Science.gov

Sample records for crystalline lens

  1. Glycation precedes lens crystallin aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, M.S.; Perry, R.E.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) seems to have the potential to alter the structure of crystallins and make them susceptible to thiol oxidation leading to disulfide-linked high molecular weight (HMW) aggregate formation. They used streptozotocin diabetic rats during precataract and cataract stages and long-term cell-free glycation of bovine lens crystallins to study the relationship between glycation and lens crystallin aggregation. HMW aggregates and other protein components of the water-soluble (WS) and urea-soluble (US) fractions were separated by molecular sieve high performance liquid chromatography. Glycation was estimated by both (/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/ reduction and phenylboronate agarose affinity chromatography. Levels of total glycated protein (GP) in the US fractions were about 2-fold higher than in the WS fractions and there was a linear increase in GP in both WS and US fractions. This increase was parallelled by a corresponding increase in HMW aggregates. Total GP extracted by the affinity method from the US fraction showed a predominance of HMW aggregates and vice versa. Cell-free glycation studies with bovine crystallins confirmed the results of the animals studies. Increasing glycation caused a corresponding increase in protein insolubilization and the insoluble fraction thus formed also contained more glycated protein. It appears that lens protein glycation, HMW aggregate formation, and protein insolubilization are interrelated.

  2. In vivo human crystalline lens topography

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Sergio; Pérez-Merino, Pablo; Gambra, Enrique; de Castro, Alberto; Marcos, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Custom high-resolution high-speed anterior segment spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to characterize three-dimensionally (3-D) the human crystalline lens in vivo. The system was provided with custom algorithms for denoising and segmentation of the images, as well as for fan (scanning) and optical (refraction) distortion correction, to provide fully quantitative images of the anterior and posterior crystalline lens surfaces. The method was tested on an artificial eye with known surfaces geometry and on a human lens in vitro, and demonstrated on three human lenses in vivo. Not correcting for distortion overestimated the anterior lens radius by 25% and the posterior lens radius by more than 65%. In vivo lens surfaces were fitted by biconicoids and Zernike polynomials after distortion correction. The anterior lens radii of curvature ranged from 10.27 to 14.14 mm, and the posterior lens radii of curvature ranged from 6.12 to 7.54 mm. Surface asphericities ranged from −0.04 to −1.96. The lens surfaces were well fitted by quadrics (with variation smaller than 2%, for 5-mm pupils), with low amounts of high order terms. Surface lens astigmatism was significant, with the anterior lens typically showing horizontal astigmatism (Z22 ranging from −11 to −1 µm) and the posterior lens showing vertical astigmatism (Z22 ranging from 6 to 10 µm). PMID:23082289

  3. Binding of actin to lens alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Actin has been coupled to a cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B column, then tested for binding to alpha, beta, and gamma crystallin preparations from the bovine lens. Alpha, but not beta or gamma, crystallins bound to the actin affinity column in a time dependent and saturable manner. Subfractionation of the alpha crystallin preparation into the alpha-A and alpha-B species, followed by incubation with the affinity column, demonstrated that both species bound approximately the same. Together, these studies demonstrate a specific and saturable binding of lens alpha-A and alpha-B with actin.

  4. Optical density of the crystalline lens

    SciTech Connect

    Hemenger, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The optical density for the noncataractous crystalline lens is written as a sum of two terms, each with a specific dependence on wavelength. The first term, proportional to 1/lambda 2, represents all light-scattering processes in the lens. The second term, assumed significant only for lambda less than or equal to 500 nm, accounts for absorption by lens pigments. By analyzing transmittance data on lenses of subjects aged 21 to 63 years, a spectrum for light absorption by lens pigment is derived and it is shown to be essentially the same for all of the lenses.

  5. [Representation and mathematical analysis of human crystalline lens].

    PubMed

    Tălu, Stefan; Giovanzana, Stefano; Tălu, Mihai

    2011-01-01

    The surface of human crystalline lens can be described and analyzed using mathematical models based on parametric representations, used in biomechanical studies and 3D solid modeling of the lens. The mathematical models used in lens biomechanics allow the study and the behavior of crystalline lens on variables and complex dynamic loads. Also, the lens biomechanics has the potential to improve the results in the development of intraocular lenses and cataract surgery. The paper presents the most representative mathematical models currently used for the modeling of human crystalline lens, both optically and biomechanically.

  6. Crystallins of the octopus lens. Recruitment from detoxification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tomarev, S I; Zinovieva, R D; Piatigorsky, J

    1991-12-15

    The eye lens crystallins of the octopus Octopus dofleini were identified by sequencing abundant proteins and cDNAs. As in squid, the octopus crystallins have subunit molecular masses of 25-30 kDa, are related to mammalian glutathione S-transferases (GST), and are encoded in at least six genes. The coding regions and deduced amino acid sequences of four octopus lens cDNAs are 75-80% identical, while their non-coding regions are entirely different. Deduced amino acid sequences show 52-57% similarity with squid GST-like crystallins, but only 20-25% similarity with mammalian GST. These data suggest that the octopus and squid lens GST-like crystallin gene families expanded after divergence of these species. Northern blot hybridization indicated that the four octopus GST-like crystallin genes examined are lens-specific. Lens extracts showed about 40 times less GST activity using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as substrate than liver extracts of the octopus, indicating that the major GST-like crystallins are specialized for a lens structural role. A prominent 59-kDa crystallin polypeptide, previously observed in octopus but not squid and called omega-crystallin (Chiou, S.-H. (1988) FEBS Lett. 241, 261-264), has been identified as an aldehyde dehydrogenase. Since cytoplasmic aldehyde dehydrogenase is a major protein in elephant shrew lenses (eta-crystallin; Wistow, G., and Kim, H. (1991) J. Mol. Evol. 32, 262-269) the octopus aldehyde dehydrogenase crystallin provides the first example of a similar enzyme-crystallin in vertebrates and invertebrates. The use of detoxification stress proteins (GST and aldehyde dehydrogenase) as cephalopod crystallins indicates a common strategy for recruitment of enzyme-crystallins during the convergent evolution of vertebrate and invertebrate lenses. For historical reasons we propose that the octopus GST-like crystallins, like those of the squid, are called S-crystallins. PMID:1721068

  7. In Vivo Brillouin Analysis of the Aging Crystalline Lens

    PubMed Central

    Besner, Sebastien; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Pineda, Roberto; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the age dependence of the longitudinal modulus of the crystalline lens in vivo using Brillouin scattering data in healthy subjects. Methods Brillouin scans were performed along the crystalline lens in 56 eyes from 30 healthy subjects aged from 19 to 63 years. Longitudinal elastic modulus was acquired along the sagittal axis of the lens with a transverse and axial resolution of 4 and 60 μm, respectively. The relative lens stiffness was computed, and correlations with age were analyzed. Results Brillouin axial profiles revealed nonuniform longitudinal modulus within the lens, increasing from a softer periphery toward a stiffer central plateau at all ages. The longitudinal modulus at the central plateau showed no age dependence in a range of 19 to 45 years and a slight decrease with age from 45 to 63 years. A significant intersubject variability was observed in an age-matched analysis. Importantly, the extent of the central stiff plateau region increased steadily over age from 19 to 63 years. The slope of change in Brillouin modulus in the peripheral regions were nearly age-invariant. Conclusions The adult human lens showed no measurable age-related increase in the peak longitudinal modulus. The expansion of the stiff central region of the lens is likely to be the major contributing factor to age-related lens stiffening. Brillouin microscopy may be useful in characterizing the crystalline lens for the optimization of surgical or pharmacological treatments aimed at restoring accommodative power. PMID:27699407

  8. Diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging of mammals crystalline lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, A.; Hönnicke, M. G.; Safatle, A. M. V.; Cusatis, C.; Moraes Barros, P. S.; Morelhão, S. L.

    2005-08-01

    Crystalline lenses are transparent biological materials where the organization of the lens fibers can also be affected by changes at molecular level, and therefore the structure and morphology of the tissue can be correlated to the loss of transparency of the lens. In this work, internal structure of mammal lenses regarding the long-range ordering of the fibers are investigated by diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging (DEI) radiography. Moreover, DEI and absorption X-ray synchrotron radiographs for healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are compared. Significant differences in healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are observed.

  9. Nonlinear laser pulse response in a crystalline lens.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R P; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ram Kishor; Strickland, D

    2016-04-01

    The propagation characteristics of a spatial Gaussian laser pulse have been studied inside a gradient-index structured crystalline lens with constant-density plasma generated by the laser-tissue interaction. The propagation of the laser pulse is affected by the nonlinearities introduced by the generated plasma inside the crystalline lens. Owing to the movement of plasma species from a higher- to a lower-temperature region, an increase in the refractive index occurs that causes the focusing of the laser pulse. In this study, extended paraxial approximation has been applied to take into account the evolution of the radial profile of the Gaussian laser pulse. To examine the propagation characteristics, variation of the beam width parameter has been observed as a function of the laser power and initial beam radius. The cavitation bubble formation, which plays an important role in the restoration of the elasticity of the crystalline lens, has been investigated. PMID:27192252

  10. Nonlinear laser pulse response in a crystalline lens.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R P; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ram Kishor; Strickland, D

    2016-04-01

    The propagation characteristics of a spatial Gaussian laser pulse have been studied inside a gradient-index structured crystalline lens with constant-density plasma generated by the laser-tissue interaction. The propagation of the laser pulse is affected by the nonlinearities introduced by the generated plasma inside the crystalline lens. Owing to the movement of plasma species from a higher- to a lower-temperature region, an increase in the refractive index occurs that causes the focusing of the laser pulse. In this study, extended paraxial approximation has been applied to take into account the evolution of the radial profile of the Gaussian laser pulse. To examine the propagation characteristics, variation of the beam width parameter has been observed as a function of the laser power and initial beam radius. The cavitation bubble formation, which plays an important role in the restoration of the elasticity of the crystalline lens, has been investigated.

  11. Effect of multiphoton ionization on performance of crystalline lens.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ram Kishor; Strickland, D; Campbell, M C W; Sharma, R P

    2014-12-15

    This Letter presents a model for propagation of a laser pulse in a human crystalline lens. The model contains a transverse beam diffraction effect, laser-induced optical breakdown for the creation of plasma via a multiphoton ionization process, and the gradient index (GRIN) structure. Plasma introduces the nonlinearity in the crystalline lens which affects the propagation of the beam. The multiphoton ionization process generates plasma that changes the refractive index and hence leads to the defocusing of the laser beam. The Letter also points out the relevance of the present investigation to cavitation bubble formation for restoring the elasticity of the eyes.

  12. Effect of multiphoton ionization on performance of crystalline lens.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ram Kishor; Strickland, D; Campbell, M C W; Sharma, R P

    2014-12-15

    This Letter presents a model for propagation of a laser pulse in a human crystalline lens. The model contains a transverse beam diffraction effect, laser-induced optical breakdown for the creation of plasma via a multiphoton ionization process, and the gradient index (GRIN) structure. Plasma introduces the nonlinearity in the crystalline lens which affects the propagation of the beam. The multiphoton ionization process generates plasma that changes the refractive index and hence leads to the defocusing of the laser beam. The Letter also points out the relevance of the present investigation to cavitation bubble formation for restoring the elasticity of the eyes. PMID:25502994

  13. OCT-based crystalline lens topography in accommodating eyes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Merino, Pablo; Velasco-Ocana, Miriam; Martinez-Enriquez, Eduardo; Marcos, Susana

    2015-12-01

    Custom Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) provided with automatic quantification and distortion correction algorithms was used to measure anterior and posterior crystalline lens surface elevation in accommodating eyes and to evaluate relationships between anterior segment surfaces. Nine young eyes were measured at different accommodative demands. Anterior and posterior lens radii of curvature decreased at a rate of 0.78 ± 0.18 and 0.13 ± 0.07 mm/D, anterior chamber depth decreased at 0.04 ± 0.01 mm/D and lens thickness increased at 0.04 ± 0.01 mm/D with accommodation. Three-dimensional surface elevations were estimated by subtracting best fitting spheres. In the relaxed state, the spherical term accounted for most of the surface irregularity in the anterior lens (47%) and astigmatism (70%) in the posterior lens. However, in accommodated lenses astigmatism was the predominant surface irregularity (90%) in the anterior lens. The RMS of high-order irregularities of the posterior lens surface was statistically significantly higher than that of the anterior lens surface (x2.02, p<0.0001). There was significant negative correlation in vertical coma (Z3 (-1)) and oblique trefoil (Z3 (-3)) between lens surfaces. The astigmatic angle showed high degree of alignment between corneal surfaces, moderate between corneal and anterior lens surface (~27 deg), but differed by ~80 deg between the anterior and posterior lens surfaces (including relative anterior/posterior lens astigmatic angle shifts (10-20 deg). PMID:26713216

  14. Fs-laser induced flexibility increase in the crystalline lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, S.; Fromm, M.; Lakharia, R.; Schaefer, M.; Oberheide, U.; Ripken, T.; Breitenfeld, P.; Gerten, G.; Ertmer, W.; Lubatschowksi, H.

    2007-02-01

    Presbyopia is one age related effect every human is suffering beginning at the age of about 45 years. Reading glasses are the conventional treatment so far. According to the Helmholtz theory the loss of accommodation in age is due to the hardening and the resulting loss of elasticity of the crystalline lens. However the ciliary muscle and the lens capsule stay active, respectively. Therefore a possible treatment concept is to regain the flexibility by inducing gliding planes in form of microcuts inside the lens. The increase of flexibility in young porcine lenses by different cutting patterns was shown by Ripken et al. 1, 2 who verified the increase in flexibility by the spinning test introduced by Fisher. 3 We will present our first measurements of flexibility increase of human donor lenses. Furthermore the influence of the laser cuts into the lens on the accommodation amplitude will be shown in a three dimensional finite-element simulation.

  15. Optical power of the isolated human crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    Borja, David; Manns, Fabrice; Ho, Arthur; Ziebarth, Noel; Rosen, Alexandre M.; Jain, Rakhi; Amelinckx, Adriana; Arrieta, Esdras; Augusteyn, Robert C.; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the age-dependence of isolated human crystalline lens power and quantify the contributions of the lens surfaces and refractive index gradient. Methods Experiments were performed on a total of 100 eyes from 73 donors (average post-mortem: 2.8±1.6 days) with an age range of 6 to 94 years. Lens power was measured with a modified commercial lensmeter or with an optical system based on the Scheiner principle. The radius of curvature and asphericity of the isolated lens surfaces were measured by shadowphotography. For each lens the contributions of the surfaces and the refractive index gradient to the measured lens power were calculated using an optical ray tracing software. The age dependency of these refractive powers was assessed. Results The total refractive power and surface refractive power both showed a biphasic age dependency. The total power decreased at a rate of −0.41D/year between age 6 and 58.1, and increased at a rate of 0.33D/year between age 58.1 and 82. The surface contribution decreased at a rate of −0.13D/year between age 6 and 55.2, and increased at a rate of 0.04D/year between age 55.2 and 94. The relative contribution of the surfaces increased by 0.17%/year. The equivalent refractive index also showed a biphasic age dependency with a decrease at a rate of −3.9×10−4/year from age 6 to 60.4 followed by a plateau. Conclusions The lens power decreases with age due mainly to a decrease in the contribution of the gradient. The use of a constant equivalent refractive index value to calculate lens power using the lens maker formula will underestimate the power of young lenses and overestimate the power of older lenses. PMID:18316704

  16. Shape of the isolated ex-vivo human crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    Urs, Raksha; Manns, Fabrice; Ho, Arthur; Borja, David; Amelinckx, Adriana; Smith, Jared; Jain, Rakhi; Augusteyn, Robert; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To develop an age-dependent mathematical model of the isolated ex-vivo human crystalline lens shape to serve as basis for use in computational modeling. Methods Profiles of whole isolated human lenses (n=27) aged 6 to 82, were measured from shadow-photogrammetric images. Two methods were used to analyze the lenses. In the Two-Curves Method (TCM) the anterior and posterior surfaces of the lens were fit to 10th-order even polynomials and in the One-Curve Method (OCM) the contour of one half-meridional section of the lens was fit to 10th-order polynomials. The age-dependence of the polynomial coefficients was assessed. The analysis was used to produce an age-dependent polynomial model of the whole lens shape. Results The root mean squared errors for the fits ranged from 11 to 70 μm for the OCM, 9 to 27 μm for the posterior surface of the TCM and 8 to 134 μm for the anterior surface of the TCM. The coefficients of the OCM did not display a significant trend with age. The 2nd, 6th and 10th-order coefficients of the anterior surface of the TCM decreased with age while the 8th-order coefficient increased. For the posterior surface of the TCM, the 8th-order coefficient significantly decreased with age and the 10th-order coefficient increased. The age-dependent equations of both the models provide a reliable model from age 20 to 60. The OCM model can be used for lenses older than 60 as well. Conclusion The shape of the whole human crystalline lens can be accurately modeled with 10th-order polynomial functions. These models can serve to improve computational modeling, such as finite element (FE) modeling of crystalline lenses. PMID:18950656

  17. αA-Crystallin Peptide 66SDRDKFVIFLDVKHF80 Accumulating in Aging Lens Impairs the Function of α-Crystallin and Induces Lens Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Raju, Murugesan; Sharma, K. Krishna

    2011-01-01

    Background The eye lens is composed of fiber cells that are filled with α-, β- and γ-crystallins. The primary function of crystallins is to maintain the clarity of the lens through ordered interactions as well as through the chaperone-like function of α-crystallin. With aging, the chaperone function of α-crystallin decreases, with the concomitant accumulation of water-insoluble, light-scattering oligomers and crystallin-derived peptides. The role of crystallin-derived peptides in age-related lens protein aggregation and insolubilization is not understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that αA-crystallin-derived peptide, 66SDRDKFVIFLDVKHF80, which accumulates in the aging lens, can inhibit the chaperone activity of α-crystallin and cause aggregation and precipitation of lens crystallins. Age-related change in the concentration of αA-(66-80) peptide was estimated by mass spectrometry. The interaction of the peptide with native crystallin was studied by multi-angle light scattering and fluorescence methods. High molar ratios of peptide-to-crystallin were favourable for aggregation and precipitation. Time-lapse recordings showed that, in the presence of αA-(66-80) peptide, α-crystallin aggregates and functions as a nucleus for protein aggregation, attracting aggregation of additional α-, β- and γ-crystallins. Additionally, the αA-(66-80) peptide shares the principal properties of amyloid peptides, such as β-sheet structure and fibril formation. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that crystallin-derived peptides such as αA-(66-80), generated in vivo, can induce age-related lens changes by disrupting the structure and organization of crystallins, leading to their insolubilization. The accumulation of such peptides in aging lenses may explain a novel mechanism for age-related crystallin aggregation and cataractogenesis. PMID:21552534

  18. Preventive role of lens antioxidant defense mechanism against riboflavin-mediated sunlight damaging of lens crystallins.

    PubMed

    Anbaraki, Afrooz; Khoshaman, Kazem; Ghasemi, Younes; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    The main components of sunlight reaching the eye lens are UVA and visible light exerting their photo-damaging effects indirectly by the aid of endogenous photosensitizer molecules such as riboflavin (RF). In this study, lens proteins solutions were incubated with RF and exposed to the sunlight. Then, gel mobility shift analysis and different spectroscopic assessments were applied to examine the structural damaging effects of solar radiation on these proteins. Exposure of lens proteins to direct sunlight, in the presence of RF, leads to marked structural crosslinking, oligomerization and proteolytic instability. These structural damages were also accompanied with reduction in the emission fluorescence of Trp and Tyr and appearance of a new absorption peak between 300 and 400nm which can be related to formation of new chromophores. Also, photo-oxidation of lens crystallins increases their oligomeric size distribution as examined by dynamic light scattering analysis. The above mentioned structural insults, as potential sources of sunlight-induced senile cataract and blindness, were significantly attenuated in the presence of ascorbic acid and glutathione which are two important components of lens antioxidant defense system. Therefore, the powerful antioxidant defense mechanism of eye lens is an important barrier against molecular photo-damaging effects of solar radiations during the life span. PMID:27316765

  19. A conserved role of αA-crystallin in the development of the zebrafish embryonic lens

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ping; Wu, Shu-Yu; Koteiche, Hanane A.; Mishra, Sanjay; Levic, Daniel S.; Knapik, Ela; Chen, Wenbiao; Mchaourab, Hassane S

    2015-01-01

    αA- and αB-crystallins are small heat shock proteins that bind thermodynamically destabilized proteins thereby inhibiting their aggregation. Highly expressed in the mammalian lens, the α-crystallins have been postulated to play a critical role in the maintenance of lens optical properties by sequestering age-damaged proteins prone to aggregation as well as through a multitude of roles in lens epithelial cells. Here, we have examined the role of α-crystallins in the development of the vertebrate zebrafish lens. For this purpose, we have carried out morpholino-mediated knockdown of αA-, αBa- and αBb-crystallin and characterized the gross morphology of the lens. We observed lens abnormalities, including increased reflectance intensity, as a consequence of the interference with expression of these proteins. These abnormalities were less frequent in transgenic zebrafish embryos expressing rat αA-crystallin suggesting a specific role of α-crystallins in embryonic lens development. To extend and confirm these findings, we generated an αA-crystallin knockout zebrafish line. A more consistent and severe lens phenotype was evident in maternal/zygotic αA-crystallin mutants compared to those observed by morpholino knockdown. The penetrance of the lens phenotype was reduced by transgenic expression of rat αA-crystallin and its severity was attenuated by maternal αA-crystallin expression. These findings demonstrate that the role of α-crystallins in lens development is conserved from mammals to zebrafish and set the stage for using the embryonic lens as a model system to test mechanistic aspects of α-crystallin chaperone activity and to develop strategies to fine-tune protein-protein interactions in aging and cataracts. PMID:26149094

  20. Age and the transmittance of the human crystalline lens.

    PubMed Central

    Weale, R A

    1988-01-01

    1. Conflicting data both on the transmission of the human crystalline lens in the ultra-violet part of the spectrum and on its variation with age necessitate a re-examination of the subject. 2. Twenty-four excised lenses in the age range of 0-85 years were studied with a Perkin-Elmer spectrophotometer between 327 and 700 nm. 3. Some lenses were homogenized and the homogenates were similarly examined. 4. A systematic increase in absorbance with age was observed both in the visible and the ultra-violet parts of the spectrum. 5. An exponential function describes the data, facilitating comparison with, and prediction of, other values. 6. The absorbance of homogenized material was found to be predictable from that of intact lenses, and does not support the notion that mechanical trauma may account for high values in earlier studies. PMID:3411488

  1. Protective Effects of Acetylation on the Pathological Reactions of the Lens Crystallins with Homocysteine Thiolactone

    PubMed Central

    Moafian, Zeinab; Khoshaman, Kazem; Oryan, Ahmad; Kurganov, Boris I.; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Various post-translational lens crystallins modifications result in structural and functional insults, contributing to the development of lens opacity and cataract disorders. Lens crystallins are potential targets of homocysteinylation, particularly under hyperhomocysteinemia which has been indicated in various eye diseases. Since both homocysteinylation and acetylation primarily occur on protein free amino groups, we applied different spectroscopic methods and gel mobility shift analysis to examine the possible preventive role of acetylation against homocysteinylation. Lens crystallins were extensively acetylated in the presence of acetic anhydride and then subjected to homocysteinylation in the presence of homocysteine thiolactone (HCTL). Extensive acetylation of the lens crystallins results in partial structural alteration and enhancement of their stability, as well as improvement of α-crystallin chaperone-like activity. In addition, acetylation partially prevents HCTL-induced structural alteration and aggregation of lens crystallins. Also, acetylation protects against HCTL-induced loss of α-crystallin chaperone activity. Additionally, subsequent acetylation and homocysteinylation cause significant proteolytic degradation of crystallins. Therefore, further experimentation is required in order to judge effectively the preventative role of acetylation on the structural and functional insults induced by homocysteinylation of lens crystallins. PMID:27706231

  2. Involvement of the N-terminal region in alpha-crystallin-lens membrane recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifeanyi, F.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that alpha-crystallin binds specifically, in a saturable manner, to lens membrane. To determine the region of the alpha-crystallin molecule that might be involved in this binding, native alpha-crystallin from the bovine lens has been treated by limited digestion with trypsin, to produce alpha-A molecules with an intact C-terminal region, and a nicked N-terminal region. Compared to intact alpha-crystallin, trypsin-treated alpha-crystallin binds less avidly to lens membrane, suggesting that the N-terminal region of the alpha-A molecule may play a key role in the recognition between lens membrane and crystallin.

  3. Lens proteome map and alpha-crystallin profile of the catfish Rita rita.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Bimal Prasanna; Bhattacharjee, Soma; Das, Manas Kumar

    2011-02-01

    Crystallins are a diverse group of proteins that constitute nearly 90% of the total soluble proteins of the vertebrate eye lens and these tightly packed crystallins are responsible for transparency of the lens. These proteins have been studied in different model and non-model species for understanding the modifications they undergo with ageing that lead to cataract, a disease of protein aggregation. In the present investigation, we studied the lens crystallin profile of the tropical freshwater catfish Rita rita. Profiles of lens crystallins were analyzed and crystallin proteome maps of Rita rita were generated for the first time. alphaA-crystallins, member of the alpha-crystallin family, which are molecular chaperons and play crucial role in maintaining lens transparency were identified by 1- and 2-D immunoblot analysis with anti-alphaA-crystallin antibody. Two protein bands of 19-20 kDa were identified as alphaA-crystallins on 1-D immunoblots and these bands separated into 10 discrete spots on 2-D immunoblot. However, anti-alphaB-crystallin and antiphospho-alphaB-crystallin antibodies were not able to detect any immunoreactive bands on 1- and 2-D immunoblots, indicating alphaB-crystallin was either absent or present in extremely low concentration in Rita rita lens. Thus, Rita rita alpha-crystallins are more like that of the catfish Clarias batrachus and the mammal kangaroo in its alphaA- and alphaB-crystallin content (contain low amount from 5-9% of alphaB-crystallin) and unlike the dogfish, zebrafish, human, bovine and mouse alpha-crystallins (contain higher amount of alphaB-crystallin from 25% in mouse and bovine to 85% in dogfish). Results of the present study can be the baseline information for stimulating further investigation on Rita rita lens crystallins for comparative lens proteomics. Comparing and contrasting the alpha-crystallins of the dogfish and Rita rita may provide valuable information on the functional attributes of alphaA- and alphaB-isoforms, as

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-derived omega-crystallins of squid and octopus. Specialization for lens expression.

    PubMed

    Zinovieva, R D; Tomarev, S I; Piatigorsky, J

    1993-05-25

    omega-Crystallin of the octopus lens is related to aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) of vertebrates (Tomarev, S. I., Zinovieva, R. D., and Piatigorsky, J. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 24226-24231) and ALDH1/eta-crystallin of elephant shrews (Wistow, G., and Kim, H. (1991) J. Mol. Evol. 32, 262-269). Only very low amounts of omega-crystallin are present in the squid lens. Here, we have cloned omega-crystallin cDNAs of the octopus (Octopus dofleini) and squid (Ommastrephes sloani pacificus) lenses. The deduced amino acid sequences of omega-crystallin from these species are 78% identical to each other, 56-58% identical to cytoplasmic ALDH1 and mitochondrial ALDH2 of vertebrates (which are 66-68% identical to each other), and 40% identical to Escherichia coli and spinach ALDHs. These data are consistent with the idea that the ALDH1/ALDH2 gene duplication in vertebrates occurred after divergence of cephalopods from the line giving rise to vertebrates, but before the separation of squid and octopus. Southern blot hybridization indicated that omega-crystallin is encoded by few genes (possibly just one) in octopus and squid. Northern blot hybridization revealed two bands (2.7 and 9.0 kilobases) of omega-crystallin RNA in the octopus lens and one band (4.2 kilobases) in the squid lens; omega-crystallin RNAs were undetectable in numerous non-lens tissues of octopus and squid, suggesting lens-specific expression of this gene(s). Finally, extracts of the octopus lens had no detectable ALDH activity using different substrates, consistent with omega-crystallin having no enzymatic activity. Taken together, our results suggest that omega-crystallin evolved by duplication of an ancestral gene encoding ALDH and subsequently specialized for refraction in the transparent lens while losing ALDH activity and expression in other tissues. PMID:7684383

  5. Quantification of the ciliary muscle and crystalline lens interaction during accommodation with synchronous OCT imaging.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Marco; de Freitas, Carolina; Williams, Siobhan; Hernandez, Victor M; Cabot, Florence; Yesilirmak, Nilufer; Alawa, Karam; Chang, Yu-Cherng; Yoo, Sonia H; Gregori, Giovanni; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    Two SD-OCT systems and a dual channel accommodation target were combined and precisely synchronized to simultaneously image the anterior segment and the ciliary muscle during dynamic accommodation. The imaging system simultaneously generates two synchronized OCT image sequences of the anterior segment and ciliary muscle with an imaging speed of 13 frames per second. The system was used to acquire OCT image sequences of a non-presbyopic and a pre-presbyopic subject accommodating in response to step changes in vergence. The image sequences were processed to extract dynamic morphological data from the crystalline lens and the ciliary muscle. The synchronization between the OCT systems allowed the precise correlation of anatomical changes occurring in the crystalline lens and ciliary muscle at identical time points during accommodation. To describe the dynamic interaction between the crystalline lens and ciliary muscle, we introduce accommodation state diagrams that display the relation between anatomical changes occurring in the accommodating crystalline lens and ciliary muscle. PMID:27446660

  6. Shifting crystalline pseudohypopyon secondary to lens absorption with spontaneous openings in the anterior lens capsule.

    PubMed

    Evereklioglu, Cem

    2006-11-01

    This is the first reported case of a crystalline pseudohypopyon presenting as a layer of "snowdrift deposits" that settled inferiorly in the anterior chamber of the eye of a 55-year-old man and was associated with freely floating crystals in the aqueous humor, producing a "snowy Christmas Eve" appearance. The cause was spontaneous openings in the center of the anterior capsule with leaching of the crystalline substance into the anterior chamber. A dense membranous cataract was left after the lens material was partly absorbed. There was no history of trauma, surgery, or known systemic disease, and the patient presented with a unilateral, mobile, 4.0 mm white pseudohypopyon with no global pain, photophobia, or lacrimation. Although the eye was not injected on admission, repetitive head shaking resulted in dusky-red perilimbal hyperemia. A B-mode ultrasound revealed an advanced retinal detachment, and electroretinographic recordings were undetectable. Visual acuity decreased to hand motions in the affected eye, and the patient ultimately required anterior chamber paracentesis. Such sediments should be differentiated from other forms of true or pseudohypopyons because the course, treatment, and prognosis are different for each.

  7. Lens defects in Astyanax mexicanus Cavefish: evolution of crystallins and a role for alphaA-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Hinaux, Hélène; Blin, Maryline; Fumey, Julien; Legendre, Laurent; Heuzé, Aurélie; Casane, Didier; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2015-05-01

    The fish Astyanax mexicanus presents, within the same species, populations of river-dwelling surface fish (SF) and blind cave-living fish. In cavefish (CF), the eyes develop almost normally during embryogenesis. But 40 h after fertilization, the lens enters apoptosis, triggering the progressive degeneration of the entire eye. Before apoptosis, the CF lens expresses early differentiation factors correctly. Here, we searched for possible late differentiation defects that would be causal in CF lens degeneration. We reasoned that crystallins, the major lens structural proteins, could be defective or misregulated. We surveyed the CF and SF transcriptomes and uncovered 14 Astyanax crystallins from the beta, gamma, lambda, mu, and zeta families. These proteins are less polymorphic and accumulate more fixed mutations, some at highly conserved positions, in CF than in SF, suggesting relaxed selection at these loci in CF. In situ hybridizations and qPCR show that crybb1c, crybgx, crygm5 are expressed at much lower levels or are not expressed in the CF lens. For the best crystallin candidates, we tested a potential causal role in CF lens apoptosis. Crybgx, crybb1c (not expressed in CF from very early on), and cryaa (previously shown to be faintly expressed in CF) failed to induce any defect when knocked-down in zebrafish embryos. However, the anti-apoptotic cryaa protected lens cells from apoptosis when reexpressed by transgenesis in CF, suggesting a cell-autonomous effect of cryaa on lens cell survival. Altogether, these data suggest that crystallin sequence evolution and expression defects may contribute to the loss of eyes in CF. PMID:25348293

  8. Gradient parameter and axial and field rays in the gradient-index crystalline lens model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, M. V.; Bao, C.; Flores-Arias, M. T.; Rama, M. A.; Gómez-Reino, C.

    2003-09-01

    Gradient-index models of the human lens have received wide attention in optometry and vision sciences for considering how changes in the refractive index profile with age and accommodation may affect refractive power. This paper uses the continuous asymmetric bi-elliptical model to determine gradient parameter and axial and field rays of the human lens in order to study the paraxial propagation of light through the crystalline lens of the eye.

  9. Design and analysis of an adaptive lens that mimics the performance of the crystalline lens in the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Alvarado, Agustin; Cruz-Félix, Angel S.; Iturbide-Jiménez, F.; Martínez-López, M.; Ramírez-Como, M.; Armengol-Cruz, V.; Vásquez-Báez, I.

    2014-09-01

    Tunable lenses are optical systems that have attracted much attention due to their potential applications in such areas like ophthalmology, machine vision, microscopy and laser processing. In recent years we have been working in the analysis and performance of a liquid-filled variable focal length lens, this is a lens that can modify its focal length by changing the amount of water within it. Nowadays we extend our study to a particular adaptive lens known as solid elastic lens (SEL) that it is formed by an elastic main body made of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS Sylgard 184). In this work, we present the design, simulation and analysis of an adaptive solid elastic lens that in principle imitates the accommodation process of the crystalline lens in the human eye. For this work, we have adopted the parameters of the schematic eye model developed in 1985 by Navarro et al.; this model represents the anatomy of the eye as close as possible to reality by predicting an acceptable and accurate quantity of spherical and chromatic aberrations without any shape fitting. An opto-mechanical analysis of the accommodation process of the adaptive lens is presented, by simulating a certain amount of radial force applied onto the SEL using the finite element method with the commercial software SolidWorks®. We also present ray-trace diagrams of the simulated compression process of the adaptive lens using the commercial software OSLO®.

  10. γ-Crystallins of the chicken lens: remnants of an ancient vertebrate gene family in birds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingwei; Sagar, Vatsala; Len, Hoay-Shuen; Peterson, Katherine; Fan, Jianguo; Mishra, Sanghamitra; McMurtry, John; Wilmarth, Phillip A; David, Larry L; Wistow, Graeme

    2016-04-01

    γ-Crystallins, abundant proteins of vertebrate lenses, were thought to be absent from birds. However, bird genomes contain well-conserved genes for γS- and γN-crystallins. Although expressed sequence tag analysis of chicken eye found no transcripts for these genes, RT-PCR detected spliced transcripts for both genes in chicken lens, with lower levels in cornea and retina/retinal pigment epithelium. The level of mRNA for γS in chicken lens was relatively very low even though the chicken crygs gene promoter had lens-preferred activity similar to that of mouse. Chicken γS was detected by a peptide antibody in lens, but not in other ocular tissues. Low levels of γS and γN proteins were detected in chicken lens by shotgun mass spectroscopy. Water-soluble and water-insoluble lens fractions were analyzed and 1934 proteins (< 1% false discovery rate) were detected, increasing the known chicken lens proteome 30-fold. Although chicken γS is well conserved in protein sequence, it has one notable difference in leucine 16, replacing a surface glutamine conserved in other γ-crystallins, possibly affecting solubility. However, L16 and engineered Q16 versions were both highly soluble and had indistinguishable circular dichroism, tryptophan fluorescence and heat stability (melting temperature Tm ~ 65 °C) profiles. L16 has been present in birds for over 100 million years and may have been adopted for a specific protein interaction in the bird lens. However, evolution has clearly reduced or eliminated expression of ancestral γ-crystallins in bird lenses. The conservation of genes for γS- and γN-crystallins suggests they may have been preserved for reasons unrelated to the bulk properties of the lens.

  11. O-Crystallin, arginine kinase and ferritin from the octopus lens.

    PubMed

    Zinovieva, R D; Piatigorsky, J; Tomarev, S I

    1999-05-18

    Three proteins have been identified in the eye lens of the octopus, Octopus dofleini. A 22 kDa protein comprising 3-5% of the soluble protein of the lens is 35-43% identical to a family of phosphatidylethanolamine-binding proteins of vertebrates. Other members of this family include the immunodominant antigen of the filarial parasite, Onchocerca volvulus, putative odorant-binding proteins of Drosophila and a protein with unknown function of Caenorhabditis elegans. We have called this protein O-crystallin on the basis of its abundance in the transparent lens. O-Crystallin mRNA was detected only in the lens. Two tryptic peptides of another octopus lens protein, less abundant than O-crystallin, showed 80% identity to arginine kinase of invertebrates, a relative of creatine kinase of vertebrates. Finally, ferritin cDNA was isolated as an abundant cDNA from the octopus lens library. Northern blots showed that ferritin mRNA is not lens-specific. PMID:10350626

  12. A novel type of crystallin in the frog eye lens. 35-kDa polypeptide is not homologous to any of the major classes of lens crystallins.

    PubMed

    Tomarev, S I; Zinovieva, R D; Dolgilevich, S M; Luchin, S V; Krayev, A S; Skryabin, K G; Gause, G G

    1984-06-11

    The nucleotide sequence of a cloned DNA coding for the 35-kDa polypeptide of the eye lens of the frog (Rana temporaria) has been determined. The sequence without connectors and poly(A) tract is 889 nucleotides in length and shows no homology with sequences coding for other classes of crystallins: alpha-, beta-, gamma- or delta-crystallins. The sequence contains one reading frame 675 nucleotides in length, an apparently intact 3'-non-translated region with the polyadenylation signal sequence and a poly(A) tract; the 5'-non-translated region is lost along with part of the coding region; this accounts for about 1/4 of the total mRNA length. The secondary structure prediction according to the Ptitsin - Finkelstein method shows the presence of predominantly beta-strands with only a few alpha-helical regions. We conclude that the 35-kDa polypeptide from the frog eye lens belongs to a new class of eye lens crystallins for which we propose the name epsilon-crystallin.

  13. Evolution of crystallins for a role in the vertebrate eye lens

    PubMed Central

    Slingsby, Christine; Wistow, Graeme J; Clark, Alice R

    2013-01-01

    The camera eye lens of vertebrates is a classic example of the re-engineering of existing protein components to fashion a new device. The bulk of the lens is formed from proteins belonging to two superfamilies, the α-crystallins and the βγ-crystallins. Tracing their ancestry may throw light on the origin of the optics of the lens. The α-crystallins belong to the ubiquitous small heat shock proteins family that plays a protective role in cellular homeostasis. They form enormous polydisperse oligomers that challenge modern biophysical methods to uncover the molecular basis of their assembly structure and chaperone-like protein binding function. It is argued that a molecular phenotype of a dynamic assembly suits a chaperone function as well as a structural role in the eye lens where the constraint of preventing protein condensation is paramount. The main cellular partners of α-crystallins, the β- and γ-crystallins, have largely been lost from the animal kingdom but the superfamily is hugely expanded in the vertebrate eye lens. Their structures show how a simple Greek key motif can evolve rapidly to form a complex array of monomers and oligomers. Apart from remaining transparent, a major role of the partnership of α-crystallins with β- and γ-crystallins in the lens is to form a refractive index gradient. Here, we show some of the structural and genetic features of these two protein superfamilies that enable the rapid creation of different assembly states, to match the rapidly changing optical needs among the various vertebrates. PMID:23389822

  14. Extraction, purification and characterization of the crystallin protein of cataractous eye lens nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sher, Muhammad; Hameed, Ayesha; Noreen, Sobia; Fayyaz-ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Hussain, Muhammad Ajaz; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2015-09-21

    The purpose of this study is to separate and identify the crystallin protein present in the nucleus of a human cataractous eye lens. Cataractous lenses were collected from different eye hospitals from patients of different etiologies with ages between 40 and 80 years. Lens nucleus proteins were extracted into four fractions on the basis of their solubility in different media by applying a reported method. These fractions were buffer-soluble proteins (PS), urea-soluble proteins (PU), yellow fraction proteins (PY) and insoluble proteins (PI). All three soluble fractions were subjected to HPLC and GPC analysis. Both HPLC and GPC analysis showed that each fraction contains α-, β- and γ-crystallins, a major class of protein present in the lenses of vertebrates. Various chromatographic parameters including precision, accuracy and linearity have been evaluated. Studies of water-insoluble crystallins using sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) have demonstrated extreme homogeneity with evidence of major components with molecular masses of 18-70 kDa, similar to the crystallin of the water-soluble portion. The method was found to be suitable for the analysis of various isomers of crystallin protein present in human cataractous eye lens nuclei. The detailed results of the GPC are discussed. This study provides the first HPLC and GPC analysis of a human cataractous eye lens nucleus.

  15. Distortion Correction of OCT Images of the Crystalline Lens: GRIN Approach

    PubMed Central

    Siedlecki, Damian; de Castro, Alberto; Gambra, Enrique; Ortiz, Sergio; Borja, David; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Manns, Fabrice; Marcos, Susana; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To propose a method to correct Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images of posterior surface of the crystalline lens incorporating its gradient index (GRIN) distribution and explore its possibilities for posterior surface shape reconstruction in comparison to existing methods of correction. Methods 2-D images of 9 human lenses were obtained with a time-domain OCT system. The shape of the posterior lens surface was corrected using the proposed iterative correction method. The parameters defining the GRIN distribution used for the correction were taken from a previous publication. The results of correction were evaluated relative to the nominal surface shape (accessible in vitro) and compared to the performance of two other existing methods (simple division, refraction correction: assuming a homogeneous index). Comparisons were made in terms of posterior surface radius, conic constant, root mean square, peak to valley and lens thickness shifts from the nominal data. Results Differences in the retrieved radius and conic constant were not statistically significant across methods. However, GRIN distortion correction with optimal shape GRIN parameters provided more accurate estimates of the posterior lens surface, in terms of RMS and peak values, with errors less than 6μm and 13μm respectively, on average. Thickness was also more accurately estimated with the new method, with a mean discrepancy of 8μm. Conclusions The posterior surface of the crystalline lens and lens thickness can be accurately reconstructed from OCT images, with the accuracy improving with an accurate model of the GRIN distribution. The algorithm can be used to improve quantitative knowledge of the crystalline lens from OCT imaging in vivo. Although the improvements over other methods are modest in 2-D, it is expected that 3-D imaging will fully exploit the potential of the technique. The method will also benefit from increasing experimental data of GRIN distribution in the lens of larger

  16. Biometry of the crystalline lens in early-onset diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, J M; Bron, A J; Brown, N A; Neil, H A

    1990-01-01

    Lenticular biometry on non-cataractous lenses has been studied by means of Scheimpflug photography and digital image analysis in 153 patients with early-onset insulin-dependent diabetes and 153 non-diabetic controls. Anteroposterior axial lens thickness, cortical thickness, nuclear thickness, anterior and posterior lenticular curvatures, and anterior chamber depth were assessed. Highly significant differences between the lenses of the diabetic subjects and non-diabetic controls were found. After the effect of age had been accounted for within the diabetic subgroup, diabetic duration was found to be a highly significant determinant of lens dimensions, such that age-related dimensional changes for various biometric parameters were accelerated by between 52% and 121% after the onset of diabetes. Because the diabetic duration of the early-onset diabetic subjects studied in this work was accurately known, this report is the first in which a precise assessment of the effect of 'true' diabetic duration on lens biometry has been possible. PMID:2223701

  17. Mass spectrometric analysis of lens [beta]-crystallins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jean B.; Miesbauer, Laura R.; Leeds, Jonathan; Smith, David L.; Loo, Joseph A.; Smith, Richard D.; Edmonds, Charles G.

    1991-12-01

    A combination of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS), fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FABMS), and sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide get electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was used to determine the homegeneity of chromatographic fractions of [beta]-crystallins, separated by reversed-phase HPLC. The molecular weight of the major component of [beta]-crystallins, [beta]B2, was found by ESIMS to be 23 215, in agreement with the accepted value of 23 209. The practical utility of improved resolution and accuracy of ESIMS relative to SDS-PAGE of identifying proteins is discussed. The component [beta]B2 was found in more than one HPLC fraction, suggesting that it migrates through the HPLC column aggregated with itself or other [beta]-crystallins. Several proteins with different molecular weights were found to be unique to each of the two classes of [beta]-crystallins. Tryptic digest of the major HPLC fractions were analyzed by FABMS, on-line HPLC continuous-flow FABMS--MS to give detailed information about the primary structure of [beta]B2. Peptides related to all but one portion of the proposed amino acid sequence of [beta]B2 were found in the tryptic digest, suggesting that the proposed sequence is correct. On-line HPLC continuous-flow FABMS analysis of the proteolytic digest was particularly attractive because it gave a nearly complete peptide molecular weight map in 20 min.

  18. Alpha-A crystallin: quantitation of C-terminal modification during lens aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takemoto, L.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin is susceptible to age-dependent, posttranslational modification. To quantitate the amount of modification, alpha-A crystallin was purified from total proteins of the aging bovine lens, then digested with lys-C endoproteinase. Reverse phase, high pressure liquid chromatography was used to resolve and quantitate the resulting peptides, to determine the amount of C-terminal peptide relative to peptides from other regions of the protein that have not been reported to undergo modification. The results indicate that relative to alpha-A crystallin from newborn lens, posttranslational modification has occurred in approximately 45-55% of the C-terminal region from mature lens. These results demonstrate extensive modification of the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin from the mature lens, indicating that during the aging process, posttranslational modifications in this region may make significant contributions to the aggregated state and/or molecular chaperone properties of the molecule.

  19. Quantification of the ciliary muscle and crystalline lens interaction during accommodation with synchronous OCT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Marco; de Freitas, Carolina; Williams, Siobhan; Hernandez, Victor M.; Cabot, Florence; Yesilirmak, Nilufer; Alawa, Karam; Chang, Yu-Cherng; Yoo, Sonia H.; Gregori, Giovanni; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Two SD-OCT systems and a dual channel accommodation target were combined and precisely synchronized to simultaneously image the anterior segment and the ciliary muscle during dynamic accommodation. The imaging system simultaneously generates two synchronized OCT image sequences of the anterior segment and ciliary muscle with an imaging speed of 13 frames per second. The system was used to acquire OCT image sequences of a non-presbyopic and a pre-presbyopic subject accommodating in response to step changes in vergence. The image sequences were processed to extract dynamic morphological data from the crystalline lens and the ciliary muscle. The synchronization between the OCT systems allowed the precise correlation of anatomical changes occurring in the crystalline lens and ciliary muscle at identical time points during accommodation. To describe the dynamic interaction between the crystalline lens and ciliary muscle, we introduce accommodation state diagrams that display the relation between anatomical changes occurring in the accommodating crystalline lens and ciliary muscle. PMID:27446660

  20. Static and dynamic crystalline lens accommodation evaluated using quantitative 3-D OCT

    PubMed Central

    Gambra, Enrique; Ortiz, Sergio; Perez-Merino, Pablo; Gora, Michalina; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Marcos, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Custom high-resolution high-speed anterior segment spectral domain Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) provided with automatic quantification and distortion correction algorithms was used to characterize three-dimensionally (3-D) the human crystalline lens in vivo in four subjects, for accommodative demands between 0 to 6 D in 1 D steps. Anterior and posterior lens radii of curvature decreased with accommodative demand at rates of 0.73 and 0.20 mm/D, resulting in an increase of the estimated optical power of the eye of 0.62 D per diopter of accommodative demand. Dynamic fluctuations in crystalline lens radii of curvature, anterior chamber depth and lens thickness were also estimated from dynamic 2-D OCT images (14 Hz), acquired during 5-s of steady fixation, for different accommodative demands. Estimates of the eye power from dynamical geometrical measurements revealed an increase of the fluctuations of the accommodative response from 0.07 D to 0.47 D between 0 and 6 D (0.044 D per D of accommodative demand). A sensitivity analysis showed that the fluctuations of accommodation were driven by dynamic changes in the lens surfaces, particularly in the posterior lens surface. PMID:24049680

  1. Semiautomated analysis of optical coherence tomography crystalline lens images under simulated accommodation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eon; Ehrmann, Klaus; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Borja, David; Arrieta-Quintero, Esdras; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2011-05-01

    Presbyopia is an age related, gradual loss of accommodation, mainly due to changes in the crystalline lens. As part of research efforts to understand and cure this condition, ex vivo, cross-sectional optical coherence tomography images of crystalline lenses were obtained by using the Ex-Vivo Accommodation Simulator (EVAS II) instrument and analyzed to extract their physical and optical properties. Various filters and edge detection methods were applied to isolate the edge contour. An ellipse is fitted to the lens outline to obtain central reference point for transforming the pixel data into the analysis coordinate system. This allows for the fitting of a high order equation to obtain a mathematical description of the edge contour, which obeys constraints of continuity as well as zero to infinite surface slopes from apex to equator. Geometrical parameters of the lens were determined for the lens images captured at different accommodative states. Various curve fitting functions were developed to mathematically describe the anterior and posterior surfaces of the lens. Their differences were evaluated and their suitability for extracting optical performance of the lens was assessed. The robustness of these algorithms was tested by analyzing the same images repeated times.

  2. Semiautomated analysis of optical coherence tomography crystalline lens images under simulated accommodation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eon; Ehrmann, Klaus; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Borja, David; Arrieta-Quintero, Esdras; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Presbyopia is an age related, gradual loss of accommodation, mainly due to changes in the crystalline lens. As part of research efforts to understand and cure this condition, ex vivo, cross-sectional optical coherence tomography images of crystalline lenses were obtained by using the Ex-Vivo Accommodation Simulator (EVAS II) instrument and analyzed to extract their physical and optical properties. Various filters and edge detection methods were applied to isolate the edge contour. An ellipse is fitted to the lens outline to obtain central reference point for transforming the pixel data into the analysis coordinate system. This allows for the fitting of a high order equation to obtain a mathematical description of the edge contour, which obeys constraints of continuity as well as zero to infinite surface slopes from apex to equator. Geometrical parameters of the lens were determined for the lens images captured at different accommodative states. Various curve fitting functions were developed to mathematically describe the anterior and posterior surfaces of the lens. Their differences were evaluated and their suitability for extracting optical performance of the lens was assessed. The robustness of these algorithms was tested by analyzing the same images repeated times. PMID:21639571

  3. Refractive index measurement of the mouse crystalline lens using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Ranjay; Lacy, Kip D; Tan, Christopher C; Park, Han Na; Pardue, Machelle T

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest for using mouse models in refractive development and myopia research. The crystalline lens is a critical optical component of the mouse eye that occupies greater than 50% of the ocular space, and significant increases in thickness with age. However, changes in refractive index of the mouse crystalline lens are less known. In this study, we examined the changes in thickness and refractive index of the mouse crystalline lens for two different strains, wild-type (WT) and a nyx mutant (nob) over the course of normal visual development or after form deprivation. Refractive index and lens thickness measurements were made on ex vivo lenses using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Comparison of refractive index measurements on 5 standard ball lenses using the SD-OCT and their known refractive indices (manufacturer provided) indicated good precision (intra-class correlation coefficient, 0.998 and Bland-Altman coefficient of repeatability, 0.116) of the SD-OCT to calculate mouse lens refractive index ex vivo. During normal visual development, lens thickness increased significantly with age for three different cohorts of mice, aged 4 (average thickness from both eyes; WT: 1.78 ± 0.03, nob: 1.79 ± 0.08 mm), 10 (WT: 2.02 ± 0.05, nob: 2.01 ± 0.04 mm) and 16 weeks (WT: 2.12 ± 0.06, nob: 2.09 ± 0.06 mm, p < 0.001). Lens thickness was not significantly different between the two strains at any age (p = 0.557). For mice with normal vision, refractive index for isolated crystalline lenses in nob mice was significantly greater than WT mice (mean for all ages; WT: 1.42 ± 0.01, nob: 1.44 ± 0.001, p < 0.001). After 4 weeks of form deprivation to the right eye using a skull-mounted goggling apparatus, a thinning of the crystalline lens was observed in both right and left eyes of goggled animals compared to their naïve controls (average from both the right and the left eye) for both

  4. A medieval fallacy: the crystalline lens in the center of the eye

    PubMed Central

    Leffler, Christopher T; Hadi, Tamer M; Udupa, Akrithi; Schwartz, Stephen G; Schwartz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether, as most modern historians have written, ancient Greco-Roman authors believed the crystalline lens is positioned in the center of the eye. Background Historians have written that statements about cataract couching by Celsus, or perhaps Galen of Pergamon, suggested a centrally located lens. Celsus specifically wrote that a couching needle placed intermediate between the corneal limbus and the lateral canthus enters an empty space, presumed to represent the posterior chamber. Methods Ancient ophthalmic literature was analyzed to understand where these authors believed the crystalline lens was positioned. In order to estimate where Celsus proposed entering the eye during couching, we prospectively measured the distance from the temporal corneal limbus to the lateral canthus in 30 healthy adults. Results Rufus of Ephesus and Galen wrote that the lens is anterior enough to contact the iris. Galen wrote that the lens equator joins other ocular structures at the corneoscleral junction. In 30 subjects, half the distance from the temporal corneal limbus to the lateral canthus was a mean of 4.5 mm (range: 3.3–5.3 mm). Descriptions of couching by Celsus and others are consistent with pars plana entry of the couching needle. Anterior angulation of the needle would permit contact of the needle with the lens. Conclusion Ancient descriptions of anatomy and couching do not establish the microanatomic relationships of the ciliary region with any modern degree of accuracy. Nonetheless, ancient authors, such as Galen and Rufus, clearly understood that the lens is located anteriorly. There is little reason to believe that Celsus or other ancient authors held a variant understanding of the anatomy of a healthy eye. The notion of the central location of the lens seems to have arisen with Arabic authors in 9th century Mesopotamia, and lasted for over 7 centuries. PMID:27114699

  5. The ability of lens alpha crystallin to protect against heat-induced aggregation is age-dependent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J.; Emmons, T.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Alpha crystallin was prepared from newborn and aged bovine lenses. SDS-PAGE and tryptic peptide mapping demonstrated that both preparations contained only the alpha-A and alpha-B chains, with no significant contamination of other crystallins. Compared with alpha crystallin from the aged lens, alpha crystallin from the newborn lens was much more effective in the inhibition of beta L crystallin denaturation and precipitation induced in vitro by heat. Together, these results demonstrate that during the aging process, the alpha crystallins lose their ability to protect against protein denaturation, consistent with the hypothesis that the alpha crystallins play an important role in the maintenance of protein native structure in the intact lens.

  6. Impact of Subunit Composition on the Uptake of α-Crystallin by Lens and Retina.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Niklaus H; Fogueri, Uma; Pedler, Michelle G; Montana, Kameron; Petrash, J Mark; Ammar, David A

    2015-01-01

    Misfolded protein aggregation, including cataract, cause a significant amount of blindness worldwide. α-Crystallin is reported to bind misfolded proteins and prevent their aggregation. We hypothesize that supplementing retina and lens with α-crystallin may help to delay disease onset. The purpose of this study was to determine if αB-crystallin subunits containing a cell penetration peptide (gC-tagged αB-crystallin) facilitate the uptake of wild type αA-crystallin (WT-αA) in lens and retina. Recombinant human αB-crystallin was modified by the addition of a novel cell penetration peptide derived from the gC gene product of herpes simplex virus (gC-αB). Recombinant gC-αB and wild-type αA-crystallin (WT-αA) were purified from E. coli over-expression cultures. After Alexa-labeling of WT-αA, these proteins were mixed at ratios of 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10, respectively, and incubated at 37°C for 4 hours to allow for subunit exchange. Mixed oligomers were subsequently incubated with tissue culture cells or mouse organ cultures. Similarly, crystallin mixtures were injected into the vitreous of rat eyes. At various times after exposure, tissues were harvested and analyzed for protein uptake by confocal microscopy or flow cytometry. Chaperone-like activity assays were performed on α-crystallins ratios showing optimal uptake using chemically-induced or heat induced substrate aggregation assays. As determined by flow cytometry, a ratio of 1:5 for gC-αB to WT-αA was found to be optimal for uptake into retinal pigmented epithelial cells (ARPE-19). Chaperone-like activity assays demonstrated that hetero-oligomeric complex of gC-αB to WT-αA (in 1:5 ratio) retained protein aggregation protection. We observed a significant increase in protein uptake when optimized (gC-αB to WT-αA (1:5 ratio)) hetero-oligomers were used in mouse lens and retinal organ cultures. Increased levels of α-crystallin were found in lens and retina following intravitreal injection of homo- and

  7. Oxidation of the N-terminal methionine of lens alpha-A crystallin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takemoto, L.; Horwitz, J.; Emmons, T.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Antiserum against the N-terminal peptide of bovine alpha-A crystallin has been used to monitor purification of two different seropositive peptides (i.e. T1a and T1b) from a tryptic digest of bovine lens proteins. Both these peptides have similar amino acid compositions, but peptide T1b has a molecular weight 16 atomic mass units larger than T1a, suggesting posttranslational modification. Analysis of ionization fragments of the T1b peptide by mass spectrometry demonstrates that this difference in molecular weight is due to the in vivo oxidation of the N-terminal met residue of the alpha-A crystallin molecule.

  8. Zeta-crystallin, a novel protein from the guinea pig lens is related to alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Rodokanaki, A; Holmes, R K; Borrás, T

    1989-05-30

    zeta-Crystallin is a major component of the water-soluble proteins of the guinea pig lens. We have constructed a lens cDNA library from one- to seven-day-old guinea pigs in the plasmid Bluescript KS+ and used the 16 amino acid (aa) sequence of a CNBr peptide to design an oligodeoxyribonucleotide probe. Analysis of two positive clones and direct sequence of the 5' end of the RNA resulted in the completion of a most probably full-length mRNA comprising 1842 nucleotides (nt). The ATG start codon occurs 83 nt downstream from the 5' end. The open reading frame, ending with a stop codon at nt position 1070, predicts a protein of 328 aa with a calculated Mr of 35,071. Comparison of the amino acid sequence with the National Biomedical Research Foundation protein data base reveals a significant similarity of zeta-crystallin with the enzyme of the alcohol dehydrogenase family.

  9. Assessing the changes in the biomechanical properties of the crystalline lens induced by cold cataract with air-pulse OCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Singh, M.; Liu, C.-H.; Han, Z.; Li, J.; Raghunathan, R.; Larin, K. V.

    2015-11-01

    A cataract is the increase in opacity of the crystalline lens that can pathologically degrade visual acuity. In this study, we utilized a phase-sensitive optical coherence elastography (OCE) system to study the effects of a cold cataract on the biomechanical properties of the porcine crystalline lens in vitro. The cold cataract was induced by placing the whole lens in a low temperature environment until the lens was obviously clouded. Air-pulse OCE measurements were conducted on 6 lenses before and after cold cataract induction. A low amplitude displacement (≤ 10 µm) was induced by a focused air-pulse and the temporal deformation profiles from the surface and within the lenses were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the stiffness of the porcine lens increased after induction of the cold cataract, and it demonstrated the feasibility of OCE to assess the biomechanical changes in the lens due to cataract.

  10. Regulatory effect of Bcl-2 in ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis of the mouse crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    DONG, YUCHEN; ZHENG, YAJUAN; XIAO, JUN; ZHU, CHAO; ZHAO, MEISHENG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the role of Bcl-2 during the process of apoptosis in the mouse crystalline lens. In total, 12 normal mice served as the control group and 12 Bcl-2 knockout (K.O) mice served as the experimental group. The mouse crystalline lens was sampled for the detection of Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expression following exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to determine Bcl-2 expression in the groups of normal mice receiving UV radiation or not receiving UV radiation. Samples of the murine crystalline lens were microscopically harvested and analyzed using western blotting. Apoptosis was detected using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Furthermore, caspase 3 activity was examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits, and RT-qPCR was used to analyze caspase-3 expression levels. The results of the present study demonstrated that there was no statistically significant difference in the level of Bcl-2 gene transcription between the two groups. In addition, UV radiation did not change the macrostructure of the crystalline lens in the group of normal mice or the group of Bcl-2 K.O mice. The results of the TUNEL assay indicated that the normal-UV group exhibited a more significant apoptosis level compared with the Bcl-2 K.O-UV group. Furthermore, the mRNA expression level of caspase-3 in the normal-UV group was significantly higher compared with the normal-nonUV group (P<0.05), while the levels in the Bcl-2 K.O-UV group were significantly higher compared with the Bcl-2 K.O and normal-nonUV groups (P<0.05). In addition, the mRNA expression level of caspase-3 was significantly higher in the normal-UV, as compared with the Bcl-2 K.O-UV group (P<0.05), and the variation trends in caspase-3 activity were consistent. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that Bcl-2 may have an important role in the

  11. Role of αA-crystallin-derived αA66-80 peptide in guinea pig lens crystallin aggregation and insolubilization.

    PubMed

    Raju, Murugesan; Mooney, Brian P; Thakkar, Kavi M; Giblin, Frank J; Schey, Kevin L; Sharma, K Krishna

    2015-03-01

    Earlier we reported that low molecular weight (LMW) peptides accumulate in aging human lens tissue and that among the LMW peptides, the chaperone inhibitor peptide αA66-80, derived from α-crystallin protein, is one of the predominant peptides. We showed that in vitro αA66-80 induces protein aggregation. The current study was undertaken to determine whether LMW peptides are also present in guinea pig lens tissue subjected to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) in vivo. The nuclear opacity induced by HBO in guinea pig lens is the closest animal model for studying age-related cataract formation in humans. A LMW peptide profile by mass spectrometry showed the presence of an increased amount of LMW peptides in HBO-treated guinea pig lenses compared to age-matched controls. Interestingly, the mass spectrometric data also showed that the chaperone inhibitor peptide αA66-80 accumulates in HBO-treated guinea pig lens. Following incubation of synthetic chaperone inhibitor peptide αA66-80 with α-crystallin from guinea pig lens extracts, we observed a decreased ability of α-crystallin to inhibit the amorphous aggregation of the target protein alcohol dehydrogenase and the formation of large light scattering aggregates, similar to those we have observed with human α-crystallin and αA66-80 peptide. Further, time-lapse recordings showed that a preformed complex of α-crystallin and αA66-80 attracted additional crystallin molecules to form even larger aggregates. These results demonstrate that LMW peptide-mediated cataract development in aged human lens and in HBO-induced lens opacity in the guinea pig may have common molecular pathways.

