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Sample records for ct dose reduction

  1. CT dose optimisation and reduction in osteoarticular disease.

    PubMed

    Gervaise, A; Teixeira, P; Villani, N; Lecocq, S; Louis, M; Blum, A

    2013-04-01

    With an improvement in the temporal and spatial resolution, computed tomography (CT) is indicated in the evaluation of a great many osteoarticular diseases. New exploration techniques such as the dynamic CT and CT bone perfusion also provide new indications. However, CT is still an irradiating imaging technique and dose optimisation and reduction remains primordial. In this paper, the authors first present the typical doses delivered during CT in osteoarticular disease. They then discuss the different ways to optimise and reduce these doses by distinguishing the behavioural factors from the technical factors. Among the latter, the optimisation of the milliamps and kilovoltage is indispensable and should be adapted to the type of exploration and the morphotype of each individual. These technical factors also benefit from recent technological evolutions with the distribution of iterative reconstructions. In this way, the dose may be divided by two and provide an image of equal quality. With these dose optimisation and reduction techniques, it is now possible, while maintaining an excellent quality of the image, to obtain low-dose or even very low-dose acquisitions with a dose sometimes similar that of a standard X-ray assessment. Nevertheless, although these technical factors provide a major reduction in the dose delivered, behavioural factors, such as compliance with the indications, remain fundamental. Finally, the authors describe how to optimise and reduce the dose with specific applications in musculoskeletal imaging such as the dynamic CT, CT bone perfusion and dual energy CT.

  2. Validation of CT dose-reduction simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Massoumzadeh, Parinaz; Don, Steven; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Whiting, Bruce R.

    2009-01-15

    The objective of this research was to develop and validate a custom computed tomography dose-reduction simulation technique for producing images that have an appearance consistent with the same scan performed at a lower mAs (with fixed kVp, rotation time, and collimation). Synthetic noise is added to projection (sinogram) data, incorporating a stochastic noise model that includes energy-integrating detectors, tube-current modulation, bowtie beam filtering, and electronic system noise. Experimental methods were developed to determine the parameters required for each component of the noise model. As a validation, the outputs of the simulations were compared to measurements with cadavers in the image domain and with phantoms in both the sinogram and image domain, using an unbiased root-mean-square relative error metric to quantify agreement in noise processes. Four-alternative forced-choice (4AFC) observer studies were conducted to confirm the realistic appearance of simulated noise, and the effects of various system model components on visual noise were studied. The ''just noticeable difference (JND)'' in noise levels was analyzed to determine the sensitivity of observers to changes in noise level. Individual detector measurements were shown to be normally distributed (p>0.54), justifying the use of a Gaussian random noise generator for simulations. Phantom tests showed the ability to match original and simulated noise variance in the sinogram domain to within 5.6%{+-}1.6% (standard deviation), which was then propagated into the image domain with errors less than 4.1%{+-}1.6%. Cadaver measurements indicated that image noise was matched to within 2.6%{+-}2.0%. More importantly, the 4AFC observer studies indicated that the simulated images were realistic, i.e., no detectable difference between simulated and original images (p=0.86) was observed. JND studies indicated that observers' sensitivity to change in noise levels corresponded to a 25% difference in dose, which

  3. Strategies for reduction of radiation dose in cardiac multislice CT.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jean-François; Abada, Hicham T

    2007-08-01

    Because cardiac computed tomography (CT) (mainly coronary CT angiography) is a very promising technique, used more and more for coronary artery evaluation, the benefits and risks of this new low-invasive technique must be balanced. Radiation dose is a major concern for coronary CT angiography, especially in case of repeated examinations or in particular subgroups of patients (for example young female patients). Radiation dose to patient tends to increase from 16- to 64-slice CT. Radiation exposure in ECG-gated acquisitions may reach up to 40 mSv; considerable differences are attributable to the performance of CT machines, to technical dose-sparing tools, but also to radiological habits. Setting radiation dose at the lowest level possible should be a constant goal for the radiologist. Current technological tools are detailed in regard to their efficiency. Optimisation is necessary, by a judicious use of technological tools and also by individual adaptation of kV or mAs. This paper reviews the different current strategies for radiation dose reduction, keeping image quality constant. Data from the literature are discussed, and future technological developments are considered in regards to radiation dose reduction. The particular case of paediatric patients with congenital heart disease is also addressed.

  4. Radiation dose reduction for coronary artery calcium scoring at 320-detector CT with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D.

    PubMed

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Fukumoto, Wataru; Kaichi, Yoko; Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Hideya; Kihara, Yasuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    To assess the possibility of reducing the radiation dose for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring by using adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR 3D) on a 320-detector CT scanner. Fifty-four patients underwent routine- and low-dose CT for CAC scoring. Low-dose CT was performed at one-third of the tube current used for routine-dose CT. Routine-dose CT was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and low-dose CT was reconstructed with AIDR 3D. We compared the calculated Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores of these images. The overall percentage difference in the Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores between routine- and low-dose CT studies was 15.9, 11.6, and 12.6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the routine- and low-dose CT studies irrespective of the scoring algorithms applied. The CAC measurements of both imaging modalities were highly correlated with respect to the Agatston- (r = 0.996), volume- (r = 0.996), and mass score (r = 0.997; p < 0.001, all); the Bland-Altman limits of agreement scores were -37.4 to 51.4, -31.2 to 36.4 and -30.3 to 40.9%, respectively, suggesting that AIDR 3D was a good alternative for FBP. The mean effective radiation dose for routine- and low-dose CT was 2.2 and 0.7 mSv, respectively. The use of AIDR 3D made it possible to reduce the radiation dose by 67% for CAC scoring without impairing the quantification of coronary calcification.

  5. Radiation dose reduction for coronary artery calcium scoring at 320-detector CT with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D.

    PubMed

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Fukumoto, Wataru; Kaichi, Yoko; Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Hideya; Kihara, Yasuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    To assess the possibility of reducing the radiation dose for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring by using adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR 3D) on a 320-detector CT scanner. Fifty-four patients underwent routine- and low-dose CT for CAC scoring. Low-dose CT was performed at one-third of the tube current used for routine-dose CT. Routine-dose CT was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and low-dose CT was reconstructed with AIDR 3D. We compared the calculated Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores of these images. The overall percentage difference in the Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores between routine- and low-dose CT studies was 15.9, 11.6, and 12.6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the routine- and low-dose CT studies irrespective of the scoring algorithms applied. The CAC measurements of both imaging modalities were highly correlated with respect to the Agatston- (r = 0.996), volume- (r = 0.996), and mass score (r = 0.997; p < 0.001, all); the Bland-Altman limits of agreement scores were -37.4 to 51.4, -31.2 to 36.4 and -30.3 to 40.9%, respectively, suggesting that AIDR 3D was a good alternative for FBP. The mean effective radiation dose for routine- and low-dose CT was 2.2 and 0.7 mSv, respectively. The use of AIDR 3D made it possible to reduce the radiation dose by 67% for CAC scoring without impairing the quantification of coronary calcification. PMID:25754302

  6. Objective assessment of image quality and dose reduction in CT iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Vaishnav, J. Y. Jung, W. C.; Popescu, L. M.; Zeng, R.; Myers, K. J.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms have the potential to reduce radiation dose in CT diagnostic imaging. As these algorithms become available on the market, a standardizable method of quantifying the dose reduction that a particular IR method can achieve would be valuable. Such a method would assist manufacturers in making promotional claims about dose reduction, buyers in comparing different devices, physicists in independently validating the claims, and the United States Food and Drug Administration in regulating the labeling of CT devices. However, the nonlinear nature of commercially available IR algorithms poses challenges to objectively assessing image quality, a necessary step in establishing the amount of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve without compromising that image quality. This review paper seeks to consolidate information relevant to objectively assessing the quality of CT IR images, and thereby measuring the level of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve. Methods: The authors discuss task-based methods for assessing the quality of CT IR images and evaluating dose reduction. Results: The authors explain and review recent literature on signal detection and localization tasks in CT IR image quality assessment, the design of an appropriate phantom for these tasks, possible choices of observers (including human and model observers), and methods of evaluating observer performance. Conclusions: Standardizing the measurement of dose reduction is a problem of broad interest to the CT community and to public health. A necessary step in the process is the objective assessment of CT image quality, for which various task-based methods may be suitable. This paper attempts to consolidate recent literature that is relevant to the development and implementation of task-based methods for the assessment of CT IR image quality.

  7. CT-guided brachytherapy of prostate cancer: reduction of effective dose from X-ray examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanin, Dmitriy B.; Biryukov, Vitaliy A.; Rusetskiy, Sergey S.; Sviridov, Pavel V.; Volodina, Tatiana V.

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most effective and informative diagnostic method. Though the number of CT scans among all radiographic procedures in the USA and European countries is 11% and 4% respectively, CT makes the highest contribution to the collective effective dose from all radiographic procedures, it is 67% in the USA and 40% in European countries [1-5]. Therefore it is necessary to understand the significance of dose value from CT imaging to a patient . Though CT dose from multiple scans and potential risk is of great concern in pediatric patients, this applies to adults as well. In this connection it is very important to develop optimal approaches to dose reduction and optimization of CT examination. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its publications recommends radiologists to be aware that often CT image quality is higher than it is necessary for diagnostic confidence[6], and there is a potential to reduce the dose which patient gets from CT examination [7]. In recent years many procedures, such as minimally invasive surgery, biopsy, brachytherapy and different types of ablation are carried out under guidance of computed tomography [6;7], and during a procedures multiple CT scans focusing on a specific anatomic region are performed. At the Clinics of MRRC different types of treatment for patients with prostate cancer are used, incuding conformal CT-guided brachytherapy, implantation of microsources of I into the gland under guidance of spiral CT [8]. So, the purpose of the study is to choose optimal method to reduce radiation dose from CT during CT-guided prostate brachytherapy and to obtain the image of desired quality.

  8. Energy deposition in the breast during CT scanning: quantification and implications for dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupcich, Franco; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Badal, Andreu; Schmidt, Taly G.

