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Sample records for crystallization phenomena accion

  1. Accions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kang-Sin; Nilles, Hans Peter; Ramos-Sánchez, Saúl; Vaudrevange, Patrick K. S.

    2009-05-01

    Axion fields provide the most elegant solution to the strong CP problem. In string compactifications it is difficult to obtain an axion whose decay constant is consistent with current cosmological bounds. We examine this question in theories with accidental U(1) symmetries that appear as low energy remnants of discrete symmetries. We refer to the axion-like particles from the spontaneous breakdown of these symmetries as accions. In such systems, the accion decay constant depends on the vacuum configuration and can be lowered to fit the bounds. Furthermore, we find that such accions with consistent decay constant can be embedded in special vacua of Z6-II orbifold models with realistic features.

  2. Wave phenomena in phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhovich, Alexey

    Novel wave phenomena in two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) phononic crystals were investigated experimentally using ultrasonic techniques. These ultrasonic techniques allow the full wave field to be imaged directly, which is a considerable advantage in fundamental studies of wave propagation in periodic media. Resonant tunnelling of ultrasonic waves was successfully observed for the first time by measuring the transmission of ultrasound pulses through a double barrier consisting of two 3D phononic crystals separated by a cavity. This effect is the classical analogue of resonant tunnelling of a quantum mechanical particle through a double potential barrier, in which transmission reaches unity at resonant frequencies. For phononic crystals, the tunnelling peak was found to be less than unity, an effect that was explained by absorption. Absorption introduces a small propagating component inside the crystals in addition to the dominant evanescent mode at band gap frequencies, and causes leakage of the pulse from the cavity. The dynamics of resonant tunnelling was explored by measuring the group velocities of the ultrasonic pulses. Very slow and very fast velocities were found at frequencies close to and at the resonance, respectively. These extreme values are less than the speed of sound in air and greater than the speed of sound in any of the crystal's constituent materials. Negative refraction and focusing effects in 2D phononic crystals were also observed. Negative refraction of ultrasound was demonstrated unambiguously in a prism-shaped 2D crystal at frequencies in the 2nd pass band, where the equifrequency contours are circular so that the wave vector and group velocity are antiparallel. The Multiple Scattering Theory and Snell's law allowed theoretical predictions of the refraction angles. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment. The negative refraction experiments revealed a mechanism that can be used to focus ultrasound using a flat

  3. Crystal Melting and Wall Crossing Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masahito

    2010-02-01

    This paper summarizes recent developments in the theory of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) state counting and the wall crossing phenomena, emphasizing in particular the role of the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting. This paper is divided into two parts, which are closely related to each other. In the first part, we discuss the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting counting BPS states. Each of the BPS state contributing to the BPS index is in one-to-one correspondence with a configuration of a molten crystal, and the statistical partition function of the melting crystal gives the BPS partition function. We also show that smooth geometry of the Calabi-Yau manifold emerges in the thermodynamic limit of the crystal. This suggests a remarkable interpretation that an atom in the crystal is a discretization of the classical geometry, giving an important clue as to the geometry at the Planck scale.In the second part we discuss the wall crossing phenomena. Wall crossing phenomena states that the BPS index depends on the value of the moduli of the Calabi-Yau manifold, and jumps along real codimension one subspaces in the moduli space. We show that by using type IIA/M-theory duality, we can provide a simple and an intuitive derivation of the wall crossing phenomena, furthermore clarifying the connection with the topological string theory. This derivation is consistent with another derivation from the wall crossing formula, motivated by multi-centered BPS extremal black holes. We also explain the representation of the wall crossing phenomena in terms of crystal melting, and the generalization of the counting problem and the wall crossing to the open BPS invariants.

  4. Crystal Melting and Wall Crossing Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masahito

    This paper summarizes recent developments in the theory of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) state counting and the wall crossing phenomena, emphasizing in particular the role of the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting. This paper is divided into two parts, which are closely related to each other. In the first part, we discuss the statistical mechanical model of crystal melting counting BPS states. Each of the BPS states contributing to the BPS index is in one-to-one correspondence with a configuration of a molten crystal, and the statistical partition function of the melting crystal gives the BPS partition function. We also show that smooth geometry of the Calabi-Yau manifold emerges in the thermodynamic limit of the crystal. This suggests a remarkable interpretation that an atom in the crystal is a discretization of the classical geometry, giving an important clue as such to the geometry at the Planck scale. In the second part, we discuss the wall crossing phenomena. Wall crossing phenomena states that the BPS index depends on the value of the moduli of the Calabi-Yau manifold, and jumps along real codimension one subspaces in the moduli space. We show that by using type IIA/M-theory duality, we can provide a simple and an intuitive derivation of the wall crossing phenomena, furthermore clarifying the connection with the topological string theory. This derivation is consistent with another derivation from the wall crossing formula, motivated by multicentered BPS extremal black holes. We also explain the representation of the wall crossing phenomena in terms of crystal melting, and the generalization of the counting problem and the wall crossing to the open BPS invariants.

  5. Protein Crystallization: Specific Phenomena and General Insights on Crystallization Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, F.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental and simulation studies of the nucleation and growth kinetics of proteins have revealed phenomena that are specific for macromolecular crystallization, and others that provide a more detailed understanding of solution crystallization in general. The more specific phenomena, which include metastable liquid-liquid phase separations and gelation prior to solid nucleation, are due to the small ratio of the intermolecular interaction-range to the size of molecules involved. The apparently more generally applicable mechanisms include the cascade-like formation of macrosteps, as an intrinsic morphological instability that roots in the coupled bulk transport and nonlinear interface kinetics in systems with mixed growth rate control. Analyses of this nonlinear response provide (a) criteria for the choice of bulk transport conditions to minimize structural defect formation, and (b) indications that the "slow" protein crystallization kinetics stems from the mutual retardation of growth steps.

  6. Protein Crystallization: Specific Phenomena and General Insights on Crystallization Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, F.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental and simulation studies of the nucleation and growth kinetics of proteins have revealed phenomena that are specific for macromolecular crystallization, and others that provide a more detailed understanding of solution crystallization in general. The more specific phenomena, which include metastable liquid-liquid phase separations and gelation prior to solid nucleation, are due to the small ratio of the intermolecular interaction-range to the size of molecules involved. The apparently more generally applicable mechanisms include the cascade-like formation of macrosteps, as an intrinsic morphological instability that roots in the coupled bulk transport and nonlinear interface kinetics in systems with mixed growth rate control. Analyses of this nonlinear response provide (a) criteria for the choice of bulk transport conditions to minimize structural defect formation, and (b) indications that the "slow" protein crystallization kinetics stems from the mutual retardation of growth steps.

  7. Polyelectrolyte effects on the crystallization phenomena of the lithium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watamura, Hiroto; Marukawa, Hironobu; Hirasawa, Izumi

    2013-06-01

    Anionic polyelectrolyte effects on the lithium carbonate crystallization phenomena were investigated. Li2CO3 crystals were obtained by reactive crystallization with seed crystals. Polyelectrolytes were dissolved into the reactive field before the reaction. Obtained crystals were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and crystal size and agglomeration degree were measured by the SEM images. The results show that Li2CO3 crystallized different shape and size from absence of polyelectrolyte in those reactive fields. Especially polyacrylic acid (PAA) improved on the agglomeration of the crystals and shaped them high aspect needles. Thus other experimental conditions including PAA molecular weight and concentration, reaction time, supersaturation by Li concentration were investigated in addition. As a result, obtained crystals were not different in each PAA molecular weight reactive fields. Meanwhile PAA concentration has optimum range. Li2CO3 formed less agglomeration and higher aspect around 1 g/l. In the concentration, Li2CO3 did not agglomerate regardless of aging time and Li concentration. Moreover crystals became rectangle shape in higher Li concentration.(020) face intensity of the rectangle shape crystals increased according to XRD pattern. PAA affected the facial growth. These results may provide a method of morphological change and clearly crystallization of Li2CO3.

  8. Certain relativistic phenomena in crystal optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chee-Seng, Lim

    1980-01-01

    Relativistic unsteady phenomena are established for a crystalline medium with unaligned sets of permittivity and permeability principal axes, but incorporating a compounded uniaxiality about some nonprincipal direction. All effects originate from a suddenly activated, arbitrarily oriented, maintained line current conducted with a finite velocity v. Integral representations studied in another paper (Chee-Seng) are applied. The original coordinate system is subjected to a series of rotational and translational, scaled and unscaled transformations. No specific coordinate frame is strictly adhered to. Instead, it is often expedient and advantageous to exploit several reference frames simultaneously in the course of the analysis and interpretations. The electric field is directly related to a net scalar field Δ involving another scalar Ψ and its complement Ψ¯ which can be deduced from Ψ; Ψ and Ψ¯ are associated with two expanding, inclined ellipsoidal wavefronts ξ and ξ¯; these are cocentered at the current origin and touch each other twice along the uniaxis. Elsewhere, ξ leads ξ¯. For a source current faster than ξ:vt ∈ extξ, Ψ≢0 within a finite but growing ''ice-cream cone'' domain, its nontrivial composition being χ-1/2 inside ξ and 2χ-1/2 inside part of a tangent cone from the advancing current edge vt to, and terminating at, ξ; the function χ vanishes along such a tangent cone. Alternatively, for a source current slower than ξ:vt∈ intξ, if vt is avoided, χ≳0 everywhere, while Ψ=χ-1/2 inside ξ but vanishes identically outside ξ. However, the crucial scalar field Δ depends on three separate current-velocity regimes. Over a slow regime: vt∈ intξ¯, Δ is nontrivial inside ξ wherein it is discontinuous across ξ¯. Over an intermediate regime: vt ∈ intξ extξ¯, Δ takes four distinct forms on 12 adjacent domains bounded by ξ, ξ¯ and a double-conical tangent surface linking vt to ξ¯. But for a fast regime: vt∈ ext

  9. Transport phenomena of crystal growth—heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Selected fundamentals of transport processes and their importance for crystal growth are given. First, principal parameters and equations of heat and mass transfer, like thermal flux, radiation and diffusion are introduced. The heat- and mass- balanced melt-solid and solution-solid interface velocities are derived, respectively. The today's significance of global numeric simulation for analysis of thermo-mechanical stress and related dislocation dynamics within the growing crystal is shown. The relation between diffusion and kinetic regime is discussed. Then, thermal and solutal buoyancy-driven and Marangoni convections are introduced. Their important interplay with the diffusion boundary layer, component and particle incorporation as well as morphological interface stability is demonstrated. Non-steady crystallization phenomena (striations) caused by convective fluctuations are considered. Selected results of global 3D numeric modeling are shown. Finally, advanced methods to control heat and mass transfer by external forces, such as accelerated container rotation, ultrasonic vibration and magnetic fields are discussed.

  10. Nonlinear pulse propagation phenomena in ion-doped dielectric crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demeter, Gabor; Kis, Zsolt; Hohenester, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    We theoretically analyze pulse propagation in a medium of inhomogeneously broadened two-level quantum systems, which have a vibrational degree of freedom with respect to the center-of-mass coordinate. This system mimics local mode oscillations of rare-earth-metal-ion dopants in dielectric crystals that are coupled to electronic transitions. We show the emergence of various nonlinear optical phenomena, such as self-induced transparency or the nonlinear interaction between two pulses coupling to different electrovibrational transitions. Interaction between the pulses makes it possible to generate various Raman sidebands of the incident fields and to tune the location where they are generated. We also demonstrate controlled population transfer between electrovibrational states of the ions at specific points along the propagation axis. Similarities and differences between our results and other pulse propagation phenomena of few-level quantum systems are discussed.

  11. Interference phenomena at backscattering by ice crystals of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Kustova, Natalia; Konoshonkin, Alexander

    2015-09-21

    It is shown that light backscattering by hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds is formed within the physical-optics approximation by both diffraction and interference phenomena. Diffraction determines the angular width of the backscattering peak and interference produces the interference rings inside the peak. By use of a simple model for distortion of the pristine hexagonal shape, we show that the shape distortion leads to both oscillations of the scattering (Mueller) matrix within the backscattering peak and to a strong increase of the depolarization, color, and lidar ratios needed for interpretation of lidar signals.

  12. Interference phenomena at backscattering by ice crystals of irregular shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoshonkin, Alexander V.; Kustova, Natalia V.; Borovoi, Anatoli G.

    2015-11-01

    It is shown that light backscattering by hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds is formed by both diffraction and interference phenomena. Diffraction determines the angular width of the backscattering peak and interference produces the interference rings inside the peak. By use of a simplest model for distortion of the pristine hexagonal shape, we show that the shape distortion leads to both oscillations of the scattering (Mueller) matrix within the backscattering peak and to a strong increase of the depolarization, color, and lidar ratios needed for interpretation of lidar signals.

  13. Premelting phenomena in pseudo-binary ionic crystals.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2010-04-21

    The theory of the premelting phenomena in ionic crystals on the basis of the concept of the heterophase fluctuation has been applied to the pseudo-binary ionic crystals, KCl-NaCl, AgBr-AgCl and AgBr-CuBr systems. Molecular dynamics simulations (MD) have been performed to examine the ionic configurations in their premelting region in the vicinity of their melting points. Liquid-like clusters have been observed in the results of MD utilizing the Lindemann instability condition. The sizes of liquid-like clusters have been estimated by theory and MD. The characteristics of the dynamical behavior of ions in the premelting region have been examined by the mean square displacement and the velocity correlation functions.

  14. Chaotic phenomena of charged particles in crystal lattices.

    PubMed

    Desalvo, Agostino; Giannerini, Simone; Rosa, Rodolfo

    2006-06-01

    In this article, we have applied the methods of chaos theory to channeling phenomena of positive charged particles in crystal lattices. In particular, we studied the transition between two ordered types of motion; i.e., motion parallel to a crystal axis (axial channeling) and to a crystal plane (planar channeling), respectively. The transition between these two regimes turns out to occur through an angular range in which the particle motion is highly disordered and the region of phase space spanned by the particle is much larger than the one swept in the two ordered motions. We have evaluated the maximum Lyapunov exponent with the method put forward by Rosenstein et al. [Physica D 65, 117 (1993)] and by Kantz [Phys. Lett. A 185, 77 (1994)]. Moreover, we estimated the correlation dimension by using the Grassberger-Procaccia method. We found that at the transition the system exhibits a very complex behavior showing an exponential divergence of the trajectories corresponding to a positive Lyapunov exponent and a noninteger value of the correlation dimension. These results turn out to be linked to a physical interpretation. The Lyapunov exponents are in agreement with the model by Akhiezer et al. [Phys. Rep. 203, 289 (1991)], based on the equivalence between the ion motion along the crystal plane described as a "string of strings" and the "kicked" rotator. The nonintegral value of the correlation dimension can be explained by the nonconservation of transverse energy at the transition.

  15. Thin Film Mediated Phase Change Phenomena: Crystallization, Evaporation and Wetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wettlaufer, John S.

    1998-01-01

    We focus on two distinct materials science problems that arise in two distinct microgravity environments: In space and within the space of a polymeric network. In the former environment, we consider a near eutectic alloy film in contact with its vapor which, when evaporating on earth, will experience compositionally induced buoyancy driven convection. The latter will significantly influence the morphology of the crystallized end member. In the absence of gravity, the morphology will be dominated by molecular diffusion and Marangoni driven viscous flow, and we study these phenomena theoretically and experimentally. The second microgravity environment exists in liquids, gels, and other soft materials where the small mass of individual molecules makes the effect of gravity negligible next to the relatively strong forces of intermolecular collisions. In such materials, an essential question concerns how to relate the molecular dynamics to the bulk rheological behavior. Here, we observe experimentally the diffusive motion of a single molecule in a single polymer filament, embedded within a polymer network and find anomalous diffusive behavior.

  16. New Phenomena in Dye-Doped Liquid Crystals: Black Hole Effect and Switchable Reversed Diffraction (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    crystals, Marangoni effect , micro-domains, nonlinear transmission 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON (Monitor) a. REPORT...AFRL-ML-WP-TP-2007-545 NEW PHENOMENA IN DYE-DOPED LIQUID CRYSTALS: BLACK HOLE EFFECT AND SWITCHABLE REVERSED DIFFRACTION (Postprint) D.R...Postprint 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NEW PHENOMENA IN DYE-DOPED LIQUID CRYSTALS: BLACK HOLE EFFECT AND

  17. New Phenomena in Dye-Doped Liquid Crystals: Black Hole Effect and Switchable Reversed Diffraction (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    15. SUBJECT TERMS Liquid Crystal, Anthraquinone Dye, Critical Opalescence, Micro-Domains, Bubbles, Marangoni Effect 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...Eng., 41, 2876, (2002). [10]M. G. Velarde and R. K. Zeytourian (Eds.), Interfacial Phenomena and the Marangoni Effect . Springer:New York (2002...AFRL-ML-WP-TP-2007-502 NEW PHENOMENA IN DYE-DOPED LIQUID CRYSTALS: BLACK HOLE EFFECT AND SWITCHABLE REVERSED DIFFRACTION (PREPRINT) D.R

  18. Physical phenomena related to crystal growth in the space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism of crystal growth which may be affected by the space environment was studied. Conclusions as to the relative technical and scientific advantages of crystal growth in space over earth bound growth, without regard to economic advantage, were deduced. It was concluded that the crucibleless technique will most directly demonstrate the unique effects of the greatly reduced gravity in the space environment. Several experiments, including crucibleless crystal growth using solar energy and determination of diffusion coefficients of common dopants in liquid silicon were recommended.

  19. Observations of dynamic stall phenomena using liquid crystal coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, Daniel C.

    1991-02-01

    Novel, shear stress-sensitive/temperature-insensitive liquid crystal coatings have been applied to the surface of an oscillating airfoil in order to ascertain the unsteady fluid physics associated with the dynamic-stall process. Surface microtufts and laser sheet/smoke-particle flow visualization were used to compare the liquid-crystal results. Boundary-layer transition and turbulent separation locations were measured as a function of geometric angle of attack. The results obtained are compared with Eppler (1980) aerodynamic design code predictions.

  20. Observations of dynamic stall phenomena using liquid crystal coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.

    1991-01-01

    Novel, shear stress-sensitive/temperature-insensitive liquid crystal coatings have been applied to the surface of an oscillating airfoil in order to ascertain the unsteady fluid physics associated with the dynamic-stall process. Surface microtufts and laser sheet/smoke-particle flow visualization were used to compare the liquid-crystal results. Boundary-layer transition and turbulent separation locations were measured as a function of geometric angle of attack. The results obtained are compared with Eppler (1980) aerodynamic design code predictions.

  1. Protein Crystals Grow Purer in Space: Physics of Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alex A.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation will summarize the quantitative experimental and theoretical results obtained by B.R. Thomas, P.G. Vekilov, D.C. Carter, A.M. Holmes, W.K. Widierow and the Author, the team with expertise in physics, biochemistry, crystallography and engineering. Impurities inhomogeneously trapped by a growing crystal - e.g., producing sectorial structure and/or striations - may induce macroscopic internal stress in it if an impurity molecule has slightly (less than 10%) different shape or volume than the regular one(s) they replace. We tested for the first time plasticity and measured Young modulus E of the triclinic, not cross-linked lysozyme by triple point bending technique. Triclinic lysozyme crystals are purely elastic with E similar or equal to 1/5 (raised dot) 10 (exp 9) partial derivative yn/sq cm. The strength limit, sigma (sub c) similar or equal to 10 (exp -3)E similar or equal to Epsilon (sub c), where sigma (sub c) and epsilon (sub c) are critical stress and strain, respectively. Scaling E and sigma (sub c) with the lattice spacing suggests similar binding stiffness in inorganic and biomolecular crystals. The inhomogeneous internal stress may be resolved in these brittle crystals either by cracking or by creation of misoriented mosaic blocks during, not after growth. If each impurity molecule induces in the lattice elementary strain epsilon (sub 0) similar or equal to 3 (raised dot) 10 (exp -2) (this is maximal elementary strain that can arise at the supersaturation DELTA mu/kT similar or equal to 2 and macroscopic molecular concentration difference between subsequent macrolayers or growth sectors is partial derivativeC similar or equal to 5 (raised dot) 10 (exp -3), the internal strain epsilon similar or equal to epsilon (sub 0) partial derivative C similar or equal to 10 (exp -4). Mosaic misorientation resolving such strain is approximately 30 arcsec. Tenfold increase of impurity concentration may cause cracking. Estimates of stress in an isometric

  2. Dissolving and melting phenomena of inorganic and organic crystals by addition of third or second components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funakoshi, Kunio; Negishi, Rina; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Rentaro

    2017-06-01

    Dissolution of potassium sulphate (K2SO4) crystals was decelerated or stopped since the trivalent chrome ions (Cr(III)) or the iron ions were added into a K2SO4 aqueous solution, but inhibition mechanism of crystal dissolving by additives is not discussed well. Moreover, the melting inhibition of organic compound crystals by addition of the second components is not reported. In this study, inorganic or organic compound crystals are dissolved in a solution added the third component or were melted in a melt added the second one, and the dissolving and melting inhibition phenomena of the inorganic and organic crystals with additives are discussed. The dissolving rates of K2SO4 crystals decreased with the increasing of the amount of Cr(III) added into an K2SO4 unsaturated solution. The melting rates of m-chloronitrobenzene (CNB) crystals were also decreased by addition of p-CNB. The dissolving rates of a K2SO4 mother crystal and the melting rates of a m-CNB mother crystal were scattered during experiments and the dissolving and the melting phenomena would be caused by adsorption and detachments of additives on and from crystal surfaces.

  3. Modeling of Macroscopic/Microscopic Transport and Growth Phenomena in Zeolite Crystal Solutions Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatsonis, Nikos A.; Alexandrou, Andreas; Shi, Hui; Ongewe, Bernard; Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Crystals grown from liquid solutions have important industrial applications. Zeolites, for instance, a class of crystalline aluminosilicate materials, form the backbone of the chemical process industry worldwide, as they are used as adsorbents and catalysts. Many of the phenomena associated with crystal growth processes are not well understood due to complex microscopic and macroscopic interactions. Microgravity could help elucidate these phenomena and allow the control of defect locations, concentration, as well as size of crystals. Microgravity in an orbiting spacecraft could help isolate the possible effects of natural convection (which affects defect formation) and minimize sedimentation. In addition, crystals will stay essentially suspended in the nutrient pool under a diffusion-limited growth condition. This is expected to promote larger crystals by allowing a longer residence time in a high-concentration nutrient field. Among other factors, the crystal size distribution depends on the nucleation rate and crystallization. These two are also related to the "gel" polymerization/depolymerization rate. Macroscopic bulk mass and flow transport and especially gravity, force the crystals down to the bottom of the reactor, thus forming a sedimentation layer. In this layer, the growth rate of the crystals slows down as crystals compete for a limited amount of nutrients. The macroscopic transport phenomena under certain conditions can, however, enhance the nutrient supply and therefore, accelerate crystal growth. Several zeolite experiments have been performed in space with mixed results. The results from our laboratory have indicated an enhancement in size of 30 to 70 percent compared to the best ground based controls, and a reduction of lattice defects in many of the space grown crystals. Such experiments are difficult to interpret, and cannot be easily used to derive empirical or other laws since many physical parameters are simultaneously involved in the process

  4. Recent Advances in Colloidal and Interfacial Phenomena Involving Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yiqun; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes recent advances in several areas of research involving the interfacial ordering of liquid crystals (LCs). The first advance revolves around the ordering of LCs at bio/chemically functionalized surfaces. Whereas the majority of past studies of surface-induced ordering of LCs have involved surfaces of solids that present a limited diversity of chemical functional groups (surfaces at which van der Waals forces dominate surface-induced ordering), recent studies have moved to investigate the ordering of LCs on chemically complex surfaces. For example, surfaces decorated with biomolecules (e.g. oligopeptides and proteins) and transition metal ions have been investigated, leading to an understanding of the roles that metal-ligand coordination interactions, electrical double-layers, acid-base interactions, and hydrogen bonding can have on the interfacial ordering of LCs. The opportunity to create chemically-responsive LCs capable of undergoing ordering transitions in the presence of targeted molecular events (e.g., ligand exchange around a metal center) has emerged from these fundamental studies. A second advance has focused on investigations of the ordering of LCs at interfaces with immiscible isotropic fluids, particularly water. In contrast to prior studies of surface-induced ordering of LCs on solid surfaces, LC- aqueous interfaces are deformable and molecules at these interfaces exhibit high levels of mobility and thus can reorganize in response to changes in interfacial environment. A range of fundamental investigations involving these LC-aqueous interfaces have revealed that (i) the spatial and temporal characteristics of assemblies formed from biomolecular interactions can be reported by surface-driven ordering transitions in the LCs, (ii) the interfacial phase behaviour of molecules and colloids can be coupled to (and manipulated via) the ordering (and nematic elasticity) of LCs, and (iii) confinement of LCs leads to unanticipated size

  5. Simulation of Transport Phenomena in Aluminum Nitride Single-Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, V F

    2002-04-03

    The goal of this project is to apply advanced computer-aided modeling techniques for simulating coupled radiation transfer present in the bulk growth of aluminum nitride (AlN) single-crystals. Producing and marketing high-quality single-crystals of AlN is currently the focus of Crystal IS, Inc., which is engaged in building a new generation of substrates for electronic and optical-electronic devices. Modeling and simulation of this company's proprietary innovative processing of AlN can substantially improve the understanding of physical phenomena, assist design, and reduce the cost and time of research activities. This collaborative work supported the goals of Crystal IS, Inc. in process scale-up and fundamental analysis with promising computational tools.

  6. Simulation of Transport Phenomena in Aluminum Nitride Single-Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, VF

    2002-05-16

    The goal of this project is to apply advanced computer-aided modeling techniques for simulating coupled radiation transfer present in the bulk growth of aluminum nitride (AlN) single-crystals. Producing and marketing high-quality single-crystals of AlN is currently the focus of Crystal IS, Inc., which is engaged in building a new generation of substrates for electronic and optical-electronic devices. Modeling and simulation of this company's proprietary innovative processing of AlN can substantially improve the understanding of physical phenomena, assist design, and reduce the cost and time of research activities. This collaborative work supported the goals of Crystal IS, Inc. in process scale-up and fundamental analysis with promising computational tools.

  7. Crystal Ice Formation of Solution and Its Removal Phenomena around Vertical Cooled Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masaaki; Akutsu, Nobuaki

    Experimental and analytical studies for freezing phenomena of ethylene glycol solution around a vertical cooled polyvinyl-chloride cylinder have been performed. It is found that the crystal ice formed around the vertical cylinder is removed from the cylinder surface due to buoyancy force acting on the crystal ice. The crystal ice slides along the cylinder surface due to buoyancy force and grows in a shape of tube by joining with the neighbour ice. It is shown that the onset of ice removal condition is related to the heat flux at the cylinder surface when the latent heat of fusion is discharged with freezing, and that the heat flux ratio of 'from the cylinder surface into the cylinder' to 'from the cylinder surface to the solution' is an important parameter for the onset conditions. The ice removal occurs easily for short cylinders than for long ones.

  8. Explicitly Solvable Model of the Charge Carriers' Phenomena in Isotropic Conducting Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzak, Yaroslav S.; Wacławski, Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical analysis of the kinetic properties of the isotropic conducting crystals is presented. The general formulas for these kinetic properties are expressed in terms of the Fermi integrals. These integrals were obtained using methods of statistical ensembles with varying number of particles and the Gibbs's grand canonical distribution. The determination of the scattering function and the exploration of its relation with the mobility of the current carriers inside these crystals have been made. Together with the results of theoretical analysis of the scattering function and its relation with the current carriers' mobility, these formulas constitute the mathematical model of the charge carriers' transport phenomena in conducting crystals (where a non-parabolic energy spectrum is described by Kane's formula) and provide algorithms for the calculation of these properties.

  9. Transport phenomena of growth-in-gel zeolite crystallization in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, H.; Ostrach, S.; Kamotani, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Secondary nucleation (SN) due to crystal sedimentation has been believed to be one of the major effects that causes smaller sizes of final zeolite crystals. The present investigation indicates that, in a reactor, this gravity-induced SN occurs only within a white opaque column termed the gel portion. Under normal gravity this portion shrinks to the bottom of the hydrothermal reactor, leaving a clear portion of solution at the top, due to depletion of the flocculated gel particles. Solution phase nucleation and crystallization is assumed and a correlation for the shrinkage is therefore derived, which shows good agreement with experimental observations. A non-dimensional parameter is suggested as a criterion for the occurrence of SN. Based on the parameter whether or not microgravity is beneficial to zeolite growth is discussed. Also, the growth mechanism and the transport phenomena in the absence of gravity are discussed.

  10. Transport phenomena of growth-in-gel zeolite crystallization in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, H.; Ostrach, S.; Kamotani, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Secondary nucleation (SN) due to crystal sedimentation has been believed to be one of the major effects that causes smaller sizes of final zeolite crystals. The present investigation indicates that, in a reactor, this gravity-induced SN occurs only within a white opaque column termed the gel portion. Under normal gravity this portion shrinks to the bottom of the hydrothermal reactor, leaving a clear portion of solution at the top, due to depletion of the flocculated gel particles. Solution phase nucleation and crystallization is assumed and a correlation for the shrinkage is therefore derived, which shows good agreement with experimental observations. A non-dimensional parameter is suggested as a criterion for the occurrence of SN. Based on the parameter whether or not microgravity is beneficial to zeolite growth is discussed. Also, the growth mechanism and the transport phenomena in the absence of gravity are discussed.

  11. Explicitly Solvable Model of the Charge Carriers' Phenomena in Isotropic Conducting Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzak, Yaroslav S.; Wacławski, Tadeusz

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a theoretical analysis of the kinetic properties of the isotropic conducting crystals is presented. The general formulas for these kinetic properties are expressed in terms of the Fermi integrals. These integrals were obtained using methods of statistical ensembles with varying number of particles and the Gibbs's grand canonical distribution. The determination of the scattering function and the exploration of its relation with the mobility of the current carriers inside these crystals have been made. Together with the results of theoretical analysis of the scattering function and its relation with the current carriers' mobility, these formulas constitute the mathematical model of the charge carriers' transport phenomena in conducting crystals (where a non-parabolic energy spectrum is described by Kane's formula) and provide algorithms for the calculation of these properties.

  12. Measurement of flow phenomena using the ultrasonic velocity profile method in a simulated Czochralski crystal puller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuhiro, Akira; Takeda, Yasushi

    1993-06-01

    An experimental investigation of flow phenomena in a simulated Czochralski (CZ) crystal puller was conducted using an ultrasound velocity profile (UVP) probe to measure fluid velocities. To isolate the various forces that influence the fluid motion, only the crystal was rotated and a water-glycerol mixture was used as the test fluid in this experiment. Measurements of the velocity components, V z and V r, under the initial transient from zero rotation to a set rotation rate as well as under steady-state conditions were made. The corresponding Reynolds number based on the crystal radius and rotation varied from Re Ω, x ≈ 660-5000 (Ω x ≈ 110-2000 rpm). The measured velocity profiles, V z and V r, were processed using a simple color image scheme based on the magnitude and direction of flow with respect to the probe. These profiles were studied to postulate flow patterns in the simulated CZ device. The measurements revealed three major regions of flow: (1) one beneath the crystal, (2) one near the free surface and crucible wall and (3) one beneath the crystal and occupying the extent of the crucible. In the initial transient, spatially symmetric outward flow beneath the crystal developed until the recirculating flow from below disturbed this pattern. At this point the apparent shear between the flow beneath the crystal and that circulating upwards from the bottom of the crucible induced flow instabilities and a non-axisymmetric flow pattern. The non-axisymmety was verified by the color-coded velocity profiles and a power spectrum analysis. The analysis revealed the critical Reynolds number for the onset of the primary instability to be Re Ωcrit ≈ 669. The linear variation in the power of the primary peak with the Reynolds number indicates that the onset of the axisymmetry-breaking instability is due to Hopf bifurcation.

  13. Coarsening Dynamics of Inclusions and Thermocapillary Phenomena in Smectic Liquid Crystal Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Cheol; Maclennan, Joseph; Glaser, Matthew; Clark, Noel; Trittel, Torsten; Eremin, Alexey; Stannarius, Ralf; Tin, Padetha; Hall, Nancy

    The Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space (OASIS) project comprises a series of experiments that probe interfacial and hydrodynamic behavior of thin spherical-bubbles of smectic liquid crystal in microgravity. Smectic films are the thinnest known stable condensed phase structures, making them ideal for studies of two-dimensional (2D) coarsening dynamics and thermocapillary phenomena in microgravity. The OASIS flight hardware was launched on SpaceX-6 in April 2015 and experiments were carried out on the International Space Station using four different smectic A and C liquid crystal materials in separate sample chambers. We will describe the behavior of collective island dynamics on the bubbles, including temperature gradient-induced themomigration, and the diffusion and coalescence-driven coarsening dynamics of island emulsions in microgravity. This work was supported by NASA Grant No. NNX-13AQ81G, and NSF MRSEC Grants No. DMR-0820579 and DMR-1420736.

  14. Convection phenomena during the growth of sodium chlorate crystals from solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P. S.; Shlichta, P. J.; Wilcox, W. R.; Lefever, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines convection phenomena during the growth of sodium chlorate crystals from solution. Schlieren observations of sodium chlorate crystals suspended in supersaturated solutions showed that with increase in supersaturation or crystal size, the boundary layer on the side faces was stable while the top boundary layer and emerging plume changed from stable to partially oscillatory. The transition was a function of the Grashof number, Gr sub top, and the crystal height. Gr sub top correlated with plume width, number of streamlines, eddy density, and plume velocity, but the oscillation period correlated with the weight increase growth rate. The mass transfer rate, the linear growth rate, and growth of vertical and horizontal faces are discussed, and an estimate of boundary layer flow vs growth rate for near-critical stable convection indicated that growth of side faces depleted over half of the excess solute in the boundary layer. Impulse energies greatly in excess of the threshold value caused transient separation of the boundary layer on the top face, and plume wavering due to background-induced fluid motion was observed only at the lowest supersaturations.

  15. Colloidal crystals and water: Perspectives on liquid-solid nanoscale phenomena in wet particulate media.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Gómez, Francisco; Morales-Flórez, Víctor; Morales, Miguel; Blanco, Alvaro; López, Cefe

    2016-08-01

    Solid colloidal ensembles inherently contain water adsorbed from the ambient moisture. This water, confined in the porous network formed by the building submicron spheres, greatly affects the ensemble properties. Inversely, one can benefit from such influence on collective features to explore the water behavior in such nanoconfinements. Recently, novel approaches have been developed to investigate in-depth where and how water is placed in the nanometric pores of self-assembled colloidal crystals. Here, we summarize these advances, along with new ones, that are linked to general interfacial water phenomena like adsorption, capillary forces, and flow. Water-dependent structural properties of the colloidal crystal give clues to the interplay between nanoconfined water and solid fine particles that determines the behavior of ensembles. We elaborate on how the knowledge gained on water in colloidal crystals provides new opportunities for multidisciplinary study of interfacial and nanoconfined liquids and their essential role in the physics of utmost important systems such as particulate media. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Theoretical study of production of unique glasses in space. [kinetic relationships describing nucleation and crystallization phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, D. C.; Sievert, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The potential of producing the glassy form of selected materials in the weightless, containerless nature of space processing is examined through the development of kinetic relationships describing nucleation and crystallization phenomena. Transformation kinetics are applied to a well-characterized system (SiO2), an excellent glass former (B2O3), and a poor glass former (Al2O3) by conventional earth processing methods. Viscosity and entropy of fusion are shown to be the primary materials parameters controlling the glass forming tendency. For multicomponent systems diffusion-controlled kinetics and heterogeneous nucleation effects are considered. An analytical empirical approach is used to analyze the mullite system. Results are consistent with experimentally observed data and indicate the promise of mullite as a future space processing candidate.

  17. Nematic liquid crystals confined in microcapillaries for imaging phenomena at liquid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shenghong; Jang, Chang-Hyun

    2015-09-21

    Here, we report the development of an experimental system based on liquid crystals (LCs) confined in microcapillaries for imaging interfacial phenomena. The inner surfaces of the microcapillaries were modified with octadecyltrichlorosilane to promote an escaped-radial configuration of LCs. We checked the optical appearance of the capillary-confined LCs under a crossed polarizing microscope and determined their arrangement based on side and top views. We then placed the capillary-confined LCs in contact with non-surfactant and surfactant solutions, producing characteristic textures of two bright lines and a four-petal shape, respectively. We also evaluated the sensitivity, stability, and reusability of the system. Our imaging system was more sensitive than previously reported LC thin film systems. The textures formed in microcapillaries were stable for more than 120 h and the capillaries could be reused at least 10 times. Finally, we successfully applied our system to image the interactions of phospholipids and bivalent metal ions. In summary, we developed a simple, small, portable, sensitive, stable, and reusable experimental system that can be broadly applied to monitor liquid-liquid interfacial phenomena. These results provide valuable information for designs using confined LCs as chemoresponsive materials in optical sensors.

  18. The numerical study on large bandwidth photonic crystal waveguide with slow light phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ming-Bao; Fu, Zhen-Tang; Wang, Wei-Yu

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, two novel types of semi-slow light photonic crystal waveguide with large transmission bandwidth obtained by shifting the boundaries of a W1 waveguide in the direction of light propagation are presented. One includes air rings localized at only one side of the line defect and the other replaces the holes at each side of the waveguide by the uniform air rings which are constructed by the homocentric square dielectric rod inserted into the air holes. The structure produces unusual "n-type" transmission spectrum depending on the different parameters such as inner radius of air ring, dielectric constant of square dielectric rod, etc. It is shown that the transmission spectra of the two structures are completely different from each other. A versatile control of light propagation with large normalized bandwidth and slow light phenomena can be obtained using a unique geometrical parameter. Numerical simulation by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method demonstrates the propagation of the broadband pulse.

  19. Diffraction phenomena in spontaneous and stimulated radiation by relativistic particles in crystals (Review)

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshevsky, V.G. ); Dubovskaya, I.Ya. )

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses: the dispersion characteristics of parametric x-ray radiation (PXR) and diffraction radiation of oscillator; cooperative effects in x-radiation by charged particles in crystals; and diffraction x-radiation by relativistic oscillator.

  20. Global Phenomena from Local Rules: Peer-to-Peer Networks and Crystal Steps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    degree of Doctor of Philosophy 2007 Advisory Committee: Professor James Yorke, Chair/Advisor Professor Brian Hunt, Co-Advisor Professor Dionisios Margetis...Massachusetts, USA, June 2007. [62] Pak-Wing Fok, Rodolfo R. Rosales, and Dionisios Margetis. Unification of step bunching phenomena on vicinal...vicinal substrates. Physical Review Letters, 89(6):1268–1271, February 1998. [73] Dionisios Margetis, Michael J. Aziz, and Howard A. Stone. Continuum

  1. The transport phenomena during the growth of ZnTe crystal by the temperature gradient solution growth technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Liying; Jie, Wanqi; Wang, Tao; Zhou, Boru; Yang, Fan

    2017-03-01

    A numerical model is developed to simulate the temperature field, the thermosolutal convection, the solute segregation and the growth interface morphology during the growth of ZnTe crystal from Te rich solution by the temperature gradient solution growth (TGSG) technique. Effects of the temperature gradient on the transport phenomena, the growth interface morphology and the growth rate are examined. The influences of the latent heat and the thermal conductivity of ZnTe crystal on the transport phenomena and the growth interface are also discussed. We find that the mass transfer of ZnTe in the solution is very slow because of the low diffusion coefficient and the lack of mixing in the lower part of the solution. During the growth, dilute solution with high density and low growth temperature accumulates in the central region of the growth interface, making the growth interface change into two distinct parts. The inner part is very concave, while the outer part is relatively flat. Growth conditions in front of the two parts of the growth interface are different. The crystalline quality of the inner part of the ingot is predicted to be worse than that of the outer part. High temperature gradient can significantly increase the growth rate, and avoid the diffusion controlled growth to some extent.

  2. Translation-rotation coupling, phase transitions, and elastic phenomena in orientationally disordered crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, R. M.; Michel, K. H.

    1994-07-01

    Many of the properties of orientationally disordered crystals are profoundly affected by the coupling (known as translation-rotation coupling) between translation displacements and molecular orientation. The consequences of translation-rotation coupling depend on molecular and crystal symmetry, and vary throughout the Brillouin zone. One result is an indirect coupling between the orientations of different molecules, which plays an important role in the order/disorder phase transition, especially in ionic orientationally disordered crystals. Translation-rotation coupling also leads to softening of elastic constants and affects phonon spectra. This article describes the theory of the coupling from the point of view of the microscopic Hamiltonian and the resulting Landau free energy. Considerable emphasis is placed on the restrictions due to symmetry as these are universal and can be used to help one's qualitative understanding of experimental observations. The application of the theory to phase transitions is described. The softening of elastic constants is discussed and shown to be universal. However, anomalies associated with the order/disorder phase transition are shown to be restricted to cases in which the symmetry of the order parameter satisfies certain conditions. Dynamic effects on phonon spectra are described and finally the recently observed dielectric behavior of ammonium compounds is discussed. Throughout the article examples from published experiments are used to illustrate the application of the theory including well known examples such as the alkali metal cyanides and more recently discovered orientationally disordered crystals such as the fullerite, C60.

  3. In-plane time-harmonic elastic wave motion and resonance phenomena in a layered phononic crystal with periodic cracks.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mikhail V; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an elastodynamic analysis of two-dimensional time-harmonic elastic wave propagation in periodically multilayered elastic composites, which are also frequently referred to as one-dimensional phononic crystals, with a periodic array of strip-like interior or interface cracks. The transfer matrix method and the boundary integral equation method in conjunction with the Bloch-Floquet theorem are applied to compute the elastic wave fields in the layered periodic composites. The effects of the crack size, spacing, and location, as well as the incidence angle and the type of incident elastic waves on the wave propagation characteristics in the composite structure are investigated in details. In particular, the band-gaps, the localization and the resonances of elastic waves are revealed by numerical examples. In order to understand better the wave propagation phenomena in layered phononic crystals with distributed cracks, the energy flow vector of Umov and the corresponding energy streamlines are visualized and analyzed. The numerical results demonstrate that large energy vortices obstruct elastic wave propagation in layered phononic crystals at resonance frequencies. They occur before the cracks reflecting most of the energy transmitted by the incoming wave and disappear when the problem parameters are shifted from the resonant ones.

  4. Improved opportunities for the investigation of crystal growth phenomena on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wargo, M. J.

    1993-09-01

    Investigation of gravity as an experimental variable during crystal growth of electronic and photonic materials is expected to be significantly enhanced by the extended availability of the microgravity environment aboard Space Station Freedom. Experiments studying liquid/solid and vapor/solid phase transformations using the Crystal Growth Furnace were conducted during the first of the U.S. Microgravity Laboratory series of Space Shuttle flights. The increased time available for experiments on Space Station coupled with the quiescent environment expected during the ground-tended phase will permit scientists to conduct experiments which are not possible at present. These include studies which are both comprehensive and require processing times which are in excess of that available on today's carriers.

  5. Flux Pinning Phenomena in Electron Irradiated Yttrium BARIUM(2) COPPER(3) OXYGEN(7-DELTA) Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giapintzakis, John Konstantinos

    1992-01-01

    It has been shown that 1 MeV electron irradiation to a typical dose Phi~ 1times 10^{19} cm^{ -2} results in an enhancement of the critical current density in twinned and untwinned YBa_2 Cu_3O_{7 -delta} single crystals. Values up to two times the preirradiation J_{c} at 10 K and 1 T are observed. The J _{c} enhancement is accompanied by a dramatic increase of the irreversibility field. A threshold incident electron energy (E_{ t}~ 0.5 MeV) is found above which flux pinning enhancement is observed. The data indicated that the electron radiation-induced defects are effective pinning centers only for the orientation H parallel c-axis. In-situ TEM studies in the HVEM suggest that the pinning centers must be smaller than 20 A. A comparison of the electron irradiation results with those of proton irradiation experiments indicate a lower magnitude of enhancement of J_{c} at 10 K and 2 T for the electron case. The probable explanation is the difference in the energy spectra of the PKAs produced by the two types of irradiation. GdBa_2Cu_3O_{7-delta } and EuBa_2Cu_3O _{7-delta} single crystals irradiated with 0.6 MeV electrons displayed similar flux pinning enhancements as YBa_2Cu _3O_{7-delta} crystals, indicating that Y displacements are not primary flux pinners. The evidence from annealing studies suggests that the primary pinning center produced by the electron irradiation is not associated with the oxygen in the Cu-O chains. Instead, a consistent interpretation of the data suggests that the primary pinning defect is most likely based on the displacement of a copper atom from the CuO_2 plane. In order to account for the complete enhancement of J_{c} other pinning mechanisms aside from point defects, such as small point defect clusters, should be considered.

  6. Structural Properties, Order–Disorder Phenomena, and Phase Stability of Orotic Acid Crystal Forms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Orotic acid (OTA) is reported to exist in the anhydrous (AH), monohydrate (Hy1), and dimethyl sulfoxide monosolvate (SDMSO) forms. In this study we investigate the (de)hydration/desolvation behavior, aiming at an understanding of the elusive structural features of anhydrous OTA by a combination of experimental and computational techniques, namely, thermal analytical methods, gravimetric moisture (de)sorption studies, water activity measurements, X-ray powder diffraction, spectroscopy (vibrational, solid-state NMR), crystal energy landscape, and chemical shift calculations. The Hy1 is a highly stable hydrate, which dissociates above 135 °C and loses only a small part of the water when stored over desiccants (25 °C) for more than one year. In Hy1, orotic acid and water molecules are linked by strong hydrogen bonds in nearly perfectly planar arranged stacked layers. The layers are spaced by 3.1 Å and not linked via hydrogen bonds. Upon dehydration the X-ray powder diffraction and solid-state NMR peaks become broader, indicating some disorder in the anhydrous form. The Hy1 stacking reflection (122) is maintained, suggesting that the OTA molecules are still arranged in stacked layers in the dehydration product. Desolvation of SDMSO, a nonlayer structure, results in the same AH phase as observed upon dehydrating Hy1. Depending on the desolvation conditions, different levels of order–disorder of layers present in anhydrous OTA are observed, which is also suggested by the computed low energy crystal structures. These structures provide models for stacking faults as intergrowth of different layers is possible. The variability in anhydrate crystals is of practical concern as it affects the moisture dependent stability of AH with respect to hydration. PMID:26741914

  7. Switching VO₂ Single Crystals and Related Phenomena: Sliding Domains and Crack Formation.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Bertina; Patlagan, Larisa

    2017-05-19

    VO₂ is the prototype material for insulator-metal transition (IMT). Its transition at TIMT = 340 K is fast and consists of a large resistance jump (up to approximately five orders of magnitude), a large change in its optical properties in the visible range, and symmetry change from monoclinic to tetragonal (expansion by 1% along the tetragonal c-axis and 0.5% contraction in the perpendicular direction). It is a candidate for potential applications such as smart windows, fast optoelectronic switches, and field-effect transistors. The change in optical properties at the IMT allows distinguishing between the insulating and the metallic phases in the mixed state. Static or dynamic domain patterns in the mixed-state of self-heated single crystals during electric-field induced switching are in strong contrast with the percolative nature of the mixed state in switching VO₂ films. The most impressive effect-so far unique to VO₂-is the sliding of narrow semiconducting domains within a metallic background in the positive sense of the electric current. Here we show images from videos obtained using optical microscopy for sliding domains along VO₂ needles and confirm a relation suggested in the past for their velocity. We also show images for the disturbing damage induced by the structural changes in switching VO₂ crystals obtained for only a few current-voltage cycles.

  8. Flow alignment phenomena in liquid crystals studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarman, Sten; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2009-10-01

    The flow alignment of a nematic liquid crystal has been studied as a function of temperature, beginning at high temperature in the nematic phase and down to the nematic-smectic A phase transition. The alignment angle is obtained by estimating the twist viscosities by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) methods. These estimates are cross-checked by evaluating the corresponding equilibrium fluctuation relations. As a further comparison, shear flow simulations are carried out by application of the SLLOD equations of motion (so named because of their close relationship to the Doll's equation of motion, which can be derived from the Doll's tensor Hamiltonian), whereby the alignment angle is obtained directly. All these methods give consistent results for the alignment angle. At low temperatures near the nematic-smectic A transition the system becomes flow unstable. In this region the alignment angle has been calculated as a function of time.

  9. Temperature-dependent ordering phenomena in single crystals of germanium antimony tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Philipp; Schneider, Matthias N.; Oeckler, Oliver

    2015-07-15

    The temperature-dependent behavior of quenched single-crystalline (GeTe){sub n}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (n~2.8, n~5 and n~11) was investigated by semiquantitative modeling of diffuse X-ray scattering. The structure at room temperature exhibits trigonal twin domains, each comprising a stacking-disordered sequence of distorted rocksalt-type slabs with variable thicknesses. Ge and Sb share the cation position and vacancies are partially ordered in defect layers (van der Waals gaps) between the slabs. The average structure determined with resonant diffraction data corresponds to a rocksalt-type structure whose cation position is split along the stacking direction. Upon heating, cation ordering leads to a metastable superstructure of the rocksalt type at ~400 °C, which transforms to a rocksalt-type high-temperature phase with randomly distributed cations and vacancies at ~500 °C; this structure was also refined using resonant diffraction. Cooling at high or intermediate rates does not yield the long-range ordered phase, but directly leads to the twinned disordered phase. - Graphical abstract: Development of the diffraction patterns of (GeTe){sub ~11}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} upon heating; the insets symbolically sketch the real structure at the corresponding temperatures. - Highlights: • The structure of disordered (GeTe){sub n}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} is described as a function of temperature. • Structural changes are tracked by modeling diffuse X-ray scattering. • Quenched crystals exhibit distorted NaCl-type slabs with different thicknesses. • Vacancy ordering upon heating leads to a metastable superstructure of the NaCl type. • Further heating leads to an undistorted disordered NaCl-type high-temperature phase.

  10. Crack growth phenomena in micro-machined single crystal silicon and design implications for micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Alissa Mirella

    The creation of micron-sized mechanisms using semiconductor processing technology is known collectively as MEMS, or Micro Electro Mechanical Systems. Many MEMS devices, such as accelerometers and switches, have mechanical structures fabricated from single crystal silicon, a brittle material. The reliability and longevity of these devices depends on minimizing the probability of fracture, and therefore requires a thorough understanding of crack growth phenomena in silicon. In this study, a special micro-machined fracture specimen, the compression-loaded double cantilever beam, was developed to study fracture phenomena in single crystal silicon on a size scale relevant to MEMS. The decreasing stress intensity geometry of this sample provided stable, controllable crack propagation in test sections as thin as 100 mum. Several common MEMS fabrication methods (plasma and chemical etch) were used to achieve a range of surface finishes. A 650 A thick titanium crack gage was used to directly measure crack extension as a function of time using the potential drop technique. High speed (100 MHz) data acquisition techniques were employed to capture fracture events on the sub-microsecond time scale. The stability of the sample design and the micron-scale resolution of the crack gage facilitated investigation into the existence of a stress corrosion effect in silicon. No evidence of sub-critical crack growth due to exposure to humid air was found in carefully controlled tests lasting up to 24 hours. Rapid crack propagation velocities (>1 km/s) during quasi-static loading were recorded using high speed data acquisition techniques. Unique evidence was found of reflected stress waves causing multiple, momentary arrests during rapid fracture events. These measurements, along with atomic force microscope scans of the fracture surfaces, offer new insight into the kinetics of the fracture process in silicon. Over 100 micro-machined samples were fractured in this research. Weibull

  11. Directional asymmetry of the nonlinear wave phenomena in a three-dimensional granular phononic crystal under gravity.

    PubMed

    Merkel, A; Tournat, V; Gusev, V

    2014-08-01

    We report the experimental observation of the gravity-induced asymmetry for the nonlinear transformation of acoustic waves in a noncohesive granular phononic crystal. Because of the gravity, the contact precompression increases with depth inducing space variations of not only the linear and nonlinear elastic moduli but also of the acoustic wave dissipation. We show experimentally and explain theoretically that, in contrast to symmetric propagation of linear waves, the amplitude of the nonlinearly self-demodulated wave depends on whether the propagation of the waves is in the direction of the gravity or in the opposite direction. Among the observed nonlinear processes, we report frequency mixing of the two transverse-rotational modes belonging to the optical band of vibrations and propagating with negative phase velocities, which results in the excitation of a longitudinal wave belonging to the acoustic band of vibrations and propagating with positive phase velocity. We show that the measurements of the gravity-induced asymmetry in the nonlinear acoustic phenomena can be used to compare the in-depth distributions of the contact nonlinearity and of acoustic absorption.

  12. Directional asymmetry of the nonlinear wave phenomena in a three-dimensional granular phononic crystal under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, A.; Tournat, V.; Gusev, V.

    2014-08-01

    We report the experimental observation of the gravity-induced asymmetry for the nonlinear transformation of acoustic waves in a noncohesive granular phononic crystal. Because of the gravity, the contact precompression increases with depth inducing space variations of not only the linear and nonlinear elastic moduli but also of the acoustic wave dissipation. We show experimentally and explain theoretically that, in contrast to symmetric propagation of linear waves, the amplitude of the nonlinearly self-demodulated wave depends on whether the propagation of the waves is in the direction of the gravity or in the opposite direction. Among the observed nonlinear processes, we report frequency mixing of the two transverse-rotational modes belonging to the optical band of vibrations and propagating with negative phase velocities, which results in the excitation of a longitudinal wave belonging to the acoustic band of vibrations and propagating with positive phase velocity. We show that the measurements of the gravity-induced asymmetry in the nonlinear acoustic phenomena can be used to compare the in-depth distributions of the contact nonlinearity and of acoustic absorption.

  13. Mujeres en accion: design and baseline data.

    PubMed

    Keller, Colleen; Fleury, Julie; Perez, Adriana; Belyea, Michael; Castro, Felipe G

    2011-10-01

    The majority of programs designed to promote physical activity in older Hispanic women includes few innovative theory-based interventions that address cultural relevant strategies. The purpose of this report is to describe the design and baseline data for Mujeres en Accion, a physical activity intervention to increase regular physical activity, and cardiovascular health outcomes among older Hispanic women. Mujeres en Accion [Women in Action for Health], a 12 month randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a social support physical activity intervention in midlife and older Hispanic women. This study tests an innovative intervention, Mujeres en Accion, and includes the use of a theory-driven approach to intervention, explores social support as a theoretical mediating variable, use of a Promotora model and a Community Advisory group to incorporate cultural and social approaches and resources, and use of objective measures of physical activity in Hispanic women.