  12. Analysis of changes in crystalline lens thickness and its refractive power after laser in situ keratomileusis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Guo, Hai-Ke; Zeng, Jing; Jin, Hai-Ying

    2012-01-01

    AIM To evaluate changes in the anterior chamber depth (ACD), crystalline lens thickness (LT) and its refractive power after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). METHODS In all cases, the preoperative and postoperative central ACD which were measured with Pentacam, Orbscan, IOL-Master and A-scan ultrasonography, central corneal true net power which was measured with the Pentacam, Orbscan and IOL-Master, axial length (AL) which was measured with IOL-Master and LT which was measured with the A-scan ultrasonography were compared using the paired sample t test. Ocular refractive errors and lens refractive power at corneal plane were calculated and their correlations were also evaluated before and after LASIK. RESULTS At 1 week after LASIK, LT and crystalline lens refractive power at corneal plane (Dlens) which were associated with the IOL-Master and Pentacam increased significantly (P≤0.005), ACD decreased significantly (P≤0.001), but no significant increase was observed in the Dlens which was associated with the Orbscan (P=0.261). Significant correlations between the changes in the ocular refractive errors and Dlens which were associated with the Pentacam were observed at 1 week and 6 months after LASIK (P=0.028; P=0.001). CONCLUSION LT increased significantly after LASIK, and this might partially lead to ACD decrease, Dlens increase and a small quantity of myopic regression. PMID:22553764

  13. The effects of actomyosin disruptors on the mechanical integrity of the avian crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    Won, Gah-Jone; Fudge, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Actin and myosin within the crystalline lens maintain the structural integrity of lens fiber cells and form a hexagonal lattice cradling the posterior surface of the lens. The actomyosin network was pharmacologically disrupted to examine the effects on lenticular biomechanics and optical quality. Methods: One lens of 7-day-old White Leghorn chickens was treated with 10 µM of a disruptor and the other with 0.01% dimethyl sulfoxide (vehicle). Actin, myosin, and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) disruptors were used. The stiffness and the optical quality of the control and treated lenses were measured. Western blotting and confocal imaging were used to confirm that treatment led to a disruption of the actomyosin network. The times for the lenses to recover stiffness to match the control values were also measured. Results: Disruptor-treated lenses were significantly less stiff than their controls (p≤0.0274 for all disruptors). The disruptors led to changes in the relative protein amounts as well as the distributions of proteins within the lattice. However, the disruptors did not affect the clarity of the lenses (p≥0.4696 for all disruptors), nor did they affect spherical aberration (p = 0.02245). The effects of all three disruptors were reversible, with lenses recovering from treatment with actin, myosin, and MLCK disruptors after 4 h, 1 h, and 8 min, respectively. Conclusions: Cytoskeletal protein disruptors led to a decreased stiffness of the lens, and the effects were reversible. Optical quality was mostly unaffected, but the long-term consequences remain unclear. Our results raise the possibility that the mechanical properties of the avian lens may be actively regulated in vivo via adjustments to the actomyosin lattice. PMID:25684975

  14. Refractive Index Measurement of the Isolated Crystalline Lens Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Uhlhorn, Stephen R.; Borja, David; Manns, Fabrice; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2008-01-01

    An optical coherence tomography system has been developed that was designed specifically for imaging the isolated crystalline lens. Cross-sectional OCT images were recorded on 40 lenses from 32 human donors with an age range of 6 – 82 years. A method has been developed to measure the axial thickness and average refractive index of the lens from a single recorded image. The measured average group refractive index at the measurement wavelength of 825 nm was converted to the average phase refractive index at 589 nm using lens dispersion data from the literature. The average refractive index for all lenses measured was 1.408 ± 0.005 which agrees well with recent MRI measurements of the lens index gradient. A linear regression of the data resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the average refractive index with age, but a simple linear model was insufficient to explain the age dependence. The results presented here suggest that the peak refractive index in the nucleus is closer to 1.420, rather than the previously accepted value of 1.406. PMID:18824191

  15. Chromatin features, RNA polymerase II and the comparative expression of lens genes encoding crystallins, transcription factors, and autophagy mediators

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian; Rockowitz, Shira; Chauss, Daniel; Wang, Ping; Kantorow, Marc; Zheng, Deyou

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Gene expression correlates with local chromatin structure. Our studies have mapped histone post-translational modifications, RNA polymerase II (pol II), and transcription factor Pax6 in lens chromatin. These data represent the first genome-wide insights into the relationship between lens chromatin structure and lens transcriptomes and serve as an excellent source for additional data analysis and refinement. The principal lens proteins, the crystallins, are encoded by predominantly expressed mRNAs; however, the regulatory mechanisms underlying their high expression in the lens remain poorly understood. Methods The formaldehyde-assisted identification of regulatory regions (FAIRE-Seq) was employed to analyze newborn lens chromatin. ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data published earlier (GSE66961) have been used to assist in FAIRE-seq data interpretation. RNA transcriptomes from murine lens epithelium, lens fibers, erythrocytes, forebrain, liver, neurons, and pancreas were compared to establish the gene expression levels of the most abundant mRNAs versus median gene expression across other differentiated cells. Results Normalized RNA expression data from multiple tissues show that crystallins rank among the most highly expressed genes in mammalian cells. These findings correlate with the extremely high abundance of pol II all across the crystallin loci, including crystallin genes clustered on chromosomes 1 and 5, as well as within regions of “open” chromatin, as identified by FAIRE-seq. The expression levels of mRNAs encoding DNA-binding transcription factors (e.g., Foxe3, Hsf4, Maf, Pax6, Prox1, Sox1, and Tfap2a) revealed that their transcripts form “clusters” of abundant mRNAs in either lens fibers or lens epithelium. The expression of three autophagy regulatory mRNAs, encoding Tfeb, FoxO1, and Hif1α, was found within a group of lens preferentially expressed transcription factors compared to the E12.5 forebrain. Conclusions This study reveals novel features of

  16. Validation of OCT-based Crystalline Lens Thickness Measurements in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Bret M.; Berntsen, David A.; Bailey, Melissa D.; Zadnik, Karla

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the validity and repeatability of crystalline lens thickness measurements obtained by anterior segment optical coherence tomography. Methods Forty-seven normal children (mean age, 11.06 ± 2.30 years) had their crystalline lens thickness measured with the Visante anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) and with conventional corneal touch A-scan ultransonography (ultrasound) (Humphrey 820). The subjects’ right corneas were anesthetized, and their right eyes were cyclopleged. Five ultrasound measurements were recorded per eye, and three Visante OCT measurements were recorded per eye. Thirty-eight subjects had measurements at a second visit where three additional Visante OCT measurements were recorded. Results The mean of the differences between the Visante OCT and ultrasound was −0.045 mm (p = 0.017) with 95% limits of agreement from −0.29 to 0.20 mm indicating that the measurement of crystalline lens thickness was slightly thinner with the Visante OCT. When validity was assessed using only Visante OCT images that contained the corneal reflex, the mean of the differences was 0.019 mm (p = 0.11) with 95% limits of agreement from −0.091 to 0.13 mm. For the repeatability of the Visante OCT, the mean of the differences between visit one and visit two was −0.008 mm (p = 0.25) with 95% limits of agreement from −0.088 to 0.072 mm. Repeatability improved when reassessed using only images that contain the corneal reflex; the mean of the differences was −0.0001 mm (p = 0.97) with 95% limits of agreement from −0.030 to 0.030 mm. Conclusion The Visante OCT is a non-contact instrument that is simple to use, and it provides valid crystalline lens thickness measurements with excellent repeatability. Validity and repeatability are optimized when the Visante OCT images contain the corneal reflex and a consistent corneal index refraction is applied to the entire image. PMID:19182701

  17. Lens gene expression analysis reveals downregulation of the anti-apoptotic chaperone alphaA-crystallin during cavefish eye degeneration.

    PubMed

    Strickler, Allen G; Byerly, Mardi S; Jeffery, William R

    2007-12-01

    We have conducted a survey of the expression patterns of five genes encoding three different classes of major lens proteins during eye degeneration in the blind cavefish Astyanax mexicanus. This species consists of two forms, an eyed surface-dwelling form (surface fish) and a blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) form. Cavefish form an optic primordium with a lens vesicle and optic cup. In contrast to surface fish, however, the cavefish lens does not differentiate fiber cells and undergoes massive apoptosis. The genes encoding the lens intrinsic membrane proteins MIP and MP19 and the divergent betaB1- and gammaM2-crystallins are expressed during cavefish lens development, although their levels are reduced because of a smaller lens, and the spatial distribution of their transcripts is modified because of the lack of differentiated fiber cells. In contrast, the alphaA-crystallin gene, which encodes a heat shock protein-related chaperone with antiapoptotic activity, is substantially downregulated in the developing cavefish lens. The results suggest that suppression of alphaA-crystallin antiapoptotic activity may be involved in cavefish eye degeneration.

  18. An unusually long non-coding region in rat lens alpha-crystallin messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Moormann, R J; van der Velden, H M; Dodemont, H J; Andreoli, P M; Bloemendal, H; Schoenmakers, J G

    1981-01-01

    Most of the mRNA sequence coding for the alpha A2 chain of the ocular lens protein alpha-crystallin from rat, has been determined by sequencing cloned DNA copies of this mRNA. The 892-base pair cDNA sequence encompasses all but 52 N-terminal amino acids of the alpha A2 chain. It lacks the sequence characteristic for the 22 extra amino acids inserted in the alpha A2 -like chain, named alpha AIns. A stretch of 583 nuceotides, representing more than 50% of the entire mRNA sequence, is located 3' wards of the alpha A2 coding sequence. It contains the characteristic AAUAAA signal involved in poly(A) -addition and represents an unexpectedly long non-coding region. Examination of the total cytoplasmic poly(A) RNA of rat lens by filter-hybridization and subsequent translation of the electrophoretically separated mRNA fractions shows that the alpha A2 chain is encoded by mRNA species which are distinct from the alpha AIns encoding mRNA. No evidence is obtained for an extensive size heterogeneity in the 3' untranslated regions of these two different rat lens mRNAs. Images PMID:6171772

  19. Effect of Asp 96 isomerization on the properties of a lens αB-crystallin-derived short peptide.

    PubMed

    Takata, Takumi; Fujii, Noriko

    2015-12-10

    One of the major reasons for age-related cataract formation is an accumulation of insoluble lens proteins. In particular, higher-order α-crystallin aggregates, comprising αA and αB subunits, are insolubilized by the build up of various post-translational modifications over time. Although we previously found an exceptional amount of Asp96 isomerization in αB-crystallin from aged human lens, the biological effect remains unknown. To approximate the effect of Asp 96 isomerization in αB-crystallin, here residues 93-103 of αB-crystallin were chemically synthesized as peptides in which l-α-Asp was replaced with l-β-Asp, D-α-Asp, or D-β-Asp. The resulting peptides were then compared in a biological assay. The results showed that isomerization of Asp 96 altered both the local structure of peptide and its stability against enzymatic digestion. In addition, the synthesized peptides decreased the insoluble fraction of heated α-crystallin. The D-β-Asp-containing peptide further decreased heat-induced precipitation of α-crystallin, and a chaperone assay based on heated alcohol dehydrogenase implied differential interaction of the peptides with substrate depending on the Asp isomer present in each. Our results suggest that the formation of Asp isomers is likely to affect the higher-order oligomer structure of α-crystallin and thereby its chaperone functions in aged lens.

  20. Spectroscopic studies on the riboflavin-sensitized conformational changes of calf lens alpha-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Andley, U P

    1988-04-01

    The change in conformation of calf lens alpha-crystallin by oxidation in the presence of the photosensitizer riboflavin and light has been investigated. Near-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectrum, absorption spectrum, tryptophan fluorescence yield and fluorescence lifetime of the SH-specific fluorescent probe, N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphtyl) ethylenediamine (1,5-IAEDANS), were significantly altered by irradiation in the presence of RF. In the initial stages of photolysis (1-2 hr), a slight degradation of the protein to lower molecular weight peptides was observed. Upon increased photolysis, intersubunit cross-linking to dimers and other high molecular weight species was observed. To determine the effects of cross-linking on the accessibility of the cysteine residues of the protein, lifetime quenching studies on the IAEDANS-labeled alpha-crystallin were performed. A decrease in the quenching constant (kappa q) in the photolysed sample indicates that the labeled SH groups are less susceptible to collisional quenching, which requires contact between the quencher and the excited state of the fluorophore, due to steric inhibition in the cross-linked protein. Cross-linking and the rate of loss of tryptophan fluorescence of alpha-crystallin diminished under anaerobic conditions and increased when D2O was used in the medium for irradiation. Use of inhibitors and quenchers of active species of oxygen suggests that photo-oxidation probably occurs via the action of singlet oxygen as well as substrate-sensitizer complexation.

  1. Stretch-dependent changes in surface profiles of the human crystalline lens during accommodation: A finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Pour, Hooman Mohammad; Kanapathipillai, Sangarapillai; Zarrabi, Khosrow; Manns, Fabrice; Ho, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Background A nonlinear isotropic finite element (FE) model of a 29 year old human crystalline lens was constructed to study the effects of various geometrical parameters on lens accommodation. Methods The model simulates dis-accommodation by stretching of the lens and predicts the change in the lens capsule, cortex and nucleus surface profiles at select states of stretching/accommodation. Multiple regression analysis (MRA) is used to develop a stretch-dependent mathematical model relating the lens sagittal height to the radial position of the lens surface as a function of dis-accommodative stretch. A load analysis is performed to compare the FE results to empirical results from lens stretcher studies. Using the predicted geometrical changes, the optical response of the whole eye during accommodation was analysed by ray-tracing. Results Aspects of lens shape change relative to stretch were evaluated including change in diameter (d), central thickness (T) and accommodation (A). Maximum accommodation achieved was 10.29 D. From the MRA, the stretch-dependent mathematical model of the lens shape related lens curvatures as a function of lens ciliary stretch well (maximum mean-square residual error 2.5×10−3 µm, p<0.001). The results are compared with those from in vitro studies. Conclusions The FE and ray-tracing predictions are consistent with EVAS studies in terms of load and power change versus change in thickness. The mathematical stretch-dependent model of accommodation presented may have utility in investigating lens behaviour at states other than the relaxed or fully-accommodated states. PMID:25727940

  2. The structural alteration and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins in the presence of calcium: Importance of lens calcium homeostasis in development of diabetic cataracts.

    PubMed

    Zm, Sara Zafaranchi; Khoshaman, Kazem; Masoudi, Raheleh; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Yousefi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    The imbalance of the calcium homeostasis in the lenticular tissues of diabetic patients is an important risk factor for development of cataract diseases. In the current study, the impact of elevated levels of calcium ions were investigated on structure and aggregation propensity of glycated lens crystallins using gel electrophoresis and spectroscopic assessments. The glycated proteins indicated significant resistance against calcium-induced structural insults and aggregation. While, glycated crystallins revealed an increased conformational stability; a slight instability was observed for these proteins upon interaction with calcium ions. Also, in the presence of calcium, the proteolytic pattern of native crystallins was altered and that of glycated protein counterparts remained almost unchanged. According to results of this study it is suggested that the structural alteration of lens crystallins upon glycation may significantly reduce their calcium buffering capacity in eye lenses. Therefore, under chronic hyperglycemia accumulation of this cataractogenic metal ion in the lenticular tissues may subsequently culminate in activation of different pathogenic pathways, leading to development of lens opacity and cataract diseases. PMID:27434877

  3. Combination of confocal principle and aperture stop separation improves suppression of crystalline lens fluorescence in an eye model

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, Matthias; Blum, Johannes; Link, Dietmar; Hammer, Martin; Haueisen, Jens; Schweitzer, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) is a new technique to detect changes in the human retina. The autofluorescence decay over time, generated by endogenous fluorophores, is measured in vivo. The strong autofluorescence of the crystalline lens, however, superimposes the intensity decay of the retina fluorescence, as the confocal principle is not able to suppress it sufficiently. Thus, the crystalline lens autofluorescence causes artifacts in the retinal fluorescence lifetimes determined from the intensity decays. Here, we present a new technique to suppress the autofluorescence of the crystalline lens by introducing an annular stop into the detection light path, which we call Schweitzer’s principle. The efficacy of annular stops with an outer diameter of 7 mm and inner diameters of 1 to 5 mm are analyzed in an experimental setup using a model eye based on fluorescent dyes. Compared to the confocal principle, Schweitzer’s principle with an inner diameter of 3 mm is able to reduce the simulated crystalline lens fluorescence to 4%, while 42% of the simulated retina fluorescence is preserved. Thus, we recommend the implementation of Schweitzer’s principle in scanning laser ophthalmoscopes used for fundus autofluorescence measurements, especially the FLIO device, for improved image quality.

  4. Combination of confocal principle and aperture stop separation improves suppression of crystalline lens fluorescence in an eye model

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, Matthias; Blum, Johannes; Link, Dietmar; Hammer, Martin; Haueisen, Jens; Schweitzer, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) is a new technique to detect changes in the human retina. The autofluorescence decay over time, generated by endogenous fluorophores, is measured in vivo. The strong autofluorescence of the crystalline lens, however, superimposes the intensity decay of the retina fluorescence, as the confocal principle is not able to suppress it sufficiently. Thus, the crystalline lens autofluorescence causes artifacts in the retinal fluorescence lifetimes determined from the intensity decays. Here, we present a new technique to suppress the autofluorescence of the crystalline lens by introducing an annular stop into the detection light path, which we call Schweitzer’s principle. The efficacy of annular stops with an outer diameter of 7 mm and inner diameters of 1 to 5 mm are analyzed in an experimental setup using a model eye based on fluorescent dyes. Compared to the confocal principle, Schweitzer’s principle with an inner diameter of 3 mm is able to reduce the simulated crystalline lens fluorescence to 4%, while 42% of the simulated retina fluorescence is preserved. Thus, we recommend the implementation of Schweitzer’s principle in scanning laser ophthalmoscopes used for fundus autofluorescence measurements, especially the FLIO device, for improved image quality. PMID:27699092

  5. [Influence of mutant genes on crystallin synthesis in the forming mouse lens. II. Fidget and ocular retardation genes].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, M I; Platonov, E S; Koniukhov, B V

    1977-01-01

    The beginning of synthesis and the localization of alpha- and gamma-crystallins in the developing lenses of the 10-13 and 15 days old mouse embryos of the genotypes fi/fi +/+, +/+ or/or, fi/fi or/or and +/+ +/+ were studied by means of indirect immunofluorescence. The synthesis of crystallins in the mutant embryos with the exception of the embryo +/+ or/or was shown to begin somewhat later than in the normal ones but to proceed in all defective lenses, irrespective of the degree of defect. Hence, the activation of the genes controlling the synthesis of alpha-crystallins begins at the early stages of lens development and the synthesis of these proteins proceeds even during the abnormal with the slowing down of the formation of primary lens fibers. In the cases of strong defects of morphogenesis in the fi/fi +/+ and, especially, fi/fi or/or, embryos gamma-crystallins were not detected. The synthesis of gamma-crystallins appears to begin at the final stages of lens fiber differentiation.

  6. The bicistronic nature of lens alpha-crystallin 14S mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J H; Spector, A

    1977-01-01

    The A2 and B2 polypeptide chains of calf lens alpha-crystallin are synthesized on a 14S, 1500-nucleotide mRNA and a 10S, 735-nucleotide mRNA, respectively. The 10S mRNA is theoretically compatible with the size of the B2 chain, but the 14S mRNA contains approximately twice the required number of nucleotides necessary for A2 chain synthesis. This fact raises the question of the function of the additional nucleotide sequence in the 14S mRNA. The following observations on 14S mRNA suggest that it may contain an additional cistron. (i) Under a number of denaturing conditions, 14S mRNA continues to retain its initial size characteristics. (ii) In addition to synthesis of the A2 chain, 14S mRNA directs the synthesis of another polypeptide with the same electrophoretic mobility as that of the B2 chain. (iii) Molecular hybridization of the 14S mRNA with the cDNA produced from the 10S mRNA suggests that 2 mol of the cDNA bind to 1 mol of the 14S mRNA. (iv) Examination of the nucleotide sequences of the 10S and 14S mRNAs by two-dimensional maps of RNase A and T1 digests indicates marked similarity. The overall data suggest that the additional cistronic component may carry coding information for an alpha-crystallin polypeptide or a closely related polypeptide species. Images PMID:271967

  7. Human lens coloration and aging. Evidence for crystallin modification by the major ultraviolet filter, 3-hydroxy-kynurenine O-beta-D-glucoside.

    PubMed

    Hood, B D; Garner, B; Truscott, R J

    1999-11-12

    The human lens becomes increasingly yellow with age and thereby reduces our perception of blue light. This coloration is associated with lens proteins (crystallins), but its molecular basis was unknown. Here we show that the coloration occurs because of the interaction of crystallins with a UV filter compound, 3-hydroxykynurenine glucoside (3-OHKG). Crystallin modification results from deamination of the 3-OHKG amino acid side chain, yielding an unsaturated ketone that is susceptible to nucleophilic attack by cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues. This novel protein modification contributes to age-related lens coloration and may play a role in human nuclear cataractogenesis. PMID:10551806

  8. Identification of the in vivo truncation sites at the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin from aged bovine and human lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takemoto, L. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Total alpha-A crystallin was purified from young versus old lens, followed by digestion with cyanogen bromide. Laser desorption mass spectrometry of the C-terminal fragment demonstrated age-dependent loss of one and five amino acids from the C-terminus of alpha-A crystallin from both bovine and human lens. These results demonstrate specific peptide bonds of alpha-A crystallin are cleaved during the aging process of the normal lens. The C-terminal region is cleaved in two places between the two hydroxyl-containing amino acids present in the sequence -P-S(T)-S-.

  9. Multiple molecular architectures of the eye lens chaperone αB-crystallin elucidated by a triple hybrid approach.

    PubMed

    Braun, Nathalie; Zacharias, Martin; Peschek, Jirka; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Zou, Juan; Hanzlik, Marianne; Haslbeck, Martin; Rappsilber, Juri; Buchner, Johannes; Weinkauf, Sevil

    2011-12-20

    The molecular chaperone αB-crystallin, the major player in maintaining the transparency of the eye lens, prevents stress-damaged and aging lens proteins from aggregation. In nonlenticular cells, it is involved in various neurological diseases, diabetes, and cancer. Given its structural plasticity and dynamics, structure analysis of αB-crystallin presented hitherto a formidable challenge. Here we present a pseudoatomic model of a 24-meric αB-crystallin assembly obtained by a triple hybrid approach combining data from cryoelectron microscopy, NMR spectroscopy, and structural modeling. The model, confirmed by cross-linking and mass spectrometry, shows that the subunits interact within the oligomer in different, defined conformations. We further present the molecular architectures of additional well-defined αB-crystallin assemblies with larger or smaller numbers of subunits, provide the mechanism how "heterogeneity" is achieved by a small set of defined structural variations, and analyze the factors modulating the oligomer equilibrium of αB-crystallin and thus its chaperone activity.

  10. Eye lens proteomics: from global approach to detailed information about phakinin and gamma E and F crystallin genes.

    PubMed

    Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Kumar, Nalin M; Wacker, Maik; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Klose, Joachim; Jungblut, Peter R

    2005-01-01

    Exploration of the lenticular proteome poses a challenging and worthwhile undertaking as cataracts, the products of a disease phenotype elicited by this proteome, remains the leading cause of vision impairment worldwide. The complete ten day old lens proteome of Mus musculus C57BL/6J was resolved into 900 distinct spots by large gel carrier ampholyte based 2-DE. The predicted amino acid sequences of all 16 crystallins ubiquitous in mammals were corroborated by mass spectrometry (MS). In detailed individual spot analyses, the primary structure of the full murine C57BL/6J beaded filament component phakinin CP49 was sequenced by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem MS and amended at two positions. This definitive polypeptide sequence was aligned to the mouse genome, thus identifying the entire C57BL/6J genomic coding region. Also, two murine C57/6J polypeptides, both previously classified as gamma F crystallin, were clearly distinguished by MS and electrophoretic mobility. Both were assigned to their respective genes, one of the polypeptides was reclassified as C57BL/6J gamma E crystallin. Building on these data and previous investigations an updated crystallin reference map was put forth and several non crystallin lenticular components were examined. These results represent the first part of a comprehensive investigation of the mouse lens proteome (http://www.mpiib-berlin.mpg.de/2D-PAGE) with emphasis on understanding genetic effects on proteins and disease development.

  11. EGCG prevents tryptophan oxidation of cataractous ocular lens human γ-crystallin in presence of H2O2.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Susmitnarayan; Ghosh, Ishita; Saha, Gautam; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of the short range order of proteins present in the ocular lens leads to cataract resulting in a loss of transparency. Human γ-crystallin (HGC), a water soluble protein present in the lens is known to aggregate with aging. A modified form of HGC (HGC(c)) was isolated from cataractous human ocular lens extract and the number of Trp residues that undergo oxidation was determined. The extent of oxidized Trp (N-formyl kynurenine) in HGC due to cataract formation was determined, primarily using fluorescence spectroscopy. The ability of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) to retain its antioxidant effect even in the presence of H2O2 was investigated. This was monitored by its ability to prevent the modification of intact Trp residues in HGC(c) isolated from cataractous human eye lens. Significant Trp fluorescence quenching occurs on interaction of the green tea component, EGCG with HGC(c) accompanied by a red shift. Docking studies were employed to substantiate the experimental results. As eye lens proteins are prone to oxidative stress it is essential that a clear understanding of the effects of the components generated in vivo vis-à-vis the antioxidant effects of natural polyphenols be obtained. PMID:25841365

  12. Results of intraocular lens implantation with capsular tension ring in subluxated crystalline or cataractous lenses in children

    PubMed Central

    Das, Pranab; Ram, Jagat; Brar, Gagandeep Singh; Dogra, Mangat R

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of intraocular lens (IOL) implantation using capsular tension ring (CTR) in subluxated crystalline or cataractous lenses in children. Setting: Tertiary care setting Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 18 eyes of 15 children with subluxation of crystalline or cataractous lenses between 90° up to 210° after phacoemulsification, CTR and IOL implantation. Each child was examined for IOL centration, zonular dehiscence and posterior capsular opacification (PCO). Results: Age of the patient ranged between five to 15 years. Out of 18 eyes, seven had traumatic and 11 had spontaneous subluxation of crystalline or cataractous lens. Phacoemulsification was successfully performed with CTR implantation in the capsular bag. Intraoperative zonular dialysis occurred in two eyes. Anterior vitrectomy was performed in six eyes to manage vitreous prolapse. IOL implanted was polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) in eight eyes, hydrophobic acrylic in seven and hydrophilic acrylic in three. Follow-up ranged from 24 months to 72 months. Sixteen eyes had a best corrected visual acuity of 20/40 or better. Nine eyes developed significant PCO and were managed with Neodymium Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser posterior capsulotomy. One eye with acrylic IOL in the capsular bag had IOL dislocation after two years which was managed with vitrectomy and secondary trans-scleral fixation of IOL. Conclusions: Phacoaspiration with CTR implantation makes capsular bag IOL fixation possible in most of the eyes with subluxated crystalline or cataractous lenses. PCO still remains a challenge in children with successful phacoaspiration with CTR implantation PMID:19861744

  13. Ultrashort-Pulse Lasers Treating the Crystalline Lens: Will They Cause Vision-Threatening Cataract? (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Ronald R.; Uy, Harvey; McDonald, Jared; Edwards, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that ultrashort-pulse laser treatment in the crystalline lens does not form a focal, progressive, or vision-threatening cataract. Methods: An Nd:vanadate picosecond laser (10 ps) with prototype delivery system was used. Primates: 11 rhesus monkey eyes were prospectively treated at the University of Wisconsin (energy 25–45 μJ/pulse and 2.0–11.3M pulses per lens). Analysis of lens clarity and fundus imaging was assessed postoperatively for up to 4½ years (5 eyes). Humans: 80 presbyopic patients were prospectively treated in one eye at the Asian Eye Institute in the Philippines (energy 10 μJ/pulse and 0.45–1.45M pulses per lens). Analysis of lens clarity, best-corrected visual acuity, and subjective symptoms was performed at 1 month, prior to elective lens extraction. Results: Bubbles were immediately seen, with resolution within the first 24 to 48 hours. Afterwards, the laser pattern could be seen with faint, noncoalescing, pinpoint micro-opacities in both primate and human eyes. In primates, long-term follow-up at 4½ years showed no focal or progressive cataract, except in 2 eyes with preexisting cataract. In humans, <25% of patients with central sparing (0.75 and 1.0 mm radius) lost 2 or more lines of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity at 1 month, and >70% reported acceptable or better distance vision and no or mild symptoms. Meanwhile, >70% without sparing (0 and 0.5 mm radius) lost 2 or more lines, and most reported poor or severe vision and symptoms. Conclusions: Focal, progressive, and vision-threatening cataracts can be avoided by lowering the laser energy, avoiding prior cataract, and sparing the center of the lens. PMID:23818739

  14. Structure of a Highly Active Cephalopod S-crystallin Mutant: New Molecular Evidence for Evolution from an Active Enzyme into Lens-Refractive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei-Hung; Cheng, Shu-Chun; Liu, Yu-Tung; Wu, Cheng-Guo; Lin, Min-Han; Chen, Chiao-Che; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Chou, Chi-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Crystallins are found widely in animal lenses and have important functions due to their refractive properties. In the coleoid cephalopods, a lens with a graded refractive index provides good vision and is required for survival. Cephalopod S-crystallin is thought to have evolved from glutathione S-transferase (GST) with various homologs differentially expressed in the lens. However, there is no direct structural information that helps to delineate the mechanisms by which S-crystallin could have evolved. Here we report the structural and biochemical characterization of novel S-crystallin-glutathione complex. The 2.35-Å crystal structure of a S-crystallin mutant from Octopus vulgaris reveals an active-site architecture that is different from that of GST. S-crystallin has a preference for glutathione binding, although almost lost its GST enzymatic activity. We’ve also identified four historical mutations that are able to produce a “GST-like” S-crystallin that has regained activity. This protein recapitulates the evolution of S-crystallin from GST. Protein stability studies suggest that S-crystallin is stabilized by glutathione binding to prevent its aggregation; this contrasts with GST-σ, which do not possess this protection. We suggest that a tradeoff between enzyme activity and the stability of the lens protein might have been one of the major driving force behind lens evolution. PMID:27499004

  15. Structure of a Highly Active Cephalopod S-crystallin Mutant: New Molecular Evidence for Evolution from an Active Enzyme into Lens-Refractive Protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei-Hung; Cheng, Shu-Chun; Liu, Yu-Tung; Wu, Cheng-Guo; Lin, Min-Han; Chen, Chiao-Che; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Chou, Chi-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Crystallins are found widely in animal lenses and have important functions due to their refractive properties. In the coleoid cephalopods, a lens with a graded refractive index provides good vision and is required for survival. Cephalopod S-crystallin is thought to have evolved from glutathione S-transferase (GST) with various homologs differentially expressed in the lens. However, there is no direct structural information that helps to delineate the mechanisms by which S-crystallin could have evolved. Here we report the structural and biochemical characterization of novel S-crystallin-glutathione complex. The 2.35-Å crystal structure of a S-crystallin mutant from Octopus vulgaris reveals an active-site architecture that is different from that of GST. S-crystallin has a preference for glutathione binding, although almost lost its GST enzymatic activity. We've also identified four historical mutations that are able to produce a "GST-like" S-crystallin that has regained activity. This protein recapitulates the evolution of S-crystallin from GST. Protein stability studies suggest that S-crystallin is stabilized by glutathione binding to prevent its aggregation; this contrasts with GST-σ, which do not possess this protection. We suggest that a tradeoff between enzyme activity and the stability of the lens protein might have been one of the major driving force behind lens evolution. PMID:27499004

  16. Accommodating volume-constant age-dependent optical (AVOCADO) model of the crystalline GRIN lens

    PubMed Central

    Sheil, Conor J.; Goncharov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to introduce a new age-dependent model of the human lens with two GRIN power distributions (axial and radial) that allow decoupling of its refractive power and axial optical path length. The aspect ratio of the lens core can be held constant under accommodation, as well as the lens volume by varying the asphericity of the lens external surfaces. The spherical aberration calculated by exact raytracing is shown to be in line with experimental data. The proposed model is compared to previous GRIN models from the literature, and it is concluded that the features of the new model will be useful for GRIN reconstruction in future experimental studies; in particular, studies of the accommodation-dependent properties of the ageing human eye. A proposed logarithmic model of the lens core enables decoupling of three fundamental optical characteristics of the lens, namely axial optical path length, optical power and third-order spherical aberration, without changing the external shape of the lens. Conversely, the near-surface GRIN structure conforms to the external shape of the lens, which is necessary for accommodation modelling. PMID:27231637

  17. Accommodating volume-constant age-dependent optical (AVOCADO) model of the crystalline GRIN lens.

    PubMed

    Sheil, Conor J; Goncharov, Alexander V

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to introduce a new age-dependent model of the human lens with two GRIN power distributions (axial and radial) that allow decoupling of its refractive power and axial optical path length. The aspect ratio of the lens core can be held constant under accommodation, as well as the lens volume by varying the asphericity of the lens external surfaces. The spherical aberration calculated by exact raytracing is shown to be in line with experimental data. The proposed model is compared to previous GRIN models from the literature, and it is concluded that the features of the new model will be useful for GRIN reconstruction in future experimental studies; in particular, studies of the accommodation-dependent properties of the ageing human eye. A proposed logarithmic model of the lens core enables decoupling of three fundamental optical characteristics of the lens, namely axial optical path length, optical power and third-order spherical aberration, without changing the external shape of the lens. Conversely, the near-surface GRIN structure conforms to the external shape of the lens, which is necessary for accommodation modelling. PMID:27231637

  18. Refractive Power and Biometric Properties of the Nonhuman Primate Isolated Crystalline Lens

    PubMed Central

    Borja, David; Ho, Arthur; Ziebarth, Noel M.; Acosta, Ana Carolina; Arrieta-Quintera, Esdras; Augusteyn, Robert C.; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize the age dependence of shape, refractive power, and refractive index of isolated lenses from nonhuman primates. Methods. Measurements were performed on ex vivo lenses from cynomolgus monkeys (cyno: n = 120; age, 2.7–14.3 years), rhesus monkeys (n = 61; age, 0.7–13.3 years), and hamadryas baboons (baboon: n = 16; age, 1.7–27.3 years). Lens thickness, diameter, and surface curvatures were measured with an optical comparator. Lens refractive power was measured with a custom optical system based on the Scheiner principle. The refractive contributions of the gradient, the surfaces, and the equivalent refractive index were calculated with optical ray-tracing software. The age dependence of the optical and biometric parameters was assessed. Results. Over the measured age range isolated lens thickness decreased (baboon: −0.04, cyno: −0.05, and rhesus: −0.06 mm/y) and equatorial diameter increased (logarithmically for the baboon and rhesus, and linearly for cyno: 0.07 mm/y). The isolated lens surfaces flattened and the corresponding refractive power from the surfaces decreased with age (−0.33, −0.48, and −0.68 D/y). The isolated lens equivalent refractive index decreased (only significant for the baboon, −0.001 D/y), and as a result the total isolated lens refractive power decreased with age (baboon: −1.26, cyno: −0.97, and rhesus: −1.76 D/y). Conclusions. The age-dependent trends in the optical and biometric properties, growth, and aging, of nonhuman primate lenses are similar to those of the pre-presbyopic human lens. As the lens ages, the decrease in refractive contributions from the gradient refractive index causes a rapid age-dependent decrease in maximally accommodated lens refractive power. PMID:20107174

  19. Analysis of crystalline lens coloration using a black and white charge-coupled device camera.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Y; Sasaki, K; Kojima, M

    1994-01-01

    To analyze lens coloration in vivo, we used a new type of Scheimpflug camera that is a black and white type of charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. A new methodology was proposed. Scheimpflug images of the lens were taken three times through red (R), green (G), and blue (B) filters, respectively. Three images corresponding with the R, G, and B channels were combined into one image on the cathode-ray tube (CRT) display. The spectral transmittance of the tricolor filters and the spectral sensitivity of the CCD camera were used to correct the scattering-light intensity of each image. Coloration of the lens was expressed on a CIE standard chromaticity diagram. The lens coloration of seven eyes analyzed by this method showed values almost the same as those obtained by the previous method using color film.

  20. The Charles F. Prentice award lecture 2009: Crystalline lens research and serendipity in science.

    PubMed

    Sivak, Jacob Gershon

    2010-09-01

    Whether it is called serendipity or creativity, the process of scientific discovery is not one that lends itself to advance planning or programming, nor does it lend itself to an emphasis solely on applied research, research with industrial partners, or large teams of researchers because researchers must rely on intuition and the capacity to move quickly in new directions. Studies in my laboratory began with efforts to relate lens embryonic development to lens optical performance in a variety of vertebrate species. The initial direction concerned the optics of the fish eye, a system in which a spherical lens is essentially the only refractive component of the eye and one in which accommodation takes place by means of lens movement. This in turn led to an interest in how amphibious animals cope with the refractive transition that takes place when moving from air to water and vice versa. The development of a super accommodative ability in some diving birds is one adaptation that was explored. These curiosity-driven efforts led in turn to the development of a scanning laser system that provided a tool that can be used to evaluate the process of cataract development, either on the basis of in vivo exposure to chemicals or electromagnetic radiation and subsequent analysis of the excised lens or to the in vitro study of the lens in long-term whole lens culture experiments. The same approach has also been used as an in vitro ocular toxicology assay to develop sensitive in vitro methods to reduce regulatory dependence on the use of live animals. Finally, these applied directions in turn created new basic knowledge concerning the morphology and physiology of eye tissue organelles, particularly the morphology, distribution, and dynamic properties of the mitochondria found in the lens and in the retinal pigment epithelium. PMID:20581727

  1. Elasticity of the eye's crystalline lens: A Brillouin light scattering study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S.; Gump, J.; Sooryakumar, R.; Jayaprakash, C.; Venkiteshwar, M. S.; Bullimore, M.; Twa, M.

    2009-03-01

    Focusing the eye on a near object results in an increase in its optical power brought about by contraction of the ciliary muscles and an increase in the lens surface curvature. Distant vision occurs when the muscular force flattens the lens. Central to the ability of the lens to alter shape are its mechanical properties. Thus, given that hardening of the lens would impede deformation and reduce its ability to undergo the changes required for accommodation, a noninvasive approach to measure the elastic properties of the lens is valuable. We present results of Brillouin scattering from bovine and human lenses (from the organ donor program at The Ohio State University) that measure their high frequency acoustic response. These measurements are conducted with a few milli-watts of laser power and, in the case of bovine lenses, from entire intact eye globes, allow the stiffness of the lens to be mapped across its cross-section. The results will be compared to values of the shear- and bulk-moduli determined from other techniques and the implications of differences in these moduli discussed.

  2. In Vivo Measurement of Age-Related Stiffening in the Crystalline Lens by Brillouin Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Scarcelli, Giuliano; Kim, Pilhan; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Abtract The biophysical and biomechanical properties of the crystalline lens (e.g., viscoelasticity) have long been implicated in accommodation and vision problems, such as presbyopia and cataracts. However, it has been difficult to measure such parameters noninvasively. Here, we used in vivo Brillouin optical microscopy to characterize material acoustic properties at GHz frequency and measure the longitudinal elastic moduli of lenses. We obtained three-dimensional elasticity maps of the lenses in live mice, which showed biomechanical heterogeneity in the cortex and nucleus of the lens with high spatial resolution. An in vivo longitudinal study of mice over a period of 2 months revealed a marked age-related stiffening of the lens nucleus. We found remarkably good correlation (log-log linear) between the Brillouin elastic modulus and the Young's modulus measured by conventional mechanical techniques at low frequencies (∼1 Hz). Our results suggest that Brillouin microscopy is potentially useful for basic and animal research and clinical ophthalmology. PMID:21943436

  3. Age-dependence of the average and equivalent refractive indices of the crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    Charman, W. Neil; Atchison, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Lens average and equivalent refractive indices are required for purposes such as lens thickness estimation and optical modeling. We modeled the refractive index gradient as a power function of the normalized distance from lens center. Average index along the lens axis was estimated by integration. Equivalent index was estimated by raytracing through a model eye to establish ocular refraction, and then backward raytracing to determine the constant refractive index yielding the same refraction. Assuming center and edge indices remained constant with age, at 1.415 and 1.37 respectively, average axial refractive index increased (1.408 to 1.411) and equivalent index decreased (1.425 to 1.420) with age increase from 20 to 70 years. These values agree well with experimental estimates based on different techniques, although the latter show considerable scatter. The simple model of index gradient gives reasonable estimates of average and equivalent lens indices, although refinements in modeling and measurements are required. PMID:24466474

  4. Age-dependence of the average and equivalent refractive indices of the crystalline lens.

    PubMed

    Charman, W Neil; Atchison, David A

    2013-12-01

    Lens average and equivalent refractive indices are required for purposes such as lens thickness estimation and optical modeling. We modeled the refractive index gradient as a power function of the normalized distance from lens center. Average index along the lens axis was estimated by integration. Equivalent index was estimated by raytracing through a model eye to establish ocular refraction, and then backward raytracing to determine the constant refractive index yielding the same refraction. Assuming center and edge indices remained constant with age, at 1.415 and 1.37 respectively, average axial refractive index increased (1.408 to 1.411) and equivalent index decreased (1.425 to 1.420) with age increase from 20 to 70 years. These values agree well with experimental estimates based on different techniques, although the latter show considerable scatter. The simple model of index gradient gives reasonable estimates of average and equivalent lens indices, although refinements in modeling and measurements are required. PMID:24466474

  5. Distribution of acetylcholine-sensitive currents around the rabbit crystalline lens.

    PubMed

    Candia, Oscar A; Zamudio, Aldo C; Polikoff, Lee A; Alvarez, Lawrence J

    2002-06-01

    The relative distribution of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors on the surface of the isolated ocular lens of the rabbit was determined from induced changes in translens short-circuit current (I(SC)) and the translenticular resistance (R(t)) at seven delineated, parallel zones from the anterior to the posterior pole. For this, one O-ring (from among several having different diameters) was used to separate two zones in a vertically arranged Ussing-type chamber. Different O-rings separated different zone pairs. Earlier experiments from this laboratory used a conventional divided chamber, which occluded the equatorial surface, to demonstrate that anterior applications of ACh transiently decreased the I(SC) due to an intracellular Ca(2+) release and inhibition of anteriorly located K(+) channels. Measurements obtained with the newly designed zonal arrangement determined that the entire epithelial surface from its anterior-most aspect to the equatorial region responds electrically to ACh exposure, while the posterior-most region does not. Furthermore, lens-mounting positions that resulted in separation of the epithelium so that portions of its surface were present in each hemichamber resulted in inverse current changes upon bilateral ACh addition to the bathing solutions. Reductions in outward cationic current across the anterior surface into the anterior bath upon ACh treatment were accompanied by an increase in translens resistance consistent with a closure of basolateral K(+) channels. Overall, these results suggest that the posterior fiber cells may lack ACh receptors, which are clearly present in the lens epithelium that covers about two-thirds of the rabbit lens surface area, and indicate that an ACh-evoked Ca(2+) signal does not spread throughout the epithelial layer. A functional role for lens acetylcholine receptors remains to be determined. PMID:12126950

  6. Chicken beta B1-crystallin gene expression: presence of conserved functional polyomavirus enhancer-like and octamer binding-like promoter elements found in non-lens genes.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, H J; Das, G C; Piatigorsky, J

    1991-01-01

    Expression of the chicken beta B1-crystallin gene was examined. Northern (RNA) blot and primer extension analyses showed that while abundant in the lens, the beta B1 mRNA is absent from the liver, brain, heart, skeletal muscle, and fibroblasts of the chicken embryo, suggesting lens specificity. Promoter fragments ranging from 434 to 126 bp of 5'-flanking sequence (plus 30 bp of exon 1) of the beta B1 gene fused to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene functioned much more efficiently in transfected embryonic chicken lens epithelial cells than in transfected primary muscle fibroblasts or HeLa cells. Transient expression of recombinant plasmids in cultured lens cells, DNase I footprinting, in vitro transcription in a HeLa cell extract, and gel mobility shift assays were used to identify putative functional promoter elements of the beta B1-crystallin gene. Sequence analysis revealed a number of potential regulatory elements between positions -126 and -53 of the beta B1 promoter, including two Sp1 sites, two octamer binding sequence-like sites (OL-1 and OL-2), and two polyomavirus enhancer-like sites (PL-1 and PL-2). Deletion and site-specific mutation experiments established the functional importance of PL-1 (-116 to -102), PL-2 (-90 to -76), and OL-2 (-75 to -68). DNase I footprinting using a lens or a HeLa cell nuclear extract and gel mobility shifts using a lens nuclear extract indicated the presence of putative lens transcription factors binding to these DNA sequences. Competition experiments provided evidence that PL-1 and PL-2 recognize the same or very similar factors, while OL-2 recognizes a different factor. Our data suggest that the same or closely related transcription factors found in many tissues are used for expression of the chicken beta B1-crystallin gene in the lens. Images PMID:1996106

  7. αA-crystallin R49Cneo mutation influences the architecture of lens fiber cell membranes and causes posterior and nuclear cataracts in mice

    PubMed Central

    Andley, Usha P

    2009-01-01

    Background αA-crystallin (CRYAA/HSPB4), a major component of all vertebrate eye lenses, is a small heat shock protein responsible for maintaining lens transparency. The R49C mutation in the αA-crystallin protein is linked with non-syndromic, hereditary human cataracts in a four-generation Caucasian family. Methods This study describes a mouse cataract model generated by insertion of a neomycin-resistant (neor) gene into an intron of the gene encoding mutant R49C αA-crystallin. Mice carrying the neor gene and wild-type Cryaa were also generated as controls. Heterozygous knock-in mice containing one wild type gene and one mutated gene for αA-crystallin (WT/R49Cneo) and homozygous knock-in mice containing two mutated genes (R49Cneo/R49Cneo) were compared. Results By 3 weeks, WT/R49Cneo mice exhibited large vacuoles in the cortical region 100 μm from the lens surface, and by 3 months posterior and nuclear cataracts had developed. WT/R49Cneo mice demonstrated severe posterior cataracts at 9 months of age, with considerable posterior nuclear migration evident in histological sections. R49Cneo/R49Cneo mice demonstrated nearly complete lens opacities by 5 months of age. In contrast, R49C mice in which the neor gene was deleted by breeding with CreEIIa mice developed lens abnormalities at birth, suggesting that the neor gene may suppress expression of mutant R49C αA-crystallin protein. Conclusion It is apparent that modification of membrane and cell-cell interactions occurs in the presence of the αA-crystallin mutation and rapidly leads to lens cell pathology in vivo. PMID:19619312

  8. Adaptation in the optical properties of the crystalline lens in the eyes of the Lessepsian migrant Siganus rivulatus.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Yakir L; Shashar, Nadav; Kröger, Ronald H H

    2011-08-15

    Vision is an important source of information for many animals. The crystalline lens plays a central role in the visual pathway and hence the ecology of fishes. In this study, we tested whether the different light regimes in the Mediterranean and Red Seas have an effect on the optical properties of the lenses in the rivulated rabbitfish, Siganus rivulatus. This species has migrated through the Suez Canal from the Red Sea and established a vital population in the Mediterranean Sea. Longitudinal spherical aberration curves and focal lengths of the fish lenses were measured by laser scans and compared between the two populations. In addition, rivulated rabbitfish from the Mediterranean Sea were exposed to colored light (yellow, green and blue) and unfiltered light for periods of 1 or 13 days to test for short-term adjustments. Lens focal length was significantly longer (3%) in the Rea Sea population. The shorter focal length of the Mediterranean population can be explained as an adaptation to the dimmer light environment, as this difference makes the Mediterranean eyes 5% more sensitive than the eyes of the Red Sea population. The difference may be due to genetic differences or, more likely, adaptive developmental plasticity. Short-term regulatory mechanisms do not seem to be involved.

  9. Axial ultrasound B-scans of the entire eye with a 20-MHz linear array: correction of crystalline lens phase aberration by applying Fermat's principle.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Tony; Chang, Alexandre; Mofid, Yassine; Pisella, Pierre-Jean; Ossant, Frederic

    2014-11-01

    In ophthalmic ultrasonography the crystalline lens is known to be the main source of phase aberration, causing a significant decrease in resolution and distortion effects on axial B-scans. This paper proposes a computationally efficient method to correct the phase aberration arising from the crystalline lens, including refraction effects using a bending ray tracing approach based on Fermat's principle. This method is used as a basis to perform eye-adapted beamforming (BF), with appropriate focusing delays for a 128-element 20-MHz linear array in both emission and reception. Implementation was achieved on an in-house developed experimental ultrasound scanning device, the ECODERM. The proposed BF was tested in vitro by imaging a wire phantom through an eye phantom consisting of a synthetic gelatin lens anatomically set up in an appropriate liquid (turpentine) to approach the in vivo velocity ratio. Both extremes of accommodation shapes of the human crystalline lens were investigated. The performance of the developed BF was evaluated in relation to that in homogeneous medium and compared to a conventional delay-and-sum (DAS) BF and a second adapted BF which was simplified to ignore the lens refraction. Global expectations provided by our method with the transducer array are reviewed by an analysis quantifying both image quality and spatial fidelity, as well as the detrimental effects of a crystalline lens in conventional reconstruction. Compared to conventional array imaging, the results indicated a two-fold improvement in the lateral resolution, greater sensitivity and a considerable reduction of spatial distortions that were sufficient to envisage reliable biometry directly in B-mode, especially phakometry. PMID:24988589

  10. Modeling phase transitions in mixtures of β-γ lens crystallins.

    PubMed

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V; Vlachy, Vojko

    2016-09-21

    We analyze the experimentally determined phase diagram of a γD-βB1 crystallin mixture. Proteins are described as dumbbells decorated with attractive sites to allow inter-particle interaction. We use thermodynamic perturbation theory to calculate the free energy of such mixtures and, by applying equilibrium conditions, also the compositions and concentrations of the co-existing phases. Initially we fit the Tcloudversus packing fraction η measurements for a pure (x2 = 0) γD solution in 0.1 M phosphate buffer at pH = 7.0. Another piece of experimental data, used to fix the model parameters, is the isotherm x2vs. η at T = 268.5 K, at the same pH and salt content. We use the conventional Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules to describe cross interactions. This enables us to determine: (i) model parameters for pure βB1 crystallin protein and to calculate; (ii) complete equilibrium surface (Tcloud-x2-η) for the crystallin mixtures. (iii) We present the results for several isotherms, including the tie-lines, as also the temperature-packing fraction curves. Good agreement with the available experimental data is obtained. An interesting result of these calculations is evidence of the coexistence of three phases. This domain appears for the region of temperatures just out of the experimental range studied so far. The input parameters, leading good description of experimental data, revealed a large difference between the numbers of the attractive sites for γD and βB1 proteins. This interesting result may be related to the fact that γD has a more than nine times smaller quadrupole moment than its partner in the mixture. PMID:27526288

  11. Structural similarity of bovine lung prostaglandin F synthase to lens epsilon-crystallin of the European common frog.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, K; Fujii, Y; Nakayama, K; Ohkubo, H; Kuramitsu, S; Kagamiyama, H; Nakanishi, S; Hayaishi, O

    1988-01-01

    Cloned cDNA sequences specific for prostaglandin F (PGF) synthase have been isolated from a cDNA library of bovine lung mRNA sequences. Nucleotide-sequence analyses of cloned cDNA inserts have revealed that PGF synthase consists of a 969-base pair open reading frame coding for a 323-amino acid polypeptide with a Mr of 36,666. The sequence analysis indicates that bovine lung PGF synthase shows 62% identical plus conservative substitutions compared with human liver aldehyde reductase [Wermuth, B., Omar, A., Forster, A., Francesco, C., Wolf, M., Wartburg, J.P., Bullock, B. & Gabbay, K.H. (1987) in Enzymology and Molecular Biology of Carbonyl Metabolism: Aldehyde Dehydrogenase, Aldo-Keto Reductase, and Alcohol Dehydrogenase, eds. Weiner, H. & Flynn, T.G. (Liss, New York), pp. 297-307], which is similar to PGF synthase in molecular weight and substrate specificity. However, comparison of the amino acid sequence of PGF synthase with the National Biomedical Research Foundation protein data base reveals that the sequences of 225 amino acids from C termini of epsilon-crystallin of the European common frog (Rana temporaria) [Tomarev, S.I., Zinovieva, R.D., Dolgilevich, S.M., Luchin, S.V., Krayev, A.S., Skryabin, K.G. & Gause, G.G. (1984) FEBS Lett. 171, 297-302] and of PGF synthase show 77% identical and conservative substitutions without deletions/additions. The result suggests that European common frog lens epsilon-crystallin is identical to bovine lung PGF synthase. Images PMID:2829166

  12. Biometric, optical and physical changes in the isolated human crystalline lens with age in relation to presbyopia.

    PubMed

    Glasser, A; Campbell, M C

    1999-06-01

    The biometric, optical and physical properties of 19 pairs of isolated human eye-bank lenses ranging in age from 5 to 96 years were compared. Lens focal length and spherical aberration were measured using a scanning laser apparatus, lens thickness and the lens surface curvatures were measured by digitizing the lens profiles and equivalent refractive indices were calculated for each lens using this data. The second lens from each donor was used to measure resistance to physical deformation by providing a compressive force to the lens. The lens capsule was then removed from each lens and each measurement was repeated to ascertain what role the capsule plays in determining these optical and physical characteristics. Age dependent changes in lens focal length, lens surface curvatures and lens resistance to physical deformation are described. Isolated lens focal length was found to be significantly linearly correlated with both the anterior and posterior surface curvatures. No age dependent change in equivalent refractive index of the isolated lens was found. Although decapsulating human lenses causes similar changes in focal length to that which we have shown to occur when human lenses are mechanically stretched into an unaccommodated state, the effects are due to nonsystematic changes in lens curvatures. These studies reinforce the conclusion that lens hardening must be considered as an important factor in the development of presbyopia, that age changes in the human lens are not limited to the loss of accommodation that characterizes presbyopia but that the lens optical and physical properties change substantially with age in a complex manner.

  13. αB-crystallin is essential for the TGF-β2-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition of lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nahomi, Rooban B; Pantcheva, Mina B; Nagaraj, Ram H

    2016-05-15

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2-mediated pathways play a major role in the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells (LECs) during secondary cataract formation, which is also known as posterior capsule opacification (PCO). Although αB-crystallin is a major protein in LEC, its role in the EMT remains unknown. In a human LEC line (FHL124), TGF-β2 treatment resulted in changes in the EMT-associated proteins at the mRNA and protein levels. This was associated with nuclear localization of αB-crystallin, phosphorylated Smad2 (pSmad2) (S245/250/255), pSmad3 (S423/425), Smad4 and Snail and the binding of αB-crystallin to these transcription factors, all of which were reduced by the down-regulation of αB-crystallin. Expression of the functionally defective R120G mutant of αB-crystallin reduced TGF-β2-induced EMT in LECs of αB-crystallin knockout (KO) mice. Treatment of bovine lens epithelial explants and mouse LEC with TGF-β2 resulted in changes in the EMT-associated proteins at the mRNA and protein levels. This was accompanied by increase in phosphorylation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) (T202/Y204), p38 MAPK (T180/Y182), protein kinase B (Akt) (S473) and Smad2 when compared with untreated cells. These changes were significantly reduced in αB-crystallin depleted or knocked out LEC. The removal of the fibre cell mass from the lens of wild-type (WT) mice resulted in the up-regulation of EMT-associated genes in the capsule-adherent epithelial cells, which was reduced in the αB-crystallin KO mice. Together, our data show that αB-crystallin plays a central role in the TGF-β2-induced EMT of LEC. αB-Crystallin could be targeted to prevent PCO and pathological fibrosis in other tissues. PMID:26987815

  14. αB-crystallin is essential for the TGF-β2-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition of lens epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nahomi, Rooban B.; Pantcheva, Mina B.; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2-mediated pathways play a major role in the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells (LECs) during secondary cataract formation, which is also known as posterior capsule opacification (PCO). Although αB-crystallin is a major protein in LEC, its role in the EMT remains unknown. In a human LEC line (FHL124), TGF-β2 treatment resulted in changes in the EMT-associated proteins at the mRNA and protein levels. This was associated with nuclear localization of αB-crystallin, phosphorylated Smad2 (pSmad2) (S245/250/255), pSmad3 (S423/425), Smad4 and Snail and the binding of αB-crystallin to these transcription factors, all of which were reduced by the down-regulation of αB-crystallin. Expression of the functionally defective R120G mutant of αB-crystallin reduced TGF-β2-induced EMT in LECs of αB-crystallin knockout (KO) mice. Treatment of bovine lens epithelial explants and mouse LEC with TGF-β2 resulted in changes in the EMT-associated proteins at the mRNA and protein levels. This was accompanied by increase in phosphorylation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) (T202/Y204), p38 MAPK (T180/Y182), protein kinase B (Akt) (S473) and Smad2 when compared with untreated cells. These changes were significantly reduced in αB-crystallin depleted or knocked out LEC. The removal of the fibre cell mass from the lens of wild-type (WT) mice resulted in the up-regulation of EMT-associated genes in the capsule-adherent epithelial cells, which was reduced in the αB-crystallin KO mice. Together, our data show that αB-crystallin plays a central role in the TGF-β2-induced EMT of LEC. αB-Crystallin could be targeted to prevent PCO and pathological fibrosis in other tissues. PMID:26987815

  15. [The effect of crystalline lens extraction on intraocular pressure in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Macarie, S; Macarie, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    This issue presents the results of a study on patients with cataract and primary open angle glaucoma who suffered lens extraction for cataract. We analise the effects of the lens extraction on the level of intraocular pressure at this patients.

  16. Gradient-index crystalline lens model: A new method for determining the paraxial properties by the axial and field rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama, María. Angeles; Pérez, María. Victoria; Bao, Carmen; Flores-Arias, María. Teresa; Gómez-Reino, Carlos

    2005-05-01

    Gradient-index (GRIN) models of the human lens have received wide attention in optometry and vision sciences for considering the effect of inhomogeneity of the refractive index on the optical properties of the lens. This paper uses the continuous asymmetric bi-elliptical model to determine analytically cardinal elements, magnifications and refractive power of the lens by the axial and field rays in order to study the paraxial light propagation through the human lens from its GRIN nature.

  17. An Eye-adapted Beamforming for Axial B-scans Free from Crystalline Lens Aberration: In vitro and ex vivo Results with a 20 MHz Linear Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matéo, Tony; Mofid, Yassine; Grégoire, Jean-Marc; Ossant, Frédéric

    In ophtalmic ultrasonography, axial B-scans are seriously deteriorated owing to the presence of the crystalline lens. This strongly aberrating medium affects both spatial and contrast resolution and causes important distortions. To deal with this issue, an adapted beamforming (BF) has been developed and experimented with a 20 MHz linear array working with a custom US research scanner. The adapted BF computes focusing delays that compensate for crystalline phase aberration, including refraction effects. This BF was tested in vitro by imaging a wire phantom through an eye phantom consisting of a synthetic gelatin lens, shaped according to the unaccommodated state of an adult human crystalline lens, anatomically set up in an appropriate liquid (turpentine) to approach the in vivo velocity ratio. Both image quality and fidelity from the adapted BF were assessed and compared with conventional delay-and-sum BF over the aberrating medium. Results showed 2-fold improvement of the lateral resolution, greater sensitivity and 90% reduction of the spatial error (from 758 μm to 76 μm) with adapted BF compared to conventional BF. Finally, promising first ex vivo axial B-scans of a human eye are presented.