    2011-03-01

    Studies suggest that dose to the breast leads to a higher lifetime attributable cancer incidence risk from a chest CT scan for women compared to men. Numerous methods have been proposed for reducing dose to the breast during CT scanning, including bismuth shielding, tube current modulation, partial-angular scanning, and reduced kVp. These methods differ in how they alter the spectrum and fluence across projection angle. This study used Monte Carlo CT simulations of a voxelized female phantom to investigate the energy (dose) deposition in the breast as a function of both photon energy and projection angle. The resulting dose deposition matrix was then used to investigate several questions regarding dose reduction to the breast: (1) Which photon energies deposit the most dose in the breast, (2) How does increased filtration compare to tube current reduction in reducing breast dose, and (3) Do reduced kVp scans reduce dose to breast, and if so, by what mechanism? The results demonstrate that while high-energy photons deposit more dose per emitted photon, the low-energy photons deposit more dose to the breast for a 120 kVp acquisition. The results also demonstrate that decreasing the tube current for the AP views to match the fluence exiting a shield deposits nearly the same dose to the breast as when using a shield (within ~1%). Finally, results suggest that the dose reduction observed during lower kVp scans is caused by reduced photon fluence rather than the elimination of high-energy photons from the beam. Overall, understanding the mechanisms of dose deposition in the breast as a function of photon energy and projection angle enables comparisons of dose reduction methods and facilitates further development of optimized dose reduction schemes.

  9. [Breast dose reduction in female CT screening for lung cancer using various metallic shields].

    PubMed

    Takada, Kenta; Kaneko, Junichi; Aoki, Kiyoshi

    2009-12-20

    We evaluated the effectiveness of metallic shields that were used for reduction of the breast dose in thoracic computed tomography(CT). For the evaluation, we measured breast surface dose and image standard deviation(SD)in the lung area. The metallic shields were made from bismuth, zinc, copper, and iron. The bismuth shield has been marketed and used for dose reduction. The other three metallic shields were chosen because they have lower atomic numbers and a lower yield of characteristic X-rays. As a result, use of the metallic shields showed a lower breast dose than the decrement of the tube current in the same image SD. The insertion of a thin aluminum sheet between the shield and a phantom was also effective in reducing breast surface dose. We calculated the dose reduction rate to evaluate the effectiveness of these metallic shields. This dose reduction rate was defined as the ratio of the decrease in breast surface dose by metallic shields to the breast surface dose measured with the tube current decrement in the same image SD. The maximum dose reduction rate was 6.4% for the bismuth shield, and 12.0-13.3% for the other shields. These results indicate that the shields made from zinc, copper, and iron are more effective for dose reduction than the shield made form bismuth. The best dose reduction rate, 13.3%, has been achieved when the zinc shield placed 20 mm apart from a phantom with 0.2 mm aluminum was used.

  10. Potential of combining iterative reconstruction with noise efficient detector design: aggressive dose reduction in head CT

    PubMed Central

    Bender, B; Schabel, C; Fenchel, M; Ernemann, U; Korn, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: With further increase of CT numbers and their dominant contribution to medical exposure, there is a recent quest for more effective dose control. While reintroduction of iterative reconstruction (IR) has proved its potential in many applications, a novel focus is placed on more noise efficient detectors. Our purpose was to assess the potential of IR in combination with an integrated circuit detector (ICD) for aggressive dose reduction in head CT. Methods: Non-contrast low-dose head CT [190 mAs; weighted volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), 33.2 mGy] was performed in 50 consecutive patients, using a new noise efficient detector and IR. Images were assessed in terms of quantitative and qualitative image quality and compared with standard dose acquisitions (320 mAs; CTDIvol, 59.7 mGy) using a conventional detector and filtered back projection. Results: By combining ICD and IR in low-dose examinations, the signal to noise was improved by about 13% above the baseline level in the standard-dose control group. Both, contrast-to-noise ratio (2.02 ± 0.6 vs 1.88 ± 0.4; p = 0.18) and objective measurements of image sharpness (695 ± 84 vs 705 ± 151 change in Hounsfield units per pixel; p = 0.79) were fully preserved in the low-dose group. Likewise, there was no significant difference in the grading of several subjective image quality parameters when both noise-reducing strategies were used in low-dose examinations. Conclusion: Combination of noise efficient detector with IR allows for meaningful dose reduction in head CT without compromise of standard image quality. Advances in knowledge: Our study demonstrates the feasibility of almost 50% dose reduction in head CT dose (1.1 mSv per scan) through combination of novel dose-reducing strategies. PMID:25827204

  11. Dose reduction and image quality optimizations in CT of pediatric and adult patients: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, P.-H.; Lee, C.-L.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, Y.-J.; Jeon, S.-S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to easily and rapidly perform numerous acquisitions, possibly leading to a marked increase in the radiation dose to individual patients. Technical options dedicated to automatically adjusting the acquisition parameters according to the patient's size are of specific interest in pediatric radiology. A constant tube potential reduction can be achieved for adults and children, while maintaining a constant detector energy fluence. To evaluate radiation dose, the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) was calculated based on the CT dose index (CTDI) measured using an ion chamber, and image noise and image contrast were measured from a scanned image to evaluate image quality. The dose-weighted contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD) was calculated from the radiation dose, image noise, and image contrast measured from a scanned image. The noise derivative (ND) is a quality index for dose efficiency. X-ray spectra with tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kVp were used to compute the average photon energy. Image contrast and the corresponding contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were determined for lesions of soft tissue, muscle, bone, and iodine relative to a uniform water background, as the iodine contrast increases at lower energy (i.e., k-edge of iodine is 33 keV closer to the beam energy) using mixed water-iodine contrast normalization (water 0, iodine 25, 100, 200, and 1000 HU, respectively). The proposed values correspond to high quality images and can be reduced if only high-contrast organs are assessed. The potential benefit of lowering the tube voltage is an improved CNRD, resulting in a lower radiation dose and optimization of image quality. Adjusting the tube potential in abdominal CT would be useful in current pediatric radiography, where the choice of X-ray techniques generally takes into account the size of the patient as well as the need to balance the conflicting requirements of diagnostic image quality and radiation dose

  12. Characterization of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for dose reduction in CT: A pediatric oncology perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S. L.; Yee, B. S.; Kaufman, R. A.

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: This study demonstrates a means of implementing an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ) technique for dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) while maintaining similar noise levels in the reconstructed image. The effects of image quality and noise texture were assessed at all implementation levels of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign . Empirically derived dose reduction limits were established for ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for imaging of the trunk for a pediatric oncology population ranging from 1 yr old through adolescence/adulthood. Methods: Image quality was assessed using metrics established by the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation program. Each image quality metric was tested using the ACR CT phantom with 0%-100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign blended with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructed images. Additionally, the noise power spectrum (NPS) was calculated for three common reconstruction filters of the trunk. The empirically derived limitations on ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign implementation for dose reduction were assessed using (1, 5, 10) yr old and adolescent/adult anthropomorphic phantoms. To assess dose reduction limits, the phantoms were scanned in increments of increased noise index (decrementing mA using automatic tube current modulation) balanced with ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction to maintain noise equivalence of the 0% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign image. Results: The ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign algorithm did not produce any unfavorable effects on image quality as assessed by ACR criteria. Conversely, low-contrast resolution was found to improve due to the reduction of noise in the reconstructed images. NPS calculations demonstrated that images with lower frequency noise had lower noise variance and coarser graininess at progressively higher percentages of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction; and in spite of the similar magnitudes of noise, the image reconstructed with 50% or more ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign presented a more

  13. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Zhao, Yunzhe; Huang, Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Chun; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J.; Osher, Stanley J.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Miao, Jianwei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Results: Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest

  14. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Zhao Yunzhe; Huang Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Zhu Chun; Miao Jianwei; Mao Yu; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Osher, Stanley J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Results: Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest

  15. A method for patient dose reduction in dynamic contrast enhanced CT study

    SciTech Connect

    Mo Kim, Sun; Haider, Masoom A.; Milosevic, Michael; Jaffray, David A.; Yeung, Ivan W. T.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: In dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) study, prolonged CT scanning with high temporal resolution is required to give accurate and precise estimates of kinetic parameters. However, such scanning protocol could lead to substantial radiation dose to the patient. A novel method is proposed to reduce radiation dose to patient, while maintaining high accuracy for kinetic parameter estimates in DCE-CT study. Methods: The method is based on a previous investigation that the arterial impulse response (AIR) in DCE-CT study can be predicted using a population-based scheme. In the proposed method, DCE-CT scanning is performed with relatively low temporal resolution, hence, giving rise to reduction in patient dose. A novel method is proposed to estimate the arterial input function (AIF) based on the coarsely sampled AIF. By using the estimated AIF in the tracer kinetic analysis of the coarsely sampled DCE-CT study, the calculated kinetic parameters are able to achieve a high degree of accuracy. The method was tested on a DCE-CT data set of 48 patients with cervical cancer scanned at high temporal resolution. A random cohort of 34 patients was chosen to construct the orthonormal bases of the AIRs via singular value decomposition method. The determined set of orthonormal bases was used to fit the AIFs in the second cohort (14 patients) at varying levels of down sampling. For each dataset in the second cohort, the estimated AIF was used for kinetic analyses of the modified Tofts and adiabatic tissue homogeneity models for each of the down-sampling schemes between intervals from 2 to 15 s. The results were compared with analyses done with the ''raw'' down-sampled AIF. Results: In the first group of 34 patients, there were 11 orthonormal bases identified to describe the AIRs. The AIFs in the second group were estimated in high accuracy based on the 11 orthonormal bases established in the first group along with down-sampled AIFs. Using the 11 orthonormal bases, the

  16. Reduction in radiation dose with reconstruction technique in the brain perfusion CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. J.; Lee, H. K.; Song, H.; Ju, M. S.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Cho, M. S.; Cho, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    The principal objective of this study was to verify the utility of the reconstruction imaging technique in the brain perfusion computed tomography (PCT) scan by assessing reductions in the radiation dose and analyzing the generated images. The setting used for image acquisition had a detector coverage of 40 mm, a helical thickness of 0.625 mm, a helical shuttle mode scan type and a rotation time of 0.5 s as the image parameters used for the brain PCT scan. Additionally, a phantom experiment and an animal experiment were carried out. In the phantom and animal experiments, noise was measured in the scanning with the tube voltage fixed at 80 kVp (kilovolt peak) and the level of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) was changed from 0% to 100% at 10% intervals. The standard deviation of the CT coefficient was measured three times to calculate the mean value. In the phantom and animal experiments, the absorbed dose was measured 10 times under the same conditions as the ones for noise measurement before the mean value was calculated. In the animal experiment, pencil-type and CT-dedicated ionization chambers were inserted into the central portion of pig heads for measurement. In the phantom study, as the level of the ASIR changed from 0% to 100% under identical scanning conditions, the noise value and dose were proportionally reduced. In our animal experiment, the noise value was lowest when the ASIR level was 50%, unlike in the phantom study. The dose was reduced as in the phantom study.