  14. Mujeres en Accion: Design and Baseline Data

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Julie; Perez, Adriana; Belyea, Michael; Castro, Felipe G.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of programs designed to promote physical activity in older Hispanic women includes few innovative theory-based interventions that address cultural relevant strategies. The purpose of this report is to describe the design and baseline data for Mujeres en Accion, a physical activity intervention to increase regular physical activity, and cardiovascular health outcomes among older Hispanic women. Mujeres en Accion [Women in Action for Health], a 12 month randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a social support physical activity intervention in midlife and older Hispanic women. This study tests an innovative intervention, Mujeres en Accion, and includes the use of a theory-driven approach to intervention, explores social support as a theoretical mediating variable, use of a Promotora model and a Community Advisory group to incorporate cultural and social approaches and resources, and use of objective measures of physical activity in Hispanic women. PMID:21298400

  15. Transport phenomena in the crystallization of lysozyme by osmotic dewatering and liquid-liquid diffusion in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Paul; Sportiello, Michael G.; Gregory, Derek; Cassanto, John M.; Alvarado, Ulises A.; Ostroff, Robert; Korszun, Z. R.

    1993-01-01

    Two methods of protein crystallization, osmotic dewatering and liquid-liquid diffusion, like the vapor diffusion (hanging-drop and sessile-drop) methods allow a gradual approach to supersaturation conditions. The crystallization of hen egg-white lysozyme, an extensively characterized protein crystal, in the presence of sodium chloride was used as an experimental model with which to compare these two methods in low gravity and in the laboratory. Comparisons of crystal growth rates by the two methods under the two conditions have, to date, indicated that the rate of crystal growth by osmotic dewatering is nearly the same in low gravity and on the ground, while much faster crystal growth rates can be achieved by the liquid-liquid diffusion method in low gravity.

  16. Transport phenomena in the crystallization of lysozyme by osmotic dewatering and liquid-liquid diffusion in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Paul; Sportiello, Michael G.; Gregory, Derek; Cassanto, John M.; Alvarado, Ulises A.; Ostroff, Robert; Korszun, Z. R.

    1993-01-01

    Two methods of protein crystallization, osmotic dewatering and liquid-liquid diffusion, like the vapor diffusion (hanging-drop and sessile-drop) methods allow a gradual approach to supersaturation conditions. The crystallization of hen egg-white lysozyme, an extensively characterized protein crystal, in the presence of sodium chloride was used as an experimental model with which to compare these two methods in low gravity and in the laboratory. Comparisons of crystal growth rates by the two methods under the two conditions have, to date, indicated that the rate of crystal growth by osmotic dewatering is nearly the same in low gravity and on the ground, while much faster crystal growth rates can be achieved by the liquid-liquid diffusion method in low gravity.

  17. Investigation of primary nucleation phenomena of acetylsalicylic acid crystals induced by ultrasonic irradiation—ultrasonic energy needed to activate primary nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Etsuko; Ebihara, Satomi; Hirasawa, Izumi

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of our study is to clarify ultrasonic primary nucleation phenomena for controlling final product size by adjusting the number of primary nuclei. In our previous study, the effect of ultrasonic irradiation on the number of nuclei was investigated under the same supersaturated condition, as a result two novel phenomena were observed. First, there is a region where ultrasonic irradiation inhibits primary nucleation. Second, a specific amount of energy is needed to activate primary nucleation. From this result, it was expected that the ultrasonic energy needed to activate primary nucleation has a certain relationship to the energy necessary to form a stable nucleus. Therefore, we investigated the following: whether ultrasonic irradiation inhibits and activates primary nucleation at various degrees of supersaturation, whether final crystal size relates to the number of nuclei, and whether the ultrasonic energy needed to activate primary nucleation relates to the energy necessary to form a stable nucleus. First, we found that ultrasonic irradiation inhibits and activates primary nucleation at various supersaturated degrees. Second, we found that final crystal size increases or decreases depending on the number of nuclei. Therefore, it was indicated that ultrasonic energy could yield the desired crystal size by inducing suitable nucleation. Third, we found that the ultrasonic energy needed to activate primary nucleation decreases with a decrease in the energy necessary to form a stable nucleus. From this, we can propose criteria for determining the effect of ultrasonic irradiation on primary nucleation by showing diagrams correlating Δ Gcrit with Ecrit.

  18. NONLINEAR-OPTICS PHENOMENA: Change in the refractive index of a photorefractive crystal during formation of a spatially screened soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assel'born, Sergei A.; Kundikova, Nataliya D.; Novikov, Igor'V.

    2010-02-01

    A change in the refractive index of a photorefractive barium-sodium niobate crystal in an alternating electric field during the propagation of intensity-modulated coherent radiation in it is studied. It is shown experimentally that a change in the refractive index in the soliton regime in a photorefractive crystal with a small nonlocal response is independent of the external-field amplitude and intensity-modulation depth.

  19. Approximate scheme by the coupled-wave theory to efficiently analyze the influences of moiré phenomena in liquid-crystal devices.

    PubMed

    Ho, I-Lin; Wang, Tsang-Chi; Chang, Yia-Chung; Li, Wang-Yang

    2012-08-20

    This work studies an approximate scheme by coupled-wave theory to analyze quickly the large-scale moiré phenomena as seen in common liquid-crystal devices. The moiré phenomena are considered to be caused by two periodic structures (with lattice vectors γ[combininb arrow](1) and γ[combininb arrow](2) and show an interference pattern spanning over a length γ(m)=|γ[combininb arrow](1)|·|γ[combininb arrow](2)|/|γ[combininb arrow](1)-γ[combininb arrow](2)| (with γ[combininb arrow](1)=/~γ[combininb arrow](2)). With the coupled-wave theory, the complete analysis of the moiré optics includes at least 2γ(m)/λ (λ: wavelength in vacuum) Fourier components and presents an ineffective computation. This work applies a cos(τ) type approximation for the openings of unpatterned liquid-crystal pixels, and considers the first-order coupling between the Fourier components of pixels and other (periodic) optical structures. We hence arrive at an effective evaluation, including 4τ|γ[combininb arrow](1)|/λ (or 4τ|γ[combininb arrow](2)|/λ) Fourier components, and are able to go back to a complete analysis when considering higher-order couplings at an appropriate τ integer value.

  20. Coherent phenomena in terahertz 2D plasmonic structures: strong coupling, plasmonic crystals, and induced transparency by coupling of localized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Gregory C.; Aizin, Gregory R.; Allen, S. James; Grine, Albert D.; Bethke, Don; Reno, John L.; Shaner, Eric A.

    2014-05-01

    The device applications of plasmonic systems such as graphene and two dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) in III-V heterostructures include terahertz detectors, mixers, oscillators and modulators. These two dimensional (2D) plasmonic systems are not only well-suited for device integration, but also enable the broad tunability of underdamped plasma excitations via an applied electric field. We present demonstrations of the coherent coupling of multiple voltage tuned GaAs/AlGaAs 2D plasmonic resonators under terahertz irradiation. By utilizing a plasmonic homodyne mixing mechanism to downconvert the near field of plasma waves to a DC signal, we directly detect the spectrum of coupled plasmonic micro-resonator structures at cryogenic temperatures. The 2DEG in the studied devices can be interpreted as a plasmonic waveguide where multiple gate terminals control the 2DEG kinetic inductance. When the gate tuning of the 2DEG is spatially periodic, a one-dimensional finite plasmonic crystal forms. This results in a subwavelength structure, much like a metamaterial element, that nonetheless Bragg scatters plasma waves from a repeated crystal unit cell. A 50% in situ tuning of the plasmonic crystal band edges is observed. By introducing gate-controlled defects or simply terminating the lattice, localized states arise in the plasmonic crystal. Inherent asymmetries at the finite crystal boundaries produce an induced transparency-like phenomenon due to the coupling of defect modes and crystal surface states known as Tamm states. The demonstrated active control of coupled plasmonic resonators opens previously unexplored avenues for sensitive direct and heterodyne THz detection, planar metamaterials, and slow-light devices.

  1. Paranormal phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    1996-08-01

    Critical analysis is given of some paranormal phenomena events (UFO, healers, psychokinesis (telekinesis))reported in Moldova. It is argued that correct analysis of paranormal phenomena should be made in the framework of electromagnetism.

  2. Anatase-TiO2 Nanomaterials: Morphological/Size Dependence of the Crystallization and Phase Behavior Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Garcia,M.; Wang, X.; Belver, C.; Hanson, J.; Rodriguez, J.

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticulated TiO{sub 2} materials with anatase structure were synthesized by using a microemulsion method. Three different syntheses with varying surfactant-to-water molar ratio ({omega}) were used to obtain amorphous solid precipitates at room temperature. The structural characteristics of these solid precursors were studied by using X-ray absorption structure (X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure) and Raman spectroscopies, which showed that all lack 3D (tridimensional) order but contain a different degree of 2D-confined connectivity. While heating such solid precursors under dry air, marked differences appeared in the phase behavior; the onset temperature for anatase crystallization increases ca. 150 {sup o}C while the {omega} parameter decreases and only one of the samples shows the anatase-to-rutile transformation below 900 {sup o}C. In all cases, the crystallization of the anatase structure does not follow a traditional nucleation and growth mechanism and its analysis using the Avrami formalism gives conclusive evidence of a surface nucleation-dominated process. This appears as a distinctive feature of anatase-TiO{sub 2} nanomaterials, far from the corresponding behavior of microsized or bulk materials. After nucleation, the grain growth of anatase nanoparticles was found to follow the kinetic equation D{sup 2}-D{sub 0}{sup 2} = k{sub 0} exp(-E{sub a}/RT), where the activation energy is a function of several structural properties of the solid materials mainly related to the hydration characteristics of the surface layer. A combined in situ X-ray diffraction/Raman/infrared study aimed to unveil the physical basis of the phase behavior and to interpret key variables allowing control of the crystallization mechanism and morphological properties, particularly primary particle size, in the nanometer regime.

  3. NONLINEAR OPTICAL PHENOMENA: Manifestation of a photorefractive effect in Raman spectra of lithium niobate crystals of different compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, N. V.; Chufyrev, P. G.; Palatnikov, M. N.; Mel'nik, N. N.; Zheleznov, Yu A.; Khomich, V. Yu

    2004-12-01

    The ordering of structural units in a cation sublattice and the photorefractive properties of lithium niobate single crystals of different compositions: nominally pure with different [Li]/[Nb] ratios and doped with non-photorefractive cations Mg2+, Gd3+, and Y3+, are studied by their Raman spectra. It is shown that at low concentrations of Mg2+, Gd3+, and Y3+, the magnitude of the photorefractive effect is determined by the ordering of the structural units of the cation sublattice. It is found for the first time that the intensity of a Raman line corresponding to the bridge valence vibrations of oxygen atoms in the NbO6 octahedra is sensitive to the dipole ordering of the cation sublattice.

  4. Colloidal Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, William B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course offered at Princeton University in colloidal phenomena stressing the physical and dynamical side of colloid science. The course outline, reading list, and requirements are presented. (BT)

  5. Colloidal Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, William B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course offered at Princeton University in colloidal phenomena stressing the physical and dynamical side of colloid science. The course outline, reading list, and requirements are presented. (BT)

  6. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a course designed to achieve a balance between exposing students to (1) advanced topics in transport phenomena, pointing out similarities and differences between three transfer processes and (2) common methods of solving differential equations. (JN)

  7. Anomalous laser deflection phenomena based on the interaction of electro-optic and graded refractivity effect in Cu:KTN crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuping; Liu, Bing; Yang, Yuguo; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lv, Xianshun; Hong, Guanglie; Shu, Rong; Yu, Haohai; Wang, Jiyang

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report an abnormal laser deflection phenomena based on quadratic electro-optic effect in copper doped KTN crystal. Cu:KTa0.62Nb0.38O3 block with size a×b×c = 2.8mm×2.6mm×12.5mm was used as beam deflection element. 75mrad beam deflection angle were observed under 1KV voltage when the laser beam across the c direction of the sample at room temperature. The special features of our experiment are that the direction of laser beam deflect perpendicular to the electric field direction, and the angular size and direction of the deflection beam remain unchanged when the electric field direction reverse. We believe that the interaction of graded refractivity and electro-optic effect leads to these special features. Besides of the special deflection mode, the deflection efficiency of our experiment also reached the world advanced level.

  8. Fluctuation phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Montroll, E.W.; Lebowitz, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Fluctuation phenomena are the ''tip of the iceberg'' revealing the existence, behind even the most quiescent appearing macroscopic states, of an underlying world of agitated, ever-changing microscopic processes. While the presence of these fluctuations can be ignored in some cases, e.g. if one is satisfied with purely thermostatic description of systems in equilibrium, they are central to the understanding of other phenomena, e.g. the nucleation of a new phase following the quenching of a system into the co-existence region. This volume contains a collection of review articles, written by experts in the field, on the subject of fluctuation phenomena. Some of the articles are of a very general nature discussing the modern mathematical formulation of the problems involved, while other articles deal with specific topics such as kinetics of phase transitions and conductivity in solids. The juxtaposition of the variety of physical situations in which fluctuation phenomena play an important role is novel and should give the reader an insight into this subject.

  9. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  10. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  11. Mujeres Unidas en Accion: A Popular Education Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Eva; Padilla, Mariwilda

    1990-01-01

    Describes the development and structure of Mujeres Unidas en Accion, Inc., a nonprofit community-based agency in Dorchester, Massachusetts, that offers educational programs to low-income Latina women, and looks closely at one of its educational components, the Spanish program. (Author/JOW)

  12. Nonlinear optical phenomena: Spectral dependence of absorption photoinduced in a Bi12TiO20 crystal by 532-nm laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstik, A. L.; Matusevich, A. Yu; Kisteneva, M. G.; Shandarov, S. M.; Itkin, S. I.; Mandel', A. E.; Kargin, Yu F.; Kulchin, Yu N.; Romashko, R. V.

    2007-11-01

    The spectral dependences of absorption photoinduced in a pure bismuth titanium oxide crystal by 532-nm laser pulses are studied. It is shown that optical absorption in the crystal in the range from 492 to 840 nm increases with increasing exposure. The photoinduced absorption relaxes in the dark for more than 60 hours. A model of photoinduced absorption is proposed which assumes the population of two trap centres with the normal energy distribution law for the concentrations of electrons photoexcited from donors to the conduction band. This model well describes the spectral dependences of photoinduced absorption by using the average ionisation energies of the traps E1 = 1.60 eV and E2 = 2.57 eV. The model is used to estimate the increase in the photorefractive sensitivity of a bismuth titanium oxide crystal in the near IR region, which was earlier observed after exposing the crystal to visible radiation. It is predicted that the speed of response of dynamic holography devices based on BTO crystals exposed to green light can be increased.

  13. Solution‐crystallization and related phenomena in 9,9‐dialkyl‐fluorene polymers. II. Influence of side‐chain structure

    PubMed Central

    Perevedentsev, Aleksandr; Stavrinou, Paul N.; Smith, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Solution‐crystallization is studied for two polyfluorene polymers possessing different side‐chain structures. Thermal analysis and temperature‐dependent optical spectroscopy are used to clarify the nature of the crystallization process, while X‐ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy reveal important differences in the resulting microstructures. It is shown that the planar‐zigzag chain conformation termed the β‐phase, which is observed for certain linear‐side‐chain polyfluorenes, is necessary for the formation of so‐called polymer‐solvent compounds for these polymers. Introduction of alternating fluorene repeat units with branched side‐chains prevents formation of the β‐phase conformation and results in non‐solvated, i.e. melt‐crystallization‐type, polymer crystals. Unlike non‐solvated polymer crystals, for which the chain conformation is stabilized by its incorporation into a crystalline lattice, the β‐phase conformation is stabilized by complexation with solvent molecules and, therefore, its formation does not require specific inter‐chain interactions. The presented results clarify the fundamental differences between the β‐phase and other conformational/crystalline forms of polyfluorenes. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2015, 53, 1492–1506 PMID:27546983

  14. "Long-distance" H/D isotopic self-organization phenomena in scope of the infrared spectra of hydrogen-bonded terephthalic and phthalic acid crystals.

    PubMed

    Flakus, Henryk T; Hachuła, Barbara; Hołaj-Krzak, Jakub T; Al-Agel, Faisal A; Rekik, Najeh

    2017-02-15

    This paper deals with the experimental and theoretical studies of abnormal properties of terephthalic acid (TAC) and phthalic acid (PAC) crystals manifested in the H/D isotopic exchange. The widely utilized deuteration routine appeared to be insufficiently effective in the case of the h6-TAC isotopomer. In the case of the d4-TAC derivative the isotopic exchange process occurred noticeably more effectively. In contrast, both isotopomers of PAC, h6 and d4, appeared much more susceptible for deuteration. A theoretical model was elaborated describing "long-distance" dynamical co-operative interactions involving hydrogen bonds in TAC and PAC crystals. The model assumes extremely strong dynamical co-operative interactions of hydrogen bonds from the adjacent (COOH)2 cycles. This leads to an additional stabilization of h6-TAC molecular chains. The interaction energies affect the chemical equilibrium of the H/D isotopic exchange. The model predicts a differentiated influence of the H and D atoms linked to the aromatic rings on to the process. In this approach the totally-symmetric CH bond stretching vibrations and the proton stretching totally symmetric vibrations couple with the π-electronic motions. It was also shown that identical hydrogen isotope atoms, H or D, in whole TAC molecules, noticeably enlarge the energy of the dynamical co-operative interactions in the crystals, in contrast to the case of different hydrogen isotopes present in the carboxyl groups and linked to the aromatic rings. The "long-distance" dynamical co-operative interactions in PAC crystals were found of a minor importance due to the electronic properties of PAC molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. "Long-distance" H/D isotopic self-organization phenomena in scope of the infrared spectra of hydrogen-bonded terephthalic and phthalic acid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flakus, Henryk T.; Hachuła, Barbara.; Hołaj-Krzak, Jakub T.; Al-Agel, Faisal A.; Rekik, Najeh

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with the experimental and theoretical studies of abnormal properties of terephthalic acid (TAC) and phthalic acid (PAC) crystals manifested in the H/D isotopic exchange. The widely utilized deuteration routine appeared to be insufficiently effective in the case of the h6-TAC isotopomer. In the case of the d4-TAC derivative the isotopic exchange process occurred noticeably more effectively. In contrast, both isotopomers of PAC, h6 and d4, appeared much more susceptible for deuteration. A theoretical model was elaborated describing "long-distance" dynamical co-operative interactions involving hydrogen bonds in TAC and PAC crystals. The model assumes extremely strong dynamical co-operative interactions of hydrogen bonds from the adjacent (COOH)2 cycles. This leads to an additional stabilization of h6-TAC molecular chains. The interaction energies affect the chemical equilibrium of the H/D isotopic exchange. The model predicts a differentiated influence of the H and D atoms linked to the aromatic rings on to the process. In this approach the totally-symmetric Csbnd H bond stretching vibrations and the proton stretching totally symmetric vibrations couple with the π-electronic motions. It was also shown that identical hydrogen isotope atoms, H or D, in whole TAC molecules, noticeably enlarge the energy of the dynamical co-operative interactions in the crystals, in contrast to the case of different hydrogen isotopes present in the carboxyl groups and linked to the aromatic rings. The "long-distance" dynamical co-operative interactions in PAC crystals were found of a minor importance due to the electronic properties of PAC molecules.

  16. Depth-dependent ordering, two-length-scale phenomena, and crossover behavior in a crystal featuring a skin layer with defects

    SciTech Connect

    Del Genio, Charo I.; Bassler, Kevin E.; Korzhenevskii, Alexander L.; Barabash, Rozaliya; Trenkler, PhD Johann; Reiter, George; Moss, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Structural defects in a crystal are responsible for the ''two-length-scale'' behavior in which a sharp central peak is superimposed over a broad peak in critical diffuse x-ray scattering. We have previously measured the scaling behavior of the central peak by scattering from a near-surface region of a V{sub 2}H crystal, which has a first-order transition in the bulk. As the temperature is lowered toward the critical temperature, a crossover in critical behavior is seen, with the temperature range nearest to the critical point being characterized by mean-field exponents. Near the transition, a small two-phase coexistence region is observed. The values of transition and crossover temperatures decay with depth. An explanation of these experimental results is here proposed by means of a theory in which edge dislocations in the near-surface region occur in walls oriented in the two directions normal to the surface. The strain caused by the dislocation lines causes the ordering in the crystal to occur as growth of roughly cylindrically shaped regions. After the regions have reached a certain size, the crossover in the critical behavior occurs, and mean-field behavior prevails. At a still lower temperature, the rest of the material between the cylindrical regions orders via a weak first-order transition.

  17. Solution-Crystallization and Related Phenomena in 9,9-Dialkyl-Fluorene Polymers. I. Crystalline Polymer-Solvent Compound Formation for Poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene).

    PubMed

    Perevedentsev, Aleksandr; Stavrinou, Paul N; Bradley, Donal D C; Smith, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Polymer-solvent compound formation, occurring via co-crystallization of polymer chains and selected small-molecular species, is demonstrated for the conjugated polymer poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) and a range of organic solvents. The resulting crystallization and gelation processes in PFO solutions are studied by differential scanning calorimetry, with X-ray diffraction providing additional information on the resulting microstructure. It is shown that PFO-solvent compounds comprise an ultra-regular molecular-level arrangement of the semiconducting polymer host and small-molecular solvent guest. Crystals form following adoption of the planar-zigzag β-phase chain conformation, which, due to its geometry, creates periodic cavities that accommodate the ordered inclusion of solvent molecules of matching volume. The findings are formalized in terms of nonequilibrium temperature-composition phase diagrams. The potential applications of these compounds and the new functionalities that they might enable are also discussed. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2015, 53, 1481-1491.

  18. Solution-Crystallization and Related Phenomena in 9,9-Dialkyl-Fluorene Polymers. I. Crystalline Polymer-Solvent Compound Formation for Poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene)

    PubMed Central

    Perevedentsev, Aleksandr; Stavrinou, Paul N; Bradley, Donal D C; Smith, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Polymer-solvent compound formation, occurring via co-crystallization of polymer chains and selected small-molecular species, is demonstrated for the conjugated polymer poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) and a range of organic solvents. The resulting crystallization and gelation processes in PFO solutions are studied by differential scanning calorimetry, with X-ray diffraction providing additional information on the resulting microstructure. It is shown that PFO-solvent compounds comprise an ultra-regular molecular-level arrangement of the semiconducting polymer host and small-molecular solvent guest. Crystals form following adoption of the planar-zigzag β-phase chain conformation, which, due to its geometry, creates periodic cavities that accommodate the ordered inclusion of solvent molecules of matching volume. The findings are formalized in terms of nonequilibrium temperature–composition phase diagrams. The potential applications of these compounds and the new functionalities that they might enable are also discussed. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part B: Polym. Phys. 2015, 53, 1481–1491 PMID:26435576

  19. Novel Colloidal and Dynamic Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid Crystalline Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-13

    investigation supported by this grant moved beyond past studies of interfacial and colloidal phenomena involving isotropic liquids to explore and understand a...2010 20-May-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Novel Colloidal and Dynamic Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid...Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 liquid crystals, interfacial phenomena, colloids , amphiphiles

  20. Transport Phenomena and Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Sindo

    1996-10-01

    An extremely useful guide to the theory and applications of transport phenomena in materials processing This book defines the unique role that transport phenomena play in materials processing and offers a graphic, comprehensive treatment unlike any other book on the subject. The two parts of the text are, in fact, two useful books. Part I is a very readable introduction to fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transfer for materials engineers and anyone not yet thoroughly familiar with the subject. It includes governing equations and boundary conditions particularly useful for studying materials processing. For mechanical and chemical engineers, and anyone already familiar with transport phenomena, Part II covers the many specific applications to materials processing, including a brief description of various materials processing technologies. Readable and unencumbered by mathematical manipulations (most of which are allocated to the appendixes), this book is also a useful text for upper-level undergraduate and graduate-level courses in materials, mechanical, and chemical engineering. It includes hundreds of photographs of materials processing in action, single and composite figures of computer simulation, handy charts for problem solving, and more. Transport Phenomena and Materials Processing: * Describes eight key materials processing technologies, including crystal growth, casting, welding, powder and fiber processing, bulk and surface heat treating, and semiconductor device fabrication * Covers the latest advances in the field, including recent results of computer simulation and flow visualization * Presents special boundary conditions for transport phenomena in materials processing * Includes charts that summarize commonly encountered boundary conditions and step-by-step procedures for problem solving * Offers a unique derivation of governing equations that leads to both overall and differential balance equations * Provides a list of publicly available computer

  1. Solid-state flow, mechanical alloying, and melt-related phenomena for [001] single-crystal tungsten ballistic rod penetrators interacting with steel targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizana, Carlos

    This research program consists of a detailed microstructural investigation of in-target, single-crystal [001], clad (with Inconel 718) and unclad, W long-rod, ballistic penetrators. The rods were shot into rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) steel targets approximately 76 mm in thickness at impact velocities ranging from 1100 m/s to 1350 m/s. A comprehensive microstructural overview of the penetration process was obtained from this investigation. Solid-state flow/erosion, solid-state target/rod mixing as well as influencing factors such as strain rate, penetration performance, cladding interference and the interaction between target and projectile were emphasized. Some of the microstructural features observed, including deformation twins, cleaving, adiabatic shear bands and DRX support an overall solid-state penetration process. Furthermore they provide for a unifying perspective for the applicability of the hydrodynamic paradigm (DOP ≈ l∘rp/rt ) and earlier mechanistic erosion approaches. DRX and grain growth within adiabatic shear bands observed at specific high strain/strain-rate zones within the rods suggest that the projectile erodes by means of these microstructures in a solid-state form. This erosion process contributes to the performance of the rod by either allowing optimum flow of rod material which would increase penetration depth, or by maximizing rod material consumption which would reduce it. Since flow and/or erosion are also necessary in the target for perforation to occur, it is not surprising that the erosion process in the target was observed to mirror the one in the projectile. That is both target and projectile developed erosion zones with DRX facilitating the extreme deformation via dense overlapping shear band formation. Mechanical alloying and/or mixing of the target (steel) and rod (W, or W-Inconel 718) was also observed and investigated. Selective etching techniques as well as energy-dispersive x-ray mapping revealed unambiguous evidence of

  2. Molecular model for chirality phenomena.

    PubMed

    Latinwo, Folarin; Stillinger, Frank H; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2016-10-21

    Chirality is a hallmark feature for molecular recognition in biology and chemical physics. We present a three-dimensional continuum model for studying chirality phenomena in condensed phases using molecular simulations. Our model system is based upon a simple four-site molecule and incorporates non-trivial kinetic behavior, including the ability to switch chirality or racemize, as well as thermodynamics arising from an energetic preference for specific chiral interactions. In particular, we introduce a chiral renormalization parameter that can locally favor either homochiral or heterochiral configurations. Using this model, we explore a range of chirality-specific phenomena, including the kinetics of chiral inversion, the mechanism of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in the liquid, chirally driven liquid-liquid phase separation, and chiral crystal structures.

  3. First principles study of the diffusional phenomena across the clean and Re-doped γ-Ni/γ’-Ni3Al interface of Ni-based single crystal superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Sun; Chong-Yu, Wang

    2016-06-01

    Density functional theory calculations in conjunction with the climbing images nudged elastic band method are conducted to study the diffusion phenomena of the Ni-based single crystal superalloys. We focus our attention on the diffusion processes of the Ni and Al atoms in the γ and γ’ phases along the direction perpendicular to the interface. The diffusion mechanisms and the expressions of the diffusion coefficients are presented. The vacancy formation energies, the migration energies, and the activation energies for the diffusing Ni and Al atoms are estimated, and these quantities display the expected and clear transition zones in the vicinity of the interface of about 3-7 (002) layers. The local density-of-states profiles of atoms in each (002) layer in the γ and γ’ phases and the partial density-of-states curves of Re and some of its nearest-neighbor atoms are also presented to explore the electronic effect of the diffusion behavior. Project supported by National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB606402) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51071091).

  4. Virtual Crystallizer

    SciTech Connect

    Land, T A; Dylla-Spears, R; Thorsness, C B

    2006-08-29

    Large dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are grown in large crystallizers to provide raw material for the manufacture of optical components for large laser systems. It is a challenge to grow crystal with sufficient mass and geometric properties to allow large optical plates to be cut from them. In addition, KDP has long been the canonical solution crystal for study of growth processes. To assist in the production of the crystals and the understanding of crystal growth phenomena, analysis of growth habits of large KDP crystals has been studied, small scale kinetic experiments have been performed, mass transfer rates in model systems have been measured, and computational-fluid-mechanics tools have been used to develop an engineering model of the crystal growth process. The model has been tested by looking at its ability to simulate the growth of nine KDP boules that all weighed more than 200 kg.

  5. Coupled Phenomena in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsubara, Akira; Nomura, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    Various phenomena in chemistry and biology can be understood through Gibbs energy utilization. Some common phenomena in chemistry are explained including neutralization, hydrolysis, oxidation and reaction, simultaneous dissociation equilibrium of two weak acids, and common ion effect on solubility. (Author/SA)

  6. Coupled Phenomena in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsubara, Akira; Nomura, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    Various phenomena in chemistry and biology can be understood through Gibbs energy utilization. Some common phenomena in chemistry are explained including neutralization, hydrolysis, oxidation and reaction, simultaneous dissociation equilibrium of two weak acids, and common ion effect on solubility. (Author/SA)

  7. Properties and Crystallization Phenomena in Li2Si2O5–Ca5(PO4)3F and Li2Si2O5–Sr5(PO4)3F Glass–Ceramics Via Twofold Internal Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Rampf, Markus; Dittmer, Marc; Ritzberger, Christian; Schweiger, Marcel; Höland, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    The combination of specific mechanical, esthetic, and chemical properties is decisive for the application of materials in prosthodontics. Controlled twofold crystallization provides a powerful tool to produce special property combinations for glass–ceramic materials. The present study outlines the potential of precipitating Ca5(PO4)3F as well as Sr5(PO4)3F as minor crystal phases in Li2Si2O5 glass–ceramics. Base glasses with different contents of CaO/SrO, P2O5, and F− were prepared within the glasses of the SiO2–Li2O–K2O–CaO/SrO–Al2O3–P2O5–F system. Preliminary studies of nucleation by means of XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the nucleated base glasses revealed X-ray amorphous phase separation phenomena. Qualitative and quantitative crystal phase analyses after crystallization were conducted using XRD in combination with Rietveld refinement. As a main result, a direct proportional relationship between the content of apatite-forming components in the base glasses and the content of apatite in the glass–ceramics was established. The microstructures of the glass–ceramics were investigated using SEM. Microstructural and mechanical properties were found to be dominated by Li2Si2O5 crystals and quite independent of the content of the apatite present in the glass–ceramics. Biaxial strengths of up to 540 MPa were detected. Ca5(PO4)3F and Sr5(PO4)3F influence the translucency of the glass–ceramics and, hence, help to precisely tailor the properties of Li2Si2O5 glass–ceramics. The authors conclude that the twofold crystallization of Li2Si2O5–Ca5(PO4)3F or Li2Si2O5–Sr5(PO4)3F glass–ceramics involves independent solid-state reactions, which can be controlled via the chemical composition of the base glasses. The influence of the minor apatite phase on the optical properties helps to achieve new combinations of features of the glass–ceramics and, hence, displays new potential for dental applications. PMID:26389112

  8. Science and Paranormal Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H. Pierre

    1999-06-03

    In order to ground my approach to the study of paranormal phenomena, I first explain my operational approach to physics, and to the ''historical'' sciences of cosmic, biological, human, social and political evolution. I then indicate why I believe that ''paranormal phenomena'' might-but need not- fit into this framework. I endorse the need for a new theoretical framework for the investigation of this field presented by Etter and Shoup at this meeting. I close with a short discussion of Ted Bastin's contention that paranormal phenomena should be defined as contradicting physics.

  9. Physical phenomena in lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayless, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Electric lamps depend for their performance on an extraordinary range of natural phenomena, some of considerable subtlety or complexity, making them a fascinating field for the scientist or engineer. The author describes some of the less obvious phenomena which are crucial to the efficient performance of modern lamps. These include: thermal diffusion; resonance line broadening; hyperfine structure; metal halide cycles; ionic pumping; voids in tungsten; photoelectricity and electrolysis; and Penning effect

  10. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  11. Flow phenomena in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creitzer, E. M.; Epstein, A. H.; Giles, M. B.; McCune, J. E.; Tan, C. S.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes work carried out at the Gas Turbine Laboratory at MIT during the period 10/20/89 - 10/19/92, as part of our multi-investigator effort on basic unsteady flow phenomena in turbomachines. Within the overall project four separate tasks are specified. These are, in brief: (1) The Influence of Inlet Temperature Nonuniformities on Turbine Heat Transfer and Dynamics; (2) Assessment of Unsteady Losses in Stator/ Rotor Interactions; (3) Unsteady Phenomena and Flowfield instabilities in Multistage Axial Compressors; (4) Vortex Wake-Compressor Blade Interaction in Cascades - A New Rapid Method for Unsteady Separation and Vorticity Flux Calculations.

  12. Imaging of snapping phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Guillin, R; Marchand, A J; Roux, A; Niederberger, E; Duvauferrier, R

    2012-01-01

    Snapping phenomena result from the sudden impingement between anatomical and/or heterotopical structures with subsequent abrupt movement and noise. Snaps are variously perceived by patients, from mild discomfort to significant pain requiring surgical management. Identifying the precise cause of snaps may be challenging when no abnormality is encountered on routinely performed static examinations. In this regard, dynamic imaging techniques have been developed over time, with various degrees of success. This review encompasses the main features of each imaging technique and proposes an overview of the main snapping phenomena in the musculoskeletal system. PMID:22744321

  13. Stress pulse phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    McGlaun, M.

    1993-08-01

    This paper is an introductory discussion of stress pulse phenomena in simple solids and fluids. Stress pulse phenomena is a very rich and complex field that has been studied by many scientists and engineers. This paper describes the behavior of stress pulses in idealized materials. Inviscid fluids and simple solids are realistic enough to illustrate the basic behavior of stress pulses. Sections 2 through 8 deal with the behavior of pressure pulses. Pressure is best thought of as the average stress at a point. Section 9 deals with shear stresses which are most important in studying solids.

  14. Frost phenomena on Mars.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D M; Gaffney, E S; Low, P F

    1967-01-20

    The hypothesis that the Martian wave of darkening might be a frostheaving phenomenon has been examined. Consideration of the water-vapor sorption characteristics of a silicate mineral surface at temperatures below freezing leads to the conclusion that, without strongly deliquescent salts to attract and retain liquid water in the Martian soil, frost-heaving phenomena are not to be expected on Mars. On the other hand frost-heaving phenomena involving the freezing and thawing of ammonia may be common in the soils of Jupiter.

  15. BECA (Bilingual Education Centro de Accion) Program Handbook for Student Teachers and Supervisory Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Maria; And Others

    This manual is a reference guide for both student teachers and supervisory personnel involved with the Texas Woman's University Bilingual Education "Centro de Accion" (BECA) Program. The BECA program includes the following components in addition to the fulltime BECA undergraduate program: para-professional training program, graduate…

  16. BECA (Bilingual Education Centro de Accion) Program Handbook for Student Teachers and Supervisory Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Maria; And Others

    This manual is a reference guide for both student teachers and supervisory personnel involved with the Texas Woman's University Bilingual Education "Centro de Accion" (BECA) Program. The BECA program includes the following components in addition to the fulltime BECA undergraduate program: para-professional training program, graduate…

  17. Neutron Star Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruderman, Malvin

    1998-01-01

    Various phenomena involving neutron stars are addressed. Electron-positron production in the near magnetosphere of gamma-ray pulsars is discussed along with magnetic field evolution in spun-up and spinning-down pulsars. Glitches and gamma-ray central engines are also discussed.

  18. Quantum phenomena in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.

    1987-08-01

    This paper contains remarks by the author on aspects of macroscopic quantum phenomena in superconductors. Some topics discussed are: Superconducting low-inductance undulatory galvanometer (SLUGS), charge imbalance, cylindrical dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUIDS), Geophysics, noise theory, magnetic resonance with SQUIDS, and macroscopic quantum tunneling. 23 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

  19. Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorrain, Paul; Corson, Dale R.; Lorrain, Francois

    Based on the classic Electromagnetic Fields and Waves by the same authors, Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Phenomena capitalizes on the older text's traditional strengths--solid physics, inventive problems, and an experimental approach--while offering a briefer, more accessible introduction to the basic principles of electromagnetism.

  20. Investigating Dissolution and Precipitation Phenomena with a Smartphone Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Arcia, Edgar

    2016-10-11

    A novel smartphone microscope can be used to observe the dissolution and crystallization of sodium chloride at a microscopic level. Observation of these seemingly simple phenomena through the microscope at 100× magnification can actually reveal some surprising behavior. These experiments offer the opportunity to discuss some basic concepts such as how the morphological features of the crystals dictates how the dissolution process proceeds, and how materials can be purified by re-crystallization techniques.

  1. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1997-01-01

    The third semi-annual period of the MTP project has been involved with performing experiments using the Membrane Transport Apparatus (MTA), development of analysis techniques for the experiment results, analytical modeling of the osmotic transport phenomena, and completion of a DC-9 microgravity flight to test candidate fluid cell geometries. Preparations were also made for the MTP Science Concept Review (SCR), held on 13 June 1997 at Lockheed Martin Astronautics in Denver. These activities are detailed in the report.

  2. Lunar transient phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, W. S.

    1991-03-01

    Lunar transient phenomena (LTP) sightings are classified into five categories: brightenings, darkenings, reddish colorations, bluish colorations, and obscurations. There is evidence that the remaining LTP's are of lunar origin. A substantial number of sightings are independently confirmed. They have been recorded on film and spectrograms, as well as with photoelectric photometers and polarization equipment. It suggested that the LTP's may be gentle outgassings of less-than-volcanic proportions.

  3. Paramutation phenomena in plants.

    PubMed

    Pilu, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Paramutation is a particular epigenetic phenomenon discovered in Zea mays by Alexander Brink in the 1950s, and then also found in other plants and animals. Brink coined the term paramutation (from the Greek syllable "para" meaning beside, near, beyond, aside) in 1958, with the aim to differentiate paramutation from mutation. The peculiarity of paramutation with respect to other gene silencing phenomena consists in the ability of the silenced allele (named paramutagenic) to silence the other allele (paramutable) present in trans. The newly silenced (paramutated) allele remains stable in the next generations even after segregation from the paramutagenic allele and acquires paramutagenic ability itself. The inheritance behaviour of these epialleles permits a fast diffusion of a particular gene expression level/phenotype in a population even in the absence of other evolutionary influences, thus breaking the Hardy-Weinberg law. As with other gene silencing phenomena such as quelling in the fungus Neurospora crassa, transvection in Drosophila, co-suppression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) described in transgenic plants and RNA interference (RNAi) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, paramutation occurs without changes in the DNA sequence. So far the molecular basis of paramutation remains not fully understood, although many studies point to the involvement of RNA causing changes in DNA methylation and chromatin structure of the silenced genes. In this review I summarize all paramutation phenomena described in plants, focusing on the similarities and differences between them.

  4. Wolf-Rayet phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, P. S.

    1982-01-01

    The properties of stars showing Wolf-Rayet phenomena are outlined along with the direction of future work. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics of W-R spectra. Specifically the following topics are covered: the absolute visual magnitudes; the heterogeneity of WN spectra; the existence of transition type spectra and compositions the mass loss rates; and the existence of very luminous and possibly very massive W-R stars. Also, a brief overview of current understanding of the theoretical aspects of stellar evolution and stellar winds and the various scenarios that have been proposed to understand W-R spectra are included.

  5. [Lateralization phenomena and headache].

    PubMed

    Nattero, G; Savi, L

    1984-09-08

    Ipsilateral carotid and vertebral vasomotor phenomena are marked components of a unilateral cluster headache crisis. Investigation of lateralisation at the height of a crisis has shown that Doppler findings supplement Heick's observation of the reversible opening of both intra and extracranial arteriovenous shunts. This observation is in line with personal thermographic evidence and that of Lance indicating local hypothermia, and with Wolff's demonstration of dilatation and congestion associated with the superficial temporal artery. Personal dynamographic findings now point to a local extra-intracranial artery pressure gradient as the cause of the peripheral component of lateralisation in cluster headache.

  6. Breakdown phenomena in rf windows

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Y.

    1995-07-05

    The multipactor and flashover phenomena of alumina rf windows used in high-power klystrons have been investigated. Multipactoring due to the high yield of secondary electron emission takes place during rf operation. A spectrum analysis of the luminescence due to multipactoring shows that multipactor electron bombardment causes an F-center of alumina, thus leading to surface melting. From the results of a high-power examination of rf windows with several kinds of alumina ceramics, it was found that an alumina material with a crystallized grain-boundary and without any voids between the boundaries, thus having a low loss-tangent value, is not liable to F-centers, even under multipactoring. Flashovers in a tree-like pattern of alumina luminescence occasionally take place on a TiN-coated surface. From the results of surface-charging measurements and high-power examinations of annealed alumina disks, the flashover phenomenon is considered to be an avalanche of electrons which have been trapped in mechanically introduced defects. The effectivenesses of multipactor-suppressing coatings and of a field-reduced window structure were also examined. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  7. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  8. Weld pool phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Zacharia, T.; DebRoy, T.

    1994-09-01

    During welding, the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure are affected by the interaction of the heat source with the metal. The interaction affects the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer in the weld pool, and the solidification behavior of the weld metal. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of the weld pool transport processes and the solid state transformation reactions in determining the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure. The relation between the weld pool transport processes and the composition and structure is reviewed. Recent applications of various solidification theories to welding are examined to understand the special problems of weld metal solidification. The discussion is focussed on the important problems and issues related to weld pool transport phenomena and solidification. Resolution of these problems would be an important step towards a science based control of composition, structure and properties of the weld metal.

  9. Thermal Wave Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This map from the MGS Horizon Sensor Assembly (HORSE) shows middle atmospheric temperatures near the 1 mbar level of Mars between Ls 170 to 175 (approx. July 14 - 23, 1999). Local Mars times between 1:30 and 4:30 AM are included. Infrared radiation measured by the Mars Horizon Sensor Assembly was used to make the map. That device continuously views the 'limb' of Mars in four directions, to help orient the spacecraft instruments to the nadir: straight down.

    The map shows thermal wave phenomena that are caused by the large topographic variety of Mars' surface, as well the latitudinally symmetric behavior expected at this time of year near the equinox.

  10. Thermal Wave Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This map from the MGS Horizon Sensor Assembly (HORSE) shows middle atmospheric temperatures near the 1 mbar level of Mars between Ls 170 to 175 (approx. July 14 - 23, 1999). Local Mars times between 1:30 and 4:30 AM are included. Infrared radiation measured by the Mars Horizon Sensor Assembly was used to make the map. That device continuously views the 'limb' of Mars in four directions, to help orient the spacecraft instruments to the nadir: straight down.

    The map shows thermal wave phenomena that are caused by the large topographic variety of Mars' surface, as well the latitudinally symmetric behavior expected at this time of year near the equinox.

  11. Ordering Phenomena in Undercooled Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fultz, Brent

    1997-07-17

    Much of the work performed under this grant was devoted to using modern ideas in kinetics to understand atom movements in metallic alloys far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Kinetics arguments were based explicitly on the vacancy mechanism for atom movements. The emphasis was on how individual atom movements are influenced by the local chemical environment of the moving atom, and how atom movements cause changes in the local chemical environments. The author formulated a kinetic master equation method to treat atom movements on a crystal lattice with a vacancy mechanism. Some of these analyses [3,10,16] are as detailed as any treatment of the statistical kinetics of atom movements in crystalline alloys. Three results came from this work. Chronologically they were (1) A recognition that tracking time dependencies is not necessarily the best way to study kinetic phenomena. If multiple order parameters can be measured in a material, the ''kinetic path'' through the space spanned by these order parameters maybe just as informative about the chemical factors that affect atom movements [2,3,5-7,9-11,14-16,18,19,21,23,24,26,36,37]. (2) Kinetic paths need not follow the steepest gradient of the free energy function (this should be well-known), and for alloys far from equilibrium the free energy function can be almost useless in describing kinetic behavior. This is why the third result surprised me. (3) In cluster approximations with multiple order parameters, saddle points are common features of free energy functions. Interestingly, kinetic processes stall or change time scale when the kinetic path approaches a state at a saddle point in the free energy function, even though these states exist far from thermodynamic equilibrium. The author calls such a state a ''pseudostable'' (falsely stable) state [6,21,26]. I have also studied these phenomena by more ''exact'' Monte Carlo simulations. The kinetic paths showed features similar to those found in analytical theories. The

  12. Generalized Bloch theorem and chiral transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2015-10-01

    Bloch theorem states the impossibility of persistent electric currents in the ground state of nonrelativistic fermion systems. We extend this theorem to generic systems based on the gauged particle number symmetry and study its consequences on the example of chiral transport phenomena. We show that the chiral magnetic effect can be understood as a generalization of the Bloch theorem to a nonequilibrium steady state, similarly to the integer quantum Hall effect. On the other hand, persistent axial currents are not prohibited by the Bloch theorem and they can be regarded as Pauli paramagnetism of relativistic matter. An application of the generalized Bloch theorem to quantum time crystals is also discussed.

  13. Arcjet Cathode Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  14. Arcjet cathode phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  15. ON DETECTING TRANSIENT PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, G.

    2013-08-10

    Transient phenomena are interesting and potentially highly revealing of details about the processes under observation and study that could otherwise go unnoticed. It is therefore important to maximize the sensitivity of the method used to identify such events. In this article, we present a general procedure based on the use of the likelihood function for identifying transients which is particularly suited for real-time applications because it requires no grouping or pre-processing of the data. The method makes use of all the information that is available in the data throughout the statistical decision-making process, and is suitable for a wide range of applications. Here we consider those most common in astrophysics, which involve searching for transient sources, events or features in images, time series, energy spectra, and power spectra, and demonstrate the use of the method in the case of a weak X-ray flare in a time series and a short-lived quasi-periodic oscillation in a power spectrum. We derive a fit statistic that is ideal for fitting arbitrarily shaped models to a power density distribution, which is of general interest in all applications involving periodogram analysis.

  16. NASA research Program: The roles of fluid motion and other transport phenomena in the morphology of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saville, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of transport phenomena on the morphology of crystalline materials was investigated. Two problems were studied: the effects of convection on the crystallization of pure materials, and the crystallization of proteins from solution.

  17. Hysteresis phenomena in hydraulic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, H. J.; Luo, X. W.; Chen, Y. L.; Xu, H. Y.; Farhat, M.

    2012-11-01

    Hysteresis phenomena demonstrate the lag between the generation and the removal of some physical phenomena. This paper studies the hysteresis phenomena of the head-drop in a scaled model pump turbine using experiment test and CFD methods. These lag is induced by complicated flow patterns, which influenced the reliability of rotating machine. Keeping the same measurement procedure is concluded for the hydraulic machine measurement.

  18. Hypervelocity impact phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.

    1995-07-01

    There is a need to determine the equations of state of materials in regimes of extreme high pressures, temperatures and strain rates that are not attainable on current two-stage light-gas guns. Understanding high-pressure material behavior is crucial to address the physical processes associated with a variety of hypervelocity impact events related to space sciences-orbital-debris impact, debris-shield designs, high-speed plasma propagation, and impact lethality applications. At very high impact velocities material properties will be dominated by phase-changes, such as melting or vaporization, which cannot be achieved at lower impact velocities. Development of well-controlled and repeatable hypervelocity launch capabilities is the first step necessary to improve our understanding of material behavior at extreme pressures and temperatures not currently available using conventional two-stage light-gas gun techniques. In this paper, techniques that have been used to extend both the launch capabilities of a two-stage light gas gun to 16 km/s, and their use to determine the material properties at pressures and temperature states higher than those ever obtained in the laboratory are summarized. The newly developed hypervelocity launcher (HVL) can launch intact (macroscopic dimensions) plates to 16 km/s. Time-resolved interferometric techniques have been used to determine shock-loading/release characteristics of materials impacted by such fliers as well as shock-induced vaporization phenomena in fully vaporized states. High-speed photography or radiography has been used to evaluate the debris propagation characteristics resulting from disc impact of thin bumper sheets at hypervelocities in excess of 10 km/s using the HVL. Examples of these experiments are provided in this paper.

  19. Studies of Novel Quantum Phenomena in Ruthenates

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Zhiqiang

    2011-04-08

    Strongly correlated oxides have been the subject of intense study in contemporary condensed matter physics, and perovskite ruthenates (Sr,Ca)n+1RunO3n+1 have become a new focus in this field. One of important characteristics of ruthenates is that both lattice and orbital degrees of freedom are active and are strongly coupled to charge and spin degrees of freedom. Such a complex interplay of multiple degrees of freedom causes the properties of ruthenates to exhibit a gigantic response to external stimuli under certain circumstances. Magnetic field, pressure, and chemical composition all have been demonstrated to be effective in inducing electronic/magnetic phase transitions in ruthenates. Therefore, ruthenates are ideal candidates for searching for novel quantum phenomena through controlling external parameters. The objective of this project is to search for novel quantum phenomena in ruthenate materials using high-quality single crystals grown by the floating-zone technique, and investigate the underlying physics. The following summarizes our accomplishments. We have focused on trilayered Sr4Ru3O10 and bilayered (Ca1-xSrx)3Ru2O7. We have succeeded in growing high-quality single crystals of these materials using the floating-zone technique and performed systematic studies on their electronic and magnetic properties through a variety of measurements, including resistivity, Hall coefficient, angle-resolved magnetoresistivity, Hall probe microscopy, and specific heat. We have also studied microscopic magnetic properties for some of these materials using neutron scattering in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory. We have observed a number of unusual exotic quantum phenomena through these studies, such as an orbital selective metamagnetic transition, bulk spin valve effect, and a heavy-mass nearly ferromagnetic state with a surprisingly large Wilson ratio. Our work has also revealed underlying physics of these exotic phenomena. Exotic phenomena of correlated

  20. Teaching Optical Phenomena with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, M.; Carvalho, P. Simeão

    2014-01-01

    Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a…

  1. Teaching Optical Phenomena with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, M.; Carvalho, P. Simeão

    2014-01-01

    Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a…

  2. Nursing phenomena in inpatient psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Frauenfelder, F; Müller-Staub, M; Needham, I; Van Achterberg, T

    2011-04-01

    Little is known about the question if the nursing diagnosis classification of North American Nursing Association-International (NANDA-I) describes the adult inpatient psychiatric nursing care. The present study aimed to identify nursing phenomena mentioned in journal articles about the psychiatric inpatient nursing care and to compare these phenomena with the labels and the definitions of the nursing diagnoses to elucidate how well this classification covers these phenomena. A search of journal articles took place in the databases MedLine, PsychInfo, Cochrane and CINAHL. A qualitative content analysis approach was used to identify nursing phenomena in the articles. Various phenomena were found in the articles. The study demonstrated that NANDA-I describes essential phenomena for the adult inpatient psychiatry on the level of labels and definitions. However, some apparently important nursing phenomena are not covered by the labels or definitions of NANDA-I. Other phenomena are assigned as defining characteristics or as related factors to construct nursing diagnoses. The further development of the classification NANDA-I will strengthen the application in the daily work of psychiatric nurses and enhance the quality of nursing care in the inpatient setting. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing.

  3. Wave phenomena in sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhner-Böttcher, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Context: The dynamic atmosphere of the Sun exhibits a wealth of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. In the presence of strong magnetic fields, most spectacular and powerful waves evolve in the sunspot atmosphere. Allover the sunspot area, continuously propagating waves generate strong oscillations in spectral intensity and velocity. The most prominent and fascinating phenomena are the 'umbral flashes' and 'running penumbral waves' as seen in the sunspot chromosphere. Their nature and relation have been under intense discussion in the last decades. Aims: Waves are suggested to propagate upward along the magnetic field lines of sunspots. An observational study is performed to prove or disprove the field-guided nature and coupling of the prevalent umbral and penumbral waves. Comprehensive spectroscopic observations at high resolution shall provide new insights into the wave characteristics and distribution across the sunspot atmosphere. Methods: Two prime sunspot observations were carried out with the Dunn Solar Telescope at the National Solar Observatory in New Mexico and with the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Teide Observatory on Tenerife. The two-dimensional spectroscopic observations were performed with the interferometric spectrometers IBIS and TESOS. Multiple spectral lines are scanned co-temporally to sample the dynamics at the photospheric and chromospheric layers. The time series (1 - 2.5 h) taken at high spatial and temporal resolution are analyzed according to their evolution in spectral intensities and Doppler velocities. A wavelet analysis was used to obtain the wave power and dominating wave periods. A reconstruction of the magnetic field inclination based on sunspot oscillations was developed. Results and conclusions: Sunspot oscillations occur continuously in spectral intensity and velocity. The obtained wave characteristics of umbral flashes and running penumbral waves strongly support the scenario of slow-mode magnetoacoustic wave propagation along the

  4. Misconceptions of Emergent Semiconductor Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Katherine G.

    The semiconductor field of Photovoltaics (PV) has experienced tremendous growth, requiring curricula to consider ways to promote student success. One major barrier to success students may face when learning PV is the development of misconceptions. The purpose of this work was to determine the presence and prevalence of misconceptions students may have for three PV semiconductor phenomena; Diffusion, Drift and Excitation. These phenomena are emergent, a class of phenomena that have certain characteristics. In emergent phenomena, the individual entities in the phenomena interact and aggregate to form a self-organizing pattern that can be observed at a higher level. Learners develop a different type of misconception for these phenomena, an emergent misconception. Participants (N=41) completed a written protocol. The pilot study utilized half of these protocols (n = 20) to determine the presence of both general and emergent misconceptions for the three phenomena. Once the presence of both general and emergent misconceptions was confirmed, all protocols (N=41) were analyzed to determine the presence and prevalence of general and emergent misconceptions, and to note any relationships among these misconceptions (full study). Through written protocol analysis of participants' responses, numerous codes emerged from the data for both general and emergent misconceptions. General and emergent misconceptions were found in 80% and 55% of participants' responses, respectively. General misconceptions indicated limited understandings of chemical bonding, electricity and magnetism, energy, and the nature of science. Participants also described the phenomena using teleological, predictable, and causal traits, indicating participants had misconceptions regarding the emergent aspects of the phenomena. For both general and emergent misconceptions, relationships were observed between similar misconceptions within and across the three phenomena, and differences in misconceptions were

  5. Unsteady flow phenomena in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greitzer, Edward M.; Epstein, Alan H.; Giles, Michael B.; McCune, James E.; Tan, Choon S.

