Science.gov

Sample records for crystal structure

  1. Crystal structure and prediction.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Tejender S; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2015-04-01

    The notion of structure is central to the subject of chemistry. This review traces the development of the idea of crystal structure since the time when a crystal structure could be determined from a three-dimensional diffraction pattern and assesses the feasibility of computationally predicting an unknown crystal structure of a given molecule. Crystal structure prediction is of considerable fundamental and applied importance, and its successful execution is by no means a solved problem. The ease of crystal structure determination today has resulted in the availability of large numbers of crystal structures of higher-energy polymorphs and pseudopolymorphs. These structural libraries lead to the concept of a crystal structure landscape. A crystal structure of a compound may accordingly be taken as a data point in such a landscape.

  2. Crystal Structure and Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Tejender S.; Dubey, Ritesh; Desiraju, Gautam R.

    2015-04-01

    The notion of structure is central to the subject of chemistry. This review traces the development of the idea of crystal structure since the time when a crystal structure could be determined from a three-dimensional diffraction pattern and assesses the feasibility of computationally predicting an unknown crystal structure of a given molecule. Crystal structure prediction is of considerable fundamental and applied importance, and its successful execution is by no means a solved problem. The ease of crystal structure determination today has resulted in the availability of large numbers of crystal structures of higher-energy polymorphs and pseudopolymorphs. These structural libraries lead to the concept of a crystal structure landscape. A crystal structure of a compound may accordingly be taken as a data point in such a landscape.

  3. Frustrated polymer crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, B.; Strasbourg, 67083

    1997-03-01

    Several crystal structures or polymorphs of chiral or achiral polymers and biopolymers with three fold conformation of the helix have been found to conform to a common and -with one exception(Puterman, M. et al, J. Pol. Sci., Pol. Phys. Ed., 15, 805 (1977))- hitherto unsuspected packing scheme. The trigonal unit-cell contains three isochiral helices; the azimuthal setting of one helix differs significantly from that of the other two, leading to a so-called frustrated packing scheme, in which the environment of conformationally identical helices differs. Two variants of the frustrated scheme are analyzed. Similarities with frustrated two dimensional magnetic systems are underlined. Various examples of frustration in polymer crystallography are illustrated via the elucidation or reinterpretation of crystal phases or polymorphs of polyolefins, polyesters, cellulose derivatives and polypeptides. Structural manifestations (including AFM evidence) and morphological consequences of frustration are presented, which help diagnose the existence of this original packing of polymers.(Work done with L. Cartier, D. Dorset, S. Kopp, T. Okihara, M. Schumacher, W. Stocker.)

  4. Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 84 FIZ/NIST Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) (PC database for purchase)   The Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) is produced cooperatively by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe(FIZ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The ICSD is a comprehensive collection of crystal structure data of inorganic compounds containing more than 140,000 entries and covering the literature from 1915 to the present.

  5. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  6. Structures beyond crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargittai, István

    2010-07-01

    Dan Shechtman made a seminal observation of the appearance on "non-crystallographic" symmetry in an alloy at the US National Bureau of Standards on April 8, 1982. This day has become known as the date of the discovery of quasicrystals. It was not easy to gain recognition for this discovery and the first printed report about it appeared two and a half years after the observation, which then was followed by an avalanche of publications. This was as if theoreticians and other experimentalists had only been waiting for a pioneer to come out with this revolutionary experiment. The discovery of quasicrystals just as the discovery of the structure of biological macromolecules was part of the development in which the framework of classical crystallography was crumbling and generalized crystallography—the science of structures—has emerged that had long been advanced by J. Desmond Bernal and his pupils. The discovery of quasicrystals offers some lessons about the nature of scientific discovery. This contribution presents selected aspects of the recognition of the importance of structures beyond crystals and is by far not a complete history of the areas involved.

  7. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF DIPHENYLTELLURIUM DIBROMIDE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    TELLURIUM COMPOUNDS, *ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , BROMIDES, SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), X RAY DIFFRACTION, FOURIER ANALYSIS, LEAST SQUARES METHOD, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CHEMICAL BONDS.

  8. REFINEMENT OF THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF GUANIDINIUM ALUMINUM SULFATE HEXAHYDRATE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FERROELECTRIC CRYSTALS, * CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*GUANIDINES, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), SULFATES, HYDRATES, X RAY DIFFRACTION, CHROMIUM COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL LATTICES, CHEMICAL BONDS

  9. Demonstration of Crystal Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neville, Joseph P.

    1985-01-01

    Describes an experiment where equal parts of copper and aluminum are heated then cooled to show extremely large crystals. Suggestions are given for changing the orientation of crystals by varying cooling rates. Students are more receptive to concepts of microstructure after seeing this experiment. (DH)

  10. Generation of crystal structures using known crystal structures as analogues

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jason C.; Groom, Colin R.; Read, Murray G.; Giangreco, Ilenia; McCabe, Patrick; Reilly, Anthony M.; Shields, Gregory P.

    2016-01-01

    This analysis attempts to answer the question of whether similar molecules crystallize in a similar manner. An analysis of structures in the Cambridge Structural Database shows that the answer is yes – sometimes they do, particularly for single-component structures. However, one does need to define what we mean by similar in both cases. Building on this observation we then demonstrate how this correlation between shape similarity and packing similarity can be used to generate potential lattices for molecules with no known crystal structure. Simple intermolecular interaction potentials can be used to minimize these potential lattices. Finally we discuss the many limitations of this approach. PMID:27484374

  11. Crystal Structure of UGe 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, Kennichi; Kamiyama, Takashi; Asano, Hajime; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Kohgi, Masahumi

    1996-10-01

    The crystal structure of UGe2 has been determined by the X-ray precession method and Rietveld analysis of neutron powder diffraction data. The crystal system is orthorhombic (space group Cmmm) with lattice parameters a=0.40089(1), b=1.50889(3) and c=0.40950(1) nm. The structure is isomorphic with one of the polymorphs of ThGe2.

  12. Crystal structure of triclopyr.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seonghwa; Kim, Jineun; Jeon, Youngeun; Kim, Tae Ho

    2014-09-01

    In the title compound {systematic name: 2-[(3,5,6-tri-chloro-pyridin-2-yl)-oxy]acetic acid}, the herbicide triclopyr, C7H4Cl3NO3, the asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol-ecules in which the dihedral angles between the mean plane of the carb-oxy-lic acid group and the pyridyl ring plane are 79.3 (6) and 83.8 (5)°. In the crystal, pairs of inter-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds form dimers through an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif and are extended into chains along [100] by weak π-π inter-actions [ring centroid separations = 3.799 (4) and 3.810 (4) Å]. In addition, short inter-molecular Cl⋯Cl contacts [3.458 (2) Å] connect the chains, yielding a two-dimensional architecture extending parallel to (020). The crystal studied was found to be non-merohedrally twinned with the minor component being 0.175 (4).

  13. Crystal structure of triclopyr

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seonghwa; Kim, Jineun; Jeon, Youngeun; Kim, Tae Ho

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound {systematic name: 2-[(3,5,6-tri­chloro­pyridin-2-yl)­oxy]acetic acid}, the herbicide triclopyr, C7H4Cl3NO3, the asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol­ecules in which the dihedral angles between the mean plane of the carb­oxy­lic acid group and the pyridyl ring plane are 79.3 (6) and 83.8 (5)°. In the crystal, pairs of inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds form dimers through an R 2 2(8) ring motif and are extended into chains along [100] by weak π–π inter­actions [ring centroid separations = 3.799 (4) and 3.810 (4) Å]. In addition, short inter­molecular Cl⋯Cl contacts [3.458 (2) Å] connect the chains, yielding a two-dimensional architecture extending parallel to (020). The crystal studied was found to be non-merohedrally twinned with the minor component being 0.175 (4). PMID:25309266

  14. Crystal structure of mandipropamid.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Jineun; Kang, Gihaeng; Kim, Tae Ho

    2015-10-01

    In the title compound, C23H22ClNO4 (systematic name: (RS)-2-(4-chloro-phen-yl)-N-{2-[3-meth-oxy-4-(prop-2-yn-1-yl-oxy)phen-yl]eth-yl}-2-(prop-2-yn-yloxy)acetamide), an amide fungicide, the dihedral angle between the chloro-benzene and benzene rings is 65.36 (6)°. In the crystal, N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds lead to zigzag supra-molecular chains along the c axis (glide symmetry). These are connected into layers by C-H⋯O and C-H⋯π inter-actions; the layers stack along the a axis with no specific inter-molecular inter-actions between them.

  15. Crystal structure of fluroxypyr

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyunjin; Choi, Myong Yong; Kwon, Eunjin; Kim, Tae Ho

    2016-01-01

    In the title pyridine herbicide {systematic name: 2-[(4-amino-3,5-di­chloro-6-fluoro­pyridin-2-yl)­oxy]acetic acid}, C7H5Cl2FN2O3, the mean plane of the carb­oxy­lic acid substituent and the pyridyl ring plane subtend a dihedral angle of 77.5 (1)°. In the crystal, pairs of O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds form inversion dimers with R 2 2(8) ring motifs. These are extended into chains along [011] by N—H⋯F hydrogen bonds. In addition, inter­molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and weak π–π inter­actions [ring centroid separation = 3.4602 (9) Å] connect these chains into a three-dimensional network. PMID:27980844

  16. Crystal structure of flumioxazin

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Jineun; Kwon, Eunjin; Kim, Tae Ho

    2015-01-01

    The title compound {systematic name: 2-[7-fluoro-3,4-di­hydro-3-oxo-4-(prop-2-yn-1-yl)-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-4,5,6,7-tetra­hydro-1H-iso­indole-1,3(2H)-dione}, C19H15FN2O4, is a dicarboximide herbicide. The dihedral angle between the male­imide and benzene ring planes is 66.13 (5)°. In the crystal, C—H⋯O and C—H⋯F hydrogen bonds and weak C—H⋯π inter­actions [3.5601 (19) Å] link adjacent mol­ecules, forming two-dimensional networks extending parallel to the (110) plane. PMID:26594468

  17. Crystal structure determination of Efavirenz

    SciTech Connect

    Popeneciu, Horea Dumitru, Ristoiu; Tripon, Carmen Borodi, Gheorghe Pop, Mihaela Maria

    2015-12-23

    Needle-shaped single crystals of the title compound, C{sub 14}H{sub 9}ClF{sub 3}NO{sub 2}, were obtained from a co-crystallization experiment of Efavirenz with maleic acid in a (1:1) ratio, using methanol as solvent. Crystal structure determination at room temperature revealed a significant anisotropy of the lattice expansion compared to the previously reported low-temperature structure. In both low- and room temperature structures the cyclopropylethynyl fragment in one of the asymmetric unit molecules is disordered. While at low-temperature only one C atom exhibits positional disorder, at room temperature the disorder is present for two C atoms of the cyclopropane ring.

  18. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    PubMed Central

    Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors. PMID:25567568

  19. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    SciTech Connect

    Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    New features added to the refinement program SHELXL since 2008 are described and explained. The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  20. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL.

    PubMed

    Sheldrick, George M

    2015-01-01

    The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as `a CIF') containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  1. Crystal structure of pymetrozine

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Youngeun; Kim, Jineun; Kang, Gihaeng; Kim, Tae Ho

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C10H11N5O {systematic name: 6-methyl-4-[(E)-(pyridin-3-yl­methyl­idene)amino]-4,5-di­hydro-1,2,4-triazin-3(2H)-one}, C10H11N5O, is used as an anti­feedant in pest control. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol­ecules, A and B, in which the dihedral angles between the pyridinyl and triazinyl ring planes [r.m.s. deviations = 0.0132 and 0.0255 ] are 11.60 (6) and 18.06 (4)°, respectively. In the crystal, N—H⋯O, N—H⋯N, C—H⋯N and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, together with weak π–π inter­actions [ring-centroid separations = 3.5456 (9) and 3.9142 (9) Å], link the pyridinyl and triazinyl rings of A mol­ecules, generating a three-dimensional network. PMID:26279908

  2. Crystal structure of pymetrozine.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Youngeun; Kim, Jineun; Kang, Gihaeng; Kim, Tae Ho

    2015-07-01

    The title compound, C10H11N5O {systematic name: 6-methyl-4-[(E)-(pyridin-3-yl-methyl-idene)amino]-4,5-di-hydro-1,2,4-triazin-3(2H)-one}, C10H11N5O, is used as an anti-feedant in pest control. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol-ecules, A and B, in which the dihedral angles between the pyridinyl and triazinyl ring planes [r.m.s. deviations = 0.0132 and 0.0255 ] are 11.60 (6) and 18.06 (4)°, respectively. In the crystal, N-H⋯O, N-H⋯N, C-H⋯N and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, together with weak π-π inter-actions [ring-centroid separations = 3.5456 (9) and 3.9142 (9) Å], link the pyridinyl and triazinyl rings of A mol-ecules, generating a three-dimensional network.

  3. Crystal Structure of Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, Stefan; Svensson, Goeran

    2001-02-15

    The room temperature structures of the two-layer Aurivillius phases Bi{sub 2.5}Me{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} (Me=Na, K) have been refined with the Rietveld method from powder neutron diffraction data ({lambda}=1.470 {angstrom}). They consist of (Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}){sup 2+} layers interleaved with perovskite (Bi{sub 0.5}Me{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sup 2-} (Me=Na, K) slabs. The structures were refined in the orthorhombic space group A2{sub 1}am, Z=4, and the unit cell parameters of the two oxides are a= 5.4937(3), b=5.4571(4), c=24.9169(14) {angstrom} and a=5.5005(8), b=5.4958(8), c=25.2524(16) {angstrom}, respectively. The orthorhombic distortion increases with decreasing Me+ cation size in the perovskite layer (Bi/Me){sup 2+} site and the lone pair electrons from the Bi{sup 3+} cation are influencing the site distortion. This is in agreement with other two-layer Aurivillius phases and originates from bonding requirements depending on size and electronic environment.

  4. Crystal structure of guggulsterone Z

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, V. K. Bandhoria, P.; Gupta, B. D.; Gupta, K. K.

    2006-03-15

    The crystal structure of the title compound (4,17(20)-trans-pregnadiene-3,16-dione, C{sub 21}H{sub 28}O{sub 2}) has been determined by direct methods using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The compound crystallizes into the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} with the unit cell parameters a = 7.908(2) A, b = 13.611(3) A, c = 16.309(4) A, and Z = 4. The structure has been refined to R = 0.058 for 3667 observed reflections. The bond distances and angles are in good agreement with guggulsterone E and other related steroid molecules. Ring A exists in the distorted sofa conformation, while rings B and C adopt the distorted chair conformation. Five-membered ring D is intermediate between the half-chair and envelope conformations. The A/B ring junction is quasi-trans, while ring systems B/C and C/D are trans fused about the C(8)-C(9) and C(13)-C(14) bonds, respectively. The steroid nucleus has a small twist, as shown by the C(19)-C(10)...C(13)-C(18) pseudo-torsion angle of 7.2{sup o}. The crystal structure is stabilized by intra-and intermolecular C-H...O hydrogen bonds.

  5. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF ANTIMONY (III) SULFOBROMIDE, SBSBR,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ANTIMONY COMPOUNDS, *SULFUR COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , BROMIDES, SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), FOURIER ANALYSIS, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CRYSTAL LATTICES, CHEMICAL BONDS, X RAY DIFFRACTION.

  6. Crystal Engineering: from Structure to Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, Mark D.

    2002-03-01

    Modern crystal engineering has emerged as a rich discipline whose success requires an iterative process of synthesis, crystallography, crystal structure analysis, and computational methods. By focusing on the molecular recognition events during nucleation and growth, chemists have uncovered new ways of controlling the internal structure and symmetry of crystals and of producing materials with useful chemical and physical properties.

  7. Microfluidic Approaches for Protein Crystal Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Maeki, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Tokeshi, Manabu; Miyazaki, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes two microfluidic-based protein crystallization methods, protein crystallization behavior in the microfluidic devices, and their applications for X-ray crystal structure analysis. Microfluidic devices provide many advantages for protein crystallography; they require small sample volumes, provide high-throughput screening, and allow control of the protein crystallization. A droplet-based protein crystallization method is a useful technique for high-throughput screening and the formation of a single crystal without any complicated device fabrication process. Well-based microfluidic platforms also enable effective protein crystallization. This review also summarizes the protein crystal growth behavior in microfluidic devices as, is known from viewpoints of theoretical and experimental approaches. Finally, we introduce applications of microfluidic devices for on-chip crystal structure analysis.

  8. Predicting crystal structures of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Price, Sarah L

    2014-04-07

    Currently, organic crystal structure prediction (CSP) methods are based on searching for the most thermodynamically stable crystal structure, making various approximations in evaluating the crystal energy. The most stable (global minimum) structure provides a prediction of an experimental crystal structure. However, depending on the specific molecule, there may be other structures which are very close in energy. In this case, the other structures on the crystal energy landscape may be polymorphs, components of static or dynamic disorder in observed structures, or there may be no route to nucleating and growing these structures. A major reason for performing CSP studies is as a complement to solid form screening to see which alternative packings to the known polymorphs are thermodynamically feasible.

  9. Uranocircite: luminescence and crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Matkovskiy, A.O.; Sidorenko, G.A.; Tarashchan, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    A study on the determination of the complex structure of the electron-vibration spectra and the elucidation of their relation to crystallochemical factors in uranocircite is presented. The work was performed on samples from zones of a single crystal of the same natural meta-uranocircite, differing in color, and also on other specimens from various Soviet and foreign deposits. Of the 15 meta-uranocircite specimens investigated, in 14 cases the luminescence spectra were homoypic and were a series of equidistant groups of lines of the fine structure; the spectral position of which was practically constant for all the specimens. The degree of hydration was found to have practically no influence on the luminescence of the meta-uranocircite. The investigation supports the supposition that there are marked differences in the structures of minerals of the uran-mica group, although in the authors' opinion, the mechanism itself of multi-center radiation is universal and manifested for all secondary uranium minerals. (JMT)

  10. Optimization of photonic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Smajic, Jasmin; Hafner, Christian; Erni, Daniel

    2004-11-01

    We report on the numerical structural optimization of two-dimensional photonic crystal (PhC) power dividers by using two different classes of optimization algorithms, namely, a modified truncated Newton (TN) gradient search as deterministic local optimization scheme and an evolutionary optimization representing the probabilistic global search strategies. Because of the severe accuracy requirements during optimization, the proper PhC device has been simulated by using the multiple-multipole program that is contained in the MaX-1 software package. With both optimizer classes, we found reliable and promising solutions that provide vanishing power reflection and perfect power balance at any specified frequency within the photonic bandgap. This outcome is astonishing in light of the discrete nature inherent in the underlying PhC structure, especially when the optimizer is allowed to intervene only within a very small volume of the device. Even under such limiting constraints structural optimization is not only feasible but has proven to be highly successful.

  11. Crystal structure analysis of intermetallic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, R. A., Jr.; Downey, J. W.; Dwight, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Study concerns crystal structures and lattice parameters for a number of new intermetallic compounds. Crystal structure data have been collected on equiatomic compounds, formed between an element of the Sc, Ti, V, or Cr group and an element of the Co or Ni group. The data, obtained by conventional methods, are presented in an easily usable tabular form.

  12. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF ALPHA-DIMETHYLTELLURIUM DICHLORIDE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    TELLURIUM COMPOUNDS, *ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , CHLORIDES, SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CHEMICAL BONDS, X RAY DIFFRACTION, ANISOTROPY, FOURIER ANALYSIS.

  13. Optically switchable liquid crystal photonic structures.

    PubMed

    Urbas, Augustine; Tondiglia, Vincent; Natarajan, Lalgudi; Sutherland, Richard; Yu, Haiping; Li, J-H; Bunning, Timothy

    2004-10-27

    Photo-optic materials offer the possibility of light controlled photonic devices, intelligent and environmentally adaptive optical materials. One strategy for creating these materials is the combination of structure formation through holographic photopolymerization and the variable optical properties of liquid crystals. Holographically patterned, polymer stabilized liquid crystals (HPSLCs) have proven to be useful optical materials. By incorporating photo-optic, azobenzene-derived liquid crystal blends into such material systems, we have generated practical photoresponsive optical materials.

  14. Pattern information extraction from crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyan, Erhan; Güdükbay, Uğur; Gülseren, Oğuz

    2007-04-01

    Determining the crystal structure parameters of a material is an important issue in crystallography and material science. Knowing the crystal structure parameters helps in understanding the physical behavior of material. It can be difficult to obtain crystal parameters for complex structures, particularly those materials that show local symmetry as well as global symmetry. This work provides a tool that extracts crystal parameters such as primitive vectors, basis vectors and space groups from the atomic coordinates of crystal structures. A visualization tool for examining crystals is also provided. Accordingly, this work could help crystallographers, chemists and material scientists to analyze crystal structures efficiently. Program summaryTitle of program: BilKristal Catalogue identifier: ADYU_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYU_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: None Programming language used: C, C++, Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1 and OpenGL Libraries Computer: Personal Computers with Windows operating system Operating system: Windows XP Professional RAM: 20-60 MB No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:899 779 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test date, etc.:9 271 521 Distribution format:tar.gz External routines/libraries: Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1. For visualization tool, graphics card driver should also support OpenGL Nature of problem: Determining crystal structure parameters of a material is a quite important issue in crystallography. Knowing the crystal structure parameters helps to understand physical behavior of material. For complex structures, particularly, for materials which also contain local symmetry as well as global symmetry, obtaining crystal parameters can be quite hard. Solution method: The tool extracts crystal parameters such as primitive vectors, basis vectors and identify the space group from

  15. Crystal structure of meteoritic schreibersites: determination of absolute structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, Roman; Císařová, Ivana

    Minerals of the schreibersite nickelphosphide series (Fe,Ni)3P crystallize in the non-centrosymmetric space group Ibar 4. As a consequence, they can possess two different spatial arrangements of the constituting atoms within the unit cell, related by the inversion symmetry operation. Here, we present the crystal structure refinements from single crystal X-ray diffraction data for schreibersite grains from iron meteorites Acuña, Carlton, Hex River Mts. (three different crystals), Odessa (two different crystals), Sikhote Alin, and Toluca aiming for the determination of the absolute structure of the examined crystals. The crystals studied cover the composition range from 58 mol% to 80 mol% Fe3P end-member. Unit-cell parameter a and volume of the unit cell V, as well as certain topological structural parameters tightly correlate with Fe3P content. Unit-cell parameter c, on the other hand, does not show such strong correlation. Eight of the nine crystal structure refinements allowed unambiguous absolute structure assignment. The single crystal extracted from Toluca is, however, of poor quality and consequently the structure refinement did not provide as good results as the rest of the materials. Also, this crystal has only weak inversion distinguishing power to provide unequivocal absolute structure determination. Six of the eight unambiguous absolute structure determinations indicated inverted atomic arrangement compared to that reported in earlier structure refinements (here called standard). Only two grains, one taken from Odessa iron and the other from the Hex River Mts. meteorite, reveal the dominance of standard crystal structure setting.

  16. Crystal structure prediction of rigid molecules.

    PubMed

    Elking, Dennis M; Fusti-Molnar, Laszlo; Nichols, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    A non-polarizable force field based on atomic multipoles fit to reproduce experimental crystal properties and ab initio gas-phase dimers is described. The Ewald method is used to calculate both long-range electrostatic and 1/r(6) dispersion energies of crystals. The dispersion energy of a crystal calculated by a cutoff method is shown to converge slowly to the exact Ewald result. A method for constraining space-group symmetry during unit-cell optimization is derived. Results for locally optimizing 4427 unit cells including volume, cell parameters, unit-cell r.m.s.d. and CPU timings are given for both flexible and rigid molecule optimization. An algorithm for randomly generating rigid molecule crystals is described. Using the correct experimentally determined space group, the average and maximum number of random crystals needed to find the correct experimental structure is given for 2440 rigid single component crystals. The force field energy rank of the correct experimental structure is presented for the same set of 2440 rigid single component crystals assuming the correct space group. A complete crystal prediction is performed for two rigid molecules by searching over the 32 most probable space groups.

  17. Liquid crystal light valve structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koda, N. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An improved photosensor film and liquid crystal light valves embodying said film is provided. The photosensor film and liquid crystal light valve is characterized by a significant lower image retention time while maintaining acceptable photosensitivity. The photosensor film is produced by sputter depositing CdS onto an ITO substrate in an atmosphere of argon/H2S gas while maintaining the substrate at a temperature in the range of about 130 C to about 200 C and while introducing nitrogen gas into the system to the extent of not more than about 1% of plasma mixture. Following sputter deposition of the CdS, the film is annealed in an inert gas at temperatures ranging from about 300 C to about 425 C.

  18. Structures of cyano-biphenyl liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Yuan-Chao; Tsang, Tung; Rahimzadeh, E.; Yin, L.

    1989-01-01

    The structures of p-alkyl- p'-cyano- bicyclohexanes, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H10)(C6H10) CN (n-CCH), and p-alkyl- p'-cyano- biphenyls, C(n)H(2n+1) (C6H4)(C6H4) CN (n-CBP), were studied. It is convenient to use an x ray image intensification device to search for symmetric x ray diffraction patterns. Despite the similarities in molecular structures of these compounds, very different crystal structures were found. For the smectic phase of 2CCH, the structure is close to rhombohedral with threefold symmetry. In contrast, the structure is close to hexagonal close-packed with two molecules per unit cell for 4CCH. Since intermolecular forces may be quite weak for these liquid crystals systems, it appears that crystal structures change considerably when the alkyl chain length is slightly altered. Different structures were also found in the crystalline phase of n-CBP for n = 6 to 9. For n = 7 to 9, the structures are close to monclinic. The structures are reminiscent of the smectic-A liquid crystal structures with the linear molecules slightly tilted away from the c-axis. In contrast, the structure is quite different for n = 6 with the molecules nearly perpendicular to the c-axis.

  19. Crystal structure of neotame anhydrate polymorph G.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zedong; Young, Victor G; Sheth, Agam; Munson, Eric J; Schroeder, Steve A; Prakash, Indra; Grant, David J W

    2002-10-01

    To determine the crystal structure of the neotame anhydrate polymorph G and to evaluate X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) with molecular modeling as an alternative method for determining the crystal structure of this conformationally flexible dipeptide. The crystal structure of polymorph G was determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography (SCXRD) and also from the X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) pattern using molecular modeling (Cerius2, Powder Solve module). From SCXRD, polymorph G crystals are orthorhombic with space group of P2(1)2(1)2(1) with Z = 4, unit cell constants: a = 5.5999(4), b = 11.8921(8), c = 30.917(2) A, and one neotame molecule per asymmetric unit. The XRPD pattern of polymorph G, analyzed by Cerius2 software, led to the same P2(1)2(1)2(1) space group and almost identical unit cell dimensions. However, with 13 rigid bodies defined, Cerius2 gives a conformation of the neotame molecule, which is different from that determined by SCXRD. For neotame anhydrate polymorph G, the unit cell dimensions calculated from XRPD were almost identical to those determined by SCXRD. However, the crystal structure determined by XRPD closely resembled that determined by SCXRD, only when the correct conformation of the neotame molecule had been chosen before detailed analysis of the XRPD pattern.

  20. Crystal structure of enolase from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sun, Congcong; Xu, Baokui; Liu, Xueyan; Zhang, Zhen; Su, Zhongliang

    2017-04-01

    Enolase is an important enzyme in glycolysis and various biological processes. Its dysfunction is closely associated with diseases. Here, the enolase from Drosophila melanogaster (DmENO) was purified and crystallized. A crystal of DmENO diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution and belonged to space group R32. The structure was solved by molecular replacement. Like most enolases, DmENO forms a homodimer with conserved residues in the dimer interface. DmENO possesses an open conformation in this structure and contains conserved elements for catalytic activity. This work provides a structural basis for further functional and evolutionary studies of enolase.

  1. Natural photonic crystals: formation, structure, function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Michael H.; Dahlby, Michael R.; Barrows, Frank P.; Richens, Zachary J.; Terooatea, Tommy; Jorgensen, Matthew R.

    2012-03-01

    The structure and properties of natural photonic crystals are discussed using the colored scales of the beetle Lamprocyphus augustus as an example. While the exact mechanism behind the formation of these biopolymeric photonic structures has yet to be fully explored, similarities of these structures to intracellular cubic membrane architectures are introduced. Some crucial parameters behind the formation of cubic membranes are discussed. Using these insights, intracellular cubic membrane structures are transformed into an extracellular environment.

  2. Nucleation and structural growth of cluster crystals.

    PubMed

    Leitold, Christian; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-08-21

    We study the nucleation of crystalline cluster phases in the generalized exponential model with exponent n = 4. Due to the finite value of this pair potential for zero separation, at high densities the system forms cluster crystals with multiply occupied lattice sites. Here, we investigate the microscopic mechanisms that lead to the formation of cluster crystals from a supercooled liquid in the low-temperature region of the phase diagram. Using molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling, we calculate the free energy as a function of the size of the largest crystalline nucleus in the system, and compare our results with predictions from classical nucleation theory. Employing bond-order parameters based on a Voronoi tessellation to distinguish different crystal structures, we analyze the average composition of crystalline nuclei. We find that even for conditions where a multiply occupied fcc crystal is the thermodynamically stable phase, the nucleation into bcc cluster crystals is strongly preferred. Furthermore, we study the particle mobility in the supercooled liquid and in the cluster crystal. In the cluster crystal, the motion of individual particles is captured by a simple reaction-diffusion model introduced previously to model the kinetics of hydrogen bonds.

  3. The crystal structure and crystal chemistry of fernandinite and corvusite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, H.T.; Post, J.E.; Ross, D.R.; Nelen, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Using type material of fernandinite from Minasragra, Peru, and corvusite from the Jack Claim, La Sal Mountains, Utah, the properties and crystal chemistry of these minerals have been determined by Rietveld analysis of the powder X-ray-diffraction patterns. The crystal structure of both species is isotypic with the V2O5 -type layer first found for ??-Ag0.68V2O5; it consists of chains of VO6 octahedra linked by opposite corners (parallel to b) condensed by edge-sharing to form the layer. The vanadium has average valence 4.8, and the resulting layer-charge is balanced by varying amounts of Ca, Na, and K in the interlayer region accompanied by labile water. This study has confirmed the validity of fernandinite as a unique mineral species. It is closely related to corvusite, from which it is distinguished on the basis of the dominant interlayer cation: Ca for fernandinite, Na for curvusite. -Authors

  4. Crystal Structures of Sialyltransferase from Photobacterium damselae

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Nhung; Li, Yanhong; Yu, Hai; Huang, Shengshu; Lau, Kam; Chen, Xi; Fisher, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Sialyltransferase structures fall into either GT-A or GT-B glycosyltransferase fold. Some sialyltransferases from the Photobacterium genus have been shown to contain an additional N-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain. Photobacterium damselae α2–6-sialyltransferase has been used efficiently in enzymatic and chemoenzymatic synthesis of α2–6-linked sialosides. Here we report three crystal structures of this enzyme. Two structures with and without a donor substrate analogue CMP-3F(a)Neu5Ac contain an immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain and adopt the GT-B sialyltransferase fold. The binary structure reveals a non-productive pre-Michaelis complex, which are caused by crystal lattice contacts that prevent the large conformational changes. The third structure lacks the Ig-domain. Comparison of the three structures reveals small inherent flexibility between the two Rossmann-like domains of the GT-B fold. PMID:25451227

  5. Machine learning for autonomous crystal structure identification.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Wesley F; Long, Andrew W; Howard, Michael P; Ferguson, Andrew L; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2017-07-21

    We present a machine learning technique to discover and distinguish relevant ordered structures from molecular simulation snapshots or particle tracking data. Unlike other popular methods for structural identification, our technique requires no a priori description of the target structures. Instead, we use nonlinear manifold learning to infer structural relationships between particles according to the topology of their local environment. This graph-based approach yields unbiased structural information which allows us to quantify the crystalline character of particles near defects, grain boundaries, and interfaces. We demonstrate the method by classifying particles in a simulation of colloidal crystallization, and show that our method identifies structural features that are missed by standard techniques.

  6. Crystal structure and chirality of natural floridoside.

    PubMed

    Simon-Colin, Christelle; Michaud, François; Léger, Jean-Michel; Deslandes, Eric

    2003-10-31

    The crystal structure and absolute configuration of natural floridoside (2-O-alpha-D-galactopyranosylglycerol) were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The space group is orthorhombic P2(1)2(1)2(1) with Z=4, a=4.885(1), b=9.734(1), c=23.886(2) A at 296 +/- 2 K. The structure was solved by a direct method and refined to R=0.0351 from 1914 reflections of Cu Kalpha radiation.

  7. Crystal structure of canagliflozin hemihydrate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai-Hang; Gu, Jian-Ming; Hu, Xiu-Rong; Tang, Gu-Ping

    2016-05-01

    There are two canagliflozin mol-ecules (A and B) and one water mol-ecule in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, C24H25FO5S·0.5H2O [systematic name: (2S,3R,4R,5S,6R)-2-(3-{[5-(4-fluoro-phen-yl)thio-phen-2-yl]meth-yl}-4-methylphen-yl)-6-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)-3,4,5,6-tetra-hydro-2H-pyran-3,4,5-triol hemihydrate]. The dihedral angles between the methyl-benzene and thio-phene rings are 115.7 (4) and 111.7 (4)°, while the dihedral angles between the fluoro-benzene and thio-phene rings are 24.2 (6) and 20.5 (9)° in mol-ecules A and B, respectively. The hydro-pyran ring exhibits a chair conformation in both canagliflozin mol-ecules. In the crystal, the canagliflozin mol-ecules and lattice water mol-ecules are connected via O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional supra-molecular architecture.

  8. Crystal structure of canagliflozin hemihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai-Hang; Gu, Jian-Ming; Hu, Xiu-Rong; Tang, Gu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    There are two canagliflozin mol­ecules (A and B) and one water mol­ecule in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, C24H25FO5S·0.5H2O [systematic name: (2S,3R,4R,5S,6R)-2-(3-{[5-(4-fluoro­phen­yl)thio­phen-2-yl]meth­yl}-4-methylphen­yl)-6-(hy­droxy­meth­yl)-3,4,5,6-tetra­hydro-2H-pyran-3,4,5-triol hemihydrate]. The dihedral angles between the methyl­benzene and thio­phene rings are 115.7 (4) and 111.7 (4)°, while the dihedral angles between the fluoro­benzene and thio­phene rings are 24.2 (6) and 20.5 (9)° in mol­ecules A and B, respectively. The hydro­pyran ring exhibits a chair conformation in both canagliflozin mol­ecules. In the crystal, the canagliflozin mol­ecules and lattice water mol­ecules are connected via O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional supra­molecular architecture. PMID:27308030

  9. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Bitto, Eduard; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-08-13

    Since first discovered in Zea mays, cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) genes have been identified in many plants including rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, which possesses CKX homologues (AtCKX1-AtCKX7). So far, the three-dimensional structure of only Z. mays CKX (ZmCKX1) has been determined. The crystal structures of ZmCKX1 have been solved in the native state and in complex with reaction products and a slowly reacting substrate. The structures revealed four glycosylated asparagine residues and a histidine residue covalently linked to FAD. Combined with the structural information, recent biochemical analyses of ZmCKX1 concluded that the final products of the reaction, adenine and a side chain aldehyde, are formed by nonenzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cytokinin imine products resulting directly from CKX catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtCKX7 (gene locus At5g21482.1, UniProt code Q9FUJ1).

  10. Crystal structure of the eukaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Jenner, Lasse; Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2010-11-26

    Crystal structures of prokaryotic ribosomes have described in detail the universally conserved core of the translation mechanism. However, many facets of the translation process in eukaryotes are not shared with prokaryotes. The crystal structure of the yeast 80S ribosome determined at 4.15 angstrom resolution reveals the higher complexity of eukaryotic ribosomes, which are 40% larger than their bacterial counterparts. Our model shows how eukaryote-specific elements considerably expand the network of interactions within the ribosome and provides insights into eukaryote-specific features of protein synthesis. Our crystals capture the ribosome in the ratcheted state, which is essential for translocation of mRNA and transfer RNA (tRNA), and in which the small ribosomal subunit has rotated with respect to the large subunit. We describe the conformational changes in both ribosomal subunits that are involved in ratcheting and their implications in coordination between the two associated subunits and in mRNA and tRNA translocation.

  11. Requirements for structure determination of aperiodic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Stern, E.A.; Ma, Y. )

    1991-01-15

    Using computer simulation, we compared the Patterson functions of one-dimensional (1D) randomly packed and quasiperiodic Fibonacci lattices with or without disorder, and a 2D Penrose lattice and random packing of pentagons (icosahedral glass model). Based on these comparisons, we derived some empirical guidelines for distinguishing ideal quasicrystals from aperiodic crystals with disorder using diffraction data. In contrast to periodic crystals, it is essential to include the background to obtain correct Patterson functions of the average structure since the background contains unresolved peaks. In particular, a Bragg peak scattering measurement {ital cannot}, in general, determine the structure of aperiodic crystals. Instead, a diffuse scattering measurement is required, which determines the absolute value of the diffraction background, in addition to the Bragg peaks. We further estimate that, dependent upon the disorder present, it is necessary to include up to 75% of the total diffracted intensity in any analysis.

  12. Shear induced structures in crystallizing cocoa butter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Guthrie, Sarah E.; Sirota, Eric B.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2004-03-01

    Cocoa butter is the main structural component of chocolate and many cosmetics. It crystallizes in several polymorphs, called phases I to VI. We used Synchrotron X-ray diffraction to study the effect of shear on its crystallization. A previously unreported phase (phase X) was found and a crystallization path through phase IV under shear was observed. Samples were crystallized under shear from the melt in temperature controlled Couette cells, at final crystallization temperatures of 17.5^oC, 20^oC and 22.5^oC in Beamline X10A of NSLS. The formation of phase X was observed at low shear rates (90 s-1) and low crystallization temperature (17.5^oC), but was absent at high shear (720 s-1) and high temperature (20^oC). The d-spacing and melting point suggest that this new phase is a mixture rich on two of the three major components of cocoa butter. We also found that, contrary to previous reports, the transition from phase II to phase V can happen through the intermediate phase IV, at high shear rates and temperature.

  13. Crystal structure of KPC-2

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Wei; Bethel, Christopher R.; Thomson, Jodi M.; Bonomo, Robert A.; van den Akker, Focco

    2008-01-01

    β-lactamases inactivate β-lactam antibiotics and are a major cause of antibiotic resistance. The recent outbreaks of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenem-resistant (KPC) infections mediated by KPC type β-lactamases are creating a serious threat to our “last resort” antibiotics, the carbapenems. KPC β-lactamases are thus carbapenemases and are a subclass of Class A β-lactamases that have evolved to efficiently hydrolyze carbapenems and cephamycins which contain substitutions at the α position proximal to the carbonyl group that normally render these β-lactams resistant to hydrolysis. To investigate the molecular basis of this carbapenemase activity, we have determined the structure of KPC-2 at 1.85Å resolution. The active site of KPC-2 reveals the presence of a bicine buffer molecule which interacts via its carboxyl group with conserved active site residues S130, K234, T235, and T237; this likely resembles the interactions the β-lactam carboxyl moiety makes in the Michaelis-Menten complex. Comparison of the KPC-2 structure with non-carbapenemases and previously determined NMC-A and SME-1 carbapenemase structures shows several active site alterations that are unique among carbapenemases. An outward shift of the catalytic S70 residue renders the active sites of the carbapenemases more shallow likely allowing easier access of the bulkier substrates. Further space for the α-substituents is likely provided by shifts in N132 and N170 in addition to concerted movements in the postulated carboxyl binding pocket that might allow the substrates to bind in a slightly different angle to accommodate these α-substituents. The structure of KPC-2 thus provides key insights into the carbapenemase activity of emerging Class A β-lactamases. PMID:17441734

  14. Crystal structure of monobasic sodium tartrate monohydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Titaeva, E. K. Somov, N. V.; Portnov, V. N.; Titaev, D. N.

    2015-01-15

    Crystals of a new polymorphic modification of monobasic sodium tartrate monohydrate NaHC{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 6} · H{sub 2}O have been grown in a metasilicate gel. Their atomic structure is solved by X-ray diffraction.

  15. Structure analysis on synthetic emerald crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pei-Lun; Lee, Jiann-Shing; Huang, Eugene; Liao, Ju-Hsiou

    2013-05-01

    Single crystals of emerald synthesized by means of the flux method were adopted for crystallographic analyses. Emerald crystals with a wide range of Cr3+-doping content up to 3.16 wt% Cr2O3 were examined by X-ray single crystal diffraction refinement method. The crystal structures of the emerald crystals were refined to R 1 (all data) of 0.019-0.024 and w R 2 (all data) of 0.061-0.073. When Cr3+ substitutes for Al3+, the main adjustment takes place in the Al-octahedron and Be-tetrahedron. The effect of substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ in the beryl structure results in progressively lengthening of the Al-O distance, while the length of the other bonds remains nearly unchanged. The substitution of Cr3+ for Al3+ may have caused the expansion of a axis, while keeping the c axis unchanged in the emerald lattice. As a consequence, the Al-O-Si and Al-O-Be bonding angles are found to decrease, while the angle of Si-O-Be increases as the Al-O distance increases during the Cr replacement.

  16. Crystal structure of a plectonemic RNA supercoil

    SciTech Connect

    Stagno, Jason R.; Ma, Buyong; Li, Jess; Altieri, Amanda S.; Byrd, R. Andrew; Ji, Xinhua

    2012-12-14

    Genome packaging is an essential housekeeping process in virtually all organisms for proper storage and maintenance of genetic information. Although the extent and mechanisms of packaging vary, the process involves the formation of nucleic-acid superstructures. Crystal structures of DNA coiled coils indicate that their geometries can vary according to sequence and/or the presence of stabilizers such as proteins or small molecules. However, such superstructures have not been revealed for RNA. Here we report the crystal structure of an RNA supercoil, which displays one level higher molecular organization than previously reported structures of DNA coiled coils. In the presence of an RNA-binding protein, two interlocking RNA coiled coils of double-stranded RNA, a 'coil of coiled coils', form a plectonemic supercoil. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that protein-RNA interaction is required for the stability of the supercoiled RNA. This study provides structural insight into higher order packaging mechanisms of nucleic acids.

  17. Troublesome Crystal Structures: Prevention, Detection, and Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    A large number of incorrect crystal structures is being published today. These structures are proving to be a particular problem to those of us who are interested in comparing structural moieties found in the databases in order to develop structure-property relationships. Problems can reside in the input data, e.g., wrong unit cell or low quality intensity data, or in the structural model, e.g., wrong space group or atom types. Many of the common mistakes are, however, relatively easy to detect and thus should be preventable; at the very least, suspicious structures can be flagged, if not by the authors then by the referees and, ultimately, the crystallographic databases. This article describes some of the more common mistakes and their effects on the resulting structures, lists a series of tests that can be used to detect incorrect structures, and makes a strong plea for the publication of higher quality structures. PMID:27805169

  18. Troublesome Crystal Structures: Prevention, Detection, and Resolution.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Richard L

    1996-01-01

    A large number of incorrect crystal structures is being published today. These structures are proving to be a particular problem to those of us who are interested in comparing structural moieties found in the databases in order to develop structure-property relationships. Problems can reside in the input data, e.g., wrong unit cell or low quality intensity data, or in the structural model, e.g., wrong space group or atom types. Many of the common mistakes are, however, relatively easy to detect and thus should be preventable; at the very least, suspicious structures can be flagged, if not by the authors then by the referees and, ultimately, the crystallographic databases. This article describes some of the more common mistakes and their effects on the resulting structures, lists a series of tests that can be used to detect incorrect structures, and makes a strong plea for the publication of higher quality structures.

  19. Crystal Structure of Human Enterovirus 71

    SciTech Connect

    Plevka, Pavel; Perera, Rushika; Cardosa, Jane; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2013-04-08

    Enterovirus 71 is a picornavirus associated with fatal neurological illness in infants and young children. Here, we report the crystal structure of enterovirus 71 and show that, unlike in other enteroviruses, the 'pocket factor,' a small molecule that stabilizes the virus, is partly exposed on the floor of the 'canyon.' Thus, the structure of antiviral compounds may require a hydrophilic head group designed to interact with residues at the entrance of the pocket.

  20. Crystal structure of zwitterionic bisimidazolium sulfonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohmoto, Shigeo; Okuyama, Shinpei; Yokota, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kishikawa, Keiki; Masu, Hyuma; Azumaya, Isao

    2012-05-01

    Crystal structures of three zwitterionic bisimidazolium salts 1-3 in which imidazolium sulfonate moieties were connected with aromatic linkers, p-xylylene, 4,4'-dimethylenebiphenyl, and phenylene, respectively, were examined. The latter two were obtained as hydrates. An S-shaped molecular structure in which the sulfonate moiety was placed on the imidazolium ring was observed for 1. A helical array of hydrated water molecules was obtained for 2 while a linear array of hydrated water molecules was observed for 3.

  1. Structures and Crystal Chemistry of Layered Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Daniel Edward

    The crystal chemistry of several layered materials has been explored using a variety of methods, with an emphasis on their structural aspects. In the second part of this work, the structure of several copper oxides that are of significance to the study of superconductors are described. The crystal structures of MgCl_2 and CdCl_2 have been refined using powder X-ray diffraction data. They have the space group Roverline{3}m. For magnesium chloride the unit cell constants are a = 3.6363(1) A, c = 17.6663(5) A. For cadmium chloride they are a = 3.8459(1) A, c = 17.4931(4) A. The structures and their relationship to that of fluorite are discussed within the framework of a Born-Mayer model. The crystal structure of Mg(OD)_2 has been refined from time-of flight (TOF) neutron diffraction data and found to be trigonal, Poverline {3}m1, a = 3.1455(1) A, c = 4.7646(3) A. The data were collected at 305 K. The O-D bond length is 0.937 (1) A (corrected for "riding" motion 0.948 A). An infrared/Raman study of Mg(OH)_2 was conducted in a diamond anvil cell in the pressure range from room pressure up to 7 Gpa. For layered crystals, it was found that as the internally fixed layers are moved apart the Madelung energy of the system becomes constant after a very short distance, although not necessarily that of the given crystal's energy at ambient conditions. The crystal structure of Sr(OD)_2 has been refined from time-of-flight neutron diffraction data and the deuterium positions found. Strontium deuteroxide crystallizes in the space group Pnma, with the unit cell constants of a = 9.8269(5) A, b = 3.9051(2) A, and c = 6.0733(3) A. The crystal structures of SrCuO_2 and Sr_2CuO_3 have been refined by time-of-flight neutron diffraction. For SrCuO_2 the space group is Cmcm, a = 3.57002(2), b = 16.32268(8), c = 3.91100(2); for Sr _2CuO_3 the space group is Immm, a = 3.49900(5), b = 12.7009(2), c = 3.91120(5). In both structures the strontium atoms are coordinated by seven oxygen atoms

  2. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF 2,7-DIACETOXYTRANS-15,16-DIMETHYL-15,16-DIHYDROPYRENE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AROMATIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*POLYCYCLIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (* CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , POLYCYCLIC COMPOUNDS), ESTERS, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, CHEMICAL BONDS, X RAY DIFFRACTION, SCINTILLATION COUNTERS, CANADA

  3. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  4. Crystal structure of riboflavin synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.-I.; Wawrzak, Z.; Calabrese, J.C.; Viitanen, P.V.; Jordan, D.B.

    2010-03-05

    Riboflavin synthase catalyzes the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-(1'-D-ribityl)-lumazine to yield riboflavin and 4-ribitylamino-5-amino-2,6-dihydroxypyrimidine. The homotrimer of 23 kDa subunits has no cofactor requirements for catalysis. The enzyme is nonexistent in humans and is an attractive target for antimicrobial agents of organisms whose pathogenicity depends on their ability to biosynthesize riboflavin. The first three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution using the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method on the Escherichia coli protein containing selenomethionine residues. The homotrimer consists of an asymmetric assembly of monomers, each of which comprises two similar {beta} barrels and a C-terminal {alpha} helix. The similar {beta} barrels within the monomer confirm a prediction of pseudo two-fold symmetry that is inferred from the sequence similarity between the two halves of the protein. The {beta} barrels closely resemble folds found in phthalate dioxygenase reductase and other flavoproteins. The three active sites of the trimer are proposed to lie between pairs of monomers in which residues conserved among species reside, including two Asp-His-Ser triads and dyads of Cys-Ser and His-Thr. The proposed active sites are located where FMN (an analog of riboflavin) is modeled from an overlay of the {beta} barrels of phthalate dioxygenase reductase and riboflavin synthase. In the trimer, one active site is formed, and the other two active sites are wide open and exposed to solvent. The nature of the trimer configuration suggests that only one active site can be formed and be catalytically competent at a time.

  5. The Surface Structure of Ground Metal Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boas, W.; Schmid, E.

    1944-01-01

    The changes produced on metallic surfaces as a result of grinding and polishing are not as yet fully understood. Undoubtedly there is some more or less marked change in the crystal structure, at least, in the top layer. Hereby a diffusion of separated crystal particles may be involved, or, on plastic material, the formation of a layer in greatly deformed state, with possible recrystallization in certain conditions. Czochralski verified the existence of such a layer on tin micro-sections by successive observations of the texture after repeated etching; while Thomassen established, roentgenographically by means of the Debye-Scherrer method, the existence of diffused crystal fractions on the surface of ground and polished tin bars, which he had already observed after turning (on the lathe). (Thickness of this layer - 0.07 mm). Whether this layer borders direct on the undamaged base material or whether deformed intermediate layers form the transition, nothing is known. One observation ty Sachs and Shoji simply states that after the turning of an alpha-brass crystal the disturbance starting from the surface, penetrates fairly deep (approx. 1 mm) into the crystal (proof by recrystallization at 750 C).

  6. Nonlinear coherent structures in granular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, C.; Porter, Mason A.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Daraio, C.

    2017-10-01

    The study of granular crystals, which are nonlinear metamaterials that consist of closely packed arrays of particles that interact elastically, is a vibrant area of research that combines ideas from disciplines such as materials science, nonlinear dynamics, and condensed-matter physics. Granular crystals exploit geometrical nonlinearities in their constitutive microstructure to produce properties (such as tunability and energy localization) that are not conventional to engineering materials and linear devices. In this topical review, we focus on recent experimental, computational, and theoretical results on nonlinear coherent structures in granular crystals. Such structures—which include traveling solitary waves, dispersive shock waves, and discrete breathers—have fascinating dynamics, including a diversity of both transient features and robust, long-lived patterns that emerge from broad classes of initial data. In our review, we primarily discuss phenomena in one-dimensional crystals, as most research to date has focused on such scenarios, but we also present some extensions to two-dimensional settings. Throughout the review, we highlight open problems and discuss a variety of potential engineering applications that arise from the rich dynamic response of granular crystals.

  7. Structural phase transitions in layered perovskitelike crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, K.S.

    1995-03-01

    Possible symmetry changes due to small tilts of octahedra are considered for layered perovskite-like crystals containing slabs of several ({ell}) layers of comer-sharing octahedra. In the crystals with {ell} > 1, four types of distortions are possible; as a rule, these distortions correspond to the librational modes of the parent lattice. Condensation of these soft modes is the reason for structural phase transitions or sequences of phase transitions. The results obtained are compared with the known experimental data for a number of layered ferroelectric and ferroelastic perovskite-like compounds. An application of the results to the initial stage of determining unknown structures is discussed with particular attention paid to high-temperature superconductors. 76 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Gas hydrate single-crystal structure analyses.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Michael T; Boese, Roland; Billups, W Edward; Norman, Lewis R

    2004-08-04

    The first single-crystal diffraction studies on methane, propane, methane/propane, and adamantane gas hydrates SI, SII, and SH have been performed. To circumvent the problem of very slow crystal growth, a novel technique of in situ cocrystallization of gases and liquids resulting in oligocrystalline material in a capillary has been developed. With special data treatment, termed oligo diffractometry, structural data of the gas hydrates of methane, acetylene, propane, a propane/ethanol/methane-mixture and an adamantane/methane-mixture were obtained. Cell parameters are in accord with reported values. Host network and guest are subject to extensive disorder, reducing the reliability of structural information. It was found that most cages are fully occupied by a guest molecule with the exception of the dodecahedral cage in the acetylene hydrate which is only filled to 60%. For adamantane in the icosahedral cage a disordered model is proposed.

  9. Crystal Structures of New Ammonium 5-Aminotetrazolates

    PubMed Central

    Lampl, Martin; Salchner, Robert; Laus, Gerhard; Braun, Doris E.; Kahlenberg, Volker; Wurst, Klaus; Fuhrmann, Gerda; Schottenberger, Herwig; Huppertz, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of three salts of anionic 5-aminotetrazole are described. The tetramethylammonium salt (P1‒) forms hydrogen-bonded ribbons of anions which accept weak C–H⋯N contacts from the cations. The cystamine salt (C2/c) shows wave-shaped ribbons of anions linked by hydrogen bonds to screw-shaped dications. The tetramethylguanidine salt (P21/c) exhibits layers of anions hydrogen-bonded to the cations. PMID:26753100

  10. Observations on the crystal structures of lueshite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Roger H.; Burns, Peter C.; Knight, Kevin S.; Howard, Christopher J.; Chakhmouradian, Anton R.

    2014-06-01

    Laboratory powder XRD patterns of the perovskite-group mineral lueshite from the type locality (Lueshe, Kivu, DRC) and pure NaNbO3 demonstrate that lueshite does not adopt the same space group ( Pbma; #57) as the synthetic compound. The crystal structures of lueshite (2 samples) from Lueshe, Mont Saint-Hilaire (Quebec, Canada) and Sallanlatvi (Kola, Russia) have been determined by single-crystal CCD X-ray diffraction. These room temperature X-ray data for all single-crystal samples can be satisfactorily refined in the orthorhombic space group Pbnm (#62). Cell dimensions, atomic coordinates of the atoms, bond lengths and octahedron tilt angles are given for four crystals. Conventional neutron diffraction patterns for Lueshe lueshite recorded over the temperature range 11-1,000 K confirm that lueshite does not adopt space group Pbma within these temperatures. Neutron diffraction indicates no phase changes on cooling from room temperature to 11 K. None of these neutron diffraction data give satisfactorily refinements but suggest that this is the space group Pbnm. Time-of-flight neutron diffraction patterns for Lueshe lueshite recorded from room temperature to 700 °C demonstrate phase transitions above 550 °C from Cmcm through P4 /mbm to above 650 °C. Cell dimensions and atomic coordinates of the atoms are given for the three high-temperature phases. The room temperature to 400 °C structures cannot be satisfactorily resolved, and it is suggested that the lueshite at room temperature consists of domains of pinned metastable phases with orthorhombic and/or monoclinic structures. However, the sequence of high-temperature phase transitions observed is similar to those determined for synthetic NaTaO3, suggesting that the equilibrated room temperature structure of lueshite is orthorhombic Pbnm.

  11. Crystal structures of sialyltransferase from Photobacterium damselae

    DOE PAGES

    Huynh, Nhung; Li, Yanhong; Yu, Hai; ...

    2014-11-15

    Sialyltransferase structures fall into either GT-A or GT-B glycosyltransferase fold. Some sialyltransferases from the Photobacterium genus have been shown to contain an additional N-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain. Photobacterium damselae α2–6-sialyltransferase has been used efficiently in enzymatic and chemoenzymatic synthesis of α2–6-linked sialosides. In this paper, we report three crystal structures of this enzyme. Two structures with and without a donor substrate analog CMP-3F(a)Neu5Ac contain an immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain and adopt the GT-B sialyltransferase fold. The binary structure reveals a non-productive pre-Michaelis complex, which are caused by crystal lattice contacts that prevent the large conformational changes. The third structure lacks themore » Ig-domain. Finally, comparison of the three structures reveals small inherent flexibility between the two Rossmann-like domains of the GT-B fold.« less

  12. Predicting polymeric crystal structures by evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiang; Sharma, Vinit; Oganov, Artem R; Ramprasad, Ramamurthy

    2014-10-21

    The recently developed evolutionary algorithm USPEX proved to be a tool that enables accurate and reliable prediction of structures. Here we extend this method to predict the crystal structure of polymers by constrained evolutionary search, where each monomeric unit is treated as a building block with fixed connectivity. This greatly reduces the search space and allows the initial structure generation with different sequences and packings of these blocks. The new constrained evolutionary algorithm is successfully tested and validated on a diverse range of experimentally known polymers, namely, polyethylene, polyacetylene, poly(glycolic acid), poly(vinyl chloride), poly(oxymethylene), poly(phenylene oxide), and poly (p-phenylene sulfide). By fixing the orientation of polymeric chains, this method can be further extended to predict the structures of complex linear polymers, such as all polymorphs of poly(vinylidene fluoride), nylon-6 and cellulose. The excellent agreement between predicted crystal structures and experimentally known structures assures a major role of this approach in the efficient design of the future polymeric materials.

  13. Lessons from crystal structures of kainate receptors.

    PubMed

    Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla; Pickering, Darryl S; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2017-01-01

    Kainate receptors belong to the family of ionotropic glutamate receptors. These receptors assemble from five subunits (GluK1-5) into tetrameric ion channels. Kainate receptors are located at both pre- and postsynaptic membranes in the central nervous system where they contribute to excitatory synaptic transmission and modulate network excitability by regulating neurotransmitter release. Dysfunction of kainate receptors has been implicated in several neurological disorders such as epilepsy, schizophrenia and depression. Here we provide a review on the current understanding of kainate receptor structure and how they bind agonists, antagonists and ions. The first structure of the ligand-binding domain of the GluK1 subunit was reported in 2005, seven years after publication of the crystal structure of a soluble construct of the ligand-binding domain of the AMPA-type subunit GluA2. Today, a full-length structure has been determined of GluK2 by cryo electron microscopy to 7.6 Å resolution as well as 84 high-resolution crystal structures of N-terminal domains and ligand-binding domains, including agonist and antagonist bound structures, modulatory ions and mutations. However, there are still many unanswered questions and challenges in front of us. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Ionotropic glutamate receptors'.

  14. Extracting Crystal Chemistry from Amorphous Carbon Structures.

    PubMed

    Deringer, Volker L; Csányi, Gábor; Proserpio, Davide M

    2017-03-08

    Carbon allotropes have been explored intensively by ab initio crystal structure prediction, but such methods are limited by the large computational cost of the underlying density functional theory (DFT). Here we show that a novel class of machine-learning-based interatomic potentials can be used for random structure searching and readily predicts several hitherto unknown carbon allotropes. Remarkably, our model draws structural information from liquid and amorphous carbon exclusively, and so does not have any prior knowledge of crystalline phases: it therefore demonstrates true transferability, which is a crucial prerequisite for applications in chemistry. The method is orders of magnitude faster than DFT and can, in principle, be coupled with any algorithm for structure prediction. Machine-learning models therefore seem promising to enable large-scale structure searches in the future.

  15. A DIRECT DETERMINATION OF THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF 2,3,4,6-TETRANITROANILINE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (* CRYSTAL STRUCTURE , EXPLOSIVES), (*EXPLOSIVES, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), AROMATIC COMPOUNDS, AMINES, NITRATES, LEAST SQUARES METHOD, FOURIER ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL BONDS.

  16. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination--Part III: X-ray Crystal Structure Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is single crystal X-ray crystal structure analysis. A common link between the NMR imaging and the traditional X-ray crystal structure analysis is reported. Claims that comparisons aid in the understanding of both techniques. (MVL)

  17. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF 2-(4’-AMINO-5’AMINO PYRIMIDY) -2-PENTENE-4-ONE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    NITROGEN HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*AMINES, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), (*KETONES, CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ), CRYSTAL LATTICES, FOURIER ANALYSIS, LEAST SQUARES METHOD, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, PYRIMIDINES, CHEMICAL BONDS

  18. Determining crystal structures through crowdsourcing and coursework.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Scott; Koepnick, Brian; Martin, Raoul; Tymieniecki, Agnes; Winburn, Amanda A; Cooper, Seth; Flatten, Jeff; Rogawski, David S; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Hailu, Tsinatkeab T; Jain, Neha; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S; Chapman, Matthew R; Sikkema, Andrew P; Skiba, Meredith A; Maloney, Finn P; Beinlich, Felix R M; Popović, Zoran; Baker, David; Khatib, Firas; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-09-16

    We show here that computer game players can build high-quality crystal structures. Introduction of a new feature into the computer game Foldit allows players to build and real-space refine structures into electron density maps. To assess the usefulness of this feature, we held a crystallographic model-building competition between trained crystallographers, undergraduate students, Foldit players and automatic model-building algorithms. After removal of disordered residues, a team of Foldit players achieved the most accurate structure. Analysing the target protein of the competition, YPL067C, uncovered a new family of histidine triad proteins apparently involved in the prevention of amyloid toxicity. From this study, we conclude that crystallographers can utilize crowdsourcing to interpret electron density information and to produce structure solutions of the highest quality.

