquid crystal (LC) can be used as a rewritable medium for reflective display without polarizing optics. With a wire or stick as a pen, we can make the surface of GO LC reflective and bright, and we can then manually draw lines, curves, and any other patterns with dark appearance. The contrast between bright and dark features is due to anisotropic optical responses of ordered GO flakes. Since optical anisotropy is an intrinsic property of 2D structures, our observations and demonstration represent one of many potential applications of macroscopically aligned 2D nanomaterials.

  5. Optical and magneto-optical properties of the endohedral La@C82 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostampour, E.; Koohi, A.; Cyrousnezhad, F.

    2013-02-01

    The magneto-optical properties of solids are theoretically described by the circular dichroism (CD) and birefringence coefficient (θ). Using the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model in conjunction with the local field method, the optical dielectric tensor, CD and θ of the simple cubic phase of the La@C82 and C82 crystals are calculated. The results obtained from the La@C82 and C82 crystals are compared with those of the C70 and C60 crystals. It is shown that La@C82 has a richer optical spectrum than C82, C70 and C60. In the La@C82 crystal, absorption bands are shown by spectrum in the 0.58 to 7.0 eV region with sharp structures in each band which indicate the localized molecular structure coupled with long-range crystalline order. Results show that the circular dichroism and birefringence coefficient of the La@C82 crystal due to a single spin localized on the C82 cage are very larger than those of the C60, C70 and C82 crystals. Also, results show that the circular dichroism and birefringence coefficient of the C82 crystal are similar to those of the C60 and C70 crystals.

  6. All-optical high performance graphene-photonic crystal switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseini, Mehrdad; Malekmohammad, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    The all-optical switch is realized based on nonlinear transmission changes in Fano resonance of 2D photonic crystals (PhC) which enhances the light intensity on the graphene in PhC; and in this study, the graphene layer is used as the nonlinear material. The refractive index change of graphene layer leads to a shift in the Fano resonance frequency due to the input light intensity through the Kerr nonlinear effect. Through finite-difference time-domain simulation, it is found that the high performance of all-optical switching can be achieved by the designed structure with a threshold pump intensity as low as MW/cm2. This structure is featured by optical bistability. The obtained results are applicable in micro optical integrated circuits for modulators, switches and logic elements for optical computation.

  7. Colloidal crystals with diamond symmetry at optical lengthscales

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifan; Jenkins, Ian C.; McGinley, James T.; Sinno, Talid; Crocker, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Future optical materials promise to do for photonics what semiconductors did for electronics, but the challenge has long been in creating the structure they require—a regular, three-dimensional array of transparent microspheres arranged like the atoms in a diamond crystal. Here we demonstrate a simple approach for spontaneously growing double-diamond (or B32) crystals that contain a suitable diamond structure, using DNA to direct the self-assembly process. While diamond symmetry crystals have been grown from much smaller nanoparticles, none of those previous methods suffice for the larger particles needed for photonic applications, whose size must be comparable to the wavelength of visible light. Intriguingly, the crystals we observe do not readily form in previously validated simulations; nor have they been predicted theoretically. This finding suggests that other unexpected microstructures may be accessible using this approach and bodes well for future efforts to inexpensively mass-produce metamaterials for an array of photonic applications. PMID:28194025

  8. Topographical studies on GNF crystals of non linear optical origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandpekar, M. M.; Pati, S. P.

    2013-02-01

    α-glycine has been combined with equal amount of nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid to form GNF crystals. Transparent and elongated crystals of appreciable sizes (2.5 cm length) useful for dislocation studies have been obtained from solution by slow evaporation in 3-4 weeks time. Crystals were found to be delicate and care is needed while handling them. The external geometry of the crystals was found to vary with composition. Glacial acetic acid (GAA) is found to be universal etching agent. GAA produces well defined elongated etch pits on the habit faces and curved triangular pits on cleavage faces in 15 seconds time. Evidence of impurity inclusions and pits on these inclusions have been detected. The orientation of pits on partial cleavage faces are clearly seen to differ. Occasional presence of long domain lines crossing the field of view has been observed. The curvature of pits edges indicates an optically active material with lower symmetry.

  9. Colloidal crystals with diamond symmetry at optical lengthscales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifan; Jenkins, Ian C.; McGinley, James T.; Sinno, Talid; Crocker, John C.

    2017-02-01

    Future optical materials promise to do for photonics what semiconductors did for electronics, but the challenge has long been in creating the structure they require--a regular, three-dimensional array of transparent microspheres arranged like the atoms in a diamond crystal. Here we demonstrate a simple approach for spontaneously growing double-diamond (or B32) crystals that contain a suitable diamond structure, using DNA to direct the self-assembly process. While diamond symmetry crystals have been grown from much smaller nanoparticles, none of those previous methods suffice for the larger particles needed for photonic applications, whose size must be comparable to the wavelength of visible light. Intriguingly, the crystals we observe do not readily form in previously validated simulations; nor have they been predicted theoretically. This finding suggests that other unexpected microstructures may be accessible using this approach and bodes well for future efforts to inexpensively mass-produce metamaterials for an array of photonic applications.

  10. Optical extinction due to intrinsic structural variations of photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenderink, A. Femius; Lagendijk, Ad; Vos, Willem L.

    2005-10-01

    Unavoidable variations in size and position of the building blocks of photonic crystals cause light scattering and extinction of coherent beams. We present a model for both two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals that relates the extinction length to the magnitude of the variations. The predicted lengths agree well with our experiments on high-quality opals and inverse opals, and with literature data analyzed by us. As a result, control over photons is limited to distances up to 50 lattice parameters (˜15 μm) in state-of-the-art structures, thereby impeding applications that require large photonic crystals, such as proposed optical integrated circuits. Conversely, scattering in photonic crystals may lead to different physics such as Anderson localization and nonclassical diffusion.

  11. Dislocations, microhardness and optical studies on glycine potassium nitrate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Ch. Sateesh; Nagaraju, D.; Shekar, P. V. Raja; Rao, T. Tirumal; Krishna, N. Gopi

    2015-06-01

    Single crystals of glycine potassium nitrate (GPN), a semiorganic nonlinear optical crystal, of dimensions 15×12×4 mm3 were grown in a period of 10 days. The defect content present in the crystals was estimated by chemical etching technique. The results indicate that the average dislocation density is about 4.1×103/cm2. The UV-Vis. studies indicate that the crystal has a wide transmission range. The Kurtz powder test indicates that the second harmonic generation efficiency of GPN is 2.5 times that of KDP. The load-hardness curves for GPN were studied over the load range 10-100 g. The anisotropy in hardness was studied using Knoop indentation technique.

  12. Colloidal crystals with diamond symmetry at optical lengthscales.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Jenkins, Ian C; McGinley, James T; Sinno, Talid; Crocker, John C

    2017-02-13

    Future optical materials promise to do for photonics what semiconductors did for electronics, but the challenge has long been in creating the structure they require-a regular, three-dimensional array of transparent microspheres arranged like the atoms in a diamond crystal. Here we demonstrate a simple approach for spontaneously growing double-diamond (or B32) crystals that contain a suitable diamond structure, using DNA to direct the self-assembly process. While diamond symmetry crystals have been grown from much smaller nanoparticles, none of those previous methods suffice for the larger particles needed for photonic applications, whose size must be comparable to the wavelength of visible light. Intriguingly, the crystals we observe do not readily form in previously validated simulations; nor have they been predicted theoretically. This finding suggests that other unexpected microstructures may be accessible using this approach and bodes well for future efforts to inexpensively mass-produce metamaterials for an array of photonic applications.