    1990-01-01

    Work carried out at the Gas Turbine Laboratory at M.I.T. as part of the multi-investigator effort on basic unsteady flow phenomena is described. Within the overall project, four separate tasks are specified. These are, in brief: unsteady flow in compressors; computational techniques for unsteady flows; unsteady phenomena, inlet distortion, and flow instabilities in multistage compressors; and unsteady vortical wakes behind blade rows - prediction of relationships with blade properties.

  6. Schizoid phenomena in substance abusers.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Ralph H

    2002-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the spectrum of schizoid disorders, schizoid phenomena, and the underlying psychodynamics can often be found in the gamut of addictions and stand in the way of recovery. Features of schizoidness, the varieties of schizoid presentations, the etiology and pathogenesis of drug/alcohol abuse in the schizoid, and readily clinically apparent psychodynamic features are discussed. Schizoid phenomena can be dealt with effectively with an informed psychotherapy.

  7. Instability phenomena in plasticity: Modelling and computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, E.; Steinmann, P.; Miehe, C.

    1995-12-01

    We presented aspects and results related to the broad field of strain localization with special focus on large strain elastoplastic response. Therefore, we first re-examined issues related to the classification of discontinuities and the classical description of localization with a particular emphasis on an Eulerian geometric representation. We touched the problem of mesh objectivity and discussed results of a particular regularization method, namely the micropolar approach. Generally, regularization has to preserve ellipticity and to reflect the underlying physics. For example ductile materials have to be modelled including viscous effects whereas geomaterials are adequately described by the micropolar approach. Then we considered localization phenomena within solids undergoing large strain elastoplastic deformations. Here, we documented the influence of isotropic damage on the failure analysis. Next, the interesting influence of an orthotropic yield condition on the spatial orientation of localized zones has been studied. Finally, we investigated the localization condition for an algorithmic model of finite strain single crystal plasticity.

  8. Physical phenomena and the microgravity response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Paul

    1989-01-01

    The living biological cell is not a sack of Newtonian fluid containing systems of chemical reactions at equilibrium. It is a kinetically driven system, not a thermodynamically driven system. While the cell as a whole might be considered isothermal, at the scale of individual macromolecular events there is heat generated, and presumably sharp thermal gradients exist at the submicron level. Basic physical phenomena to be considered when exploring the cell's response to inertial acceleration include particle sedimentation, solutal convection, motility electrokinetics, cytoskeletal work, and hydrostatic pressure. Protein crystal growth experiments, for example, illustrate the profound effects of convection currents on macromolecular assembly. Reaction kinetics in the cell vary all the way from diffusion-limited to life-time limited. Transport processes vary from free diffusion, to facilitated and active transmembrane transport, to contractile-protein-driven motility, to crystalline immobilization. At least four physical states of matter exist in the cell: aqueous, non-aqueous, immiscible-aqueous, and solid. Levels of order vary from crystalline to free solution. The relative volumes of these states profoundly influence the cell's response to inertial acceleration. Such subcellular phenomena as stretch-receptor activation, microtubule re-assembly, synaptic junction formation, chemotactic receptor activation, and statolith sedimentation were studied recently with respect to both their basic mechanisms and their responsiveness to inertial acceleration. From such studies a widespread role of cytoskeletal organization is becoming apparent.

  9. Teaching optical phenomena with Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M.; Simeão Carvalho, P.

    2014-11-01

    Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a relatively complex setup. Fortunately, nowadays it is possible to analyse optical phenomena in a simple and quantitative way using the freeware video analysis software ‘Tracker’. In this paper, we show the advantages of video-based experimental activities for teaching concepts in optics. We intend to show: (a) how easy the study of such phenomena can be, even at home, because only simple materials are needed, and Tracker provides the necessary measuring instruments; and (b) how we can use Tracker to improve students’ understanding of some optical concepts. We give examples using video modelling to study the laws of reflection, Snell’s laws, focal distances in lenses and mirrors, and diffraction phenomena, which we hope will motivate teachers to implement it in their own classes and schools.

  10. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  11. Undergraduates' understanding of cardiovascular phenomena.

    PubMed

    Michael, Joel A; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Modell, Harold I; Cliff, William; Horwitz, Barbara; McHale, Philip; Richardson, Daniel; Silverthorn, Dee; Williams, Stephen; Whitescarver, Shirley

    2002-12-01

    Undergraduates students in 12 courses at 8 different institutions were surveyed to determine the prevalence of 13 different misconceptions (conceptual difficulties) about cardiovascular function. The prevalence of these misconceptions ranged from 20 to 81% and, for each misconception, was consistent across the different student populations. We also obtained explanations for the students' answers either as free responses or with follow-up multiple-choice questions. These results suggest that students have a number of underlying conceptual difficulties about cardiovascular phenomena. One possible source of some misconceptions is the students' inability to apply simple general models to specific cardiovascular phenomena. Some implications of these results for teachers of physiology are discussed.

  12. Current program to investigate phenomena in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oran, William A.

    1986-01-01

    Current NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Division Shuttle and terrestrial experiments to acquire basic data for space-based materials processing activities are summarized. The research is carried out to increase the understanding and to improve ground-based and space-based processing, to enhance the understanding of basic physical phenomena, and to characterize the forces which effect low-gravity processing. The main areas of research are crystal growth, metallic alloy solidification, bioseparation processes, blood rheology, containerless processing, and studies of combustion processes, chemical and transport phenomena, cloud microphysics and fluid behavior and surface phenomena in microgravity. Specific experiments, which exemplify the research goals and were performed on KC-135 flights along Keplerian trajectories and on Shuttle missions, are described.

  13. NASA research program: the roles of fluid motion and other transport phenomena in the morphology of materials. Final report, July 1983-October 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The influence of transport phenomena on the morphology of crystalline materials was investigated. Two problems were studied: the effects of convection on the crystallization of pure materials, and the crystallization of proteins from solution.

  14. Discovery potential for new phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, S.; Hewett, J.L.; Price, L.E.

    1997-03-01

    The authors examine the ability of future facilities to discover and interpret non-supersymmetric new phenomena. The authors first explore explicit manifestations of new physics, including extended gauge sectors, leptoquarks, exotic fermions, and technicolor models. They then take a more general approach where new physics only reveals itself through the existence of effective interactions at lower energy scales.

  15. Visualizing Chemical Phenomena in Microdroplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sunghee; Wiener, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Phenomena that occur in microdroplets are described to the undergraduate chemistry community. Droplets having a diameter in the micrometer range can have unique and interesting properties, which arise because of their small size and, especially, their high surface area-to-volume ratio. Students are generally unfamiliar with the characteristics of…

  16. Quantum Phenomena Observed Using Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tonomura, Akira

    2011-05-06

    Electron phase microscopy based on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect principle has been used to illuminate fundamental phenomena concerning magnetism and superconductivity by visualizing quantitative magnetic lines of force. This paper deals with confirmation experiments on the AB effect, the magnetization process of tiny magnetic heads for perpendicular recording, and vortex behaviors in high-Tc superconductors.

  17. Visualizing Chemical Phenomena in Microdroplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sunghee; Wiener, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Phenomena that occur in microdroplets are described to the undergraduate chemistry community. Droplets having a diameter in the micrometer range can have unique and interesting properties, which arise because of their small size and, especially, their high surface area-to-volume ratio. Students are generally unfamiliar with the characteristics of…

  18. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction of crystals formed in water-plasticized amorphous lactose.

    PubMed

    Jouppila, K; Kansikas, J; Roos, Y H

    1998-01-01

    Effects of storage time and relative humidity on crystallization and crystal forms produced from amorphous lactose were investigated. Crystallization was observed from time-dependent loss of sorbed water and increasing intensities of peaks in X-ray diffraction patterns. The rate of crystallization increased with increasing storage relative humidity. Lactose crystallized mainly as alpha-lactose monohydrate and anhydrous crystals with alpha- and beta-lactose in a molar ratio of 5:3. The results suggested that the crystal form was defined by the early nucleation process. The crystallization data are important in modeling of crystallization phenomena and prediction of stability of lactose-containing food and pharmaceutical materials.

  19. PREFACE Integrability and nonlinear phenomena Integrability and nonlinear phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ullate, David; Lombardo, Sara; Mañas, Manuel; Mazzocco, Marta; Nijhoff, Frank; Sommacal, Matteo

    2010-10-01

    Back in 1967, Clifford Gardner, John Greene, Martin Kruskal and Robert Miura published a seminal paper in Physical Review Letters which was to become a cornerstone in the theory of integrable systems. In 2006, the authors of this paper received the AMS Steele Prize. In this award the AMS pointed out that `In applications of mathematics, solitons and their descendants (kinks, anti-kinks, instantons, and breathers) have entered and changed such diverse fields as nonlinear optics, plasma physics, and ocean, atmospheric, and planetary sciences. Nonlinearity has undergone a revolution: from a nuisance to be eliminated, to a new tool to be exploited.' From this discovery the modern theory of integrability bloomed, leading scientists to a deep understanding of many nonlinear phenomena which is by no means reachable by perturbation methods or other previous tools from linear theories. Nonlinear phenomena appear everywhere in nature, their description and understanding is therefore of great interest both from the theoretical and applicative point of view. If a nonlinear phenomenon can be represented by an integrable system then we have at our disposal a variety of tools to achieve a better mathematical description of the phenomenon. This special issue is largely dedicated to investigations of nonlinear phenomena which are related to the concept of integrability, either involving integrable systems themselves or because they use techniques from the theory of integrability. The idea of this special issue originated during the 18th edition of the Nonlinear Evolution Equations and Dynamical Systems (NEEDS) workshop, held at Isola Rossa, Sardinia, Italy, 16-23 May 2009 (http://needs-conferences.net/2009/). The issue benefits from the occasion offered by the meeting, in particular by its mini-workshops programme, and contains invited review papers and contributed papers. It is worth pointing out that there was an open call for papers and all contributions were peer reviewed

  20. Single event phenomena: A summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, W. E.; Coss, J. R.

    1989-04-01

    Single event phenomena (SEP) are effects resulting from a single particle inducing a significant response in an integrated circuit. SEP are of greatest concern to spacecraft designers but are becoming of concern to avionics and large earth-bound electronic systems due to the continual reduction in size (which increases SEP sensitivity) of circuit elements. The phenomena include soft error and multiple errors in memory cells or logic latches, latchup, MOSFET power device burnout, MNOS punch-through and transients. Cyclotron and Van de Graaff accelerators are used to produce heavy ions, protons and neutrons which induce SEP effects. Methods of testing are described. Solutions to SEP are varied, but include parts substitutions or redesign and software solutions which will be described.

  1. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena.

    PubMed

    Maroney, O J E

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  2. Statistical phenomena in particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, J.J.

    1984-09-01

    Particle beams are subject to a variety of apparently distinct statistical phenomena such as intrabeam scattering, stochastic cooling, electron cooling, coherent instabilities, and radiofrequency noise diffusion. In fact, both the physics and mathematical description of these mechanisms are quite similar, with the notion of correlation as a powerful unifying principle. In this presentation we will attempt to provide both a physical and a mathematical basis for understanding the wide range of statistical phenomena that have been discussed. In the course of this study the tools of the trade will be introduced, e.g., the Vlasov and Fokker-Planck equations, noise theory, correlation functions, and beam transfer functions. Although a major concern will be to provide equations for analyzing machine design, the primary goal is to introduce a basic set of physical concepts having a very broad range of applicability.

  3. Thermodynamic constraints on fluctuation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maroney, O. J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The relationships among reversible Carnot cycles, the absence of perpetual motion machines, and the existence of a nondecreasing globally unique entropy function form the starting point of many textbook presentations of the foundations of thermodynamics. However, the thermal fluctuation phenomena associated with statistical mechanics has been argued to restrict the domain of validity of this basis of the second law of thermodynamics. Here we demonstrate that fluctuation phenomena can be incorporated into the traditional presentation, extending rather than restricting the domain of validity of the phenomenologically motivated second law. Consistency conditions lead to constraints upon the possible spectrum of thermal fluctuations. In a special case this uniquely selects the Gibbs canonical distribution and more generally incorporates the Tsallis distributions. No particular model of microscopic dynamics need be assumed.

  4. New phenomena searches at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Soha, Aron; /UC, Davis

    2006-04-01

    The authors report on recent results from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment, which is accumulating data from proton-antiproton collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The new phenomena being explored include Higgs, Supersymmetry, and large extra dimensions. They also present the latest results of searches for heavy objects, which would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model.

  5. Mathematical Modeling of Diverse Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Tensor calculus is applied to the formulation of mathematical models of diverse phenomena. Aeronautics, fluid dynamics, and cosmology are among the areas of application. The feasibility of combining tensor methods and computer capability to formulate problems is demonstrated. The techniques described are an attempt to simplify the formulation of mathematical models by reducing the modeling process to a series of routine operations, which can be performed either manually or by computer.

  6. Visualization of solidification front phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1993-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments have been utilized throughout the Materials Processing in Space Program to provide an experimental platform which minimizes variables in solidification experiments. Because of the wide-spread use of this experimental technique in space-based research, it has become apparent that a better understanding of all the phenomena occurring during solidification can be better understood if direct visualization of the solidification interface were possible.

  7. Correlated randomness and switching phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Havlin, S.; Mallamace, F.; Kumar, P.; Plerou, V.; Preis, T.

    2010-08-01

    One challenge of biology, medicine, and economics is that the systems treated by these serious scientific disciplines have no perfect metronome in time and no perfect spatial architecture-crystalline or otherwise. Nonetheless, as if by magic, out of nothing but randomness one finds remarkably fine-tuned processes in time and remarkably fine-tuned structures in space. Further, many of these processes and structures have the remarkable feature of “switching” from one behavior to another as if by magic. The past century has, philosophically, been concerned with placing aside the human tendency to see the universe as a fine-tuned machine. Here we will address the challenge of uncovering how, through randomness (albeit, as we shall see, strongly correlated randomness), one can arrive at some of the many spatial and temporal patterns in biology, medicine, and economics and even begin to characterize the switching phenomena that enables a system to pass from one state to another. Inspired by principles developed by A. Nihat Berker and scores of other statistical physicists in recent years, we discuss some applications of correlated randomness to understand switching phenomena in various fields. Specifically, we present evidence from experiments and from computer simulations supporting the hypothesis that water’s anomalies are related to a switching point (which is not unlike the “tipping point” immortalized by Malcolm Gladwell), and that the bubbles in economic phenomena that occur on all scales are not “outliers” (another Gladwell immortalization). Though more speculative, we support the idea of disease as arising from some kind of yet-to-be-understood complex switching phenomenon, by discussing data on selected examples, including heart disease and Alzheimer disease.

  8. Phenomena and Diosignes of Aratous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgoloupis, S. I.

    2013-01-01

    Aratous (305-240B.C.) was a singular intellectual, writer and poet which engage himself to compose a very interesting astronomical poet, using the "Dactylous sixstage' style, the formal style of the ancient Greek Epic poetry. This astronomic poem of Aratous "Phenomena and Diosignes" became very favorite reading during the Alexandrine, the Romman and the Byzandin eras as well and had received many praises from significant poets and particularly from Hipparchous and from Theonas from Alexandria, an astronomer of 4rth century A.C.(in Greeks)

  9. Gravitational anomaly and transport phenomena.

    PubMed

    Landsteiner, Karl; Megías, Eugenio; Pena-Benitez, Francisco

    2011-07-08

    Quantum anomalies give rise to new transport phenomena. In particular, a magnetic field can induce an anomalous current via the chiral magnetic effect and a vortex in the relativistic fluid can also induce a current via the chiral vortical effect. The related transport coefficients can be calculated via Kubo formulas. We evaluate the Kubo formula for the anomalous vortical conductivity at weak coupling and show that it receives contributions proportional to the gravitational anomaly coefficient. The gravitational anomaly gives rise to an anomalous vortical effect even for an uncharged fluid.

  10. Interpretation of cell culture phenomena.

    PubMed

    Vierck, J L; Dodson, M V

    2000-03-01

    This paper discusses the dilemma of interpreting unusual or abnormal phenomena seen in cell cultures and is not intended to address the statistical design of experiments. Problems that can be encountered when growing cells in experimental situations include low or decreasing cell numbers, abnormal cell morphology, microbial contamination, and detachment of the cell monolayer. If any of these situations occur, it is not realistic to proceed with data analysis until the problem is corrected. The best policy is to attempt to standardize all types of cultures used for analysis and to avoid using any cultures that display atypical characteristics.

  11. Uranium Pyrophoricity Phenomena and Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    2000-04-20

    We have compiled a topical reference on the phenomena, experiences, experiments, and prediction of uranium pyrophoricity for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) with specific applications to SNFP process and situations. The purpose of the compilation is to create a reference to integrate and preserve this knowledge. Decades ago, uranium and zirconium fires were commonplace at Atomic Energy Commission facilities, and good documentation of experiences is surprisingly sparse. Today, these phenomena are important to site remediation and analysis of packaging, transportation, and processing of unirradiated metal scrap and spent nuclear fuel. Our document, bearing the same title as this paper, will soon be available in the Hanford document system [Plys, et al., 2000]. This paper explains general content of our topical reference and provides examples useful throughout the DOE complex. Moreover, the methods described here can be applied to analysis of potentially pyrophoric plutonium, metal, or metal hydride compounds provided that kinetic data are available. A key feature of this paper is a set of straightforward equations and values that are immediately applicable to safety analysis.

  12. Transport phenomena in nanoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Kärger, Jörg

    2015-01-12

    Diffusion, that is, the irregular movement of atoms and molecules, is a universal phenomenon of mass transfer occurring in all states of matter. It is of equal importance for fundamental research and technological applications. The present review deals with the challenges of the reliable observation of these phenomena in nanoporous materials. Starting with a survey of the different variants of diffusion measurement, it highlights the potentials of "microscopic" techniques, notably the pulsed field gradient (PFG) technique of NMR and the techniques of microimaging by interference microscopy (IFM) and IR microscopy (IRM). Considering ensembles of guest molecules, these techniques are able to directly record mass transfer phenomena over distances of typically micrometers. Their concerted application has given rise to the clarification of long-standing discrepancies, notably between microscopic equilibrium and macroscopic non-equilibrium measurements, and to a wealth of new information about molecular transport under confinement, hitherto often inaccessible and sometimes even unimaginable. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Critical phenomena on k -booklets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We define a "k -booklet" to be a set of k semi-infinite planes with -∞ phenomena: self-avoiding random walks, the Ising model, and percolation. For k =2 , a booklet is equivalent to a single infinite lattice, and for k =1 to a semi-infinite lattice. In both these cases the systems show standard critical phenomena. This is not so for k ≥3 . Self-avoiding walks starting at y =0 show a first-order transition at a shifted critical point, with no power-behaved scaling laws. The Ising model and percolation show hybrid transitions, i.e., the scaling laws of the standard models coexist with discontinuities of the order parameter at y ≈0 , and the critical points are not shifted. In the case of the Ising model, ergodicity is already broken at T =Tc , and not only for T

  14. Functional theories of thermoelectric phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eich, F. G.; Di Ventra, M.; Vignale, G.

    2017-02-01

    We review the progress that has been recently made in the application of time-dependent density functional theory to thermoelectric phenomena. As the field is very young, we emphasize open problems and fundamental issues. We begin by introducing the formal structure of thermal density functional theory, a density functional theory with two basic variables—the density and the energy density—and two conjugate fields—the ordinary scalar potential and Luttinger’s thermomechanical potential. The static version of this theory is contrasted with the familiar finite-temperature density functional theory, in which only the density is a variable. We then proceed to constructing the full time-dependent non equilibrium theory, including the practically important Kohn-Sham equations that go with it. The theory is shown to recover standard results of the Landauer theory for thermal transport in the steady state, while showing greater flexibility by allowing a description of fast thermal response, temperature oscillations and related phenomena. Several results are presented here for the first time, i.e. the proof of invertibility of the thermal response function in the linear regime, the full expression of the thermal currents in the presence of Luttinger’s thermomechanical potential, an explicit prescription for the evaluation of the Kohn-Sham potentials in the adiabatic local density approximation, a detailed discussion of the leading dissipative corrections to the adiabatic local density approximation and the thermal corrections to the resistivity that follow from it.

  15. Natural phenomena hazards, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Conrads, T.J.

    1998-09-29

    This document presents the natural phenomena hazard loads for use in implementing DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, and supports development of double-shell tank systems specifications at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The natural phenomena covered are seismic, flood, wind, volcanic ash, lightning, snow, temperature, solar radiation, suspended sediment, and relative humidity.

  16. Investigation of collective phenomena in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhunusiri, Wellalage Don Suranga

    I study dusty plasma produced by electrostatically confining melamine formaldehyde microparticles in a radio-frequency glow discharge plasma. Dusty plasma is a mixture of particles of solid matter (dust), electrons, ions, and neutral gas atoms. The dust particles have a very high charge and a mass compared to the electrons and ions in the ambient plasma. As a consequence, a dusty plasma exhibits collective phenomena such as dust acoustic waves, crystallization, and melting. The discrete nature of dust particles gives rise to compressibility. In this thesis I report findings of four tasks that were performed to investigate dust acoustic waves, compressibility, and melting. First, the nonlinear phenomenon of synchronization was characterized experimentally for the dust acoustic wave propagating in a dust cloud with many layers. I find four synchronized states, with frequencies that are multiples of 1, 2, 3, and 1/2 of the driving frequency. Comparing to phenomena that are typical of the van der Pol paradigm, I find that synchronization of the dust acoustic wave exhibits the signature of the suppression mechanism but not that of the phaselocking mechanism. Additionally, I find that the synchronization of the dust acoustic wave exhibits three characteristics that differ from the van der Pol paradigm: a threshold amplitude that can be seen in the Arnold tongue diagram, a branching of the 1:1 harmonic tongue at its lower extremity, and a nonharmonic state. Second, to assess which physical processes are important for a dust acoustic instability, I derived dispersion relations that encompass more physical processes than commonly done. I investigated how various physical processes affect a dust acoustic wave by solving these dispersion relations using parameters from a typical dust acoustic wave experiment. I find that the growth rate diminishes for large ion currents. I also find that the compressibility, a measure of the coupling between the dust particles, have a strong

  17. On the growth of microscopic hurt and unhurt crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offermann, H.; Ulrich, J.

    1983-09-01

    The effect of secondary nucleation depends strongly on the growth behaviour of the nuclei. Therefore the growth rate of small (<12 μm) damaged crystals was compared with that of regular shaped crystals: Damaged NaCl crystals do not grow, K 2SO 4 crystals grow slower and potash-alum crystals grow faster than the corresponding unhurt crystals. As more detailed experiments are still to be done, this paper makes no attempt to explain the above mentioned phenomena.

  18. Thermophysical parameters of the LBO crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Grechin, Sergei G; Zuev, A V; Fokin, A S; Kokh, Aleksandr E; Moiseev, N V; Popov, Petr A; Sidorov, Aleksei A

    2010-08-27

    The thermophysical parameters (linear thermal expansion coefficients, thermal conductivities, and heat capacity) of the lithium triborate (LBO) crystal are measured and compared with previously published data. (nonlinear-optics phenomena)

  19. Earthquake prediction with electromagnetic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    Short-term earthquake (EQ) prediction is defined as prospective prediction with the time scale of about one week, which is considered to be one of the most important and urgent topics for the human beings. If this short-term prediction is realized, casualty will be drastically reduced. Unlike the conventional seismic measurement, we proposed the use of electromagnetic phenomena as precursors to EQs in the prediction, and an extensive amount of progress has been achieved in the field of seismo-electromagnetics during the last two decades. This paper deals with the review on this short-term EQ prediction, including the impossibility myth of EQs prediction by seismometers, the reason why we are interested in electromagnetics, the history of seismo-electromagnetics, the ionospheric perturbation as the most promising candidate of EQ prediction, then the future of EQ predictology from two standpoints of a practical science and a pure science, and finally a brief summary.

  20. Emergent Phenomena at Oxide Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, H.Y.

    2012-02-16

    Transition metal oxides (TMOs) are an ideal arena for the study of electronic correlations because the s-electrons of the transition metal ions are removed and transferred to oxygen ions, and hence the strongly correlated d-electrons determine their physical properties such as electrical transport, magnetism, optical response, thermal conductivity, and superconductivity. These electron correlations prohibit the double occupancy of metal sites and induce a local entanglement of charge, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom. This gives rise to a variety of phenomena, e.g., Mott insulators, various charge/spin/orbital orderings, metal-insulator transitions, multiferroics, and superconductivity. In recent years, there has been a burst of activity to manipulate these phenomena, as well as create new ones, using oxide heterostructures. Most fundamental to understanding the physical properties of TMOs is the concept of symmetry of the order parameter. As Landau recognized, the essence of phase transitions is the change of the symmetry. For example, ferromagnetic ordering breaks the rotational symmetry in spin space, i.e., the ordered phase has lower symmetry than the Hamiltonian of the system. There are three most important symmetries to be considered here. (i) Spatial inversion (I), defined as r {yields} -r. In the case of an insulator, breaking this symmetry can lead to spontaneous electric polarization, i.e. ferroelectricity, or pyroelectricity once the point group belongs to polar group symmetry. (ii) Time-reversal symmetry (T) defined as t {yields} -t. In quantum mechanics, the time-evolution of the wave-function {Psi} is given by the phase factor e{sup -iEt/{h_bar}} with E being the energy, and hence time-reversal basically corresponds to taking the complex conjugate of the wave-function. Also the spin, which is induced by the 'spinning' of the particle, is reversed by time-reversal. Broken T-symmetry is most naturally associated with magnetism, since the spin

  1. Phenomena of Pneumatic Tire Hydroplaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, R. C.; Horne, W. B.

    1963-01-01

    Recent research on pneumatic tire hydroplaning has been collected and summarized with the aim of describing what is presently known about the phenomena of tire hydroplaning. A physical description of tire hydroplaning is given along with formulae for estimating the ground speed at which it occurs. Eight manifestations of tire hydroplaning which have been experimentally observed are presented and discussed. These manifestations are: detachment of tire footprint, hydrodynamic ground pressure, spin-down of wheel, suppression of tire bow wave, scouring action of escaping fluid in tire-ground footprint region, peaking of fluid displacement drag, loss in braking traction, and loss of tire directional stability. The vehicle, pavement, tire, and fluid parameters of importance to tire hydroplaning are listed and described. Finally, the hazards of tire hydroplaning to ground and air-vehicle-ground performance are listed, and procedures are given to minimize these effects.

  2. Cathode phenomena in plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrade, H. O.; Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Kurtz, H. L.

    1987-05-01

    Processes at the arc cathode attachment decisively determine the entire discharge behavior of almost all arc devices and therefore also of MPD and/or arc jet thrusters. One well known process occurring on spotty arc attachments in a transverse magnetic field is the fact that the cathode spots move or jump in the direction opposite to the Lorentzian rule. In pulsed thruster devices with cold cathodes and very likely also in continuously running thrusters with so-called thermionic-seemingly diffuse attachments of hot surfaces, the arc attachment consists of many high current density spots. These spots can stick or spread upstream and thereby overheat the insulating material of the back-plate of the thruster. In this paper an explanation of the phenomena of spot motion is presented.

  3. Purcell effect and Lamb shift as interference phenomena.

    PubMed

    Rybin, Mikhail V; Mingaleev, Sergei F; Limonov, Mikhail F; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-02-10

    The Purcell effect and Lamb shift are two well-known physical phenomena which are usually discussed in the context of quantum electrodynamics, with the zero-point vibrations as a driving force of those effects in the quantum approach. Here we discuss the classical counterparts of these quantum effects in photonics, and explain their physics trough interference wave phenomena. As an example, we consider a waveguide in a planar photonic crystal with a side-coupled defect, and demonstrate a perfect agreement between the results obtained on the basis of quantum and classic approaches and reveal their link to the Fano resonance. We find that in such a waveguide-cavity geometry the Purcell effect can modify the lifetime by at least 25 times, and the Lamb shift can exceed 3 half-widths of the cavity spectral line.

  4. Purcell effect and Lamb shift as interference phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Mingaleev, Sergei F.; Limonov, Mikhail F.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2016-02-01

    The Purcell effect and Lamb shift are two well-known physical phenomena which are usually discussed in the context of quantum electrodynamics, with the zero-point vibrations as a driving force of those effects in the quantum approach. Here we discuss the classical counterparts of these quantum effects in photonics, and explain their physics trough interference wave phenomena. As an example, we consider a waveguide in a planar photonic crystal with a side-coupled defect, and demonstrate a perfect agreement between the results obtained on the basis of quantum and classic approaches and reveal their link to the Fano resonance. We find that in such a waveguide-cavity geometry the Purcell effect can modify the lifetime by at least 25 times, and the Lamb shift can exceed 3 half-widths of the cavity spectral line.

  5. Purcell effect and Lamb shift as interference phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Mingaleev, Sergei F.; Limonov, Mikhail F.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2016-01-01

    The Purcell effect and Lamb shift are two well-known physical phenomena which are usually discussed in the context of quantum electrodynamics, with the zero-point vibrations as a driving force of those effects in the quantum approach. Here we discuss the classical counterparts of these quantum effects in photonics, and explain their physics trough interference wave phenomena. As an example, we consider a waveguide in a planar photonic crystal with a side-coupled defect, and demonstrate a perfect agreement between the results obtained on the basis of quantum and classic approaches and reveal their link to the Fano resonance. We find that in such a waveguide-cavity geometry the Purcell effect can modify the lifetime by at least 25 times, and the Lamb shift can exceed 3 half-widths of the cavity spectral line. PMID:26860195

  6. Turbulent phenomena in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Kalgin, Igor V; Chekmarev, Sergei F

    2011-01-01

    Protein folding and hydrodynamic turbulence are two long-standing challenges, in molecular biophysics and fluid dynamics, respectively. The theories of these phenomena have been developed independently and used different formalisms. Here we show that the protein folding flows can be surprisingly similar to turbulent fluid flows. Studying a benchmark model protein (an SH3 domain), we have found that the flows for the slow folding trajectories of the protein, in which a partly formed N- and C-terminal β sheet hinders the RT loop from attaching to the protein core, have many properties of turbulent flows of a fluid. The flows are analyzed in a three-dimensional (3D) space of collective variables, which are the numbers of native contacts between the terminal β strands, between the RT loop and the protein core, and the rest of the native contacts. We have found that the flows have fractal nature and are filled with 3D eddies; the latter contain strange attractors, at which the tracer flow paths behave as saddle trajectories. Two regions of the space increment have been observed, in which the flux variations are self-similar with the scaling exponent h=1/3, in surprising agreement with the Kolmogorov inertial range theory of turbulence. In one region, the cascade of protein rearrangements is directed from larger to smaller scales (net folding), and in the other, it is oppositely directed (net unfolding). Folding flows for the fast trajectories are essentially "laminar" and do not have the property of self-similarity. Based on the results of our study, we infer, and support this inference by simulations, that the origin of the similarity between the protein folding and turbulent motion of a fluid is in a cascade mechanism of structural transformations in the systems that underlies these phenomena.

  7. Crystal growth and crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    Selected topics that may be of interest for both crystal-structure and crystal-growth communities are overviewed. The growth of protein crystals, along with that of some other compounds, is one of the topics, and recent insights into related phenomena are considered as examples of applications of general principles. The relationship between crystal growth shape and structure is reviewed and an attempt to introduce semiquantitative characterization of binding for proteins is made. The concept of kinks for complex structures is briefly discussed. Even at sufficiently low supersaturations, the fluctuation of steps may not be sufficient to implement the Gibbs-Thomson law if the kink density is low enough. Subsurface ordering of liquids and growth of rough interfaces from melts is discussed. Crystals growing in microgravity from solution should be more perfect if they preferentially trap stress-inducing impurities, thus creating an impurity-depleted zone around themselves. Evidently, such a zone is developed only around the crystals growing in the absence of convection. Under terrestrial conditions, the self-purified depleted zone is destroyed by convection, the crystal traps more impurity and grows stressed. The stress relief causes mosaicity. In systems containing stress-inducing but poorly trapped impurities, the crystals grown in the absence of convection should be worse than those of their terrestrial counterparts.

  8. EDITORIAL: Quantum phenomena in Nanotechnology Quantum phenomena in Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loss, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    Twenty years ago the Institute of Physics launched the journal Nanotechnology from its publishing house based in the home town of Paul Dirac, a legendary figure in the development of quantum mechanics at the turn of the last century. At the beginning of the 20th century, the adoption of quantum mechanical descriptions of events transformed the existing deterministic world view. But in many ways it also revolutionised the progress of research itself. For the first time since the 17th century when Francis Bacon established inductive reasoning as the means of advancing science from fact to axiom to law, theory was progressing ahead of experiments instead of providing explanations for observations that had already been made. Dirac's postulation of antimatter through purely theoretical investigation before its observation is the archetypal example of theory leading the way for experiment. The progress of nanotechnology and the development of tools and techniques that enabled the investigation of systems at the nanoscale brought with them many fascinating observations of phenomena that could only be explained through quantum mechanics, first theoretically deduced decades previously. At the nanoscale, quantum confinement effects dominate the electrical and optical properties of systems. They also render new opportunities for manipulating the response of systems. For example, a better understanding of these systems has enabled the rapid development of quantum dots with precisely determined properties, which can be exploited in a range of applications from medical imaging and photovoltaic solar cells to quantum computation, a radically new information technology being currently developed in many labs worldwide. As the first ever academic journal in nanotechnology, {\\it Nanotechnology} has been the forum for papers detailing progress of the science through extremely exciting times. In the early years of the journal, the investigation of electron spin led to the formulation

  9. WESF natural phenomena hazards survey

    SciTech Connect

    Wagenblast, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01

    A team of engineers conducted a systematic natural hazards phenomena (NPH) survey for the 225-B Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The survey is an assessment of the existing design documentation to serve as the structural design basis for WESF, and the Interim Safety Basis (ISB). The lateral force resisting systems for the 225-B building structures, and the anchorages for the WESF safety related systems were evaluated. The original seismic and other design analyses were technically reviewed. Engineering judgment assessments were made of the probability of NPH survival, including seismic, for the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems. The method for the survey is based on the experience of the investigating engineers,and documented earthquake experience (expected response) data.The survey uses knowledge on NPH performance and engineering experience to determine the WESF strengths for NPH resistance, and uncover possible weak links. The survey, in general, concludes that the 225-B structures and WESF safety systems are designed and constructed commensurate with the current Hanford Site design criteria.

  10. Understanding empathy and related phenomena.

    PubMed

    Shamasundar, C

    1999-01-01

    Over a period of time, the author arrived at a few tentative postulates concerning empathy and related processes based on some of his experiences and observations. The central theme of these postulates is, firstly, that interpersonal interaction is an interaction of the personal-space fields. Secondly, empathy, therapeutic benefit, and the professional stress are all related to the same process of interpersonal interaction. This interaction takes place as an enmeshment of personal spaces of the interacting individuals, and involves transfer of a wide range of information in the affective, cognitive, and other areas. This is because the personal spaces have fieldlike qualities analogous to what Kurt Lewin described. Thus, such phenomena as empathy, therapeutic benefit, professional stress are all consequences of the same process. It is possible to substantiate these postulates by diverse evidences in the published literature. The natural consequences of such an interpersonal interaction are empathic understanding, transfer of mood states (like hope, distress or expectancy), affective states (like anxiety, sadness, anger or hostility), ideas, images and even attitudes and values, etc. This phenomenon of transfer can explain such processes as therapeutic benefit in individual and group settings, professional stress, shared delusions, and even experimenter bias. Whether one becomes aware of such transferred information or not depends upon the intent and sensitivity of the participants.

  11. Monitoring of Transient Lunar Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Timothy; Farber, Ryan; Ahrendts, Gary

    2014-06-01

    Transient Lunar Phenomena (TLP’s) are described as short-lived changes in the brightness of areas on the face of the Moon. TLP research is characterized by the inability to substantiate, reproduce, and verify findings. Our current research includes the analysis of lunar images taken with two Santa Barbara Instrument Group (SBIG) ST8-E CCD cameras mounted on two 0.36m Celestron telescopes. On one telescope, we are using a sodium filter, and on the other an H-alpha filter, imaging approximately one-third of the lunar surface. We are focusing on two regions: Hyginus and Ina. Ina is of particular interest because it shows evidence of recent activity (Schultz, P., Staid, M., Pieters, C. Nature, Volume 444, Issue 7116, pp. 184-186, 2006). A total of over 50,000 images have been obtained over approximately 35 nights and visually analyzed to search for changes. As of March, 2014, no evidence of TLPs has been found. We are currently developing a Matlab program to do image analysis to detect TLPs that might not be apparent by visual inspection alone.

  12. Conductance phenomena in microcrystalline cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, M.

    2006-02-01

    We have investigated the conduction phenomena in compacted tablets of cellulose with varying relative humidity (RH) with techniques such as Low Frequency Dielectric Spectroscopy (LFDS) and Transient Current (TC) at room temperature. Two exponential decaying regions in the transient current measurements indicate two ionic species contributing to the conduction mechanism. A high power-law exponent of 9 for the conductance with moisture content has been found. The mobility initially decreases with RH up to monolayer coverage, and further water vapor increases the mobility, indicating a blocking of available positions for the charge carrier ions. When the amount of water molecules present in the tablet increases one order of magnitude, the number of charge carriers increases 5-6 orders of magnitude, suggesting a transition from a power-law increase to a linear effective medium theory for the conduction. The charge carrier dependence on RH suggests that a percolating network of water molecules adsorbed to 6-OH units on the cellulose chain span through the sample. The conductivity mechanisms in cellulose are still not clear.

  13. Electronic phenomena at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    High pressure research is undertaken either to investigate intrinsically high pressure phenomena or in order to get a better understanding of the effect of the chemical environment on properties or processes at one atmosphere. Studies of electronic properties which fall in each area are presented. Many molecules and complexes can assume in the excited state different molecular arrangements and intermolecular forces depending on the medium. Their luminescence emission is then very different in a rigid or a fluid medium. With pressure one can vary the viscosity of the medium by a factor of 10/sup 7/ and thus control the distribution and rate of crossing between the excited state conformations. In rare earth chelates the efficiency of 4f-4f emission of the rare earth is controlled by the feeding from the singlet and triplet levels of the organic ligand. These ligand levels can be strongly shifted by pressure. A study of the effect of pressure on the emission efficiency permits one to understand the effect of ligand chemistry at one atmosphere. At high pressure electronic states can be sufficiently perturbed to provide new ground states. In EDA complexes these new ground states exhibit unusual chemical reactivity and new products.

  14. Threshold phenomena in soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhibin

    Although two different fields are covered, this thesis is mainly focused on some threshold behaviors in both liquid crystal field and fluid dynamic systems. A method of rubbed polyimide is used to obtain pretilt. Sufficiently strong rubbing of a polyimide (SE-1211) results in a large polar pretilt of liquid crystal director with respect to the homeotropic orientation. There exists a threshold rubbing strength required to induce nonzero pretilt. For the homologous liquid crystal series alkyl-cyanobyphenyl, we found that the threshold rubbing strength is a monotonic function of the number of methylene units. A dual easy axis model is then used to explain the results. Freedericksz transition measurements have been used to determine the quadratical and quartic coefficients associated with the molecules' tilt with respect to the layer normal in surface-induced smectic layers in the nematic phase above the smectic-A-nematic phase transition temperature. Both the quadratic and quartic coefficients are consistent with the scaling relationship as predicted in theory, and their ratio is approximately constant. A Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiment is performed by using a magnetic field gradient to draw down a low density but highly paramagnetic fluid below a more dense fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell. When turning off the magnetic field, the RT instability occurs in situ and the growth of the most unstable wavevector is measured as a function of time. The wavelength of the RT instability along with the growth rate was measured as a function of capillary number (which is related to the density difference and interfacial tension between two fluids). A theory for the instability that permits different viscosities for two immiscible fluids was developed, and good agreement was found with the experimental results. The technique of magnetic levitation promises to broaden significantly the accessible parameter space of gravitational interfacial instability experiments. A method is

  15. Surface energies of elemental crystals.

    PubMed

    Tran, Richard; Xu, Zihan; Radhakrishnan, Balachandran; Winston, Donald; Sun, Wenhao; Persson, Kristin A; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-09-13

    The surface energy is a fundamental property of the different facets of a crystal that is crucial to the understanding of various phenomena like surface segregation, roughening, catalytic activity, and the crystal's equilibrium shape. Such surface phenomena are especially important at the nanoscale, where the large surface area to volume ratios lead to properties that are significantly different from the bulk. In this work, we present the largest database of calculated surface energies for elemental crystals to date. This database contains the surface energies of more than 100 polymorphs of about 70 elements, up to a maximum Miller index of two and three for non-cubic and cubic crystals, respectively. Well-known reconstruction schemes are also accounted for. The database is systematically improvable and has been rigorously validated against previous experimental and computational data where available. We will describe the methodology used in constructing the database, and how it can be accessed for further studies and design of materials.

  16. Mechanics of transport phenomena in multi-component sessile drops with solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Yeong-Jen; Yang, Wen-Jei; Liu, Jiaching

    1990-01-01

    The mechanics of transport phenomena in multicomponent sessile drops with internal solidification is determined on the basis of an experimental study. A shadowgraph-schlieren system and a microscope-video system are used for the study. It is suggested that present data can be used to enhance the solid or crystal quality in a reduced-gravity environment where both thermo- and diffuso-capillary effects of solidification and crystal growth are dominant.

  17. Intrinsic interfacial phenomena in manganite heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Vaz, C A F; Walker, F J; Ahn, C H; Ismail-Beigi, S

    2015-04-01

    We review recent advances in our understanding of interfacial phenomena that emerge when dissimilar materials are brought together at atomically sharp and coherent interfaces. In particular, we focus on phenomena that are intrinsic to the interface and review recent work carried out on perovskite manganites interfaces, a class of complex oxides whose rich electronic properties have proven to be a useful playground for the discovery and prediction of novel phenomena.

  18. Observation of Celestial Phenomena in Ancient China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    Because of the need for calendar-making and portent astrology, the Chinese were diligent and meticulous observers of celestial phenomena. China has maintained the longest continuous historical records of celestial phenomena in the world. Extraordinary or abnormal celestial events were particularly noted because of their astrological significance. The historical records cover various types of celestial phenomena, which include solar and lunar eclipses, sunspots, "guest stars" (novae or supernovae as we understand today), comets and meteors, and all kinds of planetary phenomena. These records provide valuable historical data for astronomical studies today.

  19. Physicochemical principles of high-temperature crystallization and single crystal growth methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagdasarov, Kh. S.

    The mechanisms of crystal growth are reviewed, with attention given to the physicochemical reactions taking place in the melt near the phase boundary; phenomena determining physical and chemical kinetics directly at the growth front; solid-phase processes occurring within the crystal. Methods for growing refractory single crystals are discussed with particular reference to the Verneuil method, zone melting, Czhochralskii growth, horizontal directional solidification, and the Stockbarger method. Methods for growing crystals of complex geometrical shapes are also discussed.

  20. Functional possibilities of nonlinear crystals for frequency conversion: uniaxial crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Yu M; Arapov, Yu D; Kasyanov, I V; Grechin, S G; Nikolaev, P P

    2016-01-31

    The method and results of the analysis of phase-matching and nonlinear properties for all point groups of symmetry of uniaxial crystals that determine their functional possibilities for solving various problems of nonlinear frequency conversion of laser radiation are presented. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  1. Passive Sensor Materials Based on Liquid Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-12

    Program, National Cancer Institute, Cambridge, MA, October, 2008. Abbott, N.L., “Amplification of Biomolecular Interactions Based on Liquid Crystals...of Liquid Crystals" Columbia University, February, 2010, "Novel Colloidal and Interfacial Phenomena in Liquid Crystalline Systems" CBD Conference

  2. Analytics of crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.; Chang, C. E.; Shlichta, P. J.; Chen, P. S.; Kim, C. K.

    1974-01-01

    Two crystal growth processes considered for spacelab experiments were studied to anticipate and understand phenomena not ordinarily encountered on earth. Computer calculations were performed on transport processes in floating zone melting and on growth of a crystal from solution in a spacecraft environment. Experiments intended to simulate solution growth at micro accelerations were performed.

  3. Understanding of thermoacoustic phenomena and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biwa, Tetsushi

    2012-09-01

    The problem of acoustic wave propagation in a tube provides a starting point for the study of thermoacoustic phenomena, which can be analyzed in detail using hydrodynamics. A thermodynamic approach has elucidated various applications of thermoacoustic phenomena. The thermoacoustical perspective unifies these two approaches through acoustical energy flows and facilitates the development of thermoacoustic heat engines.

  4. Simulation of Quantum Phenomena in Nanowire Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-17

    2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Simulation of Quantum Phenomena in Nanowire Sensors The views, opinions and/or...4358 19-Aug-2014 ABSTRACT Final Report: Simulation of Quantum Phenomena in Nanowire Sensors Report Title The vital link between low-energy electron

  5. Interference phenomena observed during cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T. )

    1992-03-01

    In this paper the interference phenomena of waves observed during a cold fusion experiment are described. Nuclear emissions have successfully recorded two different interference phenomena of waves from an electrolyzing cell. It is inferred that the waves might be gravitational and antigravitational waves, which can be expected to be radiated from gravity decays of quad-neutrons.

  6. A Connection between Transport Phenomena and Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaney, Ross; Bird, R. Byron

    2017-01-01

    Although students take courses in transport phenomena and thermodynamics, they probably do not ask whether these two subjects are related. Here we give an answer to that question. Specifically we give relationships between the equations of change for total energy, internal energy, and entropy of transport phenomena and key equations of equilibrium…

  7. Understanding the Physics of changing mass phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellermeijer, A. L.

    2008-05-01

    Changing mass phenomena, like a falling chain or a bungee jumper, might give surprising results, even for experienced physicists. They have resulted in hot discussions in journals, in which for instance Physics professors claim the impossibility of an acceleration larger then g in case of a bungee jumper. These phenomena are also interesting as topics for challenging student projects, and used as such by Dutch high school students. I will take these phenomena as the context in which I like to demonstrate the possibilities of ICT in the learning process of physics. Especially dynamical modeling enables us to describe these phenomena in an elegant way and with knowledge of high school mathematics. Furthermore tools for video-analysis and data from measurements with sensors allow us to study the phenomena in experiments. This example demonstrates the level of implementation of ICT in Physics Education in The Netherlands [1].

  8. X-ray Microscopic Characterization of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Holmes, A.; Thomas, B.R.; Chernov, a. A.; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic mapping of the variation in degree of perfection and in type of defects in entire protein crystals by x-rays may well be a prerequisite for better understanding causes of lattice imperfections, the growth history, and properties of protein crystals. However, x-ray microscopic characterization of bulk protein crystals, in the as-grown state, is frequently more challenging than that of small molecular crystals due to the experimental difficulties arising largely from the unique features possessed by protein crystals. In this presentation, we will illustrate ssme recent activities in employing coherence-based phase contrast x-ray imaging and high-angular-resolution diffraction techniques for mapping microdefects and the degree of perfection of protein crystals, and demonstrate a correlation between crystal perfection, diffraction phenomena., and crystallization conditions. The observed features and phenomena will be discussed in context to gain insight into the nature of defects, nucleation and growth, and the properties of protein crystals.

  9. X-ray Microscopic Characterization of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Holmes, A.; Thomas, B.R.; Chernov, a. A.; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic mapping of the variation in degree of perfection and in type of defects in entire protein crystals by x-rays may well be a prerequisite for better understanding causes of lattice imperfections, the growth history, and properties of protein crystals. However, x-ray microscopic characterization of bulk protein crystals, in the as-grown state, is frequently more challenging than that of small molecular crystals due to the experimental difficulties arising largely from the unique features possessed by protein crystals. In this presentation, we will illustrate ssme recent activities in employing coherence-based phase contrast x-ray imaging and high-angular-resolution diffraction techniques for mapping microdefects and the degree of perfection of protein crystals, and demonstrate a correlation between crystal perfection, diffraction phenomena., and crystallization conditions. The observed features and phenomena will be discussed in context to gain insight into the nature of defects, nucleation and growth, and the properties of protein crystals.

  10. Crystal Creations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Nona; Whitmore, Sherry

    1989-01-01

    Presents a many-faceted learning approach to the study of crystals. Provides instructions for performing activities including crystal growth and patterns, creating miniature simulations of crystal-containing rock formations, charcoal and sponge gardens, and snowflakes. (RT)

  11. Crystal Creations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Nona; Whitmore, Sherry

    1989-01-01

    Presents a many-faceted learning approach to the study of crystals. Provides instructions for performing activities including crystal growth and patterns, creating miniature simulations of crystal-containing rock formations, charcoal and sponge gardens, and snowflakes. (RT)

  12. Crystal Meth

    MedlinePlus

    ... from Other Parents Stories of Hope Crystal meth Crystal meth Story of Hope by giovanni January 3, ... about my drug addiction having to deal with Crystal meth. I am now in recovery and fighting ...

  13. Crystal Meth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Home / Stories of Hope / Crystal meth Crystal meth Story Of Hope By giovanni January 3rd, 2013 ... my drug addiction having to deal with Crystal meth. I am now in recovery and fighting my ...

  14. Synchronization Phenomena and Epoch Filter of Electroencephalogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matani, Ayumu

    Nonlinear electrophysiological synchronization phenomena in the brain, such as event-related (de)synchronization, long distance synchronization, and phase-reset, have received much attention in neuroscience over the last decade. These phenomena contain more electrical than physiological keywords and actually require electrical techniques to capture with electroencephalography (EEG). For instance, epoch filters, which have just recently been proposed, allow us to investigate such phenomena. Moreover, epoch filters are still developing and would hopefully generate a new paradigm in neuroscience from an electrical engineering viewpoint. Consequently, electrical engineers could be interested in EEG once again or from now on.

  15. Surface energies of elemental crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Richard; Xu, Zihan; Radhakrishnan, Balachandran; Winston, Donald; Sun, Wenhao; Persson, Kristin A.; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-09-01

    The surface energy is a fundamental property of the different facets of a crystal that is crucial to the understanding of various phenomena like surface segregation, roughening, catalytic activity, and the crystal’s equilibrium shape. Such surface phenomena are especially important at the nanoscale, where the large surface area to volume ratios lead to properties that are significantly different from the bulk. In this work, we present the largest database of calculated surface energies for elemental crystals to date. This database contains the surface energies of more than 100 polymorphs of about 70 elements, up to a maximum Miller index of two and three for non-cubic and cubic crystals, respectively. Well-known reconstruction schemes are also accounted for. The database is systematically improvable and has been rigorously validated against previous experimental and computational data where available. We will describe the methodology used in constructing the database, and how it can be accessed for further studies and design of materials.

  16. Stress and phase transformation phenomena in oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Exarhos, G.J.; Hess, N.J.

    1992-04-01

    In situ optical methods are reviewed for characterization of phase transformation processes and evaluation of residual stress in solution- deposited metastable oxide films. Such low density films most often are deposited as disordered phases making them prone to crystallization and attendant densification when subjected to increased temperature and/or applied pressure. Inherent stress imparted during film deposition and its evolution during the transformation are evaluated from phonon frequency shifts seen in Raman spectra (TiO{sub 2}) or from changes in the laser-induced fluorescence emission spectra for films containing rare earth (Sm{sup +3}:Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) or transition metal (Cr{sup +3}:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) dopants. The data in combination with measured increases in line intensities intrinsic to the evolving phase are used to follow crystallization processes in thin films. In general, film deposition parameters are found to influence the crystallite ingrowth kinetics and the magnitude of stress and stress relaxation in the film during the transformation. The utility of these methods to probe crystallization phenomena in oxide films will be addressed.

  17. Canister storage building natural phenomena design loads

    SciTech Connect

    Tallman, A.M.

    1996-02-01

    This document presents natural phenomena hazard (NPH) loads for use in the design and construction of the Canister Storage Building (CSB), which will be located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site.

  18. Analysis of nuclear reactor instability phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The phenomena known as density-wave instability often occurs in phase change systems, such as boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRS). Our current understanding of density-wave oscillations is in fairly good shape for linear phenomena (eg, the onset of instabilities) but is not very advanced for non-linear phenomena [Lahey and Podowski, 1989]. In particular, limit cycle and chaotic instability modes are not well understood in boiling systems such as current and advanced generation BWRs (eg, SBWR). In particular, the SBWR relies on natural circulation and is thus inherently prone to problems with density-wave instabilities. The purpose of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of nonlinear nuclear-coupled density-wave instability phenomena in BWRS. This research builds on the work of Achard et al [1985] and Clausse et al [1991] who showed, respectively, that Hopf bifurcations and chaotic oscillations may occur in boiling systems.

  19. Perspective: Emergent magnetic phenomena at interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yuri

    2015-06-01

    The discovery of emergent magnetic phenomena is of fundamental and technological interest. This perspective highlights recent promising examples of emergent ferromagnetism at complex oxide interfaces in the context of spin based electronics.

  20. Classifying prion and prion-like phenomena.

    PubMed

    Harbi, Djamel; Harrison, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    The universe of prion and prion-like phenomena has expanded significantly in the past several years. Here, we overview the challenges in classifying this data informatically, given that terms such as "prion-like", "prion-related" or "prion-forming" do not have a stable meaning in the scientific literature. We examine the spectrum of proteins that have been described in the literature as forming prions, and discuss how "prion" can have a range of meaning, with a strict definition being for demonstration of infection with in vitro-derived recombinant prions. We suggest that although prion/prion-like phenomena can largely be apportioned into a small number of broad groups dependent on the type of transmissibility evidence for them, as new phenomena are discovered in the coming years, a detailed ontological approach might be necessary that allows for subtle definition of different "flavors" of prion / prion-like phenomena.