  19. Determining crystal structures through crowdsourcing and coursework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Scott; Koepnick, Brian; Martin, Raoul; Tymieniecki, Agnes; Winburn, Amanda A.; Cooper, Seth; Flatten, Jeff; Rogawski, David S.; Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Hailu, Tsinatkeab T.; Jain, Neha; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Chapman, Matthew R.; Sikkema, Andrew P.; Skiba, Meredith A.; Maloney, Finn P.; Beinlich, Felix R. M.; Caglar, Ahmet; Coral, Alan; Jensen, Alice Elizabeth; Lubow, Allen; Boitano, Amanda; Lisle, Amy Elizabeth; Maxwell, Andrew T.; Failer, Barb; Kaszubowski, Bartosz; Hrytsiv, Bohdan; Vincenzo, Brancaccio; de Melo Cruz, Breno Renan; McManus, Brian Joseph; Kestemont, Bruno; Vardeman, Carl; Comisky, Casey; Neilson, Catherine; Landers, Catherine R.; Ince, Christopher; Buske, Daniel Jon; Totonjian, Daniel; Copeland, David Marshall; Murray, David; Jagieła, Dawid; Janz, Dietmar; Wheeler, Douglas C.; Cali, Elie; Croze, Emmanuel; Rezae, Farah; Martin, Floyd Orville; Beecher, Gil; de Jong, Guido Alexander; Ykman, Guy; Feldmann, Harald; Chan, Hugo Paul Perez; Kovanecz, Istvan; Vasilchenko, Ivan; Connellan, James C.; Borman, Jami Lynne; Norrgard, Jane; Kanfer, Jebbie; Canfield, Jeffrey M.; Slone, Jesse David; Oh, Jimmy; Mitchell, Joanne; Bishop, John; Kroeger, John Douglas; Schinkler, Jonas; McLaughlin, Joseph; Brownlee, June M.; Bell, Justin; Fellbaum, Karl Willem; Harper, Kathleen; Abbey, Kirk J.; Isaksson, Lennart E.; Wei, Linda; Cummins, Lisa N.; Miller, Lori Anne; Bain, Lyn; Carpenter, Lynn; Desnouck, Maarten; Sharma, Manasa G.; Belcastro, Marcus; Szew, Martin; Szew, Martin; Britton, Matthew; Gaebel, Matthias; Power, Max; Cassidy, Michael; Pfützenreuter, Michael; Minett, Michele; Wesselingh, Michiel; Yi, Minjune; Cameron, Neil Haydn Tormey; Bolibruch, Nicholas I.; Benevides, Noah; Kathleen Kerr, Norah; Barlow, Nova; Crevits, Nykole Krystyne; Dunn, Paul; Silveira Belo Nascimento Roque, Paulo Sergio; Riber, Peter; Pikkanen, Petri; Shehzad, Raafay; Viosca, Randy; James Fraser, Robert; Leduc, Robert; Madala, Roman; Shnider, Scott; de Boisblanc, Sharon; Butkovich, Slava; Bliven, Spencer; Hettler, Stephen; Telehany, Stephen; Schwegmann, Steven A.; Parkes, Steven; Kleinfelter, Susan C.; Michael Holst, Sven; van der Laan, T. J. A.; Bausewein, Thomas; Simon, Vera; Pulley, Warwick; Hull, William; Kim, Annes Yukyung; Lawton, Alexis; Ruesch, Amanda; Sundar, Anjali; Lawrence, Anna-Lisa; Afrin, Antara; Maheshwer, Bhargavi; Turfe, Bilal; Huebner, Christian; Killeen, Courtney Elizabeth; Antebi-Lerrman, Dalia; Luan, Danny; Wolfe, Derek; Pham, Duc; Michewicz, Elaina; Hull, Elizabeth; Pardington, Emily; Galal, Galal Osama; Sun, Grace; Chen, Grace; Anderson, Halie E.; Chang, Jane; Hewlett, Jeffrey Thomas; Sterbenz, Jennifer; Lim, Jiho; Morof, Joshua; Lee, Junho; Inn, Juyoung Samuel; Hahm, Kaitlin; Roth, Kaitlin; Nair, Karun; Markin, Katherine; Schramm, Katie; Toni Eid, Kevin; Gam, Kristina; Murphy, Lisha; Yuan, Lucy; Kana, Lulia; Daboul, Lynn; Shammas, Mario Karam; Chason, Max; Sinan, Moaz; Andrew Tooley, Nicholas; Korakavi, Nisha; Comer, Patrick; Magur, Pragya; Savliwala, Quresh; Davison, Reid Michael; Sankaran, Roshun Rajiv; Lewe, Sam; Tamkus, Saule; Chen, Shirley; Harvey, Sho; Hwang, Sin Ye; Vatsia, Sohrab; Withrow, Stefan; Luther, Tahra K.; Manett, Taylor; Johnson, Thomas James; Ryan Brash, Timothy; Kuhlman, Wyatt; Park, Yeonjung; Popović, Zoran; Baker, David; Khatib, Firas; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2016-09-01

    We show here that computer game players can build high-quality crystal structures. Introduction of a new feature into the computer game Foldit allows players to build and real-space refine structures into electron density maps. To assess the usefulness of this feature, we held a crystallographic model-building competition between trained crystallographers, undergraduate students, Foldit players and automatic model-building algorithms. After removal of disordered residues, a team of Foldit players achieved the most accurate structure. Analysing the target protein of the competition, YPL067C, uncovered a new family of histidine triad proteins apparently involved in the prevention of amyloid toxicity. From this study, we conclude that crystallographers can utilize crowdsourcing to interpret electron density information and to produce structure solutions of the highest quality.

  20. Determining crystal structures through crowdsourcing and coursework

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Scott; Koepnick, Brian; Martin, Raoul; Tymieniecki, Agnes; Winburn, Amanda A.; Cooper, Seth; Flatten, Jeff; Rogawski, David S.; Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Hailu, Tsinatkeab T.; Jain, Neha; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Chapman, Matthew R.; Sikkema, Andrew P.; Skiba, Meredith A.; Maloney, Finn P.; Beinlich, Felix R. M.; Caglar, Ahmet; Coral, Alan; Jensen, Alice Elizabeth; Lubow, Allen; Boitano, Amanda; Lisle, Amy Elizabeth; Maxwell, Andrew T.; Failer, Barb; Kaszubowski, Bartosz; Hrytsiv, Bohdan; Vincenzo, Brancaccio; de Melo Cruz, Breno Renan; McManus, Brian Joseph; Kestemont, Bruno; Vardeman, Carl; Comisky, Casey; Neilson, Catherine; Landers, Catherine R.; Ince, Christopher; Buske, Daniel Jon; Totonjian, Daniel; Copeland, David Marshall; Murray, David; Jagieła, Dawid; Janz, Dietmar; Wheeler, Douglas C.; Cali, Elie; Croze, Emmanuel; Rezae, Farah; Martin, Floyd Orville; Beecher, Gil; de Jong, Guido Alexander; Ykman, Guy; Feldmann, Harald; Chan, Hugo Paul Perez; Kovanecz, Istvan; Vasilchenko, Ivan; Connellan, James C.; Borman, Jami Lynne; Norrgard, Jane; Kanfer, Jebbie; Canfield, Jeffrey M.; Slone, Jesse David; Oh, Jimmy; Mitchell, Joanne; Bishop, John; Kroeger, John Douglas; Schinkler, Jonas; McLaughlin, Joseph; Brownlee, June M.; Bell, Justin; Fellbaum, Karl Willem; Harper, Kathleen; Abbey, Kirk J.; Isaksson, Lennart E.; Wei, Linda; Cummins, Lisa N.; Miller, Lori Anne; Bain, Lyn; Carpenter, Lynn; Desnouck, Maarten; Sharma, Manasa G.; Belcastro, Marcus; Szew, Martin; Szew, Martin; Britton, Matthew; Gaebel, Matthias; Power, Max; Cassidy, Michael; Pfützenreuter, Michael; Minett, Michele; Wesselingh, Michiel; Yi, Minjune; Cameron, Neil Haydn Tormey; Bolibruch, Nicholas I.; Benevides, Noah; Kathleen Kerr, Norah; Barlow, Nova; Crevits, Nykole Krystyne; Dunn, Paul; Roque, Paulo Sergio Silveira Belo Nascimento; Riber, Peter; Pikkanen, Petri; Shehzad, Raafay; Viosca, Randy; James Fraser, Robert; Leduc, Robert; Madala, Roman; Shnider, Scott; de Boisblanc, Sharon; Butkovich, Slava; Bliven, Spencer; Hettler, Stephen; Telehany, Stephen; Schwegmann, Steven A.; Parkes, Steven; Kleinfelter, Susan C.; Michael Holst, Sven; van der Laan, T. J. A.; Bausewein, Thomas; Simon, Vera; Pulley, Warwick; Hull, William; Kim, Annes Yukyung; Lawton, Alexis; Ruesch, Amanda; Sundar, Anjali; Lawrence, Anna-Lisa; Afrin, Antara; Maheshwer, Bhargavi; Turfe, Bilal; Huebner, Christian; Killeen, Courtney Elizabeth; Antebi-Lerrman, Dalia; Luan, Danny; Wolfe, Derek; Pham, Duc; Michewicz, Elaina; Hull, Elizabeth; Pardington, Emily; Galal, Galal Osama; Sun, Grace; Chen, Grace; Anderson, Halie E.; Chang, Jane; Hewlett, Jeffrey Thomas; Sterbenz, Jennifer; Lim, Jiho; Morof, Joshua; Lee, Junho; Inn, Juyoung Samuel; Hahm, Kaitlin; Roth, Kaitlin; Nair, Karun; Markin, Katherine; Schramm, Katie; Toni Eid, Kevin; Gam, Kristina; Murphy, Lisha; Yuan, Lucy; Kana, Lulia; Daboul, Lynn; Shammas, Mario Karam; Chason, Max; Sinan, Moaz; Andrew Tooley, Nicholas; Korakavi, Nisha; Comer, Patrick; Magur, Pragya; Savliwala, Quresh; Davison, Reid Michael; Sankaran, Roshun Rajiv; Lewe, Sam; Tamkus, Saule; Chen, Shirley; Harvey, Sho; Hwang, Sin Ye; Vatsia, Sohrab; Withrow, Stefan; Luther, Tahra K; Manett, Taylor; Johnson, Thomas James; Ryan Brash, Timothy; Kuhlman, Wyatt; Park, Yeonjung; Popović, Zoran; Baker, David; Khatib, Firas; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2016-01-01

    We show here that computer game players can build high-quality crystal structures. Introduction of a new feature into the computer game Foldit allows players to build and real-space refine structures into electron density maps. To assess the usefulness of this feature, we held a crystallographic model-building competition between trained crystallographers, undergraduate students, Foldit players and automatic model-building algorithms. After removal of disordered residues, a team of Foldit players achieved the most accurate structure. Analysing the target protein of the competition, YPL067C, uncovered a new family of histidine triad proteins apparently involved in the prevention of amyloid toxicity. From this study, we conclude that crystallographers can utilize crowdsourcing to interpret electron density information and to produce structure solutions of the highest quality. PMID:27633552

  1. Synthesis and structural characterization of a single-crystal to single-crystal transformable coordination polymer.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuyang; Allan, Phoebe K; Renouf, Catherine L; He, Xiang; McCormick, Laura J; Morris, Russell E

    2014-01-28

    A single-crystal to single-crystal transformable coordination polymer compound was hydrothermally synthesized. The structural rearrangement is induced by selecting a ligand that contains both strong and weaker coordinating groups. Both hydrated and dehydrated structures were determined by single crystal X-ray analysis.

  2. Crystal Structure of Cryptosporidium parvum Pyruvate Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Cook, William J.; Senkovich, Olga; Aleem, Khadijah; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2012-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase plays a critical role in cellular metabolism of glucose by serving as a major regulator of glycolysis. This tetrameric enzyme is allosterically regulated by different effector molecules, mainly phosphosugars. In response to binding of effector molecules and substrates, significant structural changes have been identified in various pyruvate kinase structures. Pyruvate kinase of Cryptosporidium parvum is exceptional among known enzymes of protozoan origin in that it exhibits no allosteric property in the presence of commonly known effector molecules. The crystal structure of pyruvate kinase from C. parvum has been solved by molecular replacement techniques and refined to 2.5 Å resolution. In the active site a glycerol molecule is located near the γ-phosphate site of ATP, and the protein structure displays a partially closed active site. However, unlike other structures where the active site is closed, the α6' helix in C. parvum pyruvate kinase unwinds and assumes an extended conformation. In the crystal structure a sulfate ion is found at a site that is occupied by a phosphate of the effector molecule in many pyruvate kinase structures. A new feature of the C. parvum pyruvate kinase structure is the presence of a disulfide bond cross-linking the two monomers in the asymmetric unit. The disulfide bond is formed between cysteine residue 26 in the short N-helix of one monomer with cysteine residue 312 in a long helix (residues 303–320) of the second monomer at the interface of these monomers. Both cysteine residues are unique to C. parvum, and the disulfide bond remained intact in a reduced environment. However, the significance of this bond, if any, remains unknown at this time. PMID:23056503

  3. Crystal Structure of the Human Primase*

    PubMed Central

    Baranovskiy, Andrey G.; Zhang, Yinbo; Suwa, Yoshiaki; Babayeva, Nigar D.; Gu, Jianyou; Pavlov, Youri I.; Tahirov, Tahir H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication in bacteria and eukaryotes requires the activity of DNA primase, a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase that lays short RNA primers for DNA polymerases. Eukaryotic and archaeal primases are heterodimers consisting of small catalytic and large accessory subunits, both of which are necessary for RNA primer synthesis. Understanding of RNA synthesis priming in eukaryotes is currently limited due to the lack of crystal structures of the full-length primase and its complexes with substrates in initiation and elongation states. Here we report the crystal structure of the full-length human primase, revealing the precise overall organization of the enzyme, the relative positions of its functional domains, and the mode of its interaction with modeled DNA and RNA. The structure indicates that the dramatic conformational changes in primase are necessary to accomplish the initiation and then elongation of RNA synthesis. The presence of a long linker between the N- and C-terminal domains of p58 provides the structural basis for the bulk of enzyme's conformational flexibility. Deletion of most of this linker affected the initiation and elongation steps of the primer synthesis. PMID:25550159

  4. The First Mammalian Aldehyde Oxidase Crystal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Catarina; Mahro, Martin; Trincão, José; Carvalho, Alexandra T. P.; Ramos, Maria João; Terao, Mineko; Garattini, Enrico; Leimkühler, Silke; Romão, Maria João

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidases (AOXs) are homodimeric proteins belonging to the xanthine oxidase family of molybdenum-containing enzymes. Each 150-kDa monomer contains a FAD redox cofactor, two spectroscopically distinct [2Fe-2S] clusters, and a molybdenum cofactor located within the protein active site. AOXs are characterized by broad range substrate specificity, oxidizing different aldehydes and aromatic N-heterocycles. Despite increasing recognition of its role in the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics, the physiological function of the protein is still largely unknown. We have crystallized and solved the crystal structure of mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 to 2.9 Å. This is the first mammalian AOX whose structure has been solved. The structure provides important insights into the protein active center and further evidence on the catalytic differences characterizing AOX and xanthine oxidoreductase. The mouse liver aldehyde oxidase 3 three-dimensional structure combined with kinetic, mutagenesis data, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics studies make a decisive contribution to understand the molecular basis of its rather broad substrate specificity. PMID:23019336

  5. Crystal Structure of the 30S Ribosomal Subunit from Thermus Thermophilus. Purification, Crystallization and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, William M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; McCutcheonn, John P.; May, Joanna L.C.; Carter, Andrew P.; Morgan-Warren, Robert J.; Wimberly, Brian T.; Ramakrishnan, Venki

    2009-10-07

    We describe the crystallization and structure determination of the 30 S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus. Previous reports of crystals that diffracted to 10 {angstrom} resolution were used as a starting point to improve the quality of the diffraction. Eventually, ideas such as the addition of substrates or factors to eliminate conformational heterogeneity proved less important than attention to detail in yielding crystals that diffracted beyond 3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite improvements in technology and methodology in the last decade, the structure determination of the 30 S subunit presented some very challenging technical problems because of the size of the asymmetric unit, crystal variability and sensitivity to radiation damage. Some steps that were useful for determination of the atomic structure were: the use of anomalous scattering from the LIII edges of osmium and lutetium to obtain the necessary phasing signal; the use of tunable, third-generation synchrotron sources to obtain data of reasonable quality at high resolution; collection of derivative data precisely about a mirror plane to preserve small anomalous differences between Bijvoet mates despite extensive radiation damage and multi-crystal scaling; the pre-screening of crystals to ensure quality, isomorphism and the efficient use of scarce third-generation synchrotron time; pre-incubation of crystals in cobalt hexaammine to ensure isomorphism with other derivatives; and finally, the placement of proteins whose structures had been previously solved in isolation, in conjunction with biochemical data on protein-RNA interactions, to map out the architecture of the 30 S subunit prior to the construction of a detailed atomic-resolution model.

  6. Waveguide structures in anisotropic nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Hong, Pengda; Meissner, Helmuth E.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the design and manufacturing parameters of waveguiding structures of anisotropic nonlinear crystals that are employed for harmonic conversions, using Adhesive-Free Bonding (AFB®). This technology enables a full range of predetermined refractive index differences that are essential for the design of single mode or low-mode propagation with high efficiency in anisotropic nonlinear crystals which in turn results in compact frequency conversion systems. Examples of nonlinear optical waveguides include periodically bonded walk-off corrected nonlinear optical waveguides and periodically poled waveguide components, such as lithium triborate (LBO), beta barium borate (β-BBO), lithium niobate (LN), potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP), zinc germanium phosphide (ZGP) and silver selenogallate (AGSE). Simulation of planar LN waveguide shows that when the electric field vector E lies in the k-c plane, the power flow is directed precisely along the propagation direction, demonstrating waveguiding effect in the planar waveguide. Employment of anisotropic nonlinear optical waveguides, for example in combination with AFB® crystalline fiber waveguides (CFW), provides access to the design of a number of novel high power and high efficiency light sources spanning the range of wavelengths from deep ultraviolet (as short as 200 nm) to mid-infrared (as long as about 18 μm). To our knowledge, the technique is the only generally applicable one because most often there are no compatible cladding crystals available to nonlinear optical cores, especially not with an engineer-able refractive index difference and large mode area.

  7. Crystal Structure Prediction from First Principles: The Crystal Structures of Glycine

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Albert M.; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Orendt, Anita M.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Facelli, Julio C.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the results of our unbiased searches of glycine polymorphs obtained using the Genetic Algorithms search implemented in Modified Genetic Algorithm for Crystals coupled with the local optimization and energy evaluation provided by Quantum Espresso. We demonstrate that it is possible to predict the crystal structures of a biomedical molecule using solely first principles calculations. We were able to find all the ambient pressure stable glycine polymorphs, which are found in the same energetic ordering as observed experimentally and the agreement between the experimental and predicted structures is of such accuracy that the two are visually almost indistinguishable. PMID:25843964

  8. Crystal structure prediction from first principles: The crystal structures of glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Albert M.; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Orendt, Anita M.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Facelli, Julio C.

    2015-04-01

    Here we present the results of our unbiased searches of glycine polymorphs obtained using the genetic algorithms search implemented in MGAC, modified genetic algorithm for crystals, coupled with the local optimization and energy evaluation provided by Quantum Espresso. We demonstrate that it is possible to predict the crystal structures of a biomedical molecule using solely first principles calculations. We were able to find all the ambient pressure stable glycine polymorphs, which are found in the same energetic ordering as observed experimentally and the agreement between the experimental and predicted structures is of such accuracy that the two are visually almost indistinguishable.

  9. The Crystal Structures of Potentially Tautomeric Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmanova, Nina G.

    1981-08-01

    Data on the structures of potentially proto-, metallo-, and carbono-tropic compounds, obtained mainly by X-ray diffraction, are surveyed. The results of neutron and electron diffraction studies have also been partly used. It is shown that a characteristic feature of all the systems considered is the formation of hydrogen or secondary bonds ensuring the contribution of both possible tautomeric forms to the structure. Systematic consideration of the experimental data leads to the conclusion that there is a close relation between the crystal structure and the dynamic behaviour of the molecules in solution and that secondary and hydrogen bonds play a significant role in the tautomeric transition. The bibliography includes 152 references.

  10. Crystal structure of plant photosystem I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Shem, Adam; Frolow, Felix; Nelson, Nathan

    2003-12-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the principal producer of both oxygen and organic matter on Earth. The conversion of sunlight into chemical energy is driven by two multisubunit membrane protein complexes named photosystem I and II. We determined the crystal structure of the complete photosystem I (PSI) from a higher plant (Pisum sativum var. alaska) to 4.4Å resolution. Its intricate structure shows 12 core subunits, 4 different light-harvesting membrane proteins (LHCI) assembled in a half-moon shape on one side of the core, 45 transmembrane helices, 167 chlorophylls, 3 Fe-S clusters and 2 phylloquinones. About 20 chlorophylls are positioned in strategic locations in the cleft between LHCI and the core. This structure provides a framework for exploration not only of energy and electron transfer but also of the evolutionary forces that shaped the photosynthetic apparatus of terrestrial plants after the divergence of chloroplasts from marine cyanobacteria one billion years ago.

  11. The Crystal Structure of Monovalent Streptavidin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Biswas, Sangita; Deng, Wenbin; Yu, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    The strong interaction between streptavidin (SA) and biotin is widely utilized in biotechnological applications. A SA variant, monovalent SA, was developed with a single and high affinity biotin-binding site within the intact tetramer. However, its structural characterization remains undetermined. Here, we seek to determine the crystal structure of monovalent SA at 1.7-Å resolution. We show that, in contrast to its ‘close-state’ in the only wild-type subunit, the L3,4 loops of three Dead SA subunits are free from crystal packing and remain in an ‘open state’, stabilized by a consistent H-bonding network involving S52. This H-bonding network also applies to the previously reported open state of the wild-type apo-SA. These results suggest that specific substitutions (N23A/S27D/S45A) at biotin-binding sites stabilize the open state of SA L3,4 loop, thereby further reducing biotin-binding affinity. The general features of the ‘open state’ SA among different SA variants may facilitate its rational design. The structural information of monovalent SA will be valuable for its applications across a wide range of biotechnological areas. PMID:28000673

  12. Crystal structure of Marburg virus VP24.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Adrianna P P; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Abelson, Dafna M; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2014-05-01

    The VP24 protein plays an essential, albeit poorly understood role in the filovirus life cycle. VP24 is only 30% identical between Marburg virus and the ebolaviruses. Furthermore, VP24 from the ebolaviruses is immunosuppressive, while that of Marburg virus is not. The crystal structure of Marburg virus VP24, presented here, reveals that although the core is similar between the viral genera, Marburg VP24 is distinguished by a projecting β-shelf and an alternate conformation of the N-terminal polypeptide.

  13. Temperature dependent spin structures in Hexaferrite crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Y. C.; Lin, J. G.; Chun, S. H.; Kim, K. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the Hexaferrite Ba0.5Sr1.5Zn2Fe12O22 (BSZFO) is studied due to its interesting characteristics of long-wavelength spin structure. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is used to probe the magnetic states of BSZFO single crystal and its temperature dependence behavior is analyzed by decomposing the multiple lines of FMR spectra into various phases. Distinguished phase transition is observed at 110 K for one line, which is assigned to the ferro(ferri)-magnetic transition from non-collinear to collinear spin state.

  14. Elasticity of some mantle crystal structures. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H.; Simmons, G.

    1973-01-01

    The single-crystal elastic constants are determined as a function of pressure and temperature for rutile structure germanium dioxide (GeO2). The data are qualitatively similar to those of rutile TiO2 measured by Manghnani (1969). The compressibility in the c direction is less than one-half that in the a direction, the pressure derivative of the shear constant is negative, and the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus has a relatively high value of about 6.2. According to an elastic strain energy theory, the negative shear modulus derivative implies that the kinetic barrier to diffusion decreases with increasing pressure.

  15. Crystal structure of a DNA catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Salvatierra, Almudena; Wawrzyniak-Turek, Katarzyna; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Höbartner, Claudia; Pena, Vladimir

    2016-01-14

    Catalysis in biology is restricted to RNA (ribozymes) and protein enzymes, but synthetic biomolecular catalysts can also be made of DNA (deoxyribozymes) or synthetic genetic polymers. In vitro selection from synthetic random DNA libraries identified DNA catalysts for various chemical reactions beyond RNA backbone cleavage. DNA-catalysed reactions include RNA and DNA ligation in various topologies, hydrolytic cleavage and photorepair of DNA, as well as reactions of peptides and small molecules. In spite of comprehensive biochemical studies of DNA catalysts for two decades, fundamental mechanistic understanding of their function is lacking in the absence of three-dimensional models at atomic resolution. Early attempts to solve the crystal structure of an RNA-cleaving deoxyribozyme resulted in a catalytically irrelevant nucleic acid fold. Here we report the crystal structure of the RNA-ligating deoxyribozyme 9DB1 (ref. 14) at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure captures the ligation reaction in the post-catalytic state, revealing a compact folding unit stabilized by numerous tertiary interactions, and an unanticipated organization of the catalytic centre. Structure-guided mutagenesis provided insights into the basis for regioselectivity of the ligation reaction and allowed remarkable manipulation of substrate recognition and reaction rate. Moreover, the structure highlights how the specific properties of deoxyribose are reflected in the backbone conformation of the DNA catalyst, in support of its intricate three-dimensional organization. The structural principles underlying the catalytic ability of DNA elucidate differences and similarities in DNA versus RNA catalysts, which is relevant for comprehending the privileged position of folded RNA in the prebiotic world and in current organisms.

  16. Crystal structure of yeast Sco1

    SciTech Connect

    Abajian, Carnie; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-03-05

    The Sco family of proteins are involved in the assembly of the dinuclear CuA site in cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme in aerobic respiration. These proteins, which are found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, are characterized by a conserved CXXXC sequence motif that binds copper ions and that has also been proposed to perform a thiol:disulfide oxidoreductase function. The crystal structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae apo Sco1 (apo-ySco1) and Sco1 in the presence of copper ions (Cu-ySco1) were determined to 1.8- and 2.3-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively. Yeast Sco1 exhibits a thioredoxin-like fold, similar to that observed for human Sco1 and a homolog from Bacillus subtilis. The Cu-ySco1 structure, obtained by soaking apo-ySco1 crystals in copper ions, reveals an unexpected copper-binding site involving Cys181 and Cys216, cysteine residues present in ySco1 but not in other homologs. The conserved CXXXC cysteines, Cys148 and Cys152, can undergo redox chemistry in the crystal. An essential histidine residue, His239, is located on a highly flexible loop, denoted the Sco loop, and can adopt positions proximal to both pairs of cysteines. Interactions between ySco1 and its partner proteins yeast Cox17 and yeast COX2 are likely to occur via complementary electrostatic surfaces. This high-resolution model of a eukaryotic Sco protein provides new insight into Sco copper binding and function.

  17. Clay Mineral Crystal Structure Tied to Composition

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-13

    This diagram illustrates how the dimensions of clay minerals' crystal structure are affected by which ions are present in the composition of the mineral. Different clay minerals were identified this way at two sites in Mars' Gale Crater: "Murray Buttes" and "Yellowknife Bay." In otherwise identical clay minerals, a composition that includes aluminum and ferric iron ions (red dots) results in slightly smaller crystalline unit cells than one that instead includes magnesium and ferrous iron ions (green dots). Ferric iron is more highly oxidized than ferrous iron. Crystalline cell units are the basic repeating building blocks that define minerals. X-ray diffraction analysis, a capability of the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover, identifies minerals from their crystalline structure. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21148

  18. Structure, thermodynamics, and crystallization of amorphous hafnia

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xuhui; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-09-28

    We investigate theoretically amorphous hafnia using the first principles melt and quench method. We identify two types of amorphous structures of hafnia. Type I and type II are related to tetragonal and monoclinic hafnia, respectively. We find type II structure to show stronger disorder than type I. Using the phonon density of states, we calculate the specific heat capacity for type II amorphous hafnia. Using the nudged elastic band method, we show that the averaged transition barrier between the type II amorphous hafnia and monoclinic phase is approximately 0.09 eV/HfO{sub 2}. The crystallization temperature is estimated to be 421 K. The calculations suggest an explanation for the low thermal stability of amorphous hafnia.

  19. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann–Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann–Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  20. Crystal structure of human nicotinamide riboside kinase.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed A; Xiang, Song; Tong, Liang

    2007-08-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD(+) as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 A resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 A resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel beta sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations.

  1. The Crystal Structure of Human Argonaute2

    SciTech Connect

    Schirle, Nicole T.; MacRae, Ian J.

    2012-07-18

    Argonaute proteins form the functional core of the RNA-induced silencing complexes that mediate RNA silencing in eukaryotes. The 2.3 angstrom resolution crystal structure of human Argonaute2 (Ago2) reveals a bilobed molecule with a central cleft for binding guide and target RNAs. Nucleotides 2 to 6 of a heterogeneous mixture of guide RNAs are positioned in an A-form conformation for base pairing with target messenger RNAs. Between nucleotides 6 and 7, there is a kink that may function in microRNA target recognition or release of sliced RNA products. Tandem tryptophan-binding pockets in the PIWI domain define a likely interaction surface for recruitment of glycine-tryptophan-182 (GW182) or other tryptophan-rich cofactors. These results will enable structure-based approaches for harnessing the untapped therapeutic potential of RNA silencing in humans.

  2. Crystal Structure of Human Nicotinamide Riboside Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Khan,J.; Xiang, S.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel {beta} sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations.

  3. Structural Transitions in Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ye; Bukusoglu, Emre; Martínez-González, José A.; Rahimi, Mohammad; Roberts, Tyler F.; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiaoguang; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-07-26

    Confinement of cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLC) into droplets leads to a delicate interplay between elasticity, chirality, and surface energy. In this work, we rely on a combination of theory and experiments to understand the rich morphological behavior that arises from that balance. More specifically, a systematic study of micrometer-sized ChLC droplets is presented as a function of chirality and surface energy (or anchoring). With increasing chirality, a continuous transition is observed from a twisted bipolar structure to a radial spherical structure, all within a narrow range of chirality. During such a transition, a bent structure is predicted by simulations and confirmed by experimental observations. Simulations are also able to capture the dynamics of the quenching process observed in experiments. Consistent with published work, it is found that nanoparticles are attracted to defect regions on the surface of the droplets. For weak anchoring conditions at the nanoparticle surface, ChLC droplets adopt a morphology similar to that of the equilibrium helical phase observed for ChLCs in the bulk. As the anchoring strength increases, a planar bipolar structure arises, followed by a morphological transition to a bent structure. The influence of chirality and surface interactions are discussed in the context of the potential use of ChLC droplets as stimuli-responsive materials for reporting molecular adsorbates.

  4. Crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Lígia R; Low, John Nicolson; Magalhães E Silva, Diogo; Cagide, Fernando; Borges, Fernanda

    2016-03-01

    The crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives, viz. 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan-yl]-1-(3-meth-oxy-phen-yl)ethan-1-one (1), C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan-yl]-1-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)ethan-1-one (2), C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan-yl]-1-(4-chloro-phen-yl)ethan-1-one (3), C15H11ClN4O2S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan-yl]-1-(4-bromo-phen-yl)ethan-1-one (4), C15H11BrN4O2S, and 1-(3-meth-oxy-phen-yl)-2-[(9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan-yl]ethan-1-one (5), C14H12N4O2S. Compounds (2), (3) and (4) are isomorphous and accordingly their mol-ecular and supra-molecular structures are similar. An analysis of the dihedral angles between the purine and exocyclic phenyl rings show that the mol-ecules of (1) and (5) are essentially planar but that in the case of the three isomorphous compounds (2), (3) and (4), these rings are twisted by a dihedral angle of approximately 38°. With the exception of (1) all mol-ecules are linked by weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds in their crystals. There is π-π stacking in all compounds. A Cambridge Structural Database search revealed the existence of 11 deposited compounds containing the 1-phenyl-2-sulfanyl-ethanone scaffold; of these, only eight have a cyclic ring as substituent, the majority of these being heterocycles.

  5. Crystal structure of natural phaeosphaeride A

    PubMed Central

    Abzianidze, Victoria V.; Poluektova, Ekaterina V.; Bolshakova, Ksenia P.; Panikorovskii, Taras L.; Bogachenkov, Alexander S.; Berestetskiy, Alexander O.

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C15H23NO5, contains two independent mol­ecules. Phaeosphaeride A contains two primary sections, an alkyl chain consisting of five C atoms and a cyclic system consisting of fused five- and six-membered rings with attached substituents. In the crystal, the mol­ecules form layered structures. Nearly planar sheets, parallel to the (001) plane, form bilayers of two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded networks with the hy­droxy groups located on the inter­ior of the bilayer sheets. The network is constructed primarily of four O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which form a zigzag pattern in the (001) plane. The butyl chains inter­digitate with the butyl chains on adjacent sheets. The crystal was twinned by a twofold rotation about the c axis, with refined major–minor occupancy fractions of 0.718 (6):0.282 (6). PMID:26396831

  6. Niobium hyperfine structure in crystal calcium tungstate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, D. L.; Kikuchi, C.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the niobium hyperfine structure in single crystal calcium tungstate was made by the combination of the technique of electron paramagnetic resonance and electron nuclear double resonance (EPR/ENDOR). The microwave frequency was about 9.4 GHz and the radio frequency from 20MHz to 70 MHz. The rare earth ions Nd(3+), U(3+), or Tm(3+) were added as the charge compensator for Nb(5+). To create niobium paramagnetic centers, the sample was irradiated at 77 deg K with a 10 thousand curie Co-60 gamma source for 1 to 2 hours at a dose rate of 200 K rads per hour and then transferred quickly into the cavity. In a general direction of magnetic field, the spectra showed 4 sets of 10 main lines corresponding to 4 nonequivalent sites of niobium with I = 9/2. These 4 sets of lines coalesced into 2 sets of 10 in the ab-plane and into a single set of 10 along the c-axis. This symmetry suggested that the tungsten ions are substituted by the niobium ions in the crystal.

  7. Crystal Structures of Respiratory Pathogen Neuraminidases

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Y.; Parker, D; Ratner, A; Prince, A; Tong, L

    2009-01-01

    Currently there is pressing need to develop novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of infections by the human respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The neuraminidases of these pathogens are important for host colonization in animal models of infection and are attractive targets for drug discovery. To aid in the development of inhibitors against these neuraminidases, we have determined the crystal structures of the P. aeruginosa enzyme NanPs and S. pneumoniae enzyme NanA at 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In situ proteolysis with trypsin was essential for the crystallization of our recombinant NanA. The active site regions of the two enzymes are strikingly different. NanA contains a deep pocket that is similar to that in canonical neuraminidases, while the NanPs active site is much more open. The comparative studies suggest that NanPs may not be a classical neuraminidase, and may have distinct natural substrates and physiological functions. This work represents an important step in the development of drugs to prevent respiratory tract colonization by these two pathogens.

  8. The crystal structure Escherichia coli Spy

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Eunju; Kim, Dong Young; Gross, Carol A; Gross, John D; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli spheroplast protein y (EcSpy) is a small periplasmic protein that is homologous with CpxP, an inhibitor of the extracytoplasmic stress reponse. Stress conditions such as spheroplast formation induce the expression of Spy via the Cpx or the Bae two-component systems in E. coli, though the function of Spy is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of EcSpy, which reveals a long kinked hairpin-like structure of four α-helices that form an antiparallel dimer. The dimer contains a curved oval shape with a highly positively charged concave surface that may function as a ligand binding site. Sequence analysis reveals that Spy is highly conserved over the Enterobacteriaceae family. Notably, three conserved regions that contain identical residues and two LTxxQ motifs are placed at the horizontal end of the dimer structure, stablizing the overall fold. CpxP also contains the conserved sequence motifs and has a predicted secondary structure similar to Spy, suggesting that Spy and CpxP likely share the same fold. PMID:20799348

  9. The crystal structure Escherichia coli Spy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eunju; Kim, Dong Young; Gross, Carol A; Gross, John D; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2010-11-01

    Escherichia coli spheroplast protein y (EcSpy) is a small periplasmic protein that is homologous with CpxP, an inhibitor of the extracytoplasmic stress response. Stress conditions such as spheroplast formation induce the expression of Spy via the Cpx or the Bae two-component systems in E. coli, though the function of Spy is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of EcSpy, which reveals a long kinked hairpin-like structure of four α-helices that form an antiparallel dimer. The dimer contains a curved oval shape with a highly positively charged concave surface that may function as a ligand binding site. Sequence analysis reveals that Spy is highly conserved over the Enterobacteriaceae family. Notably, three conserved regions that contain identical residues and two LTxxQ motifs are placed at the horizontal end of the dimer structure, stabilizing the overall fold. CpxP also contains the conserved sequence motifs and has a predicted secondary structure similar to Spy, suggesting that Spy and CpxP likely share the same fold.

  10. Crystal structure of Junin virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinjie; Li, Le; Liu, Xiang; Dong, Shishang; Wang, Wenming; Huo, Tong; Guo, Yu; Rao, Zihe; Yang, Cheng

    2013-10-01

    Junin virus (JUNV) has been identified as the aetiological agent of Argentine haemorrhagic fever (AHF), which is a serious public health problem with approximately 5 million people at risk. It is treated as a potential bioterrorism agent because of its rapid transmission by aerosols. JUNV is a negative-sense ssRNA virus that belongs to the genus Arenavirus within the family Arenaviridae, and its genomic RNA contains two segments encoding four proteins. Among these, the nucleoprotein (NP) has essential roles in viral RNA synthesis and immune suppression, but the molecular mechanisms of its actions are only partially understood. Here, we determined a 2.2 Å crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of JUNV NP. This structure showed high similarity to the Lassa fever virus (LASV) NP C-terminal domain. However, both the structure and function of JUNV NP showed differences compared with LASV NP. This study extends our structural insight into the negative-sense ssRNA virus NPs.

  11. Crystal structures of the human adiponectin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Motoyama, Kanna; Ikeda, Mariko; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Terada, Takaho; Ohsawa, Noboru; Hato, Masakatsu; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Hino, Tomoya; Murata, Takeshi; Iwata, So; Hirata, Kunio; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin stimulation of its receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, increases AMPK and PPAR activities, respectively, thereby contributing to healthy longevity as key anti-diabetic molecules. AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 were predicted to contain seven transmembrane helices with the opposite topology to G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)s. Here we report the crystal structures of human AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 at 2.9- and 2.4-Å resolution, respectively, which represent a novel class of receptor structure. The seven-transmembrane helices, conformationally distinct from those of GPCRs, enclose a large cavity where three conserved histidine residues coordinate a zinc ion. The zinc-binding structure may play a role in the adiponectin-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and UCP2 upregulation. Adiponectin may broadly interact with the extracellular face, rather than the C-terminal flexible tail, of the receptors. The present information will facilitate the understanding of novel structure-function relationships and the development and optimization of AdipoR agonists for the treatment of obesity-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. PMID:25855295

  12. Unusual co-crystal of isonicotinamide: the structural landscape in crystal engineering.

    PubMed

    Tothadi, Srinu; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2012-06-28

    The idea of a structural landscape is based on the fact that a large number of crystal structures can be associated with a particular organic molecule. Taken together, all these structures constitute the landscape. The landscape includes polymorphs, pseudopolymorphs and solvates. Under certain circumstances, it may also include multi-component crystals (or co-crystals) that contain the reference molecule as one of the components. Under still other circumstances, the landscape may include the crystal structures of molecules that are closely related to the reference molecule. The idea of a landscape is to facilitate the understanding of the process of crystallization. It includes all minima that can, in principle, be accessed by the molecule in question as it traverses the path from solution to the crystal. Isonicotinamide is a molecule that is known to form many co-crystals. We report here a 2:1 co-crystal of this amide with 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, wherein an unusual N-H···N hydrogen-bonded pattern is observed. This crystal structure offers some hints about the recognition processes between molecules that might be implicated during crystallization. Also included is a review of other recent results that illustrate the concept of the structural landscape.

  13. Crystal structure of a snake venom cardiotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, B.; Samama, J.P.; Thierry, J.C.; Gilibert, M.; Fischer, J.; Schweitz, H.; Lazdunski, M.; Moras, D.

    1987-05-01

    Cardiotoxin V/sup II/4 from Naja mossambica crystallizes in space group P6/sub 1/ (a = b = 73.9 A; c = 59.0 A) with two molecules of toxin (molecular mass = 6715 Da) in the asymmetric unit. The structure was solved by using a combination of multiple isomorphous replacement and density modification methods. Model building and least-squares refinement led to an agreement factor of 27% for a data set to 3-A resolution prior to any inclusion of solvent molecules. The topology of the molecule is similar to that found in short and long snake neurotoxins, which block the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Major differences occur in the conformation of the central loop, resulting in a change in the concavity of the molecule. Hydrophobic residues are clustered in two distinct areas. The existence of stable dimeric entities in the crystalline state, with the formation of a six-stranded antiparallel ..beta.. sheet, may be functionally relevant.

  14. Crystal Structure of the VS ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Suslov, Nikolai B.; DasGupta, Saurja; Huang, Hao; Fuller, James R.; Lilley, David M.J.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Varkud Satellite (VS) ribozyme mediates rolling circle replication of a plasmid found in the Neurospora mitochondria. We report crystal structures of this ribozyme at 3.1Å resolution, revealing an intertwined dimer formed by an exchange of substrate helices. Within each protomer, an arrangement of three-way helical junctions organizes seven helices into a global fold that creates a docking site for the substrate helix of the other protomer, resulting in the formation of two active sites in trans. This mode of RNA-RNA association resembles the process of domain swapping in proteins and has implications for RNA regulation and evolution. Within each active site, adenine and guanine nucleobases abut the scissile phosphate, poised to serve direct roles in catalysis. Similarities to the active sites of the hairpin and hammerhead ribozymes highlight the functional significance of active site features, underscore the ability of RNA to access functional architectures from distant regions of sequence space, and suggest convergent evolution. PMID:26414446

  15. Exploring structural phase transitions of ion crystals

    PubMed Central

    Yan, L. L.; Wan, W.; Chen, L.; Zhou, F.; Gong, S. J.; Tong, X.; Feng, M.

    2016-01-01

    Phase transitions have been a research focus in many-body physics over past decades. Cold ions, under strong Coulomb repulsion, provide a repealing paradigm of exploring phase transitions in stable confinement by electromagnetic field. We demonstrate various conformations of up to sixteen laser-cooled 40Ca+ ion crystals in a home-built surface-electrode trap, where besides the usually mentioned structural phase transition from the linear to the zigzag, two additional phase transitions to more complicated two-dimensional configurations are identified. The experimental observation agrees well with the numerical simulation. Heating due to micromotion of the ions is analysed by comparison of the numerical simulation with the experimental observation. Our investigation implies very rich and complicated many-body behaviour in the trapped-ion systems and provides effective mechanism for further exploring quantum phase transitions and quantum information processing with ultracold trapped ions. PMID:26865229

  16. Controllable Layered Structures in Polyoxomolybdate-Surfactant Hybrid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Takeru; Yamase, Toshihiro

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic-organic hybrid crystals containing α-octamolybdate (Mo8) or hexamolybdate (Mo6) were isolated by using hexadecyltrimethylammonium (C16) surfactant. The packing mode of the inorganic layers depended on a difference in the polyoxomolybdate molecular structure. The structure for both crystals consisted of alternate stacking of C16 organic bilayers and polyoxomolybdate inorganic layers with a periodicity of 24.4–24.6 Å. However, the C16-Mo8 crystals contained Mo8 monolayers, while the C16-Mo6 crystals contained Mo6 bilayers. These lattice structures for the polyoxometalate/organic hybrid will be designed by the molecular structures of polyoxometalate.

  17. New Tricks of the Trade for Crystal Structure Refinement.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinjin; Abramov, Yuriy A; Doherty, Michael F

    2017-07-26

    Accurate crystal structures and their experimental uncertainties, determined by X-ray diffraction/neutron diffraction techniques, are vital for crystal engineering studies, such as polymorph stability and crystal morphology calculations. Because of differences in crystal growth and data measurement conditions, crystallographic databases often contain multiple entries of varying quality of the same compound. The choice of the most reliable and best quality crystal structure from many very similar structures remains an unresolved problem, especially for nonexperts. In addition, while crystallographers can make use of some professional software (i.e., Materials Studio) for structure refinement, noncrystallographers may not have access to it. In the present paper, we propose a simple method to study the sensitivity of the crystal lattice energy to changes in the structural parameters, which creates a diagnostic tool to test the quality of crystal structure files and to improve the low-quality structures based on lattice energy distribution. Thus, noncrystallographers could take the proposed idea and program/optimize crystal structure by themselves. They can have their in-house program to determine the reliability of the selected crystal data and then use the best quality data or carry out structural optimization for low-quality data. The proposed method will benefit a broad cross-section of scientific researchers, especially those in solid-state and physical chemistry.

  18. Tetrahedron-tiling method for crystal structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Qi-Jun; Yasi, Joseph; van de Walle, Axel

    2017-07-01

    Reliable and robust methods of predicting the crystal structure of a compound, based only on its chemical composition, is crucial to the study of materials and their applications. Despite considerable ongoing research efforts, crystal structure prediction remains a challenging problem that demands large computational resources. Here we propose an efficient approach for first-principles crystal structure prediction. The new method explores and finds crystal structures by tiling together elementary tetrahedra that are energetically favorable and geometrically matching each other. This approach has three distinguishing features: a favorable building unit, an efficient calculation of local energy, and a stochastic Monte Carlo simulation of crystal growth. By applying the method to the crystal structure prediction of various materials, we demonstrate its validity and potential as a promising alternative to current methods.

  19. Revisiting the blind tests in crystal structure prediction: accurate energy ranking of molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Asmadi, Aldi; Neumann, Marcus A; Kendrick, John; Girard, Pascale; Perrin, Marc-Antoine; Leusen, Frank J J

    2009-12-24

    In the 2007 blind test of crystal structure prediction hosted by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), a hybrid DFT/MM method correctly ranked each of the four experimental structures as having the lowest lattice energy of all the crystal structures predicted for each molecule. The work presented here further validates this hybrid method by optimizing the crystal structures (experimental and submitted) of the first three CCDC blind tests held in 1999, 2001, and 2004. Except for the crystal structures of compound IX, all structures were reminimized and ranked according to their lattice energies. The hybrid method computes the lattice energy of a crystal structure as the sum of the DFT total energy and a van der Waals (dispersion) energy correction. Considering all four blind tests, the crystal structure with the lowest lattice energy corresponds to the experimentally observed structure for 12 out of 14 molecules. Moreover, good geometrical agreement is observed between the structures determined by the hybrid method and those measured experimentally. In comparison with the correct submissions made by the blind test participants, all hybrid optimized crystal structures (apart from compound II) have the smallest calculated root mean squared deviations from the experimentally observed structures. It is predicted that a new polymorph of compound V exists under pressure.

  20. Some Lower Valence Vanadium Fluorides: Their Crystal Distortions, Domain Structures, Modulated Structures, Ferrimagnetism, and Composition Dependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Y. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes some contemporary concepts unique to the structure of advanced solids, i.e., their crystal distortions, domain structures, modulated structures, ferrimagnetism, and composition dependence. (Author/CS)

  1. Some Lower Valence Vanadium Fluorides: Their Crystal Distortions, Domain Structures, Modulated Structures, Ferrimagnetism, and Composition Dependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Y. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes some contemporary concepts unique to the structure of advanced solids, i.e., their crystal distortions, domain structures, modulated structures, ferrimagnetism, and composition dependence. (Author/CS)

  2. Crystal structure of Homo sapiens kynureninase.

    PubMed

    Lima, Santiago; Khristoforov, Roman; Momany, Cory; Phillips, Robert S

    2007-03-13

    Kynureninase is a member of a large family of catalytically diverse but structurally homologous pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes known as the aspartate aminotransferase superfamily or alpha-family. The Homo sapiens and other eukaryotic constitutive kynureninases preferentially catalyze the hydrolytic cleavage of 3-hydroxy-l-kynurenine to produce 3-hydroxyanthranilate and l-alanine, while l-kynurenine is the substrate of many prokaryotic inducible kynureninases. The human enzyme was cloned with an N-terminal hexahistidine tag, expressed, and purified from a bacterial expression system using Ni metal ion affinity chromatography. Kinetic characterization of the recombinant enzyme reveals classic Michaelis-Menten behavior, with a Km of 28.3 +/- 1.9 microM and a specific activity of 1.75 micromol min-1 mg-1 for 3-hydroxy-dl-kynurenine. Crystals of recombinant kynureninase that diffracted to 2.0 A were obtained, and the atomic structure of the PLP-bound holoenzyme was determined by molecular replacement using the Pseudomonas fluorescens kynureninase structure (PDB entry 1qz9) as the phasing model. A structural superposition with the P. fluorescens kynureninase revealed that these two structures resemble the "open" and "closed" conformations of aspartate aminotransferase. The comparison illustrates the dynamic nature of these proteins' small domains and reveals a role for Arg-434 similar to its role in other AAT alpha-family members. Docking of 3-hydroxy-l-kynurenine into the human kynureninase active site suggests that Asn-333 and His-102 are involved in substrate binding and molecular discrimination between inducible and constitutive kynureninase substrates.

  3. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss–Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent. PMID:26042198

  4. Crystal structure of human nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Marletta, Ada Serena; Massarotti, Alberto; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio; Rizzi, Menico; Garavaglia, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.11) (NaPRTase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the three-step Preiss-Handler pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD. The enzyme catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid (Na) and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate (PPi). Several studies have underlined the importance of NaPRTase for NAD homeostasis in mammals, but no crystallographic data are available for this enzyme from higher eukaryotes. Here, we report the crystal structure of human NaPRTase that was solved by molecular replacement at a resolution of 2.9 Å in its ligand-free form. Our structural data allow the assignment of human NaPRTase to the type II phosphoribosyltransferase subfamily and reveal that the enzyme consists of two domains and functions as a dimer with the active site located at the interface of the monomers. The substrate-binding mode was analyzed by molecular docking simulation and provides hints into the catalytic mechanism. Moreover, structural comparison of human NaPRTase with the other two human type II phosphoribosyltransferases involved in NAD biosynthesis, quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, reveals that while the three enzymes share a conserved overall structure, a few distinctive structural traits can be identified. In particular, we show that NaPRTase lacks a tunnel that, in nicotinamide phosphoribosiltransferase, represents the binding site of its potent and selective inhibitor FK866, currently used in clinical trials as an antitumoral agent.

  5. Structure dependent hydrogen induced etching features of graphene crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thangaraja, Amutha; Shinde, Sachin M.; Kalita, Golap; Papon, Remi; Sharma, Subash; Vishwakarma, Riteshkumar; Sharma, Kamal P.; Tanemura, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    H2 induced etching of graphene is of significant interest to understand graphene growth process as well as to fabricate nanoribbons and various other structures. Here, we demonstrate the structure dependent H2 induced etching behavior of graphene crystals. We synthesized graphene crystals on electro-polished Cu foil by an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition process, where some of the crystals showed hexagonal shaped snowflake-dendritic morphology. Significant differences in H2 induced etching behavior were observed for the snowflake-dendritic and regular graphene crystals by annealing in a gas mixture of H2 and Ar. The regular graphene crystals were etched anisotropically creating hexagonal holes with pronounced edges, while etching of all the dendritic crystals occurred from the branches of lobs creating symmetrical fractal structures. The etching behavior provides important clue of graphene nucleation and growth as well as their selective etching to fabricate well-defined structures for nanoelectronics.

  6. Crystallization and Characterization of Galdieria sulphuraria RUBISCO in Two Crystal Forms: Structural Phase Transition Observed in P21 Crystal Form

    PubMed Central

    Baranowski, Michael; Stec, Boguslaw

    2007-01-01

    We have isolated ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (RUBISCO) from the red algae Galdieria Sulphuraria. The protein crystallized in two different crystal forms, the I422 crystal form being obtained from high salt and the P21 crystal form being obtained from lower concentration of salt and PEG. We report here the crystallization, preliminary stages of structure determination and the detection of the structural phase transition in the P21 crystal form of G. sulphuraria RUBISCO. This red algae enzyme belongs to the hexadecameric class (L8S8) with an approximate molecular weight 0.6MDa. The phase transition in G. sulphuraria RUBISCO leads from two hexadecamers to a single hexadecamer per asymmetric unit. The preservation of diffraction power in a phase transition for such a large macromolecule is rare.

  7. Formamidinium iodide: crystal structure and phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Goodilin, Eugene A.; Tarasov, Alexey B.; Dorovatovskii, Pavel V.

    2017-01-01

    At a temperature of 100 K, CH5N2 +·I− (I), crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c. The formamidinium cation adopts a planar symmetrical structure [the r.m.s. deviation is 0.002 Å, and the C—N bond lengths are 1.301 (7) and 1.309 (8) Å]. The iodide anion does not lie within the cation plane, but deviates from it by 0.643 (10) Å. The cation and anion of I form a tight ionic pair by a strong N—H⋯I hydrogen bond. In the crystal of I, the tight ionic pairs form hydrogen-bonded zigzag-like chains propagating toward [20-1] via strong N—H⋯I hydrogen bonds. The hydrogen-bonded chains are further packed in stacks along [100]. The thermal behaviour of I was studied by different physicochemical methods (thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and powder diffraction). Differential scanning calorimetry revealed three narrow endothermic peaks at 346, 387 and 525 K, and one broad endothermic peak at ∼605 K. The first and second peaks are related to solid–solid phase transitions, while the third and fourth peaks are attributed to the melting and decomposition of I. The enthalpies of the phase transitions at 346 and 387 K are estimated as 2.60 and 2.75 kJ mol−1, respectively. The X-ray powder diffraction data collected at different temperatures indicate the existence of I as the monoclinic (100–346 K), ortho­rhom­bic (346–387 K) and cubic (387–525 K) polymorphic modifications. PMID:28435723

  8. Crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Lígia R.; Low, John Nicolson; Magalhães e Silva, Diogo; Cagide, Fernando; Borges, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of five 6-mercaptopurine derivatives, viz. 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan­yl]-1-(3-meth­oxy­phen­yl)ethan-1-one (1), C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan­yl]-1-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)ethan-1-one (2), C16H14N4O3S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan­yl]-1-(4-chloro­phen­yl)ethan-1-one (3), C15H11ClN4O2S, 2-[(9-acetyl-9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan­yl]-1-(4-bromo­phen­yl)ethan-1-one (4), C15H11BrN4O2S, and 1-(3-meth­oxy­phen­yl)-2-[(9H-purin-6-yl)sulfan­yl]ethan-1-one (5), C14H12N4O2S. Compounds (2), (3) and (4) are isomorphous and accordingly their mol­ecular and supra­molecular structures are similar. An analysis of the dihedral angles between the purine and exocyclic phenyl rings show that the mol­ecules of (1) and (5) are essentially planar but that in the case of the three isomorphous compounds (2), (3) and (4), these rings are twisted by a dihedral angle of approximately 38°. With the exception of (1) all mol­ecules are linked by weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds in their crystals. There is π–π stacking in all compounds. A Cambridge Structural Database search revealed the existence of 11 deposited compounds containing the 1-phenyl-2-sulfanyl­ethanone scaffold; of these, only eight have a cyclic ring as substituent, the majority of these being heterocycles. PMID:27006794

  9. Crystal structure of a Trypanosoma brucei metacaspase.

    PubMed

    McLuskey, Karen; Rudolf, Jana; Proto, William R; Isaacs, Neil W; Coombs, Graham H; Moss, Catherine X; Mottram, Jeremy C

    2012-05-08

    Metacaspases are distantly related caspase-family cysteine peptidases implicated in programmed cell death in plants and lower eukaryotes. They differ significantly from caspases because they are calcium-activated, arginine-specific peptidases that do not require processing or dimerization for activity. To elucidate the basis of these differences and to determine the impact they might have on the control of cell death pathways in lower eukaryotes, the previously undescribed crystal structure of a metacaspase, an inactive mutant of metacaspase 2 (MCA2) from Trypanosoma brucei, has been determined to a resolution of 1.4 Å. The structure comprises a core caspase fold, but with an unusual eight-stranded β-sheet that stabilizes the protein as a monomer. Essential aspartic acid residues, in the predicted S1 binding pocket, delineate the arginine-specific substrate specificity. In addition, MCA2 possesses an unusual N terminus, which encircles the protein and traverses the catalytic dyad, with Y31 acting as a gatekeeper residue. The calcium-binding site is defined by samarium coordinated by four aspartic acid residues, whereas calcium binding itself induces an allosteric conformational change that could stabilize the active site in a fashion analogous to subunit processing in caspases. Collectively, these data give insights into the mechanistic basis of substrate specificity and mode of activation of MCA2 and provide a detailed framework for understanding the role of metacaspases in cell death pathways of lower eukaryotes.

  10. Crystal Structure of Human Kynurenine Aminotransferase ll*

    SciTech Connect

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Li, J.

    2008-01-01

    Human kynurenine aminotransferase II (hKAT-II) efficiently catalyzes the transamination of knunrenine to kynurenic acid (KYNA). KYNA is the only known endogenous antagonist of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and is also an antagonist of 7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Abnormal concentrations of brain KYNA have been implicated in the pathogenesis and development of several neurological and psychiatric diseases in humans. Consequently, enzymes involved in the production of brain KYNA have been considered potential regulatory targets. In this article, we report a 2.16 Angstroms crystal structure of hKAT-II and a 1.95 Angstroms structure of its complex with kynurenine. The protein architecture of hKAT-II reveals that it belongs to the fold-type I pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes. In comparison with all subclasses of fold-type I-PLP-dependent enzymes, we propose that hKAT-II represents a novel subclass in the fold-type I enzymes because of the unique folding of its first 65 N-terminal residues. This study provides a molecular basis for future effort in maintaining physiological concentrations of KYNA through molecular and biochemical regulation of hKAT-II.

  11. Manipulating Heat Flow through 3 Dimensional Nanoscale Phononic Crystal Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-02

    Nanoscale Phononic Crystal Structure 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA23861214047 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Baowen Li 5d...through computer simulation, how the three dimensional (3D) phononic crystal structures can confine phonon and thus reduce thermal conductivity...phononic crystal (PnC) with spherical pores, which can reduce thermal conductivity of bulk Si by a factor up to 10,000 times at room temperature. The

  12. Anomalous variations of crystal habits and solution properties in the context of the crystallization medium structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiryanova, E. V.; Ugolkov, V. L.; Pyankova, L. A.; Filatov, S. K.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of the real structure of solutions on crystallization is one of the basic issues of crystallogenesis, which is also important for resolving problems of genetic mineralogy. The study of the NaNO3-H2O and KNO3-H2O model systems yielded new data on anomalous characteristics of crystal-forming systems, including morphological and kinetic properties of crystals, crystal-solution equilibrium, and physical properties of solutions (light scattering, thermal properties, IR parameters, pH), providing information on the structure of solutions. The internally consistent data confirm the previously suggested variations in structural heterogeneity of solutions related to minor (2-4%) variations in their composition, which result in numerous disturbances of monotonicity (thermal-concentration oscillations) in the liquidus curves of salts. It is shown that these variations can be caused by variable size and composition of crystal hydrate clusters. The experimental data indicate that the effect of the real solution structure on crystal morphology and crystal-solution equilibrium is enhanced in multicomponent systems, including natural crystal-forming systems. Anomalous faceting and habit, zoning, a sectorial structure of crystals, and nonuniform entrapment of admixtures cannot be ruled out in these systems.

  13. Undergraduates Improve upon Published Crystal Structure in Class Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Scott; Koldewey, Philipp; Bardwell, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, 57 undergraduate students at the University of Michigan were assigned the task of solving a crystal structure, given only the electron density map of a 1.3 Å crystal structure from the electron density server, and the position of the N-terminal amino acid. To test their knowledge of amino acid chemistry, the students were not given the…

  14. Undergraduates Improve upon Published Crystal Structure in Class Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Scott; Koldewey, Philipp; Bardwell, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, 57 undergraduate students at the University of Michigan were assigned the task of solving a crystal structure, given only the electron density map of a 1.3 Å crystal structure from the electron density server, and the position of the N-terminal amino acid. To test their knowledge of amino acid chemistry, the students were not given the…

  15. Growth and crystal structure of the BeAl 6O 10 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimpiev, A. I.; Merkulov, A. A.; Solntsev, V. P.; Tsvetkov, E. G.; Matrosov, V. N.; Pestryakov, E. V.

    2002-04-01

    Unlike earlier published works we have established incongruent melting for the compound BeAl 6O 10 (BHA). The conditions of growing crystals from their own melt with a superstoichiometric excess of BeO, using the Czochralski method, have been determined. The nature of inclusions in grown BHA crystals is described. On the basis of X-ray crystal structure analysis and data of spectroscopic studies the symmetry and space group of BHA crystal structure have been refined, as well as uncertainties arising in their interpretation are discussed.

  16. Predicting crystal structure by merging data mining with quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Christopher C; Tibbetts, Kevin J; Morgan, Dane; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2006-08-01

    Modern methods of quantum mechanics have proved to be effective tools to understand and even predict materials properties. An essential element of the materials design process, relevant to both new materials and the optimization of existing ones, is knowing which crystal structures will form in an alloy system. Crystal structure can only be predicted effectively with quantum mechanics if an algorithm to direct the search through the large space of possible structures is found. We present a new approach to the prediction of structure that rigorously mines correlations embodied within experimental data and uses them to direct quantum mechanical techniques efficiently towards the stable crystal structure of materials.