  13. Hydrothermal crystal growth of oxides for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Colin David

    2007-12-01

    The manipulation of light has proven to be an integral part of today's technology-based society. In particular, there is great interest in obtaining coherent radiation in all regions of the optical spectrum to advance technology in military, medical, industrial, scientific and consumer fields. Exploring new crystal growth techniques as well as the growth of new optical materials is critical in the advancement of solid state optics. Surprisingly, the academic world devotes little attention to the growth of large crystals. This shortcoming has left gaps in the optical spectrum inaccessible by solid state devices. This dissertation explores the hydrothermal crystal growth of materials that could fill two such gaps. The first gap exists in the deep-UV region, particularly below 200 nm. Some materials such as LiB3O5 and beta-BaB2O4 can generate coherent light at wavelengths as low as 205 nm. The growth of these materials was explored to investigate the feasibility of the hydrothermal method as a new technique for growing these crystals. Particular attention was paid to the descriptive chemistry surrounding these systems, and several novel structures were elucidated. The study was also extended to the growth of materials that could be used for the generation of coherent light as low as 155 nm. Novel synthetic schemes for Sr2Be2B2O7 and KBe2BO 3F2 were developed and the growth of large crystals was explored. An extensive study of the structures, properties and crystal growth of related compounds, RbBe2BO3F2 and CsBe2BO 3F2, was also undertaken. Optimization of a number of parameters within this family of compounds led to the hydrothermal growth of large, high quality single crystal at rates suitable for large-scale growth. The second gap in technology is in the area of high average power solid state lasers emitting in the 1 mum and eye-safe (>1.5 mum) regions. A hydrothermal technique was developed to grow high quality crystals of Sc 2O3 and Sc2O3 doped with suitable

  14. Graphene oxide liquid crystals for reflective displays without polarizing optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Liqun; Ye, Jian; Shuai, Min; Zhu, Zhuan; Zhou, Xufeng; Wang, Yanan; Li, Yang; Su, Zhihua; Zhang, Haiyan; Chen, Ying; Liu, Zhaoping; Cheng, Zhengdong; Bao, Jiming

    2015-01-01

    The recent emergence of liquid crystals of atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) materials not only has allowed us to explore novel phenomena of macroscopically aligned 2D nanomaterials but also has provided a route toward their controlled assembly into three-dimensional functional macrostructures. Using flow-induced mechanical alignment, we prepared flakes of graphene oxide (GO) in different orientational orders and demonstrated that GO liquid crystals (LC) can be used as rewritable media for reflective displays without polarizing optics. With a wire or stick as a pen, we can make the surface of GO LC reflective and bright, and we can then manually draw lines, curves, and any patterns with dark appearance. The contrast between bright and dark features is due to anisotropic optical responses of ordered GO flakes. Since optical anisotropy is an intrinsic property of 2D structures, our observations and demonstration represent one of many potential applications of macroscopically aligned 2D nanomaterials.The recent emergence of liquid crystals of atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) materials not only has allowed us to explore novel phenomena of macroscopically aligned 2D nanomaterials but also has provided a route toward their controlled assembly into three-dimensional functional macrostructures. Using flow-induced mechanical alignment, we prepared flakes of graphene oxide (GO) in different orientational orders and demonstrated that GO liquid crystals (LC) can be used as rewritable media for reflective displays without polarizing optics. With a wire or stick as a pen, we can make the surface of GO LC reflective and bright, and we can then manually draw lines, curves, and any patterns with dark appearance. The contrast between bright and dark features is due to anisotropic optical responses of ordered GO flakes. Since optical anisotropy is an intrinsic property of 2D structures, our observations and demonstration represent one of many potential applications of

  15. Non-linear optical titanyl arsenates: Crystal growth and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordborg, Jenni Eva Louise

    Crystals are appreciated not only for their appearance, but also for their unique physical properties which are utilized by the photonic industry in appliances that we come across every day. An important part of enabling the technical use of optical devices is the manufacture of crystals. This dissertation deals with a specific group of materials called the potassium titanyl phosphate (KIP) family, known for their non-linear optical and ferroelectric properties. The isomorphs vary in their linear optical and dielectric properties, which can be tuned to optimize device performance by forming solid solutions of the different materials. Titanyl arsenates have a wide range of near-infrared transmission which makes them useful for tunable infrared lasers. The isomorphs examined in the present work were primarily RbTiOASO4 (RTA) and CsTiOAsO4 (CTA) together with the mixtures RbxCs 1-xTiOAsO4 (RCTA). Large-scale crystals were grown by top seeding solution growth utilizing a three-zone furnace with excellent temperature control. Sufficiently slow cooling and constant upward lifting produced crystals with large volumes useable for technical applications. Optical quality RTA crystals up to 10 x 12 x 20 mm were grown. The greater difficulty in obtaining good crystals of CTA led to the use of mixed RCTA materials. The mixing of rubidium and cesium in RCTA is more favorable to crystal growth than the single components in pure RTA and CTA. Mixed crystals are rubidium-enriched and contain only 20-30% of the cesium concentration in the flux. The cesium atoms show a preference for the larger cation site. The network structure is very little affected by the cation substitution; consequently, the non-linear optical properties of the Rb-rich isomorphic mixtures of RTA and CTA can be expected to remain intact. Crystallographic methods utilizing conventional X-ray tubes, synchrotron radiation and neutron diffraction have been employed to investigate the properties of the atomic

  16. Exploring Novel Crystals and Designs for Acousto-Optic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Jonathan B.

    Acousto-optic devices are a versatile technology that are driven electronically to precisely and rapidly control the intensity, frequency, and propagation direction of a laser beam. Applications include acousto-optic scanners, filters, mode lockers, and modulators. Despite the popularity of acousto-optic devices, there currently is no UV transparent device that can satisfy the requirements of the atomic clock and quantum computing communities. In this thesis, I describe my experimental efforts for discovering a new UV transparent, acousto-optic crystal that can meet the experimental requirements. I also present my graphical representations for locating practical and efficient acousto-optic designs in a given medium. The first part of this thesis describes how to measure the elastic-stiffness and photoelastic coefficients of a given crystal. The elastic-stiffness coefficients are essential for designing acousto-optic devices because they determine the velocity, diffraction, and polarization of acoustic waves in a given medium. I used both resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and a modified version of Schaefer-Bergman diffraction to measure elastic coefficients. I discuss in detail the strengths, differences, and similarities of the two experiments. The photoelastic coefficients are necessary for determining the diffraction efficiency of a given acousto-optic geometry. Similar to the elastic coefficients, I employ a modified version of the Schaefer-Bergmann experiment to measure the photoelastic coefficients. I corroborate the measured results with the well established Dixon experiment. The second part of this thesis describes four different graphical representations that help locate practical and efficient acousto-optic designs. I describe in detail each algorithm and how to interpret the calculated results. Several examples are provided for commonly used acosuto-optic materials. The thesis concludes by describing the design and performance of an acousto-optic frequency

  17. Highly sensitive optical biosensor based on silicon-microring-resonator-loaded Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Soichiro; Ishihara, Shintaro; Arakawa, Taro; Kokubun, Yasuo

    2017-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel biosensor based on a silicon-single-microring-resonator-loaded Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MRR-MZI), and discuss the design of the sensor theoretically. Owing to the combination of an MZI and the enhanced phase change in a microring resonator (MRR), high sensitivity is expected to be realized. The designed MRR-MZI sensor is fabricated using a CMOS-compatible process, and its sensing characteristics are measured using ethanol solutions with a concentration of less than 3 wt % and avidin solutions. The sensitivity of the MRR-MZI to changes in the environmental refractive index is increased by approximately 50 times compared with that of a simple MRR. In addition, avidin solution with a concentration as low as 20 pM was successfully detected.