  1. Collective Phenomena in Macroscopic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, G.; Pozzoli, R.; Romé, M.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    2007-08-01

    for high and low B plasmas / E. Tassi, P. J. Morrison and D. Grasso -- Non locality of collective effects related to dynamical friction in elliptical galaxies / S.E. Arena and G. Bertin -- Evolution of a satellite dragged in by dynamical friction towards the center of a galaxy / S.E. Arena, G. Bertin and T. Liseykina -- Investigation of free decaying turbulence in a trapped pure electron plasma / G. Bettega ... [et al.] -- Structures of charge sheaths and transition layers in ion sources / M. Cavenago -- Generation of plasma perturbations under collisionless interaction of super-Alfvenic flows / G. Dudnikova, T. Liseykina and K. Vshivkov -- Program package for 3D Pic model of plasma fiber / P. Kulhanek and D. Bren -- A Stochastic approach to generalized quantum dynamics with collective long-range forces / A. Lavagno -- Filling of Electrostatic Plasma Lens for Ion-Beam-Focusing by electrons against direction of electric field due to non-linear vortex behavior / V. Maslov -- Thermal barrier formation for plasma electrons and ions in kind of connected solitary dip and hump of electric potential near ECR points in cylindrical trap / V. Maslov ... [et al.] -- Excitation of solitary wake-field by relativistic electron bunch and laser pulse / V. Maslov, A. Egorov and I. Onishchenko -- Enhancement of ion beam charge states by electron vortices in a plasma optical device / V. Maslov, A. Goncharov and I. Brown -- Wake-field mechanism of ion quasi-crystal formation in nonequilibrium dusty plasmas of technological devices / V. Maslov ... [et al.] -- Spiral perturbation in separator for extraction of heavy drops from plasma flow / V. Maslov ... [et al.] -- Fractional relaxation equation from AC universality in disordered solids / A. V. Milovanov, K. Rypdal and J. J. Rasmussen -- Vortices in two-dimensional rotating bose-Einstein condensates / T. Rindler-Daller -- Studying instability of 3D collisionless systems on Stochastic trajectories / V. N. Snytnikov and E. A. Kuksheva

  2. Young children's understanding of random phenomena.

    PubMed

    Kuzmak, S D; Gelman, R

    1986-06-01

    2 experiments on the development of the understanding of random phenomena are reported. Of interest was whether children understand the characteristic uncertainty in the physical nature of random phenomena as well as the unpredictability of outcomes. Children were asked, for both a random and a determined phenomenon, whether they knew what its next outcome would be and why. In Experiment 1, 4-, 5-, and 7-year-olds correctly differentiated their responses to the question of outcome predictability; the 2 older groups also mentioned appropriate characteristics of the random mechanism in explaining why they did not know what its outcome would be. Although 3-year-olds did not differentiate the random and determined phenomena, neither did they treat both phenomena as predictable. This latter result is inconsistent with Piaget and Inhelder's characterization of an early stage of development. Experiment 2 was designed to control for the possibility that children in Experiment 1 learned how to respond on the basis of pretest experience with the 2 different phenomena. 5- and 7-year-olds performed at a comparable level to the same-aged children in Experiment 1. Results suggest an earlier understanding of random phenomena than previously has been reported and support results in the literature indicating an early understanding of causality.

  3. Hybrid colloidal plasmonic-photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Sergei G; Korovin, Alexander V; Regensburger, Alois; Peschel, Ulf

    2011-06-17

    We review the recently emerged class of hybrid metal-dielectric colloidal photonic crystals. The hybrid approach is understood as the combination of a dielectric photonic crystal with a continuous metal film. It allows to achieve a strong modification of the optical properties of photonic crystals by involving the light scattering at electronic excitations in the metal component into moulding of the light flow in series to the diffraction resonances occurring in the body of the photonic crystal. We consider different realizations of hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystals based on two- and three-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals in association with flat and corrugated metal films. In agreement with model calculations, different resonance phenomena determine the optical response of hybrid crystals leading to a broadly tuneable functionality of these crystals.

  4. Superconductivity-like phenomena in an ferrimagnetic endohedral fullerene with diluted magnetic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantar, Ersin

    2017-09-01

    The hysteretic properties of a Ising-type endohedral fullerene (EF) with a doped magnetic spin-1/2 particle confined within a spherical cage (by diluted magnetic spin-1 particles) are investigated by using the effective-field theory with correlations. The extrinsic and intrinsic parameters dependencies of the magnetic hysteresis curves and superconductivity-like phenomena in the Ising-type EF system have investigated. We have reported that doped magnetic core atom is chiefly responsible of the occurrence of the superconductivity-like phenomena in the system. Moreover, three superconductivity series have been presented by the temperature, surface composition and crystal field.

  5. Photon management of GaN-based optoelectronic devices via nanoscaled phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Lin; Lai, Kun-Yu; Lee, Ming-Jui; Liao, Yu-Kuang; Ooi, Boon S.; Kuo, Hao-Chung; He-Hau, Jr.

    2016-09-01

    Photon management is essential in improving the performances of optoelectronic devices including light emitting diodes, solar cells and photo detectors. Beyond the advances in material growth and device structure design, photon management via nanoscaled phenomena have also been demonstrated as a promising way for further modifying/improving the device performance. The accomplishments achieved by photon management via nanoscaled phenomena include strain-induced polarization field management, crystal quality improvement, light extraction/harvesting enhancement, radiation pattern control, and spectrum management. In this review, we summarize recent development, challenges and underlying physics of photon management in GaN-based light emitting diodes and solar cells.

  6. Axion crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Sho; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2017-08-01

    The low-energy effective theories for gapped insulators are classified by three parameters: permittivity ɛ, permeability μ, and theta angle θ. Crystals with periodic ɛ are known as photonic crystals. We here study the band structure of photons in a new type of crystals with periodic θ (modulo 2 π) in space, which we call the axion crystals. We find that the axion crystals have a number of new properties that the usual photonic crystals do not possess, such as the helicity-dependent mass gap and nonrelativistic gapless dispersion relation at small momentum. We briefly discuss possible realizations of axion crystals in condensed matter systems and high-energy physics.

  7. Atomistic simulation of transport phenomena in nanoelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Luisier, Mathieu

    2014-07-07

    Computational chemistry deals with the first-principles calculation of electronic and crystal structures, phase diagrams, charge distributions, vibrational frequencies, or ion diffusivity in complex molecules and solids. Typically, none of these numerical experiments allows for the calculation of electrical currents under the influence of externally applied voltages. To address this issue, there is an imperative need for an advanced simulation approach capable of treating all kind of transport phenomena (electron, energy, momentum) at a quantum mechanical level. The goal of this tutorial review is to give an overview of the "quantum transport" (QT) research activity, introduce specific techniques such as the Non-equilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) formalism, describe their basic features, and underline their strengths and weaknesses. Three examples from the nanoelectronics field have been selected to illustrate the insight provided by quantum transport simulations. Details are also given about the numerical algorithms to solve the NEGF equations and about strategies to parallelize the workload on supercomputers.

  8. Critical phenomena of emergent monopoles in a chiral magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Nagaosa, Naoto

    A three-dimensional cubic Skyrmion crystal in the bulk, which is simultaneously a lattice of monopole-antimonopole pairs predicted theoretically, has been recently identified experimentally in MnGe. Adopting appropriate temperature Green's function technique for optical conductivity and devising a solvable phonon-magnon interaction, we systematically developed the theory of coupling spin-waves to both itinerant electrons and mechanical degrees of freedom in this chiral magnet, describing the latest experimental observations including anomalies and critical phenomena in magnetotransport and magnetoelasticity, which are identified as hallmarks of fluctuations of the emergent monopolar fields upon the nontrivial monopole dynamics and especially a topological phase transition signifying strong correlation. As a whole, they speak for a crucial role played by the monopole defects and hence the real-space spin topology in this material.

  9. Phenomena and mechanisms of crack propagation in glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Apel, E; Deubener, J; Bernard, A; Höland, M; Müller, R; Kappert, H; Rheinberger, V; Höland, W

    2008-10-01

    Lithium disilicate, leucite and apatite glass-ceramics have become state-of-the-art framework materials in the fabrication of all-ceramic dental restorative materials. The goal of this study was to examine the crack propagation behaviour of these three known glass-ceramic materials after they have been subjected to Vickers indentation and to characterize their crack opening profiles (delta(meas) vs. (a-r)). For this purpose, various methods of optical examination were employed. Optical microscopy investigations were performed to examine the crack phenomena at a macroscopic level, while high-resolution techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), were employed to investigate the crack phenomena at a microscopic level. The crack patterns of the three glass-ceramics vary from fairly straightforward to more complex, depending on the amount of residual glass matrix present in the material. The high-strength lithium disilicate crystals feature a high degree of crosslinking, thereby preventing crack propagation. In this material, the crack propagates only through the residual glass phase, which constitutes 30%-40% by volume. Having a high glass content of more than 65% by volume, the leucite and apatite glass-ceramics show far more complex crack patterns. Cracks in the leucite glass-ceramic propagate through both the glass and crystal phase. The apatite glass-ceramic shows a similar crack behaviour as an inorganic-organic composite material containing nanoscale fillers, which are pulled out in the surroundings of the crack tip. The observed crack behaviour and the calculated K(tip) values of the three types of glass-ceramics were compared to the K(IC) values determined according to the SEVNB method.

  10. Crystal Growth Rate Dispersion: A Predictor of Crystal Quality in Microgravity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kephart, Richard D.; Judge, Russell A.; Snell, Edward H.; vanderWoerd, Mark J.

    2003-01-01

    In theory macromolecular crystals grow through a process involving at least two transport phenomena of solute to the crystal surface: diffusion and convection. In absence of standard gravitational forces, the ratio of these two phenomena can change and explain why crystal growth in microgravity is different from that on Earth. Experimental evidence clearly shows, however, that crystal growth of various systems is not equally sensitive to reduction in gravitational forces, leading to quality improvement in microgravity for some crystals but not for others. We hypothesize that the differences in final crystal quality are related to crystal growth rate dispersion. If growth rate dispersion exists on Earth, decreases in microgravity, and coincides with crystal quality improvements then this dispersion is a predictor for crystal quality improvement. In order to test this hypothesis, we will measure growth rate dispersion both in microgravity and on Earth and will correlate the data with previously established data on crystal quality differences for the two environments. We present here the first crystal growth rate measurement data for three proteins (lysozyme, xylose isomerase and human recombinant insulin), collected on Earth, using hardware identical to the hardware to be used in microgravity and show how these data correlate with crystal quality improvements established in microgravity.

  11. Crystal Growth Rate Dispersion: A Predictor of Crystal Quality in Microgravity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kephart, Richard D.; Judge, Russell A.; Snell, Edward H.; vanderWoerd, Mark J.

    2003-01-01

    In theory macromolecular crystals grow through a process involving at least two transport phenomena of solute to the crystal surface: diffusion and convection. In absence of standard gravitational forces, the ratio of these two phenomena can change and explain why crystal growth in microgravity is different from that on Earth. Experimental evidence clearly shows, however, that crystal growth of various systems is not equally sensitive to reduction in gravitational forces, leading to quality improvement in microgravity for some crystals but not for others. We hypothesize that the differences in final crystal quality are related to crystal growth rate dispersion. If growth rate dispersion exists on Earth, decreases in microgravity, and coincides with crystal quality improvements then this dispersion is a predictor for crystal quality improvement. In order to test this hypothesis, we will measure growth rate dispersion both in microgravity and on Earth and will correlate the data with previously established data on crystal quality differences for the two environments. We present here the first crystal growth rate measurement data for three proteins (lysozyme, xylose isomerase and human recombinant insulin), collected on Earth, using hardware identical to the hardware to be used in microgravity and show how these data correlate with crystal quality improvements established in microgravity.

  12. Diversity of threshold phenomena in geophysical media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The sample analysis of threshold phenomena in the lithosphere, atmosphere, and magnetosphere is conducted. The phenomena due to the flow of electric current and pore fluid in the rocks are considered, the scenario of wind-driven generation of atmospheric electricity is suggested, and the model of the geomagnetic storm time Dst variation is analyzed. An important general conclusion consists in the fact that in the geophysical media there is a wide class of threshold phenomena that are affine with phase transitions of the second kind. These phenomena are also related to the critical transitions in self-oscillatory systems with soft self-excitation. The integral representation of bifurcation diagrams for threshold phenomena is suggested. This provides a simple way to take into account the influence of the fluctuations on the transition of a system through the threshold. Fluctuations remove singularity at the threshold point and, generally, lead to a certain shifting of the threshold. The question concerning the hard transition through the threshold and several aspects of modeling the blow-up instability which is presumed to occasionally develop in the geophysical media are discussed.

  13. Anomalous Light Phenomena vs. Bioelectric Brain Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorani, M.; Nobili, G.

    We present a research proposal concerning the instrumented investigation of anomalous light phenomena that are apparently correlated with particular mind states, such as prayer, meditation or psi. Previous research by these authors demonstrate that such light phenomena can be monitored and measured quite efficiently in areas of the world where they are reported in a recurrent way. Instruments such as optical equipment for photography and spectroscopy, VLF spectrometers, magnetometers, radar and IR viewers were deployed and used massively in several areas of the world. Results allowed us to develop physical models concerning the structural and time-variable behaviour of light phenomena, and their kinematics. Recent insights and witnesses have suggested to us that a sort of "synchronous connection" seems to exist between plasma-like phenomena and particular mind states of experiencers who seem to trigger a light manifestation which is very similar to the one previously investigated. The main goal of these authors is now aimed at the search for a concrete "entanglement-like effect" between the experiencer's mind and the light phenomena, in such a way that both aspects are intended to be monitored and measured simultaneously using appropriate instrumentation. The goal of this research project is twofold: a) to verify quantitatively the existence of one very particular kind of mind-matter interaction and to study in real time its physical and biophysical manifestations; b) to repeat the same kind of experiment using the same test-subject in different locations and under various conditions of geomagnetic activity.

  14. [Spiritual phenomena occurring in everybody and health].

    PubMed

    Krsiak, M

    2008-01-01

    The past several years have seen an explosion of research in the area of spirituality and health. However, confusion and incomprehension of the conception of spirituality (e.g. confounding spirituality with various conventional views on religiousness) hampers better understanding in this area. The present paper proposes definition of spiritual phenomena in man based on natural epistemological and instrumental criteria (whether a certain phenomenon can be objectively known and evoked): spiritual phenomena in man are those, which cannot be objectively known nor evoked, but which act (e.g., love, idea). Spiritual phenomena can be really known only in the self ("in spirit"). Objectively known can be only manifestations of spiritual phenomena. Some attributes of love (e.g. its personal uniqueness) or ideas (e.g., sense of own life) whose satisfaction appears to be important for health are briefly outlined. A review of some frequently cited recent papers investigating the role of spirituality in health and discussion of frequent pitfalls in this area is given. Spirituality is a universal human phenomenon. All human beings, secular or religious, encounter with spiritual phenomena. Although the present conception of spirituality distances from some conventional views on religiousness, it is not atheistic. On the contrary, it accommodates the basic religious concept "God is love". Conceptual clarification is essential for further progress in the study of impact of spirituality on health.

  15. Focusing of ultrasonic waves by negative refraction in phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    Negative refraction and focusing phenomena in phononic crystals is reviewed, starting with their initial discovery over 10 years ago in flat three-dimensional (3D) phononic crystals. This work soon led to direct observations of negative refraction in 2D phononic crystals, and an extensive series of experiments, simulations and theoretical predictions to explore and optimize focusing by flat phononic crystal lenses. More recently, the emphasis has been on demonstrating how super-resolution focusing that beats the diffraction limit can be achieved. Ultrasonic experiments, in combination with theory and simulations, have played an important role in developing a detailed understanding of these phenomena.

  16. Theories of dynamical phenomena in sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Attempts that have been made to understand and explain observed dynamical phenomena in sunspots within the framework of magnetohydrodynamic theory are surveyed. The qualitative aspects of the theory and physical arguments are emphasized, with mathematical details generally avoided. The dynamical phenomena in sunspots are divided into two categories: aperiodic (quasi-steady) and oscillatory. For each phenomenon discussed, the salient observational features that any theory should explain are summarized. The two contending theoretical models that can account for the fine structure of the Evershed motion, namely the convective roll model and the siphon flow model, are described. With regard to oscillatory phenomena, attention is given to overstability and oscillatory convection, umbral oscillations and flashes. penumbral waves, five-minute oscillations in sunspots, and the wave cooling of sunspots.

  17. The making of extraordinary psychological phenomena.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the extraordinary phenomena that have been central to unorthodox areas of psychological knowledge. It shows how even the agreed facts relating to mesmerism, spiritualism, psychical research, and parapsychology have been framed as evidence both for and against the reality of the phenomena. It argues that these disputes can be seen as a means through which beliefs have been formulated and maintained in the face of potentially challenging evidence. It also shows how these disputes appealed to different forms of expertise, and that both sides appealed to belief in various ways as part of the ongoing dispute about both the facts and expertise. Finally, it shows how, when a formal Psychology of paranormal belief emerged in the twentieth century, it took two different forms, each reflecting one side of the ongoing dispute about the reality of the phenomena. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Self field electromagnetism and quantum phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1994-07-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) has been extremely successful inits predictive capability for atomic phenomena. Thus the greatest hope for any alternative view is solely to mimic the predictive capability of quantum mechanics (QM), and perhaps its usefulness will lie in gaining a better understanding of microscopic phenomena. Many ?paradoxes? and problematic situations emerge in QED. To combat the QED problems, the field of Stochastics Electrodynamics (SE) emerged, wherein a random ?zero point radiation? is assumed to fill all of space in an attmept to explain quantum phenomena, without some of the paradoxical concerns. SE, however, has greater failings. One is that the electromagnetic field energy must be infinit eto work. We have examined a deterministic side branch of SE, ?self field? electrodynamics, which may overcome the probelms of SE. Self field electrodynamics (SFE) utilizes the chaotic nature of electromagnetic emissions, as charges lose energy near atomic dimensions, to try to understand and mimic quantum phenomena. These fields and charges can ?interact with themselves? in a non-linear fashion, and may thereby explain many quantum phenomena from a semi-classical viewpoint. Referred to as self fields, they have gone by other names in the literature: ?evanesccent radiation?, ?virtual photons?, and ?vacuum fluctuations?. Using self fields, we discuss the uncertainty principles, the Casimir effects, and the black-body radiation spectrum, diffraction and interference effects, Schrodinger's equation, Planck's constant, and the nature of the electron and how they might be understood in the present framework. No new theory could ever replace QED. The self field view (if correct) would, at best, only serve to provide some understanding of the processes by which strange quantum phenomena occur at the atomic level. We discuss possible areas where experiments might be employed to test SFE, and areas where future work may lie.

  19. Modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; Vitek, J.M.; Goldak, J.A.; DebRoy, T.A.; Rappaz, M.; Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in the mathematical modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds are summarized. State-of-the-art mathematical models, advances in computational techniques, emerging high-performance computers, and experimental validation techniques have provided significant insight into the fundamental factors that control the development of the weldment. The current status and scientific issues in the areas of heat and fluid flow in welds, heat source metal interaction, solidification microstructure, and phase transformations are assessed. Future research areas of major importance for understanding the fundamental phenomena in weld behavior are identified.

  20. Collective phenomena in cold indirect excitons

    SciTech Connect

    Butov, L. V.

    2016-03-15

    Due to their long lifetimes, indirect excitons can cool to below the temperature of quantum degeneracy. This gives an opportunity to experimentally study cold composite bosons. Both theoretically predicted phenomena and phenomena that have not been anticipated were observed in a cold gas of indirect excitons. In this contribution, we overview our studies of cold indirect excitons over the past decade, presenting spontaneous coherence and condensation of excitons, spatially modulated exciton state, long-range spin currents and spin textures, and exciton localization–delocalization transitions.

  1. Incorporating interfacial phenomena in solidification models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Wang, Chao Yang

    1994-01-01

    A general methodology is available for the incorporation of microscopic interfacial phenomena in macroscopic solidification models that include diffusion and convection. The method is derived from a formal averaging procedure and a multiphase approach, and relies on the presence of interfacial integrals in the macroscopic transport equations. In a wider engineering context, these techniques are not new, but their application in the analysis and modeling of solidification processes has largely been overlooked. This article describes the techniques and demonstrates their utility in two examples in which microscopic interfacial phenomena are of great importance.

  2. Incorporating interfacial phenomena in solidification models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Wang, Chao Yang

    1994-01-01

    A general methodology is available for the incorporation of microscopic interfacial phenomena in macroscopic solidification models that include diffusion and convection. The method is derived from a formal averaging procedure and a multiphase approach, and relies on the presence of interfacial integrals in the macroscopic transport equations. In a wider engineering context, these techniques are not new, but their application in the analysis and modeling of solidification processes has largely been overlooked. This article describes the techniques and demonstrates their utility in two examples in which microscopic interfacial phenomena are of great importance.

  3. Phenomena at hot-wire electrodes.

    PubMed

    Gründler, P

    2000-06-01

    An overview is given describing phenomena at heated microelectrodes where matter and heat energy are simultaneously emitted into the solution. With controlled electric heating, virtual "quiescent" periods as well as ones with constant streaming conditions are found that depend on the heating time. A close look at a permanently heated wire reveals a well defined structure with stationary concentration, temperature and flow rate profiles. The observed phenomena can be utilised for analytical measurements, e.g. with the novel method "Temperature Pulse Voltammetry" (TPV).

  4. Fundamental investigation of duct/ESP phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.A. ); Durham, M.D. ); Sowa, W.A. . Combustion Lab.); Himes, R.M. ); Mahaffey, W.A. )

    1991-10-21

    Radian Corporation was contracted to investigate duct injection and ESP phenomena in a 1.7 MW pilot plant constructed for this test program. This study was an attempt to resolve problems found in previous studies and answer remaining questions for the technology using an approach which concentrates on the fundamental mechanisms of the process. The goal of the study was to obtain a better understanding of the basic physical and chemical phenomena that control: (1) the desulfurization of flue gas by calcium-based reagent, and (2) the coupling of an existing ESP particulate collection device to the duct injection process. Process economics are being studied by others. (VC)

  5. Local phenomena, chapter 3, part C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Oceanic and coastal phenomena with dimensions ranging to 100 km are dealt with. The two major categories discussed are waves, their generation and dynamics and ocean-land related problems. The dynamics, of surface waves in both capillary and gravity ranges indicates that microwave technology provides a superior means of measuring simultaneously the spatial and temporal properties of ocean waves. The need for basic studies of physical phenomena in support of active microwave sensing is indicated. Active microwave scattering from surface waves is discussed in terms of wave dynamics.

  6. Crystallization modifiers in lipid systems.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana Paula Badan; Masuchi, Monise Helen; Miyasaki, Eriksen Koji; Domingues, Maria Aliciane Fontenele; Stroppa, Valter Luís Zuliani; de Oliveira, Glazieli Marangoni; Kieckbusch, Theo Guenter

    2015-07-01

    Crystallization of fats is a determinant physical event affecting the structure and properties of fat-based products. The stability of these processed foods is regulated by changes in the physical state of fats and alterations in their crystallization behavior. Problems like polymorphic transitions, oil migration, fat bloom development, slow crystallization and formation of crystalline aggregates stand out. The change of the crystallization behavior of lipid systems has been a strategic issue for the processing of foods, aiming at taylor made products, reducing costs, improving quality, and increasing the applicability and stability of different industrial fats. In this connection, advances in understanding the complex mechanisms that govern fat crystallization led to the development of strategies in order to modulate the conventional processes of fat structuration, based on the use of crystallization modifiers. Different components have been evaluated, such as specific triacyglycerols, partial glycerides (monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols), free fatty acids, phospholipids and emulsifiers. The knowledge and expertise on the influence of these specific additives or minor lipids on the crystallization behavior of fat systems represents a focus of current interest for the industrial processing of oils and fats. This article presents a comprehensive review on the use of crystallization modifiers in lipid systems, especially for palm oil, cocoa butter and general purpose fats, highlighting: i) the removal, addition or fractionation of minor lipids in fat bases; ii) the use of nucleating agents to modify the crystallization process; iii) control of crystallization in lipid bases by using emulsifiers. The addition of these components into lipid systems is discussed in relation to the phenomena of nucleation, crystal growth, morphology, thermal behavior and polymorphism, with the intention of providing the reader with a complete panorama of the associated mechanisms

  7. Optical properties of contrail-induced cirrus: discussion of unusual halo phenomena.

    PubMed

    Sussmann, R

    1997-06-20

    Photographs of a 120 degrees parhelion and a 22 degrees parhelion within persistent contrails are presented. These phenomena result from hexagonal plate-shaped ice crystals oriented horizontally with diameters between 300 mum and 2 mm. From our observations and reinvestigation of previous reports, we conclude that a subset of the population in persistent contrails can consist of highly regular, oriented, hexagonal plates or columns comparable to the most regular crystals in natural cirrus clouds. This is explained by measured ambient humidities below the formation conditions of natural cirrus. The resulting strong azimuthal variability of the scattering phase function impacts the radiative transfer through persistent contrails.

  8. Natural phenomena exhibited by forest fires

    Treesearch

    J. S. Barrows

    1961-01-01

    Forest fire phenomena are presented through a series of motion pictures and 35 mm slides. These films have been taken by the staffs of the Southeastern, Pacific Southwest, and Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Stations of the U. S. Forest Service and by Dr. Vincent J. Schaefer during the course of fire research activities. Both regular speed and time-lapse...

  9. Displaying Computer Simulations Of Physical Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val

    1991-01-01

    Paper discusses computer simulation as means of experiencing and learning to understand physical phenomena. Covers both present simulation capabilities and major advances expected in near future. Visual, aural, tactile, and kinesthetic effects used to teach such physical sciences as dynamics of fluids. Recommends classrooms in universities, government, and industry be linked to advanced computing centers so computer simulations integrated into education process.

  10. Intervention in Biological Phenomena via Feedback Linearization

    PubMed Central

    Fnaiech, Mohamed Amine; Nounou, Hazem; Nounou, Mohamed; Datta, Aniruddha

    2012-01-01

    The problems of modeling and intervention of biological phenomena have captured the interest of many researchers in the past few decades. The aim of the therapeutic intervention strategies is to move an undesirable state of a diseased network towards a more desirable one. Such an objective can be achieved by the application of drugs to act on some genes/metabolites that experience the undesirable behavior. For the purpose of design and analysis of intervention strategies, mathematical models that can capture the complex dynamics of the biological systems are needed. S-systems, which offer a good compromise between accuracy and mathematical flexibility, are a promising framework for modeling the dynamical behavior of biological phenomena. Due to the complex nonlinear dynamics of the biological phenomena represented by S-systems, nonlinear intervention schemes are needed to cope with the complexity of the nonlinear S-system models. Here, we present an intervention technique based on feedback linearization for biological phenomena modeled by S-systems. This technique is based on perfect knowledge of the S-system model. The proposed intervention technique is applied to the glycolytic-glycogenolytic pathway, and simulation results presented demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique. PMID:23209459

  11. Geophysical phenomena classification by artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gough, M. P.; Bruckner, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Space science information systems involve accessing vast data bases. There is a need for an automatic process by which properties of the whole data set can be assimilated and presented to the user. Where data are in the form of spectrograms, phenomena can be detected by pattern recognition techniques. Presented are the first results obtained by applying unsupervised Artificial Neural Networks (ANN's) to the classification of magnetospheric wave spectra. The networks used here were a simple unsupervised Hamming network run on a PC and a more sophisticated CALM network run on a Sparc workstation. The ANN's were compared in their geophysical data recognition performance. CALM networks offer such qualities as fast learning, superiority in generalizing, the ability to continuously adapt to changes in the pattern set, and the possibility to modularize the network to allow the inter-relation between phenomena and data sets. This work is the first step toward an information system interface being developed at Sussex, the Whole Information System Expert (WISE). Phenomena in the data are automatically identified and provided to the user in the form of a data occurrence morphology, the Whole Information System Data Occurrence Morphology (WISDOM), along with relationships to other parameters and phenomena.

  12. Wave Phenomena in an Acoustic Resonant Chamber

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mary E.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design and operation of a high Q acoustical resonant chamber which can be used to demonstrate wave phenomena such as three-dimensional normal modes, Q values, densities of states, changes in the speed of sound, Fourier decomposition, damped harmonic oscillations, sound-absorbing properties, and perturbation and scattering problems.…

  13. Simple Phenomena, Slow Motion, Surprising Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koupil, Jan; Vicha, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a few simple experiments that are worthwhile for slow motion recording and analysis either because of interesting phenomena that can be seen only when slowed down significantly or because of the ability to do precise time measurements. The experiments described in this article are quite commonly done in Czech schools. All…

  14. Observations of Nonlinear Phenomena in Rotordynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrich, Fredric F.

    Observations, analysis and understanding of nonlinear rotordynamic phenomena observed in aircraft gas turbine engines and other high-speed rotating machinery over the course of the author's career are described. Included are observations of sum-and-difference frequency response; effects of roller bearing clearance; relaxation oscillations; subharmonic response; chaotic response; and other generic nonlinear responses such as superharmonic and ultra-subharmonic response.

  15. Simple Phenomena, Slow Motion, Surprising Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koupil, Jan; Vicha, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a few simple experiments that are worthwhile for slow motion recording and analysis either because of interesting phenomena that can be seen only when slowed down significantly or because of the ability to do precise time measurements. The experiments described in this article are quite commonly done in Czech schools. All…

  16. Some Phenomena on Negative Inversion Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Tae-Soo

    2013-01-01

    We examine the characteristics of NDI (negative degree inversion) and its relation with other inversion phenomena such as SVI (subject-verb inversion) and SAI (subject-auxiliary inversion). The negative element in the NDI construction may be" not," a negative adverbial, or a negative verb. In this respect, NDI has similar licensing…

  17. Solar Phenomena Associated with "EIT Waves"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesecker, D. A.; Myers, D. C.; Thompson, B. J.; Hammer, D. M.; Vourlidas, A.

    2002-01-01

    In an effort to understand what an 'EIT wave' is and what its causes are, we have looked for correlations between the initiation of EIT waves and the occurrence of other solar phenomena. An EIT wave is a coronal disturbance, typically appearing as a diffuse brightening propagating across the Sun. A catalog of EIT waves, covering the period from 1997 March through 1998 June, was used in this study. For each EIT wave, the catalog gives the heliographic location and a rating for each wave, where the rating is determined by the reliability of the observations. Since EIT waves are transient, coronal phenomena, we have looked for correlations with other transient, coronal phenomena: X-ray flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and metric type II radio bursts. An unambiguous correlation between EIT waves and CMEs has been found. The correlation of EIT waves with flares is significantly weaker, and EIT waves frequently are not accompanied by radio bursts. To search for trends in the data, proxies for each of these transient phenomena are examined. We also use the accumulated data to show the robustness of the catalog and to reveal biases that must be accounted for in this study.

  18. Reduplication phenomena: body, mind and archetype.

    PubMed

    Garner, J

    2000-09-01

    The many biological and few psychodynamic explanations of reduplicative syndromes tend to have paralleled the dualism of the phenomenon with organic theories concentrating on form and dynamic theories emphasising content. This paper extends the contribution of psychoanalytic thinking to an elucidation of the form of the delusion. Literature on clinical and aetiological aspects of reduplicative phenomena is reviewed alongside a brief examination of psychoanalytic models not overtly related to these phenomena. The human experience of doubles as universal archetype is considered. There is an obvious aetiological role for brain lesions in delusional misidentifications, but psychological symptoms in an individual can rarely be reduced to an organic disorder. The splitting and doubling which occurs in the phenomena have resonances in cultural mythology and in theories from different schools of psychodynamic thought. For the individual patient and doctor, it is a diverting but potentially empty debate to endeavour to draw strict divisions between what is physical and what is psychological although both need to be investigated. Nevertheless, in patients in whom there is clear evidence of an organic contribution to aetiology a psychodynamic understanding may serve to illuminate the patient's experience. Organic brain disease or serious functional illness predispose to regression to earlier modes of archetypical and primitive thinking with concretization of the metaphorical and mythological world. Psychoanalytic models have a contribution in describing the form as well as the content of reduplicative phenomena.

  19. Wave Phenomena in an Acoustic Resonant Chamber

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mary E.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design and operation of a high Q acoustical resonant chamber which can be used to demonstrate wave phenomena such as three-dimensional normal modes, Q values, densities of states, changes in the speed of sound, Fourier decomposition, damped harmonic oscillations, sound-absorbing properties, and perturbation and scattering problems.…

  20. Temporal Phenomena in the Korean Conjunctive Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Dongmin

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize the temporal phenomena in the Korean conjunctive constructions. These constructions consist of three components: a verbal stem, a clause medial temporal suffix, and a clause terminal suffix. This study focuses on both the temporality of the terminal connective suffixes and the grammatical meanings of the…

  1. Displaying Computer Simulations Of Physical Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Val

    1991-01-01

    Paper discusses computer simulation as means of experiencing and learning to understand physical phenomena. Covers both present simulation capabilities and major advances expected in near future. Visual, aural, tactile, and kinesthetic effects used to teach such physical sciences as dynamics of fluids. Recommends classrooms in universities, government, and industry be linked to advanced computing centers so computer simulations integrated into education process.

  2. Geophysical phenomena classification by artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gough, M. P.; Bruckner, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Space science information systems involve accessing vast data bases. There is a need for an automatic process by which properties of the whole data set can be assimilated and presented to the user. Where data are in the form of spectrograms, phenomena can be detected by pattern recognition techniques. Presented are the first results obtained by applying unsupervised Artificial Neural Networks (ANN's) to the classification of magnetospheric wave spectra. The networks used here were a simple unsupervised Hamming network run on a PC and a more sophisticated CALM network run on a Sparc workstation. The ANN's were compared in their geophysical data recognition performance. CALM networks offer such qualities as fast learning, superiority in generalizing, the ability to continuously adapt to changes in the pattern set, and the possibility to modularize the network to allow the inter-relation between phenomena and data sets. This work is the first step toward an information system interface being developed at Sussex, the Whole Information System Expert (WISE). Phenomena in the data are automatically identified and provided to the user in the form of a data occurrence morphology, the Whole Information System Data Occurrence Morphology (WISDOM), along with relationships to other parameters and phenomena.

  3. Temporal Phenomena in the Korean Conjunctive Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Dongmin

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize the temporal phenomena in the Korean conjunctive constructions. These constructions consist of three components: a verbal stem, a clause medial temporal suffix, and a clause terminal suffix. This study focuses on both the temporality of the terminal connective suffixes and the grammatical meanings of the…

  4. Economic agents and markets as emergent phenomena.

    PubMed

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    2002-05-14

    An overview of recent work in agent-based computational economics is provided, with a stress on the research areas highlighted in the National Academy of Sciences Sackler Colloquium session "Economic Agents and Markets as Emergent Phenomena" held in October 2001.

  5. Sundance Fire: an analysis of fire phenomena

    Treesearch

    Hal E. Anderson

    1968-01-01

    The Sundance Fire on September 1, 1967, made a spectacular run of 16 miles in 9 hours and destroyed more than 50,000 acres. This run became the subject of a detailed research analysis of the environmental, topographic, and vegetation variables aimed at reconstructing and describing fire phenomena. This report details the fire's progress; discusses the fire's...

  6. Nitrous oxide sedation and sexual phenomena.

    PubMed

    Jastak, J T; Malamed, S F

    1980-07-01

    Nine cases of sexual phenomena that occurred with use of nitrous oxide and oxygen sedation are described. Dentists involved routinely used concentrations of nitrous oxide greater than 50% and did not have assistants in the room during dental procedures. Recommendations on the concentrations of nitrous oxide and the presence of an assistant are made.

  7. Crystal growing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neville, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    One objective is to demonstrate the way crystals grow and how they affect the behavior of material. Another objective is to compare the growth of crystals in metals and nonmetals. The procedures, which involve a supersaturated solution of a salt that will separate into crystals on cooling and the pouring off of an eutectic solution to expose the crystals formed by a solid solution when an alloy of two metals forms a solid and eutectic solution on cooling, are described.

  8. Theory and experimental evidence of phonon domains and their roles in pre-martensitic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yongmei M.; Wang, Yu U.; Ren, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Pre-martensitic phenomena, also called martensite precursor effects, have been known for decades while yet remain outstanding issues. This paper addresses pre-martensitic phenomena from new theoretical and experimental perspectives. A statistical mechanics-based Grüneisen-type phonon theory is developed. On the basis of deformation-dependent incompletely softened low-energy phonons, the theory predicts a lattice instability and pre-martensitic transition into elastic-phonon domains via 'phonon spinodal decomposition.' The phase transition lifts phonon degeneracy in cubic crystal and has a nature of phonon pseudo-Jahn-Teller lattice instability. The theory and notion of phonon domains consistently explain the ubiquitous pre-martensitic anomalies as natural consequences of incomplete phonon softening. The phonon domains are characterised by broken dynamic symmetry of lattice vibrations and deform through internal phonon relaxation in response to stress (a particular case of Le Chatelier's principle), leading to previously unexplored new domain phenomenon. Experimental evidence of phonon domains is obtained by in situ three-dimensional phonon diffuse scattering and Bragg reflection using high-energy synchrotron X-ray single-crystal diffraction, which observes exotic domain phenomenon fundamentally different from usual ferroelastic domain switching phenomenon. In light of the theory and experimental evidence of phonon domains and their roles in pre-martensitic phenomena, currently existing alternative opinions on martensitic precursor phenomena are revisited.

  9. The Correlation of Upwelling Phenomena and Ocean Sunfish Occurrences in Nusa Penida, Bali

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tito, C. K.; Susilo, E.

    2017-02-01

    Sea surface Temperature (SST) is an important oceanographic variable that can figure the upwelling phenomena. This study aims to determine the variability of SST in relation to upwelling phenomena in the Indian Ocean Southern of Bali Island and the Ocean Sunfish occurrences in the southern of Nusa Penida. Data loggers and remote sensing approach that record temperature was used. An Onset HOBO U20 Water Level Logger U20-001-02 was deployed in Crystal Bay (08°42‧S and 115°27‧E) at 8 meters depth. The daily field SST data were available from June 2011 to December 2014 with 30 minutes time interval. The monthly satellite images obtained from MODIS on board the Aqua satellite. While the ocean sunfish occurrences were based on rate of encounter (ROE) of previous works by Putra (2015) on July to October 2014. It was found that field data and MODIS have a high correlation (r=0.89) with Root Mean Square Error (RMSE=1.64°C). The upwelling phenomena characterized by the evidence of the colder water mass (SST < 25°C) and a higher concentration of chlorophyll-a, reach its peak in August to September. This phenomena coincidence with the high occurrences of Ocean Sunfish in Crystal Bay on August to October.

  10. Apoferritin crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Alexander Chernov, of the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) and based at Marshall Space Flight Center, is investigating why protein crystals grown in space are, in about 20 percent of cases, better-ordered than those grown on the ground. They are testing the idea that the amount of impurities trapped by space-grown crystals may be different than the amount trapped by crystals grown on Earth because convection is negligible in microgravity. The concentrations or impurities in many space-grown crystals turned out to be several times lower than that in the terrestrial ones, sometimes below the detection limit. The ground-based experiment also showed that the amount of impurities per unit volume of the crystals was usually higher than the amount per unit volume of the solution. This means that a growing crystal actually purifies the solution in its immediate vicinity. Here, an impurity depletion zone is created around apoferritin crystals grown in gel, imitating microgravity conditions.

  11. Apoferritin crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Alexander Chernov, of the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) and based at Marshall Space Flight Center, is investigating why protein crystals grown in space are, in about 20 percent of cases, better-ordered than those grown on the ground. They are testing the idea that the amount of impurities trapped by space-grown crystals may be different than the amount trapped by crystals grown on Earth because convection is negligible in microgravity. The concentrations or impurities in many space-grown crystals turned out to be several times lower than that in the terrestrial ones, sometimes below the detection limit. The ground-based experiment also showed that the amount of impurities per unit volume of the crystals was usually higher than the amount per unit volume of the solution. This means that a growing crystal actually purifies the solution in its immediate vicinity. Here, an impurity depletion zone is created around apoferritin crystals grown in gel, imitating microgravity conditions.

  12. Auroral Phenomena: Associated with auroras in complex ways are an extraordinary number of other physical phenomena.

    PubMed

    O'brien, B J

    1965-04-23

    The array of auroral phenomena involves all the basic types of physical phenomena: heat, light, sound, electricity and magnetism, atomic physics, and plasma physics. The uncontrollability, the unreproducibility, and the sheer enormity of the phenomena will keep experimentalists and theorists busy but unsatisfied for many years to come. The greatest challenge in this field of research is an adequate experimentally verifiable theory of the local energization of auroral particle fluxes. Once that is achieved, there is every likelihood that the multitude of correlations between auroral phenomena can be understood and appreciated. Until that time, however, such correlations are to be regarded like icebergs-the parts that can be seen are only a small fraction of the whole phenomenon, and it is the large unseen parts that can be dangerous to theorists and experimentalists alike.

  13. A review of impulsive phase phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review is given of impulsive phase phenomena in support of the models used to compute the energies of the different components of the flares under study. The observational characteristics of the impulsive phase are discussed as well as the evidence for multi-thermal or non-thermal phenomena. The significance of time delays between hard X-rays and microwaves is discussed in terms of electron beams and Alfven waves, two-step acceleration, and secondary bursts at large distances from the primary source. Observations indicating the occurrence of chromospheric evaporation, coronal explosions, and thermal conduction fronts are reviewed briefly, followed by the gamma ray and neutron results. Finally, a preferred flare scenario and energy source are presented involving the interactions in a complex of magnetic loops with the consequent reconnection and electron acceleration.

  14. Coherence Phenomena in Coupled Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. D.; Chang, H.

    2004-01-01

    We predict a variety of photonic coherence phenomena in passive and active coupled ring resonators. Specifically, the effective dispersive and absorptive steady-state response of coupled resonators is derived, and used to determine the conditions for coupled-resonator-induced transparency and absorption, lasing without gain, and cooperative cavity emission. These effects rely on coherent photon trapping, in direct analogy with coherent population trapping phenomena in atomic systems. We also demonstrate that the coupled-mode equations are formally identical to the two-level atom Schrodinger equation in the rotating-wave approximation, and use this result for the analysis of coupled-resonator photon dynamics. Notably, because these effects are predicted directly from coupled-mode theory, they are not unique to atoms, but rather are fundamental to systems of coherently coupled resonators.

  15. Study of non-equilibrium transport phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.

    1987-01-01

    Nonequilibrium phenomena due to real gas effects are very important features of low density hypersonic flows. The shock shape and emitted nonequilibrium radiation are identified as the bulk flow behavior parameters which are very sensitive to the nonequilibrium phenomena. These parameters can be measured in shock tubes, shock tunnels, and ballistic ranges and used to test the accuracy of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes. Since the CDF codes, by necessity, are based on multi-temperature models, it is also desirable to measure various temperatures, most importantly, the vibrational temperature. The CFD codes would require high temperature rate constants, which are not available at present. Experiments conducted at the NASA Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) facility reveal that radiation from steel contaminants overwhelm the radiation from the test gas. For the measurement of radiation and the chemical parameters, further investigation and then appropriate modifications of the EAST facility are required.

  16. Transport Phenomena During Equiaxed Solidification of Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; deGroh, H. C., III

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in modeling of transport phenomena during dendritic alloy solidification is reviewed. Starting from the basic theorems of volume averaging, a general multiphase modeling framework is outlined. This framework allows for the incorporation of a variety of microscale phenomena in the macroscopic transport equations. For the case of diffusion dominated solidification, a simplified set of model equations is examined in detail and validated through comparisons with numerous experimental data for both columnar and equiaxed dendritic growth. This provides a critical assessment of the various model assumptions. Models that include melt flow and solid phase transport are also discussed, although their validation is still at an early stage. Several numerical results are presented that illustrate some of the profound effects of convective transport on the final compositional and structural characteristics of a solidified part. Important issues that deserve continuing attention are identified.

  17. Oscillatory phenomena in a solar network region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiropoula, Georgia; Tziotziou, Kostas; Schwartz, Pavol; Heinzel, Petr

    2009-03-01

    We examine oscillatory phenomena in a solar network region from multi-wavelength, observations obtained by the ground-based Dutch Open Telescope (DOT), and by instruments on the spacecraft Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO). The observations were obtained during a coordinated observing campaign on October 14, 2005. The temporal variations of the intensities and velocities in two distinct regions of the quiet Sun were investigated: one containing several dark mottles and the other several bright points defining the network boundaries (NB). The aim is to find similarities and/or differences in the oscillatory phenomena observed in these two regions and in different spectral lines formed from the chromosphere to the transition region, as well as propagation characteristics of waves.

  18. Optimizing Laboratory Experiments for Dynamic Astrophysical Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D; Remington, B

    2005-09-13

    To make a laboratory experiment an efficient tool for the studying the dynamical astrophysical phenomena, it is desirable to perform them in such a way as to observe the scaling invariance with respect to the astrophysical system under study. Several examples are presented of such scalings in the area of magnetohydrodynamic phenomena, where a number of scaled experiments have been performed. A difficult issue of the effect of fine-scale dissipative structures on the global scale dissipation-free flow is discussed. The second part of the paper is concerned with much less developed area of the scalings relevant to the interaction of an ultra-intense laser pulse with a pre-formed plasma. The use of the symmetry arguments in such experiments is also considered.

  19. Coherence Phenomena in Coupled Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. D.; Chang, H.

    2004-01-01

    We predict a variety of photonic coherence phenomena in passive and active coupled ring resonators. Specifically, the effective dispersive and absorptive steady-state response of coupled resonators is derived, and used to determine the conditions for coupled-resonator-induced transparency and absorption, lasing without gain, and cooperative cavity emission. These effects rely on coherent photon trapping, in direct analogy with coherent population trapping phenomena in atomic systems. We also demonstrate that the coupled-mode equations are formally identical to the two-level atom Schrodinger equation in the rotating-wave approximation, and use this result for the analysis of coupled-resonator photon dynamics. Notably, because these effects are predicted directly from coupled-mode theory, they are not unique to atoms, but rather are fundamental to systems of coherently coupled resonators.

  20. Frustrated pretransitional phenomena in aperiodic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariette, C.; Frantsuzov, Ilya; Wang, Bo; Guérin, L.; Rabiller, P.; Hollingsworth, Mark D.; Toudic, B.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on symmetry breaking in the aperiodic inclusion compound n -octadecane/urea and its isotopomer n -octadecane/urea-d4. The high-symmetry phase is described by a hexagonal rank-4 superspace group. Pretransitional phenomena in this crystallographic superspace reveal competing short-range-ordering phenomena within the high-symmetry phase. Very high-resolution diffraction data show that critical scattering appears at inequivalent points within the four-dimensional Brillouin zone, although the first phase transition at Tc1 near 158 K implies the condensation at only one of those points. The resulting superspace group remains of dimension 4. Two other phase transitions are reported at Tc2= 152.8 (4 ) K and Tc3= 109 (4 ) K in n -octadecane/urea-d4. The two low-symmetry phases that arise are described by rank-5 superspace groups.

  1. Observational data needs for plasma phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedner, M. B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Bright comets display a rich variety of interesting plasma phenomena which occur over an enormous range of spatial scales, and which require different observational techniques to be studied effectively. Wide-angle photography of high time resolution is probably the best method of studying the phenomenon of largest known scale: the plasma tail disconnection event (DE), which has been attributed to magnetic reconnection at interplanetary sector boundary crossings. These structures usually accelerate as they recede from the head region and observed velocities are typically in the range 50 V km/s. They are often visible for several days following the time of disconnection, and are sometimes seen out past 0.2 AU from the cometary head. The following areas pertaining to plasma phenomena in the ionoshere are addressed: the existence, size, and heliocentric distance variations of the contact surface, and the observational signatures of magnetic reconnection at sector boundary crossings.

  2. Parity-time-symmetric quantum critical phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Yuto; Furukawa, Shunsuke; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic non-conservative systems with parity-time (PT) symmetric gain–loss structures can exhibit unusual spontaneous symmetry breaking that accompanies spectral singularity. Recent studies on PT symmetry in optics and weakly interacting open quantum systems have revealed intriguing physical properties, yet many-body correlations still play no role. Here by extending the idea of PT symmetry to strongly correlated many-body systems, we report that a combination of spectral singularity and quantum criticality yields an exotic universality class which has no counterpart in known critical phenomena. Moreover, we find unconventional low-dimensional quantum criticality, where superfluid correlation is anomalously enhanced owing to non-monotonic renormalization group flows in a PT-symmetry-broken quantum critical phase, in stark contrast to the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless paradigm. Our findings can be experimentally tested in ultracold atoms and predict critical phenomena beyond the Hermitian paradigm of quantum many-body physics. PMID:28593991

  3. Spontaneous pneumocephalus presenting with alien limb phenomena.

    PubMed

    Nash, R; Wilson, M; Adams, M; Kitchen, N

    2012-07-01

    Spontaneous pneumocephalus is a rare condition that has been reported infrequently. Alien limb syndrome is an uncommon phenomenon most often seen in patients with frontal and callosal lesions. Case report of a patient with pneumocephalus presenting with alien limb syndrome. The patient underwent successful surgical management. A literature review and discussion of aspects of this presentation are also included. In this case, a spontaneous pneumocephalus has formed a frontal space-occupying lesion and presented with alien limb phenomena.

  4. Multiscale Phenomena in Biology and Scientific Perspectivism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callebaut, Werner

    2009-09-01

    This paper is a plea for considering scientific perspectivism as the appropriate philosophical stance to deal with a number of epistemological, methodological, and ontological challenges modelers of complex, multi-scale phenomena are facing. Broadly speaking, perspectivism is the philosophical position that one's access to the world through perception, experience, and reason is possible only through one's own perspective and interpretation. Scientific perspectivism extends this position to scientific.

  5. Understanding Natural Language Descriptions of Physical Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-07

    continue pouring coffee in it. People know all these things and can explain them with ease to others, but in most cases mathematical formulas are not...a part of these explanations. Instead of producing mathematical formulas or using formal representation languages, people use their own natural...in all these cases is on developing a conceptual understanding of the phenomena. The fact that human readers can learn about the physical world

  6. Mirage phenomena in superconducting quantum corrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, M.; Kampf, A. P.

    2005-09-01

    [Dedicated to Bernhard Mühlschlegel on the occasion ofhis 80th birthday]We investigate the local density of states and the order parameter structure inside an elliptic quantum corral on surfaces of isotropic and anisotropic superconductors. The Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations are solved in the presence of non-magnetic and magnetic impurities. We observe and discuss a variety of mirage and anti-mirage phenomena, which specifically reflect the nature of the superconducting pairing state.

  7. Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and Associated Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, P. K.

    2008-10-01

    The Sun is the most powerful radio waves emitting object in the sky. The first documented recognition of the reception of radio waves from the Sun was made in 1942 by Hey.15 Since then solar radio observations, from ground-based and space-based instruments, have played a major role in understanding the physics of the Sun and fundamental physical processes of the solar radio emitting phenomena...

  8. Low-gravity experiments in critical phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moldover, Michael R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of anomalous thermodynamic, transport, and structural phenomena in multibody systems near critical points are reviewed. The nomenclature used to describe critical points is explained; theoretical predictions of the thermodynamic properties of bulk systems are presented; and experimental tests of these predictions systems are discussed, considering equilibration and gravity effects in fluid systems and emphasizing the value of experiments conducted in a reduced-gravity environment. Several such experiments are described, and the available academic-research opportunities are briefly surveyed.

  9. Breakdown phenomena in high power klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoyt, E.W.; Lebacqz, J.V.; Lee, T.G.

    1988-03-01

    In the course of developing new high peak power klystrons at SLAC, high electric fields in several regions of these devices have become an important source of vacuum breakdown phenomena. In addition, a renewed interest in breakdown phenomena for nanosecond pulse, multi-megavolt per centimeter fields has been sparked by recent R and D work in the area of gigawatt RF sources. The most important regions of electrical breakdown are in the output cavity gap area, the RF ceramic windows, and the gun ceramic insulator. The details of the observed breakdown in these regions, experiments performed to understand the phenomena and solutions found to alleviate the problems will be discussed. Recently experiments have been performed on a new prototype R and D klystron. Peak electric fields across the output cavity gaps of this klystron exceed 2 MV/cm. The effect of peak field duration (i.e. pulse width) on the onset of breakdown have been measured. The pulse widths varied from tens of nanoseconds to microseconds. Results from these experiments will be presented. The failure of ceramic RF windows due to multipactor and puncturing was an important problem to overcome in order that our high power klystrons would have a useful life expectancy. Consequently many studies and tests were made to understand and alleviate window breakdown phenomena. Some of the results in this area, especially the effects of surface coatings, window materials and processing techniques and their effects on breakdown will be discussed. Another important source of klystron failure in the recent past at SLAC has been the puncturing of the high voltage ceramic insulator in the gun region. A way of alleviating this problem has been found although the actual cause of the puncturing is not yet clear. The ''practical'' solution to this breakdown process will be described and a possible mechanism for the puncturing will be presented. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Natural phenomena hazards site characterization criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The criteria and recommendations in this standard shall apply to site characterization for the purpose of mitigating Natural Phenomena Hazards (wind, floods, landslide, earthquake, volcano, etc.) in all DOE facilities covered by DOE Order 5480.28. Criteria for site characterization not related to NPH are not included unless necessary for clarification. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology, and geotechnical studies.

  11. Seismoelectric Phenomena in Fluid-Saturated Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Block, G I; Harris, J G

    2005-04-22

    Seismoelectric phenomena in sediments arise from acoustic wave-induced fluid motion in the pore space, which perturbs the electrostatic equilibrium of the electric double layer on the grain surfaces. Experimental techniques and the apparatus built to study this electrokinetic (EK) effect are described and outcomes for studies of seismoelectric phenomena in loose glass microspheres and medium-grain sand are presented. By varying the NaCl concentration in the pore fluid, we measured the conductivity dependence of two kinds of EK behavior: (1) the electric fields generated within the samples by the passage of transmitted acoustic waves, and (2) the electromagnetic wave produced at the fluid-sediment interface by the incident acoustic wave. Both phenomena are caused by relative fluid motion in the sediment pores--this feature is characteristic of poroelastic (Biot) media, but not predicted by either viscoelastic fluid or solid models. A model of plane-wave reflection from a fluid-sediment interface using EK-Biot theory leads to theoretical predictions that compare well to the experimental data for both sand and glass microspheres.

  12. Physical mechanism of membrane osmotic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Guell, D.C.; Brenner, H.

    1996-09-01

    The microscale, physicomechanical cause of osmosis and osmotic pressure in systems involving permeable and semipermeable membranes is not well understood, and no fully satisfactory mechanism has been offered to explain these phenomena. A general theory, albeit limited to dilute systems of inert, noninteracting solute particles, is presented which demonstrates that short-range forces exerted by the membrane on the dispersed solute particles constitute the origin of osmotic phenomena. At equilibrium, the greater total force exerted by the membrane on those solute particles present in the reservoir containing the more concentrated of the two solutions bathing the membrane is balanced by a macroscopically observable pressure difference between the two reservoirs. The latter constitutes the so-called osmotic pressure difference. Under nonequilibrium conditions, the membrane-solute force is transmitted to the solvent, thus driving the convective flow of solvent observed macroscopically as osmosis. While elements of these ideas have been proposed previously in various forms, the general demonstration offered here of the physicomechanical source of osmotic phenomena is novel. Beyond the purely academic interest that exists in establishing a mechanical understanding of osmotic pressure, the analysis lays the foundation underlying a quantitative theory of osmosis in dilute, nonequilibrium systems outlined in a companion paper.