  18. Evidence of Highly Conserved β-Crystallin Disulfidome that Can be Mimicked by In Vitro Oxidation in Age-related Human Cataract and Glutathione Depleted Mouse Lens.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xingjun; Zhou, Sheng; Wang, Benlian; Hom, Grant; Guo, Minfei; Li, Binbin; Yang, Jing; Vaysburg, Dennis; Monnier, Vincent M

    2015-12-01

    Low glutathione levels are associated with crystallin oxidation in age-related nuclear cataract. To understand the role of cysteine residue oxidation, we used the novel approach of comparing human cataracts with glutathione-depleted LEGSKO mouse lenses for intra- versus intermolecular disulfide crosslinks using 2D-PAGE and proteomics, and then systematically identified in vivo and in vitro all disulfide forming sites using ICAT labeling method coupled with proteomics. Crystallins rich in intramolecular disulfides were abundant at young age in human and WT mouse lens but shifted to multimeric intermolecular disulfides at older age. The shift was ∼4x accelerated in LEGSKO lens. Most cysteine disulfides in β-crystallins (except βA4 in human) were highly conserved in mouse and human and could be generated by oxidation with H(2)O(2), whereas γ-crystallin oxidation selectively affected γC23/42/79/80/154, γD42/33, and γS83/115/130 in human cataracts, and γB79/80/110, γD19/109, γF19/79, γE19, γS83/130, and γN26/128 in mouse. Analysis based on available crystal structure suggests that conformational changes are needed to expose Cys42, Cys79/80, Cys154 in γC; Cys42, Cys33 in γD, and Cys83, Cys115, and Cys130 in γS. In conclusion, the β-crystallin disulfidome is highly conserved in age-related nuclear cataract and LEGSKO mouse, and reproducible by in vitro oxidation, whereas some of the disulfide formation sites in γ-crystallins necessitate prior conformational changes. Overall, the LEGSKO mouse model is closely reminiscent of age-related nuclear cataract.

  19. Inhibitory Effect of Crocin(s) on Lens α-Crystallin Glycation and Aggregation, Results in the Decrease of the Risk of Diabetic Cataract.

    PubMed

    Bahmani, Fereshteh; Bathaie, Seyedeh Zahra; Aldavood, Seyed Javid; Ghahghaei, Arezou

    2016-01-26

    The current study investigates the inhibitory effect of crocin(s), also known as saffron apocarotenoids, on protein glycation and aggregation in diabetic rats, and α-crystallin glycation. Thus, crocin(s) were administered by intraperitoneal injection to normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The cataract progression was recorded regularly every two weeks and was classified into four stages. After eight weeks, the animals were sacrificed and the parameters involved in the cataract formation were measured in the animal lenses. Some parameters were also determined in the serum and blood of the rats. In addition, the effect of crocin(s) on the structure and chaperone activity of α-crystallin in the presence of glucose was studied by different methods. Crocin(s) lowered serum glucose levels of diabetic rats and effectively maintained plasma total antioxidants, glutathione levels and catalase activity in the lens of the animals. In the in vitro study, crocin(s) inhibited α-crystallin glycation and aggregation. Advanced glycation end products fluorescence, hydrophobicity and protein cross-links were also decreased in the presence of crocin(s). In addition, the decreased chaperone activity of α-crystallin in the presence of glucose changed and became close to the native value by the addition of crocin(s) in the medium. Crocin(s) thus showed a powerful inhibitory effect on α-crystallin glycation and preserved the structure-function of this protein. Crocin(s) also showed the beneficial effects on prevention of diabetic cataract.

  20. The absence of the long 3'-non-translated region in mRNA coding for eye lens alpha A2-crystallin of the frog (Rana temporaria).

    PubMed

    Tomarev, S I; Zinovieva, R D; Dolgilevich, S M; Krayev, A S; Skryabin, K G; Gause, G G

    1983-10-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a cloned cDNA (clone pRt(1)297; GENE (1982) 17, 131) coding for a 18 kDa polypeptide of the frog eye lens has been determined. The sequence, 791 nucleotide in length has only one long open reading frame (447 nucleotides). The derived amino acid sequence in this frame has greater than 90% homology with the region 25-173 of alpha A2-crystallin amino acid sequence from a related frog species Rana pipiens. The 5'-terminal part of mRNA corresponding to the first 24 amino acids of alpha A2-crystallin has been lost in cloning and substituted by an artefactual sequence. The 3'-terminal part appears to be intact as follows from the presence of the universal poly(A) addition site and poly(A) tract. The 3'-nontranslated region present in frog alpha A2-crystallin mRNA (130 nucleotides) is about 4-times shorter than in mammalian alpha A2-crystallin mRNA. Intact alpha A2-crystallin mRNA with a size of about 700 nucleotides as determined by Northern blot hybridization is about twice smaller than corresponding mammalian mRNAs.

  1. Contribution of the crystalline lens gradient refractive index to the accommodation amplitude in non-human primates: In vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    Maceo, Bianca M.; Manns, Fabrice; Borja, David; Nankivil, Derek; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Arrieta, Esdras; Ho, Arthur; Augusteyn, Robert C.; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of the gradient refractive index to the change in lens power in hamadryas baboon and cynomolgus monkey lenses during simulated accommodation in a lens stretcher. Thirty-six monkey lenses (1.4–14.1 years) and twenty-five baboon lenses (1.8–28.0 years) were stretched in discrete steps. At each stretching step, the lens back vertex power was measured and the lens cross-section was imaged with optical coherence tomography. The radii of curvature for the lens anterior and posterior surfaces were calculated for each step. The power of each lens surface was determined using refractive indices of 1.365 for the outer cortex and 1.336 for the aqueous. The gradient contribution was calculated by subtracting the power of the surfaces from the measured lens power. In all lenses, the contribution of the surfaces and gradient increased linearly with the amplitude of accommodation. The gradient contributes on average 65 ± 3% for monkeys and 66 ± 3% for baboons to the total power change during accommodation. When expressed in percent of the total power change, the relative contribution of the gradient remains constant with accommodation and age in both species. These findings are consistent with Gullstrand’s intracapsular theory of accommodation. PMID:22131444

  2. 13C-NMR off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation studies of bovine lens gamma-crystallin self association: effect of 'macromolecular crowding'.

    PubMed

    Stevens, A; Wang, S X; Caines, G H; Schleich, T

    1995-01-01

    The NMR technique of 13C off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation, which provides an accurate assessment of the effective rotational correlation time (tau 0, eff) for macromolecular rotational diffusion, was applied to the study of gamma-crystallin association as a function of protein concentration and temperature. Values of the effective rotational correlation time for gamma-crystallin rotational diffusion were obtained at moderate to high protein concentrations (80-350 mg/ml) and at temperatures above, and below, the cold cataract phase transition temperature. With increasing concentration gamma-crystallin was observed to increasingly associate as reflected by larger values of tau 0, eff Decreasing temperature in the range of 35 to 22 degrees C was found to result in no change in the temperature corrected value of tau 0, eff at a gamma-crystallin concentration of 80 mg/ml, whereas at temperatures of 18 degrees C or below, this parameter was approx. twofold larger, suggesting the occurrence of a well defined phase transition, which correlated well with the cold cataract phase transition temperature. At higher protein concentrations, by contrast, tau 0, eff (temperature corrected) was found to increase by approx. 1.6- to 2-times in the temperature interval 35 degrees C to 22 degrees C, a result consistent with the dependence of the cold cataract phase transition temperature on gamma-crystallin concentration. Analysis of intensity ratio dispersion curves, using an assumed model of isodesmic association, permitted the estimation of the association constant characterizing the aggregation under particular conditions of concentration and temperature. The significant increase in the value of the association constant with moderate increases in protein concentration was rationalized by invoking the effect of 'macromolecular crowding'. The results obtained in this study suggest that in the intact lens, where high protein concentrations prevail, gamma-crystallin

  3. Assessing the mechanical properties of tissue-mimicking phantoms at different depths as an approach to measure biomechanical gradient of crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shang; Aglyamov, Salavat; Karpiouk, Andrei; Li, Jiasong; Emelianov, Stanislav; Manns, Fabrice; Larin, Kirill V.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using the dominant frequency of the sample surface response to a mechanical stimulation as an effective indicator for sensing the depthwise distribution of elastic properties in transparent layered phantom samples simulating the cortex and nucleus of the crystalline lens. Focused ultrasound waves are used to noninvasively interrogate the sample surface. A phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography system is utilized to capture the surface dynamics over time with nanometer scale sensitivity. Spectral analysis is performed on the sample surface response to ultrasound stimulation and the dominant frequency is calculated under particular loading parameters. Pilot experiments were conducted on homogeneous and layered tissue-mimicking phantoms. Results indicate that the mechanical layers located at different depths introduce different frequencies to the sample surface response, which are correlated with the depth-dependent elasticity of the sample. The duration and the frequency of the ultrasound excitation are also investigated for their influences on this spectrum-based detection. This noninvasive method may be potentially applied for localized and rapid assessment of the depth dependence of the mechanical properties of the crystalline lens. PMID:24409379

  4. A Novel Non-Lens βγ−Crystallin and Trefoil Factor Complex from Amphibian Skin and Its Functional Implications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Lee, Wen-Hui; Qian, Jin-Qiao; Lai, Ren; Jin, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, non-lens βγ-crystallins are widely expressed in various tissues, but their functions are unknown. The molecular mechanisms of trefoil factors, initiators of mucosal healing and being greatly involved in tumorigenesis, have remained elusive. Principal Findings A naturally existing 72-kDa complex of non-lens βγ-crystallin (α-subunit) and trefoil factor (β-subunit), named βγ-CAT, was identified from frog Bombina maxima skin secretions. Its α-subunit and β-subunit (containing three trefoil factor domains), with a non-covalently linked form of αβ2, show significant sequence homology to ep37 proteins, a group of non-lens βγ-crystallins identified in newt Cynops pyrrhogaster and mammalian trefoil factors, respectively. βγ-CAT showed potent hemolytic activity on mammalian erythrocytes. The specific antiserum against each subunit was able to neutralize its hemolytic activity, indicating that the two subunits are functionally associated. βγ-CAT formed membrane pores with a functional diameter about 2.0 nm, leading to K+ efflux and colloid-osmotic hemolysis. High molecular weight SDS-stable oligomers (>240-kDa) were detected by antibodies against the α-subunit with Western blotting. Furthermore, βγ-CAT showed multiple cellular effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Low dosages of βγ-CAT (25–50 pM) were able to stimulate cell migration and wound healing. At high concentrations, it induced cell detachment (EC50 10 nM) and apoptosis. βγ-CAT was rapidly endocytosed via intracellular vacuole formation. Under confocal microscope, some of the vacuoles were translocated to nucleus and partially fused with nuclear membrane. Bafilomycin A1 (a specific inhibitor of the vacuolar-type ATPase) and nocodazole (an agent of microtuble depolymerizing), while inhibited βγ-CAT induced vacuole formation, significantly inhibited βγ-CAT induced cell detachment, suggesting that βγ-CAT endocytosis is important for its activities

  5. Leonardo da Vinci, visual perspective and the crystalline sphere (lens): if only Leonardo had had a freezer.

    PubMed

    Hilloowala, Rumy

    2004-06-01

    This study confirms Leonardo's claim to have experimented on the bovine eye to determine the internal anatomy of the eye. The experiment, as described by Leonardo, was repeated in our laboratory. The study further discusses Leonardo's primary interest in the study of the eye (especially the lens), to determine how the image of an object which enters the eye in an inverted form is righted. The study shows the evolution of Leonardo's understanding of the anatomy and the physiology of vision. Initially, in keeping with his reading of the literature, the lens was placed in the centre but he made it globular. Later he promulgated two theories, reflection from the uvea and refraction within the lens to explain reversal of the image in the eye. Subsequently he rejected the first theory and, putting credence in the second theory, experimented (1509) to show that the lens is globular and is centrally placed. The fact that the present knowledge about the lens is at variance from his findings is not because he did not carry out the experiment, as suggested by some modern authors, but because of the limitation of the techniques available to him at the time.

  6. Inhibitory Effect of Crocin(s) on Lens α-Crystallin Glycation and Aggregation, Results in the Decrease of the Risk of Diabetic Cataract.

    PubMed

    Bahmani, Fereshteh; Bathaie, Seyedeh Zahra; Aldavood, Seyed Javid; Ghahghaei, Arezou

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigates the inhibitory effect of crocin(s), also known as saffron apocarotenoids, on protein glycation and aggregation in diabetic rats, and α-crystallin glycation. Thus, crocin(s) were administered by intraperitoneal injection to normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The cataract progression was recorded regularly every two weeks and was classified into four stages. After eight weeks, the animals were sacrificed and the parameters involved in the cataract formation were measured in the animal lenses. Some parameters were also determined in the serum and blood of the rats. In addition, the effect of crocin(s) on the structure and chaperone activity of α-crystallin in the presence of glucose was studied by different methods. Crocin(s) lowered serum glucose levels of diabetic rats and effectively maintained plasma total antioxidants, glutathione levels and catalase activity in the lens of the animals. In the in vitro study, crocin(s) inhibited α-crystallin glycation and aggregation. Advanced glycation end products fluorescence, hydrophobicity and protein cross-links were also decreased in the presence of crocin(s). In addition, the decreased chaperone activity of α-crystallin in the presence of glucose changed and became close to the native value by the addition of crocin(s) in the medium. Crocin(s) thus showed a powerful inhibitory effect on α-crystallin glycation and preserved the structure-function of this protein. Crocin(s) also showed the beneficial effects on prevention of diabetic cataract. PMID:26821002

  7. Distortions of the posterior surface in optical coherence tomography images of the isolated crystalline lens: effect of the lens index gradient

    PubMed Central

    Borja, David; Siedlecki, Damian; de Castro, Alberto; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Ortiz, Sergio; Arrieta, Esdras; Parel, Jean-Marie; Marcos, Susana; Manns, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    We quantify the posterior surface distortions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of isolated crystalline lenses. The posterior radius of curvature and asphericity obtained from OCT images acquired with the beam incident first on the anterior, and then the posterior, surface were compared. The results were compared with predictions of a ray-tracing model which includes the index gradient. The results show that the error in the radius of curvature is within the measurement reproducibility and that it can be corrected by assuming a uniform refractive index. However, accurate asphericity values require a correction algorithm that takes into account the gradient. PMID:21258553

  8. Creation of a new eye lens crystallin (Gambeta) through structure-guided mutagenic grafting of the surface of betaB2 crystallin onto the hydrophobic core of gammaB crystallin.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Divya; Singh, Balvinder; Subramanian, Karthikeyan; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2009-06-01

    The degree of conservation of three-dimensional folds in protein superfamilies is greater than that of amino acid sequences. Therefore, very different groups of residues (and schemes of residue packing) can be found displayed upon similar structural scaffolds. We have previously demonstrated the workability of a protein engineering-based method for rational mixing of the interior features of an all-beta enzyme with the substrate-binding and catalytic (surface) features of another enzyme whose sequence is not similar but which is structurally homologous to the first enzyme. Here, we extend this method to whole-protein surfaces and interiors. We show how two all-beta Greek key proteins, betaB2 crystallin and gammaB crystallin, can be recombined to produce a new protein through rational transplantation of the entire surface of betaB2 crystallin upon the structure of gammaB crystallin, without altering the latter's interior. This new protein, Gambeta, consists of 61 residues possessing the same identity at structurally equivalent positions in betaB2- and gammaB crystallin, 91 surface residues unique to betaB2 crystallin, and 27 interior residues unique to gammaB crystallin. Gambeta displays a mixture of the structural/biochemical characteristics, surface features and colligative properties of its progenitor crystallins. It also displays optical properties common to both progenitor crystallins (i.e. retention of transparency at high concentrations, as well as high refractivity). The folding of a protein with such a 'patchwork' residue ancestry suggests that interior/surface transplants involving all-beta proteins are a feasible engineering strategy.

  9. Creation of a new eye lens crystallin (Gambeta) through structure-guided mutagenic grafting of the surface of betaB2 crystallin onto the hydrophobic core of gammaB crystallin.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Divya; Singh, Balvinder; Subramanian, Karthikeyan; Guptasarma, Purnananda

    2009-06-01

    The degree of conservation of three-dimensional folds in protein superfamilies is greater than that of amino acid sequences. Therefore, very different groups of residues (and schemes of residue packing) can be found displayed upon similar structural scaffolds. We have previously demonstrated the workability of a protein engineering-based method for rational mixing of the interior features of an all-beta enzyme with the substrate-binding and catalytic (surface) features of another enzyme whose sequence is not similar but which is structurally homologous to the first enzyme. Here, we extend this method to whole-protein surfaces and interiors. We show how two all-beta Greek key proteins, betaB2 crystallin and gammaB crystallin, can be recombined to produce a new protein through rational transplantation of the entire surface of betaB2 crystallin upon the structure of gammaB crystallin, without altering the latter's interior. This new protein, Gambeta, consists of 61 residues possessing the same identity at structurally equivalent positions in betaB2- and gammaB crystallin, 91 surface residues unique to betaB2 crystallin, and 27 interior residues unique to gammaB crystallin. Gambeta displays a mixture of the structural/biochemical characteristics, surface features and colligative properties of its progenitor crystallins. It also displays optical properties common to both progenitor crystallins (i.e. retention of transparency at high concentrations, as well as high refractivity). The folding of a protein with such a 'patchwork' residue ancestry suggests that interior/surface transplants involving all-beta proteins are a feasible engineering strategy. PMID:19438717

  10. The use of a syncytium model of the crystalline lens of the eye as a new tool to study the light flashes phenomenon seen by astronauts.

    PubMed

    Nurzia, Giampietro; Scrimaglio, Renato; Spataro, Bruno; Zirilli, Francesco

    2006-11-01

    A syncytium model to study some electrical properties of the eye is proposed to study the phenomenon of anomalous light flashes (LF) perceived by astronauts in orbit. The crystalline lens is modelled as an ellipsoidal syncytium with a variable relative dielectric constant. The corresponding mathematical model is a boundary value problem for a system of two coupled elliptic partial differential equations in the two unknown syncytial electrical potentials. A numerical method to compute an approximate solution of this mathematical model is used, and some numerical results are shown. The model can be regarded as a new tool to study the LF phenomenon. In particular, the energy lost in the syncytium by a transversing cosmic charged particle is calculated and the results obtained with the syncytium model are compared with those obtained using the previously available Geant 3.21 simulation program. In addition, the interaction of antimatter-syncytium is studied, and the Creme96 computer program is used to evaluate the cosmic ray fluxes encountered by the International Space Station in its standard mission. PMID:17031662

  11. Mapping of four mouse genes encoding eye lens-specific structural, gap junction, and integral membrane proteins: Cryba1 (crystallin{beta}A3/A1), Crybb2 (crystallin{beta}B2), Gja8 (MP70), and Lim2 (MP19)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerscher, S.; Boyd, Y.; Lyon, M.F.

    1995-09-20

    Four genes encoding eye lens-specific proteins, potential candidate genes for congenital cataract (CC) mutations, were mapped in the mouse genome using a panel of somatic cell hybrids and DNAs from the EUCIB (European Collaborative Interspecific Backcross). Two of them are lens fiber cell structural proteins: the Cryba1 locus encoding crystallin{beta}A3/A1 maps to chromosome 11, 2.5 {+-} 2.5 cM distal to D11Mit31, and the Crybb2 locus encoding crystallin{beta}B2 maps to chromosome 5, 9.1 {+-} 4.3 cM distal to D5Mit88. The other two genes encode lens-specific gap junction and integral membrane proteins, respectively: the Gja8 locus encoding gap junction membrane channel protein {alpha}8, also called connexin50 or MP70, maps to chromosome 3, 11.9 {+-} 5.0 cM distal to D3Mit22, and the Lim2 locus encoding lens intrinsic membrane protein 2, also call MP19, maps to chromosome 7, 2.5 {+-} 2.5 cM proximal to Ngfg. All four map positions, when compared with the corresponding positions in human, lie within known regions of conserved synteny between mouse and human chromosomes. 43 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. [The comparative characteristics of crystalline lens and limb regeneration in newts operated on before and after the completion of an orbital space flight].

    PubMed

    Tuchkova, S Ia; Brushlinskaia, N V; Grigorian, E N; Mitashov, V I

    1994-01-01

    It has been already established that a tendency towards synchronization and acceleration of the forelimb and lens regeneration is observed in Pleurodeles waltlii under the effect of space flight factors. Here we present the results obtained after 16-day space flight of two groups of newts. In animals of group I forelimbs were amputated and lenses were removed 14 and 7 days before the space flight, respectively. Intact animals of group II were operated on the day of the sputnik landing. Regenerates of the flight and corresponding control animals were fixed at the same time after the operation. For evaluation of the regeneration rate morphological criteria were used: morphological stages of regeneration were compared in the experiment and the control. For quantitative assay of the regeneration rate we determined the index of nuclei labelled with 3H-thymidine in the blastema and lens rudiment cells and used morphometry of the lens regenerates. Acceleration of forelimb and lens regeneration was observed in both groups of animals. In group II more than two-fold increase of the index of labelled nuclei was found in the blastema cells at the comparable stages of development. The size of lens regenerates in flight groups I and II exceeded reliably those in the control animals. The results obtained suggest a prolonged effect of the space flight factors on forelimb and lens regeneration. Under the conditions of space flight the lens regenerates reached more advanced stages of regeneration, as compared with the control animals operated after the space flight. These results also suggest acceleration of regeneration in lower vertebrates. PMID:7858470

  13. Quantitative evaluation of light scattering intensities of the crystalline lens for radiation related minimal change in interventional radiologists: a cross-sectional pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Toshi; Furui, Shigeru; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Suzuki, Shigeru; Ishitake, Tatsuya; Terasaki, Kinuyo; Kohtake, Hiroshi; Norbash, Alexander M.; Behrman, Richard H.; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate low-dose X-ray radiation effects on the eye by measuring the amount of light scattering in specific regions of the lens, we compared exposed subjects (interventional radiologists) with unexposed subjects (employees of medical service companies), as a pilot study. According to numerous exclusionary rules, subjects with confounding variables contributing to cataract formation were excluded. Left eye examinations were performed on 68 exposed subjects and 171 unexposed subjects. The eye examinations consisted of an initial screening examination, followed by Scheimpflug imaging of the lens using an anterior eye segment analysis system. The subjects were assessed for the quantity of light scattering intensities found in each of the six layers of the lens. Multiple stepwise regression analyses were performed with the stepwise regression for six variables: age, radiation exposure, smoking, drinking, wearing glasses and workplace. In addition, an age-matched comparison between exposed and unexposed subjects was performed. Minimal increased light scattering intensity in the posterior subcapsular region showed statistical significance. Our results indicate that occupational radiation exposure in interventional radiologists may affect the posterior subcapsular region of the lens. Since by its very nature this retrospective study had many limitations, further well-designed studies concerning minimal radiation-related lens changes should be carried out in a low-dose exposure group. PMID:23143743

  14. Ultraviolet spectrograph lens

    SciTech Connect

    Brixner, B.; Winkler, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    A 700-mm f/4.7 spectrograph camera lens was designed for imaging spectral lines in the 200 to 400-nm region on a 120-mm flat image field. Lens elements of fused silica and crystalline calcium fluoride have so little secondary spectrum that raytracing calculations predict a monochromatic resolution limit of 30 lines/mm without refocusing in the 238- to 365-nm region. Light scattering at the polished calcium-fluoride surfaces is avoided by sandwiching the fluoride elements between fused silica and cementing with silicone fluid. The constructed lens makes good spectrograms.

  15. Crystal structures of truncated alphaA and alphaB crystallins reveal structural mechanisms of polydispersity important for eye lens function

    SciTech Connect

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Benesch, Justin L.P.; Landau, Meytal; Ding, Linlin; Sawaya, Michael R.; Cascio, Duilio; Huang, Qingling; Robinson, Carol V.; Horwitz, Joseph; Eisenberg, David

    2010-08-23

    Small heat shock proteins alphaA and alphaB crystallin form highly polydisperse oligomers that frustrate protein aggregation, crystallization, and amyloid formation. Here, we present the crystal structures of truncated forms of bovine alphaA crystallin (AAC{sub 59-163}) and human alphaB crystallin (ABC{sub 68-162}), both containing the C-terminal extension that functions in chaperone action and oligomeric assembly. In both structures, the C-terminal extensions swap into neighboring molecules, creating runaway domain swaps. This interface, termed DS, enables crystallin polydispersity because the C-terminal extension is palindromic and thereby allows the formation of equivalent residue interactions in both directions. That is, we observe that the extension binds in opposite directions at the DS interfaces of AAC{sub 59-163} and ABC{sub 68-162}. A second dimeric interface, termed AP, also enables polydispersity by forming an antiparallel beta sheet with three distinct registration shifts. These two polymorphic interfaces enforce polydispersity of alpha crystallin. This evolved polydispersity suggests molecular mechanisms for chaperone action and for prevention of crystallization, both necessary for transparency of eye lenses.

  16. Effect of Mild Heating on Human Lens Epithelial Cells: A Possible Model of Lens Aging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keke; Zhu, Xiangjia; Lu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of mild heating on lens epithelial cells and to explore its possibility as an in vitro model for lens aging. Human lens epithelial cells (LECs) were heated at 50 °C for a cellular lens aging study. Analysis of the head group order of lens membranes was performed using Laurdan labeling. Immunofluorescence was performed to detect changes in α-crystallin expression and its cellular distribution. The chaperone-like activity of α-crystallin was also assessed. After mild heating, α-crystallin in LECs showed a tendency towards accumulation around the nucleus. The membrane head group environment of lens epithelial cells became more fluid with increasing time of exposure to mild heating, as indicated by increased water penetration. Furthermore, the chaperone activity of α-crystallin decreased, and suggests a relatively lower protective effect on other functional proteins in LECs. Thus, compared to the mild heating model based on lens tissue, this cellular model could provide a more convenient and accurate method for studying lens aging in vitro, including changes in membrane head group order in each cell, the real-time observation of crystallin distribution, and the monitoring of functional changes in the chaperone activity of crystallins as a result of aging. PMID:27725687

  17. Assessing the elasticity change of cataract lens with OCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-Hao; Raghunathan, Raksha; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Han, Zhaolong; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Cataract is one of the most common degenerative diseases that causes blindness. Careful quantification of lens biomechanical properties can greatly assist in early detection of the disease as well as personalization of treatment procedures. In this study, we utilize a phase-sensitive optical coherence elastography (OCE) system to assess the effects of the cold cataract on the biomechanical properties of porcine crystalline lens in vitro. Relaxation rates of air puff induced elastic waves were measured on the same crystalline lens with and without cold cataract. Results demonstrate that the relaxation rate and, thus, associated elasticity of the porcine lens, increased due to the presence of cold cataract.

  18. Introduction to the development of intraocular lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifan; Peng, Runling; Hu, Shuilan; Wei, Maowei; Chen, Jiabi

    2013-08-01

    In order to cure the cataract disease or injuries in eyes, intraocular lens(IOL) has been studied all the time to replace the crystalline lens in human eyes. Researches on IOL are started early from 19th century, and it develops greatly in the hundreds years after. This article introduces several main kinds of IOLs that appear in the development history of IOL, and raises the double-liquid zoom IOL based on electrowetting, which will be the trend of IOL study.

  19. Lens Extrusion from Laminin Alpha 1 Mutant Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Semina, Elena V.; Duncan, Melinda K.

    2014-01-01

    We report analysis of the ocular lens phenotype of the recessive, larval lethal zebrafish mutant, lama1a69/a69. Previous work revealed that this mutant has a shortened body axis and eye defects including a defective hyaloid vasculature, focal corneal dysplasia, and loss of the crystalline lens. While these studies highlight the importance of laminin α1 in lens development, a detailed analysis of the lens defects seen in these mutants was not reported. In the present study, we analyze the lenticular anomalies seen in the lama1a69/a69 mutants and show that the lens defects result from the anterior extrusion of lens material from the eye secondary to structural defects in the lens capsule and developing corneal epithelium associated with basement membrane loss. Our analysis provides further insights into the role of the lens capsule and corneal basement membrane in the structural integrity of the developing eye. PMID:24526906

  20. Collection Mode Lens System

    DOEpatents

    Fletcher, Daniel A.; Kino, Gordon S.

    2002-11-05

    A lens system including a collection lens and a microlens spaced from the collection lens adjacent the region to be observed. The diameter of the observablel region depends substantially on the radius of the microlens.

  1. Crystalline Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapatsis, Michael (Inventor); Lai, Zhiping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    In certain aspects, the invention features methods for forming crystalline membranes (e.g., a membrane of a framework material, such as a zeolite) by inducing secondary growth in a layer of oriented seed crystals. The rate of growth of the seed crystals in the plane of the substrate is controlled to be comparable to the rate of growth out of the plane. As a result, a crystalline membrane can form a substantially continuous layer including grains of uniform crystallographic orientation that extend through the depth of the layer.

  2. Cubozoan crystallins: evidence for convergent evolution of pax regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    Kozmik, Zbynek; Swamynathan, Shivalingappa K; Ruzickova, Jana; Jonasova, Kristyna; Paces, Vaclav; Vlcek, Cestmir; Piatigorsky, Joram

    2008-01-01

    Cnidaria is the earliest-branching metazoan phylum containing a well-developed, lens-containing visual system located on specialized sensory structures called rhopalia. Each rhopalium in a cubozoan jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora has a large and a small complex, camera-type eye with a cellular lens containing distinct families of crystallins. Here, we have characterized J2-crystallin and its gene in T. cystophora. The J2-crystallin gene is composed of a single exon and encodes a 157-amino acid cytoplasmic protein with no apparent homology to known proteins from other species. The non-lens expression of J2-crystallin suggests nonoptical as well as crystallin functions consistent with the gene-sharing strategy that has been used during evolution of lens crystallins in other invertebrates and vertebrates. Although nonfunctional in transfected mammalian lens cells, the J2-crystallin promoter is activated by the jellyfish paired domain transcription factor PaxB in co-transfection tests via binding to three paired domain sites. PaxB paired domain-binding sites were also identified in the PaxB-regulated promoters of the J1A- and J1B-crystallin genes, which are not homologous to the J2-crystallin gene. Taken together with previous studies on the regulation of the diverse crystallin genes, the present report strongly supports the idea that crystallin recruitment of multifunctional proteins was driven by convergent changes involving Pax (as well as other transcription factors) in the promoters of nonhomologous genes within and between species as well as within gene families. PMID:18184357

  3. Converging or Diverging Lens?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branca, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Why does a lens magnify? Why does it shrink objects? Why does this happen? The activities that we propose here are useful in helping us to understand how lenses work, and they show that the same lens can have different magnification capabilities. A converging lens can also act as a diverging lens. (Contains 4 figures.)

  4. Contact lens in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Varsha M; Mandathara, Preeji S; Dumpati, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Contact lenses are required for the visual improvement in patients with keratoconus. Various contact lens options, such as rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, soft and soft toric lenses, piggy back contact lenses (PBCL), hybrid lenses and scleral lenses are availble. This article discusses about selection of a lens depending on the type of keratoconus and the fitting philosophies of various contact lenses including the starting trial lens. A Medline search was carried out for articles in the English language with the keywords keratoconus and various contact lenses such as Rose k lens, RGP lens, hybrid lens, scleral lens and PBCL. PMID:23925325

  5. The Lens Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Danysh, Brian P.; Duncan, Melinda K.

    2009-01-01

    The lens capsule is a modified basement membrane that completely surrounds the ocular lens. It is known that this extracellular matrix is important for both the structure and biomechanics of the lens in addition to providing informational cues to maintain lens cell phenotype. This review covers the development and structure of the lens capsule, lens diseases associated with mutations in extracellular matrix genes and the role of the capsule in lens function including those proposed for visual accommodation, selective permeability to infectious agents, and cell signaling. PMID:18773892

  6. Isomerization of Asp residues plays an important role in αA-crystallin dissociation.

    PubMed

    Takata, Takumi; Fujii, Noriko

    2016-03-01

    Aged cataract formation is caused by the accumulative precipitation of lens proteins incorporating diverse post-translational modifications. α-Crystallin, a major structural and functional lens protein, consists of a large polymeric structure that is dissociated and insolubilized with accumulative post-translational modifications. One such modification, isomerization of Asp, was recently identified in αB-crystallin monomers derived from aged lens. However, the distributions of Asp isomers in each lens fraction remain unknown. Here, α-crystallin fractions from aged lens were separated into heteropolymeric and monomeric forms to determine the Asp isomerization ratios in each fraction. Lens of four different ages were homogenized and centrifuged, and the soluble fraction was applied to size-exclusion chromatography. The heteropolymeric α-crystallin and monomeric crystallin fractions were obtained and concentrated. After trypsin digestion, each fraction was independently applied to liquid chromatography equipped with mass spectrometry to extract α-crystallin-derived peptides containing Asp isomers. The results showed that Asp58, Asp84 and Asp151 of αA-crystallin were highly isomerized in the monomeric fraction, but not isomerized to the same level in the heteropolymeric fraction. Each type of Asp isomerization increased in an age-dependent manner, was site-specific and was similar to previous results from lens water-insoluble fractions. These results imply that isomerization of Asp residues leads to dissociation of αA-crystallin from the heteropolymeric state and induces insolubilization in aged lens. Taken together, our findings suggest that isomerization of Asp might disrupt the higher order polymeric state of α-crystallin, resulting in decreased solubility and function, ultimately contributing to lens protein impairment and cataract formation with aging. PMID:26700637

  7. Isomerization of Asp residues plays an important role in αA-crystallin dissociation.

    PubMed

    Takata, Takumi; Fujii, Noriko

    2016-03-01

    Aged cataract formation is caused by the accumulative precipitation of lens proteins incorporating diverse post-translational modifications. α-Crystallin, a major structural and functional lens protein, consists of a large polymeric structure that is dissociated and insolubilized with accumulative post-translational modifications. One such modification, isomerization of Asp, was recently identified in αB-crystallin monomers derived from aged lens. However, the distributions of Asp isomers in each lens fraction remain unknown. Here, α-crystallin fractions from aged lens were separated into heteropolymeric and monomeric forms to determine the Asp isomerization ratios in each fraction. Lens of four different ages were homogenized and centrifuged, and the soluble fraction was applied to size-exclusion chromatography. The heteropolymeric α-crystallin and monomeric crystallin fractions were obtained and concentrated. After trypsin digestion, each fraction was independently applied to liquid chromatography equipped with mass spectrometry to extract α-crystallin-derived peptides containing Asp isomers. The results showed that Asp58, Asp84 and Asp151 of αA-crystallin were highly isomerized in the monomeric fraction, but not isomerized to the same level in the heteropolymeric fraction. Each type of Asp isomerization increased in an age-dependent manner, was site-specific and was similar to previous results from lens water-insoluble fractions. These results imply that isomerization of Asp residues leads to dissociation of αA-crystallin from the heteropolymeric state and induces insolubilization in aged lens. Taken together, our findings suggest that isomerization of Asp might disrupt the higher order polymeric state of α-crystallin, resulting in decreased solubility and function, ultimately contributing to lens protein impairment and cataract formation with aging.

  8. Contact Lens Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Contact Lens Care Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... 1088, www.fda.gov/medwatch Learn More about Contact Lens Care Other Tips on Contact Lenses Decorative ...

  9. Contact Lens Solution Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Contact Lens Solution Toxicity Information for adults A A A This image shows a reaction to contact lens solution. The prominent blood vessels and redness ...

  10. Clinical Detection of Pre-Cataractous Lens Protein Changes using Dynamic Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Datiles, Manuel B.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; Vitale, Susan; Reed, George F.; Zigler, J. Samuel; Ferris., Frederick L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To use Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) to clinically assess early pre-cataractous lens protein changes. Methods We performed a cross sectional study in 380 eyes of 235 subjects aged 7–86 years with AREDS clinical lens nuclear grades ranging from 0–3.8. A DLS device was used to assess α-crystallin, a molecular chaperone protein shown to bind other damaged lens proteins, preventing their aggregation. The outcome measure was the α-crystallin index (ACI), a measure of unbound α-crystallin in each lens. The association of ACI with increasing nuclear opacity and aging was determined. Results There was a significant decrease in ACI associated with increasing grades of lens nuclear opacity (p<0.0001). There are significant losses of α-crystallin even in clinically clear lenses associated with aging (p<0.0001). The standard error of measurement was 3%. Conclusions DLS clinically detects loss of α-crystallin proteins even in clinically clear lenses. ACI measurements may be useful in identifying patients at high risk for developing cataract, and as an outcome variable in clinical lens studies. Clinical Relevance Our studies suggest that the ACI may be a useful measure of the protective α-crystallin molecular chaperone reserve present in a lens, analogous to creatinine clearance in estimating renal function reserve. PMID:19064850

  11. Bio-inspired accommodating fluidic intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wen; Johnson, Daniel; Tsai, Frank S; Cho, Sung Hwan; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2009-10-15

    The invention of intraocular lens (IOL), a substitute for crystalline lens, represents a major advancement in cataract surgery. After about sixty years of IOL development, one key remaining problem is its limited accommodation range compared with natural eyes. To overcome this performance limit, we explore bio-inspired fluidic IOL. By mimicking the working principle of natural eyes, a fluidic intraocular lens can achieve an exceedingly large accommodation range. An experiment on fluidic IOL demonstrated a very high tuning range of 12 D. This accommodation range was achieved with a modest amount of force (0.06 N) and equatorial radius change (0.286 mm), in conditions matching well with the characteristics of aged eyes. PMID:19838277

  12. Oxygen transfer in the corneal-contact lens system.

    PubMed

    Garr-Peters, J M; Ho, C S

    1987-01-01

    The clinical results of contact lens wearers indicate that materials which theoretically are adequate to prevent corneal hypoxia and edema do not perform optimally under actual wearing conditions. Optimization of the cornea-tear-lens system requires an analysis of the modes of oxygen transport, mass transfer resistances, and characteristic dimensions. The lens properties are a function of polymer composition. Thus, investigations for ideal lens materials may result in limitless test copolymers and graft polymers of siloxane, methylmethacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl-methacrylate, vinylpyrollidone, vinylacetate, and cellulose acetate butyrate of varying degrees of cross-linking and crystallinity. In an attempt to channel research efforts, this review will state the developments to date and the desirable properties of an optimal cornea-tear-lens system. The logic should encompass a theory and model whereby parameters are identified and varied within satisfactory physiological limitations, and experiments which provide data indicative of the in vivo conditions. The parameters must reflect the inherent transport properties of the corneal-contact lens system. Contact lenses may be categorized as soft, gas-permeable rigid/hydrophobic flexible, or hard. The major differences between these three categories are the properties: equilibrium water content or degree of hydration, tendency for water pervaporation and/or dehydration, surface hydrophobicity, thermal conductivity, oxygen diffusivity and solubility, lens thickness, rest height over corneal tear, flexibility, lens mobility over the cornea, cross-linking, crystallinity, stagnant boundary layer resistances, and manufacturing processes. Aside from complications presented by lens coatings and cleansing solutions, the most common problems experienced by lens wearers include corneal edema, dehydration involving the lens and the cornea, "blurry" vision due to localized corneal anoxia, debris trapped under the lens, and deposits on

  13. Aberration design of zoom lens systems using thick lens modules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinkai; Chen, Xiaobo; Xi, Juntong; Wu, Zhuoqi

    2014-12-20

    A systematic approach for the aberration design of a zoom lens system using a thick lens module is presented. Each component is treated as a thick lens module at the beginning of the design. A thick lens module refers to a thick lens component with a real lens structure, like lens materials, lens curvatures, lens thicknesses, and lens interval distances. All nine third-order aberrations of a thick lens component are considered during the design. The relationship of component aberrations in different zoom positions can be approximated from the aberration shift. After minimizing the aberrations of the zoom lens system, the nine third-order aberrations of every lens component can be determined. Then the thick lens structure of every lens component can be determined after optimization according to their first-order properties and third-order aberration targets. After a third optimization for minimum practical third-order aberrations of a zoom lens system, the aberration design using the thick lens module is complete, which provides a practical zoom lens system with thick lens structures. A double-sided telecentric zoom lens system is designed using the thick lens module in this paper, which shows that this method is practical for zoom lens design.

  14. Geometry-invariant gradient refractive index lens: analytical ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, Mehdi; Goncharov, Alexander V.

    2012-05-01

    A new class of gradient refractive index (GRIN) lens is introduced and analyzed. The interior iso-indicial contours mimic the external shape of the lens, which leads to an invariant geometry of the GRIN structure. The lens model employs a conventional surface representation using a coincoid of revolution with a higher-order aspheric term. This model has a unique feature, namely, it allows analytical paraxial ray tracing. The height and the angle of an arbitrary incident ray can be found inside the lens in a closed-form expression, which is used to calculate the main optical characteristics of the lens, including the optical power and third-order monochromatic aberration coefficients. Moreover, due to strong coupling of the external surface shape to the GRIN structure, the proposed GRIN lens is well suited for studying accommodation mechanism in the eye. To show the power of the model, several examples are given emphasizing the usefulness of the analytical solution. The presented geometry-invariant GRIN lens can be used for modeling and reconstructing the crystalline lens of the human eye and other types of eyes featuring a GRIN lens.

  15. Reaction of tyrosine oxidation products with proteins of the lens

    PubMed Central

    Pirie, Antoinette

    1968-01-01

    Oxidation of tyrosine in the presence of bovine lens proteins leads to the formation of brown or black melanoproteins. Both tyrosinase and the oxidizing system of ferrous sulphate–ascorbic acid–EDTA are effective. The fluorescence of the lens proteins is both altered and enhanced by the tyrosine-oxidizing systems. Their fluorescence spectra resemble those of urea-insoluble proteins of human cataractous lens and of 1,2-naphthaquinone–proteins of naphthalene cataract. The lens proteins lose their thiol groups and, in acid hydrolysates of treated β-and γ-crystallins, a substance has been detected chromatographically that behaves similarly to a compound formed when 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) is oxidized by tyrosinase in the presence of cysteine. Analysis and behaviour of this substance from hydrolysates of lens proteins suggest that it is a compound of cysteine and dopa. PMID:4971287

  16. Glycation by Ascorbic Acid Oxidation Products Leads to the Aggregation of Lens Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Linetsky, Mikhail; Shipova, Ekaterina; Cheng, Rongzhu; Ortwerth, Beryl J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that there are striking similarities between the yellow chromophores, fluorophores and modified amino acids released by proteolytic digestion from calf lens proteins ascorbylated in vitro and their counterparts isolated from aged and cataractous lens proteins. The studies reported in this communication were conducted to further investigate whether ascorbic acid-mediated modification of lens proteins could lead to the formation of lens protein aggregates capable of scattering visible light, similar to the high molecular aggregates found in aged human lenses. Ascorbic acid, but not glucose, fructose, ribose or erythrulose, caused the aggregation of calf lens proteins to proteins ranging from 2.2 × 106 up to 3.0 × 108 Da. This compared to proteins ranging from 1.8 × 106 up to 3.6 × 108 Da for the water-soluble (WS) proteins isolated from aged human lenses. This aggregation was likely due to the glycation of lens crystallins because [U-14C] ascorbate was incorporated into the aggregate fraction and because CNBH3, which reduces the initial Schiff base, prevented any protein aggregation. Reactions of ascorbate with purified crystallin fractions showed little or no aggregation of α-crystallin, significant aggregation of βH-crystallin, but rapid precipitation of purified βL- and γ-crystallin. The aggregation of lens proteins can be prevented by the binding of damaged crystallins to alpha-crystallin due to its chaperone activity. Depending upon the ratios between the components of the incubation mixtures, α-crystallin prevented the precipitation of the purified βL- and γ-crystallin fractions during ascorbylation. The addition of at least 20% of alpha-crystallin by weight into glycation mixtures with βL-, or γ-crystallins completely inhibited protein precipitation, and increased the amount of the high molecular weight aggregates in solution. Static and dynamic light scattering measurements of the supernatants from

  17. Characterization of α-Crystallin-Plasma Membrane Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Brian A.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2010-01-01

    α-Crystallin, a large lenticular protein complex made up of two related subunits (αA- and αB-crystallin), is known to associate increasingly with fiber cell plasma membranes with age and/or the onset of cataract. To understand better the binding mechanism, we developed a sensitive membrane binding assay using lens plasma membranes and recombinant human αA- and αB-crystallins conjugated to a small fluorescent tag (Alexa350®). Both αA and αB homopolymer complexes, as well as a reconstituted 3:1 heteromeric complex, bind to lens membranes in a specific, saturable, and partially irreversible manner that is sensitive to both time and temperature. The amount of α-crystallin that binds to the membrane increases under acidic pH conditions and upon removal of exposed intrinsic membrane protein domains but is not affected at high ionic strength, suggesting that α-crystallin binds to the fiber cell plasma membranes mainly through hydrophobic interactions. The binding capacity and affinity for the reconstituted 3:1 heteromeric complex were measured to be 3.45 ± 0.11 ng/μg of membrane and 4.57 ± 0.50 × 10−4 μg−1 of membrane, respectively. The present membrane binding data support the hypothesis that the physical properties of a mixed α-crystallin complex may hold particular relevance for the function of α-crystallin within the lens. PMID:10692476

  18. Interaction of βA3-Crystallin with Deamidated Mutants of αA- and αB-Crystallins.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Ekta; Hegde, Shylaja; Purushotham, Sangeetha; Deivanayagam, Champion; Srivastava, Om

    2015-01-01

    Interaction among crystallins is required for the maintenance of lens transparency. Deamidation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in crystallins, which results in incorrect interaction and leads to aggregate formation. Various studies have established interaction among the α- and β-crystallins. Here, we investigated the effects of the deamidation of αA- and αB-crystallins on their interaction with βA3-crystallin using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET) methods. SPR analysis confirmed adherence of WT αA- and WT αB-crystallins and their deamidated mutants with βA3-crystallin. The deamidated mutants of αA-crystallin (αA N101D and αA N123D) displayed lower adherence propensity for βA3-crystallin relative to the binding affinity shown by WT αA-crystallin. Among αB-crystallin mutants, αB N78D displayed higher adherence propensity whereas αB N146D mutant showed slightly lower binding affinity for βA3-crystallin relative to that shown by WT αB-crystallin. Under the in vivo condition (FLIM-FRET), both αA-deamidated mutants (αA N101D and αA N123D) exhibited strong interaction with βA3-crystallin (32±4% and 36±4% FRET efficiencies, respectively) compared to WT αA-crystallin (18±4%). Similarly, the αB N78D and αB N146D mutants showed strong interaction (36±4% and 22±4% FRET efficiencies, respectively) with βA3-crystallin compared to 18±4% FRET efficiency of WT αB-crystallin. Further, FLIM-FRET analysis of the C-terminal domain (CTE), N-terminal domain (NTD), and core domain (CD) of αA- and αB-crystallins with βA3-crystallin suggested that interaction sites most likely reside in the αA CTE and αB NTD regions, respectively, as these domains showed the highest FRET efficiencies. Overall, results suggest that similar to WT αA- and WTαB-crystallins, the deamidated mutants showed strong interactionfor βA3-crystallin. Variable

  19. Interaction of βA3-Crystallin with Deamidated Mutants of αA- and αB-Crystallins

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Ekta; Hegde, Shylaja; Purushotham, Sangeetha; Deivanayagam, Champion; Srivastava, Om

    2015-01-01

    Interaction among crystallins is required for the maintenance of lens transparency. Deamidation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in crystallins, which results in incorrect interaction and leads to aggregate formation. Various studies have established interaction among the α- and β-crystallins. Here, we investigated the effects of the deamidation of αA- and αB-crystallins on their interaction with βA3-crystallin using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET) methods. SPR analysis confirmed adherence of WT αA- and WT αB-crystallins and their deamidated mutants with βA3-crystallin. The deamidated mutants of αA–crystallin (αA N101D and αA N123D) displayed lower adherence propensity for βA3-crystallin relative to the binding affinity shown by WT αA-crystallin. Among αB-crystallin mutants, αB N78D displayed higher adherence propensity whereas αB N146D mutant showed slightly lower binding affinity for βA3-crystallin relative to that shown by WT αB-crystallin. Under the in vivo condition (FLIM-FRET), both αA-deamidated mutants (αA N101D and αA N123D) exhibited strong interaction with βA3-crystallin (32±4% and 36±4% FRET efficiencies, respectively) compared to WT αA-crystallin (18±4%). Similarly, the αB N78D and αB N146D mutants showed strong interaction (36±4% and 22±4% FRET efficiencies, respectively) with βA3-crystallin compared to 18±4% FRET efficiency of WT αB-crystallin. Further, FLIM-FRET analysis of the C-terminal domain (CTE), N-terminal domain (NTD), and core domain (CD) of αA- and αB-crystallins with βA3-crystallin suggested that interaction sites most likely reside in the αA CTE and αB NTD regions, respectively, as these domains showed the highest FRET efficiencies. Overall, results suggest that similar to WT αA- and WTαB-crystallins, the deamidated mutants showed strong interactionfor βA3-crystallin

  20. Interaction of βA3-Crystallin with Deamidated Mutants of αA- and αB-Crystallins.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Ekta; Hegde, Shylaja; Purushotham, Sangeetha; Deivanayagam, Champion; Srivastava, Om

    2015-01-01

    Interaction among crystallins is required for the maintenance of lens transparency. Deamidation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in crystallins, which results in incorrect interaction and leads to aggregate formation. Various studies have established interaction among the α- and β-crystallins. Here, we investigated the effects of the deamidation of αA- and αB-crystallins on their interaction with βA3-crystallin using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET) methods. SPR analysis confirmed adherence of WT αA- and WT αB-crystallins and their deamidated mutants with βA3-crystallin. The deamidated mutants of αA-crystallin (αA N101D and αA N123D) displayed lower adherence propensity for βA3-crystallin relative to the binding affinity shown by WT αA-crystallin. Among αB-crystallin mutants, αB N78D displayed higher adherence propensity whereas αB N146D mutant showed slightly lower binding affinity for βA3-crystallin relative to that shown by WT αB-crystallin. Under the in vivo condition (FLIM-FRET), both αA-deamidated mutants (αA N101D and αA N123D) exhibited strong interaction with βA3-crystallin (32±4% and 36±4% FRET efficiencies, respectively) compared to WT αA-crystallin (18±4%). Similarly, the αB N78D and αB N146D mutants showed strong interaction (36±4% and 22±4% FRET efficiencies, respectively) with βA3-crystallin compared to 18±4% FRET efficiency of WT αB-crystallin. Further, FLIM-FRET analysis of the C-terminal domain (CTE), N-terminal domain (NTD), and core domain (CD) of αA- and αB-crystallins with βA3-crystallin suggested that interaction sites most likely reside in the αA CTE and αB NTD regions, respectively, as these domains showed the highest FRET efficiencies. Overall, results suggest that similar to WT αA- and WTαB-crystallins, the deamidated mutants showed strong interactionfor βA3-crystallin. Variable

  1. Zeta-crystallin displays strong selectivity for salicylic acid over aspirin.

    PubMed

    Bazzi, Mohammad D

    2002-04-26

    Interaction of camel lens zeta-crystallin with aspirin was investigated by activity and fluorescence measurements. Aspirin minimally inhibited the oxidoreductase activity of the enzyme and weakly quenched its fluorescence. However, significant fluorescence quenching of zeta-crystallin coincided with the appearance of a fluorescence signal characteristic of salicylic acid thereby raising the possibility that salicylic acid might have been the moiety responsible for inhibition and fluorescence quenching. Direct fluorescence measurements showed that zeta-crystallin had a much higher affinity for salicylic acid than aspirin (K(i) of about 24 microM for salicylic acid versus 630 microM for aspirin). Salicylic acid was also far more effective in inhibiting zeta-crystallin than aspirin (K(i) values were 23 microM versus 820 microM, respectively). Inhibition kinetics suggested that salicylic acid interacted with zeta-crystallin via a binding site that was distinct from that of NADPH. Salicylic acid also interacted with and quenched the fluorescence of camel lens alpha-crystallin suggesting a general mode of interaction with lens proteins. Within the normal therapeutic concentrations of salicylic acid or aspirin, only crystallin-salicylic acid interactions might be significant. These results showed that camel lens zeta- and alpha-crystallin exhibited remarkable selectivity for salicylic acid over aspirin, and thus, could be considered as salicylate-binding proteins.

  2. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Hari S.; Chu, Shaoping; Reimus, Paul William; Makedonska, Nataliia; Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Karra, Satish; Dittrich, Timothy M.

    2015-12-21

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2014 and July 2015 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program.

  3. The optic vesicle promotes cornea to lens transdifferentiation in larval Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Cannata, Stefano M; Bernardini, Sergio; Filoni, Sergio; Gargioli, Cesare

    2008-01-01

    The outer cornea and pericorneal epidermis (lentogenic area) of larval Xenopus laevis are the only epidermal regions competent to regenerate a lens under the influence of the retinal inducer. However, the head epidermis of the lentogenic area can acquire the lens-regenerating competence following transplantation of an eye beneath it. In this paper we demonstrate that both the outer cornea and the head epidermis covering a transplanted eye are capable of responding not only to the retinal inducer of the larval eye but also to the inductive action of the embryonic optic vesicle by synthesizing crystallins. As the optic vesicle is a very weak lens inductor, which promotes crystallin synthesis only on the lens biased ectoderm of the embryo, these results indicate that the lens-forming competence in the outer cornea and epidermis of larval X. laevis corresponds to the persistence and acquisition of a condition similar to that of the embryonic biased ectoderm. PMID:18430089

  4. Anterior Chamber Iris Claw Lens for the Treatment of Aphakia in a Patient with Megalocornea

    PubMed Central

    Saffra, Norman; Rakhamimov, Aleksandr; Masini, Robert; Rosenthal, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Megalocornea in isolation is a rare congenital enlargement of the cornea greater than 13 mm in diameter. Patients with megalocornea are prone to cataract formation, crystalline lens subluxation, zonular deficiencies and dislocation of the posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL) within the capsular bag. A 55-year-old male with megalocornea in isolation developed subluxation of the capsular bag and PCIOL. The PCIOL and capsular bag were explanted, and the patient was subsequently implanted with an anterior chamber iris claw lens. An anterior chamber iris claw lens is an effective option for the correction of aphakia in patients with megalocornea. PMID:26120314

  5. Contact lens hygiene compliance and lens case contamination: A review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yvonne Tzu-Ying; Willcox, Mark; Zhu, Hua; Stapleton, Fiona

    2015-10-01

    A contaminated contact lens case can act as a reservoir for microorganisms that could potentially compromise contact lens wear and lead to sight threatening adverse events. The rate, level and profile of microbial contamination in lens cases, compliance and other risk factors associated with lens case contamination, and the challenges currently faced in this field are discussed. The rate of lens case contamination is commonly over 50%. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Bacillus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens are frequently recovered from lens cases. In addition, we provide suggestions regarding how to clean contact lens cases and improve lens wearers' compliance as well as future lens case design for reducing lens case contamination. This review highlights the challenges in reducing the level of microbial contamination which require an industry wide approach.

  6. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Lear, K.L.

    1997-05-27

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method are disclosed. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors. 9 figs.

  7. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1997-01-01

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors.

  8. Intraocular lens fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Salazar, Mike A.; Foreman, Larry R.

    1997-01-01

    This invention describes a method for fabricating an intraocular lens made rom clear Teflon.TM., Mylar.TM., or other thermoplastic material having a thickness of about 0.025 millimeters. These plastic materials are thermoformable and biocompatable with the human eye. The two shaped lenses are bonded together with a variety of procedures which may include thermosetting and solvent based adhesives, laser and impulse welding, and ultrasonic bonding. The fill tube, which is used to inject a refractive filling material is formed with the lens so as not to damage the lens shape. A hypodermic tube may be included inside the fill tube.

  9. Intraocular lens fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Salazar, M.A.; Foreman, L.R.

    1997-07-08

    This invention describes a method for fabricating an intraocular lens made from clear Teflon{trademark}, Mylar{trademark}, or other thermoplastic material having a thickness of about 0.025 millimeters. These plastic materials are thermoformable and biocompatable with the human eye. The two shaped lenses are bonded together with a variety of procedures which may include thermosetting and solvent based adhesives, laser and impulse welding, and ultrasonic bonding. The fill tube, which is used to inject a refractive filling material is formed with the lens so as not to damage the lens shape. A hypodermic tube may be included inside the fill tube. 13 figs.

  10. Ultraviolet-spectrograph lens

    SciTech Connect

    Brixner, B.; Winkler, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    A 700-mm f/4.7 spectrograph camera lens was designed for imaging spectral lines in the 200- to 400-nm region on a 120-mm flat image field. Lens elements of fused silica and crystal calcium fluoride give such good achromatization that raytracing calculations predict a resolution limit of 30 lines/mm without refocusing in the 238- to 365-nm region. Light scattering at the polished calcium-fluoride surfaces is avoided by sandwiching the fluoride elements between fused silica and cementing with silicone fluid. The constructed lens makes good spectrograms.

  11. Telescopic vision contact lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Eric J.; Beer, R. Dirk; Arianpour, Ashkan; Ford, Joseph E.

    2011-03-01

    We present the concept, optical design, and first proof of principle experimental results for a telescopic contact lens intended to become a visual aid for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), providing magnification to the user without surgery or external head-mounted optics. Our contact lens optical system can provide a combination of telescopic and non-magnified vision through two independent optical paths through the contact lens. The magnified optical path incorporates a telescopic arrangement of positive and negative annular concentric reflectors to achieve 2.8x - 3x magnification on the eye, while light passing through a central clear aperture provides unmagnified vision.

  12. Ultraprecision Machining Characteristics of Poly-Crystalline Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiwang; Takahashi, Yasunori; Tamaki, Jun'Ichi; Kubo, Akihiko; Kuriyagawa, Tsunemoto; Sato, Yutaka

    Germanium is an excellent infrared optical material. On most occasions, single-crystalline germanium is used as optical lens substrate because its homogeneous structure is beneficial for fabricating uniform optical surfaces. In this work, we attempt to use poly crystals as lens substrates instead of single crystals, which may lead to a significant reduction in production cost. We conducted ultraprecision cutting experiments on poly-crystalline germanium to examine the microscopic machinability. The crystal orientations of specific crystal grains were characterized, and the machining characteristics of these crystal grains including surface textures, cutting forces, and grain boundary steps were investigated under various machining conditions. It was possible to produce uniformly ductile-cut surfaces cross all crystal grains by using an extremely small undeformed chip thickness (˜ 80nm) under negative tool rake angles (˜ -45°). This work indicates the possibility of fabricating high-quality infrared optical components from poly-crystalline germanium.

  13. An assay for intermolecular exchange of alpha crystallin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    An affinity column of alpha crystallin linked to cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose was developed to study the exchange of alpha subunits. Alpha crystallin bound to the Sepharose-alpha complex was dissociated with 8 mol/l urea, followed by quantitation using high-performance reverse-phase liquid chromatography. The time course of binding at 37 degrees C showed a hyperbolic binding pattern reaching equilibrium between 6-18 hr. Under these conditions, binding of beta and gamma crystallins to the same matrix was less than 10% of the alpha values, as was binding of alpha to glycine-coupled Sepharose. This assay was used to demonstrate changes in the subunit exchange of alpha crystallins present in high molecular weight versus lower molecular weight aggregates of the human lens. These results show that this binding procedure was a specific reproducible assay that might be used to study intermolecular interactions of the alpha crystallins.

  14. Reflections From a Fresnel Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2005-01-01

    Reflection of light by a convex Fresnel lens gives rise to two distinct images. A highly convex inverted real reflective image forms on the object side of the lens, while an upright virtual reflective image forms on the opposite side of the lens. I describe here a set of laser experiments performed upon a Fresnel lens. These experiments provide…

  15. Transglutaminase involvement in UV-A damage to the eye lens.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, O; Dovrat, A

    1996-11-01

    Solar radiation is believed to be one of the major environmental factors involved in lens cataractogenesis. The purpose of the study was to investigate the mechanisms by which UV-A at 365 nm causes damage to the eye lens. Bovine lenses were placed in special culture cells for pre-incubation of 24 hr. The lenses were positioned so that the anterior surface faced the incident UV-A radiation source and were maintained in the cells during irradiation. After irradiation, lens optical quality was monitored throughout the culture period and lens epithelium, cortex and nuclear samples were taken for biochemical analysis. Transglutaminase activity in the lens was affected by the radiation. The activity of transglutaminase in lens epithelium cortex and nucleus increased as a result of the irradiation and then declined towards control levels during the culture period, as the lens recovered from the UV-A damage. Specific lens proteins, alpha B and beta B1 crystallins (the enzyme substrates) were analyzed by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting with specific antibodies. Seventy-two hours after irradiation of 44.8 J cm-2 UV-A, alpha B crystallins were affected as was shown by the appearance of aggregation and degradation products. Some protein changes seem to be reversible. It appears that transglutaminase may be involved in the mechanism by which UV-A causes damage to the eye lens.