  18. Determination of biotin and folate in infant formula and milk by optical biosensor-based immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Indyk, H E; Evans, E A; Bostrom Caselunghe, M C; Persson, B S; Finglas, P M; Woollard, D C; Filonzi, E L

    2000-01-01

    Biomolecular interaction analysis was evaluated for the automated analysis of biotin- and folate-supplemented infant formulas and milk powders. The technique was configured as a biosensor-based, nonlabeled inhibition immunoassay using monoclonal antibodies raised against analyte-conjugate. Sample extraction conditions were optimized and antibodies were evaluated for cross-reactivity. Performance parameters included a quantitation range of 2-70 ng/mL, recoveries of 86-102%, agreement against assigned reference values for National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 1846, between-laboratory reproducibility relative standard deviation of 9.1% for biotin and 8.1% for folate, respectively, and equivalence against reference microbiological assay methods for both analytes.

  19. Immobilization of bovine serum albumin as a sensitive biosensor for the detection of trace lead ion in solution by piezoelectric quartz crystal impedance.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jian; Wei, Wanzhi; Liu, Xiaoying; Kong, Bo; Wu, Ling; Gong, Shuguo

    2007-01-01

    A biosensor based on bovine serum albumin (BSA) for the detection of lead (Pb(2+)) ion was developed and characterized. BSA was immobilized onto a colloidal Au-modified piezoelectric quartz crystal (PQC) as a biosensor for the detection of Pb(2+) ion by piezoelectric quartz crystal impedance (PQCI). Calibration curves for the quantification of Pb(2+) ion showed excellent linearity throughout the concentration range from 1.0 x 10(-7) to 3.0 x 10(-9)mol/L. The interaction between the Pb(2+) ions and the sensor chip is influenced significantly by the pH of the reaction buffer, and the optimal pH for the experiment was 5.4. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit of 1.0 x 10(-9)mol/L for Pb(2+) was obtained. Kinetic parameters of the Pb(2+)-BSA interactions were also determined by using this chip. The sensor chip could be regenerated for use by dipping in the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution for approximately 2h, and the chip was used to detect Pb(2+) ion for eight times without obvious signal attenuation.

  20. Growth of bulk single crystals of organic materials for nonlinear optical devices - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, Benjamin G.; Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; Shields, Angela W.; Frazier, D. O.

    1991-01-01

    Highly perfect single crystals of nonlinear optical organic materials are required for use in optical devices. An overview of the bulk crystal growth of these materials by melt, vapor, and solution processes is presented. Additionally, methods that may be used to purify starting materials, detect impurities at low levels, screen materials for crystal growth, and process grown crystals are discussed.

  1. Growth of bulk single crystals of organic materials for nonlinear optical devices - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, Benjamin G.; Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Moore, Craig E.; Shields, Angela W.; Frazier, D. O.

    1991-01-01

    Highly perfect single crystals of nonlinear optical organic materials are required for use in optical devices. An overview of the bulk crystal growth of these materials by melt, vapor, and solution processes is presented. Additionally, methods that may be used to purify starting materials, detect impurities at low levels, screen materials for crystal growth, and process grown crystals are discussed.

  2. An optical biosensor for detection of pathogen biomarkers from Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in ground beef samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoureux, Loreen; Adams, Peter; Banisadr, Afsheen; Stromberg, Zachary; Graves, Steven; Montano, Gabriel; Moxley, Rodney; Mukundan, Harshini

    2014-03-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) poses a serious threat to human health through the consumption of contaminated food products, particularly beef and produce. Early detection in the food chain, and discrimination from other non-pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), is critical to preventing human outbreaks, and meeting current agricultural screening standards. These pathogens often present in low concentrations in contaminated samples, making discriminatory detection difficult without the use of costly, time-consuming methods (e.g. culture). Using multiple signal transduction schemes (including novel optical methods designed for amphiphiles), specific recognition antibodies, and a waveguide-based optical biosensor developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed ultrasensitive detection methods for lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and protein biomarkers (Shiga toxin) of STEC in complex samples (e.g. beef lysates). Waveguides functionalized with phospholipid bilayers were used to pull down amphiphilic LPS, using methods (membrane insertion) developed by our team. The assay format exploits the amphiphilic biochemistry of lipoglycans, and allows for rapid, sensitive detection with a single fluorescent reporter. We have used a combination of biophysical methods (atomic force and fluorescence microscopy) to characterize the interaction of amphiphiles with lipid bilayers, to efficiently design these assays. Sandwich immunoassays were used for detection of protein toxins. Biomarkers were spiked into homogenated ground beef samples to determine performance and limit of detection. Future work will focus on the development of discriminatory antibodies for STEC serotypes, and using quantum dots as the fluorescence reporter to enable multiplex screening of biomarkers.

  3. Rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis biomarkers in a sandwich immunoassay format using a waveguide-based optical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Mukundan, Harshini; Kumar, Sandeep; Price, Dominique N; Ray, Sonja M; Lee, Ye-Jin; Min, Seonyeong; Eum, Seokyong; Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica; Resnick, Jesse M; Grace, W Kevin; Anderson, Aaron S; Hwang, Soo Hee; Cho, Sang Nae; Via, Laura E; Barry, Clifton; Sakamuri, Ramamurthy; Swanson, Basil I

    2012-09-01

    Early diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) remains an elusive challenge, especially in individuals with disseminated TB and HIV co-infection. Recent studies have shown a promise for the direct detection of pathogen-specific biomarkers such as lipoarabinomannan (LAM) for the diagnosis of TB in HIV-positive individuals. Currently, traditional immunoassay platforms that suffer from poor sensitivity and high non-specific interactions are used for the detection of such biomarkers. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the development of sandwich immunoassays for the direct detection of three TB-specific biomarkers, namely LAM, early secretory antigenic target 6 (ESAT6) and antigen 85 complex (Ag85), using a waveguide-based optical biosensor platform. Combining detection within the evanescent field of a planar optical waveguide with functional surfaces that reduce non-specific interactions allows for the ultra-sensitive and quantitative detection of biomarkers (an order of magnitude enhanced sensitivity, as compared to plate-based ELISA) in complex patient samples (urine, serum) within a short time. We also demonstrate the detection of LAM in urine from a small sample of subjects being treated for TB using this approach with excellent sensitivity and 100% corroboration with disease status. These results suggest that pathogen-specific biomarkers can be applied for the rapid and effective diagnosis of disease. It is likely that detection of a combination of biomarkers offers greater reliability of diagnosis, rather than detection of any single pathogen biomarker. NCT00341601.

  4. Biological properties of coral GFP-type proteins provide clues for engineering novel optical probes and biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salih, Anya; Larkum, Anthony W.; Cronin, Thomas W.; Wiedenmann, Joerg; Szymczak, Ron; Cox, Guy C.

    2004-06-01

    In recent years, a variety of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-like pigments have been discovered from corals and other marine organisms. They are widely used to expand the range of available GFP-type proteins in imaging applications, such as in vivo markers for gene expression and protein localization studies, FRET-based (Förster resonance energy transfer) multicolor imaging and biosensors. They have known diverse optical and biochemical properties but their in vivo spectral properties and biological function in marine organisms is only beginning to be understood. We have investigated their spectral diversity, optical properties and cellular microstructure in corals of the Great Barrier Reef with the aim of elucidating their photo-biological function/s as well as to identify novel proteins suitable for GFP-based technologies. We found numerous spectral variants, with emissions covering almost the full range of the visible spectrum. Many of these GFP-like proteins, especially in corals from the more extreme habitats, such as sun-exposed shallows or in deep water, showed a range of light-related spectral characteristics: high photostability, spectral tuning for energy transfer and dynamic photo-induced transformation properties. Intra-cellularly they were organized into spectral donor-acceptor pairs or even arrays, tuned for FRET. Coral color proteins thus offer an exciting potential to expand the use of the available GFPs in bio-imaging applications and as a basis for improved protein engineering.