  13. Thermal transport phenomena in nanoparticle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, Annalisa; Fasano, Matteo; Bozorg Bigdeli, Masoud; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Asinari, Pietro

    2016-12-01

    Nanoparticle suspensions in liquids have received great attention, as they may offer an approach to enhance thermophysical properties of base fluids. A good variety of applications in engineering and biomedicine has been investigated with the aim of exploiting the above potential. However, the multiscale nature of nanosuspensions raises several issues in defining a comprehensive modelling framework, incorporating relevant molecular details and much larger scale phenomena, such as particle aggregation and their dynamics. The objectives of the present topical review is to report and discuss the main heat and mass transport phenomena ruling macroscopic behaviour of nanosuspensions, arising from molecular details. Relevant experimental results are included and properly put in the context of recent observations and theoretical studies, which solved long-standing debates about thermophysical properties enhancement. Major transport phenomena are discussed and in-depth analysis is carried out for highlighting the role of geometrical (nanoparticle shape, size, aggregation, concentration), chemical (pH, surfactants, functionalization) and physical parameters (temperature, density). We finally overview several computational techniques available at different scales with the aim of drawing the attention on the need for truly multiscale predictive models. This may help the development of next-generation nanoparticle suspensions and their rational use in thermal applications.

  14. Stability and restoration phenomena in competitive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uechi, Lisa; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2013-10-01

    A conservation law along with stability, recovering phenomena, and characteristic patterns of a nonlinear dynamical system have been studied and applied to physical, biological, and ecological systems. In our previous study, we proposed a system of symmetric 2n-dimensional conserved nonlinear differential equations. In this paper, competitive systems described by a 2-dimensional nonlinear dynamical (ND) model with external perturbations are applied to population cycles and recovering phenomena of systems from microbes to mammals. The famous 10-year cycle of population density of Canadian lynx and snowshoe hare is numerically analyzed. We find that a nonlinear dynamical system with a conservation law is stable and generates a characteristic rhythm (cycle) of population density, which we call the standard rhythm of a nonlinear dynamical system. The stability and restoration phenomena are strongly related to a conservation law and the balance of a system. The standard rhythm of population density is a manifestation of the survival of the fittest to the balance of a nonlinear dynamical system.

  15. An interpretation of passive containment cooling phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Bum-Jin; Kang, Chang-Sun,

    1995-09-01

    A simplified interpretation model for the cooling capability of the Westinghouse type PCCS is proposed in this paper. The PCCS domain was phenomenologically divided into 3 regions; water entrance effect region, asymptotic region, and air entrance effect region. The phenomena in the asymptotic region is focused in this paper. Due to the very large height to thickness ratio of the water film, the length of the asymptotic region is estimated to be over 90% of the whole domain. Using the analogy between heat and mass transfer phenomena in a turbulent situation, a new dependent variable combining temperature and vapor mass fraction was defined. The similarity between the PCCS phenomena, which contains the sensible and latent heat transfer, and the buoyant air flow on a vertical heated plate is derived. The modified buoyant coefficient and thermal conductivity were defined. Using these newly defined variable and coefficients, the modified correlation for the interfacial heat fluxes and the ratios of latent heat transfer to sensible heat transfer is established. To verify the accuracy of the correlation, the results of this study were compared with the results of other numerical analyses performed for the same configuration and they are well within the range of 15% difference.

  16. Lysozyme Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    To the crystallographer, this may not be a diamond but it is just as priceless. A Lysozyme crystal grown in orbit looks great under a microscope, but the real test is X-ray crystallography. The colors are caused by polarizing filters. Proteins can form crystals generated by rows and columns of molecules that form up like soldiers on a parade ground. Shining X-rays through a crystal will produce a pattern of dots that can be decoded to reveal the arrangement of the atoms in the molecules making up the crystal. Like the troops in formation, uniformity and order are everything in X-ray crystallography. X-rays have much shorter wavelengths than visible light, so the best looking crystals under the microscope won't necessarily pass muster under the X-rays. In order to have crystals to use for X-ray diffraction studies, crystals need to be fairly large and well ordered. Scientists also need lots of crystals since exposure to air, the process of X-raying them, and other factors destroy them. Growing protein crystals in space has yielded striking results. Lysozyme's structure is well known and it has become a standard in many crystallization studies on Earth and in space.

  17. An Undergraduate Laboratory Exercise for Studying Kinetics of Batch Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louhi­-Kultanen, Marjatta; Han, Bing; Nurkka, Annikka; Hatakka, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The present work describes an undergraduate laboratory exercise for improving understanding of fundamental phenomena in cooling crystallization. The exercise of nucleation and crystal growth kinetics supports learning of theories and models presented in lectures and calculation exercises. The teaching methodology incorporates precepts the…

  18. An Undergraduate Laboratory Exercise for Studying Kinetics of Batch Crystallization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louhi­-Kultanen, Marjatta; Han, Bing; Nurkka, Annikka; Hatakka, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The present work describes an undergraduate laboratory exercise for improving understanding of fundamental phenomena in cooling crystallization. The exercise of nucleation and crystal growth kinetics supports learning of theories and models presented in lectures and calculation exercises. The teaching methodology incorporates precepts the…

  19. RNA Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  20. RNA Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  1. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  2. Local polarization phenomena in In-doped CdTe x-ray detector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Toshiyuki; Sato, Kenji; Ishida, Shinichiro; Kiri, Motosada; Hirooka, Megumi; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kanamori, Hitoshi

    1995-10-01

    Local polarization phenomena have been studied in detector arrays with the detector element size of 500 {micro}m x 500 {micro}m, which are fabricated from high-resistivity In-doped CdTe crystals grown by the vertical Bridgman technique. It has been found for the first time that a polarization effect, which is characterized by a progressive decrease of the pulse counting rate with increasing photon fluence, strongly depends on the detector elements, that is, the portion of crystals used. The influence of several parameters, such as the applied electric field strength, time, and temperature, on this local polarization effect is also investigated. From the photoluminescence measurements of the inhomogeneity of In dopant, it is concluded that the local polarization effect observed here originates from a deep level associated with In dopant in CdTe crystals.

  3. Computational crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Altan, Irem; Charbonneau, Patrick; Snell, Edward H.

    2016-01-01

    Crystallization is a key step in macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. While a robust theoretical treatment of the process is available, due to the complexity of the system, the experimental process is still largely one of trial and error. In this article, efforts in the field are discussed together with a theoretical underpinning using a solubility phase diagram. Prior knowledge has been used to develop tools that computationally predict the crystallization outcome and define mutational approaches that enhance the likelihood of crystallization. For the most part these tools are based on binary outcomes (crystal or no crystal), and the full information contained in an assembly of crystallization screening experiments is lost. The potential of this additional information is illustrated by examples where new biological knowledge can be obtained and where a target can be sub-categorized to predict which class of reagents provides the crystallization driving force. Computational analysis of crystallization requires complete and correctly formatted data. While massive crystallization screening efforts are under way, the data available from many of these studies are sparse. The potential for this data and the steps needed to realize this potential are discussed. PMID:26792536

  4. Computational crystallization.

    PubMed

    Altan, Irem; Charbonneau, Patrick; Snell, Edward H

    2016-07-15

    Crystallization is a key step in macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. While a robust theoretical treatment of the process is available, due to the complexity of the system, the experimental process is still largely one of trial and error. In this article, efforts in the field are discussed together with a theoretical underpinning using a solubility phase diagram. Prior knowledge has been used to develop tools that computationally predict the crystallization outcome and define mutational approaches that enhance the likelihood of crystallization. For the most part these tools are based on binary outcomes (crystal or no crystal), and the full information contained in an assembly of crystallization screening experiments is lost. The potential of this additional information is illustrated by examples where new biological knowledge can be obtained and where a target can be sub-categorized to predict which class of reagents provides the crystallization driving force. Computational analysis of crystallization requires complete and correctly formatted data. While massive crystallization screening efforts are under way, the data available from many of these studies are sparse. The potential for this data and the steps needed to realize this potential are discussed.

  5. Crystallization mechanisms of acicular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puel, François; Verdurand, Elodie; Taulelle, Pascal; Bebon, Christine; Colson, Didier; Klein, Jean-Paul; Veesler, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    In this contribution, we present an experimental investigation of the growth of four different organic molecules produced at industrial scale with a view to understand the crystallization mechanism of acicular or needle-like crystals. For all organic crystals studied in this article, layer-by-layer growth of the lateral faces is very slow and clear, as soon as the supersaturation is high enough, there is competition between growth and surface-activated secondary nucleation. This gives rise to pseudo-twinned crystals composed of several needle individuals aligned along a crystallographic axis; this is explained by regular over- and inter-growths as in the case of twinning. And when supersaturation is even higher, nucleation is fast and random. In an industrial continuous crystallization, the rapid growth of needle-like crystals is to be avoided as it leads to fragile crystals or needles, which can be partly broken or totally detached from the parent crystals especially along structural anisotropic axis corresponding to weaker chemical bonds, thus leading to slower growing faces. When an activated mechanism is involved such as a secondary surface nucleation, it is no longer possible to obtain a steady state. Therefore, the crystal number, size and habit vary significantly with time, leading to troubles in the downstream processing operations and to modifications of the final solid-specific properties. These results provide valuable information on the unique crystallization mechanisms of acicular crystals, and show that it is important to know these threshold and critical values when running a crystallizer in order to obtain easy-to-handle crystals.

  6. Study of interfacial phenomena for bio/chemical sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Hwall

    This work presents the fundamental study of biological and chemical interfacial phenomena and (bio)chemical sensing applications using high frequency resonator arrays. To realize a versatile (bio)chemical sensing system for the fundamental study as well as their practical applications, the following three distinct components were studied and developed: i) detection platforms with high sensitivity, ii) novel innovative sensing materials with high selectivity, iii) analytical model for data interpretation. 8-pixel micromachined quartz crystal resonator (muQCR) arrays with a fundamental resonance frequency of 60 ¡V 90 MHz have been used to provide a reliable detection platform with high sensitivity. Room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) has been explored and integrated into the sensing system as a smart chemical sensing material. The use of nanoporous gold (np-Au) enables the combination of the resonator and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for both quantitative and qualitative measurement. A statistical model for the characterization of resonator behavior to study the protein adsorption kinetics is developed by random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach with the integration of an effective surface depletion theory. The investigation of the adsorption kinetics of blood proteins is reported as the fundamental study of biological phenomena using the proposed sensing system. The aim of this work is to study different aspects of protein adsorption and kinetics of adsorption process with blood proteins on different surfaces. We specifically focus on surface depletion effect in conjunction with the RSA model to explain the observed adsorption isotherm characteristics. A number of case studies on protein adsorption conducted using the proposed sensing system has been discussed. Effort is specifically made to understand adsorption kinetics, and the effect of surface on the adsorption process as well as the properties of the adsorbed protein layer. The second half of the

  7. Microgravity Transport Phenomena Experiment (MTPE) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Transport Phenomena Experiment (MTPE) is a fluids experiment supported by the Fundamentals in Biotechnology program in association with the Human Exploration and Development of Space (BEDS) initiative. The MTP Experiment will investigate fluid transport phenomena both in ground based experiments and in the microgravity environment. Many fluid transport processes are affected by gravity. Osmotic flux kinetics in planar membrane systems have been shown to be influenced by gravimetric orientation, either through convective mixing caused by unstably stratified fluid layers, or through a stable fluid boundary layer structure that forms in association with the membrane. Coupled transport phenomena also show gravity related effects. Coefficients associated with coupled transport processes are defined in terms of a steady state condition. Buoyancy (gravity) driven convection interferes with the attainment of steady state, and the measurement of coupled processes. The MTP Experiment measures the kinetics of molecular migration that occurs in fluids, in response to the application of various driving potentials. Three separate driving potentials may be applied to the MTP Experiment fluids, either singly or in combination. The driving potentials include chemical potential, thermal potential, and electrical potential. Two separate fluid arrangements are used to study membrane mediated and bulk fluid transport phenomena. Transport processes of interest in membrane mediated systems include diffusion, osmosis, and streaming potential. Bulk fluid processes of interest include coupled phenomena such as the Soret Effect, Dufour Effect, Donnan Effect, and thermal diffusion potential. MTP Experiments are performed in the Microgravity Transport Apparatus (MTA), an instrument that has been developed specifically for precision measurement of transport processes. Experiment fluids are contained within the MTA fluid cells, designed to create a one dimensional flow geometry

  8. Simulating physical phenomena with a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Gerardo

    2003-03-01

    In a keynote speech at MIT in 1981 Richard Feynman raised some provocative questions in connection to the exact simulation of physical systems using a special device named a ``quantum computer'' (QC). At the time it was known that deterministic simulations of quantum phenomena in classical computers required a number of resources that scaled exponentially with the number of degrees of freedom, and also that the probabilistic simulation of certain quantum problems were limited by the so-called sign or phase problem, a problem believed to be of exponential complexity. Such a QC was intended to mimick physical processes exactly the same as Nature. Certainly, remarks coming from such an influential figure generated widespread interest in these ideas, and today after 21 years there are still some open questions. What kind of physical phenomena can be simulated with a QC?, How?, and What are its limitations? Addressing and attempting to answer these questions is what this talk is about. Definitively, the goal of physics simulation using controllable quantum systems (``physics imitation'') is to exploit quantum laws to advantage, and thus accomplish efficient imitation. Fundamental is the connection between a quantum computational model and a physical system by transformations of operator algebras. This concept is a necessary one because in Quantum Mechanics each physical system is naturally associated with a language of operators and thus can be considered as a possible model of quantum computation. The remarkable result is that an arbitrary physical system is naturally simulatable by another physical system (or QC) whenever a ``dictionary'' between the two operator algebras exists. I will explain these concepts and address some of Feynman's concerns regarding the simulation of fermionic systems. Finally, I will illustrate the main ideas by imitating simple physical phenomena borrowed from condensed matter physics using quantum algorithms, and present experimental

  9. Rod Driven Frequency Entrainment and Resonance Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Salchow, Christina; Strohmeier, Daniel; Klee, Sascha; Jannek, Dunja; Schiecke, Karin; Witte, Herbert; Nehorai, Arye; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A controversy exists on photic driving in the human visual cortex evoked by intermittent photic stimulation. Frequency entrainment and resonance phenomena are reported for frequencies higher than 12 Hz in some studies while missing in others. We hypothesized that this might be due to different experimental conditions, since both high and low intensity light stimulation were used. However, most studies do not report radiometric measurements, which makes it impossible to categorize the stimulation according to photopic, mesopic, and scotopic vision. Low intensity light stimulation might lead to scotopic vision, where rod perception dominates. In this study, we investigated photic driving for rod-dominated visual input under scotopic conditions. Twelve healthy volunteers were stimulated with low intensity light flashes at 20 stimulation frequencies, leading to rod activation only. The frequencies were multiples of the individual alpha frequency (α) of each volunteer in the range from 0.40 to 2.30(∗)α. Three hundred and six-channel whole head magnetoencephalography recordings were analyzed in time, frequency, and spatiotemporal domains with the Topographic Matching Pursuit algorithm. We found resonance phenomena and frequency entrainment for stimulations at or close to the individual alpha frequency (0.90-1.10(∗)α) and half of the alpha frequency (0.40-0.55(∗)α). No signs of resonance and frequency entrainment phenomena were revealed around 2.00(∗)α. Instead, on-responses at the beginning and off-responses at the end of each stimulation train were observed for the first time in a photic driving experiment at frequencies of 1.30-2.30(∗)α, indicating that the flicker fusion threshold was reached. All results, the resonance and entrainment as well as the fusion effects, provide evidence for rod-dominated photic driving in the visual cortex.

  10. Rod Driven Frequency Entrainment and Resonance Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Salchow, Christina; Strohmeier, Daniel; Klee, Sascha; Jannek, Dunja; Schiecke, Karin; Witte, Herbert; Nehorai, Arye; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A controversy exists on photic driving in the human visual cortex evoked by intermittent photic stimulation. Frequency entrainment and resonance phenomena are reported for frequencies higher than 12 Hz in some studies while missing in others. We hypothesized that this might be due to different experimental conditions, since both high and low intensity light stimulation were used. However, most studies do not report radiometric measurements, which makes it impossible to categorize the stimulation according to photopic, mesopic, and scotopic vision. Low intensity light stimulation might lead to scotopic vision, where rod perception dominates. In this study, we investigated photic driving for rod-dominated visual input under scotopic conditions. Twelve healthy volunteers were stimulated with low intensity light flashes at 20 stimulation frequencies, leading to rod activation only. The frequencies were multiples of the individual alpha frequency (α) of each volunteer in the range from 0.40 to 2.30∗α. Three hundred and six-channel whole head magnetoencephalography recordings were analyzed in time, frequency, and spatiotemporal domains with the Topographic Matching Pursuit algorithm. We found resonance phenomena and frequency entrainment for stimulations at or close to the individual alpha frequency (0.90–1.10∗α) and half of the alpha frequency (0.40–0.55∗α). No signs of resonance and frequency entrainment phenomena were revealed around 2.00∗α. Instead, on-responses at the beginning and off-responses at the end of each stimulation train were observed for the first time in a photic driving experiment at frequencies of 1.30–2.30∗α, indicating that the flicker fusion threshold was reached. All results, the resonance and entrainment as well as the fusion effects, provide evidence for rod-dominated photic driving in the visual cortex. PMID:27588002

  11. Fast Particle Methods for Multiscale Phenomena Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koumoutsakos, P.; Wray, A.; Shariff, K.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    We are developing particle methods oriented at improving computational modeling capabilities of multiscale physical phenomena in : (i) high Reynolds number unsteady vortical flows, (ii) particle laden and interfacial flows, (iii)molecular dynamics studies of nanoscale droplets and studies of the structure, functions, and evolution of the earliest living cell. The unifying computational approach involves particle methods implemented in parallel computer architectures. The inherent adaptivity, robustness and efficiency of particle methods makes them a multidisciplinary computational tool capable of bridging the gap of micro-scale and continuum flow simulations. Using efficient tree data structures, multipole expansion algorithms, and improved particle-grid interpolation, particle methods allow for simulations using millions of computational elements, making possible the resolution of a wide range of length and time scales of these important physical phenomena.The current challenges in these simulations are in : [i] the proper formulation of particle methods in the molecular and continuous level for the discretization of the governing equations [ii] the resolution of the wide range of time and length scales governing the phenomena under investigation. [iii] the minimization of numerical artifacts that may interfere with the physics of the systems under consideration. [iv] the parallelization of processes such as tree traversal and grid-particle interpolations We are conducting simulations using vortex methods, molecular dynamics and smooth particle hydrodynamics, exploiting their unifying concepts such as : the solution of the N-body problem in parallel computers, highly accurate particle-particle and grid-particle interpolations, parallel FFT's and the formulation of processes such as diffusion in the context of particle methods. This approach enables us to transcend among seemingly unrelated areas of research.

  12. Shock Tunnel Studies of Scramjet Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalker, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Work focussed on a large number of preliminary studies of supersonic combustion in a simple combustion duct - thrust nozzle combination, investigating effects of Mach number, equivalence ratio, combustor divergence, fuel injecting angle and other parameters with an influence on the combustion process. This phase lasted for some three or four years, during which strongest emphasis was placed on responding to the request for preliminary experimental information on high enthalpy effects, to support the technology maturation activities of the NASP program. As the need for preliminary data became less urgent, it was possible to conduct more systematic studies of high enthalpy combustion phenomena, and to initiate other projects aimed at improving the facilities and instrumentation used for studying scramjet phenomena at high enthalpies. The combustion studies were particularly directed towards hypersonic combustion, and to the effects of injecting fuel along the combustion chamber wall. A substantial effort was directed towards a study of the effect of scale on the supersonic combustion process. The influence of wave phenomena (both compression waves and expansion waves) on the realization of thrust from a supersonic combustion process was also investigated. The effect of chemical kinetics was looked into, particularly as it affected the composition of the test flow provided by a ground facility. The effect of injection of the fuel through wall orifices was compared with injection from a strut spanning the stream, and the effect of heating the fuel prior to injection was investigated. Studies of fuel-air mixing by shock impingement were also done, as well as mass spectrometer surveys of a combustion wake. The use of hypersonic nozzles with an expansion tube was investigated. A new method was developed for measuring the forces acting of a model in less than one millisecond. Also included in this report are listings of published journal papers and conference presentations.

  13. Complex Synchronization Phenomena in Ecological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Lewi; Olinky, Ronen; Blasius, Bernd; Huppert, Amit; Cazelles, Bernard

    2002-07-01

    Ecological and biological systems provide us with many striking examples of synchronization phenomena. Here we discuss a number of intriguing cases and attempt to explain them taking advantage of a modelling framework. One main focus will concern synchronized ecological end epidemiological cycles which have Uniform Phase growth associated with their regular recurrence, and Chaotic Amplitudes - a feature we term UPCA. Examples come from different areas and include decadal cycles of small mammals, recurrent viral epidemics such as childhood infections (eg., measles), and seasonally driven phytoplankton blooms observed in lakes and the oceans. A more detailed theoretical analysis of seasonally synchronized chaotic population cycles is presented.

  14. Quenching phenomena in natural circulation loop

    SciTech Connect

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Ishida, Naoki

    1995-09-01

    Quenching phenomena has been investigated experimentally using circulation loop of liquid nitrogen. During the quenching under natural circulation, the heat transfer mode changes from film boiling to nucleate boiling, and at the same time flux changes with time depending on the vapor generation rate and related two-phase flow characteristics. Moreover, density wave oscillations occur under a certain operating condition, which is closely related to the dynamic behavior of the cooling curve. The experimental results indicates that the occurrence of the density wave oscillation induces the deterioration of effective cooling of the heat surface in the film and the transition boiling regions, which results in the decrease in the quenching velocity.

  15. Heavenly Bodies and Phenomena in Petroglyphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokhatyan, Karen

    2016-12-01

    In Armenian culture are amply reflected realities connected with Universe. Their figurative expressions are also petroglyphs in which there are representations of solar signs, swastika, Moon crescend, planets, stars, star groups, constellations, Milky Way, Earth. Among heavenly and atmospheric phenomena are: eclipce, meteor, comet, ligthning, cloud, rain and rainbow. There are many products of scientific thinking: stellar maps, calendars, compasses, astronomical records, Zodiac signs and ideograms. Thousands of the Armenian petroglyphs that were created millennia ago by an indigenous ethnos – Armenians, point to the significant place of celestial bodies and luminaries, especially the Sun, stars, and stellar constellations in our ancestors' cosmological perceptions.

  16. Electrodiffusion phenomena in neuroscience: a neglected companion.

    PubMed

    Savtchenko, Leonid P; Poo, Mu Ming; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2017-09-19

    The emerging technological revolution in genetically encoded molecular sensors and super-resolution imaging provides neuroscientists with a pass to the real-time nano-world. On this small scale, however, classical principles of electrophysiology do not always apply. This is in large part because the nanoscopic heterogeneities in ionic concentrations and the local electric fields associated with individual ions and their movement can no longer be ignored. Here, we review basic principles of molecular electrodiffusion in the cellular environment of organized brain tissue. We argue that accurate interpretation of physiological observations on the nanoscale requires a better understanding of the underlying electrodiffusion phenomena.

  17. Relating Macroscopic Thermal Phenomena with Molecular Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Priscilla W.

    2002-03-01

    A series of observations and activities have been developed to help students enrich their understanding of how physicists can use model building to construct self-consistent models of physical reality.* This talk will describe the instructional use of integrated microcomputer-based laboratory measurements of macroscopic phenomena and digital video analysis of simulated microscopic events to help students understand the ideal gas law, the first law of thermodynamics, and heat engines. *Workshop Physics Activity Guide (Module 3), P. Laws, (John Wiley and Sons, Inc., NY, 1997).

  18. On periodicity of solar wind phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, V. K.; Joshi, G. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the rate of occurrence of solar wind phenomena observed between 1972-1984 using power spectrum analysis. The data have been taken from the high speed solar wind (HSSW) streams catalogue published by Mavromichalaki et al. (1988). The power spectrum analysis of HSSW events indicate that HSSW stream events have a periodicity of 9 days. This periodicity of HSSW events is 1/3 of the 27 days period of coronal holes which are the major source of solar wind events. In our opinion the 9 days period may be the energy build up time to produce the HSSW stream events.

  19. Advances in modelling of condensation phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.S.; Zaltsgendler, E.; Hanna, B.

    1997-07-01

    The physical parameters in the modelling of condensation phenomena in the CANDU reactor system codes are discussed. The experimental programs used for thermal-hydraulic code validation in the Canadian nuclear industry are briefly described. The modelling of vapour generation and in particular condensation plays a key role in modelling of postulated reactor transients. The condensation models adopted in the current state-of-the-art two-fluid CANDU reactor thermal-hydraulic system codes (CATHENA and TUF) are described. As examples of the modelling challenges faced, the simulation of a cold water injection experiment by CATHENA and the simulation of a condensation induced water hammer experiment by TUF are described.

  20. Epileptic phenomena in bismuth toxic encephalopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Buge, A; Supino-Viterbo, V; Rancurel, G; Pontes, C

    1981-01-01

    Seventy patients admitted to hospital with bismuth encephalopathy had repeated clinical and EEG examinations. All the patients exhibited myoclonic jerks, but no paroxysmal features ever appeared on EEG. Computed tomography showed cortical hyperdensities. Seizures were observed in 22 patients, but epileptic EEG patterns appeared only when the bismuth blood level was below 1500 microgram/1. It is suggested that a high cortical intracellular bismuth concentration induces a "cortical inhibition" which causes suppression of physiological electrical brain activity, the absence of EEG paroxysmal phenomena during myoclonic jerks, and explains the rarity of epileptic seizures. Images PMID:7205307

  1. Prehistoric Phenomena and Self-referentiality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Junhua

    By terms-allowed-in-types capacity, the Logic of Proofs LP enjoys a system of advanced combinatory terms, while including types of the form t:φ(t), which have self-referential meanings. This paper suggests a research on possible S4 measures of self-referentiality introduced by this capacity. Specifically, we define "prehistoric phenomena" in G3s, a Gentzen-style formulation of modal logic S4. A special phenomenon, namely, "left prehistoric loop", is then shown to be necessary for self-referentiality in realizations of S4 theorems in LP.

  2. Crystal Data

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 3 NIST Crystal Data (PC database for purchase)   NIST Crystal Data contains chemical, physical, and crystallographic information useful to characterize more than 237,671 inorganic and organic crystalline materials. The data include the standard cell parameters, cell volume, space group number and symbol, calculated density, chemical formula, chemical name, and classification by chemical type.

  3. Growth dynamics of isotactic polypropylene single crystals during isothermal crystallization from a miscible polymeric solvent.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rujul; Keawwattana, Wirunya; Kyu, Thein

    2004-02-22

    The present article presents a spatiotemporal growth of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) single crystals, melt crystallized from a polymeric solvent, i.e., poly (ethylene octene) copolymer that is known to be miscible with iPP. Optical and atomic force microscopic investigations reveal that the melt grown single crystals of iPP develop in the form of two parallel rows of crystal lamellae, but these crystals merge at the tips. To elucidate the mechanism of these emerging parallel rows of iPP crystals, a phase field model pertaining to solidification phenomena has been employed that involves a nonconserved crystal order parameter and a chain-tilting angle. This phase field model is based on the free energy of crystallization, having an asymmetric double well, and a tensorial surface free energy of the crystal interface coupled with a curvature elastic free energy that is possessed by the solid-liquid interface. The spatiotemporal simulation of iPP single crystal growth has been carried out on a square lattice based on the finite difference method for spatial steps and an explicit method for temporal steps with a periodic boundary condition. The appearance of the seemingly twin crystal is captured in the simulation, which may be attributed to the sector demarcation that is taking place in the anisotropically growing single crystal of iPP.

  4. Growth dynamics of isotactic polypropylene single crystals during isothermal crystallization from a miscible polymeric solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rujul; Keawwattana, Wirunya; Kyu, Thein

    2004-02-01

    The present article presents a spatiotemporal growth of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) single crystals, melt crystallized from a polymeric solvent, i.e., poly (ethylene octene) copolymer that is known to be miscible with iPP. Optical and atomic force microscopic investigations reveal that the melt grown single crystals of iPP develop in the form of two parallel rows of crystal lamellae, but these crystals merge at the tips. To elucidate the mechanism of these emerging parallel rows of iPP crystals, a phase field model pertaining to solidification phenomena has been employed that involves a nonconserved crystal order parameter and a chain-tilting angle. This phase field model is based on the free energy of crystallization, having an asymmetric double well, and a tensorial surface free energy of the crystal interface coupled with a curvature elastic free energy that is possessed by the solid-liquid interface. The spatiotemporal simulation of iPP single crystal growth has been carried out on a square lattice based on the finite difference method for spatial steps and an explicit method for temporal steps with a periodic boundary condition. The appearance of the seemingly twin crystal is captured in the simulation, which may be attributed to the sector demarcation that is taking place in the anisotropically growing single crystal of iPP.

  5. Multiscale phenomena in the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surjalal Sharma, A.

    The multiscale phenomena in the Earth's magnetosphere have been studied using data from ground-based and space-borne measurements. The ground-based observations provide data over decades and are suitable for characterizing the inherent nature of the multiscale behavior and for studying the dynamical and statistical features. On the other hand, the spacecraft data provide in-situ observations of the processes. The multipoint measurements by Cluster have provided a new understanding of the plasma processes at microand meso-scales and the cross-scale coupling among them. The role of cross-scale coupling is evident in phenomena such as bursty bulk flows, flux ropes, and reconnection. The characteristic scales of the processes range from electron skin depth to MHD scales and the modeling of these processes need different physical models, such as kinetic, EMHD, Hall MHD, and MHD. The ground-based data have been used to develop models based on techniques of nonlinear science and yield predictive models which can be used for forecasting. These models characterize the magnetospheric dynaics and yield its global and multiscale aspects. The distribution of scales in the magnetosphere is studied using an extensive database of the solar wind and the magnetosphere. The distributions of the waiting times deviate significantly from a power law as well as stretched exponential distributions, and show a scaling with respect to the mean, indicating a limited role of long-term correlations in the magnetospheric dynamics.

  6. Animal network phenomena: insights from triadic games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesterton-Gibbons, Mike; Sherratt, Tom N.

    Games of animal conflict in networks rely heavily on computer simulation because analysis is difficult, the degree of difficulty increasing sharply with the size of the network. For this reason, virtually the entire analytical literature on evolutionary game theory has assumed either dyadic interaction or a high degree of symmetry, or both. Yet we cannot rely exclusively on computer simulation in the study of any complex system. So the study of triadic interactions has an important role to play, because triads are both the simplest groups in which asymmetric network phenomena can be studied and the groups beyond dyads in which analysis of population games is most likely to be tractable, especially when allowing for intrinsic variation. Here we demonstrate how such analyses can illuminate a variety of behavioral phenomena within networks, including coalition formation, eavesdropping (the strategic observation of contests between neighbors) and victory displays (which are performed by the winners of contests but not by the losers). In particular, we show that eavesdropping acts to lower aggression thresholds compared to games without it, and that victory displays to bystanders will be most intense when there is little difference in payoff between dominating an opponent and not subordinating.

  7. Animal network phenomena: insights from triadic games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesterton-Gibbons, Mike; Sherratt, Tom N.

    Games of animal conflict in networks rely heavily on computer simulation because analysis is difficult, the degree of difficulty increasing sharply with the size of the network. For this reason, virtually the entire analytical literature on evolutionary game theory has assumed either dyadic interaction or a high degree of symmetry, or both. Yet we cannot rely exclusively on computer simulation in the study of any complex system. So the study of triadic interactions has an important role to play, because triads are both the simplest groups in which asymmetric network phenomena can be studied and the groups beyond dyads in which analysis of population games is most likely to be tractable, especially when allowing for intrinsic variation. Here we demonstrate how such analyses can illuminate a variety of behavioral phenomena within networks, including coalition formation, eavesdropping (the strategic observation of contests between neighbors) and victory displays (which are performed by the winners of contests but not by the losers). In particular, we show that eavesdropping acts to lower aggression thresholds compared to games without it, and that victory displays to bystanders will be most intense when there is little difference in payoff between dominating an opponent and not subordinating.

  8. Nonlinear phenomena in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln D.

    2008-05-01

    We present a medley of results from the last three years on nonlinear phenomena in BECs [1]. These include exact dynamics of multi-component condensates in optical lattices [2], vortices and ring solitons [3], macroscopic quantum tunneling [4], nonlinear band theory [5], and a pulsed atomic soliton laser [6]. 1. Emergent Nonlinear Phenomena in Bose-Einstein Condensates: Theory and Experiment, ed. P. G. Kevrekidis, D. J. Frantzeskakis, and R. Carretero-Gonzalez (Springer-Verlag, 2008). 2. R. Mark Bradley, James E. Bernard, and L. D. Carr, e-print arXiv:0711.1896 (2007). 3. G. Herring, L. D. Carr, R. Carretero-Gonzalez, P. G. Kevrekidis, D. J. Frantzeskakis, Phys. Rev. A in press, e-print arXiv:0709.2193 (2007); L. D. Carr and C. W. Clark, Phys. Rev. A v. 74, p.043613 (2006); L. D. Carr and C. W. Clark, Phys. Rev. Lett. v. 97, p.010403 (2006). 4. L. D. Carr, M. J. Holland, and B. A. Malomed, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys., v.38, p.3217 (2005) 5. B. T. Seaman, L. D. Carr, and M. J. Holland, Phys. Rev. A, v. 71, p.033622 (2005). 6. L. D. Carr and J. Brand, Phys. Rev. A, v.70, p.033607 (2004); L. D. Carr and J. Brand, Phys. Rev. Lett., v.92, p.040401 (2004).

  9. WHC natural phenomena hazards mitigation implementation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Conrads, T.J.

    1996-09-11

    Natural phenomena hazards (NPH) are unexpected acts of nature which pose a threat or danger to workers, the public or to the environment. Earthquakes, extreme winds (hurricane and tornado),snow, flooding, volcanic ashfall, and lightning strike are examples of NPH at Hanford. It is the policy of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design, construct and operate DOE facilitiesso that workers, the public and the environment are protected from NPH and other hazards. During 1993 DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) transmitted DOE Order 5480.28, ``Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation,`` to Westinghouse Hanford COmpany (WHC) for compliance. The Order includes rigorous new NPH criteria for the design of new DOE facilities as well as for the evaluation and upgrade of existing DOE facilities. In 1995 DOE issued Order 420.1, ``Facility Safety`` which contains the same NPH requirements and invokes the same applicable standards as Order 5480.28. It will supersede Order 5480.28 when an in-force date for Order 420.1 is established through contract revision. Activities will be planned and accomplished in four phases: Mobilization; Prioritization; Evaluation; and Upgrade. The basis for the graded approach is the designation of facilities/structures into one of five performance categories based upon safety function, mission and cost. This Implementation Plan develops the program for the Prioritization Phase, as well as an overall strategy for the implemention of DOE Order 5480.2B.

  10. EUV Dimmings: Formation Mechanisms and Associated Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, B. J.; Mays, M. L.; West, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale coronal EUV dimmings, developing on timescales of minutes to hours in association with a flare or filament eruption, are known to exhibit a high correlation with coronal mass ejections. While most observations indicate that the decrease in emission in a dimming is due, at least in part, to a density decrease, a complete understanding requires us to examine at least four mechanisms that have been observed to cause darkened regions in the corona: 1) mass loss, 2) cooling, 3) heating, and 4) absorption/obscuration. Recent advances in automatic detection, observations with improved cadence and resolution, multi-viewpoint imaging, and spectroscopic studies have continued to shed light on dimming formation, evolution, and recovery. However, there are still some outstanding questions, including 1) Why do some CMEs show dimming and some do not? 2) What determines the location of a dimming? 3) What determines the temporal evolution of a dimming? 4) How does the post-eruption dimming connect to the ICME? 5) What is the relationship between dimmings and other CME-associated phenomena? The talk will emphasize the different formation mechanisms of dimmings and their relationship to CMEs and CME-associated phenomena.

  11. Uncommon corrosion phenomena of archaeological bronze alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingo, G. M.; de Caro, T.; Riccucci, C.; Khosroff, S.

    2006-06-01

    In the framework of the EFESTUS project (funded by the European Commission, contract No. ICA3-CT-2002-10030) the corrosion products of a large number of archaeological bronze artefacts are investigated by means of the combined use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical microscopy (OM) and tentative correlation of their nature with the chemical composition of the artefacts and the burial context is proposed. The results provide good insight into the corrosion layers and evidence in some bronze Roman coins and artefacts; the occurrence of uncommon corrosion phenomena that give rise to the formation of a yellowish-green complex chlorine-phosphate of lead (pyromorphite, (PbCl)Pb4(PO4)3) and of a gold-like thick layer of an iron and copper sulphide (chalcopyrite, CuFeS2). The micro-chemical and micro-structural results show that the coins were buried in a soil enriched in phosphorus for the accidental presence of a large amount of decomposing fragments of bones or in an anaerobic and humus rich soil where the chalcopyrite layer has been produced via the interaction between the iron of the soil, the copper of the coin and the sulphur produced by the decomposition of organic matter in an almost oxygen free environment. Finally, some unusual periodic corrosion phenomena occurring in high tin bronze mirrors found at Zama (Tunisia) are described.

  12. Emergent phenomena and partonic structure in hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Craig D.; Mezrag, Cédric

    2017-03-01

    Modern facilities are poised to tackle fundamental questions within the Standard Model, aiming to reveal the nature of confinement, its relationship to dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB) - the origin of visible mass - and the connection between these two, key emergent phenomena. There is strong evidence to suggest that they are intimately connected with the appearance of momentum-dependent masses for gluons and quarks in QCD, which are large in the infrared: mg 500MeV and Mq 350MeV. DCSB, expressed in the dynamical generation of a dressed-quark mass, has an enormous variety of verifiable consequences, including an enigmatic result that the properties of the (almost) massless pion are the cleanest expression of the mechanism which is responsible for almost all the visible mass in the Universe. This contribution explains that these emergent phenomena are expressed with particular force in the partonic structure of hadrons, e.g. in valence-quark parton distribution amplitudes and functions, and, consequently, in numerous hadronic observables, so that we are now in a position to exhibit the consequences of confinement and DCSB in a wide range of hadron observables, opening the way to empirical verification of their expression in the Standard Model.

  13. Mathematical methods of studying physical phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2013-03-01

    In recent decades, substantial theoretical and experimental progress was achieved in understanding the quantum nature of physical phenomena that serves as the foundation of present and future quantum technologies. Quantum correlations like the entanglement of the states of composite systems, the phenomenon of quantum discord, which captures other aspects of quantum correlations, quantum contextuality and, connected with these phenomena, uncertainty relations for conjugate variables and entropies, like Shannon and Rényi entropies, and the inequalities for spin states, like Bell inequalities, reflect the recently understood quantum properties of micro and macro systems. The mathematical methods needed to describe all quantum phenomena mentioned above were also the subject of intense studies in the end of the last, and beginning of the new, century. In this section of CAMOP 'Mathematical Methods of Studying Physical Phenomena' new results and new trends in the rapidly developing domain of quantum (and classical) physics are presented. Among the particular topics under discussion there are some reviews on the problems of dynamical invariants and their relations with symmetries of the physical systems. In fact, this is a very old problem of both classical and quantum systems, e.g. the systems of parametric oscillators with time-dependent parameters, like Ermakov systems, which have specific constants of motion depending linearly or quadratically on the oscillator positions and momenta. Such dynamical invariants play an important role in studying the dynamical Casimir effect, the essence of the effect being the creation of photons from the vacuum in a cavity with moving boundaries due to the presence of purely quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field in the vacuum. It is remarkable that this effect was recently observed experimentally. The other new direction in developing the mathematical approach in physics is quantum tomography that provides a new vision of

  14. Microgravity Transport Phenomena Experiment (MTPE) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Transport Phenomena Experiment (MTPE) is a fluids experiment supported by the Fundamentals in Biotechnology program in association with the Human Exploration and Development of Space (BEDS) initiative. The MTP Experiment will investigate fluid transport phenomena both in ground based experiments and in the microgravity environment. Many fluid transport processes are affected by gravity. Osmotic flux kinetics in planar membrane systems have been shown to be influenced by gravimetric orientation, either through convective mixing caused by unstably stratified fluid layers, or through a stable fluid boundary layer structure that forms in association with the membrane. Coupled transport phenomena also show gravity related effects. Coefficients associated with coupled transport processes are defined in terms of a steady state condition. Buoyancy (gravity) driven convection interferes with the attainment of steady state, and the measurement of coupled processes. The MTP Experiment measures the kinetics of molecular migration that occurs in fluids, in response to the application of various driving potentials. Three separate driving potentials may be applied to the MTP Experiment fluids, either singly or in combination. The driving potentials include chemical potential, thermal potential, and electrical potential. Two separate fluid arrangements are used to study membrane mediated and bulk fluid transport phenomena. Transport processes of interest in membrane mediated systems include diffusion, osmosis, and streaming potential. Bulk fluid processes of interest include coupled phenomena such as the Soret Effect, Dufour Effect, Donnan Effect, and thermal diffusion potential. MTP Experiments are performed in the Microgravity Transport Apparatus (MTA), an instrument that has been developed specifically for precision measurement of transport processes. Experiment fluids are contained within the MTA fluid cells, designed to create a one dimensional flow geometry

  15. Microgravity Transport Phenomena Experiment (MTPE) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Transport Phenomena Experiment (MTPE) is a fluids experiment supported by the Fundamentals in Biotechnology program in association with the Human Exploration and Development of Space (BEDS) initiative. The MTP Experiment will investigate fluid transport phenomena both in ground based experiments and in the microgravity environment. Many fluid transport processes are affected by gravity. Osmotic flux kinetics in planar membrane systems have been shown to be influenced by gravimetric orientation, either through convective mixing caused by unstably stratified fluid layers, or through a stable fluid boundary layer structure that forms in association with the membrane. Coupled transport phenomena also show gravity related effects. Coefficients associated with coupled transport processes are defined in terms of a steady state condition. Buoyancy (gravity) driven convection interferes with the attainment of steady state, and the measurement of coupled processes. The MTP Experiment measures the kinetics of molecular migration that occurs in fluids, in response to the application of various driving potentials. Three separate driving potentials may be applied to the MTP Experiment fluids, either singly or in combination. The driving potentials include chemical potential, thermal potential, and electrical potential. Two separate fluid arrangements are used to study membrane mediated and bulk fluid transport phenomena. Transport processes of interest in membrane mediated systems include diffusion, osmosis, and streaming potential. Bulk fluid processes of interest include coupled phenomena such as the Soret Effect, Dufour Effect, Donnan Effect, and thermal diffusion potential. MTP Experiments are performed in the Microgravity Transport Apparatus (MTA), an instrument that has been developed specifically for precision measurement of transport processes. Experiment fluids are contained within the MTA fluid cells, designed to create a one dimensional flow geometry

  16. Multiscale Modeling of Mesoscale and Interfacial Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petsev, Nikolai Dimitrov

    With rapidly emerging technologies that feature interfaces modified at the nanoscale, traditional macroscopic models are pushed to their limits to explain phenomena where molecular processes can play a key role. Often, such problems appear to defy explanation when treated with coarse-grained continuum models alone, yet remain prohibitively expensive from a molecular simulation perspective. A prominent example is surface nanobubbles: nanoscopic gaseous domains typically found on hydrophobic surfaces that have puzzled researchers for over two decades due to their unusually long lifetimes. We show how an entirely macroscopic, non-equilibrium model explains many of their anomalous properties, including their stability and abnormally small gas-side contact angles. From this purely transport perspective, we investigate how factors such as temperature and saturation affect nanobubbles, providing numerous experimentally testable predictions. However, recent work also emphasizes the relevance of molecular-scale phenomena that cannot be described in terms of bulk phases or pristine interfaces. This is true for nanobubbles as well, whose nanoscale heights may require molecular detail to capture the relevant physics, in particular near the bubble three-phase contact line. Therefore, there is a clear need for general ways to link molecular granularity and behavior with large-scale continuum models in the treatment of many interfacial problems. In light of this, we have developed a general set of simulation strategies that couple mesoscale particle-based continuum models to molecular regions simulated through conventional molecular dynamics (MD). In addition, we derived a transport model for binary mixtures that opens the possibility for a wide range of applications in biological and drug delivery problems, and is readily reconciled with our hybrid MD-continuum techniques. Approaches that couple multiple length scales for fluid mixtures are largely absent in the literature, and

  17. Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John D.

    1995-02-01

    This book describes the chemical and physical structure of molecular crystals, their optical and electronic properties, and the reactions between neighboring molecules in crystals. In the second edition, the author has taken into account research that has undergone extremely rapid development since the first edition was published in 1987. For instance, he gives extensive coverage to the applications of molecular materials in high-technology devices (e.g. optical communications, laser printers, photocopiers, liquid crystal displays, solar cells, and more). There is also an entirely new chapter on the recently discovered Buckminsterfullerene carbon molecule (C60) and organic non-linear optic materials.

  18. Large Interface Simulation in Multiphase Flow Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, Aparicio; Coste, Pierre; Pigny, Sylvain; Magnaudet, Jacques

    2006-07-01

    An attempt to represent multiphase multi-scale flow, filling the gap between Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and averaged approaches, is the purpose of this paper. We present a kind of Large Interface (LI) simulation formalism obtained after a filtering process on local instantaneous conservation equations of the two-fluid model which distinguishes between small scales and large scales contributions. LI surface tension force is also taken into account. Small scale dynamics call for modelization and large scale for simulation. Joined to this formalism, a criterion to recognize LI's is developed. It is used in an interface recognition algorithm which is qualified on a sloshing case and a bubble oscillation under zero-gravity. This method is applied to a rising bubble in a pool that collapses at a free surface and to a square-base basin experiment where splashing and sloshing at the free surface are the main break-up phenomena. (authors)

  19. Transient Phenomena: Opportunities for New Discoveries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.

    2010-01-01

    Known classes of radio wavelength transients range from the nearby (stellar flares and radio pulsars) to the distant Universe (gamma-ray burst afterglows). Hypothesized classes of radio transients include analogs of known objects, such as extrasolar planets emitting Jovian-like radio bursts and giant-pulse emitting pulsars in other galaxies, to the exotic, such as prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts, evaporating black holes and transmitters from other civilizations. Time domain astronomy has been recognized internationally as a means of addressing key scientific questions in astronomy and physics, and pathfinders and Precursors to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) are beginning to offer a combination of wider fields of view and more wavelength agility than has been possible in the past. These improvements will continue when the SKA itself becomes operational. I illustrate the range of transient phenomena and discuss how the detection and study of radio transients will improve immensely.

  20. Geometrical-numerical approach to diffraction phenomena.

    PubMed

    Bosch, S; Ferré-Borrull, J

    2001-02-15

    The calculation of diffracted fields is considered by means of a geometrical analysis of the incoming wave into semiperiodic zones in the aperture plane, followed by a numerical process for addition of the contributions corresponding to the semiperiodic zones. This general approach constitutes a novel interpretation of diffraction phenomena that permits exact evaluation of the mathematical expressions of diffraction theory and overcomes the limitations of any approximation. The method is illustrated by analysis of two important configuration in optics: the pinhole camera, for which we deduce the optimum radius for imaging, and the diffraction of a spherical converging wave through a circular aperture, from which we determine the limit of the validity of the Fraunhofer approximation (i.e., of the Airy pattern) and the influence of the obliquity factor.

  1. Single event phenomena: Testing and prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinnison, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Highly integrated microelectronic devices are often used to increase the performance of satellite systems while reducing the system power dissipation, size, and weight. However, these devices are usually more susceptible to radiation than less integrated devices. In particular, the problem of sensitivity to single event upset and latchup is greatly increased as the integration level is increased. Therefore, a method for accurately evaluating the susceptibility of new devices to single event phenomena is critical to qualifying new components for use in space systems. This evaluation includes testing devices for upset or latchup and extrapolating the results of these tests to the orbital environment. Current methods for testing devices for single event effects are reviewed, and methods for upset rate prediction, including a new technique based on Monte Carlo simulation, are presented.

  2. Autistic phenomena in The Adventures of Pinocchio.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    This paper seeks to demonstrate that the protagonist of Carlo Collodi's The Adventures of Pinocchio illustrates numerous autistic phenomena such as communication difficulties, sensory and perceptual distortions and mindblindness. While Pinocchio is viewed as a literary construct with contraindications of autism, it will be argued that his autistic traits are sufficient to suggest the possibility that Collodi had a partial intuition of the syndrome 60 years before it was identified by Leo Kanner. Approaching Collodi's text in this manner is taken as an opportunity to survey and reflect upon the psychoanalytic literature on autism and to position it in relation to contemporary theories from cognitive neuroscience. © 2017, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  3. The demystification of autoscopic phenomena: experimental propositions.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Christine; Blanke, Olaf

    2005-06-01

    Autoscopic phenomena (AP) are rare, illusory visual experiences during which the subject has the impression of seeing a second own body in extrapersonal space. AP consist of out-of-body experience, autoscopic hallucination, and heautoscopy. Recent neurologic reports support the role of multisensory integration deficits of body-related information and vestibular dysfunctions in AP at the temporo-parietal junction. A caveat to test the underlying neurologic and cognitive mechanisms of AP has been their rare and spontaneous occurrence. Recent evidence linked AP to mental own-body imagery engaging brain mechanisms at the temporo-parietal junction. These recent observations open a new avenue for testing AP-related cognitive mechanisms in selected clinical and normal populations. We review evidence on several clinical syndromes (psychosis, depression, anxiety, depersonalization, body dysmorphic disorder), suggesting that some of these syndromes may relate to AP-proneness, thereby leading to testable propositions for future research on body and self processing in addition to AP.

  4. Hadronic and nuclear phenomena in quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1987-06-01

    Many of the key issues in understanding quantum chromodynamics involves processes at intermediate energies. We discuss a range of hadronic and nuclear phenomena - exclusive processes, color transparency, hidden color degrees of freedom in nuclei, reduced nuclear amplitudes, jet coalescence, formation zone effects, hadron helicity selection rules, spin correlations, higher twist effects, and nuclear diffraction - as tools for probing hadron structure and the propagation of quark and gluon jets in nuclei. Many of these processes can be studied in electroproduction, utilizing internal targets in storage rings. We also review several areas where there has been significant theoretical progress in determining the form of hadron and nuclear wavefunctions, including QCD sum rules, lattice gauge theory, and discretized light-cone quantization. 98 refs., 40 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Taylor, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an experimental investigation of phenomena associated with the oblique hypervelocity impact of spherical projectiles on multisheet aluminum structures. A model that can be employed in the design of meteoroid and space debris protection systems for space structures is developed. The model consists of equations that relate crater and perforation damage of a multisheet structure to parameters such as projectile size, impact velocity, and trajectory obliquity. The equations are obtained through a regression analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact test data. This data shows that the response of a multisheet structure to oblique impact is significantly different from its response to normal hypervelocity impact. It was found that obliquely incident projectiles produce ricochet debris that can severely damage panels or instrumentation located on the exterior of a space structure. Obliquity effects of high-speed impact must, therefore, be considered in the design of any structure exposed to a meteoroid or space debris environement.

  6. Lunar orbital photography of astronomical phenomena.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, R. D.; Dunkelman, L.; Ross, C. L.; Worden, A.

    1972-01-01

    This paper reports further progress on photography of faint astronomical and geophysical phenomena accomplished during the recent Apollo missions. Command module pilots have been able to photograph such astronomical objects as the solar corona, zodiacal light-corona transition region, lunar libration region, and portions of the Milky Way. The methods utilized for calibration of the film by adaptation of the High Altitude Observatory sensitometer are discussed. Kodak 2485 high-speed recording film was used in both 35-mm and 70-mm formats. The cameras used were Nikon f/1.2 55-mm focal length and Hasselblad f/2.8 80-mm focal length. Preflight and postflight calibration exposures were included on both the flight and control films, corresponding to luminances extending from the inner solar corona to as faint as 1/10 of the luminance of the light of the night sky. The photographs obtained from unique vantage points available during lunar orbit are discussed.

  7. Coherence Phenomena in Coupled Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.

    2007-01-01

    Quantum coherence effects in atomic media such as electromagnetically-induced transparency and absorption, lasing without inversion, super-radiance and gain-assisted superluminality have become well-known in atomic physics. But these effects are not unique to atoms, nor are they uniquely quantum in nature, but rather are fundamental to systems of coherently coupled oscillators. In this talk I will review a variety of analogous photonic coherence phenomena that can occur in passive and active coupled optical resonators. Specifically, I will examine the evolution of the response that can occur upon the addition of a second resonator, to a single resonator that is side-coupled to a waveguide, as the coupling is increased, and discuss the conditions for slow and fast light propagation, coupled-resonator-induced transparency and absorption, lasing without gain, and gain-assisted superluminal pulse propagation. Finally, I will discuss the application of these systems to laser stabilization and gyroscopy.

  8. Microdevices enabled by rarefied flow phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeenko, Alina A.; Strongrich, A. D.; Cofer, A. G.; Pikus, A.; Sebastiao, I. B.; Tholeti, S. S.; Shivkumar, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we review emerging applications of rarefied gas dynamics for microscale sensing, actuation, power generation and thermal management. The performance of conventional fluidic devices such as pumps, combustors and heat engines drops with the decrease of characteristic length scale due to greater viscous and heat transfer losses. However, the close coupling between non-equilibrium gas, liquid and solid-state transport and electromagnetic phenomena enables unconventional micro/nanodevices. We specifically consider three distinct examples of devices with non-equilibrium gas-phase transport based on i) very large thermal gradients; ii) increased capillary forces; iii) high electric fields - all of which are generated by scaling down device size by using nano/micromanufacturing techniques.