  16. Delay of diabetic cataract in rats by the antiglycating potential of cumin through modulation of alpha-crystallin chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pasupulati Anil; Reddy, Paduru Yadagiri; Srinivas, P N B S; Reddy, Geereddy Bhanuprakash

    2009-07-01

    alpha-Crystallin, a molecular chaperone of the eye lens, plays an important role in maintaining the transparency of the lens by preventing the aggregation/inactivation of several proteins and enzymes in addition to its structural role. alpha-Crystallin is a long-lived protein and is susceptible to several posttranslational modifications during aging, more so in certain clinical conditions such as diabetes. Nonenzymatic glycation of lens proteins and decline in the chaperone-like function of alpha-crystallin have been reported in diabetic conditions. Therefore, inhibitors of nonenzymatic protein glycation appear to be a potential target to preserve the chaperone activity of alpha-crystallin and to combat cataract under hyperglycemic conditions. In this study, we investigated the antiglycating potential of cumin in vitro and its ability to modulate the chaperone-like activity of alpha-crystallin vis-à-vis the progression of diabetic cataract in vivo. Aqueous extract of cumin was tested for its antiglycating ability against fructose-induced glycation of goat lens total soluble protein (TSP), alpha-crystallin from goat lens and a nonlenticular protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). The antiglycating potential of cumin was also investigated by feeding streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats with diet containing 0.5% cumin powder. The aqueous extract of cumin prevented in vitro glycation of TSP, alpha-crystallin and BSA. Slit lamp examination revealed that supplementation of cumin delayed progression and maturation of STZ-induced cataract in rats. Cumin was effective in preventing glycation of TSP and alpha-crystallin in diabetic lens. Interestingly, feeding of cumin to diabetic rats not only prevented loss of chaperone activity but also attenuated the structural changes of alpha-crystallin in lens. These results indicated that cumin has antiglycating properties that may be attributed to the modulation of chaperone activity of alpha-crystallin, thus delaying cataract in

  17. Characterization of the major cyanogen bromide fragment of alpha-A crystallin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifeanyi, F.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    Alpha crystallin from the bovine lens has been digested with cyanogen bromide, and the major fragment (CB-1) has been purified using reverse phase HPLC. Characterization of this fragment by Edman degradation and antisera to synthetic peptides indicates that it originates from alpha-A crystallin, but lacks the N-terminal methionine and the last 35 amino acids from the C-terminus of the molecule. The purified CB-1 fragment binds as well as native alpha crystallin to lens membrane, but is unable to self-assemble into the correct size of high molecular weight oligomeric complexes characteristic of the intact alpha-A chain. Together, these results demonstrate that the alpha-A chain is comprised of at least two functional domains, one of which is involved in binding of alpha-A crystallin to lens membrane, and another which is necessary for correct self-assembly of the molecule into high molecular weight oligomers.

  18. A Class I UV-Blocking (senofilcon A) Soft Contact Lens Prevents UVA-induced Yellow Fluorescence and NADH loss in the Rabbit Lens Nucleus in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Giblin, Frank J.; Lin, Li-Ren; Simpanya, Mukoma F.; Leverenz, Victor R.; Fick, Catherine E.

    2012-01-01

    It is known that fluorescence, much of it caused by UVA light excitation, increases in the aging human lens, resulting in loss of sharp vision. This study used an in vivo animal model to investigate UVA-excited fluorescence in the rabbit lens, which contains a high level of the UVA chromophore NADH, existing both free and bound to λ-crystallin. Also, the ability of a Class I (senofilcon A) soft contact lens to protect against UVA-induced effects on the rabbit lens was tested. Rabbit eyes were irradiated with UVA light in vivo (100 mW/cm2 on the cornea) for 1 hour using monochromatic 365 nm light. Irradiation was conducted in the presence of either a senofilcon A contact lens, a minimally UV-absorbing lotrafilcon A contact lens, or no contact lens at all. Eyes irradiated without a contact lens showed blue 365 nm-excited fluorescence initially, but this changed to intense yellow fluorescence after 1 hour. Isolated, previously irradiated lenses exhibited yellow fluorescence originating from the lens nucleus when viewed under 365 nm light, but showed normal blue fluorescence arising from the cortex. Previously irradiated lenses also exhibited a faint yellow color when observed under visible light. The senofilcon A contact lens protected completely against the UVA-induced effects on fluorescence and lens yellowing, whereas the lotrafilcon A lens showed no protection. The UVA-exposure also produced a 53% loss of total NADH (free plus bound) in the lens nucleus, with only a 13% drop in the anterior cortex. NADH loss in the nucleus was completely prevented with use of a senofilcon A contact lens, but no significant protection was observed with a lotrafilcon A lens. Overall, the senofilcon A lens provided an average of 67% protection against UVA-induced loss of four pyridine nucleotides in four different regions of the lens. HPLC analysis with fluorescence detection indicated a nearly six-fold increase in 365 nm-excited yellow fluorescence arising from lens nuclear λ-crystallin

  19. Contact Lens Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health and Consumer Devices Consumer Products Contact Lenses Contact Lens Risks Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... redness blurred vision swelling pain Serious Hazards of Contact Lenses Symptoms of eye irritation can indicate a ...

  20. Lens auto-centering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, Frédéric; Desnoyers, Nichola; Doucet, Michel; Côté, Patrice; Gauvin, Jonny; Anctil, Geneviève; Tremblay, Mathieu

    2015-09-01

    In a typical optical system, optical elements usually need to be precisely positioned and aligned to perform the correct optical function. This positioning and alignment involves securing the optical element in a holder or mount. Proper centering of an optical element with respect to the holder is a delicate operation that generally requires tight manufacturing tolerances or active alignment, resulting in costly optical assemblies. To optimize optical performance and minimize manufacturing cost, there is a need for a lens mounting method that could relax manufacturing tolerance, reduce assembly time and provide high centering accuracy. This paper presents a patent pending lens mounting method developed at INO that can be compared to the drop-in technique for its simplicity while providing the level of accuracy close to that achievable with techniques using a centering machine (usually < 5 μm). This innovative auto-centering method is based on the use of geometrical relationship between the lens diameter, the lens radius of curvature and the thread angle of the retaining ring. The autocentering principle and centering test results performed on real optical assemblies are presented. In addition to the low assembly time, high centering accuracy, and environmental robustness, the INO auto-centering method has the advantage of relaxing lens and barrel bore diameter tolerances as well as lens wedge tolerances. The use of this novel lens mounting method significantly reduces manufacturing and assembly costs for high performance optical systems. Large volume productions would especially benefit from this advancement in precision lens mounting, potentially providing a drastic cost reduction.

  1. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-03-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices.

  2. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens.

    PubMed

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices. PMID:26973294

  3. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens.

    PubMed

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M

    2016-03-14

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices.

  4. Terahertz Artificial Dielectric Lens

    PubMed Central

    Mendis, Rajind; Nagai, Masaya; Wang, Yiqiu; Karl, Nicholas; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and experimentally characterized a lens for the THz regime based on artificial dielectrics. These are man-made media that mimic properties of naturally occurring dielectric media, or even manifest properties that cannot generally occur in nature. For example, the well-known dielectric property, the refractive index, which usually has a value greater than unity, can have a value less than unity in an artificial dielectric. For our lens, the artificial-dielectric medium is made up of a parallel stack of 100 μm thick metal plates that form an array of parallel-plate waveguides. The convergent lens has a plano-concave geometry, in contrast to conventional dielectric lenses. Our results demonstrate that this lens is capable of focusing a 2 cm diameter beam to a spot size of 4 mm, at the design frequency of 0.17 THz. The results further demonstrate that the overall power transmission of the lens can be better than certain conventional dielectric lenses commonly used in the THz regime. Intriguingly, we also observe that under certain conditions, the lens boundary demarcated by the discontinuous plate edges actually resembles a smooth continuous surface. These results highlight the importance of this artificial-dielectric technology for the development of future THz-wave devices. PMID:26973294

  5. Characterization of the alpha-gamma and alpha-beta complex: evidence for an in vivo functional role of alpha-crystallin as a molecular chaperone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, D.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that in vitro, alpha-crystallin can protect other lens proteins against extensive denaturation and aggregation. The mechanism of this protection involves preferential binding of the partially denatured protein to a central region of the native alpha-crystallin complex. To test whether a similar phenomenon might occur in vivo, a high molecular weight aggregate (HMWA) fraction was isolated from the aged bovine lens. Negative staining of this preparation revealed the presence of particles of 13-14 nm diameter, characteristic of alpha-crystallin. Immunolocalization of the same particles using antiserum specific for gamma- and beta-crystallins demonstrated preferential binding of these crystallins to the central region of the alpha-crystallin complex. Together, these results provide evidence that in the intact lens, the alpha-crystallins are functionally important molecular chaperones.

  6. Spectral analysis and comparison of mineral deposits forming in opacified intraocular lens and senile cataractous lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Chen, Ko-Hwa; Lin, Chih-Cheng; Cheng, Wen-Ting; Li, Mei-Jane

    2010-10-01

    This preliminary report was attempted to compare the chemical components of mineral deposits on the surfaces of an opacified intraocular lens (IOL) and a calcified senile cataractous lens (SCL) by vibrational spectral diagnosis. An opacified intraocular lens (IOL) was obtained from a 65-year-old male patient who had a significant decrease in visual acuity 2-years after an ocular IOL implantation. Another SCL with grayish white calcified plaque on the subcapsular cortex was isolated from a 79-year-old male patient with complicated cataract after cataract surgery. Optical light microscope was used to observe both samples and gross pictures were taken. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman microspectroscopic techniques were employed to analyze the calcified deposits. The curve-fitting algorithm using the Gaussian function was also used to quantitatively estimate the chemical components in each deposit. The preliminary results of spectral diagnosis indicate that the opacified IOL mainly consisted of the poorly crystalline, immature non-stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (HA) with higher content of type B carbonated apatites. However, the calcified plaque deposited on the SCL was comprised of a mature crystalline stoichiometric HA having higher contents of type A and type B carbonate apatites. More case studies should be examined in future.

  7. Refined flicker photometry technique to measure ocular lens density.

    PubMed

    Teikari, Petteri; Najjar, Raymond P; Knoblauch, Kenneth; Dumortier, Dominique; Cornut, Pierre-Loïc; Denis, Philippe; Cooper, Howard M; Gronfier, Claude

    2012-11-01

    Many physiological and pathological conditions are associated with a change in the crystalline lens transmittance. Estimates of lens opacification, however, generally rely on subjective rather than objective measures in clinical practice. The goal of our study was to develop an improved psychophysical heterochromatic flicker photometry technique combined with existing mathematical models to evaluate the spectral transmittance of the human ocular media noninvasively. Our results show that it is possible to accurately estimate ocular media density in vivo in humans. Potential applications of our approach include basic research and clinical settings on visual and nonimage-forming visual systems.

  8. Tunable optofluidic birefringent lens.

    PubMed

    Wee, D; Hwang, S H; Song, Y S; Youn, J R

    2016-05-01

    An optofluidic birefringent lens is demonstrated using hydrodynamic liquid-liquid (L(2)) interfaces in a microchannel. The L(2) lens comprises a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) phase and an optically isotropic phase for the main stream and the surrounding sub-stream, respectively. When the optofluidic device is subjected to a sufficiently strong electric field perpendicular to the flow direction, NLCs are allowed to orient along the external field rather than the flow direction overcoming fluidic viscous stress. The characteristics of the optofluidic birefringence lens are investigated by experimental and numerical analyses. The difference between the refractive indices of the main stream and the sub-stream changes according to the polarization direction of incident light, which determines the optical behaviour of the lens. The incidence of s-polarized light leads to a short focal point, while p-polarized light has a relatively long focal distance from the same L(2) interface. The curvatures and focal lengths of the lens are successfully evaluated by a hydrodynamic theory of NLCs and a simple ray-tracing model. PMID:27035877

  9. Bionic optical imaging system with aspheric solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jia-Wei; Wang, Xuan-Yin; Liang, Dan

    2016-02-01

    A bionic optical imaging system with an aspheric solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens was designed and fabricated. The entire system mainly consisted of a doublet lens, a solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens, a connecting part, and a CCD imaging device. To mimic the structure of the crystalline lens, the solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens consisted of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) lens, a polymethyl methacrylate lens, and the liquid of ethyl silicone oil. By pumping liquid in or out of the cavity using a microinjector, the curvatures of the front and rear surfaces of the PDMS lens were varied, resulting in a change of focal length. The overall structure of the system was presented, as well as a detailed description of the solid-liquid mixed variable-focus lens, material, and fabrication process. Under different injection volumes, the deformation of the PDMS lens was measured and simulated, pictures were captured, and the optical performance was analyzed in simulations and experiments. The focal length of the system ranged from 25.05 to 14.61 mm, and the variation of the diopter was 28.5D, which was larger than that of the human eye.

  10. Subunit exchange demonstrates a differential chaperone activity of calf alpha-crystallin toward beta LOW- and individual gamma-crystallins.

    PubMed

    Putilina, Tatiana; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Prat, Karine; Lubsen, Nicolette H; Tardieu, Annette

    2003-04-18

    complexes involved various binding sites. The changes in subunit exchange associated with the chaperone properties of alpha-crystallins toward the other lens crystallins demonstrate the dynamic character of the heat-activated alpha-crystallin structure.

  11. Metamaterial lens design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Ralph Hamilton, III

    Developments in nanotechnology and material science have produced optical materials with astonishing properties. Theory and experimentation have demonstrated that, among other properties, the law of refraction is reversed at an interface between a naturally occurring material and these so-called metamaterials. As the technology advances metamaterials have the potential to vastly impact the field of optical science. In this study we provide a foundation for future work in the area of geometric optics and lens design with metamaterials. The concept of negative refraction is extended to derive a comprehensive set of first-order imaging principles as well as an exhaustive aberration theory to 4th order. Results demonstrate congruence with the classical theory; however, negative refraction introduces a host of novel properties. In terms of aberration theory, metamaterials present the lens designer with increased flexibility. A singlet can be bent to produce either positive or negative spherical aberration (regardless of its focal length), its contribution to coma can become independent of its conjugate factor, and its field curvature takes on the opposite sign of its focal power. This is shown to be advantageous in some designs such as a finite conjugate relay lens; however, in a wider field of view landscape lens we demonstrate a metamaterial's aberration properties may be detrimental. This study presents the first comprehensive investigation of metamaterial lenses using industry standard lens design software. A formal design study evaluates the performance of doublet and triplet lenses operating at F/5 with a 100 mm focal length, a 20° half field of view, and specific geometric constraints. Computer aided optimization and performance evaluation provide experimental controls to remove designer-induced bias from the results. Positive-index lenses provide benchmarks for comparison to metamaterial systems subjected to identical design constraints. We find that

  12. Microoptical compound lens

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Gill, David D.

    2007-10-23

    An apposition microoptical compound lens comprises a plurality of lenslets arrayed around a segment of a hollow, three-dimensional optical shell. The lenslets collect light from an object and focus the light rays onto the concentric, curved front surface of a coherent fiber bundle. The fiber bundle transports the light rays to a planar detector, forming a plurality of sub-images that can be reconstructed as a full image. The microoptical compound lens can have a small size (millimeters), wide field of view (up to 180.degree.), and adequate resolution for object recognition and tracking.

  13. A guinea-pig hereditary cataract contains a splice-site deletion in a crystallin gene.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, I R; Gonzalez, P; Zigler, J S; Borrás, T

    1992-10-13

    A congenital cataract present in guinea pigs provided a unique opportunity to study a hereditary lens disease at the molecular level. zeta-Crystallin, one of the most abundant guinea pig lens proteins, was found to be altered in the lens of cataractous animals. Several zeta-crystallin cDNA clones were isolated from a cataractous lens library and found to contain a 102-bp deletion towards the 3' end of the coding region. This deletion does not interfere with the reading frame but results in a protein 34 amino acids shorter. Sequence analysis of a normal genomic zeta-crystallin clone revealed that the missing 102-bp fragment corresponds to an entire exon (exon 7). PCR analysis of the genomic DNA isolated from cataractous animals showed that exon 7, though missing from the mRNA, is intact in the cataractous genome. Further sequence analysis of the zeta-crystallin gene disclosed a dinucleotide deletion of the universal AG at the acceptor splice-site of intron 6 of the mutant gene. The presence of this mutation results in the skipping of exon 7 during the mRNA processing which in turn results in the altered zeta-crystallin protein. This is the first time a genomic mutation in an enzyme/crystallin gene has been directly linked to a congenital cataract.

  14. Acetylation of Gly1 and Lys2 Promotes Aggregation of Human γD-Crystallin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The human lens contains three major protein families: α-, β-, and γ-crystallin. Among the several variants of γ-crystallin in the human lens, γD-crystallin is a major form. γD-Crystallin is primarily present in the nuclear region of the lens and contains a single lysine residue at the second position (K2). In this study, we investigated the acetylation of K2 in γD-crystallin in aging and cataractous human lenses. Our results indicated that K2 is acetylated at an early age and that the amount of K2-acetylated γD-crystallin increased with age. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that in addition to K2, glycine 1 (G1) was acetylated in γD-crystallin from human lenses and in γD-crystallin acetylated in vitro. The chaperone ability of α-crystallin for acetylated γD-crystallin was lower than that for the nonacetylated protein. The tertiary structure and the microenvironment of the cysteine residues were significantly altered by acetylation. The acetylated protein exhibited higher surface hydrophobicity, was unstable against thermal and chemical denaturation, and exhibited a higher propensity to aggregate at 80 °C in comparison to the nonacetylated protein. Acetylation enhanced the GdnHCl-induced unfolding and slowed the subsequent refolding of γD-crystallin. Theoretical analysis indicated that the acetylation of K2 and G1 reduced the structural stability of the protein and brought the distal cysteine residues (C18 and C78) into close proximity. Collectively, these results indicate that the acetylation of G1 and K2 residues in γD-crystallin likely induced a molten globule-like structure, predisposing it to aggregation, which may account for the high content of aggregated proteins in the nucleus of aged and cataractous human lenses. PMID:25393041

  15. Frs2α enhances fibroblast growth factor-mediated survival and differentiation in lens development

    PubMed Central

    Madakashira, Bhavani P.; Kobrinski, Daniel A.; Hancher, Andrew D.; Arneman, Elizabeth C.; Wagner, Brad D.; Wang, Fen; Shin, Hailey; Lovicu, Frank J.; Reneker, Lixing W.; Robinson, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Most growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) signal through similar intracellular pathways, but they often have divergent biological effects. Therefore, elucidating the mechanism of channeling the intracellular effect of RTK stimulation to facilitate specific biological responses represents a fundamental biological challenge. Lens epithelial cells express numerous RTKs with the ability to initiate the phosphorylation (activation) of Erk1/2 and PI3-K/Akt signaling. However, only Fgfr stimulation leads to lens fiber cell differentiation in the developing mammalian embryo. Additionally, within the lens, only Fgfrs activate the signal transduction molecule Frs2α. Loss of Frs2α in the lens significantly increases apoptosis and decreases phosphorylation of both Erk1/2 and Akt. Also, Frs2α deficiency decreases the expression of several proteins characteristic of lens fiber cell differentiation, including Prox1, p57KIP2, aquaporin 0 and β-crystallins. Although not normally expressed in the lens, the RTK TrkC phosphorylates Frs2α in response to binding the ligand NT3. Transgenic lens epithelial cells expressing both TrkC and NT3 exhibit several features characteristic of lens fiber cells. These include elongation, increased Erk1/2 and Akt phosphorylation, and the expression of β-crystallins. All these characteristics of NT3-TrkC transgenic lens epithelial cells depend on Frs2α. Therefore, tyrosine phosphorylation of Frs2α mediates Fgfr-dependent lens cell survival and provides a mechanistic basis for the unique fiber-differentiating capacity of Fgfs on mammalian lens epithelial cells. PMID:23136392

  16. Messenger RNA stabilization in chicken lens development: a reexamination.

    PubMed

    Li, X A; Beebe, D C

    1991-07-01

    Previous studies, using actinomycin D, suggested that the rate of mRNA degradation in chicken embryo lens epithelial cells decreased sharply between Days 11 and 13 of development (Yoshida and Katoh, Exp. Eye Res. 11, 1971; Exp. Cell Res. 71, 1972). We repeated these studies and directly measured the effects of actinomycin on lens mRNAs. Although actinomycin decreased [3H]uridine incorporation greater than 90%, only modest decreases in methionine incorporation were detected. Treatment for 6 hr had no detectable effect on delta-crystallin mRNA levels or on the relative amounts of proteins synthesized in an in vitro translation system. Unlike the previous studies, we did not find significant changes in the stability of lens epithelial mRNAs during development. PMID:2060704

  17. Broadband wide angle lens implemented with dielectric metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Hunt, John; Kundtz, Nathan; Landy, Nathan; Nguyen, Vinh; Perram, Tim; Starr, Anthony; Smith, David R

    2011-01-01

    The Luneburg lens is a powerful imaging device, exhibiting aberration free focusing for parallel rays incident from any direction. However, its advantages are offset by a focal surface that is spherical and thus difficult to integrate with standard planar detector and emitter arrays. Using the recently developed technique of transformation optics, it is possible to transform the curved focal surface to a flat plane while maintaining the perfect focusing behavior of the Luneburg over a wide field of view. Here we apply these techniques to a lesser-known refractive Luneburg lens and implement the design with a metamaterial composed of a semi-crystalline distribution of holes drilled in a dielectric. In addition, we investigate the aberrations introduced by various approximations made in the implementation of the lens. The resulting design approach has improved mechanical strength with small aberrations and is ideally suited to implementation at infrared and visible wavelengths. PMID:22164056

  18. [The artificial lens: the folly of yesterday, the standard of today].

    PubMed

    Meur, G

    1999-01-01

    Traditional cataract operation (dislocation of the crystalline lens into the vitreous body by external pressure or by needling) is nearly as old as mankind. The idea of implanting an artificial lenticulus is not new but this was only performed for the first time in 1949. In the last 50 years, a better knowledge of corneal and retinal physiology, as well as the improvements of intraocular lens material and design, have led to very safe routine surgery.

  19. A Tribute to Len Barton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This article constitutes a short personal tribute to Len Barton in honour of his work and our collegial relationship going back over 30 years. It covers how Len saw his intellectual project of providing critical sociological and political perspectives on special education, disability and inclusion, and his own radical political perspectives. Len's…

  20. Characterization, cloning, and expression of porcine alpha B crystallin.

    PubMed

    Liao, J H; Hung, C C; Lee, J S; Wu, S H; Chiou, S H

    1998-03-01

    alpha-Crystallin is a major lens protein present in the lenses of all vertebrate species. Recent studies have revealed that bovine alpha-crystallins possess genuine chaperone activity similar to small heat-shock proteins. In order to compare this chaperone-like structural protein from the eye lenses of different mammalian species, we have cloned and expressed one of the main alpha-crystallin subunits, i.e., alpha B crystallin, from the porcine lenses in order to facilitate the structure-function evaluation and comparison of this chaperonin protein. cDNA encoding alpha B subunit chain was obtained using a new "Marathon cDNA amplification" protocol of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). PCR-amplified product corresponding to alpha B subunit was then ligated into pGEM-T plasmid and prepared for nucleotide sequencing by the dideoxy-nucleotide chain-termination method. Sequencing several positive clones containing DNA inserts coding for alpha B-crystallin subunit constructed only one complete full-length reading frame of 525 base pairs similar to human and bovine alpha B subunits, covering a deduced protein sequence of 175 amino acids including the universal translation-initiating methionine. The porcine alpha B crystallin shows only 3 and 7 residues difference to bovine and human alpha B crystallins respectively, revealing the close relatedness among mammalian eye lens proteins. The sequence differences between porcine and sub-mammalian species such as chicken and bullfrog are much greater, especially at the N- and C-terminal regions of these alpha B crystallins. Expression of alpha B subunit chain in E. coli vector generated a polypeptide which can cross-react with the antiserum against the native and purified alpha B subunit from the native porcine lenses albeit with a much lower activity.

  1. Thin Lens Ray Tracing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatland, Ian R.

    2002-01-01

    Proposes a ray tracing approach to thin lens analysis based on a vector form of Snell's law for paraxial rays as an alternative to the usual approach in introductory physics courses. The ray tracing approach accommodates skew rays and thus provides a complete analysis. (Author/KHR)

  2. The Lens of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thalos, Mariam

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry possesses a distinctive theoretical lens--a distinctive set of theoretical concerns regarding the dynamics and transformations of a perplexing variety of organic and nonorganic substances--to which it must be faithful. Even if it is true that chemical facts bear a special (reductive) relationship to physical facts, nonetheless it will…

  3. Thermal Lens Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Kenji; Hibara, Akihide; Kimura, Hiroko; Sawada, Tsuguo; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2000-09-01

    We developed a novel laser microscope based on the thermal lens effect induced by a coaxial beam comprised of excitation and probe beams. The signal generation mechanism was confirmed to be an authentic thermal lens effect from the measurement of signal and phase dependences on optical configurations between the sample and the probe beam focus, and therefore, the thermal lens effect theory could be applied. Two-point spatial resolution was determined by the spot size of the excitation beam, not by the thermal diffusion length. Sensitivity was quite high, and the detection ability, evaluated using a submicron microparticle containing dye molecules, was 0.8 zmol/μm2, hence a distribution image of trace chemical species could be obtained quantitatively. In addition, analytes are not restricted to fluorescent species, therefore, the thermal lens microscope is a promising analytical microscope. A two-dimensional image of a histamine molecule distribution, which was produced in mast cells at the femtomole level in a human nasal mucous polyp, was obtained.

  4. Retinal images in the human eye with implanted intraocular lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zając, Marek; Siedlecki, Damian; Nowak, Jerzy

    2007-04-01

    A typical proceeding in cataract is based on the removal of opaque crystalline lens and inserting in its place the artificial intraocular lens (IOL). The quality of retinal image after such procedure depends, among others, on the parameters of the IOL, so the design of the implanted lens is of great importance. An appropriate choice of the IOL material, especially in relation to its biocompatibility, is often considered. However the parameter, which is often omitted during the IOL design is its chromatic aberration. In particular lack of its adequacy to the chromatic aberration of a crystalline lens may cause problems. In order to fit better chromatic aberration of the eye with implanted IOL to that of the healthy eye we propose a hybrid - refractive-diffractive IOL. It can be designed in such way that the total longitudinal chromatic aberration of an eye with implanted IOL equals the total longitudinal chromatic aberration of a healthy eye. In this study we compare the retinal image quality calculated numerically on the basis of the well known Liou-Brennan eye model with typical IOL implanted with that obtained if the IOL is done as hybrid (refractive-diffractive) design.

  5. Electrostatic origin of in vitro aggregation of human γ-crystallin

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Benjamin G.; Dobson, Cassidy M.; Garman, Scott C.; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2013-01-01

    The proteins α-, β-, and γ-crystallins are the major components of the lens in the human eye. Using dynamic light scattering method, we have performed in vitro investigations of protein-protein interactions in dilute solutions of human γ-crystallin and α-crystallin. We find that γ-crystallin spontaneously aggregates into finite-sized clusters in phosphate buffer solutions. There are two distinct populations of unaggregated and aggregated γ-crystallins in these solutions. On the other hand, α-crystallin molecules are not aggregated into large clusters in solutions of α-crystallin alone. When α-crystallin and γ-crystallin are mixed in phosphate buffer solutions, we demonstrate that the clusters of γ-crystallin are prevented. By further investigating the roles of temperature, protein concentration, pH, salt concentration, and a reducing agent, we show that the aggregation of γ-crystallin under our in vitro conditions arises from non-covalent electrostatic interactions. In addition, we show that aggregation of γ-crystallin occurs under the dilute in vitro conditions even in the absence of oxidizing agents that can induce disulfide cross-links, long considered to be responsible for human cataracts. Aggregation of γ-crystallin when maintained under reducing conditions suggests that oxidation does not contribute to the aggregation in dilute solutions. PMID:24089726

  6. Topological crystalline insulator nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Cha, Judy J

    2014-11-01

    Topological crystalline insulators are topological insulators whose surface states are protected by the crystalline symmetry, instead of the time reversal symmetry. Similar to the first generation of three-dimensional topological insulators such as Bi₂Se₃ and Bi₂Te₃, topological crystalline insulators also possess surface states with exotic electronic properties such as spin-momentum locking and Dirac dispersion. Experimentally verified topological crystalline insulators to date are SnTe, Pb₁-xSnxSe, and Pb₁-xSnxTe. Because topological protection comes from the crystal symmetry, magnetic impurities or in-plane magnetic fields are not expected to open a gap in the surface states in topological crystalline insulators. Additionally, because they have a cubic structure instead of a layered structure, branched structures or strong coupling with other materials for large proximity effects are possible, which are difficult with layered Bi₂Se₃ and Bi₂Te₃. Thus, additional fundamental phenomena inaccessible in three-dimensional topological insulators can be pursued. In this review, topological crystalline insulator SnTe nanostructures will be discussed. For comparison, experimental results based on SnTe thin films will be covered. Surface state properties of topological crystalline insulators will be discussed briefly.

  7. Dominant inhibition of lens placode formation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Burgess, Daniel; Overbeek, Paul A.; Govindarajan, Venkatesh

    2008-01-01

    The lens in the vertebrate eye has been shown to be critical for proper differentiation of the surrounding ocular tissues including the cornea, iris and ciliary body. In mice, previous investigators have assayed the consequences of molecular ablation of the lens. However, in these studies, lens ablation was initiated (and completed) after the cornea, retina, iris and ciliary body had initiated their differentiation programs thereby precluding analysis of the early role of the lens in fate determination of these tissues. In the present study, we have ablated the lens precursor cells of the surface ectoderm by generation of transgenic mice that express an attenuated version of diphtheria toxin (Tox176) linked to a modified Pax6 promoter that is active in the lens ectodermal precursors. In these mice, lens precursor cells fail to express Sox2, Prox1 and αA-crystallin and die before the formation of a lens placode. The Tox176 mice also showed profound alterations in the corneal differentiation program. The corneal epithelium displayed histological features of the skin, and expressed markers of skin differentiation such as Keratin 1 and 10 instead of Keratin 12, a marker of corneal epithelial differentiation. In the Tox176 mice, in the absence of the lens, extensive folding of the retina was seen. However, differentiation of the major cell types in the retina including the ganglion, amacrine, bipolar and horizontal cells was not affected. Unexpectedly, ectopic placement of the retinal pigmented epithelium was seen between the folds of the retina. Initial specification of the presumptive ciliary body and iris at the anterior margins of the retina was not altered in the Tox176 mice but their subsequent differentiation was blocked. Lacrimal and Harderian glands, which are derived from the Pax6-expressing surface ectodermal precursors, also failed to differentiate. These results suggest that, in mice, specification of the retina, ciliary body and iris occurs at the very

  8. Differential analysis of D-{beta}-Asp-containing proteins found in normal and infrared irradiated rabbit lens

    SciTech Connect

    Takata, Takumi; Shimo-Oka, Tadashi; Kojima, Masami; Miki, Kunio; Fujii, Noriko . E-mail: nfujii@HL.rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-05-26

    Although proteins are generally composed of L-{alpha}-amino acids, D-{beta}-aspartic acid (Asp)-containing proteins have been reported in various elderly tissues. Our previous study detected several D-{beta}-Asp-containing proteins in a rabbit lens derived from epithelial cell line by Western blot analysis of a 2D-gel using a polyclonal antibody that is highly specific for D-{beta}-Asp-containing proteins. The identity of each spot was subsequently determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and the Ms-Fit online database searching algorithm. In this study, we discovered novel D-{beta}-Asp-containing proteins from rabbit lens. The results indicate that {beta}-crystallin A3, {beta}-crystallin A4, {beta}-crystallin B1, {beta}-crystallin B2, {beta}-crystallin B3, {gamma}-crystallin C, {gamma}-crystallin D, and {lambda}-crystallin in rabbit lens contain D-{beta}-Asp residues. Furthermore, the occurrence of D-{beta}-Asp residues increases with infrared ray (IR) irradiation. Additionally, some D-{beta}-Asp-containing proteins only appear after IR irradiation. One such protein is the {alpha}-enolase, which shows homology to {tau}-crystallin.

  9. Interactions between Small Heat Shock Protein α-Crystallin and Galectin-Related Interfiber Protein (GRIFIN) in the Ocular Lens†

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Kelly A.; Hsu, Cheng-Da; Petrash, J. Mark

    2013-01-01

    As a member of the small heat shock protein superfamily, α-crystallin has a chaperone-like ability to recognize and bind denatured or unfolded proteins and prevent their aggregation. Recent studies suggest that α-crystallin may also interact with a variety of proteins under native conditions in vitro. To identify potential binding partners for α-crystallin in the intact ocular lens, we conducted cross-linking studies in transgenic mouse lenses designed for overexpression of His-tagged human αA-crystallin. Interacting proteins were copurified with the epitope-tagged crystallin complexes and were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. This approach identified GRIFIN (galectin-related interfiber protein) as a novel binding partner. Consistent with results from cross-linking, GRIFIN subunits copurified with α-crystallin complexes during size exclusion chromatography of nontransgenic mouse lens extracts prepared without chemical cross-linking. Equilibrium binding to GRIFIN was studied using native α-crystallin isolated from calf lenses as well as oligomeric complexes reconstituted from recombinant αA- and αB-crystallin subunits. Calf lens α-crystallin binds GRIFIN with relatively high affinity (Kd=6.5 ± 0.8 μM) at a stoichiometry of 0.25 ± 0.01 GRIFIN monomer/α-crystallin subunit. The binding interaction between α-crystallin and GRIFIN is enhanced up to 5-fold in the presence of 3 mM ATP. These binding data support the hypothesis that GRIFIN is a novel binding partner of α-crystallin in the lens. PMID:19296714

  10. Identification of tryptophan oxidation products in bovine alpha-crystallin.

    PubMed Central

    Finley, E. L.; Dillon, J.; Crouch, R. K.; Schey, K. L.

    1998-01-01

    Oxidation is known to affect the structure, activity, and rate of degradation of proteins, and is believed to contribute to a variety of pathological conditions. Metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) is a primary oxidizing system in many cell types. In this study, the oxidative effects of a MCO system (the Fenton reaction) on the structure of the tryptophan residues of alpha-crystallin were determined. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was utilized to identify specific tryptophan and methionine oxidation products in the bovine alpha-crystallin sequence. After oxidative exposure, alpha-crystallin was digested with trypsin, and the resulting peptides were fractionated by reverse-phase HPLC. Structural analysis by mass spectrometry revealed that tryptophan 9 of alphaA- and tryptophan 60 of alphaB-crystallin were each converted into hydroxytryptophans (HTRP), N-formylkynurenine (NFK), and kynurenine (KYN). However, only HTRP and KYN formation were detected at residue 9 of alphaB-crystallin. Oxidation of methionine 1 of alphaA- and methionine 1 and 68 of alphaB-crystallin was also detected. The products NFK and KYN are of particular importance in the lens, as they themselves are photosensitizers that can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon UV light absorption. The unambiguous identification of HTRP, NFK, and KYN in intact alpha-crystallin represents the first structural proof of the formation of these products in an intact protein, and provides a basis for detailed structural analysis of oxidized proteins generated in numerous pathological conditions. PMID:9828005

  11. Crystalline Silica Primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1992-01-01

    substance and will present a nontechnical overview of the techniques used to measure crystalline silica. Because this primer is meant to be a starting point for anyone interested in learning more about crystalline silica, a list of selected readings and other resources is included. The detailed glossary, which defines many terms that are beyond the scope of this publication, is designed to help the reader move from this presentation to a more technical one, the inevitable next step.

  12. Functional modular contact lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, Angela J.; Cowan, Melissa; Lähdesmäki, Ilkka; Lingley, Andrew; Otis, Brian; Parviz, Babak A.

    2009-08-01

    Tear fluid offers a potential route for non-invasive sensing of physiological parameters. Utilization of this potential depends on the ability to manufacture sensors that can be placed on the surface of the eye. A contact lens makes a natural platform for such sensors, but contact lens polymers present a challenge for sensor fabrication. This paper describes a microfabrication process for constructing sensors that can be integrated into the structure of a functional contact lens in the future. To demonstrate the capabilities of the process, an amperometric glucose sensor was fabricated on a polymer substrate. The sensor consists of platinum working and counter electrodes, as well as a region of indium-tin oxide (ITO) for glucose oxidase immobilization. An external silver-silver chloride electrode was used as the reference electrode during the characterization experiments. Sensor operation was validated by hydrogen peroxide measurements in the 10- 20 μM range and glucose measurements in the 0.125-20 mM range.

  13. Binary-liquid phase separation of lens protein solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Broide, M L; Berland, C R; Pande, J; Ogun, O O; Benedek, G B

    1991-01-01

    We have determined the coexistence curves (plots of phase-separation temperature T versus protein concentration C) for aqueous solutions of purified calf lens proteins. The proteins studied, calf gamma IIIa-, gamma IIIb-, and gamma IVa-crystallin, have very similar amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures. Both ascending and descending limbs of the coexistence curves were measured. We find that the coexistence curves for each of these proteins and for gamma II-crystallin can be fit, near the critical point, to the function /(Cc-C)/Cc/ = A [(Tc - T)/Tc]beta, where beta = 0.325, Cc is the critical protein concentration in mg/ml, Tc is the critical temperature for phase separation in K, and A is a parameter that characterizes the width of the coexistence curve. We find that A and Cc are approximately the same for all four coexistence curves (A = 2.6 +/- 0.1, Cc = 289 +/- 20 mg/ml), but that Tc is not the same. For gamma II- and gamma IIIb-crystallin, Tc approximately 5 degrees C, whereas for gamma IIIa- and gamma IVa-crystallin, Tc approximately 38 degrees C. By comparing the published protein sequences for calf, rat, and human gamma-crystallins, we postulate that a few key amino acid residues account for the division of gamma-crystallins into low-Tc and high-Tc groups. Images PMID:2062844

  14. Intraocular lens employed for cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roszkowska, A. M.; Torrisi, L.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to illustrate the techniques of cataract surgery with implantation of intraocular lenses and some physical properties of the used materials. The new technology, coupled with extensive experience and the studied cases, permits to increase the standardization and accuracy of the engravings, by reducing the use and handling of surgical instruments inside the eye. At present it is possible to replace the cataract with crystalline lenses based on biopolymers such as PMMA, silicone, acrylic hydrophilic and hydrophobic acrylic. These materials are increasingly able to replace the natural lens and to ensure the fully functional of the eye. The role of femtosecond lasers in cataract surgery, to assist or replace several aspects of the manual cataract surgery, are discussed.

  15. THE OPTIMAL GRAVITATIONAL LENS TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Surdej, J.; Hanot, C.; Sadibekova, T.; Delacroix, C.; Habraken, S.; Coleman, P.; Dominik, M.; Le Coroller, H.; Mawet, D.; Quintana, H.; Sluse, D.

    2010-05-15

    Given an observed gravitational lens mirage produced by a foreground deflector (cf. galaxy, quasar, cluster, ...), it is possible via numerical lens inversion to retrieve the real source image, taking full advantage of the magnifying power of the cosmic lens. This has been achieved in the past for several remarkable gravitational lens systems. Instead, we propose here to invert an observed multiply imaged source directly at the telescope using an ad hoc optical instrument which is described in the present paper. Compared to the previous method, this should allow one to detect fainter source features as well as to use such an optimal gravitational lens telescope to explore even fainter objects located behind and near the lens. Laboratory and numerical experiments illustrate this new approach.

  16. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, D.N. Jr.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-10-21

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations is disclosed, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components. 2 figs.

  17. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, Jr., David N.; Simpson, Marc L.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components.

  18. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-07-13

    The present invention provides phyllosilicate-polymer compositions which are useful as liquid crystalline composites. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while at the same time be transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles liquid crystalline composite, liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  19. Dispersion-compensated Fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, K.C.

    1992-11-03

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4[times]10[sup [minus]5] inch and a profile width of at least 10[sup [minus]3] inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight. 10 figs.

  20. Dispersion-compensated fresnel lens

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Kenneth C.

    1992-01-01

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4.multidot.10.sup.-5 inch and a profile width of at least 10.sup.-3 inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight.

  1. Simultaneous stereoinversion and isomerization at the Asp-4 residue in βB2-crystallin from the aged human eye lenses.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Norihiko; Kawaguchi, Takehiro; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2011-10-11

    The lens proteins are composed of α-, β-, and γ-crystallins that interact with each other to maintain the transparency and refractive power of the lens. Because the lens crystallins are long-lived proteins, they undergo various post-translational modifications including racemization, isomerization, deamidation, oxidation, glycation, and truncation. In βB2-crystallin, which is the most abundant β-crystallin, the deamidation of asparagine and glutamine residues has been reported. Here, we found that the aspartyl (Asp) residue at position 4 of βB2-crystallin in the lenses of elderly human individuals undergoes a significant degree of inversion and isomerization to the biologically uncommon residue D-β-Asp. Surprisingly, the D/L ratio of β-Asp at position 4 in βB2-crystallin from elderly donors (67-77 year old) was 0.88-3.21. A D/L ratio of amino acids greater than 1.0 is defined as an inversion of configuration from the L- to D-form, rather than a racemization. These extremely high D/L ratios are equivalent to those of Asp-58 and Asp-151 (D/L ratio: 3.1 for Asp-58 and 5.7 for Asp-151) in αA-crystallin from elderly donors (~80 year old) as reported previously. Initially, we identified specific Asp residues in the β-crystallin family of proteins that undergo a high degree of inversion. These results show that the isomerization and inversion of Asp residues occurs both in the α- and β-crystallins of the lens. Inversion of these Asp residues directly affects the higher order structure of the protein. Hence, this modification may change crystallin-crystallin interactions and disrupt the function of crystallins in the lens.

  2. Light scattering studies of human crystallin proteins and loss of transparency in cataracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Benjamin; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2012-02-01

    The human lens derives its transparency and refractive index from the interactions between crystallin proteins (α-, β-, γ-crystallin). When the ordering of these crystallins is perturbed, insoluble macromolecular aggregates of crystalline proteins can occur resulting in cataracts. Using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC), we have conducted a detailed study of the formation of these aggregates. Our DLS results on γ-crystallin solutions exhibit the occurrence of slow and fast modes demonstrating the spontaneous formation of aggregates (hydrodynamic radius, Rh ˜ 200 nm) in equilibrium with monomeric proteins (Rh ˜ 3 nm). On the other hand, DLS results on α-crystallin solutions clearly demonstrate that α-crystallin molecules exist as a single population (Rh ˜ 18 nm). Our results on mixtures of α- and γ-crystallin solutions show that the α-crystallin tends to demolish the clumps of γ-crystallin. Our exploration of environmental effecs (temperature, pH, salt concentration) has revealed the macromolecular mechanism of dissolution of crystallin aggregates, providing a strategy for cataract prevention and insight into protein-protein interactions.

  3. HUMAN AND NON-HUMAN PRIMATE LENSES CULTURED WITH IONOPHORE FORM αB-CRYSTALLIN LACKING THE C-TERMINAL LYS, A PROMINENT FEATURE OF SOME HUMAN CATARACTS

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Emi; David, Larry L.; Riviere, Michael A.; Azuma, Mitsuyoshi; Shearer, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Elevation of lens calcium occurs in both human and experimental animal cataracts, and opacification may result from calcium-activated proteolysis. The purpose of the present study was to determine if calcium accumulation in cultured human and Macaca mulatta lenses results in proteolysis of crystallins, the major lens proteins. Methods Two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to construct detailed maps of human and monkey lens crystallins so that proteolysis following calcium accumulation could be monitored and the altered crystallins identified. Human and macaque lenses cultured in A23187 showed elevated lenticular calcium and superficial cortical opacities. The carboxypeptidase E (CPE) gene is expressed in human lens, and its presence in lens fibers was demonstrated by western blot. To investigate if CPE could cause similar truncation, purified αB-crystallin and CPE were incubated in vitro Results The major change observed in the crystallins of these cultured lenses was the accumulation of αB1-174-crystallin resulting from the loss of a C-terminal lysine. This result was significant, because similar appearance of αB1-174 is a prominent change in some human cataracts. αB-crystallin and CPE incubation result in the formation αB1-174-crystallin. This truncation was specific to αB1-174-crystallin since other crystallins were not proteolyzed. While a weaker activator than zinc, calcium was capable of activating CPE in vitro. Conclusions Since zinc concentrations did not increase during culture in A23187, calcium uptake in lens may be responsible for CPE activation and αB1-174 formation during cataract. PMID:19608539

  4. Crystalline molecular flasks.

    PubMed

    Inokuma, Yasuhide; Kawano, Masaki; Fujita, Makoto

    2011-05-01

    A variety of host compounds have been used as molecular-scale reaction vessels, protecting guests from their environment or restricting the space available around them, thus favouring particular reactions. Such molecular 'flasks' can endow guest molecules with reactivities that differ from those in bulk solvents. Here, we extend this concept to crystalline molecular flasks, solid-state crystalline networks with pores within which pseudo-solution-state reactions can take place. As the guest molecules can spontaneously align along the walls and channels of the hosts, structural changes in the substrates can be directly observed by in situ X-ray crystallography during reaction. Recently, this has enabled observation of the molecular structures of transient intermediates and other labile species, in the form of sequential structural snapshots of the chemical transformation. Here, we describe the principles, development and applications of crystalline molecular flasks.

  5. Lens of Eye Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, Michael Wesley

    2015-03-23

    An analysis of LANL occupational dose measurements was made with respect to lens of eye dose (LOE), in particular, for plutonium workers. Table 1 shows the reported LOE as a ratio of the “deep” (photon only) and “deep+neutron” dose for routine monitored workers at LANL for the past ten years. The data compares the mean and range of these values for plutonium workers* and non-routine plutonium workers. All doses were reported based on measurements with the LANL Model 8823 TLD.

  6. Physics of electrostatic lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this program was to study the physics of the ion-energy boosting electrostatic lens for collective ion acceleration in the Luce diode. Extensive work was done in preparation for experiments on the PI Pulserad 1150. Analytic work was done on the orbit of protons in a mass spectrometer and a copper stack for nuclear activation analysis of proton energy spectrum has been designed. Unfortunately, a parallel program which would provide the Luce diode for the collective ion acceleration experiment never materialized. As a result no experiments were actually performed on the Pulserad 1150.

  7. The 2014 IODC lens design problem: the Cinderella lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juergens, Richard C.

    2014-12-01

    The lens design problem for the 2014 IODC is to design a 100 mm focal length lens in which all the components of the lens can be manufactured from ten Schott N-BK7 lens blanks 100 mm in diameter x 30 mm thick. The lens is used monochromatically at 587.56 nm. The goal of the problem is to maximize the product of the entrance pupil diameter and the semi-field of view while holding the RMS wavefront error to <= 0.070 wave within the field of view. There were 45 entries from 13 different countries. Four different commercial lens design programs were used, along with six custom, in-house programs. The number of lens elements in the entries ranged from 10 to 52. The winning entry from Jon Ehrmann had 25 lens elements, and had an entrance pupil diameter of 33.9 mm and a semi-field of view of 62.5° for a merit function product of 2,119.

  8. Topological crystalline insulators.

    PubMed

    Fu, Liang

    2011-03-11

    The recent discovery of topological insulators has revived interest in the band topology of insulators. In this Letter, we extend the topological classification of band structures to include certain crystal point group symmetry. We find a class of three-dimensional "topological crystalline insulators" which have metallic surface states with quadratic band degeneracy on high symmetry crystal surfaces. These topological crystalline insulators are the counterpart of topological insulators in materials without spin-orbit coupling. Their band structures are characterized by new topological invariants. We hope this work will enlarge the family of topological phases in band insulators and stimulate the search for them in real materials.

  9. Lens Densitometry after Corneal Cross-linking in Patients with Keratoconus Using a Scheimpflug Camera

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran-Rafii, Alireza; Amiri, Mohammad Aghazazeh; Mohaghegh, Sahar; Zarei-Ghanavati, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate changes in crystalline lens densitometry following corneal cross-linking (CXL) in keratoconic patients. Methods: In a quasi-experimental study, three-dimensional lens densitometry was performed using the Pentacam Scheimpflug camera (Oculus Optikgerate GmbH, Wetzlar, Germany) at baseline and six months after CXL. Densitometry was performed in a fixed area of 2 inch × 1 inch of the anterior capsule and anterior lens cortex. The subject group included patients with progressive keratoconus who underwent CXL (n = 40) and the control group was comprised of aged-matched patients with non-progressive keratoconus (n = 36). Results: Mean age of the case and control groups was 25.8 ± 4.0 and 25.0 ± 4.1 years, respectively (P = 0.392). Mean lens density in the CXL group was 6.68% ± 0.58% at baseline and 6.77% ± 0.53% at the last visit (P = 0.352). Corresponding figures in the control group were 6.53% ± 0.27% and 6.39% ± 0.31%, respectively (P = 0.213). There was no significant difference between the study groups at baseline or six months later (P = 0.96). Conclusion: In this short term study with six months’ follow-up, we observed no significant impact on lens density following exposure of the crystalline lens to ultraviolet A and riboflavin free radicals in the CXL procedure. PMID:26425312

  10. Electrostatic Focusing Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Eric; Hopkins, Demitri

    2011-10-01

    We developed an electrostatic focusing lens capable of generating DD reactions, by focusing deuterium ions generated from a pointed emitter at a frozen heavy water target. Due to difficulty with the pointed emitter, we later switched to a hollow cathode design. To model the lenses, chamber, and calculate the dimensions for the design that would maximize ion energy and density, the program SIMION was used. During stable operation, vacuum was hand adjusted around 10-13 mTorr. To keep stable beam, DC voltage generator was varied between 15-25 kV. Hand adjusting was necessary, because at points in the operation the frozen heavy water would release vapor at an increased rate. This caused the pressure to rise and the beam current to spike, creating instabilities and an arc to the lens. Three methods were used to determine successful DD production. (1) Two differently shielded Geiger counters (unshielded and UHMW-PE insulated tube), (2) Spectrophotometer comparing control peaks with heavy water tests, and (3) a calibrated bubble dosimeter specific to neutrons. Analysis of the results suggest the neutrons flux varied from 532 to 1.4 × 106 neutrons/sec, and require further tests to plot and narrow results.

  11. DNA methylation as a regulatory mechanism in rat gamma-crystallin gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Peek, R; Niessen, R W; Schoenmakers, J G; Lubsen, N H

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the methylation state of the rat gamma-crystallin genes in DNA from lens cells at different developmental stages as well as from kidney and heart cells. A clear correlation between the extent of demethylation of the promoter and 5' gene regions and the expression of these genes was observed. No change in the methylation state of the far upstream or 3' regions of the genes was seen. The demethylation of the promoter region was shown to occur during the differentiation from the lens epithelial to the lens fiber cell. The effect of cytosine methylation on gamma-crystallin promoter activity was tested by measuring gamma-crystallin promoter/chloramphenicol acetyltransferase fusion gene expression after in vitro primed repair synthesis of the promoter region in the presence of either dCTP or 5mdCTP. The hemimethylated promoter was no longer capable of promoting high CAT activity after introduction into lens-like cells. Taken together, our data suggest that DNA demethylation may be the determining step in the developmental stage-specific expression of the rat gamma-crystallin genes. Images PMID:2011513

  12. Sequence analysis of one major basic beta-crystallin (beta Bp) of amphibian lenses: evolutionary comparison and phylogenetic relatedness between beta- and gamma-crystallins.

    PubMed

    Pan, F M; Chang, W C; Lu, S F; Hsu, A L; Chiou, S H

    1995-12-26

    beta Bp-Crystallin, a major basic beta-crystallin of vertebrate eye lens, is developmentally regulated during the process of amphibian metamorphosis. In order to facilitate the determination of the primary sequence of this ubiquitous crystallin present in all vertebrate species, cDNA mixture was synthesized from the poly(A)+ mRNA isolated from bullfrog eye lenses. A protocol of Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) was used to amplify cDNAs encoding beta Bp-crystallin by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR-amplified product corresponding to beta Bp-crystallin was then ligated into pGEM-T vector and then transformed into E. coli strain JM109. One complete full-length reading frame of 615 base pairs, which covers a deduced protein sequence of 205 amino acids, including the universal initiating methionine, was revealed by automatic nucleotide sequencing with a fluorescence-based dideoxynucleotide chain-termination method. It shows 83, 74, 78 and 80 percent sequence similarity to the homologous beta 2 crystallins of chicken, rat, bovine, and human species, respectively, revealing the close structural relationship among beta Bp-crystallins even from remotely related species. In this study phylogenetic trees based on nucleotide and protein sequences of various beta- and gamma-crystallins from different vertebrate classes are constructed using a combination of distance matrix and approximate parsimony methods, which corroborate the previous supposition that beta- and gamma-crystallins form a superfamily with a common ancestry.

  13. Spectral and Lensing Characteristics of Gel-Derived Strontium Tartrate Single Crystals Using Dual-Beam Thermal Lens Technique.

    PubMed

    Rejeena, I; Thomas, V; Mathew, S; Lillibai, B; Nampoori, V P N; Radhakrishnan, P

    2016-09-01

    The Dual Beam mode-matched thermal lens spectrometry is a sensible technique for direct measurements of the thermal properties of tartrate crystalline materials. Here we report the measurement of thermal diffusivity of Strontium Tartrate single crystals incorporated with Rhodamine 6G using the thermal lens experiment. The respective crystals were prepared by solution-gel method at room temperature. The absorption characteristics of three different Strontium Tartrate crystals viz. pure, electric field applied and magnetic field applied were also carried out.

  14. Intraocular camera for retinal prostheses: Refractive and diffractive lens systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauer, Michelle Christine

    The focus of this thesis is on the design and analysis of refractive, diffractive, and hybrid refractive/diffractive lens systems for a miniaturized camera that can be surgically implanted in the crystalline lens sac and is designed to work in conjunction with current and future generation retinal prostheses. The development of such an intraocular camera (IOC) would eliminate the need for an external head-mounted or eyeglass-mounted camera. Placing the camera inside the eye would allow subjects to use their natural eye movements for foveation (attention) instead of more cumbersome head tracking, would notably aid in personal navigation and mobility, and would also be significantly more psychologically appealing from the standpoint of personal appearances. The capability for accommodation with no moving parts or feedback control is incorporated by employing camera designs that exhibit nearly infinite depth of field. Such an ultracompact optical imaging system requires a unique combination of refractive and diffractive optical elements and relaxed system constraints derived from human psychophysics. This configuration necessitates an extremely compact, short focal-length lens system with an f-number close to unity. Initially, these constraints appear highly aggressive from an optical design perspective. However, after careful analysis of the unique imaging requirements of a camera intended to work in conjunction with the relatively low pixellation levels of a retinal microstimulator array, it becomes clear that such a design is not only feasible, but could possibly be implemented with a single lens system.

  15. Refractive lens exchange in modern practice: when and when not to do it?

    PubMed

    Alió, Jorge L; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Romaniuk, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Cataract surgery due to advances in small incision surgery evolved from a procedure concerned with the primary focus on the safe removal of cataractous lens to a procedure focused on the best possible postoperative refractive result. As the outcomes of cataract surgery became better, the use of lens surgery as a refractive modality in patients without cataracts has increased in interest and in popularity. Removal of the crystalline lens for refractive purposes or refractive lens exchange (RLE) presents several advantages over corneal refractive surgery. Patients with high degrees of myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism are still not good candidates for laser surgery. Moreover, presbyopia can currently only be corrected with monovision or reading spectacles. RLE supplemented with multifocal or accommodating intraocular lenses (IOLs) in combination with corneal astigmatic procedures might address all refractive errors including presbyopia, and eliminate the future need for cataract surgery.

  16. Evaluation of intraocular lens implant location in the eyeball basing on the Purkinje images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jóźwik, A.; Siedlecki, D.; Zajac, M.

    2012-01-01

    Intraocular lens (IOL) is an artificial implant substituting natural crystalline lens which is non-transparent due to cataract. Incorrect location of the IOL in the eyeball (e.g. its shift or tilt) causes significant deterioration of patient's vision. The analysis of Purkinje images (i.e. reflections from successive refracting surfaces in the eye) enables to determine the real IOL location and thus helps in evaluating the retinal image quality. The experimental setup for Purkinje images recording consists of illuminator, composed of a number of infrared LEDs, telecentric lens and detector (CCD camera). Analysis of mutual position of particular reflections enables to evaluate the lens location in respect to the corneal axis. The actual measurements are realized on artificial eye model, what allows to estimate the precision of the algorithm applied in the calculations. In the future the experimental set-up will be adapted to measure the eyes of real patients.

  17. Shape optimization of an accommodative intra-ocular lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouve, François; Hanna, Khalil

    2005-03-01

    Cataract surgery consists in replacing the clouded or opacified crystalline lens by an Intra-Ocular Lens (IOL) having the same mean dioptrical power. Clear vision is then achieved at a given distance and glasses are needed in many situations. A new kind of IOL, potentially accommodative, is proposed. Its design is based on the deep understanding of the accommodation mechanism and on the mathematical modeling and the numerical simulation of the IOL's comportment in vivo. A preliminary version of this IOL is now commercialized by the company HumanOptics under the name '1CU'. In a second phase, shape optimization techniques equipped with strong mechanical and physiological constraints, are used to enhance the IOL performance and build a new design. To cite this article: F. Jouve, K. Hanna, C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  18. Identification of hydrogen peroxide oxidation sites of alpha A- and alpha B-crystallins.

    PubMed

    Smith, J B; Jiang, X; Abraham, E C

    1997-02-01

    The alpha-crystallins are the most abundant structural proteins of the lens and, because of their chaperone activity, contribute to the solubility of the other crystallins. With aging, the lens crystallins undergo a variety of modifications which correlate with a loss of solubility and the development of cataract. A recent study demonstrating that alpha-crystallins exposed in vitro to FeCl3 and H2O2 exhibit decreased chaperone activity, implicates metal catalyzed oxidations of alpha-crystallins in this loss of solubility. The present study has determined that alpha-crystallins incubated with FeCl3 and H2O2 are modified by the nearly complete oxidation of all methionine residues to methionine sulfoxide, with no other detectable reaction products. The modifications were identified from the molecular weights of peptides formed by enzymatic digestion of the alpha-crystallins and located by tandem mass spectrometric analysis of the fragmentation pattern of the mass spectra of the fragments from peptides with oxidized methionine is loss of 64 Da, which corresponds to loss of CH3SOH from the methionine sulfoxide. These fragments are useful in identifying peptides that include oxidized methionine residues.

  19. Imaging characteristics of ball lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qinghui; Shao, Xiaopeng

    2014-05-01

    In most digital imaging applications, high-resolution imaging or videos are usually desired for later processing and analysis. The desire for high-resolution stems from two principal application areas: improvement of pictorial information for human interpretation, and helping representation for automatic machine preception. While the image sensors limit the spatial resolution of the image, the image details are also limited by the optical system, due to diffraction, and aberration1. Monocentric lens are an attractive option for gigapixel camera because the symmetrical design focuses light identically coming from any direction. Marks and Brady proposed a monocentric lens design imaging 40 gigapixels with an f-number of 2.5 and resolving 2 arcsec over a 120 degrees field of view2. Recently, Cossairt, Miau, and Nayer proposed a proof-of-concept gigapixel computational camera consisting of a large ball lens shared by several small planar sensors coupled with a deblurring step3. The design consists of a ball element resulting in a lens that is both inexpensive to produce and easy to align. Because the resolution of spherical lens is fundamentally limited by geometric aberrations, the imaging characteristics of the ball lens is expressed by the geometrical aberrations, in which the general equations for the primary aberration of the ball lens are given. The effect of shifting the stop position on the aberrations of a ball lens is discussed. The variation of the axial chromatic aberration with the Abbe V-number when the refraction index takes different values is analyzed. The variation of the third-order spherical aberration ,the fifth-order spherical aberration and the spherical aberration obtained directly from ray tracing with the f-number is discussed. The other imaging evaluation merits, such as the spot diagram, the modulation transfer function(MTF) and the encircled energy are also described. Most of the analysis of the ball lens is carried out using OSLO optics

  20. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko; David J.