  5. PEG Functionalization of Whispering Gallery Mode Optical Microresonator Biosensors to Minimize Non-Specific Adsorption during Targeted, Label-Free Sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fanyongjing; Anderson, Mark; Bernards, Matthew T; Hunt, Heather K

    2015-07-24

    Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) optical microresonator biosensors are a powerful tool for targeted detection of analytes at extremely low concentrations. However, in complex environments, non-specific adsorption can significantly reduce their signal to noise ratio, limiting their accuracy. To overcome this, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) can be employed in conjunction with appropriate recognition elements to create a nonfouling surface capable of detecting targeted analytes. This paper investigates a general route for the addition of nonfouling elements to WGM optical biosensors to reduce non-specific adsorption, while also retaining high sensitivity. We use the avidin-biotin analyte-recognition element system, in conjunction with PEG nonfouling elements, as a proof-of-concept, and explore the extent of non-specific adsorption of lysozyme and fibrinogen at multiple concentrations, as well as the ability to detect avidin in a concentration-dependent fashion. Ellipsometry, contact angle measurement, fluorescence microscopy, and optical resonator characterization methods were used to study non-specific adsorption, the quality of the functionalized surface, and the biosensor's performance. Using a recognition element ratio to nonfouling element ratio of 1:1, we showed that non-specific adsorption could be significantly reduced over the controls, and that high sensitivity could be maintained. Due to the frequent use of biotin-avidin-biotin sandwich complexes in functionalizing sensor surfaces with biotin-labeled recognition elements, this chemistry could provide a common basis for creating a non-fouling surface capable of targeted detection. This should improve the ability of WGM optical biosensors to operate in complex environments, extending their application towards real-world detection.

  6. Acousto-optics studied in polaritonic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mahi R.; Racknor, C.

    2010-10-01

    We have studied the acousto-optic effect on the photon transmission and the spontaneous emission in polaritonic photonic crystal. We have considered that photonic crystals are fabricated from polaritonic materials such as GaP, MgO, LiNbO3 , and LiTaO3 . A two-level quantum dot is doped in a polaritonic crystal to study the decay rate of the spontaneous emission. The decay rate of quantum dots, band structure, and photon transmission coefficient have been calculated. It is found that band-gap width and the decay rate of quantum dots depends strongly on the high-frequency dielectric constant of the polaritonic crystals while the photonic band edges vary inversely by the ratio of longitudinal- to transverse-optical phonon energies. The spontaneous decay rate of the quantum dot can be controlled by the external strain field. This finding is significant because it is well known that the spontaneous emission is source of undesirable noise in different types of electronic and optical devices. Finally, we have also found the system can be switched from transmitting state to reflecting state by applying an external strain field. These are distinct and interesting results and can be used to fabricate new types of photonic couplers and fibers which in turn can be used to fabricate all photonic switches.

  7. Phototriggers for liquid crystal-based optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, Kikue Sugiyama

    PartI. Three 1,2-diarylethene derivatives with thiophene or furan rings were synthesized. The photochromism and chiroptical properties of these compounds were studied to assess their suitability for use as a chiroptical liquid crystal switch. No enantiomeric enrichment was observed when the racemic ring-closed forms were irradiated with circularly polarized light (CPL). It was found that the Kuhn anisotropy factor (gλ) for these molecules was too small for this application. PartII. The photochromic pair 1,1' -binaphthylpyran (1) and 2-hydroxy-2'- hydroxymethyl-[1,1 ']-binaphthylene (2) were examined to assess their suitability as optical triggers in a liquid crystal switch. Irradiation of optically active 1 in a CH3CN/H2O solution led to its racemization and the formation of optically active 2. Irradiation of optically active 2 under these conditions gave optically active 1 but no racemization of 2. Time-resolved absorption spectroscopy showed that irradiation of 1 generates an intermediate assigned to a 1,1'- biaryl quinone methide (3). Analysis of the mechanism for photoracemization and photochromism revealed that 3 is the key intermediate in both processes. This system was not well-suited for development as an optical trigger for a liquid crystal switch because the magnitude of gλ was too small in the useful spectral region. PartIII. A series of axially chiral acrylic acid-substituted bicyclic ketones were synthesized and examined. The helical twisting power (βM) of these compounds was measured. Their irradiation with CPL led to partial resolution. Irradiation of partially resolved ketones with unpolarized light caused their racemization. Addition of optically active compounds to nematic liquid crystals converted them to their chiral, cholesteric form. They serve as a phototriggers for this process. Irradiation of (+/-)-(3-oxo-bicylo[3.2.1]oct-8-ylidene)-acetic acid trans-4-(4-heptyloxy-cyclohexyl)-benzyl ester ( 16) with CPL in ZLI1167 droplets (a nematic

  8. ZnO films formed by atomic layer deposition as an optical biosensor platform for the detection of Grapevine virus A-type proteins.

    PubMed

    Tereshchenko, Alla; Fedorenko, Viktoriia; Smyntyna, Valentyn; Konup, Igor; Konup, Anastasiya; Eriksson, Martin; Yakimova, Rositsa; Ramanavicius, Arunas; Balme, Sebastien; Bechelany, Mikhael

    2017-06-15

    Novel sensitive optical biosensor for determination of Grapevine virus A-type (GVA) proteins (GVA-antigens) has been designed. This biosensor was based on thin films of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The ZnO-based films have demonstrated favorable surface-structural properties for the direct immobilization of antibodies against GVA-antigens in order to form a biosensitive layer sensitive to GVA-antigens. The immobilization was confirmed by intensity changes in the main near band emission (NBE) peak of ZnO and by the formation of intense photoluminescence band, discovered in the visible range around 425nm, caused by the immobilized proteins. The GVA-antigen detection was performed by the evaluation of changes and behavior of a corresponding luminescence band. The sensitivity of as-formed label-free biosensor towards the GVA-antigens was determined in the range from 1pg/ml to 10ng/ml; in addition, the selectivity of biosensor was evaluated.

  9. A Flexible Parameterization for Shortwave Optical Properties of Ice Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDiedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Cairns, Brian; Fridlind, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    A parameterization is presented that provides extinction cross section sigma (sub e), single-scattering albedo omega, and asymmetry parameter (g) of ice crystals for any combination of volume, projected area, aspect ratio, and crystal distortion at any wavelength in the shortwave. Similar to previous parameterizations, the scheme makes use of geometric optics approximations and the observation that optical properties of complex, aggregated ice crystals can be well approximated by those of single hexagonal crystals with varying size, aspect ratio, and distortion levels. In the standard geometric optics implementation used here, sigma (sub e) is always twice the particle projected area. It is shown that omega is largely determined by the newly defined absorption size parameter and the particle aspect ratio. These dependences are parameterized using a combination of exponential, lognormal, and polynomial functions. The variation of (g) with aspect ratio and crystal distortion is parameterized for one reference wavelength using a combination of several polynomials. The dependences of g on refractive index and omega are investigated and factors are determined to scale the parameterized (g) to provide values appropriate for other wavelengths. The parameterization scheme consists of only 88 coefficients. The scheme is tested for a large variety of hexagonal crystals in several wavelength bands from 0.2 to 4 micron, revealing absolute differences with reference calculations of omega and (g) that are both generally below 0.015. Over a large variety of cloud conditions, the resulting root-mean-squared differences with reference calculations of cloud reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance are 1.4%, 1.1%, and 3.4%, respectively. Some practical applications of the parameterization in atmospheric models are highlighted.