  17. Crystal structure of a defective folding protein

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Frederick A.; Mourez, Michaël; Vulliez-le Normand, Brigitte; Sassoon, Nathalie; Bentley, Graham A.; Betton, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    Maltose-binding protein (MBP or MalE) of Escherichia coli is the periplasmic receptor of the maltose transport system. MalE31, a defective folding mutant of MalE carrying sequence changes Gly 32→Asp and Ile 33→Pro, is either degraded or forms inclusion bodies following its export to the periplasmic compartment. We have shown previously that overexpression of FkpA, a heat-shock periplasmic peptidyl-prolyl isomerase with chaperone activity, suppresses MalE31 misfolding. Here, we have exploited this property to characterize the maltose transport activity of MalE31 in whole cells. MalE31 displays defective transport behavior, even though it retains maltose-binding activity comparable with that of the wild-type protein. Because the mutated residues are in a region on the surface of MalE not identified previously as important for maltose transport, we have solved the crystal structure of MalE31 in the maltose-bound state in order to characterize the effects of these changes. The structure was determined by molecular replacement methods and refined to 1.85 Å resolution. The conformation of MalE31 closely resembles that of wild-type MalE, with very small displacements of the mutated residues located in the loop connecting the first α-helix to the first β-strand. The structural and functional characterization provides experimental evidence that MalE31 can attain a wild-type folded conformation, and suggest that the mutated sites are probably involved in the interactions with the membrane components of the maltose transport system. PMID:12592028

  18. Crystal structure of a defective folding protein.

    PubMed

    Saul, Frederick A; Mourez, Michaël; Vulliez-Le Normand, Brigitte; Sassoon, Nathalie; Bentley, Graham A; Betton, Jean-Michel

    2003-03-01

    Maltose-binding protein (MBP or MalE) of Escherichia coli is the periplasmic receptor of the maltose transport system. MalE31, a defective folding mutant of MalE carrying sequence changes Gly 32-->Asp and Ile 33-->Pro, is either degraded or forms inclusion bodies following its export to the periplasmic compartment. We have shown previously that overexpression of FkpA, a heat-shock periplasmic peptidyl-prolyl isomerase with chaperone activity, suppresses MalE31 misfolding. Here, we have exploited this property to characterize the maltose transport activity of MalE31 in whole cells. MalE31 displays defective transport behavior, even though it retains maltose-binding activity comparable with that of the wild-type protein. Because the mutated residues are in a region on the surface of MalE not identified previously as important for maltose transport, we have solved the crystal structure of MalE31 in the maltose-bound state in order to characterize the effects of these changes. The structure was determined by molecular replacement methods and refined to 1.85 A resolution. The conformation of MalE31 closely resembles that of wild-type MalE, with very small displacements of the mutated residues located in the loop connecting the first alpha-helix to the first beta-strand. The structural and functional characterization provides experimental evidence that MalE31 can attain a wild-type folded conformation, and suggest that the mutated sites are probably involved in the interactions with the membrane components of the maltose transport system.

  19. Use of Pom Pons to Illustrate Cubic Crystal Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Susan G.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a method that uses olefin pom pons to illustrate cubic crystal structure. Facilitates hands-on examination of different packing arrangements such as hexagonal close-packed and cubic close-packed structures. (JRH)

  20. Use of Pom Pons to Illustrate Cubic Crystal Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Susan G.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a method that uses olefin pom pons to illustrate cubic crystal structure. Facilitates hands-on examination of different packing arrangements such as hexagonal close-packed and cubic close-packed structures. (JRH)

  1. High-speed prediction of crystal structures for organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shigeaki; Goto, Hitoshi

    2015-02-01

    We developed a master-worker type parallel algorithm for allocating tasks of crystal structure optimizations to distributed compute nodes, in order to improve a performance of simulations for crystal structure predictions. The performance experiments were demonstrated on TUT-ADSIM supercomputer system (HITACHI HA8000-tc/HT210). The experimental results show that our parallel algorithm could achieve speed-ups of 214 and 179 times using 256 processor cores on crystal structure optimizations in predictions of crystal structures for 3-aza-bicyclo(3.3.1)nonane-2,4-dione and 2-diazo-3,5-cyclohexadiene-1-one, respectively. We expect that this parallel algorithm is always possible to reduce computational costs of any crystal structure predictions.

  2. Microstructure and Crystal Structure in TAGS Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A. J.; Sharp, J; Rawn, Claudia J

    2009-01-01

    GeTe, a small bandgap semiconductor that has native p-type defects due to Ge vacancies, is an important constituent in the thermoelectric material known as TAGS. TAGS is an acronym for alloys of GeTe with AgSbTe{sub 2}, and compositions are normally designated as TAGS-x, where x is the fraction of GeTe. TAGS-85 is the most important with regard to applications, and there is also commercial interest in TAGS-80. The crystal structure of GeTe{sub 1+{delta}} has a composition-dependent phase transformation at a temperature ranging from 430 C ({delta} = 0) to {approx}400 C ({delta} = 0.02). The high-temperature form is cubic. The low-temperature form is rhombohedral for {delta} < 0.01, as is the case for good thermoelectric performance. Addition of AgSbTe{sub 2} shifts the phase transformation to lower temperatures, and one of the goals of this work is a systematic study of the dependence of transformation temperature on the parameter x. We present results on phase transformations and associated instabilities in TAGS compositions in the range of 70 at.% to 85 at.% GeTe.

  3. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-11

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  4. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Chumbler, Nicole M; Rutherford, Stacey A; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A; Lisher, John P; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P; Spiller, Benjamin W; Melnyk, Roman A; Lacy, D Borden

    2016-01-11

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  5. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Chumbler, Nicole M; Rutherford, Stacey A; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A; Lisher, John P; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P; Spiller, Benjamin W; Melnyk, Roman A; Lacy, D Borden

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon(1,2). The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host(3,4). The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics.

  6. Crystal structure of oxam­yl

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Eunjin; Park, Ki-Min; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Tae Ho

    2016-01-01

    The title compound, C7H13N3O3S [systematic name: (Z)-methyl 2-di­methyl­amino-N-(methyl­carbamo­yloxy)-2-oxoethanimido­thio­ate], is an oxime carbamate acaride, insecticide and nematicide. The asymmetric unit comprises two independent mol­ecules, A and B. The dihedral angles between the mean planes [r.m.s. deviations = 0.0017 (A) and 0.0016 Å (B)] of the acetamide and oxyimino groups are 88.80 (8)° for A and 87.05 (8)° for B. In the crystal, N/C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link adjacent mol­ecules, forming chains along the a axis. The chains are further linked by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, resulting in a three-dimensional network with alternating rows of A and B mol­ecules in the bc plane stacked along the a-axis direction. The structure was refined as an inversion twin with a final BASF parameter of 0.16 (9). PMID:27980838

  7. Crystal structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Zhang, Zhifen; Farrow, Melissa A.; Lisher, John P.; Farquhar, Erik; Giedroc, David P.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Melnyk, Roman A.; Lacy, D. Borden

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. Disease is mediated by the actions of two toxins, TcdA and TcdB, which cause the diarrhoea, as well as inflammation and necrosis within the colon1,2. The toxins are large (308 and 270 kDa, respectively), homologous (47% amino acid identity) glucosyltransferases that target small GTPases within the host3,4. The multidomain toxins enter cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and, upon exposure to the low pH of the endosome, insert into and deliver two enzymatic domains across the membrane. Eukaryotic inositol-hexakisphosphate (InsP6) binds an autoprocessing domain to activate a proteolysis event that releases the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the cytosol. Here, we report the crystal structure of a 1,832-amino-acid fragment of TcdA (TcdA1832), which reveals a requirement for zinc in the mechanism of toxin autoprocessing and an extended delivery domain that serves as a scaffold for the hydrophobic α-helices involved in pH-dependent pore formation. A surface loop of the delivery domain whose sequence is strictly conserved among all large clostridial toxins is shown to be functionally important, and is highlighted for future efforts in the development of vaccines and novel therapeutics. PMID:27571750

  8. Preparation of iridescent colloidal crystal coatings with variable structural colors.

    PubMed

    Cong, Hailin; Yu, Bing; Wang, Shaopeng; Qi, Limin; Wang, Jilei; Ma, Yurong

    2013-07-29

    Iridescent colloidal crystal coatings with variable structural colors were fabricated by incorporating carbon black nanoparticles (CB-NPs) into the voids of polystyrene (PS) colloidal crystals. The structural color of the colloid crystal coatings was not only greatly enhanced after the composition but also varied with observation angles. By changing the diameter of monodisperse PS colloids in the composites, colloidal crystal coatings with three primary colors for additive or subtractive combination were obtained. After incorporation of the PS/CB-NPs hybrid coatings into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix, manmade opal jewelry with variable iridescent colors was made facilely.

  9. Refinement of the crystal structure of rutherfordine.

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, R. J.; Cooper, M. A.; Hawthorne, F. C.; Ewing, R. C.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Manitoba; Univ. of Michigan

    1999-01-01

    Rutherfordine, UO{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is orthorhombic, a 4.840(1), b 9.273(2), c 4.298(1) Angstroms, V192.90(7) Angstroms{sup 3}, space group lmm2,Z=2. The structure was refined to an R index of 2.2% on the basis of 306 unique data [|F{sub o}|/{sigma}(|F{sub o}|)>5] measured with MoK{alpha} X-radiation on a single-crystal diffractometer. The structure consists of neutral sheets of edge- and corner-sharing (UO{sub 8}) hexagonal bipyramids and (CO{sub 3}) triangles, as originally proposed by Christ et al. (1955); our refinement, however shows that (CO{sub 3}) groups in alternate layers have the same orientation, not opposite orientations as originally reported. The refined value of the U-O (uranyl) distance is strongly affected by the details of the absorption correction, ranging from 1.71 to 1.80 Angstroms as a function of the plate-glancing angle used in an empirical psi-scan absorption correction and as a function of the type of weighting scheme used in the refinement. The Gaussian-quadrature method of integration also shows similar problems, but they are less extreme. The preferred value for the U-O (uranyl) distance in rutherfordine is {approx}1.745 Angstroms; as rutherfordine contains no H atoms, the O(uranyl) atom is [1]-coordinated, and should have the shortest U-O(uranyl) distance stereochemically possible. The current work suggests that U-O(uranyl) values less than 1.745 Angstrom reported in other studies are adversely affected by less-than-optimum absorption corrections.

  10. Crystal structures of dihydroxyacetone and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Slepokura, Katarzyna; Lis, Tadeusz

    2004-08-02

    The crystal and molecular structures of three crystalline forms of the dihydroxyacetone dimer, C6H12O6, DHA-dimer: alpha (1a), beta (1b), and gamma (1c), the hydrated calcium chloride complex of dihydroxyacetone monomer, CaCl2(C3H6O3)(2) x H2O, CaCl2(DHA)2 x H2O (2a), the tetrahydrated calcium chloride complex of dihydroxyacetone monomer, CaCl2(C3H6O3) x 4H2O, CaCl2(DHA) x 4H2O (2b), the dihydroxyacetone monomer, C3H6O3, DHA (2c), and dihydroxyacetone dimethyl acetal, C5H12O4, (MeO)2DHA (3) are described. Compounds 1a and 2b crystallize in the triclinic system, and 1b,c, 2a,c, and 3 are monoclinic. Molecules of all forms of dihydroxyacetone dimer 1a,b, and 1c are the trans isomers, with the 1,4-dioxane ring in the chair conformation and the hydroxyl and hydroxymethyl groups in axial and equatorial dispositions, respectively. The Ca2+ ions in 2a and 2b are bridged by the carbonyl O atoms from two symmetry-related DHA molecules to form centrosymmetric dimers with Ca...Ca distance of 4.307(2)A in 2a and 4.330(2) and 4.305(2)A in two crystallographically independent dimers in 2b. DHA molecules coordinate to the Ca2+ ions by hydroxyl and carbonyl oxygen atoms. The eight-coordinate polyhedra of Ca2+ are completed by water molecule and Cl- ion in 2a and by four water molecules in 2b. The dihydroxyacetone molecules in 2a,b, and 2c are in an extended conformation, with both hydroxyl groups being synperiplanar (sp) to the carbonyl O atom. All hydroxyl groups in 2c (along with water molecules in 2a and 2b) are involved as donors in medium strong and weak intermolecular O-H...O hydrogen bonding. Some of them, as well as carbonyl O atoms or Cl- ions in 2a and 2b, act as acceptors in C-H...O (and C-H...Cl) hydrogen interactions.

  11. Origin and structure of polar domains in doped molecular crystals

    PubMed Central

    Meirzadeh, E.; Azuri, I.; Qi, Y.; Ehre, D.; Rappe, A. M.; Lahav, M.; Kronik, L.; Lubomirsky, I.

    2016-01-01

    Doping is a primary tool for the modification of the properties of materials. Occlusion of guest molecules in crystals generally reduces their symmetry by the creation of polar domains, which engender polarization and pyroelectricity in the doped crystals. Here we describe a molecular-level determination of the structure of such polar domains, as created by low dopant concentrations (<0.5%). The approach comprises crystal engineering and pyroelectric measurements, together with dispersion-corrected density functional theory and classical molecular dynamics calculations of the doped crystals, using neutron diffraction data of the host at different temperatures. This approach is illustrated using centrosymmetric α-glycine crystals doped with minute amounts of different L-amino acids. The experimentally determined pyroelectric coefficients are explained by the structure and polarization calculations, thus providing strong support for the local and global understanding of how different dopants influence the properties of molecular crystals. PMID:27824050

  12. Structural Color Patterns by Electrohydrodynamic Jet Printed Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haibo; Zhu, Cun; Tian, Lei; Liu, Cihui; Fu, Guangbin; Shang, Luoran; Gu, Zhongze

    2017-02-09

    In this work, we demonstrate the fabrication of photonic crystal patterns with controllable morphologies and structural colors utilizing electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing with colloidal crystal inks. The final shape of photonic crystal units is controlled by the applied voltage signal and wettability of the substrate. Optical properties of the structural color patterns are tuned by the self-assembly of the silica nanoparticle building blocks. Using this direct printing technique, it is feasible to print customized functional patterns composed of photonic crystal dots or photonic crystal lines according to relevant printing mode and predesigned tracks. This is the first report for E-jet printing with colloidal crystal inks. Our results exhibit promising applications in displays, biosensors, and other functional devices.

  13. Novel photonic crystal cavities and related structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, Ting Shan

    2007-11-01

    The key accomplishment of this project is to achieve a much more in-depth understanding of the thermal emission physics of metallic photonic crystal through theoretical modeling and experimental measurements. An improved transfer matrix technique was developed to enable incorporation of complex dielectric function. Together with microscopic theory describing emitter radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics, a non-equilibrium thermal emission model is developed. Finally, experimental methodology was developed to measure absolute emissivity of photonic crystal at high temperatures with accuracy of +/-2%. Accurate emissivity measurements allow us to validate the procedure to treat the effect of the photonic crystal substrate.

  14. Crystal fingerprint space--a novel paradigm for studying crystal-structure sets.

    PubMed

    Valle, Mario; Oganov, Artem R

    2010-09-01

    The initial aim of the crystal fingerprint project was to solve a very specific problem: to classify and remove duplicate crystal structures from the results generated by the evolutionary crystal-structure predictor USPEX. These duplications decrease the genetic diversity of the population used by the evolutionary algorithm, potentially leading to stagnation and, after a certain time, reducing the likelihood of predicting essentially new structures. After solving the initial problem, the approach led to unexpected discoveries: unforeseen correlations, useful derived quantities and insight into the structure of the overall set of results. All of these were facilitated by the project's underlying idea: to transform the structure sets from the physical configuration space to an abstract, high-dimensional space called the fingerprint space. Here every structure is represented as a point whose coordinates (fingerprint) are computed from the crystal structure. Then the space's distance measure, interpreted as structure 'closeness', enables grouping of structures into similarity classes. This model provides much flexibility and facilitates access to knowledge and algorithms from fields outside crystallography, e.g. pattern recognition and data mining. The current usage of the fingerprint-space model is revealing interesting properties that relate to chemical and crystallographic attributes of a structure set. For this reason, the mapping of structure sets to fingerprint space could become a new paradigm for studying crystal-structure ensembles and global chemical features of the energy landscape.

  15. A Dominant Factor for Structural Classification of Protein Crystals.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fei; Fudo, Satoshi; Neya, Saburo; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2015-08-24

    With the increasing number of solved protein crystal structures, much information on protein shape and atom geometry has become available. It is of great interest to know the structural diversity for a single kind of protein. Our preliminary study suggested that multiple crystal structures of a single kind of protein can be classified into several groups from the viewpoint of structural similarity. In order to broadly examine this finding, cluster analysis was applied to the crystal structures of hemoglobin (Hb), myoglobin (Mb), human serum albumin (HSA), hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL), and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1 PR), downloaded from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). As a result of classification by cluster analysis, 146 crystal structures of Hb were separated into five groups. The crystal structures of Mb (n = 284), HEWL (n = 336), HSA (n = 63), and HIV-1 PR (n = 488) were separated into six, five, three, and six groups, respectively. It was found that a major factor causing these structural separations is the space group of crystals and that crystallizing agents have an influence on the crystal structures. Amino acid mutation is a minor factor for the separation because no obvious point mutation making a specific cluster group was observed for the five kinds of proteins. In the classification of Hb and Mb, the species of protein source such as humans, rabbits, and mice is another significant factor. When the difference in amino sequence is large among species, the species of protein source is the primary factor causing cluster separation in the classification of crystal structures.

  16. On the Crystal Structure of Ln

    SciTech Connect

    Olafsen, Anja; Larsson, Ann-Kristin; Fjellvaag, Helmer; Hauback, Bjoern C.

    2001-04-01

    The crystal structures of La{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} II and Nd{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} II have been shown by means of high-resolution powder neutron (PND) and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD) combined with selected area electron diffraction (SAED) studies to be far more complex than earlier anticipated, owing to ordering of carbonate groups between (Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup +2}){sub n} layers. In contrast to earlier descriptions, the carbonate groups appear to be rather regular. Relative to an average model, the SAED patterns show additional scattering in the form of closely distributed, but essentially discrete, spots along < 1/3, 1/3, 1 >. Most of the observed scattering, H, can be described as H=G{+-}m q{sub 1}+n q{sub 2}, where G is the Bragg reflections of the underlying average P6{sub 3}/mmc lattice, q1=[1/3, 1/3, {+-}1/2]*, q2=[1/3, 1/3, {+-}2/3]*, and m and n are integers. The additional scattering reflects ordering of the carbonate groups into trigonal layers between the (Ln{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup +2}){sub n} layers, but it remains open whether q{sub 1} and q{sub 2} represent two separate structures with different stacking sequences of such layers or whether they correspond to an even more complex stacking sequence. In any case, some disorder and rotational domain twinning are present. Two structure models, one for each modulation wave vector, were constructed. Rietveld-type refinements of PND data of La{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} II were performed, approximating the complex, and at least partly disordered, stacking sequence as a two-phase mixture of the two modulated phases. Satisfactory convergence was achieved with R{sub p}=6.4%, R{sub wp}=8.3%, and {chi}{sup 2}=3.32. The isothermal expansivities, {alpha}{sub p}, for La{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} II and Nd{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} II between 298 and 893 K were determined as 2.92x10{sup {minus}5} and 2.70x10{sup {minus}5} K{sup {minus}1}, respectively.

  17. Structural and Thermoelectric Properties of Tungsten Diselenide Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, K. K.; Patel, K. D.; Patel, Mayur; Patel, C. A.; Pathak, V. M.; Srivastava, R.

    2011-12-01

    Crystals of Tungsten diselenide (WSe2) have been grown by direct vapour transport (DVT) technique using micro processor controlled dual zone horizontal furnace. The chemical composition and structure of grown crystals were confirmed using energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In the present investigation thermoelectric power measurements (TEP) have been carried out on the grown crystals. Different electrical transport parameters of semiconductors have been determined and discussed in the paper.

  18. Crystal structure and characterization of pyrroloquinoline quinone disodium trihydrate

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a tricarboxylic acid, has attracted attention as a growth factor, and its application to supplements and cosmetics is underway. The product used for these purposes is a water-soluble salt of PQQ disodium. Although in the past, PQQ disodiumpentahydrates with a high water concentration were used, currently, low hydration crystals of PQQ disodiumpentahydrates are preferred. Results We prepared a crystal of PQQ disodium trihydrate in a solution of ethanol and water, studied its structure, and analyzed its properties. In the prepared crystal, the sodium atom interacted with the oxygen atom of two carboxylic acids as well as two quinones of the PQQ disodium trihydrate. In addition, the hydration water of the prepared crystal was less than that of the conventional PQQ disodium crystal. From the results of this study, it was found that the color and the near-infrared (NIR) spectrum of the prepared crystal changed depending on the water content in the dried samples. Conclusions The water content in the dried samples was restored to that in the trihydrate crystal by placing the samples in a humid environment. In addition, the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray diffraction-differential calorimetry (XRD-DSC) analyses show that the phase of the trihydrate crystal changed when the crystallization water was eliminated. The dried crystal has two crystalline forms that are restored to the original trihydrate crystals in 20% relative humidity (RH). This crystalline (PQQ disodium trihydrate) is stable under normal environment. PMID:22713213

  19. Paramagnetic ionic plastic crystals containing the octamethylferrocenium cation: counteranion dependence of phase transitions and crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Tomoyuki; Ishida, Mai; Tominaga, Takumi; Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Sakurai, Takahiro; Ohta, Hitoshi

    2017-05-31

    In recent years, ionic plastic crystals have attracted much attention. Many metallocenium salts exhibit plastic phases, but factors affecting their phase transitions are yet to be elucidated. To investigate these factors, we synthesized octamethylferrocenium salts with various counteranions [Fe(C5Me4H)2]X ([1]X; X(-) = B(CN)4(-), C(CN)3(-), N(CN)2(-), FSA (= (SO2F)2N(-)), FeCl4(-), GaCl4(-) and CPFSA (= CF2(SO2CF2)2N(-))) and elucidated their crystal structures and phase behavior. Correlations between the crystal structures and phase sequences, and the shapes and volumes of the anions are discussed. Except for [1][CPFSA], these salts exhibit phase transitions to plastic phases at or above room temperature (TC = 298-386 K), and the plastic phases exhibit either NaCl- or anti-NiAs-type structures. X-ray crystal structure analyses of these salts at 100 K revealed that they have structures in which cations and anions are alternately arranged, with the exception of [1][CPFSA]. [1][CPFSA] exhibits a structure in which anions and cations are separately stacked to form columns. [1][N(CN)2] exhibits a polar crystal structure that undergoes a monotropic phase transition to a centrosymmetric structure. The magnetic susceptibilities of room-temperature plastic crystals [1][GaCl4] and [1][FeCl4] were investigated; the latter exhibits a small ferromagnetic interaction at low temperatures.

  20. Photonic crystal structures with tunable structure color as colorimetric sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2013-03-28

    Colorimetric sensing, which transduces environmental changes into visible color changes, provides a simple yet powerful detection mechanism that is well-suited to the development of low-cost and low-power sensors. A new approach in colorimetric sensing exploits the structural color of photonic crystals (PCs) to create environmentally-influenced color-changeable materials. PCs are composed of periodic dielectrics or metallo-dielectric nanostructures that affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves (EM) by defining the allowed and forbidden photonic bands. Simultaneously, an amazing variety of naturally occurring biological systems exhibit iridescent color due to the presence of PC structures throughout multi-dimensional space. In particular, some kinds of the structural colors in living organisms can be reversibly changed in reaction to external stimuli. Based on the lessons learned from natural photonic structures, some specific examples of PCs-based colorimetric sensors are presented in detail to demonstrate their unprecedented potential in practical applications, such as the detections of temperature, pH, ionic species, solvents, vapor, humidity, pressure and biomolecules. The combination of the nanofabrication technique, useful design methodologies inspired by biological systems and colorimetric sensing will lead to substantial developments in low-cost, miniaturized and widely deployable optical sensors.

  1. Photonic Crystal Structures with Tunable Structure Color as Colorimetric Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Colorimetric sensing, which transduces environmental changes into visible color changes, provides a simple yet powerful detection mechanism that is well-suited to the development of low-cost and low-power sensors. A new approach in colorimetric sensing exploits the structural color of photonic crystals (PCs) to create environmentally-influenced color-changeable materials. PCs are composed of periodic dielectrics or metallo-dielectric nanostructures that affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves (EM) by defining the allowed and forbidden photonic bands. Simultaneously, an amazing variety of naturally occurring biological systems exhibit iridescent color due to the presence of PC structures throughout multi-dimensional space. In particular, some kinds of the structural colors in living organisms can be reversibly changed in reaction to external stimuli. Based on the lessons learned from natural photonic structures, some specific examples of PCs-based colorimetric sensors are presented in detail to demonstrate their unprecedented potential in practical applications, such as the detections of temperature, pH, ionic species, solvents, vapor, humidity, pressure and biomolecules. The combination of the nanofabrication technique, useful design methodologies inspired by biological systems and colorimetric sensing will lead to substantial developments in low-cost, miniaturized and widely deployable optical sensors. PMID:23539027

  2. Crystal structures of three bicyclic carbohydrate derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Schilde, Uwe; Kelling, Alexandra; Umbreen, Sumaira; Linker, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    The title compounds, [(1R,3R,4R,5R,6S)-4,5-bis­(acet­yloxy)-7-oxo-2-oxabi­cyclo[4.2.0]octan-3-yl]methyl acetate, C14H18O8, (I), [(1S,4R,5S,6R)-5-acet­yloxy-7-hy­droxy­imino-2-oxobi­cyclo­[4.2.0]octan-4-yl acetate, C11H15NO6, (II), and [(3aR,5R,6R,7R,7aS)-6,7-bis­(acet­yloxy)-2-oxo­octa­hydro­pyrano[3,2-b]pyrrol-5-yl]methyl acetate, C14H19NO8, (III), are stable bicyclic carbohydrate derivatives. They can easily be synthesized in a few steps from commercially available glycals. As a result of the ring strain from the four-membered rings in (I) and (II), the conformations of the carbohydrates deviate strongly from the ideal chair form. Compound (II) occurs in the boat form. In the five-membered lactam (III), on the other hand, the carbohydrate adopts an almost ideal chair conformation. As a result of the distortion of the sugar rings, the configurations of the three bicyclic carbohydrate derivatives could not be determined from their NMR coupling constants. From our three crystal structure determinations, we were able to establish for the first time the absolute configurations of all new stereocenters of the carbohydrate rings. PMID:27980845

  3. Isomorph invariance of the structure and dynamics of classical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrechtsen, Dan E.; Olsen, Andreas E.; Pedersen, Ulf R.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2014-09-01

    This paper shows by computer simulations that some crystalline systems have curves in their thermodynamic phase diagrams, so-called isomorphs, along which structure and dynamics in reduced units are invariant to a good approximation. The crystals are studied in a classical-mechanical framework, which is generally a good description except significantly below melting. The existence of isomorphs for crystals is validated by simulations of particles interacting via the Lennard-Jones pair potential arranged into a face-centered cubic (fcc) crystalline structure; the slow vacancy-jump dynamics of a defective fcc crystal is also shown to be isomorph invariant. In contrast, a NaCl crystal model does not exhibit isomorph invariances. Other systems simulated, though in less detail, are the Wahnström binary Lennard-Jones crystal with the MgZn2 Laves crystal structure, monatomic fcc crystals of particles interacting via the Buckingham pair potential and via a purely repulsive pair potential diverging at a finite separation, an ortho-terphenyl molecular model crystal, and SPC/E hexagonal ice. Except for NaCl and ice, the crystals simulated all have isomorphs. Based on previous simulations of liquid models, we conjecture that crystalline solids with isomorphs include most or all formed by atoms or molecules interacting via metallic or van der Waals forces, whereas covalently bonded or hydrogen-bonded crystals are not expected to have isomorphs; crystals of ions or dipolar molecules constitute a limiting case for which isomorphs are only expected when the Coulomb interactions are relatively weak. We briefly discuss the consequences of the findings for theories of melting and crystallization.

  4. Electronic structure of Cr{sup 3+} in forsterite crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Avanesov, A.G.; Zhorin, V.V.; Pisarenko, V.F.

    1994-11-01

    Specific properties of silicate crystals that make them promising in applications as active media for IR tunable lasers are discussed. The energy level structure of Cr{sup 3+} ions in a forsterite crystal field is analyzed. 4 refs., 3 tabs.

  5. Colloidal crystals: Structure, dynamics, and the importance of dimer bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbode, Sharon Jane

    Colloidal crystals, periodic arrays of micron-sized solid particles in solution, offer a unique glimpse of the particle-scale structures and dynamics within a true thermodynamic ensemble. Experimental colloidal studies of melting and crystallization [55, 56, 13, 76, 2] as well as non-equilibrium states such as colloidal glasses [67, 68, 29, 49] have uncovered numerous mechanisms that are experimentally inaccessible in atomic systems due to both small timescales and small lengthscales. The great successes of colloidal physics have emerged as a result of technological advances enabling synthesis of large batches of monodisperse spherical particles. Yet, the crystal structures formed by such particles are limited to variations on layers of close-packed spheres. Consequently, one of the current frontiers in colloidal physics is the study of novel crystal structures formed by non-spherical particles. My thesis work has focused on crystals formed by colloidal dimer particles consisting of two connected spherical lobes. Surprisingly, while the structure of two dimensional crystals formed by the dimers are quite similar to those observed for spheres, the motion of defects within the dimer crystals is significantly different. Geometric obstacles formed by interlocking dimers restrict the motion of defects and ultimately introduce a completely unexpected, previously unreported glassy defect dynamics within a colloidal crystal.

  6. Crystal structure and phototransistor behavior of N-substituted heptacence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuechao; Yin, Zongyou; Xiao, Jinchong; Liu, Yi; Wei, Fengxia; Tan, Ke Jie; Kloc, Christian; Huang, Ling; Yan, Qingyu; Hu, Fangzhong; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Qichun

    2012-04-01

    6,8,15,17-Tetraaza-1.18,4.5,9.10,13.14-tetrabenzoheptacene (TTH, 1) has been prepared and characterized by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis. A phototransistor device based on TTH single crystal demonstrated that TTH showed a good performance in signal amplification under the photoconductive effect as well as photocontrolled switches.

  7. Missing strings of residues in protein crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Carugo, Oliviero

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of the protein crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank are incomplete, since the position of one or more residues is not reported, despite these residues are part of the material that was analyzed. This may bias the use of the protein crystal structures by molecular biologists. Here we observe that in the large majority of the protein crystal structures strings of residues are missing. Polar residues incline to occur in missing strings together with glycine, while apolar and aromatic residues tend to avoid them. Particularly flexible residues, as shown by their extremely high B-factors, by their exposure to the solvent and by their secondary structures, flank the missing strings. These data should be a helpful guideline for crystallographers that encounter regions of flat and uninterpretable electron density as well as end-users of crystal structures.

  8. Crystal growth conditions and structural features of ladder type superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Leonyuk, L.; Szymczak, R.; Szymczak, H.; Baran, M.; Babonas, G.J.; Maltsev, V.; Shvanskaya, L.; Reza, A.

    1999-12-01

    The single crystals (M{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub m}(CuO{sub 2}){sub n} (M = Ca, Sr, Y, Bi) containing the ladder-type plane Cu{sub 2}O{sub 3} were obtained by the flux method using Bi- and Ba-cuprates as fluxes. The single crystals with m/n-values 5/7 and 1/1 were found to be superconducting (SC) with the onset of the transition at 80 K. The regularities of the SC crystals with the ladder-type structure were discussed from the viewpoint of the crystal chemistry.

  9. Structural and mechanical studies of cadmium manganese thiocyanate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, M. R.; Vijayaprasath, G.; babu, G. Anandha; Bhagavannarayan, G.; Vijayan, N.; Ravi, G.

    2012-06-01

    Single crystals of cadmium manganese thiocyanate (CMTC) have been synthesized successfully and grown by slow evaporation method. The structural perfection of the grown crystals has been analyzed by High resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), which shows the crystalline perfection of the grown crystal is quite good. Optical behavior was assessed by UV-Vis analysis and found that no absorption in the UV visible region and it may be useful for second harmonic applications. The mechanical hardness of the grown crystals was studied and Vicker's microhardness, Stiffness constant was calculated.

  10. Hydroflux synthesis and crystal structure of new lanthanide tungstate oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latshaw, Allison M.; Smith, Mark D.; Chance, W. Michael; zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2015-04-01

    Single crystals of Na5Ln(OH)6WO4 where Ln = Er, Tm, and Yb were grown out of a NaOH hydroflux. The crystals were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and were found to crystallize in the monoclinic space group I2/a. The lattice parameter ranges for the three structures are a = 11.2024(7) Å-11.2412(6) Å, b = 16.1850(10) Å-16.2220(10) Å, and c = 11.9913(7) Å-12.0323(7) Å while the β angle range is 101.999(2)°-102.025(2)°.

  11. Interplay between Structure and Size in a Critical Crystal Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroni, Daniele; Ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2005-06-01

    We study the kinetics of crystal nucleation of an undercooled Lennard-Jones liquid using various path-sampling methods. We obtain the rate constant and elucidate the pathways for crystal nucleation. Analysis of the path ensemble reveals that crystal nucleation occurs along many different pathways, in which critical solid nuclei can be small, compact, and face centered cubic, but also large, less ordered, and more body centered cubic. The reaction coordinate thus includes, besides the cluster size, also the quality of the crystal structure.

  12. Growth, characterization and crystal structure analysis of rifapentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, K.; Li, J.; Zheng, D. S.

    2010-11-01

    Single crystals of rifapentine have been grown by cooling technique. The crystal structure analysis and the molecular arrangement of these crystals have been determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. From single-crystal XRD studies, it is found that the compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system with a space group P2 1, and the corresponding lattice parameters were calculated ( a = 12.278(3) Å, b = 19.768(4) Å, c = 12.473(3) Å, Z = 2, beta = 112.35(3)°). FT-IR spectra are recorded to identify the various functional groups present in the compound. The UV-Vis spectrum of rifapentine takes place at a wavelength of 236, 255, 334 and 474 nm, respectively. The thermal stability of the crystal is determined from TG/DTA curves.

  13. Comparison of hexagonal crystal structures between fluorapatite and polytetrafluoroethylene.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    The crystallographic properties of fluorapatite (FAp) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as biomedical materials were compared. Both materials contain fluorine and casually belong to the hexagonal crystal system. It is interesting that FAp is an inorganic ionic crystal, while PTFE is an organic covalent-bond crystal. Generally, fluorine contributes to the physicochemical stability and in some cases to the biocompatibility. The crystal structure of FAp was initially analyzed in 1930 by Náray-Szabó, although the analysis of hydroxyapatite (HAp) was markedly delayed until 1964. The computer graphics display demonstrated that fluoride ions serve to stabilize the hydroxyapatite crystals and prevent dental caries. On the other hand, PTFE crystal analysis was reported in 1954 by Bunn and Howells. The PTFE temperature-pressure phase diagram accepted for over 60 years is very complicated and insufficient. PTFE delicately changes its phase near room temperature, although at a glance it appears to have a simple form compared with DNA.

  14. DNA variability in five crystal structures of d(CGCAATTGCG).

    PubMed

    Valls, Núria; Wright, Glenford; Steiner, Roberto A; Murshudov, Garib N; Subirana, Juan A

    2004-04-01

    The deoxyoligonucleotide d(CGCAATTGCG) has previously been crystallized in four different space groups. The crystals diffract to moderate resolution (2.3-2.9 A). Here, a fifth crystal form that diffracts to higher resolution (1.6 A) is presented which was obtained thanks to the use of Co2+ and cryogenic temperatures. The availability of five different crystal structures allows a thorough analysis of the conformational variability of this DNA sequence. It is concluded that the central hexamer sequence CAATTG has a practically constant conformation under all conditions, whilst the terminal base pairs at both ends vary considerably as a result of differing interactions in the crystals. The new crystal structure presented here is stabilized by guanine-Co2+-guanine interactions and the formation of C1+ -G8.C3 triplexes between neighbouring duplexes. As a result of the higher resolution of the crystal structure, a more regular structure was obtained and a clear definition of the spine of hydration was observed which was not visible in the four previous structures.

  15. Construction of crystal structure prototype database: methods and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chuanxun; Lv, Jian; Li, Quan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Lijun; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2017-04-01

    Crystal structure prototype data have become a useful source of information for materials discovery in the fields of crystallography, chemistry, physics, and materials science. This work reports the development of a robust and efficient method for assessing the similarity of structures on the basis of their interatomic distances. Using this method, we proposed a simple and unambiguous definition of crystal structure prototype based on hierarchical clustering theory, and constructed the crystal structure prototype database (CSPD) by filtering the known crystallographic structures in a database. With similar method, a program structure prototype analysis package (SPAP) was developed to remove similar structures in CALYPSO prediction results and extract predicted low energy structures for a separate theoretical structure database. A series of statistics describing the distribution of crystal structure prototypes in the CSPD was compiled to provide an important insight for structure prediction and high-throughput calculations. Illustrative examples of the application of the proposed database are given, including the generation of initial structures for structure prediction and determination of the prototype structure in databases. These examples demonstrate the CSPD to be a generally applicable and useful tool for materials discovery.

  16. Construction of crystal structure prototype database: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Su, Chuanxun; Lv, Jian; Li, Quan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Lijun; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2017-04-26

    Crystal structure prototype data have become a useful source of information for materials discovery in the fields of crystallography, chemistry, physics, and materials science. This work reports the development of a robust and efficient method for assessing the similarity of structures on the basis of their interatomic distances. Using this method, we proposed a simple and unambiguous definition of crystal structure prototype based on hierarchical clustering theory, and constructed the crystal structure prototype database (CSPD) by filtering the known crystallographic structures in a database. With similar method, a program structure prototype analysis package (SPAP) was developed to remove similar structures in CALYPSO prediction results and extract predicted low energy structures for a separate theoretical structure database. A series of statistics describing the distribution of crystal structure prototypes in the CSPD was compiled to provide an important insight for structure prediction and high-throughput calculations. Illustrative examples of the application of the proposed database are given, including the generation of initial structures for structure prediction and determination of the prototype structure in databases. These examples demonstrate the CSPD to be a generally applicable and useful tool for materials discovery.

  17. Room Temperature Crystallization of Hydroxyapatite in Porous Silicon Structures.

    PubMed

    Santana, M; Estevez, J O; Agarwal, V; Herrera-Becerra, R

    2016-12-01

    Porous silicon (PS) substrates, with different pore sizes and morphology, have been used to crystallize hydroxyapatite (HA) nano-fibers by an easy and economical procedure using a co-precipitation method at room temperature. In situ formation of HA nanoparticles, within the meso- and macroporous silicon structure, resulted in the formation of nanometer-sized hydroxyapatite crystals on/within the porous structure. The X-ray diffraction technique was used to determine the tetragonal structure of the crystals. Analysis/characterization demonstrates that under certain synthesis conditions, growth and crystallization of hydroxyapatite layer on/inside PS can be achieved at room temperature. Such composite structures expand the possibility of designing a new bio-composite material based on the hydroxyapatite and silicon synthesized at room temperature.

  18. Precise Identification of Graphene's Crystal Structures by Removable Nanowire Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonghyeok; Lim, Kitaek; Lee, Yangjin; Kim, Jongin; Kim, Kihwan; Park, Jungwon; Kim, Kwanpyo; Lee, Won Chul

    2017-03-16

    Monitoring crystallographic orientations of graphene is important for the reliable generation of graphene-based nanostructures such as van der Waals heterostructures and graphene nanoribbons because their physical properties are dependent on crystal structures. However, facile and precise identification of graphene's crystallographic orientations is still challenging because the majority of current tools rely on complex atomic-scale imaging. Here, we present an identification method for the crystal orientations and grain boundaries of graphene using the directional alignment between epitaxially grown AuCN nanowires and the underlying graphene. Because the nanowires are visible in scanning electron microscopy, crystal orientations of graphene can be inspected with simple procedures. Kernel density estimation that we used in analyzing the nanowire directions enables precise measurement of graphene's crystal orientations. We also confirm that the imaged nanowires can be simply removed without degrading graphene's quality, thus showing that the present method can be practically used for measuring graphene's crystal structures.

  19. The Crystal and Molecular Structure of Dianhydrogossypol

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dianhydrogossypol (4,4'-dihydroxy-5,5'-diisopropyl-7,7'-dimethyl-bis(3H-naphtho[1,8-bc]furan-3-one)) was made by refluxing gossypol in m-xylene. Proton NMR confirmed that complete conversion was achieved over several hours. Single crystals were obtained by slow evaporation of the product from dichl...

  20. Millimeter-wave Bragg diffraction of microfabricated crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C. P.; Lin, S. Y.; Chang, T. H.; Shew, B. Y.

    2011-06-01

    A compact diffraction apparatus is developed with millimeter-wave propagation between two parallel plates. Two types of microfabricated model crystals are individually mounted on a rotatable structure. In contrast to previous work, the experimental results agree well with Bragg's predictions because multiple scattering is minimized in this configuration. Factors that affect the resolution and signal strength, such as the number of scatterers, cylinder radius, and the distance between the detector and the model crystal, are analyzed. The apparatus offers a visually accessible way to teach students about crystal structure as well as scattering and diffraction.

  1. Stability of orientationally disordered crystal structures of colloidal hard dumbbells.

    PubMed

    Marechal, Matthieu; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2008-06-01

    We study the stability of orientationally disordered crystal phases in a suspension of colloidal hard dumbbells using Monte Carlo simulations. For dumbbell bond length L/sigma<0.4 with L the separation of the two spheres of the dumbbell and sigma the diameter of the spheres, we determine the difference in Helmholtz free energy of a plastic crystal with a hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) and a face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure using thermodynamic integration and the lattice-switch Monte Carlo method. We find that the plastic crystal with the hcp structure is more stable than the one with the fcc structure for a large part of the stable plastic crystal regime. In addition, we study the stability of an orientationally disordered aperiodic crystal structure in which the spheres of the dumbbells are on a random-hexagonal-close-packed lattice, and the dumbbells are formed by taking random pairs of neighboring spheres. Using free-energy calculations, we determine the fluid-aperiodic crystal and periodic-aperiodic crystal coexistence regions for L/sigma>0.88 .

  2. Allophycocyanin and phycocyanin crystal structures reveal facets of phycobilisome assembly.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Adir, Noam

    2013-03-01

    X-ray crystal structures of the isolated phycobiliprotein components of the phycobilisome have provided high resolution details to the description of this light harvesting complex at different levels of complexity and detail. The linker-independent assembly of trimers into hexamers in crystal lattices of previously determined structures has been observed in almost all of the phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC) structures available in the Protein Data Bank. In this paper we describe the X-ray crystal structures of PC and APC from Synechococcus elongatus sp. PCC 7942, PC from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and PC from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus crystallized in the presence of urea. All five structures are highly similar to other PC and APC structures on the levels of subunits, monomers and trimers. The Synechococcus APC forms a unique loose hexamer that may show the structural requirements for core assembly and rod attachment. While the Synechococcus PC assembles into the canonical hexamer, it does not further assemble into rods. Unlike most PC structures, the Synechocystis PC fails to form hexamers. Addition of low concentrations of urea to T. vulcanus PC inhibits this proteins propensity to form hexamers, resulting in a crystal lattice composed of trimers. The molecular source of these differences in assembly and their relevance to the phycobilisome structure is discussed.

  3. Computed crystal energy landscapes for understanding and predicting organic crystal structures and polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Price, Sarah Sally L

    2009-01-20

    The phenomenon of polymorphism, the ability of a molecule to adopt more than one crystal structure, is a well-established property of crystalline solids. The possible variations in physical properties between polymorphs make the reliable reproduction of a crystalline form essential for all research using organic materials, as well as quality control in manufacture. Thus, the last two decades have seen both an increase in interest in polymorphism and the availability of the computer power needed to make the computational prediction of organic crystal structures a practical possibility. In the past decade, researchers have made considerable improvements in the theoretical basis for calculating the sets of structures that are within the energy range of possible polymorphism, called crystal energy landscapes. It is common to find that a molecule has a wide variety of ways of packing with lattice energy within a few kilojoules per mole of the most stable structure. However, as we develop methods to search for and characterize "all" solid forms, it is also now usual for polymorphs and solvates to be found. Thus, the computed crystal energy landscape reflects and to an increasing extent "predicts" the emerging complexity of the solid state observed for many organic molecules. This Account will discuss the ways in which the calculation of the crystal energy landscape of a molecule can be used as a complementary technique to solid form screening for polymorphs. Current methods can predict the known crystal structure, even under "blind test" conditions, but such successes are generally restricted to those structures that are the most stable over a wide range of thermodynamic conditions. The other low-energy structures can be alternative polymorphs, which have sometimes been found in later experimental studies. Examining the computed structures reveals the various compromises between close packing, hydrogen bonding, and pi-pi stacking that can result in energetically feasible

  4. Membrane protein structures without crystals, by single particle electron cryomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R

    2015-01-01

    It is an exciting period in membrane protein structural biology with a number of medically important protein structures determined at a rapid pace. However, two major hurdles still remain in the structural biology of membrane proteins. One is the inability to obtain large amounts of protein for crystallization and the other is the failure to get well-diffracting crystals. With single particle electron cryomicroscopy, both these problems can be overcome and high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and other labile protein complexes can be obtained with very little protein and without the need for crystals. In this review, I highlight recent advances in electron microscopy, detectors and software, which have allowed determination of medium to high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and complexes that have been difficult to study by other structural biological techniques. PMID:26435463

  5. X-ray crystal structures of a severely desiccated protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Unlike most protein crystals, form IX of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A diffracts well when severely dehydrated. Crystal structures have been solved after 2.5 and 4 days of desiccation with CaSO4, at 1.9 and 2.0 A resolution, respectively. The two desiccated structures are very similar. An RMS displacement of 1.6 A is observed for main-chain atoms in each structure when compared to the hydrated crystal structure with some large rearrangements observed in loop regions. The structural changes are the result of intermolecular contacts formed by strong electrostatic interactions in the absence of a high dielectric medium. The electron density is very diffuse for some surface loops, consistent with a very disordered structure. This disorder is related to the conformational changes. These results help explain conformational changes during the lyophilization of protein and the associated phenomena of denaturation and molecular memory. PMID:10548049

  6. Toward the Prediction of Organic Hydrate Crystal Structures.

    PubMed

    Hulme, Ashley T; Price, Sarah L

    2007-07-01

    Lattice energy minimization studies on four ordered crystal structures of ice and 22 hydrates of approximately rigid organic molecules (along with 11 corresponding anhydrate structures) were used to establish a model potential scheme, based on the use of a distributed multipole electrostatic model, that can reasonably reproduce the crystal structures. Transferring the empirical repulsion-dispersion potentials for organic oxygen and polar hydrogen atoms to water appears more successful for modeling ice phases than using common water potentials derived from liquid properties. Lattice energy differences are reasonable but quite sensitive to the exact conformation of water and the organic molecule used in the rigid molecule modeling. This potential scheme was used to test a new approach of predicting the crystal structure of 5-azauracil monohydrate (an isolated site hydrate) based on seeking dense crystal packings of 66 5-azauracil···water hydrogen-bonded clusters, derived from an analysis of hydrate hydrogen bond geometries involving the carbonyl- and aza-group acceptors in the Cambridge Structural Database. The known structure was found within 5 kJ mol(-1) of the global minimum in static lattice energy and as the third most stable structure, within 1 kJ mol(-1), when thermal effects at ambient temperature were considered. Thus, although the computational prediction of whether an organic molecule will crystallize in a hydrated form poses many challenges, the prediction of plausible structures for hydrogen-bonded monohydrates is now possible.

  7. Homodiselenacalix[4]arenes: Molecules with Unique Channelled Crystal Structures.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joice; Dobrzańska, Liliana; Van Meervelt, Luc; Quevedo, Mario Alfredo; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Stachowicz, Marcin; Smet, Mario; Maes, Wouter; Dehaen, Wim

    2016-01-18

    A synthetic route towards homodiselenacalix[4]arene macrocycles is presented, based on the dynamic covalent chemistry of diselenides. The calixarene inner rim is decorated with either alkoxy or tert-butyl ester groups. Single-crystal X-ray analysis of two THF solvates with methoxy and ethoxy substituents reveals the high similarity of their molecular structures and alterations on the supramolecular level. In both crystal structures, solvent channels are present and differ in both shape and capacity. Furthermore, the methoxy-substituted macrocycle undergoes a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation during which the molecular structure changes its conformation from 1,3-alternate (loaded with THF/water) to 1,2-alternate (apohost form). Molecular modelling techniques were applied to explore the conformational and energetic behaviour of the macrocycles.

  8. Synthesis and crystal structure analysis of uranyl triple acetates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepov, Vladislav V.; Serezhkina, Larisa B.; Serezhkin, Victor N.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.

    2016-12-01

    Single crystals of triple acetates NaR[UO2(CH3COO)3]3·6H2O (R=Mg, Co, Ni, Zn), well-known for their use as reagents for sodium determination, were grown from aqueous solutions and their structural and spectroscopic properties were studied. Crystal structures of the mentioned phases are based upon {Na[UO2(CH3COO)3]3}2- clusters and [R(H2O)6]2+ aqua-complexes. The cooling of a single crystal of NaMg[UO2(CH3COO)3]3·6H2O from 300 to 100 K leads to a phase transition from trigonal to monoclinic crystal system. Intermolecular interactions between the structural units and their mutual packing were studied and compared from the point of view of the stereoatomic model of crystal structures based on Voronoi-Dirichlet tessellation. Using this method we compared the crystal structures of the triple acetates with Na[UO2(CH3COO)3] and [R(H2O)6][UO2(CH3COO)3]2 and proposed reasons of triple acetates stability. Infrared and Raman spectra were collected and their bands were assigned.

  9. Submicrometer Single Crystal Diffractometry for Highly Accurate Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Fukuyama, Yoshimitsu; Kimura, Shigeru; Toriumi, Koshiro; Takata, Masaki

    2010-06-23

    Submicrometer single crystal diffractometry for highly accurate structure determination was developed using the extremely stable and highly brilliant synchrotron radiation from SPring-8. This was achieved using a microbeam focusing system and the submicrometer precision low-eccentric goniometer system. We demonstrated the structure analyses with 2x2x2 {mu}m{sup 3} cytidine, 600x600x300 nm{sup 3} BaTiO{sub 3}, and 1x1x1 {mu}m{sup 3} silicon. The observed structure factors of the silicon crystal were in agreement with the structure factors determined by the Pendelloesung method and do not require absorption and extinction corrections.

  10. Three supramolecular compounds of 1,4-benzeneditetrazole (H2BDT): Syntheses, crystal structures, and crystal to crystal transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ji-Hua; Wen, Ya-Qiong; Luo, Jie; Huang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhong, Di-Chang

    2017-08-01

    Three supramolecular compounds based on 1,4-benzeneditetrazole (H2BDT), (NH4)2(BDT) (1), [Mg(H2O)6](HBDT)2·2H2O (2), and [Mg(CH3OH)4(H2O)2](HBDT)2·2CH3OH (3) have been solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal/powder X-ray diffraction. Structural analyses indicated that these compounds are 3D supramolecular structures stabilized by electrostatic interactions and intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The crystal to crystal transformation between 2 and 3 were investigated. The result showed that 2 is readily transform to 3 after immersed in methanol solution, while 3 can not be converted to 2 after immersed in distilled water solution.

  11. Evolution of molecular crystal optical phonons near structural phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michki, Nigel; Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Markelz, Andrea

    Molecular crystals are increasingly important photonic and electronic materials. For example organic semiconductors are lightweight compared to inorganic semiconductors and have inexpensive scale up processing with roll to roll printing. However their implementation is limited by their environmental sensitivity, in part arising from the weak intermolecular interactions of the crystal. These weak interactions result in optical phonons in the terahertz frequency range. We examine the evolution of intermolecular interactions near structural phase transitions by measuring the optical phonons as a function of temperature and crystal orientation using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The measured orientation dependence of the resonances provides an additional constraint for comparison of the observed spectra with the density functional calculations, enabling us to follow specific phonon modes. We observe crystal reorganization near 350 K for oxalic acid as it transforms from dihydrate to anhydrous form. We also report the first THz spectra for the molecular crystal fructose through its melting point.

  12. Structure of initial crystals formed during human amelogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisinier, F. J. G.; Voegel, J. C.; Yacaman, J.; Frank, R. M.

    1992-02-01

    X-ray diffraction analysis revealed only the existence of carbonated hydroxyapatite (c.HA) during amelogenesis, whereas conventional transmission electron microscopy investigations showed that developing enamel crystals have a ribbon-like habit. The described compositional changes could be an indication for the presence of minerals different from c.HA. However, the absence of identification of such a mineral shows the need of studies by high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) of initial formed human enamel crystals. We demonstrate the existence of two crystal families involved in the early stages of biomineralization: (a) nanometer-size particles which appeared as a precursor phase; (b) ribbon-like crystals, with a structure closely related to c.HA, which by a progressive thickening process tend to attain the mature enamel crystal habit.

  13. Datamining protein structure databanks for crystallization patterns of proteins.

    PubMed

    Valafar, Homayoun; Prestegard, James H; Valafar, Faramarz

    2002-12-01

    A study of 345 protein structures selected among 1,500 structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, revealed useful correlations between crystallization properties and several parameters for the studied proteins. NMR methods of structure determination do not require the growth of protein crystals, and hence allow comparison of properties of proteins that have or have not been the subject of crystallographic approaches. One- and two-dimensional statistical analyses of the data confirmed a hypothesized relation between the size of the molecule and its crystallization potential. Furthermore, two-dimensional Bayesian analysis revealed a significant relationship between relative ratio of different secondary structures and the likelihood of success for crystallization trials. The most immediate result is an apparent correlation of crystallization potential with protein size. Further analysis of the data revealed a relationship between the unstructured fraction of proteins and the success of its crystallization. Utilization of Bayesian analysis on the latter correlation resulted in a prediction performance of about 64%, whereas a two-dimensional Bayesian analysis succeeded with a performance of about 75%.

  14. Single-crystal structure of a covalent organic framework.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue-Biao; Su, Jie; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Yun, Yifeng; Gándara, Felipe; Duong, Adam; Zou, Xiaodong; Yaghi, Omar M

    2013-11-06

    The crystal structure of a new covalent organic framework, termed COF-320, is determined by single-crystal 3D electron diffraction using the rotation electron diffraction (RED) method for data collection. The COF crystals are prepared by an imine condensation of tetra-(4-anilyl)methane and 4,4'-biphenyldialdehyde in 1,4-dioxane at 120 °C to produce a highly porous 9-fold interwoven diamond net. COF-320 exhibits permanent porosity with a Langmuir surface area of 2400 m(2)/g and a methane total uptake of 15.0 wt % (176 cm(3)/cm(3)) at 25 °C and 80 bar. The successful determination of the structure of COF-320 directly from single-crystal samples is an important advance in the development of COF chemistry.

  15. Single-Crystal Structure of a Covalent Organic Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, YB; Su, J; Furukawa, H; Yun, YF; Gandara, F; Duong, A; Zou, XD; Yaghi, OM

    2013-11-06

    The crystal structure of a new covalent organic framework, termed COF-320, is determined by single-crystal 3D electron diffraction using the rotation electron diffraction (RED) method for data collection. The COF crystals are prepared by an imine condensation of tetra-(4-anilyl)methane and 4,4'-biphenyldialdehyde in 1,4-dioxane at 120 degrees C to produce a highly porous 9-fold interwoven diamond net. COF-320 exhibits permanent porosity with a Langmuir surface area of 2400 m(2)/g and a methane total uptake of 15.0 wt % (176 cm(3)/cm(3)) at 25 degrees C and 80 bar. The successful determination of the structure of COF-320 directly from single-crystal samples is an important advance in the development of COF chemistry.

  16. Birefringence property of asymmetric structure photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingsheng; Yue, Yingjuan; Li, Yan

    2010-12-01

    The random offset of hole-position or random variation of hole-diameter always occur during the actual manufacture process of asymmetric structure photonic crystal fibers. Birefringence of asymmetric photonic crystal fibers with circular air holes and photonic crystal fibers with elliptical air holes are studied numerically based on the finite element method under the perturbation circumstance. The results indicate that when the intrinsic-birefringence of asymmetric photonic crystal fiber is smaller, the random offset of hole-position has larger influence than the variation of hole-diameter. Birefringence resulted from perturbation is less sensitive to asymmetric structures with large pitch or small air-hole. Moreover, the desired birefringence can be obtained by controlling the relative size of the two air holes or the ellipticity of the elliptical-hole.

  17. Crystal structure of TiBi2

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kei; Yamane, Hisanori

    2016-01-01

    Black granular single crystals of monotitanium dibismuth, TiBi2, were synthesized by slow cooling of a mixture of Bi and Ti from 693 K. The title compound is isostructural with CuMg2 (ortho­rhom­bic Fddd symmetry). Ti atoms are located in square anti­prisms of Bi atoms. The network of one type of Bi atom spirals along the a-axis direction while honeycomb layers of the other type of Bi atom spreading in the ab plane inter­lace one another. PMID:27920910

  18. The different conformations and crystal structures of dihydroergocristine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönch, B.; Kraus, W.; Köppen, R.; Emmerling, F.

    2016-02-01

    The identification of different forms of dihydroergocristine (DHEC) was carried out by crystallization from different organic solvents. DHEC was identified as potential template for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for the epimeric specific analysis of ergot alkaloids (EAs) in food. DHEC was crystallized from different solvents in order to mimic the typical MIP synthesis conditions. Four new solvatomorphs of DHEC were obtained. All solvatomorphs contain a water molecule in the crystal structure, whereas three compounds contain an additional solvent molecule. Based on the conformation of DHEC a comparison with typical EA molecules was possible. The analysis showed that DHEC is a suitable template for MIPs for EAs.

  19. Use of Crystal Structure Informatics for Defining the Conformational Space Needed for Predicting Crystal Structures of Pharmaceutical Molecules.

    PubMed

    Iuzzolino, Luca; Reilly, Anthony M; McCabe, Patrick; Price, Sarah L

    2017-10-10

    Determining the range of conformations that a flexible pharmaceutical-like molecule could plausibly adopt in a crystal structure is a key to successful crystal structure prediction (CSP) studies. We aim to use conformational information from the crystal structures in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) to facilitate this task. The conformations produced by the CSD Conformer Generator are reduced in number by considering the underlying rotamer distributions, an analysis of changes in molecular shape, and a minimal number of molecular ab initio calculations. This method is tested for five pharmaceutical-like molecules where an extensive CSP study has already been performed. The CSD informatics-derived set of crystal structure searches generates almost all the low-energy crystal structures previously found, including all experimental structures. The workflow effectively combines information on individual torsion angles and then eliminates the combinations that are too high in energy to be found in the solid state, reducing the resources needed to cover the solid-state conformational space of a molecule. This provides insights into how the low-energy solid-state and isolated-molecule conformations are related to the properties of the individual flexible torsion angles.

  20. Crystal Structure Prediction for Cyclotrimethylene Trinitramine (RDX) from First Principles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    of molecular parameters from corresponding values in an ideal RDX crystal; experimental and predicted orienta- tional parameters of symmetry equivalent...small molecules. Thus, this DFT+D method includes a significant degree of empiricism , in contrast to our SAPT(DFT)-based approach which is completely...in the tables denote only the starting configu- rations . In order to identify duplicate crystal structures pro- duced during the WMIN lattice energy

  1. Boron-oxygen polyanion in the crystal structure of tunellite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.R.

    1963-01-01

    The crystal structure of tunellite, SrO??3B2O 3??4H2O, with infinite sheets of composition n[B6O9(OH)2]2-, has cations and water molecules in the spaces within the sheets. Adjacent sheets are held together by hydrogen bonding through the water molecules. The boron-oxygen polyanions provide the first example in hydrated borate crystals of one oxygen linked to three borons.

  2. Atomic- Resolution Crystal Structure of the Antiviral Lectin Scytovirin

    SciTech Connect

    Moulaei,T.; Botos, I.; Ziolkowska, N.; Bokesch, H.; Krumpe, L.; McKee, T.; O'Keefe, B.; Dauter, Z.; Wlodawer, A.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structures of the natural and recombinant antiviral lectin scytovirin (SVN) were solved by single-wavelength anomalous scattering and refined with data extending to 1.3 Angstroms and 1.0 Angstroms resolution, respectively. A molecule of SVN consists of a single chain 95 amino acids long, with an almost perfect sequence repeat that creates two very similar domains (RMS deviation 0.25 Angstroms for 40 pairs of Ca atoms). The crystal structure differs significantly from a previously published NMR structure of the same protein, with the RMS deviations calculated separately for the N- and C-terminal domains of 5.3 Angstroms and 3.7 Angstroms, respectively, and a very different relationship between the two domains. In addition, the disulfide bonding pattern of the crystal structures differs from that described in the previously published mass spectrometry and NMR studies.

  3. Band structures and localization properties of aperiodic layered phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhi-Zhong; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2012-03-01

    The band structures and localization properties of in-plane elastic waves with coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes oblique propagating in aperiodic phononic crystals based on Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequences are studied. Using transfer matrix method, the concept of the localization factor is introduced and the correctness is testified through the Rytov dispersion relation. For comparison, the perfect periodic structure and the quasi-periodic Fibonacci system are also considered. In addition, the influences of the random disorder, local resonance, translational and/or mirror symmetries on the band structures of the aperiodic phononic crystals are analyzed in this paper.

  4. Structure of ice crystallized from supercooled water

    PubMed Central

    Malkin, Tamsin L.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Brukhno, Andrey V.; Anwar, Jamshed; Salzmann, Christoph G.