  17. Dose reduction for cardiac CT using a registration-based approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wierzbicki, Marcin; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Jones, Douglas L.; Peters, Terry

    2007-06-15

    Two reasons for the recent rise in radiation exposure from CT are increases in its clinical applicability and the desire to maintain high SNR while acquiring smaller voxels. To address this emerging dose problem, several strategies for reducing patient exposure have already been proposed. One method employed in cardiac imaging is ECG-driven modulation of the tube current between 100% at one time point in the cardiac cycle and a reduced fraction at the remaining phases. In this paper, we describe how images obtained during such acquisition can be used to reconstruct 4D data of consistent high quality throughout the cardiac cycle. In our approach, we assume that the mid-diastole (MD) phase is imaged with full dose. The MD image is then independently registered to lower dose images (lower SNR) at other frames, resulting in a set of transformations. Finally, the transformations are used to warp the MD frame through the cardiac cycle to generate the full 4D image. In addition, the transformations may be interpolated to increase the temporal sampling or to generate images at arbitrary time points. Our approach was validated using various data obtained with simulated and scanner-implemented dose modulation. We determined that as little as 10% of the total dose was required to reproduce full quality images with a 1 mm spatial error and an error in intensity values on the order of the image noise. Thus, our technique offers considerable dose reductions compared to standard imaging protocols, with minimal effects on the quality of the final data.

  18. Performance evaluation of iterative reconstruction algorithms for achieving CT radiation dose reduction - a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Cristina T; Tamm, Eric P; Cody, Dianna D; Liu, Xinming; Jensen, Corey T; Wei, Wei; Kundra, Vikas; Rong, X John

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize image quality and dose performance with GE CT iterative reconstruction techniques, adaptive statistical iterative recontruction (ASiR), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), over a range of typical to low-dose intervals using the Catphan 600 and the anthropomorphic Kyoto Kagaku abdomen phantoms. The scope of the project was to quantitatively describe the advantages and limitations of these approaches. The Catphan 600 phantom, supplemented with a fat-equivalent oval ring, was scanned using a GE Discovery HD750 scanner at 120 kVp, 0.8 s rotation time, and pitch factors of 0.516, 0.984, and 1.375. The mA was selected for each pitch factor to achieve CTDIvol values of 24, 18, 12, 6, 3, 2, and 1 mGy. Images were reconstructed at 2.5 mm thickness with filtered back-projection (FBP); 20%, 40%, and 70% ASiR; and MBIR. The potential for dose reduction and low-contrast detectability were evaluated from noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements in the CTP 404 module of the Catphan. Hounsfield units (HUs) of several materials were evaluated from the cylinder inserts in the CTP 404 module, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated from the air insert. The results were con-firmed in the anthropomorphic Kyoto Kagaku abdomen phantom at 6, 3, 2, and 1mGy. MBIR reduced noise levels five-fold and increased CNR by a factor of five compared to FBP below 6mGy CTDIvol, resulting in a substantial improvement in image quality. Compared to ASiR and FBP, HU in images reconstructed with MBIR were consistently lower, and this discrepancy was reversed by higher pitch factors in some materials. MBIR improved the conspicuity of the high-contrast spatial resolution bar pattern, and MTF quantification confirmed the superior spatial resolution performance of MBIR versus FBP and ASiR at higher dose levels. While ASiR and FBP were relatively insensitive to changes in dose and pitch, the spatial resolution for MBIR

  19. Experimental proof of an idea for a CT-scanner with dose reduction potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de las Heras, Hugo; Tischenko, Oleg; Renger, Bernhard; Xu, Yuan; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2008-03-01

    Preliminary results for a new CT scanning device with dose-reduction potential were presented at the SPIE Medical Imaging conference 2007. The new device acquires the Radon data after the X-ray beam is collimated through a special mask. This mask is combined with a new and efficient data collection geometry; thus the device has the potential of reducing the dose by a factor of two. In this work, we report the first complete proof of the idea using the same simplified mask of 197 detectors as last year, and a clinical C-arm with a flat panel detector to simulate the gantry. This addition enables the acquisition of two independent and complementary data sets for reconstruction. Moreover, this clinical set-up enables the acquisition of data for clinically relevant phantoms. Phantom data were acquired using both detector sets and were reconstructed with the robust algorithm OPED. The independent sinograms were matched to a single one, and from this a diagnostic image was reconstructed successfully. This image has improved resolution, as well as less noise and artifacts compared to each single independent reconstruction. The results obtained are highly promising, even though the current device acquires only 197 views. Dose comparisons can be carried out in the future with a more precise prototype, comparable to current clinical devices with respect to imaging performance.

  20. Pediatric cT: Implementation of ASIR for Substantial Radiation Dose Reduction While Maintaining Pre-ASIR Image Noise1

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Samuel L.; Moore, Bria M.; Yee, Brian S.; Kaufman, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine a comprehensive method for the implementation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for maximal radiation dose reduction in pediatric computed tomography (CT) without changing the magnitude of noise in the reconstructed image or the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the patient. Materials and Methods The institutional review board waived the need to obtain informed consent for this HIPAA-compliant quality analysis. Chest and abdominopelvic CT images obtained before ASIR implementation (183 patient examinations; mean patient age, 8.8 years ± 6.2 [standard deviation]; range, 1 month to 27 years) were analyzed for image noise and CNR. These measurements were used in conjunction with noise models derived from anthropomorphic phantoms to establish new beam current–modulated CT parameters to implement 40% ASIR at 120 and 100 kVp without changing noise texture or magnitude. Image noise was assessed in images obtained after ASIR implementation (492 patient examinations; mean patient age, 7.6 years ± 5.4; range, 2 months to 28 years) the same way it was assessed in the pre-ASIR analysis. Dose reduction was determined by comparing size-specific dose estimates in the pre- and post-ASIR patient cohorts. Data were analyzed with paired t tests. Results With 40% ASIR implementation, the average relative dose reduction for chest CT was 39% (2.7/4.4 mGy), with a maximum reduction of 72% (5.3/18.8 mGy). The average relative dose reduction for abdominopelvic CT was 29% (4.8/6.8 mGy), with a maximum reduction of 64% (7.6/20.9 mGy). Beam current modulation was unnecessary for patients weighing 40 kg or less. The difference between 0% and 40% ASIR noise magnitude was less than 1 HU, with statistically nonsignificant increases in patient CNR at 100 kVp of 8% (15.3/14.2; P = .41) for chest CT and 13% (7.8/6.8; P = .40) for abdominopelvic CT. Conclusion Radiation dose reduction at pediatric CT was achieved when 40% ASIR was implemented as a dose

  1. Pilot Study on Image Quality and Radiation Dose of CT Colonography with Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Three-Dimensional

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hesong; Liang, Dan; Luo, Mingyue; Duan, Chaijie; Cai, Wenli; Zhu, Shanshan; Qiu, Jianping; Li, Wenru

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate image quality and radiation dose of CT colonography (CTC) with adaptive iterative dose reduction three-dimensional (AIDR3D). Methods Ten segments of porcine colon phantom were collected, and 30 pedunculate polyps with diameters ranging from 1 to 15 mm were simulated on each segment. Image data were acquired with tube voltage of 120 kVp, and current doses of 10 mAs, 20 mAs, 30 mAs, 40 mAs, 50 mAs, respectively. CTC images were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and AIDR3D. Two radiologists blindly evaluated image quality. Quantitative evaluation of image quality included image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Qualitative image quality was evaluated with a five-score scale. Radiation dose was calculated based on dose-length product. Ten volunteers were examined supine 50 mAs with FBP and prone 20 mAs with AIDR3D, and image qualities were assessed. Paired t test was performed for statistical analysis. Results For 20 mAs with AIDR3D and 50 mAs with FBP, image noise, SNRs and CNRs were (16.4 ± 1.6) HU vs. (16.8 ± 2.6) HU, 1.9 ± 0.2 vs. 1.9 ± 0.4, and 62.3 ± 6.8 vs. 62.0 ± 6.2, respectively; qualitative image quality scores were 4.1 and 4.3, respectively; their differences were all not statistically significant. Compared with 50 mAs with FBP, radiation dose (1.62 mSv) of 20 mAs with AIDR3D was decreased by 60.0%. There was no statistically significant difference in image noise, SNRs, CNRs and qualitative image quality scores between prone 20 mAs with AIDR3D and supine 50 mAs with FBP in 10 volunteers, the former reduced radiation dose by 61.1%. Conclusion Image quality of CTC using 20 mAs with AIDR3D could be comparable to standard 50 mAs with FBP, radiation dose of the former reduced by about 60.0% and was only 1.62 mSv. PMID:25635839