  10. An Investigation of some Optical Properties of Crystals and of Crystal Surfaces.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    optical properties of solids including; Ab Initio Calculation of Crystal Tensor, Light Scattering, Morphic Effects, Group Theory, and Impurity Induced Absorption. Twenty eight papers deal with surface properties including; Surface Excitations, Spacial Dispersion Effects, Surface Roughness, Thermodynamic Properties, Lattice Dynamics and Edge Modes. Three papers discuss the possibility of the coexistence of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) pairing and the Peierls

  11. Sensors and Biosensors for the Determination of Small Molecule Biological Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Shuo

    2008-01-01

    The following review of sensors and biosensors focuses on the determination of commonly studied small molecule biological toxins, including mycotoxins and small molecule neurotoxins. Because of the high toxicity of small molecule toxins, an effective analysis technique for determining their toxicity is indispensable. Sensors and biosensors have emerged as sensitive and rapid techniques for toxicity analysis in the past decade. Several different sensors for the determination of mycotoxins and other small molecule neurotoxins have been reported in the literature, and many of these sensors such as tissue biosensors, enzyme sensors, optical immunosensors, electrochemical sensors, quartz crystal sensors, and surface plasmon resonance biosensors are reviewed in this paper. Sensors are a practical and convenient monitoring tool in the area of routine analysis, and their specificity, sensitivity, reproducibility and analysis stability should all be improved in future work. In addition, accuracy field portable sensing devices and multiplexing analysis devices will be important requirement for the future. PMID:27873857

  12. Liquid crystal cells and optical fibers in neural network implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domanski, Andrzej W.; Buczynski, Ryszard; Sierakowski, Marek W.

    1995-08-01

    Optical binary computer may be as easy to operate as parallel system. For such configuration Boolean logic is not very convenient and therefore neural networks should be introduced. In works leading to the paper we used liquid crystal cells as a standard system of liquid crystalline layer between to conducting electrodes in 'sandwich' geometry. We have used 25 micrometers display cells filled with nematic 6CHBT working on 'twisted nematic' effect. Based on such elements a mode of a simple Hopfield network was set up. More advanced experiments were carried out on a model of neurone with supervised learning. The model consists of four laser diodes pigtailed to the multimode optical fibers with 50 micrometers core diameter. The directional couplers help to control the level of input optical power. Four liquid crystal cells allow to change the transmission level according to superivised learning requirements. All the signals were detected by one photodiode. The presented results of experiments are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. An additional study was done to check the possibility to build up a linear neural network with Grossberg layer, a neural network with Kohonen layer, and a counter propagation network with two layers of neurones. We have proved that such models may be set up based on simple liquid crystals cells and optical fiber networks.

  13. Fibre-optic bacterial biosensors and their application for the analysis of bioavailable Hg and As in soils and sediments from Aznalcollar mining area in Spain.

    PubMed

    Ivask, Angela; Green, Tal; Polyak, Boris; Mor, Amit; Kahru, Anne; Virta, Marko; Marks, Robert

    2007-02-15

    Fibre-optic biosensors for Hg and As were developed by attaching alginate-immobilised recombinant luminescent Hg- and As-sensor bacteria onto optical fibres. The optimised biosensors (consisting of seven layers of fibre-attached bacteria pre-grown till mid-logarithmic growth phase) enabled quantification of environmentally relevant concentrations of the target analytes: 2.6 microg l-1 of Hg(II) and 141 microg l-1 of As(V) or 18 microg l-1 of As(III). The highest viability and sensitivity for target analyte was obtained when fibre tips were stored in CaCl2 solution at -80 degrees C. Applicability of the fibre-optic biosensors in parallel to the respective non-immobilised sensors was assessed on 10 natural soil and sediment samples from Aznalcollar mining area (Spain). On the average 0.2% of the total Hg and 0.87% of the total As proved bioavailable to fibre-attached bacteria. Interestingly, about 20-fold more Hg and 4-fold more As was available to non-immobilised sensor bacteria indicating the importance of direct cell contact (possible only for non-immobilised cells) for enhanced bioavailability of these metals in solid samples.

  14. Multiplex fiber optic biosensor for detection of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica from ready-to-eat meat samples.

    PubMed

    Ohk, Seung-Ho; Bhunia, Arun K

    2013-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica are the most common foodborne bacterial pathogens and are responsible for many outbreaks. Therefore, multiplex detection of these three using a single assay platform is highly desirable. The objective was to develop and optimize a fiber optic sensor for simultaneous detection of these three from food. The streptavidin coated optical waveguides were immobilized with biotinylated polyclonal antibodies and exposed to the bacterial suspensions or enriched food samples for 2 h. Pathogens were detected after reacting with Alexa-Fluor 647-labeled monoclonal antibodies. Ready-to-eat beef, chicken and turkey meats were inoculated with each pathogen (~100 cfu/25 g), enriched in SEL (Salmonella, E. coli, Listeria), a multipathogen selective enrichment broth for 18 h and tested with the biosensor. The biosensor was able to detect each pathogen, individually or in a mixture with very little cross-reactivity. The limit of detection for the sensor was ~10(3) cfu/ml for all three pathogens. Furthermore, the biosensor successfully detected each pathogen, grown in a mixture from enriched meat samples under 24 h. The pathogen presence was further verified by PCR and immunofluorescence assay. The multiplex fiber optic sensor shows promise for detection of the three pathogens if present in the same sample eliminating the use of multiple single pathogen detection platforms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonlinear optical processes in liquid crystals and applications in optical switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shuo

    This dissertation research completes the exploration and development of the theoretical framework for collective liquid crystalline optical nonlinearities capable of response speeds in the microseconds---nanoseconds scale, which is more than 1000 times faster than the conventional liquid crystal (LC) response speed. Also explored in this dissertation are utilizations of these new discoveries to achieve all-optical switching. This work demonstrates all-optical switching using nonlinear orientational and thermal effects, respectively, in pure and dye-doped twisted nematic liquid crystal (TNLC) cells set between crossed polarizers. In the former case, the flow of liquid crystal molecules is generated by Maxwell stress and thereby exerts a torque on the liquid crystal. The resulting reorientation changes the effective birefringence of the liquid crystal, affecting the overall transmission. In dye-doped twisted nematics, the absorption of dye enhances laser heating in the liquid crystal, which leads to reduction of the order parameter and the corresponding macroscopic birefringence, finally making the transmission drop to zero. Following the sequences of these processes, detailed modeling for collective responses of liquid crystal and the time evolution of transmissions under short laser pulses are presented. Besides theoretical description and modeling, we demonstrate the nonlinear optical switching experimentally. The switching threshold and time are consistent with the simulation results. While dye-doped liquid crystals have a low threshold for nonlinear switching, pure twisted nematics possess high transparency in the entire visible and nearinfrared spectrum. These findings are believed to advance the current arsenal of highperformance materials for integration/use in advanced optical systems designed for sensor protection; laser hardening; and other beam/image switching, sensing, and processing operations.

  16. Multiplexed specific label-free detection of NCI-H358 lung cancer cell line lysates with silicon based photonic crystal microcavity biosensors.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Drabkin, Harry A; Gemmill, Robert M; Simon, George R; Chin, Steve H; Chen, Ray T

    2013-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate label-free photonic crystal (PC) microcavity biosensors in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) to detect the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) transcription factor, ZEB1, in minute volumes of sample. Multiplexed specific detection of ZEB1 in lysates from NCI-H358 lung cancer cells down to an estimated concentration of 2 cells per micro-liter is demonstrated. L13 photonic crystal microcavities, coupled to W1 photonic crystal waveguides, are employed in which resonances show high Q in the bio-ambient phosphate buffered saline (PBS). When the sensor surface is derivatized with a specific antibody, the binding of the corresponding antigen from a complex whole-cell lysate generates a change in refractive index in the vicinity of the photonic crystal microcavity, leading to a change in the resonance wavelength of the resonance modes of the photonic crystal microcavity. The shift in the resonance wavelength reveals the presence of the antigen. The sensor cavity has a surface area of ∼11μm(2). Multiplexed sensors permit simultaneous detection of many binding interactions with specific immobilized antibodies from the same bio-sample at the same instant of time. Specificity was demonstrated using a sandwich assay which further amplifies the detection sensitivity at low concentrations. The device represents a proof-of-concept demonstration of label-free, high throughput, multiplexed detection of cancer cells with specificity and sensitivity on a silicon chip platform.