    2012-01-01

    The freezing of water to ice is fundamentally important to fields as diverse as cloud formation to cryopreservation. At ambient conditions, ice is considered to exist in two crystalline forms: stable hexagonal ice and metastable cubic ice. Using X-ray diffraction data and Monte Carlo simulations, we show that ice that crystallizes homogeneously from supercooled water is neither of these phases. The resulting ice is disordered in one dimension and therefore possesses neither cubic nor hexagonal symmetry and is instead composed of randomly stacked layers of cubic and hexagonal sequences. We refer to this ice as stacking-disordered ice I. Stacking disorder and stacking faults have been reported earlier for metastable ice I, but only for ice crystallizing in mesopores and in samples recrystallized from high-pressure ice phases rather than in water droplets. Review of the literature reveals that almost all ice that has been identified as cubic ice in previous diffraction studies and generated in a variety of ways was most likely stacking-disordered ice I with varying degrees of stacking disorder. These findings highlight the need to reevaluate the physical and thermodynamic properties of this metastable ice as a function of the nature and extent of stacking disorder using well-characterized samples. PMID:22232652

  5. Structure of ice crystallized from supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Malkin, Tamsin L; Murray, Benjamin J; Brukhno, Andrey V; Anwar, Jamshed; Salzmann, Christoph G

    2012-01-24

    The freezing of water to ice is fundamentally important to fields as diverse as cloud formation to cryopreservation. At ambient conditions, ice is considered to exist in two crystalline forms: stable hexagonal ice and metastable cubic ice. Using X-ray diffraction data and Monte Carlo simulations, we show that ice that crystallizes homogeneously from supercooled water is neither of these phases. The resulting ice is disordered in one dimension and therefore possesses neither cubic nor hexagonal symmetry and is instead composed of randomly stacked layers of cubic and hexagonal sequences. We refer to this ice as stacking-disordered ice I. Stacking disorder and stacking faults have been reported earlier for metastable ice I, but only for ice crystallizing in mesopores and in samples recrystallized from high-pressure ice phases rather than in water droplets. Review of the literature reveals that almost all ice that has been identified as cubic ice in previous diffraction studies and generated in a variety of ways was most likely stacking-disordered ice I with varying degrees of stacking disorder. These findings highlight the need to reevaluate the physical and thermodynamic properties of this metastable ice as a function of the nature and extent of stacking disorder using well-characterized samples.

  6. Synthesis and Structure Characterization of Forsterite Single Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Jin, S.; Wang, X.; Liu, X.; Fleet, M. E.; Jin, Z.

    2006-12-01

    Forsterite (Mg2SiO4), the low-pressure polymorph of magnesium orthosilicate, is of great importance in the upper mantle due to its aboundance. Up to now, only powder samples of forsterite can be synthesized due to the difficulty of its crystal growth. Therefore, the exact crystal structure of forsterite is still an open question. The crystal structure of forsterite was firstly studied in 1926 by Brown and Bragg. Numerous experimental investigations have been performed in order to get the structure of the olivine group minerals at ambient conditions and a variety of temperature and pressures by using the advent of the computer, the single crystal diffractometer and the diamond cell. However, there are still considerable uncertaintes regarding the accuracy of its unit-cell parameter values. In this study, we synthesized for the first time high quality single crystals of forsterite using the Quickpress piston-cylinder apparatus. The single crystal of forsterite was synthesized by direct reaction of stoichiometric amounts of MgO and amorphous SiO2 (Alfa Aesar, 99.999%) in the presence of ~10-11 wt% distilled water at 2.0GPa, 1723 K for 12h. A colorless single crystal of Mg2SiO4 with size dimensions 0.16×0.11×0.04 mm was selected for single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The intensity data were collected with a Rigaku R-AXIS RAPID IP diffractometer by oscillation scans using graphite- monochromated Mo-K?0?6?0?6?7677?0?6?0?6?7699 radiation (λ=0.71073 Å). Cell refinement and data reduction were accomplished with RAPID AUTO program. The crystal structure was solved by direct methods with the SHELXL crystallographic software package. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis shows a crystal structure of orthorhombic space group Pnma (No. 62) with a = 10.2073(11) Å, b = 5.9863(5) Å, c = 4.7611(4) Å and Z = 4. Our new data provides new constraints for theoretical investigations of the physical and chemistry properties and behaviors of forsterite under various

  7. Formation of lanthanum beryllate real structure under different crystallization conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvetkov, E.G. . E-mail: tsvetkov@uiggm.nsc.ru; Rylov, G.M.; Matrosov, V.N.

    2006-02-02

    The aim of this paper is to characterize the major structural defects of lanthanum beryllate single crystals grown by the Czochralski method, including those doped with rare-earth elements, and to reveal their relationship to specific properties of the crystal structure of La{sub 2}Be{sub 2}O{sub 5} and with their crystallization conditions. As a basic method for research, we used transmission X-ray topography. It was established that the defect state of La{sub 2}Be{sub 2}O{sub 5} crystals prepared by this method can be caused by different types of dislocations and their ordered assemblies, solid-phase inclusions of crucible metal and eutectically co-crystallizing phases, as well as by face growth sectors with elevated content of dopant. We show a possibility for growing single crystals of doped lanthanum beryllate having a minimum quantity of structural defects that could be suitable for manufacture of high quality laser rods.

  8. On the mechanisms of modulation of crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, S. V.; Magarill, S. A.; Pervukhina, N. V.

    2017-05-01

    Based on the assumption that crystal structures of a number of sulfides are the result of modulation of cationic lattices by anionic lattices, the versions of their conjugation in direct and reciprocal spaces have been analyzed using common translational lattices. The concept of this phenomenon, developed within the superspace formalism, is supplemented by a proposed interpretation of the real modulation of the structures.

  9. On automation of the procedure for crystal structure model refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Dudka, A. P.

    2008-03-15

    The methods of automation of the procedure for crystal structure model refinement from experimental diffraction data, implemented in the ASTRA program package, are described. Such tools as statistical tests, parameter scanning, and data scanning reduce the time necessary for structural investigation. At strong correlations between parameters, especially when the data set is limited, parameter scanning has an advantage over the full-matrix refinement.

  10. Heterogeneous Crystallization on Pairs of Pre-Structured Seeds

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Studying the effects of small pre-structured seeds on the crystallization transition in an undercooled monodisperse Lennard-Jones fluid with transition interface path sampling combined with molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze the impact of the simultaneous presence of two seeds with various structures. In the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures, we find that decreasing the seed-to-seed distance enhances the probability of the crystalline clusters formed on one of the seeds to grow beyond the critical size, thus, increasing the crystal nucleation rates. In contrast, when seeds have an icosahedral structure, the crystalline clusters form mostly in the bulk. The crystal nucleation rate, however, is also determined by the distance between the seeds with regular structure in which the lattice spacing is equal to the bulk lattice constant, pointing to a heterogeneous crystal nucleation that occurs away from the icosahedrally structured seeds. For slightly squeezed seeds, the effects of the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures are reduced in comparison to the regular seeds, and we do not see any effect of the presence of the second seed for seeds with squeezed icosahedral structure. PMID:27479875

  11. Crystal structure and texture changes during thermal cycling of TATB

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Sven C.; Yeager, John David

    2015-02-20

    Goals: Understand crystal structure and micro-structure changes during thermal cycling, understand reasons for ratcheting of TATB during thermal cycling, and Support of B61 LEP. Deliverables achieved: Completed in situ thermal cycling of loose powder and pressed pellet TATB on HIPPO, Quantified preferred orientation of pressed pellet, and quantified relative change of each of the six lattic parameters.

  12. Heterogeneous Crystallization on Pairs of Pre-Structured Seeds.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, Swetlana; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Studying the effects of small pre-structured seeds on the crystallization transition in an undercooled monodisperse Lennard-Jones fluid with transition interface path sampling combined with molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze the impact of the simultaneous presence of two seeds with various structures. In the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures, we find that decreasing the seed-to-seed distance enhances the probability of the crystalline clusters formed on one of the seeds to grow beyond the critical size, thus, increasing the crystal nucleation rates. In contrast, when seeds have an icosahedral structure, the crystalline clusters form mostly in the bulk. The crystal nucleation rate, however, is also determined by the distance between the seeds with regular structure in which the lattice spacing is equal to the bulk lattice constant, pointing to a heterogeneous crystal nucleation that occurs away from the icosahedrally structured seeds. For slightly squeezed seeds, the effects of the presence of seeds with face- and body-centered cubic structures are reduced in comparison to the regular seeds, and we do not see any effect of the presence of the second seed for seeds with squeezed icosahedral structure.

  13. Ytterbium- and neodymium-doped vanadate laser hose crystals having the apatite crystal structure

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Kway, Wayne L.; DeLoach, Laura D.; Krupke, William F.; Chai, Bruce H. T.

    1994-01-01

    Yb.sup.3+ and Nd.sup.3+ doped Sr.sub.5 (VO.sub.4).sub.3 F crystals serve as useful infrared laser media that exhibit low thresholds of oscillation and high slope efficiencies, and can be grown with high optical quality. These laser media possess unusually high absorption and emission cross sections, which provide the crystals with the ability to generate greater gain for a given amount of pump power. Many related crystals such as Sr.sub.5 (VO.sub.4).sub.3 F crystals doped with other rare earths, transition metals, or actinides, as well as the many structural analogs of Sr.sub.5 (VO.sub.4).sub.3 F, where the Sr.sup.2+ and F.sup.- ions are replaced by related chemical species, have similar properties.

  14. Ytterbium- and neodymium-doped vanadate laser hose crystals having the apatite crystal structure

    DOEpatents

    Payne, S.A.; Kway, W.L.; DeLoach, L.D.; Krupke, W.F.; Chai, B.H.T.

    1994-08-23

    Yb[sup 3+] and Nd[sup 3+] doped Sr[sub 5](VO[sub 4])[sub 3]F crystals serve as useful infrared laser media that exhibit low thresholds of oscillation and high slope efficiencies, and can be grown with high optical quality. These laser media possess unusually high absorption and emission cross sections, which provide the crystals with the ability to generate greater gain for a given amount of pump power. Many related crystals such as Sr[sub 5](VO[sub 4])[sub 3]F crystals doped with other rare earths, transition metals, or actinides, as well as the many structural analogs of Sr[sub 5](VO[sub 4])[sub 3]F, where the Sr[sup 2+] and F[sup [minus

  15. Combined crystal structure prediction and high-pressure crystallization in rational pharmaceutical polymorph screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, M. A.; van de Streek, J.; Fabbiani, F. P. A.; Hidber, P.; Grassmann, O.

    2015-07-01

    Organic molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals and pigments, frequently form several crystal polymorphs with different physicochemical properties. Finding polymorphs has long been a purely experimental game of trial-and-error. Here we utilize in silico polymorph screening in combination with rationally planned crystallization experiments to study the polymorphism of the pharmaceutical compound Dalcetrapib, with 10 torsional degrees of freedom one of the most flexible molecules ever studied computationally. The experimental crystal polymorphs are found at the bottom of the calculated lattice energy landscape, and two predicted structures are identified as candidates for a missing, thermodynamically more stable polymorph. Pressure-dependent stability calculations suggested high pressure as a means to bring these polymorphs into existence. Subsequently, one of them could indeed be crystallized in the 0.02 to 0.50 GPa pressure range and was found to be metastable at ambient pressure, effectively derisking the appearance of a more stable polymorph during late-stage development of Dalcetrapib.

  16. On the influence of crystal structure on the electromagnetic shower development in the lead tungstate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshevsky, V. G.; Haurylavets, V. V.; Korjik, M. V.; Lobko, A. S.; Mechinsky, V. A.; Sytov, A. I.; Tikhomirov, V. V.; Uglov, V. V.

    2017-07-01

    The development of high-energy electromagnetic showers in long oriented lead tungstate crystals, accelerated by the effects induced by the strong field of atomic strings, is simulated for the first time. For that the characteristics of pair production and gamma-radiation by electrons or positrons were first simulated by the direct application of Baier-Katkov formulae in a thin PWO crystal to derive the scaling coefficients of the corresponding Bethe-Heitler cross sections to be incorporated into GEANT4 for the simulation of the electromagnetic shower development in a long crystal. Simulation results demonstrate the significant influence of the crystal structure on the e± and gamma-quanta registration processes in the existing homogeneous electromagnetic calorimeters and gamma-telescopes as well as wide possibilities of improving their performance in future developments.

  17. Crystal structure of rubidium peroxide ammonia disolvate.

    PubMed

    Grassl, Tobias; Korber, Nikolaus

    2017-02-01

    The title compound, Rb2O2·2NH3, has been obtained as a reaction product of rubidium metal dissolved in liquid ammonia and glucuronic acid. As a result of the low-temperature crystallization, a disolvate was formed. To our knowledge, only one other solvate of an alkali metal peroxide is known: Na2O2·8H2O has been reported by Grehl et al. [Acta Cryst. (1995), C51, 1038-1040]. We determined the peroxide bond length to be 1.530 (11) Å, which is in accordance with the length reported by Bremm & Jansen [Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem. (1992), 610, 64-66]. One of the ammonia solvate molecules is disordered relative to a mirror plane, with 0.5 occupancy for the corresponding nitrogen atom.

  18. Band structure peculiarities of magnetic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorgyan, A. H.; Golik, S. S.

    2017-10-01

    In this work we studied light diffraction in magneto-photonic crystals (MPC) having large magneto-optical activity and modulation large depth. The case of arbitrary angles between the direction of the external static magnetic field and the normal to the border of the MPC layer is considered. The problem is solved by Ambartsumian's modified layer addition method. It is found that there is a new type of non-reciprocity, namely, the relation R (α) ≠ R (- α) takes place, where R is the reflection coefficient, and α is the incidence angle. It is shown the formation of new photonic band gap (PBG) at oblique incidence of light, which is not selective for the polarization of the incident light, in the case when the external magnetic field is directed along the medium axis. Such a system can be used as: a tunable polarization filter, polarization mirror, circular (elliptical) polarizer, tunable optical diode, etc.

  19. Crystal structure of rubidium peroxide ammonia disolvate

    PubMed Central

    Grassl, Tobias; Korber, Nikolaus

    2017-01-01

    The title compound, Rb2O2·2NH3, has been obtained as a reaction product of rubidium metal dissolved in liquid ammonia and glucuronic acid. As a result of the low-temperature crystallization, a disolvate was formed. To our knowledge, only one other solvate of an alkali metal peroxide is known: Na2O2·8H2O has been reported by Grehl et al. [Acta Cryst. (1995), C51, 1038–1040]. We determined the peroxide bond length to be 1.530 (11) Å, which is in accordance with the length reported by Bremm & Jansen [Z. Anorg. Allg. Chem. (1992), 610, 64–66]. One of the ammonia solvate molecules is disordered relative to a mirror plane, with 0.5 occupancy for the corresponding nitrogen atom. PMID:28217342

  20. Synthesis, crystal structure and computational studies of 4-nitrobenzylphosphonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilk, Magdalena; Jarzembska, Katarzyna N.; Janczak, Jan; Hoffmann, Józef; Videnova-Adrabinska, Veneta

    2014-09-01

    4-Nitrobenzylphosphonic acid (1a) has been synthesized and structurally characterized by vibrational spectroscopy (IR and Raman) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Additionally, Hirshfeld surface analysis and computational methods have been used to compare the intermolecular interactions in the crystal structures of 1a and its carboxylic analogue, 4-nitrobenzylcarboxylic acid (4-NBCA). The crystal structure analysis of 1a has revealed that the acid molecules are extended into helical chains along the b axis using one of the hydrogen bonds established between phosphonic groups. The second (P)Osbnd H⋯O(P) hydrogen bond cross-links the inversion-related chains to form a thick monolayer with phosphonic groups arranged inwards and aromatic rings outwards. The nitro groups serve to link the neighbouring monolayers by weak Csbnd H⋯O(N) hydrogen bonds. Computations have confirmed the great contribution of electrostatic interactions for the crystal lattice stability. The cohesive energy, computed for the crystal structure of 1a exceeds 200 kJ mol-1 in magnitude and is nearly twice as large as that of 4-NBCA. The calculated cohesive energy values have been further related to the results of thermal analyses.

  1. Anisotropy of bond projections in simple crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimůnek, Antonín

    2011-10-01

    The nearest-neighbor bond distances represented by the stick-and-ball model of a crystal are projected into planes in order to find the directions from where the projections have maximum or minimum values. The projection directions and their corresponding values of the maxima and minima are presented for simple cubic, body-centered-cubic, face-centered-cubic, sodium chloride, zinc sulfide, diamond, fluorite, cesium chloride, hexagonal close-packed, tungsten carbide, wurtzite, graphite, graphene, and aluminum boride structures. The purely geometrical considerations quantitatively reflect an anisotropy of the bond projections and provide data for a large amount of materials crystallizing in these structures. The presented results can be applied to the description, analysis, and understanding of anisotropic effects related to bond projection in 14 crystal structures. The application of hardness anisotropy for BN, SiC, and TiC is shown.

  2. Free-Standing Photonic Crystal Films with Gradient Structural Colors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haibo; Liu, Cihui; Ye, Baofen; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-03-23

    Hydrogel colloidal crystal composite materials have a demonstrated value in responsive photonic crystals (PhCs) via controllable stimuli. Although they have been successfully exploited to generate a gradient of color distribution, the soft hydrogels have limitations in terms of stability and storage caused by dependence on environment. Here, we present a practical strategy to fabricate free-standing PhC films with a stable gradient of structural colors using binary polymer networks. A colloidal crystal hydrogel film was prepared for this purpose, with continuously varying photonic band gaps corresponding to the gradient of the press. Then, a second polymer network was used to lock the inside non-close-packed PhC structures and color distribution of the hydrogel film. It was demonstrated that our strategy could bring about a solution to the angle-dependent structural colors of the PhC films by coating the surface with special microstructures.

  3. Compact Couplers for Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin; Lin, M.C.; Schwartz, Brian; Byer, Robert; McGuinness, Christopher; Colby, Eric; England, Robert; Noble, Robert; Spencer, James; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    Photonic crystal waveguides are promising candidates for laser-driven accelerator structures because of their ability to confine a speed-of-light mode in an all-dielectric structure. Because of the difference between the group velocity of the waveguide mode and the particle bunch velocity, fields must be coupled into the accelerating waveguide at frequent intervals. Therefore efficient, compact couplers are critical to overall accelerator efficiency. We present designs and simulations of high-efficiency coupling to the accelerating mode in a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide from a waveguide adjoining it at 90{sup o}. We discuss details of the computation and the resulting transmission. We include some background on the accelerator structure and photonic crystal-based optical acceleration in general.

  4. Polymorph identification and crystal structure determination by a combined crystal structure prediction and transmission electron microscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Eddleston, Mark D; Hejczyk, Katarzyna E; Bithell, Erica G; Day, Graeme M; Jones, William

    2013-06-10

    Electron diffraction offers advantages over X-ray based methods for crystal structure determination because it can be applied to sub-micron sized crystallites, and picogram quantities of material. For molecular organic species, however, crystal structure determination with electron diffraction is hindered by rapid crystal deterioration in the electron beam, limiting the amount of diffraction data that can be collected, and by the effect of dynamical scattering on reflection intensities. Automated electron diffraction tomography provides one possible solution. We demonstrate here, however, an alternative approach in which a set of putative crystal structures of the compound of interest is generated by crystal structure prediction methods and electron diffraction is used to determine which of these putative structures is experimentally observed. This approach enables the advantages of electron diffraction to be exploited, while avoiding the need to obtain large amounts of diffraction data or accurate reflection intensities. We demonstrate the application of the methodology to the pharmaceutical compounds paracetamol, scyllo-inositol and theophylline. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Optical extinction due to intrinsic structural variations of photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenderink, A. Femius; Lagendijk, Ad; Vos, Willem L.

    2005-10-01

    Unavoidable variations in size and position of the building blocks of photonic crystals cause light scattering and extinction of coherent beams. We present a model for both two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals that relates the extinction length to the magnitude of the variations. The predicted lengths agree well with our experiments on high-quality opals and inverse opals, and with literature data analyzed by us. As a result, control over photons is limited to distances up to 50 lattice parameters (˜15 μm) in state-of-the-art structures, thereby impeding applications that require large photonic crystals, such as proposed optical integrated circuits. Conversely, scattering in photonic crystals may lead to different physics such as Anderson localization and nonclassical diffusion.

  6. A STUDY OF DISLOCATION STRUCTURE OF SUBBOUNDARIES IN MOLYBDENUM SINGLE CRYSTALS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MOLYBDENUM, *DISLOCATIONS), GRAIN STRUCTURES(METALLURGY), SINGLE CRYSTALS, ZONE MELTING, ELECTRON BEAM MELTING , GRAIN BOUNDARIES, MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS, ETCHED CRYSTALS, ETCHING, ELECTROEROSIVE MACHINING, CHINA

  7. The Crystal Structure of GXGD Membrane Protease FlaK

    SciTech Connect

    J Hu; Y Xue; S Lee; Y Ha

    2011-12-31

    The GXGD proteases are polytopic membrane proteins with catalytic activities against membrane-spanning substrates that require a pair of aspartyl residues. Representative members of the family include preflagellin peptidase, type 4 prepilin peptidase, presenilin and signal peptide peptidase. Many GXGD proteases are important in medicine. For example, type 4 prepilin peptidase may contribute to bacterial pathogenesis, and mutations in presenilin are associated with Alzheimer's disease. As yet, there is no atomic-resolution structure in this protease family. Here we report the crystal structure of FlaK, a preflagellin peptidase from Methanococcus maripaludis, solved at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure contains six transmembrane helices. The GXGD motif and a short transmembrane helix, helix 4, are positioned at the centre, surrounded by other transmembrane helices. The crystal structure indicates that the protease must undergo conformational changes to bring the GXGD motif and a second essential aspartyl residue from transmembrane helix 1 into close proximity for catalysis. A comparison of the crystal structure with models of presenilin derived from biochemical analysis reveals three common transmembrane segments that are similarly arranged around the active site. This observation reinforces the idea that the prokaryotic and human proteases are evolutionarily related. The crystal structure presented here provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of the GXGD proteases, and may facilitate the rational design of inhibitors that target specific members of the family.

  8. The crystal structure of GXGD membrane protease FlaK

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian; Xue, Yi; Lee, Sangwon; Ha, Ya

    2011-09-20

    The GXGD proteases are polytopic membrane proteins with catalytic activities against membrane-spanning substrates that require a pair of aspartyl residues. Representative members of the family include preflagellin peptidase, type 4 prepilin peptidase, presenilin and signal peptide peptidase. Many GXGD proteases are important in medicine. For example, type 4 prepilin peptidase may contribute to bacterial pathogenesis, and mutations in presenilin are associated with Alzheimer's disease. As yet, there is no atomic-resolution structure in this protease family. Here we report the crystal structure of FlaK, a preflagellin peptidase from Methanococcus maripaludis, solved at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure contains six transmembrane helices. The GXGD motif and a short transmembrane helix, helix 4, are positioned at the centre, surrounded by other transmembrane helices. The crystal structure indicates that the protease must undergo conformational changes to bring the GXGD motif and a second essential aspartyl residue from transmembrane helix 1 into close proximity for catalysis. A comparison of the crystal structure with models of presenilin derived from biochemical analysis reveals three common transmembrane segments that are similarly arranged around the active site. This observation reinforces the idea that the prokaryotic and human proteases are evolutionarily related. The crystal structure presented here provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of the GXGD proteases, and may facilitate the rational design of inhibitors that target specific members of the family.

  9. Crystal chemistry and structure refinement of five hydrated calcium borates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.R.; Appleman, D.E.; Christ, C.L.

    1964-01-01

    The crystal structures of the five known members of the series Ca2B6O11??xH2O (x = 1, 5, 5, 7, 9, and 13) have been refined by full-matrix least-squares techniques, yielding bond distances and angles with standard errors of less than 0??01 A?? and 0??5??, respectively. The results illustrate the crystal chemical principles that govern the structures of hydrated borate compounds. The importance of hydrogen bonding in the ferroelectric transition of colemanite is confirmed by more accurate proton assignments. ?? 1964.

  10. The crystal structure of KR-21042, an analgesic capsaicinoid.

    PubMed

    Park, No Sang; Kim, Yang Bae; Jeong, Eun Ju; Chung, Uoo Tae; Park, I I Yeong

    2002-02-01

    The crystal structure of KR-21042, N-(3-Phenylpropyl)-4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylacetamide, was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The compound was recrystallized from a mixture of ethylacetate and n-hexane in monoclinic, space group P21/c, with a = 16.622(1), b = 6.215(1), c = 15.802(1) A, P= 104.97(1), and Z = 4. The calculated density is 1.261 g/cm3. The structure was solved by the direct method and refined by full matrix least-squares procedure to the final R value of 0.068 for 2332 observed reflections.

  11. Photonic crystals, light manipulation, and imaging in complex nematic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravnik, Miha; Å timulak, Mitja; Mur, Urban; Čančula, Miha; Čopar, Simon; Žumer, Slobodan

    2016-03-01

    Three selected approaches for manipulation of light by complex nematic colloidal and non-colloidal structures are presented using different own custom developed theoretical and modelling approaches. Photonic crystals bands of distorted cholesteric liquid crystal helix and of nematic colloidal opals are presented, also revealing distinct photonic modes and density of states. Light propagation along half-integer nematic disclinations is shown with changes in the light polarization of various winding numbers. As third, simulated light transmission polarization micrographs of nematic torons are shown, offering a new insight into the complex structure characterization. Finally, this work is a contribution towards using complex soft matter in optics and photonics for advanced light manipulation.

  12. Clathrate Structure Determination by Combining Crystal Structure Prediction with Computational and Experimental (129) Xe NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Selent, Marcin; Nyman, Jonas; Roukala, Juho; Ilczyszyn, Marek; Oilunkaniemi, Raija; Bygrave, Peter J; Laitinen, Risto; Jokisaari, Jukka; Day, Graeme M; Lantto, Perttu

    2017-01-23

    An approach is presented for the structure determination of clathrates using NMR spectroscopy of enclathrated xenon to select from a set of predicted crystal structures. Crystal structure prediction methods have been used to generate an ensemble of putative structures of o- and m-fluorophenol, whose previously unknown clathrate structures have been studied by (129) Xe NMR spectroscopy. The high sensitivity of the (129) Xe chemical shift tensor to the chemical environment and shape of the crystalline cavity makes it ideal as a probe for porous materials. The experimental powder NMR spectra can be used to directly confirm or reject hypothetical crystal structures generated by computational prediction, whose chemical shift tensors have been simulated using density functional theory. For each fluorophenol isomer one predicted crystal structure was found, whose measured and computed chemical shift tensors agree within experimental and computational error margins and these are thus proposed as the true fluorophenol xenon clathrate structures.

  13. Utilization of Protein Crystal Structures in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kohki

    In industry, protein crystallography is used in mainly two technologies. One is structure-based drug design, and the other is structure-based enzyme engineering. Some successful cases together with recent advances are presented in this article. The cases include the development of an anti-influenza drug, and the introduction of engineered acid phosphatase to the manufacturing process of nucleotides used as umami seasoning.

  14. Synthesis, crystal structure, crystal growth and physical properties of N,N-diethyl anilinium picrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniyan @ Raja, R.; Anandha Babu, G.; Ramasamy, P.

    2011-11-01

    Crystalline substance of N,N-diethyl anilinium picrate (NNDEAP) has been synthesized and single crystals of NNDEAP were successfully grown for the first time by the slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature with dimensions 14×10×10 mm3. The formation of the new crystal has been confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The structural perfection of the grown crystal was analyzed by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurements. The functional groups of NNDEAP have been identified by Fourier transform infrared spectral studies. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) have also been carried out and the thermal behavior of NNDEAP has been studied. The UV-vis-NIR studies have been carried out to identify the optical transmittance and the cut off wavelength of NNDEAP is identified. The dielectric loss and the dielectric constant as a function of frequency and temperature were measured for the grown crystal and the nature of variation of dielectric constant εr and dielectric losses (tan δ) were studied. Vicker's hardness test has been carried out on NNDEAP to measure the load dependent hardness. The laser induced surface damage threshold for the grown crystal was measured using Nd:YAG laser.

  15. Crystal Structures of Monomeric Actin Bound to Cytochalasin D

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Usha B.; Joel, Peteranne B.; Wan, Qun; Lowey, Susan; Rould, Mark A.; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2008-01-01

    The fungal toxin cytochalasin D (CD) interferes with the normal dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton by binding to the barbed end of actin filaments. Despite its widespread use as a tool for studying actin-mediated processes, the exact location and nature of its binding to actin has not been previously determined. Here we describe two crystal structures of an expressed monomeric actin in complex with CD, one obtained by soaking preformed actin crystals with CD, and the other by co-crystallization. The binding site for CD, in the hydrophobic cleft between actin subdomains 1 and 3, is the same in the two structures. Polar and hydrophobic contacts play an equally important role in CD binding, and six hydrogen bonds stabilize the actin-CD complex. Many unrelated actin-binding proteins and marine toxins target this cleft, and the hydrophobic pocket at the front end of the cleft (viewing actin with subdomain 2 in the upper right corner). CD differs in that it binds to the back half of the cleft. The ability of CD to induce actin dimer formation and actin-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis may be related to its unique binding site, and the necessity to fit its bulky macrocycle into this cleft. Contacts with residues lining this cleft appear to be crucial to capping and/or severing. The co-crystallized actin-CD structure also revealed changes in actin conformation. A rotation of ~6° of the smaller actin domain (subdomains 1 and 2) with respect to the larger domain (subdomains 3 and 4) results in small changes in crystal packing that allow the D-loop to adopt an extended loop structure, instead of being disordered as it is in most crystal structures of actin. We speculate that these changes represent a potential conformation that the actin monomer can adopt on the pathway to polymerization or in the filament. PMID:18938176

  16. The crystal structure of URu3B2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogl, Peter

    1980-09-01

    The crystal structure of URu3B2 has been determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. URu3B2 crystallizes in the trigonal space group P3bar (C131) with hexagonal lattice a = 1.09531(14), c = 0.59353 (8) nm, Z = 8. Intensity measurements were obtained from a fourcircle diffractometer. The structure was solved by Patterson methods and refined by full matrix least squares calculation. The final R-value, R = ∑ |ΔF|/∑ F0, is 0.052 for an asymetric set of 962 independent reflections (l-F0l > 2 σ (F0)). The crystal structure is a twofold superstructure (distortion-derivative) of the CeCo3B2-type cell (a = 2a', c = 2c' and thus closely related to the CaCu5 type structure. The coordination numbers of U are 2 U + 12 Ru + (6 B) and those of Ru atoms 4 U + 6 Ru + 4 B. The isolated boron atoms have tetrakaidekahedral metal coordination 6 Ru + 3 U; no boron-boron contacts occur. The structural chemistry of (Th, U, RE)Ru3B2 phases is discussed.

  17. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF A PUTATIVE OXIDOREDUCTASE FROM KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE

    SciTech Connect

    Baig, M.; Brown, A.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a gram-negative enteric bacterium, is found in nosocomial infections which are acquired during hospital stays for about 10% of hospital patients in the United States. The crystal structure of a putative oxidoreductase from K. pneumoniae has been determined. The structural information of this K. pneumoniae protein was used to understand its function. Crystals of the putative oxidoreductase enzyme were obtained by the sitting drop vapor diffusion method using Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350, Bis-Tris buffer, pH 5.5 as precipitant. These crystals were used to collect X-ray data at beam line X12C of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The crystal structure was determined using the SHELX program and refi ned with CNS 1.1. This protein, which is involved in the catalysis of an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction, has an alpha/beta structure. It utilizes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) or nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to perform its function. This structure could be used to determine the active and co-factor binding sites of the protein, information that could help pharmaceutical companies in drug design and in determining the protein’s relationship to disease treatment such as that for pneumonia and other related pathologies.

  18. Enhancing the Sensitivity of NDIR Spectroscopy Using Plasmonic Crystal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Amr Elsayed Shebl Mahmoud

    Monitoring the concentration of methane is of crucial importance for health, safety, and maintenance. NDIR spectroscopy is a widely used commercially available method of monitoring the concentration of Gases. Enhancing the sensitivity of the IR detector enhances the limit of detection of NDIR sensors. Plasmonic crystal structures have been shown to enhance the absorption of EM radiation at certain wavelengths depending on their dimensions. In this thesis, a 13 fold enhancement in the LOD of a methane NDIR gas sensor was achieved by designing a plasmonic crystal structure. The structure is a layer of gold with a two dimensional array of micro sized holes. The dimensions of the structure were optimized by COMSOL(TM) simulations to get maximum absorption at lambda = 7:7 mum. The structure was fabricated and the NDIR sensor was developed to experimentally show the enhancement. The experimental results showed good agreement with the simulations and achieved the expected enhancement.

  19. Preparation, structural, and calorimetric characterization of bicomponent metallic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, M. E.; Murthy, N. S.; Udod, I.; Khayrullin, I. I.; Baughman, R. H.; Zakhidov, A. A.

    2007-03-01

    We report preparation and characterization of novel bicomponent metal-based photonic crystals having submicron three-dimensional (3D) periodicity. Fabricated photonic crystals include SiO2 sphere lattices infiltrated interstitially with metals, carbon inverse lattices filled with metal or metal alloy spheres, Sb inverse lattices, and Sb inverse lattices filled with Bi spheres. Starting from a face centered SiO2 lattice template, these materials were obtained by sequences of either templating and template extraction or templating, template extraction, and retemplating. Surprising high fidelity was obtained for all templating and template extraction steps. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to characterize the structure and the effects of the structure on calorimetric properties. To the best of our knowledge, SAXS data on metallic photonic crystals were collected for first time.

  20. Crystal engineering of ibuprofen compounds: From molecule to crystal structure to morphology prediction by computational simulation and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Liang, Zuozhong; Wu, Fei; Chen, Jian-Feng; Xue, Chunyu; Zhao, Hong

    2017-06-01

    We selected the crystal structures of ibuprofen with seven common space groups (Cc, P21/c, P212121, P21, Pbca, Pna21, and Pbcn), which was generated from ibuprofen molecule by molecular simulation. The predicted crystal structures of ibuprofen with space group P21/c has the lowest total energy and the largest density, which is nearly indistinguishable with experimental result. In addition, the XRD patterns for predicted crystal structure are highly consistent with recrystallization from solvent of ibuprofen. That indicates that the simulation can accurately predict the crystal structure of ibuprofen from the molecule. Furthermore, based on this crystal structure, we predicted the crystal habit in vacuum using the attachment energy (AE) method and considered solvent effects in a systematic way using the modified attachment energy (MAE) model. The simulation can accurately construct a complete process from molecule to crystal structure to morphology prediction. Experimentally, we observed crystal morphologies in four different polarity solvents compounds (ethanol, acetonitrile, ethyl acetate, and toluene). We found that the aspect ratio decreases of crystal habits in this ibuprofen system were found to vary with increasing solvent relative polarity. Besides, the modified crystal morphologies are in good agreement with the observed experimental morphologies. Finally, this work may guide computer-aided design of the desirable crystal morphology.

  1. The characterisation of the "X" crystal structure in the Stillinger-Weber potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fijan, Domagoj; Wilson, Mark

    2017-10-01

    A recently observed crystal structure is characterised by reference to the calculated diffraction patterns. The "X" crystal is related to the β -Sn crystal structure via an atom displacement and a reduction in symmetry from tetragonal to orthorhombic. A further crystal polymorph is identified which retains the tetragonal symmetry of the β -Sn structure but involves a related atom displacement. The unit cells and space groups are reported. The two crystals are labelled as o-X and t-X respectively. The transformation mechanisms from the β -Sn crystal structure to the two structures are identified. No routes to these crystals from other polymorphs are found.

  2. Crystal growth, structure analysis and characterisation of 2 - (1, 3 - dioxoisoindolin - 2 - yl) acetic acid single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Sankari, R. Siva; Perumal, Rajesh Narayana

    2014-04-24

    Single crystal of dielectric material 2 - (1, 3 - dioxoisoindolin - 2 - yl) acetic acid has been grown by slow evaporation solution growth method. The grown crystal was harvested in 25 days. The crystal structure was analyzed by Single crystal X - ray diffraction. UV-vis-NIR analysis was performed to examine the optical property of the grown crystal. The thermal property of the grown crystal was studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The dielectric measurements were carried out and the dielectric constant was calculated and plotted at all frequencies.

  3. Crystal growth, spectral, structural and optical studies of π-conjugated stilbazolium crystal: 4-bromobenzaldehyde-4'-N'-methylstilbazolium tosylate.

    PubMed

    Krishna Kumar, M; Sudhahar, S; Bhagavannarayana, G; Mohan Kumar, R

    2014-05-05

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) organic compound, 4-bromobenzaldehyde-4'-N'-methylstilbazolium tosylate was synthesized by reflux method. The formation of molecular complex was confirmed from (1)H NMR, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral analyses. The single crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth method and the crystal structure and atomic packing of grown crystal was identified. The morphology and growth axis of grown crystal were determined. The crystal perfection was analyzed using high resolution X-ray diffraction study on (001) plane. Thermal stability, decomposition stages and melting point of the grown crystal were analyzed. The optical absorption coefficient (α) and energy band gap (E(g)) of the crystal were determined using UV-visible absorption studies. Second harmonic generation efficiency of the grown crystal was examined by Kurtz powder method with different particle size using 1064 nm laser. Laser induced damage threshold study was carried out for the grown crystal using Nd:YAG laser.

  4. Unusual Features of Crystal Structures of Some Simple Copper Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Bodie

    2009-01-01

    Some simple copper compounds have unusual crystal structures. Cu[subscript 3]N is cubic with N atoms at centers of octahedra formed by 6 Cu atoms. Cu[subscript 2]O (cuprite) is also cubic; O atoms are in tetrahedra formed by 4 Cu atoms. These tetrahedra are linked by sharing vertices forming two independent networks without linkages between them.…

  5. Materials research at Stanford University. [composite materials, crystal structure, acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Research activity related to the science of materials is described. The following areas are included: elastic and thermal properties of composite materials, acoustic waves and devices, amorphous materials, crystal structure, synthesis of metal-metal bonds, interactions of solids with solutions, electrochemistry, fatigue damage, superconductivity and molecular physics and phase transition kinetics.

  6. Unusual Features of Crystal Structures of Some Simple Copper Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Bodie

    2009-01-01

    Some simple copper compounds have unusual crystal structures. Cu[subscript 3]N is cubic with N atoms at centers of octahedra formed by 6 Cu atoms. Cu[subscript 2]O (cuprite) is also cubic; O atoms are in tetrahedra formed by 4 Cu atoms. These tetrahedra are linked by sharing vertices forming two independent networks without linkages between them.…

  7. Crystal structures and morphologies of fractionated milk fat in nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Truong, Tuyen; Morgan, Garry P; Bansal, Nidhi; Palmer, Martin; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2015-03-15

    The triacylglycerol (TAG) crystal structures and morphologies of fractionated milk lipids in nanoemulsions were investigated at 4°C. Droplet size (0.17 versus 1.20 μm), lipid composition (stearin versus olein) and cooling rate (1 versus 10°C min(-1)) had an influence on the structural properties. Five crystal polymorphs (α, β'1, β'2, β1, and β2) were formed with either triple and/or double chain length structures in the solid phases of the emulsified systems. X-ray scattering peak intensities were reduced with the nanoemulsion particles. The internal structure of TAG exhibited stacking of individual lamellar layers (3.8-4.2 nm). Various anisometric shapes of fat nanoparticles were formed due to a highly sharp curvature of the nano-size droplets. The shape of olein nanoparticles was more polyhedral compared to the stearin. TAG crystals arranged in a planar-layered organisation at the slower cooling rate. These differences imply that the nanometric confinement of oil droplets modifies the fat crystal habit.

  8. Crystal structure and packing energy calculations of (+)-6-aminopenicillanic acid.

    PubMed

    Saouane, Sofiane; Buth, Gernot; Fabbiani, Francesca P A

    2013-11-01

    The X-ray single-crystal structure of (2S,5R,6R)-6-amino-3,3-dimethyl-7-oxo-4-thia-1-azabicyclo[3.2.0]heptane-2-carboxylic acid, commonly known as (+)-6-aminopenicillanic acid (C8H12N2O3S) and a precursor of a variety of semi-synthetic penicillins, has been determined from synchrotron data at 150 K. The structure represents an ordered zwitterion and the crystals are nonmerohedrally twinned. The crystal structure is composed of a three-dimensional network built by three charge-assisted hydrogen bonds between the ammonium and carboxylate groups. The complementary analysis of the crystal packing by the PIXEL method brings to light the nature and ranking of the energetically most stabilizing intermolecular interaction energies. In accordance with the zwitterionic nature of the structure, PIXEL lattice energy calculations confirm the predominance of the Coulombic term (-379.1 kJ mol(-1)) ahead of the polarization (-141.4 kJ mol(-1)), dispersion (-133.7 kJ mol(-1)) and repulsion (266.3 kJ mol(-1)) contributions.

  9. Crystal and molecular structure of lancerodiol–p–hydroxybenzoate

    PubMed Central

    Abd El–Razek, Mohamed H.; Hegazy, Mohamed–Elamir F.; Mohamed, Abou El–Hamd H.

    2010-01-01

    Lancerodiol–p–hydroxybenzoate was isolated from the leaves of Ferula sinaica L. (Apiaceae) as light needle crystals. This work reports for the first time the molecular structure and relative configuration of compound 1, established by X-ray analysis. PMID:21808543

  10. A unified picture of the crystal structures of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderlind, Per; Eriksson, Olle; Johansson, Börje; Wills, J. M.; Boring, A. M.

    1995-04-01

    THE crystal structures of the light actinides have intrigued physicists and chemists for several decades1. Simple metals and transition metals have close-packed, high-symmetry structures, such as body-centred cubic, face-centred cubic and hexagonal close packing. In contrast, the structures of the light actinides are very loosely packed and of low symmetry-tetragonal, orthorhombic and monoclinic. To understand these differences, we have performed total-energy calculations, as a function of volume, for both high-and low-symmetry structures of a simple metal (aluminium), a non-magnetic transition metal (niobium), a ferromagnetic transition metal (iron) and a light actinide (uranium). We find that the crystal structure of all of these metals is determined by the balance between electrostatic (Madelung) interactions, which favour high symmetry, and a Peierls distortion of the crystal lattice, which favours low symmetry. We show that simple metals and transition metals can adopt low-symmetry structures on expansion of the lattice; and we predict that, conversely, the light actinides will undergo transitions to structures of higher symmetry on compression.

  11. VO{sub 2} (A): Reinvestigation of crystal structure, phase transition and crystal growth mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Rao Popuri, Srinivasa; Artemenko, Alla; Labrugere, Christine; Miclau, Marinela; Villesuzanne, Antoine; Pollet, Michaël

    2014-05-01

    Well crystallized VO{sub 2} (A) microrods were grown via a single step hydrothermal reaction in the presence of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and oxalic acid. With the advantage of high crystalline samples, we propose P4/ncc as an appropriate space group at room temperature. From morphological studies, we found that the oriented attachment and layer by layer growth mechanisms are responsible for the formation of VO{sub 2} (A) micro rods. The structural and electronic transitions in VO{sub 2} (A) are strongly first order in nature, and a marked difference between the structural transition temperatures and electronic transitions temperature was evidenced. The reversible intra- (LTP-A to HTP-A) and irreversible inter- (HTP-A to VO{sub 2} (M1)) structural phase transformations were studied by in-situ powder X-ray diffraction. Attempts to increase the size of the VO{sub 2} (A) microrods are presented and the possible formation steps for the flower-like morphologies of VO{sub 2} (M1) are described. - Graphical abstract: Using a single step and template free hydrothermal synthesis, well crystallized VO{sub 2} (A) microrods were prepared and the P4/ncc space group was assigned to the room temperature crystal structure. Reversible and irreversible phase transitions among different VO{sub 2} polymorphs were identified and their progressive nature was highlighted. Attempts to increase the microrods size, involving layer by layer formation mechanisms, are presented. - Highlights: • Highly crystallized VO{sub 2} (A) microrods were grown via a single step hydrothermal process. • The P4/ncc space group was determined for VO{sub 2} (A) at room temperature. • The electronic structure and progressive nature of the structural phase transition were investigated. • A weak coupling between structural and electronic phase transitions was identified. • Different crystallite morphologies were discussed in relation with growth mechanisms.

  12. Crystallization studies of lunar igneous rocks: crystal structure of synthetic armalcolite.

    PubMed

    Lind, M D; Housley, R M

    1972-02-04

    Crystals of armalcolite, Mg(0.5)Fe(0.5)Ti(2)O(5), up to several millimeters in length have been grown from a glass initially having the composition of lunar rock 10017. A single-crystal x-ray study has confirmed that the crystals are isomorphous with pseudobrookite and has shown that the cations are strongly ordered, with the Ti(4+) ions occupying the 8f sites and the Fe(2+) and Mg(2+) ions randomly distributed over the 4c sites. An examination of karrooite, MgTi(2)O(5), has revealed a similar distribution of Mg(2+) and Ti(4+) ions. A reexamination of earlier x-ray and Mössbauer data for pseudobrookite, Fe(2)TiO(5), has shown that it is more consistent with this type of ordering than with the inverse structure that has been generally assumed.

  13. Single crystal growth, crystal structure characterization and magnetic properties of UCo0.5Sb2

    SciTech Connect

    Bukowski, Z. . E-mail: bukowski@int.pan.wroc.pl; Tran, V.H.; Stepien-Damm, J.; Troc, R.

    2004-11-01

    Single crystals of uranium intermetallic compound UCo0.5Sb2 were grown by means of the antimony-flux technique. The characterization of the samples has been carried out utilizing single crystal X-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. UCo0.5Sb2 is found to crystallize in the tetragonal HfCuSi2-type structure, space group P4/nmm with Z=2 formula units per cell, and the lattice parameters a=0.4300(1) and c=0.8958(2)nm. The refinement of the occupancy parameters and the energy dispersive X-ray analysis have indicated a distinct deficiency on the cobalt sites. The results of magnetization measurements showed that UCo0.5Sb2 orders ferromagnetically below 65K with a huge magnetocrystalline anisotropy with the c direction being the easy magnetization axis.

  14. Crystal Structure of the Bacillus subtilis Superoxide Dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ping; Ewis, H.E.; Huang, Y.-J; Lu, C.-D.; Tai, P.C.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-06-01

    The sodA gene of Bacillus subtilis was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystal structure of MnSOD was solved by molecular replacement with four dimers per asymmetric unit and refined to an R factor of 21.1% at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. The dimer structure is very similar to that of the related enzyme from B. anthracis. Larger structural differences were observed with the human MnSOD, which has one less helix in the helical domain and a longer loop between two -strands and also showed differences in three amino acids at the intersubunit interface in the dimer compared with the two bacterial MnSODs. These structural differences can be exploited in the design of drugs that selectively target the Bacillus enzymes.

  15. Crystal structure and stereochemistry study of 2-substituted benzoxazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mabied, Ahmed F; Shalaby, Elsayed M; Zayed, Hamdia A; El-Kholy, Esmat; Farag, Ibrahim S A; Ahmed, Naima A

    2014-01-01

    The structure of 2-[(4-chlorophenylazo) cyanomethyl] benzoxazole, C15H9ClN4O (I), has triclinic ([Formula: see text]) symmetry. The structure displays N-H ⋯ N hydrogen bonding. The structure of 2-[(arylidene) cyanomethyl] benzoxazoles, C17H10N2O3 (II), has triclinic ([Formula: see text]) symmetry. The structure displays C-H ⋯ N, C-H ⋯ C hydrogen bonding. In (I), the chlorophenyl and benzoxazole groups adopt a trans configuration with respect to the central cyanomethyle hydrazone moiety. Compound (II) crystallized with two molecules in the asymmetric unit shows cisoid conformation between cyano group and benzoxazole nitrogen, contrary to (I). In (II) the benzodioxole has an envelope conformation (the C17 atom is the flap atom). The molecular geometry obtained using molecular mechanics (MM) calculations has been discussed along with the results of single crystal analysis.

  16. Effect of local structures on structural evolution during crystallization in undercooled metallic glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z W; Li, M Z; Wang, W H; Song, W J; Liu, K X

    2013-02-21

    The effect of local structures on structural evolution during the crystallization of undercooled ZrCu metallic glass-forming liquid was studied via molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that body-centered-cubic (bcc)-like clusters play a key role in structural evolution during crystallization. In contrast to previous speculations, the number of bcc-like crystal nuclei does not change much before the onset of crystallization. Instead, the development of a bcc-like critical nucleus during annealing leads to a strong spatial correlation with other nuclei in its surroundings, forming a crystalline structure template. It is also found that the size distribution of bcc-like nuclei follows a power-law form with an exponential cutoff in the early stage of annealing, but changes to a pure power-law behavior just before the onset of crystallization. This implies that the crystalline structure template has fractal feature and the undercooled liquids evolve to a self-organized critical state before the onset of crystallization, which might trigger the subsequent rapid crystallization. According to the graph theory analysis, it is also found that the observed large scatter of the onset time of crystallization in different liquid samples results from the connectivity of the bcc-like clusters.

  17. Crystal Structure of Cold Compressed Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsler, Maximilian; Flores-Livas, José A.; Lehtovaara, Lauri; Balima, Felix; Ghasemi, S. Alireza; Machon, Denis; Pailhès, Stéphane; Willand, Alexander; Caliste, Damien; Botti, Silvana; San Miguel, Alfonso; Goedecker, Stefan; Marques, Miguel A. L.

    2012-02-01

    Through a systematic structural search we found an allotrope of carbon with Cmmm symmetry which we predict to be more stable than graphite for pressures above 10 GPa. This material, which we refer to as Z-carbon, is formed by pure sp3 bonds and it provides an explanation to several features in experimental x-ray diffraction and Raman spectra of graphite under pressure. The transition from graphite to Z-carbon can occur through simple sliding and buckling of graphene sheets. Our calculations predict that Z-carbon is a transparent wide band-gap semiconductor with a hardness comparable to diamond.

  18. Crystal structures at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Wendel Alexander

    2000-10-01

    The diamond anvil cell (DAC) is a unique instrument that can generate pressures equivalent to those inside planetary interiors (pressures on the order of 1 million atmospheres) under sustained conditions. When combined with a bright source of collimated x-rays, the DAC can be used to probe the structure of materials in-situ at ultra-high pressures. An understanding of the high-pressure structure of materials is important in determining what types of processes may take place in the Earth at great depths. Motivated by previous studies showing that xenon becomes metallic at pressures above ˜1 megabar (100 GPa), we examined the stable structures and reactivity of xenon at pressures approaching that of the core-mantle boundary in the Earth. Our findings indicate the transformation of xenon from face-centered cubic (fcc) to hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structures is kinetically hindered at room temperature, with the equilibrium fcc--hcp phase boundary at 21 (+/-3) gigapascals, a pressure lower than was previously thought. Additionally, we find no tendency on the part of xenon to form a metal alloy with iron or platinum to at least 100 to 150 gigapascals, making it unlikely that the Earth's core serves as a reservoir for primordial xenon. Measurements of the compressibility of natural (Mg.75,Fe .25)2SiO4 gamma-spinel at pressures of the Earth's transition zone yield a pressure derivative of the bulk modulus K0 ' = 6.3 (+/-0.3). As gamma-spinel is considered to be a dominant mineral phase of the transition-zone of the Earth's mantle (400--670 km depth), the relatively high value of K0' for gamma-spinel may help explain the rapid increase with depth of seismic velocities through the transition zone. The thermodynamics, mechanisms and kinetics of pressure-induced amorphization are not well understood. We report here new studies indicating little or no entropy difference between the crystalline and glassy states of Ca(OH) 2 (portlandite). Additional work on the pressure

  19. Single Crystal Structure Determination of Alumina to 1 Mbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, H.; Zhang, L.; Prakapenka, V.; Mao, H.

    2014-12-01

    Aluminum oxide (Al2O3) is an important ceramic material and a major oxide in the earth. Additionally, alumina is a widely used pressure standard in static high-pressure experiments (Cr3+-bearing corundum, ruby). The changes of its crystal structure with pressure (P) and temperature (T) are important for its applications and understanding its physical properties in the deep Earth. There have been numerous reports on the high P-T polymorphs of alumina. Previous theoretical calculations and experiments suggest that the crystal structure of Al2O3 evolves greatly at high P-T. In this study, we used the newly developed multigrain crystallography method combined with single-crystal x-ray diffraction analysis technique for the structure determination of alumina at high P-T to provide single-crystal structure refinement for high-pressure phases of Al2O3. Alumina powder was mixed with ~10% Pt and Ne was used as both pressure transmitting media and thermal insulating layers during laser-heating. Coarse-grained aggregates of Al2O3 were synthesized in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The structure change of Al2O3 was monitored by in situ x-ray diffraction at ~1 Mbar and 2700 K. The results allow us to distinguish the structural differences between the Rh2O3 (II) structure (space group Pbcn) and perovskite structure (space group Pbnm) for the first high-pressure phase of Al2O3. More detailed results will be discussed in the later work.

  20. Crystal structure of new AsS2 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotina, N. B.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Dyuzheva, T. I.; Lityagina, L. M.; Kulikova, L. F.; Nikolaev, N. A.; Verin, I. A.

    2013-01-01

    AsS2 single crystals have been obtained for the first time from an As2S3 melt at pressures above 6 GPa and temperatures above 800 K in the As2S3 → AsS + AsS2 reaction. The monoclinic structure of the new high-pressure phase is solved by X-ray diffraction analysis and compared to the structure of high-pressure AsS phase, which was studied previously.

  1. Structural evolution in the crystallization of rapid cooling silver melt

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Z.A.; Dong, K.J.; Yu, A.B.

    2015-03-15

    The structural evolution in a rapid cooling process of silver melt has been investigated at different scales by adopting several analysis methods. The results testify Ostwald’s rule of stages and Frank conjecture upon icosahedron with many specific details. In particular, the cluster-scale analysis by a recent developed method called LSCA (the Largest Standard Cluster Analysis) clarified the complex structural evolution occurred in crystallization: different kinds of local clusters (such as ico-like (ico is the abbreviation of icosahedron), ico-bcc like (bcc, body-centred cubic), bcc, bcc-like structures) in turn have their maximal numbers as temperature decreases. And in a rather wide temperature range the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) demonstrates a saturated stage (where the amount of ico-like structures keeps stable) that breeds metastable bcc clusters. As the precursor of crystallization, after reaching the maximal number bcc clusters finally decrease, resulting in the final solid being a mixture mainly composed of fcc/hcp (face-centred cubic and hexagonal-closed packed) clusters and to a less degree, bcc clusters. This detailed geometric picture for crystallization of liquid metal is believed to be useful to improve the fundamental understanding of liquid–solid phase transition. - Highlights: • A comprehensive structural analysis is conducted focusing on crystallization. • The involved atoms in our analysis are more than 90% for all samples concerned. • A series of distinct intermediate states are found in crystallization of silver melt. • A novelty icosahedron-saturated state breeds the metastable bcc state.

  2. Tailor-made force fields for crystal-structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Marcus A

    2008-08-14

    A general procedure is presented to derive a complete set of force-field parameters for flexible molecules in the crystalline state on a case-by-case basis. The force-field parameters are fitted to the electrostatic potential as well as to accurate energies and forces generated by means of a hybrid method that combines solid-state density functional theory (DFT) calculations with an empirical van der Waals correction. All DFT calculations are carried out with the VASP program. The mathematical structure of the force field, the generation of reference data, the choice of the figure of merit, the optimization algorithm, and the parameter-refinement strategy are discussed in detail. The approach is applied to cyclohexane-1,4-dione, a small flexible ring. The tailor-made force field obtained for cyclohexane-1,4-dione is used to search for low-energy crystal packings in all 230 space groups with one molecule per asymmetric unit, and the most stable crystal structures are reoptimized in a second step with the hybrid method. The experimental crystal structure is found as the most stable predicted crystal structure both with the tailor-made force field and the hybrid method. The same methodology has also been applied successfully to the four compounds of the fourth CCDC blind test on crystal-structure prediction. For the five aforementioned compounds, the root-mean-square deviations between lattice energies calculated with the tailor-made force fields and the hybrid method range from 0.024 to 0.053 kcal/mol per atom around an average value of 0.034 kcal/mol per atom.

  3. Structural, magnetic and optical properties of two concomitant molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Manuela Ramos; Milne, Bruce; Coutinho, Joana T.; Pereira, Laura C. J.; Martín-Ramos, Pablo; Pereira da Silva, Pedro S.; Martín-Gil, Jesús

    2016-03-01

    A new 1D complex has been prepared and characterized. X-ray single crystal structure confirms that the Cu(II) ions assemble in alternating chains with Cu … Cu distances of 2.5685(4) and 3.1760(4) Å. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility reveals an antiferromagnetic interaction between the paddle-wheel copper centers with an exchange of -300 cm-1. The exchange integral was also determined by quantum chemical ab-initio calculations, using polarised and unpolarised basis sets reproducing well the experimental value. The second harmonic generation efficiency of a concomitantly crystallized material was evaluated and was found to be comparable to urea.

  4. On calculating the equilibrium structure of molecular crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet; Wixom, Ryan R.; Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene

    2010-03-01

    The difficulty of calculating the ambient properties of molecular crystals, such as the explosive PETN, has long hampered much needed computational investigations of these materials. One reason for the shortcomings is that the exchange-correlation functionals available for Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations do not correctly describe the weak intermolecular van der Waals' forces present in molecular crystals. However, this weak interaction also poses other challenges for the computational schemes used. We will discuss these issues in the context of calculations of lattice constants and structure of PETN with a number of different functionals, and also discuss if these limitations can be circumvented for studies at non-ambient conditions.

  5. Crystal structure of alpha poly-p-xylylene.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubo, S.; Wunderlich, B.

    1971-01-01

    A crystal structure of alpha poly-p-xylylene is proposed with the help of data of oriented crystals grown during polymerization. The unit cell is monoclinic with the parameters a = 8.57 A, b = 10.62 A, c = 6.54 A (chain axis), and beta = 101.3 deg. Four repeating units per cell lead to a calculated density of 1.185 g/cu cm and a packing density of 0.71. The probable space group is P2 sub 1/m.

  6. Crystal structure of tin(IV) chloride octa-hydrate.

    PubMed

    Hennings, Erik; Schmidt, Horst; Voigt, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    The title compound, [SnCl4(H2O)2]·6H2O, was crystallized according to the solid-liquid phase diagram at lower temperatures. It is built-up of SnCl4(H2O)2 octa-hedral units (point group symmetry 2) and lattice water mol-ecules. An intricate three-dimensional network of O-H⋯O and O-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds between the complex molecules and the lattice water molecules is formed in the crystal structure.

  7. Crystal Structure of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Hexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiu-Gong; Maldonado, Ernesto; Perez-Montfort, Ruy; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Tuena de Gomez-Puyou, Marietta; Gomez-Puyou, Armando; Rodriguez-Romero, Adela

    1999-08-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms of enzyme catalysis in organic solvents, the x-ray structure of some monomeric enzymes in organic solvents was determined. However, it remained to be explored whether the structure of oligomeric proteins is also amenable to such analysis. The field acquired new perspectives when it was proposed that the x-ray structure of enzymes in nonaqueous media could reveal binding sites for organic solvents that in principle could represent the starting point for drug design. Here, a crystal of the dimeric enzyme triosephosphate isomerase from the pathogenic parasite Trypanosoma cruzi was soaked and diffracted in hexane and its structure solved at 2- angstrom resolution. Its overall structure and the dimer interface were not altered by hexane. However, there were differences in the orientation of the side chains of several amino acids, including that of the catalytic Glu-168 in one of the monomers. No hexane molecules were detected in the active site or in the dimer interface. However, three hexane molecules were identified on the surface of the protein at sites, which in the native crystal did not have water molecules. The number of water molecules in the hexane structure was higher than in the native crystal. Two hexanes localized at <4 angstrom from residues that form the dimer interface; they were in close proximity to a site that has been considered a potential target for drug design.

  8. Crystal structure of triosephosphate isomerase from Trypanosoma cruzi in hexane

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiu-Gong; Maldonado, Ernesto; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; de Gómez-Puyou, Marietta Tuena; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela

    1999-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms of enzyme catalysis in organic solvents, the x-ray structure of some monomeric enzymes in organic solvents was determined. However, it remained to be explored whether the structure of oligomeric proteins is also amenable to such analysis. The field acquired new perspectives when it was proposed that the x-ray structure of enzymes in nonaqueous media could reveal binding sites for organic solvents that in principle could represent the starting point for drug design. Here, a crystal of the dimeric enzyme triosephosphate isomerase from the pathogenic parasite Trypanosoma cruzi was soaked and diffracted in hexane and its structure solved at 2-Å resolution. Its overall structure and the dimer interface were not altered by hexane. However, there were differences in the orientation of the side chains of several amino acids, including that of the catalytic Glu-168 in one of the monomers. No hexane molecules were detected in the active site or in the dimer interface. However, three hexane molecules were identified on the surface of the protein at sites, which in the native crystal did not have water molecules. The number of water molecules in the hexane structure was higher than in the native crystal. Two hexanes localized at <4 Å from residues that form the dimer interface; they were in close proximity to a site that has been considered a potential target for drug design. PMID:10468562

  9. Crystal structure of 4-carbamoylpyridinium chloride

    PubMed Central

    Fellows, Simon M.; Prior, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    The hydro­chloride salt of isonicotinamide, C6H7N2O+·Cl−, has been synthesized from a dilute solution of hydro­chloric acid in aceto­nitrile. The compound displays monoclinic symmetry (space group C2/c) at 150 K, similar to the related hydro­chloride salt of nicotinamide. The asymmetric unit contains one protonated isonicotinamide mol­ecule and a chloride anion. An array of hydrogen-bonding inter­actions, including a peculiar bifurcated pyridinium–chloride inter­action, results in linear chains running almost perpendicularly in the [150] and [1-50] directions within the structure. A description of the hydrogen-bonding network and comparison with similar compounds are presented. PMID:27375858

  10. Crystal structure representations for machine learning models of formation energies

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, Felix; Lindmaa, Alexander; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Armiento, Rickard

    2015-04-20

    We introduce and evaluate a set of feature vector representations of crystal structures for machine learning (ML) models of formation energies of solids. ML models of atomization energies of organic molecules have been successful using a Coulomb matrix representation of the molecule. We consider three ways to generalize such representations to periodic systems: (i) a matrix where each element is related to the Ewald sum of the electrostatic interaction between two different atoms in the unit cell repeated over the lattice; (ii) an extended Coulomb-like matrix that takes into account a number of neighboring unit cells; and (iii) an ansatz that mimics the periodicity and the basic features of the elements in the Ewald sum matrix using a sine function of the crystal coordinates of the atoms. The representations are compared for a Laplacian kernel with Manhattan norm, trained to reproduce formation energies using a dataset of 3938 crystal structures obtained from the Materials Project. For training sets consisting of 3000 crystals, the generalization error in predicting formation energies of new structures corresponds to (i) 0.49, (ii) 0.64, and (iii) 0.37eV/atom for the respective representations.