    2007-05-08

    The present invention provides barrier films having reduced gas permeability for use in packaging and coating applications. The barrier films comprise an anisotropic liquid crystalline composite layer formed from phyllosilicate-polymer compositions. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while remaining transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles in the liquid crystalline composite, barrier films comprising liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  1. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling is essential for lens fiber cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haotian; Yang, Tianyu; Madakashira, Bhavani P.; Thiels, Cornelius A.; Bechtle, Chad A.; Garcia, Claudia M.; Zhang, Huiming; Yu, Kai; Ornitz, David M.; Beebe, David C.; Robinson, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    The vertebrate lens provides an excellent model to study the mechanisms that regulate terminal differentiation. Although fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are thought to be important for lens cell differentiation, it is unclear which FGF receptors mediate these processes during different stages of lens development. Deletion of three FGF receptors (Fgfr1-3) early in lens development demonstrated that expression of only a single allele of Fgfr2 or Fgfr3 was sufficient for grossly normal lens development, while mice possessing only a single Fgfr1 allele developed cataracts and microphthalmia. Profound defects were observed in lenses lacking all three Fgfrs. These included lack of fiber cell elongation, abnormal proliferation in prospective lens fiber cells, reduced expression of the cell cycle inhibitors p27kip1 and p57kip2, increased apoptosis and aberrant or reduced expression of Prox1, Pax6, c-Maf, E-cadherin and α-, β- and γ-crystallins. Therefore, while signaling by FGF receptors is essential for lens fiber differentiation, different FGF receptors function redundantly. PMID:18455718

  2. Lens opacity induced by lipid peroxidation products as a model of cataract associated with retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, M A; Deyev, A I

    1989-07-17

    The cataractous lenses of patients with retinitis pigmentosa have been studied by electron microscopy. The posterior subcapsular opacities showed common ultrastructural features. Large areas of disruption of the lens fibre pattern were observed which showed an increase in the number of fibre membranes per unit area. In many regions an elaborate and regular folding of membranes was noted which produced complex 'figure-of-eight' and 'tramline' patterns, as well as membranous lamellar bodies. Masses of various size globules were also identified. It has been established that injection into the vitreous body of the rabbit eye of a suspension of liposomes prepared from phospholipids containing lipid peroxidation products induces the development of posterior subcapsular cataract. Such modelling of cataract is based on a type of clouding of the crystalline lens similar to that observed in cataract resulting from diffusion of toxic lipid peroxidation products from the retina to the lens through the vitreous body on degeneration of the photoreceptors. Saturated liposomes (prepared from beta-oleoyl-gamma-palmitoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine) do not cause clouding of the lens, which demonstrates the peroxide mechanism of the genesis of this form of cataract. Clouding of the lens is accompanied by accumulation of fluorescing lipid peroxidation products in the vitreous body, aqueous humor and the lens and also by a fall in the concentration of reduced glutathione in the lens. From the results it is concluded that lipid peroxidation may initiate the development of cataract. PMID:2742866

  3. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Rayford G.; Dosch, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  4. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1993-01-05

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  5. Pediatric genetic disorders of lens.

    PubMed

    Nihalani, Bharti R

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric genetic disorders of lens include various cataractous and non-cataractous anomalies. The purpose of this review is to help determine the genetic cause based on the lens appearance, ocular and systemic associations. Children with bilateral cataracts require a comprehensive history, ophthalmic and systemic examination to guide further genetic evaluation. With advancements in genetics, it is possible to determine the genetic mutations and assess phenotype genotype correlation in different lens disorders. The genetic diagnosis helps the families to better understand the disorder and develop realistic expectations as to the course of their child's disorder. PMID:27625879

  6. Pediatric genetic disorders of lens

    PubMed Central

    Nihalani, Bharti R.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric genetic disorders of lens include various cataractous and non-cataractous anomalies. The purpose of this review is to help determine the genetic cause based on the lens appearance, ocular and systemic associations. Children with bilateral cataracts require a comprehensive history, ophthalmic and systemic examination to guide further genetic evaluation. With advancements in genetics, it is possible to determine the genetic mutations and assess phenotype genotype correlation in different lens disorders. The genetic diagnosis helps the families to better understand the disorder and develop realistic expectations as to the course of their child's disorder.

  7. A liquid crystal adaptive lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowel, S. T.; Cleverly, D.

    1981-01-01

    Creation of an electronically controlled liquid crystal lens for use as a focusing mechanism in a multi-element lens system or as an adaptive optical element is analyzed. Varying the index of refraction is shown to be equivalent to the shaping of a solid refracting material. Basic characteristics of liquid crystals, essential for the creation of a lens, are reviewed. The required variation of index of refraction is provided by choosing appropriate electrode voltages. The configuration required for any incoming polarization is given and its theoretical performance in terms of modulation transfer function derived.

  8. Thermal Stress Induced Aggregation of Aquaporin 0 (AQP0) and Protection by α-Crystallin via Its Chaperone Function

    PubMed Central

    Swamy-Mruthinti, Satyanarayana; Srinivas, Volety; Hansen, John E.; Rao, Ch Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporin 0 (AQP0) formerly known as membrane intrinsic protein (MIP), is expressed exclusively in the lens during terminal differentiation of fiber cells. AQP0 plays an important role not only in the regulation of water content but also in cell-to-cell adhesion of the lens fiber cells. We have investigated the thermal stress-induced structural alterations of detergent (octyl glucoside)-solubilized calf lens AQP0. The results show an increase in the amount of AQP0 that aggregated as the temperature increased from 40°C to 65°C. α-Crystallin, molecular chaperone abundantly present in the eye lens, completely prevented the AQP0 aggregation at a 1∶1 (weight/weight) ratio. Since α-crystallin consists of two gene products namely αA- and αB-crystallins, we have tested the recombinant proteins on their ability to prevent thermal-stress induced AQP0 aggregation. In contrast to the general observation made with other target proteins, αA-crystallin exhibited better chaperone-like activity towards AQP0 compared to αB-crystallin. Neither post-translational modifications (glycation) nor C-terminus truncation of AQP0 have any appreciable effect on its thermal aggregation properties. α-Crystallin offers similar protection against thermal aggregation as in the case of the unmodified AQP0, suggesting that αcrystallin may bind to either intracellular loops or other residues of AQP0 that become exposed during thermal stress. Far-UV circular dichroism studies indicated a loss of αhelical structures when AQP0 was subjected to temperatures above 45°C, and the presence of α-crystallin stabilized these secondary structures. We report here, for the first time, that α-crystallin protects AQP0 from thermal aggregation. Since stress-induced structural perturbations of AQP0 may affect the integrity of the lens, presence of the molecular chaperone, α-crystallin (particularly αA-crystallin) in close proximity to the lens membrane is physiologically relevant. PMID:24312215

  9. Lens system for a photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Young, Charles E.; Pellin, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    A lens system in a photo ion spectrometer for manipulating a primary ion beam and ionized atomic component. The atomic components are removed from a sample by a primary ion beam using the lens system, and the ions are extracted for analysis. The lens system further includes ionization resistant coatings for protecting the lens system.

  10. Lens system for a photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1990-11-27

    A lens system in a photo ion spectrometer for manipulating a primary ion beam and ionized atomic component is disclosed. The atomic components are removed from a sample by a primary ion beam using the lens system, and the ions are extracted for analysis. The lens system further includes ionization resistant coatings for protecting the lens system. 8 figs.

  11. Lens design based on lens form parameters using Gaussian brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiangyu; Cheng, Xuemin

    2014-11-01

    The optical power distribution and the symmetry of the lens components are two important attributes that decide the ultimate lens performance and characteristics. Lens form parameters W and S are the key criteria describing the two attributes mentioned above. Lens components with smaller W and S will have a good nature of aberration balance and perform well in providing good image quality. Applying the Gaussian brackets, the two lens form parameters and the Seidel Aberration Coefficients are reconstructed. An initial lens structure can be analytically described by simultaneous equations of Seidel Aberration Coefficients and third-order aberration theory. Adding the constraints of parameters W and S in the solving process, a solution with a proper image quality and aberration distribution is achieved. The optical properties and image quality of the system based on the parameters W and S are also analyzed in this article. In the method, the aberration distribution can be controlled to some extent in the beginning of design, so that we can reduce some workload of optimization later.

  12. Survey of intraocular lens material and design.

    PubMed

    Doan, Kim T; Olson, Randall J; Mamalis, Nick

    2002-02-01

    Modern cataract surgery is constantly evolving and improving in terms of lens material and design. Researchers and physicians strive to obtain better refractive correction with smaller wound size and minimizing host cell response to limit the proliferation of lens epithelial cells leading to opacification of the lens capsule. Intraocular lens material varies in water content, refractive index, and tensile strength. Intraocular lens design has undergone revisions to prohibit lens epithelial cell migration and reflection of internal and external light. The evolution of intraocular lens and extracapsular cataract surgery has lead to faster postoperative recovery and better visual outcomes.

  13. Zebrafish mutations in Gli-mediated hedgehog signaling lead to lens transdifferentiation from the adenohypophysis anlage.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, H; Uchikawa, M; Yoda, H; Takeda, H; Furutani-Seiki, M; Karlstrom, R O

    2000-09-01

    It is known that the earliest lens marker delta-crystallin is expressed abundantly in Rathke's pouch of the chicken, suggesting a close relationship between the cell states of the adenohypophysis (pituitary) anlage and the early lens. We show here that the zebrafish midline mutants you-too (yot) and iguana (igu) develop lenses from the adenohypophysis anlage. The early adenohypophysis anlage of normal zebrafish expresses lim3 and six3 but in yot(ty119) mutants the anterior part of the anlage lacks lim3 expression, and instead produces a crystallin-expressing cell population which develops into a large lens structure expressing beta and gamma-crystallins, but is not associated with retina tissues. Among the zebrafish mutants with midline defects, midline lenses were observed in two mutant alleles of yot and an allele of igu, but not in other mutants (syu, con, smh, dtr, uml, spi and lok). Two yot mutant alleles with midline lenses likely encode dominant negative forms of the Gli2 protein which will interfere with transcriptional activation by other Gli proteins. The observation argues that overall inhibition of Shh-Gli signaling leads the adenohypophysis anlage to transdifferentiate into lens.

  14. Contact lens management of keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Downie, Laura E; Lindsay, Richard G

    2015-07-01

    Contact lenses are the primary form of visual correction for patients with keratoconus. Contemporary advances in contact lens designs and materials have significantly expanded the available fitting options for patients with corneal ectasia. Furthermore, imaging technology, such as corneal topography and anterior segment optical coherence tomography, can be applied to both gain insight into corneal microstructural changes and to guide contact lens fitting. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the range of contact lens modalities, including soft lenses, hybrid designs, rigid lenses, piggyback configurations, corneo-scleral, mini-scleral and scleral lenses that are currently available for the optical management of keratoconus. The review also discusses the importance of monitoring for disease progression in patients with keratoconus, in particular children, who tend to undergo more rapid progressive changes, so as to facilitate appropriate modification to contact lens fitting and/or potential referral for corneal collagen cross-linking treatment, as appropriate. PMID:26104589

  15. Intraocular lens fixation with dacron.

    PubMed

    Peyman, G A; Koziol, J E

    1978-10-01

    To overcome the problem of postoperative lens dislocation, we evaluated a new means of lens fixation. Our experimental studies in rabbits and primates demonstrated that Dacron polyethylene terephtalate induced a cellular reaction from either the anterior or posterior iris surface when placed in contact with the iris, thereby establishing a bond between the Dacron fibers and the iris. Dacron mesh can be attached to the distal portion of either the anterior or posterior loops of a Binkhorst iris clip (4-loop) lens. In the rabbit eye, lens fixation occurred within five days; in the primate eye, 30 days. When combined with silk, Dacron produced tissue ingrowth in the primate eye within 14 days. No unwanted reaction occurred in any animal with the Dacron and silk combination. Being biodegradable, the silk induced faster cellular ingrowth than the Dacron. However, Dacron, which is not biodegradable, provided a permanent means of fixation. PMID:155053

  16. Effect of methylglyoxal modification on stress-induced aggregation of client proteins and their chaperoning by human alphaA-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ashis; Wang, Benlian; Miyagi, Masaru; Nagaraj, Ram H

    2008-02-01

    alpha-Crystallin prevents protein aggregation under various stress conditions through its chaperone-like properties. Previously, we demonstrated that MGO (methylglyoxal) modification of alphaA-crystallin enhances its chaperone function and thus may affect transparency of the lens. During aging of the lens, not only alphaA-crystallin, but its client proteins are also likely to be modified by MGO. We have investigated the role of MGO modification of four model client proteins (insulin, alpha-lactalbumin, alcohol dehydrogenase and gamma-crystallin) in their aggregation and structure and the ability of human alphaA-crystallin to chaperone them. We found that MGO modification (10-1000 microM) decreased the chemical aggregation of insulin and alpha-lactalbumin and thermal aggregation of alcohol dehydrogenase and gamma-crystallin. Surface hydrophobicity in MGO-modified proteins decreased slightly relative to unmodified proteins. HPLC and MS analyses revealed argpyrimidine and hydroimidazolone in MGO-modified client proteins. The degree of chaperoning by alphaA-crystallin towards MGO-modified and unmodified client proteins was similar. Co-modification of client proteins and alphaA-crystallin by MGO completely inhibited stress-induced aggregation of client proteins. Our results indicate that minor modifications of client proteins and alphaA-crystallin by MGO might prevent protein aggregation and thus help maintain transparency of the aging lens. PMID:17941823

  17. Single lens laser beam shaper

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chuyu; Zhang, Shukui

    2011-10-04

    A single lens bullet-shaped laser beam shaper capable of redistributing an arbitrary beam profile into any desired output profile comprising a unitary lens comprising: a convex front input surface defining a focal point and a flat output portion at the focal point; and b) a cylindrical core portion having a flat input surface coincident with the flat output portion of the first input portion at the focal point and a convex rear output surface remote from the convex front input surface.

  18. Novel roles for α-crystallins in retinal function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Ram; Sreekumar, Parameswaran G.; Hinton, David R.

    2012-01-01

    α-Crystallins are key members of the superfamily of small heat shock proteins that have been studied in detail in the ocular lens. Recently, novel functions for α-crystallins have been identified in the retina and in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE). αB-Crystallin has been localized to multiple compartments and organelles including mitochondria, golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus. α-Crystallins are regulated by oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and inhibit apoptosis-induced cell death. α-Crystallins interact with a large number of proteins that include other crystallins, and apoptotic, cytoskeletal, inflammatory, signaling, angiogenic, and growth factor molecules. Studies with RPE from αB-crystallin deficient mice have shown that αB-crystallin supports retinal and choroidal angiogenesis through its interaction with vascular endothelial growth factor. αB-Crystallin has also been shown to have novel functions in the extracellular space. In RPE, αB-crystallin is released from the apical surface in exosomes where it accumulates in the interphotoreceptor matrix and may function to protect neighboring cells. In other systems administration of exogenous recombinant αB-crystallin has been shown to be anti-inflammatory. Another newly described function of αB-crystallin is its ability to inhibit β-amyloid fibril formation. α-Crystallin mini-chaperone peptides have been identified that elicit anti-apoptotic function in addition to being efficient chaperones. Generation of liposomal particles and other modes of nanoencapsulation of these minipeptides could offer great therapeutic advantage in ocular delivery for a wide variety of retinal degenerative, inflammatory and vascular diseases including age related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:22721717

  19. Molecular mechanism of the chaperone function of mini-α-crystallin, a 19-residue peptide of human α-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Priya R; Pande, Ajay; Shekhtman, Alexander; Pande, Jayanti

    2015-01-20

    α-Crystallin is the archetypical chaperone of the small heat-shock protein family, all members of which contain the so-called "α-crystallin domain" (ACD). This domain and the N- and C-terminal extensions are considered the main functional units in its chaperone function. Previous studies have shown that a 19-residue fragment of the ACD of human αA-crystallin called mini-αA-crystallin (MAC) shows chaperone properties similar to those of the parent protein. Subsequent studies have confirmed the function of this peptide, but no studies have addressed the mechanistic basis for the chaperone function of MAC. Using human γD-crystallin (HGD), a key substrate protein for parent α-crystallin in the ocular lens, we show here that MAC not only protects HGD from aggregation during thermal and chemical unfolding but also binds weakly and reversibly to HGD (Kd ≈ 200-700 μM) even when HGD is in the native state. However, at temperatures favoring the unfolding of HGD, MAC forms a stable complex with HGD similar to parent α-crystallin. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we identify the residues in HGD that are involved in these two modes of binding and show that MAC protects HGD from aggregation by binding to Phe 56 and Val 132 at the domain interface of the target protein, and residues Val 164 to Leu 167 in the core of the C-terminal domain. Furthermore, we suggest that the low-affinity, reversible binding of MAC on the surface of HGD in the native state is involved in facilitating its binding to both the domain interface and core regions during the early stages of the unfolding of HGD. This work highlights some structural features of MAC and MAC-like peptides that affect their chaperone activity and can potentially be manipulated for translational studies. PMID:25478825

  20. Age-Related True Exfoliation of the Lens Capsule: Phacoemulsification Surgery Results

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Alex Lap Ki; Marcet, Marcus M.; Lai, Jimmy S.M.; Yeung, Jane C.C.

    2015-01-01

    Historically associated with glassblowers, true exfoliation of the crystalline lens involves a splitting or delamination of the capsule. We reviewed the phacoemulsification records of a single surgeon for patients with true exfoliation of the lens capsule. The incidence in our series was 2.2% (6 in 278 cases). The average age was 85.0 years. All patients had successful phacoemulsification outcomes, which may have been due to accurate recognition of the condition and appropriate surgical planning. Our findings support the notion that true exfoliation may be more often associated with advanced age rather than infrared radiation. PMID:26955340

  1. The Thermal Structural Transition of Alpha-Crystallin Modulates Subunit Interactions and Increases Protein Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; De Spirito, Marco; Arcovito, Giuseppe; Papi, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    Background Alpha crystallin is an oligomer composed of two types of subunits, alpha-A and alpha-B crystallin, and is the major constituent of human lens. The temperature induced condensation of alpha-crystallin, the main cause for eye lens opacification (cataract), is a two step-process, a nucleation followed by an aggregation phase, and a protective effect towards the aggregation is exhibited over the alpha crystallin phase transition temperature (Tc = 318.16 K). Methods/Results To investigate if a modulation of the subunit interactions over Tc could trigger the protective mechanism towards the aggregation, we followed, by using simultaneously static and dynamic light scattering, the temperature induced condensation of alpha-crystallin. By developing a mathematical model able to uncouple the nucleation and aggregation processes, we find a previously unobserved transition in the nucleation rate constant. Its temperature dependence allows to determine fundamental structural parameters, the chemical potential (Δμ) and the interfacial tension (γ) of the aggregating phase, that characterize subunit interactions. Conclusions/General Significance The decrease of both Δμ and γ at Tc, and a relative increase in solubility, reveal a significative decrease in the strenght of alpha-crystallin subunits interactions, which protects from supramolecolar condensation in hypertermic conditions. On the whole, we suggest a general approach able to understand the structural and kinetic mechanisms involved in aggregation-related diseases and in drugs development and testing. PMID:22347398

  2. Identification of a major continuous epitope of human alpha crystallin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takemoto, L.; Emmons, T.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Human lens proteins were digested with trypsin or V8 protease, and the resulting peptides resolved on a C18 reverse phase column. Fractions from this column were probed with polyclonal antiserum made against the whole alpha crystallin molecule. Peptides in the seropositive fraction were purified to homogeneity, then characterized by mass spectral analysis and partial Edman degradation. The tryptic and V8 digests contained only one seropositive peptide that was derived from the C-terminal region of the alpha-A molecule. To determine the exact boundaries of the epitope, various size analogues of this region were synthesized and probed with anti-alpha serum. Together, these studies demonstrate that the major continuous epitope of the alpha-A chain includes the sequence KPTSAPS, corresponding to residues 166-172 of the human alpha-A crystallin chain.

  3. Expression of truncated PITX3 in the developing lens leads to microphthalmia and aphakia in mice.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kenta; Matsushima, Yoshibumi; Tada, Tomoki; Hasegawa, Sayaka; Obara, Yo; Yoshizawa, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Gou; Hiai, Hiroshi; Shimanuki, Midori; Suzuki, Sari; Saitou, Junichi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ichikawa, Masumi; Watanabe, Kei; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Microphthalmia is a severe ocular disorder, and this condition is typically caused by mutations in transcription factors that are involved in eye development. Mice carrying mutations in these transcription factors would be useful tools for defining the mechanisms underlying developmental eye disorders. We discovered a new spontaneous recessive microphthalmos mouse mutant in the Japanese wild-derived inbred strain KOR1/Stm. The homozygous mutant mice were histologically characterized as microphthalmic by the absence of crystallin in the lens, a condition referred to as aphakia. By positional cloning, we identified the nonsense mutation c.444C>A outside the genomic region that encodes the homeodomain of the paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 3 gene (Pitx3) as the mutation responsible for the microphthalmia and aphakia. We examined Pitx3 mRNA expression of mutant mice during embryonic stages using RT-PCR and found that the expression levels are higher than in wild-type mice. Pitx3 over-expression in the lens during developmental stages was also confirmed at the protein level in the microphthalmos mutants via immunohistochemical analyses. Although lens fiber differentiation was not observed in the mutants, strong PITX3 protein signals were observed in the lens vesicles of the mutant lens. Thus, we speculated that abnormal PITX3, which lacks the C-terminus (including the OAR domain) as a result of the nonsense mutation, is expressed in mutant lenses. We showed that the expression of the downstream genes Foxe3, Prox1, and Mip was altered because of the Pitx3 mutation, with large reductions in the lens vesicles in the mutants. Similar profiles were observed by immunohistochemical analysis of these proteins. The expression profiles of crystallins were also altered in the mutants. Therefore, we speculated that the microphthalmos/aphakia in this mutant is caused by the expression of truncated PITX3, resulting in the abnormal expression of downstream targets and

  4. Expression of Truncated PITX3 in the Developing Lens Leads to Microphthalmia and Aphakia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Kenta; Matsushima, Yoshibumi; Tada, Tomoki; Hasegawa, Sayaka; Obara, Yo; Yoshizawa, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Gou; Hiai, Hiroshi; Shimanuki, Midori; Suzuki, Sari; Saitou, Junichi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Ichikawa, Masumi; Watanabe, Kei; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Microphthalmia is a severe ocular disorder, and this condition is typically caused by mutations in transcription factors that are involved in eye development. Mice carrying mutations in these transcription factors would be useful tools for defining the mechanisms underlying developmental eye disorders. We discovered a new spontaneous recessive microphthalmos mouse mutant in the Japanese wild-derived inbred strain KOR1/Stm. The homozygous mutant mice were histologically characterized as microphthalmic by the absence of crystallin in the lens, a condition referred to as aphakia. By positional cloning, we identified the nonsense mutation c.444C>A outside the genomic region that encodes the homeodomain of the paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 3 gene (Pitx3) as the mutation responsible for the microphthalmia and aphakia. We examined Pitx3 mRNA expression of mutant mice during embryonic stages using RT-PCR and found that the expression levels are higher than in wild-type mice. Pitx3 over-expression in the lens during developmental stages was also confirmed at the protein level in the microphthalmos mutants via immunohistochemical analyses. Although lens fiber differentiation was not observed in the mutants, strong PITX3 protein signals were observed in the lens vesicles of the mutant lens. Thus, we speculated that abnormal PITX3, which lacks the C-terminus (including the OAR domain) as a result of the nonsense mutation, is expressed in mutant lenses. We showed that the expression of the downstream genes Foxe3, Prox1, and Mip was altered because of the Pitx3 mutation, with large reductions in the lens vesicles in the mutants. Similar profiles were observed by immunohistochemical analysis of these proteins. The expression profiles of crystallins were also altered in the mutants. Therefore, we speculated that the microphthalmos/aphakia in this mutant is caused by the expression of truncated PITX3, resulting in the abnormal expression of downstream targets and

  5. The transcription factor D-Pax2 regulates crystallin production during eye development in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Katharine; Heaphy, Julie; Prescott, Hallie; Kavaler, Joshua

    2009-10-01

    The generation of a functioning Drosophila eye requires the coordinated differentiation of multiple cell types and the morphogenesis of eye-specific structures. Here we show that D-Pax2 plays a significant role in lens development through regulation of the Crystallin gene and because Crystallin is also expressed in D-Pax2(+) cells in the external sensory organs. Loss of D-Pax2 function leads to loss of Crystallin expression in both eyes and bristles. A 2.3 kilobase (kb) upstream region of the Crystallin gene can drive GFP expression in the eye and is dependent on D-Pax2. In addition, D-Pax2 binds to an evolutionarily conserved site in this region that, by itself, is sufficient to drive GFP expression in the eye. However, mutation of this site does not greatly affect the regulatory region's function. The data indicate that D-Pax2 acts to promote lens development by controlling the production of the major protein component of the lens. Whether this control is direct or indirect remains unresolved.

  6. Delayed accumulation of lens material behind the foldable intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Harsha; Bhattacharjee, Kasturi; Bhattacharjee, Pankaj

    2007-01-01

    Foldable acrylic intraocular lenses (IOLs) are known to reduce posterior capsule opacification by preventing migration of lens epithelial cells with its square edge design and its property of tackiness. Studies have reported a mean adhesiveness to posterior capsule more than three times higher for certain acrylic foldable IOLs than polymethyl methacrylate IOLs. The authors would like to report two cases where the force of tackiness was compensated, thereby presenting with delayed accumulation of lens material in the capsular bags behind the IOL with temporary loss of vision. PMID:17951912

  7. Delayed accumulation of lens material behind the foldable intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Harsha; Bhattacharjee, Kasturi; Bhattacharjee, Pankaj

    2007-01-01

    Foldable acrylic intraocular lenses (IOLs) are known to reduce posterior capsule opacification by preventing migration of lens epithelial cells with its square edge design and its property of tackiness. Studies have reported a mean adhesiveness to posterior capsule more than three times higher for certain acrylic foldable IOLs than polymethyl methacrylate IOLs. The authors would like to report two cases where the force of tackiness was compensated, thereby presenting with delayed accumulation of lens material in the capsular bags behind the IOL with temporary loss of vision.

  8. Delayed accumulation of lens material behind the foldable intraocular lens

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Kasturi; Bhattacharjee, Pankaj

    2007-01-01

    Foldable acrylic intraocular lenses (IOLs) are known to reduce posterior capsule opacification by preventing migration of lens epithelial cells with its square edge design and its property of tackiness. Studies have reported a mean adhesiveness to posterior capsule more than three times higher for certain acrylic foldable IOLs than polymethyl methacrylate IOLs. The authors would like to report two cases where the force of tackiness was compensated, thereby presenting with delayed accumulation of lens material in the capsular bags behind the IOL with temporary loss of vision. PMID:17951912

  9. Coherent X-ray and laser spectroscopy measurements of diffusion in concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunaratne, V. N. C.

    The mammalian eye lens is composed of a concentrated solution of water soluble proteins called crystallins. Alpha-crystallin, the most abundant protein found in the lens, plays a crucial role in maintaining lens transparency and lens accommodation. However, alpha-crystallins along with other ocular proteins suffer from irreversible processes such as oxidation. One cause of oxidation is radiation-induced radical formation which alters the inter-molecular interactions, thereby degrading the normal function of ocular proteins. The main goal of this thesis is to quantify molecular scale dynamics of concentrated solutions of alpha-crystallins using coherent X-rays and visible laser light. I believe a detailed analysis of the dynamics pertaining to alpha-crystallin will provide the foundation to understand molecular scale mechanisms that lead to conditions like cataract and presbyopia. I explore the dynamics of concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions by measuring diffusive motion over a range of length scales using Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). To a certain extent, the dynamical properties of crystallins obtained in this manner are consistent with established theories in colloidal physics. However, there are some deviations, which I will address in this thesis. In terms of X-ray data, I employed a new, efficient photon correlation technique to obtain the best possible signal, furthermore this technique is embedded in a stand-alone software program that has the ability to provide real time results, quickly and efficiently with the help of high performance computing resources available at Northern Illinois University (NIU). The technique has potential to be used by the coherent X-ray spectroscopy community in the future. In addition, by using X-ray scattering data, I probe potential modifications and or damage effects on alpha-crystallins due to radiation exposure. The damage analysis methodology described in this thesis

  10. Identification of Proteins that Modify Cataract of the Eye Lens

    PubMed Central

    Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Tang, Yajun; Ackermann, Renate; Pleissner, Klaus-Peter; Schmid, Monika; Stein, Robert; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Kumar, Nalin M.; Jungblut, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of a nuclear cataract in the eye lens due to disruption of theα3Cx46 connexin gene, Gja3, is dependent on strain background in a mouse model, implicating factors that modify the pathology. The differences upon cataractogenesis in the urea soluble proteins of the lens of two mouse strains, C57BL/6J and 129/SvJ, were analyzed by a comparative proteomics approach. Determination of the complete proteome of an organ offers the opportunity to characterize at a molecular level, differences in gene expression and post-translational modifications occurring during pathology and between individuals. The abundance of 63 protein species was altered between the strains. A unique aspect of this study is the identification of chaperonin subunit 6A, mortalin, ERp29 and syntaxin binding protein 6 in the eye lens. DNA polymorphisms resulting in non-conservative amino acid changes that led to altered physicochemical properties of the proteins were detected for mortalin, chaperonin subunit 6A, annexin A1 and possibly gamma N crystallin. The results show HSP27/25 and/or ERp29 are the likely major modifying factors for cataractogenesis. Extension of the results suggests that small heat shock proteins have a major role for influencing cataract formation in humans. PMID:19003866

  11. [Research progress in relative crystallin genes of congenital cataract].

    PubMed

    Wang, D D; Yang, H J; Yi, J L

    2016-02-01

    Congenital cataract is the common cause of visual disability in children. Nearly one third of congenital cataract cases may have a related genetic mutation. With the development of molecular genetics, especially gentechnik, more and more genes, such as crystallin genes, membrane protein genes, eytoskeletal protein genes and regulatory protein genes have been confirmed to participate in the process of congenital cataract. Furthermore, crystallin genes account for most of these genes and the crystallin has the highest amount of the whole protein in lens.It has been found that nearly one hundred mutations in crystallin genes are associated with the onset of congenital cataract. Researchers are exploring how these mutations further affect the function of cellular biology and eventually lead to cataract. Although more and more research results gradually reveal the pathogenesis of congenital cataract from the level of gene and protein, the specific pathogenesis is still unclear. The recent progression about inherited congenital cataract related with crysallin genes is summarized in this review.

  12. Liquid Crystalline Microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Yueh; Petschek, Rolfe G.

    2000-03-01

    If an isotropic component of an emulsion is replaced by one having liquid crystalline (e.g. nematic) order the equilibrium behavior can change dramatically. There are long range enthalpic effects which can result in either repulsive or attractive interactions between the surfaces of an emulsion and entropic effects which generally result in an attractive interaction between these surfaces. We review briefly the possibility of stable blue-phase like microemulsions in mixtures of chiral nematics, appropriate surfactants and an incompatible isotropic solvent. We discuss the entropic effects in a lamellar phase, including the effects of changes in elastic constants and surface-nematic coupling. The effects of fluctuations on blue phases will be briefly discussed.

  13. Liquid crystalline polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties and thermal stability of fibers fabricated from liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) have led to the use of these materials in structural applications where weight savings are critical. Advances in processing of LCPs could permit the incorporation of these polymers into other than uniaxial designs and extend their utility into new areas such as nonlinear optical devices. However, the unique feature of LCPs (intrinsic orientation order) is itself problematic, and current understanding of processing with control of orientation falls short of allowing manipulation of macroscopic orientation (except for the case of uniaxial fibers). The current and desirable characteristics of LCPs are reviewed and specific problems are identified along with issues that must be addressed so that advances in the use of these unique polymers can be expedited.

  14. The SNAP Strong Lens Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, P.

    2005-01-03

    Basic considerations of lens detection and identification indicate that a wide field survey of the types planned for weak lensing and Type Ia SNe with SNAP are close to optimal for the optical detection of strong lenses. Such a ''piggy-back'' survey might be expected even pessimistically to provide a catalogue of a few thousand new strong lenses, with the numbers dominated by systems of faint blue galaxies lensed by foreground ellipticals. After sketching out our strategy for detecting and measuring these galaxy lenses using the SNAP images, we discuss some of the scientific applications of such a large sample of gravitational lenses: in particular we comment on the partition of information between lens structure, the source population properties and cosmology. Understanding this partitioning is key to assessing strong lens cosmography's value as a cosmological probe.

  15. [Contact lens-related keratitis].

    PubMed

    Steiber, Zita; Berta, András; Módis, László

    2013-11-10

    Nowadays, keratitis, corneal infection due to wearing contact lens means an increasingly serious problem. Neglected cases may lead to corneal damage that can cause blindness in cases of otherwise healthy eyes. Early diagnosis based on the clinical picture and the typical patient history is an important way of prevention. Prophylaxis is substantial to avoid bacterial and viral infection that is highly essential in this group of diseases. Teaching contact lens wearers the proper contact lens care, storage, sterility, and hygiene regulations is of great importance. In case of corneal inflammation early accurate diagnosis supported by microbiological culture from contact lenses, storage boxes or cornea is very useful. Thereafter, targeted drug therapy or in therapy-resistant cases surgical treatment may even be necessary in order to sustain suitable visual acuity.

  16. A Prototype Antifungal Contact Lens

    PubMed Central

    Ciolino, Joseph B.; Hudson, Sarah P.; Mobbs, Ashley N.; Hoare, Todd R.; Iwata, Naomi G.; Fink, Gerald R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To design a contact lens to treat and prevent fungal ocular infections. Methods. Curved contact lenses were created by encapsulating econazole-impregnated poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) films in poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) by ultraviolet photopolymerization. Release studies were conducted in phosphate-buffered saline at 37°C with continuous shaking. The contact lenses and their release media were tested in an antifungal assay against Candida albicans. Cross sections of the pre- and postrelease contact lenses were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and by Raman spectroscopy. Results. Econazole-eluting contact lenses provided extended antifungal activity against Candida albicans fungi. Fungicidal activity varied in duration and effectiveness depending on the mass of the econazole-PLGA film encapsulated in the contact lens. Conclusions. An econazole-eluting contact lens could be used as a treatment for fungal ocular infections. PMID:21527380

  17. Automated Fresnel lens tester system

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, G.S.

    1981-07-01

    An automated data collection system controlled by a desktop computer has been developed for testing Fresnel concentrators (lenses) intended for solar energy applications. The system maps the two-dimensional irradiance pattern (image) formed in a plane parallel to the lens, whereas the lens and detector assembly track the sun. A point detector silicon diode (0.5-mm-dia active area) measures the irradiance at each point of an operator-defined rectilinear grid of data positions. Comparison with a second detector measuring solar insolation levels results in solar concentration ratios over the image plane. Summation of image plane energies allows calculation of lens efficiencies for various solar cell sizes. Various graphical plots of concentration ratio data help to visualize energy distribution patterns.

  18. Inhibition of Lens Photodamage by UV-Absorbing Contact Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Malone, James P.; Townsend, R. Reid

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether class 1 UV-blocking contact lenses protect against UVB radiation–induced damage in a human lens epithelial cell line (HLE B-3) and postmortem human lenses using a proteomics approach. Methods. HLE B-3 cells were exposed to 6.4 mW/cm2 UVB radiation at 302 nm for 2 minutes (768 mJ/cm2) with or without covering by senofilcon A class 1 UV-blocking contact lenses or lotrafilcon A non–UV-blocking (lotrafilcon A has some UV-blocking ability, albeit minimal) contact lenses. Control cells were not exposed to UVB radiation. Four hours after treatment, cells were analyzed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry, and changes in protein abundance were quantified. F-actin and microtubule cytoskeletons were examined by fluorescence staining. In addition, human donor lenses were exposed to UVB radiation at 302 nm for 4 minutes (1536 mJ/cm2). Cortical and epithelial cell proteins were scraped from lens surfaces and subjected to the same protein analyses. Results. Senofilcon A lenses were beneficial for protecting HLE B-3 cells against UVB radiation–induced changes in caldesmon 1 isoform, lamin A/C transcript variant 1, DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide, β-actin, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), annexin A2, triose phosphate isomerase, and ubiquitin B precursor. These contact lenses also prevented actin and microtubule cytoskeleton changes typically induced by UVB radiation. Conversely, non–UV-blocking contact lenses were not protective. UVB-irradiated human lenses showed marked reductions in αA-crystallin, αB-crystallin, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, βS-crystallin, βB2-crystallin, and G3PDH, and UV-absorbing contact lenses significantly prevented these alterations. Conclusions. Senofilcon A class 1 UV-blocking contact lenses largely prevented UVB-induced changes in protein abundance in lens epithelial cells and in human lenses. PMID:21873653

  19. Locus for a human hereditary cataract is closely linked to the. gamma. -crystallin gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Lubsen, N.H.; Renwick, J.H.; Tsui, L.C.; Breitman, M.L.; Schoenmakers, J.G.G.

    1987-01-01

    Within the human ..gamma..-crystallin gene cluster polymorphic Taq I sites are present. These give rise to three sets of allelic fragments from the ..gamma..-crystallin genes. Together these restriction fragment length polymorphisms define eight possible haplotypes, three of which (Q, R, and S) were found in the Dutch and English population. A fourth haplotype (P) was detected within a family in which a hereditary Coppock-like cataract of the embryonic lens nucleus occurs in heterozygotes. Haplotype P was found only in family members who suffered from cataract, and all family members who suffered from cataract had haplotype P. The absolute correlation between the presence of haplotype P and cataract within this family shows that the ..gamma..-crystallin gene cluster and the locus for the Coppock-like cataract are closely linked. This linkage provides genetic evidence that the primary cause of a cataract in humans could possibly be a lesion in a crystallin gene.

  20. Computer-aided lens assembly.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Richard; Alcock, Rob; Petzing, Jon; Coupland, Jeremy

    2004-01-20

    We propose a computer-aided method of lens manufacture that allows assembly, adjustment, and test phases to be run concurrently until an acceptable level of optical performance is reached. Misalignment of elements within a compound lens is determined by a comparison of the results of physical ray tracing by use of an array of Gaussian laser beams with numerically obtained geometric ray traces. An estimate of misalignment errors is made, and individual elements are adjusted in an iterative manner until performance criteria are achieved. The method is illustrated for the alignment of an air-spaced doublet. PMID:14765916

  1. Liquid crystal Fresnel lens display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Qian; Abhishek Kumar, Srivastava; Alwin Tam, Ming-Wai; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Shen, Dong; Vladimir, Chigrinov G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2016-09-01

    A novel see-through display with a liquid crystal lens array was proposed. A liquid crystal Fresnel lens display (LCFLD) with a holographic screen was demonstrated. The proposed display system has high efficiency, simple fabrication, and low manufacturing cost due to the absence of a polarizer and color filter. Project supported by Partner State Key Laboratory on Advanced Displays and Optoelectronics Technologies HKUST, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61435008 and 61575063), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. WM1514036).

  2. Liquid crystal Fresnel lens display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Qian; Abhishek Kumar, Srivastava; Alwin Tam, Ming-Wai; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Shen, Dong; Vladimir, Chigrinov G.; Kwok, Hoi-Sing

    2016-09-01

    A novel see-through display with a liquid crystal lens array was proposed. A liquid crystal Fresnel lens display (LCFLD) with a holographic screen was demonstrated. The proposed display system has high efficiency, simple fabrication, and low manufacturing cost due to the absence of a polarizer and color filter. Project supported by Partner State Key Laboratory on Advanced Displays and Optoelectronics Technologies HKUST, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61435008 and 61575063), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. WM1514036).

  3. Contact lens wear at altitude: subcontact lens bubble formation.

    PubMed

    Flynn, W J; Miller, R E; Tredici, T J; Block, M G; Kirby, E E; Provines, W F

    1987-11-01

    A concern in the past regarding contact lens wear in aviation has been the fear of subcontact lens bubble formation. Previous reports have documented the occurrence of bubbles with hard (PMMA) lenses. Reported here are the results of contact lens bubble studies with soft hydrophilic and rigid gas-permeable lenses. Testing was accomplished in hypobaric chambers and onboard USAF transport aircraft. Hypobaric chamber flights were of three types: high-altitude flights up to 7,620 m (25,000 ft); explosive rapid decompressions from 2,438.4 m (8,000 ft) to 7,620 m (25,000 ft); and 4-h flights at 3,048 m (10,000 ft). Flights aboard transport aircraft typically had cabin pressures equivalent to 1,524-2,438.4 m (5,000-8,000 ft), and ranged in duration from 3 to 10 h. For subjects wearing rigid gas-permeable lenses, central bubbles were detected in 2 of 10 eyes and occurred at altitudes greater than 6,096 m (20,000 ft). With soft contact lenses, bubble formation was detected in approximately 24% (22 of 92 eyes) of the eyes tested, sometimes occurring at altitudes as low as 1,828.8 m (6,000 ft). Soft lens bubbles were always located at the limbus and were without sequela to vision or corneal epithelial integrity. Bubbles under the rigid lenses were primarily central, with potential adverse effects on vision and the corneal epithelium.

  4. Ensuring Safe Use of Contact Lens Solution

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Ensuring Safe Use of Contact Lens Solution Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... back to top Dos and Don'ts for Contact Lens Wearers DO: Always wash your hands before ...

  5. The amino-acid sequence of the alpha-crystallin A chains of red kangaroo and Virginia opossum.

    PubMed

    De Jong, W W; Terwindt, E C

    1976-08-16

    The amino acid sequence of the A chain of the eye lens protein alpha-crystallin from the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) was completely determined by manual Edman degradation of tryptic, thermolytic and cyanogen bromide peptides. The sequence of the alpha-crystallin A chain from the Virginia opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) was deduced from amino acid analyses and partial Edman degradation of peptides. The 173-residue A chains of kangaroo and opossum differ in six positions, whereas comparison with the bovine alpha-crystallin A chain reveals 17 and 22 substitutions, respectively. Most substitutions occur in the COOH-terminal part of the chain.

  6. SimpLens: Interactive gravitational lensing simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Prasenjit; Williams, Liliya L. R.

    2016-06-01

    SimpLens illustrates some of the theoretical ideas important in gravitational lensing in an interactive way. After setting parameters for elliptical mass distribution and external mass, SimpLens displays the mass profile and source position, the lens potential and image locations, and indicate the image magnifications and contours of virtual light-travel time. A lens profile can be made shallower or steeper with little change in the image positions and with only total magnification affected.

  7. Stimulation by Insulin of Cell Elongation and Microtubule Assembly in Embryonic Chick-Lens Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Piatigorsky, Joram; Rothschild, Sonia S.; Wollberg, Miriam

    1973-01-01

    Both fetal-calf serum and insulin cause cell elongation in explanted chick-lens epithelia from 6-day-old embryos. We show that 1 μg/ml of insulin, like serum, stimulates a doubling of cell length and an assembly of longitudinally oriented microtubules; colchicine treatment inhibits this cell elongation. In contrast to serum, insulin neither promotes further lens-cell elongation nor appreciably stimulates the synthesis of bulk proteins or of delta crystallin under the present conditions. These data indicate that the early morphological events of lens fiber differentiation can be initiated by insulin in a chemically defined, serum-free medium without significant affects upon protein synthesis. Images PMID:4515617

  8. Phototoxicity and cytotoxicity of fullerol in human lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Joan E. Wielgus, Albert R. Boyes, William K. Andley, Usha Chignell, Colin F.

    2008-04-01

    The water-soluble, hydroxylated fullerene [fullerol, nano-C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22-26}] has several clinical applications including use as a drug carrier to bypass the blood ocular barriers. We have assessed fullerol's potential ocular toxicity by measuring its cytotoxicity and phototoxicity induced by UVA and visible light in vitro with human lens epithelial cells (HLE B-3). Accumulation of nano-C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22-26} in the cells was confirmed spectrophotometrically at 405 nm and cell viability estimated using MTS and LDH assays. Fullerol was cytotoxic to HLE B-3 cells maintained in the dark at concentrations higher than 20 {mu}M. Exposure to either UVA or visible light in the presence of > 5 {mu}M fullerol-induced phototoxic damage. When cells were pretreated with non-toxic antioxidants: 20 {mu}M lutein, 1 mM N-acetyl cysteine, or 1 mM L-ascorbic acid prior to irradiation, only the singlet oxygen quencher-lutein significantly protected against fullerol photodamage. Apoptosis was observed in lens cells treated with fullerol whether or not the cells were irradiated, in the order UVA > visible light > dark. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that in the presence of the endogenous lens protein {alpha}-crystallin, large aggregates of fullerol were reduced. In conclusion, fullerol is both cytotoxic and phototoxic to human lens epithelial cells. Although the acute toxicity of water-soluble nano-C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22-26} is low, these compounds are retained in the body for long periods, raising concern for their chronic toxic effect. Before fullerols are used to deliver drugs to the eye, they should be tested for photo- and cytotoxicity in vivo.

  9. A broadband transformation-optics metasurface lens

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Xiang; Xiang Jiang, Wei; Feng Ma, Hui; Jun Cui, Tie

    2014-04-14

    We present a transformational metasurface Luneburg lens based on the quasi-conformal mapping method, which has weakly anisotropic constitutive parameters. We design the metasurface lens using inhomogeneous artificial structures to realize the required surface refractive indexes. The transformational metasurface Luneburg lens is fabricated and the measurement results demonstrate very good performance in controlling the radiated surface waves.

  10. 21 CFR 886.3600 - Intraocular lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraocular lens. 886.3600 Section 886.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3600 Intraocular lens. (a) Identification. An intraocular lens is a device made of materials...

  11. Contact Lens-Related Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Contact Lens-Related Eye Infections Sections Contact Lens-Related ... About Contact Lenses Proper Care of Contact Lenses Contact Lens-Related Eye Infections Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  12. New merit values for lens performance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, J.

    1995-08-01

    New merit values for lens performance m=Σ(Qh)2 and m¯=Σ(Qh¯)2 were introduced, where Q is Abbe's invariant, h is paraxial ray height and the bar indicates principal ray. The studies showed that m and m¯ are useful for the evaluation of potentialities of lens systems and for the optimization of lens designs.

  13. Connections between connexins, calcium, and cataracts in the lens.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junyuan; Sun, Xiurong; Martinez-Wittinghan, Francisco J; Gong, Xiaohua; White, Thomas W; Mathias, Richard T

    2004-10-01

    Cx46 causes loss of coupling of mature fiber cells; the efflux path for calcium is therefore blocked; calcium accumulates in the central cells; at concentrations above approximately 1 microM (from the center to about half way out of a 3-wk-old lens) Lp82 is activated; Lp82 cleaves cytoplasmic proteins (crystallins) in central cells; and the cleaved proteins aggregate and scatter light.

  14. Age-dependent loss of the C-terminal amino acid from alpha crystallin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmons, T.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Antiserum made against the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin was used to monitor the purification of a tryptic peptide containing the C-terminus of the molecule from fetal versus adult bovine lenses. Mass spectral analysis of the peptide preparations obtained from these lenses demonstrated the presence of a peptide (T20) containing an intact C-terminus from fetal lenses and the presence of an additional peptide (T20') from older lenses that contained a cleaved C-terminal serine. These results demonstrate an age-dependent processing of alpha-A crystallin in the bovine lens, resulting in removal of the C-terminal amino acid residue.

  15. Tevatron electron lens magnetic system

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Shiltsev et al.

    2001-07-12

    In the framework of collaboration between IHEP and FNAL, a magnetic system of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) has been designed and built. The TEL is currently installed in the superconducting ring of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider and used for experimental studies of beam-beam compensation [1].

  16. The Fyodorov Sputnik intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Kwitko, M L

    1979-04-01

    The author has implanted 197 Fyodorov intraocular lenses. With careful selection of patients, good surgical judgment, and meticulous surgery, a degree of success can be obtained with this lens, which will equal that of conventional cataract surgery. The surgical technique of implantation will be described. PMID:537770

  17. A Lens to the Enterprise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This essay is based on a series of roundtables convened through the Knight Collaborative National Medical Education Roundtable. It reports that the challenges and transformations experienced in recent years by community-based medical schools and clinical campuses offer a lens to the whole higher education enterprise, and asks the fundamental…

  18. Measurement of Lens Protein Aggregation in Vivo Using Dynamic Light Scattering in a Guinea Pig/UVA Model for Nuclear Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Simpanya, M. Francis; Ansari, Rafat R.; Leverenz, Victor; Giblin, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    The role of UVA radiation in the formation of human nuclear cataract is not well understood. We have previously shown that exposing guinea pigs for 5 months to a chronic low level of UVA light produces increased lens nuclear light scattering and elevated levels of protein disulfide. Here we have used the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) to investigate lens protein aggregation in vivo in the guinea pig/UVA model. DLS size distribution analysis conducted at the same location in the lens nucleus of control and UVA-irradiated animals showed a 28% reduction in intensity of small diameter proteins in experimental lenses compared with controls (P < 0.05). In addition, large diameter proteins in UVA-exposed lens nuclei increased five-fold in intensity compared to controls (P < 0.05). The UVA-induced increase in apparent size of lens nuclear small diameter proteins was three-fold (P < 0.01), and the size of large diameter aggregates was more than four-fold in experimental lenses compared with controls. The diameter of crystallin aggregates in the UVA-irradiated lens nucleus was estimated to be 350 nm, a size able to scatter light. No significant changes in protein size were detected in the anterior cortex of UVA-irradiated lenses. It is presumed that the presence of a UVA chromophore in the guinea pig lens (NADPH bound to zeta crystallin), as well as traces of oxygen, contributed to UVA-induced crystallin aggregation. The results indicate a potentially harmful role for UVA light in the lens nucleus. A similar process of UVA-irradiated protein aggregation may take place in the older human lens nucleus, accelerating the formation of human nuclear cataract. PMID:18627516

  19. Hard convex lens-shaped particles: Densest-known packings and phase behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Cinacchi, Giorgio; Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-12-14

    By using theoretical methods and Monte Carlo simulations, this work investigates dense ordered packings and equilibrium phase behavior (from the low-density isotropic fluid regime to the high-density crystalline solid regime) of monodisperse systems of hard convex lens-shaped particles as defined by the volume common to two intersecting congruent spheres. We show that, while the overall similarity of their shape to that of hard oblate ellipsoids is reflected in a qualitatively similar phase diagram, differences are more pronounced in the high-density crystal phase up to the densest-known packings determined here. In contrast to those non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis crystals that are the densest-known packings of hard (oblate) ellipsoids, hard convex lens-shaped particles pack more densely in two types of degenerate crystalline structures: (i) non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis body-centered-orthorhombic-like crystals and (ii) (Bravais) lattice monoclinic crystals. By stacking at will, regularly or irregularly, laminae of these two crystals, infinitely degenerate, generally non-periodic in the stacking direction, dense packings can be constructed that are consistent with recent organizing principles. While deferring the assessment of which of these dense ordered structures is thermodynamically stable in the high-density crystalline solid regime, the degeneracy of their densest-known packings strongly suggests that colloidal convex lens-shaped particles could be better glass formers than colloidal spheres because of the additional rotational degrees of freedom.

  20. Hard convex lens-shaped particles: Densest-known packings and phase behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinacchi, Giorgio; Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-12-01

    By using theoretical methods and Monte Carlo simulations, this work investigates dense ordered packings and equilibrium phase behavior (from the low-density isotropic fluid regime to the high-density crystalline solid regime) of monodisperse systems of hard convex lens-shaped particles as defined by the volume common to two intersecting congruent spheres. We show that, while the overall similarity of their shape to that of hard oblate ellipsoids is reflected in a qualitatively similar phase diagram, differences are more pronounced in the high-density crystal phase up to the densest-known packings determined here. In contrast to those non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis crystals that are the densest-known packings of hard (oblate) ellipsoids, hard convex lens-shaped particles pack more densely in two types of degenerate crystalline structures: (i) non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis body-centered-orthorhombic-like crystals and (ii) (Bravais) lattice monoclinic crystals. By stacking at will, regularly or irregularly, laminae of these two crystals, infinitely degenerate, generally non-periodic in the stacking direction, dense packings can be constructed that are consistent with recent organizing principles. While deferring the assessment of which of these dense ordered structures is thermodynamically stable in the high-density crystalline solid regime, the degeneracy of their densest-known packings strongly suggests that colloidal convex lens-shaped particles could be better glass formers than colloidal spheres because of the additional rotational degrees of freedom.

  1. Hard convex lens-shaped particles: Densest-known packings and phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Cinacchi, Giorgio; Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-12-14

    By using theoretical methods and Monte Carlo simulations, this work investigates dense ordered packings and equilibrium phase behavior (from the low-density isotropic fluid regime to the high-density crystalline solid regime) of monodisperse systems of hard convex lens-shaped particles as defined by the volume common to two intersecting congruent spheres. We show that, while the overall similarity of their shape to that of hard oblate ellipsoids is reflected in a qualitatively similar phase diagram, differences are more pronounced in the high-density crystal phase up to the densest-known packings determined here. In contrast to those non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis crystals that are the densest-known packings of hard (oblate) ellipsoids, hard convex lens-shaped particles pack more densely in two types of degenerate crystalline structures: (i) non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis body-centered-orthorhombic-like crystals and (ii) (Bravais) lattice monoclinic crystals. By stacking at will, regularly or irregularly, laminae of these two crystals, infinitely degenerate, generally non-periodic in the stacking direction, dense packings can be constructed that are consistent with recent organizing principles. While deferring the assessment of which of these dense ordered structures is thermodynamically stable in the high-density crystalline solid regime, the degeneracy of their densest-known packings strongly suggests that colloidal convex lens-shaped particles could be better glass formers than colloidal spheres because of the additional rotational degrees of freedom. PMID:26671389

  2. Solid-liquid phase boundaries of lens protein solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Berland, C R; Thurston, G M; Kondo, M; Broide, M L; Pande, J; Ogun, O; Benedek, G B

    1992-01-01

    We report measurement of the solid-liquid phase boundary, or liquidus line, for aqueous solutions of three pure calf gamma-crystallin proteins: gamma II, gamma IIIa, and gamma IIIb. We also studied the liquidus line for solutions of native gamma IV-crystallin calf lens protein, which consists of 85% gamma IVa/15% gamma IVb. In all four proteins the liquidus phase boundaries lie higher in temperature than the previously determined liquid-liquid coexistence curves. Thus, over the range of concentration and temperature for which liquid-liquid phase separation occurs, the coexistence of a protein crystal phase with a protein liquid solution phase is thermodynamically stable relative to the metastable separated liquid phases. The location of the liquidus lines clearly divides these four crystallin proteins into two groups: those in which liquidus lines flatten at temperatures greater than 70 degrees C: gamma IIIa and gamma IV, and those in which liquidus lines flatten at temperatures less than 50 degrees C: gamma II and gamma IIIb. We have analyzed the form of the liquidus lines by using specific choices for the structures of the Gibbs free energy in solution and solid phases. By applying the thermodynamic conditions for equilibrium between the two phases to the resulting chemical potentials, we can estimate the temperature-dependent free energy change upon binding of protein and water into the solid phase. PMID:1741375

  3. Evidence of a glycemic threshold for the formation of pentosidine in diabetic dog lens but not in collagen.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, R H; Kern, T S; Sell, D R; Fogarty, J; Engerman, R L; Monnier, V M

    1996-05-01

    The relationship between long-term glycemic control and the advanced Maillard reaction was investigated in dura mater collagen and lens proteins from dogs that were diabetic for 5 years. Diabetic dogs were assigned prospectively to good, moderate, and poor glycemic control and maintained by insulin. Biochemical changes were determined at study exit. Mean levels of collagen digestibility by pepsin decreased (NS) whereas collagen glycation (P < 0.001), pentosidine cross-links (P < 0.001), and collagen fluorescence (P = 0.02) increased with increasing mean HbA1 values. Similarly, mean levels of lens crystallin glycation (P < 0.001), fluorescence (P < 0.001), and the specific advanced lens Maillard product 1 (LM-1) (P < 0.001) and pentosidine (P < 0.005) increased significantly with poorer glycemic control. Statistical analysis revealed very high Spearman correlation coefficients between collagen and lens changes. Whereas pentosidine cross-links were significantly elevated in collagen from diabetic dogs with moderate levels of HbA1 (i.e., 8.0 +/- 0.4%), lens pentosidine levels were normal in this group and were elevated (P < 0.001) only in the animals with poor glycemic control (HbA1 = 9.7 +/- 0.6%). Thus, whereas protein glycation and advanced glycation in the extracellular matrix and in the lens are generally related to the level of glycemic control, there is evidence for a tissue-specific glycemic threshold for pentosidine formation, i.e., glycoxidation, in the lens. This threshold may be in part linked to a dramatic acceleration in crystallin glycation with HbA1 values of > 8.0% and/or a loss of lens membrane permeability. This study provides support at the molecular level for the growing concept that glycemic thresholds may be involved in the development of some of the complications in diabetes.

  4. γS-Crystallin Proteins from the Antarctic Nototheniid Toothfish: A Model System for Investigating Differential Resistance to Chemical and Thermal Denaturation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The γS1- and γS2-crystallins, structural eye lens proteins from the Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni), are homologues of the human lens protein γS-crystallin. Although γS1 has the higher thermal stability of the two, it is more susceptible to chemical denaturation by urea. The lower thermodynamic stability of both toothfish crystallins relative to human γS-crystallin is consistent with the current picture of how proteins from organisms endemic to perennially cold environments have achieved low-temperature functionality via greater structural flexibility. In some respects, the sequences of γS1- and γS2-crystallin are typical of psychrophilic proteins; however, their amino acid compositions also reflect their selection for a high refractive index increment. Like their counterparts in the human lens and those of mesophilic fish, both toothfish crystallins are relatively enriched in aromatic residues and methionine and exiguous in aliphatic residues. The sometimes contradictory requirements of selection for cold tolerance and high refractive index make the toothfish crystallins an excellent model system for further investigation of the biophysical properties of structural proteins. PMID:25372016

  5. Age-dependent variation of the Gradient Index profile in human crystalline lenses.

    PubMed

    de Castro, A; Siedlecki, D; Borja, David; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice; Marcos, S

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To reconstruct the gradient index (GRIN) profile of human crystalline lenses ex-vivo using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) imaging with an optimization technique and to study the dependence of the GRIN profile with age. METHODS: Cross-sectional images of nine isolated human crystalline lenses with ages ranging from 6 to 72 (post mortem time 1 to 4 days) were obtained using a custom-made OCT system. Lenses were extracted from whole cadaver globes and placed in a measurement chamber filled with preservation medium (DMEM). Lenses were imaged with the anterior surface up and then flipped over and imaged again, to obtain posterior lens surface profiles both undistorted and distorted by the refraction through the anterior crystalline lens and GRIN. The GRIN distribution of the lens was described with three variables by means of power function, with variables being the nucleus and surface index, and a power coefficient that describes the decay of the refractive index from the nucleus to the surface. An optimization method was used to search for the parameters that produced the best match of the distorted posterior surface. RESULTS: The distorted surface was simulated with accuracy around the resolution of the OCT system (under 15 µm). The reconstructed refractive index values ranged from 1.356 to 1.388 for the surface, and from 1.396 to 1.434 for the nucleus. The power coefficient ranged between 3 and 18. The power coefficient increased significantly with age, at a rate of 0.24 per year. CONCLUSION: Optical Coherence Tomography allowed optical, non-invasive measurement of the 2-D gradient index profile of the isolated human crystalline lens ex vivo. The age-dependent variation of the changes is consistent with previous data using magnetic resonance imaging, and the progressive formation of a refractive index plateau. PMID:22865954

  6. Age-dependent variation of the Gradient Index profile in human crystalline lenses

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, A.; Siedlecki, D.; Borja, David; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice; Marcos, S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To reconstruct the gradient index (GRIN) profile of human crystalline lenses ex-vivo using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) imaging with an optimization technique and to study the dependence of the GRIN profile with age. Methods Cross-sectional images of nine isolated human crystalline lenses with ages ranging from 6 to 72 (post mortem time 1 to 4 days) were obtained using a custom-made OCT system. Lenses were extracted from whole cadaver globes and placed in a measurement chamber filled with preservation medium (DMEM). Lenses were imaged with the anterior surface up and then flipped over and imaged again, to obtain posterior lens surface profiles both undistorted and distorted by the refraction through the anterior crystalline lens and GRIN. The GRIN distribution of the lens was described with three variables by means of power function, with variables being the nucleus and surface index, and a power coefficient that describes the decay of the refractive index from the nucleus to the surface. An optimization method was used to search for the parameters that produced the best match of the distorted posterior surface. Results The distorted surface was simulated with accuracy around the resolution of the OCT system (under 15 µm). The reconstructed refractive index values ranged from 1.356 to 1.388 for the surface, and from 1.396 to 1.434 for the nucleus. The power coefficient ranged between 3 and 18. The power coefficient increased significantly with age, at a rate of 0.24 per year. Conclusion Optical Coherence Tomography allowed optical, non-invasive measurement of the 2-D gradient index profile of the isolated human crystalline lens ex vivo. The age-dependent variation of the changes is consistent with previous data using magnetic resonance imaging, and the progressive formation of a refractive index plateau. PMID:22865954

  7. Age-dependent variation of the gradient index profile in human crystalline lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Alberto; Siedlecki, Damian; Borja, David; Uhlhorn, Stephen; Parel, Jean-Marie; Manns, Fabrice; Marcos, Susana

    2011-11-01

    An investigation was carried out with the aim of reconstructing the gradient index (GRIN) profile of human crystalline lenses ex-vivo using optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging with an optimization technique and to study the dependence of the GRIN profile with age. Cross-sectional images of nine isolated human crystalline lenses with ages ranging from 6 to 72 (post-mortem time 1 to 4 days) were obtained using a custom-made OCT system. Lenses were extracted from whole cadaver globes and placed in a measurement chamber filled with preservation medium (DMEM). Lenses were imaged with the anterior surface up and then flipped over and imaged again, to obtain posterior lens surface profiles both undistorted and distorted by the refraction through the anterior crystalline lens and GRIN. The GRIN distribution of the lens was described with three variables by means of power function, with variables being the nucleus and surface index, and a power coefficient that describes the decay of the refractive index from the nucleus to the surface. An optimization method was used to search for the parameters that produced the best match of the distorted posterior surface. The distorted surface was simulated with accuracy around the resolution of the OCT system (under 15 µm). The reconstructed refractive index values ranged from 1.356 to 1.388 for the surface, and from 1.396 to 1.434 for the nucleus. The power coefficient ranged between 3 and 18. The power coefficient increased significantly with age, at a rate of 0.24 per year. Optical coherence tomography allowed optical, non-invasive measurement of the 2D gradient index profile of the isolated human crystalline lens ex vivo. The age-dependent variation of the changes is consistent with previous data using magnetic resonance imaging, and the progressive formation of a refractive index plateau.