  2. SU-E-I-37: Eye Lens Dose Reduction From CT Scan Using Organ Based Tube Current Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H; Liu, T; Xu, X; Wu, J; Zhuo, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the eye lens dose reduction by CT scan with organ based tube current modulation (OBTCM) using GPU Monte Carlo code ARCHER-CT. Methods: 36 X-ray sources and bowtie filters were placed around the patient head with the projection angle interval of 10° for one rotation of CT scan, each projection was simulated respectively. The voxel eye models with high resolution(0.1mm*0.1mm*0.1mm) were used in the simulation and different tube voltage including 80kVp, 100kVp, 120kVp and 140kVp were taken into consideration. Results: The radiation doses to the eye lens increased with the tube voltage raised from 80kVp to 140kVp, and the dose results from 0° (AP) direction are much higher than those from 180° (PA) direction for all the 4 different tube voltage investigated. This 360° projection dose characteristic enables organ based TCM, which can reduce the eye lens dose by more than 55%. Conclusion: As the eye lens belongs to superficial tissues, its radiation dose to external exposure like CT is direction sensitive, and this characteristic feature makes organ based TCM to be an effective way to reduce the eye lens dose, so more clinical use of this technique were recommended. National Nature Science Foundation of China(No.11475047)

  3. Radiation Dose Reduction in Pediatric Body CT Using Iterative Reconstruction and a Novel Image-Based Denoising Method

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G.; Shiung, Maria; Thomas, Kristen B.; Matsumoto, Jane M.; Zingula, Shannon N.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose reduction potential of a novel image-based denoising technique in pediatric abdominopelvic and chest CT examinations and compare it with a commercial iterative reconstruction method. MATERIALS AND METHODS Data were retrospectively collected from 50 (25 abdominopelvic and 25 chest) clinically indicated pediatric CT examinations. For each examination, a validated noise-insertion tool was used to simulate half-dose data, which were reconstructed using filtered back-projection (FBP) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) methods. A newly developed denoising technique, adaptive nonlocal means (aNLM), was also applied. For each of the 50 patients, three pediatric radiologists evaluated four datasets: full dose plus FBP, half dose plus FBP, half dose plus SAFIRE, and half dose plus aNLM. For each examination, the order of preference for the four datasets was ranked. The organ-specific diagnosis and diagnostic confidence for five primary organs were recorded. RESULTS The mean (± SD) volume CT dose index for the full-dose scan was 5.3 ± 2.1 mGy for abdominopelvic examinations and 2.4 ± 1.1 mGy for chest examinations. For abdominopelvic examinations, there was no statistically significant difference between the half dose plus aNLM dataset and the full dose plus FBP dataset (3.6 ± 1.0 vs 3.6 ± 0.9, respectively; p = 0.52), and aNLM performed better than SAFIRE. For chest examinations, there was no statistically significant difference between the half dose plus SAFIRE and the full dose plus FBP (4.1 ± 0.6 vs 4.2 ± 0.6, respectively; p = 0.67), and SAFIRE performed better than aNLM. For all organs, there was more than 85% agreement in organ-specific diagnosis among the three half-dose configurations and the full dose plus FBP configuration. CONCLUSION Although a novel image-based denoising technique performed better than a commercial iterative reconstruction method in pediatric

  4. [5 years of "concerted action dose reduction in CT" -- what has been achieved and what remains to be done?].

    PubMed

    Nagel, H D; Blobel, J; Brix, G; Ewen, K; Galanski, M; Höfs, P; Loose, R; Prokop, M; Schneider, K; Stamm, G; Stender, H-S; Süss, C; Türkay, S; Vogel, H; Wucherer, M

    2004-11-01

    In May 1998, the German "Concerted Action Dose Reduction in CT" was founded by all parties involved in CT. Its intention was to achieve a significant reduction of the radiation exposure caused by CT, a matter that has increasingly been considered a major challenge since the early nineties. As a result of a number of joint efforts, the essential preconditions have been established by now. The fifth anniversary of the Concerted Action gave rise for both retrospection and outlook on the tasks that have already been accomplished and those that still need to be done. For this purpose, a one-day symposium took place in Berlin on November 4, 2003. The contents of a total of 18 contributions will be outlined here in brief. PMID:15497088

  5. Dose reduction of up to 89% while maintaining image quality in cardiovascular CT achieved with prospective ECG gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londt, John H.; Shreter, Uri; Vass, Melissa; Hsieh, Jiang; Ge, Zhanyu; Adda, Olivier; Dowe, David A.; Sabllayrolles, Jean-Louis

    2007-03-01

    We present the results of dose and image quality performance evaluation of a novel, prospective ECG-gated Coronary CT Angiography acquisition mode (SnapShot Pulse, LightSpeed VCT-XT scanner, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and compare it to conventional retrospective ECG gated helical acquisition in clinical and phantom studies. Image quality phantoms were used to measure noise, slice sensitivity profile, in-plane resolution, low contrast detectability and dose, using the two acquisition modes. Clinical image quality and diagnostic confidence were evaluated in a study of 31 patients scanned with the two acquisition modes. Radiation dose reduction in clinical practice was evaluated by tracking 120 consecutive patients scanned with the prospectively gated scan mode. In the phantom measurements, the prospectively gated mode resulted in equivalent or better image quality measures at dose reductions of up to 89% compared to non-ECG modulated conventional helical scans. In the clinical study, image quality was rated excellent by expert radiologist reviewing the cases, with pathology being identical using the two acquisition modes. The average dose to patients in the clinical practice study was 5.6 mSv, representing 50% reduction compared to a similar patient population scanned with the conventional helical mode.

  6. Application of time sampling in brain CT perfusion imaging for dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. G.; Park, S. J.; Im, Jung Gi

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine a stable sampling rate not to be affected by sampling shift for reducing radiation exposure with time sampling and interpolation in cerebral perfusion CT examination. Original images were obtained every 1 second for 40 time series from 3 patients, respectively. Time sampling was performed with sampling intervals (SI) from 2 to 10 seconds. Sampling shift was applied from +1 to SI-1 for each sampling rate. For each patient, 30 tissue concentration time-course data were collected, and arterial input curves were fitted by gamma-variate function. The sinc function was introduced for interpolation. Deconvolution analysis based on SVD was performed for quantifying perfusion parameters. The perfusion values through time-varying sampling and interpolation were statistically compared with the original perfusion values. The mean CBF values with increase of sampling interval and shift magnitude from the collected data had a wider fluctuation pattern centering around the original mean CBF. The mean CBV values had a similar tendency to the mean CBF values, but a relatively narrower deviation. The mean MTT values were fluctuated reversely to the trend of the mean CBF values. The stable sampling interval for quantifying perfusion parameters with lower radiation exposure was statistically acceptable up to 4 seconds. These results indicate that sampling shift limits sampling rate for acquiring acceptable perfusion values. This study will help in selecting more reasonable sampling rate for low-radiation-dose CT examination.

  7. Determination of the Optimal Dose Reduction Level via Iterative Reconstruction Using 640-Slice Volume Chest CT in a Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xingli; Wang, Jingshi; Liu, Qin; Zhao, Pengfei; Hou, Yang; Ma, Yue; Guo, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the optimal dose reduction level of iterative reconstruction technique for paediatric chest CT in pig models. Materials and Methods 27 infant pigs underwent 640-slice volume chest CT with 80kVp and different mAs. Automatic exposure control technique was used, and the index of noise was set to SD10 (Group A, routine dose), SD12.5, SD15, SD17.5, SD20 (Groups from B to E) to reduce dose respectively. Group A was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), and Groups from B to E were reconstructed using iterative reconstruction (IR). Objective and subjective image quality (IQ) among groups were compared to determine an optimal radiation reduction level. Results The noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in Group D had no significant statistical difference from that in Group A (P = 1.0). The scores of subjective IQ in Group A were not significantly different from those in Group D (P>0.05). There were no obvious statistical differences in the objective and subjective index values among the subgroups (small, medium and large subgroups) of Group D. The effective dose (ED) of Group D was 58.9% lower than that of Group A (0.20±0.05mSv vs 0.48±0.10mSv, p <0.001). Conclusions In infant pig chest CT, using iterative reconstruction can provide diagnostic image quality; furthermore, it can reduce the dosage by 58.9%. PMID:25764485

  8. Reduction of eye lens radiation dose by orbital bismuth shielding in pediatric patients undergoing CT of the head: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Raissaki, Maria; Tzedakis, Antonis; Theocharopoulos, Nicholas; Damilakis, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2005-04-01

    Our aim in the study was to assess the eye lens dose reduction resulting from the use of radioprotective bismuth garments to shield the eyes of pediatric patients undergoing head CT. The Monte Carlo N-particle transport code and mathematical humanoid phantoms representing the average individual at different ages were used to determine eye lens dose reduction accomplished with bismuth shielding of the eye in the following simulated CT scans: (a) scanning of the orbits, (b) scanning of the whole head, and (c) 20 deg. angled scanning of the brain excluding the orbits. The effect of bismuth shielding on the eye lens dose was also investigated using an anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). Eye lens dose reduction achieved by bismuth shielding was measured in 16 patients undergoing multiphase CT scanning of the head. The patient's scans were divided in the following: CT examinations where the eye globes were entirely included (n=5), partly included (n=6) and excluded (n=5) from the scanned region. The eye lens dose reduction depended mainly on the scan boundaries set by an operator. The average eye lens dose reduction determined by Monte Carlo simulation was 38.2%, 33.0% and <1% for CT scans of the orbits, whole head, and brain with an angled gantry, respectively. The difference between the Monte Carlo derived eye lens dose reduction factor values and corresponding values determined directly by using the anthropomorphic phantom head was found less than 5%. The mean eye lens dose reduction achieved by bismuth shielding in pediatric patients were 34%, 20% and <2% when eye globes were entirely included, partly included and excluded from the scanned region, respectively. A significant reduction in eye lens dose may be achieved by using superficial orbital bismuth shielding during pediatric head CT scans. However, bismuth garments should not be used in children when the eyes are excluded from the primarily exposed region.