  11. Growth and crystal structure of LiCuO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Katsuhiro; Koike, Masayoshi; Sawa, Hiroshi; Takei, Humihiko

    1993-03-01

    A new crystal LiCuO2 is synthesized from Li2CuO2 using a topotactic reaction by Li extraction. X-ray measurements reveal that the crystal system of the LiCuO2 is orthorhombic, the space group is Cmmm, and the lattice parameters are a = 5.7078(6) Å, b = 9.639(2) Å, and c = 2.7172(3) Å. The crystal structure determined by Rietveld analysis is closely related to that of Li2CuO2 and of NaCuO2. Magnetic measurement of LiCuO2 shows temperature-independent paramagnetism similar to that of NaCuO2.

  12. Crystal structure and density of helium to 232 kbar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, H. K.; Wu, Y.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Hemley, R. J.; Bell, P. M.; Bassett, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of helium and hydrogen at high pressure are topics of great interest to the understanding of planetary interiors. These materials constitute 95 percent of the entire solar system. A technique was presented for the measurement of X-ray diffraction from single-crystals of low-Z condenses gases in a diamond-anvil cell at high pressure. The first such single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements on solid hydrogen to 26.5 GPa were presented. The application of this technique to the problem of the crystal structure, equation of state, and phase diagram of solid helium is reported. Crucial for X-ray diffraction studies of these materials is the use of a synchrotron radiation source which provides high brillance, narrow collimation of the incident and diffracted X-ray beams to reduce the background noise, and energy-dispersive diffraction techniques with polychromatic (white) radiation, which provides high detection efficiency.

  13. Production, crystallization and structure determination of a mycobacterial glucosylglycerate hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Cereija, Tatiana Barros; Alarico, Susana; Empadinhas, Nuno; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2017-09-01

    Glucosylglycerate hydrolase is highly conserved among rapidly growing mycobacteria and has been found to be involved in recovery from nitrogen starvation by promoting the rapid mobilization of the glucosylglycerate that accumulates under these conditions. Here, the production, crystallization and structure determination of glucosylglycerate hydrolase from Mycobacterium hassiacum using two-wavelength anomalous diffraction of selenomethionine-substituted crystals are described. The monoclinic (space group P21) crystals diffracted to ∼2.0 Å resolution at a synchrotron-radiation source and contained four molecules in the asymmetric unit, corresponding to a Matthews coefficient of 3.07 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 59.9%. The quality of the experimental phases allowed the automated building of 1677 of the 1792 residues in the asymmetric unit.

  14. Gas and crystal structures of CCl2FSCN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Yanina Berrueta; Rodríguez Pirani, Lucas S.; Erben, Mauricio F.; Boese, Roland; Reuter, Christian G.; Vishnevskiy, Yury V.; Mitzel, Norbert W.; Della Védova, Carlos O.

    2017-03-01

    Dichlorofluoromethyl thiocyanate, CCl2FSCN, was structurally studied in the solid and in the gas phase by means of single-crystal X-ray (XRD) and gas electron diffraction (GED), respectively. In the gas phase the title molecule adopts two stable conformers, described by the FC-SC dihedral angle. The gauche-conformer (FC bond with respect to the SC bond) is more stable than the anti-conformer. In this work we present the first experimental evidence for the existence of the anti-CF2ClSCN form. In the solid state only the most stable gauche-conformer was found. Intermolecular interactions were detected in the crystal structure and analyzed. A structural comparison of the results with those of related species as CCl2FSCN, CCl3SCN and CH2ClSCN is presented.

  15. GPCR crystal structures: Medicinal chemistry in the pocket.

    PubMed

    Shonberg, Jeremy; Kling, Ralf C; Gmeiner, Peter; Löber, Stefan

    2015-07-15

    Recent breakthroughs in GPCR structural biology have significantly increased our understanding of drug action at these therapeutically relevant receptors, and this will undoubtedly lead to the design of better therapeutics. In recent years, crystal structures of GPCRs from classes A, B, C and F have been solved, unveiling a precise snapshot of ligand-receptor interactions. Furthermore, some receptors have been crystallized in different functional states in complex with antagonists, partial agonists, full agonists, biased agonists and allosteric modulators, providing further insight into the mechanisms of ligand-induced GPCR activation. It is now obvious that there is enormous diversity in the size, shape and position of the ligand binding pockets in GPCRs. In this review, we summarise the current state of solved GPCR structures, with a particular focus on ligand-receptor interactions in the binding pocket, and how this can contribute to the design of GPCR ligands with better affinity, subtype selectivity or efficacy.

  16. Myelin structures formed by thermotropic smectic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Peddireddy, Karthik; Kumar, Pramoda; Thutupalli, Shashi; Herminghaus, Stephan; Bahr, Christian

    2013-12-17

    We report on transient structures, formed by thermotropic smectic-A liquid crystals, resembling the myelin figures of lyotropic lamellar liquid crystals. The thermotropic myelin structures form during the solubilization of a smectic-A droplet in an aqueous phase containing a cationic surfactant at concentrations above the critical micelle concentration. Similar to the lyotropic myelin figures, the thermotropic myelins appear in an optical microscope as flexible tubelike structures growing at the smectic/aqueous interface. Polarizing microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy show that the smectic layers are parallel to the tube surface and form a cylindrically bent arrangement around a central line defect in the tube. We study the growth behavior of this new type of myelins and discuss similarities to and differences from the classical lyotropic myelin figures.

  17. Anisotropic crystal structure of magnetized neutron star crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiko, D. A.; Kozhberov, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Although the crystallized neutron star crust is responsible for many fascinating observational phenomena, its actual microscopic structure in tremendous gravitational and magnetic fields is not understood. Here we show that in a non-uniform magnetic field, three-dimensional ionic Coulomb crystals comprising the crust may stretch or shrink while their electrostatic pressure becomes anisotropic. The pressure depends non-linearly on the magnitude of the stretch, so that a continuous magnetic field evolution may result in an abrupt crystal elongation or contraction. This may provide a trigger for magnetar activity. A phonon-mode instability is revealed, which sets the limits of magnetic field variation beyond which the crystal is destroyed. These limits sometimes correspond to surprisingly large deformations. It is not known what happens to crust matter subjected to a pressure anisotropy exceeding these limits. We hypothesize that the ion system then possesses a long-range order only in one or two dimensions, i.e. becomes a liquid crystal.

  18. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins for Structure Determination using Lipidic Mesophases

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Martin; Porter, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    A detailed protocol for crystallizing membrane proteins by using lipidic mesophases is described. This method has variously been referred to as the lipidic cubic phase or in meso method. The method has been shown to be quite versatile in that it has been used to solve X-ray crystallographic structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins, proteins that are monomeric, homo- and hetero-multimeric, chromophore-containing and chromophore-free, and alpha-helical and beta-barrel proteins. Recent successes using in meso crystallization are the human engineered beta2-adrenergic and adenosine A2a G protein-coupled receptors. Protocols are presented for reconstituting the membrane protein into the monoolein-based mesophase, and for setting up crystallizations in the manual mode. Additional steps in the overall process, such as crystal harvesting, are to be addressed in future video articles. The time required to prepare the protein-loaded mesophase and to set up a crystallization plate manually is about one hour. PMID:21113125

  19. Crystal structure of a symbiosis-related lectin from octocoral.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Sakai, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yukio; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    D-Galactose-binding lectin from the octocoral, Sinularia lochmodes (SLL-2), distributes densely on the cell surface of microalgae, Symbiodinium sp., an endosymbiotic dinoflagellate of the coral, and is also shown to be a chemical cue that transforms dinoflagellate into a non-motile (coccoid) symbiotic state. SLL-2 binds with high affinity to the Forssman antigen (N-acetylgalactosamine(GalNAc)α1-3GalNAcβ1-3Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc-ceramide), and the presence of Forssman antigen-like sugar on the surface of Symbiodinium CS-156 cells was previously confirmed. Here we report the crystal structures of SLL-2 and its GalNAc complex as the first crystal structures of a lectin involved in the symbiosis between coral and dinoflagellate. N-Linked sugar chains and a galactose derivative binding site common to H-type lectins were observed in each monomer of the hexameric SLL-2 crystal structure. In addition, unique sugar-binding site-like regions were identified at the top and bottom of the hexameric SLL-2 structure. These structural features suggest a possible binding mode between SLL-2 and Forssman antigen-like pentasaccharide.

  20. Random hcp and fcc structures in thermoresponsive microgel crystals.

    PubMed

    Brijitta, J; Tata, B V R; Joshi, R G; Kaliyappan, T

    2009-08-21

    Monodisperse thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel particles having a diameter of 520 nm were synthesized by free-radical precipitation polymerization and centrifuged to obtain a concentrated suspension. The centrifuged mother suspension was made to self-order into a crystalline state by repeated annealing beyond the volume phase transition (VPT) of the particles. We report here the three-dimensional (3D) real space structure, determined using a confocal laser scanning microscope, of PNIPAM microgel crystal samples prepared by two different recrystallized routes: (1) solidifying a shear melted colloidal liquid (referred as as-prepared sample) and (2) slow cooling of a colloidal liquid (referred as recrystallized sample). We have recorded images of several regions of the crystal with each region containing 15 horizontal crystal planes for determining the in-plane [two-dimensional (2D)] and 3D pair-correlation functions. The 2D pair-correlation function g(r) revealed hexagonal long-range order of particles in the layers with a lattice constant of 620 nm. The analysis of stacking sequence of layers recorded on as-prepared sample has revealed the existence of stacking disorder with an average stacking probability alpha approximately 0.42. This value of alpha together with the analysis of 3D pair-correlation function determined from particle positions revealed the structure of microgel crystals in the as-prepared sample to be random hexagonal close packing. We report the first observation of a split second peak in the 3D g(r) of the microgel crystals obtained from a shear melted liquid. Upon melting the sample above VPT and recrystallizing it the split second peak disappeared and the crystals are found to have a face centered cubic (fcc) structure with alpha approximately 0.95. From simulations, the split second peak is shown to arise from the displacement of some of the B-planes from the ideal hcp positions. The present results are discussed in

  1. Synthetic antibodies for specific recognition and crystallization of structured RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jing-Dong; Tereshko, Valentina; Frederiksen, John K.; Koide, Akiko; Fellouse, Frederic A.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Koide, Shohei; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    Antibodies that bind protein antigens are indispensable in biochemical research and modern medicine. However, knowledge of RNA-binding antibodies and their application in the ever-growing RNA field is lacking. Here we have developed a robust approach using a synthetic phage-display library to select specific antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) targeting a large functional RNA. We have solved the crystal structure of the first Fab–RNA complex at 1.95 Å. Capability in phasing and crystal contact formation suggests that the Fab provides a potentially valuable crystal chaperone for RNA. The crystal structure reveals that the Fab achieves specific RNA binding on a shallow surface with complementarity-determining region (CDR) sequence diversity, length variability, and main-chain conformational plasticity. The Fab–RNA interface also differs significantly from Fab–protein interfaces in amino acid composition and light-chain participation. These findings yield valuable insights for engineering of Fabs as RNA-binding modules and facilitate further development of Fabs as possible therapeutic drugs and biochemical tools to explore RNA biology. PMID:18162543

  2. Structural engineering of three-dimensional phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpero, Tommaso; Schoenwald, Stefan; Zemp, Armin; Bergamini, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Artificially-structured materials are attracting the research interest of a growing community of scientists for the possibility to develop novel materials with advantageous properties that arise from the ability to tailor the propagation of elastic waves, and thus energy, through them. In this work, we propose a three-dimensional phononic crystal whose unit cell has been engineered to obtain a strong wave-attenuation band in the middle of the acoustic frequency range. The combination of its acoustic properties with the dimensions of the unit cell and its static mechanical properties makes it an interesting material for possibly several applications in civil and mechanical engineering, for instance as the core of an acoustically insulating sandwich panel. A sample of this crystal has been manufactured and experimentally tested with respect to its acoustic transmissibility. The performance of the phononic crystal core is remarkable both in terms of amplitude reduction in the transmissibility and width of the attenuation band. A parametric study has been finally conducted on selected geometrical parameters of the unit cell and on their effect on the macroscopic properties of the crystal. This work represents an application-oriented example of how the macroscopic properties of an artificially-structured material can be designed, according to specific needs, by a conventional engineering of its unit cell.

  3. One dimensional coordination polymers: Synthesis, crystal structures and spectroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaağaç, Dursun; Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla; Şenyel, Mustafa; Şahin, Onur

    2016-11-01

    Two new one dimensional (1D) cyanide complexes, namely [M(4-aepy)2(H2O)2][Pt(CN)4], (4-aepy = 4-(2-aminoethyl)pyridine M = Cu(II) (1) or Zn(II) (2)), have been synthesized and characterized by vibrational (FT-IR and Raman) spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, thermal and elemental analyses techniques. The crystallographic analyses reveal that 1 and 2 are isomorphous and isostructural, and crystallize in the monoclinic system and C2 space group. The Pt(II) ions are coordinated by four cyanide-carbon atoms in the square-planar geometry and the [Pt(CN)4]2- ions act as a counter ion. The M(II) ions display an N4O2 coordination sphere with a distorted octahedral geometry, the nitrogen donors belonging to four molecules of the organic 4-aepy that act as unidentate ligands and two oxygen atoms from aqua ligands. The crystal structures of 1 and 2 are similar each other and linked via intermolecular hydrogen bonding, Pt⋯π interactions to form 3D supramolecular network. Vibration assignments of all the observed bands are given and the spectral features also supported to the crystal structures of the complexes.

  4. Crystal structure of four-stranded Oxytricha telomeric DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C.; Zhang, X.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1992-01-01

    The sequence d(GGGGTTTTGGGG) from the 3' overhang of the Oxytricha telomere has been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure solved to 2.5 A resolution. The oligonucleotide forms hairpins, two of which join to make a four-stranded helical structure with the loops containing four thymine residues at either end. The guanine residues are held together by cyclic hydrogen bonding and an ion is located in the centre. The four guanine residues in each segment have a glycosyl conformation that alternates between anti and syn. There are two four-stranded molecules in the asymmetric unit showing that the structure has some intrinsic flexibility.

  5. Crystal structure of inactive form of Rab3B

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Shen, Yang; Jiao, Ronghong; Liu, Yanli; Deng, Lingfu; Qi, Chao

    2012-06-28

    Rab proteins are the largest family of ras-related GTPases in eukaryotic cells. They act as directional molecular switches at membrane trafficking, including vesicle budding, cargo sorting, transport, tethering, and fusion. Here, we generated and crystallized the Rab3B:GDP complex. The structure of the complex was solved to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution and the structural base comparison with other Rab3 members provides a structural basis for the GDP/GTP switch in controlling the activity of small GTPase. The comparison of charge distribution among the members of Rab3 also indicates their different roles in vesicular trafficking.

  6. Crystal structure of four-stranded Oxytricha telomeric DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, C.; Zhang, X.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1992-01-01

    The sequence d(GGGGTTTTGGGG) from the 3' overhang of the Oxytricha telomere has been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure solved to 2.5 A resolution. The oligonucleotide forms hairpins, two of which join to make a four-stranded helical structure with the loops containing four thymine residues at either end. The guanine residues are held together by cyclic hydrogen bonding and an ion is located in the centre. The four guanine residues in each segment have a glycosyl conformation that alternates between anti and syn. There are two four-stranded molecules in the asymmetric unit showing that the structure has some intrinsic flexibility.

  7. Crystal structure and microstructure of cholesteryl oleyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Das, Pradip; De, Joyes

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structure as well as the microstructure, i.e., size and strain, of crystallites of cholesteryl oleyl carbonate was determined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The X-ray line broadening was analyzed through the refinement of TCH-pseudo-Voigt function parameters (isotropic effects) and the refinement of multipolar functions, i.e., symmetrized cubic harmonics (anisotropic effects). The crystal structure turns out to be primitive monoclinic, space group Pc, type I monolayer having two molecules per unit cell with parameters: a=18.921±0.006Å, b=12.952±0.003Å, c=9.276±0.002Å and β=91.32±0.03°. The average size of a well ground specimen of crystallites was 60nm. The average micro-strain, e.g., 45×10(-4) has been tentatively attributed to fatty chain conformational disorder. The unit cell parameters, including the lamellar thickness, of COC crystal is very closely similar to those of another, structurally similar cholesterol ester, e.g., cholesteryl oleate (CO) crystal, space group P2(1), type II monolayer. Type I monolayer structure has been established for COC on the basis of the intensity calculations of the XRD profiles of both CO and COC. The dipolar and structural disorder in a 4:1 molar, binary mixture of CO and COC can be accommodated in an induced smectic phase with a lamellar thickness, which is nearly equal to that of pure CO or pure COC.

  8. Two crystal structures of the leupeptin-trypsin complex.

    PubMed Central

    Kurinov, I. V.; Harrison, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    Three-dimensional structures of trypsin with the reversible inhibitor leupeptin have been determined in two different crystal forms. The first structure was determined at 1.7 A resolution with R-factor = 17.7% in the trigonal crystal space group P3(1)21, with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 55.62 A, c = 110.51 A. The second structure was determined at a resolution of 1.8 A with R-factor = 17.5% in the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit cell dimensions of a = 63.69 A, b = 69.37 A, c = 63.01 A. The overall protein structure is very similar in both crystal forms, with RMS difference for main-chain atoms of 0.27 A. The leupeptin backbone forms four hydrogen bonds with trypsin and a fifth hydrogen bond interaction is mediated by a water molecule. The aldehyde carbonyl of leupeptin forms a covalent bond of 1.42 A length with side-chain oxygen of Ser-195 in the active site. The reaction of trypsin with leupeptin proceeds through the formation of stable tetrahedral complex in which the hemiacetal oxygen atom is pointing out of the oxyanion hole and forming a hydrogen bond with His-57. PMID:8845765

  9. Crystal structure optimisation using an auxiliary equation of state.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Adam J; Skelton, Jonathan M; Hendon, Christopher H; Butler, Keith T; Walsh, Aron

    2015-11-14

    Standard procedures for local crystal-structure optimisation involve numerous energy and force calculations. It is common to calculate an energy-volume curve, fitting an equation of state around the equilibrium cell volume. This is a computationally intensive process, in particular, for low-symmetry crystal structures where each isochoric optimisation involves energy minimisation over many degrees of freedom. Such procedures can be prohibitive for non-local exchange-correlation functionals or other "beyond" density functional theory electronic structure techniques, particularly where analytical gradients are not available. We present a simple approach for efficient optimisation of crystal structures based on a known equation of state. The equilibrium volume can be predicted from one single-point calculation and refined with successive calculations if required. The approach is validated for PbS, PbTe, ZnS, and ZnTe using nine density functionals and applied to the quaternary semiconductor Cu2ZnSnS4 and the magnetic metal-organic framework HKUST-1.

  10. Structural evolution in the crystallization of rapid cooling silver melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Z. A.; Dong, K. J.; Yu, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    The structural evolution in a rapid cooling process of silver melt has been investigated at different scales by adopting several analysis methods. The results testify Ostwald's rule of stages and Frank conjecture upon icosahedron with many specific details. In particular, the cluster-scale analysis by a recent developed method called LSCA (the Largest Standard Cluster Analysis) clarified the complex structural evolution occurred in crystallization: different kinds of local clusters (such as ico-like (ico is the abbreviation of icosahedron), ico-bcc like (bcc, body-centred cubic), bcc, bcc-like structures) in turn have their maximal numbers as temperature decreases. And in a rather wide temperature range the icosahedral short-range order (ISRO) demonstrates a saturated stage (where the amount of ico-like structures keeps stable) that breeds metastable bcc clusters. As the precursor of crystallization, after reaching the maximal number bcc clusters finally decrease, resulting in the final solid being a mixture mainly composed of fcc/hcp (face-centred cubic and hexagonal-closed packed) clusters and to a less degree, bcc clusters. This detailed geometric picture for crystallization of liquid metal is believed to be useful to improve the fundamental understanding of liquid-solid phase transition.

  11. Crystal structure optimisation using an auxiliary equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Adam J.; Skelton, Jonathan M.; Hendon, Christopher H.; Butler, Keith T.; Walsh, Aron

    2015-11-14

    Standard procedures for local crystal-structure optimisation involve numerous energy and force calculations. It is common to calculate an energy–volume curve, fitting an equation of state around the equilibrium cell volume. This is a computationally intensive process, in particular, for low-symmetry crystal structures where each isochoric optimisation involves energy minimisation over many degrees of freedom. Such procedures can be prohibitive for non-local exchange-correlation functionals or other “beyond” density functional theory electronic structure techniques, particularly where analytical gradients are not available. We present a simple approach for efficient optimisation of crystal structures based on a known equation of state. The equilibrium volume can be predicted from one single-point calculation and refined with successive calculations if required. The approach is validated for PbS, PbTe, ZnS, and ZnTe using nine density functionals and applied to the quaternary semiconductor Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} and the magnetic metal-organic framework HKUST-1.

  12. Revisiting the crystal structure of rhombohedral lead metaniobate.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Gerhard Henning; Sørby, Magnus Helgerud; Hauback, Bjørn Christian; Selbach, Sverre Magnus; Grande, Tor

    2014-09-15

    Lead metaniobate (PbNb2O6) can exist both as a stable rhombohedral and a metastable orthorhombic tungsten-bronze-type polymorph. Although the orthorhombic is a well-known ferroelectric material, the rhombohedral polymorph has been far less studied. The crystal structure and energetic stability of the stable rhombohedral polymorph of lead metaniobate is re-examined by powder X-ray diffraction and powder neutron diffraction in combination with ab initio calculations. We show that this structure is described by the polar space group R3, in contradiction to the previously reported space group R3m. The crystal structure is unusual, consisting of edge-sharing dimers of NbO(6/2) octahedra forming layers with 6- and 3-fold rings of octahedra and lead ions in channels formed by these rings. The layers are connected by corner-sharing between octahedra. Finally, the crystal structure is discussed in relation to other AB2O6 compounds with B = Nb, Ta.

  13. Combined crystal structure prediction and high-pressure crystallization in rational pharmaceutical polymorph screening

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, M. A.; van de Streek, J.; Fabbiani, F. P. A.; Hidber, P.; Grassmann, O.

    2015-01-01

    Organic molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, agro-chemicals and pigments, frequently form several crystal polymorphs with different physicochemical properties. Finding polymorphs has long been a purely experimental game of trial-and-error. Here we utilize in silico polymorph screening in combination with rationally planned crystallization experiments to study the polymorphism of the pharmaceutical compound Dalcetrapib, with 10 torsional degrees of freedom one of the most flexible molecules ever studied computationally. The experimental crystal polymorphs are found at the bottom of the calculated lattice energy landscape, and two predicted structures are identified as candidates for a missing, thermodynamically more stable polymorph. Pressure-dependent stability calculations suggested high pressure as a means to bring these polymorphs into existence. Subsequently, one of them could indeed be crystallized in the 0.02 to 0.50 GPa pressure range and was found to be metastable at ambient pressure, effectively derisking the appearance of a more stable polymorph during late-stage development of Dalcetrapib. PMID:26198974

  14. Crystal growth, crystal structure, vibrational spectroscopy, linear and nonlinear optical properties of guanidinium phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, Ivan; Matulková, Irena; Held, Peter; Kroupa, Jan; Němec, Petr; Li, Dongxu; Bohatý, Ladislav; Becker, Petra

    2017-07-01

    Of the three guanidinium phosphates GuH2PO4 (space group P21/c), Gu2HPO4·H2O (space group P 4 bar 21 c) and Gu3PO4· 3/2 H2O (space group Cc) crystal structures and a vibrational spectroscopy study are presented. Large single crystals of GuH2PO4 and Gu2HPO4·H2O are grown. Refractive indices and their dispersion in the wavelength range 365 nm - 1083 nm are determined and used for the analysis of phase matching conditions for collinear SHG in the case of the non-centrosymmetric crystals of Gu2HPO4·H2O. The crystals are not phase-matchable within their transmission range. Both independent components of the SHG tensor of Gu2HPO4·H2O, determined by the Maker fringe method, are given, with d14 = 0.23 pm/V and d36 = 0.22 pm/V. In addition, the thermal stability and the anisotropy of thermal expansion of GuH2PO4 and Gu2HPO4·H2O is reported.

  15. EVO—Evolutionary algorithm for crystal structure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmann, Silvia; Kortus, Jens

    2013-06-01

    We present EVO—an evolution strategy designed for crystal structure search and prediction. The concept and main features of biological evolution such as creation of diversity and survival of the fittest have been transferred to crystal structure prediction. EVO successfully demonstrates its applicability to find crystal structures of the elements of the 3rd main group with their different spacegroups. For this we used the number of atoms in the conventional cell and multiples of it. Running EVO with different numbers of carbon atoms per unit cell yields graphite as the lowest energy structure as well as a diamond-like structure, both in one run. Our implementation also supports the search for 2D structures and was able to find a boron sheet with structural features so far not considered in literature. Program summaryProgram title: EVO Catalogue identifier: AEOZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 23488 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1830122 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python. Computer: No limitations known. Operating system: Linux. RAM: Negligible compared to the requirements of the electronic structure programs used Classification: 7.8. External routines: Quantum ESPRESSO (http://www.quantum-espresso.org/), GULP (https://projects.ivec.org/gulp/) Nature of problem: Crystal structure search is a global optimisation problem in 3N+3 dimensions where N is the number of atoms in the unit cell. The high dimensional search space is accompanied by an unknown energy landscape. Solution method: Evolutionary algorithms transfer the main features of biological evolution to use them in global searches. The combination of the "survival of the fittest" (deterministic) and the

  16. How evolutionary crystal structure prediction works--and why.

    PubMed

    Oganov, Artem R; Lyakhov, Andriy O; Valle, Mario

    2011-03-15

    Once the crystal structure of a chemical substance is known, many properties can be predicted reliably and routinely. Therefore if researchers could predict the crystal structure of a material before it is synthesized, they could significantly accelerate the discovery of new materials. In addition, the ability to predict crystal structures at arbitrary conditions of pressure and temperature is invaluable for the study of matter at extreme conditions, where experiments are difficult. Crystal structure prediction (CSP), the problem of finding the most stable arrangement of atoms given only the chemical composition, has long remained a major unsolved scientific problem. Two problems are entangled here: search, the efficient exploration of the multidimensional energy landscape, and ranking, the correct calculation of relative energies. For organic crystals, which contain a few molecules in the unit cell, search can be quite simple as long as a researcher does not need to include many possible isomers or conformations of the molecules; therefore ranking becomes the main challenge. For inorganic crystals, quantum mechanical methods often provide correct relative energies, making search the most critical problem. Recent developments provide useful practical methods for solving the search problem to a considerable extent. One can use simulated annealing, metadynamics, random sampling, basin hopping, minima hopping, and data mining. Genetic algorithms have been applied to crystals since 1995, but with limited success, which necessitated the development of a very different evolutionary algorithm. This Account reviews CSP using one of the major techniques, the hybrid evolutionary algorithm USPEX (Universal Structure Predictor: Evolutionary Xtallography). Using recent developments in the theory of energy landscapes, we unravel the reasons evolutionary techniques work for CSP and point out their limitations. We demonstrate that the energy landscapes of chemical systems have an

  17. The crystal structure of ice under mesospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Benjamin J.; Malkin, Tamsin L.; Salzmann, Christoph G.

    2015-05-01

    Ice clouds form in the summer high latitude mesopause region, which is the coldest part of the Earth's atmosphere. At these very low temperatures (<150 K) ice can exist in metastable forms, but the nature of these ices remains poorly understood. In this paper we show that ice which is grown at mesospherically relevant temperatures does not have a structure corresponding to the well-known hexagonal form or the metastable cubic form. Instead, the ice which forms under mesospheric conditions is a material in which cubic and hexagonal sequences of ice are randomly arranged to produce stacking disordered ice (ice Isd). The structure of this ice is in the trigonal crystal system, rather than the cubic or hexagonal systems, and is expected to produce crystals with aspect ratios consistent with lidar observations.

  18. Crystal structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Verburg, P. C.; Smillie, L. A.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Haberl, B.; Bradby, J. E.; Williams, J. S.; Huis in ’t Veld, A. J.

    2015-06-04

    Laser-induced subsurface modification of dielectric materials is a well-known technology. Applications include the production of optical components and selective etching. In addition to dielectric materials, the subsurface modification technology can be applied to silicon, by employing near to mid-infrared radiation. An application of subsurface modifications in silicon is laser-induced subsurface separation, which is a method to separate wafers into individual dies. Other applications for which proofs of concept exist are the formation of waveguides and resistivity tuning. However, limited knowledge is available about the crystal structure of subsurface modifications in silicon. In this paper, we investigate the geometry and crystal structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in monocrystalline silicon wafers. Finally, in addition to the generation of lattice defects, we found that transformations to amorphous silicon and Si-iii/Si-xii occur as a result of the laser irradiation.

  19. Synthesis, structural and spectroscopic investigations of nanostructured samarium oxalate crystals.

    PubMed

    Vimal, G; Mani, Kamal P; Biju, P R; Joseph, Cyriac; Unnikrishnan, N V; Ittyachen, M A

    2014-03-25

    Nanostructured samarium oxalate crystals were prepared via microwave assisted co-precipitation method. The crystal structure and morphology of the sample were analyzed using X-ray powder diffraction, Scanning electron microscopy and Transmission electron microscopy. The presence of functional groups is ascertained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Samarium oxalate nanocrystals of average size 20 nm were aggregated together to form nano-plate structure in sub-microrange. Detailed spectroscopic investigation of the prepared phosphor material was carried out by Judd-Ofelt analysis based on the UV-Visible-NIR absorption spectra and photoluminescence emission spectra. The analysis reveals that the transition from energy level (4)G5/2 to (6)H7/2 of Sm(3+) ion has maximum branching ratio and the corresponding orange emission can be used for display applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Crystal structures and properties of nylon polymers from theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, S.; Goddard, W.A. III; Hammond, W.B.

    1996-12-11

    A complete force field (MSXX) for simulation of all nylon polymers is derived from ab initio quantum calculations. Special emphasis is given to the accuracy of the hydrogen bond potential for the amide unit and the torsional potential between the peptide and alkane fragments. The MSXX force field was used to predict the structures, moduli, and detailed geometries of all nine nylons for which there are experimental crystal data plus one other. For nylon-(2n) with 2n = 6, the {alpha} crystal structure (with all-trans CH{sub 2} chains nearly coplanar with the hydrogen bonding plane) is more stable, while for 2n > 6, {gamma} (with the alkane plane twisted by 70{degree}) is more stable. This change results from the increased importance of methylene packing interactions over H bonds for larger 2n. We find the highest Young`s modulus for nylon-7. 51 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Electronic structure of polymeric KC 60 - a crystal orbital analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Joachim; Böhm, Michael C.

    1996-04-01

    The band structure of orthorhombic KC 60 is investigated by a crystal approach based on an intermediate neglect of differential orbital Hamiltonian. The title compound crystallizes in the space group Pnnm with covalent intermolecular carboncarbon bonds. Polymeric KC 60 is a metal with a low electronic density of states (DOS) at the Fermi energy ɛF. This metallic behaviour differs from the electronic ground state calculated for isotropic fcc KC 60 with potassium occupying the octahedral intersitial site. The reduced width of the conduction band in the fcc structure favours an insulating Mott state relative to the metallic configuration. The dimensionality of the title compound is discussed on the basis of intercell energies, the DOS profile and dispersion curves. The theoretical results are compared with experimental observations. Wiberg bond-indices are employed to describe the chemical bonding within the distorted C 60 soccerball.

  2. Crystal structure of tris-(hydroxyl-ammonium) orthophosphate.

    PubMed

    Leinemann, Malte; Jess, Inke; Boeckmann, Jan; Näther, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The crystal structure of the title salt, ([H3NOH](+))3·[PO4](3-), consists of discrete hydroxyl-ammonium cations and ortho-phos-phate anions. The atoms of the cation occupy general positions, whereas the anion is located on a threefold rotation axis that runs through the phospho-rus atom and one of the phosphate O atoms. In the crystal structure, cations and anions are linked by inter-molecular O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional network. Altogether, one very strong O-H⋯O, two N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds of medium strength and two weaker bifurcated N-H⋯O inter-actions are observed.

  3. Crystal structure of N'-hy-droxy-pyrimidine-2-carboximidamide.

    PubMed

    Jasmine, Nithianantham Jeeva; Muthiah, Packianathan Thomas; Stanley, Nithianantham

    2014-10-01

    The title compound, C5H6N4O, is approximately planar, with an angle of 11.04 (15)° between the planes of the pyrimidine ring and the non-H atoms of the carboximidamide unit. The mol-ecule adopts an E configuration about the C=N double bond. In the crystal, adjacent mol-ecules are linked by pairs of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers with an R 2 (2)(10) ring motif. The dimers are further linked via N-H⋯N and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds into a sheet structure parallel to the ac plane. The crystal structure also features N-H⋯O and weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and offset π-π stacking inter-actions between adjacent pyrimidine rings [centroid-centroid distance = 3.622 (1) Å].

  4. Structure and functionality of nanostructured triacylglycerol crystal networks.

    PubMed

    Ramel, Pere R; Co, Edmund D; Acevedo, Nuria C; Marangoni, Alejandro G

    2016-10-01

    In this review, recent advances in the characterization of the nanoscale structure of fat crystal networks are outlined. The effect of different factors on the properties of crystalline nanoplatelets (CNPs) is comprehensively described. These are discussed together with the observed changes in polymorphism and micro- or mesostructural properties so as to have a complete understanding of the influence of different internal and external factors on the material properties of fats. The relationship between the nanostructure and the material properties of fats (i.e., oil binding capacity and rheology) is also described. Characterization of the nanostructure of fats has provided a new dimension to the analysis of fat crystal networks and opportunities for nanoengineering that could result in innovations in the food industry with regards to processing and structuring fatty materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Crystal structure of BIS(Betaine) hydrochloride monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-Ming; Mak, Thomas C. W.

    1990-11-01

    Bis(betaine) hydrochloride monohydrate, 2Me 3NCH 2COO·HCI·H 2O, crystallizes in space group Pnma (No. 62), with a=11.904(1), b=22.454(5), c=5.624(1) Å, and Z=4. The structure has been refined to RinF=0.046 for 863 observed (| Fo||>6σ| Fo|) Mo Kα data. the carboxylate groups of a pair of betaine molecules are bridged by a proton to form a centrosymmetric dimer featuring a very strong hydrogen bond of length 2.454(4) Å. The crystal structure comprises a packing of such [(Me 3NCH 2COO) 2H] + moieties and hydrogen-bonded (Cl -·H 2O) ∞ zigzag chains running parallel to the c axis.

  6. Crystal structure of bis(pyridine betaine) hydrochloride monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Ming, Chen; Mak, Thomas C. W.

    1990-04-01

    Bis(pyridine betaine) hydrochloride monohydrate, 2C 5H 5NCH 2COO·HCl·H 2O, crystallizes in space group Pnna (No. 52), with a=15.623(3), b=19.707(3), c=5.069(1) Å, and Z=4. The structure has been refined to RF=0.067 for 1207 observed (| F0|>6σ| F0|) Mo Kα data. The carboxylate groups of a pair of pyridine betaine molecules are bridged by a proton to form a centrosymmetric dimer featuring a very strong hydrogen bond of length 2.436(6) Å. The crystal structure comprises a packing of such [(C 5H 5NCH 2COO) 2H] + moieties and hydrogen-bonded (Cl -{dH 2O} ∞) zigzag chains running parallel to the c axis.

  7. Structure development in silicon sheet by shaped crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.; De Angelis, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Models are presented for the development of a parallel twinned structure of the 110 plane type and the 112 line type in silicon ribbons. The models are believed to be mutually compatible and operable. The first model relates the requirements for super-cooling during crystallization. The existence of reentrant angles associated with the twin structure is proposed to provide a rough interface to reduce super-cooling. The spacing of the twins is proposed to be limited by the geometrical relationship between the thermal gradient in the liquid and the dimensions of the twinned crystallization front. The second model relates the thermal stress configuration to detail dislocation reactions which would be expected to develop twins. While a specific dislocation mechanism cannot yet be defined, a number of alternatives are presented. All of these various dislocation mechanisms would result in the observed crystalline configuration and the choice among them is not critical.

  8. Crystal and molecular structures of new enantiopure quinuclidines.

    PubMed

    Kania, Iwona; Stadnicka, Katarzyna; Oleksyn, Barbara J

    2004-03-01

    X-ray crystal structure analysis was performed on single crystals of two diastereomeric enantiopure quinuclidines, (3R,8R)-3-vinyl-8-hydroxymethyl-quinuclidine (quincoridine, QCD) and (3R,8S)-3-vinyl-8-hydroxymethyl-quinuclidine (quincorine, QCI) as their salts with tartaric and p-toluenesulphonate anions, respectively. The molecules of these quinuclidine derivatives are considered here as fragments of the Cinchona alkaloids, quinidine and quinine. A comparison of the conformational features of QCD, QCI, and Cinchona alkaloids in the crystalline state shows that the molecular geometry of the title compounds is similar to that of threo-alkaloids (e.g., R,R isomer of epicinchonine) rather than to quinidine and quinine. The packing of the molecules in both structures is dominated by intermolecular hydrogen bonds.

  9. Structure development in silicon sheet by shaped crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.; De Angelis, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Models are presented for the development of a parallel twinned structure of the 110 plane type and the 112 line type in silicon ribbons. The models are believed to be mutually compatible and operable. The first model relates the requirements for super-cooling during crystallization. The existence of reentrant angles associated with the twin structure is proposed to provide a rough interface to reduce super-cooling. The spacing of the twins is proposed to be limited by the geometrical relationship between the thermal gradient in the liquid and the dimensions of the twinned crystallization front. The second model relates the thermal stress configuration to detail dislocation reactions which would be expected to develop twins. While a specific dislocation mechanism cannot yet be defined, a number of alternatives are presented. All of these various dislocation mechanisms would result in the observed crystalline configuration and the choice among them is not critical.

  10. Woodpulp Crystal Structure and Its Effect on Nitrocellulose Physical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    25963. 10 3. A.M. Hindelah and D.J. Johnson, "Crystallinity and Crystallite Size Treatment in Cellulose I Fibres : 1. Ramie and Fortisan," Polymer , Vol...nitrocellulose from N-7 and N-5 is attributed to the presence of Cellulose 11 crystal structure in the fibre . It does not appear to affect the...13, 1972, pp 42330. 4. V.W. Tripp, "Measurement of Crystallinity," High Polymers : Cellulose and Cellulose Derivatives Part IV, Vol V, 1971, Wiley

  11. Phytases: crystal structures, protein engineering and potential biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Yao, M-Z; Zhang, Y-H; Lu, W-L; Hu, M-Q; Wang, W; Liang, A-H

    2012-01-01

    Phytases are a group of enzymes capable of releasing phosphates from phytates, one of the major forms of phosphorus (P) in animal feeds of plant origin. These enzymes have been widely used in animal feed to improve phosphorus nutrition and to reduce phosphorus pollution in animal waste. This review covers the basic nomenclature and crystal structures of phytases and emphasizes both the protein engineering strategies used for the development of new, effective phytases with improved properties and the potential biotechnological applications of phytases.

  12. Sixth blind test of organic crystal-structure prediction methods.

    PubMed

    Groom, Colin R; Reilly, Anthony M

    2014-08-01

    Over the past 15 years progress in predicting crystal structures of small organic molecules has been charted by a series of blind tests hosted by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. This letter announces a sixth blind test to take place between September 2014 and August 2015, giving details of the target systems and the revised procedure. We hope that as many methods as possible will be assessed and benchmarked in this new blind test.

  13. Crystal Structure of the Human Laminin Receptor Precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson,K.; Wu, J.; Hubbard, S.; Meruelo, D.

    2008-01-01

    The human laminin receptor (LamR) interacts with many ligands, including laminin, prions, Sindbis virus, and the polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and has been implicated in a number of diseases. LamR is overexpressed on tumor cells, and targeting LamR elicits anti-cancer effects. Here, we report the crystal structure of human LamR, which provides insights into its function and should facilitate the design of novel therapeutics targeting LamR.

  14. Crystal Structures of Cisplatin Bound to a Human Copper Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-08-16

    Copper trafficking proteins, including the chaperone Atox1 and the P{sub 1B}-type ATPase ATP7B, have been implicated in cellular resistance to the anticancer drug cisplatin. We have determined two crystal structures of cisplatin-Atox1 adducts that reveal platinum coordination by the conserved CXXC copper-binding motif. Direct interaction of cisplatin with this functionally relevant site has significant implications for understanding the molecular basis for resistance mediated by copper transport pathways.

  15. Crystal structures of Aedes aegypti alanine glyoxylate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Han, Qian; Robinson, Howard; Gao, Yi Gui; Vogelaar, Nancy; Wilson, Scott R; Rizzi, Menico; Li, Jianyong

    2006-12-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75A high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1A resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  16. Crystal Structures of Aedes Aegypt Alanine Glyoxylate Aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Han,Q.; Robinson, H.; Gao, Y.; Vogelaar, N.; Wilson, S.; Rizzi, M.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mosquitoes are unique in having evolved two alanine glyoxylate aminotransferases (AGTs). One is 3-hydroxykynurenine transaminase (HKT), which is primarily responsible for catalyzing the transamination of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) to xanthurenic acid (XA). Interestingly, XA is used by malaria parasites as a chemical trigger for their development within the mosquito. This 3-HK to XA conversion is considered the major mechanism mosquitoes use to detoxify the chemically reactive and potentially toxic 3-HK. The other AGT is a typical dipteran insect AGT and is specific for converting glyoxylic acid to glycine. Here we report the 1.75{angstrom} high-resolution three-dimensional crystal structure of AGT from the mosquito Aedes aegypti (AeAGT) and structures of its complexes with reactants glyoxylic acid and alanine at 1.75 and 2.1{angstrom} resolution, respectively. This is the first time that the three-dimensional crystal structures of an AGT with its amino acceptor, glyoxylic acid, and amino donor, alanine, have been determined. The protein is dimeric and adopts the type I-fold of pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferases. The PLP co-factor is covalently bound to the active site in the crystal structure, and its binding site is similar to those of other AGTs. The comparison of the AeAGT-glyoxylic acid structure with other AGT structures revealed that these glyoxylic acid binding residues are conserved in most AGTs. Comparison of the AeAGT-alanine structure with that of the Anopheles HKT-inhibitor complex suggests that a Ser-Asn-Phe motif in the latter may be responsible for the substrate specificity of HKT enzymes for 3-HK.

  17. Structural considerations on acridine/acridinium derivatives: Synthesis, crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis and computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wera, Michał; Storoniak, Piotr; Serdiuk, Illia E.; Zadykowicz, Beata

    2016-02-01

    This article describes a detailed study of the molecular packing and intermolecular interactions in crystals of four derivatives of acridine, i.e. 9-methyl-, 9-ethyl, 9-bromomethyl- and 9-piperidineacridine (1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively) and three 10-methylacridinium salts containing the trifluoromethanesulphonate anion and 9-vinyl-, 9-bromomethyl, and 9-phenyl-10-methylacridinium cations (5, 6 and 7, respectively). The crystal structures of all of the compounds are stabilized by long-range electrostatic interactions, as well as by a network of short-range C-HṡṡṡO (in hydrates and salts 3 and 5-7, respectively), C-Hṡṡṡπ, π-π, C-Fṡṡṡπ and S-Oṡṡṡπ (in salts 5-7) interactions. Hirshfeld surface analysis shows that various intermolecular contacts play an important role in the crystal packing, graphically exhibiting the differences in spatial arrangements of the acridine/acridinium derivatives under scrutiny here. Additionally, computational methods have been used to compare the intermolecular interactions in the crystal structures of the investigated compounds. Computations have confirmed the great contribution of dispersive interactions for crystal lattice stability in the case of 9-substituted acridine and electrostatic interactions for the crystal lattice stability in the case of 9-substituted 10-methylacridinium trifluoromethanesulphonates. The value of crystal lattice energy and the electrostatic contribution in the crystal lattice energy of monohydrated acridine derivatives have confirmed that these compounds have behave as acridinium derivatives.

  18. Crystal structure dependent thermal conductivity in two-dimensional phononic crystal nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Junki; Kage, Yuta; Hori, Takuma; Shiomi, Junichiro; Nomura, Masahiro

    2015-07-01

    Thermal phonon transport in square- and triangular-lattice Si phononic crystal (PnC) nanostructures with a period of 300 nm was investigated by measuring the thermal conductivity using micrometer-scale time-domain thermoreflectance. The placement of circular nanoholes has a strong influence on thermal conductivity when the periodicity is within the range of the thermal phonon mean free path. A staggered hole structure, i.e., a triangular lattice, has lower thermal conductivity, where the difference in thermal conductivity depends on the porosity of the structure. The largest difference in conductivity of approximately 20% was observed at a porosity of around 30%. This crystal structure dependent thermal conductivity can be understood by considering the local heat flux disorder created by a staggered hole structure. Numerical simulation using the Monte Carlo technique was also employed and also showed the lower thermal conductivity for a triangular lattice structure. Besides gaining a deeper understanding of nanoscale thermal phonon transport, this information would be useful in the design of highly efficient thermoelectric materials created by nanopatterning.

  19. Crystal structure of the integral membrane diacylglycerol kinase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dianfan; Lyons, Joseph A.; Pye, Valerie E.; Vogeley, Lutz; Aragão, David; Kenyon, Colin P.; Shah, Syed T. A.; Doherty, Christine; Aherne, Margaret; Caffrey, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DgkA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid for use in shuttling water-soluble components to membrane derived oligosaccharide and lipopolysaccharide in the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria1. For half a century, this 121-residue kinase has served as a paradigm for investigating membrane protein enzymology1,3-7, folding8,9, assembly10-13, and stability1,14. Here, we present crystal structures for three functional forms of this unique and paradigmatic kinase, one of which is wild type (WT). These reveal a homo-trimeric enzyme with three transmembrane helices and an N-terminal amphiphilic helix per monomer. Bound lipid substrate and docked ATP identify the putative active site which is of the composite, shared site type. The crystal structures rationalize extensive biochemical and biophysical data on the enzyme. They are however at variance with a published solution NMR model2 in that domain swapping, a key feature of the solution form, is not observed in the crystal structures. PMID:23676677

  20. Pressure effects on crystal and electronic structure of bismuth tellurohalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusinov, I. P.; Menshchikova, T. V.; Sklyadneva, I. Yu; Heid, R.; Bohnen, K.-P.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    We study the possibility of pressure-induced transitions from a normal semiconductor to a topological insulator (TI) in bismuth tellurohalides using density functional theory and tight-binding method. In BiTeI this transition is realized through the formation of an intermediate phase, a Weyl semimetal, that leads to modification of surface state dispersions. In the topologically trivial phase, the surface states exhibit a Bychkov-Rashba type dispersion. The Weyl semimetal phase exists in a narrow pressure interval of 0.2 GPa. After the Weyl semimetal-TI transition occurs, the surface electronic structure is characterized by gapless states with linear dispersion. The peculiarities of the surface states modification under pressure depend on the band-bending effect. We have also calculated the frequencies of Raman active modes for BiTeI in the proposed high-pressure crystal phases in order to compare them with available experimental data. Unlike BiTeI, in BiTeBr and BiTeCl the topological phase transition does not occur. In BiTeBr, the crystal structure changes with pressure but the phase remains a trivial one. However, the transition appears to be possible if the low-pressure crystal structure is retained. In BiTeCl under pressure, the topological phase does not appear up to 18 GPa due to a relatively large band gap width in this compound.

  1. Crystal structure and chemical bonding of Mg3Ru2.

    PubMed

    Pöttgen, Rainer; Hlukhyy, Viktor; Baranov, Aleksey; Grin, Yuri

    2008-07-07

    Mg 3Ru 2 was prepared by a reaction between the elements in the ideal ratio in a sealed tantalum ampule. Its beta-manganese type crystal structure was refined on the basis of the single-crystal data: space group P4 132, a = 693.52(6) pm, wR2 = 0.024, 168 F (2) values, and 10 parameters. The magnesium (CN = 14) and ruthenium (CN = 12) atoms are completely ordered on the 12d and 8c sites of the crystal structure of beta-manganese. Both environments can be considered as Frank-Kasper related polyhedra. A periodic nodal surface P4 132(110) pi (1) P4 132 separates the magnesium and ruthenium positions in two different labyrinths, suggesting different chemical interactions within different parts of the structural motif. Analysis of the chemical bonding with the electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) reveals covalently interacting three-bonded ruthenium atoms, forming a 3D network. The network interacts with the magnesium substructure by multicenter bonds.

  2. Crystal structure of lead(II) tartrate: a redetermination.

    PubMed

    Weil, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Single crystals of poly[μ4-tartrato-κ(6) O (1),O (3):O (1'):O (2),O (4):O (4')-lead], [Pb(C4H4O6)] n , were grown in a gel medium. In comparison with the previous structure determination of this compound from laboratory powder X-ray diffraction data [De Ridder et al. (2002 ▶). Acta Cryst. C58, m596-m598], the redetermination on the basis of single-crystal data reveals the absolute structure, all atoms with anisotropic displacement parameters and a much higher accuracy in terms of bond lengths and angles. It could be shown that a different space group or incorporation of water as reported for similarly gel-grown lead tartrate crystals is incorrect. In the structure, each Pb(2+) cation is bonded to eight O atoms of five tartrate anions, while each tartrate anion links four Pb(2+) cations. The resulting three-dimensional framework is stabilized by O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the OH groups of one tartrate anion and the carboxyl-ate O atoms of adjacent anions.

  3. Structural contribution to the roughness of supersmooth crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Butashin, A. V.; Muslimov, A. E. Kanevsky, V. M.; Deryabin, A. N.; Pavlov, V. A.; Asadchikov, V. E.

    2013-05-15

    Technological advances in processing crystals (Si, sapphire {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC, GaN, LiNbO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3}, etc.) of substrate materials and X-ray optics elements make it possible to obtain supersmooth surfaces with a periodicity characteristic of the crystal structure. These periodic structures are formed by atomically smooth terraces and steps of nano- and subnanometer sizes, respectively. A model surface with such nanostructures is proposed, and the relations between its roughness parameters and the height of atomic steps are determined. The roughness parameters calculated from these relations almost coincide with the experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) data obtained from 1 Multiplication-Sign 1 and 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 {mu}m areas on the surface of sapphire plates with steps. The minimum roughness parameters for vicinal crystal surfaces, which are due to the structural contribution, are calculated based on the approach proposed. A comparative analysis of the relief and roughness parameters of sapphire plate surfaces with different degrees of polishing is performed. A size effect is established: the relief height distribution changes from stochastic to regular with a decrease in the surface roughness.

  4. Nanoconfinement-induced structures in chiral liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Melle, Michael; Theile, Madlona; Hall, Carol K; Schoen, Martin

    2013-08-28

    We employ Monte Carlo simulations in a specialized isothermal-isobaric and in the grand canonical ensemble to study structure formation in chiral liquid crystals as a function of molecular chirality. Our model potential consists of a simple Lennard-Jones potential, where the attractive contribution has been modified to represent the orientation dependence of the interaction between a pair of chiral liquid-crystal molecules. The liquid crystal is confined between a pair of planar and atomically smooth substrates onto which molecules are anchored in a hybrid fashion. Hybrid anchoring allows for the formation of helical structures in the direction perpendicular to the substrate plane without exposing the helix to spurious strains. At low chirality, we observe a cholesteric phase, which is transformed into a blue phase at higher chirality. More specifically, by studying the unit cell and the spatial arrangement of disclination lines, this blue phase can be established as blue phase II. If the distance between the confining substrates and molecular chirality are chosen properly, we see a third structure, which may be thought of as a hybrid, exhibiting mixed features of a cholesteric and a blue phase.

  5. Crystal structure of lead(II) tartrate: a redetermination

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Single crystals of poly[μ4-tartrato-κ6 O 1,O 3:O 1′:O 2,O 4:O 4′-lead], [Pb(C4H4O6)]n, were grown in a gel medium. In comparison with the previous structure determination of this compound from laboratory powder X-ray diffraction data [De Ridder et al. (2002 ▸). Acta Cryst. C58, m596–m598], the redetermination on the basis of single-crystal data reveals the absolute structure, all atoms with anisotropic displacement parameters and a much higher accuracy in terms of bond lengths and angles. It could be shown that a different space group or incorporation of water as reported for similarly gel-grown lead tartrate crystals is incorrect. In the structure, each Pb2+ cation is bonded to eight O atoms of five tartrate anions, while each tartrate anion links four Pb2+ cations. The resulting three-dimensional framework is stabilized by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the OH groups of one tartrate anion and the carboxyl­ate O atoms of adjacent anions. PMID:25705458

  6. Ionic colloidal crystals: Ordered, multicomponent structures via controlled heterocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Maskaly, Garry R; García, R Edwin; Carter, W Craig; Chiang, Yet-Ming

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new type of ordered colloid, the "ionic colloidal crystal" (ICC), which is stabilized by attractive electrostatic interactions analogous to those in atomic ionic materials. The rapid self-organization of colloids via this method should result in a diversity of orderings that are analogous to ionic compounds. Most of these complex structures would be difficult to produce by other methods. We use a Madelung summation approach to evaluate the conditions where ICC's are thermodynamically stable. Using this model, we compare the relative electrostatic energies of various structures showing that the regions of ICC stability are determined by two dimensionless parameters representing charge balance and the spatial extent of the electrostatic interactions. Parallels and distinctions between ICC's and classical ionic crystals are discussed. Monte Carlo simulations are utilized to examine the glass transition and melting temperatures, between which crystallization can occur, of a model system having the rocksalt structure. These tools allow us to make a first-order prediction of the experimentally accessible regions of surface charge, particle size, ionic strength, and temperature where ICC formation is probable.

  7. A novel characterization of organic molecular crystal structures for the purpose of crystal engineering.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Noel W

    2015-08-01

    A novel analytical approach is proposed for the characterization of organic molecular crystal structures where close packing is an important factor. It requires the identification of a unique reference axis within the crystal, along which three-dimensional space is divided into close-packed blocks (CPB) and junction zones (JZ). The degree of close packing along the reference axis is quantified by a two-dimensional packing function, ϕ2D, of symmetry determined by the space group. Values of ϕ2D reflect the degree of area-filling in planes perpendicular to this axis. The requirement of close packing within CPB allows the planar structures perpendicular to the reference axis to be analysed as tessellations of area-filling molecular-based cells (MBC), which are generally hexagonal. The form of these cells reflects the molecular shape in the cross-section, since their vertices are given by the centres of the voids between molecules. There are two basic types of MBC, Type 1, of glide or pseudo-glide symmetry, and Type 2, which is formed by lattice translations alone and generally requires a short unit-cell axis. MBC at layers of special symmetry are used to characterize the structures in terms of equivalent ellipses with parameters aell, bell and χell. The ratio aell/bell allows the established α, β, γ classification to be integrated into the current framework. The values of parameters aell and bell arising from all the structures considered, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), substituted anthracenes and anthraquinones (SAA) and 2-benzyl-5-benzylidene (BBCP) are mapped onto a universal curve. The division of three-dimensional space into CPB and JZ is fundamentally useful for crystal engineering, since the structural perturbations brought about by substitution at hydrogen positions located within JZ are minimal. A contribution is also made to ongoing debate concerning the adoption of polar space groups, isomorphism and polymorphism.

  8. The crystal structure of aluminum doped {beta}-rhombohedral boron

    SciTech Connect

    Bykova, Elena; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2012-10-15

    A crystal structure of aluminum doped {beta}-rhombohedral boron was studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 80 K. The crystals were synthesized using high-pressure high temperature technique at 3 GPa and 2100 K. The structure is based on three-dimensional framework made of B{sub 12} icosahedra with voids occupied by the B{sub 28}-B-B{sub 28} units, it has the R-3m space group with a=10.9014(3), c=23.7225(7) A lattice dimensions in hexagonal setting. Aluminum atoms are located in A1 and D special positions of the {beta}-B structure with occupancies of 82.7(6)% and 11.3(4)%, respectively. Additional boron atoms are located near the D-site. Their possible distribution is discussed. Finally we have found two appropriate structural models whose refinement suggests two possible chemical compositions, AlB{sub 44.8(5)} and AlB{sub 37.8(5)}, which are in a good agreement with the chemical analysis data obtained from EDX. The crystal structure of AlB{sub 44.8(5)} is described in detail. - Graphical abstract: The atomic distribution near the B(15) atom (non-labeled atom in the center of the picture) shown along the c axis. Anisotropic displacement ellipses for Al(2) (D-site) and B(15) are shown with 50 % probability level. The mirror plane with Miller indices (1 1 0) and related to it (-1 2 0) and (-2 1 0) generated by the 3-fold rotation-inversion axis parallel to the c axis splits the position of B(16) over two sites. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure of the AlB{sub 44.8(5)} has been refined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminum atoms partially fill certain types of voids (the A1- and D-sites). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have got two possible models of atomic distribution near the D-site.

  9. Ab initio molecular crystal structures, spectra, and phase diagrams.

    PubMed

    Hirata, So; Gilliard, Kandis; He, Xiao; Li, Jinjin; Sode, Olaseni

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Molecular crystals are chemists' solids in the sense that their structures and properties can be understood in terms of those of the constituent molecules merely perturbed by a crystalline environment. They form a large and important class of solids including ices of atmospheric species, drugs, explosives, and even some organic optoelectronic materials and supramolecular assemblies. Recently, surprisingly simple yet extremely efficient, versatile, easily implemented, and systematically accurate electronic structure methods for molecular crystals have been developed. The methods, collectively referred to as the embedded-fragment scheme, divide a crystal into monomers and overlapping dimers and apply modern molecular electronic structure methods and software to these fragments of the crystal that are embedded in a self-consistently determined crystalline electrostatic field. They enable facile applications of accurate but otherwise prohibitively expensive ab initio molecular orbital theories such as Møller-Plesset perturbation and coupled-cluster theories to a broad range of properties of solids such as internal energies, enthalpies, structures, equation of state, phonon dispersion curves and density of states, infrared and Raman spectra (including band intensities and sometimes anharmonic effects), inelastic neutron scattering spectra, heat capacities, Gibbs energies, and phase diagrams, while accounting for many-body electrostatic (namely, induction or polarization) effects as well as two-body exchange and dispersion interactions from first principles. They can fundamentally alter the role of computing in the studies of molecular crystals in the same way ab initio molecular orbital theories have transformed research practices in gas-phase physical chemistry and synthetic chemistry in the last half century. In this Account, after a brief summary of formalisms and algorithms, we discuss applications of these methods performed in our group as compelling

  10. Bio-Inspired Approaches to Crystals with Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldrum, Fiona

    2013-03-01

    Advances in technology demand an ever-increasing degree of control over material structure, properties and function. As the properties of monolithic materials are necessary limited, one route to extending them is to create a composite by combining contrasting materials. The potential of this approach is beautifully illustrated by the formation of biominerals where organic macromolecules are combined with brittle minerals such as calcite to create crystals with considerable fracture toughness. This talk will discuss how bio-inspired approaches can be used to generate single crystals with composite crystals through a simple one-pot method. By precipitating calcite crystals in the presence of ``occlusion species'' ranging from latex particles, to organic and inorganic nanoparticles and finally small molecules we demonstrate that high amounts of foreign species can be incorporated through control over the additive surface chemistry, and that this can lead to an enhancement of the mechanical properties of the calcite. Occlusion of 20 nm anionic diblock copolymer micelles was achieved at levels of over 13 wt%, and the properties of the resuktant composite calcite crystals were measured using a range of techniques including IR spectroscopy, high resolution powder XRD and high resolution TEM. Incorporation of these macromolecules leads to crystals with structures and mechanical properties similar to those of biominerals. With sizes in the range of some intracrystalline proteins, the micelles act as ``pseudo-proteins'', thereby providing an excellent model system for investigation of the mechanism of macromolecule insertion within biominerals. Extension of these studies to the incorporation of small molecules (amino acids) again demonstrated high levels of incorporation without any change in the crystal morphology. Further, occlusion of these small molecules within the calcite lattice again resulted in a significant increase in the hardness of the calcite, a result which

  11. Fourier transform infrared transmission microspectroscopy of photonic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Kilby, Gregory R; Gaylord, Thomas K

    2009-07-01

    The detailed microscopic characterization of photonic crystal (PC) structures is challenging due to their small sizes. Generally, only the gross macroscopic behavior can be determined. This leaves in question the performance at the basic structure level. The single-incident-angle plane-wave transmittances of one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) structures are extracted from multiple-incident-angle, focused-beam measurements. In the experimental apparatus, an infrared beam is focused by a reflecting microscope objective to produce an incident beam. This beam can be modeled as multiple, variable-intensity plane waves incident on the PC structure. The transmittance of the structure in response to a multiple-incident-angle composite beam is measured. The composite beam measurement is repeated at various incident angle orientations with respect to the sample normal so that, at each angular orientation, the included set of single-angle plane-wave components is unique. A set of measurements recorded over a range of angular orientations results in an underspecified matrix algebra problem. Regularization techniques can be applied to the problem to extract the single-angle plane-wave response of the structure from the composite measurements. Experimental results show very good agreement between the measured and theoretical single-angle plane-wave transmittances.