  8. Characterization of gamma-crystallin from a catfish: structural characterization of one major isoform with high methionine by cDNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Pan, F M; Chang, W C; Lin, C H; Hsu, A L; Chiou, S H

    1995-04-01

    gamma-Crystallin is the major and most abundant lens protein present in the eye lens of most teleostean fishes. To facilitate structural characterization of gamma-crystallins isolated from the lens of the catfishes (Clarias fuscus), a cDNA mixture was synthesized from the poly(A)+mRNA isolated from fresh eye lenses, and amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was adopted to obtain cDNAs encoding various gamma-crystallins. Plasmids of transformed E. coli strain JM109 containing amplified gamma-crystallin cDNAs were purified and prepared for nucleotide sequencing by the dideoxynucleotide chain-termination method. Sequencing more than five clones containing DNA inserts of 0.52 kb revealed the presence of one major isoform with a complete reading frame of 534 base pairs, covering a gamma-crystallin (gamma M1) with a deduced protein sequence of 177 amino acids excluding the initiating methionine. It was of interest to find that this crystallin of pI 9.1 contains a high-methionine content of 15.3% in contrast to those gamma-crystallins of low-methionine content from most mammalian lenses. Sequence comparisons of catfish gamma M1-crystallin with those published sequences of gamma-crystallins from carp, bovine and mouse lenses indicate that there is approx. an 82% sequence homology between the catfish and the carp species of piscine class whereas only 51-58% homology is found between mammals and the catfish. Moreover the differences in the hydropathy profiles for these two groups of gamma-crystallins, i.e. one with a high-methionine content from teleostean fishes and the other with a low-methionine content from mammalian species, reflect a distinct variance in the polarity distributions of surface amino acids in these crystallins.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. A stochastic model of eye lens growth.

    PubMed

    Šikić, Hrvoje; Shi, Yanrong; Lubura, Snježana; Bassnett, Steven

    2015-07-01

    The size and shape of the ocular lens must be controlled with precision if light is to be focused sharply on the retina. The lifelong growth of the lens depends on the production of cells in the anterior epithelium. At the lens equator, epithelial cells differentiate into fiber cells, which are added to the surface of the existing fiber cell mass, increasing its volume and area. We developed a stochastic model relating the rates of cell proliferation and death in various regions of the lens epithelium to deposition of fiber cells and radial lens growth. Epithelial population dynamics were modeled as a branching process with emigration and immigration between proliferative zones. Numerical simulations were in agreement with empirical measurements and demonstrated that, operating within the strict confines of lens geometry, a stochastic growth engine can produce the smooth and precise growth necessary for lens function. PMID:25816743

  10. Adjustable hybrid diffractive/refractive achromatic lens.

    PubMed

    Valley, Pouria; Savidis, Nickolaos; Schwiegerling, Jim; Dodge, Mohammad Reza; Peyman, Gholam; Peyghambarian, N

    2011-04-11

    We demonstrate a variable focal length achromatic lens that consists of a flat liquid crystal diffractive lens and a pressure-controlled fluidic refractive lens. The diffractive lens is composed of a flat binary Fresnel zone structure and a thin liquid crystal layer, producing high efficiency and millisecond switching times while applying a low ac voltage input. The focusing power of the diffractive lens is adjusted by electrically modifying the sub-zones and re-establishing phase wrapping points. The refractive lens includes a fluid chamber with a flat glass surface and an opposing elastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane surface. Inserting fluid volume through a pump system into the clear aperture region alters the membrane curvature and adjusts the refractive lens' focal position. Primary chromatic aberration is remarkably reduced through the coupling of the fluidic and diffractive lenses at selected focal lengths. Potential applications include miniature color imaging systems, medical and ophthalmic devices, or any design that utilizes variable focal length achromats.

  11. Formation of Micro Lens by Laser Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Akira; Horiuchi, Takashi; Mizumachi, Manabu; Seino, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Takuya; Suzuki, Kaoru

    Recently, a micro lens has been demanded in uniting a laser device and an optical fiber. We have fabricated a new type of plastic micro lens by laser polymerization. The amount of the resin polymerized by exposing laser light, namely light-curing, depends on the laser power and exposing time. The shape of the lens can be controlled by changing the condition of laser irradiation. In this paper, the characteristic of the lens formed by this method was examined. Moreover, the relation between the lens shape and the condition of laser irradiation was investigated, and the condition to reducing a transverse spherical aberration was examined. As the result, the lens of 390μm in diameter was formed. The area which can be used for light coupling from a laser diode to a multimode fiber will be 81 % in the total lens area.

  12. Effect of diabetes associated increases in lens optical density on colour discrimination in insulin dependent diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, K J; Scarpello, J H; Foster, D H; Moreland, J D

    1994-01-01

    Optical density (OD) of the crystalline lens has been shown in non-diabetics to increase linearly with age over the first five decades and at an increased rate thereafter; in insulin dependent diabetic (IDDM) patients, lens OD increases with age and with duration of diabetes at a rate similar to that in non-diabetics over the age of 60 years. Recently, it has been established that colour discrimination is abnormal in a majority of young patients with uncomplicated IDDM and angiographically normal retinas. Colour discrimination loss was attributed to functional abnormalities in the retina or neural pathways; yet the possibility exists that increases in lens OD may account for part or all of the colour discrimination loss in IDDM. In the present study, colour discrimination was compared in aretinopathic IDDM patients and age-matched controls, and then in a group of aretinopathic IDDM patients individually matched to controls with respect to lens OD. Colour discrimination was significantly worse in diabetic patients than in age-matched controls, and was significantly worse when diabetic patients were compared with controls matched for OD. The magnitude of the difference in 100 hue error score between diabetic patients and OD matched controls was, however, considerably less than the difference between diabetic patients and age-matched controls. These data suggest that colour discrimination loss in aretinopathic IDDM patients cannot be explained solely on the basis of diabetes induced increases in lens OD, but must involve abnormalities of the retina or its neural connections. PMID:7803350

  13. Evaluation of the toric implantable collamer lens for simultaneous treatment of myopia and astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Price, Marianne O; Price, Francis W

    2015-01-01

    Myopic astigmatism is a prevalent condition that can be treated with spectacles, contact lenses, or laser refractive surgery. However, these treatment options have functional limitations at higher levels of refractive error. The toric implantable collamer lens is designed to treat a broad range of refractive error, generally up to -18 diopters with +1 to +6 diopters of astigmatism. Approval for a more limited treatment range of up to 15 diopters of myopia with +1 to +4 diopters of astigmatism is being sought in the US, where this device has not yet received marketing approval. Surgical correction of high-myopic astigmatism can be life-altering and allow people to participate in activities that were not previously feasible because of visual limitations. The toric implantable collamer lens is implanted behind the iris and in front of the natural crystalline lens. With earlier lens designs, it was necessary to create an iridectomy or iridotomy to prevent pupillary block. The newest toric implantable collamer lens model has a small central hole that is not visually noticeable. This eliminates the need to create a hole in the iris, thereby enhancing the safety of the procedure.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of bovine γB-crystallin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, George; Mills, Jeffrey; Michel, Lea; Mathews, Kaylee; Zanet, John; Payan, Angel; van Nostrand, Keith; Kotlarchyk, Michael; Ross, David; Wahle, Christopher; Hamilton, John

    Anisotropy of shape and/or interactions play an important role in determining the properties of concentrated solutions of the eye lens protein, γB-crystallin, including its liquid-liquid phase transition. We are studying γB anisotropic interactions with use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) concentration- and temperature-dependent chemical shift perturbations (CSPs). We analyze two-dimensional heteronuclear spin quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra on backbone nitrogen and attached hydrogen nuclei for CSPs, up to 3 percent volume fraction. Cumulative distribution functions of the CSPs show a concentration and temperature-dependent spread. Many peaks that are highly shifted with either concentration or temperature are close (i) crystal intermolecular contacts (ii) locations of cataractogenic point mutations of a homologous human protein, human γD-crystallin, and (iii) charged amino-acid residues. We also discuss the concentration- and temperature-dependence of NMR and quasielastic light scattering measurements of rotational and translational diffusion of γB crystallin in solution, affected by interprotein attractions. Supported by NIH EY018249.

  15. Lens Coupled Quantum Cascade Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Qing (Inventor); Lee, Alan Wei Min (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade (QC) devices are disclosed that can operate, e.g., in a range of about 1 THz to about 10 THz. In some embodiments, QC lasers are disclosed in which an optical element (e.g., a lens) is coupled to an output facet of the laser's active region to enhance coupling of the lasing radiation from the active region to an external environment. In other embodiments, terahertz amplifier and tunable terahertz QC lasers are disclosed.

  16. New Scleral Lens For Electroretinography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlier, J. R.; Grall, Y.; Legargasson, J. F.

    1986-05-01

    This paper presents a scleral lens specifically designed for the implementation of new electroretinography (E.R.G.) procedures including ganzeld ERG, pattern ERG and optic fiber ERG. Ganzfeld ERG requires a direct, uniform illumination of the retina and is usually obtained within a ball stimulation which provides precisely controlled stimulation conditions. Pattern ERG is related to the electrical activity of ganglion cells and is produced by a structured visual stimulus, for instance a cherkerboard reversal. Fiber optics stimulation is a promising new technique involving an optic fiber which connects the scleral lens to a remote light stimulator. The new scleral lens is made out of silicon. Silicon is an ideal material for ERG applications. It is highly permeable to oxygen. It eliminates the risk of corneal abrasion and it provides good comfort to the patient. Two layers of conductive silicon are used for recording the bioelectric potential difference of the cornea with respect to the eye lids. An optically transparent window allows for the projection of structured images on the retina. A wide angle conic aperture is provided for ganzfeld stimulation. The same cone is used as a blepharostat and as a plug for connecting the optic fiber, once the transparent window is centered with respect to the pupil entrance.

  17. Rethinking contact lens associated keratitis.

    PubMed

    Efron, Nathan; Morgan, Philip B

    2006-09-01

    This review presents a critical analysis of the literature relating to the use of binomial and polynomial classification schemes for categorising corneal infiltrative events (CIEs) associated with contact lens wear and the epidemiology of such events. The results of the Manchester Keratitis Study-a 12-month, prospective, hospital-based epidemiological study of contact lens wearer suffering from CIEs-are used as a tool to challenge and test traditional thinking in relation to contact lens associated keratitis. An innovative aspect of this study is the use of a novel clinical severity matrix to systematically score the severity of CIEs based on 10 key signs and symptoms. The ambiguities inherent in using binomial classification schemes (such as, microbial versus sterile, ulcerative versus non-ulcerative etcetera) are highlighted. The failure of a polynomial scheme-due to extensive classification overlap between proposed sub-types of CIEs-is demonstrated using a Venn diagram. A cartographic analysis reveals that infiltrates tend to occur in the superior cornea of patients wearing extended wear silicone hydrogel lenses, in the central cornea of patients wearing daily wear hydrogel daily disposable lenses and in the peripheral cornea of patients wearing daily wear hydrogel (excluding daily disposable) lenses. Infiltrates that occur more towards the limbus are less severe. The incidence of CIEs is higher when contact lenses are worn overnight. Logistic analysis reveals that the risk of developing a severe CIE is five times greater with conventional hydrogel extended wear versus silicone hydrogel extended wear. The male gender, smoking, a healthy eye and body, and the late Winter months are associated with an increased risk of developing CIEs. The rate of significant visual loss as a result of developing a CIE is low. Two key conclusions are drawn from this work, which represent a radical rethinking of this potentially sight-threatening condition. CIEs should be

  18. Spectral and Lensing Characteristics of Gel-Derived Strontium Tartrate Single Crystals Using Dual-Beam Thermal Lens Technique.

    PubMed

    Rejeena, I; Thomas, V; Mathew, S; Lillibai, B; Nampoori, V P N; Radhakrishnan, P

    2016-09-01

    The Dual Beam mode-matched thermal lens spectrometry is a sensible technique for direct measurements of the thermal properties of tartrate crystalline materials. Here we report the measurement of thermal diffusivity of Strontium Tartrate single crystals incorporated with Rhodamine 6G using the thermal lens experiment. The respective crystals were prepared by solution-gel method at room temperature. The absorption characteristics of three different Strontium Tartrate crystals viz. pure, electric field applied and magnetic field applied were also carried out. PMID:27465706

  19. Carnosine ameliorates lens protein turbidity formations by inhibiting calpain proteolysis and ultraviolet C-induced degradation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Lin, I-Lin; Huang, Kai-Fa; Kuo, Pei-Ting; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Wu, Tzu-Hua

    2014-06-25

    Carnosine (CAR) is an endogenous peptide and present in lens, but there is little evidence for its effectiveness in calpain-induced proteolysis inhibition and its differential effects toward different wavelengths of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. This study aimed to develop three in vitro cataract models to compare the mechanisms underlying the protective activities of CAR. Crude crystallins extracted from porcine lenses were used for antiproteolysis assays, and purified γ-crystallins were used for anti-UV assays. The turbidity in those in vitro models mimics cataract formation and was assayed by measuring optical density (OD) at 405 nm. The effectiveness of CAR on calpain-induced proteolysis was studied at 37 and 58 °C. Patterns of proteins were then analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The turbidity was reduced significantly (p<0.05) at 60 min measurements with the increased concentration of CAR (10-300 mM). SDS-PAGE showed that the decreased intensities at both ∼28 and ∼30 kDa protein bands in heat-enhanced assays were ameliorated by CAR at ≥10 mM concentrations. In UV-B studies, CAR (200, 300 mM) reduced the turbidity of γ-crystallin significantly (p<0.05) at 6 h observations. The turbidity of samples containing γ-crystallins was ameliorated while incubated with CAR (100, 300 mM) significantly (p<0.05) following 4 h of exposure to UV-C. SDS-PAGE showed that the presence of CAR reduced UV-B-induced aggregation of γ-crystallins at ∼44 kDa and resulted in less loss of γ-crystallin following UV-C exposure. The result of modeling also suggests that CAR acts as an inhibitor of calpain. In conclusion, CAR protects lens proteins more readily by inhibiting proteolysis and UV-C-induced degradation than aggregation induced by UV-B irradiation.

  20. Graphene plasmonic lens for manipulating energy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoxi; Liu, Xueming; Lu, Hua; Zeng, Chao

    2014-02-01

    Manipulating the energy flow of light is at the heart of modern information and communication technologies. Because photons are uncharged, it is still difficult to effectively control them by electrical means. Here, we propose a graphene plasmonic (GP) lens to efficiently manipulate energy flow by elaborately designing the thickness of the dielectric spacer beneath the graphene sheet. Different from traditional metal-based lenses, the proposed graphene plasmonic lens possesses the advantages of tunability and excellent confinement of surface plasmons. It is found that the proposed lens can be utilized to focus and collimate the GP waves propagating along the graphene sheet. Particularly, the lens is dispersionless over a wide frequency range and the performance of lens can be flexibly tuned by adjusting the bias voltage. As an application of such a lens, the image transfer of two point sources with a separation of λ0/30 is demonstrated.

  1. Graphene plasmonic lens for manipulating energy flow

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoxi; Liu, Xueming; Lu, Hua; Zeng, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Manipulating the energy flow of light is at the heart of modern information and communication technologies. Because photons are uncharged, it is still difficult to effectively control them by electrical means. Here, we propose a graphene plasmonic (GP) lens to efficiently manipulate energy flow by elaborately designing the thickness of the dielectric spacer beneath the graphene sheet. Different from traditional metal-based lenses, the proposed graphene plasmonic lens possesses the advantages of tunability and excellent confinement of surface plasmons. It is found that the proposed lens can be utilized to focus and collimate the GP waves propagating along the graphene sheet. Particularly, the lens is dispersionless over a wide frequency range and the performance of lens can be flexibly tuned by adjusting the bias voltage. As an application of such a lens, the image transfer of two point sources with a separation of λ0/30 is demonstrated. PMID:24517981

  2. Optmization design of zoom lens systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaotong; Cen, Zhaofeng

    2002-09-01

    A zoom lens system is usually composed of several components. Some of the components can be moved to change the focal length or magnification. Zoom lens system design is more complicated than fixed-focus lens design due to the moving of some components. In this paper, an optimization method that is used to design zoom lens systems is presented. Using this method, the Gaussian parameters of zoom lens systems are optimized at first, and then the initial structure parameters in each component are generated and optimized. At last the aberration balance is made using multi-configuration. In this paper the flowchart of optimization design for such complex optical systems is showed and the algorithms are described. As a conclusion, the relationship between power distribution, initial structure and the aberrations is considered at the beginning, the evaluation criteria are reliable and efficiency for designing zoom lens systems.

  3. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.N.

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  4. Lateral shear interferometry with holo shear lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joenathan, C.; Mohanty, R. K.; Sirohi, R. S.

    1984-12-01

    A simple method for obtaining lateral shear using holo shear lenses (HSL) has been discussed. This simple device which produces lateral shears in the orthogonal directions has been used for lens testing. The holo shear lens is placed at or near the focus of the lens to be tested. It has also been shown that HSL can be used in speckle shear interferometry as it performs both the functions of shearing and imaging.

  5. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  6. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semirigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers. This paper will also highlight the interactions between academia and small businesses in developing new products and processes.

  7. Rotationally Molded Liquid Crystalline Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Martin; Stevenson, Paige; Scribben, Eric; Baird, Donald; Hulcher, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Rotational molding is a unique process for producing hollow plastic parts. Rotational molding offers advantages of low cost tooling and can produce very large parts with complicated shapes. Products made by rotational molding include water tanks with capacities up to 20,000 gallons, truck bed liners, playground equipment, air ducts, Nylon fuel tanks, pipes, toys, stretchers, kayaks, pallets, and many others. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers are an important class of engineering resins employed in a wide variety of applications. Thermotropic liquid crystalline polymers resins are composed of semi-rigid, nearly linear polymeric chains resulting in an ordered mesomorphic phase between the crystalline solid and the isotropic liquid. Ordering of the rigid rod-like polymers in the melt phase yields microfibrous, self-reinforcing polymer structures with outstanding mechanical and thermal properties. Rotational molding of liquid crystalline polymer resins results in high strength and high temperature hollow structures useful in a variety of applications. Various fillers and reinforcements can potentially be added to improve properties of the hollow structures. This paper focuses on the process and properties of rotationally molded liquid crystalline polymers.

  8. Amyloid fiber formation in human γD-Crystallin induced by UV-B photodamage.

    PubMed

    Moran, Sean D; Zhang, Tianqi O; Decatur, Sean M; Zanni, Martin T

    2013-09-10

    γD-Crystallin is an abundant structural protein of the lens that is found in native and modified forms in cataractous aggregates. We establish that UV-B irradiation of γD-Crystallin leads to structurally specific modifications and precipitation via two mechanisms: amorphous aggregates and amyloid fibers. UV-B radiation causes cleavage of the backbone, in large measure near the interdomain interface, where side chain oxidations are also concentrated. 2D IR spectroscopy and expressed protein ligation localize fiber formation exclusively to the C-terminal domain of γD-Crystallin. The native β-sandwich domains are not retained upon precipitation by either mechanism. The similarities between the amyloid forming pathways when induced by either UV-B radiation or low pH suggest that the propensity for the C-terminal β-sandwich domain to form amyloid β-sheets determines the misfolding pathway independent of the mechanism of denaturation.

  9. Molecular cloning and sequencing of zeta-crystallin/quinone reductase cDNA from human liver.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, P; Rao, P V; Zigler, J S

    1993-03-31

    Zeta-crystallin is an enzyme-crystallin highly expressed in the lens of some hystricomorph rodents and camels. It has been shown to have a novel NADPH: quinone oxidoreductase activity and is present at enzymatic levels in a variety of tissues from various mammals. We report here the cDNA cloning of zeta-crystallin from a human liver library. One clone with the complete open reading frame was obtained. Ten nucleotides of the 5' and 796 of the 3' nontranslated regions are present in the clone including two possible polyadenylation signals. The deduced amino acid sequence is 328 residues long with a calculated molecular mass of 34910 daltons and isoelectric point of 8.73. It shows 84% identity with the guinea pig protein.

  10. Design of a Test Bench for Intraocular Lens Optical Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alba-Bueno, Francisco; Vega, Fidel; Millán, María S.

    2011-01-01

    The crystalline lens is the responsible for focusing at different distances (accommodation) in the human eye. This organ grows throughout life increasing in size and rigidity. Moreover, due this growth it loses transparency through life, and becomes gradually opacified causing what is known as cataracts. Cataract is the most common cause of visual loss in the world. At present, this visual loss is recoverable by surgery in which the opacified lens is destroyed (phacoemulsification) and replaced by the implantation of an intraocular lens (IOL). If the IOL implanted is mono-focal the patient loses its natural capacity of accommodation, and as a consequence they would depend on an external optic correction to focus at different distances. In order to avoid this dependency, multifocal IOLs designs have been developed. The multi-focality can be achieved by using either, a refractive surface with different radii of curvature (refractive IOLs) or incorporating a diffractive surface (diffractive IOLs). To analyze the optical quality of IOLs it is necessary to test them in an optical bench that agrees with the ISO119679-2 1999 standard (Ophthalmic implants. Intraocular lenses. Part 2. Optical Properties and Test Methods). In addition to analyze the IOLs according to the ISO standard, we have designed an optical bench that allows us to simulate the conditions of a real human eye. To do that, we will use artificial corneas with different amounts of optical aberrations and several illumination sources with different spectral distributions. Moreover, the design of the test bench includes the possibility of testing the IOLs under off-axis conditions as well as in the presence of decentration and/or tilt. Finally, the optical imaging quality of the IOLs is assessed by using common metrics like the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the Point Spread Function (PSF) and/or the Strehl ratio (SR), or via registration of the IOL's wavefront with a Hartmann-Shack sensor and its

  11. Miniaturized unified imaging system using bio-inspired fluidic lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Frank S.; Cho, Sung Hwan; Qiao, Wen; Kim, Nam-Hyong; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2008-08-01

    Miniaturized imaging systems have become ubiquitous as they are found in an ever-increasing number of devices, such as cellular phones, personal digital assistants, and web cameras. Until now, the design and fabrication methodology of such systems have not been significantly different from conventional cameras. The only established method to achieve focusing is by varying the lens distance. On the other hand, the variable-shape crystalline lens found in animal eyes offers inspiration for a more natural way of achieving an optical system with high functionality. Learning from the working concepts of the optics in the animal kingdom, we developed bio-inspired fluidic lenses for a miniature universal imager with auto-focusing, macro, and super-macro capabilities. Because of the enormous dynamic range of fluidic lenses, the miniature camera can even function as a microscope. To compensate for the image quality difference between the central vision and peripheral vision and the shape difference between a solid-state image sensor and a curved retina, we adopted a hybrid design consisting of fluidic lenses for tunability and fixed lenses for aberration and color dispersion correction. A design of the world's smallest surgical camera with 3X optical zoom capabilities is also demonstrated using the approach of hybrid lenses.

  12. Chalcogenide material strengthening through the lens molding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J.; Scordato, M.; Lucas, Pierre; Coleman, Garrett J.

    2016-05-01

    The demand for infrared transmitting materials has grown steadily for several decades as markets realize new applications for longer wavelength sensing and imaging. With this growth has come the demand for new and challenging material requirements that cannot be satisfied with crystalline products alone. Chalcogenide materials, with their unique physical, thermal, and optical properties, have found acceptance by designers and fabricators to meet these demands. No material is perfect in every regard, and chalcogenides are no exception. A cause for concern has been the relatively low fracture toughness and the propensity of the bulk material to fracture. This condition is amplified when traditional subtractive manufacturing processes are employed. This form of processing leaves behind micro fractures and sub surface damage, which act as propagation points for both local and catastrophic failure of the material. Precision lens molding is not a subtractive process, and as a result, micro fractures and sub surface damage are not created. This results in a stronger component than one produced by traditional methods. New processing methods have also been identified that result in an even stronger surface that is more resistant to breakage, without the need for post processing techniques that may compromise surface integrity. This paper will discuss results achieved in the process of lens molding development at Edmund Optics that result in measurably stronger chalcogenide components. Various metrics will be examined and data will be presented that quantifies component strength for different manufacturing processes.

  13. Geometry-invariant GRIN lens: finite ray tracing.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Mehdi; Goncharov, Alexander V

    2014-11-17

    The refractive index distribution of the geometry-invariant gradient refractive index lens (GIGL) model is derived as a function of Cartesian coordinates. The adjustable external geometry of the GIGL model aims to mimic the shape of the human and animal crystalline lens. The refractive index distribution is based on an adjustable power-law profile, which provides additional flexibility of the model. An analytical method for layer-by-layer finite ray tracing through the GIGL model is developed and used to calculate aberrations of the GIGL model. The result of the finite ray tracing aberrations of the GIGL model are compared to those obtained with paraxial ray tracing. The derived analytical expression for the refractive index distribution can be employed in the reconstruction processes of the eye using the conventional ray tracing methods. The layer-by-layer finite ray tracing approach would be an asset in ray tracing through a modified GIGL model, where the refractive index distribution cannot be described analytically. Using the layer-by-layer finite ray-tracing method, the potential of the GIGL model in representing continuous as well as shell-like layered structures is illustrated and the results for both cases are presented and analysed.

  14. Role of the lens capsule on the mechanical accommodative response in a lens stretcher

    PubMed Central

    Ziebarth, Noël M.; Borja, David; Arrieta, Esdras; Aly, Mohamed; Manns, Fabrice; Dortonne, Isabelle; Nankivil, Derek; Jain, Rakhi; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine if changes in elastic properties of the lens capsule ex vivo with age contribute to the forces required to accommodate. Methods Post-mortem human (n=22; age average: 41±17years, range: 6–71 years) and cynomolgus monkey (n=19; age average: 7.7±1.8 years, range: 4.2–10 years) tissues including the lens, capsule, zonules, ciliary body, and sclera were mounted in an optomechanical lens stretching system. Starting at zero load, the sclera was symmetrically stretched to 2mm in 0.25 steps at a speed of 0.1mm.s−1. The load and lens diameter were measured at each step. The lens contents were removed through a mini-capsulorhexis. The stretching cycles were repeated on the empty capsular bag. The forces required to stretch the natural lens and empty bag were quantified as a function of age and compared. Results The force required to stretch the empty lens capsule was independent of age (human=2.6–34.9g/mm [25.2–342.7mN/mm], monkey=8.2–21.3g/mm [80.3–208.6mN/mm]). The ratio of the force required to stretch the empty lens capsule to the force required to stretch the natural lens decreases with age in human and monkey lenses (p=0.003, p=0.72, respectively). Conclusions The mechanical properties of the empty lens capsule assessed ex vivo in a lens stretcher remain constant with age, suggesting that the changes in elasticity of the lens capsule do not play a significant role in presbyopia. In young eyes, the lens capsule determines the force required to stretch the whole lens. The age-related increase in force required to stretch the lens is due to changes in the lens contents. PMID:18515568

  15. Stretchable Binary Fresnel Lens for Focus Tuning

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueming; Wei, Lei; Poelma, René H.; Vollebregt, Sten; Wei, Jia; Urbach, Hendrik Paul; Sarro, Pasqualina M.; Zhang, Guo Qi

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a tuneable binary amplitude Fresnel lens produced by wafer-level microfabrication. The Fresnel lens is fabricated by encapsulating lithographically defined vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles inside a polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) layer. The composite lens material combines the excellent optical absorption properties of the CNT with the transparency and stretchability of the PDMS. By stretching the elastomeric composite in radial direction, the lens focal length is tuned. Good focusing response is demonstrated and a large focus change (≥24%) was achieved by stretching lenses up to 11.4%. PMID:27139747

  16. A Magnification Lens for Interactive Volume Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    LaMar, E; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

    2001-07-19

    Volume visualization of large data sets suffers from the same problem that many other visualization modalities suffer from: either one can visualize the entire data set and lose small details or visualize a small region and lose the context. In this paper, they present a magnification lens technique for volume visualization. While the notion of a magnification-lens is not new, and other techniques attempt to simulate the physical properties of a magnifying lens, their contribution is in developing a magnification lens that is fast, can be implemented using a fairly small software overhead, and has a natural, intuitive appearance. The issue with magnification lens is the border, or transition, region. The lens center and exterior have a constant zoom factor, and are simple to render. It is the border region that blends between the external and interior magnification, and has a non-constant magnification. They use the perspective-correct textures capability, available in most current graphics systems, to produce a lens with a tessellated border region that approximates linear compression with respect to the radius of the magnification lens. They discuss how a cubic border can mitigate the discontinuities resulting from the use of a linear function, without significant performance loss. They discuss various issues concerning development of a three-dimensional magnification lens.

  17. Stretchable Binary Fresnel Lens for Focus Tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xueming; Wei, Lei; Poelma, René H.; Vollebregt, Sten; Wei, Jia; Urbach, Hendrik Paul; Sarro, Pasqualina M.; Zhang, Guo Qi

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a tuneable binary amplitude Fresnel lens produced by wafer-level microfabrication. The Fresnel lens is fabricated by encapsulating lithographically defined vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles inside a polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) layer. The composite lens material combines the excellent optical absorption properties of the CNT with the transparency and stretchability of the PDMS. By stretching the elastomeric composite in radial direction, the lens focal length is tuned. Good focusing response is demonstrated and a large focus change (≥24%) was achieved by stretching lenses up to 11.4%.

  18. Endoscopic inspection using a panoramic annular lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.; Matthys, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this one year study was to design, build, and demonstrate a prototype system for cavity inspection. A cylindrical view of the cavity interior was captured in real time through a compound lens system consisting of a unique panoramic annular lens and a collector lens. Images, acquired with a digitizing camera and stored in a desktop computer, were manipulated using image processing software to aid in visual inspection and qualitative analysis. A detailed description of the lens and its applications is given.

  19. Algorithm design of liquid lens inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Lu-Lin; Wang, Chun-Chieh

    2008-08-01

    In mobile lens domain, the glass lens is often to be applied in high-resolution requirement situation; but the glass zoom lens needs to be collocated with movable machinery and voice-coil motor, which usually arises some space limits in minimum design. In high level molding component technology development, the appearance of liquid lens has become the focus of mobile phone and digital camera companies. The liquid lens sets with solid optical lens and driving circuit has replaced the original components. As a result, the volume requirement is decreased to merely 50% of the original design. Besides, with the high focus adjusting speed, low energy requirement, high durability, and low-cost manufacturing process, the liquid lens shows advantages in the competitive market. In the past, authors only need to inspect the scrape defect made by external force for the glass lens. As to the liquid lens, authors need to inspect the state of four different structural layers due to the different design and structure. In this paper, authors apply machine vision and digital image processing technology to administer inspections in the particular layer according to the needs of users. According to our experiment results, the algorithm proposed can automatically delete non-focus background, extract the region of interest, find out and analyze the defects efficiently in the particular layer. In the future, authors will combine the algorithm of the system with automatic-focus technology to implement the inside inspection based on the product inspective demands.

  20. Growth and differentiation of human lens epithelial cells in vitro on matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, E. A.; Bjornstad, K. A.; Chang, P. Y.; McNamara, M. P.; Chang, E.; Aragon, G.; Lin, S. P.; Lui, G.; Polansky, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To characterize the growth and maturation of nonimmortalized human lens epithelial (HLE) cells grown in vitro. METHODS: HLE cells, established from 18-week prenatal lenses, were maintained on bovine corneal endothelial (BCE) extracellular matrix (ECM) in medium supplemented with basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). The identity, growth, and differentiation of the cultures were characterized by karyotyping, cell morphology, and growth kinetics studies, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis. RESULTS: HLE cells had a male, human diploid (2N = 46) karyotype. The population-doubling time of exponentially growing cells was 24 hours. After 15 days in culture, cell morphology changed, and lentoid formation was evident. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicated expression of alphaA- and betaB2-crystallin, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), and major intrinsic protein (MIP26) in exponential growth. Western analyses of protein extracts show positive expression of three immunologically distinct classes of crystallin proteins (alphaA-, alphaB-, and betaB2-crystallin) with time in culture. By Western blot analysis, expression of p57(KIP2), a known marker of terminally differentiated fiber cells, was detectable in exponential cultures, and levels increased after confluence. MIP26 and gamma-crystallin protein expression was detected in confluent cultures, by using immunofluorescence, but not in exponentially growing cells. CONCLUSIONS: HLE cells can be maintained for up to 4 months on ECM derived from BCE cells in medium containing FGF-2. With time in culture, the cells demonstrate morphologic characteristics of, and express protein markers for, lens fiber cell differentiation. This in vitro model will be useful for investigations of radiation-induced cataractogenesis and other studies of lens toxicity.

  1. The βγ-crystallins: native state stability and pathways to aggregation.

    PubMed

    Serebryany, Eugene; King, Jonathan A

    2014-07-01

    The βγ-crystallins are among the most stable and long-lived proteins in the human body. With increasing age, however, they transform to high molecular weight light-scattering aggregates, resulting in cataracts. This occurs despite the presence in the lens of high concentrations of the a-crystallin chaperones. Aggregation of crystallins can be induced in vitro by a variety of stresses, including acidic pH, ultraviolet light, oxidative damage, heating or freezing, and specific amino acid substitutions. Accumulating evidence points to the existence of specific biochemical pathways of protein: protein interaction and polymerization. We review the methods used for studying crystallin stability and aggregation and discuss the sometimes counterintuitive relationships between factors that favor native state stability and those that favor non-native aggregation. We discuss the behavior of βγ-crystallins in mixtures and their chaperone ability; the consequences of missense mutations and covalent damage to the side-chains; and the evolutionary strategies that have shaped these proteins. Efforts are ongoing to reveal the nature of cataractous crystallin aggregates and understand the mechanisms of aggregation in the context of key models of protein polymerization: amyloid, native-state, and domain-swapped. Such mechanistic understanding is likely to be of value for the development of therapeutic interventions and draw attention to unanswered questions about the relationship between a protein's native state stability and its transformation to an aggregated state.

  2. Comparison of modification sites in glycated crystallin in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kielmas, Martyna; Kijewska, Monika; Kluczyk, Alicja; Oficjalska, Jolanta; Gołębiewska, Bożena; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2015-03-01

    Glycation of α-crystallin is responsible for age- and diabetic-related cataracts, which are the main cause of blindness worldwide. We optimized the method of identification of lysine residues prone to glycation using the combination of LC-MS, isotopic labeling, and modified synthetic peptide standards with the glycated lysine derivative (Fmoc-Lys(i,i-Fru,Boc)-OH). The in vitro glycation of bovine lens α-crystallin was conducted by optimized method with the equimolar mixture of [(12)C6]- and [(13)C6]D-glucose. The in vivo glycation was studied on human lens crystallin. The glycated protein was subjected to proteolysis and analyzed using LC-MS. The results of in vitro and in vivo glycation of α-crystallin reveal a different distribution of the modified lysine residues. More Amadori products were detected as a result of the in vitro reaction due to forced glycation conditions. The developed method allowed us to identify the glycation sites in crystallin from eye lenses obtained from patients suffering from the cataract. We identified K166 in the A chain and K166 in the B chain of α-crystallin as major glycation sites during the in vitro reaction. We found also two in vivo glycated lysine residues: K92 in the B chain and K166 in the A chain, which are known as locations for Amadori products. These modification sites were confirmed by the LC-MS experiment using two synthetic standards. This study demonstrates the applicability of the LC-MS methods combined with the isotopic labeling and synthetic peptide standards for analysis of post-translational modifications in the biological material. PMID:25636230

  3. Paediatric intraocular lens implants: accuracy of lens power calculations.

    PubMed

    O'Gallagher, M K; Lagan, M A; Mulholland, C P; Parker, M; McGinnity, G; McLoone, E M

    2016-09-01

    PurposeThis study aims to evaluate the accuracy of lens prediction formulae on a paediatric population.MethodsA retrospective case-note review was undertaken of patients under 8 years old who underwent cataract surgery with primary lens implantation in a regional referral centre for paediatric ophthalmology, excluding those whose procedure was secondary to trauma. Biometric and refractive data were analysed for 43 eyes, including prediction errors (PE). Statistical measures used included mean absolute error (MAE), median absolute error (MedAE), Student's t-test and Lin's correlation coefficient.ResultsThe mean PE using the SRK-II formula was +0.96 D (range -2.47D to +2.41 D, SD 1.33 D, MAE 1.38 D, MedAE 1.55, n=15). The mean PE was smaller using SRK/T (-0.18 D, range -3.25 D to +3.95 D, SD 1.70 D, MAE 1.30 D, MedAE 1.24, n=27). We performed an analysis of the biometry data using four different formula (Hoffer Q, Holladay 1, SRK-II and SRK/T). Hoffer Q showed a smaller MedAE than other formulae but also a myopic bias.ConclusionOur clinical data suggest SRK/T was more accurate in predicting post-operative refraction in this cohort of paediatric patients undergoing cataract surgery. Hoffer Q may have improved accuracy further.

  4. Multilayer Laue Lens Sequence Compiler

    2005-10-01

    For the growth of a new kind of x-ray focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens, a device is constructed in which each layer of alernating high-z and low-z is placed in the appropriate place according to the Fresnel zone plate law. This requires that each layer have a different layer thickness. Because each layer is grown using DC magnetron sputter deposition, these layer thicknesses are not only dictated by the zone plate law, butmore » are adjusted to account for various drifting in the growth chamber due to target erosion, etc.« less

  5. Multilayer Laue Lens Sequence Compiler

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, Roy; Liu, Chian

    2005-10-01

    For the growth of a new kind of x-ray focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens, a device is constructed in which each layer of alernating high-z and low-z is placed in the appropriate place according to the Fresnel zone plate law. This requires that each layer have a different layer thickness. Because each layer is grown using DC magnetron sputter deposition, these layer thicknesses are not only dictated by the zone plate law, but are adjusted to account for various drifting in the growth chamber due to target erosion, etc.

  6. Plasmonic lens for ultraviolet wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Minoru; Tanimoto, Takuya; Inoue, Tsutomu; Aizawa, Kento

    2016-09-01

    A plasmonic lens (PL) is one of the promising photonic devices utilizing the surface plasmon wave. In this study, we have newly developed a PL with a 3.5 µm diameter for a wavelength of 375 nm (ultraviolet region). It is composed of multiple circular slit apertures milled in aluminum (Al) thin film. We have simulated the electric field distribution of the PL, and confirmed that a tightly focused beam spot of subwavelength size in the far-field region was attained. We have also measured the focusing characteristics of the PL using a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and compared them with the calculated results.

  7. Health Through the Urban Lens

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Cities are now the major sites of human habitation worldwide, a trend that will continue for the foreseeable future, not only in the developed world but in developing countries. Urban residence impacts health and health prospects both positively and negatively through a complex mix of exposures and mechanisms. In addition, cities concentrate population subsets of various demographic, economic, and social characteristics, some with particular health risks and vulnerabilities. Looking at health through the urban lens allows increased understanding of disparate risks and emphasizes the essentiality of collaborative efforts in protecting and enhancing the health of populations, especially those living in cities. PMID:18668367

  8. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hochbaum, A.I.; Gargas, Daniel; Jeong Hwang, Yun; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-04

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. These porous nanowires also retain the crystallographic orientation of the wafer from which they are etched. Electron microscopy and diffraction confirm their single-crystallinity and reveal the silicon surrounding the pores is as thin as several nanometers. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the photoluminescence (PL) of these arrays emanate from the nanowires themselves, and their PL spectrum suggests that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  9. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hochbaum, Allon; Dargas, Daniel; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-18

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. The photoluminescence of these nanowires suggest they are composed of crystalline silicon with small enough dimensions such that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. A better understanding of this electroless route to mesoporous silicon could lead to facile and general syntheses of different narrow bandgap semiconductor nanostructures for various applications.

  10. Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Lee

    2014-07-02

    This is the Final Progress Report for DOE-funded research project DE-PS02-08ER08-01 titled “Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens”. The project focuses on the effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on the ocular lens. The lens is an exquisitely radiosensitive tissue with a highly-ordered molecular structure that is amenable to non-invasive optical study from the periphery. These merits point to the lens as an ideal target for laser-based molecular biodosimetry (MBD). Following exposure to different types of ionizing radiations, the lens demonstrates molecular changes (e.g., oxidation, racemization, crosslinkage, truncation, aggregation, etc.) that impact the structure and function of the long-lived proteins in the cytosol of lens fiber cells. The vast majority of proteins in the lens comprise the highly-ordered crystallins. These highly conserved lens proteins are amongst the most concentrated and stable in the body. Once synthesized, the crystallins are retained in the fiber cell cytoplasm for life. Taken together, these properties point to the lens as an ideal system for quantitative in vivo MBD assessment using quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS) analysis. In this project, we deploy a purpose-designed non-invasive infrared laser QLS instrument as a quantitative tool for longitudinal assessment of pre-cataractous molecular changes in the lenses of living mice exposed to low-dose low-LET radiation compared to non-irradiated sham controls. We hypothesize that radiation exposure will induce dose-dependent changes in the molecular structure of matrix proteins in the lens. Mechanistic assays to ascertain radiation-induced molecular changes in the lens focus on protein aggregation and gene/protein expression patterns. We anticipate that this study will contribute to our understanding of early molecular changes associated with radiation-induced tissue pathology. This study also affords potential for

  11. Change of optical design thought about focusing of zoom lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagimori, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    Zoom lens has been developed around lens applications of consumer still camera and TV broadcast cameras from about 1960s. Among, zoom lens as an interchangeable lens of a single-lens camera has made the most significant evolution in technically. In this paper, I describe the change of optical design concept about focusing function in zoom lens including introduction of some topic specific lenses.

  12. Mechanically tunable photonic crystal lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.; Tamma, V. A.; Lee, J.-B.; Park, W.

    2010-08-01

    We designed, fabricated and characterized MEMS-enabled mechanically-tunable photonic crystal lens comprised of 2D photonic crystal and symmetrical electro-thermal actuators. The 2D photonic crystal was made of a honeycomb-lattice of 340 nm thick, 260 nm diameter high-index silicon rods embedded in low-index 10 μm thick SU-8 cladding. Silicon input waveguide and deflection block were also fabricated for light in-coupling and monitoring of focused spot size, respectively. When actuated, the electro-thermal actuators induced mechanical strain which changed the lattice constant of the photonic crystal and consequently modified the photonic band structure. This in turn modified the focal-length of the photonic crystal lens. The fabricated device was characterized using a tunable laser (1400~1602 nm) and an infrared camera during actuation. At the wavelength of 1450 nm, the lateral light spot size observed at the deflection block gradually decreased 40%, as applied current increased from 0 to 0.7 A, indicating changes in focal length in response to the mechanical stretching.

  13. Fabricating customized hydrogel contact lens

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Andre; Li, Hao; Lewittes, Daniella M.; Dong, Biqin; Liu, Wenzhong; Shu, Xiao; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Contact lenses are increasingly used in laboratories for in vivo animal retinal imaging and pre-clinical studies. The lens shapes often need modification to optimally fit corneas of individual test subjects. However, the choices from commercially available contact lenses are rather limited. Here, we report a flexible method to fabricate customized hydrogel contact lenses. We showed that the fabricated hydrogel is highly transparent, with refractive indices ranging from 1.42 to 1.45 in the spectra range from 400 nm to 800 nm. The Young’s modulus (1.47 MPa) and hydrophobicity (with a sessile drop contact angle of 40.5°) have also been characterized experimentally. Retinal imaging using optical coherence tomography in rats wearing our customized contact lenses has the quality comparable to the control case without the contact lens. Our method could significantly reduce the cost and the lead time for fabricating soft contact lenses with customized shapes, and benefit the laboratorial-used contact lenses in pre-clinical studies. PMID:27748361

  14. Fabricating customized hydrogel contact lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Andre; Li, Hao; Lewittes, Daniella M.; Dong, Biqin; Liu, Wenzhong; Shu, Xiao; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-10-01

    Contact lenses are increasingly used in laboratories for in vivo animal retinal imaging and pre-clinical studies. The lens shapes often need modification to optimally fit corneas of individual test subjects. However, the choices from commercially available contact lenses are rather limited. Here, we report a flexible method to fabricate customized hydrogel contact lenses. We showed that the fabricated hydrogel is highly transparent, with refractive indices ranging from 1.42 to 1.45 in the spectra range from 400 nm to 800 nm. The Young’s modulus (1.47 MPa) and hydrophobicity (with a sessile drop contact angle of 40.5°) have also been characterized experimentally. Retinal imaging using optical coherence tomography in rats wearing our customized contact lenses has the quality comparable to the control case without the contact lens. Our method could significantly reduce the cost and the lead time for fabricating soft contact lenses with customized shapes, and benefit the laboratorial-used contact lenses in pre-clinical studies.

  15. Impedance of the amphibian lens.

    PubMed

    Duncan, G; Patmore, L; Pynsent, P B

    1981-03-01

    1. The electrical resistance of the perfused frog lens was measured using separate internal current passing and voltage measuring electrodes. 2. The resistance values obtained using voltage clamp and direct and alternating current techniques were in good agreement. 3. The voltage transients induced in response to current steps were multi-exponential in form. Increasing the external K concentration reduced both the amplitude of the voltage response and the rise time. 4. The impedance characteristics were investigated in more detail using alternating current analysis techniques. 5. In an equivalent-circuit modelling study it was assumed that there were two major pathways for current flow in the lens. The first through the surface membranes and the second through the inner fibre membranes via the narrow extracellular spaces. 6. The experimental impedance loci could not be adequately fitted by a simple two time constant model and a third time constant was introduced which may represent diffusion polarization effects in the extracellular spaces. 7. The three time constant model gave good and consistent fits to impedance data from a number of preparations. 8. The form of the impedance loci was also dependent on the external K concentration, but the only fitted parameter which changed consistently with external K was the surface membrane resistance (Rs).

  16. Impedance of the amphibian lens.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, G; Patmore, L; Pynsent, P B

    1981-01-01

    1. The electrical resistance of the perfused frog lens was measured using separate internal current passing and voltage measuring electrodes. 2. The resistance values obtained using voltage clamp and direct and alternating current techniques were in good agreement. 3. The voltage transients induced in response to current steps were multi-exponential in form. Increasing the external K concentration reduced both the amplitude of the voltage response and the rise time. 4. The impedance characteristics were investigated in more detail using alternating current analysis techniques. 5. In an equivalent-circuit modelling study it was assumed that there were two major pathways for current flow in the lens. The first through the surface membranes and the second through the inner fibre membranes via the narrow extracellular spaces. 6. The experimental impedance loci could not be adequately fitted by a simple two time constant model and a third time constant was introduced which may represent diffusion polarization effects in the extracellular spaces. 7. The three time constant model gave good and consistent fits to impedance data from a number of preparations. 8. The form of the impedance loci was also dependent on the external K concentration, but the only fitted parameter which changed consistently with external K was the surface membrane resistance (Rs). PMID:6973626

  17. Contact lens sensors in ocular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Farandos, Nicholas M; Yetisen, Ali K; Monteiro, Michael J; Lowe, Christopher R; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-04-22

    Contact lenses as a minimally invasive platform for diagnostics and drug delivery have emerged in recent years. Contact lens sensors have been developed for analyzing the glucose composition of tears as a surrogate for blood glucose monitoring and for the diagnosis of glaucoma by measuring intraocular pressure. However, the eye offers a wider diagnostic potential as a sensing site and therefore contact lens sensors have the potential to improve the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases and conditions. With advances in polymer synthesis, electronics and micro/nanofabrication, contact lens sensors can be produced to quantify the concentrations of many biomolecules in ocular fluids. Non- or minimally invasive contact lens sensors can be used directly in a clinical or point-of-care setting to monitor a disease state continuously. This article reviews the state-of-the-art in contact lens sensor fabrication, their detection, wireless powering, and readout mechanisms, and integration with mobile devices and smartphones. High-volume manufacturing considerations of contact lenses are also covered and a case study of an intraocular pressure contact lens sensor is provided as an example of a successful product. This Review further analyzes the contact lens market and the FDA regulatory requirements for commercialization of contact lens sensors.

  18. Analysis of a Thin Optical Lens Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivchenko, Vladimir V.

    2011-01-01

    In this article a thin optical lens model is considered. It is shown that the limits of its applicability are determined not only by the ratio between the thickness of the lens and the modules of the radii of curvature, but above all its geometric type. We have derived the analytical criteria for the applicability of the model for different types…

  19. Mathematical Lens: How Much Can You Bench?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolognese, Chris A.

    2013-01-01

    "How Much Can You Bench?" appears in the "Mathematical Lens" section of "Mathematics Teacher." "Mathematical Lens" uses photographs as a springboard for mathematical inquiry and appears in every issue of "Mathematics Teacher." This month the mathematics behind the photograph includes finding areas…

  20. A Fisheye Lens for Many Point PDV

    SciTech Connect

    Frogget, B.

    2011-11-01

    The features of the fisheye lens are illustrated, including a design with reflector prisms. The fisheye fiber map and the beam footprint are shown. Fisheye rough-angle metrology was done and results presented. Next steps are given, including a smaller top fisheye lens element, longer reflector prisms with better mounting, and different fiber arrangements.

  1. Mathematical Lens: Iron Gate, Metulla, Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The "Mathematical Lens" feature of "Mathematics Teacher," uses photographs as a springboard for mathematical inquiry. The goal of this feature is to encourage readers to see patterns and relationships that they can think about and extend in a mathematically playful way. In this edition of "Mathematical Lens," students analyze the shapes in an iron…

  2. Disability for function: loss of Ca(2+)-binding is obligatory for fitness of mammalian βγ-crystallins.

    PubMed

    Suman, Shashi Kumar; Mishra, Amita; Yeramala, Lahari; Rastogi, Ishan Das; Sharma, Yogendra

    2013-12-17

    Vertebrate βγ-crystallins belonging to the βγ-crystallin superfamily lack functional Ca(2+)-binding sites, while their microbial homologues do not; for example, three out of four sites in lens γ-crystallins are disabled. Such loss of Ca(2+)-binding function in non-lens βγ-crystallins from mammals (e.g., AIM1 and Crybg3) raises the possibility of a trade-off in the evolutionary extinction of Ca(2+)-binding. We test this hypothesis by reconstructing ancestral Ca(2+)-binding motifs (transforming disabled motifs into the canonical ones) in the lens γB-crystallin by introducing minimal sets of mutations. Upon incorporation of serine at the fifth position in the N/D-N/D-X-X-S/T(5)-S motif, which endowed a domain with microbial characteristics, a decreased domain stability was observed. Ca(2+) further destabilized the N-terminal domain (NTD) and its serine mutants profoundly, while the incorporation of a C-terminal domain (CTD) nullified this destabilization. On the other hand, Ca(2+)-induced destabilization of the CTD was not rescued by the introduction of an NTD. Of note, only one out of four sites is functional in the NTD of γB-crystallins responsible for weak Ca(2+) binding, but the deleterious effects of Ca(2+) are overcome by introduction of a CTD. The rationale for the onset of cataracts by certain mutations, such as R77S, which have not been clarified by structural means, could be explained by this work. The findings presented here shed light on the evolutionary innovations in terms of the functional loss of Ca(2+)-binding and acquisition of a bilobed domain, besides imparting additional advantages (e.g., protection from light) required for specialized functions.

  3. Generic Crystalline Disposal Reference Case

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, Scott Leroy; Chu, Shaoping; Harp, Dylan Robert; Perry, Frank Vinton; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-02-20

    A generic reference case for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock is outlined. The generic cases are intended to support development of disposal system modeling capability by establishing relevant baseline conditions and parameters. Establishment of a generic reference case requires that the emplacement concept, waste inventory, waste form, waste package, backfill/buffer properties, EBS failure scenarios, host rock properties, and biosphere be specified. The focus in this report is on those elements that are unique to crystalline disposal, especially the geosphere representation. Three emplacement concepts are suggested for further analyses: a waste packages containing 4 PWR assemblies emplaced in boreholes in the floors of tunnels (KBS-3 concept), a 12-assembly waste package emplaced in tunnels, and a 32-assembly dual purpose canister emplaced in tunnels. In addition, three failure scenarios were suggested for future use: a nominal scenario involving corrosion of the waste package in the tunnel emplacement concepts, a manufacturing defect scenario applicable to the KBS-3 concept, and a disruptive glaciation scenario applicable to both emplacement concepts. The computational approaches required to analyze EBS failure and transport processes in a crystalline rock repository are similar to those of argillite/shale, with the most significant difference being that the EBS in a crystalline rock repository will likely experience highly heterogeneous flow rates, which should be represented in the model. The computational approaches required to analyze radionuclide transport in the natural system are very different because of the highly channelized nature of fracture flow. Computational workflows tailored to crystalline rock based on discrete transport pathways extracted from discrete fracture network models are recommended.

  4. A γA-Crystallin Mouse Mutant Secc with Small Eye, Cataract and Closed Eyelid

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Man Hei; Tam, Chung Nga; Choy, Kwong Wai; Tsang, Wai Hung; Tsang, Sze Lan; Pang, Chi Pui; Song, You Qiang; Sham, Mai Har

    2016-01-01

    Cataract is the most common cause of visual loss in humans. A spontaneously occurred, autosomal dominant mouse mutant Secc, which displayed combined features of small eye, cataract and closed eyelid was discovered in our laboratory. In this study, we identified the mutation and characterized the cataract phenotype of this novel Secc mutant. The Secc mutant mice have eyelids that remain half-closed throughout their life. The mutant lens has a significant reduction in size and with opaque spots clustered in the centre. Histological analysis showed that in the core region of the mutant lens, the fiber cells were disorganized and clefts and vacuoles were observed. The cataract phenotype was evident from new born stage. We identified the Secc mutation by linkage analysis using whole genome microsatellite markers and SNP markers. The Secc locus was mapped at chromosome 1 flanked by SNPs rs3158129 and rs13475900. Based on the chromosomal position, the candidate cataract locus γ-crystallin gene cluster (Cryg) was investigated by sequencing. A single base deletion (299delG) in exon 3 of Cryga which led to a frame-shift of amino acid sequence from position 91 was identified. As a result of this mutation, the sequences of the 3rd and 4th Greek-key motifs of the γA-crystallin are replaced with an unrelated C-terminal peptide of 75 residues long. Coincidentally, the point mutation generated a HindIII restriction site, allowing the identification of the CrygaSecc mutant allele by RFLP. Western blot analysis of 3-week old lenses showed that the expression of γ-crystallins was reduced in the CrygaSecc mutant. Furthermore, in cell transfection assays using CrygaSecc mutant cDNA expression constructs in 293T, COS-7 and human lens epithelial B3 cell lines, the mutant γA-crystallins were enriched in the insoluble fractions and appeared as insoluble aggregates in the transfected cells. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the Secc mutation leads to the generation of Cryga

  5. A γA-Crystallin Mouse Mutant Secc with Small Eye, Cataract and Closed Eyelid.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Man Hei; Tam, Chung Nga; Choy, Kwong Wai; Tsang, Wai Hung; Tsang, Sze Lan; Pang, Chi Pui; Song, You Qiang; Sham, Mai Har

    2016-01-01

    Cataract is the most common cause of visual loss in humans. A spontaneously occurred, autosomal dominant mouse mutant Secc, which displayed combined features of small eye, cataract and closed eyelid was discovered in our laboratory. In this study, we identified the mutation and characterized the cataract phenotype of this novel Secc mutant. The Secc mutant mice have eyelids that remain half-closed throughout their life. The mutant lens has a significant reduction in size and with opaque spots clustered in the centre. Histological analysis showed that in the core region of the mutant lens, the fiber cells were disorganized and clefts and vacuoles were observed. The cataract phenotype was evident from new born stage. We identified the Secc mutation by linkage analysis using whole genome microsatellite markers and SNP markers. The Secc locus was mapped at chromosome 1 flanked by SNPs rs3158129 and rs13475900. Based on the chromosomal position, the candidate cataract locus γ-crystallin gene cluster (Cryg) was investigated by sequencing. A single base deletion (299delG) in exon 3 of Cryga which led to a frame-shift of amino acid sequence from position 91 was identified. As a result of this mutation, the sequences of the 3rd and 4th Greek-key motifs of the γA-crystallin are replaced with an unrelated C-terminal peptide of 75 residues long. Coincidentally, the point mutation generated a HindIII restriction site, allowing the identification of the CrygaSecc mutant allele by RFLP. Western blot analysis of 3-week old lenses showed that the expression of γ-crystallins was reduced in the CrygaSecc mutant. Furthermore, in cell transfection assays using CrygaSecc mutant cDNA expression constructs in 293T, COS-7 and human lens epithelial B3 cell lines, the mutant γA-crystallins were enriched in the insoluble fractions and appeared as insoluble aggregates in the transfected cells. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the Secc mutation leads to the generation of Cryga

  6. Determining the optomechanical properties of accommodating gel for lens refilling surgery using finite element analysis and numerical ray-tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad-Pour, Hooman; Kanapathipillai, Sangarapillai; Manns, Fabrice; Ho, Arthur

    2015-03-01

    A key step in the design of an accommodating gel to replace the natural contents of the presbyopic human crystalline lens is to find the equivalent homogeneous mechanical and material properties of the gel that yield comparable optical response as the lens with gradient properties. This process is compounded by the interplay between the mechanical and optical gradient. In order to find uniform properties of the lens both gradients need to be considered. In this paper, numerical ray-tracing and finite element method (FEM) are implemented to investigate the effects of varying the uniform elasticity and refractive index on the accommodative amplitude. Our results show that the accommodative amplitude be expressed as a function of gel refractive index and Young's modulus of elasticity. In other words infinite sets of elasticity and refractive index exist that yield a certain amount of accommodation.

  7. Organization of the human [zeta]-crystallin/quinone reductase gene (CRYZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, P.; Rao, P.V.; Zigler, J.S. Jr. )

    1994-05-15

    [zeta]-Crystallin is a protein highly expressed in the lens of guinea pigs and camels, where it comprises about 10% of the total soluble protein. It has recently been characterized as a novel quinone oxidoreductase present in a variety of mammalian tissues. The authors report here the isolation and characterization of the human [zeta]-crystallin gene (CRYZ) and its processed pseudogene. The functional gene is composed of nine exons and spans about 20 kb. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene is rich in G and C (58%) and lacks TATA and CAAT boxes. Previous analysis of the guinea pig gene revealed the presence of two different promoters, one responsible for the high lens-specific expression and the other for expression at the enzymatic level in numerous tissues. Comparative analysis with the guinea pig gene shows that a region of [approximately]2.5 kb that includes the promoter responsible for the high expression in the lens in guinea pig is not present in the human gene. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Xanthone-2-carboxylic acid effect on lens growth, hydration and proteins during diabetic cataract development.