  17. Multiplexed Specific Label-Free Detection of NCI-H358 Lung Cancer Cell Line Lysates with Silicon Based Photonic Crystal Microcavity Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Drabkin, Harry A.; Gemmill, Robert M.; Simon, George R.; Chin, Steve H.; Chen, Ray T.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate label-free photonic crystal (PC) microcavity biosensors in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) to detect the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) transcription factor, ZEB1, in minute volumes of sample. Multiplexed specific detection of ZEB1 in lysates from NCI-H358 lung cancer cells down to an estimated concentration of 2 cells per micro-liter is demonstrated. L13 photonic crystal microcavities, coupled to W1 photonic crystal waveguides, are employed in which resonances show high Q in the bio-ambient phosphate buffered saline (PBS). When the sensor surface is derivatized with a specific antibody, the binding of the corresponding antigen from a complex whole-cell lysate generates a change in refractive index in the vicinity of the photonic crystal microcavity, leading to a change in the resonance wavelength of the resonance modes of the photonic crystal microcavity. The shift in the resonance wavelength reveals the presence of the antigen. The sensor cavity has a surface area of ~11 μm2. Multiplexed sensors permit simultaneous detection of many binding interactions with specific immobilized antibodies from the same bio-sample at the same instant of time. Specificity was demonstrated using a sandwich assay which further amplifies the detection sensitivity at low concentrations. The device represents a proof-of-concept demonstration of label-free, high throughput, multiplexed detection of cancer cells with specificity and sensitivity on a silicon chip platform. PMID:23274197

  18. Nanoscale Biosensor Based on Silicon Photonic Cavity for Home Healthcare Diagnostic Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimy, Mehdi N.; Moghaddam, Aydin B.; Andalib, Alireza; Naziri, Mohammad; Ronagh, Nazli

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a new ultra-compact optical biosensor based on photonic crystal (phc) resonant cavity is proposed. This sensor has ability to work in chemical optical processes for the determination and analysis of liquid material. Here, we used an optical filter based on two-dimensional phc resonant cavity on a silicon layer and an active area is created in center of cavity. According to results, with increasing the refractive index of cavity, resonant wavelengths shift so that this phenomenon provides the ability to measure the properties of materials. This novel designed biosensor has more advantage to operate in the biochemical process for example sensing protein and DNA molecule refractive index. This nanoscale biosensor has quality factor higher than 1.5 × 104 and it is suitable to be used in the home healthcare diagnostic applications.

  19. Semiconductor Quantum Dots in Chemical Sensors and Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Frasco, Manuela F.; Chaniotakis, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots are nanometre-scale semiconductor crystals with unique optical properties that are advantageous for the development of novel chemical sensors and biosensors. The surface chemistry of luminescent quantum dots has encouraged the development of multiple probes based on linked recognition molecules such as peptides, nucleic acids or small-molecule ligands. This review overviews the design of sensitive and selective nanoprobes, ranging from the type of target molecules to the optical transduction scheme. Representative examples of quantum dot-based optical sensors from this fast-moving field have been selected and are discussed towards the most promising directions for future research. PMID:22423206

  20. Diamond drumhead crystals for X-ray optics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kolodziej, Tomasz; Vodnala, Preeti; Terentyev, Sergey; Blank, Vladimir; Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-07-14

    Thin (<50 µm) and flawless diamond single crystals are essential for the realization of numerous advanced X-ray optical devices at synchrotron radiation and free-electron laser facilities. The fabrication and handling of such ultra-thin components without introducing crystal damage and strain is a challenge. Drumhead crystals, monolithic crystal structures composed of a thin membrane furnished with a surrounding solid collar, are a solution ensuring mechanically stable strain-free mounting of the membranes with efficient thermal transport. Diamond, being one of the hardest and most chemically inert materials, poses significant difficulties in fabrication. Reported here is the successful manufacture of diamond drumhead crystals in the [100] orientation using picosecond laser milling. Subsequent high-temperature treatment appears to be crucial for the membranes to become defect free and unstrained, as revealed by X-ray topography on examples of drumhead crystals with a 26 µm thick (1 mm in diameter) and a 47 µm thick (1.5 × 2.5 mm) membrane.

  1. Silicon single-crystal cryogenic optical resonator.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Eugen; Chen, Qun-Feng; Ernsting, Ingo; Luckmann, Heiko; Rosowski, Ulrich; Nevsky, Alexander; Schiller, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    We report on the demonstration and characterization of a silicon optical resonator for laser frequency stabilization, operating in the deep cryogenic regime at temperatures as low as 1.5 K. Robust operation was achieved, with absolute frequency drift less than 20 Hz over 1 h. This stability allowed sensitive measurements of the resonator thermal expansion coefficient (α). We found that α=4.6×10(-13)  K(-1) at 1.6 K. At 16.8 K α vanishes, with a derivative equal to -6×10(-10)  K(-2). The temperature of the resonator was stabilized to a level below 10 μK for averaging times longer than 20 s. The sensitivity of the resonator frequency to a variation of the laser power was also studied. The corresponding sensitivities and the expected Brownian noise indicate that this system should enable frequency stabilization of lasers at the low-10(-17) level.

  2. Organic silicone sol-gel polymer as a noncovalent carrier of receptor proteins for label-free optical biosensor application.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Wang, Linghua; Han, Xiuyou; Cheng, Jianfang; Lv, Huanlin; Wang, Jinyan; Jian, Xigao; Zhao, Mingshan; Jia, Lingyun

    2013-01-23

    Optical biosensing techniques have become of key importance for label-free monitoring of biomolecular interactions in the current proteomics era. Together with an increasing emphasis on high-throughput applications in functional proteomics and drug discovery, there has been demand for facile and generally applicable methods for the immobilization of a wide range of receptor proteins. Here, we developed a polymer platform for microring resonator biosensors, which allows the immobilization of receptor proteins on the surface of waveguide directly without any additional modification. A sol-gel process based on a mixture of three precursors was employed to prepare a liquid hybrid polysiloxane, which was photopatternable for the photocuring process and UV imprint. Waveguide films were prepared on silicon substrates by spin coating and characterized by atomic force microscopy for roughness, and protein adsorption. The results showed that the surface of the polymer film was smooth (rms = 0.658 nm), and exhibited a moderate hydrophobicity with the water contact angle of 97°. Such a hydrophobic extent could provide a necessary binding strength for stable immobilization of proteins on the material surface in various sensing conditions. Biological activity of the immobilized Staphylococcal protein A and its corresponding biosensing performance were demonstrated by its specific recognition of human Immunoglobulin G. This study showed the potential of preparing dense, homogeneous, specific, and stable biosensing surfaces by immobilizing receptor proteins on polymer-based optical devices through the direct physical adsorption method. We expect that such polymer waveguide could be of special interest in developing low-cost and robust optical biosensing platform for multidimensional arrays.

  3. Nanosecond Electro-Optic Switching of a Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borshch, Volodymyr; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2013-09-01

    Electrically induced reorientation of nematic liquid crystal (NLC) molecules caused by dielectric anisotropy of the material is a fundamental phenomenon widely used in modern technologies. Its Achilles heel is a slow (millisecond) relaxation from the field-on to the field-off state. We present an electro-optic effect in an NLC with a response time of about 30 ns to both the field-on and field-off switching. This effect is caused by the electric field induced modification of the order parameters and does not require reorientation of the optic axis (director).