  12. The first crystal structure of an archaeal helical repeat protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, Kazunari; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Tsuge, Hideaki; Katunuma, Nobuhiko; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Kawabata, Takeshi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2005-07-01

    The crystal structure of ST1625p, a protein encoded by a hypothetical open reading frame ST1625 in the genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii, was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The structure of ST1625p consists of a unique superhelix with a low-level structure resemblance to doamins from other proteins with known three-dimensional structures. The crystal structure of ST1625p, a protein encoded by a hypothetical open reading frame ST1625 in the genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii, was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The only sequence similarity exhibited by the amino-acid sequence of ST1625p was a 33% identity with the sequence of SSO0983p from S. solfataricus. The 19 kDa monomeric protein was observed to consist of a right-handed superhelix assembled from a tandem repeat of ten α-helices. A structural homology search using the DALI and MATRAS algorithms indicates that this protein can be classified as a helical repeat protein.

  13. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana SNC1 TIR domain.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyung-Gi; Lee, Yeon; Yoon, Jungmin; Yi, Hankuil; Song, Ji-Joon

    2016-12-02

    Plant immune response is initiated by Resistance proteins (R proteins). Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain in R proteins, which is responsible for the dimerization but has limited conservation in their primary structures. Suppressor of npr1-1, constitutive 1 (SNC1), a TIR-containing R protein, is involved in autoimmunity of plant, but the binding partner of SNC1 via the TIR domain and its specific cognate effector protein remain elusive. Here, we present the crystal structure of the TIR domain of Arabidopsis thaliana SNC1 (AtSNC1-TIR). The structure shows that AtSNC1-TIR domain is similar to those of other plant TIR domains including AtTIR, L6 and RPS4. Structural and sequence analysis on AtSNC1-TIR revealed that almost all conserved amino acids are located in the core of the structure, while the amino acids on the surface are highly variable, implicating that each TIR domain utilizes the variable surface for interacting its binding partner. In addition, the interaction between AtSNC1-TIR proteins in the crystal suggests two possible dimerization modes of AtSNC1-TIR domain. This study provides structural platform to investigate AtSNC1-TIR mediated signaling pathway of plant immune responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Gyroid cuticular structures in butterfly wing scales: biological photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Michielsen, K; Stavenga, D G

    2008-01-06

    We present a systematic study of the cuticular structure in the butterfly wing scales of some papilionids (Parides sesostris and Teinopalpus imperialis) and lycaenids (Callophrys rubi, Cyanophrys remus, Mitoura gryneus and Callophrys dumetorum). Using published scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, analytical modelling and computer-generated TEM micrographs, we find that the three-dimensional cuticular structures can be modelled by gyroid structures with various filling fractions and lattice parameters. We give a brief discussion of the formation of cubic gyroid membranes from the smooth endoplasmic reticulum in the scale's cell, which dry and harden to leave the cuticular structure behind when the cell dies. The scales of C. rubi are a potentially attractive biotemplate for producing three-dimensional optical photonic crystals since for these scales the cuticle-filling fraction is nearly optimal for obtaining the largest photonic band gap in a gyroid structure.

  15. Crystal structure of inactive form of Rab3B

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Shen, Yang; Jiao, Ronghong; Liu, Yanli; Deng, Lingfu; Qi, Chao

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first structural information of human Rab3B. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To provides a structural basis for the GDP/GTP switch in controlling the activity of Rab3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The charge distribution of Rab3B indicates its unique roles in vesicular trafficking. -- Abstract: Rab proteins are the largest family of ras-related GTPases in eukaryotic cells. They act as directional molecular switches at membrane trafficking, including vesicle budding, cargo sorting, transport, tethering, and fusion. Here, we generated and crystallized the Rab3B:GDP complex. The structure of the complex was solved to 1.9 A resolution and the structural base comparison with other Rab3 members provides a structural basis for the GDP/GTP switch in controlling the activity of small GTPase. The comparison of charge distribution among the members of Rab3 also indicates their different roles in vesicular trafficking.

  16. Fusion proteins as alternate crystallization paths to difficult structure problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Rueker, Florian; Ho, Joseph X.; Lim, Kap; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary; Ji, Xinhua

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a peptide fusion product with glutathione transferase from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGST) has been solved by crystallographic methods to 2.5 A resolution. Peptides or proteins can be fused to SjGST and expressed in a plasmid for rapid synthesis in Escherichia coli. Fusion proteins created by this commercial method can be purified rapidly by chromatography on immobilized glutathione. The potential utility of using SjGST fusion proteins as alternate paths to the crystallization and structure determination of proteins is demonstrated.

  17. Surface-induced structures in nematic liquid crystal colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshuk, S. B.; Tovkach, O. M.; Lev, B. I.

    2014-08-01

    We predict theoretically the existence of a class of colloidal structures in nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cells, which are induced by surface patterns on the plates of the cell (like cells with UV-irradiated polyamide surfaces using micron sized masks in front of the cell). These bulk structures arise from nonuniform boundary conditions for the director distortions at the confining surfaces. In particular, we demonstrate that quadrupole spherical particles (like spheres with boojums or Saturn-ring director configurations) form a square lattice inside a planar NLC cell, which has checkerboard patterns on both its plates.

  18. Crystal structure of new AsS{sub 2} compound

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotina, N. B.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Dyuzheva, T. I.; Lityagina, L. M.; Kulikova, L. F.; Nikolaev, N. A.; Verin, I. A.

    2013-01-15

    AsS{sub 2} single crystals have been obtained for the first time from an As{sub 2}S{sub 3} melt at pressures above 6 GPa and temperatures above 800 K in the As{sub 2}S{sub 3} {yields} AsS + AsS{sub 2} reaction. The monoclinic structure of the new high-pressure phase is solved by X-ray diffraction analysis and compared to the structure of high-pressure AsS phase, which was studied previously.

  19. Unified approach for determining tetragonal tungsten bronze crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, M; Saint-Grégoire, P

    2014-05-01

    Tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) oxides are one of the most important classes of ferroelectrics. Many of these framework structures undergo ferroelastic transformations related to octahedron tilting deformations. Such tilting deformations are closely related to the rigid unit modes (RUMs). This paper discusses the whole set of RUMs in an ideal TTB lattice and possible crystal structures which can emerge owing to the condensation of some of them. Analysis of available experimental data for the TTB-like niobates lends credence to the obtained theoretical predictions.

  20. Band structures in the nematic elastomers phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuai; Liu, Ying; Liang, Tianshu

    2017-02-01

    As one kind of new intelligent materials, nematic elastomers (NEs) represent an exciting physical system that combines the local orientational symmetry breaking and the entropic rubber elasticity, producing a number of unique physical phenomena. In this paper, the potential application of NEs in the band tuning is explored. The band structures in two kinds of NE phononic crystals (PCs) are investigated. Through changing NE intrinsic parameters, the influence of the porosity, director rotation and relaxation on the band structures in NE PCs are analyzed. This work is a meaningful try for application of NEs in acoustic field and proposes a new intelligent strategy in band turning.

  1. The Cambridge Structural Database: a quarter of a million crystal structures and rising.

    PubMed

    Allen, Frank H

    2002-06-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) now contains data for more than a quarter of a million small-molecule crystal structures. The information content of the CSD, together with methods for data acquisition, processing and validation, are summarized, with particular emphasis on the chemical information added by CSD editors. Nearly 80% of new structural data arrives electronically, mostly in CIF format, and the CCDC acts as the official crystal structure data depository for 51 major journals. The CCDC now maintains both a CIF archive (more than 73,000 CIFs dating from 1996), as well as the distributed binary CSD archive; the availability of data in both archives is discussed. A statistical survey of the CSD is also presented and projections concerning future accession rates indicate that the CSD will contain at least 500,000 crystal structures by the year 2010.

  2. Crystal structure and crystal chemistry of melanovanadite, a natural vanadium bronze.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konnert, J.A.; Evans, H.T.

    1987-01-01

    The crystal structure of melanovanadite from Minas Ragra, Peru, has been determined in space group P1. The triclinic unit cell (non-standard) has a 6.360(2), b 18.090(9), c 6.276(2) A, alpha 110.18(4)o, beta 101.62(3)o, gamma 82.86(4)o. A subcell with b' = b/2 was found by crystal-structure analysis to contain CaV4O10.5H2O. The subcell has a layer structure in which the vanadate sheet consists of corner-shared tetrahedral VO4 and double square-pyramidal V2O8 groups, similar to that previously found in synthetic CsV2O5. Refinement of the full structure (R = 0.056) showed that the Ca atom, which half-occupies a general position in the subcell, is 90% ordered at one of these sites in the whole unit cell. Bond length-bond strength estimates indicate that the tetrahedra contain V5+, and the square pyramids, V4+.-J.A.Z.

  3. Thermally triggered solid-state single-crystal-to-single-crystal structural transformation accompanies property changes.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan-Quan; Ren, Chun-Yan; Huang, Yang-Yang; Li, Jian-Li; Liu, Ping; Liu, Bin; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yao-Yu

    2015-03-16

    The 1D complex [(CuL0.5H2O)⋅H2O]n (1) (H4L = 2,2'-bipyridine-3,3',6,6'-tetracarboxylic acid) undergoes an irreversible thermally triggered single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) transformation to produce the 3D anhydrous complex [CuL0.5]n (2). This SCSC structural transformation was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns, variable-temperature powder X-ray diffraction (VT-PXRD) patterns, and IR spectroscopy. Structural analyses reveal that in complex 2, though the initial 1D chain is still retained as in complex 1, accompanied with the Cu-bound H2O removed and new O(carboxyl)-Cu bond forming, the coordination geometries around the Cu(II) ions vary from a distorted trigonal bipyramid to a distorted square pyramid. With the drastic structural transition, significant property changes are observed. Magnetic analyses show prominent changes from antiferromagnetism to weak ferromagnetism due to the new formed Cu1-O-C-O-Cu4 bridge. The catalytic results demonstrate that, even though both solid-state materials present high catalytic activity for the synthesis of 2-imidazolines derivatives and can be reused, the activation temperature of complex 1 is higher than that of complex 2. In addition, a possible pathway for the SCSC structural transformations is proposed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. From protein structure to function via single crystal optical spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Luca; Bruno, Stefano; Bettati, Stefano; Storici, Paola; Mozzarelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The more than 100,000 protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography provide a wealth of information for the characterization of biological processes at the molecular level. However, several crystallographic “artifacts,” including conformational selection, crystallization conditions and radiation damages, may affect the quality and the interpretation of the electron density maps, thus limiting the relevance of structure determinations. Moreover, for most of these structures, no functional data have been obtained in the crystalline state, thus posing serious questions on their validity in infereing protein mechanisms. In order to solve these issues, spectroscopic methods have been applied for the determination of equilibrium and kinetic properties of proteins in the crystalline state. These methods are UV-vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, IR, EPR, Raman, and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Some of these approaches have been implemented with on-line instruments at X-ray synchrotron beamlines. Here, we provide an overview of investigations predominantly carried out in our laboratory by single crystal polarized absorption UV-vis microspectrophotometry, the most applied technique for the functional characterization of proteins in the crystalline state. Studies on hemoglobins, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate dependent enzymes and green fluorescent protein in the crystalline state have addressed key biological issues, leading to either straightforward structure-function correlations or limitations to structure-based mechanisms. PMID:25988179

  5. Crystal structure of eukaryotic ribosome and its complexes with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yusupova, Gulnara; Yusupov, Marat

    2017-03-19

    A high-resolution structure of the eukaryotic ribosome has been determined and has led to increased interest in studying protein biosynthesis and regulation of biosynthesis in cells. The functional complexes of the ribosome crystals obtained from bacteria and yeast have permitted researchers to identify the precise residue positions in different states of ribosome function. This knowledge, together with electron microscopy studies, enhances our understanding of how basic ribosome processes, including mRNA decoding, peptide bond formation, mRNA, and tRNA translocation and cotranslational transport of the nascent peptide, are regulated. In this review, we discuss the crystal structure of the entire 80S ribosome from yeast, which reveals its eukaryotic-specific features, and application of X-ray crystallography of the 80S ribosome for investigation of the binding mode for distinct compounds known to inhibit or modulate the protein-translation function of the ribosome. We also refer to a challenging aspect of the structural study of ribosomes, from higher eukaryotes, where the structures of major distinctive features of higher eukaryote ribosome-the high-eukaryote-specific long ribosomal RNA segments (about 1MDa)-remain unresolved. Presently, the structures of the major part of these high-eukaryotic expansion ribosomal RNA segments still remain unresolved.This article is part of the themed issue 'Perspectives on the ribosome'.

  6. The crystal structure of human GDP-L-fucose synthase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan; Sun, Lihua; Li, Jian; Xu, Chunyan; Yu, Feng; Liu, Yahui; Ji, Chaoneng; He, Jianhua

    2013-09-01

    Human GDP-l-fucose synthase, also known as FX protein, synthesizes GDP-l-fucose from its substrate GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose. The reaction involves epimerization at both C-3 and C-5 followed by an NADPH-dependent reduction of the carbonyl at C-4. In this paper, the first crystal structure of human FX protein was determined at 2.37 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit of the crystal structure contains four molecules which form two homodimers. Each molecule consists of two domains, a Rossmann-fold NADPH-binding motif and a carboxyl terminal domain. Compared with the Escherichia coli GDP-l-fucose synthase, the overall structures of these two enzymes have four major differences. There are four loops in the structure of human FX protein corresponding to two α-helices and two β-sheets in that of the E. coli enzyme. Besides, there are seven different amino acid residues binding with NAPDH comparing human FX protein with that from E. coli. The structure of human FX reveals the key catalytic residues and could be useful for the design of drugs for the treatment of inflammation, auto-immune diseases, and possibly certain types of cancer.

  7. Manganese oxide minerals: Crystal structures and economic and environmental significance

    PubMed Central

    Post, Jeffrey E.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese oxide minerals have been used for thousands of years—by the ancients for pigments and to clarify glass, and today as ores of Mn metal, catalysts, and battery material. More than 30 Mn oxide minerals occur in a wide variety of geological settings. They are major components of Mn nodules that pave huge areas of the ocean floor and bottoms of many fresh-water lakes. Mn oxide minerals are ubiquitous in soils and sediments and participate in a variety of chemical reactions that affect groundwater and bulk soil composition. Their typical occurrence as fine-grained mixtures makes it difficult to study their atomic structures and crystal chemistries. In recent years, however, investigations using transmission electron microscopy and powder x-ray and neutron diffraction methods have provided important new insights into the structures and properties of these materials. The crystal structures for todorokite and birnessite, two of the more common Mn oxide minerals in terrestrial deposits and ocean nodules, were determined by using powder x-ray diffraction data and the Rietveld refinement method. Because of the large tunnels in todorokite and related structures there is considerable interest in the use of these materials and synthetic analogues as catalysts and cation exchange agents. Birnessite-group minerals have layer structures and readily undergo oxidation reduction and cation-exchange reactions and play a major role in controlling groundwater chemistry. PMID:10097056

  8. Natural Cr3+-rich ettringite: occurrence, properties, and crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seryotkin, Yurii V.; Sokol, Ella V.; Kokh, Svetlana N.; Murashko, Mikhail N.

    2017-08-01

    Cr3+-rich ettringite with Cr3+→Al substitution and Cr/(Cr + Al) ratios up to 0.40-0.50 was found in mineral assemblages of the Ma'aleh Adumim area of Mottled Zone (Judean Desert). The Cr3+-rich compositions were the latest in the thaumasite → ettringite-thaumasite solid solution → ettringite → ettringite-bentorite solid solution series. The mineral-forming solution was enriched in Cr3+ and had a pH buffered by afwillite at 11-12. Chromium was inherited from larnite rocks produced by high-temperature combustion metamorphic alteration of bioproductive calcareous sediments. The Cr/(Cr + Al) ratios are within 0.10-0.15 in most of the analysed crystals. This degree of substitution imparts pink colouration to the crystals, but does not affect their habit (a combination of monohedra and a prism). The habit changes to pyramid faces in coarse and later Cr3+-bearing crystals as Cr/(Cr + Al) ratios increase abruptly to 0.40-0.50. Single-crystal XRD analysis of one Cr-free and two Cr3+-rich samples and their structure determination and refinement indicate that the Cr-rich crystals (with Cr/(Cr + Al) to 0.3) preserve the symmetry and metrics of ettringite. The Ca-O bonding network undergoes differentiation with increase of Cr3+ concentration at octahedral M sites. The compression of Ca2 and expansion of Ca1 polyhedra sub-networks correlates with the degree of Cr3+→Al substitution.

  9. Crystal structures of three (trichloromethyl)(carbamoyl)disulfanes.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Barbara L; Young, Victor G; Barany, George

    2015-10-01

    The present paper reports crystallographic studies on three related compounds that were of inter-est as precursors for synthetic and mechanistic work in organosulfur chemistry, as well as to model nitro-gen-protecting groups: (N-methyl-carbamo-yl)(tri-chloro-meth-yl)disulfane, C3H4Cl3NOS2, (1), (N-benzyl-carbamo-yl)(tri-chloro-meth-yl)disulfane, C9H8Cl3NOS2, (2), and (N-methyl-N-phenyl-carbamo-yl)(tri-chloro-meth-yl)disulfane, C9H8Cl3NOS2, (3). Their mol-ecular structures, with similar bond lengths and angles for the CCl3SS(C=O)N moieties, are confirmed. Compounds (1) and (3) both crystallized with two independent mol-ecules in the asymmetric unit. Classical hydrogen bonding, as well as chlorine-dense regions, are evident in the crystal packing for (1) and (2). In the crystal of (1), mol-ecules are linked via N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds forming chains along [110], which are linked by short Cl⋯Cl and S⋯O contacts forming sheets parallel to (001). In the crystal of (2), mol-ecules are linked via N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds forming chains along [001], which in turn are linked by pairs of short O⋯Cl contacts forming ribbons along the c-axis direction. In the crystal of (3), there are no classical hydrogen bonds present and the chlorine-dense regions observed in (1) and (2) are lacking.

  10. Crystal Structures of Intermediates in the Nitroalkane Oxidase Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, A.; Bozinovski, D; Valley, M; Fitzpatrick, P; Orville, A

    2009-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to nitrite and the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. Crystal structures to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution or better of enzyme complexes with bound substrates and of a trapped substrate-flavin adduct are described. The D402N enzyme has no detectable activity with neutral nitroalkanes. The structure of the D402N enzyme crystallized in the presence of 1-nitrohexane or 1-nitrooctane shows the presence of the substrate in the binding site. The aliphatic chain of the substrate extends into a tunnel leading to the enzyme surface. The oxygens of the substrate nitro group interact both with amino acid residues and with the 2'-hydroxyl of the FAD. When nitroalkane oxidase oxidizes nitroalkanes in the presence of cyanide, an electrophilic flavin imine intermediate can be trapped (Valley, M. P., Tichy, S. E., and Fitzpatrick, P. F. (2005) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2062-2066). The structure of the enzyme trapped with cyanide during oxidation of 1-nitrohexane shows the presence of the modified flavin. A continuous hydrogen bond network connects the nitrogen of the CN-hexyl-FAD through the FAD 2'-hydroxyl to a chain of water molecules extending to the protein surface. Together, our complementary approaches provide strong evidence that the flavin cofactor is in the appropriate oxidation state and correlates well with the putative intermediate state observed within each of the crystal structures. Consequently, these results provide important structural descriptions of several steps along the nitroalkane oxidase reaction cycle.

  11. Relation between photochromic properties and molecular structures in salicylideneaniline crystals.

    PubMed

    Johmoto, Kohei; Ishida, Takashi; Sekine, Akiko; Uekusa, Hidehiro; Ohashi, Yuji

    2012-06-01

    The crystal structures of the salicylideneaniline derivatives N-salicylidene-4-tert-butyl-aniline (1), N-3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene-3-methoxyaniline (2), N-3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene-3-bromoaniline (3), N-3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene-3-chloroaniline (4), N-3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene-4-bromoaniline (5), N-3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene-aniline (6), N-3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene-4-carboxyaniline (7) and N-salicylidene-2-chloroaniline (8) were analyzed by X-ray diffraction analysis at ambient temperature to investigate the relationship between their photochromic properties and molecular structures. A clear correlation between photochromism and the dihedral angle of the two benzene rings in the salicylideneaniline derivatives was observed. Crystals with dihedral angles less than 20° were non-photochromic, whereas those with dihedral angles greater than 30° were photochromic. Crystals with dihedral angles between 20 and 30° could be either photochromic or non-photochromic. Inhibition of the pedal motion by intra- or intermolecular steric hindrance, however, can result in non-photochromic behaviour even if the dihedral angle is larger than 30°.

  12. N-methylcodeinium iodide—Crystal structure and spectroscopic elucidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, R. W.; Bakalska, B. R.; Kolev, T.; Vassilev, D.; Mayer-Figge, H.; Spiteller, M.; Sheldrick, W. S.; Koleva, B. B.

    2009-07-01

    The correlation between the structure and the spectroscopic properties of N-methylcodeinium iodide ( 1) has been studied, using the methods of single crystal X-ray diffraction, IR-LD spectroscopy of oriented samples as a suspension in nematic liquid crystals, UV-vis spectroscopy and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. HPLC tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC ESI MS/MS) and thermal methods were also employed. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed with a view to obtaining the electronic structure and vibrational properties of the title compound. Compound ( 1) crystallizes in the space group P2 12 12 1 and its cations and anions are joined by moderate intermolecular OH…I - interaction of length 3.442 Å. The codeine molecule exhibits the classical T-shape for opiates. A dihedral angle value of 86.4(5)° between the A/B/C and D/E planes is obtained. Rings A and B are effectively coplanar with an interplanar angle of 3.6(3)°.

  13. N-methylcodeinium iodide--crystal structure and spectroscopic elucidation.

    PubMed

    Seidel, R W; Bakalska, B R; Kolev, T; Vassilev, D; Mayer-Figge, H; Spiteller, M; Sheldrick, W S; Koleva, B B

    2009-07-01

    The correlation between the structure and the spectroscopic properties of N-methylcodeinium iodide (1) has been studied, using the methods of single crystal X-ray diffraction, IR-LD spectroscopy of oriented samples as a suspension in nematic liquid crystals, UV-vis spectroscopy and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. HPLC tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC ESI MS/MS) and thermal methods were also employed. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed with a view to obtaining the electronic structure and vibrational properties of the title compound. Compound (1) crystallizes in the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) and its cations and anions are joined by moderate intermolecular OH...I- interaction of length 3.442A. The codeine molecule exhibits the classical T-shape for opiates. A dihedral angle value of 86.4(5) degrees between the A/B/C and D/E planes is obtained. Rings A and B are effectively coplanar with an interplanar angle of 3.6(3) degrees.

  14. Identifying duplicate crystal structures: XTALCOMP, an open-source solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonie, David C.; Zurek, Eva

    2012-03-01

    We describe the implementation of XTALCOMP, an efficient, reliable, and open-source library that tests if two crystal descriptions describe the same underlying structure. The algorithm has been tested and found to correctly identify duplicate structures in spite of the "real-world" difficulties that arise from working with numeric crystal representations: degenerate unit cell lattices, numerical noise, periodic boundaries, and the lack of a canonical coordinate origin. The library is portable, open, and not dependent on any external packages. A web interface to the algorithm is publicly accessible at http://xtalopt.openmolecules.net/xtalcomp/xtalcomp.html. Program summaryProgram title: XtalComp Catalogue identifier: AEKV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: "New" (3-clause) BSD [1] No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3148 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 21 860 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: No restrictions Operating system: All operating systems with a compliant C++ compiler. Classification: 7.8 Nature of problem: Computationally identifying duplicate crystal structures taken from the output of modern solid state calculations is a non-trivial exercise for many reasons. The translation vectors in the description are not unique — they may be transformed into linear combinations of themselves and continue to describe the same extended structure. The coordinates and cell parameters contain numerical noise. The periodic boundary conditions at the unit cell faces, edges, and corners can cause very small displacements of atomic coordinates to result in very different representations. The positions of all atoms may be uniformly translated by an arbitrary vector without modifying the underlying structure. Additionally, certain

  15. Crystal structure, phase transition, and disorder in pyridinium methanesulfonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesariew, Dominik; Ilczyszyn, Maria M.

    2017-05-01

    Thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy have been used to investigate pyridinium methanesulfonate in order to verify its crystal structure and to have insight into its anomalous dynamical properties. This compound undergoes a solid-solid, reversible phase transition at 255.8/266.8 K (cooling/heating). It crystallizes in non-centrosymmetric Pna21 space group at the high-temperature phase (I) and in centrosymmetric Pbca one at the low-temperature phase (II). The entropy gain occurred at the II→I transition has shown that two independent orientations of ions in the disorder phase (I) are allowed. Infrared spectra have confirmed that the pyridinium cation as well as the -CH3 group of the anion exhibit changes in their dynamics when entering the phase I. These spectra have also suggested residual disorder of both, the pyridinium cation and the -CH3 group, in the low temperature phase (II).

  16. Faceting and commensurability in crystal structures of colloidal thin films.

    PubMed

    Ramiro-Manzano, F; Meseguer, F; Bonet, E; Rodriguez, I

    2006-07-14

    This Letter investigates the influence of finite size effects on the particle arrangement of thin film colloidal crystals. A rich variety of crystallographic faceting with large single domain microcrystallites is shown. Optical reflectance experiments together with scanning electron microscopy permit the identification of the crystal symmetry and the facet orientation, as well as the exact number of monolayers. When the cell thickness is not commensurable with a high symmetry layering, particles arrange themselves in a periodic distribution of (111)- and (100)-orientated face centered cubic (fcc) microcrystallites separated by planar defects. These structures can be described as a fcc ordering orientated along a vicinal surface, modified by a periodic distribution of fcc (111) stacking faults.

  17. Crystal structure and magnetism of UOsAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. V.; Daniš, S.; Šebek, J.; Henriques, M. S.; Vejpravová, J.; Gorbunov, D. I.; Havela, L.

    2017-04-01

    Crystal structure, magnetization, and specific heat were studied on single crystal of uranium intermetallic compound UOsAl. It is a hexagonal Laves phase of MgZn2 type, space group P63/mmc, with lattice parameters a=536.4 pm, c=845.3 pm. Shortest inter-uranium distance 313 pm (along the c-axis) is considerably smaller than the Hill limit (340 pm). The compound is a weakly temperature-dependent paramagnet with magnetic susceptibility of ≈1.5*10-8 m3 mol-1 (at T=2 K), which is slightly higher with magnetic field along the a-axis compared to the c-axis. The Sommerfeld coefficient of electronic specific heat has moderate value of γ=36 mJ mol-1 K-2.

  18. Crystal structure of 1-methylimidazole 3-oxide monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, Christopher S.; Murray, James I.; Spivey, Alan C.

    2017-01-01

    1-Methylimidazole 3-N-oxide (NMI-O) crystallizes as a monohydrate, C4H6N2O·H2O, in the monoclinic space group P21 with Z′ = 2 (mol­ecules A and B). The imidazole rings display a planar geometry (r.m.s. deviations = 0.0008 and 0.0002 Å) and are linked in the crystal structure into infinite zigzag strands of ⋯NMI-O(A)⋯OH2⋯NMI-O(B)⋯OH2⋯ units by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. These chains propagate along the b-axis direction of the unit cell. PMID:28316812

  19. On calculating the equilibrium structure of molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Ann E.; Wixom, Ryan R.; Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2010-03-01

    The difficulty of calculating the ambient properties of molecular crystals, such as the explosive PETN, has long hampered much needed computational investigations of these materials. One reason for the shortcomings is that the exchange-correlation functionals available for Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations do not correctly describe the weak intermolecular van der Waals' forces present in molecular crystals. However, this weak interaction also poses other challenges for the computational schemes used. We will discuss these issues in the context of calculations of lattice constants and structure of PETN with a number of different functionals, and also discuss if these limitations can be circumvented for studies at non-ambient conditions. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. The crystal structure of Sr(OD) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, D. E.; O'Keeffe, M.

    1995-10-01

    The crystal structure of Sr(OD) 2 has been determined from a Reitveld refinement of time-of-flight neutron diffraction data, and the deuterium atom positions have been determined for the first time. The structure is orthorhombic: Pnma, a = 9.8269(5) Å, b = 3.9051(2) Å, c = 6.0733(3) Å, V = 233.06 Å 3, D x = 3.466 g cm -3, Rwp = 3.93%, Rp = 2.95%, reduced X2 = 4.774 for 81 variables. Although the data were collected at 12 K, the H atoms have large thermal parameters suggesting the possibility of some disorder. Relationships of the structure to the structures of YOOH, SrBr 2, SrI 2, and SrBr 2 · H 2O are discussed.

  1. Protein dynamics derived from clusters of crystal structures.

    PubMed Central

    van Aalten, D M; Conn, D A; de Groot, B L; Berendsen, H J; Findlay, J B; Amadei, A

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented to mathematically extract concerted structural transitions in proteins from collections of crystal structures. The "essential dynamics" procedure is used to filter out small-amplitude fluctuations from such a set of structures; the remaining large conformational changes describe motions such as those important for the uptake/release of substrate/ligand and in catalytic reactions. The method is applied to sets of x-ray structures for a number of proteins, and the results are compared with the results from essential dynamics as applied to molecular dynamics simulations of those proteins. A significant degree of similarity is found, thereby providing a direct experimental basis for the application of such simulations to the description of large concerted motions in proteins. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9414203

  2. Crystal Structure of a Fructokinase Homolog from Halothermothrix orenii

    SciTech Connect

    Khiang, C.; Seetharaman, J; Kasprzak, J; Cherlyn, N; Patel, B; Love, C; Bujnicki, J; Sivaraman, J

    2010-01-01

    Fructokinase (FRK; EC 2.7.1.4) catalyzes the phosphorylation of D-fructose to D-fructose 6-phosphate (F6P). This irreversible and near rate-limiting step is a central and regulatory process in plants and bacteria, which channels fructose into a metabolically active state for glycolysis. Towards understanding the mechanism of FRK, here we report the crystal structure of a FRK homolog from a thermohalophilic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii (Hore{_}18220 in sequence databases). The structure of the Hore{_}18220 protein reveals a catalytic domain with a Rossmann-like fold and a b-sheet 'lid' for dimerization. Based on comparison of Hore{_}18220 to structures of related proteins, we propose its mechanism of action, in which the lid serves to regulate access to the substrate binding sites. Close relationship of Hore{_}18220 and plant FRK enzymes allows us to propose a model for the structure and function of FRKs.

  3. Crystal structure of isoflavone reductase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; He, Xianzhi; Lin, Jianqiao; Shao, Hui; Chang, Zhenzhan; Dixon, Richard A

    2006-05-19

    Isoflavonoids play important roles in plant defense and exhibit a range of mammalian health-promoting activities. Isoflavone reductase (IFR) specifically recognizes isoflavones and catalyzes a stereospecific NADPH-dependent reduction to (3R)-isoflavanone. The crystal structure of Medicago sativa IFR with deletion of residues 39-47 has been determined at 1.6A resolution. Structural analysis, molecular modeling and docking, and comparison with the structures of other NADPH-dependent enzymes, defined the putative binding sites for co-factor and substrate and potential key residues for enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Further mutagenesis has confirmed the role of Lys144 as a catalytic residue. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the enzymatic mechanism and substrate specificity of IFRs as well as the functions of IFR-like proteins.

  4. Single crystal growth and X-ray structure analysis of non-peripheral octahexyl phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Masashi; Nakano, Chika; Higashi, Takuya; Miyano, Tetsuya; Tohnai, Norimitsu; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-07-01

    The single-crystal structure of metal-free non-peripheral octahexyl-substituted phthalocyanine (C6PcH2) has been investigated by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis. Two types of C6PcH2 single crystal, bulk and needle crystals, were separately grown by controlling the recrystallization conditions. The structures of the two types of crystal were determined, and were found to be completely different, that is, C6PcH2 exhibits structural polymorphism. It has been clarified that the C6PcH2 microcrystals in thin films used in previously reported electronic devices have the needle structure.

  5. Crystal structure and conformational analysis of angiotensinogen fragments.

    PubMed

    Benkoulouche, M; Cotrait, M; Geoffre, S; Precigoux, G

    1989-12-01

    The tripeptide acetyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-histidine crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with eight molecules in a unit cell of dimensions a = 9.028(2), b = 140.54(6) and c = 42.41(1)A. The structure has been solved by direct methods and refined to an R value of 0.056 for 2904 observed reflections. The molecule exists as a zwitterion with terminal (His)CO2- and (imidazole)H+ as charged groups. The two peptide molecules in the structure adopt a type I beta-turn with Pro and Phe as the corner residues. The main conformational difference between the two crystallographically independent molecules is seen to be in the histidine side-chain orientations. The molecules arrange themselves in sheets perpendicular to the c axis. All hydrophobic side chains lie on one side of the sheets thus generated, whereas the hydrophilic groups are located on the other side. An interesting feature of the crystal structure is the existence of a water layer between adjacent peptide sheets. The conformational study of the isolated Ac-His-Pro-Phe-His-MA using energy calculations gives a rather limited number of stable conformers. The most stable corresponds to a type I beta-turn stabilized through two hydrogen bonds, followed by a less stable type II beta-turn (delta E = 2.0 kcal) and a partly helical structure (delta E = 2.6 kcal).

  6. Crystal Structure of the Japanese Encephalitis Virus Envelope Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Luca, Vincent C.; AbiMansour, Jad; Nelson, Christopher A.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2012-03-13

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading global cause of viral encephalitis. The JEV envelope protein (E) facilitates cellular attachment and membrane fusion and is the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. We have determined the 2.1-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the JEV E ectodomain refolded from bacterial inclusion bodies. The E protein possesses the three domains characteristic of flavivirus envelopes and epitope mapping of neutralizing antibodies onto the structure reveals determinants that correspond to the domain I lateral ridge, fusion loop, domain III lateral ridge, and domain I-II hinge. While monomeric in solution, JEV E assembles as an antiparallel dimer in the crystal lattice organized in a highly similar fashion as seen in cryo-electron microscopy models of mature flavivirus virions. The dimer interface, however, is remarkably small and lacks many of the domain II contacts observed in other flavivirus E homodimers. In addition, uniquely conserved histidines within the JEV serocomplex suggest that pH-mediated structural transitions may be aided by lateral interactions outside the dimer interface in the icosahedral virion. Our results suggest that variation in dimer structure and stability may significantly influence the assembly, receptor interaction, and uncoating of virions.

  7. Crystal Structure of Baculovirus RNA Triphosphatase Complexed with Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Changela, Anita; Martin, Alexandra; Shuman, Stewart; Mondragon, Alfonso

    2010-03-05

    Baculovirus RNA 5'-triphosphatase (BVP) exemplifies a family of RNA-specific cysteine phosphatases that includes the RNA triphosphatase domains of metazoan and plant mRNA capping enzymes. Here we report the crystal structure of BVP in a phosphate-bound state at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution. BVP adopts the characteristic cysteine-phosphatase {alpha}/{beta} fold and binds two phosphate ions in the active site region, one of which is proposed to mimic the phosphate of the product complex after hydrolysis of the covalent phosphoenzyme intermediate. The crystal structure highlights the role of backbone amides and side chains of the P-loop motif {sup 118}HCTHGXNRT{sup 126} in binding the cleavable phosphate and stabilizing the transition state. Comparison of the BVP structure to the apoenzyme of mammalian RNA triphosphatase reveals a concerted movement of the Arg-125 side chain (to engage the phosphate directly) and closure of an associated surface loop over the phosphate in the active site. The structure highlights a direct catalytic role of Asn-124, which is the signature P-loop residue of the RNA triphosphatase family and a likely determinant of the specificity of BVP for hydrolysis of phosphoanhydride linkages.

  8. The crystal structure of superoxide dismutase from Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Ian W; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Brannigan, James A; Schnick, Claudia; Smith, Derek J; Kyes, Sue A; Wilkinson, Anthony J

    2006-01-01

    Background Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are important enzymes in defence against oxidative stress. In Plasmodium falciparum, they may be expected to have special significance since part of the parasite life cycle is spent in red blood cells where the formation of reactive oxygen species is likely to be promoted by the products of haemoglobin breakdown. Thus, inhibitors of P. falciparum SODs have potential as anti-malarial compounds. As a step towards their development we have determined the crystal structure of the parasite's cytosolic iron superoxide dismutase. Results The cytosolic iron superoxide dismutase from P. falciparum (PfFeSOD) has been overexpressed in E. coli in a catalytically active form. Its crystal structure has been solved by molecular replacement and refined against data extending to 2.5 Å resolution. The structure reveals a two-domain organisation and an iron centre in which the metal is coordinated by three histidines, an aspartate and a solvent molecule. Consistent with ultracentrifugation analysis the enzyme is a dimer in which a hydrogen bonding lattice links the two active centres. Conclusion The tertiary structure of PfFeSOD is very similar to those of a number of other iron-and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutases, moreover the active site residues are conserved suggesting a common mechanism of action. Comparison of the dimer interfaces of PfFeSOD with the human manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase reveals a number of differences, which may underpin the design of parasite-selective superoxide dismutase inhibitors. PMID:17020617

  9. Diterbium hepta­nickel: a crystal structure redetermination

    PubMed Central

    Levytskyy, Volodymyr; Babizhetskyy, Volodymyr; Kotur, Bohdan; Smetana, Volodymyr

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, Tb2Ni7, was redetermined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. In comparison with previous studies based on powder X-ray diffraction data [Lemaire et al. (1967). C. R. Acad. Sci. Ser. B, 265, 1280–1282; Lemaire & Paccard (1969). Bull. Soc. Fr. Mineral. Cristallogr. 92, 9–16; Buschow & van der Goot (1970). J. Less-Common Met. 22, 419–428], the present redetermination affords refined coordinates and anisotropic displacement parameters for all atoms. A partial occupation for one Tb atom results in the non-stoichiometric composition Tb1.962 (4)Ni7. The title compound adopts the Ce2Ni7 structure type and can also be derived from the CaCu5 structure type as an inter­growth structure. The asymmetric unit contains two Tb sites (both site symmetries 3m.) and five Ni sites (.m., mm2, 3m., 3m., -3m.). The two different coordination polyhedra of Tb are a Frank–Kasper polyhedron formed by four Tb and 12 Ni atoms and a pseudo Frank–Kasper polyhedron formed by two Tb and 18 Ni atoms. The four different coordination polyhedra of Ni are Frank–Kasper icosa­hedra formed by five Tb and seven Ni atoms, four Tb and eight Ni atoms, three Tb and nine Ni atoms, and six Tb and six Ni atoms, respectively. PMID:25249871

  10. Crystal Structure of Rat Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao,Y.; Jogl, G.; Esser, V.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) has a crucial role in the {beta}-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in mitochondria. We report here the crystal structure of rat CPT-II at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The overall structure shares strong similarity to those of short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, although detailed structural differences in the active site region have a significant impact on the substrate selectivity of CPT-II. Three aliphatic chains, possibly from a detergent that is used for the crystallization, were found in the structure. Two of them are located in the carnitine and CoA binding sites, respectively. The third aliphatic chain may mimic the long-chain acyl group in the substrate of CPT-II. The binding site for this aliphatic chain does not exist in the short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, due to conformational differences among the enzymes. A unique insert in CPT-II is positioned on the surface of the enzyme, with a highly hydrophobic surface. It is likely that this surface patch mediates the association of CPT-II with the inner membrane of the mitochondria.

  11. The crystal structure of methylglyoxal synthase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Saadat, D; Harrison, D H

    1999-03-15

    The reaction mechanism of methylglyoxal synthase (MGS) is believed to be similar to that of triosephosphate isomerase (TIM). Both enzymes utilise dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to form an enediol(ate) phosphate intermediate as the first step of their reaction pathways. However, the second catalytic step in the MGS reaction pathway is characterized by the elimination of phosphate and collapse of the enediol(ate) to form methylglyoxal instead of reprotonation to form the isomer glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The crystal structure of MGS bound to formate and substoichiometric amounts of phosphate in the space group P6522 has been determined at 1.9 A resolution. This structure shows that the enzyme is a homohexamer composed of interacting five-stranded beta/alpha proteins, rather than the hallmark alpha/beta barrel structure of TIM. The conserved residues His19, Asp71, and His98 in each of the three monomers in the asymmetric unit bind to a formate ion that is present in the crystallization conditions. Differences in the three monomers in the asymmetric unit are localized at the mouth of the active site and can be ascribed to the presence or absence of a bound phosphate ion. In agreement with site-directed mutagenesis and mechanistic enzymology, the structure suggests that Asp71 acts as the catalytic base. Further, Asp20 and Asp101 are involved in intersubunit salt bridges. These salt bridges may provide a pathway for transmitting allosteric information.

  12. Crystal Structure of Cruxrhodopsin-3 from Haloarcula vallismortis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu Kit; Kitajima-Ihara, Tomomi; Fujii, Ryudoh; Gotoh, Toshiaki; Murakami, Midori; Ihara, Kunio; Kouyama, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Cruxrhodopsin-3 (cR3), a retinylidene protein found in the claret membrane of Haloarcula vallismortis, functions as a light-driven proton pump. In this study, the membrane fusion method was applied to crystallize cR3 into a crystal belonging to space group P321. Diffraction data at 2.1 Å resolution show that cR3 forms a trimeric assembly with bacterioruberin bound to the crevice between neighboring subunits. Although the structure of the proton-release pathway is conserved among proton-pumping archaeal rhodopsins, cR3 possesses the following peculiar structural features: 1) The DE loop is long enough to interact with a neighboring subunit, strengthening the trimeric assembly; 2) Three positive charges are distributed at the cytoplasmic end of helix F, affecting the higher order structure of cR3; 3) The cytoplasmic vicinity of retinal is more rigid in cR3 than in bacteriorhodopsin, affecting the early reaction step in the proton-pumping cycle; 4) the cytoplasmic part of helix E is greatly bent, influencing the proton uptake process. Meanwhile, it was observed that the photobleaching of retinal, which scarcely occurred in the membrane state, became significant when the trimeric assembly of cR3 was dissociated into monomers in the presence of an excess amount of detergent. On the basis of these observations, we discuss structural factors affecting the photostabilities of ion-pumping rhodopsins. PMID:25268964

  13. Lithium-cation conductivity and crystal structure of lithium diphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, V.I.; Sherstobitova, E.A.; Blatov, V.A.; Shekhtman, G.Sh.

    2014-03-15

    The electrical conductivity of lithium diphosphate Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been measured and jump-like increasing of ionic conductivity at 913 K has been found. The crystal structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been refined using high temperature neutron diffraction at 300–1050 K. At 913 K low temperature triclinic form of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms into high temperature monoclinic one, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a=8.8261(4) Å, b=5.2028(4) Å, c=13.3119(2) Å, β=104.372(6)°. The migration maps of Li{sup +} cations based on experimental data implemented into program package TOPOS have been explored. It was found that lithium cations in both low- and high temperature forms of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} migrate in three dimensions. Cross sections of the migrations channels extend as the temperature rises, but at the phase transition point have a sharp growth showing a strong “crystal structure – ion conductivity” correlation. -- Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} at 950 K. Red balls represent oxygen atoms; black lines show Li{sup +} ion migration channels in the layers perpendicular to [001] direction. Highlights: • Structure of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} has been refined using high temperature neutron diffraction. • At 913 K triclinic form of Li{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} transforms into high temperature monoclinic one. • The migration maps of Li{sup +} implemented into program package TOPOS have been explored. • Cross sections of the migrations channels at the phase transition have a sharp growth.

  14. Structure, Hydrodynamics, and Phase Transition of Freely Suspended Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Noel A.

    2000-01-01

    Smectic liquid crystals are phases of rod shaped molecules organized into one dimensionally (1D) periodic arrays of layers, each layer being between one and two molecular lengths thick. In the least ordered smectic phases, the smectics A and C, each layer is a two dimensional (2D) liquid. Additionally there are a variety of more ordered smectic phases having hexatic short range translational order or 2D crystalline quasi long range translational order within the layers. The inherent fluid-layer structure and low vapor pressure of smectic liquid crystals enable the long term stabilization of freely suspended, single component, layered fluid films as thin as 30A, a single molecular layer. The layering forces the films to be an integral number of smectic layers thick, quantizing their thickness in layer units and forcing a film of a particular number of layers to be physically homogeneous with respect to its layer structure over its entire area. Optical reflectivity enables the precise determination of the number of layers. These ultrathin freely suspended liquid crystal films are structures of fundamental interest in condensed matter and fluid physics. They are the thinnest known stable condensed phase fluid structures and have the largest surface-to-volume ratio of any stable fluid preparation, making them ideal for the study of the effects of reduced dimensionality on phase behavior and on fluctuation and interface phenomena. Their low vapor pressure and quantized thickness enable the effective use of microgravity to extend the study of basic capillary phenomena to ultrathin fluid films. Freely suspended films have been a wellspring of new liquid crystal physics. They have been used to provide unique experimental conditions for the study of condensed phase transitions in two dimensions. They are the only system in which the hexatic has been unambiguously identified as a phase of matter, and the only physical system in which fluctuations of a 2D XY system and

  15. Structural chemistry and number theory amalgamized: crystal structure of Na11Hg52.

    PubMed

    Hornfeck, Wolfgang; Hoch, Constantin

    2015-12-01

    The recently elucidated crystal structure of the technologically important amalgam Na11Hg52 is described by means of a method employing some fundamental concept of number theory, namely modular arithmetical (congruence) relations observed between a slightly idealized set of atomic coordinates. In combination with well known ideas from group theory, regarding lattice-sublattice transformations, these allow for a deeper mutual understanding of both and provide the structural chemist with a slightly different kind of spectacles, thus enabling a distinct viw on complex crystal structures in general.

  16. Crystallization, X-Ray Structure Determination and Structure-Based Drug Design for Targeted Malarial Enzymes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DAMD17-95-2-5007 TITLE: Crystallization, X-ray Structure Determination and Structure-Based Drug Design for...approach for the develpment of anti-malarial agent using structure-based drug design . This technique will enable us to identify active site inhibitors...based drug design project high resolution three domensional structure of the enzyme - inhibitor complex provides the basis for further modifications

  17. Unusual formation of single-crystal manganese sulfide microboxes co-mediated by the cubic crystal structure and shape.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Liang; Wu, Hao Bin; Xu, Rong; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2012-07-16

    Kept cubic: MnS microboxes, which act as an anode material for lithium ion batteries, are synthesized by a simple H(2)S gas sulfidation approach (TEM images show porous and hollow microcubes and a microbox). The formation of the single crystals is aided by the intrinsic cubic crystal structure and the nearly cubic shape of the MnCO(3) precursor.

  18. Crystal Structure of the Human Ephrin-A5 Ectodomain

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolov,D.; Li, C.; Lackmann, M.; Jeffrey, P.; Himanen, J.

    2007-01-01

    The Eph receptors, the largest subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases, and their ephrin ligands are important mediators of cell-cell communication regulating cell attachment, pathfinding, and mobility in the nervous and cardiovascular systems. Recent structural studies have revealed unique molecular features that explain many of the biochemical and signaling properties of Ephs and ephrins. Nevertheless, open questions remain, including understanding the precise molecular mechanism underlining their binding-partner preferences and subclass specificity. In this study, we have determined and present the crystal structure of the extracellular domain of ephrin-A5--the first structure of an unbound A-class ephrin. The structure, determined at 2.1 Angstroms resolution, is a variation of the Greek key {beta}-barrel folding topology, containing eight {beta}-strands, and stabilized by two disulphide bonds. Overall, ephrin-A5 is structurally very similar to ephrin-B1 and ephrin-B2 but, unlike ephrin-B2, it does not show dimerization either in solution or in the crystals. Comparing free ephrin-A5 to the previously published structure of EphB2-bound ephrin-A5 reveals that significant conformational changes occur only around the G-H ephrin loop that upon binding bends toward the receptor. Interestingly, the G-H loop undergoes a very similar conformational rearrangement in ephrin-B2 upon receptor binding. The results of this study further emphasize the importance of the G-H loop for receptor recognition and selectivity, and could serve as a starting point for the development of structure-based Eph antagonists.

  19. On Predicting the Crystal Structure of Energetic Materials From Quantum Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    ON PREDICTING THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF ENERGETIC MATERIALS FROM QUANTUM MECHANICS Betsy M. Rice* U. S. Army Research Laboratory, AMSRD-ARL-WM...cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) is used to predict polymorphic structures of crystalline RDX. The potential was first used in crystal structure prediction...methods which generate polymorphs of RDX and provide a 0 K ordering in energy. The 13 low energy- structures generated by crystal structure prediction

  20. Exploring Solid-State Structure and Physical Properties: A Molecular and Crystal Model Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    A crystal model laboratory exercise is presented that allows students to examine relations among the microscopic-macroscopic-symbolic levels, using crystalline mineral samples and corresponding crystal models. Students explore the relationship between solid-state structure and crystal form. Other structure-property relationships are explored. The…

  1. Exploring Solid-State Structure and Physical Properties: A Molecular and Crystal Model Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    A crystal model laboratory exercise is presented that allows students to examine relations among the microscopic-macroscopic-symbolic levels, using crystalline mineral samples and corresponding crystal models. Students explore the relationship between solid-state structure and crystal form. Other structure-property relationships are explored. The…

  2. Supressed Water Crystallization in Nano-Structured Physical Hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, Clinton; Vogt, Bryan; Weiss, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Suppressed water crystallization occurs in some organisms, such as the common wood frog, which allows it to hibernate in a frozen state without damage to its cells. Knowledge of the behavior of supercooled water and alternate ice forms may have many implications to many fields of science. Supercooling of water by several degrees below the normal freezing point is often observed in hydrogels that have attractive interactions with water, e.g., hydrogen bonding. Repulsive confinement, such as in hydrophobic porous carbon, can have even more significant effects on the supercooling of the entrapped water. This talk describes the freezing behavior in nano-structured, hydrophobically modified poly(dimethyl acrylamide) hydrogels that possess attractive and repulsive interactions with water and are physically crosslinked by hydrophobic nanodomains. Three distinct water freezing regimes were observed in the hydrogel swollen to about 50% water by weight. Differential scanning calorimetry detected three crystallization exotherms at 254K, 244K, and 227K. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments have shown that although the water mobility was suppressed at room temperature, the water remained significantly mobile below the normal freezing point of water. The talk will discuss how tuning the concentration of the hydrophobic composition of the hydrogel affects the porous length scales in the hydrogel, which may alter the state of water and the crystal form produced by supercooling.

  3. Crystal Structure Characterization of Thin Layer Zinc Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyan, Aris; Susilawati; Azizatul Fitri, Siti; Ahzan, Sukainil

    2017-05-01

    In this research the characterization of the crystal structure of a thin layer of ZnO (zinc oxide) were synthesized by sol - gel method and spin coating deposited on a glass substrate. The samples were divided into three sol concentrations of 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 Molar and two deposition temperature is 350 °C, and 550 °C. UV-Vis. spectrophotometer results showed that in the spectrum of visible light (wavelength range 300-800 nm) has a transmittance value of which increases with increasing concentration and temperature deposition of zinc oxide, otherwise the value of the absorption and the band gap energy decreases with the addition of concentration and deposition temperature. The transmittances value of the highest and lowest absorption was 93.5% and 0.03 is at a concentration of 0.1 M and zinc oxide deposition temperature of 550 °C, with a value of band gap energy of 2.98 eV. The XRD results showed that the zinc oxide crystal orientation in the field of 013 with a crystal grain size 14.4472 nm. SEM results showed the surface morphology of zinc oxide such as rod-like.

  4. Phase-field-crystal methodology for modeling of structural transformations.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Michael; Rottler, Jörg; Provatas, Nikolas

    2011-03-01

    We introduce and characterize free-energy functionals for modeling of solids with different crystallographic symmetries within the phase-field-crystal methodology. The excess free energy responsible for the emergence of periodic phases is inspired by classical density-functional theory, but uses only a minimal description for the modes of the direct correlation function to preserve computational efficiency. We provide a detailed prescription for controlling the crystal structure and introduce parameters for changing temperature and surface energies, so that phase transformations between body-centered-cubic (bcc), face-centered-cubic (fcc), hexagonal-close-packed (hcp), and simple-cubic (sc) lattices can be studied. To illustrate the versatility of our free-energy functional, we compute the phase diagram for fcc-bcc-liquid coexistence in the temperature-density plane. We also demonstrate that our model can be extended to include hcp symmetry by dynamically simulating hcp-liquid coexistence from a seeded crystal nucleus. We further quantify the dependence of the elastic constants on the model control parameters in two and three dimensions, showing how the degree of elastic anisotropy can be tuned from the shape of the direct correlation functions.

  5. Natural pseudowollastonite: Crystal structure, associated minerals, and geological context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seryotkin, Yurii V.; Sokol, Ella V.; Kokh, Svetlana N.

    2012-03-01

    Pseudowollastonite, an extremely rare constituent of ultrahigh-temperature combustion metamorphic and igneous rocks, has been found as a rock-forming mineral in Ca-rich paralava veins of Nabi Musa fossil mud volcano (Dead Sea area). Pseudowollastonite-bearing paralavas are the products of combustion metamorphism associated with spontaneous burning of methane. The melt began to crystallize at 1480-1500 °C about the ambient pressure. Pseudowollastonite enters two mineral assemblages: (1) rankinite, larnite, nagelschmidtite, wollastonite (1T), gehlenite-rich melilite, Ti-rich andradite, cuspidine, and fluorapatite; (2) parawollastonite (2M), wollastonite (1T), gehlenite-rich melilite, Ti-rich andradite, fluorellestadite. In this study we present the first single-crystal structure determination of natural pseudowollastonite. Pseudowollastonite from Nabi Musa dome is stoichiometric CaSiO3 and belongs to the most widespread four-layer polytype: a = 6.83556(10) Å, b = 11.86962(18) Å, c = 19.6255(3) Å, β = 90.6805(13)°, V = 1592.21(4) Å3, space group C2/c. We argue that pseudowollastonite is so scarce in nature because its formation requires joint action of several uncommon factors: availability of hot melts of T > 1200 °C that bear free calcium but are poor in Mg and Fe (mostly as Fe3 +) and their crystallization in the shallow crust followed by quenching.

  6. Crystal structure and vibrational spectra of betaine hydrogen selenate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, J.; Drozd, M.; Lis, T.; Śledź, M.; Barnes, A. J.; Ratajczak, H.

    1995-11-01

    The crystal structure of betaine hydrogen selenate monohydrate, (C 5H 12NO 2) +·(HSeO 4) -·(H 2O), BHSeH 2O, has been determined by X-ray diffraction as monoclinic, space group {P2 1}/{c} with a = 6.674(6), b = 11.912(9), c = 14.156(14) A, β = 100.61(4)° and Z = 4. It comprises protonated betaine moieties (betainium cations), hydrogen selenate anions and water molecules which are held together by a number of hydrogen bonds and form infinite chains. Two types of four-membered centrosymmetric rings are distinguished in the chain. The two rings share a common side. Powder FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were measured for the title crystal, the dehydrated crystal (betaine hydrogen selenate, BHSe) and their deuterated analogues. Assignments of the observed bands to vibrations of the hydrogen bonds and internal vibrations of the hydrogen selenate anions and the betainium cations are proposed. DSC data are also presented.

  7. Crystal structure and spectroscopic investigations of an organic monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Dhaouadi, H.; Marouani, H. Rzaigui, M.; Madani, A.

    2008-12-01

    Single crystals of (p-ClC{sub 6}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3})H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} are synthesized in water by interaction of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and (p-ClC{sub 6}H{sub 4}NH{sub 2}). This compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with the Pbca space group. Its unit-cell parameters are a = 9.724(3), b = 7.861(1), c = 25.078(6) A, V = 1917.1(6) A{sup 3} and Z = 8. The crystal structure has been solved and refined to R = 0.039, using 4298 independent reflections. The atomic arrangement can be described by inorganic layers parallel to ab plane, between which the organic cations are located. This compound exhibits a reversible phase transition at 403 K. The electrical conductivity measurements show that the (p-ClC{sub 6}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3})H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} has a conductivity value which goes from {sigma} = 0.88 x 10{sup -6} {omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1} at room temperature (293 K) to 3.31 x 10{sup -4} {omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1} at 433 K. Its characterisation by TA, NMR and IR is reported too.

  8. Structure and Chemical Durability of Lead Crystal Glass.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Frédéric; Jollivet, Patrick; Charpentier, Thibault; Fournier, Maxime; Gin, Stéphane

    2016-11-01

    Silicate glasses containing lead, also called lead crystal glasses, are commonly used as food product containers, in particular for alcoholic beverages. Lead's health hazards require major attention, which can first be investigated through the understanding of Pb release mechanisms in solution. The behavior of a commercial crystal glass containing 10.6 mol % of PbO (28.3 wt %) was studied in a reference solution of 4% acetic acid at 22, 40, and 70 °C at early and advanced stages of reaction. High-resolution solid-state (17)O and (29)Si NMR was used to probe the local structure of the pristine and, for the first time, of the altered lead crystal glass. Inserted into the vitreous structure between the network formers as Si-O-Pb bonds, Pb does not form Pb-O-Pb clusters which are expected to be more easily leached. A part of K is located near Pb, forming mixed Si-O-(Pb,K) near the nonbridging oxygens. Pb is always released into the solution following a diffusion-controlled dissolution over various periods of time, at a rate between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude lower than the alkalis (K and Na). The preferential release of alkalis is followed by an in situ repolymerization of the silicate network. Pb is only depleted in the outermost part of the alteration layer. In the remaining part, it stays mainly surrounded by Si in a stable structural configuration similar to that of the pristine glass. A simple model is proposed to estimate the Pb concentration as a function of glass surface, solution volume, temperature, and contact time.

  9. Crystal structures of ethylene glycol and ethylene glycol monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Fortes, A Dominic; Suard, Emmanuelle

    2011-12-21

    We have carried out a neutron powder diffraction study of deuterated ethylene glycol (1,2-ethanediol), and deuterated ethylene glycol monohydrate with the D2B high-resolution diffractometer at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Using these data, we have refined the complete structure, including all hydrogen atoms, of the anhydrous phase at 220 K. In addition, we have determined the structure of ethylene glycol monohydrate at 210 K using direct space methods. Anhydrous ethylene glycol crystallizes in space-group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with four formula units in a unit-cell of dimensions a = 5.0553(1) Å, b = 6.9627(1) Å, c = 9.2709(2) Å, and V = 326.319(8) Å(3) [ρ(calc)(deuterated) = 1386.26(3) kg m(-3)] at 220 K. Ethylene glycol monohydrate crystallizes in space-group P2(1)/c with four formula units in a unit-cell of dimensions a = 7.6858(3) Å, b = 7.2201(3) Å, c = 7.7356(4) Å, β = 92.868(3)°, and V = 428.73(2) Å(3) [ρ(calc)(deuterated) = 1365.40(7) kg m(-3)] at 210 K. Both the structures are characterized by the gauche conformation of the ethylene glycol molecule; however, the anhydrous phase contains the tGg' rotamer (or its mirror, g'Gt), whereas the monohydrate contains the gGg' rotamer. In the monohydrate, each water molecule is tetrahedrally coordinated, donating two hydrogen bonds to, and accepting two hydrogen bonds from the hydroxyl groups of neighboring ethylene glycol molecules. There are substantial differences in the degree of weak C-D···O hydrogen bonding between the two crystals, which calls into question the role of these interactions in determining the conformation of the ethylene glycol molecule.

  10. Crystal Structure of a Self-Spliced Group ll Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Toor,N.; Keating, K.; Taylor, S.; Pyle, A.

    2008-01-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing ribozymes that catalyze their own excision from precursor transcripts and insertion into new genetic locations. Here we report the crystal structure of an intact, self-spliced group II intron from Oceanobacillus iheyensis at 3.1 angstrom resolution. An extensive network of tertiary interactions facilitates the ordered packing of intron subdomains around a ribozyme core that includes catalytic domain V. The bulge of domain V adopts an unusual helical structure that is located adjacent to a major groove triple helix (catalytic triplex). The bulge and catalytic triplex jointly coordinate two divalent metal ions in a configuration that is consistent with a two-metal ion mechanism for catalysis. Structural and functional analogies support the hypothesis that group II introns and the spliceosome share a common ancestor.

  11. Crystal Structure of a Lipid G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Michael A; Roth, Christopher B; Jo, Euijung; Griffith, Mark T; Scott, Fiona L; Reinhart, Greg; Desale, Hans; Clemons, Bryan; Cahalan, Stuart M; Schuerer, Stephan C; Sanna, M Germana; Han, Gye Won; Kuhn, Peter; Rosen, Hugh; Stevens, Raymond C

    2012-03-01

    The lyso-phospholipid sphingosine 1-phosphate modulates lymphocyte trafficking, endothelial development and integrity, heart rate, and vascular tone and maturation by activating G protein-coupled sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. Here, we present the crystal structure of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 fused to T4-lysozyme (S1P1-T4L) in complex with an antagonist sphingolipid mimic. Extracellular access to the binding pocket is occluded by the amino terminus and extracellular loops of the receptor. Access is gained by ligands entering laterally between helices I and VII within the transmembrane region of the receptor. This structure, along with mutagenesis, agonist structure-activity relationship data, and modeling, provides a detailed view of the molecular recognition and requirement for hydrophobic volume that activates S1P1, resulting in the modulation of immune and stromal cell responses.

  12. Highly birefringent photonic crystal fiber with hybrid cladding structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianhua; Wang, Rong; Wang, Jingyuan; Zhang, Baofu; Zhou, Hua

    2010-12-01

    A novel highly birefringent photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with hybrid cladding is proposed. In this hybrid structural PCF, some air holes of the cladding are selectively filled with high refractive index material. The increased birefringence mainly results from that the symmetry is destroyed further in the designed PCF. The birefringence is theoretically investigated with variant structural parameters and refractive index of the filled material. The plane wave expansion method (PWE) and full-vector finite-element method (FEM) are respectively employed to investigate the optical properties of the proposed PCF. The numerical results show that the designed PCF can provide high birefringence and be well tuned by the structural parameters and refractive index of the filled material. It can be used as all-fiber polarization controllers and highly sensitive sensors.