    PubMed

    Beyer-Mears, A; Cruz, E; Nicolas-Alexandre, J; Varagiannis, E

    1982-09-01

    The concomitant protective effects of the aldose reductase inhibitor, 7-dimethylsulfamoyl-xanthone-2-carboxylic acid, were established by three lens parameters (soluble crystallin proteins, growth and cell hydration) because their quantitation provided a comprehensive index of lens physiology during sugar cataractogenesis in the rat neonate. Their fused eyelids provided the orbital pouch for topical administration of inhibitor to the treated lens; the contralateral pouch served as an untreated control. Protein preservation was determined by gel filtration chromatography. In galactose-maintained neonates, untreated lenses exhibited only 50% of the normal Fraction II protein whereas xanthone-treatment maintained 73% of this component. Quantitative analysis of scanning electron micrographs indicated that xanthone-treatment partially protected lenses against both intra and extracellular fluid accumulation as determined by measurements of individual fiber cell thickness, density (the number of cells/10 micron cortex), and interdigitation. In addition, xanthone-treatment improved lens growth as evidenced by radius and dry weight measurements. Our results suggest that topically applied xanthone partially inhibited sugar cataractogenesis. PMID:6817723

  9. Crystallin gene expression and lentoid body formation in quail embryo neuroretina cultures transformed by the oncogenic retrovirus Mill Hill 2 or Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Simonneau, L; Crisanti, P; Lorinet, A M; Alliot, F; Courtois, Y; Calothy, G; Pessac, B

    1986-01-01

    The lens-specific proteins alpha and delta crystallins and lentoid bodies, structures that follow a differentiation pathway similar to that of the lens, regularly appear after 4 to 5 weeks in quail embryo neuroretina monolayer cultures. We have investigated the effects of the avian oncogenic retroviruses Mill Hill 2 and Rous sarcoma virus on this process. Quail embryo neuroretina cells transformed by Mill Hill 2 virus were established into permanent cultures that synthesized alpha and delta crystallins and contained stem cells for the production of lentoid bodies. In contrast, transformation with the Rous sarcoma virus mutant tsNY-68 blocked the appearance of mRNA crystallins, but cytoplasmic alpha and delta crystallin mRNA and alpha crystallin appeared 44 h after a shift to the nonpermissive temperature. However, delta crystallins and lentoid bodies were only present after 7 days. The crystallins of transformed quail neuroretina cultures were immunologically indistinguishable from those of quail lenses and of normal quail embryo neuroretina cultures. Images PMID:3025609

  10. Unsutured phakic implantation of a black intraocular lens in the sulcus to treat leukocoria

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Sher A.; Yusuf, Imran H.; MacLaren, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 40-year-old woman with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, secondary chronic exudative retinal detachment, and white cataract with consequent leukocoria. Because the cataract was contracted and calcified, a black Morcher 85F poly(methyl methacrylate) IOL was implanted in the ciliary sulcus anterior to the lens to prevent posterior capsule rupture and potential destabilization of the retinal detachment with a risk for phthisis. Excellent centration of the black IOL was achieved with good cosmetic outcome and without postoperative uveitis or glaucoma. We suggest that this is a rare indication for implantation of an IOL designed for the sulcus but in the presence of the crystalline lens. This approach makes IOL removal, if necessary at a later date, relatively straightforward. Financial Disclosure No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. PMID:25135551

  11. Compound mouse mutants of bZIP transcription factors Mafg and Mafk reveal a regulatory network of non-crystallin genes associated with cataract.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Smriti A; Anand, Deepti; Siddam, Archana D; Kakrana, Atul; Dash, Soma; Scheiblin, David A; Dang, Christine A; Terrell, Anne M; Waters, Stephanie M; Singh, Abhyudai; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Lachke, Salil A

    2015-07-01

    Although majority of the genes linked to early-onset cataract exhibit lens fiber cell-enriched expression, our understanding of gene regulation in these cells is limited to function of just eight transcription factors and largely in the context of crystallins. We report on small Maf transcription factors Mafg and Mafk as regulators of several non-crystallin human cataract-associated genes in fiber cells and establish their significance to this disease. We applied a bioinformatics tool for cataract gene discovery iSyTE to identify Mafg and its co-regulators in the lens, and generated various null-allelic combinations of Mafg:Mafk mouse mutants for phenotypic and molecular analysis. By age 4 months, Mafg-/-:Mafk+/- mutants exhibit lens defects that progressively develop into cataract. High-resolution phenotypic characterization of Mafg-/-:Mafk+/- mouse lens reveals severely disorganized fiber cells, while microarray-based expression profiling identifies 97 differentially regulated genes (DRGs). Integrative analysis of Mafg-/-:Mafk+/- lens-DRGs with (1) binding motifs and genomic targets of small Mafs and their regulatory partners, (2) iSyTE lens expression data, and (3) interactions between DRGs in the String database, unravel a detailed small Maf regulatory network in the lens, several nodes of which are linked to cataract. This approach identifies 36 high-priority candidates from the original 97 DRGs. Significantly, 8/36 (22%) DRGs are associated with cataracts in human (GSTO1, MGST1, SC4MOL, UCHL1) or mouse (Aldh3a1, Crygf, Hspb1, Pcbd1), suggesting a multifactorial etiology that includes oxidative stress and misregulation of sterol synthesis. These data identify Mafg and Mafk as new cataract-associated candidates and define their function in regulating largely non-crystallin genes linked to human cataract. PMID:25896808

  12. Cytodifferentiation and tissue phenotype change during transformation of embryonic lens epithelium to mesenchyme-like cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Greenburg, G; Hay, E D

    1986-06-01

    A number of adult and embryonic epithelia, when suspended within native type I collagen gels, give rise to elongate bipolar cells that migrate freely within the three-dimensional matrix. The morphology of these newly formed mesenchyme-like cells is indistinguishable from "true" mesenchymal cells at the light and ultrastructural level. In this report, we extend previous observations on the transformation of embryonic avian lens epithelium to mesenchyme-like cells. Lens epithelia, dissected from 12-day chick embryos, were cultured either within a collagen matrix or on a two-dimensional surface. Cells derived from explants on the surface of type I collagen express the epithelial phenotype. The cells form new basal lamina, continue to express delta-crystallin protein and secrete both type IV collagen and laminin. In contrast, epithelia suspended within collagen gels lose epithelial morphology, phenotype, and cytodifferentiation. The newly formed mesenchyme-like cells lack the ability to synthesize lens-specific delta-crystallin protein, type IV collagen, and laminin. They do, however, express type I collagen de novo, a characteristic of mesenchymal cells. The changes in cytodifferentiation and tissue phenotype which occur during the transformation are stable under the conditions studied here. When mesenchyme-like cells are removed from the gel and replated onto two-dimensional surfaces, they remain bipolar, will invade collagen matrices, and are unable to synthesize delta-crystallin protein.

  13. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  14. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

  15. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Studies on contact lens materials.

    PubMed

    Alyanak, H; Aksoy, S; Hasirci, N

    1991-02-01

    The development of plastics with the optical properties of glass led promptly to their use as contact lenses and intra-ocular lenses to rectify certain visual defects. Research to improve these polymeric materials is continuous but there is not much in the literature since most of the findings are patented. In this work, polymethyl methacrylate, the most commonly used lens material was chosen as the base material and its co and terpolymers were prepared using 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone, hexamethyl disiloxane, and polypropylene glycol. The transparency, refractive index, contact angle, density, equilibrium water content, and percent hydration properties were examined. Theoretical values were calculated for linear expansion and oxygen permeation from the density and hydration values.

  17. Variable focus crystal diffraction lens

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R.K.

    1988-11-01

    A new method has been developed to control the shape of the surface of a diffracting crystal that will allow it to function as a variable focus crystal diffraction lens, for focusing photon beams from a synchrotron source. The new method uses thermal gradients in the crystal to control the shape of the surface of the crystal in two dimensions and allows one to generate both spherical and ellipsoidal surface shapes. In this work the thermal gradient was generated by core drilling two sets of cooling channels in a silicon crystal so that cooling or heating fluids could be circulated through the crystal at two different levels. The first set of channels is close to the surface of the crystal where the photon beam strikes it. The second set of channels is equal distant from the back surface. If a concave surface is desired, the fluid in the channels just below the surface exposed to the beam is cooler than the fluid circulating through the channels near the back surface. If a convex surface is desired, then the cooling fluid in the upper channels near the surface exposed to the incident photon beam, is warmer than the fluid in the lower channels. The focal length of the crystal lens is varied by varying the thermal gradient in the crystal. This approach can also be applied to the first crystal in a high power synchrotron beam line to eliminate the bowing and other thermal distortions of the crystal caused by the high heat load. 6 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Microbial contamination of contact lens storage cases and domestic tap water of contact lens wearers.

    PubMed

    Üstüntürk, Miray; Zeybek, Zuhal

    2012-11-01

    Contact lenses have been widely used as an alternative to spectacles both in developed and developing countries. However, under certain circumstances, adverse responses can occur during contact lens wear and several microorganisms--including bacteria, fungi, and free living amoebae--can cause several eye infections in wearers. Extended wear of contact lenses is the major risk factor of eye infections such as microbial keratitis, besides contaminated contact lens storage case, contaminated lens care solutions, and inaccurate contact lens handling. In this study, we collected contact lens storage case and domestic tap water samples from 50 asymptomatic contact lens wearers. We determined that total aerobic mesophilic bacteria were isolated in 45 (90 %), Gram negative rod bacteria were isolated in 20 (40 %), Pseudomonas spp. were isolated in 2 (4 %) and fungi were isolated in 18 (36 %) out of 50 contact lens storage cases. Free living amoebae were not detected in investigated contact lens storage cases. At the same time, out of 50, total aerobic mesophilic bacteria were isolated in 34 (68 %), fungi were isolated in 15 (30 %) and free living amoebae were isolated in 15 (30 %) domestic tap water samples. No Gram-negative rod bacteria and Pseudomonas spp. were detected in investigated water samples. Two contact lens case samples and two tap water samples were excluded from the analysis for Pseudomonas spp. for technical reasons. According to our findings, inadequate contact lens maintenance during lens wear may result in the contamination of contact lens storage cases. This situation can lead to severe eye infections in contact lens wearers over time.

  19. Cloning, expression, and chaperone-like activity of human alphaA-crystallin.

    PubMed

    Andley, U P; Mathur, S; Griest, T A; Petrash, J M

    1996-12-13

    One of the major protein components of the ocular lens, alpha-crystallin, is composed of alphaA and alphaB chain subunits that have structural homology to the family of mammalian small heat shock proteins. Like other small heat shock proteins, alpha-crystallin subunits associate to form large oligomeric aggregates that express chaperone-like activity, as defined by the ability to suppress nonspecific aggregation of proteins destabilized by treatment with a variety of denaturants including heat, UV irradiation, and chemical modification. It has been proposed that age-related loss of sequences at the C terminus of the alphaA chain subunit may be a factor in the pathogenesis of cataract due to diminished capacity of the truncated crystallin to protect against nonspecific aggregation of lens proteins. To evaluate the functional consequences of alpha-crystallin modification, two mutant forms of alphaA subunits were prepared by site-directed mutagenesis. Like wild type (WT), aggregates of approximately 540 kDa were formed from a tryptophan-free alphaA mutant (W9F). When added in stoichiometric amounts, both WT and W9F subunits completely suppressed the heat-induced aggregation of aldose reductase. In contrast, subunits encoded by a truncation mutant in which the C-terminal 17 residues were deleted (R157STOP), despite having spectroscopic properties similar to WT, formed much larger aggregates with a marked reduction in chaperone-like activity. Similar results were observed when the chaperone-like activity was assessed through inhibition of gamma-crystallin aggregation induced by singlet oxygen. These results demonstrate that the structurally conservative substitution of Phe for Trp-9 has a negligible effect on the functional interaction of alphaA subunits, and that deletion of C-terminal sequences from the alphaA subunit results in substantial loss of chaperone-like activity, despite overall preservation of secondary structure. PMID:8943244

  20. Domain exchange experiments in duck delta-crystallins: functional and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed Central

    Sampaleanu, L. M.; Davidson, A. R.; Graham, C.; Wistow, G. J.; Howell, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    Delta-crystallin, the major soluble protein component of the avian and reptilian eye lens, is homologous to the urea cycle enzyme argininosuccinate lyase (ASL). In duck lenses there are two delta crystallins, denoted delta1 and delta2. Duck delta2 is both a major structural protein of the lens and also the duck orthologue of ASL, an example of gene recruitment. Although 94% identical to delta2/ASL in the amino acid sequence, delta1 is enzymatically inactive. A series of hybrid proteins have been constructed to assess the role of each structural domain in the enzymatic mechanism. Five chimeras--221, 122, 121, 211, and 112, where the three numbers correspond to the three structural domains and the value of 1 or 2 represents the protein of origin, delta1 or delta2, respectively--were constructed and thermodynamically and kinetically analyzed. The kinetic analysis indicates that only domain 1 is crucial for restoring ASL activity to delta1 crystallin, and that amino acid substitutions in domain 2 may play a role in substrate binding. These results confirm the hypothesis that only one domain, domain 1, is responsible for the loss of catalytic activity in delta1. The thermodynamic characterization of human ASL (hASL) and duck delta1 and delta2 indicate that delta crystallins are slightly less stable than hASL, with the delta1 being the least stable. The deltaGs of unfolding are 57.25, 63.13, and 70.71 kcal mol(-1) for delta1, delta2, and hASL, respectively. This result was unexpected, and we speculate that delta crystallins have adapted to their structural role by adopting a slightly less stable conformation that might allow for enhanced protein-protein and protein-solvent interactions. PMID:10091655

  1. Singlet mega-pixel resolution lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chen-Hung; Lin, Hoang Yan; Chang, Horng

    2008-03-01

    There always exist some new challenges for lens designers to keep their old-line technology update. To minimize lens volume is one of the most notified examples. In this paper we designed a single thick lens, constructed by using one oblique (reflective) surface, apart from two conventional refractive surfaces, to bend the optical path of the optical system to achieve this goal. Detail design procedure, including system layout and lens performance diagrams, will be presented. Following the first order layout, we applied aspherical form to the two refractive surfaces in order to correct the spherical aberration up to an acceptable condition. Then, the reduced aberrations such as coma, astigmatism, field curvature and distortion can easily be corrected with some calculations related to spherical aberration as shown in the publication of H. H. Hopkins (1950). Plastic material is used in the design, because the aspherical surfaces can then be manufactured in a more cost effective way. The final specification of the design is: EFL is 4.6 mm, the F number is 2.8, the over all thickness of lens is 3.6 mm, its MTF is 0.3 at 227 lp/mm in center field and chief ray angle is less than 15 degrees. Lens data as well as optical performance curves are also presented in the paper. In conclusion we have successfully finished a mega-pixel resolution lens design and its overall thickness is compatible with the state of the art.

  2. Microindentation of the young porcine ocular lens.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Matthew; Ravi, Nathan

    2009-04-01

    Debate regarding the mechanisms of how the eye changes focus (accommodation) and why this ability is lost with age (presbyopia) has recently been rejoined due to the advent of surgical procedures for the correction of presbyopia. Due to inherent confounding factors in both in vivo and in vitro measurement techniques, mechanical modeling of the behavior of the ocular lens in accommodation has been attempted to settle the debate. However, a paucity of reliable mechanical property measurements has proven problematic in the development of a successful mechanical model of accommodation. Instrumented microindentation was utilized to directly measure the local elastic modulus and dynamic response at various locations in the lens. The young porcine lens exhibits a large modulus gradient with the highest modulus appearing at the center of the nucleus and exponentially decreasing with distance. The loss tangent was significantly higher in the decapsulated lens and the force waveform amplitude decreased significantly upon removal of the lens capsule. The findings indicate that localized measurements of the lens' mechanical properties are necessary to achieve accurate quantitative parameters suitable for mechanical modeling efforts. The results also indicate that the lens behaves as a crosslinked gel rather than as a collection of individual arched fiber cells.

  3. The crystalline sponge method updated

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Manabu; Khutia, Anupam; Xing, Hongzhu; Inokuma, Yasuhide; Fujita, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Crystalline sponges are porous metal complexes that can absorb and orient common organic molecules in their pores and make them observable by conventional X-ray structure analysis (crystalline sponge method). In this study, all of the steps in the crystalline sponge method, including sponge crystal preparation, pore–solvent exchange, guest soaking, data collection and crystallographic analysis, are carefully examined and thoroughly optimized to provide reliable and meaningful chemical information as chemical crystallography. Major improvements in the method have been made in the guest-soaking and data-collection steps. In the soaking step, obtaining a high site occupancy of the guest is particularly important, and dominant parameters for guest soaking (e.g. temperature, time, concentration, solvents) therefore have to be optimized for every sample compound. When standard conditions do not work, a high-throughput method is useful for efficiently optimizing the soaking conditions. The X-ray experiments are also carefully re-examined. Significant improvement of the guest data quality is achieved by complete data collection at high angle regions. The appropriate disorder treatment of the most flexible ZnI2 portions of the host framework and refinement of the solvents filling the remaining void are also particularly important for obtaining better data quality. A benchmark test for the crystalline sponge method toward an achiral molecule is proposed with a guaiazulene guest, in which the guest structure (with ∼ 100% site occupancy) is refined without applying any restraints or constraints. The obtained data quality with R int = 0.0279 and R 1 = 0.0379 is comparable with that of current conventional crystallographic analysis for small molecules. Another benchmark test for this method toward a chiral molecule is also proposed with a santonin guest. The crystallographic data obtained [R int = 0.0421, R 1 = 0.0312, Flack (Parsons) = −0.0071 (11)] represents the

  4. Soliton structure in crystalline acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilbeck, J. C.; Lomdahl, P. S.; Scott, A. C.

    1984-10-01

    The theory of self-trapping of amide I vibrational energy in crystalline acetanilide is studied in detail. A spectrum of stationary, self-trapped (soliton) solutions is determined and tested for dynamic stability. Only those solutions for which the amide I energy is concentrated near a single molecule were found to be stable. Exciton modes were found to be unstable to decay into solitons.

  5. Soliton structure in crystalline acetanilide

    SciTech Connect

    Eilbeck, J.C.; Lomdahl, P.S.; Scott, A.C.

    1984-10-15

    The theory of self-trapping of amide I vibrational energy in crystalline acetanilide is studied in detail. A spectrum of stationary, self-trapped (soliton) solutions is determined and tested for dynamic stability. Only those solutions for which the amide I energy is concentrated near a single molecule were found to be stable. Exciton modes were found to be unstable to decay into solitons.

  6. EELS from organic crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brydson, R.; Eddleston, M. D.; Jones, W.; Seabourne, C. R.; Hondow, N.

    2014-06-01

    We report the use of the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for providing light element chemical composition information from organic, crystalline pharmaceutical materials including theophylline and paracetamol and discuss how this type of data can complement transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and electron diffraction when investigating polymorphism. We also discuss the potential for the extraction of bonding information using electron loss near-edge structure (ELNES).

  7. The Effect of Attractive Interactions and Macromolecular Crowding on Crystallins Association

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jiachen; Dobnikar, Jure; Curk, Tine; Song, Fan

    2016-01-01

    In living systems proteins are typically found in crowded environments where their effective interactions strongly depend on the surrounding medium. Yet, their association and dissociation needs to be robustly controlled in order to enable biological function. Uncontrolled protein aggregation often causes disease. For instance, cataract is caused by the clustering of lens proteins, i.e., crystallins, resulting in enhanced light scattering and impaired vision or blindness. To investigate the molecular origins of cataract formation and to design efficient treatments, a better understanding of crystallin association in macromolecular crowded environment is needed. Here we present a theoretical study of simple coarse grained colloidal models to characterize the general features of how the association equilibrium of proteins depends on the magnitude of intermolecular attraction. By comparing the analytic results to the available experimental data on the osmotic pressure in crystallin solutions, we identify the effective parameters regimes applicable to crystallins. Moreover, the combination of two models allows us to predict that the number of binding sites on crystallin is small, i.e. one to three per protein, which is different from previous estimates. We further observe that the crowding factor is sensitive to the size asymmetry between the reactants and crowding agents, the shape of the protein clusters, and to small variations of intermolecular attraction. Our work may provide general guidelines on how to steer the protein interactions in order to control their association. PMID:26954357

  8. The Effect of Attractive Interactions and Macromolecular Crowding on Crystallins Association.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiachen; Dobnikar, Jure; Curk, Tine; Song, Fan

    2016-01-01

    In living systems proteins are typically found in crowded environments where their effective interactions strongly depend on the surrounding medium. Yet, their association and dissociation needs to be robustly controlled in order to enable biological function. Uncontrolled protein aggregation often causes disease. For instance, cataract is caused by the clustering of lens proteins, i.e., crystallins, resulting in enhanced light scattering and impaired vision or blindness. To investigate the molecular origins of cataract formation and to design efficient treatments, a better understanding of crystallin association in macromolecular crowded environment is needed. Here we present a theoretical study of simple coarse grained colloidal models to characterize the general features of how the association equilibrium of proteins depends on the magnitude of intermolecular attraction. By comparing the analytic results to the available experimental data on the osmotic pressure in crystallin solutions, we identify the effective parameters regimes applicable to crystallins. Moreover, the combination of two models allows us to predict that the number of binding sites on crystallin is small, i.e. one to three per protein, which is different from previous estimates. We further observe that the crowding factor is sensitive to the size asymmetry between the reactants and crowding agents, the shape of the protein clusters, and to small variations of intermolecular attraction. Our work may provide general guidelines on how to steer the protein interactions in order to control their association. PMID:26954357

  9. Tear analysis in contact lens wearers.

    PubMed Central

    Farris, R L

    1985-01-01

    Tear analysis in contact lens wearers was compared with tear analysis in aphakics without contact lens wear and normal phakic patients. Subjects were divided into five groups: group 1, aphakic without contact lens; group 2, phakic with daily-wear hard contact lens; group 3, phakic with daily-wear soft contact lens; group 4, phakic with extended-wear soft contact lens; and group 5, aphakic with extended-wear soft contact lens. The experimental groups were compared with age- and sex-matched control groups for statistical analysis of tear variables by means of the Student's t-test. The variables measured were tear osmolarity, tear albumin, and lysozyme and lactoferrin concentrations in basal and reflex tears. Highly significant elevations of tear osmolarity were found in aphakic subjects without contact lenses. Less significant differences in tear osmolarity were found in phakic subjects with hard daily-wear lenses or with extended-wear soft lenses. Tear albumin, lysozyme, and lactoferrin in basal and reflex tears were not significantly different in the different groups of contact lens wearers or in the group of aphakic subjects without contact lenses compared with their control groups. Individual variations in tear albumin, lysozyme, and lactoferrin appeared to be responsible for the inability to demonstrate significant differences in tear composition in association with the wearing of different types of contact lenses. Older and aphakic patients demonstrated a tendency to have increased concentrations of proteins in the tears compared with younger, phakic contact lens wearers and normal controls without contact lenses. PMID:3914131

  10. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal), despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. Methods In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm) were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Results 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. Conclusions There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells. PMID:23088559

  11. Inelastic deformation in crystalline rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, H.; Borja, R. I.

    2011-12-01

    The elasto-plastic behavior of crystalline rocks, such as evaporites, igneous rocks, or metamorphic rocks, is highly dependent on the behavior of their individual crystals. Previous studies indicate that crystal plasticity can be one of the dominant micro mechanisms in the plastic deformation of crystal aggregates. Deformation bands and pore collapse are examples of plastic deformation in crystalline rocks. In these cases twinning within the grains illustrate plastic deformation of crystal lattice. Crystal plasticity is governed by the plastic deformation along potential slip systems of crystals. Linear dependency of the crystal slip systems causes singularity in the system of equations solving for the plastic slip of each slip system. As a result, taking the micro-structure properties into account, while studying the overall behavior of crystalline materials, is quite challenging. To model the plastic deformation of single crystals we use the so called `ultimate algorithm' by Borja and Wren (1993) implemented in a 3D finite element framework to solve boundary value problems. The major advantage of this model is that it avoids the singularity problem by solving for the plastic slip explicitly in sub steps over which the stress strain relationship is linear. Comparing the results of the examples to available models such as Von Mises we show the significance of considering the micro-structure of crystals in modeling the overall elasto-plastic deformation of crystal aggregates.

  12. Liquid crystalline order in mucus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viney, C.; Huber, A. E.; Verdugo, P.

    1993-01-01

    Mucus plays an exceptionally wide range of important biological roles. It operates as a protective, exchange, and transport medium in the digestive, respiratory, and reproductive systems of humans and other vertebrates. Mucus is a polymer hydrogel. It is secreted as discrete packages (secretory granules) by specialized secretory cells. Mucus hydrogel is stored in a condensed state inside the secretory granules. Depending upon the architecture of their constituent macromolecules and on the composition of the solvent, polymer gels can form liquid crystalline microstructures, with orientational order being exhibited over optically resolvable distances. Individual mucin molecules consist of alternating rigid segments (heavily glycosylated; hydrophilic) and flexible segments (nonglycosylated; hydrophobic). Polymer molecules consisting of rigid units linked by flexible spacers are frequently associated with liquid crystalline behavior, which again raises the possibility that mucus could form anisotropic fluid phases. Suggestions that mucins may be self-associating in dilute solution have previously been challenged on the basis of sedimentation-equilibrium studies performed on mucus in which potential sites of association were competitively blocked with inhibitors. However, the formation of stable liquid crystalline phases does not depend on the existence of inter- or intramolecular associations; these phases can form on the basis of steric considerations alone.

  13. The elastic constants of the human lens.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R F

    1971-01-01

    1. When the lens is spun around its antero-posterior polar axis in an apparatus designed for the purpose, high speed photography can be used to record its changing profile. By this method a variable radial centrifugal force can be applied to the lens which mimics the pull of the zonule.2. If the lens is not stressed at its centre beyond 100 Nm(-2) it behaves as a truly elastic body. When stressed beyond this limit visco-elastic strain is produced at its poles.3. The human lens has isotropic elastic properties at the extremes of life, but at the other times Young's Modulus of Elasticity varies with the direction in which it is measured.4. Young's Modulus of Elasticity of the lens varies with age, polar elasticity and equatorial elasticity, at birth being 0.75 x 10(3) and 0.85 x 10(3) Nm(-2) respectively, while at 63 years of age both are equal to 3 x 10(3) Nm(-2).5. A comparison of Young's Modulus of the young human lens with that of the rabbit and cat shows that the polar elasticity of the lenses of these animals was 5 times greater in the young rabbit, and 21 times greater in the adult cat. Equatorial elasticities of the rabbit and human lens were equal, while in the cat the equatorial elasticity was four times greater.6. A mathematical model showing the lens substance possessing a nucleus of lower isotropic elasticity than that of the isotropic elastic cortex surrounding it, accounts for the difference between polar and equatorial elasticity of the intact adult lens.7. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to:(i) accommodation and the rheological properties of the lens;(ii) possible differences in the physical state of the lenticular proteins in the cortex and nucleus which may account for the senile variations in Young's Modulus of Elasticity in these regions of the lens;(iii) the loss of accommodation due solely to an increase in Young's Modulus of Elasticity of the lens between the ages of 15 and 60. This would amount to 44% of the total

  14. Negative refraction makes a perfect lens

    PubMed

    Pendry

    2000-10-30

    With a conventional lens sharpness of the image is always limited by the wavelength of light. An unconventional alternative to a lens, a slab of negative refractive index material, has the power to focus all Fourier components of a 2D image, even those that do not propagate in a radiative manner. Such "superlenses" can be realized in the microwave band with current technology. Our simulations show that a version of the lens operating at the frequency of visible light can be realized in the form of a thin slab of silver. This optical version resolves objects only a few nanometers across.

  15. Negative Refraction Makes a Perfect Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendry, J. B.

    2000-10-01

    With a conventional lens sharpness of the image is always limited by the wavelength of light. An unconventional alternative to a lens, a slab of negative refractive index material, has the power to focus all Fourier components of a 2D image, even those that do not propagate in a radiative manner. Such ``superlenses'' can be realized in the microwave band with current technology. Our simulations show that a version of the lens operating at the frequency of visible light can be realized in the form of a thin slab of silver. This optical version resolves objects only a few nanometers across.

  16. Gravitational lens time delays and gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Frieman, J.A. Department of Astronomy Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 ); Harari, D.D.; Surpi, G.C. )

    1994-10-15

    Using Fermat's principle, we analyze the effects of very long wavelength gravitational waves upon the images of a gravitationally lensed quasar. We show that the lens equation in the presence of gravity waves is equivalent to that of a lens with a different alignment between source, deflector, and observer in the absence of gravity waves. Contrary to a recent claim, we conclude that measurements of time delays in gravitational lenses cannot serve as a method to detect or constrain a stochastic background of gravitational waves of cosmological wavelengths, because the wave-induced time delay is observationally indistinguishable from an intrinsic time delay due to the lens geometry.

  17. Lens-Free Imaging for Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bok; Bae, Hojae; Koo, Kyo-in; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Ozcan, Aydogan; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Lens-free (or lensless) imaging is emerging as a cost-effective, compact, and lightweight detection method that can serve numerous biological applications. Lens-free imaging can generate high-resolution images within a field-portable platform, which is ideal for affordable point-of-care devices aiming at resource-limited settings. In this mini-review, we first describe different modes of operation for lens-free imaging and then highlight several recent biological applications of this emerging platform technology. PMID:22357607

  18. The elastic constants of the human lens

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, R. F.

    1971-01-01

    1. When the lens is spun around its antero-posterior polar axis in an apparatus designed for the purpose, high speed photography can be used to record its changing profile. By this method a variable radial centrifugal force can be applied to the lens which mimics the pull of the zonule. 2. If the lens is not stressed at its centre beyond 100 Nm-2 it behaves as a truly elastic body. When stressed beyond this limit visco-elastic strain is produced at its poles. 3. The human lens has isotropic elastic properties at the extremes of life, but at the other times Young's Modulus of Elasticity varies with the direction in which it is measured. 4. Young's Modulus of Elasticity of the lens varies with age, polar elasticity and equatorial elasticity, at birth being 0·75 × 103 and 0·85 × 103 Nm-2 respectively, while at 63 years of age both are equal to 3 × 103 Nm-2. 5. A comparison of Young's Modulus of the young human lens with that of the rabbit and cat shows that the polar elasticity of the lenses of these animals was 5 times greater in the young rabbit, and 21 times greater in the adult cat. Equatorial elasticities of the rabbit and human lens were equal, while in the cat the equatorial elasticity was four times greater. 6. A mathematical model showing the lens substance possessing a nucleus of lower isotropic elasticity than that of the isotropic elastic cortex surrounding it, accounts for the difference between polar and equatorial elasticity of the intact adult lens. 7. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to: (i) accommodation and the rheological properties of the lens; (ii) possible differences in the physical state of the lenticular proteins in the cortex and nucleus which may account for the senile variations in Young's Modulus of Elasticity in these regions of the lens; (iii) the loss of accommodation due solely to an increase in Young's Modulus of Elasticity of the lens between the ages of 15 and 60. This would amount to 44% of the

  19. Electrowetting based infrared lens using ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Shiguo; Liu, Yu; Qu, Chao; Lu, Liujin; Ma, Xiangyuan; Zhang, Xiaoping; Deng, Youquan

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrated an infrared variable focus ionic liquids lens using electrowetting, which could overcome the problems caused by use of water, e.g., evaporation and poor thermostability, while keeping good optical transparency in visible light and near-infrared region. Besides, the type of lens (convex or concave) could be tuned by applied voltage or refractive index of ILs used, and the transmittance was measured to exceed 90% over the spectrum of visible light and near-infrared. We believe this infrared variable focus ionic liquids lens has a great application prospect in both visible light and infrared image systems.

  20. Development of a tantalum pentoxide Luneberg lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, D. A.; Chubb, C. R.; Powers, J. K.; Reed, W. R.; Dalke, E. A.; Tomaschke, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    A process has been developed for the fabrication of a tantalum pentoxide waveguide Luneburg lens as the input collimator for an optical signal processing circuit on a silicon substrate, such as an integrated wavelength demultiplexer. The development of such a lens involved improvement of the deposition mask profile, reduction of surface scattering by underlaying the lens, reduction of edge scattering by using shims under the mask, and prediction and measurement of the TE-TM polarization aberration. It is shown that polarization aberration significantly affects the design of a demultiplexer system.

  1. Copper and Zinc Ions Specifically Promote Nonamyloid Aggregation of the Highly Stable Human γ-D Crystallin.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, Liliana; Domínguez-Calva, José A; Serebryany, Eugene; Rivillas-Acevedo, Lina; Haase-Pettingell, Cameron; Amero, Carlos; King, Jonathan A

    2016-01-15

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in the world. It results from aggregation of eye lens proteins into high-molecular-weight complexes, causing light scattering and lens opacity. Copper and zinc concentrations in cataractous lens are increased significantly relative to a healthy lens, and a variety of experimental and epidemiological studies implicate metals as potential etiological agents for cataract. The natively monomeric, β-sheet rich human γD (HγD) crystallin is one of the more abundant proteins in the core of the lens. It is also one of the most thermodynamically stable proteins in the human body. Surprisingly, we found that both Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions induced rapid, nonamyloid aggregation of HγD, forming high-molecular-weight light-scattering aggregates. Unlike Zn(II), Cu(II) also substantially decreased the thermal stability of HγD and promoted the formation of disulfide-bridged dimers, suggesting distinct aggregation mechanisms. In both cases, however, metal-induced aggregation depended strongly on temperature and was suppressed by the human lens chaperone αB-crystallin (HαB), implicating partially folded intermediates in the aggregation process. Consistently, distinct site-specific interactions of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions with the protein and conformational changes in specific hinge regions were identified by nuclear magnetic resonance. This study provides insights into the mechanisms of metal-induced aggregation of one of the more stable proteins in the human body, and it reveals a novel and unexplored bioinorganic facet of cataract disease. PMID:26579725

  2. 21 CFR 886.1390 - Flexible diagnostic Fresnel lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flexible diagnostic Fresnel lens. 886.1390 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1390 Flexible diagnostic Fresnel lens. (a) Identification. A flexible diagnostic Fresnel lens is a device that is a very thin lens which...

  3. 21 CFR 886.1390 - Flexible diagnostic Fresnel lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Flexible diagnostic Fresnel lens. 886.1390 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1390 Flexible diagnostic Fresnel lens. (a) Identification. A flexible diagnostic Fresnel lens is a device that is a very thin lens which...

  4. Coculture with intraocular lens material-activated macrophages induces an inflammatory phenotype in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pintwala, Robert; Postnikoff, Cameron; Molladavoodi, Sara; Gorbet, Maud

    2015-03-01

    Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide, requiring surgical implantation of an intraocular lens. Despite evidence of leukocyte ingress into the postoperative lens, few studies have investigated the leukocyte response to intraocular lens materials. A novel coculture model was developed to examine macrophage activation by hydrophilic acrylic (poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) and hydrophobic acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) commercial intraocular lens. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was differentiated into macrophages and cocultured with human lens epithelial cell line (HLE-B3) with or without an intraocular lens for one, two, four, or six days. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, expression of the macrophage activation marker CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and production of reactive oxygen species via the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate were examined in macrophages. α-Smooth muscle actin, a transdifferentiation marker, was characterized in lens epithelial cells. The poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) intraocular lens prevented adhesion but induced significant macrophage activation (p < 0.03) versus control (no intraocular lens), while the polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens enabled adhesion and multinucleated fusion, but induced no significant activation. Coculture with either intraocular lens increased reactive oxygen species production in macrophages after one day (p < 0.03) and increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin in HLE B-3 after six days, although only poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced a significant difference versus control (p < 0.01). Our results imply that-contrary to prior uveal biocompatibility understanding-macrophage adherence is not necessary for a strong inflammatory response to an intraocular lens, with hydrophilic surfaces inducing higher activation than hydrophobic surfaces. These findings provide a new method of inquiry into uveal

  5. Coculture with intraocular lens material-activated macrophages induces an inflammatory phenotype in lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pintwala, Robert; Postnikoff, Cameron; Molladavoodi, Sara; Gorbet, Maud

    2015-03-01

    Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide, requiring surgical implantation of an intraocular lens. Despite evidence of leukocyte ingress into the postoperative lens, few studies have investigated the leukocyte response to intraocular lens materials. A novel coculture model was developed to examine macrophage activation by hydrophilic acrylic (poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) and hydrophobic acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate) commercial intraocular lens. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was differentiated into macrophages and cocultured with human lens epithelial cell line (HLE-B3) with or without an intraocular lens for one, two, four, or six days. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, expression of the macrophage activation marker CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) and production of reactive oxygen species via the fluorogenic probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate were examined in macrophages. α-Smooth muscle actin, a transdifferentiation marker, was characterized in lens epithelial cells. The poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) intraocular lens prevented adhesion but induced significant macrophage activation (p < 0.03) versus control (no intraocular lens), while the polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lens enabled adhesion and multinucleated fusion, but induced no significant activation. Coculture with either intraocular lens increased reactive oxygen species production in macrophages after one day (p < 0.03) and increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin in HLE B-3 after six days, although only poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) induced a significant difference versus control (p < 0.01). Our results imply that-contrary to prior uveal biocompatibility understanding-macrophage adherence is not necessary for a strong inflammatory response to an intraocular lens, with hydrophilic surfaces inducing higher activation than hydrophobic surfaces. These findings provide a new method of inquiry into uveal

  6. Luneburg and flat lens based on graded photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Sun, Xiaohong; Gao, Minglei; Wang, Shuai

    2016-04-01

    Square-lattice graded photonic crystals employed for designing Luneburg and Flat Lens is presented. Comparable simulation of the Luneburg lens with TE and TM polarizations predicts that TM lens possesses of enlarged transmission bandwidth and strengthened focusing ability, in comparison with TE lens. As a typical simplified counterpart, the evolution of focusing intensity and numerical aperture of the flat lens is achieved. What is more, those Luneburg and Flat Lens can withstand imperfect gradients in structure design. This will provide a guidance to produce a high quality focusing lens with small size, short focal length and large numerical aperture applied in the integrated photonic devices.

  7. Bionic intraocular lens with variable focus and integrated structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dan; Wang, Xuan-Yin; Du, Jia-Wei; Xiang, Ke

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes a bionic accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) for ophthalmic surgery. The designed lens has a solid-liquid mixed integrated structure, which mainly consists of a support ring, elastic membrane, rigid lens, and optical liquid. The lens focus can be adjusted through the deformation of the lens front surface when compressed. The integrated structure of the IOL is presented, as well as a detailed description of the lens materials and fabrication process. Images under different radial pressures are captured, and the lens deformation process, accommodating range, density, and optical property are analyzed. The designed lens achieves a 14.6 D accommodating range under a radial pressure of 51.4 mN and a 0.24 mm alteration of the lens outer radius. The deformation property of the lens matches well with the characteristic of the eye and shows the potential to help patients fully recover their vision accommodation ability after the cataract surgery.

  8. Bilateral lens luxation and intracapsular lens extractions in a Matshchie's tree kangaroo.

    PubMed

    McLean, Nancy Johnstone; Zimmerman, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    An adult, female, captive, Matshchie's tree kangaroo was diagnosed with an anterior lens luxation in the right eye and a lens subluxation in the left eye. Both eyes were treated surgically with intracapsular lens extractions. A 360° rhegmatogenous retinal detachment was diagnosed 6 months postoperatively in the left eye. Aphakic vision was maintained in the right eye 9 months postoperatively. Based on family history and the lack of antecedent ocular disease, the lens luxations were presumed to be inherited and veterinarians should be aware of this condition within the captive tree kangaroo population.

  9. Bilateral lens luxation and intracapsular lens extractions in a Matshchie's tree kangaroo.

    PubMed

    McLean, Nancy Johnstone; Zimmerman, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    An adult, female, captive, Matshchie's tree kangaroo was diagnosed with an anterior lens luxation in the right eye and a lens subluxation in the left eye. Both eyes were treated surgically with intracapsular lens extractions. A 360° rhegmatogenous retinal detachment was diagnosed 6 months postoperatively in the left eye. Aphakic vision was maintained in the right eye 9 months postoperatively. Based on family history and the lack of antecedent ocular disease, the lens luxations were presumed to be inherited and veterinarians should be aware of this condition within the captive tree kangaroo population. PMID:25135107

  10. RISK FACTORS FOR CONTACT LENS INDUCED PAPILLARY CONJUNCTIVITIS ASSOCIATED WITH SILICONE HYDROGEL CONTACT LENS WEAR

    PubMed Central

    Tagliaferri, Angela; Love, Thomas E.; Szczotka-Flynn, Loretta

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Contact lens induced papillary conjunctivitis (CLPC) continues to be a major cause of dropout during contact lens extended wear. This retrospective study explores risk factors for the development of CLPC during silicone hydrogel lens extended wear. METHODS Data from 205 subjects enrolled in the Longitudinal Analysis of Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lens (LASH) study wearing lotrafilcon A silicone hydrogel lenses for up to 30 days of continuous wear were used to determine risk factors for CLPC in this secondary analysis of the main cohort. The main covariates of interest included substantial lens-associated bacterial bioburden, and topographically determined lens base curve-to-cornea fitting relationships. Additional covariates of interest included history of prior adverse events, time of year, race, education level, gender and other subject demographics. Statistical analyses included univariate logistic regression to assess the impact of potential risk factors on the binary CLPC outcome, and Cox proportional hazards regression to describe the impact of those factors on time-to-CLPC diagnosis. RESULTS Across 12 months of follow-up, 52 subjects (25%) experienced CLPC. No associations were found between CLPC development and the presence of bacterial bioburden, lens-to-cornea fitting relationships, history of prior adverse events, gender or race. CLPC development followed the same seasonal trends as the local peaks in environmental allergans. CONCLUSIONS Lens fit and biodeposits, in the form of lens associated bacterial bioburden, were not associated with the development of CLPC during extended wear with lotrafilcon A silicone hydrogel lenses. PMID:24681609

  11. Restoring lens capsule integrity enhances lens regeneration in New Zealand albino rabbits and cats.

    PubMed

    Gwon, A; Gruber, L J; Mantras, C

    1993-11-01

    In studies conducted by numerous investigators for 150 years, lenses regenerated following endocapsular lens extraction in New Zealand albino rabbits have been irregular in shape, appearing primarily doughnut-shaped as a result of lack of lens growth at the site of the anterior capsulotomy and its adhesion to the posterior capsule. In the present study, we restored the lens capsule integrity by inserting a collagen patch at the time of surgery to seal the anterior capsulotomy and to improve the shape and structure of the regenerated lenses. We then filled the capsule bag with air to prevent adhesions between the anterior and posterior capsule and maintain capsule tautness and shape. Lens regeneration was first noted as early as one to two weeks. Regenerated lens filled approximately 50% of the capsule bag at two weeks and 100% by five weeks. Subsequent growth was in the anterior-posterior direction and measured by A-scan biometry. Lens thickness increased by 0.3 mm per month. The regenerated lenses were spherical with normal cortical structure and a nuclear opacity. In conclusion, restoration of lens capsular integrity with a collagen patch following endocapsular lens extraction enhanced the shape, structure, and growth rate of the regenerated lenses. In addition, lens regeneration was shown to occur in two cats.

  12. A Plasma Lens for Magnetron Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Brown, Jeff

    2010-11-30

    A plasma lens, consisting of a solenoid and potential-defining ring electrodes, has been placed between a magnetron and substrates to be coated. Photography reveals qualitative information on excitation, ionization, and the transport of plasma to the substrate.

  13. Perfect lens makes a perfect trap.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhaolin; Murakowski, Janusz; Schuetz, Christopher A; Shi, Shouyuan; Schneider, Garrett J; Samluk, Jesse P; Prather, Dennis W

    2006-03-20

    In this work, we present for the first time a new and realistic application of the "perfect lens", namely, electromagnetic traps (or tweezers). We combined two recently developed techniques, 3D negative refraction flat lenses (3DNRFLs) and optical tweezers, and experimentally demonstrated the very unique advantages of using 3DNRFLs for electromagnetic traps. Super-resolution and short focal distance of the flat lens result in a highly focused and strongly convergent beam, which is a key requirement for a stable and accurate electromagnetic trap. The translation symmetry of 3DNRFL provides translation-invariance for imaging, which allows an electromagnetic trap to be translated without moving the lens, and permits a trap array by using multiple sources with a single lens. Electromagnetic trapping was demonstrated using polystyrene particles in suspension, and subsequent to being trapped to a single point, they were then accurately manipulated over a large distance by simple movement of a 3DNRFL-imaged microwave monopole source.

  14. Methane Detector With Plastic Fresnel Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    Laser detector for natural gas leaks modified by substitution of molded plastic lens for spherical mirror. By measuring relative attenuation at two wavelengths, detector used to check for methane escaping from pipelines above or below ground and from landfill.

  15. Optical switch based on electrowetting liquid lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Liu, Chao; Peng, Hua-Rong; Wang, Qiong-Hua

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we propose an optical switch based on an electrowetting liquid lens. The device consists of an electrowetting liquid lens and a non-transparent cap with a pin hole. When the lens is actuated to be positive, the incident light can be converged on the pin hole and pass through the hole with less attenuation. When the lens is deformed to be negative, the incident light is diverged and most of light is blocked by the cap. Our results show that the system can provide high contrast ratio (˜800:1) and reasonable response time (˜88 ms). The proposed optical switch has potential application in light shutters, variable optical attenuators, and adaptive irises.

  16. Avoiding liability in contact lens practice.

    PubMed

    Classé, J G

    1994-01-01

    Contact lens practice is the leading source of liability claims involving optometrists. Claims most often allege negligence, although informed consent or product liability may also be causes of legal claims for damages. For daily wear patients, the most likely causes of claims are nonapproved use of lenses or solutions, monovision contact lenses, negligence by a contact lens technician, failure to verify lenses before dispensing, mismanagement of contact lens-related corneal abrasions, and inadequate monitoring of ocular health. For extended-wear patients, the most common sources of liability claims are inappropriate patient selection, inadequate training of patients, improper wearing schedules, improper management of contact lens-related corneal complications, and inadequate monitoring of ocular health.

  17. 23-gauge vitrectomy for retained lens material.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Ramanath; Ernst, Benjamin J; Stafeeva, Ksenia; Mandava, Naresh; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo

    2012-07-01

    A technique for removal of retained lens material is described with a three-port 23-gauge vitrectomy system. Removal of the core vitreous is first performed, followed by removal of the cortical vitreous. All vitreous adhesions to the lens are cleared. The cut rate is then decreased to 1,500 cuts per minute, and vacuum increased to 600 mm Hg. The cortical lens material is cleared first, and then the nuclear material is taken with the same vitrectomy probe using the light pipe to assist in crushing the nuclear fragments. With this technique, even large dense nuclear and cortical retained lens material can be removed from the vitreous chamber without the need for a fragmatome. PMID:22692723

  18. Role of Aquaporin 0 in lens biomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Sindhu Kumari, S.; Gupta, Neha; Shiels, Alan; FitzGerald, Paul G.; Menon, Anil G.; Mathias, Richard T.; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan

    2015-07-10

    Maintenance of proper biomechanics of the eye lens is important for its structural integrity and for the process of accommodation to focus near and far objects. Several studies have shown that specialized cytoskeletal systems such as the beaded filament (BF) and spectrin-actin networks contribute to mammalian lens biomechanics; mutations or deletion in these proteins alters lens biomechanics. Aquaporin 0 (AQP0), which constitutes ∼45% of the total membrane proteins of lens fiber cells, has been shown to function as a water channel and a structural cell-to-cell adhesion (CTCA) protein. Our recent ex vivo study on AQP0 knockout (AQP0 KO) mouse lenses showed the CTCA function of AQP0 could be crucial for establishing the refractive index gradient. However, biomechanical studies on the role of AQP0 are lacking. The present investigation used wild type (WT), AQP5 KO (AQP5{sup −/−}), AQP0 KO (heterozygous KO: AQP0{sup +/−}; homozygous KO: AQP0{sup −/−}; all in C57BL/6J) and WT-FVB/N mouse lenses to learn more about the role of fiber cell AQPs in lens biomechanics. Electron microscopic images exhibited decreases in lens fiber cell compaction and increases in extracellular space due to deletion of even one allele of AQP0. Biomechanical assay revealed that loss of one or both alleles of AQP0 caused a significant reduction in the compressive load-bearing capacity of the lenses compared to WT lenses. Conversely, loss of AQP5 did not alter the lens load-bearing ability. Compressive load-bearing at the suture area of AQP0{sup +/−} lenses showed easy separation while WT lens suture remained intact. These data from KO mouse lenses in conjunction with previous studies on lens-specific BF proteins (CP49 and filensin) suggest that AQP0 and BF proteins could act co-operatively in establishing normal lens biomechanics. We hypothesize that AQP0, with its prolific expression at the fiber cell membrane, could provide anchorage for cytoskeletal structures like BFs and

  19. Luneburg lens and optical matrix algebra research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, V. E.; Busch, J. R.; Verber, C. M.; Caulfield, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    Planar, as opposed to channelized, integrated optical circuits (IOCs) were stressed as the basis for computational devices. Both fully-parallel and systolic architectures are considered and the tradeoffs between the two device types are discussed. The Kalman filter approach is a most important computational method for many NASA problems. This approach to deriving a best-fit estimate for the state vector describing a large system leads to matrix sizes which are beyond the predicted capacities of planar IOCs. This problem is overcome by matrix partitioning, and several architectures for accomplishing this are described. The Luneburg lens work has involved development of lens design techniques, design of mask arrangements for producing lenses of desired shape, investigation of optical and chemical properties of arsenic trisulfide films, deposition of lenses both by thermal evaporation and by RF sputtering, optical testing of these lenses, modification of lens properties through ultraviolet irradiation, and comparison of measured lens properties with those expected from ray trace analyses.

  20. Gravitational Lens B0218+357

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie illustrates the components of a gravitational lens system (a kind of natural telescope formed when a rare cosmic alignment allows the gravity of a massive object to bend and amplify ligh...

  1. Environmental standards for intraocular lens implantation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, B A; Kaufman, D V

    1984-02-01

    Successful implantation of prosthetic devices depends upon their freedom from postoperative inflammation and infection. Techniques and lessons learned in orthopaedic and other implant surgery should be applied to intraocular lens implantation. The avoidance of contamination by particles and micro-organisms is one essential principle of the surgical procedure. Practical steps are described to reduce both types of contamination. These measures taken together are recommended for adoption as a standard of environmental safety for lens implantation.

  2. Lens Design Using Group Indices of Refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    An approach to lens design is described in which the ratio of the group velocity to the speed of light (the group index) in glass is used, in conjunction with the more familiar phase index of refraction, to control certain chromatic properties of a system of thin lenses in contact. The first-order design of thin-lens systems is illustrated by examples incorporating the methods described.

  3. Amiodarone keratopathy and rigid contact lens wear.

    PubMed

    Astin, C L

    2001-01-01

    Two cases are presented of patients wearing rigid gas permeable contact lenses who exhibited the typical fan-shaped patterns of corneal pigment deposition related to long-term medication containing amiodarone. The vortex corneal epitheliopathy and contact lens tolerance were monitored over several years. In both cases, the lens material was replaced with one incorporating an ultra-violet light inhibitor in view of the possibility of medically induced photosensitivity.

  4. Veselago lens by photonic hyper-crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zun Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2014-07-21

    Based on the recent concept of the photonic hyper-crystal—an artificial optical medium that combines the properties of hyperbolic materials and photonic crystals, we present the imaging system functioning as a Veselago lens. This planar lens shows a nearly constant negative refractive index with substantially reduced image aberrations, and can find potential applications in photolithography and hot-spots detection of silicon-based integrated circuits.

  5. ["Christmas tree decoration" crystals in the lens].

    PubMed

    Pau, H

    1983-01-01

    In lens crystal cataracts resembling Christmas tree decorations there are, most commonly in the nucleus, crystals in tubular cavities whose double refraction corresponds to that of cholesterol. There are considerable differences in the sizes of the crystals and they are not restricted to the borders of the lens fibers. In the cortex the cholesterol crystals minute if they are found here at all are situated in areas disposed to water-cleft formation.

  6. UV filters in the lens of the thirteen lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus).

    PubMed

    Hains, P G; Simpanya, M F; Giblin, F; Truscott, R J W

    2006-04-01

    Major UV filters have been identified in the lens of the 13 lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus). These were found to be N-acetyl-3-hydroxykynurenine and N-acetyl-kynurenine, in addition to a small quantity of 3-hydroxykynurenine. The level of N-acetyl-3-hydroxykynurenine measured in the ground squirrel lens, 8.2mM, is approximately 11 times the concentration of 3-hyroxykynurenine glucoside reported previously for the human lens. Two additional UV filters of related structure were also present; however, their structures are still under investigation. HPLC elution profiles indicated that the ground squirrel lens cortex and nucleus contained comparable amounts of alpha-, beta(H)-, beta(L)-, and gamma-crystallins. Levels of GSH in the cortex and nucleus were 12.4 and 7.4mM, respectively. Such high concentrations of GSH may act to inhibit oxidation of the 3-hydroxykynurenine and N-acetyl-3-hydroxykynurenine. N-Acetylated kynurenines are less labile than those with free alpha-amino groups since N-acetyl-alpha-amino groups do not undergo spontaneous deamination. This modification thus stabilises the squirrel UV filters. In addition, because deamination is prevented, the decomposition products will not be involved in binding to lens proteins. Because of the similarity of the UV filters present in the ground squirrel to those in man, this species may be a suitable animal model for investigating the effects of UV radiation on cataract, and other ocular diseases, thought to involve exposure to light.

  7. Photon nanojet lens: design, fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chen; Zhang, Sichao; Shao, Jinhai; Lu, Bing-Rui; Mehfuz, Reyad; Drakeley, Stacey; Huang, Fumin; Chen, Yifang

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a novel nanolens with super resolution, based on the photon nanojet effect through dielectric nanostructures in visible wavelengths, is proposed. The nanolens is made from plastic SU-8, consisting of parallel semi-cylinders in an array. This paper focuses on the lens designed by numerical simulation with the finite-difference time domain method and nanofabrication of the lens by grayscale electron beam lithography combined with a casting/bonding/lift-off transfer process. Monte Carlo simulation for injected charge distribution and development modeling was applied to define the resultant 3D profile in PMMA as the template for the lens shape. After the casting/bonding/lift-off process, the fabricated nanolens in SU-8 has the desired lens shape, very close to that of PMMA, indicating that the pattern transfer process developed in this work can be reliably applied not only for the fabrication of the lens but also for other 3D nanopatterns in general. The light distribution through the lens near its surface was initially characterized by a scanning near-field optical microscope, showing a well defined focusing image of designed grating lines. Such focusing function supports the great prospects of developing a novel nanolithography based on the photon nanojet effect.

  8. The lens as a nonuniform spherical syncytium.

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, R T; Rae, J L; Eisenberg, R S

    1981-01-01

    The effective intracellular resistivity Ri of the ocular lens is a measure of the coupling between cells. Since degradation of coupling may accompany cataracts, measurements of Ri are of considerable interest. Experimental results show that the lens is a nonuniform syncytium in which Ri is much higher in the nuclear region than in the cortex. A theory describing the lens as a radially nonuniform spherical syncytium is proposed, solved, and described as a simple equivalent circuit. The impedance of the lens is measured with new circuitry which permits the accurate application and measurement of current and voltage over a wide bandwidth without arbitrary compensation of unstable capacitances. The fit of the nonuniform theory to experimental data is satisfactory and the parameters determined are consistent with theoretical assumptions. In the outer region (cortex) of the lens Ri = 2.4 k omega-cm, probably as a consequence of differences in coupling and cytoplasmic resistivity. The radial resistivity of the cortex is some five times the circumferential resistivity, demonstrating a marked anisotropy in the preparation, probably reflecting the anisotropy in the orientation of lens fibers and distribution of gap junctions. Current can flow in the circumferential direction without crossing from fiber to fiber; current can flow in the radial direction only by crossing from fiber to fiber. PMID:7213932

  9. LENS: Science Scope and Development Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelaar, R. Bruce

    2013-04-01

    The Low-Energy Neutrino Spectroscopy (LENS) experiment will resolve the solar metallicity question via measurement of the CNO neutrino flux, as well as test the predicted equivalence of solar luminosity as measured by photon versus neutrinos. The LENS detector uses charged-current interaction of neutrinos on Indium-115 (loaded in a scintillator, InLS) to reveal the complete solar neutrino spectrum. LENS's optically segmented 3D lattice geometry achieves precise time and spatial resolution and unprecedented background rejection and sensitivity for low-energy neutrino events. This first-of-a-kind lattice design is also suited for a range of other applications where high segmentation and large light collection are required (eg: sterile neutrinos with sources, double beta decay, and surface detection of reactor neutrinos). The physics scope, detector design, and logic driving the microLENS and miniLENS prototyping stages will be presented. The collaboration is actively running programs; building, operating, developing, and simulating these prototypes using the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF). New members are welcome to the LENS Collaboration, and interested parties should contact R. Bruce Vogelaar.

  10. Conservation Through the Economics Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    Although conservation is an inherently transdisciplinary issue, there is much to be gained from examining the problem through an economics lens. Three benefits of such an approach are laid out in this paper. First, many of the drivers of environmental degradation are economic in origin, and the better we understand them, the better we can conserve ecosystems by reducing degradation. Second, economics offers us a when-to-stop rule, which is equivalent to a when-to-conserve rule. All economic production is based on the transformation of raw materials provided by nature. As the economic system grows in physical size, it necessarily displaces and degrades ecosystems. The marginal benefits of economic growth are diminishing, and the marginal costs of ecological degradation are increasing. Conceptually, we should stop economic growth and focus on conservation when the two are equal. Third, economics can help us understand how to efficiently and justly allocate resources toward conservation, and this paper lays out some basic principles for doing so. Unfortunately, the field of economics is dominated by neoclassical economics, which builds an analytical framework based on questionable assumptions and takes an excessively disciplinary and formalistic approach. Conservation is a complex problem, and analysis from individual disciplinary lenses can make important contributions to conservation only when the resulting insights are synthesized into a coherent vision of the whole. Fortunately, there are a number of emerging transdisciplines, such as ecological economics and environmental management, that are dedicated to this task.

  11. The lens equator: a platform for molecular machinery that regulates the switch from cell proliferation to differentiation in the vertebrate lens.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Toshiaki; Masai, Ichiro

    2014-06-01

    The vertebrate lens is a transparent, spheroidal tissue, located in the anterior region of the eye that focuses visual images on the retina. During development, surface ectoderm associated with the neural retina invaginates to form the lens vesicle. Cells in the posterior half of the lens vesicle differentiate into primary lens fiber cells, which form the lens fiber core, while cells in the anterior half maintain a proliferative state as a monolayer lens epithelium. After formation of the primary fiber core, lens epithelial cells start to differentiate into lens fiber cells at the interface between the lens epithelium and the primary lens fiber core, which is called the equator. Differentiating lens fiber cells elongate and cover the old lens fiber core, resulting in growth of the lens during development. Thus, lens fiber differentiation is spatially regulated and the equator functions as a platform that regulates the switch from cell proliferation to cell differentiation. Since the 1970s, the mechanism underlying lens fiber cell differentiation has been intensively studied, and several regulatory factors that regulate lens fiber cell differentiation have been identified. In this review, we focus on the lens equator, where these regulatory factors crosstalk and cooperate to regulate lens fiber differentiation. Normally, lens epithelial cells must pass through the equator to start lens fiber differentiation. However, there are reports that when the lens epithelium structure is collapsed, lens fiber cell differentiation occurs without passing the equator. We also discuss a possible mechanism that represses lens fiber cell differentiation in lens epithelium.

  12. Identification of the locus for human polymorphic cataract on chromosome 2 near gamma-crystallin gene cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Rogaev, E.I.; Rogaeva, E.A.; Keryanov, S.

    1994-09-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in human population. While positive linkage data have been obtained for some forms of inherited cataract, no evidence for mutations in any genes have been reported for human inherited cataract existing as an isolated abnormality. Previously, we have described the autosomal dominant polymorphic congenital cataract (PCC) which is characterized by partial opacity located between the fetal nucleus of the lens and the equator. The number, color and form of opacity is varied. We described pedigrees with 73 affected individuals, and used this in a linkage analysis with a set of polymorphic DNA markers randomly placed across the genome as well as with markers selected from some of the candidate genes or from nearby chromosomal regions. We have found evidence for segregation of a cataract locus with DNA markers from 2q36. The causative genetic defect has been mapped to a 20 cM interval which includes a cluster of gamma-crystallin genes. The gamma-crystallin proteins are abundant soluble low molecular weight proteins in the lens. We have used the trinucleotide repeat polymorphic markers from intron 2 of gamma-crystallin B gene and found the segregation of this marker with the disease with no evidence for recombination in the pedigree containing 62 affected individuals. These data suggest that the non-nuclear forms of human cataract may be caused by defects in gamma-crystallin genes.

  13. Effects of green and red light in βL-crystallin and ovalbumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, J. Horacio; Reynaga-Hernández, Elizabeth; Ruiz-García, Jaime; Montero-Morán, Gabriela; Sanchez-Dominguez, Margarita; Mercado-Uribe, Hilda

    2015-12-01

    The effects of visible light on biological systems have been widely studied. In particular, the alterations of blue light on the ocular lens have recently attracted much attention. Here, we present a study about the effects produced by green and red light on two different proteins: βL-crystallin and ovalbumin. Based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and fluorescence emission measurements, we found that both wavelengths induce structural changes in these proteins. We also observed that βL-crystallin aggregates. Our work may advance our understanding about conformational and aggregation processes in proteins subjected to visible radiation and the possible relationship with cataracts. While blue light has been considered the only harmful component in the visible espectrum, our findings show the possibility that lower energy components may be also of some concern.