  4. Optical addressing in dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ko-Ting; Liu, Cheng-Kai; Ting, Chi-Lun; Fuh, Andy Ying-Guey

    2008-10-01

    This study investigates a method of optical addressing in dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystals (DDCLCs). Photo-induced randomly adsorbed dyes can change the CLC textures from planar to focal conic. Such patterning can be adopted to develop a display that is initially invisible, but becomes visible upon heating above the clearing temperature, followed by cooling to room temperature. The display can also become visible upon the application of a suitable voltage, and its rapid release. Additionally, the display is thermally erasable, optically rewritable and electrically switchable. It can be applied for use as a smart card.

  5. Extreme optical confinement in a slotted photonic crystal waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Caër, Charles; Le Roux, Xavier; Cassan, Eric; Combrié, Sylvain De Rossi, Alfredo

    2014-09-22

    Using Optical Coherence Tomography, we measure the attenuation of slow light modes in slotted photonic crystal waveguides. When the group index is close to 20, the attenuation is below 300 dB cm{sup −1}. Here, the optical confinement in the empty slot is very strong, corresponding to an ultra-small effective cross section of 0.02 μm{sup 2}. This is nearly 10 times below the diffraction limit at λ = 1.5 μm, and it enables an effective interaction with a very small volume of functionalized matter.

  6. Optical bistability with a repulsive optical force in coupled silicon photonic crystal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Pui-Chuen; Woolf, David; Iwase, Eiji; Sohn, Young-Ik; Ramos, Daniel; Khan, Mughees; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Johnson, Steven G.; Capasso, Federico; Loncar, Marko

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate actuation of a silicon photonic crystal membrane with a repulsive optical gradient force. The extent of the static actuation is extracted by examining the optical bistability as a combination of the optomechanical, thermo-optic, and photo-thermo-mechanical effects using coupled-mode theory. Device behavior is dominated by a repulsive optical force which results in displacements of ≈1 nm/mW. By employing an extended guided resonance which effectively eliminates multi-photon thermal and electronic nonlinearities, our silicon-based device provides a simple, non-intrusive solution to extending the actuation range of micro-electromechanical devices.

  7. Eliminating crystals in non-oxide optical fiber preforms and optical fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Michael R. (Inventor); Tucker, Dennis S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method is provided for eliminating crystals in non-oxide optical fiber preforms as well as optical fibers drawn therefrom. The optical-fiber-drawing axis of the preform is aligned with the force of gravity. A magnetic field is applied to the preform as it is heated to at least a melting temperature thereof. The magnetic field is applied in a direction that is parallel to the preform's optical-fiber-drawing axis. The preform is then cooled to a temperature that is less than a glass transition temperature of the preform while the preform is maintained in the magnetic field. When the processed preform is to have an optical fiber drawn therefrom, the preform's optical-fiber-drawing axis is again aligned with the force of gravity and a magnetic field is again applied along the axis as the optical fiber is drawn from the preform.

  8. Simulation of optical diagnostics for crystal growth: models and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banish, Michele R.; Clark, Rodney L.; Kathman, Alan D.; Lawson, Shelah M.

    1991-12-01

    A computer simulation of a two-color holographic interferometric (TCHI) optical system was performed using a physical (wave) optics model. This model accurately simulates propagation through time-varying, 2-D or 3-D concentration and temperature fields as a wave phenomenon. The model calculates wavefront deformations that can be used to generate fringe patterns. This simulation modeled a proposed TriGlycine sulphate TGS flight experiment by propagating through the simplified onion-like refractive index distribution of the growing crystal and calculating the recorded wavefront deformation. The phase of this wavefront was used to generate sample interferograms that map index of refraction variation. Two such fringe patterns, generated at different wavelengths, were used to extract the original temperature and concentration field characteristics within the growth chamber. This proves feasibility for this TCHI crystal growth diagnostic technique. This simulation provides feedback to the experimental design process.

  9. Growth morphologies and optical properties of LTA single crystal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojing; Ren, Miaojuan; Chen, Gang; Wang, Peiji

    2013-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to study the growth morphologies of l-threonine acetate (abbreviated as LTA) crystal. Spiral growth hillocks and typical step patterns are described and discussed. Nuclei with various shapes often distribute at the larger step terraces. Eventually, in order to investigate microscopic second order nonlinear optical properties of LTA crystals, the molecular dipole moment (μ), polarizability (α), and first hyperpolarizability (β) were computed using a series of basis sets including polarized and diffuse functions at the framework of Hartree-Fock and density functional theory methods. The study is helpful to the further development of l-threonine analogs with improved nonlinear optical properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Interaction of excitons with optical phonons in layer crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsovich, Bohdan M.; Zenkova, C. Y.; Kramar, N. K.

    2002-02-01

    The investigation is concerned with layer crystals of the GaSe, InSe, GaTe, MoS2-type and other inorganic semiconductors, whose phonon spectrum has a great number of peculiarities, among them the availability of low-energy optical phonons. In this case the dispersion of these phonons can be essential and vary in character. The mass operator of the exciton-phonon system and the light absorption coefficient for different dispersion laws of optical phonons have been calculated. The influence of the sign of the phonon 'effective mass' on the exciton absorption band of layer crystals, which causes the opposite in sign dynamics of the absorption maximum shift, and the change of the absorption curve asymmetry have been determined.

  11. Giant electro-optic effect in nanodisordered KTN crystals.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yun-Ching; Wang, Chao; Yin, Shizhuo; Hoffman, Robert C; Mott, Andrew G

    2013-11-15

    The electro-optic (EO) effect in nanodisordered potassium tantalate niobate (KTN) crystal is quantitatively investigated. It is found out that the EO coefficient of nanodisordered KTN crystal depends not only on the cooling temperature but also on the cooling rate. A larger EO coefficient can be obtained by employing a faster cooling rate. A Kerr EO efficient (s(11) - s(12) = 6.94 × 10(-14) m(2)/V(2)) is obtained at a cooling rate of 0.45 °C/s. The enhanced EO efficient by employing a faster cooling rate will be greatly beneficial for a variety of applications such as laser Q switches, laser pulse shaping, high-speed optical shutters, and modulating retroreflectors.

  12. Crystal growth, spectral, structural and optical studies of π-conjugated stilbazolium crystal: 4-bromobenzaldehyde-4'-N'-methylstilbazolium tosylate.

    PubMed

    Krishna Kumar, M; Sudhahar, S; Bhagavannarayana, G; Mohan Kumar, R

    2014-05-05

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) organic compound, 4-bromobenzaldehyde-4'-N'-methylstilbazolium tosylate was synthesized by reflux method. The formation of molecular complex was confirmed from (1)H NMR, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral analyses. The single crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth method and the crystal structure and atomic packing of grown crystal was identified. The morphology and growth axis of grown crystal were determined. The crystal perfection was analyzed using high resolution X-ray diffraction study on (001) plane. Thermal stability, decomposition stages and melting point of the grown crystal were analyzed. The optical absorption coefficient (α) and energy band gap (E(g)) of the crystal were determined using UV-visible absorption studies. Second harmonic generation efficiency of the grown crystal was examined by Kurtz powder method with different particle size using 1064 nm laser. Laser induced damage threshold study was carried out for the grown crystal using Nd:YAG laser.

  13. Logically combined photonic crystal - A Fabry Perot optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagappan, G.; Png, C. E.