  13. Crystal Structure of Antagonist Bound Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Roth, Christopher B.; Terakado, Masahiko; Kurata, Haruto; Omi, Rie; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Warshaviak, Dora; Nakade, Shinji; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo; Mileni, Mauro; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Griffith, Mark T.; Rodgers, Caroline; Han, Gye Won; Velasquez, Jeffrey; Chun, Jerold; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lipid biology continues to emerge as an area of significant therapeutic interest, particularly as the result of an enhanced understanding of the wealth of signaling molecules with diverse physiological properties. This growth in knowledge is epitomized by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which functions through interactions with six cognate G protein-coupled receptors. Herein we present three crystal structures of LPA1 in complex with antagonist tool compounds selected and designed through structural and stability analysis. Structural analysis combined with molecular dynamics identified a basis for ligand access to the LPA1 binding pocket from the extracellular space contrasting with the proposed access for the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor. Characteristics of the LPA1 binding pocket raise the possibility of promiscuous ligand recognition of phosphorylated endocannabinoids. Cell-based assays confirmed this hypothesis, linking the distinct receptor systems through metabolically related ligands with potential functional and therapeutic implications for treatment of disease. PMID:26091040

  14. Crystal structure solution from experimentally determined atomic pair distribution functions

    SciTech Connect

    Juhas, P.; Granlund, L.; Gujarathi, S.R.; Duxbury, P.M.; Billinge, S.J.L.

    2010-05-25

    An extension of the Liga algorithm for structure solution from atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs), to handle periodic crystal structures with multiple elements in the unit cell, is described. The procedure is performed in three separate steps. First, pair distances are extracted from the experimental PDF. In the second step the Liga algorithm is used to find unit-cell sites consistent with these pair distances. Finally, the atom species are assigned over the cell sites by minimizing the overlap of their empirical atomic radii. The procedure has been demonstrated on synchrotron X-ray PDF data from 16 test samples. The structure solution was successful for 14 samples, including cases with enlarged supercells. The algorithm success rate and the reasons for the failed cases are discussed, together with enhancements that should improve its convergence and usability.

  15. Crystal structure of the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin type A.

    PubMed Central

    Schad, E M; Zaitseva, I; Zaitsev, V N; Dohlsten, M; Kalland, T; Schlievert, P M; Ohlendorf, D H; Svensson, L A

    1995-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins are prototype superantigens characterized by their ability to bind to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and subsequently activate a large fraction of T-lymphocytes. The crystal structure of staphylococcal enterotoxin type A (SEA), a 27 kDa monomeric protein, was determined to 1.9 A resolution with an R-factor of 19.9% by multiple isomorphous replacement. SEA is a two domain protein composed of a beta-barrel and a beta-grasp motif demonstrating the same general structure as staphylococcal enterotoxins SEB and TSST-1. Unique for SEA, however, is a Zn2+ coordination site involved in MHC class II binding. Four amino acids including Ser1, His187, His225 and Asp227 were found to be involved in direct coordination of the metal ion. SEA is the first Zn2+ binding enterotoxin that has been structurally determined. Images PMID:7628431

  16. Syntheses, spectroscopy and crystal structures of new group 4 metallasiloxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Andreas; Murugavel, Ramaswamy; Roesky, Herbert W.; Schmidt, Hans-Georg

    1997-12-01

    The reactions of the organic-soluble (trimethylsilyl)arylaminosilanetriol RSi(OH) 3 (R = (2,6- i-Pr 2C 6H 3)NSiMe 3) (1) with titanocene dichloride and zirconocene dichloride in dimethoxyethane as the solvent leads to the formation of acyclic and cyclic siloxanes [RSi(OH) 2(OTiCp 2Cl)] (2) and [RSi(OH)(OZrCp 2)O] 2 (3), respectively. The molecular structures of the new products 2 and 3 have been established by means of their analytical and spectral data. Further, in each case the solid-state structure of the compounds has been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The EI mass spectral data reveal the presence of higher molecular weight compounds in the gas phase corresponding to the bicyclic or cubic structures of 2 and 3, respectively.

  17. Germanium FCC structure from a colloidal crystal template

    SciTech Connect

    Miguez, H.; Meseguer, F.; Lopez, C.; Holgado, M.; Andreasen, G.; Mifsud, A.; Fornes, V.

    2000-05-16

    Here, the authors show a method to fabricate a macroporous structure in which the pores, essentially identical, arrange regularly in a face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice. The result is a network of air spheres in a germanium medium. This structure presents the highest dielectric contrast ({epsilon}{sub Ge}/{epsilon}{sub air} = 16) ever achieved in the optical regime in such periodic structures, which could result in important applications in photonics. The authors employ solid silica colloidal crystals (opals) as templates within which a cyclic germanium growth process is carried out. Thus, the three-dimensional periodicity of the host is inherited by the guest. Afterward, the silica is removed and a germanium opal replica is obtained.

  18. Crystal Structure of a Self-Spliced Group II Intron

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, Navtej; Keating, Kevin S.; Taylor, Sean D.; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2008-04-10

    Group II introns are self-splicing ribozymes that catalyze their own excision from precursor transcripts and insertion into new genetic locations. Here we report the crystal structure of an intact, self-spliced group II intron from Oceanobacillus iheyensis at 3.1 angstrom resolution. An extensive network of tertiary interactions facilitates the ordered packing of intron subdomains around a ribozyme core that includes catalytic domain V. The bulge of domain V adopts an unusual helical structure that is located adjacent to a major groove triple helix (catalytic triplex). The bulge and catalytic triplex jointly coordinate two divalent metal ions in a configuration that is consistent with a two-metal ion mechanism for catalysis. Structural and functional analogies support the hypothesis that group II introns and the spliceosome share a common ancestor.

  19. Crystal structure of Homo sapiens protein LOC79017

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-02-08

    LOC79017 (MW 21.0 kDa, residues 1-188) was annotated as a hypothetical protein encoded by Homo sapiens chromosome 7 open reading frame 24. It was selected as a target by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) because it did not share more than 30% sequence identity with any protein for which the three-dimensional structure is known. The biological function of the protein has not been established yet. Parts of LOC79017 were identified as members of uncharacterized Pfam families (residues 1-95 as PB006073 and residues 104-180 as PB031696). BLAST searches revealed homologues of LOC79017 in many eukaryotes, but none of them have been functionally characterized. Here, we report the crystal structure of H. sapiens protein LOC79017 (UniGene code Hs.530024, UniProt code O75223, CESG target number go.35223).

  20. The crystal structure and superconducting properties of monatomic bromine.

    PubMed

    Duan, Defang; Meng, Xing; Tian, Fubo; Chen, Changbo; Wang, Liancheng; Ma, Yanming; Cui, Tian; Liu, Bingbing; He, Zhi; Zou, Guangtian

    2010-01-13

    The crystal structure and superconducting properties of monatomic bromine under high pressure have been studied by first-principles calculations. We have found the following phase transition sequence with increasing pressure: from body-centered orthorhombic (bco, phase II) to body-centered tetragonal structure (bct, phase III) at 126 GPa, then to face-centered cubic structure (fcc, phase IV) at 157 GPa, which is stable at least up to 300 GPa. The calculated superconducting critical temperature T(c) = 1.46 K at 100 GPa is consistent with the experimental value of 1.5 K. In addition, our results of T(c) decrease with increasing pressure in all the monatomic phases of bromine, similar to monatomic iodine. Further calculations show that the decrease of λ with pressure in phase IV is mainly attributed to the weakening of the 'soft' vibrational mode caused by pressure.

  1. Banded Structure and Domain Arrangements in PbTiO3 Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chen-Chia; Chen, Cheng-Sao

    1998-09-01

    In the present work we report the ferroelectric domain arrangements and characteristics of banded structures observed in flux-grown PbTiO3 single crystals. Investigations of etched crystals indicate that most of the specimens show banded structures which may correspond to surface relief characteristics of as-grown crystals. Banded structures, which are different from domain structures, possess structural characteristics similar to those of martensite variants in various alloys and ceramics. The stresses produced during transformation were relieved by the formation of the banded structures and the 90° domain structures, suggesting that the band structures and 90° domains are the products of self-accommodation in as-grown PbTiO3 crystals during the cubic/tetragonal (C/T) transformation. Image characteristics imply that banded-structure-induced domain intersections may store high strain energy in lead titanate crystals and therefore hinder polarization switching of the crystals.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Vanadate-Inhibited Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Johannes D; Bublitz, Maike; Arnou, Bertrand; Olesen, Claus; Andersen, Jens Peter; Møller, Jesper Vuust; Nissen, Poul

    2016-04-05

    Vanadate is the hallmark inhibitor of the P-type ATPase family; however, structural details of its inhibitory mechanism have remained unresolved. We have determined the crystal structure of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase with bound vanadate in the absence of Ca(2+). Vanadate is bound at the catalytic site as a planar VO3(-) in complex with water and Mg(2+) in a dephosphorylation transition-state-like conformation. Validating bound VO3(-) by anomalous difference Fourier maps using long-wavelength data we also identify a hitherto undescribed Cl(-) site near the dephosphorylation site. Crystallization was facilitated by trinitrophenyl (TNP)-derivatized nucleotides that bind with the TNP moiety occupying the binding pocket that normally accommodates the adenine of ATP, rationalizing their remarkably high affinity for E2P-like conformations of the Ca(2+)-ATPase. A comparison of the configurations of bound nucleotide analogs in the E2·VO3(-) structure with that in E2·BeF3(-) (E2P ground state analog) reveals multiple binding modes to the Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  3. Refinement of the crystal structure of lithium-bearing uvite

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhdestvenskaya, I. V. Frank-Kamenetskaya, O. V.; Kuznetsova, L. G.; Bannova, I. I.; Bronzova, Yu. M.

    2007-03-15

    The crystal structure of a natural calcium tourmaline, i.e., uvite with a high lithium content (0.51 au per formula (aupf) at the Y site, is refined to R = 0.019, R{sub w} = 0.020, and S = 1.11. It is shown that, in nature, there exist uvites in which the charge balance in the case where the Z site is occupied by trivalent cations is provided by the replacement of part of the divalent magnesium cations at the Y site by univalent cations, divalent calcium cations at the X site by sodium cations, and univalent anions at the W site by oxygen anions. The W site is found to be split into two sites, namely, the W1 and W11 sites (the W1-W11 distance is 0.14 A), which are partially occupied by the fluorine and oxygen anions, respectively. An analysis of the results obtained in this study and the data available in the literature on the crystal structure of uvites allows the conclusion that uvite can be considered a superspecies and that the nomenclature of this mineral group needs refinement with the use of structural data.

  4. Crystal structure of the yeast metacaspase Yca1.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ada Hang-Heng; Yan, Chuangye; Shi, Yigong

    2012-08-24

    Yca1, the only metacaspase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is thought to be a clan CD cysteine protease that includes the caspase subfamily. Although yeast is a single cell eukaryote, it can undergo a cell death process reminiscent of apoptosis. Yca1 has been reported to play an important role in the regulation of such apoptotic process. However, the structure and functional mechanism of Yca1 remain largely enigmatic. In this study, we report the crystal structure of the Yca1 metacaspase at 1.7 Å resolution, confirming a caspase-like fold. In sharp contrast to canonical caspases, however, Yca1 exists as a monomer both in solution and in the crystals. Canonical caspase contains six β-strands, with strand β6 pairing up with β6 of another caspase molecule to form a homodimerization interface. In Yca1, an extra pair of antiparallel β-strands forms a continuous β-sheet with the six caspase-common β-strands, blocking potential dimerization. Yca1 was reported to undergo autocatalytic processing in yeast; overexpression in bacteria also led to autoprocessing of Yca1 into two fragments. Unexpectedly, we found that both the autocatalytic processing and the proteolytic activity of Yca1 are greatly facilitated by the presence of calcium (Ca(2+)), but not other divalent cations. Our structural and biochemical characterization identifies Yca1 as a Ca(2+)-activated cysteine protease that may cleave specific substrates during stress response in yeast.

  5. Crystal structure of rofecoxib bound to human cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Benjamin J; Malkowski, Michael G

    2016-10-01

    Rofecoxib (Vioxx) was one of the first selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors (coxibs) to be approved for use in humans. Within five years after its release to the public, Vioxx was withdrawn from the market owing to the adverse cardiovascular effects of the drug. Despite the widespread knowledge of the development and withdrawal of Vioxx, relatively little is known at the molecular level about how the inhibitor binds to COX-2. Vioxx is unique in that the inhibitor contains a methyl sulfone moiety in place of the sulfonamide moiety found in other coxibs such as celecoxib and valdecoxib. Here, new crystallization conditions were identified that allowed the structural determination of human COX-2 in complex with Vioxx and the structure was subsequently determined to 2.7 Å resolution. The crystal structure provides the first atomic level details of the binding of Vioxx to COX-2. As anticipated, Vioxx binds with its methyl sulfone moiety located in the side pocket of the cyclooxygenase channel, providing support for the isoform selectivity of this drug.

  6. Models of protein-ligand crystal structures: trust, but verify

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, Marc C.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    X-ray crystallography provides the most accurate models of protein-ligand structures. These models serve as the foundation of many computational methods including structure prediction, molecular modelling, and structure-based drug design. The success of these computational methods ultimately depends on the quality of the underlying protein-ligand models. X-ray crystallography offers the unparalleled advantage of a clear mathematical formalism relating the experimental data to the protein-ligand model. In the case of X-ray crystallography, the primary experimental evidence is the electron density of the molecules forming the crystal. The first step in the generation of an accurate and precise crystallographic model is the interpretation of the electron density of the crystal, typically carried out by construction of an atomic model. The atomic model must then be validated for fit to the experimental electron density and also for agreement with prior expectations of stereochemistry. Stringent validation of protein-ligand models has become possible as a result of the mandatory deposition of primary diffraction data, and many computational tools are now available to aid in the validation process. Validation of protein-ligand complexes has revealed some instances of overenthusiastic interpretation of ligand density. Fundamental concepts and metrics of protein-ligand quality validation are discussed and we highlight software tools to assist in this process. It is essential that end users select high quality protein-ligand models for their computational and biological studies, and we provide an overview of how this can be achieved.

  7. Origins of Water Molecules in the Photosystem II Crystal Structure.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, Naoki; Watanabe, Hiroshi C; Ikeda, Takuya; Saito, Keisuke; Ishikita, Hiroshi

    2017-06-20

    The cyanobacterial photosystem II (PSII) crystal structure includes more than 1300 water molecules in each monomer unit; however, their precise roles in water oxidation are unclear. To understand the origins of water molecules in the PSII crystal structure, the accessibility of bulk water molecules to channel inner spaces in PSII was investigated using the water-removed PSII structure and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The inner space of the channel that proceeds toward the D1-Glu65/D2-Glu312 pair (E65/E312 channel) was entirely filled with water molecules from the bulk region. In the same channel, a diamond-shaped cluster of water molecules formed near redox-active TyrZ in MD simulations. Reorientation of the D2-Leu352 side chain resulted in formation of a hexagonal water network at the Cl(-)2 binding site. Water molecules could not enter the main region of the O4-water chain, which proceeds from the O4 site of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. However, in the O4-water chain, the two water binding sites that are most distant from the protein bulk surface were occupied by water molecules that approached along the E65/E312 channel, one of which formed an H-bond with the O4 site. These findings provide key insights into the significance of the channel ends, which may utilize water molecules during the PSII photocycle.

  8. Potassium and magnesium succinatouranilates - Synthesis and crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, S. A.; Grigoriev, M. S.; Serezhkina, L. B.; Serezhkin, V. N.

    2017-04-01

    Single crystal X-ray diffraction has been applied to determine the structures of two new uranyl coordination polymers: K2[(UO2)2(C4H4O4)3] (1) and [Mg(H2O)6] [(UO2)2(C4H4O4)3]·2H2O (2), where C4H4O42- is succinate anion. Crystals of 1 and 2 contain polymeric complex anions [(UO2)2(C4H4O4)3]2- with the same A2Q023 crystallochemical formula (A=UO22+, Q02=C4O4H42-), and have layered (1) or chain (2) structure. It has been found, that conformation of succinate ions is one of the factors, which affects the structure of [(UO2)2(C4H4O4)3]2- anions. IR spectra of these new compounds are in good agreement with crystallographic data. Topological analysis of the uranium dicarboxylates with A2Q023 crystallochemical formula has shown the presence of five isomers which differ from each other in coordination sequences and / or dimensionality.

  9. Crystal structure of rofecoxib bound to human cyclooxygenase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Orlando, Benjamin J.; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2016-10-26

    Rofecoxib (Vioxx) was one of the first selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors (coxibs) to be approved for use in humans. Within five years after its release to the public, Vioxx was withdrawn from the market owing to the adverse cardiovascular effects of the drug. Despite the widespread knowledge of the development and withdrawal of Vioxx, relatively little is known at the molecular level about how the inhibitor binds to COX-2. Vioxx is unique in that the inhibitor contains a methyl sulfone moiety in place of the sulfonamide moiety found in other coxibs such as celecoxib and valdecoxib. Here, new crystallization conditions were identified that allowed the structural determination of human COX-2 in complex with Vioxx and the structure was subsequently determined to 2.7- Å resolution. The crystal structure provides the first atomic level details of the binding of Vioxx to COX-2. As anticipated, Vioxx binds with its methyl sulfone moiety located in the side pocket of the cyclooxygenase channel, providing support for the isoform selectivity of this drug.

  10. Crystal structure of tuguaconitine, a diterpene alkaloid from Aconitum sibiricum.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Kyun; Lee, Soo Jae; Kim, Yang Bae; Lee, Hyeong Kyu; Jeong, Eun Ju; Park, Il Yeong

    2008-02-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a natural product, tuguaconitine (C23H35NO7) from Aconitumrn sibiricum was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The compound was recrystallized from a methanol solution into orthorhombic crystal system, with a = 18.093(4), b = 12.075(11), c = 9.824(4) A, Dm = 1.35, Dx= 1.354 g/cm3, space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), and Z=4. The structure was solved by direct method and refined by least-squares procedure to the final R value of 0.046 for 1495 observed reflections with I > or = 2sigma(I). Aconitines are diterpene alkaloid composed of six rings. In the molecule, two 6-membered rings have stable chair conformation, but other two 6-membered rings have unstable boat conformation because of their bonding strain and hydrogen bonds. Based on the three-dimensional structure of tuguaconitine, we suggest another 2D-diagram for the compound which is far better in imagination of the spatial shape of the molecule than the ordinary one.

  11. Electrical and Structural Characterization of Web Dendrite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, G. H.; Koliwad, K.; Dumas, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    Minority carrier lifetime distributions in silicon web dendrites are measured. Emphasis is placed on measuring areal homogeneity of lifetime, show its dependency on structural defects, and its unique change during hot processing. The internal gettering action of defect layers present in web crystals and their relation to minority carrier lifetime distributions is discussed. Minority carrier lifetime maps of web dendrites obtained before and after high temperature heat treatment are compared to similar maps obtained from 100 mm diameter Czochralski silicon wafers. Such maps indicate similar or superior areal homogeneity of minority carrier lifetime in webs.

  12. Crystal structure of hexa-aqua-dichlorido-ytterbium(III) chloride.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Kevin M; Crundwell, Guy; Westcott, Barry L

    2015-06-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, [YbCl2(H2O)6]Cl, was determined at 110 K. Samples were obtained from evaporated aceto-nitrile solutions containing the title compound, which consists of a [YbCl2(H2O)6](+) cation and a Cl(-) anion. The cations in the title compound sit on a twofold axis and form O-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds with the nearby Cl(-) anion. The coordination geometry around the metal centre forms a distorted square anti-prism. The ytterbium complex is isotypic with the europium complex [Tambrornino et al. (2014 ▶). Acta Cryst. E70, i27].

  13. Study of the crystal structure of silicon nanoislands on sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Krivulin, N. O. Pirogov, A. V.; Pavlov, D. A.; Bobrov, A. I.

    2015-02-15

    The results of studies of the crystal structure of silicon nanoislands on sapphire are reported. It is shown that the principal defects in silicon nanoislands on sapphire are twinning defects. As a result of the formation of such defects, different crystallographic orientations are formed in silicon nanoislands on sapphire. In the initial stages of the molecular-beam epitaxy of silicon on sapphire, there are two basic orientations: the (001) orientation parallel to the surface and the (001) orientation at an angle of 70° to the surface.

  14. Crystal Structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Factor Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, Timothy J.; Worzalla, Gregory A.; Ginster, Aaron M.; Forest, Katrina T.

    2012-09-07

    Virulence factor regulator (Vfr) enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity through its role as a global transcriptional regulator. The crystal structure of Vfr shows that it is a winged-helix DNA-binding protein like its homologue cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). In addition to an expected primary cyclic AMP-binding site, a second ligand-binding site is nestled between the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal helix-turn-helix domain. Unlike CRP, Vfr is a symmetric dimer in the absence of DNA. Removal of seven disordered N-terminal residues of Vfr prvents the growth of P. aeruginosa.

  15. Crystal structure of tris-(piperidinium) hydrogen sulfate sulfate.

    PubMed

    Lukianova, Tamara J; Kinzhybalo, Vasyl; Pietraszko, Adam

    2015-12-01

    In the title molecular salt, 3C5H12N(+)·HSO4 (-)·SO4 (2-), each cation adopts a chair conformation. In the crystal, the hydrogen sulfate ion is connected to the sulfate ion by a strong O-H⋯O hydrogen bond. The packing also features a number of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which lead to a three-dimensional network structure. The hydrogen sulfate anion accepts four hydrogen bonds from two cations, whereas the sulfate ion, as an acceptor, binds to five separate piperidinium cations, forming seven hydrogen bonds.

  16. Photonic crystal digital alloys and their band structure properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongkug; Kim, Dong-Uk; Jeon, Heonsu

    2011-09-26

    We investigated semi-disordered photonic crystals (PCs), digital alloys, and made thorough comparisons with their counterparts, random alloys. A set of diamond lattice PC digital alloys operating in a microwave regime were prepared by alternately stacking two kinds of sub-PC systems composed of alumina and silica spheres of the same size. Measured transmission spectra as well as calculated band structures revealed that when the digital alloy period is short, band-gaps of the digital alloys are practically the same as those of the random alloys. This study indicates that the concept of digital alloys holds for photons in PCs as well.

  17. Crystal structure of human tooth enamel studied by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouladdiaf, Bachir; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan; Goutaudier, Christelle; Ouladdiaf, Selma; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Pradelle, Nelly; Colon, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    Crystal structure of human tooth enamel was investigated using high-resolution neutron powder diffraction. Excellent agreement between observed and refined patterns is obtained, using the hexagonal hydroxyapatite model for the tooth enamel, where a large hydroxyl deficiency ˜70% is found in the 4e site. Rietveld refinements method combined with the difference Fourier maps have revealed, however, that the hydroxyl ions are not only disordered along the c-axis but also within the basal plane. Additional H ions located at the 6h site and forming HPO42- anions were found.

  18. Characteristics and crystal structure of bacterial inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Evans, G.; Rotella, F. J.; Westbrook, E. M.; Beno, D.; Huberman, E.; Joachimiak, A.; Collart, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is an essential enzyme that catalyzes the first step unique to GTP synthesis. To provide a basis for the evaluation of IMPDH inhibitors as antimicrobial agents, we have expressed and characterized IMPDH from the pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes. Our results show that the biochemical and kinetic characteristics of S. pyogenes IMPDH are similar to other bacterial IMPDH enzymes. However, the lack of sensitivity to mycophenolic acid and the K{sub m} for NAD (1180 {mu}M) exemplify some of the differences between the bacterial and mammalian IMPDH enzymes, making it an attractive target for antimicrobial agents. To evaluate the basis for these differences, we determined the crystal structure of the bacterial enzyme at 1.9 {angstrom} with substrate bound in the catalytic site. The structure was determined using selenomethionine-substituted protein and multiwavelength anomalous (MAD) analysis of data obtained with synchrotron radiation from the undulator beamline (19ID) of the Structural Biology Center at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source. S. pyogenes IMPDH is a tetramer with its four subunits related by a crystallographic 4-fold axis. The protein is composed of two domains: a TIM barrel domain that embodies the catalytic framework and a cystathione {beta}-synthase (CBS) dimer domain of so far unknown function. Using information provided by sequence alignments and the crystal structure, we prepared several site-specific mutants to examine the role of various active site regions in catalysis. These variants implicate the active site flap as an essential catalytic element and indicate there are significant differences in the catalytic environment of bacterial and mammalian IMPDH enzymes. Comparison of the structure of bacterial IMPDH with the known partial structures from eukaryotic organisms will provide an explanation of their distinct properties and contribute to the design of specific bacterial IMPDH inhibitors.

  19. Crystal Structure of the Marburg Virus VP35 Oligomerization Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bruhn, Jessica F.; Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Urata, Sarah M.; Li, Sheng; Tickle, Ian J.; Bricogne, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marburg virus (MARV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that is classified in a genus distinct from that of Ebola virus (EBOV) (genera Marburgvirus and Ebolavirus, respectively). Both viruses produce a multifunctional protein termed VP35, which acts as a polymerase cofactor, a viral protein chaperone, and an antagonist of the innate immune response. VP35 contains a central oligomerization domain with a predicted coiled-coil motif. This domain has been shown to be essential for RNA polymerase function. Here we present crystal structures of the MARV VP35 oligomerization domain. These structures and accompanying biophysical characterization suggest that MARV VP35 is a trimer. In contrast, EBOV VP35 is likely a tetramer in solution. Differences in the oligomeric state of this protein may explain mechanistic differences in replication and immune evasion observed for MARV and EBOV. IMPORTANCE Marburg virus can cause severe disease, with up to 90% human lethality. Its genome is concise, only producing seven proteins. One of the proteins, VP35, is essential for replication of the viral genome and for evasion of host immune responses. VP35 oligomerizes (self-assembles) in order to function, yet the structure by which it assembles has not been visualized. Here we present two crystal structures of this oligomerization domain. In both structures, three copies of VP35 twist about each other to form a coiled coil. This trimeric assembly is in contrast to tetrameric predictions for VP35 of Ebola virus and to known structures of homologous proteins in the measles, mumps, and Nipah viruses. Distinct oligomeric states of the Marburg and Ebola virus VP35 proteins may explain differences between them in polymerase function and immune evasion. These findings may provide a more accurate understanding of the mechanisms governing VP35's functions and inform the design of therapeutics. PMID:27847355

  20. Probing the molecular structure of interfacial films and crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Anfeng

    The properties of outside surfaces were found to play an important role in the nucleation and crystallization processes. Thus controlling the surface properties would provide an effective means for crystal engineering. Hydrophobic surface is prepared by self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formation of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) on silicon surface, with the hydrophobicity adjusted by the monolayer coverage. Silicon wafer treated by RCA method is hydrophilic, so are SAMs formed by two amine-terminated organosilanes on silicon. However these three hydrophilic surfaces are unstable, due to contamination of the amine-terminated SAMs and hydrolysis of RCA treated silicon. Polymethine dyes, BDH+Cl- and BDH +ClO4-, are synthesized and characterized by UV spectra and crystal morphology. They have identical UV spectrum in dilute solutions due to the same chromophore, and J-aggregation happens at much higher concentrations. IR spectra are analyzed to monitor the crystallization process of BDH+Cl- OTS SAM surface and the crystallization process of BDH+Cl- on substrates with varying hydrophobicity was monitored by optical microscopy and compared. Due to the extreme flexibility of polysiloxane, silicone surfactants can arrange themselves at the interfaces quickly to adopt configurations with minimum free energy. Polysiloxane is hydrophobic but not oleophilic, which makes them effective emulsifiers and stabilizers in aqueous and nonaqueous media. The interaction between an AFM Si3N4 tip and a hydrophobic surface in silicone polyether (SPE) solution in the presence of ethanol was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) force measurement. ABA triblock type and comb-type SPE surfactants, adsorbed at the liquid-solid interface, provide steric barriers, even with significant addition of ethanol. On the contrary, conventional low-molecular weight and polymeric alkyl surfactants display no steric barrier even in the presence of moderate amount of ethanol. This unique property makes

  1. Structure and Dynamics of Freely Suspended Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Noel A.

    2004-01-01

    Smectic liquid crystals are phases of rod shaped molecules organized into one dimensionally (1 D) periodic arrays of layers, each layer being between one and two molecular lengths thick. In the least ordered smectic phases, the smectics A and C, each layer is a two dimensional (2D) liquid. Additionally there are a variety of more ordered smectic phases having hexatic short range translational order or 2D crystalline or quasi long range translational order within the layers. The inherent fluid-layer structure and low vapor pressure of smectic liquid crystals enables the long term stabilization of freely suspended, single component, layered fluid films as thin as 30A, a single molecular layer. The layering forces the films to be an integral number of smectic layers thick, quantizing their thickness in layer units and forcing a film of a particular number of layers to be physically homogeneous with respect to its layer structure over its entire area. Optical reflectivity enables the precise determination of the number of layers. These ultrathin freely suspended liquid crystal films are structures of fundamental interest in condensed matter and fluid physics. They are the thinnest known stable fluid structures and have the largest surface-to-volume ratio of any stable fluid preparation, making them ideal for the study of the effects of reduced dimensionality on phase behavior and on fluctuation and interface phenomena. Their low vapor pressure and quantized thickness enable the effective use of microgravity to extend the study of basic capillary phenomena to ultrathin fluid films. Freely suspended films have been a wellspring of new LC physics. They have been used to provide unique experimental conditions for the study of condensed phase transitions in two dimensions. They are the only system in which the hexatic has been unambiguously identified as a phase of matter, and the only physical system in which fluctuations of a 2D XY system and Kosterlitz Thouless phase

  2. Synthesis, crystal structure and electronic structure of the binary phase Rh2Cd5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koley, Biplab; Chatterjee, S.; Jana, Partha P.

    2017-02-01

    A new phase in the Rh-Cd binary system - Rh2Cd5 has been identified and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and Energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The stoichiometric compound Rh2Cd5 crystallizes with a unit cell containing 14 atoms, in the orthorhombic space group Pbam (55). The crystal structure of Rh2Cd5 can be described as a defect form of the In3Pd5 structure with ordered vacancies, formed of two 2D atomic layers with the stacking sequence: ABAB. The A type layers consist of (3.6.3.6)-Kagomé nets of Cd atoms while the B type layers consist of (35) (37)- nets of both Cd and Rh atoms. The stability of this line phase is investigated by first principle electronic structure calculations on the model of ordered Rh2Cd5.

  3. Prediction of crystal structures from crystal chemistry rules by simulated annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannetier, J.; Bassas-Alsina, J.; Rodriguez-Carvajal, J.; Caignaert, V.

    1990-07-01

    THE prediction of the structure of inorganic crystalline solids from the knowledge of their chemical composition is still a largely unresolved problem1-3. The usual approach to this problem is to minimize, for a selection of candidate models, the potential energy of the system with respect to the structural parameters of these models: the solution is the arrangement that comes out lowest in energy. Methods using this procedure may differ in the origin (ab initio or empirical) of the interatomic potentials used, but they usually restrict themselves to optimizing a structural arrangement within the constraints of given symmetry and bond topology. As a result, they do not truly address the problem of predicting the unknown structure of a real compound. The method we describe here is an attempt at solving the following problem: given the chemical composition of a crystalline compound and the values of its unit-cell parameters, find its structure (topology and bond distances) by optimizing the arrangement of ions, atoms or molecules in accordance with a set of prescribed rules. The procedure uses simple, empirical crystal chemistry arguments (Pauling's principles for ionic compounds4) and a powerful stochastic search procedure, known as simulated annealing5 to identify the best atomic model or models. We discuss the potential of the method for structure determination and refinement, using results obtained for several known inorganic structures, and by the determination of a previously unknown structure. Although the approach is limited to the case of inorganic compounds, it is nevertheless very general, and would apply to any crystalline structure provided that the principles governing the architecture of the solid can be properly described.

  4. Are the Crystal Structures of Enantiopure and Racemic Mandelic Acids Determined by Kinetics or Thermodynamics?

    PubMed

    Hylton, Rebecca K; Tizzard, Graham J; Threlfall, Terence L; Ellis, Amy L; Coles, Simon J; Seaton, Colin C; Schulze, Eric; Lorenz, Heike; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Stein, Matthias; Price, Sarah L

    2015-09-02

    Mandelic acids are prototypic chiral molecules where the sensitivity of crystallized forms (enantiopure/racemic compound/polymorphs) to both conditions and substituents provides a new insight into the factors that may allow chiral separation by crystallization. The determination of a significant number of single crystal structures allows the analysis of 13 enantiopure and 30 racemic crystal structures of 21 (F/Cl/Br/CH3/CH3O) substituted mandelic acid derivatives. There are some common phenyl packing motifs between some groups of racemic and enantiopure structures, although they show very different hydrogen-bonding motifs. The computed crystal energy landscape of 3-chloromandelic acid, which has at least two enantiopure and three racemic crystal polymorphs, reveals that there are many more possible structures, some of which are predicted to be thermodynamically more favorable as well as slightly denser than the known forms. Simulations of mandelic acid dimers in isolation, water, and toluene do not differentiate between racemic and enantiopure dimers and also suggest that the phenyl ring interactions play a major role in the crystallization mechanism. The observed crystallization behavior of mandelic acids does not correspond to any simple "crystal engineering rules" as there is a range of thermodynamically feasible structures with no distinction between the enantiopure and racemic forms. Nucleation and crystallization appear to be determined by the kinetics of crystal growth with a statistical bias, but the diversity of the mandelic acid crystallization behavior demonstrates that the factors that influence the kinetics of crystal nucleation and growth are not yet adequately understood.

  5. Single crystal structures of thallium (I) thorium fluorides and crystal chemistry of monovalent tetravalent cation pentafluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudahmane, Abdelghani; El-Ghozzi, Malika; Jouffret, Laurent; Avignant, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Two thallium (I) thorium (IV) fluorides, TlTh3F13 and TlThF5 were obtained by solid state synthesis and their crystal structures determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data recorded at room temperature with an APEX-II CCD diffractometer. TlTh3F13 is orthorhombic, space group Pmc21, with a=8.1801(2) Å, b=7.4479(2) Å, c=8.6375(2) Å, V=526.24(2) Å3, Z=2 and TlThF5 is monoclinic, space group P21/n, with a=8.1128(5) Å, b=7.2250(4) Å, c=8.8493(6) Å, β=116.683(3)°, V=463.46(5) Å3, Z=4. The structure of TlTh3F13 comprises layers of corner and edge-sharing ThF9 polyhedra further linked by chains of trans connected tricapped trigonal prisms ThF9 through corners and edges. The three dimensional thorium frameworks delimits channels parallel to [0 0 1] where the 11-coordinated Tl+ ions are arranged into double columns located in mirror planes of the structure. TlTh3F13 is isotypic with RbTh3F13, RbU3F13 and with one of the two polymorphs of CsTh3F13. The structure of TlThF5 may be regarded as a layer structure built up from the regular succession of 2∞[ M ‧F5 ] - corrugated layers further held by the Tl+ ions along the [1 0 1 ̅] direction. The layers are built up from edge and corner-sharing thorium polyhedra where each (ThF9)5- monocapped square antiprism is connected to five others by sharing three edges and two corners. TlThF5 is isostructural with β-NH4UF5 and with one of the polymorphs of CsThF5. A comparison of the different structural types of MM‧F5 pentafluorides is presented and a diagram of repartition of their structures is given. From the comparison of the Tl structures with their Rb or Cs homologs, where very similar monovalent cation environments are observed it should be concluded to a stereochemically inactivity of the 6s2 lone pair of Tl(I) in both TlTh3F13 and TlThF5, contrary to what is observed in richer Tl(I) content Tl3ThF7 fluorothorate.

  6. Crystal Initiation Structures in Developing Enamel: Possible Implications for Caries Dissolution of Enamel Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Colin; Connell, Simon D.

    2017-01-01

    Investigations of developing enamel crystals using Atomic and Chemical Force Microscopy (AFM, CFM) have revealed a subunit structure. Subunits were seen in height images as collinear swellings about 30 nM in diameter on crystal surfaces. In friction mode they were visible as positive regions. These were similar in size (30–50 nM) to collinear spherical structures, presumably mineral matrix complexes, seen in developing enamel using a freeze fracturing/freeze etching procedure. More detailed AFM studies on mature enamel suggested that the 30–50 nM structures were composed of smaller units, ~10–15 nM in diameter. These were clustered in hexagonal or perhaps a spiral arrangement. It was suggested that these could be the imprints of initiation sites for mineral precipitation. The investigation aimed at examining original freeze etched images at high resolution to see if the smaller subunits observed using AFM in mature enamel were also present in developing enamel i.e., before loss of the organic matrix. The method used was freeze etching. Briefly samples of developing rat enamel were rapidly frozen, fractured under vacuum, and ice sublimed from the fractured surface. The fractured surface was shadowed with platinum or gold and the metal replica subjected to high resolution TEM. For AFM studies high-resolution tapping mode imaging of human mature enamel sections was performed in air under ambient conditions at a point midway between the cusp and the cervical margin. Both AFM and freeze etch studies showed structures 30–50 nM in diameter. AFM indicated that these may be clusters of somewhat smaller structures ~10–15 nM maybe hexagonally or spirally arranged. High resolution freeze etching images of very early enamel showed ~30–50 nM spherical structures in a disordered arrangement. No smaller units at 10–15 nM were clearly seen. However, when linear arrangements of 30–50 nM units were visible the picture was more complex but also smaller units including

  7. Theoretical studies of the crystal structure of rare earths and actinides at zero temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, J.M. ); Eriksson, O. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-01-01

    Accurate total energy electronic structure calculations have recently been carried out over a range of volumes for selected rare-earth and actinide elements in crystal structures, experimentally observed in these elements. Correct zero temperature crystal structures are obtained, and calculated equilibrium properties are in reasonable agreement with experiment. Results of these calculations indicate that the interactions underlying crystal structure stability are similar in itinerant f-electron metals and transition metals. The stable crystal structure at a particular volume is determined by a balance between one-electron bandwidths and band fillings and the electrostatic energy of the crystal lattice. Broad bands favor high-symmetry, close-packed structures while narrow bands favor low-symmetry, open structures; allowing for expansion as well as contraction, both transition and actinide elements can be stabilized in both low- and high-symmetry crystal structures.

  8. Theoretical studies of the crystal structure of rare earths and actinides at zero temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, J.M.; Eriksson, O.

    1993-07-01

    Accurate total energy electronic structure calculations have recently been carried out over a range of volumes for selected rare-earth and actinide elements in crystal structures, experimentally observed in these elements. Correct zero temperature crystal structures are obtained, and calculated equilibrium properties are in reasonable agreement with experiment. Results of these calculations indicate that the interactions underlying crystal structure stability are similar in itinerant f-electron metals and transition metals. The stable crystal structure at a particular volume is determined by a balance between one-electron bandwidths and band fillings and the electrostatic energy of the crystal lattice. Broad bands favor high-symmetry, close-packed structures while narrow bands favor low-symmetry, open structures; allowing for expansion as well as contraction, both transition and actinide elements can be stabilized in both low- and high-symmetry crystal structures.

  9. Crystal structure of nonspecific lipid transfer protein from Solanum melongena.

    PubMed

    Jain, Abha; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2017-10-01

    Lipids are considered to protect protein allergens from proteolysis and are generally seen to exist in a bound form. One of the well-known plant protein families with bound lipids is non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs). Structure-function relationships in the case of the members of non-specific lipid transfer protein family are not clearly understood. As part of exploring the seed proteome, we have analyzed the proteome of a member of Solanaceae family, Solanum melongena (eggplant) and a non-specific lipid transfer protein from S. melongena, SM80.2 was purified, crystallized and the structure was determined at 1.87 Å resolution. Overall, the tertiary structure is a cluster of α-helices forming an internal hydrophobic cavity. Absence of conserved Tyr79, known to govern the plasticity of hydrophobic cavity, and formation of hydrogen bond between Asn79 and Asn36 further reduced the pocket size. Structural analysis of SM80.2 thus gives insight about a new hydrogen bond mediated mechanism followed in closure of the binding pocket. Extra electron densities observed at two different places on the protein surface and not in the cavity could provide interesting physiological relevance. In light of allergenic properties, probably overlapping of epitopic region and ligand binding on surface could be a main reason. This work shows first crystal structure of A-like nsLTP with a close binding pocket and extra density on the surface suggesting a plausible intermediate state during transfer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Analysis of zinc binding sites in protein crystal structures.

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, I. L.; Nadassy, K.; Wodak, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    The geometrical properties of zinc binding sites in a dataset of high quality protein crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank have been examined to identify important differences between zinc sites that are directly involved in catalysis and those that play a structural role. Coordination angles in the zinc primary coordination sphere are compared with ideal values for each coordination geometry, and zinc coordination distances are compared with those in small zinc complexes from the Cambridge Structural Database as a guide of expected trends. We find that distances and angles in the primary coordination sphere are in general close to the expected (or ideal) values. Deviations occur primarily for oxygen coordinating atoms and are found to be mainly due to H-bonding of the oxygen coordinating ligand to protein residues, bidentate binding arrangements, and multi-zinc sites. We find that H-bonding of oxygen containing residues (or water) to zinc bound histidines is almost universal in our dataset and defines the elec-His-Zn motif. Analysis of the stereochemistry shows that carboxyl elec-His-Zn motifs are geometrically rigid, while water elec-His-Zn motifs show the most geometrical variation. As catalytic motifs have a higher proportion of carboxyl elec atoms than structural motifs, they provide a more rigid framework for zinc binding. This is understood biologically, as a small distortion in the zinc position in an enzyme can have serious consequences on the enzymatic reaction. We also analyze the sequence pattern of the zinc ligands and residues that provide elecs, and identify conserved hydrophobic residues in the endopeptidases that also appear to contribute to stabilizing the catalytic zinc site. A zinc binding template in protein crystal structures is derived from these observations. PMID:10082367

  11. Photochemical manipulation of colloidal structures in liquid-crystal colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Tabe, Y.; Yokoyama, H.

    2007-05-01

    We investigated photochemical manipulation of physical properties and colloidal structures in liquid-crystal (LC) colloids containing azobenzene compounds. In a LC suspension where polymeric particles were dispersed in a host LC, we achieved photochemical control of light-scattering properties of the suspension. In a nematic phase, when the suspension was sandwiched with two glass plates, the film became opaque. This would be attributable to an appearance of both multidomain structures of LC alignment and mismatches of refractive indices between the materials. The opaque state turned into a transparent one when a nematic-to-isotropic phase transition was induced by the trans-to-cis photoisomerization of the azo-dye. This will result from a disappearance of both the multidomain structures and the refractive-index mismatches in the isotropic phase. The transparent film went back into the initial opaque film when the nematic phase was obtained by the cis-to-trans photoisomerization. In a LC emulsion in which glycerol or water droplets were dispersed in liquid crystals, we examined photochemical change of defect structures and inter-droplet distances by the photochemical manner. At the initial state, Saturn ring and hedgehog defects were formed around the droplets. For the glycerol droplets, we observed structural transformations between Saturn ring and boojums on irradiation with ultra-violet and visible light. For the water droplets, the inter-droplet distances varied by changing defect size on the irradiation. These phenomena would result from modulation of anchoring conditions of the droplets by the photoisomerization of the azo-dyes.

  12. Magnetic and Crystal Structure of α-RuCl3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Jennifer

    The layered honeycomb material α-RuCl3 has been proposed as a candidate material to show significant bond-dependent Kitaev type interactions. This has prompted several recent studies of magnetism in this material that have found evidence for multiple magnetic transitions in the temperature range of 8-14 K. We will present elastic neutron scattering measurements collected using a co-aligned array of α-RuCl3 crystals, identifying zigzag magnetic order within the honeycomb planes with an ordering temperature of ~8 K. It has been reported that the ordering temperature depends on the c axis periodicity of the layered structure, with ordering temperatures of 8 and 14 K for three and two-layer periodicity respectively. While the in-plane magnetic order has been identified, it is clear that a complete understanding of magnetic ordering and interactions will depend on the three dimensional structure of the crystal. Evidence of a structural transition at ~150 K has been reported and questions remain about the structural details, in particular the stacking of the honeycomb layers. We will present x-ray diffraction measurements investigating the low and high temperature structures and stacking disorder in α-RuCl3. Finally, we will present inelastic neutron scattering measurements of magnetic excitations in this material. Work done in collaboration with K. W. Plumb (Johns Hopkins University), J. P. Clancy, Young-June Kim (University of Toronto), J. Britten (McMaster University), Yu-Sheng Chen (Argonne National Laboratory), Y. Qiu, Y. Zhao, D. Parshall, and J. W. Lynn (NCNR).

  13. Crystal structure of plastocyanin from a green alga, Enteromorpha prolifera.

    PubMed

    Collyer, C A; Guss, J M; Sugimura, Y; Yoshizaki, F; Freeman, H C

    1990-02-05

    The crystal structure of the Cu-containing protein plastocyanin (Mr 10,500) from the green alga Enteromorpha prolifera has been solved by molecular replacement. The structure was refined by constrained-restrained and restrained reciprocal space least-squares techniques. The refined model includes 111 solvent sites. There is evidence for alternate conformers at eight residues. The residual is 0.12 for a data set comprising 74% of all observations accessible at 1.85 A resolution. The beta-sandwich structure of the algal plastocyanin is effectively the same as that of poplar leaf (Populus nigra var. italica) plastocyanin determined at 1.6 A resolution. The sequence homology between the two proteins is 56%. Differences between the contacts in the hydrophobic core create some significant (0.5 to 1.2 A) movements of the polypeptide backbone, resulting in small differences between the orientations and separations of corresponding beta-strands. These differences are most pronounced at the end of the molecule remote from the Cu site. The largest structural differences occur in the single non-beta strand, which includes the sole turn of helix in the molecule: two of the residues in a prominent kink of the poplar plastocyanin backbone are missing from the algal plastocyanin sequence, and there is a significant change in the position of the helical segment in relation to the beta-sandwich. Several other small but significant structural differences can be correlated with intermolecular contacts in the crystals. An intramolecular carboxyl-carboxylate hydrogen bond in the algal plastocyanin may be associated with an unusually high pKa. The dimensions of the Cu site in the two plastocyanins are, within the limits of precision, identical.

  14. Crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophytochrome: Photoconversion and signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojing; Kuk, Jane; Moffat, Keith

    2008-01-01

    Phytochromes are red-light photoreceptors that regulate light responses in plants, fungi, and bacteria via reversible photoconversion between red (Pr) and far-red (Pfr) light-absorbing states. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.9 Å resolution of a bacteriophytochrome from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with an intact, fully photoactive photosensory core domain in its dark-adapted Pfr state. This structure reveals how unusual interdomain interactions, including a knot and an “arm” structure near the chromophore site, bring together the PAS (Per-ARNT-Sim), GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenyl cyclase/FhlA), and PHY (phytochrome) domains to achieve Pr/Pfr photoconversion. The PAS, GAF, and PHY domains have topologic elements in common and may have a single evolutionary origin. We identify key interactions that stabilize the chromophore in the Pfr state and provide structural and mutational evidence to support the essential role of the PHY domain in efficient Pr/Pfr photoconversion. We also identify a pair of conserved residues that may undergo concerted conformational changes during photoconversion. Modeling of the full-length bacteriophytochrome structure, including its output histidine kinase domain, suggests how local structural changes originating in the photosensory domain modulate interactions between long, cross-domain signaling helices at the dimer interface and are transmitted to the spatially distant effector domain, thereby regulating its histidine kinase activity. PMID:18799746

  15. Crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophytochrome: Photoconversion and signal transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaojing; Kuk, Jane; Moffat, Keith

    2008-11-12

    Phytochromes are red-light photoreceptors that regulate light responses in plants, fungi, and bacteria via reversible photoconversion between red (Pr) and far-red (Pfr) light-absorbing states. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution of a bacteriophytochrome from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with an intact, fully photoactive photosensory core domain in its dark-adapted Pfr state. This structure reveals how unusual interdomain interactions, including a knot and an 'arm' structure near the chromophore site, bring together the PAS (Per-ARNT-Sim), GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenyl cyclase/FhlA), and PHY (phytochrome) domains to achieve Pr/Pfr photoconversion. The PAS, GAF, and PHY domains have topologic elements in common and may have a single evolutionary origin. We identify key interactions that stabilize the chromophore in the Pfr state and provide structural and mutational evidence to support the essential role of the PHY domain in efficient Pr/Pfr photoconversion. We also identify a pair of conserved residues that may undergo concerted conformational changes during photoconversion. Modeling of the full-length bacteriophytochrome structure, including its output histidine kinase domain, suggests how local structural changes originating in the photosensory domain modulate interactions between long, cross-domain signaling helices at the dimer interface and are transmitted to the spatially distant effector domain, thereby regulating its histidine kinase activity.

  16. Crystal structure of pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae

    PubMed Central

    Buddrus, Lisa; Andrews, Emma S. V.; Leak, David J.; Danson, Michael J.; Arcus, Vickery L.; Crennell, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) is a thiamine pyrophosphate- and Mg2+ ion-dependent enzyme that catalyses the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. It is rare in bacteria, but is a key enzyme in homofermentative metabolism, where ethanol is the major product. Here, the previously unreported crystal structure of the bacterial pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae is presented. The crystals were shown to diffract to 2.15 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 204.56, b = 177.39, c = 244.55 Å and R r.i.m. = 0.175 (0.714 in the highest resolution bin). The structure was solved by molecular replacement using PDB entry 2vbi as a model and the final R values were R work = 0.186 (0.271 in the highest resolution bin) and R free = 0.220 (0.300 in the highest resolution bin). Each of the six tetramers is a dimer of dimers, with each monomer sharing its thiamine pyrophosphate across the dimer interface, and some contain ethylene glycol mimicking the substrate pyruvate in the active site. Comparison with other bacterial PDCs shows a correlation of higher thermostability with greater tetramer interface area and number of interactions. PMID:27599861

  17. Crystal Structure of 3S-hydroxy-7 Melleine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Xu, Fang; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Li-hong; Huang, Hua-rong; She, Zhi-gang; Lin, Yong-cheng; Chan, Winglai

    2006-10-01

    A new compound, 3S-hydroxy-7 melleine was isolated from the endophytic fungus Xylariasp No.2508 from the mangrove tree on the South China Sea coast. It was the first time that this kind of compound was isolated from marine fungus. The structure was elucidated by NMR data, infrared spectrum (IR) and mass spectrometry (MS). In addition, its structure was determined by the single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. It crystallized in monoclinic, space group P21 with a=10.8884(19) Å, b=7.2284(13) Å, c=13.398(2) Å, β=104.217(3)°, C10H10O4·H2O, Mr=212.20, V=1022.2(3) Å3, Z=4, Dc=1.379 mg/m3, F(000)=448, μ=0.112 mm-1, the final R=0.0498, ωR=0.101 for 2407 observed reflections (I>2σ(I)). The molecular backbone of the compound includes a benzopyran ring. By comparing with the melting point and the optical rotation of the known 3R-hydroxy-7 melleine in literature, the absolute configuration of the compound was determined as 3S. It didn't exhibit antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus at 200 μg/disk in the preliminary test.

  18. Facile synthesis and structure characterization of hexagonal tungsten bronzes crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jiann-Shing; Liu, Hao-Chuan; Peng, Gao-De; Tseng, Yawteng

    2017-05-01

    A facile molten-salt route was used to synthesize hexagonal Cs0.33WO3, Rb0.33WO3 and K0.30WO3 crystals. The three isostructural compounds were successfully prepared from the reaction of MxWO3 powders (M = Cs, Rb, K) in the CsCl/NaCl, RbCl/NaCl and KCl/NaCl fluxes, respectively. The structure determination and refinement, based on single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, are in agreement with previous works, possessing space group P63/mcm. The a and c parameters vary non-linearly with increasing radii of the M+ cations (rM) that is coordinated to twelve oxygen atoms. Both the volumes of unit-cell and WO6 octahedra vary linearly with rM, which become smaller from Cs0.33WO3 to K0.30WO3. The distortion of WO6 octahedra as well as isotropic displacement parameters increases from Cs0.33WO3 to K0.30WO3. The geometry of the WO6 octahedron becomes more regular with increasing rM. These structural trends arise from the effective size of the M+ cation.

  19. Structure of carboxymyoglobin in crystals and in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Makinen, M W; Houtchens, R A; Caughey, W S

    1979-01-01

    The configuration of the heme-carbonyl group upon binding of carbon monoxide to sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) in crystals is evaluated on the basis of infrared spectroscopic methods. Multiplets of the totally symmetric C-O stretching mode are observed for the heme-bound ligand near 1933, 1944, and 1967 cm-1, corresponding to three different heme-carbonyl conformers. Variations in the relative proportions of these conformers can be induced by incorporation of small fractions of metMb or deoxyMb into MbCO crystals. The configuration of the iron-carbonyl with respect to the immediate coordination environment of the heme iron is assigned for each v(CO) stretching frequency on the basis of a detailed comparison of the three-dimensional structures of the heme environments of MbCO, metMb, and deoxyMb defined by crystallographic methods. The structures of the three heme-carbonyl conformers account for the v(CO) infrared absorption bands that can be observed for MbCO in solution. PMID:293700

  20. Crystal structures of vortioxetine and its methanol monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin-Bo; Gu, Jian-Ming; Sun, Meng-ying; Hu, Xiu-Rong; Wu, Su-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Vortioxetine, C18H22N2S, (1), systematic name 1-{2-[(2,4-di­methyl­phen­yl)sulfan­yl]phen­yl}piperazine, a new drug used to treat patients with major depressive disorder, has been crystallized as the free base and its methanol monosolvate, C18H22N2S·CH3OH, (2). In both structures, the vortioxetine mol­ecules have similar conformations: in (1), the dihedral angle between the aromatic rings is 80.04 (16)° and in (2) it is 84.94 (13)°. The C—S—C bond angle in (1) is 102.76 (14)° and the corresponding angle in (2) is 103.41 (11)°. The piperazine ring adopts a chair conformation with the exocyclic N—C bond in a pseudo-equatorial orientation in both structures. No directional inter­actions beyond normal van der Waals contacts could be identified in the crystal of (1), whereas in (2), the vortioxetine and methanol mol­ecules are linked by N—H⋯O and O—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, generating [001] chains. PMID:26396746

  1. Crystal structure of the petal death protein from carnation flower.

    PubMed

    Teplyakov, Alexey; Liu, Sijiu; Lu, Zhibing; Howard, Andrew; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Herzberg, Osnat

    2005-12-20

    Expression of the PSR132 protein from Dianthus caryophyllus (carnation, clover pink) is induced in response to ethylene production associated with petal senescence, and thus the protein is named petal death protein (PDP). Recent work has established that despite the annotation of PDP in sequence databases as carboxyphosphoenolpyruvate mutase, the enzyme is actually a C-C bond cleaving lyase exhibiting a broad substrate profile. The crystal structure of PDP has been determined at 2.7 A resolution, revealing a dimer-of-dimers oligomeric association. Consistent with sequence homology, the overall alpha/beta barrel fold of PDP is the same as that of other isocitrate lyase/PEP mutase superfamily members, including a swapped eighth helix within a dimer. Moreover, Mg(2+) binds in the active site of PDP with a coordination pattern similar to that seen in other superfamily members. A compound, covalently bound to the catalytic residue, Cys144, was interpreted as a thiohemiacetal adduct resulting from the reaction of glutaraldehyde used to cross-link the crystals. The Cys144-carrying flexible loop that gates access to the active site is in the closed conformation. Models of bound substrates and comparison with the closed conformation of isocitrate lyase and 2-methylisocitrate lyase revealed the structural basis for the broad substrate profile of PDP.

  2. Crystal structure of K[Hg(SCN)3] - a redetermination.

    PubMed

    Weil, Matthias; Häusler, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The crystal structure of the room-temperature modification of K[Hg(SCN)3], potassium tri-thio-cyanato-mercurate(II), was redetermined based on modern CCD data. In comparison with the previous report [Zhdanov & Sanadze (1952 ▶). Zh. Fiz. Khim. 26, 469-478], reliability factors, standard deviations of lattice parameters and atomic coordinates, as well as anisotropic displacement parameters, were revealed for all atoms. The higher precision and accuracy of the model is, for example, reflected by the Hg-S bond lengths of 2.3954 (11), 2.4481 (8) and 2.7653 (6) Å in comparison with values of 2.24, 2.43 and 2.77 Å. All atoms in the crystal structure are located on mirror planes. The Hg(2+) cation is surrounded by four S atoms in a seesaw shape [S-Hg-S angles range from 94.65 (2) to 154.06 (3)°]. The HgS4 polyhedra share a common S atom, building up chains extending parallel to [010]. All S atoms of the resulting (1) ∞[HgS2/1S2/2] chains are also part of SCN(-) anions that link these chains with the K(+) cations into a three-dimensional network. The K-N bond lengths of the distorted KN7 polyhedra lie between 2.926 (2) and 3.051 (3) Å.

  3. Crystal structure of two covalent nucleoside derivatives of ribonuclease A.

    PubMed

    Nachman, J; Miller, M; Gilliland, G L; Carty, R; Pincus, M; Wlodawer, A

    1990-01-30

    Crystal structures of two forms of ribonuclease A with deoxynucleosides covalently bound to respectively His 12 and His 119 have been solved. One form, T-H12-RNase, has a deoxythymidine bound to N epsilon 2 of His 12, while the other one, U-H119-RNase, has a deoxyuridine bound to N delta 1 of His 119. The two crystal forms are nearly isomorphous, with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. However, the modified ribonucleases differ both in their enzymatic activities and in the conformation of the catalytic site and of the deoxynucleoside-histidine moiety. T-H12-RNase is characterized by complete loss of enzymatic activity; in this form the deoxynucleoside completely blocks the catalytic site and forms intramolecular contacts with residues associated with both the B1 and B2 sites. U-H119-RNase retains 1% of the activity of the unmodified enzyme, and in this form His 119 adopts a different orientation, corresponding to the alternate conformation reported for this residue; the deoxynucleoside-histidine moiety points out of the active site and does not form any contacts with the rest of the protein, thus allowing partial access to the catalytic site. On the basis of these structures, we propose possible mechanisms for the reactions of bromoacetamido nucleosides with ribonuclease A.

  4. Structure of cleaved (001) USb2 single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shao-ping; Hawley, Marilyn; Bauer, Eric D; Stockum, Phil B; Manoharan, Hari C

    2009-01-01

    We have achieved what we believe to be the first atomic resolution STM images for a uranium compound taken at room temperature. The a, b, and c lattice parameters in the images confirm that the USb{sub 2} crystals cleave on the (001) basal plane as expected. The a and b dimensions were equal, with the atoms arranged in a cubic pattern. Our calculations indicate a symmetric cut between Sb planes to be the most favorable cleavage plane and U atoms to be responsible for most of the DOS measured by STM. Some strange features observed in the STM will be discussed in conjunction with ab initio calculations. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the power of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques combined with a theoretical underpinning to determine the surface atomic structure and properties of actinide materials, such as the quasi 2-dimensional uranium dipnictide USb{sub 2} single crystal, thereby contributing to the understanding of their surface structural and electronic properties. The members of this interesting UX{sub 2} (X=P, As, Sb, Bi) series of compounds display dual localized and itinerant 5f electron behavior within the same compound due to the hybridization of the 5f orbitals with the conduction band. With the exception of UO{sub 2}, which has to be studied at elevated temperature to generate enough carriers for STM imaging, STM techniques have not been applied successfully to the characterization of the surface atomic structure of any other single crystal actinide compound, to the best of our knowledge. However, STM has been used to a limited extent for the study of some cerium compounds. STM probes electronic properties at the atomic level and can directly provide information about the local density of filled and empty states (LDOS) states simultaneously. A STM topograph provides the local atomic arrangement and spacing of the atoms on the surface, local defect structures (e.g. steps, vacancies, and kink sites) and the presence of contaminants

  5. The crystal structure of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3}: New single-crystal data for an old problem

    SciTech Connect

    Pitscheider, Almut; Kaindl, Reinhard; Oeckler, Oliver; Huppertz, Hubert

    2011-01-15

    Single crystals of the orthoborate {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} were synthesized from Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions of 2 GPa and 800 {sup o}C in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus. The crystal structure was determined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, collected at room temperature. The title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic pseudowollastonite-type structure, space group C2/c, with the lattice parameters a=1128.4(2) pm, b=652.6(2) pm, c=954.0(2) pm, and {beta}=112.8(1){sup o} (R{sub 1}=0.0124 and wR{sub 2}=0.0404 for all data). -- graphical abstract: The first satisfying single-crystal structure determination of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} sheds light on the extensively discussed structure of {pi}-orthoborates. The application of light pressure during the solid state synthesis yielded in high-quality crystals, due to pressure-induced crystallization. Research highlights: {yields} High-quality single crystals of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} were prepared via high-pressure-induced crystallization. {yields} At least five different space groups for the rare-earth {pi}-orthoborates are reported. {yields} {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} is isotypic to the pseudowollastonite-type CaSiO{sub 3}. {yields} Remaining ambiguities regarding the structure of the rare-earth {pi}-orthoborates are resolved.