  9. Reversion phenomena of Cu-Cr alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, S.; Nagata, K.; Kobayashi, S.

    1985-01-01

    Cu-Cr alloys which were given various aging and reversion treatments were investigated in terms of electrical resistivity and hardness. Transmission electron microscopy was one technique employed. Some results obtained are as follows: the increment of electrical resistivity after the reversion at a constant temperature decreases as the aging temperature rises. In a constant aging condition, the increment of electrical resistivity after the reversion increases, and the time required for a maximum reversion becomes shorter as the reversion temperature rises. The reversion phenomena can be repeated, but its amount decreases rapidly by repetition. At first, the amount of reversion increases with aging time and reaches its maximum, and then tends to decrease again. Hardness changes by the reversion are very small, but the hardness tends to soften slightly. Any changes in transmission electron micrographs by the reversion treatment cannot be detected.

  10. Pump instability phenomena generated by fluid forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalakrishnan, S.

    1985-01-01

    Rotor dynamic behavior of high energy centrifugal pumps is significantly affected by two types of fluid forces; one due to the hydraulic interaction of the impeller with the surrounding volute or diffuser and the other due to the effect of the wear rings. The available data on these forces is first reviewed. A simple one degree-of-freedom system containing these forces is analytically solved to exhibit the rotor dynamic effects. To illustrate the relative magnitude of these phenomena, an example of a multistage boiler feed pump is worked out. It is shown that the wear ring effects tend to suppress critical speed and postpone instability onset. But the volute-impeller forces tend to lower the critical speed and the instability onset speed. However, for typical boiler feed pumps under normal running clearances, the wear ring effects are much more significant than the destabilizing hydraulic interaction effects.

  11. Novel nuclear phenomena in quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1987-08-01

    Many of the key issues in understanding quantum chromodynamics involve processes in nuclear targets at intermediate energies. A range of hadronic and nuclear phenomena-exclusive processes, color transparency, hidden color degrees of freedom in nuclei, reduced nuclear amplitudes, jet coalescence, formation zone effects, hadron helicity selection rules, spin correlations, higher twist effects, and nuclear diffraction were discussed as tools for probing hadron structure and the propagation of quark and gluon jets in nuclei. Several areas were also reviewed where there has been significant theoretical progress determining the form of hadron and nuclear wave functions, including QCD sum rules, lattice gauge theory, and discretized light-cone quantization. A possible interpretation was also discussed of the large spin correlation A/sub NN/ in proton-proton scattering, and how relate this effect to an energy and angular dependence of color transparency in nuclei. 76 refs., 24 figs.

  12. Natural time analysis of critical phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Varotsos, Panayiotis; Sarlis, Nicholas V.; Skordas, Efthimios S.; Uyeda, Seiya; Kamogawa, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    A quantity exists by which one can identify the approach of a dynamical system to the state of criticality, which is hard to identify otherwise. This quantity is the variance of natural time χ, where and pk is the normalized energy released during the kth event of which the natural time is defined as χk = k/N and N stands for the total number of events. Then we show that κ1 becomes equal to 0.070 at the critical state for a variety of dynamical systems. This holds for criticality models such as 2D Ising and the Bak–Tang–Wiesenfeld sandpile, which is the standard example of self-organized criticality. This condition of κ1 = 0.070 holds for experimental results of critical phenomena such as growth of rice piles, seismic electric signals, and the subsequent seismicity before the associated main shock. PMID:21700886

  13. Electron Acceleration by Transient Ion Foreshock Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Turner, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Particle acceleration is a topic of considerable interest in space, laboratory, and astrophysical plasmas as it is a fundamental physical process to all areas of physics. Recent THEMIS [e.g., Turner et al., 2014] and Wind [e.g., Wilson et al., 2013] observations have found evidence for strong particle acceleration at macro- and meso-scale structures and/or pulsations called transient ion foreshock phenomena (TIFP). Ion acceleration has been extensively studied, but electron acceleration has received less attention. Electron acceleration can arise from fundamentally different processes than those affecting ions due to differences in their gyroradii. Electron acceleration is ubiquitous, occurring in the solar corona (e.g., solar flares), magnetic reconnection, at shocks, astrophysical plasmas, etc. We present new results analyzing the dependencies of electron acceleration on the properties of TIFP observed by the THEMIS spacecraft.

  14. Physical Phenomena in Containerless Glass Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, R. S.; Cole, R.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation into the various physical phenomena of importance in the space experiments is under way. Theoretical models of thermocapillary flow in drops, thermal migration of bubbles and droplets, the motion of bubbles inside drops, and the migration of bubbles in rotating liquid bodies are being developed. Experiments were conducted on the migration of bubbles and droplets to the axis of a rotating liquid body, and the rise of bubbles in molten glass. Also, experiments on thermocapillary motion in silicone oils as well as glass melts were performed. Experiments are currently being conducted on the migration of bubbles in a thermal gradient, and on their motion inside unconstrained liquid drops in a rotating liquid.

  15. Using Spatial Gradients to Model Localization Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    D.J.Bammann; D.Mosher; D.A.Hughes; N.R.Moody; P.R.Dawson

    1999-07-01

    We present the final report on a Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project, Using Spatial Gradients to Model Localization Phenomena, performed during the fiscal years 1996 through 1998. The project focused on including spatial gradients in the temporal evolution equations of the state variables that describe hardening in metal plasticity models. The motivation was to investigate the numerical aspects associated with post-bifurcation mesh dependent finite element solutions in problems involving damage or crack propagation as well as problems in which strain Localizations occur. The addition of the spatial gradients introduces a mathematical length scale that eliminates the mesh dependency of the solution. In addition, new experimental techniques were developed to identify the physical mechanism associated with the numerical length scale.

  16. Dynamic phenomena in coronal flux tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariska, J. T.; Boris, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    The study of stellar atmospheres and the determination of specific physical mechanisms, geometries, and magnetic structures by which coronae are maintained is examined. Ultraviolet and soft X-ray components observed in the radiative output of cool stars and the Sun require counterentropic temperature gradients for their explanation. The existence of a hot corona is recognized as a result of mechanical or fluid dynamic effects and the importance of the magnetic field in the heating is accepted. Magnetohydrodynamic energy release associated with the emergence of magnetic flux through the chromosphere and its dynamic readjustment in the corona are major counterentropic phenomena which are considered as primary candidates for corona heating. Systematic plows in coronal flux tubes result from asymmetric heating and systematic flows can exist without substantial chromospheric pressure differences.

  17. Boundary quantum critical phenomena with entanglement renormalization

    SciTech Connect

    Evenbly, G.; Pfeifer, R. N. C.; Tagliacozzo, L.; McCulloch, I. P.; Vidal, G.; Pico, V.; Iblisdir, S.

    2010-10-15

    We propose the use of entanglement renormalization techniques to study boundary critical phenomena on a lattice system. The multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz (MERA), in its scale invariant version, offers a very compact approximation to quantum critical ground states. Here we show that, by adding a boundary to the MERA, an accurate approximation to the ground state of a semi-infinite critical chain with an open boundary is obtained, from which one can extract boundary scaling operators and their scaling dimensions. As in Wilson's renormalization-group formulation of the Kondo problem, our construction produces, as a side result, an effective chain displaying explicit separation of energy scales. We present benchmark results for the quantum Ising and quantum XX models with free and fixed boundary conditions.

  18. Surfactant-based critical phenomena in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaler, Eric W.; Paulaitis, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to characterize by experiment and theoretically both the kinetics of phase separation and the metastable structures produced during phase separation in a microgravity environment. The particular systems we are currently studying are mixtures of water, nonionic surfactants, and compressible supercritical fluids at temperatures and pressures where the coexisting liquid phases have equal densities (isopycnic phases). In this report, we describe experiments to locate equilibrium isopycnic phases and to determine the 'local' phase behavior and critical phenomena at nearby conditions of temperature, pressure, and composition. In addition, we report the results of preliminary small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments to characterize microstructures that exist in these mixtures at different fluid densities.

  19. Topological Spintronics: Materials, Phenomena and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarth, Nitin

    2015-03-01

    The two-dimensional surface states of three-dimensional topological insulators such as Bi2Se3and(Bi,Sb)2Te3 possess a spin texture that can potentially be exploited for spintronics applications. We provide a perspective on the emergence of ``topological spintronics,'' demonstrating how this spin texture can be engineered using either quantum tunneling between surfaces or by breaking time-reversal symmetry. We then discuss recent experiments that show striking spintronic phenomena useful for proof-of-concept devices, including a spin-orbit torque of record efficiency at room temperature and an electrically-gated ``giant anisotropic magnetoresistance'' at low temperature. This work was carried out in collaboration with A. Richardella, S.-Y. Xu, M. Neupane, A. Mellnik, A. Kandala, J. S. Lee, D. M. Zhang, M. Z. Hasan and D. C. Ralph. We acknowledge funding from the DARPA Meso program, ONR and C-SPIN (under sponsorship of MARCO and DARPA).

  20. Teaching wave phenomena via biophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Daniel; Robbins, Mark; Leheny, Robert; Wonnell, Steven

    2014-03-01

    Over the past several years we have developed a two-semester second-year physics course sequence for students in the biosciences, tailored in part to the needs of undergraduate biophysics majors. One semester, ``Biological Physics,'' is based on the book of that name by P. Nelson. This talk will focus largely on the other semester, ``Wave Phenomena with Biophysical Applications,'' where we provide a novel introduction to the physics of waves, primarily through the study of experimental probes used in the biosciences that depend on the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. Topic covered include: Fourier analysis, sound and hearing, diffraction - culminating in an analysis of x-ray fiber diffraction and its use in the determination of the structure of DNA - geometrical and physical optics, the physics of modern light microscopy, NMR and MRI. Laboratory exercises tailored to this course will also be described.

  1. Pairing phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotscheck, E.; Smith, R. A.; Jackson, A. D.

    1981-12-01

    The correlated-basis-function method is extended to deal with pairing phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids. With a variational ansatz for the model wave function we derive the "correlated" analog of the conventional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (or Balian-Werthamer), Anderson-Brinkman-Morel theory of pairing. A suitable (and well-controlled) set of approximations brings the theory into a form identical to the conventional theories, but with the bare interaction replaced by a weak effective interaction and the bare single-particle energies replaced by an effective single-particle spectrum. As usual, liquid 3He provides a very stringent test of the theory, as both the interaction and the experimental facts are pretty clear. The variational estimates for the pairing interaction are improved by nonorthogonal perturbation theory. We find the expected enhancement of the attraction in P waves, although the restriction to effective two-body interactions appears to be insufficient to generate P-wave pairing.

  2. Analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Taylor, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an experimental investigation of phenomena associated with the oblique hypervelocity impact of spherical projectiles on multisheet aluminum structures. A model that can be employed in the design of meteoroid and space debris protection systems for space structures is developed. The model consists of equations that relate crater and perforation damage of a multisheet structure to parameters such as projectile size, impact velocity, and trajectory obliquity. The equations are obtained through a regression analysis of oblique hypervelocity impact test data. This data shows that the response of a multisheet structure to oblique impact is significantly different from its response to normal hypervelocity impact. It was found that obliquely incident projectiles produce ricochet debris that can severely damage panels or instrumentation located on the exterior of a space structure. Obliquity effects of high-speed impact must, therefore, be considered in the design of any structure exposed to a meteoroid or space debris environement.

  3. Oscillatory Phenomena in a Solar Network Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, K.; Tsiropoula, G.; Schwartz, P.; Heinzel, P.

    2008-09-01

    Multi-wavelength, multi-instrument observations, obtained during a coordinated observing campaign on October 2005 by the ground-based Dutch Open Telescope (DOT), and by instruments on the spacecraft Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO) and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE), are used to study oscillatory phenomena in a solar network region. Temporal variations of the intensities and velocities in a region of the quiet Sun containing several dark mottles and in a region with several bright points defining the network boundaries (NB) are investigated with the aim of finding similarities and/or differences in the oscillatory phenomena observed in these two regions and in different spectral lines formed from the chromosphere to the transition region, as well as propagation characteristics of waves. A wavelet, phase difference and coherence analyses were performed indicating a periodicity around 5 min in all considered lines for both regions. V-V phase differences in the NB region point to an upward propagation of, most probably, acoustic waves, while in the region of mottles they indicate a non vertical propagation of waves, due to the presence of several inclined mottles along the line-of-sight. In mottles, for periods of 250-400 s the phase difference is mainly negative suggesting that propagating waves encounter a boundary and are refracted and reflected. However, limitations arising from the complex topology of the magnetic field, the formation conditions and heights of the examined spectral lines and the low spatial resolution of the space instruments influence the exact interpretation of the phase differences.

  4. Meteorological phenomena in Western classical orchestral music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.; Aplin, K. L.

    2012-12-01

    The creative output of composers, writers, and artists is often influenced by their surroundings. To give a literary example, it has been claimed recently that some of the characters in Oliver Twist and A Christmas Carol were based on real-life people who lived near Charles Dickens in London. Of course, an important part of what we see and hear is not only the people with whom we interact, but also our geophysical surroundings. Of all the geophysical phenomena to influence us, the weather is arguably the most significant, because we are exposed to it directly and daily. The weather was a great source of inspiration for Monet, Constable, and Turner, who are known for their scientifically accurate paintings of the skies. But to what extent does weather inspire composers? The authors of this presentation, who are atmospheric scientists by day but amateur classical musicians by night, have been contemplating this question. We have built a systematic musical database, which has allowed us to catalogue and analyze the frequencies with which weather is depicted in a sample of classical orchestral music. The depictions vary from explicit mimicry using traditional and specialized orchestral instruments, through to subtle suggestions. We have found that composers are generally influenced by their own environment in the type of weather they choose to represent. As befits the national stereotype, British composers seem disproportionately keen to depict the UK's variable weather patterns and stormy coastline. Reference: Aplin KL and Williams PD (2011) Meteorological phenomena in Western classical orchestral music. Weather, 66(11), pp 300-306. doi:10.1002/wea.765

  5. Nonlinear Phenomena in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln D.

    2008-03-01

    We present a medley of results from the last three years on nonlinear phenomena in BECs [1]. These include exact dynamics of multi-component condensates in optical lattices [2], vortices and ring solitons [3], macroscopic quantum tunneling [4], nonlinear band theory [5], and a pulsed atomic soliton laser [6]. 1. Emergent Nonlinear Phenomena in Bose-Einstein Condensates: Theory and Experiment, ed. P. G. Kevrekidis, D. J. Frantzeskakis, and R. Carretero-Gonzalez (Springer-Verlag, to appear, 2008) -- see L. D. Carr and Joachim Brand, e-print arXiv:0705.1139 (2007); Joachim Brand, L. D. Carr, B. P. Anderson, e-print arXiv:0705.1341 (2007). 2. R. Mark Bradley, James E. Bernard, and L. D. Carr, e-print arXiv:0711.1896 (2007). 3. G. Herring, L. D. Carr, R. Carretero-Gonzalez, P. G. Kevrekidis, D. J. Frantzeskakis, e-print arXiv:0709.2193 (2007); L. D. Carr and C. W. Clark, Phys. Rev. A v. 74, p.043613 (2006); L. D. Carr and C. W. Clark, Phys. Rev. Lett. v. 97, p.010403 (2006). 4. L. D. Carr, M. J. Holland, and B. A. Malomed, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys., v.38, p.3217 (2005) 5. B. T. Seaman, L. D. Carr, and M. J. Holland, Phys. Rev. A, v. 71, p.033622 (2005). 6. L. D. Carr and J. Brand, Phys. Rev. A, v.70, p.033607 (2004); L. D. Carr and J. Brand, Phys. Rev. Lett., v.92, p.040401 (2004).

  6. TRANSIENT LUNAR PHENOMENA: REGULARITY AND REALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Crotts, Arlin P. S.

    2009-05-20

    Transient lunar phenomena (TLPs) have been reported for centuries, but their nature is largely unsettled, and even their existence as a coherent phenomenon is controversial. Nonetheless, TLP data show regularities in the observations; a key question is whether this structure is imposed by processes tied to the lunar surface, or by terrestrial atmospheric or human observer effects. I interrogate an extensive catalog of TLPs to gauge how human factors determine the distribution of TLP reports. The sample is grouped according to variables which should produce differing results if determining factors involve humans, and not reflecting phenomena tied to the lunar surface. Features dependent on human factors can then be excluded. Regardless of how the sample is split, the results are similar: {approx}50% of reports originate from near Aristarchus, {approx}16% from Plato, {approx}6% from recent, major impacts (Copernicus, Kepler, Tycho, and Aristarchus), plus several at Grimaldi. Mare Crisium produces a robust signal in some cases (however, Crisium is too large for a 'feature' as defined). TLP count consistency for these features indicates that {approx}80% of these may be real. Some commonly reported sites disappear from the robust averages, including Alphonsus, Ross D, and Gassendi. These reports begin almost exclusively after 1955, when TLPs became widely known and many more (and inexperienced) observers searched for TLPs. In a companion paper, we compare the spatial distribution of robust TLP sites to transient outgassing (seen by Apollo and Lunar Prospector instruments). To a high confidence, robust TLP sites and those of lunar outgassing correlate strongly, further arguing for the reality of TLPs.

  7. Transient Lunar Phenomena: Regularity and Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, Arlin P. S.

    2009-05-01

    Transient lunar phenomena (TLPs) have been reported for centuries, but their nature is largely unsettled, and even their existence as a coherent phenomenon is controversial. Nonetheless, TLP data show regularities in the observations; a key question is whether this structure is imposed by processes tied to the lunar surface, or by terrestrial atmospheric or human observer effects. I interrogate an extensive catalog of TLPs to gauge how human factors determine the distribution of TLP reports. The sample is grouped according to variables which should produce differing results if determining factors involve humans, and not reflecting phenomena tied to the lunar surface. Features dependent on human factors can then be excluded. Regardless of how the sample is split, the results are similar: ~50% of reports originate from near Aristarchus, ~16% from Plato, ~6% from recent, major impacts (Copernicus, Kepler, Tycho, and Aristarchus), plus several at Grimaldi. Mare Crisium produces a robust signal in some cases (however, Crisium is too large for a "feature" as defined). TLP count consistency for these features indicates that ~80% of these may be real. Some commonly reported sites disappear from the robust averages, including Alphonsus, Ross D, and Gassendi. These reports begin almost exclusively after 1955, when TLPs became widely known and many more (and inexperienced) observers searched for TLPs. In a companion paper, we compare the spatial distribution of robust TLP sites to transient outgassing (seen by Apollo and Lunar Prospector instruments). To a high confidence, robust TLP sites and those of lunar outgassing correlate strongly, further arguing for the reality of TLPs.

  8. Crystal clear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-02-01

    A semiconductor is usually opaque to any light whose photon energy is larger than the semiconductor bandgap. Nature Photonics spoke to Stephen Durbin about how to render GaAs semiconductor crystals transparent using intense X-ray pulses.

  9. Surface energies of elemental crystals

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Richard; Xu, Zihan; Radhakrishnan, Balachandran; Winston, Donald; Sun, Wenhao; Persson, Kristin A.; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-01-01

    The surface energy is a fundamental property of the different facets of a crystal that is crucial to the understanding of various phenomena like surface segregation, roughening, catalytic activity, and the crystal’s equilibrium shape. Such surface phenomena are especially important at the nanoscale, where the large surface area to volume ratios lead to properties that are significantly different from the bulk. In this work, we present the largest database of calculated surface energies for elemental crystals to date. This database contains the surface energies of more than 100 polymorphs of about 70 elements, up to a maximum Miller index of two and three for non-cubic and cubic crystals, respectively. Well-known reconstruction schemes are also accounted for. The database is systematically improvable and has been rigorously validated against previous experimental and computational data where available. We will describe the methodology used in constructing the database, and how it can be accessed for further studies and design of materials. PMID:27622853

  10. Computer Modeling of Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Rauzah

    This chapter outlines the methodologies and models which are commonly used in the simulation of liquid crystals. The approach in the simulation of liquid crystals has always been to understand the nature of the phase and to relate this to fundamental molecular features such as geometry and intermolecular forces, before important properties related to certain applications are elucidated. Hence, preceding the description of the main "molecular-based" models for liquid crystals, a general but brief outline of the nature of liquid crystals and their historical development is given. Three main model classes, namely the coarse-grained single-site lattice and Gay-Berne models and the full atomistic model will be described here where for each a brief review will be given followed by assessment of its application in describing the phase phenomena with an emphasis on understanding the molecular organization in liquid crystal phases and the prediction of their bulk properties. Variants and hybrid models derived from these classes and their applications are given.

  11. Nucleation of Crystals in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekilov, Peter G.

    2010-07-01

    Solution crystallization is an essential part of processes in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries and a major step in physiological and pathological phenomena. Crystallization starts with nucleation and control of nucleation is crucial for the control of the number, size, perfection, polymorphism and other characteristics of the crystalline materials. Recently, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the mechanism of nucleation of crystals in solution. The most significant of these is the two-step mechanism of nucleation, according to which the crystalline nucleus appears inside pre-existing metastable clusters of size several hundred nanometers, which consist of dense liquid and are suspended in the solution. While initially proposed for protein crystals, the applicability of this mechanism has been demonstrated for small molecule organic materials, colloids, and biominerals. This mechanism helps to explain several long-standing puzzles of crystal nucleation in solution: nucleation rates which are many orders of magnitude lower than theoretical predictions, nucleation kinetic dependencies with steady or receding parts at increasing supersaturation, the role of heterogeneous substrates for polymorph selection, the significance of the dense protein liquid, and others. More importantly, this mechanism provides powerful tools for control of the nucleation process by varying the solution thermodynamic parameters so that the volume occupied by the dense liquid shrinks or expands.

  12. Experimental studies of cascade phenomena in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, M.L. . Dept. of Materials); Kirk, M.A. ); Phythian, W.J. . Harwell Lab.)

    1992-06-01

    We review recent ion-irradiation experiments which have been performed to investigate the collapse of displacement cascades to dislocation loops in a range of metals and alloys. Many of the results including the dependencies of the collapse probabilities on irradiation temperature, and ion dose, energy and mass, can be explained within the framework of a thermal spike/cascade melting model which has been suggested by computer molecular dynamics simulations. Other aspects, such as the dependence of collapse propabilities on the crystal structure and the effects of alloying and impurities, are less well understood.

  13. Visualization of atomic-scale phenomena in superconductors: application to FeSe

    SciTech Connect

    Choubey, Peayush; Berlijn, Tom; Kreisel, Andreas; Cao, Chao; Hirschfeld, Peter J.

    2014-10-31

    Here we propose a simple method of calculating inhomogeneous, atomic-scale phenomena in superconductors which makes use of the wave function information traditionally discarded in the construction of tight-binding models used in the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. The method uses symmetry- based first principles Wannier functions to visualize the effects of superconducting pairing on the distribution of electronic states over atoms within a crystal unit cell. Local symmetries lower than the global lattice symmetry can thus be exhibited as well, rendering theoretical comparisons with scanning tunneling spectroscopy data much more useful. As a simple example, we discuss the geometric dimer states observed near defects in superconducting FeSe.

  14. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries.

  15. Dynamic phenomena studied with a CCD detector

    SciTech Connect

    Brizard, C.M.; Rodricks, B.G.; Alp, E.E. ); MacHarrie, R. )

    1991-08-01

    A new programmable charge coupled device (CCD) detector based on the CAMAC (Computer Automated Measurement and Control) modular system and coupled to a MircoVax 3 computer has been developed for time-resolved synchrotron experiments. The programmability of the electronics allows one to use many kinds of CCD chip. Moreover, different detector modes can be chosen according to the time scale of the experiment. Various time-resolved x-ray scattering experiments have already been performed at NSLS and CHESS with this imaging system. For example, a real-time study of the early stages of crystallization of the amorphous metallic alloy Fe{sub 80}B{sub 20} was carried out at the X6 beamline at NSLS. Here a spin melt ribbon of the amorphous metal was resistively heated in stages in 600{degrees}C and the crystallization observed on the CCD. The detector angular acceptance of 3{degrees} allowed for the observation of the evolution of the {alpha}-Fe, and Fe{sub 3}B and the Fe{sub 2}B phases simultaneously on a minute time scale.

  16. Living matter: the "lunar eclipse" phenomena.

    PubMed

    Korpan, Nikolai N

    2010-01-01

    The present investigations describe a unique phenomenon, namely the phenomenon of the "lunar eclipse", which has been observed and discovered by the author in living substance during the freeze-thawing processes in vivo using temperatures of various intensities and its cryosurgical response in animal experiment. Similar phenomena author has observed in nature, namely the total lunar eclipse and total solar eclipse. In this experimental study 76 animals (mongrel dogs) were investigated. A disc cryogenic probe was placed on the pancreas after the laparotomy. For cryosurgical exposure a temperature range of -40 degrees C, -80 degrees C, -120 degrees C and -180 degrees C was selected in contact with pancreas parenchyma. The freeze-thaw cycle was monitored by intraoperative ultrasound before, during and after cryosurgery. Each cryolesion was observed for one hour after thawing intraoperatively. Immediately after freezing, during the thawing process, the snow-white pancreas parenchyma, frozen hard to an ice block and resembling a full moon with a sharp demarcation line, gradually assumed a ruby-red shade and a hemispherical shape as it grew in size depend on reconstruction vascular circulation from the periphery to the center. This snow-white cryogenic lesion dissolved in the same manner in all animal tissues. The "lunar eclipse" phenomenon contributes to a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of biological tissue damage during low temperature exposure in cryoscience and cryomedicine. Properties of the pancreas parenchyma response during the phenomenon of the "lunar eclipse" provide important insights into the mechanisms of damage and the formation of cryogenic lesion immediately after thawing in cryosurgery. Vascular changes and circulatory stagnation are commonly considered to be the main mechanism of biological tissue injury during low temperature exposure. The phenomenon of the "lunar eclipse" suggests that cryosurgery is the first surgical technique to use

  17. Pathways toward understanding Macroscopic Quantum Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, B. L.; Subaşi, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Macroscopic quantum phenomena refer to quantum features in objects of 'large' sizes, systems with many components or degrees of freedom, organized in some ways where they can be identified as macroscopic objects. This emerging field is ushered in by several categories of definitive experiments in superconductivity, electromechanical systems, Bose-Einstein condensates and others. Yet this new field which is rich in open issues at the foundation of quantum and statistical physics remains little explored theoretically (with the important exception of the work of A J Leggett [1], while touched upon or implied by several groups of authors represented in this conference. Our attitude differs in that we believe in the full validity of quantum mechanics stretching from the testable micro to meso scales, with no need for the introduction of new laws of physics.) This talk summarizes our thoughts in attempting a systematic investigation into some key foundational issues of quantum macroscopic phenomena, with the goal of ultimately revealing or building a viable theoretical framework. Three major themes discussed in three intended essays are the large N expansion [2], the correlation hierarchy [3] and quantum entanglement [4]. We give a sketch of the first two themes and then discuss several key issues in the consideration of macro and quantum, namely, a) recognition that there exist many levels of structure in a composite body and only by judicious choice of an appropriate set of collective variables can one give the best description of the dynamics of a specific level of structure. Capturing the quantum features of a macroscopic object is greatly facilitated by the existence and functioning of these collective variables; b) quantum entanglement, an exclusively quantum feature [5], is known to persist to high temperatures [6] and large scales [7] under certain conditions, and may actually decrease with increased connectivity in a quantum network [8]. We use entanglement as a

  18. BPS States, Crystals, and Matrices

    DOE PAGES

    Sułkowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We review free fermion, melting crystal, and matrix model representations of wall-crossing phenomena on local, toric Calabi-Yau manifolds. We consider both unrefined and refined BPS counting of closed BPS states involving D2- and D0-branes bound to a D6-brane, as well as open BPS states involving open D2-branes ending on an additional D4-brane. Appropriate limit of these constructions provides, among the others, matrix model representation of refined and unrefined topological string amplitudes.

  19. The study of single crystals for space processing and the effect of zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A study was undertaken to analyze different growth techniques affected by a space environment. Literature on crystal growth from melt, vapor phase and float zone was reviewed and the physical phenomena important for crystal growth in zero-gravity environment was analyzed. Recommendations for potential areas of crystal growth feasible for space missions are presented and a bibliography of articles in the area of crystal growth in general is listed.

  20. Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Thermochromic liquid crystals, or TLCs, are a type of liquid crystals that react to changes in temperature by changing color. The Hallcrest/NASA collaboration involved development of a new way to visualize boundary layer transition in flight and in wind tunnel testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. TLCs offered a new and potentially better method of visualizing the boundary layer transition in flight. Hallcrest provided a liquid crystal formulation technique that afforded great control over the sensitivity of the liquid crystals to varying conditions. Method is of great use to industry, government and universities for aerodynamic and hydrodynamic testing. Company's principal line is temperature indicating devices for industrial use, such as non-destructive testing and flaw detection in electric/electronic systems, medical application, such as diagnostic systems, for retail sale, such as room, refrigerator, baby bath and aquarium thermometers, and for advertising and promotion specials. Additionally, Hallcrest manufactures TLC mixtures for cosmetic applications, and liquid crystal battery tester for Duracell batteries.

  1. Thermomechanical phenomena in high speed rubbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical approach is presented for the modeling of the thermomechanical interactions which occur in high speed sliding situations. These sliding contact problems which are characterized by active and interrelated thermal and mechanical phenomena could be called 'rub energetics' problems. Analytical models were developed to simulate two different rub situations: high energy braking of disk brakes and high speed rubs of gas path seals in turbine engines. The models proved to be particularly useful in predicting the severe temperatures and deformations near hot contact patches on the rubbing surfaces. The size of the hot patches is generally determined by normal load and the properties of the contacting materials. Temperatures at the contact patches can approach the melting point of the materials, especially at high sliding velocities. These high temperatures can lead to large amounts of near-surface deformation and high wear rates. Decreased contact temperatures can result from using materials with increased thermal conductivity and increased heat capacity or choosing mechanical properties (decreased stiffness, yield stress or coefficient of thermal expansion) which give larger hot spot size.

  2. Mixing, ergodicity and slow relaxation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, I. V. L.; Vainstein, M. H.; Lapas, L. C.; Batista, A. A.; Oliveira, F. A.

    2006-11-01

    Investigations on diffusion in systems with memory [I.V.L. Costa, R. Morgado, M.V.B.T. Lima, F.A. Oliveira, Europhys. Lett. 63 (2003) 173] have established a hierarchical connection between mixing, ergodicity, and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT). This hierarchy means that ergodicity is a necessary condition for the validity of the FDT, and mixing is a necessary condition for ergodicity. In this work, we compare those results with recent investigations using the Lee recurrence relations method [M.H. Lee, Phys. Rev. B 26 (1982) 2547; M.H. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 250601; M.H. Lee, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 (2006) 4651]. Lee shows that ergodicity is violated in the dynamics of the electron gas [M.H. Lee, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 (2006) 4651]. This reinforces both works and implies that the results of [I.V.L. Costa, R. Morgado, M.V.B.T. Lima, F.A. Oliveira, Europhys. Lett. 63 (2003) 173] are more general than the framework in which they were obtained. Some applications to slow relaxation phenomena are discussed.

  3. Observations of dynamical phenomena in sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nye, A. H.; Cram, L. E.; Beckers, J. M.; Thomas, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A preliminary report of the results of one observing run based on data from one spectral line, the photospheric magnetic line Fe 6303, is presented as part of a series of observations of dynamical phenomena in sunspots using photographic spectra with the SPO vacuum tower telescope and echelle spectrograph. The ejection of a magnetic feature from the outer edge of the penumbra was observed. The initial total field strength of the feature was about 1000 gauss, which appeared to decrease as the feature moved away from the sunspot. The proper motion was about 2 km/s, and the velocity field measured in the V profile showed a downflow of 400 m/s on the spotward side of the moving magnetic feature. Umbral oscillations at the photospheric level with a herringbone structure characteristic of horizontally propagating waves, suggesting some overtone mode of membrane oscillation in the umbra, were seen. The peak amplitude of the oscillation was about 200 m/s, and the mean power spectrum had several clear peaks.

  4. High energy phenomena during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Emilia

    1989-11-01

    The main purpose is to analyze the characteristics of peculiar solar events that could be produced by ultrarelativistic electrons and try to define the new boundary conditions for the primary energy release during impulsive phase. It seems that submillimeter emission in solar flares is not a rare phenomenon, there is not much evidence, due to the lack of observations in this range of the spectrum. During May 1984 the Sun was observed at 90 GHz with high time resolution and high sensitivity, and evidence was obtained. The May 21, 1984 event, at 1326 UT is the best example of the high energy manifestation during the spectrum and gave us new boundary conditions for the physical phenomena in the Sun. The May 21 event required a detailed analysis of the current interpretation models and suggested the presence of relativistic electrons during the impulsive phase. In this case Syncrotron/inverse compton mechanism was suggested to explain submillimeter/x ray emission and short pulse duration. The new boundary conditions for primary energy release favored Tajima and Sakai's model, based in magnetic island coalescence theory.

  5. Some novel phenomena at high density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Evan Scott

    Astrophysical environments probe matter in ways impossible on Earth. In particular, matter in compact objects are extraordinarily dense. In this thesis we discuss two phenomena that may occur at high density. First, we study toroidal topological solitons called vortons, which can occur in the kaon-condensed color-flavor-locked phase of high-density quark matter, a candidate phase for the core of some neutron stars. We show that vortons have a large radius compared to their thickness if their electrical charge is on the order of 104 times the fundamental charge. We show that shielding of electric fields by electrons dramatically reduces the size of a vorton. Second, we study an unusual phase of degenerate electrons and nonrelativistic Bose-condensed helium nuclei that may exist in helium white dwarfs. We show that this phase supports a previously-unknown gapless mode, known as the half-sound, that radically alters the material's specific heat, and can annihilate into neutrinos. We provide evidence that this neutrino radiation is negligible compared to the star's surface photoemission.

  6. Recognizing hesitation phenomena in continuous, spontaneous speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshaughnessy, Douglas

    Spontaneous speech differs from read speech in speaking rate and hesitation. In natural, spontaneous speech, people often start talking and then think along the way; at times, this causes the speech to have hesitation pauses (both filled and unfilled) and restarts. Results are reported on all types of pauses in a widely-used speech database, for both hesitation pauses and semi-intentional pauses. A distinction is made between grammatical pauses (at major syntactic boundaries) and ungrammatical ones. Different types of unfilled pauses cannot be reliably separated based on silence duration, although grammatical pauses tend to be longer. In the prepausal word before ungrammatical pauses, there were few continuation rises in pitch, whereas 80 percent of the grammatical pauses were accompanied by a prior fundamental frequency rise of 10-40 kHz. Identifying the syntactic function of such hesitation phenomena can improve recognition performance by eliminating from consideration some of the hypotheses proposed by an acoustic recognizer. Results presented allow simple identification of filled pauses (such as uhh, umm) and their syntactic function.

  7. Quantification of statistical phenomena in turbulent dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Matthew; Hann, David; Hewakandamby, Buddhika

    2015-11-01

    Understanding of turbulent dispersions is of great importance for environmental and industrial applications. This includes developing a greater understanding of particle movement in atmospheric flows, and providing data that can be used to validate CFD models aimed at producing more accurate simulations of dispersed turbulent flows, aiding design of many industrial components. Statistical phenomena in turbulent dispersions were investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry. Experiments were carried out in a two dimensional channel over a Reynolds number range of 10000-30000, using water and 500 micron hydrogel particles. Particles were injected at the channel entrance, and dispersion properties were characterised at different distances downstream from the injection point. Probability density functions were compiled for the velocity components of the hydrogels for differing flow conditions. Higher order PDFs were constructed to investigate the behaviour of particle pairs. Dispersed phase data was also used to investigate the mechanics of collisions between hydrogel particles, allowing for calculation of the co-efficient of restitution. PIV algorithms were used to create velocity maps for the continuous phase for varying dispersed phase fractions. Thanks to support of Chevron grant as part of TMF consortium.

  8. Is volcanic phenomena of fractal nature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevedo, R.; Lopez, D. A. L.; Alparone, S.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Sagiya, T.; Barrancos, J.; Rodriguez-Santana, A. A.; Ramos, A.; Calvari, S.; Perez, N. M.

    2016-12-01

    A particular resonance waveform pattern has been detected beneath different physical volcano manifestations from recent 2011-2012 period of volcanic unrest at El Hierro Island, Canary Islands, and also from other worldwide volcanoes with different volcanic typology. This mentioned pattern appears to be a fractal time dependent waveform repeated in different time scales (periods of time). This time dependent feature suggests this resonance as a new approach to volcano phenomena for predicting such interesting matters as earthquakes, gas emission, deformation etc. as this fractal signal has been discovered hidden in a wide typical volcanic parameters measurements. It is known that the resonance phenomenon occurring in nature usually denote a structure, symmetry or a subjacent law (Fermi et al., 1952; and later -about enhanced cross-sections symmetry in protons collisions), which, in this particular case, may be indicative of some physical interactions showing a sequence not completely chaotic but cyclic provided with symmetries. The resonance and fractal model mentioned allowed the authors to make predictions in cycles from a few weeks to months. In this work an equation for this waveform has been described and also correlations with volcanic parameters and fractal behavior demonstration have been performed, including also some suggestive possible explanations of this signal origin.

  9. Two-Stage Modelling Of Random Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barańska, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The main objective of this publication was to present a two-stage algorithm of modelling random phenomena, based on multidimensional function modelling, on the example of modelling the real estate market for the purpose of real estate valuation and estimation of model parameters of foundations vertical displacements. The first stage of the presented algorithm includes a selection of a suitable form of the function model. In the classical algorithms, based on function modelling, prediction of the dependent variable is its value obtained directly from the model. The better the model reflects a relationship between the independent variables and their effect on the dependent variable, the more reliable is the model value. In this paper, an algorithm has been proposed which comprises adjustment of the value obtained from the model with a random correction determined from the residuals of the model for these cases which, in a separate analysis, were considered to be the most similar to the object for which we want to model the dependent variable. The effect of applying the developed quantitative procedures for calculating the corrections and qualitative methods to assess the similarity on the final outcome of the prediction and its accuracy, was examined by statistical methods, mainly using appropriate parametric tests of significance. The idea of the presented algorithm has been designed so as to approximate the value of the dependent variable of the studied phenomenon to its value in reality and, at the same time, to have it "smoothed out" by a well fitted modelling function.

  10. Ultrashort Phenomena in Biochemistry and Biological Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splinter, Robert

    2014-11-01

    In biological phenomena there are indications that within the long pulse-length of the action potential on millisecond scale, there is additional ultrashort perturbation encoding that provides the brain with detailed information about the origin (location) and physiological characteristics. The objective is to identify the mechanism-of-action providing the potential for encoding in biological signal propagation. The actual molecular processes involved in the initiation of the action potential have been identified to be in the femtosecond and pico-second scale. The depolarization process of the cellular membrane itself, leading to the onset of the actionpotential that is transmitted to the brain, however is in the millisecond timeframe. One example of the femtosecond chemical interaction is the photoresponse of bacteriorhodopsin. No clear indication for the spatial encoding has so far been verified. Further research will be required on a cellular signal analysis level to confirm or deny the spatial and physiological encoding in the signal wave-trains of intercellular communications and sensory stimuli. The pathological encoding process for cardiac depolarization is however very pronounced and validated, however this electro-chemical process is in the millisecond amplitude and frequency modulation spectrum.

  11. Highly energetic phenomena in water electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Postnikov, A V; Uvarov, I V; Lokhanin, M V; Svetovoy, V B

    2016-12-16

    Water electrolysis performed in microsystems with a fast change of voltage polarity produces optically invisible nanobubbles containing H2 and O2 gases. In this form the gases are able to the reverse reaction of water formation. Here we report extreme phenomena observed in a millimeter-sized open system. Under a frequency of driving pulses above 100 kHz the process is accompanied by clicking sounds repeated every 50 ms or so. Fast video reveals that synchronously with the click a bubble is growing between the electrodes which reaches a size of 300 μm in 50 μs. Detailed dynamics of the system is monitored by means of a vibrometer by observing a piece of silicon floating above the electrodes. The energy of a single event is estimated as 0.3 μJ and a significant part of this energy is transformed into mechanical work moving the piece. The observations are explained by the combustion of hydrogen and oxygen mixture in the initial bubble with a diameter of about 40 μm. Unusual combustion mechanism supporting spontaneous ignition at room temperature is responsible for the process. The observed effect demonstrates a principal possibility to build a microscopic internal combustion engine.

  12. Highly energetic phenomena in water electrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Postnikov, A. V.; Uvarov, I. V.; Lokhanin, M. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-01-01

    Water electrolysis performed in microsystems with a fast change of voltage polarity produces optically invisible nanobubbles containing H2 and O2 gases. In this form the gases are able to the reverse reaction of water formation. Here we report extreme phenomena observed in a millimeter-sized open system. Under a frequency of driving pulses above 100 kHz the process is accompanied by clicking sounds repeated every 50 ms or so. Fast video reveals that synchronously with the click a bubble is growing between the electrodes which reaches a size of 300 μm in 50 μs. Detailed dynamics of the system is monitored by means of a vibrometer by observing a piece of silicon floating above the electrodes. The energy of a single event is estimated as 0.3 μJ and a significant part of this energy is transformed into mechanical work moving the piece. The observations are explained by the combustion of hydrogen and oxygen mixture in the initial bubble with a diameter of about 40 μm. Unusual combustion mechanism supporting spontaneous ignition at room temperature is responsible for the process. The observed effect demonstrates a principal possibility to build a microscopic internal combustion engine. PMID:27982103

  13. Highly energetic phenomena in water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnikov, A. V.; Uvarov, I. V.; Lokhanin, M. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-12-01

    Water electrolysis performed in microsystems with a fast change of voltage polarity produces optically invisible nanobubbles containing H2 and O2 gases. In this form the gases are able to the reverse reaction of water formation. Here we report extreme phenomena observed in a millimeter-sized open system. Under a frequency of driving pulses above 100 kHz the process is accompanied by clicking sounds repeated every 50 ms or so. Fast video reveals that synchronously with the click a bubble is growing between the electrodes which reaches a size of 300 μm in 50 μs. Detailed dynamics of the system is monitored by means of a vibrometer by observing a piece of silicon floating above the electrodes. The energy of a single event is estimated as 0.3 μJ and a significant part of this energy is transformed into mechanical work moving the piece. The observations are explained by the combustion of hydrogen and oxygen mixture in the initial bubble with a diameter of about 40 μm. Unusual combustion mechanism supporting spontaneous ignition at room temperature is responsible for the process. The observed effect demonstrates a principal possibility to build a microscopic internal combustion engine.

  14. Interface-Induced Phenomena in Magnetism.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Frances; Hoffmann, Axel; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Beach, Geoffrey S D; Fullerton, Eric E; Leighton, Chris; MacDonald, Allan H; Ralph, Daniel C; Arena, Dario A; Dürr, Hermann A; Fischer, Peter; Grollier, Julie; Heremans, Joseph P; Jungwirth, Tomas; Kimel, Alexey V; Koopmans, Bert; Krivorotov, Ilya N; May, Steven J; Petford-Long, Amanda K; Rondinelli, James M; Samarth, Nitin; Schuller, Ivan K; Slavin, Andrei N; Stiles, Mark D; Tchernyshyov, Oleg; Thiaville, André; Zink, Barry L

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews static and dynamic interfacial effects in magnetism, focusing on interfacially-driven magnetic effects and phenomena associated with spin-orbit coupling and intrinsic symmetry breaking at interfaces. It provides a historical background and literature survey, but focuses on recent progress, identifying the most exciting new scientific results and pointing to promising future research directions. It starts with an introduction and overview of how basic magnetic properties are affected by interfaces, then turns to a discussion of charge and spin transport through and near interfaces and how these can be used to control the properties of the magnetic layer. Important concepts include spin accumulation, spin currents, spin transfer torque, and spin pumping. An overview is provided to the current state of knowledge and existing review literature on interfacial effects such as exchange bias, exchange spring magnets, spin Hall effect, oxide heterostructures, and topological insulators. The article highlights recent discoveries of interface-induced magnetism and non-collinear spin textures, non-linear dynamics including spin torque transfer and magnetization reversal induced by interfaces, and interfacial effects in ultrafast magnetization processes.

  15. Bulk Rashba Semiconductors and Related Quantum Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Bahramy, Mohammad Saeed; Ogawa, Naoki

    2017-03-29

    Bithmuth tellurohalides BiTeX (X = Cl, Br and I) are model examples of bulk Rashba semiconductors, exhibiting a giant Rashba-type spin splitting among their both valence and conduction bands. Extensive spectroscopic and transport experiments combined with the state-of-the-art first-principles calculations have revealed many unique quantum phenomena emerging from the bulk Rashba effect in these systems. The novel features such as the exotic inter- and intra-band optical transitions, enhanced magneto-optical response, divergent orbital dia-/para-magnetic susceptibility and helical spin textures with a nontrivial Berry's phase in the momentum space are among the salient discoveries, all arising from this effect. Also, it is theoretically proposed and indications have been experimentally reported that bulk Rashba semiconductors such as BiTeI have the capability of becoming a topological insulator under the application of a hydrostatic pressure. Here, we overview these studies and show that BiTeX are an ideal platform to explore the next aspects of quantum matter, which could ultimately be utilized to create spintronic devices with novel functionalities.

  16. Basic ablation phenomena during laser thrombolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Shearin, Alan; Prahl, Scott A.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents studies of microsecond ablation phenomena that take place during laser thrombolysis. The main goals were to optimize laser parameters for efficient ablation, and to investigate the ablation mechanism. Gelatin containing an absorbing dye was used as the clot model. A parametric study was performed to identify the optimal wavelength, spot size, pulse energies, and repetition rate for maximum material removal. The minimum radiant exposures to achieve ablation at any wavelength were measured. The results suggest that most visible wavelengths were equally efficient at removing material at radiant exposures above threshold. Ablation was initiated at surface temperatures just above 100 degrees Celsius. A vapor bubble was formed during ablation. Less than 5% of the total pulse energy is coupled into the bubble energy. A large part of the delivered energy is unaccounted for and is likely released partly as acoustic transients from the vapor expansion and partly wasted as heat. The current laser and delivery systems may not be able to completely remove large clot burden that is sometimes encountered in heart attacks. However, laser thrombolysis may emerge as a favored treatment for strokes where the occlusion is generally smaller and rapid recanalization is of paramount importance. A final hypothesis is that laser thrombolysis should be done at radiant exposures close to threshold to minimize any damaging effects of the bubble dynamics on the vessel wall.

  17. Rotary kilns - transport phenomena and transport processes

    SciTech Connect

    Boateng, A.

    2008-01-15

    Rotary kilns and rotating industrial drying ovens are used for a wide variety of applications including processing raw minerals and feedstocks as well as heat-treating hazardous wastes. They are particularly critical in the manufacture of Portland cement. Their design and operation is critical to their efficient usage, which if done incorrectly can result in improperly treated materials and excessive, high fuel costs. This book treats all engineering aspects of rotary kilns, including thermal and fluid principles involved in their operation, as well as how to properly design an engineering process that uses rotary kilns. Chapter 1: The Rotary Kiln Evolution and Phenomenon Chapter 2: Basic Description of Rotary Kiln Operation Chapter 3: Freeboard Aerodynamic Phenomena Chapter 4: Granular Flows in Rotary Kilns Chapter 5: Mixing and Segregation Chapter 6: Combustion and Flame - includes section on types of fuels used in rotary kilns, coal types, ranking and analysis, petroleum coke combustion, scrap tire combustion, pulverized fuel (coal/coke) firing in kilns, pulverized fuel delivery and firing systems. Chapter 7: Freeboard Heat Transfer Chapter 8: Heat Transfer Processes in the Rotary Kiln Bed Chapter 9: Mass and Energy Balance Chapter 10: Rotary Kiln Minerals Process Applications.

  18. New theoretical treatment of ion resonance phenomena.

    PubMed

    Vincze, G; Szasz, A; Liboff, A R

    2008-07-01

    Despite experimental evidence supporting ICR-like interactions in biological systems, to date there is no reasonable theoretical explanation for this phenomenon. The parametric resonance approach introduced by Lednev has enjoyed limited success in predicting the response as a function of the ratio of AC magnetic intensity to that of the DC field, explaining the results in terms of magnetically induced changes in the transition probability of calcium binding states. In the present work, we derive an expression for the velocity of a damped ion with arbitrary q/m under the influence of the Lorentz force. Series solutions to the differential equations reveal transient responses as well as resonance-like terms. One fascinating result is that the expressions for ionic drift velocity include a somewhat similar Bessel function dependence as was previously obtained for the transition probability in parametric resonance. However, in the present work, not only is there an explicit effect due to damping, but the previous Bessel dependence now occurs as a subset of a more general solution, including not only the magnetic field AC/DC ratio as an independent variable, but also the ratio of the cyclotronic frequency Omega to the applied AC frequency omega. In effect, this removes the necessity to explain the ICR interaction as stemming from ion-protein binding sites. We hypothesize that the selectively enhanced drift velocity predicted in this model can explain ICR-like phenomena as resulting from increased interaction probabilities in the vicinity of ion channel gates.

  19. Rheological Properties and Transfer Phenomena of Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kang-min; Kim, Sung Hyun

    2008-07-01

    This study focused on the synthesis of stable nanofluids and investigation of their rhelogical properties and transfer phenomena. Nanofluids of diamond/ethylene glycol, alumina/transformer oil and silica/water were made to use in this study. Rheological properties of diamond nanofluids were determined at constant temperature (25 °C) using a viscometer. For the convective heat transfer experiment, alumina nanofluid passed through the plate heat exchanger. CO2 absorption experiment was conducted in a bubble type absorber containing silica nanofluid. Diamond nanofluid showed non-Newtonian behaviors under a steady-shear flow except the case of very low concentration of solid nanoparticles. The heat transfer coefficient of alumina nanofluid was higher than that of base fluid. One possible reason is that concentration of nanoparticles at the wall side is higher than that of microparticles. Silica nanofluid showed that both average CO2 absorption rate and total absorption amount enhanced than those of base fluid. The stably suspended nanoparticles create a mesh-like structure. That structure arrangement cracks the gas bubble and increases the surface area.

  20. Constrained tricritical phenomena in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Deng, Youjin; Heringa, Jouke R; Blöte, Henk W J

    2005-03-01

    We investigate several tricritical models on the square lattice by means of Monte Carlo simulations. These include the Blume-Capel model, Baxter's hard-square model, and the q=1 , 3, and 4 Potts models with vacancies. We use a combination of the Wolff and geometric cluster methods, which conserves the total number of vacancies or lattice-gas particles and suppresses critical slowing down. Several quantities are sampled, such as the specific heat C and the structure factor C(s) , which accounts for the large-scale spatial inhomogeneity of the energy fluctuations. We find that the constraint strongly modifies some of the critical singularities. For instance, the specific heat C reaches a finite value at tricriticality, while C(s) remains divergent as in the unconstrained system. We are able to explain these observed constrained phenomena on the basis of the Fisher renormalization mechanism generalized to include a subleading relevant thermal scaling field. In this context, we find that, under the constraint, the leading thermal exponent y(t1) is renormalized to 2- y(t1) , while the subleading exponent y(t2) remains unchanged.

  1. Interface-Induced Phenomena in Magnetism

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Axel; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Leighton, Chris; MacDonald, Allan H.; Ralph, Daniel C.; Arena, Dario A.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Fischer, Peter; Grollier, Julie; Heremans, Joseph P.; Jungwirth, Tomas; Kimel, Alexey V.; Koopmans, Bert; Krivorotov, Ilya N.; May, Steven J.; Petford-Long, Amanda K.; Rondinelli, James M.; Samarth, Nitin; Schuller, Ivan K.; Slavin, Andrei N.; Stiles, Mark D.; Tchernyshyov, Oleg; Thiaville, André; Zink, Barry L.

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews static and dynamic interfacial effects in magnetism, focusing on interfacially-driven magnetic effects and phenomena associated with spin-orbit coupling and intrinsic symmetry breaking at interfaces. It provides a historical background and literature survey, but focuses on recent progress, identifying the most exciting new scientific results and pointing to promising future research directions. It starts with an introduction and overview of how basic magnetic properties are affected by interfaces, then turns to a discussion of charge and spin transport through and near interfaces and how these can be used to control the properties of the magnetic layer. Important concepts include spin accumulation, spin currents, spin transfer torque, and spin pumping. An overview is provided to the current state of knowledge and existing review literature on interfacial effects such as exchange bias, exchange spring magnets, spin Hall effect, oxide heterostructures, and topological insulators. The article highlights recent discoveries of interface-induced magnetism and non-collinear spin textures, non-linear dynamics including spin torque transfer and magnetization reversal induced by interfaces, and interfacial effects in ultrafast magnetization processes. PMID:28890576

  2. Interface-induced phenomena in magnetism

    DOE PAGES

    Hellman, Frances; Hoffmann, Axel; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; ...

    2017-06-05

    Our article reviews static and dynamic interfacial effects in magnetism, focusing on interfacially-driven magnetic effects and phenomena associated with spin-orbit coupling and intrinsic symmetry breaking at interfaces. It provides a historical background and literature survey, but focuses on recent progress, identifying the most exciting new scientific results and pointing to promising future research directions. It starts with an introduction and overview of how basic magnetic properties are affected by interfaces, then turns to a discussion of charge and spin transport through and near interfaces and how these can be used to control the properties of the magnetic layer. Important conceptsmore » include spin accumulation, spin currents, spin transfer torque, and spin pumping. We provide an overview for the current state of knowledge and existing review literature on interfacial effects such as exchange bias, exchange spring magnets, spin Hall effect, oxide heterostructures, and topological insulators. Our article highlights recent discoveries of interface-induced magnetism and non-collinear spin textures, non-linear dynamics including spin torque transfer and magnetization reversal induced by interfaces, and interfacial effects in ultrafast magnetization processes.« less

  3. Further shock tunnel studies of scramjet phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. G.; Paull, A.; Morris, N. A.; Stalker, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Scramjet phenomena were studied using the shock tunnel T3 at the Australian National University. Simple two dimensional models were used with a combination of wall and central injectors. Silane as an additive to hydrogen fuel was studied over a range of temperatures and pressures to evaluate its effect as an ignition aid. The film cooling effect of surface injected hydrogen was measured over a wide range of equivalence. Heat transfer measurements without injection were repeated to confirm previous indications of heating rates lower than simple flat plate predictions for laminar boundary layers in equilibrium flow. The previous results were reproduced and the discrepancies are discussed in terms of the model geometry and departures of the flow from equilibrium. In the thrust producing mode, attempts were made to increase specific impulse with wall injection. Some preliminary tests were also performed on shock induced ignition, to investigate the possibility in flight of injecting fuel upstream of the combustion chamber, where it could mix but not burn.