  9. Reducing CT dose in myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Emma; Dixon, Kat L

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the radiation dose arising from computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction to single photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging studies without adversely affecting its accuracy. Using the Perspex CTDI phantom with the Xi detector to measure dose, CT scans were acquired using the Siemens Symbia T over the full range of CT settings available. Using the default setting 'AECmean', the measured dose at the centre of the phantom was 1.68 mGy and the breast dose from the scout view was 0.30 mGy. The lowest dose was achieved using the dose modulation setting in which the doses were reduced to 1.21 mGy and undetectable (<0.01 mGy), respectively. To observe the effect of changing these settings, 30 patients received a stress scan with default CT settings and a rest scan utilizing single photon emission computed tomography-guided CT and the dose modulation CT settings. Results showed a mean effective dose reduction of 23.6%. The dose reduction was greatest for larger patients, with the largest dose reduction for one patient being 72%. There was no apparent difference in attenuation correction between the two sets of resultant images. These new lower-dose settings are now applied to all clinical myocardial perfusion imaging studies. PMID:26302461

  10. Evaluation of exposure dose reduction in multislice CT coronary angiography (MS-CTA) with prospective ECG-gated helical scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Takamasa; Tsuyuki, Masaharu; Okumura, Miwa; Sano, Tomonari; Kondo, Takeshi; Takase, Shinichi

    2008-03-01

    A novel low-dose ECG-gated helical scan method to investigate coronary artery diseases was developed. This method uses a high pitch for scanning (based on the patient's heart rate) and X-rays are generated only during the optimal cardiac phases. The dose reduction was obtained using a two-level approach: 1) To use a 64-slice CT scanner (Aquilion, Toshiba, Otawara, Tochigi, Japan) with a scan speed of 0.35 s/rot. to helically scan the heart at a high pitch based on the patient's heart rate. By changing the pitch from the conventional 0.175 to 0.271 for a heart rate of 60 bpm, the exposure dose was reduced to 65%. 2) To employ tube current gating that predicts the timing of optimal cardiac phases from the previous cardiac cycle and generates X-rays only during the required cardiac phases. The combination of high speed scanning with a high pitch and appropriate X-ray generation only in the cardiac phases from 60% to 90% allows the exposure dose to be reduced to 5.6 mSv for patients with a heart rate lower than 65 bpm. This is a dose reduction of approximately 70% compared to the conventional scanning method recommended by the manufacturer when segmental reconstruction is considered. This low-dose protocol seamlessly allows for wide scan ranges (e.g., aortic dissection) with the benefits of ECG-gated helical scanning: smooth continuity for longitudinal direction and utilization of data from all cardiac cycles.

  11. Radiation dose reduction to the breast in thoracic CT: Comparison of bismuth shielding, organ-based tube current modulation, and use of a globally decreased tube current

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jia; Duan Xinhui; Christner, Jodie A.; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate dose performance and image quality in thoracic CT using three techniques to reduce dose to the breast: bismuth shielding, organ-based tube current modulation (TCM) and global tube current reduction. Methods: Semi-anthropomorphic thorax phantoms of four different sizes (15, 30, 35, and 40 cm lateral width) were used for dose measurement and image quality assessment. Four scans were performed on each phantom using 100 or 120 kV with a clinical CT scanner: (1) reference scan; (2) scan with bismuth breast shield of an appropriate thickness; (3) scan with organ-based TCM; and (4) scan with a global reduction in tube current chosen to match the dose reduction from bismuth shielding. Dose to the breast was measured with an ion chamber on the surface of the phantom. Image quality was evaluated by measuring the mean and standard deviation of CT numbers within the lung and heart regions. Results: Compared to the reference scan, dose to the breast region was decreased by about 21% for the 15-cm phantom with a pediatric (2-ply) shield and by about 37% for the 30, 35, and 40-cm phantoms with adult (4-ply) shields. Organ-based TCM decreased the dose by 12% for the 15-cm phantom, and 34-39% for the 30, 35, and 40-cm phantoms. Global lowering of the tube current reduced breast dose by 23% for the 15-cm phantom and 39% for the 30, 35, and 40-cm phantoms. In phantoms of all four sizes, image noise was increased in both the lung and heart regions with bismuth shielding. No significant increase in noise was observed with organ-based TCM. Decreasing tube current globally led to similar noise increases as bismuth shielding. Streak and beam hardening artifacts, and a resulting artifactual increase in CT numbers, were observed for scans with bismuth shields, but not for organ-based TCM or global tube current reduction. Conclusions: Organ-based TCM produces dose reduction to the breast similar to that achieved with bismuth shielding for

  12. The adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V technique for radiation dose reduction in abdominal CT: comparison with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinhan; Oh, Jongyeong; Kim, Dongwon; Cho, Junghyun; Kim, Sanghyun; Lee, Sangyun; Lee, Jihyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether reduced radiation dose abdominal CT images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction V (ASIR-V) compromise the depiction of clinically competent features when compared with the currently used routine radiation dose CT images reconstructed with ASIR. Methods: 27 consecutive patients (mean body mass index: 23.55 kg m−2 underwent CT of the abdomen at two time points. At the first time point, abdominal CT was scanned at 21.45 noise index levels of automatic current modulation at 120 kV. Images were reconstructed with 40% ASIR, the routine protocol of Dong-A University Hospital. At the second time point, follow-up scans were performed at 30 noise index levels. Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), 40% ASIR, 30% ASIR-V, 50% ASIR-V and 70% ASIR-V for the reduced radiation dose. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses of image quality were conducted. The CT dose index was also recorded. Results: At the follow-up study, the mean dose reduction relative to the currently used common radiation dose was 35.37% (range: 19–49%). The overall subjective image quality and diagnostic acceptability of the 50% ASIR-V scores at the reduced radiation dose were nearly identical to those recorded when using the initial routine-dose CT with 40% ASIR. Subjective ratings of the qualitative analysis revealed that of all reduced radiation dose CT series reconstructed, 30% ASIR-V and 50% ASIR-V were associated with higher image quality with lower noise and artefacts as well as good sharpness when compared with 40% ASIR and FBP. However, the sharpness score at 70% ASIR-V was considered to be worse than that at 40% ASIR. Objective image noise for 50% ASIR-V was 34.24% and 46.34% which was lower than 40% ASIR and FBP. Conclusion: Abdominal CT images reconstructed with ASIR-V facilitate radiation dose reductions of to 35% when compared with the ASIR. Advances in knowledge: This study represents the first

  13. NIH-funded study shows 20 percent reduction in lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT compared to chest X-ray: | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray. The primary research results from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) were published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine. |

  14. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 02: A comparison of dose reduction methods on image quality for cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R; Buckley, LA

    2014-08-15

    Modern radiotherapy uses highly conformai dose distributions and therefore relies on daily image guidance for accurate patient positioning. Kilovoltage cone beam CT is one technique that is routinely used for patient set-up and results in a high dose to the patient relative to planar imaging techniques. This study uses an Elekta Synergy linac equipped with XVI cone beam CT to investigate the impact of various imaging parameters on dose and image quality. Dose and image quality are assessed as functions of x-ray tube voltage, tube current and the number of projections in the scan. In each case, the dose measurements confirm that as each parameter increases the dose increases. The assessment of high contrast resolution shows little dependence on changes to the image technique. However, low contrast visibility suggests a trade off between dose and image quality. Particularly for changes in tube potential, the dose increases much faster as a function of voltage than the corresponding increase in low contrast image quality. This suggests using moderate values of the peak tube voltage (100 – 120 kVp) since higher values result in significant dose increases with little gain in image quality. Measurements also indicate that increasing tube current achieves the greatest degree of improvement in the low contrast visibility. The results of this study highlight the need to establish careful imaging protocols to limit dose to the patient and to limit changes to the imaging parameters to those cases where there is a clear clinical requirement for improved image quality.

  15. The reduction in Monte Carlo calculated organ doses from CT with tube current modulation using WILLIAM, a voxel model of seven year-old anatomy.

    PubMed

    Caon, Martin

    2014-12-01

    The construction of a voxel model of seven year-old male anatomy from a low resolution whole body CT scan acquired with a PET-CT scanner is described. The model is referred to as WILLIAM. The model was used to compare the Monte Carlo calculated relative organ doses with and without tube current modulation from simulated CAP and chest CT examinations. Tube current modulation was simulated in both the angular (x-y plane) and axial (along the z axis) senses. For organs that are located wholly within the scanned anatomy, significant relative dose reductions of approximately 43 to 62 % were calculated when tube current modulation was simulated compared to Monte Carlo calculations that did not include tube current modulation. Organs located outside of the directly irradiated anatomy, experienced a decrease in their relative dose of between 33 and 38 % when tube current modulation was simulated.

  16. Ultra-low-dose dual-source CT coronary angiography with high pitch: diagnostic yield of a volumetric planning scan and effects on dose reduction and imaging strategy

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, B; Huppertz, A; Lembcke, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of an ultra-low-dose dual-source CT coronary angiography (CTCA) scan with high pitch for delimiting the range of the subsequent standard CTCA scan. Methods: 30 patients with an indication for CTCA were prospectively examined using a two-scan dual-source CTCA protocol (2.0 × 64.0 × 0.6 mm; pitch, 3.4; rotation time of 280 ms; 100 kV): Scan 1 was acquired with one-fifth of the tube current suggested by the automatic exposure control software [CareDose 4D™ (Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) using 100 kV and 370 mAs as a reference] with the scan length from the tracheal bifurcation to the diaphragmatic border. Scan 2 was acquired with standard tube current extending with reduced scan length based on Scan 1. Nine central coronary artery segments were analysed qualitatively on both scans. Results: Scan 2 (105.1 ± 10.1 mm) was significantly shorter than Scan 1 (127.0 ± 8.7 mm). Image quality scores were significantly better for Scan 2. However, in 5 of 6 (83%) patients with stenotic coronary artery disease, a stenosis was already detected in Scan 1 and in 13 of 24 (54%) patients with non-stenotic coronary arteries, a stenosis was already excluded by Scan 1. Using Scan 2 as reference, the positive- and negative-predictive value of Scan 1 was 83% (5 of 6 patients) and 100% (13 of 13 patients), respectively. Conclusion: An ultra-low-dose CTCA planning scan enables a reliable scan length reduction of the following standard CTCA scan and allows for correct diagnosis in a substantial proportion of patients. Advances in knowledge: Further dose reductions are possible owing to a change in the individual patient's imaging strategy as a prior ultra-low-dose CTCA scan may already rule out the presence of a stenosis or may lead to a direct transferal to an invasive catheter procedure. PMID:25710210