  6. Crystal Structure of the Marburg Virus VP35 Oligomerization Domain.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Jessica F; Kirchdoerfer, Robert N; Urata, Sarah M; Li, Sheng; Tickle, Ian J; Bricogne, Gérard; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2017-01-15

    Marburg virus (MARV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that is classified in a genus distinct from that of Ebola virus (EBOV) (genera Marburgvirus and Ebolavirus, respectively). Both viruses produce a multifunctional protein termed VP35, which acts as a polymerase cofactor, a viral protein chaperone, and an antagonist of the innate immune response. VP35 contains a central oligomerization domain with a predicted coiled-coil motif. This domain has been shown to be essential for RNA polymerase function. Here we present crystal structures of the MARV VP35 oligomerization domain. These structures and accompanying biophysical characterization suggest that MARV VP35 is a trimer. In contrast, EBOV VP35 is likely a tetramer in solution. Differences in the oligomeric state of this protein may explain mechanistic differences in replication and immune evasion observed for MARV and EBOV.

  7. Crystal structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in Si

    DOE PAGES

    Verburg, P. C.; Smillie, L. A.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; ...

    2015-06-04

    Laser-induced subsurface modification of dielectric materials is a well-known technology. Applications include the production of optical components and selective etching. In addition to dielectric materials, the subsurface modification technology can be applied to silicon, by employing near to mid-infrared radiation. An application of subsurface modifications in silicon is laser-induced subsurface separation, which is a method to separate wafers into individual dies. Other applications for which proofs of concept exist are the formation of waveguides and resistivity tuning. However, limited knowledge is available about the crystal structure of subsurface modifications in silicon. In this paper, we investigate the geometry and crystalmore » structure of laser-induced subsurface modifications in monocrystalline silicon wafers. Finally, in addition to the generation of lattice defects, we found that transformations to amorphous silicon and Si-iii/Si-xii occur as a result of the laser irradiation.« less

  8. The first crystal structure of an archaeal helical repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Kazunari; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Tsuge, Hideaki; Katunuma, Nobuhiko; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Kawabata, Takeshi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2005-01-01

    The crystal structure of ST1625p, a protein encoded by a hypothetical open reading frame ST1625 in the genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii, was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The only sequence similarity exhibited by the amino-acid sequence of ST1625p was a 33% identity with the sequence of SSO0983p from S. solfataricus. The 19 kDa monomeric protein was observed to consist of a right-handed superhelix assembled from a tandem repeat of ten α-­helices. A structural homology search using the DALI and MATRAS algorithms indicates that this protein can be classified as a helical repeat protein. PMID:16511116

  9. Crystal structure of a family 80 chitosanase from Mitsuaria chitosanitabida.

    PubMed

    Yorinaga, Yutaka; Kumasaka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Hamada, Kensaku; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2017-02-01

    Chitosanases belong to glycoside hydrolase families 5, 7, 8, 46, 75 and 80 and hydrolyse glucosamine polymers produced by partial or full deacetylation of chitin. Herein, we determined the crystal structure of chitosanase from the β-proteobacterium, Mitsuaria chitosanitabida, (McChoA) at 1.75 Å resolution; the first structure of a family 80 chitosanase. McChoA is a 34 kDa extracellular protein of 301 amino acids that fold into two (upper and lower) globular domains with an active site cleft between them. Key substrate-binding features are conserved with family 24 lysozymes and family 46 chitosanases. The distance between catalytic residues E41 and E61 (10.8 Å) indicates an inverting type mechanism. Uniquely, three disulphide bridges and the C terminus might contribute to enzyme activity.

  10. Crystal structure of PvdO from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zenglin; Gao, Fei; Bai, Guohui; Xia, Hengchuan; Gu, Lichuan; Xu, Sujuan

    2017-02-26

    Pyoverdine I (PVDI) is a water-soluble fluorescein siderophore with strong iron chelating ability from the gram-negative pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Compared to common siderophores, PVDI is a relatively large compound whose synthesis requires a group of enzymes with different catalytic activities. In addition to four nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) which are responsible for the production of the peptide backbone of PVDI, several additional enzymes are associated with the modification of the side chains. PvdO is one of these enzymes and participates in PVDI precursor maturation in the periplasm. We determined the crystal structure of PvdO at 1.24 Å resolution. The PvdO structure shares a common fold with some FGly-generating enzymes (FGE) and is stabilized by Ca(2+). However, the catalytic residues in FGE are not observed in PvdO, indicating PvdO adopts a unique catalytic mechanism.

  11. Crystal structure of Hg2SO4 – a redetermination

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of mercury(I) sulfate (or mercurous sulfate), Hg2SO4, was re-determined based on modern CCD data. In comparison with the previous determination from Weissenberg film data [Dorm (1969 ▶). Acta Chem. Scand. 23, 1607–1615], all atoms were refined with anisotropic displacement parameters, leading to higher precision in terms of bond lengths and angles [e.g. Hg—Hg = 2.5031 (7) compared to 2.500 (3)Å]. The structure consists of alternating rows along [001] of Hg2 2+ dumbbells (generated by inversion symmetry) and SO4 2− tetra­hedra (symmetry 2). The dumbbells are linked via short O—Hg—Hg—O bonds to the sulfate tetra­hedra into chains extending parallel to [20-1]. More remote O—Hg—Hg—O bonds connect these chains into a three-dimensional framework. PMID:25309168

  12. Band structure of absorptive two-dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lem, Han; Tip, Adriaan; Moroz, Alexander

    2003-06-01

    The band structure for an absorptive two-dimensional photonic crystal made from cylinders consisting of a Drude material is calculated. Absorption causes the spectrum to become complex and form islands in the negative complex half-plane. The boundaries of these islands are not always formed by the eigenvalues calculated for Bloch vectors on the characteristic path, and we find a hole in the spectrum. For realistic parameter values, the real part of the spectrum is hardly influenced by absorption, typically less than 0.25%. The employed method uses a Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker procedure together with analytical continuation. This results in an efficient approach that allows these band-structure calculations to be done on a Pentium III personal computer.

  13. Crystal structure of the superconducting phase of sulfur hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einaga, Mari; Sakata, Masafumi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shimizu, Katsuya; Eremets, Mikhail I.; Drozdov, Alexander P.; Troyan, Ivan A.; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-09-01

    A superconducting critical temperature above 200 K has recently been discovered in H2S (or D2S) under high hydrostatic pressure. These measurements were interpreted in terms of a decomposition of these materials into elemental sulfur and a hydrogen-rich hydride that is responsible for the superconductivity, although direct experimental evidence for this mechanism has so far been lacking. Here we report the crystal structure of the superconducting phase of hydrogen sulfide (and deuterium sulfide) in the normal and superconducting states obtained by means of synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements, combined with electrical resistance measurements at both room and low temperatures. We find that the superconducting phase is mostly in good agreement with the theoretically predicted body-centred cubic (bcc) structure for H3S. The presence of elemental sulfur is also manifest in the X-ray diffraction patterns, thus proving the decomposition mechanism of H2S to H3S + S under pressure.

  14. Structural noise tolerance of photonic crystal optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odontsengel, Nyam-Erdene; Cai, DongSheng; Cole, James B.

    2016-12-01

    Using nonstandard (NS) finite difference time domain (FDTD) scheme to perform 2D electromagnetic (EM) simulations, we investigate how the optical properties of 2D photonic crystals (PCs) are affected by various different kinds of structural noises in the PC lattice. While the transmission spectrum is strongly affected by noises, the position and the depth of the band gap in the transmission spectrum are remarkably robust. It is shown that rather coarse numerical grids can be used to evaluate various PC structures in NS-FDTD EM simulations. The combination of noises affects transmission spectrum in the same way as the most influential individual noise. It is shown that reducing the most influential individual noise is a very efficient method to make PC more accurate.

  15. Crystal Structure of a Phosphorylation-coupled Saccharide Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Y Cao; X Jin; E Levin; H Huang; Y Zong; W Hendrickson; J Javitch; K Rajashankar; M Zhou; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Saccharides have a central role in the nutrition of all living organisms. Whereas several saccharide uptake systems are shared between the different phylogenetic kingdoms, the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system exists almost exclusively in bacteria. This multi-component system includes an integral membrane protein EIIC that transports saccharides and assists in their phosphorylation. Here we present the crystal structure of an EIIC from Bacillus cereus that transports diacetylchitobiose. The EIIC is a homodimer, with an expansive interface formed between the amino-terminal halves of the two protomers. The carboxy-terminal half of each protomer has a large binding pocket that contains a diacetylchitobiose, which is occluded from both sides of the membrane with its site of phosphorylation near the conserved His250 and Glu334 residues. The structure shows the architecture of this important class of transporters, identifies the determinants of substrate binding and phosphorylation, and provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of sugar translocation.

  16. Crystal structure of a catalytic intermediate of the maltose transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Michael L.; Khare, Dheeraj; Quiocho, Florante A.; Davidson, Amy L.; Chen, Jue

    2008-08-20

    The maltose uptake system of Escherichia coli is a well-characterized member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. Here we present the 2.8-{angstrom} crystal structure of the intact maltose transporter in complex with the maltose-binding protein, maltose and ATP. This structure, stabilized by a mutation that prevents ATP hydrolysis, captures the ATP-binding cassette dimer in a closed, ATP-bound conformation. Maltose is occluded within a solvent-filled cavity at the interface of the two transmembrane subunits, about halfway into the lipid bilayer. The binding protein docks onto the entrance of the cavity in an open conformation and serves as a cap to ensure unidirectional translocation of the sugar molecule. These results provide direct evidence for a concerted mechanism of transport in which solute is transferred from the binding protein to the transmembrane subunits when the cassette dimer closes to hydrolyse ATP.

  17. Tetrel Bonds in Infinite Molecular Chains by Electronic Structure Theory and Their Role for Crystal Stabilization.

    PubMed

    George, Janine; Dronskowski, Richard

    2017-02-16

    Intermolecular bonds play a crucial role in the rational design of crystal structures, dubbed crystal engineering. The relatively new term tetrel bonds (TBs) describes a long-known type of such interactions presently in the focus of quantum chemical cluster calculations. Here, we energetically explore the strengths and cooperativity of these interactions in infinite chains, a possible arrangement of such tetrel bonds in extended crystals, by periodic density functional theory. In the chains, the TBs are amplified due to cooperativity by up to 60%. Moreover, we computationally take apart crystals stabilized by infinite tetrel-bonded chains and assess the importance of the TBs for the crystal stabilization. Tetrel bonds can amount to 70% of the overall interaction energy within some crystals, and they can also be energetically decisive for the taken crystal structure; their individual strengths also compete with the collective packing within the crystal structures.

  18. The crystal structure of loparite: a new acentric variety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, Elena A.; Lushnikov, Sergey G.; Yakovenchuk, Victor N.; Krivovichev, Sergey V.

    2017-02-01

    The crystal structure of a new structural variety of loparite (Na0.56Ce0.21La0.14Ca0.06Sr0.03Nd0.02Pr0.01)Σ=1.03(Ti0.83Nb0.15)Σ=0.98O3 from the Khibiny alkaline massif, Kola peninsula, Russia, was solved by direct methods and refined to R 1 = 0.029 for 492 unique observed reflections with I > 2σ(I). The mineral is orthorhombic, Ima2, a = 5.5129(2), b = 5.5129(2) and c = 7.7874(5) Å. Similarly to other perovskite-group minerals with the general formula ABO3, the crystal structure of loparite is based upon a three-dimensional framework of distorted corner-sharing BO6. The A cations are coordinated by 12 oxygen atoms and are situated in distorted cuboctahedral cavities. In contrast to the ideal perovskite-type structure ( Pmoverset{-}{3} m ), the unit cell is doubled along the c axis and the a and b axes are rotated in the ab plane at 45o. The BO6 octahedron displays distortion characteristic for the d 0 transition metal cations with the out-of-center shift of the B site. The symmetry reduction is also attributable to the distortion of the BO6 octahedra which are tilted and rotated with respect to the c axis. The occurrence of a new acentric variety of loparite can be explained by the pecularities of its chemical composition characterized by the increased content of Ti compared to the previously studied samples.

  19. Crystal Structure and Inhibition Studies of Transglutaminase from Streptomyces mobaraense*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Te; Chang, Cheng-Hsiang; Wang, Jiou Ming; Wu, Tung Kung; Wang, Yu-Kuo; Chang, Chin-Yuan; Li, TienHsiung Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structure of the microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) zymogen from Streptomyces mobaraense has been determined at 1.9-Å resolution using the molecular replacement method based on the crystal structure of the mature MTGase. The overall structure of this zymogen is similar to that of the mature form, consisting of a single disk-like domain with a deep active cleft at the edge of the molecule. A major portion of the prosequence (45 additional amino acid residues at the N terminus of the mature transglutaminase) folds into an L-shaped structure, consisting of an extended N-terminal segment linked with a one-turn short helix and a long α-helix. Two key residues in the short helix of the prosequence, Tyr-12 and Tyr-16, are located on top of the catalytic triad (Cys-110, Asp-301, and His-320) to block access of the substrate acyl donors and acceptors. Biochemical characterization of the mature MTGase, using N-α-benzyloxycarbonyl-l-glutaminylglycine as a substrate, revealed apparent Km and kcat/Km values of 52.66 mm and 40.42 mm−1 min−1, respectively. Inhibition studies using the partial prosequence SYAETYR and homologous sequence SQAETYR showed a noncompetitive inhibition mechanism with IC50 values of 0.75 and 0.65 mm, respectively, but no cross-linking product formation. Nevertheless, the prosequence homologous oligopeptide SQAETQR, with Tyr-12 and Tyr-16 each replaced with Gln, exhibited inhibitory activity with the formation of the SQAETQR-monodansylcadaverine fluorophore cross-linking product (SQAETQR-C-DNS). MALDI-TOF tandem MS analysis of SQAETQR-C-DNS revealed molecular masses corresponding to those of NSQAETQC-C-DNS and C-DNS-NQRC sequences, suggesting the incorporation of C-DNS onto the C-terminal Gln residue of the prosequence homologous oligopeptide. These results support the putative functional roles of both Tyr residues in substrate binding and inhibition. PMID:21193394

  20. Specific features of the crystal structure of erbium polyphosphate of the structural type C

    SciTech Connect

    Murashova, E. V. Chudinova, N. N.; Ilyukhin, A. B.

    2007-03-15

    Erbium polyphosphate Er(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} is synthesized at a temperature of 270 deg. C from a polyphosphoric acid melt containing cerium, erbium, and phosphorus in the atomic ratio Cs: Er: P = 5: 1: 15. The crystal structure of the Er(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} polyphosphate synthesized is determined. The framework structure of the Er(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} polyphosphate is built up of infinite polyphosphate chains and ErO{sub 6} octahedra bonded to these chains. The structure is a derivative of the structural type C, in which a large number of trivalent metal polyphosphates crystallize. The main distinguishing feature of this structural type is an increase in the parameter b of the monoclinic unit cell of the Er(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} compound by a factor of 11 (a = 10.040 A, b = 73.482 A, c = 11.268 A, {beta} = 97.28 deg., space group Ia)

  1. Applications of the Cambridge Structural Database in organic chemistry and crystal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Allen, Frank H; Motherwell, W D Samuel

    2002-06-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and its associated software systems have formed the basis for more than 800 research applications in structural chemistry, crystallography and the life sciences. Relevant references, dating from the mid-1970s, and brief synopses of these papers are collected in a database, DBUse, which is freely available via the CCDC website. This database has been used to review research applications of the CSD in organic chemistry, including supramolecular applications, and in organic crystal chemistry. The review concentrates on applications that have been published since 1990 and covers a wide range of topics, including structure correlation, conformational analysis, hydrogen bonding and other intermolecular interactions, studies of crystal packing, extended structural motifs, crystal engineering and polymorphism, and crystal structure prediction. Applications of CSD information in studies of crystal structure precision, the determination of crystal structures from powder diffraction data, together with applications in chemical informatics, are also discussed.

  2. Photonic band structure of diamond colloidal crystals in a cholesteric liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changizrezaei, Setarehalsadat; Denniston, Colin

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the presence of a photonic band gap for a diamond lattice structure made of particles with normal anchoring inside a cholesteric liquid crystal. As is typical for liquid crystals (LCs), there is considerable contrast between the dielectric constant parallel ɛ∥ and perpendicular ɛ⊥ to the director, with ɛ∥/ɛ⊥˜4 here. It is shown that the size of the photonic band gap is directly related to the size of colloidal particles and the contrast between the dielectric constant in the particles and the extreme values of ɛ in the LC medium (one needs either ɛ in the particle much smaller than ɛ⊥ o r much bigger than ɛ∥). No opening is seen in the band diagrams for small particles. For larger particles a partial gap opens when the particles are composed of very low dielectric material but never a complete gap. On the other hand, a complete gap starts to be revealed when the size of the colloidal particles is increased and when a high dielectric constant is used for filling inside the particles. The maximum size of the gap is observed when the particles are large enough so that their surfaces overlap.

  3. Silicon crystals: Process for manufacturing wafer-like silicon crystals with a columnar structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Authier, B.

    1978-01-01

    Wafer-like crystals suitable for making solar cells are formed by pouring molten Si containing suitable dopants into a mold of the desired shape and allowing it to solidify in a temperature gradient, whereby the large surface of the melt in contact with the mold is kept at less than 200 D and the free surface is kept at a temperature of 200-1000 D higher, but below the melting point of Si. The mold can also be made in the form of a slit, whereby the 2 sides of the mold are kept at different temperatures. A mold was milled in the surface of a cylindrical graphite block 200 mm in diameter. The granite block was induction heated and the bottom of the mold was cooled by means of a water-cooled Cu plate, so that the surface of the mold in contact with one of the largest surfaces of the melt was held at approximately 800 D. The free surface of the melt was subjected to thermal radiation from a graphite plate located 2 mm from the surface and heated to 1500 D. The Si crystal formed after slow cooling to room temperature had a columnar structure and was cut with a diamond saw into wafers approximately 500 mm thick. Solar cells prepared from these wafers had efficiencies of 10 to 11%.

  4. Crystal structure of the Mus81-Eme1 complex.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Jeong Joo; Choi, Jung Min; Lee, Jung Hoon; Cho, Yunje

    2008-04-15

    The Mus81-Eme1 complex is a structure-specific endonuclease that plays an important role in rescuing stalled replication forks and resolving the meiotic recombination intermediates in eukaryotes. We have determined the crystal structure of the Mus81-Eme1 complex. Both Mus81 and Eme1 consist of a central nuclease domain, two repeats of the helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) motif at their C-terminal region, and a linker helix. While each domain structure resembles archaeal XPF homologs, the overall structure is significantly different from those due to the structure of a linker helix. We show that a flexible intradomain linker that formed with 36 residues in the nuclease domain of Eme1 is essential for the recognition of DNA. We identified several basic residues lining the outer surface of the active site cleft of Mus81 that are involved in the interaction with a flexible arm of a nicked Holliday junction (HJ). These interactions might contribute to the optimal positioning of the opposite junction across the nick into the catalytic site, which provided the basis for the "nick and counternick" mechanism of Mus81-Eme1 and for the nicked HJ to be the favored in vitro substrate of this enzyme.

  5. The crystal structures of potassium and cesium trivanadates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, H.T.; Block, S.

    1966-01-01

    Potassium and cesium trivanadates are monoclinic and isomorphous, space group P21/m, with the following dimensions (Z = 2): KV3O8, a = 7.640 A, b = 8.380 A, c = 4.979 A, ??= 96?? 57???; CsV3O8, a = 8.176 A, b = 8.519 A, c = 4.988 A, ?? = 95?? 32???. The crystal structure of KV3O8 has been determined from hk0, 0kl, and h0l Weissenberg data with an R factor of 0.15. The structure of CsV3O8 has been refined with 1273 hkl Weissenberg data to an R factor of 0.089. The structures consist of corrugated sheets based on a linkage of distorted VO6, octahedra. Two of the vanadium atoms lie in double, square-pyramid groups V2O8, which are linked through opposite basal corners into chains along the b axis. The chains are joined laterally along the c axis into sheets by the third vanadium atom in VO groups, also forming part of a square-pyramid coordination. Various aspects of these structures are compared with other known oxovanadate structures.

  6. Crystal structure of E. coli lipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase.

    PubMed

    Mao, Guotao; Zhao, Yan; Kang, Xusheng; Li, Zhijie; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xianping; Sun, Fei; Sankaran, Krishnan; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2016-01-05

    Lipoprotein biogenesis is essential for bacterial survival. Phosphatidylglycerol:prolipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (Lgt) is an integral membrane enzyme that catalyses the first reaction of the three-step post-translational lipid modification. Deletion of the lgt gene is lethal to most Gram-negative bacteria. Here we present the crystal structures of Escherichia coli Lgt in complex with phosphatidylglycerol and the inhibitor palmitic acid at 1.9 and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. The structures reveal the presence of two binding sites and support the previously reported structure-function relationships of Lgt. Complementation results of lgt-knockout cells with different mutant Lgt variants revealed critical residues, including Arg143 and Arg239, that are essential for diacylglyceryl transfer. Using a GFP-based in vitro assay, we correlated the activities of Lgt with structural observations. Together, the structural and biochemical data support a mechanism whereby substrate and product, lipid-modified lipobox-containing peptide, enter and leave the enzyme laterally relative to the lipid bilayer.

  7. Crystal structure of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Artur T; Feliciano, Patricia R; Pinheiro, Matheus P; Nonato, M Cristina

    2012-08-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) is the fourth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway and has been exploited as the target for therapy against proliferative and parasitic diseases. In this study, we report the crystal structures of DHODH from Leishmania major, the species of Leishmania associated with zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis, in its apo form and in complex with orotate and fumarate molecules. Both orotate and fumarate were found to bind to the same active site and exploit similar interactions, consistent with a ping-pong mechanism described for class 1A DHODHs. Analysis of LmDHODH structures reveals that rearrangements in the conformation of the catalytic loop have direct influence on the dimeric interface. This is the first structural evidence of a relationship between the dimeric form and the catalytic mechanism. According to our analysis, the high sequence and structural similarity observed among trypanosomatid DHODH suggest that a single strategy of structure-based inhibitor design can be used to validate DHODH as a druggable target against multiple neglected tropical diseases such as Leishmaniasis, Sleeping sickness and Chagas' diseases.

  8. Crystal structure of the human glucose transporter GLUT1.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dong; Xu, Chao; Sun, Pengcheng; Wu, Jianping; Yan, Chuangye; Hu, Mingxu; Yan, Nieng

    2014-06-05

    The glucose transporter GLUT1 catalyses facilitative diffusion of glucose into erythrocytes and is responsible for glucose supply to the brain and other organs. Dysfunctional mutations may lead to GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, whereas overexpression of GLUT1 is a prognostic indicator for cancer. Despite decades of investigation, the structure of GLUT1 remains unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of human GLUT1 at 3.2 Å resolution. The full-length protein, which has a canonical major facilitator superfamily fold, is captured in an inward-open conformation. This structure allows accurate mapping and potential mechanistic interpretation of disease-associated mutations in GLUT1. Structure-based analysis of these mutations provides an insight into the alternating access mechanism of GLUT1 and other members of the sugar porter subfamily. Structural comparison of the uniporter GLUT1 with its bacterial homologue XylE, a proton-coupled xylose symporter, allows examination of the transport mechanisms of both passive facilitators and active transporters.

  9. Crystal Structure of the BARD1 BRCT Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Birrane,G.; Varma, A.; Soni, A.; Ladias, J.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of the breast tumor suppressor BRCA1 with the protein BARD1 results in the formation of a heterodimeric complex that has ubiquitin ligase activity and plays central roles in cell cycle checkpoint control and DNA repair. Both BRCA1 and BARD1 possess a pair of tandem BRCT domains that interact in a phosphorylation-dependent manner with target proteins. We determined the crystal structure of the human BARD1 BRCT repeats (residues 568-777) at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. The composition and structure of the BARD1 phosphoserine-binding pocket P{sub 1} are strikingly similar to those of the BRCA1 and MDC1 BRCT domains, suggesting a similar mode of interaction with the phosphate group of the ligand. By contrast, the BARD1 BRCT selectivity pocket P{sub 2} exhibits distinct structural features, including two prominent histidine residues, His685 and His686, which may be important for ligand binding. The protonation state of these histidines has a marked effect on the calculated electrostatic potential in the vicinity of P{sub 2}, raising the possibility that ligand recognition may be regulated by changes in pH. Importantly, the BARD1 BRCT structure provides insights into the mechanisms by which the cancer-associated missense mutations C645R, V695L, and S761N may adversely affect the structure and function of BARD1.

  10. Crystal structure of the human glucose transporter GLUT1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dong; Xu, Chao; Sun, Pengcheng; Wu, Jianping; Yan, Chuangye; Hu, Mingxu; Yan, Nieng

    2014-06-01

    The glucose transporter GLUT1 catalyses facilitative diffusion of glucose into erythrocytes and is responsible for glucose supply to the brain and other organs. Dysfunctional mutations may lead to GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, whereas overexpression of GLUT1 is a prognostic indicator for cancer. Despite decades of investigation, the structure of GLUT1 remains unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of human GLUT1 at 3.2 Å resolution. The full-length protein, which has a canonical major facilitator superfamily fold, is captured in an inward-open conformation. This structure allows accurate mapping and potential mechanistic interpretation of disease-associated mutations in GLUT1. Structure-based analysis of these mutations provides an insight into the alternating access mechanism of GLUT1 and other members of the sugar porter subfamily. Structural comparison of the uniporter GLUT1 with its bacterial homologue XylE, a proton-coupled xylose symporter, allows examination of the transport mechanisms of both passive facilitators and active transporters.

  11. Ab initio solution of macromolecular crystal structures without direct methods.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Airlie J; Oeffner, Robert D; Wrobel, Antoni G; Ojala, Juha R M; Tryggvason, Karl; Lohkamp, Bernhard; Read, Randy J

    2017-04-04

    The majority of macromolecular crystal structures are determined using the method of molecular replacement, in which known related structures are rotated and translated to provide an initial atomic model for the new structure. A theoretical understanding of the signal-to-noise ratio in likelihood-based molecular replacement searches has been developed to account for the influence of model quality and completeness, as well as the resolution of the diffraction data. Here we show that, contrary to current belief, molecular replacement need not be restricted to the use of models comprising a substantial fraction of the unknown structure. Instead, likelihood-based methods allow a continuum of applications depending predictably on the quality of the model and the resolution of the data. Unexpectedly, our understanding of the signal-to-noise ratio in molecular replacement leads to the finding that, with data to sufficiently high resolution, fragments as small as single atoms of elements usually found in proteins can yield ab initio solutions of macromolecular structures, including some that elude traditional direct methods.

  12. Crystal and molecular structure of the antimalarial agent enpiroline.

    PubMed

    Karle, J M; Karle, I L

    1989-07-01

    To identify common spatial and structural features of amino alcohol antimalarial agents with the eventual goal of designing more effective drugs and a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this class of antimalarial agents, the three-dimensional crystal and molecular structure of enpiroline, a new antimalarial agent active against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum, was determined by X-ray crystallography and compared with the crystal structures of the cinchona alkaloids and of the new antimalarial agent WR 194,965. The aromatic rings of the phenyl-pyridine ring system of enpiroline are twisted from each other by approximately 18 degrees. The intramolecular aliphatic N-O distance in enpiroline was 2.80 A (1 A = 0.1 nm), which is close to the N-O distance found in the antimalarial cinchona alkaloids. Enpiroline contains both an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the aliphatic nitrogen and oxygen atoms and an intermolecular hydrogen bond between the aliphatic nitrogen and oxygen atoms of two neighboring molecules. One enantiomer of enpiroline superimposed best with quinine, and the other enantiomer of enpiroline superimposed best with quinidine, suggesting that both enantiomers of enpiroline possess antimalarial activity. Since a common feature of the crystal structures of the amino alcohol antimalarial agents is the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, the common spatial direction of hydrogen bond formation indicates the potential ability of these antimalarial agents to bind to a common receptor site. The crystallographic parameters were as follows: C19H18F6N5O; Mr = 404.3; symmetry of unit cell, monoclinic; space group, P2(1)/a; parameters of unit cell---a = 9.454 +/- 0.004 A, b = 18.908 +/- 0.008 A, c = 10.300 +/- 0.004 A, and beta = 96.55 +/- 0.03 degrees: V (volume of unit cell) = 1829.2 A3; Z (number of molecules per unit cell) = 4; Dchi (calculated density) = 1.46 g cm-3; source of radiation, CuK alpha (lambda = 1.54178 A); mu

  13. Crystal and molecular structure of the antimalarial agent enpiroline.

    PubMed Central

    Karle, J M; Karle, I L

    1989-01-01

    To identify common spatial and structural features of amino alcohol antimalarial agents with the eventual goal of designing more effective drugs and a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this class of antimalarial agents, the three-dimensional crystal and molecular structure of enpiroline, a new antimalarial agent active against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum, was determined by X-ray crystallography and compared with the crystal structures of the cinchona alkaloids and of the new antimalarial agent WR 194,965. The aromatic rings of the phenyl-pyridine ring system of enpiroline are twisted from each other by approximately 18 degrees. The intramolecular aliphatic N-O distance in enpiroline was 2.80 A (1 A = 0.1 nm), which is close to the N-O distance found in the antimalarial cinchona alkaloids. Enpiroline contains both an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the aliphatic nitrogen and oxygen atoms and an intermolecular hydrogen bond between the aliphatic nitrogen and oxygen atoms of two neighboring molecules. One enantiomer of enpiroline superimposed best with quinine, and the other enantiomer of enpiroline superimposed best with quinidine, suggesting that both enantiomers of enpiroline possess antimalarial activity. Since a common feature of the crystal structures of the amino alcohol antimalarial agents is the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, the common spatial direction of hydrogen bond formation indicates the potential ability of these antimalarial agents to bind to a common receptor site. The crystallographic parameters were as follows: C19H18F6N5O; Mr = 404.3; symmetry of unit cell, monoclinic; space group, P2(1)/a; parameters of unit cell---a = 9.454 +/- 0.004 A, b = 18.908 +/- 0.008 A, c = 10.300 +/- 0.004 A, and beta = 96.55 +/- 0.03 degrees: V (volume of unit cell) = 1829.2 A3; Z (number of molecules per unit cell) = 4; Dchi (calculated density) = 1.46 g cm-3; source of radiation, CuK alpha (lambda = 1.54178 A); mu

  14. Local structural ordering in surface-confined liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śliwa, I.; Jeżewski, W.; Zakharov, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    The effect of the interplay between attractive nonlocal surface interactions and attractive pair long-range intermolecular couplings on molecular structures of liquid crystals confined in thin cells with flat solid surfaces has been studied. Extending the McMillan mean field theory to include finite systems, it has been shown that confining surfaces can induce complex orientational and translational ordering of molecules. Typically, local smectic A, nematic, and isotropic phases have been shown to coexist in certain temperature ranges, provided that confining cells are sufficiently thick, albeit finite. Due to the nonlocality of surface interactions, the spatial arrangement of these local phases can display, in general, an unexpected complexity along the surface normal direction. In particular, molecules located in the vicinity of surfaces can still be organized in smectic layers, even though nematic and/or isotropic order can simultaneously appear in the interior of cells. The resulting surface freezing of smectic layers has been confirmed to occur even for rather weak surface interactions. The surface interactions cannot, however, prevent smectic layers from melting relatively close to system boundaries, even when molecules are still arranged in layers within the central region of the system. The internal interfaces, separating individual liquid-crystal phases, are demonstrated here to form fronts of local finite-size transitions that move across cells under temperature changes. Although the complex molecular ordering in surface confined liquid-crystal systems can essentially be controlled by temperature variations, specific thermal properties of these systems, especially the nature of the local transitions, are argued to be strongly conditioned to the degree of molecular packing.

  15. Crystal structure of a new natural Mn, W-Tantaloniobate

    SciTech Connect

    Yamnova, N.A.; Pushcharovskii, D.Yu; Voloshin, A.V.

    1995-05-01

    The crystal structure of a new natural Mn, W-tantaloniobate (Mn{sup 2+}{sub 1.76}Mn{sup 3+}{sub 0.1}Fe{sup 2+}{sub 0.1}{open_square}0.14)Nb{sub 0.8}Mn{sup 2+}{sub 0.2}{sub 2}(Nb{sub 2.0}Ta{sub 0.65}W{sub 0.1}{open_square}{sub 0.25})(W{sub 1.71}Ti{sub 0.09}{open_square}{sub 0.20})O{sub 20} discovered in the granite pegmatites of Southwestern Pamir was determined (Syntex P1 automated diffractometer; 20/0 scan; 1041 reflections; and R=0.054). Parameters of the monoclinic unit cell are: a=24.73(2){angstrom}, b=5.056(3){angstrom}, and c=5.760(3){angstrom}; {beta}=103.50(7){degrees}; V=700.5(9){angstrom}{sup 3}; sp. gr. P2{sub 1}, Z=2; and d{sub calc}=6.11 g/cm{sup 3}. The basic units of the structure are blocks of the {alpha}-PbO{sub 2} type that are formed of zigzag octahedral columns with Mn, Nb, and the columns formed by W triognal prisms. A comparative crystal-chemical analysis of the structures of a number of complex oxides of the {alpha}-PbO{sub 2} type was performed. 9 refs., 2 fig., 3 tab.

  16. Models of protein–ligand crystal structures: trust, but verify

    PubMed Central

    Deller, Marc C.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray crystallography provides the most accurate models of protein–ligand structures. These models serve as the foundation of many computational methods including structure prediction, molecular modelling, and structure-based drug design. The success of these computational methods ultimately depends on the quality of the underlying protein–ligand models. X-ray crystallography offers the unparalleled advantage of a clear mathematical formalism relating the experimental data to the protein–ligand model. In the case of X-ray crystallography, the primary experimental evidence is the electron density of the molecules forming the crystal. The first step in the generation of an accurate and precise crystallographic model is the interpretation of the electron density of the crystal, typically carried out by construction of an atomic model. The atomic model must then be validated for fit to the experimental electron density and also for agreement with prior expectations of stereochemistry. Stringent validation of protein–ligand models has become possible as a result of the mandatory deposition of primary diffraction data, and many computational tools are now available to aid in the validation process. Validation of protein–ligand complexes has revealed some instances of overenthusiastic interpretation of ligand density. Fundamental concepts and metrics of protein–ligand quality validation are discussed and we highlight software tools to assist in this process. It is essential that end users select high quality protein–ligand models for their computational and biological studies, and we provide an overview of how this can be achieved. PMID:25665575

  17. Crystal Structures of Yellowtail Ascites Virus VP4 Protease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ivy Yeuk Wah; Paetzel, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Yellowtail ascites virus (YAV) is an aquabirnavirus that causes ascites in yellowtail, a fish often used in sushi. Segment A of the YAV genome codes for a polyprotein (pVP2-VP4-VP3), where processing by its own VP4 protease yields the capsid protein precursor pVP2, the ribonucleoprotein-forming VP3, and free VP4. VP4 protease utilizes the rarely observed serine-lysine catalytic dyad mechanism. Here we have confirmed the existence of an internal cleavage site, preceding the VP4/VP3 cleavage site. The resulting C-terminally truncated enzyme (ending at Ala716) is active, as shown by a trans full-length VP4 cleavage assay and a fluorometric peptide cleavage assay. We present a crystal structure of a native active site YAV VP4 with the internal cleavage site trapped as trans product complexes and trans acyl-enzyme complexes. The acyl-enzyme complexes confirm directly the role of Ser633 as the nucleophile. A crystal structure of the lysine general base mutant (K674A) reveals the acyl-enzyme and empty binding site states of VP4, which allows for the observation of structural changes upon substrate or product binding. These snapshots of three different stages in the VP4 protease reaction mechanism will aid in the design of anti-birnavirus compounds, provide insight into previous site-directed mutagenesis results, and contribute to understanding of the serine-lysine dyad protease mechanism. In addition, we have discovered that this protease contains a channel that leads from the enzyme surface (adjacent to the substrate binding groove) to the active site and the deacylating water. PMID:23511637

  18. Exploring protein flexibility: incorporating structural ensembles from crystal structures and simulation into virtual screening protocols.

    PubMed

    Osguthorpe, David J; Sherman, Woody; Hagler, Arnold T

    2012-06-14

    The capacity of proteins to adapt their structure in response to various perturbations including covalent modifications, and interactions with ligands and other proteins plays a key role in biological processes. Here, we explore the ability of molecular dynamics (MD), replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD), and a library of structures of crystal-ligand complexes, to sample the protein conformational landscape and especially the accessible ligand binding site geometry. The extent of conformational space sampled is measured by the diversity of the shapes of the ligand binding sites. Since our focus here is the effect of this plasticity on the ability to identify active compounds through virtual screening, we use the structures generated by these techniques to generate a small ensemble for further docking studies, using binding site shape hierarchical clustering to determine four structures for each ensemble. These are then assessed for their capacity to optimize enrichment and diversity in docking. We test these protocols on three different receptors: androgen receptor (AR), HIV protease, and CDK2. We show that REMD enhances structural sampling slightly as compared both to MD, and the distortions induced by ligand binding as reflected in the crystal structures. The improved sampling of the simulation methods does not translate directly into improved docking performance, however. The ensemble approach did improve enrichment and diversity, and the ensemble derived from the crystal structures performed somewhat better than those derived from the simulations.

  19. Structures of the OmpF porin crystallized in the presence of foscholine-12

    PubMed Central

    Kefala, Georgia; Ahn, Chihoon; Krupa, Martin; Esquivies, Luis; Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Choe, Senyon

    2010-01-01

    The endogenous Escherichia coli porin OmpF was crystallized as an accidental by-product of our efforts to express, purify, and crystallize the E. coli integral membrane protein KdpD in the presence of foscholine-12 (FC12). FC12 is widely used in membrane protein studies, but no crystal structure of a protein that was both purified and crystallized with this detergent has been reported in the Protein Data Bank. Crystallization screening for KdpD yielded two different crystals of contaminating protein OmpF. Here, we report two OmpF structures, the first membrane protein crystal structures for which extraction, purification, and crystallization were done exclusively with FC12. The first structure was refined in space group P21 with cell parameters a = 136.7 Å, b = 210.5 Å, c = 137 Å, and β = 100.5°, and the resolution of 3.8 Å. The second structure was solved at the resolution of 4.4 Å and was refined in the P321 space group, with unit cell parameters a = 215.5 Å, b = 215.5 Å, c = 137.5 Å, and γ = 120°. Both crystal forms show novel crystal packing, in which the building block is a tetrahedral arrangement of four trimers. Additionally, we discuss the use of FC12 for membrane protein crystallization and structure determination, as well as the problem of the OmpF contamination for membrane proteins overexpressed in E. coli. PMID:20196071

  20. Automated High Throughput Protein Crystallization Screening at Nanoliter Scale and Protein Structural Study on Lactate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fenglei

    2006-08-09

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To develop an economical, easy to use, automated, high throughput system for large scale protein crystallization screening. (2) To develop a new protein crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and complete compatibility with high throughput screening system. (3) To determine the structure of lactate dehydrogenase complexed with NADH by x-ray protein crystallography to study its inherent structural properties. Firstly, we demonstrated large scale protein crystallization screening can be performed in a high throughput manner with low cost, easy operation. The overall system integrates liquid dispensing, crystallization and detection and serves as a whole solution to protein crystallization screening. The system can dispense protein and multiple different precipitants in nanoliter scale and in parallel. A new detection scheme, native fluorescence, has been developed in this system to form a two-detector system with a visible light detector for detecting protein crystallization screening results. This detection scheme has capability of eliminating common false positives by distinguishing protein crystals from inorganic crystals in a high throughput and non-destructive manner. The entire system from liquid dispensing, crystallization to crystal detection is essentially parallel, high throughput and compatible with automation. The system was successfully demonstrated by lysozyme crystallization screening. Secondly, we developed a new crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and compatibility with automation and high throughput. In this crystallization method, a gas permeable membrane is employed to achieve the gentle evaporation required by protein crystallization. Protein consumption is significantly reduced to nanoliter scale for each condition and thus permits exploring more conditions in a phase diagram for given amount of protein. In addition

  1. The use of small-molecule structures to complement protein–ligand crystal structures in drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Jason C.

    2017-01-01

    Many ligand-discovery stories tell of the use of structures of protein–ligand complexes, but the contribution of structural chemistry is such a core part of finding and improving ligands that it is often overlooked. More than 800 000 crystal structures are available to the community through the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). Individually, these structures can be of tremendous value and the collection of crystal structures is even more helpful. This article provides examples of how small-molecule crystal structures have been used to complement those of protein–ligand complexes to address challenges ranging from affinity, selectivity and bioavailability though to solubility. PMID:28291759

  2. Preparation and crystal structure of Ba 2NF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibel, H.; Wagner, T. R.

    2004-08-01

    Single crystalline Ba 2NF was prepared by heating a mixture of KCuF 3 and Ba metal to 900°C under dynamic flow of N 2, followed by slow cooling from the melt. Crystals of Ba 2NF were dark violet in color and very air sensitive. X-ray diffraction experiments revealed that Ba 2NF is isostructural with rocksalt-type BaO, and has space group Fm-3 m (No. 225) with cell parameter of a=5.6796(19) Å, Z=2. X-ray data was collected on a Bruker SMART APEX 4k CCD Single Crystal Diffractometer at 100 K, using Mo( Kα) radiation. Structure refinement was carried out by full-matrix least squares on F2 on all data, to give R1=0.0194 (all data) and w R2=0.0433 for 3 parameters and 23 independent reflections. The final position assignments were analyzed via bond valence sum calculations.

  3. Crystal and mol-ecular structure of aflatrem.

    PubMed

    Lenta, Bruno N; Ngatchou, Jules; Kenfack, Patrice T; Neumann, Beate; Stammler, Hans-Georg; Sewald, Norbert

    2015-11-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, C32H39NO4, confirms the absolute configuration of the seven chiral centres in the mol-ecule. The molecule has a 1,1-dimethylprop-2-enyl substituent on the indole nucleus and this nucleus shares one edge with the five-membered ring which is, in turn, connected to a sequence of three edge-shared fused rings. The skeleton is completed by the 7,7-trimethyl-6,8-dioxabi-cyclo-[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one group connected to the terminal cyclohexene ring. The two cyclohexane rings adopt chair and half-chair conformations, while in the dioxabi-cyclo-[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one unit, the six-membered ring has a half-chair conformation. The indole system of the mol-ecule exhibits a tilt of 2.02 (1)° between its two rings. In the crystal, O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds connect mol-ecules into chains along [010]. Weak N-H⋯π inter-actions connect these chains, forming sheets parallel to (10-1).

  4. Birefringence and band structure of CdP2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beril, S. I.; Stamov, I. G.; Syrbu, N. N.; Zalamai, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    The spatial dispersion in CdP2 crystals was investigated. The dispersion is positive (nk||с>nk||у) at λ>λ0 and negative (nk||сcrystals are isotropic for wavelength λо=896 nm. Indirect transitions in excitonic region Еgx are nonpolarized due to one pair of bands. Minimal direct energy intervals correspond to transitions Г1→Г1 for Е||с and Г2→Г1 for Е⊥с. The temperature coefficient of energy gap sifting in the case of temperature changing between 2 and 4.2 K equals to 10.6 meV/K and 3.2 mev/K for Г1→Г1 and Г2→Г1 band gap correspondingly. Reflectivity spectra were measured for energy interval 1.5-10 eV and optical functions (n, k, ε1, ε2,d2ε1/dE2 and d2ε2/dE2) were calculated by using Kramers-Kronig analyses. All features were interpreted as optical transitions on the basis of both theoretical calculations of band structure.

  5. Crystallization of germanium-carbon alloys -- Structure and electronic transport

    SciTech Connect

    John, T.M.; Blaesing, J.; Veit, P.; Druesedau, T.

    1997-07-01

    Amorphous Ge{sub 1{minus}x}C{sub x} alloys were deposited by rf-magnetron sputtering from a germanium target in methane-argon atmosphere. Structural investigations were performed by means of wide and small angle X-ray scattering, X-ray reflectometry and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The electronic transport properties were characterized using Hall-measurements and temperature depended conductivity. The results of X-ray techniques together with the electron microscopy clearly prove the existence of a segregation of the electronic conductivity in the as-prepared films follows the Mott' T{sup {minus}1/4} law, indicating transport by a hopping process. After annealing at 870 K, samples with x {le} 0.4 show crystallization of the Ge-clusters with a crystallite size being a function of x. After Ge-crystallization, the conductivity increases by 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. Above room temperature, electronic transport is determined by a thermally activated process. For lower temperatures, the {sigma}(T) curves show a behavior which is determined by the crystallite size and the free carrier concentration, both depending on the carbon content.

  6. Modulated crystal structure of Pr2SbO2.

    PubMed

    Magdysyuk, Oxana V; Nuss, Jürgen; Jansen, Martin

    2013-12-01

    The crystal structure of commensurately modulated Pr2SbO2 was solved in the orthorhombic superspace group Immm(0β0)000, q = 3/4b*, a = 13.5790 (15), b = 3.9818 (18), c = 4.0041 (18) Å (T = 40 K) from a crystal twinned by reticular pseudomerohedry applying the twin law (1 0 0, 0 0 1, 0 -1 0), corresponding to a rotation by 90° along the reciprocal a axis. The formation of Zintl-type Sb(2-)-Sb(2-) dumbbells in Pr2(3+)Sb(2-)O2(2-) is considered to be accountable for its semiconducting properties, as observed previously. The space group for the three-dimensional commensurate supercell a = 13.5790 (15), b = 15.9272 (18), c = 4.0041 (18) Å (T = 40 K) is Pmnm.

  7. Crystal structure of norgestimate, C23H31NO3

    SciTech Connect

    Kaduk, James A.; Gindhart, Amy M.; Blanton, Thomas N.

    2016-09-28

    The crystal structure of norgestimate has been solved and refined using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data, and optimized using density functional techniques. Norgestimate crystallizes in space groupP212121(#19) witha= 11.523 67(9),b= 16.130 72(20),c= 22.247 93(20) Å,V= 4135.56(7) Å3, andZ= 8. There are two independent molecules in the asymmetric unit, with opposite conformations of the acetate groups. Molecule 2 is 7.3 kcal mole-1lower in energy than molecule 1, and is in the minimum energy conformation. The hydroxyimine groups form O–H∙∙∙O hydrogen bonds to the acetate carbonyl groups, resulting in two separate C(15) chains along theb-axis. The powder pattern is included in the Powder Diffraction Fileas entry 00-064-1503.

  8. VO2 (A): Reinvestigation of crystal structure, phase transition and crystal growth mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao Popuri, Srinivasa; Artemenko, Alla; Labrugere, Christine; Miclau, Marinela; Villesuzanne, Antoine; Pollet, Michaël

    2014-05-01

    Well crystallized VO2 (A) microrods were grown via a single step hydrothermal reaction in the presence of V2O5 and oxalic acid. With the advantage of high crystalline samples, we propose P4/ncc as an appropriate space group at room temperature. From morphological studies, we found that the oriented attachment and layer by layer growth mechanisms are responsible for the formation of VO2 (A) micro rods. The structural and electronic transitions in VO2 (A) are strongly first order in nature, and a marked difference between the structural transition temperatures and electronic transitions temperature was evidenced. The reversible intra- (LTP-A to HTP-A) and irreversible inter- (HTP-A to VO2 (M1)) structural phase transformations were studied by in-situ powder X-ray diffraction. Attempts to increase the size of the VO2 (A) microrods are presented and the possible formation steps for the flower-like morphologies of VO2 (M1) are described.

  9. Crystal Structure of a Thermally Stable Rhodopsin Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Standfuss, Jörg; Xie, Guifu; Edwards, Patricia C.; Burghammer, Manfred; Oprian, Daniel D.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.

    2007-01-01

    We determined the structure of the rhodopsin mutant N2C/D282C expressed in mammalian cells; the first structure of a recombinantly produced G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The mutant was designed to form a disulfide bond between the N-terminus and loop E3 which allows handling of opsin in detergent solution and increases thermal stability of rhodopsin by 10°C. It furthermore allowed us to crystallize a fully deglycosylated rhodopsin (N2C/N15D/D282C). N15 mutations are normally misfolding and cause retinitis pigmentosa in humans. Microcrystallographic techniques and a 5μm x-ray beam were used to collect data along a single needle measuring 5x5x90μm3. The disulfide introduces only minor changes but fixes the N-terminal cap over the β-sheet lid covering the ligand binding site, a likely explanation for the increased stability. This work allows structural investigation of rhodopsin mutants and shows the problems encountered during structure determination of GPCRs and other mammalian membrane proteins. PMID:17825322

  10. Crystal Structure of the MecA Degradation Tag*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Mei, Ziqing; Qi, Yutao; Yan, Chuangye; Xiang, Siheng; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Hu, Qi; Wang, Jiawei; Shi, Yigong

    2009-01-01

    MecA is an adaptor protein that regulates the assembly and activity of the ATP-dependent ClpCP protease in Bacillus subtilis. MecA contains two domains. Although the amino-terminal domain of MecA recruits substrate proteins such as ComK and ComS, the carboxyl-terminal domain (residues 121–218) has dual roles in the regulation and function of ClpCP protease. MecA-(121–218) facilitates the assembly of ClpCP oligomer, which is required for the protease activity of ClpCP. This domain was identified to be a non-recycling degradation tag that targets heterologous fusion proteins to the ClpCP protease for degradation. To elucidate the mechanism of MecA, we determined the crystal structure of MecA-(121–218) at 2.2 Å resolution, which reveals a previously uncharacterized α/β fold. Structure-guided mutagenesis allows identification of surface residues that are essential for the function of MecA. We also solved the structure of a carboxyl-terminal domain of YpbH, a paralogue of MecA in B. subtilis, at 2.4 Å resolution. Despite low sequence identity, the two structures share essentially the same fold. The presence of MecA homologues in other bacterial species suggests conservation of a large family of unique degradation tags. PMID:19801546

  11. Crystal Structure of an Active Form of Human MMP-1

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Shalini; Visse, Robert; Nagase, Hideaki; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a dynamic environment that constantly undergoes remodelling and degradation during vital physiological processes such as angiogenesis, wound healing, and development. Unbalanced extracellular matrix breakdown is associated with many diseases such as arthritis, cancer and fibrosis. Interstitial collagen is degraded by matrix metalloproteinases with collagenolytic activity by MMP-1, MMP-8 and MMP-13, collectively known as the collagenases. Matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) plays a pivotal role in degradation of interstitial collagen types I, II, and III. Here, we report the crystal structure of the active form of human MMP-1 at 2.67 Å resolution. This is the first MMP-1 structure that is free of inhibitor and a water molecule essential for peptide hydrolysis is observed coordinated with the active site zinc. Comparing this structure with the human proMMP-1 shows significant structural differences, mainly in the relative orientation of the hemopexin domain, between the pro form and active form of the human enzyme. PMID:16890240

  12. Understanding surface structure and chemistry of single crystal lanthanum aluminate.

    PubMed

    Pramana, Stevin S; Cavallaro, Andrea; Qi, Jiahui; Nicklin, Chris L; Ryan, Mary P; Skinner, Stephen J

    2017-03-02

    The surface crystallography and chemistry of a LaAlO3 single crystal, a material mainly used as a substrate to deposit technologically important thin films (e.g. for superconducting and magnetic devices), was analysed using surface X-ray diffraction and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The surface was determined to be terminated by Al-O species, and was significantly different from the idealised bulk structure. Termination reversal was not observed at higher temperature (600 °C) and chamber pressure of 10(-10) Torr, but rather an increased Al-O occupancy occurred, which was accompanied by a larger outwards relaxation of Al from the bulk positions. Changing the oxygen pressure to 10(-6) Torr enriched the Al site occupancy fraction at the outermost surface from 0.245(10) to 0.325(9). In contrast the LaO, which is located at the next sub-surface atomic layer, showed no chemical enrichment and the structural relaxation was lower than for the top AlO2 layer. Knowledge of the surface structure will aid the understanding of how and which type of interface will be formed when LaAlO3 is used as a substrate as a function of temperature and pressure, and so lead to improved design of device structures.

  13. Understanding surface structure and chemistry of single crystal lanthanum aluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramana, Stevin S.; Cavallaro, Andrea; Qi, Jiahui; Nicklin, Chris L.; Ryan, Mary P.; Skinner, Stephen J.

    2017-03-01

    The surface crystallography and chemistry of a LaAlO3 single crystal, a material mainly used as a substrate to deposit technologically important thin films (e.g. for superconducting and magnetic devices), was analysed using surface X-ray diffraction and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The surface was determined to be terminated by Al-O species, and was significantly different from the idealised bulk structure. Termination reversal was not observed at higher temperature (600 °C) and chamber pressure of 10-10 Torr, but rather an increased Al-O occupancy occurred, which was accompanied by a larger outwards relaxation of Al from the bulk positions. Changing the oxygen pressure to 10-6 Torr enriched the Al site occupancy fraction at the outermost surface from 0.245(10) to 0.325(9). In contrast the LaO, which is located at the next sub-surface atomic layer, showed no chemical enrichment and the structural relaxation was lower than for the top AlO2 layer. Knowledge of the surface structure will aid the understanding of how and which type of interface will be formed when LaAlO3 is used as a substrate as a function of temperature and pressure, and so lead to improved design of device structures.

  14. Crystal Structure of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor CB1.

    PubMed

    Hua, Tian; Vemuri, Kiran; Pu, Mengchen; Qu, Lu; Han, Gye Won; Wu, Yiran; Zhao, Suwen; Shui, Wenqing; Li, Shanshan; Korde, Anisha; Laprairie, Robert B; Stahl, Edward L; Ho, Jo-Hao; Zvonok, Nikolai; Zhou, Han; Kufareva, Irina; Wu, Beili; Zhao, Qiang; Hanson, Michael A; Bohn, Laura M; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Stevens, Raymond C; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2016-10-20

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is the principal target of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a psychoactive chemical from Cannabis sativa with a wide range of therapeutic applications and a long history of recreational use. CB1 is activated by endocannabinoids and is a promising therapeutic target for pain management, inflammation, obesity, and substance abuse disorders. Here, we present the 2.8 Å crystal structure of human CB1 in complex with AM6538, a stabilizing antagonist, synthesized and characterized for this structural study. The structure of the CB1-AM6538 complex reveals key features of the receptor and critical interactions for antagonist binding. In combination with functional studies and molecular modeling, the structure provides insight into the binding mode of naturally occurring CB1 ligands, such as THC, and synthetic cannabinoids. This enhances our understanding of the molecular basis for the physiological functions of CB1 and provides new opportunities for the design of next-generation CB1-targeting pharmaceuticals.

  15. Crystal structure of lipid phosphatase Escherichia coli phosphatidylglycerophosphate phosphatase B

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Junping; Jiang, Daohua; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Xuejun Cai

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-integrated type II phosphatidic acid phosphatases (PAP2s) are important for numerous bacterial to human biological processes, including glucose transport, lipid metabolism, and signaling. Escherichia coli phosphatidylglycerol-phosphate phosphatase B (ecPgpB) catalyzes removing the terminal phosphate group from a lipid carrier, undecaprenyl pyrophosphate, and is essential for transport of many hydrophilic small molecules across the membrane. We determined the crystal structure of ecPgpB at a resolution of 3.2 Å. This structure shares a similar folding topology and a nearly identical active site with soluble PAP2 enzymes. However, the substrate binding mechanism appears to be fundamentally different from that in soluble PAP2 enzymes. In ecPgpB, the potential substrate entrance to the active site is located in a cleft formed by a V-shaped transmembrane helix pair, allowing lateral movement of the lipid substrate entering the active site from the membrane lipid bilayer. Activity assays of point mutations confirmed the importance of the catalytic residues and potential residues involved in phosphate binding. The structure also suggests an induced-fit mechanism for the substrate binding. The 3D structure of ecPgpB serves as a prototype to study eukaryotic PAP2 enzymes, including human glucose-6-phosphatase, a key enzyme in the homeostatic regulation of blood glucose concentrations. PMID:24821770

  16. Crystal structure of the γ-secretase component nicastrin

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Tian; Yan, Chuangye; Zhou, Rui; Zhao, Yanyu; Sun, Linfeng; Yang, Guanghui; Lu, Peilong; Ma, Dan; Shi, Yigong

    2014-01-01

    γ-Secretase is an intramembrane protease responsible for the generation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Aberrant accumulation of Aβ leads to the formation of amyloid plaques in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Nicastrin is the putative substrate-recruiting component of the γ-secretase complex. No atomic-resolution structure had been identified on γ-secretase or any of its four components, hindering mechanistic understanding of γ-secretase function. Here we report the crystal structure of nicastrin from Dictyostelium purpureum at 1.95-Å resolution. The extracellular domain of nicastrin contains a large lobe and a small lobe. The large lobe of nicastrin, thought to be responsible for substrate recognition, associates with the small lobe through a hydrophobic pivot at the center. The putative substrate-binding pocket is shielded from the small lobe by a lid, which blocks substrate entry. These structural features suggest a working model of nicastrin function. Analysis of nicastrin structure provides insights into the assembly and architecture of the γ-secretase complex. PMID:25197054

  17. Understanding surface structure and chemistry of single crystal lanthanum aluminate

    PubMed Central

    Pramana, Stevin S.; Cavallaro, Andrea; Qi, Jiahui; Nicklin, Chris L.; Ryan, Mary P.; Skinner, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    The surface crystallography and chemistry of a LaAlO3 single crystal, a material mainly used as a substrate to deposit technologically important thin films (e.g. for superconducting and magnetic devices), was analysed using surface X-ray diffraction and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The surface was determined to be terminated by Al-O species, and was significantly different from the idealised bulk structure. Termination reversal was not observed at higher temperature (600 °C) and chamber pressure of 10−10 Torr, but rather an increased Al-O occupancy occurred, which was accompanied by a larger outwards relaxation of Al from the bulk positions. Changing the oxygen pressure to 10−6 Torr enriched the Al site occupancy fraction at the outermost surface from 0.245(10) to 0.325(9). In contrast the LaO, which is located at the next sub-surface atomic layer, showed no chemical enrichment and the structural relaxation was lower than for the top AlO2 layer. Knowledge of the surface structure will aid the understanding of how and which type of interface will be formed when LaAlO3 is used as a substrate as a function of temperature and pressure, and so lead to improved design of device structures. PMID:28252044

  18. Crystal structure of lipid phosphatase Escherichia coli phosphatidylglycerophosphate phosphatase B.

    PubMed

    Fan, Junping; Jiang, Daohua; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Xuejun Cai

    2014-05-27

    Membrane-integrated type II phosphatidic acid phosphatases (PAP2s) are important for numerous bacterial to human biological processes, including glucose transport, lipid metabolism, and signaling. Escherichia coli phosphatidylglycerol-phosphate phosphatase B (ecPgpB) catalyzes removing the terminal phosphate group from a lipid carrier, undecaprenyl pyrophosphate, and is essential for transport of many hydrophilic small molecules across the membrane. We determined the crystal structure of ecPgpB at a resolution of 3.2 Å. This structure shares a similar folding topology and a nearly identical active site with soluble PAP2 enzymes. However, the substrate binding mechanism appears to be fundamentally different from that in soluble PAP2 enzymes. In ecPgpB, the potential substrate entrance to the active site is located in a cleft formed by a V-shaped transmembrane helix pair, allowing lateral movement of the lipid substrate entering the active site from the membrane lipid bilayer. Activity assays of point mutations confirmed the importance of the catalytic residues and potential residues involved in phosphate binding. The structure also suggests an induced-fit mechanism for the substrate binding. The 3D structure of ecPgpB serves as a prototype to study eukaryotic PAP2 enzymes, including human glucose-6-phosphatase, a key enzyme in the homeostatic regulation of blood glucose concentrations.

  19. Crystal structure of substrate free form of glycerol dehydratase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Der-Ing; Dotson, Garry; Turner, Jr., Ivan; Reiss, Lisa; Emptage, Mark

    2010-03-08

    Glycerol dehydratase (GDH) and diol dehydratase (DDH) are highly homologous isofunctional enzymes that catalyze the elimination of water from glycerol and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) to the corresponding aldehyde via a coenzyme B{sub 12}-dependent radical mechanism. The crystal structure of substrate free form of GDH in complex with cobalamin and K{sup +} has been determined at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. Its overall fold and the subunit assembly closely resemble those of DDH. Comparison of this structure and the DDH structure, available only in substrate bound form, shows the expected change of the coordination of the essential K{sup +} from hexacoordinate to heptacoordinate with the displacement of a single coordinated water by the substrate diol. In addition, there appears to be an increase in the rigidity of the K{sup +} coordination (as measured by lower B values) upon the binding of the substrate. Structural analysis of the locations of conserved residues among various GDH and DDH sequences has aided in identification of residues potentially important for substrate preference or specificity of protein-protein interactions.

  20. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF A VOLTAGE-GATED SODIUM CHANNEL

    PubMed Central

    Payandeh, Jian; Scheuer, Todd; Zheng, Ning; Catterall, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels initiate electrical signaling in excitable cells and are the molecular targets for drugs and disease mutations, but the structural basis for their voltage-dependent activation, ion selectivity, and drug block is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of a voltage-gated Na+-channel from Arcobacter butzleri (NavAb) captured in a closed-pore conformation with four activated voltage-sensors at 2.7 Å resolution. The arginine gating charges make multiple hydrophilic interactions within the voltage-sensor, including unanticipated hydrogen bonds to the protein backbone. Comparisons to previous open-pore potassium channel structures suggest that the voltage-sensor domains and the S4-S5 linkers dilate the central pore by pivoting together around a hinge at the base of the pore module. The NavAb selectivity filter is short, ~6.5 Å wide, and water-filled, with four acidic side-chains surrounding the narrowest part of the ion conduction pathway. This unique structure presents a high field-strength anionic coordination site, which confers Na+-selectivity through partial dehydration via direct interaction with glutamate side-chains. Fenestrations in the sides of the pore module are unexpectedly penetrated by fatty acyl chains that extend into the central cavity, and these portals are large enough for the entry of small, hydrophobic pore-blocking drugs. PMID:21743477