  4. Bifurcation analysis method of nonlinear traffic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Wenhuan; Shi, Zhongke; Liu, Dawei

    2015-03-01

    A new bifurcation analysis method for analyzing and predicting the complex nonlinear traffic phenomena based on the macroscopic traffic flow model is presented in this paper. This method makes use of variable substitution to transform a traditional traffic flow model into a new model which is suitable for the stability analysis. Although the substitution seems to be simple, it can extend the range of the variable to infinity and build a relationship between the traffic congestion and the unstable system in the phase plane. So the problem of traffic flow could be converted into that of system stability. The analysis identifies the types and stabilities of the equilibrium solutions of the new model and gives the overall distribution structure of the nearby equilibrium solutions in the phase plane. Then we deduce the existence conditions of the models Hopf bifurcation and saddle-node bifurcation and find some bifurcations such as Hopf bifurcation, saddle-node bifurcation, Limit Point bifurcation of cycles and Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation. Furthermore, the Hopf bifurcation and saddle-node bifurcation are selected as the starting point of density temporal evolution and it will be helpful for improving our understanding of stop-and-go wave and local cluster effects observed in the free-way traffic.

  5. Interface-induced phenomena in magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellman, Frances; Hoffmann, Axel; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Leighton, Chris; MacDonald, Allan H.; Ralph, Daniel C.; Arena, Dario A.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Fischer, Peter; Grollier, Julie; Heremans, Joseph P.; Jungwirth, Tomas; Kimel, Alexey V.; Koopmans, Bert; Krivorotov, Ilya N.; May, Steven J.; Petford-Long, Amanda K.; Rondinelli, James M.; Samarth, Nitin; Schuller, Ivan K.; Slavin, Andrei N.; Stiles, Mark D.; Tchernyshyov, Oleg; Thiaville, André; Zink, Barry L.

    2017-04-01

    This article reviews static and dynamic interfacial effects in magnetism, focusing on interfacially driven magnetic effects and phenomena associated with spin-orbit coupling and intrinsic symmetry breaking at interfaces. It provides a historical background and literature survey, but focuses on recent progress, identifying the most exciting new scientific results and pointing to promising future research directions. It starts with an introduction and overview of how basic magnetic properties are affected by interfaces, then turns to a discussion of charge and spin transport through and near interfaces and how these can be used to control the properties of the magnetic layer. Important concepts include spin accumulation, spin currents, spin-transfer torque, and spin pumping. An overview is provided to the current state of knowledge and existing review literature on interfacial effects such as exchange bias, exchange-spring magnets, the spin Hall effect, oxide heterostructures, and topological insulators. The article highlights recent discoveries of interface-induced magnetism and noncollinear spin textures, nonlinear dynamics including spin-transfer torque and magnetization reversal induced by interfaces, and interfacial effects in ultrafast magnetization processes.

  6. Phantom black holes and critical phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Azreg-Aïnou, Mustapha; Marques, Glauber T.

    2014-07-01

    We consider the two classes cosh and sinh of normal and phantom black holes of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. The thermodynamics of these holes is characterized by heat capacities that may have both signs depending on the parameters of the theory. Leaving aside the normal Reissner-Nordström black hole, it is shown that only some phantom black holes of both classes exhibit critical phenomena. The two classes share a nonextremality, but special, critical point where the transition is continuous and the heat capacity, at constant charge, changes sign with an infinite discontinuity. This point yields a classification scheme for critical points. It is concluded that the two unstable and stable phases coexist on one side of the criticality state and disappear on the other side, that is, there is no configuration where only one phase exists. The sinh class has an extremality critical point where the entropy diverges. The transition from extremality to nonextremality with the charge held constant is accompanied by a loss of mass and an increase in the temperature. A special case of this transition is when the hole is isolated (microcanonical ensemble), it will evolve by emission of energy, which results in a decrease of its mass, to the final state of minimum mass and vanishing heat capacity. The Ehrenfest scheme of classification is inaccurate in this case but the generalized one due to Hilfer leads to conclude that the transition is of order less than unity. Fluctuations near criticality are also investigated.

  7. Anomalous Nuclear Phenomena Assocoated with Ultrafast Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xingliu; Zhou, Xiaoping; Liu, Chun; Wang, Liying; Zhang, Zhongliang

    2007-04-01

    Quantum physics predicts the existence of an underlying sea of zero-point energy at every point in the universe. A minority of physicists accept it as real energy which we cannot directly sense since it is the same everywhere, even inside our bodies and measuring devices. If the zero-point energy is real, there is the possibility that it can be tapped as a source of power or be harnassed to generate a propulsive force for space travel. However if some asymmetric variation of the Casimir force could be identified one could in effect sail through space as if propelled by a kind of quantum fluctuation wind. In our previous papers, anomalous excess heat and localized nuclear reactions on the surface of electrodes in electrolysis cells have been observed. A physical model of transient vortex dynamics with torsion coherence with the zero point energy has been proposed by Xingliu Jiang based on the ultrafast processes of triple phases area of tip effect on the electrode surface. Considering the large equiverlent capacitance of electrochemical double layer, it is presumed that the double layer can exhibit nonlinear electrical response with spatial and temporal variations confined to microscopic areas by tip effect. Experimental results of transient processes with ultrafast phenomena with nanosecond duration in electrical discharge systems including electrolysis cells and corona discharge have been presented.

  8. Anomalous Magnetoresistance Phenomena in Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeson, Jeremy D.; Lincoln, Derek M.; Shima Edelstein, Ruth; Prigodin, Vladimir N.; Epstein, Arthur J.

    2006-03-01

    We report magnetoresistance (MR) phenomena with temperature and bias dependence in organic semiconductor thin films with either nonmagnetic or magnetic contacts through high field reaching 9T. For nonmagnetic organic thin films such as Alq3 we find a low field MR up to 15%. A similar magnetic field effect has been reported earlier^1 but, as noted, the mechanism remains unclear. We propose a model of the anomalous MR where charge transport is space-charge limited. The current is determined by the e-h recombination rate. The recombination rate is field dependent, analogous to the chemical yield for radical pairs^2. Using an organic- based magnetic semiconductor^3, V[TCNE]x, and Co as magnetic contacts, with a nonmagnetic organic semiconductor (α-6T) leads to an order-of-magnitude broader zero-centered MR peak superimposed on a spin-valve effect. Possible origins of this broader MR will be discussed. 1. Francis, et al., New J. Phys. 6 185 (2004); Frankevich, et al., Phys. Rev. B 53 4498 (1996) 2. Steiner and Ulrich, Chem. Rev. 89 51 (1989) 3. Pokhodnya, et al., Adv. Mater. 12 410 (2000); Prigodin, et al., Adv. Mater. 14 1230 (2002); Shima Edelstein, et al., Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 871E I7.3 (2005)

  9. Half collision resonance phenomena in molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Maximo Garcia-Sucre ); Raseev, G. ); Ross, S.C. )

    1991-01-01

    The Escuela Latinoamericana de Fisica (ELAF) is a series of meeting s that for 28 years has played an important role in research-level teaching of physics in Latin America. This book contains the proceedings of ELAF 90 which was held at the Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas (IVIC) in Caracas, Venezuela from July 23 to August 3, 1990, as part of the commemoration of the 30th anniversary of IVIC. In contrast to previous ELAF's that were of general scope, ELAF 90 centered on a particular subject matter: Half Collisional Resonance Phenomena in Molecules, Experimental and Theoretical Approaches. The term Half Collision'' refers to the fragmentation of a molecular system following is excitation by light. The lack of an incident fragmentation of a molecular system following is excitation by light. The lack of an incident particle (other than the photon) in the fragmentation process is what leads to the term. The purpose of this volume is to present current results in the experimental and theoretical study of half collisions and also to include pedagogical papers at an introductory or intermediate level. The contributions are grouped into several sections; light sources; ionization; dissociation-experimental; dissociation-theory; competition between ionization and dissociation; and particle-molecule collisions.

  10. Bubble breakup phenomena in a venturi tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Akiko

    2005-11-01

    Microbubble has distinguished characteristics of large surface area to unit volume and small buoyancy, and it has advantages in many engineering fields. Recently microbubble generators with low energy and high performance are required to wide applications. In the present study, we propose one new effective technique to generate tiny bubbles with less than 200 μm diameter utilizing venturi tube under high void fraction condition. The objective of the present study is to elucidate the mechanism of bubble breakup phenomena in the venturi tube and to clarify the effects of parameters which are necessary to realize an optimum system experimentally. Experiment was conducted with void fraction of 4% and variation of liquid velocity from 9 to 26 m/s at the throat. Under low velocity condition, bubbles which were observed with a high speed camera parted gradually in a wide region. On the contrary under high velocity condition, bubbles expanded after passing through the throat and shrank rapidly. Since the speed of sound in gas-liquid system is extremely lower than that of single-phase flow, the bubble breakup phenomenon in the venturi tube is explained as the supersonic flow in a Laval nozzle. By rapid pressure recovery in diverging area, expanding bubbles collapse violently. The tiny bubbles are generated due to the surface instability of shrinking bubbles.

  11. Ion effects on ionospheric electron resonance phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    Ion effects are often observed on topside-sounder stimulated electron plasma wave phenomena. A commonly observed effect is a spur, appearing after a time delay corresponding to the proton gyro period, attached to the low frequency side of an electron plasma resonance. The spurs are often observed on the resonances at the electron plasma frequency f sub N, the harmonics nf sub H of the electron cyclotron frequency f sub H (n = 2, 3, 4, ...), and occasionally on the upper hybrid frequency. The spurs on the f sub N resonance are usually quite small unless the f sub N resonance overlaps with an nf sub H resonance; very large spurs are observed during such overlap conditions. Proton spurs are only observed on the nf sub H resonances when the electron plasma waves associated with these resonances are susceptible to the Harris instability and when the electromagnetic z wave can be initiated by the sounderpulse. This instability is the result of a sounder stimulated anisotropic electron velocity distribution. The observations suggest that energy is fed into the nf sub H longitudinal plasma wave from the z wave via wave-mode coupling. The magnitude of the nf sub H spurs for large n is much greater than for small n.

  12. Efferent feedback can explain many hearing phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, W. Harvey; Flax, Matthew R.

    2015-12-01

    The mixed mode cochlear amplifier (MMCA) model was presented at the last Mechanics of Hearing workshop [4]. The MMCA consists principally of a nonlinear feedback loop formed when an efferent-controlled outer hair cell (OHC) is combined with the cochlear mechanics and the rest of the relevant neurobiology. Essential elements of this model are efferent control of the OHC motility and a delay in the feedback to the OHC. The input to the MMCA is the passive travelling wave. In the MMCA amplification is localized where both the neural and tuned mechanical systems meet in the Organ of Corti (OoC). The simplest model based on this idea is a nonlinear delay line resonator (DLR), which is mathematically described by a nonlinear delay-differential equation (DDE). This model predicts possible Hopf bifurcations and exhibits its most interesting behaviour when operating near a bifurcation. This contribution presents some simulation results using the DLR model. These show that various observed hearing phenomena can be accounted for by this model, at least qualitatively, including compression effects, two-tone suppression and some forms of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs).

  13. Fingering phenomena during grain-grain displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Nathália M. P.; Paiva, Humberto A.; Combe, G.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous formation of fingered patterns during the displacement of dense granular assemblies was experimentally reported few years ago, in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Here, by means of discrete element simulations, we have recovered the experimental findings and extended the original study to explore the control parameters space. In particular, using assemblies of grains with different geometries (monodisperse, bidisperse, or polydisperse), we measured the macroscopic stress tensor in the samples in order to confirm some conjectures proposed in analogy with Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering phenomena for immiscible fluids. Considering an axial setup which allows to control the discharge of grains and to follow the trajectory and the pressure gradient along the displacing interface, we have applied the Darcy law for laminar flow in fluids in order to measure an "effective viscosity" for each assembly combination, in an attempt to mimic variation of the viscosity ratio between the injected/displaced fluids in the Saffman-Taylor experiment. The results corroborate the analogy with the viscous fluids displacement, with the bidisperse assembly corresponding to the less viscous geometry. But, differently to fluid case, granular fingers only develop for a specific combination of displaced/injected geometries, and we have demonstrated that it is always related with the formation of a force chain network along the finger direction.

  14. Numerical analysis and modeling of atmospheric phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Peter H.

    1994-01-01

    For the past 22 years Grant NGR 22-009-727 has been supporting research in the Center for Meteorology and Physical Oceanography (and its predecessors) in a wide variety of diagnostic and modeling studies of atmospheric and ocean phenomena. Professor Jule Charney was the initial Principal Investigator. Professor Peter Stone joined him as co-Principal Investigator in 1975 and became the sole Principal Investigator in 1981. During its lifetime the Grant has supported in whole or in part 11 Master's theses, 14 Ph.D. theses, and 45 papers published in refereed scientific journals. All of these theses and papers (with bibliographic references) are listed below. All but one of the theses were used to fulfill the requirements for MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) degrees and are available from the MIT libraries. The one exception is F. Chen's Ph.D. thesis which was for a Harvard degree and is available from the Harvard libraries. In addition to the work described in the citations listed below, the Grant has supported Research Assistant Amy Solomon during the past two years to carry out a study of how baroclinic adjustment is affected by vertical resolution, vertical temperature structure, and dissipation. Ms. Solomon plans to use this project for her Ph.D. thesis. Support for this project will continue under NASA Grant NAG 5-2490, 'The Factors Controlling Poleward Heat Transport in Climate Models.'

  15. Living Liquid Crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shuang; Sokolov, Andrey; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2014-01-28

    Collective motion of self-propelled organisms or synthetic par­ticles, often termed •active fluid,• has attracted enormous atten­tion in the broad scientific community because of its fundamentally nonequilibrium nature. Energy input and interactions among the moving units and the medium lead to complex dynamics. Here,we introduce a class of active matter-living liquid crystals (UCs}­ that combines living swimming bacteria with a lyotropic liquid crystal. The physical properties of LLCs can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to bacteria, by concentration of ingre­dients, or by temperature. Our studies reveal a wealth of intriguing dynamic phenomena. caused by the coupling between the activity-triggered flow and long-range orientational order of the medium. Among these are (i) nonlinear trajectories of bacterial motion guided by nonuniform director, (ii) local melting of the liquid crystal caused by the bacteria-produced shear flows, (iii) activity-triggered transition from a nonflowing uniform state into a flowing one-dimensional periodic pattern and its evolution into a turbulent array of topological defects, and (iv) birefringence­ enabled visualization of microflow generated by the nanometers­ thick bacterial flagella. Unlike their isotropic counterpart, the LLCs show collective dynamic effects at very low volume fraction of bacteria, on the order of 0.2%. Our work suggests an unorthodox design concept to control and manipulate the dynamic behavior of soft active matter and opens the door for potential biosensing and biomedical applications.

  16. Natural phenomena hazards, Hanford Site, south central Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Tallman, A.M.

    1996-04-16

    This document presents the natural phenomena hazard (NPH) loads for use in implementing DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The purpose of this document is twofold: (1) summarize the NPH that are important to the design and evaluation of structures, systems, and components at the Hanford Site; (2) develop the appropriate natural phenomena loads for use in the implementation of DOE Order 5480.28. The supporting standards, DOE-STD-1020-94, Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities (DOE 1994a); DOE-STD-1022-94, Natural Phenomena Hazards Site Characteristics Criteria (DOE 1994b); and DOE-STD-1023-95, Natural Phenomena Hazards Assessment Criteria (DOE 1995) are the basis for developing the NPH loads.

  17. The Role of Family Phenomena in Posttraumatic Stress in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Deatrick, Janet A.

    2010-01-01

    Topic Youth face trauma that can cause posttraumatic stress (PTS). Purpose 1). To identify the family phenomena used in youth PTS research; and 2). Critically examine the research findings regarding the relationship between family phenomena and youth PTS. Sources Systematic literature review in PsycInfo, PILOTS, CINAHL, and MEDLINE. Twenty-six empirical articles met inclusion criteria. Conclusion Measurement of family phenomena included family functioning, support, environment, expressiveness, relationships, cohesion, communication, satisfaction, life events related to family, parental style of influence, and parental bonding. Few studies gave clear conceptualization of family or family phenomena. Empirical findings from the 26 studies indicate inconsistent empirical relationships between family phenomena and youth PTS, though a majority of the prospective studies support a relationship between family phenomena and youth PTS. Future directions for leadership by psychiatric nurses in this area of research and practice are recommended. PMID:21344778

  18. Amorphous photonic crystals with only short-range order.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Zhang, Yafeng; Dong, Biqin; Zhan, Tianrong; Liu, Xiaohan; Zi, Jian

    2013-10-04

    Distinct from conventional photonic crystals with both short- and long-range order, amorphous photonic crystals that possess only short-range order show interesting optical responses owing to their unique structural features. Amorphous photonic crystals exhibit unique light scattering and transport, which lead to a variety of interesting phenomena such as isotropic photonic bandgaps or pseudogaps, noniridescent structural colors, and light localization. Recent experimental and theoretical advances in the study of amorphous photonic crystals are summarized, focusing on their unique optical properties, artificial fabrication, bionspiration, and potential applications. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Inverse Analysis of Cavitation Impact Phenomena on Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-02

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6390--07-9051 Inverse Analysis of Cavitation Impact Phenomena on Structures July 2, 2007...ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Inverse Analysis of Cavitation Impact Phenomena on Structures S.G. Lambrakos and N.E...signature analysis A general methodology is presented for in situ detection of cavitation impact phenomena on structures based on inverse analysis of

  20. Power-law behavior in social and economical phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Keizo; Miyazima, Sasuke

    2004-12-01

    We have already found power-law behavior in various phenomena such as high-tax payer, population distribution, name distribution, passenger number at stations, student number in a university from high schools, and so on. We can explain why these phenomena show such interesting behaviors by doing simulations based on adequate models. We have come to the conclusion that there are fractal structures underlying those phenomena.

  1. SYMMETRICAL LASER CRYSTALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTAL GROWTH , SYMMETRY(CRYSTALLOGRAPHY), LASERS, SYNTHESIS, FERROELECTRIC CRYSTALS , FLUORESCENCE, IMPURITIES, BARIUM COMPOUNDS, ZIRCONATES...STRONTIUM COMPOUNDS, TITANATES, STANNATES, SAMARIUM, MANGANESE, REFRACTORY MATERIALS, OXIDES, SINGLE CRYSTALS .

  2. Programmed death phenomena: from organelle to organism.

    PubMed

    Skulachev, Vladimir P

    2002-04-01

    Programmed death phenomena appear to be inherent not only in living cells (apoptosis), but also in subcellular organelles (e.g., self-elimination of mitochondria, called mitoptosis), organs (organoptosis), and even whole organisms (phenoptosis). In all these cases, the "Samurai law of biology"--it is better to die than to be wrong--seems to be operative. The operation of this law helps complicated living systems avoid the risk of ruin when a system of lower hierarchic position makes a significant mistake. Thus, mitoptosis purifies a cell from damaged and hence unwanted mitochondria; apoptosis purifies a tissue from unwanted cells; and phenoptosis purifies a community from unwanted individuals. Defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS) is probably one of the primary evolutionary functions of programmed death mechanisms. So far, it seems that ROS play a key role in the mito-, apo-, organo-, and phenoptoses, which is consistent with Harman's theory of aging. Here a concept is described that tries to unite Weismann's hypothesis of aging as an adaptive programmed death mechanism and the generally accepted alternative point of view that considers aging as an inevitable result of accumulation in an organism of occasional injuries. It is suggested that injury accumulation is monitored by a system(s) actuating a phenoptotic death program when the number of injuries reaches some critical level. The system(s) in question are organized in such a way that the lethal case appears to be a result of phenoptosis long before the occasional injuries make impossible the functioning of the organism. It is stressed that for humans these cruel regulations look like an atavism that, if overcome, might dramatically prolong the human life span.

  3. Testing the potential paradoxes in "retrocausal" phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolij, Jacob; Bierman, Dick J.

    2017-05-01

    Discussions with regard to potential paradoxes arising from "retrocausal" phenomena have been purely theoretical because so far no empirical effects had been established that allowed for empirical exploration of these potential paradoxes. In this article we describe three human experiments that showed clear "retrocausal" effects. In these neuropsychological, so-called, face-detection experiments, consisting of hundreds of trials per participant, we use brain signals to predict an upcoming random stimulus. The binary random decision, corresponding to showing a noisy cartoon face or showing only noise on a display with equal probability is taken after the brain signals have been measured. The prediction accuracy ranges from 50.5-56.5% for the 3 experiments where chance performance would be 50%. The prediction algorithm is based on a template constructed out of all the pre-stimulus brain signals obtained in other trials of that particular participant. This approach thus controls for individual difference in brain functioning. Subsequently we describe an experiment based upon these findings where the predictive information is used in part of the trials to determine the stimulus rather than randomly select that stimulus. In those trials we analyze what the brain signals tell us what the future stimulus would be and then we reverse the actual future that is presented on the display. This is a `bilking' condition. We analyze what the consequence of the introduction of this bilking condition is on the accuracy of the remaining (normal) trials and, following a suggestion inferred from Thorne et al, we also check what the effect is on the random decision to either bilk or not bilk the specific trial. The bilking experiment is in progress and the results so far do not allow for conclusions and are presented only as an illustration.

  4. Fluctuation phenomena in structurally symmetric polymer blends

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, C.; Schweizer, K.S. ); Yethiraj, A. )

    1995-02-01

    Polymer reference interaction site model theory with the new molecular closures is used to study structurally and interaction potential symmetric binary blends. Both compressibility and free energy routes to thermodynamics are studied and thermodynamic consistency is addressed. Various non-Flory-Huggins effects, or fluctuation phenomena,'' are found: nonuniversal renormalization of critical temperature and effective chi-parameter from mean field values, composition-dependent chi-parameters, and nonlinear dependence of inverse osmotic compressibility on inverse temperature. These fluctuation effects depend on degree of polymerization, [ital N], chain length asymmetry, polymer density, range and precise form of attractive tail potentials, chain stiffness, and proximity to phase boundary. Some fluctuation effects are intrinsic, i.e., survive in the long chain [ital N][r arrow][infinity] limit, while others are finite size effects which arise from chain-connectivity-induced coupled local density and long wavelength concentration fluctuations. Due to multiple sources of fluctuation effects, even asymptotic finite size effects can appear intrinsic'' over extended ranges of [ital N]. Comparison with lattice Monte Carlo simulations of Deutsch and Binder shows good agreement with theory. All fluctuation effects can be understood in simple terms by examining enthalpy of mixing and local interchain correlations. Key physical process is thermally driven local interchain rearrangements corresponding to formation of diffuse interfaces and clusters or droplets. Analytic results are derived using the Gaussian thread model, which provides a simple physical understanding of the origin of numerically determined fluctuation effects. In the long chain limit predictions for the thread blend are shown to be exactly thermodynamically consistent, a unique circumstance for liquid state theories.

  5. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2010-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the sector grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  6. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the one-twelfth grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  7. EPA se mueve hacia la prohibición de desengrasantes en aerosol y quitamanchas para lavado en seco como una de las primeras acciones reglamentarias conforme a la ley reformada de sustancias químicas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Comunicado de prensa de EPA: EPA se mueve hacia la prohibición de desengrasantes en aerosol y quitamanchas para lavado en seco como una de las primeras acciones reglamentarias conforme a la ley reformada de sustancias químicas

  8. Crystal growth in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, Roger L. (Inventor); Reiss, Donald A. (Inventor); Lehoczky, Sandor L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Gravitational phenomena, including convection, sedimentation, and interactions of materials with their containers all affect the crystal growth process. If they are not taken into consideration they can have adverse effects on the quantity and quality of crystals produced. As a practical matter, convection, and sedimentation can be completely eliminated only under conditions of low gravity attained during orbital flight. There is, then, an advantage to effecting crystallization in space. In the absence of convection in a microgravity environment cooling proceeds by thermal diffusion from the walls to the center of the solution chamber. This renders control of nucleation difficult. Accordingly, there is a need for a new improved nucleation process in space. Crystals are nucleated by creating a small localized region of high relative supersaturation in a host solution at a lower degree of supersaturation.

  9. Formation of a crystal nucleus from liquid

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Crystallization is one of the most fundamental nonequilibrium phenomena universal to a variety of materials. It has so far been assumed that a supercooled liquid is in a “homogeneous disordered state” before crystallization. Contrary to this common belief, we reveal that a supercooled colloidal liquid is actually not homogeneous, but has transient medium-range structural order. We find that nucleation preferentially takes place in regions of high structural order via wetting effects, which reduce the crystal–liquid interfacial energy significantly and thus promotes crystal nucleation. This novel scenario provides a clue to solving a long-standing mystery concerning a large discrepancy between the rigorous numerical estimation of the nucleation rate on the basis of the classical nucleation theory and the experimentally observed ones. Our finding may shed light not only on the mechanism of crystal nucleation, but also on the fundamental nature of a supercooled liquid state. PMID:20663951

  10. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  11. Modeling diffusion-governed solidification of ternary alloys - Part 2: Macroscopic transport phenomena and macrosegregation.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Li, J; Ludwig, A; Kharicha, A

    2014-09-01

    Part 1 of this two-part investigation presented a multiphase solidification model incorporating the finite diffusion kinetics and ternary phase diagram with the macroscopic transport phenomena (Wu et al., 2013). In Part 2, the importance of proper treatment of the finite diffusion kinetics in the calculation of macrosegregation is addressed. Calculations for a two-dimensional (2D) square casting (50 × 50 mm(2)) of Fe-0.45 wt.%C-1.06 wt.%Mn considering thermo-solutal convection and crystal sedimentation are performed. The modeling result indicates that the infinite liquid mixing kinetics as assumed by classical models (e.g., the Gulliver-Scheil or lever rule), which cannot properly consider the solute enrichment of the interdendritic or inter-granular melt at the early stage of solidification, might lead to an erroneous estimation of the macrosegregation. To confirm this statement, further theoretical and experimental evaluations are desired. The pattern and intensity of the flow and crystal sedimentation are dependent on the crystal morphologies (columnar or equiaxed); hence, the potential error of the calculated macrosegregation caused by the assumed growth kinetics depends on the crystal morphology. Finally, an illustrative simulation of an engineering 2.45-ton steel ingot is performed, and the results are compared with experimental results. This example demonstrates the model applicability for engineering castings regarding both the calculation efficiency and functionality.

  12. Crystal growth of device quality GaAs in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Lagowski, J.

    1984-01-01

    The crystal growth, device processing and device related properties and phenomena of GaAs are investigated. Our GaAs research evolves about these key thrust areas. The overall program combines: (1) studies of crystal growth on novel approaches to engineering of semiconductor materials (i.e., GaAs and related compounds); (2) investigation and correlation of materials properties and electronic characteristics on a macro- and microscale; (3) investigation of electronic properties and phenomena controlling device applications and device performance. The ground based program is developed which would insure successful experimentation with and eventually processing of GaAs in a near zero gravity environment.

  13. Therapeutic Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Charles S.

    2014-01-01

    Some readers might not fully know what the difference is between crystallography, and the "new age" practice of dangling crystals around the body to capitalise on their healing energy. The latter is often considered to be superstition, while ironically, the former has actually resulted in real rationally-based healing of human diseases…

  14. Optical Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergsten, Ronald

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the production and structure of a sequence of optical crystals which can serve as one-, two-, and three-dimensional diffraction plates to illustrate diffraction patterns by using light rather than x-rays or particles. Applications to qualitative presentations of Laue theory at the secondary and college levels are recommended. (CC)

  15. Therapeutic Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Charles S.

    2014-01-01

    Some readers might not fully know what the difference is between crystallography, and the "new age" practice of dangling crystals around the body to capitalise on their healing energy. The latter is often considered to be superstition, while ironically, the former has actually resulted in real rationally-based healing of human diseases…

  16. Comparing Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Janet; Hoiberg, Karen; Chumbley, Scott

    2003-01-01

    This standard lesson on identifying salt and sugar crystals expands into an opportunity for students to develop their observation, questioning, and modeling skills. Although sugar and salt may look similar, students discovered that they looked very different under a magnifying glass and behaved differently when dissolved in water. In addition,…

  17. Optical Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergsten, Ronald

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the production and structure of a sequence of optical crystals which can serve as one-, two-, and three-dimensional diffraction plates to illustrate diffraction patterns by using light rather than x-rays or particles. Applications to qualitative presentations of Laue theory at the secondary and college levels are recommended. (CC)

  18. 1995 national heat transfer conference: Proceedings. Volume 4: Transport phenomena in manufacturing and materials processing; Transport phenomena in materials joining processes; Transport phenomena in net shape manufacturing; HTD-Volume 306

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    This book is divided into three sections: (1) transport phenomena in manufacturing and materials processing; (2) transport phenomena in net shape manufacturing: and (3) transport phenomena in materials joining processes. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

  19. The phenomenology of life phenomena--in a nursing context.

    PubMed

    Delmar, Charlotte

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and develop knowledge about life phenomena in a life-philosophical and nursing context. Knowledge about life phenomena is part of a care-ethical understanding with a focus on relations. Life phenomena are to be understood as a generalized label for the various phenomena which are given with human existence. The Danish life philosophical tradition with the perspective of life as experienced has something to say in relation to a further refinement of the phenomenology of life phenomena. The refinement will be described as an ethical and existential understanding of the phenomena of nursing. The first part of the article takes a philosophical approach to the phenomenology of life phenomena. It attempts to locate life phenomena in relation to, respectively, needs, senses, and feelings. In order to maintain an overview, the attempt is made to separate needs, senses, and feelings, although in real life these are closely interwoven. The article also describes philosophy and life phenomena in relation to nursing as an empirical field. In nursing there is a risk that life phenomena become invisible to those whose task is to help the ill person adjust to a new life situation. For the nurse, it will be a continuing task, never completed, to develop a sensory-based, situation-determined attention to the patient. And the nurse must be continually aware of whether mere 'need-oriented' nursing is controlling her professional actions as a nurse. Taking a point of departure in the nurse's sensory, situationally determined attention, the last part of the article focuses on needs, senses, and feelings in connection with the nurse being able to direct her attention to the patient's life phenomena.

  20. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope with open sample space observes dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas.

    PubMed

    Suga, Mitsuo; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Konyuba, Yuji; Iwamatsu, Shinnosuke; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Yoshiura, Chie; Ueda, Takumi; Sato, Chikara

    2011-12-01

    Although conventional electron microscopy (EM) requires samples to be in vacuum, most chemical and physical reactions occur in liquid or gas. The Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM) can observe dynamic phenomena in liquid or gas under atmospheric pressure in real time. An electron-permeable window made of pressure-resistant 100 nm-thick silicon nitride (SiN) film, set into the bottom of the open ASEM sample dish, allows an electron beam to be projected from underneath the sample. A detector positioned below captures backscattered electrons. Using the ASEM, we observed the radiation-induced self-organization process of particles, as well as phenomena accompanying volume change, including evaporation-induced crystallization. Using the electrochemical ASEM dish, we observed tree-like electrochemical depositions on the cathode. In silver nitrate solution, we observed silver depositions near the cathode forming incidental internal voids. The heated ASEM dish allowed observation of patterns of contrast in melting and solidifying solder. Finally, to demonstrate its applicability for monitoring and control of industrial processes, silver paste and solder paste were examined at high throughput. High resolution, imaging speed, flexibility, adaptability, and ease of use facilitate the observation of previously difficult-to-image phenomena, and make the ASEM applicable to various fields. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Homogeneous crystal nucleation in polymers.

    PubMed

    Schick, Christoph; Androsch, R; Schmelzer, Juern W P

    2017-07-14

    The pathway of crystal nucleation significantly influences the structure and properties of semi-crystalline polymers. Crystal nucleation is normally heterogeneous at low supercooling, and homogeneous at high supercooling, of the polymer melt. Homogeneous nucleation in bulk polymers has been, so far, hardly accessible experimentally, and was even doubted to occur at all. This topical review summarizes experimental findings on homogeneous crystal nucleation in polymers. Recently developed fast scanning calorimetry, with cooling and heating rates up to 106 K s-1, allows for detailed investigations of nucleation near and even below the glass transition temperature, including analysis of nuclei stability. As for other materials, the maximum homogeneous nucleation rate for polymers is located close to the glass transition temperature. In the experiments discussed here, it is shown that polymer nucleation is homogeneous at such temperatures. Homogeneous nucleation in polymers is discussed in the framework of classical nucleation theory. The majority of our observations are consistent with the theory. The discrepancies may guide further research, particularly experiments to progress theoretical development. Progress in the understanding of homogeneous nucleation is much needed, since most of the modelling approaches dealing with polymer crystallization exclusively consider homogeneous nucleation. This is also the basis for advancing theoretical approaches to the much more complex phenomena governing heterogeneous nucleation. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. Challenges in modeling of bulk crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, G.; Friedrich, J.

    2004-05-01

    This paper tries to analyze some of the presently existing problems and challenges in the field of modeling bulk crystal growth processes. Strategies will be discussed to meet and overcome these problems and challenges. The different topics will be illustrated by typical examples of bulk growth of semiconductor and optical crystals. Experimental results will be used for a comparison and validation of the numerical results in order to demonstrate the status and maturity of the models. The following topics are considered: modeling of transport phenomena and three-dimensional effects, process optimization by soft computing, modeling of defect formation and finally the speed-up of computations by using PC clusters and paralellization.

  3. Structural phenomena in hydrogel-drug systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekunov, B. Yu; Taylor, P.; Grossmann, J. G.

    1999-03-01

    Crystallization and structural transition in a cross-linked poly(ethylene oxide) 4000 (PEO) polymer were investigated as functions of water content and concentration of model drugs (acetaminophen and caffeine) using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) techniques. In the hydrated state (300 wt% of water), gel retains an ordering with characteristic spacing of 80 Å. With a water concentration of about 20%, this structure undergoes transition into lamellae with long spacing of 200 Å and then into semi-crystalline polymer matrix when water content is below 5%. This transition is associated with different type of phase separations, first, between crystalline and amorphous PEO domains in the dry polymer and, second, between water and hydrophobic cross-linked regions in the swollen gel. Because of a specific hydrogen bonding, acetaminophen forms a molecular complex with the PEO, a drug concentration as small as 1% resulting in a significant increase of the long spacing and decrease of crystallinity of the polymer. Caffeine precipitates in the form of crystalline particles and also reduces the crystallinity of the polymer matrix.

  4. Investigations of Induced Charge Electrokinetic Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascall, Andrew James

    Recent developments in microfluidics have highlighted the importance of efficiently transporting fluids at the micron scale. This has lead to a resurgence of interest in utilizing electrokinetic phenomena, which scale favorably with the small channel dimensions encountered in microfluidics, to drive fluid flows. This dissertation focuses on induced charge electro-osmosis (ICEO), a nonlinear electrokinetic effect in which an applied electric field both induces and drives a layer of charged fluid near an electrically conductive surface. ICEO has been shown to produce time-averaged flows with AC electric fields and may provide an on-chip means of generating high pressure flows with low applied voltages. Experimental studies of ICEO have shown that standard theories generally overpredict the observed slip velocity, frequently by orders of magnitude. This discrepancy could be explained by the presence of a thin coating of an adventitious dielectric over the conductive surface. In this work, I develop a modified theory of ICEO that incorporates the effects of a dielectric coating and its surface chemistry, both of which act to decrease the slip velocity relative to a clean metal. This theory shows that a layer of dielectric contaminant of only nanometer thickness can lead to significantly suppressed ICEO flows. In order to test this theory, I developed a novel experimental apparatus, the details of which are presented herein, that allows for the observation of ICEO flows over planar surfaces coated with dielectrics of controlled physical properties. Data for over 8000 combinations of parameters over both an oxide dielectric and alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer show unprecedented quantitative agreement with this modified theory. The goal for engineering practical microfluidic devices is to generate the fastest flows possible for a given set of conditions. I end the dissertation with a discussion of how to generate flows that are orders of magnitude faster than those

  5. Saving the Phenomena in Medieval Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeskin, K.

    2011-06-01

    Aristotle's theory of motion is based on two principles: (1) all motion to either from the midpoint of the Earth, toward it, or around it, and (2) circular motion must proceed around an immovable point. On this view, the heavenly bodies are individual points of light carried around by a series of concentric spheres rotating at a constant pace around the midpoint of the Earth. But even in Aristotle's day, it was known that this theory had a great deal of difficulty accounting for planetary motion. Ptolemy's alternative was to introduce epicycles and eccentric orbits, thus denying Aristotle's view of natural motion. There was no doubt that Ptolemy's predictions were far better than Aristotle's. But for the medievals, Aristotle's theory made better intuitive sense. Moreover, Ptolemy's theory raised the question of how one sphere could pass through another. What to do? The solution of Moses Maimonides (1138-1204) was to say that it is not the job of the astronomer to tell us how things actually are but merely to propose a series of hypotheses that allow us to explain the relevant data. This view had obvious theological implications. If astronomy could explain planetary motion in an acceptable way, there was reason to believe that the order or structure of the heavens is what it is by necessity. This suggests that God did not exercise any degree of choice in making it that way. But if astronomy cannot explain planetary motion, the most reasonable explanation is that we are dealing with contingent phenomena rather than necessary ones. If there is contingency, there is reason to think God did exercise a degree of choice in making the heavens the way they are. A God who exercises choice is much closer to the God of Scripture. Although Galileo changed all of this, and paved the way for a vastly different view of astronomy, the answer to one set of questions raises a whole different set. In short, the heavenly motion still poses ultimate questions about God, existence, and

  6. Solidification phenomena in metal matrix nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cicco, Michael Peter

    2009-12-01

    Nanoparticles in metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs) were shown to act as catalysts for nucleation of solidification of the matrix alloy, as well as to alter the intermetallic phase formation. These phenomena were studied in zinc, aluminum, and magnesium alloys. In all alloys studied, a refinement of the microstructure was seen with the addition of the nanoparticles. Various types of nanoparticles were used and had varying degrees of refinement. In a zinc alloy, AC43A, SiC, TiC, and Al2O3 gamma nanoparticles were all found to refine the alloy. Thermal analysis of bulk samples showed the onset of solidification at reduced undercoolings, indicating nucleation catalysis. Nucleation of the primary phase was also observed by employing the droplet emulsion technique (DET). DET results showed that the secondary phase nucleation was also catalyzed by the nanoparticles. Exploiting the nucleation catalysis of the nanoparticles and the associated grain refinement, a semi-solid casting (SSC) process was demonstrated in AC43A + SiC nanocomposites. This novel process successfully incorporated the strength enhancement of MMNCs and the casting quality benefits of SSC. This process required no additional processing steps or material handling typical of existing SSC processes. The nucleation catalysis of the nanoparticles was sufficient to create semi-solid slurries appropriate for SSC. Nanoparticle induced nucleation catalysis was also examined in a common aluminum alloy, A356, using the DET. All nanoparticles catalyzed nucleation of the primary Al phase. However, undercoolings varied depending on the nanoparticle identity and average diameter. The variation in undercoolings generally agreed with a modified lattice disregistry theory and the free growth theory. For nanoparticles with a small lattice spacing mismatch with the Al phase, undercoolings approached the size dependent free growth limit. Binary alloys of magnesium and zinc showed significant strength and ductility

  7. Magnetoresistive phenomena in nanoscale magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, John D.

    Nanomagnetic materials are playing an increasingly important role in modern technologies. A particular area of interest involves the interplay between magnetism and electric transport, i.e. magnetoresistive properties. Future generations of field sensors and memory elements will have to be on a length scale of a few nanometers or smaller. Magnetoresistive properties of such nanoscale objects exhibit novel features due to reduced dimensionality, complex surfaces and interfaces, and quantum effects. In this dissertation theoretical aspects of three such nanoscale magnetoresistive phenomena are discussed. Very narrow magnetic domain walls can strongly scatter electrons leading to an increased resistance. Specifically, this dissertation will cover the newly predicted effect of magnetic moment softening in magnetic nanocontacts or nanowires. Atomically thin domain walls in Ni exhibit a reduction, or softening, of the local magnetic moments due to the noncollinearity of the magnetization. This effect leads to a strong enhancement of the resistance of a domain wall. Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) consist of two ferromagnetic electrodes separated by a thin layer of insulating material through which current can be carried by electron tunneling. The resistance of an MTJ depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the two ferromagnetic layers, an effect known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). A first-principles analysis of CoFeB|MgO|CoFeB MTJs will be presented. Calculations reveal that it is energetically favorable for interstitial boron atoms to reside at the interface between the electrode and MgO tunneling barrier, which can be detrimental to the TMR effect. Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) is the change in resistance of a ferromagnetic system as the orientation of the magnetization is altered. In this dissertation, the focus will be on AMR in the tunneling regime. Specifically we will present new theoretical results on tunneling AMR (TAMR) in two

  8. Development of an Experimental Facility for Analysis of Rotordynamic Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    was developed to investigate the rotordynamic phenomena of rotating machinery during subcritical, resonant and supercritical operation. The facility...the rotordynamic phenomena of rotating machinery during subcritical. resonant and supercritical operation. The behavior of the rotor was...Supercritical Speed of 5560 RPM. The Rotor is Experiencing Synchronous and Subsynchronous Forward Whirl. The Rotor Assembly is in a Simply Supported, Single

  9. Collective phenomena in photonic, plasmonic and hybrid structures.

    PubMed

    Boriskina, Svetlana V; Povinelli, Michelle; Astratov, Vasily N; Zayats, Anatoly V; Podolskiy, Viktor A

    2011-10-24

    Preface to a focus issue of invited articles that review recent progress in studying the fundamental physics of collective phenomena associated with coupling of confined photonic, plasmonic, electronic and phononic states and in exploiting these phenomena to engineer novel devices for light generation, optical sensing, and information processing. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  10. Pendulum Phenomena and the Assessment of Scientific Inquiry Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachos, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Phenomena associated with the "pendulum" present numerous opportunities for assessing higher order human capabilities related to "scientific inquiry" and the "discovery" of natural law. This paper illustrates how systematic "assessment of scientific inquiry capabilities", using "pendulum" phenomena, can provide a useful tool for classroom teachers…

  11. Raman scattering study of glass crystallization kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkanski, M.; Haro, E.; Espinosa, G. P.; Phillips, J. C.

    1984-08-01

    Laser induced glass-crystalline transition is studied by light scattering. Three significant effects are observed depending on the incident laser energy density: (i) Spectral band narrowing indicating cluster enlargement constitutes a precursor effect, (ii) an intensity increase effect indicates a rapid rise of the density of clusters attaining microcrystalline size and (iii) a dynamical reversal effect indicative of glass-crystalline instability. Cluster volume and crystallization appear as separate but related threshold phenomena.

  12. Vortex crystals in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Anna M.

    It is common in geophysical flows to observe localized regions of enhanced vorticity. This observation can be used to derive model equations to describe the motion and interaction of these localized regions, or vortices, and which are simpler than the original PDEs. The best known vortex model is derived from the incompressible Euler equations, and treats vortices as points in the plane. A large part of this dissertation utilizes this particular model, but we also survey other point vortex and weakly viscous models. The main focus of this thesis is an object known as the vortex crystal. These remarkable configurations of vortices maintain their basic shapes for long times, while perhaps rotating or translating rigidly in space. We study existence and stability of families of vortex crystals in the special case where N vortices have small and equal circulation and one vortex has large circulation. As the small circulation tends to zero, the weak vortices tend to a circle centered on the strong vortex. A special potential function of this limiting problem can be used to characterize orbits and stability. Whenever a critical point of this function is nondegenerate, we prove that the orbit can be continued via the Implicit Function Theorem, and its linear stability is determined by the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix of the potential. For general N, we find at least three distinct families of critical points, one of which continues to a linearly stable class of vortex crystals. Because the stable family is most likely to be observed in nature, we study it extensively. Continuation methods allow us to follow these critical points to nonzero weak vortex strength and investigate stability and bifurcations. In the large N limit of this family, we prove that there is a unique one parameter family of distributions which minimize a "generalized" potential. Finally, we use point vortex and weakly viscous vortex models to analyze vortex crystal configurations observed in

  13. Crystal growth of device quality GaAs in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Lagowski, J.

    1983-01-01

    GaAs device technology has recently reached a new phase of rapid advancement, made possible by the improvement of the quality of GaAs bulk crystals. At the same time, the transition to the next generation of GaAs integrated circuits and optoelectronic systems for commercial and government applications hinges on new quantum steps in three interrelated areas: crystal growth, device processing and device-related properties and phenomena. Special emphasis is placed on the establishment of quantitative relationships among crystal growth parameters-material properties-electronic properties and device applications. The overall program combines studies of crystal growth on novel approaches to engineering of semiconductor material (i.e., GaAs and related compounds); investigation and correlation of materials properties and electronic characteristics on a macro- and microscale; and investigation of electronic properties and phenomena controlling device applications and device performance.

  14. EXX phenomena in macroscopic, microscopic, and nanoscopic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solin, S. A.

    2010-04-01

    The new "EXX" phenomena in macroscopic, microscopic and nanoscopic metal-semiconductor hybrid structures is described. Here E = extraordinary and XX = magnetoresistance (EMR), piezoconductance (EPC), optoconductance (EOC), and electroconductance (EEC). This new class of phenomena is based on the control and dominance of the geometric contributions, e.g. sample shape, lead placement, the presence of inhomogenieties, etc., to the transport properties of a physical system in contrast to traditional transport phenomena which are dominated by the intrinsic properties, e.g. mobility, carrier density, band structure, etc. The underlying phyiscs of EXX phenomena is elucidated with particular emphasis on the use of analytic and finite element analysis methods to quantitatively account for the observed EXX signal enhancement. The potential application of EXX phenomena to the study of the biologically relevant properties of cells such as surface charge density will be described.

  15. Conceptual Framework to Enable Early Warning of Relevant Phenomena (Emerging Phenomena and Big Data)

    SciTech Connect

    Schlicher, Bob G; Abercrombie, Robert K; Hively, Lee M

    2013-01-01

    Graphs are commonly used to represent natural and man-made dynamic systems such as food webs, economic and social networks, gene regulation, and the internet. We describe a conceptual framework to enable early warning of relevant phenomena that is based on an artificial time-based, evolving network graph that can give rise to one or more recognizable structures. We propose to quantify the dynamics using the method of delays through Takens Theorem to produce another graph we call the Phase Graph. The Phase Graph enables us to quantify changes of the system that form a topology in phase space. Our proposed method is unique because it is based on dynamic system analysis that incorporates Takens Theorem, Graph Theory, and Franzosi-Pettini (F-P) theorem about topology and phase transitions. The F-P Theorem states that the necessary condition for phase transition is a change in the topology. By detecting a change in the topology that we represent as a set of M-order Phase Graphs, we conclude a corresponding change in the phase of the system. The onset of this phase change enables early warning of emerging relevant phenomena.

  16. Crystallization Physics in Biomacromolecular Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    The crystals are built of molecules of protein, nucleic acid and their complexes, like viruses, approx. 5x10(exp 3)+ 3x10(exp 6) Da in weight and 2 + 20 nm in effective diameter. This size strongly exceeds action range of molecular forces and makes a big difference with inorganic crystals. Intermolecular contacts form patches on the biomacromolecular surface. Each patch may occupy only a small percent of the whole surface and vary from polymorph to polymorph of the same protein. Thus, under different conditions (pH, solution chemistry, temperature, any area on the macromolecular surface may form a contact. The crystal Young moduli, E approx. equals 0.1 + 0.5 GPa are more than 10 times lower than that of inorganics and the biomolecules themselves. Water within biocrystals (30-70%) is unable to flow unless typical deformation time is longer than approx. 10(exp -5)s. This explains the discrepancy between light scattering and static measurements of E. Nucleation and Growth requires typically concentrations exceeding the equilibrium ones up to 100 times - because of the new size scale results in 10 - 10(exp 3) times lower kinetic coefficients than that needed for inorganic solution growth. All phenomena observed in the latter occur with protein crystallization and are even better studied by AFM. Crystals are typically facetted. Among unexpected findings of general significance are - net molecular exchange flux at kinks is much lower than that expected from supersaturation, steps with low (< approx. 10(exp -2)) kink density at steps follow Gibbs-Thomson law only at very low supersaturations, step segment growth rate may be independent of step energy. Crystal perfection is a must of biocrystallization to achieve the major goal to find 3-D atomic structure of biomacromolecules by x-ray diffraction. Poor diffraction resolution (> 3Angstrom) makes crystallization a bottleneck for structural biology. All defects typical of small molecule crystals are found in biocrystals, but

  17. Crystallization Physics in Biomacromolecular Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    The crystals are built of molecules of protein, nucleic acid and their complexes, like viruses, approx. 5x10(exp 3)+ 3x10(exp 6) Da in weight and 2 + 20 nm in effective diameter. This size strongly exceeds action range of molecular forces and makes a big difference with inorganic crystals. Intermolecular contacts form patches on the biomacromolecular surface. Each patch may occupy only a small percent of the whole surface and vary from polymorph to polymorph of the same protein. Thus, under different conditions (pH, solution chemistry, temperature, any area on the macromolecular surface may form a contact. The crystal Young moduli, E approx. equals 0.1 + 0.5 GPa are more than 10 times lower than that of inorganics and the biomolecules themselves. Water within biocrystals (30-70%) is unable to flow unless typical deformation time is longer than approx. 10(exp -5)s. This explains the discrepancy between light scattering and static measurements of E. Nucleation and Growth requires typically concentrations exceeding the equilibrium ones up to 100 times - because of the new size scale results in 10 - 10(exp 3) times lower kinetic coefficients than that needed for inorganic solution growth. All phenomena observed in the latter occur with protein crystallization and are even better studied by AFM. Crystals are typically facetted. Among unexpected findings of general significance are - net molecular exchange flux at kinks is much lower than that expected from supersaturation, steps with low (< approx. 10(exp -2)) kink density at steps follow Gibbs-Thomson law only at very low supersaturations, step segment growth rate may be independent of step energy. Crystal perfection is a must of biocrystallization to achieve the major goal to find 3-D atomic structure of biomacromolecules by x-ray diffraction. Poor diffraction resolution (> 3Angstrom) makes crystallization a bottleneck for structural biology. All defects typical of small molecule crystals are found in biocrystals, but

  18. Reproducibility in Psychological Science: When Do Psychological Phenomena Exist?

    PubMed Central

    Iso-Ahola, Seppo E.

    2017-01-01

    Scientific evidence has recently been used to assert that certain psychological phenomena do not exist. Such claims, however, cannot be made because (1) scientific method itself is seriously limited (i.e., it can never prove a negative); (2) non-existence of phenomena would require a complete absence of both logical (theoretical) and empirical support; even if empirical support is weak, logical and theoretical support can be strong; (3) statistical data are only one piece of evidence and cannot be used to reduce psychological phenomena to statistical phenomena; and (4) psychological phenomena vary across time, situations and persons. The human mind is unreproducible from one situation to another. Psychological phenomena are not particles that can decisively be tested and discovered. Therefore, a declaration that a phenomenon is not real is not only theoretically and empirically unjustified but runs counter to the propositional and provisional nature of scientific knowledge. There are only “temporary winners” and no “final truths” in scientific knowledge. Psychology is a science of subtleties in human affect, cognition and behavior. Its phenomena fluctuate with conditions and may sometimes be difficult to detect and reproduce empirically. When strictly applied, reproducibility is an overstated and even questionable concept in psychological science. Furthermore, statistical measures (e.g., effect size) are poor indicators of the theoretical importance and relevance of phenomena (cf. “deliberate practice” vs. “talent” in expert performance), not to mention whether phenomena are real or unreal. To better understand psychological phenomena, their theoretical and empirical properties should be examined via multiple parameters and criteria. Ten such parameters are suggested. PMID:28626435

  19. Experimental Study of Sand Production and Mud Erosion Phenomena for Sand Mud Alternate Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, H.; Sato, T.

    2014-12-01

    Methane hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds under specific thermodynamic conditions. The existence of methane hydrates is confirmed in the Nankai Trough, an offshore area of Japan. Japan's Methane Hydrate Research and Development Program (MH21) has been under way at this area. In the early 2013, the world's first intentional gas production attempt from marine gas hydrate deposits was tried and accomplished in the Daini Atumi Knoll area of the Eastern Nankai Trough. For gas production, depressurization method has been considered as a promising gas production technique from methane hydrate reservoirs. However, considering of continuous gas production over a long period, there is still something to clarify. The methane hydrate crystals are very small and existed in the intergranular pores of sandy layer of turbidite sediments. When the intergranular methane hydrates will be dissociated, it is considered that dissociated gas and water flow will cause sand production and mud erosion phenomena of turbidite sediments. The production of framework sands into a well is one of the problems plaguing the gas because of its adverse effects on well productivity and equipment. If the eroded mud is accumulated in the pore space of sand, skin is generated and permeability becomes lower. In addition, mud erosion has a negative effect for the well stability. This research presents an experimental study to understand sand production and mud erosion phenomena for sand mud alternate layer. The aims of this study are to understand these phenomena and clarify driving forces. In our experiments, we used an artificial sedimentary core and performed experiments under various conditions. As the results, the driving forces of these phenomena are not dissociation gas flow but water flow through pore.

  20. State estimation of spatio-temporal phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dan

    This dissertation addresses the state estimation problem of spatio-temporal phenomena which can be modeled by partial differential equations (PDEs), such as pollutant dispersion in the atmosphere. After discretizing the PDE, the dynamical system has a large number of degrees of freedom (DOF). State estimation using Kalman Filter (KF) is computationally intractable, and hence, a reduced order model (ROM) needs to be constructed first. Moreover, the nonlinear terms, external disturbances or unknown boundary conditions can be modeled as unknown inputs, which leads to an unknown input filtering problem. Furthermore, the performance of KF could be improved by placing sensors at feasible locations. Therefore, the sensor scheduling problem to place multiple mobile sensors is of interest. The first part of the dissertation focuses on model reduction for large scale systems with a large number of inputs/outputs. A commonly used model reduction algorithm, the balanced proper orthogonal decomposition (BPOD) algorithm, is not computationally tractable for large systems with a large number of inputs/outputs. Inspired by the BPOD and randomized algorithms, we propose a randomized proper orthogonal decomposition (RPOD) algorithm and a computationally optimal RPOD (RPOD*) algorithm, which construct an ROM to capture the input-output behaviour of the full order model, while reducing the computational cost of BPOD by orders of magnitude. It is demonstrated that the proposed RPOD* algorithm could construct the ROM in real-time, and the performance of the proposed algorithms on different advection-diffusion equations. Next, we consider the state estimation problem of linear discrete-time systems with unknown inputs which can be treated as a wide-sense stationary process with rational power spectral density, while no other prior information needs to be known. We propose an autoregressive (AR) model based unknown input realization technique which allows us to recover the input

  1. Ionic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G.D.

    1985-03-01

    The theme of the second Petra School of Physics was the optical properties of solids. The author's lectures will discuss the theory of ionic crystals such as the alkali halides. The general topics will include a discussion of: the local electric fields, multipole polarizability, core level spectra, and electron energy levels. The subject of alkali halides is today regarded as unfashionable. They were quite popular years ago, but fashions and fancies in science have moved elsewhere. One should not think they are well understood. The author's impression of this field is that activity stopped, not because the problems were solved, but rather because the workers got tired of not being able to solve them. For example, we still do not have a good theory of crystal structure, since microscopic forces are not well characterized. One concludes that other quantities which depend upon forces, such as the elastic constants, are also not well understood, although theories of them are published all of the time. As another example, we still do not have a good theory of bonding. Here there are two camps: one which regards the bonding as ionic, while the other advocates significant amounts of covalency. Recently we have shown that both the elastic constants, and the amount of covalent bonding, depend significantly upon the higher multipole polarizabilities. In summary, the subject of ionic crystals is a field where there are still many unresolved issues awaiting good research. 21 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Phase transitions and reentrant phenomena in liquid crystals having both rigid and flexible intramolecular joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyżuk, W.; Górecka, E.; Mieczkowski, J.; Przedmojski, J.