  17. Image Quality and Radiation Dose of CT Coronary Angiography with Automatic Tube Current Modulation and Strong Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Three-Dimensional (AIDR3D)

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hesong; Dai, Guochao; Luo, Mingyue; Duan, Chaijie; Cai, Wenli; Liang, Dan; Wang, Xinhua; Zhu, Dongyun; Li, Wenru; Qiu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate image quality and radiation dose of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) scanned using automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) and reconstructed by strong adaptive iterative dose reduction three-dimensional (AIDR3D). Methods Eighty-four consecutive CTCA patients were collected for the study. All patients were scanned using ATCM and reconstructed with strong AIDR3D, standard AIDR3D and filtered back-projection (FBP) respectively. Two radiologists who were blinded to the patients' clinical data and reconstruction methods evaluated image quality. Quantitative image quality evaluation included image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). To evaluate image quality qualitatively, coronary artery is classified into 15 segments based on the modified guidelines of the American Heart Association. Qualitative image quality was evaluated using a 4-point scale. Radiation dose was calculated based on dose-length product. Results Compared with standard AIDR3D, strong AIDR3D had lower image noise, higher SNR and CNR, their differences were all statistically significant (P<0.05); compared with FBP, strong AIDR3D decreased image noise by 46.1%, increased SNR by 84.7%, and improved CNR by 82.2%, their differences were all statistically significant (P<0.05 or 0.001). Segments with diagnostic image quality for strong AIDR3D were 336 (100.0%), 486 (96.4%), and 394 (93.8%) in proximal, middle, and distal part respectively; whereas those for standard AIDR3D were 332 (98.8%), 472 (93.7%), 378 (90.0%), respectively; those for FBP were 217 (64.6%), 173 (34.3%), 114 (27.1%), respectively; total segments with diagnostic image quality in strong AIDR3D (1216, 96.5%) were higher than those of standard AIDR3D (1182, 93.8%) and FBP (504, 40.0%); the differences between strong AIDR3D and standard AIDR3D, strong AIDR3D and FBP were all statistically significant (P<0.05 or 0.001). The mean effective radiation dose was (2.55±1.21) mSv. Conclusion

  18. Regularized ML reconstruction for time/dose reduction in 18F-fluoride PET/CT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bernardi, Elisabetta; Magnani, Patrizia; Gianolli, Luigi; Carla Gilardi, Maria; Bettinardi, Valentino

    2015-01-01

    We are proposing a regularized reconstruction strategy for the detection of bone lesions in 18F-fluoride whole body PET images obtained with 1 min/bed using the anatomical information provided by co-registered CT images. Bones are recognized on CT images and then transposed into the PET volume framework. During PET reconstruction, two different priors are used for bone and non-bone voxels: the relative difference prior in bone and the P-Gaussian prior in non-bone. After a tuning of the priors’ parameters, the reconstruction strategy has been tested on 6 18F-fluoride PET/CT studies, on a total of 67 lesions. Regularized images provided results comparable to the standard 3 min/bed images, in terms image quality, lesion activity, noise level and noise correlation. The proposed strategy therefore appears to be a useful tool to reduce the acquisition time or the injected dose in 18F-fluoride PET studies.

  19. SU-E-I-62: Assessing Radiation Dose Reduction and CT Image Optimization Through the Measurement and Analysis of the Detector Quantum Efficiency (DQE) of CT Images Using Different Beam Hardening Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, J; Aldoohan, S; Gill, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Reducing patient dose while maintaining (or even improving) image quality is one of the foremost goals in CT imaging. To this end, we consider the feasibility of optimizing CT scan protocols in conjunction with the application of different beam-hardening filtrations and assess this augmentation through noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detector quantum efficiency (DQE) analysis. Methods: American College of Radiology (ACR) and Catphan phantoms (The Phantom Laboratory) were scanned with a 64 slice CT scanner when additional filtration of thickness and composition (e.g., copper, nickel, tantalum, titanium, and tungsten) had been applied. A MATLAB-based code was employed to calculate the image of noise NPS. The Catphan Image Owl software suite was then used to compute the modulated transfer function (MTF) responses of the scanner. The DQE for each additional filter, including the inherent filtration, was then computed from these values. Finally, CT dose index (CTDIvol) values were obtained for each applied filtration through the use of a 100 mm pencil ionization chamber and CT dose phantom. Results: NPS, MTF, and DQE values were computed for each applied filtration and compared to the reference case of inherent beam-hardening filtration only. Results showed that the NPS values were reduced between 5 and 12% compared to inherent filtration case. Additionally, CTDIvol values were reduced between 15 and 27% depending on the composition of filtration applied. However, no noticeable changes in image contrast-to-noise ratios were noted. Conclusion: The reduction in the quanta noise section of the NPS profile found in this phantom-based study is encouraging. The reduction in both noise and dose through the application of beam-hardening filters is reflected in our phantom image quality. However, further investigation is needed to ascertain the applicability of this approach to reducing patient dose while maintaining diagnostically acceptable image qualities in a

  20. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-01-21

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging. PMID:22156174

  1. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  2. Variability in CT lung-nodule quantification: Effects of dose reduction and reconstruction methods on density and texture based features

    PubMed Central

    Lo, P.; Young, S.; Kim, H. J.; Brown, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of dose level and reconstruction method on density and texture based features computed from CT lung nodules. Methods: This study had two major components. In the first component, a uniform water phantom was scanned at three dose levels and images were reconstructed using four conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and four iterative reconstruction (IR) methods for a total of 24 different combinations of acquisition and reconstruction conditions. In the second component, raw projection (sinogram) data were obtained for 33 lung nodules from patients scanned as a part of their clinical practice, where low dose acquisitions were simulated by adding noise to sinograms acquired at clinical dose levels (a total of four dose levels) and reconstructed using one FBP kernel and two IR kernels for a total of 12 conditions. For the water phantom, spherical regions of interest (ROIs) were created at multiple locations within the water phantom on one reference image obtained at a reference condition. For the lung nodule cases, the ROI of each nodule was contoured semiautomatically (with manual editing) from images obtained at a reference condition. All ROIs were applied to their corresponding images reconstructed at different conditions. For 17 of the nodule cases, repeat contours were performed to assess repeatability. Histogram (eight features) and gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) based texture features (34 features) were computed for all ROIs. For the lung nodule cases, the reference condition was selected to be 100% of clinical dose with FBP reconstruction using the B45f kernel; feature values calculated from other conditions were compared to this reference condition. A measure was introduced, which the authors refer to as Q, to assess the stability of features across different conditions, which is defined as the ratio of reproducibility (across conditions) to repeatability (across repeat contours) of each feature. Results: The

  3. Angular on-line tube current modulation in multidetector CT examinations of children and adults: The influence of different scanning parameters on dose reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Papadakis, Antonios E.; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of angular on-line tube current modulation on dose reduction in pediatric and adult patients undergoing multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) examinations. Five physical anthropomorphic phantoms that simulate the average individual as neonate, 1-year-old, 5-year-old, 10-year-old, and adult were employed in the current study. Phantoms were scanned with the use of on-line tube current modulation (TCM). Percent dose reduction (%DR) factors achieved by applying TCM, were determined for standard protocols used for head and neck, shoulder, thorax, thorax and abdomen, abdomen, abdomen and pelvis, pelvis, and whole body examinations. A preliminary study on the application of TCM in MDCT examinations of adult patients was performed to validate the results obtained in anthropomorphic phantoms. Dose reduction was estimated as the percentage difference of the modulated milliamperes for each scan and the preset milliamperes prescribed by the scan protocol. The dose reduction in children was found to be much lower than the corresponding reduction achieved for adults. For helical scans the %DR factors, ranged between 1.6% and 7.4% for the neonate, 2.9% and 8.7% for the 1-year old, 2% and 6% for the 5-year-old, 5% and 10.9% for the 10-year-old, and 10.4% and 20.7% for the adult individual. For sequential scans the corresponding %DR factors ranged between 1.3% and 6.7%, 4.5% and 11%, 4.2% and 6.6%, 6.4% and 12.3%, and 8.9% and 23.3%, respectively. Broader beam collimations are associated with decreased %DR factors, when other scanning parameters are held constant. TCM did not impair image noise. In adult patients, the %DR values were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding results obtained in the anthropomorphic adult phantom. In conclusion, on-line TCM may be considered as a valuable tool for reducing dose in routine CT examinations of pediatric and adult patients. However, the dose reduction achieved with TCM

  4. Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-11-15

    that were not adjusted by patient size. Additionally, considerable differences were noted in ED{sub adj} distributions between scanners, with scanners employing iterative reconstruction exhibiting significantly lower ED{sub adj} (range: 9%-64%). Finally, a significant difference (up to 59%) in ED{sub adj} distributions was observed between institutions, indicating the potential for dose reduction. Conclusions: The authors developed a robust automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT. Using this program, significant differences in ED{sub adj} were observed between scanner models and across institutions. This new dose monitoring program offers a unique tool for improving quality assurance and standardization both within and across institutions.