    2016-11-01

    We address the logical combination, as opposed to the linear superposition, of two one - dimensional photonic crystals of slightly different periodicities. The original short range translational symmetry is destroyed in these quasi - periodic system. This induces a strong coupling between Bloch modes of different translational wavevectors, and results in a large number of slow modes in such logically combined photonic crystal. In this article, we show by exploiting the beating feature characteristics of the topology of our system, that these slow modes can be effectively described as modes of a Fabry Perot optical cavity made of a homogenous metamaterial with a dispersive refractive index. The homogenized refractive index of the equivalent metamaterial can be obtained from the band structure calculations, using an extended zone scheme. The density of the slow modes in the logically combined photonic crystal is inversely proportional to the group index of the equivalent metamaterial.

  14. Preliminary study of simultaneous multi-anticoagulant deficiency diagnosis by fiber optic multi-analyte biosensor.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Kang, Kyung A

    2005-01-01

    Protein C (PC), protein S (PS), antithrombin III, and plasminogen are four important anticoagulants in blood plasma. Deficiency of any of these biomolecules may lead to thrombo-embolic complications including lung embolism, heart attack, and stroke. A multi-factor sensing system is beneficial for identifying the cause of abnormal blood clotting more effectively, rapidly, and cost-effectively. As an initial effort toward simultaneous multi-anticoagulant detection, a PC and PS dual-sensing system has been under development in our research group. A fiberoptic PC biosensor utilizing fluorophore-mediated sandwich immunoassay was already developed for rapid (-5 minutes) PC deficiency diagnosis. After a single PS sensor was developed for the PS deficiency diagnosis, the two sensors were connected in series to form a dual-sensing system. The cross-reactivity between the analytes and the sensors was found to be minimal. For easier sensing operation, a mixture of fluorophore-linked anti-PC and anti-PS was applied. The results showed that the mixture can be used with a slight signal reduction. When PC and PS was mixed in a sample, the signal intensity was decreased by approximately 5% for both sensors. A study is currently being performed to overcome the signal reduction by increasing the flow velocity and incubation time.

  15. An optical biosensor assay for rapid dual detection of Botulinum neurotoxins A and E.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Christian; Ferracci, Géraldine; Maulet, Yves; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Seagar, Michael; El Far, Oussama

    2015-12-09

    The enzymatic activity of the pathogenic botulinum neurotoxins type A and E (BoNT/A and E) leads to potentially lethal paralytic symptoms in humans and their prompt detection is of crucial importance. A chip assay based on Surface Plasmon Resonance monitoring of the cleavage products is a simple method that we have previously established to detect BoNT/A activity. We have now developed a similar format assay to measure BoNT/E activity. A monoclonal antibody specifically recognizing SNAP25 cleaved by BoNT/E was generated and used to measure the appearance of the neo-epitope following injection of BoNT/E over SNAP-25 immobilized on a chip. This assay detects BoNT/E activity at 1 LD50/ml within minutes and linear dose-responses curves were obtained using a multiplexed biosensor. A threshold of 0.01 LD50/ml was achieved after 5 h of cleavage. This assay is 10-fold more sensitive than the in vivo assay for direct detection of BoNT/E in serum samples. The SNAP25 chip assay is able to discriminate in an automated manner the presence of BoNT/E, BoNT/A or a combination of both toxins.

  16. An optical biosensor assay for rapid dual detection of Botulinum neurotoxins A and E

    PubMed Central

    Lévêque, Christian; Ferracci, Géraldine; Maulet, Yves; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel R.; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Seagar, Michael; El Far, Oussama

    2015-01-01

    The enzymatic activity of the pathogenic botulinum neurotoxins type A and E (BoNT/A and E) leads to potentially lethal paralytic symptoms in humans and their prompt detection is of crucial importance. A chip assay based on Surface Plasmon Resonance monitoring of the cleavage products is a simple method that we have previously established to detect BoNT/A activity. We have now developed a similar format assay to measure BoNT/E activity. A monoclonal antibody specifically recognizing SNAP25 cleaved by BoNT/E was generated and used to measure the appearance of the neo-epitope following injection of BoNT/E over SNAP-25 immobilized on a chip. This assay detects BoNT/E activity at 1 LD50/ml within minutes and linear dose-responses curves were obtained using a multiplexed biosensor. A threshold of 0.01 LD50/ml was achieved after 5 h of cleavage. This assay is 10-fold more sensitive than the in vivo assay for direct detection of BoNT/E in serum samples. The SNAP25 chip assay is able to discriminate in an automated manner the presence of BoNT/E, BoNT/A or a combination of both toxins. PMID:26648139

  17. Detection of lipopolysaccharides in serum using a waveguide-based optical biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noormohamed, Aneesa; Stromberg, Loreen R.; Anderson, Aaron S.; Karim, Zachary; Dighe, Priya; Kempaiah, Prakasha; Ong'echa, John M.; Perkins, Douglas J.; Doggett, Norman; McMahon, Benjamin; Mukundan, Harshini

    2017-02-01

    Direct ultra-sensitive detection of pathogen biomarkers in blood could provide a universal strategy for diagnosis of bacterial infections, which remain a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in many areas of the world. Many factors complicate diagnosis, including the presence of multiple co-infections in a given patient, and lack of infrastructure in rural settings. In some pediatric patients, such as those in areas with poor resources, an additional challenge exists with low sample volumes due to age and other health factors such as anemia and dehydration. Our team is working on developing novel diagnostic assays, with a waveguide-based biosensor platform, to rapidly and specifically identify pathogen biomarkers from small samples of serum or plasma, allowing for the timely and sensitive diagnosis of infection at the point of care. In addition to the platform, we have developed novel membrane insertion and lipoprotein capture assay methods, to capture lipidated pathogen biomarkers in aqueous blood, by virtue of their interactions with host lipoprotein carriers. Herein, we demonstrate our efforts to adapt the lipoprotein capture assay for the detection of small concentrations of pathogen-secreted lipopolysaccharides in aqueous blood, with the ultimate aim of diagnosing Gram-negative infections effectively.

  18. Silica Sol-Gel Optical Biosensors: Ultrahigh Enzyme Loading Capacity on Thin Films via Kinetic Doping.

    PubMed

    Crosley, Matthew S; Yip, Wai Tak

    2017-03-09

    Easy to use and easy to produce biosensors would have a huge range of applications. To reach this goal many see the incorporation of a protein into a sol-gel network as one of the most viable options. The current most prevalent technique of predoping presents inherent limits on the concentration possible for the resulting thin film. In this study we demonstrate a new process utilizing the newly developed kinetic doping method to load silica sol-gel thin films with cytochrome C (CytC) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Both enzymes are shown to successfully load and have a concentration increase over their original loading solution by factors of 1300× and 2600×, respectively. Furthermore, each enzyme once loaded retained the ability to act as a catalyst for the detection of hydrogen peroxide. Ultimately the CytC- and HRP-loaded thin films were found to have enzyme concentrations of 11 ± 1 mM and 6.0 ± 0.4 mM, respectively, a considerable step up from any doping method reported in the past.

  19. Novel Liquid Crystals - Polymers and Monomers - As Nonlinear Optical Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-31

    and pyridine N - oxides . Results of collaborative efforts in further characterization (electrooptic, dielectric, Langmuir-Blodgett films) are described...Polymalonate Liquid Crystals for Nonlinear Optics", A. C. Griffin, A. M. Bhatti and R. S. L. Hung, Mol Cryst LiS Cryst, 155, 129 (1988). " Pyridine N - oxides ... pyridine N - oxide based side chain polymers having a push-pull pi electronic structure, (d) generation of a series of copolymers involving both an nlo

  20. Crystallization, Optical and Chemical Properties of Fluoride Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Fluoride glasses have great promise as infrared optical components, especially fibers, because they are transparent to 8 micrometers and higher. In order to optimize properties, different glass compositions are needed. Some are hard to form in a container, and may possibly be formable in a containerless furnace. Understanding of crystallization with and without a container could lead to glasses with optimum properties. Chemical durability (attack by water) can limit or extend the applicability of fluoride glasses. Progress to date is given.