  14. Effects of green and red light in βL-crystallin and ovalbumin

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, J. Horacio; Reynaga-Hernández, Elizabeth; Ruiz-García, Jaime; Montero-Morán, Gabriela; Sanchez-Dominguez, Margarita; Mercado-Uribe, Hilda

    2015-01-01

    The effects of visible light on biological systems have been widely studied. In particular, the alterations of blue light on the ocular lens have recently attracted much attention. Here, we present a study about the effects produced by green and red light on two different proteins: βL-crystallin and ovalbumin. Based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and fluorescence emission measurements, we found that both wavelengths induce structural changes in these proteins. We also observed that βL-crystallin aggregates. Our work may advance our understanding about conformational and aggregation processes in proteins subjected to visible radiation and the possible relationship with cataracts. While blue light has been considered the only harmful component in the visible espectrum, our findings show the possibility that lower energy components may be also of some concern. PMID:26656181

  15. L-type calcium channels play a critical role in maintaining lens transparency by regulating phosphorylation of aquaporin-0 and myosin light chain and expression of connexins.

    PubMed

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Nagendran, Tharkika; de Ridder, Gustaaf G; Schey, Kevin L; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Homeostasis of intracellular calcium is crucial for lens cytoarchitecture and transparency, however, the identity of specific channel proteins regulating calcium influx within the lens is not completely understood. Here we examined the expression and distribution profiles of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and explored their role in morphological integrity and transparency of the mouse lens, using cDNA microarray, RT-PCR, immunoblot, pharmacological inhibitors and immunofluorescence analyses. The results revealed that Ca (V) 1.2 and 1.3 channels are expressed and distributed in both the epithelium and cortical fiber cells in mouse lens. Inhibition of LTCCs with felodipine or nifedipine induces progressive cortical cataract formation with time, in association with decreased lens weight in ex-vivo mouse lenses. Histological analyses of felodipine treated lenses revealed extensive disorganization and swelling of cortical fiber cells resembling the phenotype reported for altered aquaporin-0 activity without detectable cytotoxic effects. Analysis of both soluble and membrane rich fractions from felodipine treated lenses by SDS-PAGE in conjunction with mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses revealed decreases in β-B1-crystallin, Hsp-90, spectrin and filensin. Significantly, loss of transparency in the felodipine treated lenses was preceded by an increase in aquaporin-0 serine-235 phosphorylation and levels of connexin-50, together with decreases in myosin light chain phosphorylation and the levels of 14-3-3ε, a phosphoprotein-binding regulatory protein. Felodipine treatment led to a significant increase in gene expression of connexin-50 and 46 in the mouse lens. Additionally, felodipine inhibition of LTCCs in primary cultures of mouse lens epithelial cells resulted in decreased intracellular calcium, and decreased actin stress fibers and myosin light chain phosphorylation, without detectable cytotoxic response. Taken together, these observations reveal a crucial

  16. Genetics of Bietti Crystalline Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ng, Danny S C; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Ng, Tsz Kin; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is an inherited retinal degenerative disease characterized by crystalline deposits in the retina, followed by progressive atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaris, and photoreceptors. CYP4V2 has been identified as the causative gene for BCD. The CYP4V2 gene belongs to the cytochrome P450 superfamily and encodes for fatty acid ω-hydroxylase of both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. The CYP4V2 protein is localized most abundantly within the endoplasmic reticulum in the RPE and is postulated to play a role in the physiological lipid recycling system between the RPE and photoreceptors to maintain visual function. Electroretinographic assessments have revealed progressive dysfunction of rod and cone photoreceptors in patients with BCD. Several genotypes have been associated with more severe phenotypes based on clinical and electrophysiological findings. With the advent of multimodal imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, more precise delineation of BCD severity and progression is now possible, allowing for the potential future development of targets for gene therapy. PMID:27228076

  17. Particle motion in crystalline beams

    SciTech Connect

    Haffmans, A.F.; Maletic, D.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1994-04-20

    Studying the possibility of storing a low emittance (or ``cooled``) beam of charged particles in a storage ring, the authors are faced with the effect of space charge by which particles are repelled and influence each others` motion. The correct evaluation of the space-charge effects is important to determine the attainment and properties of Crystalline Beams, a phase transition which intense beams of ions can undergo when cooling is applied. In this report they derive the equations of motion of a particle moving under the action of external resorting forces generated by the magnets of the storage ring, and of the electromagnetic fields generated by the other particles. The motion in every direction is investigated: in the longitudinal, as well as vertical and horizontal direction. The external forces are assumed to be linear with the particle displacement from the reference orbit. The space-charge forces are comparable in magnitude to the external focusing forces. The equations of motion so derived are then used to determine confinement and stability conditions for the attainment of Crystalline Beams, using transfer matrices.

  18. Ferromagnetic viscoelastic liquid crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesier, Cristina; Shibaev, Petr; McDonald, Scott

    2012-02-01

    Novel ferromagnetic liquid crystalline materials were designed by mixing ferromagnetic nanoparticles with glass forming oligomers and low molar mass liquid crystals. The matrix in which nanoparticles are embedded is highly viscous that reduces aggregation of nanoparticles and stabilizes the whole composition. Mechanical and optical properties of the composite material are studied in the broad range of nanoparticle concentrations. The mechanical properties of the viscoelastic composite material resemble those of chemically crosslinked elastomers (elasticity and reversibility of deformations). The optical properties of ferromagnetic cholesteric materials are discussed in detail. It is shown that application of magnetic field leads to the shift of the selective reflection band of the cholesteric material and dramatically change its color. Theoretical model is suggested to account for the observed effects; physical properties of the novel materials and liquid crystalline elastomers are compared and discussed. [1] P.V. Shibaev, C. Schlesier, R. Uhrlass, S. Woodward, E. Hanelt, Liquid Crystals, 37, 1601 (2010) [2] P.V. Shibaev, R. Uhrlass, S. Woodward, C. Schlesier, Md R. Ali, E. Hanelt, Liquid Crystals, 37, 587 (2010)

  19. A rapid, comprehensive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based survey of the Asp isomers in crystallins from human cataract lenses.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Norihiko; Sakaue, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2012-11-16

    Cataracts are caused by clouding of the eye lens and may lead to partial or total loss of vision. The mechanism of cataract development, however, is not well understood. It is thought that abnormal aggregates of lens proteins form with age, causing loss of lens clarity and development of the cataract. Lens proteins are composed of soluble α-, β-, and γ-crystallins, and as long lived proteins, they undergo post-translational modifications including isomerization, deamidation, and oxidation, which induce insolubilization, aggregation, and loss of function that may lead to cataracts. Therefore, analysis of post-translational modifications of individual amino acid residues in proteins is important. However, detection of the optical isomers of amino acids formed in these proteins is difficult because optical resolution is only achieved using complex methodology. In this study, we describe a new method for the analysis of isomerization of individual Asp residues in proteins using LC-MS and the corresponding synthetic peptides containing the Asp isomers. This makes it possible to analyze isomers of Asp residues in proteins precisely and quickly. We demonstrate that Asp-58, -76, -84, and -151 of αA-crystallin and Asp-62 and -96 of αB-crystallin are highly converted to lβ-, dβ-, and dα-isomers. The amount of isomerization of Asp is greater in the insoluble fraction at all Asp sites in lens proteins, therefore indicating that isomerization of these Asp residues affects the higher order structure of the proteins and contributes to the increase in aggregation, insolubilization, and disruption of function of proteins in the lens, leading to the cataract.

  20. Regulation of the murine alpha B-crystallin/small heat shock protein gene in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Gopal-Srivastava, R; Haynes, J I; Piatigorsky, J

    1995-01-01

    The murine alpha B-crystallin/small heat shock protein gene is expressed at high levels in the lens and at lower levels in the heart, skeletal muscle, and numerous other tissues. Previously we have found a skeletal-muscle-preferred enhancer at positions -427 to -259 of the alpha B-crystallin gene containing at least four cis-acting regulatory elements (alpha BE-1, alpha BE-2, alpha BE-3, and MRF, which has an E box). Here we show that in transgenic mice, the alpha B-crystallin enhancer directs the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene driven by the alpha B-crystallin promoter specifically to myocardiocytes of the heart. The alpha B-crystallin enhancer was active in conjugation with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter/human growth hormone reporter gene in transfected rat myocardiocytes. DNase I footprinting and site-specific mutagenesis experiments showed that alpha BE-1, alpha BE-2, alpha BE-3, MRF, and a novel, heart-specific element called alpha BE-4 are required for alpha B-crystallin enhancer activity in transfected myocardiocytes. By contrast, alpha BE-4 is not utilized for enhancer activity in transfected lens or skeletal muscle cell lines. Alpha BE-4 contains an overlapping heat shock sequence and a reverse CArG box [5'-GG(A/T)6CC-3']. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with an antibody to serum response factor and a CArG-box-competing sequence from the c-fos promoter indicated that a cardiac-specific protein with DNA-binding and antigenic similarities to serum response factor binds to alpha BE-4 via the reverse CArG box; electrophoretic mobility shift assays and antibody experiments with anti-USF antiserum and heart nuclear extract also raised the possibility that the MRF E box utilizes USF or an antigenically related protein. We conclude that the activity of the alpha B-crystallin enhancer in the heart utilizes a reverse CArG box and an E-box-dependent pathway. PMID:8524275

  1. Gravitational binary-lens events with prominent effects of lens orbital motion

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.; Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrzyński, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Tsapras, Y.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; and others

    2013-12-01

    Gravitational microlensing events produced by lenses composed of binary masses are important because they provide a major channel for determining physical parameters of lenses. In this work, we analyze the light curves of two binary-lens events, OGLE-2006-BLG-277 and OGLE-2012-BLG-0031, for which the light curves exhibit strong deviations from standard models. From modeling considering various second-order effects, we find that the deviations are mostly explained by the effect of the lens orbital motion. We also find that lens parallax effects can mimic orbital effects to some extent. This implies that modeling light curves of binary-lens events not considering orbital effects can result in lens parallaxes that are substantially different from actual values and thus wrong determinations of physical lens parameters. This demonstrates the importance of routine consideration of orbital effects in interpreting light curves of binary-lens events. It is found that the lens of OGLE-2006-BLG-277 is a binary composed of a low-mass star and a brown dwarf companion.

  2. Lens-based fluorescence nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Eggeling, Christian; Willig, Katrin I; Sahl, Steffen J; Hell, Stefan W

    2015-05-01

    The majority of studies of the living cell rely on capturing images using fluorescence microscopy. Unfortunately, for centuries, diffraction of light was limiting the spatial resolution in the optical microscope: structural and molecular details much finer than about half the wavelength of visible light (~200 nm) could not be visualized, imposing significant limitations on this otherwise so promising method. The surpassing of this resolution limit in far-field microscopy is currently one of the most momentous developments for studying the living cell, as the move from microscopy to super-resolution microscopy or 'nanoscopy' offers opportunities to study problems in biophysical and biomedical research at a new level of detail. This review describes the principles and modalities of present fluorescence nanoscopes, as well as their potential for biophysical and cellular experiments. All the existing nanoscopy variants separate neighboring features by transiently preparing their fluorescent molecules in states of different emission characteristics in order to make the features discernible. Usually these are fluorescent 'on' and 'off' states causing the adjacent molecules to emit sequentially in time. Each of the variants can in principle reach molecular spatial resolution and has its own advantages and disadvantages. Some require specific transitions and states that can be found only in certain fluorophore subfamilies, such as photoswitchable fluorophores, while other variants can be realized with standard fluorescent labels. Similar to conventional far-field microscopy, nanoscopy can be utilized for dynamical, multi-color and three-dimensional imaging of fixed and live cells, tissues or organisms. Lens-based fluorescence nanoscopy is poised for a high impact on future developments in the life sciences, with the potential to help solve long-standing quests in different areas of scientific research.

  3. Thermodynamics of rock forming crystalline solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, S. K.

    1971-01-01

    Analysis of phase diagrams and cation distributions within crystalline solutions as means of obtaining thermodynamic data on rock forming crystalline solutions is discussed along with some aspects of partitioning of elements in coexisting phases. Crystalline solutions, components in a silicate mineral, and chemical potentials of these components were defined. Examples were given for calculating thermodynamic mixing functions in the CaW04-SrW04, olivine-chloride solution, and orthopyroxene systems.

  4. Association of actin with alpha crystallins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Boyle, D.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The alpha crystallins are cytosolic proteins that co-localize and co-purify with actin-containing microfilaments. Affinity column chromatography employing both covalently-coupled actin or alpha crystallin was used to demonstrate specific and saturable binding of actin with alpha crystallin. This conclusion was confirmed by direct visualization of alpha aggregates bound to actin polymerized in vitro. The significance of this interaction in relation to the functional properties of these two polypeptides will be discussed.

  5. Acetylation of Lysine92 Improves the Chaperone and Anti-apoptotic Activities of Human αB-Crystallin

    PubMed Central

    Nahomi, Rooban B.; Huang, Rong; Nandi, Sandip K.; Wang, Benlian; Padmanabha, Smitha; Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Filipek, Slawomir; Biswas, Ashis; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2013-01-01

    αB-Crystallin is a chaperone and an anti-apoptotic protein that is highly expressed in many tissues, including the lens, retina, heart and kidney. In the human lens, several lysine residues in αB-crystallin are acetylated. We have previously shown that such acetylation is predominant at lysine92 (K92) and K166. We have investigated the effect of lysine acetylation on the structure and functions of αB-crystallin by the specific introduction of an Nε-acetyllysine (AcK) mimic at K92. The introduction of AcK slightly altered the secondary and tertiary structures of the protein. AcK introduction also resulted in an increase in the molar mass and hydrodynamic radius of the protein, and the protein became structurally more open and more stable than the native protein. The acetyl protein acquired higher surface hydrophobicity and exhibited 25-55% higher chaperone activity than the native protein. The acetyl protein had higher client protein binding per subunit of the protein and higher binding affinity relative to the native protein. The acetyl protein was at least 20% more effective in inhibiting chemically induced apoptosis than the native protein. Molecular modeling suggests that acetylation of K92 makes the ‘α-crystallin domain’ more hydrophobic. Together, our results reveal that the acetylation of a single lysine residue in αB-crystallin makes the protein structurally more stable and improves its chaperone and anti-apoptotic activities. Our findings suggest that lysine acetylation of αB-crystallin is an important chemical modification to enhance αB-crystallin’s protective functions in the eye. PMID:24128140

  6. Crystalline imide/arylene ether copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Bass, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Crystalline imide/arylene ether block copolymers are prepared by reacting anhydride terminated poly(amic acids) with amine terminated poly)arylene ethers) in polar aprotic solvents and chemically or thermally cyclodehydrating the resulting intermediate poly(amic acids). The block copolymers of the invention have one glass transition temperature or two, depending on the particular structure and/or the compatibility of the block units. Most of these crystalline block copolymers for tough, solvent resistant films with high tensile properties. While all of the copolymers produced by the present invention are crystalline, testing reveals that copolymers with longer imide blocks or higher imide content have increased crystallinity.

  7. The structure of the cytoplasm of lens fibers as determined by conical tomography.

    PubMed

    Schietroma, C; Fain, N; Zampighi, L M; Lanzavecchia, S; Zampighi, G A

    2009-03-01

    Studies using conventional electron microscopy describe the cytoplasm of lens fiber cells as having essentially an amorphous structure. We hypothesized that significant structural detail might have been lost as a result of projecting the entire thickness of the section (50-100 nm) onto a single plane (the "projection artifact"). To test this hypothesis, we studied the 3D-structure of rat lens cortical fibers before and after extracting the "soluble" crystallins with low ionic strength buffers to make "ghosts." Tomographic series in conical geometry were collected at 55 degrees tilts and by 5 degrees rotations until completing a 360 degrees turn by low dose methods. They were aligned using fiduciary points, reconstructed with the weighted back projection algorithm and refined by projection matching. Analysis of the 3D-maps included semiautomatic density segmentation using a computer program based on the watershed algorithm. We found that the cytoplasm of cortical fibers, though appearing amorphous in regions of the highest density, was in fact comprised of an ordered structure resembling a "clustered matrix." The matrix was comprised of thin ( approximately 6 nm diameter) filaments bent sharply at 110-120 degrees angles and studded with cube-shaped particles (the "beaded" filaments). In cortical fibers, the particles measured a=14+/-2, b=13+/-2 and c=10+/-2.4 nm (n=30, mean+/-SD) and were spaced at distances measuring 27.5+/-2.4 nm apart (n=8, mean+/-SD), center-to-center. The matrix was formed as "beaded" filaments, bound to clusters of "soluble" proteins, crossed each other at nearly perpendicular angles. The matrix also made contact with the plasma membrane at a large number of distinct regions. We thus concluded that the cytoplasm of cortical lens fibers is comprised of a cytoskeletal matrix of "beaded" filaments that organize the "soluble" crystallins in separate regions. The association of this matrix with the plasma membrane allows the lens to maintain its

  8. Scratch resistance of rigid contact lens materials.

    PubMed

    Tranoudis, I; Efron, N

    1996-07-01

    Practitioners have long recognised the importance of determining the extent of scratching on the surface of rigid contact lenses when deciding on lens replacement. Despite this, little research has been undertaken to define this problem. The extent of scratching of rigid contact lens materials was evaluated and this property was related to material oxygen permeability and refractive index. One hundred and forty lenses made from 28 different rigid materials were evaluated in a masked and randomised manner. Scratches were created on the front surface of the lenses using an apparatus that was specifically designed and constructed for this experiment. The extent of scratching was quantitatively evaluated using a computer-based scanning and image analysis system. The oxygen permeability of all materials was measured using the polarographic method. An Atago N3000 hand-held refractometer was used to measure the refractive index of these materials. Three significant correlations were revealed: an inverse relationship (r = -0.813, P < 0.0001) between oxygen permeability and refractive index; a positive relationship (r = 0.511, P < 0.008) between oxygen permeability and the extent of scratching; and an inverse relationship (r = -0.539, P < 0.0058) between refractive index and the extent of scratching. The information generated in this study concerning scratch resistance of rigid contact-lens materials may assist the contact lens industry and contact lens practitioners in developing and prescribing rigid lenses with optimal performance characteristics.

  9. Design and fabrication of soft zoom lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chen, Chao-Chang A.; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2008-08-01

    With minimization of optical-electronics devices, conventional optical zoom lens component has been explored with liquid lens and soft polymer membranes. This paper introduces a novel zoom lens system with a soft polymer material, Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), its shape and curvature can be controlled by pneumatic pressure. Therefore, effective focal length (EFL) of soft zoom lens (SZL) system can be controlled and altered. According to desired opto-mechanical design, this ZL has been accessed to determine the optical specifications. After the pressure activated from 0 to 0.02MPa, the change of EFL of the SZL system can reach up to 18.77% (33.44mm to 39.717mm). Experimental results show that zoom effects of the developed SZL system are significantly affected by the shape, thickness and curing parameter of PDMS soft lens. The SZL system has been verified with the function of zoom ability. Further research works on the integration of the SZL system with imaging system for mobile devices or robot vision applications.

  10. Elasticity of crystalline molecular explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Hooks, Daniel E.; Ramos, Kyle J.; Bolme, C. A.; Cawkwell, Marc J.

    2015-04-14

    Crystalline molecular explosives are key components of engineered explosive formulations. In precision applications a high degree of consistency and predictability is desired under a range of conditions to a variety of stimuli. Prediction of behaviors from mechanical response and failure to detonation initiation and detonation performance of the material is linked to accurate knowledge of the material structure and first stage of deformation: elasticity. The elastic response of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), including aspects of material and measurement variability, and computational methods are described in detail. Experimental determinations of elastic tensors are compared, and an evaluation of sources of error is presented. Furthermore, computed elastic constants are also compared for these materials and for triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), for which there are no measurements.

  11. Elasticity of crystalline molecular explosives

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hooks, Daniel E.; Ramos, Kyle J.; Bolme, C. A.; Cawkwell, Marc J.

    2015-04-14

    Crystalline molecular explosives are key components of engineered explosive formulations. In precision applications a high degree of consistency and predictability is desired under a range of conditions to a variety of stimuli. Prediction of behaviors from mechanical response and failure to detonation initiation and detonation performance of the material is linked to accurate knowledge of the material structure and first stage of deformation: elasticity. The elastic response of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), including aspects of material and measurement variability, and computational methods are described in detail. Experimental determinations of elastic tensors are compared, andmore » an evaluation of sources of error is presented. Furthermore, computed elastic constants are also compared for these materials and for triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), for which there are no measurements.« less

  12. Increased aquaporin 1 and 5 membrane expression in the lens epithelium of cataract patients.

    PubMed

    Barandika, Olatz; Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Anasagasti, Ander; Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara; Llarena, Irantzu; Bascaran, Lucia; Alberdi, Txomin; De Benedetti, Giacomo; Mendicute, Javier; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2016-10-01

    In this work we have analyzed the expression levels of the main aquaporins (AQPs) expressed in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) using 112 samples from patients treated with cataract surgery and 36 samples from individuals treated with refractive surgery, with transparent lenses as controls. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is the main AQP, representing 64.1% of total AQPs in HLECs, with aquaporin-5 (AQP5) representing 35.9% in controls. A similar proportion of each AQP in cataract was found. Although no differences were found at the mRNA level compared to controls, a significant 1.65-fold increase (p=0.001) in AQP1protein expression was observed in HLECs from cataract patients, with the highest differences being found for nuclear cataracts (2.1-fold increase; p<0.001). A similar trend was found for AQP5 (1.47-fold increase), although the difference was not significant (p=0.161). Moreover we have shown increased membrane AQP5 protein expression in HLECs of patients with cataracts. No association of AQP1 or AQP5 expression levels with age or sex was observed in either group. Our results suggest regulation of AQP1 and AQP5 at the post-translational level and support previous observations on the implication of AQP1 and 5 in maintenance of lens transparency in animal models. Our results likely reflect a compensatory response of the crystalline lens to delay cataract formation by increasing the water removal rate.

  13. Increased aquaporin 1 and 5 membrane expression in the lens epithelium of cataract patients.

    PubMed

    Barandika, Olatz; Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Anasagasti, Ander; Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara; Llarena, Irantzu; Bascaran, Lucia; Alberdi, Txomin; De Benedetti, Giacomo; Mendicute, Javier; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2016-10-01

    In this work we have analyzed the expression levels of the main aquaporins (AQPs) expressed in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) using 112 samples from patients treated with cataract surgery and 36 samples from individuals treated with refractive surgery, with transparent lenses as controls. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is the main AQP, representing 64.1% of total AQPs in HLECs, with aquaporin-5 (AQP5) representing 35.9% in controls. A similar proportion of each AQP in cataract was found. Although no differences were found at the mRNA level compared to controls, a significant 1.65-fold increase (p=0.001) in AQP1protein expression was observed in HLECs from cataract patients, with the highest differences being found for nuclear cataracts (2.1-fold increase; p<0.001). A similar trend was found for AQP5 (1.47-fold increase), although the difference was not significant (p=0.161). Moreover we have shown increased membrane AQP5 protein expression in HLECs of patients with cataracts. No association of AQP1 or AQP5 expression levels with age or sex was observed in either group. Our results suggest regulation of AQP1 and AQP5 at the post-translational level and support previous observations on the implication of AQP1 and 5 in maintenance of lens transparency in animal models. Our results likely reflect a compensatory response of the crystalline lens to delay cataract formation by increasing the water removal rate. PMID:27497833

  14. Apoptosis in the lens anlage of the heritable lens aplastic mouse (lap mouse).

    PubMed

    Aso, S; Tashiro, M; Baba, R; Sawaki, M; Noda, S; Fujita, M

    1998-08-01

    Adult homozygous lap mice show various eye abnormalities, such as aphakia, retinal disorganization, and dysplasia of the cornea and anterior chamber. In the fetal eye of a homozygous lap mouse, the lens placode seems to develop normally. However, the lens vesicle progresses abnormally to form a mass of cells without a cavity, and the mass vanishes soon afterward. We examined cell death in the lens anlage of this mutant. The lens anlagen of homozygous lap and normal mice from days 10 to 12 of gestation were observed by light microscopy after DNA end-labeling by immunohistochemistry and by transmission electron microscopy. By light microscopy, a slight frequency of cell death was detected in the lens anlage encircling the surface ectoderm and in the anlage or in the anlage of both homozygous lap mice and normal mice at day 10 of gestation. Cell death was seen in the lens anlage encircling the surface ectoderm in the normal mouse and sporadically in the anlage of the homozygous lap mouse at day 10.5 of gestation. Cell death was visible at the area of the lens vesicle attached to the surface ectoderm and encircling the surrounding surface ectoderm in the normal mouse, and in the lens anlage encircling the surface ectoderm and the apex areas of the lens anlage in the homozygous lap mouse at day 11 of gestation. At day 12 of gestation, almost no cell death was observed in the lens anlage of the normal mouse. However, extensive areas of cell death were still seen in the lens anlage at its apex, at the inner region, and encircling the surface ectoderm in the homozygous lap mouse. Electron microscopic observation showed that the dead cells observed in the lens anlagen by light microscopy in normal and lap mice are the result of apoptosis. In lap mice, cells with cytoplasmic condensation were observed mainly at days 10 and 10.5 of gestation. Many apoptotic bodies which had been phagocytosed by adjacent cells were seen predominantly at day 11 of gestation. At day 12 of

  15. Terahertz lens made out of natural stone.

    PubMed

    Han, Daehoon; Lee, Kanghee; Lim, Jongseok; Hong, Sei Sun; Kim, Young Kie; Ahn, Jaewook

    2013-12-20

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy probes the optical properties of naturally occurring solid aggregates of minerals, or stones, in the THz frequency range. Refractive index and extinction coefficient measurement reveals that most natural stones, including mudstone, sandstone, granite, tuff, gneiss, diorite, slate, marble, and dolomite, are fairly transparent for THz frequency waves. Dolomite in particular exhibits a nearly uniform refractive index of 2.7 over the broad frequency range from 0.1 to 1 THz. The high index of refraction allows flexibility in lens designing with a shorter accessible focal length or a thinner lens with a given focal length. Good agreement between the experiment and calculation for the THz beam profile confirms that dolomite has high homogeneity as a lens material, suggesting the possibility of using natural stones for THz optical elements. PMID:24513932

  16. RHIC electron lens test bench diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner, D.; Beebe, E.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Hamdi, K.; Hock, J.; Liu, C.; Miller, T.; Pikin, A.; Thieberger, P.

    2011-05-16

    An Electron Lens (E-Lens) system will be installed in RHIC to increase luminosity by counteracting the head-on beam-beam interaction. The proton beam collisions at the RHIC experimental locations will introduce a tune spread due to a difference of tune shifts between small and large amplitude particles. A low energy electron beam will be used to improve luminosity and lifetime of the colliding beams by reducing the betatron tune shift and spread. In preparation for the Electron Lens installation next year, a test bench facility will be used to gain experience with many sub-systems. This paper will discuss the diagnostics related to measuring the electron beam parameters.

  17. Rotating black lens solution in five dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yu; Teo, Edward

    2008-09-15

    It has recently been shown that a stationary, asymptotically flat vacuum black hole in five space-time dimensions with two commuting axial symmetries must have an event horizon with either a spherical, ring or lens-space topology. In this paper, we study the third possibility, a so-called black lens with L(n,1) horizon topology. Using the inverse scattering method, we construct a black-lens solution with the simplest possible rod structure, and possessing a single asymptotic angular momentum. Its properties are then analyzed; in particular, it is shown that there must either be a conical singularity or a naked curvature singularity present in the space-time.

  18. Invited review article: the electrostatic plasma lens.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, Alexey

    2013-02-01

    The fundamental principles, experimental results, and potential applications of the electrostatic plasma lens for focusing and manipulating high-current, energetic, heavy ion beams are reviewed. First described almost 50 years ago, this optical beam device provides space charge neutralization of the ion beam within the lens volume, and thus provides an effective and unique tool for focusing high current beams where a high degree of neutralization is essential to prevent beam blow-up. Short and long lenses have been explored, and a lens in which the magnetic field is provided by rare-earth permanent magnets has been demonstrated. Applications include the use of this kind of optical tool for laboratory ion beam manipulation, high dose ion implantation, heavy ion accelerator injection, in heavy ion fusion, and other high technology.

  19. Terahertz lens made out of natural stone.

    PubMed

    Han, Daehoon; Lee, Kanghee; Lim, Jongseok; Hong, Sei Sun; Kim, Young Kie; Ahn, Jaewook

    2013-12-20

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy probes the optical properties of naturally occurring solid aggregates of minerals, or stones, in the THz frequency range. Refractive index and extinction coefficient measurement reveals that most natural stones, including mudstone, sandstone, granite, tuff, gneiss, diorite, slate, marble, and dolomite, are fairly transparent for THz frequency waves. Dolomite in particular exhibits a nearly uniform refractive index of 2.7 over the broad frequency range from 0.1 to 1 THz. The high index of refraction allows flexibility in lens designing with a shorter accessible focal length or a thinner lens with a given focal length. Good agreement between the experiment and calculation for the THz beam profile confirms that dolomite has high homogeneity as a lens material, suggesting the possibility of using natural stones for THz optical elements.

  20. Focusing light with a flame lens.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Max M; Mafusire, Cosmas; Grobler, Jan-Hendrik; Forbes, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The lens is a well-understood optical component used for focusing light, but is almost exclusively made in the solid-state form and, thus, suffers from optical damage at high powers. Attempts to overcome this through the use of non-solid graded-index media for lensing, for example, heated gasses, have found limited application owing to their long focal lengths. Here we describe the first flame lens, which produces a sharp focus with very little stray light and has a fourfold increase in focal power per unit length over previous gas lenses. Such gas devices remain topical due to their inherent ability to deliver high-power laser beams: our flame lens has a 'damage' threshold that is several orders of magnitude higher than that of most conventional lenses and is immediately repaired after damage for reuse, and thus will be of use in focusing high-irradiance laser beams.

  1. Focusing light with a flame lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Max M.; Mafusire, Cosmas; Grobler, Jan-Hendrik; Forbes, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    The lens is a well-understood optical component used for focusing light, but is almost exclusively made in the solid-state form and, thus, suffers from optical damage at high powers. Attempts to overcome this through the use of non-solid graded-index media for lensing, for example, heated gasses, have found limited application owing to their long focal lengths. Here we describe the first flame lens, which produces a sharp focus with very little stray light and has a fourfold increase in focal power per unit length over previous gas lenses. Such gas devices remain topical due to their inherent ability to deliver high-power laser beams: our flame lens has a ‘damage’ threshold that is several orders of magnitude higher than that of most conventional lenses and is immediately repaired after damage for reuse, and thus will be of use in focusing high-irradiance laser beams.

  2. A Luneburg lens in moving coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladyshev, V. O.; Tereshin, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    The reflection of light rays by a reference microsatellite of new design, which moves with a velocity of 7500 m/s along a near-Earth orbit with a radius of 835 km, is calculated. The microsatellite is a bilayer Luneburg lens with an outer radius of 85 mm. The process of propagation of electromagnetic radiation in a Luneburg lens is analyzed for the first time with the effects of electrodynamics of moving media and optical glass dispersion taken into account. It is demonstrated that the lens motion leads to additional deflection and mixing of rays with various angles of incidence. The obtained results allow one to improve the accuracy of determination of satellite coordinates and open up new opportunities for tests of the theory of relativity and electrodynamics.

  3. Invited Review Article: The electrostatic plasma lens

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, Alexey

    2013-02-15

    The fundamental principles, experimental results, and potential applications of the electrostatic plasma lens for focusing and manipulating high-current, energetic, heavy ion beams are reviewed. First described almost 50 years ago, this optical beam device provides space charge neutralization of the ion beam within the lens volume, and thus provides an effective and unique tool for focusing high current beams where a high degree of neutralization is essential to prevent beam blow-up. Short and long lenses have been explored, and a lens in which the magnetic field is provided by rare-earth permanent magnets has been demonstrated. Applications include the use of this kind of optical tool for laboratory ion beam manipulation, high dose ion implantation, heavy ion accelerator injection, in heavy ion fusion, and other high technology.

  4. Underwater imaging with a moving acoustic lens.

    PubMed

    Kamgar-Parsi, B; Rosenblum, L J; Belcher, E O

    1998-01-01

    The acoustic lens is a high-resolution, forward-looking sonar for three dimensional (3-D) underwater imaging. We discuss processing the lens data for recreating and visualizing the scene. Acoustical imaging, compared to optical imaging, is sparse and low resolution. To achieve higher resolution, we obtain a denser sample by mounting the lens on a moving platform and passing over the scene. This introduces the problem of data fusion from multiple overlapping views for scene formation, which we discuss. We also discuss the improvements in object reconstruction by combining data from several passes over an object. We present algorithms for pass registration and show that this process can be done with enough accuracy to improve the image and provide greater detail about the object. The results of in-water experiments show the degree to which size and shape can be obtained under (nearly) ideal conditions.

  5. The effect of time, patching, and lens flexibility on RGP lens adherence.

    PubMed

    Lin, S T; Leahy, C D; Mandell, R B

    1989-03-01

    The effects of time, eye patching, and lens flexibility on rigid lens adherence was evaluated in five overnight, in-laboratory test sessions. Patching was investigated with a group of 11 subjects in two overnight test sessions. Sleep time and lens flexibility were investigated in three separate overnight test sessions with two groups of subjects wearing two lens types of fluorosilicone materials (Dk 92 and 60). Adherence occurred in a significant portion of eyes within a 2-hour time period, and the incidence increased throughout the night. There was no significant difference between the incidence of adherence for lenses of a flexible material compared to lenses of a more rigid material (p greater than 0.6, X2 test), nor did patching have a significant influence on the incidence of adherence. The mechanism of lens adherence may be related to several factors including arbitrary lens movement to a peripheral corneal position, the creation of a geometric spacing between the lens and the eye, lid forces producing a negative pressure, and an increase in tear viscosity throughout the night.

  6. ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS OF SINGULAR ISOTHERMAL QUADRUPOLE LENS

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Zhe; Lin, W. P.; Yang Xiaofeng E-mail: linwp@shao.ac.cn

    2013-06-20

    Using an analytical method, we study the singular isothermal quadrupole (SIQ) lens system, which is the simplest lens model that can produce four images. In this case, the radial mass distribution is in accord with the profile of the singular isothermal sphere lens, and the tangential distribution is given by adding a quadrupole on the monopole component. The basic properties of the SIQ lens have been studied in this Letter, including the deflection potential, deflection angle, magnification, critical curve, caustic, pseudo-caustic, and transition locus. Analytical solutions of the image positions and magnifications for the source on axes are derived. We find that naked cusps will appear when the relative intensity k of quadrupole to monopole is larger than 0.6. According to the magnification invariant theory of the SIQ lens, the sum of the signed magnifications of the four images should be equal to unity, as found by Dalal. However, if a source lies in the naked cusp, the summed magnification of the left three images is smaller than the invariant 1. With this simple lens system, we study the situations where a point source infinitely approaches a cusp or a fold. The sum of the magnifications of the cusp image triplet is usually not equal to 0, and it is usually positive for major cusps while negative for minor cusps. Similarly, the sum of magnifications of the fold image pair is usually not equal to 0 either. Nevertheless, the cusp and fold relations are still equal to 0 in that the sum values are divided by infinite absolute magnifications by definition.

  7. Analytic Models of Plausible Gravitational Lens Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, Edward A.; Marshall, Phil; Oguri, Masamune

    2007-05-04

    Gravitational lenses on galaxy scales are plausibly modeled as having ellipsoidal symmetry and a universal dark matter density profile, with a Sersic profile to describe the distribution of baryonic matter. Predicting all lensing effects requires knowledge of the total lens potential: in this work we give analytic forms for that of the above hybrid model. Emphasizing that complex lens potentials can be constructed from simpler components in linear combination, we provide a recipe for attaining elliptical symmetry in either projected mass or lens potential.We also provide analytic formulae for the lens potentials of Sersic profiles for integer and half-integer index. We then present formulae describing the gravitational lensing effects due to smoothly-truncated universal density profiles in cold dark matter model. For our isolated haloes the density profile falls off as radius to the minus fifth or seventh power beyond the tidal radius, functional forms that allow all orders of lens potential derivatives to be calculated analytically, while ensuring a non-divergent total mass. We show how the observables predicted by this profile differ from that of the original infinite-mass NFW profile. Expressions for the gravitational flexion are highlighted. We show how decreasing the tidal radius allows stripped haloes to be modeled, providing a framework for a fuller investigation of dark matter substructure in galaxies and clusters. Finally we remark on the need for finite mass halo profiles when doing cosmological ray-tracing simulations, and the need for readily-calculable higher order derivatives of the lens potential when studying catastrophes in strong lenses.

  8. Eye lens dose in interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Principi, S; Delgado Soler, C; Ginjaume, M; Beltran Vilagrasa, M; Rovira Escutia, J J; Duch, M A

    2015-07-01

    The ICRP has recently recommended reducing the occupational exposure dose limit for the lens of the eye to 20 mSv y(-1), averaged over a period of 5 y, with no year exceeding 50 mSv, instead of the current 150 mSv y(-1). This reduction will have important implications for interventional cardiology and radiology (IC/IR) personnel. In this work, lens dose received by a staff working in IC is studied in order to determine whether eye lens dose monitoring or/and additional radiological protection measures are required. Eye lens dose exposure was monitored in 10 physicians and 6 nurses. The major IC procedures performed were coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. The personnel were provided with two thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs): one calibrated in terms of Hp(3) located close to the left ear of the operator and a whole-body dosemeter calibrated in terms of Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) positioned on the lead apron. The estimated annual eye lens dose for physicians ranged between 8 and 60 mSv, for a workload of 200 procedures y(-1). Lower doses were collected for nurses, with estimated annual Hp(3) between 2 and 4 mSv y(-1). It was observed that for nurses the Hp(0.07) measurement on the lead apron is a good estimate of eye lens dose. This is not the case for physicians, where the influence of both the position and use of protective devices such as the ceiling shield is very important and produces large differences among doses both at the eyes and on the thorax. For physicians, a good correlation between Hp(3) and dose area product is shown. PMID:25809107

  9. Refractive index of rigid contact lens materials.

    PubMed

    Tranoudis, I; Efron, N

    1998-01-01

    A simple hand-held refractometer was used to measure the refractive index of 27 rigid gas permeable contact lens materials. As a general rule, lenses with refractive indices lower than 1.458 are made from fluorosilicone acrylates; lenses with refractive indices in the range of 1.458 to 1.469 are made from either fluorosilicone acrylates or silicone acrylates; and lenses with refractive indices greater than 1.469 are made from silicone acrylates. It is demonstrated how refractometry can be used by contact lens practitioners for the identification and verification of rigid contact lenses.

  10. Coherent diffraction imaging by moving a lens.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cheng; Tan, Jiubin; Wei, Ce; Liu, Zhengjun

    2016-07-25

    A moveable lens is used for determining amplitude and phase on the object plane. The extended fractional Fourier transform is introduced to address the single lens imaging. We put forward a fast algorithm for the transform by convolution. Combined with parallel iterative phase retrieval algorithm, it is applied to reconstruct the complex amplitude of the object. Compared with inline holography, the implementation of our method is simple and easy. Without the oversampling operation, the computational load is less. Also the proposed method has a superiority of accuracy over the direct focusing measurement for the imaging of small size objects. PMID:27464107

  11. Novel approach to a perfect lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    Within the framework of an exact analytical solution of Maxwell equations in a space domain, it is shown that optical scheme based on a slab with negative refractive index ( n = -1) (Veselago lens or Pendry lens) does not possess focusing properties in the usual sense. In fact, the energy in such systems does not go from object to its “image,” but from object and its “image” to an intersection point inside a metamaterial layer, or vice versa. A possibility of applying this phenomenon to a creation of entangled states of two atoms is discussed.

  12. Tunable dielectric liquid lens on flexible substrate

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yen-Sheng; Tu, Hongen; Xu, Yong; Jiang, Hongrui

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of a tunable-focus dielectric liquid lens (DLL) on a flexible substrate made of polydimethylsiloxane, which was wrapped onto a goggle surface to show its functionality. As a positive meniscus converging lens, the DLL has the focal length variable from 14.2 to 6.3 mm in 1.3 s when the driving voltage increases to 125 Vrms. The resolving power of the DLL is 17.95 line pairs per mm. The DLL on a flexible, curvilinear surface is promising for expanded field of view covered as well as in reconfigurable optical systems. PMID:24493877

  13. Time resolved thermal lens in edible oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, T. A. S.; Pedreira, P. R. B.; Medina, A. N.; Pereira, J. R. D.; Bento, A. C.; Baesso, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    In this work time resolved thermal lens spectrometry is applied to investigate the optical properties of the following edible oils: soya, sunflower, canola, and corn oils. The experiments were performed at room temperature using the mode mismatched thermal lens configuration. The results showed that when the time resolved procedure is adopted the technique can be applied to investigate the photosensitivity of edible oils. Soya oil presented a stronger photochemical reaction as compared to the other investigated samples. This observation may be relevant for future studies evaluating edible oils storage conditions and also may contribute to a better understanding of the physical and chemical properties of this important foodstuff.

  14. Bilateral Pseudoexfoliation Deposits on Intraocular Lens Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bonafonte Marquez, Elena; Bonafonte Royo, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of bilateral pseudoexfoliative deposits on both intraocular lens (IOL) implants in an 83-year-old woman with no other associated pathology, 5 years after cataract surgery. Pseudoexfoliation syndrome is the most common cause of secondary open-angle glaucoma worldwide and these deposits are usually found on the natural lens. The fact that pseudoexfoliative deposits have been found on IOL implants implies the need for a thorough examination in pseudophakic patients, for it could be the only sign of secondary glaucoma. PMID:25713742

  15. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; London, Richard A.; Seppala, Lynn G.

    1991-01-01

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed.

  16. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; London, Richard A.; Seppala, Lynn G.

    1993-01-01

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed. Thin film embodiments are described.

  17. Aspherical lens shapes for focusing synchrotron beams.

    PubMed

    Sanchez del Rio, Manuel; Alianelli, Lucia

    2012-05-01

    Aspherical surfaces required for focusing collimated and divergent synchrotron beams using a single refractive element (lens) are reviewed. The Cartesian oval, a lens shape that produces perfect point-to-point focusing for monochromatic radiation, is studied in the context of X-ray beamlines. Optical surfaces that approximate ideal shapes are compared. Results are supported by ray-tracing simulations. Elliptical lenses, rather than parabolic, are preferred for nanofocusing X-rays because of the higher peak and lower tails in the intensity distribution. Cartesian ovals will improve the gain when using high-demagnification lenses of high numerical aperture. PMID:22514171

  18. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Hawryluk, A.M.; London, R.A.; Seppala, L.G.

    1993-10-26

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed. Thin film embodiments are described. 21 figures.

  19. Thermal lens spectrometry in biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Martín-Biosca, Y; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C; Ramis-Ramos, G

    1994-07-01

    The photothermal spectroscopic techniques, with special emphasis on the thermal lens spectrometry (TLS), are introduced to the non-specialist in laser spectroscopy. The following topics are treated on an elementary basis: fundamentals and analytical characteristics, instrumentation, selectivity and multi-wavelength capability, the models describing the signal-concentration relationship, the sensitivity, background noise and limits of detection, the influence of light scattering and flow. Applications related to the fields of clinical and biochemical analysis and organic pollution are given. The thermal lens circular dichroism and the infrared TLS are also briefly outlined.

  20. Hyperbranched Polyether Polyols with Liquid Crystalline Properties.

    PubMed

    Sunder; Quincy; Mülhaupt; Frey

    1999-10-01

    The attachment of mesogens as end groups to hyperbranched polyglycerol (degree of polymerization 22-45; see schematic representation, the rigid mesogens are shown as rods and the flexible alkyl chains as lines) leads to liquid crystalline polymers with narrow polydispersity, whose liquid crystalline behavior is induced by the mesogenic end groups only.

  1. Light: Isometric Casing with Lens, South Elevation, North Elevation, Top ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Light: Isometric Casing with Lens, South Elevation, North Elevation, Top Plan, Base Plan; Fresnel Lens: Isometric, Elevation, Plan - Fort Washington, Fort Washington Light, Northeast side of Potomac River at Fort Washington Park, Fort Washington, Prince George's County, MD

  2. Experimental Contact Lens to Prevent Glaucoma-Induced Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page An Experimental Contact Lens to Prevent Glaucoma-Induced Blindness By Sharon Reynolds Posted January 23, 2014 An experimental contact lens design releases a glaucoma medicine at a ...

  3. An Essential Role for FGF Receptor Signaling in Lens Development

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Since the days of Hans Spemann, the ocular lens has served as one of the most important developmental systems for elucidating fundamental processes of induction and differentiation. More recently, studies in the lens have contributed significantly to our understanding of cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. Over twenty years of accumulated evidence using several different vertebrate species has suggested that fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and/or fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) play a key role in lens development. FGFR signaling has been implicated in lens induction, lens cell proliferation and survival, lens fiber differentiation and lens regeneration. Here we will review and discuss historical and recent evidence suggesting that (FGFR) signaling plays a vital and universal role in multiple aspects of lens development. PMID:17116415

  4. A broadband zone plate lens from transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Tang, Wenxuan; Hao, Yang

    2011-06-20

    A zone plate lens utilizing a refractive instead of diffractive approach is presented for broadband operation. By utilizing transformation optics, we compress the conventional hyperbolic lens into a flat one with a few zone plates made of all-dielectric materials. Such a transformed lens maintains the broadband performance of the original lens, thus providing a superior alternative to the diffractive Fresnel element which is inherently narrow band.

  5. Modified matching Ronchi test to visualize lens aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Kh; Hooshmand Ziafi, H.

    2011-09-01

    We introduce a modification to the matching Ronchi test to visualize lens aberrations with simple and inexpensive equipment available in educational optics labs. This method can help instructors and students to observe and estimate lens aberrations in real time. It is also a semi-quantitative tool for primary tests in research labs. In this work by comparing a single lens with a doublet, we can clearly demonstrate the superior quality of the doublet over the single lens, and estimate their conic constants.

  6. Sequence analysis of frog rho-crystallin by cDNA cloning and sequencing: a member of the aldo-keto reductase family.

    PubMed

    Lu, S F; Pan, F M; Chiou, S H

    1995-09-25

    rho-Crystallin is a major enzyme crystallin present in the lenses of amphibian species with a blocked amino terminus. In order to facilitate the determination of the primary sequence of this taxon-specific crystallin, cDNA mixture was synthesized from the poly(A)+mRNA of bullfrog eye lenses. cDNAs encoding rho-crystallin were then amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a new protocol of Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE). PCR-amplified product corresponding to rho-crystallin was obtained, which was then subcloned into pUC18 vector and then transformed into E. coli strain JM109. Plasmids purified from the positive clones were prepared for nucleotide sequencing by the automatic fluorescence-based dideoxynucleotide chain-termination method. Sequencing more than 15 clones containing DNA inserts coding for rho-crystallin constructed only one unique and complete full-length reading frame of 975 base pairs covering a deduced protein sequence of 324 amino acids including the universal initiating methionine. It shows 96, 59, 46 and 37 percent sequence similarity to another rho-crystallin from European common frog, bovine prostaglandin-F synthase, human aldose reductase and human aldehyde reductase, respectively, revealing the close relationship between rho-crystallins from related amphibian species and its possible evolutionary relatedness with various aldo-keto reductases. In this study a phylogenetic tree for rho-crystallin and related enzymes is constructed based on multiple-sequence alignment program using a combination of distance matrix and approximate parsimony methods. We have thus established the remote phylogenetic relationship between rho-crystallin and some aldehyde/aldose reductases, which may provide a possible link for the recruitment of this crystallin from detoxification-related enzymes and its physiological role in maintaining a transparent and clear lens.

  7. Nanoscale strain distributions in embedded SiGe semiconductor devices revealed by precession electron diffraction and dual lens dark field electron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. Y.; Cooper, D.; Bernier, N.; Rouviere, J.; Murray, C. E.; Bruley, J.

    2015-01-26

    The detailed strain distributions produced by embedded SiGe stressor structures are measured at high spatial resolution with high precision, with dual lens dark field electron holography and precession electron diffraction. Shear strain and lattice rotation within the crystalline lattice are observed at the boundaries between the SiGe and Si regions. The experimental results are compared to micromechanical modeling simulations to understand the mechanisms of elastic relaxation on all the modes of deformation at a sub-micron length scale.

  8. 21 CFR 886.5925 - Soft (hydrophilic) contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Soft (hydrophilic) contact lens. 886.5925 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5925 Soft (hydrophilic) contact lens. (a) Identification. A soft (hydrophilic) contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  9. 21 CFR 886.5925 - Soft (hydrophilic) contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Soft (hydrophilic) contact lens. 886.5925 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5925 Soft (hydrophilic) contact lens. (a) Identification. A soft (hydrophilic) contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  10. 21 CFR 886.5925 - Soft (hydrophilic) contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Soft (hydrophilic) contact lens. 886.5925 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5925 Soft (hydrophilic) contact lens. (a) Identification. A soft (hydrophilic) contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  11. 21 CFR 886.1425 - Lens measuring instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lens measuring instrument. 886.1425 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1425 Lens measuring instrument. (a) Identification. A lens measuring instrument is an AC-powered device intended to measure the power of...

  12. 21 CFR 886.1425 - Lens measuring instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lens measuring instrument. 886.1425 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1425 Lens measuring instrument. (a) Identification. A lens measuring instrument is an AC-powered device intended to measure the power of...

  13. 19. Detail of base of revolving lens assembly, showing bottom ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Detail of base of revolving lens assembly, showing bottom of lamp at center and brass tens framework at edges of circular platform. Mercury float bearing lies in circular well just beneath lens platform. (Blurred due to lens motion.) - Block Island Southeast Light, Spring Street & Mohegan Trail at Mohegan Bluffs, New Shoreham, Washington County, RI

  14. 21 CFR 886.4300 - Intraocular lens guide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraocular lens guide. 886.4300 Section 886.4300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4300 Intraocular lens guide. (a) Identification. An intraocular lens guide is a device...

  15. 21 CFR 886.1410 - Ophthalmic trial lens clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ophthalmic trial lens clip. 886.1410 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1410 Ophthalmic trial lens clip. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic trial lens clip is a device intended to hold prisms, spheres, cylinders,...

  16. 21 CFR 886.1410 - Ophthalmic trial lens clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic trial lens clip. 886.1410 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1410 Ophthalmic trial lens clip. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic trial lens clip is a device intended to hold prisms, spheres, cylinders,...

  17. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5916 Rigid gas permeable contact lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  18. 16 CFR 315.6 - Expiration of contact lens prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Expiration of contact lens prescriptions. 315.6 Section 315.6 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CONTACT LENS RULE § 315.6 Expiration of contact lens prescriptions. (a) In general. A contact...

  19. 21 CFR 800.10 - Contact lens solutions; sterility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Contact lens solutions; sterility. 800.10 Section...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL Requirements for Specific Medical Devices § 800.10 Contact lens solutions... ophthalmic use, including contact lens solutions, should be sterile. It is further evident that...

  20. 21 CFR 886.5925 - Soft (hydrophilic) contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Soft (hydrophilic) contact lens. 886.5925 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5925 Soft (hydrophilic) contact lens. (a) Identification. A soft (hydrophilic) contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  1. 21 CFR 886.5420 - Contact lens inserter/remover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Contact lens inserter/remover. 886.5420 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5420 Contact lens inserter/remover. (a) Identification. A contact lens inserter/remover is a handheld device intended to insert or...

  2. 21 CFR 800.10 - Contact lens solutions; sterility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contact lens solutions; sterility. 800.10 Section...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL Requirements for Specific Medical Devices § 800.10 Contact lens solutions... ophthalmic use, including contact lens solutions, should be sterile. It is further evident that...

  3. 21 CFR 886.5925 - Soft (hydrophilic) contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Soft (hydrophilic) contact lens. 886.5925 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5925 Soft (hydrophilic) contact lens. (a) Identification. A soft (hydrophilic) contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  4. 21 CFR 886.5420 - Contact lens inserter/remover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contact lens inserter/remover. 886.5420 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5420 Contact lens inserter/remover. (a) Identification. A contact lens inserter/remover is a handheld device intended to insert or...

  5. 16 CFR 315.6 - Expiration of contact lens prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Expiration of contact lens prescriptions. 315.6 Section 315.6 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CONTACT LENS RULE § 315.6 Expiration of contact lens prescriptions. (a) In general. A contact...

  6. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5916 Rigid gas permeable contact lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  7. 21 CFR 886.1405 - Ophthalmic trial lens set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic trial lens set. 886.1405 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1405 Ophthalmic trial lens set. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic trial lens set is a device that is a set of lenses of various dioptric...

  8. Automatic Element Addition and Deletion in Lens Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xuemin; Wang, Yongtian; Hao, Qun; Sasian, Jose

    2003-03-01

    A mechanism is established for the automatic addition and deletion of optical elements during the course of lens optimization. Two lens-form parameters, quantifying the symmetry of the optical system and the optical-power distribution among the individual lens elements, are used as criteria in this automatic procedure. Design examples are provided that demonstrate the practicability of the scheme.

  9. 16 CFR 315.6 - Expiration of contact lens prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Commission, its employees, and its representatives. (3) No prescriber shall include an expiration date on a... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Expiration of contact lens prescriptions... CONGRESS CONTACT LENS RULE § 315.6 Expiration of contact lens prescriptions. (a) In general. A contact...

  10. 16 CFR 315.6 - Expiration of contact lens prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Commission, its employees, and its representatives. (3) No prescriber shall include an expiration date on a... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Expiration of contact lens prescriptions... CONGRESS CONTACT LENS RULE § 315.6 Expiration of contact lens prescriptions. (a) In general. A contact...

  11. 16 CFR 315.6 - Expiration of contact lens prescriptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Commission, its employees, and its representatives. (3) No prescriber shall include an expiration date on a... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Expiration of contact lens prescriptions... CONGRESS CONTACT LENS RULE § 315.6 Expiration of contact lens prescriptions. (a) In general. A contact...

  12. Liquid-filled tunable lenticular lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iimura, Yoshinobu; Onoe, Hiroaki; Teshima, Tetsuhiko; Heo, Yun Jung; Yoshida, Shotaro; Morimoto, Yuya; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a liquid-filled tunable lenticular lens for switching between two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) images in naked-eye 3D displays. Compared with previous 2D/3D switchable displays, this tunable lenticular lens that is directly attached to a smartphone display can project both a 2D image with the original resolution of the smartphone display and a 3D image with high brightness. This lens is simply composed of transparent poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchannels. While the thin top membrane on the microchannels is normally flat to transmit light without deflection for displaying 2D images, applying pressure to the microchannel deforms the membrane to acquire characteristics of lenticular lenses for 3D images. We successfully demonstrate the switching between the 2D and 3D modes. We believe that our lens can be applied as a part of a portable 2D/3D naked-eye 3D display.

  13. Lens testing using total internal reflection holography

    DOEpatents

    Hildebrand, Bernard P.

    1976-12-14

    Accurate, rapid and inexpensive testing and inspecting of lens surfaces tugh holographic means requiring no beamsplitters, mirrors or overpower optics, and wherein a hologram formed in accordance with one aspect of the invention contains the entire interferometer and serves as both a master and illuminating source for both concave and convex surfaces to be so tested.

  14. Testing and inspecting lens by holographic means

    DOEpatents

    Hildebrand, Bernard P.

    1976-01-01

    Processes for the accurate, rapid and inexpensive testing and inspecting of oncave and convex lens surfaces through holographic means requiring no beamsplitters, mirrors or overpower optics, and wherein a hologram formed in accordance with one aspect of the invention contains the entire interferometer and serves as both a master and illuminating source for both concave and said convex surfaces to be so tested.

  15. Low scatter lens design/development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallipeau, R. B.; Quesada, A.

    1974-01-01

    The criteria for the optimum design of optical systems are discussed along with the selection of appropriate materials. The construction details of low scatter lens systems are tabulated. Scattering analysis; total energy diffracted; and computation of delta for a scratch, bubble, and microscopic irregularities are also discussed.

  16. Galaxy mergers and gravitational lens statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rix, Hans-Walter; Maoz, Dan; Turner, Edwin L.; Fukugita, Masataka

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the impact of hierarchical galaxy merging on the statistics of gravitational lensing of distant sources. Since no definite theoretical predictions for the merging history of luminous galaxies exist, we adopt a parameterized prescription, which allows us to adjust the expected number of pieces comprising a typical present galaxy at z approximately 0.65. The existence of global parameter relations for elliptical galaxies and constraints on the evolution of the phase space density in dissipationless mergers, allow us to limit the possible evolution of galaxy lens properties under merging. We draw two lessons from implementing this lens evolution into statistical lens calculations: (1) The total optical depth to multiple imaging (e.g., of quasars) is quite insensitive to merging. (2) Merging leads to a smaller mean separation of observed multiple images. Because merging does not reduce drastically the expected lensing frequency, it cannot make lambda-dominated cosmologies compatible with the existing lensing observations. A comparison with the data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Snapshot Survey shows that models with little or no evolution of the lens population are statistically favored over strong merging scenarios. A specific merging scenario proposed to Toomre can be rejected (95% level) by such a comparison. Some versions of the scenario proposed by Broadhurst, Ellis, & Glazebrook are statistically acceptable.

  17. Design considerations for millimetre wave lens antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, R. J.

    1982-12-01

    Attention is given to the operational background and some of the possible single and dual lens antenna options for use in a millimetric sensor with a beamwidth of approximately 3 deg. A particular single lens antenna design is found to give a scan of more than + or - 3 beamwidths and to be compatible with conical scan, beam broadening, and monopulse operation. A dual lens antenna design is operated both with a single feed horn and with a rectangular matrix of plain waveguide radiators (with potential application in real-time imaging). Good scan characteristics are obtained out to + or - 6 beam-widths with the single feed horn, although it is found that the matrix feed assembly needs a group of elements to be fed in phase before equivalent performance can be obtained. The goal of the study presented here is to simulate feeding the lens antenna with a monolithic array, and whereas an array of waveguides cannot accurately model all the properties of a monolithic array, they are considered sufficiently representative to indicate some of the compromises that may have to be made.

  18. Tevatron electron lens and it's applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.L.; Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Romnov, A.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2009-08-01

    The Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) is designed for the purpose of the Beam-beam tuneshift compensation. Now it's one of the vital parts of the Tevatron. In this report, its daily operations and beam study results are presented. And its possible future applications are also discussed as well.

  19. Zoom optical system using tunable polymer lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dan; Wang, Xuan Yin

    2016-07-01

    This paper demonstrated a zoom optical system with variable magnification based on the tunable polymer lens. The designed system mainly consists of two polymer lenses, voice coil motors, a doublet lens and CMOS chip. The zoom magnification can be adjusted by altering the focal length of the two elastic polymer lenses synergistically through controlling the output displacement of the voice coil motor. A static doublet lens in combination with the polymer lenses stabilize the image plane at the CMOS chip. The optical structure of the zoom system is presented, as well as a detailed description including the lens materials and fabrication process. Images with each zoom magnification are captured, and the Spot diagram and MTF are simulated using Zemax software. A change in magnification from 0.13×to 8.44×is demonstrated within the tiny 0.4 mm variation of the displacement load, and produce a 16.1×full range of magnification experimentally. Simulation analyses show that all the radii of the spot diagram under different magnifications are less than 11.3 um, and the modulation transfer function reaches 107 line pairs per mm. The designed optical system shows the potential for developing stable, integrated, and low-cost zoom systems with large magnification range.

  20. Gravitational Lens Modeling with Basis Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrer, Simon; Amara, Adam; Refregier, Alexandre

    2015-11-01

    We present a strong lensing modeling technique based on versatile basis sets for the lens and source planes. Our method uses high performance Monte Carlo algorithms, allows for an adaptive build up of complexity, and bridges the gap between parametric and pixel based reconstruction methods. We apply our method to a Hubble Space Telescope image of the strong lens system RX J1131-1231 and show that our method finds a reliable solution and is able to detect substructure in the lens and source planes simultaneously. Using mock data, we show that our method is sensitive to sub-clumps with masses four orders of magnitude smaller than the main lens, which corresponds to about {10}8{M}⊙ , without prior knowledge of the position and mass of the sub-clump. The modeling approach is flexible and maximizes automation to facilitate the analysis of the large number of strong lensing systems expected in upcoming wide field surveys. The resulting search for dark sub-clumps in these systems, without mass-to-light priors, offers promise for probing physics beyond the standard model in the dark matter sector.