  5. Improved dose calculation accuracy for low energy brachytherapy by optimizing dual energy CT imaging protocols for noise reduction using sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Landry, Guillaume; Gaudreault, Mathieu; van Elmpt, Wouter; Wildberger, Joachim E; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the noise reduction achievable from dual energy computed tomography (CT) imaging (DECT) using filtered backprojection (FBP) and iterative image reconstruction algorithms combined with increased imaging exposure. We evaluated the data in the context of imaging for brachytherapy dose calculation, where accurate quantification of electron density ρe and effective atomic number Zeff is beneficial. A dual source CT scanner was used to scan a phantom containing tissue mimicking inserts. DECT scans were acquired at 80 kVp/140Sn kVp (where Sn stands for tin filtration) and 100 kVp/140Sn kVp, using the same values of the CT dose index CTDIvol for both settings as a measure for the radiation imaging exposure. Four CTDIvol levels were investigated. Images were reconstructed using FBP and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with strength 1,3 and 5. From DECT scans two material quantities were derived, Zeff and ρe. DECT images were used to assign material types and the amount of improperly assigned voxels was quantified for each protocol. The dosimetric impact of improperly assigned voxels was evaluated with Geant4 Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for an (125)I source in numerical phantoms. Standard deviations for Zeff and ρe were reduced up to a factor ∼2 when using SAFIRE with strength 5 compared to FBP. Standard deviations on Zeff and ρe as low as 0.15 and 0.006 were achieved for the muscle insert representing typical soft tissue using a CTDIvol of 40 mGy and 3mm slice thickness. Dose calculation accuracy was generally improved when using SAFIRE. Mean (maximum absolute) dose errors of up to 1.3% (21%) with FBP were reduced to less than 1% (6%) with SAFIRE at a CTDIvol of 10 mGy. Using a CTDIvol of 40mGy and SAFIRE yielded mean dose calculation errors of the order of 0.6% which was the MC dose calculation precision in this study and no error was larger than ±2.5% as opposed to errors of up to -4% with FPB. This

  6. AAPM/RSNA Physics Tutorial for Residents: Topics in CT. Radiation dose in CT.

    PubMed

    McNitt-Gray, Michael F

    2002-01-01

    This article describes basic radiation dose concepts as well as those specifically developed to describe the radiation dose from computed tomography (CT). Basic concepts of radiation dose are reviewed, including exposure, absorbed dose, and effective dose. Radiation dose from CT demonstrates variations within the scan plane and along the z axis because of its unique geometry and usage. Several CT-specific dose descriptors have been developed: the Multiple Scan Average Dose descriptor, the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) and its variations (CTDI(100), CTDI(w), CTDI(vol)), and the dose-length product. Factors that affect radiation dose from CT include the beam energy, tube current-time product, pitch, collimation, patient size, and dose reduction options. Methods of reducing the radiation dose to a patient from CT include reducing the milliampere-seconds value, increasing the pitch, varying the milliampere-seconds value according to patient size, and reducing the beam energy. The effective dose from CT can be estimated by using Monte Carlo methods to simulate CT of a mathematical patient model, by estimating the energy imparted to the body region being scanned, or by using conversion factors for general anatomic regions. Issues related to radiation dose from CT are being addressed by the Society for Pediatric Radiology, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the American College of Radiology, and the Center for Devices and Radiological Health of the Food and Drug Administration.

  7. The Impact of Different Levels of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D on Image Quality of 320-Row Coronary CT Angiography: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Sarah; Rief, Matthias; Zimmermann, Elke; Martus, Peter; Schuijf, Joanne Désirée; Blobel, Jörg; Richter, Felicitas; Dewey, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was the systematic image quality evaluation of coronary CT angiography (CTA), reconstructed with the 3 different levels of adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR 3D) and compared to filtered back projection (FBP) with quantum denoising software (QDS). Methods Standard-dose CTA raw data of 30 patients with mean radiation dose of 3.2 ± 2.6 mSv were reconstructed using AIDR 3D mild, standard, strong and compared to FBP/QDS. Objective image quality comparison (signal, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), contour sharpness) was performed using 21 measurement points per patient, including measurements in each coronary artery from proximal to distal. Results Objective image quality parameters improved with increasing levels of AIDR 3D. Noise was lowest in AIDR 3D strong (p≤0.001 at 20/21 measurement points; compared with FBP/QDS). Signal and contour sharpness analysis showed no significant difference between the reconstruction algorithms for most measurement points. Best coronary SNR and CNR were achieved with AIDR 3D strong. No loss of SNR or CNR in distal segments was seen with AIDR 3D as compared to FBP. Conclusions On standard-dose coronary CTA images, AIDR 3D strong showed higher objective image quality than FBP/QDS without reducing contour sharpness. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00967876 PMID:25945924

  8. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  9. Radiation dose measurements in coronary CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Sun, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography is associated with high radiation dose and this has raised serious concerns in the literature. Awareness of various parameters for dose estimates and measurements of coronary CT angiography plays an important role in increasing our understanding of the radiation exposure to patients, thus, contributing to the implementation of dose-saving strategies. This article provides an overview of the radiation dose quantity and its measurement during coronary CT angiography procedures. PMID:24392190

  10. Toward time resolved 4D cardiac CT imaging with patient dose reduction: estimating the global heart motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Segars, W. Paul; Fung, George S. K.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2006-03-01

    Coronary artery imaging with multi-slice helical computed tomography is a promising noninvasive imaging technique. The current major issues include the insufficient temporal resolution and large patient dose. We propose an image reconstruction method which provides a solution to both of the problems. The method uses an iterative approach repeating the following four steps until the difference between the two projection data sets falls below a certain criteria in step-4: 1) estimating or updating the cardiac motion vectors, 2) reconstructing the time-resolved 4D dynamic volume images using the motion vectors, 3) calculating the projection data from the current 4D images, 4) comparing them with the measured ones. In this study, we obtain the first estimate of the motion vector. We use the 4D NCAT phantom, a realistic computer model for the human anatomy and cardiac motions, to generate the dynamic fan-beam projection data sets as well to provide a known truth for the motion. Then, the halfscan reconstruction with the sliding time-window technique is used to generate cine images: f(t, r r). Here, we use one heart beat for each position r so that the time information is retained. Next, the magnitude of the first derivative of f(t, r r) with respect to time, i.e., |df/dt|, is calculated and summed over a region-of-interest (ROI), which is called the mean-absolute difference (MAD). The initial estimation of the vector field are obtained using MAD for each ROI. Results of the preliminary study are presented.

  11. SCCT guidelines on radiation dose and dose-optimization strategies in cardiovascular CT

    PubMed Central

    Halliburton, Sandra S.; Abbara, Suhny; Chen, Marcus Y.; Gentry, Ralph; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Raff, Gilbert L.; Shaw, Leslee J.; Hausleiter, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years, computed tomography (CT) has developed into a standard clinical test for a variety of cardiovascular conditions. The emergence of cardiovascular CT during a period of dramatic increase in radiation exposure to the population from medical procedures and heightened concern about the subsequent potential cancer risk has led to intense scrutiny of the radiation burden of this new technique. This has hastened the development and implementation of dose reduction tools and prompted closer monitoring of patient dose. In an effort to aid the cardiovascular CT community in incorporating patient-centered radiation dose optimization and monitoring strategies into standard practice, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography has produced a guideline document to review available data and provide recommendations regarding interpretation of radiation dose indices and predictors of risk, appropriate use of scanner acquisition modes and settings, development of algorithms for dose optimization, and establishment of procedures for dose monitoring. PMID:21723512

  12. Ultralow dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric PET CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Samuel L.; Shulkin, Barry L.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To develop ultralow dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultralow doses (10–35 mA s). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for 11 tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% volume computed tomography dose index (0.39/3.64; mGy) from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUV{sub bw}) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the nondose reduced CTAC image for 90% dose reduction. No change in SUV{sub bw}, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols was found down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62% and 86% (3.2/8.3–0.9/6.2). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from predose-reduced patient images. Conclusions: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CT dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for colocalization of hybrid CT anatomy and PET radioisotope uptake.

  13. Patient radiation doses for electron beam CT.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Isabel A; Dance, David R; Skinner, Claire L; Evans, Phil M

    2005-08-01

    A Monte Carlo based computer model has been developed for electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) to calculate organ and effective doses in a humanoid hermaphrodite phantom. The program has been validated by comparison with experimental measurements of the CT dose index in standard head and body CT dose phantoms; agreement to better than 8% has been found. The robustness of the model has been established by varying the input parameters. The amount of energy deposited at the 12:00 position of the standard body CT dose phantom is most susceptible to rotation angle, whereas that in the central region is strongly influenced by the beam quality. The program has been used to investigate the changes in organ absorbed doses arising from partial and full rotation about supine and prone subjects. Superficial organs experience the largest changes in absorbed dose with a change in subject orientation and for partial rotation. Effective doses for typical clinical scan protocols have been calculated and compared with values obtained using existing dosimetry techniques based on full rotation. Calculations which make use of Monte Carlo conversion factors for the scanner that best matches the EBCT dosimetric characteristics consistently overestimate the effective dose in supine subjects by typically 20%, and underestimate the effective dose in prone subjects by typically 13%. These factors can therefore be used to correct values obtained in this way. Empirical dosimetric techniques based on the dose-length product yield errors as great as 77%. This is due to the sensitivity of the dose length product to individual scan lengths. The magnitude of these errors is reduced if empirical dosimetric techniques based on the average absorbed dose in the irradiated volume (CTDIvol) are used. Therefore conversion factors specific to EBCT have been calculated to convert the CTDIvol to an effective dose. PMID:16193782

  14. Patient radiation doses for electron beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, Isabel A.; Dance, David R.; Skinner, Claire L.; Evans, Phil M.

    2005-08-15

    A Monte Carlo based computer model has been developed for electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) to calculate organ and effective doses in a humanoid hermaphrodite phantom. The program has been validated by comparison with experimental measurements of the CT dose index in standard head and body CT dose phantoms; agreement to better than 8% has been found. The robustness of the model has been established by varying the input parameters. The amount of energy deposited at the 12:00 position of the standard body CT dose phantom is most susceptible to rotation angle, whereas that in the central region is strongly influenced by the beam quality. The program has been used to investigate the changes in organ absorbed doses arising from partial and full rotation about supine and prone subjects. Superficial organs experience the largest changes in absorbed dose with a change in subject orientation and for partial rotation. Effective doses for typical clinical scan protocols have been calculated and compared with values obtained using existing dosimetry techniques based on full rotation. Calculations which make use of Monte Carlo conversion factors for the scanner that best matches the EBCT dosimetric characteristics consistently overestimate the effective dose in supine subjects by typically 20%, and underestimate the effective dose in prone subjects by typically 13%. These factors can therefore be used to correct values obtained in this way. Empirical dosimetric techniques based on the dose-length product yield errors as great as 77%. This is due to the sensitivity of the dose length product to individual scan lengths. The magnitude of these errors is reduced if empirical dosimetric techniques based on the average absorbed dose in the irradiated volume (CTDI{sub vol}) are used. Therefore conversion factors specific to EBCT have been calculated to convert the CTDI{sub vol} to an effective dose.