    1992-07-01

    Two series of liquid-crystalline compounds having three phenyl rings separated by flexible spacer —CH(CH{3})CH{2}—COO— and by rigid azo and azoxy group, were studied by DSC, optical and X-ray methods. For esters of dl-3-(4^{prime}-nitro)-phenylbutyric acid with 4^{prime}-alkoxy-phenylazo-phenol-4 having dodecyloxy or longer terminal chains, as well as for related azoxy compounds, a narrow (even below 5 K) reentrant or inverted nematic phase appearing between partly bilayer and monolayer smectics A was observed. For higher homologues of the azoxy series additional smectic phases appear, leading to the occurrence of new multicritical points, e.g. the critical end point Ad Cd N^re. On each of the lines, which separate nematic from smectic A phases, transitions are of weakly first or second-order and more than one tricritical point can occur. On the A{1} N/A{1} N^re line, a simple N A{1} tricritical point is observed at T_NI/T_AN = 0.834. The presence of further critical points depends on the components of the binary system involved. Four of the azoxy compounds studied undergo a second order phase transition between partly bilayer smectics, Ad and Cd. Such a transition is accompanied by a jumb in the specific heat, varying linearly with the length of the molecular tails. Various temperature dependences of the layer spacing in the Ad phase are observed for subsequent homologues from the azoxy series. Plusieurs cristaux liquides composés de trois groupements phényl séparés par un groupement —CH(CH{3})CH{2}—COO—, ainsi que par des groupements azo et azoxy, ont été examinés par AED, méthodes optiques et par rayons X. Pour des esters de l'acide dl-3-(4^{prime}-nitro)phénylbutyrique et de 4^{prime}-alkoxy-phénylazo-phénol-4 ayant comme terminaison une chaîne dodecyloxy ou bien plus longue, ainsi que pour des composés azoxy relatif, on observe (même au-dessous de 5 K) une étroite phase nématique réentrante ou inverse entre les phases smectiques : monocouche et partiellement bicouche. Pour des homologues plus longs dans la série des composés azoxy, on a constaté l'existence d'autres phases smectiques ce qui implique l'apparition, sur les diagrammes des phases, de nouveau points multicritiques, par exemple le point Ad Cd N^re. Sur chaque ligne séparant les phases smectiques A de la phase nématique les transitions sont faiblement du premier ordre ou du deuxième ordre ce qui mène dans certain cas à plus qu'un point tricritique. Sur la ligne A{1} N/A{1} N^re on observe à T_NI/T_AN = 0,834 un simple point tricritique N A{1} — l'apparition des autres dépend du choix des constituants du système binaire. Dans le cas de quatre composés azoxy on a constaté une transition du deuxième ordre entre les phases smectiques partiellement bicouches, Ad et Cd. La transition est accompagnée d'un brusque changement de la chaleur spécifique qui varie linéairement avec la longueur de la queue de la molécule. Pour des homologues suivants de la série des composés azoxy on observe différentes dépendances en température de la distance entre les couches de la phase Ad.

  3. High-spin phenomena in the mass 100 to 200 region seen through the Crystal Ball

    SciTech Connect

    Gaardhoeje, J.J.; Garrett, J.D.; Hagemann, G.B.; Herskind, B.; Holm, A.; Nolan, P.; Sletten, G.; Beene, J.R.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    The average properties of the gamma-ray entry region and the decay from it are studied systematically, for 49 nuclear systems, in the spin spectrometer. Preliminary results are given for the mass and neutron-number dependence of the gamma-ray fold distribution and of unresolved ..gamma.. spectra. The possibility of gating simultaneously on narrow regions of fold and excitation energy is exploited.

  4. Electromagnetic emission memory phenomena related to LiF ionic crystal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatou, C.; Tombras, G. S.; Ninos, D.; Hadjicontis, V.

    2008-04-01

    During the uniaxial compression of LiF ionic monocrystals, acoustic and electromagnetic emissions (EME) are detected. We observed that when the compression is performed in successive loading, unloading cycles and these emissions are being monitored, no new emissions will occur unless the maximum stress of the previous cycle is exceeded, meaning that the material presents memory characteristics. This is observed not only for the acoustic emission (AE), which is the well known Kaiser effect, but for the EME as well. In other words, the material appears to memorize and reveal the previously maximum stress it suffered while being deformed. The importance of an electromagnetic memory feature of a material can be related to various applications in material science, especially when the detection of AE is not feasible or gives false alert. Such cases may very well be earthquakes' predictive indications, monitoring of mines' stability, imminent landslides, etc.

  5. Laser-induced glass-crystallization phenomena of GeSe2 investigated by light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro, E.; Xu, Z. S.; Morhange, J.-F.; Balkanski, M.; Espinosa, G. P.; Phillips, J. C.

    1985-07-01

    Recrystallization of glassy GeSe2 under laser irradiation has been studied with use of Raman spectroscopy. A threshold irradiation power level below which no changes in the local molecular structure of the system can be detected has been defined. For an irradiation power above the threshold, three stages of transformation have been identified: The first stage is characterized by the nucleation of clusters or submicrocrystallites which remain embedded in a continuum glass matrix. The second stage is characterized by the coexistence of clusters of various sizes. Up to this stage, the system is fully reversible. The last stage is reached when the crystallites coalesce to form a polycrystalline material.

  6. Hallucinations, sleep fragmentation, and altered dream phenomena in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pappert, E J; Goetz, C G; Niederman, F G; Raman, R; Leurgans, S

    1999-01-01

    In a series of consecutively randomized outpatients who had Parkinson's disease (PD), we examined the association of three behaviors: sleep fragmentation, altered dream phenomena, and hallucinations/illusions. Using a log-linear model methodology, we tested the independence of each behavior. Sixty-two percent of the subjects had sleep fragmentation, 48% had altered dream phenomena, and 26% had hallucinations/illusions. Eighty-two percent of the patients with hallucinations/illusions experienced some form of sleep disorder. The three phenomena were not independent. The interaction between sleep fragmentation and altered dream phenomena was strongly statistically significant. Likewise, a significant interaction existed between altered dream phenomena and hallucinations/illusions. No interaction occurred between sleep fragmentation and hallucinations/illusions. Sleep fragmentation, altered dream phenomena, and hallucinations/illusions in PD should be considered distinct but often overlapping behaviors. The close association between altered dream phenomena and hallucinations suggests that therapeutic interventions aimed at diminishing dream-related activities may have a specific positive impact on hallucinatory behavior.

  7. Thermal and x-ray analysis on the origin of double melting phenomena of poly(L-lactic acid) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xiaoyun

    Thermal analysis is one of the most commonly used techniques to characterize the structure and properties of semicrystalline polymers. However, the complexity involved is often overlooked, leading to erroneous or, at least, questionable results and interpretations. In the present study we carry out an extensive investigation of the complex thermal behavior of poly(L-lactic acid), PLLA, films prepared under a wide range of crystallization conditions, including isothermal and non-isothermal crystallization from both the glassy state and the melt. The primary techniques used were differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature modulated DSC (TMDSC), wide-angle x-ray diffraction (WAXD), and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). A major goal of the research was to sort out the various phenomena and to understand the mechanisms that produced them. Depending on the sample preparation conditions up to three crystallization peaks and two melting peaks could be observed during heating in the DSC. The occurrence of double melting is a function of crystallization temperature, crystallization time, heating rate, and molecular weight. It occurs under many experimental conditions, and it depends largely on the size and perfection of initial crystals, not the overall initial crystallinity, nor the completion of crystallization. It was found that the first endotherm was often obscured by the recrystallization exotherm. It was concluded that PLLA double melting originates mainly from the melt-recrystallization of metastable crystals. For samples cold-crystallized above 140°C, it is due to a dual lamellar population present in the samples. For crystallization below 120°C, a proposal in the literature that PLLA double melting is caused by the formation and subsequent transformation of beta-phase could not be ruled out. A unique double "cold-crystallization" peak was observed when amorphous PLLA was heated at 10°C/min. It was concluded to result from the sum of conventional cold-crystallization

  8. Astrophysical phenomena related to supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pott, Jörg-Uwe

    2006-12-01

    The thesis contains the results of my recent projects in astrophysical research. All projects aim at pushing the limits of our knowledge about the interaction between a galaxy, the fundamental building block of today's universe, and a supermassive black hole (SMBH) at its center. Over the past years a lot of observational evidence has been gathered for the current understanding, that at least a major part of the galaxies with a stellar bulge contain central SMBHs. The typical extragalactic approach consists of searching for the spectroscopic pattern of Keplerian rotation, produced by stars and gas, when orbiting a central dark mass (Kormendy & Richstone 1995). It suggests that a significant fraction of large galaxies host in their very nucleus a SMBH of millions to billions of solar masses (Kormendy & Gebhardt 2001). In the closest case, the center of our Milky Way, the most central stars, which can be imaged, were shown to move on orbits with circulation times of a few decades only, evidencing a mass and compactness of the dark counter part of the Keplerian motion, which can only be explained by a SMBH (Eckart & Genzel 1996; Ghez et al. 2000; Schödel et al. 2002). Having acknowledged the widespread existence of SMBHs the obvious next step is investigating the interaction with their environment. Although the basic property of a SMBH, which is concentrating a huge amount of mass in a ludicrously small volume defined by the Schwarzschild radius, only creates a deep gravitational trough, its existence evokes much more phenomena than simply attracting the surrounding matter. It can trigger or exacerbate star formation via tidal forces (Morris 1993). It shapes the distribution of its surrounding matter to accretion discs, which themselves release gravitational potential energy as radiation, possibly due to magnetic friction (Blandford 1995). The radiation efficiency of such active galactic nuclei (AGN) can become roughly 100 times more efficient than atomic nuclear

  9. Time-Variable Phenomena in the Jovian System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belton, Michael J. S. (Editor); West, Robert A. (Editor); Rahe, Jurgen (Editor); Pereyda, Margarita

    1989-01-01

    The current state of knowledge of dynamic processes in the Jovian system is assessed and summaries are provided of both theoretical and observational foundations upon which future research might be based. There are three sections: satellite phenomena and rings; magnetospheric phenomena, Io's torus, and aurorae; and atmospheric phenomena. Each chapter discusses time dependent theoretical framework for understanding and interpreting what is observed; others describe the evidence and nature of observed changes or their absence. A few chapters provide historical perspective and attempt to present a comprehensive synthesis of the current state of knowledge.

  10. Analytical investigation of critical phenomena in MHD power generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Critical phenomena in the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) High Performance Demonstration Experiment (HPDE) and the U.S. U-25 Experiment, are analyzed. The performance of a NASA specified 500 MW(th) flow train is analyzed. Critical phenomena analyzed include: Hall voltage overshoots; optimal load schedules; parametric dependence of the electrode voltage drops; boundary layer behavior; near electrode phenomena with finite electrode segmentation; current distribution in the end regions; scale up rules; optimum Mach number distribution; and the effects of alternative cross sectional shapes.

  11. Nonlinear Effects in Photorefractive Crystals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbschloe, Donald Ross

    1988-12-01

    phenomena, and laser beam steering. A new gain mechanism for wave mixing in photorefractive crystals is verified experimentally using the unidirectional ring resonator and the linear resonator. The new mechanism depends on two, frequency detuned pump beams and off-Bragg coupling. A comparison with the traditional gain mechanism for wave amplification, using a single pump beam, reveals that the intensity of the oscillating beam with the new mechanism can be four times larger than with a single pump beam. We provide the first quantitative measurement of oscillation in the linear resonator using Bi_ {12}SiO_{20} .

  12. Crystallization of sodium chloride from a concentrated calcium chloride-potassium chloride-sodium chloride solution in a CMSMPR crystallizer: Observation of crystal size distribution and model validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung Sang

    Compared to overwhelming technical data available in other advanced technologies, knowledge about particle technology, especially in particle synthesis from a solution, is still poor due to the lack of available equipment to study crystallization phenomena in a crystallizer. Recent technical advances in particle size measurement such as Coulter counter and laser light scattering have made in/ex situ study of some of particle synthesis, i.e., growth, attrition, and aggregation, possible with simple systems. Even with these advancements in measurement technology, to grasp fully the crystallization phenomena requires further theoretical and technical advances in understanding such particle synthesis mechanisms. Therefore, it is the motive of this work to establish the general processing parameters and to produce rigorous experimental data with reliable performance and characterization that rigorously account for the crystallization phenomena of nucleation, growth, aggregation, and breakage including their variations with time and space in a controlled continuous mixed-suspension mixed-product removal (CMSMPR) crystallizer. This dissertation reports the results and achievements in the following areas: (1) experimental programs to support the development and validation of the phenomenological models and generation of laboratory data for the purpose of testing, refining, and validating the crystallization process, (2) development of laboratory well-mixed crystallizer system and experimental protocols to generate crystal size distribution (CSD) data, (3) the effects of feed solution concentration, crystallization temperature, feed flow rate, and mixing speed, as well as different types of mixers resulting in the evolution of CSDs with time from a concentrated brine solution, (4) with statistically designed experiments the effects of processing variables on the resultant particle structure and CSD at steady state were quantified and related to each of those operating

  13. The role of mass transport in protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Otálora, Fermín; García-Caballero, Alfonso

    2016-02-01

    Mass transport takes place within the mesoscopic to macroscopic scale range and plays a key role in crystal growth that may affect the result of the crystallization experiment. The influence of mass transport is different depending on the crystallization technique employed, essentially because each technique reaches supersaturation in its own unique way. In the case of batch experiments, there are some complex phenomena that take place at the interface between solutions upon mixing. These transport instabilities may drastically affect the reproducibility of crystallization experiments, and different outcomes may be obtained depending on whether or not the drop is homogenized. In diffusion experiments with aqueous solutions, evaporation leads to fascinating transport phenomena. When a drop starts to evaporate, there is an increase in concentration near the interface between the drop and the air until a nucleation event eventually takes place. Upon growth, the weight of the floating crystal overcomes the surface tension and the crystal falls to the bottom of the drop. The very growth of the crystal then triggers convective flow and inhomogeneities in supersaturation values in the drop owing to buoyancy of the lighter concentration-depleted solution surrounding the crystal. Finally, the counter-diffusion technique works if, and only if, diffusive mass transport is assured. The technique relies on the propagation of a supersaturation wave that moves across the elongated protein chamber and is the result of the coupling of reaction (crystallization) and diffusion. The goal of this review is to convince protein crystal growers that in spite of the small volume of the typical protein crystallization setup, transport plays a key role in the crystal quality, size and phase in both screening and optimization experiments.

  14. Hydrogen gas storage in fluorinated ultramicroporous tunnel crystal.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Katagiri, Toshimasa

    2012-08-21

    We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder.

  15. INVESTIGATIONS INTO BIOFOULING PHENOMENA IN FINE PORE AERATION DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbiologically-based procedures were used to describe biofouling phenomena on fine pore aeration devices and to determine whether biofilm characteristics could be related to diffuser process performance parameters. Fine pore diffusers were obtained from five municipal wastewa...

  16. Probing Cytological and Reproductive Phenomena by Means of Bryophytes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes procedures (recommended for both secondary and college levels) to study mitosis, Giemsa C-banding, reproductive phenomena (including alternation of generations), and phototropism in mosses and liverworts. (JN)

  17. INVESTIGATIONS INTO BIOFOULING PHENOMENA IN FINE PORE AERATION DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbiologically-based procedures were used to describe biofouling phenomena on fine pore aeration devices and to determine whether biofilm characteristics could be related to diffuser process performance parameters. Fine pore diffusers were obtained from five municipal wastewa...

  18. Deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols on the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Y.; Zhao, C. S.; Ma, N.; Liu, H. J.; Bian, Y. X.; Tao, J. C.; Hu, Min

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we report that the deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols on the North China Plain are frequently observed using a humidified nephelometer system. The deliquescence relative humidity (RH) primarily ranges from 73% to 81%, with an average of 76.8%. The observed deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols exhibit distinct diurnal patterns and are highly correlated with ammonium sulfate. The diurnal variations of ammonium and nitrate may play significant roles on occurrences of observed deliquescent phenomena. The frequently observed deliquescent phenomena of ambient aerosols in this paper imply that current parameterization schemes that describe the RH dependence of particle light scattering may result in a significant bias when estimating aerosol effects on climate.

  19. Analysis of nuclear reactor instability phenomena. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1993-03-01

    The phenomena known as density-wave instability often occurs in phase change systems, such as boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRS). Our current understanding of density-wave oscillations is in fairly good shape for linear phenomena (eg, the onset of instabilities) but is not very advanced for non-linear phenomena [Lahey and Podowski, 1989]. In particular, limit cycle and chaotic instability modes are not well understood in boiling systems such as current and advanced generation BWRs (eg, SBWR). In particular, the SBWR relies on natural circulation and is thus inherently prone to problems with density-wave instabilities. The purpose of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of nonlinear nuclear-coupled density-wave instability phenomena in BWRS. This research builds on the work of Achard et al [1985] and Clausse et al [1991] who showed, respectively, that Hopf bifurcations and chaotic oscillations may occur in boiling systems.

  20. Probing Cytological and Reproductive Phenomena by Means of Bryophytes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes procedures (recommended for both secondary and college levels) to study mitosis, Giemsa C-banding, reproductive phenomena (including alternation of generations), and phototropism in mosses and liverworts. (JN)

  1. Ambroise August Liébeault and psychic phenomena.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Carlos S

    2009-10-01

    Some nineteenth-century hypnosis researchers did not limit their interest to the study of the conventional psychological and behavioral aspects of hypnosis, but also studied and wrote about psychic phenomena such as mental suggestion and clairvoyance. One example, and the topic of this paper, was French physician Ambroise August Liébeault (1823-1904), who influenced the Nancy school of hypnosis. Liébeault wrote about mental suggestion, clairvoyance, mediumship, and even so-called poltergeists. Some of his writings provide conventional explanations of the phenomena. Still of interest today, Liébeault's writings about psychic phenomena illustrate the overlap that existed during the nineteenth-century between hypnosis and psychic phenomena--an overlap related to the potentials of the mind and its subconscious activity.

  2. Swimming bacteria in liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Zhou, Shuang; Aranson, Igor; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Dynamics of swimming bacteria can be very complex due to the interaction between the bacteria and the fluid, especially when the suspending fluid is non-Newtonian. Placement of swimming bacteria in lyotropic liquid crystal produces a new class of active materials by combining features of two seemingly incompatible constituents: self-propelled live bacteria and ordered liquid crystals. Here we present fundamentally new phenomena caused by the coupling between direction of bacterial swimming, bacteria-triggered flows and director orientations. Locomotion of bacteria may locally reduce the degree of order in liquid crystal or even trigger nematic-isotropic phase transition. Microscopic flows generated by bacterial flagella disturb director orientation. Emerged birefringence patterns allow direct optical observation and quantitative characterization of flagella dynamics. At high concentration of bacteria we observed the emergence of self-organized periodic texture caused by bacteria swimming. Our work sheds new light on self-organization in hybrid bio-mechanical systems and can lead to valuable biomedical applications. Was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under the Contract No. DE AC02-06CH11357.

  3. [Problems of psychiatrization, medicalization and related social phenomena].

    PubMed

    Opalić, Petar

    2009-01-01

    The introduction contains definitions of the terms psychiatrization, medicalization, psychotherapeutization and psychologization of the society, i.e. social problems. Different aspects of the above phenomena are analyzed, their origin, relation with the professions they originate from, and, finally, their social significance, i.e. social function. In conclusion, the article points to different possibilities to prevent the above phenomena, undesirable both for the society and the objectives and activities of the professions they originate from.

  4. Unusual radio and plasma wave phenomena observed in March 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.

    1992-01-01

    During the intense solar flare activity in March 1991 a number of unusual radio emission and Langmuir wave phenomena were observed by the radio and plasma wave (URAP) experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft. These phenomena were associated with unusual conditions in the interplanetary medium (IPM) presumably resulting from intense solar activity. Some of these URAP observations cannot be explained by mechanisms usually attributed to interplanetary (IP) radio emissions and Langmuir wave activity and require other interpretations.

  5. Unusual radio and plasma wave phenomena observed in March 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.

    1992-06-01

    During the intense solar flare activity in March 1991 a number of unusual radio emission and Langmuir wave phenomena were observed by the radio and plasma wave (URAP) experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft. These phenomena were associated with unusual conditions in the interplanetary medium (IPM) presumably resulting from intense solar activity. Some of these URAP observations cannot be explained by mechanisms usually attributed to interplanetary (IP) radio emissions and Langmuir wave activity and require other interpretations.

  6. Aberration vignetting phenomena and its visualization in wide angular objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livshits, Irina; Letunovskaya, Marina; Potemin, Igor; Okishev, Sergey; Zhdanov, Dmitry

    2016-11-01

    Aberration vignetting phenomena changes light distribution in the image plane. A method of physically accurate simulation of this effect in optical devices is presented. We modified a stochastic ray tracing technique to use it for the analysis and visualization of the aberration vignetting. Some useful illustrations with a number of visual examples of these phenomena for different optical systems are given: bi-concentric lens, wide-angle lens, fish-eye lenses, etc.

  7. Classification of Transient Phenomena in Distribution System using wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, Alireza

    2014-05-01

    An efficient procedure for classification of transient phenomena in distribution systems is proposed in this paper. The proposed method has been applied to classify some transient phenomena such as inrush current, load switching, capacitor switching and single phase to ground fault. The new scheme is based on wavelet transform algorithm. All of the events for feature extraction and test are simulated using Electro Magnetic Transient Program (EMTP). Results show high accuracy of proposed method.

  8. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.C.

    1993-09-01

    This paper will present a summary of past and present accomplishments of the Natural Phenomena Hazards Program that has been ongoing at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory since 1975. The Natural Phenomena covered includes earthquake; winds, hurricanes, and tornadoes; flooding and precipitation; lightning; and volcanic events. The work is organized into four major areas (1) Policy, requirements, standards, and guidance (2) Technical support, research development, (3) Technology transfer, and (4) Oversight.

  9. Deep Inelastic Scattering and Related Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostini, G.; Nigro, A.

    1997-03-01

    Inelastic Scattering * Instantons and Forward Jets at HERA * Forward Jets at HERA and at the Tevatron * Distinguishing the DGLAP and BFKL Evolutions with Transverse Momentum Spectra * The Properties of Hadrons in Neutrino-Neon Interactions * Transverse Energy Flow Distributions in Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA * WORKING GROUP 5: Polarized Structure Functions * A New Measurement of the Spin Dependent Structure Functions gp1 and gd1 * Spin Asymmetry in Muon-deuteron Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized Target * Polarization of Valence and Light Sea Quarks in the Nucleon * Results from SLAC * Inclusive Spin-Dependent DIS from the Nucleon with HERMES * Semi-Inclusive Data from HERMES * Future Measurements of the g1 Spin Structure function with Polarized e - p Collisions and Determination of Δg * A Future Measurement of ΔG at CERN * The Polarized Two-Loop Splitting Functions * Polarized Parton Distributions from a Global NLO-QCD Analysis * Polarized Partons at Next-to-leading Order * Small-x Behaviour of the Structure Function g1 * On Small-x Resummations for the Evolution of Unpolarized and Polarized Non-Singlet and singlet Structure Functions * Parton Model Prediction for g2 * On the Twist-2 Contributions to Polarized Structure Functions and New Sum Rules * Some Aspects of the Polarized Structure Functions * Inclusive Production of Hadrons in l↑p↑ → h↑X and Spin Measurements * Polarized Structure Functions and QPMSR * Polarization Phenomena and Photon Dissociation in Deep-Inelastic Lepton-Nucleon Scattering * Prospects for Measuring Δg from Jets at HERA with Polarized Protons * On the Q2 Dependence of Asymmetry A1 * WORKING GROUP 6: Special Theoretical Topics * Coherence and Final States in DIS at Small x * Unitarity and Saturation in the Dipole Formulation * Radiative Corrections to the Leading log(1/x) Approximation for Structure Functions * Effective Action Approach for Small-x Physics in QCD * Unitarization of BFKL Pomeron * The Role of the

  10. LITERATURE SURVEY FOR FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    PERSON, J.C.

    2004-07-14

    The literature survey for the fractional crystallization study of material from tank 241-S-112 is completed, fulfilling the requirements of the Test Plan for Tank 241-S-112 Fractional Crystallization Study (Herting 2003). Crystallization involves the formation of one or more solid phases from a fluid phase or an amorphous solid phase. It is applied extensively in the chemical industry, both as a purification process and a separation process. The main advantage of crystallization over distillation is the production of substances with a very high purity, at a low level of energy consumption, and at relatively mild process conditions. Crystallization is one of the older operations in the chemical industry; therefore, practical experience can usually be used for the design and operation of industrial crystallizers. In addition, advances in the understanding of crystallization kinetics can be useful in the control, design, and scale-up of industrial crystallizers. Research work is currently underway; e.g., the CrysCODE (Crystallizer Control & Design) project, littu://www.aui.tudelft.nl/uroiect/Cn/scode/crvscode.htm, at the Delft University of Technology, with the goal of improving the performance and controllability of industrial crystallizers by means of better control and improved design methodologies. Recent developments in fluid dynamics and reactor technology (e.g., compartment approaches) have led to a better understanding of processes and scale-up phenomena. The ultimate aim of such research is to develop a knowledge-based design frame for optimization of industrial crystallization units. Development work is in progress on a rigorous design analysis model for the description of the crystallization process as a function of the reactor geometry, crystallization kinetics, and operating conditions. One modeling effort is aimed at improving the predictive crystallizer model by implementing a population balance equation that depends on two variables: the size and

  11. Theoretical model of crystal growth shaping process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarchenko, V. A.; Uspenski, V. S.; Tatarchenko, E. V.; Nabot, J. Ph.; Duffar, T.; Roux, B.

    1997-10-01

    A theoretical investigation of the crystal growth shaping process is carried out on the basis of the dynamic stability concept. The capillary dynamic stability of shaped crystal growth processes for various forms of the liquid menisci is analyzed using the mathematical model of the phenomena in the axisymmetric case. The catching boundary condition of the capillary boundary problem is considered and the limits of its application for shaped crystal growth modeling are discussed. The static stability of a liquid free surface is taken into account by means of the Jacobi equation analysis. The result is that a large number of menisci having drop-like shapes are statically unstable. A few new non-traditional liquid meniscus shapes (e.g., bubbles and related shapes) are proposed for the case of a catching boundary condition.

  12. [Non-epileptic motor paroxysmal phenomena in wakefulness in childhood].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Víctor L; Arberas, Claudia L

    2013-09-06

    Paroxysmal events in childhood are a challenge for pediatric neurologists, given its highly heterogeneous clinical manifestations, often difficult to distinguish between phenomena of epileptic seizure or not. The non-epileptic paroxysmal episodes are neurological phenomena, with motor, sensory symptoms, and/or sensory impairments, with or without involvement of consciousness, epileptic phenomena unrelated, so no electroencephalographic correlative expression between or during episodes. From the clinical point of view can be classified into four groups: motor phenomena, syncope, migraine (and associated conditions) and acute psychiatric symptoms. In this paper we analyze paroxysmal motor phenomena in awake children, dividing them according to their clinical manifestations: extrapyramidal episodes (paroxysmal kinesiogenic, non kinesiogenic and not related to exercise dyskinesias, Dopa responsive dystonia) and similar symptoms of dystonia (Sandifer syndrome); manifestations of startle (hyperekplexia); episodic eye and head movements (benign paroxysmal tonic upward gaze nistagmus deviation); episodic ataxia (familial episodic ataxias, paroxysmal benign vertigo); stereotyped and phenomena of self-gratification; and myoclonic events (benign myoclonus of early infancy). The detection of these syndromes will, in many cases, allow an adequate genetic counseling, initiate a specific treatment and avoid unnecessary additional studies. Molecular studies have demonstrated a real relationship between epileptic and non-epileptic basis of many of these entities and surely the identification of the molecular basis and understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms in many of them allow us, in the near future will benefit our patients.

  13. Light flash phenomena induced by HzE particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, P. J.; Pease, V. P.

    1980-01-01

    Astronauts and Apollo and Skylab missions have reported observing a variety of visual phenomena when their eyes are closed and adapted to darkness. These phenomena have been collectively labelled as light flashes. Visual phenomena which are similar in appearance to those observed in space have been demonstrated at the number of accelerator facilities by expressing the eyes of human subjects to beams of various types of radiation. In some laboratory experiments Cerenkov radiation was found to be the basis for the flashes observed while in other experiments Cerenkov radiation could apparently be ruled out. Experiments that differentiate between Cerenkov radiation and other possible mechanisms for inducing visual phenomena was then compared. The phenomena obtained in the presence and absence of Cerenkov radiation were designed and conducted. A new mechanism proposed to explain the visual phenomena observed by Skylab astronauts as they passed through the South Atlantic Anomaly, namely nuclear interactions in and near the sensitive layer of the retina, is covered. Also some studies to search for similar transient effects of space radiation on sensors and microcomputer memories are described.

  14. Detecting psychological phenomena: taking bottom-up research seriously.

    PubMed

    Haig, Brian D

    2013-01-01

    For more than 50 years, psychology has been dominated by a top-down research strategy in which a simplistic account of the hypothetico-deductive method is paired with null hypothesis testing in order to test hypotheses and theories. As a consequence of this focus on testing, psychologists have failed to pay sufficient attention to a complementary, bottom-up research strategy in which data-to-theory research is properly pursued.This bottom-up strategy has 2 primary aspects: the detection of phenomena, mostly in the form of empirical generalizations, and the subsequent understanding of those phenomena through the abductive generation of explanatory theories. This article provides a methodologically informative account of phenomena detection with reference to psychology. It begins by presenting the important distinctions between data, phenomena, and theory. It then identifies a number of different methodological strategies that are used to identify empirical phenomena. Thereafter, it discusses aspects of the nature of science that are prompted by a consideration of the distinction between data, phenomena, and explanatory theory. Taken together, these considerations press for significant changes in the way we think about and practice psychological research. The adoption of these changes would help psychology correct a number of its major current research deficiencies.

  15. Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization Database and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.

  16. Investigaccion-accion en la sala de clases sobre las creencias de la cultura de la ciencia de un grupo de estudiantes universitarios y su relacion reciproca con el aprendizaje de las ciencias biologicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordova-Santiago, Lizzette Astrid

    La investigacion---accion que se llevo a cabo en la sala de clases tenia como punto de partida las creencias de la cultura de la ciencia de un grupo de estudiantes universitarios para luego examinar sus implicaciones en el proceso de aprendizaje de las Ciencias Biologicas. ¿Que se supone que hagan las creencias en relacion con el aprendizaje? ¿En que consiste incorporar este aspecto a la practica educativa universitaria? Utilizando el modelo de Kemmis y McTaggart (1987) la investigacion-accion se planteo como un proceso dinamico en cuatro momentos en espiral constituidos por la planificacion, la accion, la observacion y la reflexion. Cada una de las fases tuvo una intencion retrospectiva y prospectiva formando una espiral de autorreflexion del conocimiento y la accion. Se llevaron a cabo audio grabaciones en clases y analisis de documentos. Ademas, la profesora-investigadora hizo un portafolio para reflexionar sobre las creencias de la cultura de la ciencia que tienen los estudiantes y las creencias del aprendizaje que tiene la profesora y sobre como la comprension de estos elementos ayudo a mejorar su practica educativa a traves del tiempo. Los resultados obtenidos apuntan a que las creencias de la cultura de la ciencia que tiene el grupo de estudiantes son diversas. Ellos si creen que la ciencia tiene una cultura la cual describieron como: complicada y desconocida que evoluciona constantemente, que es un conjunto de metodos, que es altamente tecnologica, que resuelve problemas de salud, ayuda a interpretar la realidad del mundo que los rodea y su origen y que existen unas intersecciones entre la ciencia y el poder. Sobre las creencias del proceso de aprendizaje de la profesora-investigadora, estas senalan que el modelaje de actores, la vision de la academia que tiene ella asi como la participacion y negociacion entre todos los involucrados en el proceso educativo, son factores que inciden en el proceso de aprendizaje.

  17. Crystallization process

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Robert J.; Brown, William R.; Auyang, Lun; Liu, Yin-Chang; Cook, W. Jeffrey

    1986-01-01

    An improved crystallization process is disclosed for separating a crystallizable material and an excluded material which is at least partially excluded from the solid phase of the crystallizable material obtained upon freezing a liquid phase of the materials. The solid phase is more dense than the liquid phase, and it is separated therefrom by relative movement with the formation of a packed bed of solid phase. The packed bed is continuously formed adjacent its lower end and passed from the liquid phase into a countercurrent flow of backwash liquid. The packed bed extends through the level of the backwash liquid to provide a drained bed of solid phase adjacent its upper end which is melted by a condensing vapor.

  18. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  19. Liquid Crystal Inquiries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marroum, Renata-Maria

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the properties and classification of liquid crystals. Presents a simple experiment that illustrates the structure of liquid crystals and the differences between the various phases liquid crystals can assume. (JRH)

  20. Visualization of atomic-scale phenomena in superconductors: application to FeSe

    DOE PAGES

    Choubey, Peayush; Berlijn, Tom; Kreisel, Andreas; ...

    2014-10-31

    Here we propose a simple method of calculating inhomogeneous, atomic-scale phenomena in superconductors which makes use of the wave function information traditionally discarded in the construction of tight-binding models used in the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. The method uses symmetry- based first principles Wannier functions to visualize the effects of superconducting pairing on the distribution of electronic states over atoms within a crystal unit cell. Local symmetries lower than the global lattice symmetry can thus be exhibited as well, rendering theoretical comparisons with scanning tunneling spectroscopy data much more useful. As a simple example, we discuss the geometric dimer states observedmore » near defects in superconducting FeSe.« less

  1. Low-gravity fluid dynamics and transport phenomena. Progress in Astronautics and Aeronautics. Vol. 130

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, J.N.; Sani, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on low-gravity fluid dynamics and transport phenomena are presented. Individual topics addressed include: fluid management in low gravity, nucleate pool boiling in variable gravity, application of energy-stability theory to problems in crystal growth, thermosolutal convection in liquid HgCdTe near the liquidus temperature, capillary surfaces in microgravity, thermohydrodynamic instabilities and capillary flows, interfacial oscillators, effects of gravity jitter on typical fluid science experiments and on natural convection in a vertical cylinder. Also discussed are: double-diffusive convection and its effects under reduced gravity, segregation and convection in dendritic alloys, fluid flow and microstructure development, analysis of convective situations with the Soret effect, complex natural convection in low Prandtl number metals, separation physics, phase partitioning in reduced gravity, separation of binary alloys with miscibility gap in the melt, Ostwald ripening in liquids, particle cloud combustion in reduced gravity, opposed-flow flame spread with implications for combustion at microgravity.

  2. Generation of negative pressures and spallation phenomena in diamond exposed to a picosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Abrosimov, S A; Bazhulin, A P; Bol'shakov, A P; Konov, V I; Krasyuk, I K; Pashinin, P P; Ral'chenko, V G; Semenov, A Yu; Sovyk, D N; Stuchebryukhov, I A; Khomich, A A; Fortov, V E; Khishchenko, K V

    2014-06-30

    The spallation phenomena in poly- and single-crystal synthetic diamonds have been experimentally investigated. A shockwave impact on a target was implemented using a 70-ps laser pulse in the Kamerton-T facility. The ablation pressure of 0.66 TPa on the front target surface was formed by pulsed radiation of a neodymium phosphate glass laser (second harmonic λ = 0.527 mm, pulse energy 2.5 J) with an intensity as high as 2 × 10{sup 13} W cm{sup -2}. The maximum diamond spall strength σ* ≈ 16.5 GPa is found to be 24% of the theoretical ultimate strength. Raman scattering data indicate that a small amount of crystalline diamond in the spallation region on the rear side of the target is graphitised. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  3. Mesoscopic description of hot spot phenomena: a route for hybrid multiscale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillet, Jean-Bernard

    2015-06-01

    We describe large scale simulations of hot spot phenomena in single TATB crystals within the DPDE framework. The mesoscopic DPDE model is calibrated on all atom simulations, and particular attention is given to the rate of heat exchange between intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom, which control the non-equilibrium behaviour of the system. Simulations of pore collapse at different shock speeds and for different pore sizes are performed, and a criterium for the quantification of the hot spot energy is proposed. These results are considered as reference data for subsequent comparison with top down simulations of similar processes. We present a reformulation of the (hydrodynamic) SDPD method allowing a direct coupling with the DPDE model, then opening the route for hybrid multiscale simulations.

  4. Inception of ice accretion by ice crystal impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwe, Jens; Kintea, Daniel; Baumert, Arne; Bansmer, Stephan; Roisman, Ilia V.; Tropea, Cameron

    2016-09-01

    In this experimental and theoretical study the ice accretion phenomena on a heated cylinder in Braunschweig Icing Wind Tunnel are investigated. The ice crystal size, velocity, the liquid-to-total mass ratio are accurately controlled. The evolution of the cylinder temperature, the time required for the inception of the ice accretion, and the ice accretion rate are measured for various operating conditions. The surface temperature of the solid target is determined by balancing the heating power in the wall and the cooling effect of the stream of ice particles. We have discovered that the inception of the ice crystal accretion is determined by the instant when the surface temperature of the heated target reduces to the freezing temperature. This result will help to model the phenomena of ice crystal accretion.

  5. Mesoscopic surface roughness of ice crystals pervasive across a wide range of ice crystal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, N. B.; Miller, A.; Amaral, M.; Cumiskey, A.

    2014-03-01

    Here we show high-magnification images of hexagonal ice crystals acquired by Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM). Most ice crystals were grown and sublimated in the water vapor environment of an FEI-Quanta-200 ESEM, but crystals grown in a laboratory diffusion chamber were also transferred intact and imaged via ESEM. All of these images display prominent mesoscopic topography including linear striations, ridges, islands, steps, peaks, pits, and crevasses; the roughness is not observed to be confined to prism facets. The observations represent the most highly magnified images of ice surfaces yet reported and expand the range of conditions where the rough surface features are known to be conspicuous. Microscale surface topography is seen to be ubiquitously present at temperatures ranging from -10 °C to -40 °C, at super-saturated and sub-saturated conditions, on all crystal facets, and irrespective of substrate. Despite the constant presence of surface roughness, the patterns of roughness are observed to be dramatically different between growing and sublimating crystals, and transferred crystals also display qualitatively different patterns of roughness. Crystals are also demonstrated to sometimes exhibit inhibited growth in moderately supersaturated conditions following exposure to near-equilibrium conditions, a phenomena interpreted as evidence of 2-D nucleation. New knowledge of the characteristics of these features could affect the fundamental understanding of ice surfaces and their physical parameterization in the context of satellite retrievals and cloud modeling. Links to Supplement videos of ice growth and sublimation are provided.

  6. PARAMAGNETIC RELAXATION IN CRYSTALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTALS, PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE, RELAXATION TIME , CRYSTAL DEFECTS, QUARTZ, GLASS, STRAIN(MECHANICS), TEMPERATURE, NUCLEAR SPINS, HYDROGEN, CALCIUM COMPOUNDS, FLUORIDES, COLOR CENTERS, PHONONS, OXYGEN.

  7. Visualizing Advective and Diffusive Phenomena in Fluid-Rock Interaction using Thermochromic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinle, B.; Cardiff, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    The presence of fractures plays an essential role in hydrogeologic transport, as well as geothermal and hydrocarbon industries, as fractures introduce new pathways for flow and transport in host rocks. Transport through these features is often highly non-Fickian, due to the combination of both heterogeneous advection and matrix diffusion. Fracture aperture distributions and contact areas control the ability of fluids to flow through a fracture, and to interact with host rock. The heterogeneous nature of these fracture apertures often lead to preferential fluid pathways that control the prevalence of advective and diffusive processes within the fracture network. To understand how preferential fluid pathways affect these transport processes in detail, an innovative approach is introduced for visualizing advective and diffusive phenomena through the use of thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs). An artificial fracture with the ability to have its surface roughness altered is constructed and heterogeneous flow and diffusion of heat is observed directly using these TLCs. The surfaces are digitized and simulated in COMSOL Multiphysics where particle tracing is used to determine arrival time curves in the absence of host rock diffusion. The resulting combination of the visual results from lab experiments and particle statistics from the computer model provide a unique method for assessing the impact of both heterogeneous advection and matrix-diffusion on tracer breakthrough in fractures, across a variety of fracture geometries. Figure 1. Image of advective (left) and diffusive (right) phenomena occurring simultaneously as fluid flows through the artificial fracture.

  8. Grain Boundary and Interface Phenomena in Deformed Rocks - Implications for Creep Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The scaling of ductile rheology within the lithospheric crust can be examined as the progressive aggregation of point and line defect motion and interaction that culminates in the cooperative behavior of grain boundaries and like interfaces. Even though the role of interfaces in mediating defect motion, and in turn macroscopic ductility, is well recognized, many details of interface structure and function remain unresolved. As a contribution to the latter, grain boundary phenomena studied by transmission electron microscopy are described from different pressure-temperature conditions (greenschist to granulite grade) in concert with the macroscopic deformation response. In generally, the interfaces have important differences from classic models based on metals and simple non-metals. The combination of crystal-chemical complexity and compositional heterogeneity of crustal materials is reflected in grain boundary features that include classic coincident-boundary types, grain boundary ledges, finite width interfaces, grain boundary cavitation, dislocation-diffusion metamorphic effects and intra-/ intercrystalline defect interactions. The need to establish the range of interface phenomena is seen in the fact that grain boundary activity is the primary factor in grain-size sensitive (GSS) flow where grain size is in effect an easily observable proxy for the fractional grain boundary area (volume) of the material.

  9. Magnetic Fluctuations, Precursor Phenomena, and Phase Transition in MnSi under a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, C.; Bannenberg, L. J.; Lelièvre-Berna, E.; Qian, F.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Dalgliesh, R. M.; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T. A.; Falus, P.

    2017-07-01

    The reference chiral helimagnet MnSi is the first system where Skyrmion lattice correlations have been reported. At a zero magnetic field the transition at TC to the helimagnetic state is of first order. Above TC, in a region dominated by precursor phenomena, neutron scattering shows the buildup of strong chiral fluctuating correlations over the surface of a sphere with radius 2 π /ℓ, where ℓ is the pitch of the helix. It has been suggested that these fluctuating correlations drive the helical transition to first order following a scenario proposed by Brazovskii for liquid crystals. We present a comprehensive neutron scattering study under magnetic fields, which provides evidence that this is not the case. The sharp first order transition persists for magnetic fields up to 0.4 T whereas the fluctuating correlations weaken and start to concentrate along the field direction already above 0.2 T. Our results thus disconnect the first order nature of the transition from the precursor fluctuating correlations. They also show no indication for a tricritical point, where the first order transition crosses over to second order with increasing magnetic field. In this light, the nature of the first order helical transition and the precursor phenomena above TC, both of general relevance to chiral magnetism, remain an open question.

  10. Comprehending emergent systems phenomena through direct-manipulation animation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Priscilla Abel

    This study seeks to understand the type of interaction mode that best supports learning and comprehension of emergent systems phenomena. Given that the literature has established that students hold robust misconceptions of such phenomena, this study investigates the influence of using three types of interaction; speed-manipulation animation (SMN), post-manipulation animation (PMA) and direct-manipulation animation (DMA) for increasing comprehension and testing transfer of the phenomena, by looking at the effect of simultaneous interaction of haptic and visual channels on long term and working memories when seeking to comprehend emergent phenomena. The questions asked were: (1) Does the teaching of emergent phenomena, with the aid of a dynamic interactive modeling tool (i.e., SMA, PMA or DMA), improve students' mental model construction of systems, thus increasing comprehension of this scientific concept? And (2) does the teaching of emergent phenomena, with the aid of a dynamic interactive modeling tool, give the students the necessary complex cognitive skill which can then be applied to similar (near transfer) and/or novel, but different, (far transfer) scenarios? In an empirical study undergraduate and graduate students were asked to participate in one of three experimental conditions: SMA, PMA, or DMA. The results of the study found that it was the participants of the SMA treatment condition that had the most improvement in post-test scores. Students' understanding of the phenomena increased most when they used a dynamic model with few interactive elements (i.e., start, stop, and speed) that allowed for real time visualization of one's interaction on the phenomena. Furthermore, no indication was found that the learning of emergent phenomena, with the aid of a dynamic interactive modeling tool, gave the students the necessary complex cognitive skill which could then be applied to similar (near transfer) and/or novel, but different, (far transfer) scenarios

  11. PREFACE: Transport phenomena in proton conducting media Transport phenomena in proton conducting media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikerling, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Proton transport phenomena are of paramount importance for acid-base chemistry, energy transduction in biological organisms, corrosion processes, and energy conversion in electrochemical systems such as polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The relevance for such a plethora of materials and systems, and the ever-lasting fascination with the highly concerted nature of underlying processes drive research across disciplines in chemistry, biology, physics and chemical engineering. A proton never travels alone. Proton motion is strongly correlated with its environment, usually comprised of an electrolyte and a solid or soft host material. For the transport in nature's most benign proton solvent and shuttle, water that is, insights from ab initio simulations, matured over the last 15 years, have furnished molecular details of the structural diffusion mechanism of protons. Excess proton movement in water consists of sequences of Eigen-Zundel-Eigen transitions, triggered by hydrogen bond breaking and making in the surrounding water network. Nowadays, there is little debate about the validity of this mechanism in water, which bears a stunning resemblance to the basic mechanistic picture put forward by de Grotthuss in 1806. While strong coupling of an excess proton with degrees of freedom of solvent and host materials facilitates proton motion, this coupling also creates negative synergies. In general, proton mobility in biomaterials and electrochemical proton conducting media is highly sensitive to the abundance and structure of the proton solvent. In polymer electrolyte membranes, in which protons are bound to move in nano-sized water-channels, evaporation of water or local membrane dehydration due to electro-osmotic coupling are well-known phenomena that could dramatically diminish proton conductivity. Contributions in this special issue address various vital aspects of the concerted nature of proton motion and they elucidate important structural and dynamic effects of solvent

  12. Using Inorganic Crystals To Grow Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Mcpherson, Alexander A.

    1989-01-01

    Solid materials serve as nucleating agents. Protein crystals induced by heterogeneous nucleation and in some cases by epitaxy to grow at lower supersaturations than needed for spontaneous nucleation. Heterogeneous nucleation makes possible to grow large, defect-free single crystals of protein more readily. Such protein crystals benefits research in biochemistry and pharmacology.

  13. Using Inorganic Crystals To Grow Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Mcpherson, Alexander A.

    1989-01-01

    Solid materials serve as nucleating agents. Protein crystals induced by heterogeneous nucleation and in some cases by epitaxy to grow at lower supersaturations than needed for spontaneous nucleation. Heterogeneous nucleation makes possible to grow large, defect-free single crystals of protein more readily. Such protein crystals benefits research in biochemistry and pharmacology.

  14. Laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Teruki; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2011-11-04

    Recent streams of laser studies on crystallization and crystal growth are summarized and reviewed. Femtosecond multiphoton excitation of solutions leads to their ablation at the focal point, inducing local bubble formation, shockwave propagation, and convection flow. This phenomenon, called "laser micro tsunami" makes it possible to trigger crystallization of molecules and proteins from their supersaturated solutions. Femtosecond laser ablation of a urea crystal in solution triggers the additional growth of a single daughter crystal. Intense continuous wave (CW) near infrared laser irradiation at the air/solution interface of heavy-water amino acid solutions results in trapping of the clusters and evolves to crystallization. A single crystal is always prepared in a spatially and temporally controlled manner, and the crystal polymorph of glycine depends on laser power, polarization, and solution concentration. Upon irradiation at the glass/solution interface, a millimeter-sized droplet is formed, and a single crystal is formed by shifting the irradiation position to the surface. Directional and selective crystal growth is also possible with laser trapping. Finally, characteristics of laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth are summarized.

  15. In situ fast ellipsometric analysis of repetitive surface phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, J.; Campmany, J.; Canillas, A.; Andújar, J. L.; Bertran, E.

    1997-08-01

    We present an ellipsometric technique and ellipsometric analysis of repetitive phenomena, based on the experimental arrangement of conventional phase modulated ellipsometers (PME) conceived to study fast surface phenomena in repetitive processes such as periodic and triggered experiments. Phase modulated ellipsometry is a highly sensitive surface characterization technique that is widely used in the real-time study of several processes such as thin film deposition and etching. However, fast transient phenomena cannot be analyzed with this technique because precision requirements limit the data acquisition rate to about 25 Hz. The presented new ellipsometric method allows the study of fast transient phenomena in repetitive processes with a time resolution that is mainly limited by the data acquisition system. As an example, we apply this new method to the study of surface changes during plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of amorphous silicon in a modulated radio frequency discharge of SiH4. This study has revealed the evolution of the optical parameters of the film on the millisecond scale during the plasma on and off periods. The presented ellipsometric method extends the capabilities of PME arrangements and permits the analysis of fast surface phenomena that conventional PME cannot achieve.

  16. Semiology of subtle motor phenomena in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Florea, Bogdan; Beniczky, Simona Alexandra; Demény, Helga; Beniczky, Sándor

    2017-05-01

    to investigate the semiology of subtle motor phenomena in critically ill patients, with- versus without nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). 60 consecutive comatose patients, in whom subtle motor phenomena were observed in the intensive care unit (ICU), were analysed prospectively. The semiology of the subtle phenomena was described from video-recordings, blinded to all other data. For each patient, the type, location and occurrence-pattern/duration were described. EEGs recorded in the ICU were classified using the Salzburg criteria for NCSE. only 23% (14/60) of the patients had NCSE confirmed by EEG. None of the semiological features could distinguish between patients with NCSE and those without. In both groups, the following phenomena were most common: discrete myoclonic muscle twitching and discrete tonic muscle activation. Besides these, automatisms and eye deviation were observed in both groups. subtle motor phenomena in critically ill patients can raise the suspicion of NCSE. Nevertheless, EEG is needed to confirm the diagnosis, since none of the semiological features are specific. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Liquid crystals for laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, S. D.; Marshall, K. L.; Schmid, A.

    1992-10-01

    This article highlights some of the advances made in the use of liquid crystals for laser applications from 1982 through 1992. New materials and new effects were discovered, many new devices were developed, and novel applications for well-understood phenomena were conceived. This was quite an eventful time period. Several new books were published on the broad subject of LC's, and the international scientific community organized a society devoted to encouraging further scientific and educational advancement in the field. Attention was focused on LC's in October of 1991 when the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Pierre-Gilles de Gennes for his pioneering work toward understanding order phenomena in LC's and polymers. This article is divided into four sections. The first section discusses new materials, specifically ferroelectric LC's and LC polymers. The former have opened up the realm of submicrosecond response for LC devices, and the latter have significantly reduced the sensitivity of LC optics to temperature. Some new insights into the optical properties of materials are also mentioned. The second section reviews new developments in passive applications for cholesterics and nematics. Included here are the fabrication of cholesteric laser mirrors and apodizers, the use of LC polymers for notch filters and as optical storage media, and some novel nematic retarder concepts such as the distributed polarization rotator.

  18. The Center for Natural Phenomena Engineering (CNPE), 1990--1991

    SciTech Connect

    1992-07-01

    The Center for Natural Phenomena Engineering (CNPE) was established to provide a natural phenomena (NP) engineering oversight role within Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES). In this oversight role CNPE`s goals are to provide coordination and direction of activities related to earthquake and other natural phenomena engineering, including development of hazard definition, development of design criteria, conducting new facility design, development and conducting of testing, performance of analysis and vulnerability studies, development of analysis methodology, and provision of support for preparation of safety analysis reports for the five MMES sites. In conducting these activities it is CNPE`s goal to implement the elements of Total Quality Management (TQM) in a cost-effective manner, providing its customers with a quality product. This report describes 1990--1991 activities.

  19. Direct observation of thitherto unobservable quantum phenomena by using electrons.

    PubMed

    Tonomura, Akira

    2005-10-18

    Fundamental aspects of quantum mechanics, which were discussed only theoretically as "thought experiments" in the 1920s and 1930s, have begun to frequently show up in nanoscopic regions owing to recent rapid progress in advanced technologies. Quantum phenomena were once regarded as the ultimate factors limiting further miniaturization trends of microstructured electronic devices, but now they have begun to be actively used as the principles for new devices such as quantum computers. To directly observe what had been unobservable quantum phenomena, we have tried to develop bright and monochromatic electron beams for the last 35 years. Every time the brightness of an electron beam improved, fundamental experiments in quantum mechanics became possible, and quantum phenomena became observable by using the wave nature of electrons.

  20. Multicluster solutions to a multinucleon problem and clustering phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Gnilozub, I. A.; Kurgalin, S. D.; Tchuvil'sky, Yu. M.

    2008-07-15

    Various concepts of clustering phenomena are discussed. Precise multicluster solutions constructed by the present authors for an A-nucleon problem whose dynamical properties are described by a generalized Elliott Hamiltonian are used as a mathematical formalism of the theory of clustering phenomena in nuclei. It is shown that qualitative features of various clustering phenomena, such as the very fact of the existence of cluster states, their classification, and selectivity of reactions that populate them, are explained within the concept being discussed. The 2{alpha} + bineutron three-cluster states of the {sup 10}Be nucleus are classified, and their spectrum is calculated. It is demonstrated that the results of these calculations are in good agreement with experimental data.