  15. [Indications for low-dose CT in the emergency setting].

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Andereggen, Elisabeth; Rutschmann, Olivier; de Perrot, Thomas; Caviezel, Alessandro; Platon, Alexandra

    2009-08-19

    CT delivers a large dose of radiation, especially in abdominal imaging. Recently, a low-dose abdominal CT protocol (low-dose CT) has been set-up in our institution. "Low-dose CT" is almost equivalent to a single standard abdominal radiograph in term of dose of radiation (about one sixth of those delivered by a standard CT). "Low-dose CT" is now used routinely in our emergency service in two main indications: patients with a suspicion of renal colic and those with right lower quadrant pain. It is obtained without intravenous contrast media. Oral contrast is given to patients with suspicion of appendicitis. "Low-dose CT" is used in the frame of well defined clinical algorithms, and does only replace standard CT when it can reach a comparable diagnostic quality.

  16. Optimizing CT radiation dose based on patient size and image quality: the size-specific dose estimate method.

    PubMed

    Larson, David B

    2014-10-01

    The principle of ALARA (dose as low as reasonably achievable) calls for dose optimization rather than dose reduction, per se. Optimization of CT radiation dose is accomplished by producing images of acceptable diagnostic image quality using the lowest dose method available. Because it is image quality that constrains the dose, CT dose optimization is primarily a problem of image quality rather than radiation dose. Therefore, the primary focus in CT radiation dose optimization should be on image quality. However, no reliable direct measure of image quality has been developed for routine clinical practice. Until such measures become available, size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) can be used as a reasonable image-quality estimate. The SSDE method of radiation dose optimization for CT abdomen and pelvis consists of plotting SSDE for a sample of examinations as a function of patient size, establishing an SSDE threshold curve based on radiologists' assessment of image quality, and modifying protocols to consistently produce doses that are slightly above the threshold SSDE curve. Challenges in operationalizing CT radiation dose optimization include data gathering and monitoring, managing the complexities of the numerous protocols, scanners and operators, and understanding the relationship of the automated tube current modulation (ATCM) parameters to image quality. Because CT manufacturers currently maintain their ATCM algorithms as secret for proprietary reasons, prospective modeling of SSDE for patient populations is not possible without reverse engineering the ATCM algorithm and, hence, optimization by this method requires a trial-and-error approach.

  17. Ultra Low Dose CT Pulmonary Angiography with Iterative Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Thomas; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Brendel, Bernhard; Richter, Vivien; Rasper, Michael; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Noël, Peter B.; Münzel, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of a new iterative reconstruction algorithm (IMR) for detection/rule-out of pulmonary embolism (PE) in ultra-low dose computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Methods Lower dose CT data sets were simulated based on CTPA examinations of 16 patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) with dose levels (DL) of 50%, 25%, 12.5%, 6.3% or 3.1% of the original tube current setting. Original CT data sets and simulated low-dose data sets were reconstructed with three reconstruction algorithms: the standard reconstruction algorithm “filtered back projection” (FBP), the first generation iterative reconstruction algorithm iDose and the next generation iterative reconstruction algorithm “Iterative Model Reconstruction” (IMR). In total, 288 CTPA data sets (16 patients, 6 tube current levels, 3 different algorithms) were evaluated by two blinded radiologists regarding image quality, diagnostic confidence, detectability of PE and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Results iDose and IMR showed better detectability of PE than FBP. With IMR, sensitivity for detection of PE was 100% down to a dose level of 12.5%. iDose and IMR showed superiority to FBP regarding all characteristics of subjective (diagnostic confidence in detection of PE, image quality, image noise, artefacts) and objective image quality. The minimum DL providing acceptable diagnostic performance was 12.5% (= 0.45 mSv) for IMR, 25% (= 0.89 mSv) for iDose and 100% (= 3.57 mSv) for FBP. CNR was significantly (p < 0.001) improved by IMR compared to FBP and iDose at all dose levels. Conclusion By using IMR for detection of PE, dose reduction for CTPA of up to 75% is possible while maintaining full diagnostic confidence. This would result in a mean effective dose of approximately 0.9 mSv for CTPA. PMID:27611830

  18. Fluence field optimization for noise and dose objectives in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolac, Steven; Graham, Sean; Siewerdsen, Jeff; Jaffray, David

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Selecting the appropriate imaging technique in computed tomography (CT) inherently involves balancing the tradeoff between image quality and imaging dose. Modulation of the x-ray fluence field, laterally across the beam, and independently for each projection, may potentially meet user-prescribed, regional image quality objectives, while reducing radiation to the patient. The proposed approach, called fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT), parallels the approach commonly used in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), except ''image quality plans'' replace the ''dose plans'' of IMRT. This work studies the potential noise and dose benefits of FFMCT via objective driven optimization of fluence fields. Methods: Experiments were carried out in simulation. Image quality plans were defined by specifying signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) criteria for regions of interest (ROIs) in simulated cylindrical and oblong water phantoms, and an anthropomorphic phantom with bone, air, and water equivalent regions. X-ray fluence field patterns were generated using a simulated annealing optimization method that attempts to achieve the spatially-dependent prescribed SNR criteria in the phantoms while limiting dose (to the volume or subvolumes). The resulting SNR and dose distributions were analyzed and compared to results using a bowtie filtered fluence field. Results: Compared to using a fixed bowtie filtered fluence, FFMCT achieved superior agreement with the target image quality objectives, and resulted in integral dose reductions ranging from 39 to 52%. Prioritizing dose constraints for specific regions of interest resulted in a preferential reduction of dose to those regions with some tradeoff in SNR, particularly where the target low dose regions overlapped with regions where high SNR was prescribed. The method appeared fairly robust under increased complexity and heterogeneity of the object structure. Conclusions: These results support that FFMCT has the potential to meet

  19. Adaptively Tuned Iterative Low Dose CT Image Denoising.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, SayedMasoud; Paul, Narinder S; Beheshti, Soosan; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2015-01-01

    Improving image quality is a critical objective in low dose computed tomography (CT) imaging and is the primary focus of CT image denoising. State-of-the-art CT denoising algorithms are mainly based on iterative minimization of an objective function, in which the performance is controlled by regularization parameters. To achieve the best results, these should be chosen carefully. However, the parameter selection is typically performed in an ad hoc manner, which can cause the algorithms to converge slowly or become trapped in a local minimum. To overcome these issues a noise confidence region evaluation (NCRE) method is used, which evaluates the denoising residuals iteratively and compares their statistics with those produced by additive noise. It then updates the parameters at the end of each iteration to achieve a better match to the noise statistics. By combining NCRE with the fundamentals of block matching and 3D filtering (BM3D) approach, a new iterative CT image denoising method is proposed. It is shown that this new denoising method improves the BM3D performance in terms of both the mean square error and a structural similarity index. Moreover, simulations and patient results show that this method preserves the clinically important details of low dose CT images together with a substantial noise reduction. PMID:26089972

  20. Adaptively Tuned Iterative Low Dose CT Image Denoising

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, SayedMasoud; Paul, Narinder S.; Beheshti, Soosan; Cobbold, Richard S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Improving image quality is a critical objective in low dose computed tomography (CT) imaging and is the primary focus of CT image denoising. State-of-the-art CT denoising algorithms are mainly based on iterative minimization of an objective function, in which the performance is controlled by regularization parameters. To achieve the best results, these should be chosen carefully. However, the parameter selection is typically performed in an ad hoc manner, which can cause the algorithms to converge slowly or become trapped in a local minimum. To overcome these issues a noise confidence region evaluation (NCRE) method is used, which evaluates the denoising residuals iteratively and compares their statistics with those produced by additive noise. It then updates the parameters at the end of each iteration to achieve a better match to the noise statistics. By combining NCRE with the fundamentals of block matching and 3D filtering (BM3D) approach, a new iterative CT image denoising method is proposed. It is shown that this new denoising method improves the BM3D performance in terms of both the mean square error and a structural similarity index. Moreover, simulations and patient results show that this method preserves the clinically important details of low dose CT images together with a substantial noise reduction. PMID:26089972

  1. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2008-12-15

    any other patient in the same size/protocol group who undergoes the chest scan. In summary, this work reported the first assessment of dose variations across pediatric CT patients in the same size/protocol group due to the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus and provided a previously unavailable method for patient-specific organ dose estimation, which will help in assessing patient risk and optimizing dose reduction strategies, including the development of scan protocols.

  2. 20 percent lower lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT vs chest X-ray

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray.

  3. Cone beam CT for dental and maxillofacial imaging: dose matters.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Ruben

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of cone-beam CT (CBCT) in dentistry has led to increasing concern regarding justification and optimisation of CBCT exposures. When used as a substitute to multidetector CT (MDCT), CBCT can lead to significant dose reduction; however, low-dose protocols of current-generation MDCTs show that there is an overlap between CBCT and MDCT doses. More importantly, although the 3D information provided by CBCT can often lead to improved diagnosis and treatment compared with 2D radiographs, a routine or excessive use of CBCT would lead to a substantial increase of the collective patient dose. The potential use of CBCT for paediatric patients (e.g. developmental disorders, trauma and orthodontic treatment planning) further increases concern regarding its proper application. This paper provides an overview of justification and optimisation issues in dental and maxillofacial CBCT. The radiation dose in CBCT will be briefly reviewed. The European Commission's Evidence Based Guidelines prepared by the SEDENTEXCT Project Consortium will be summarised, and (in)appropriate use of CBCT will be illustrated for various dental applications. PMID:25805884

  4. CT dose minimization using personalized protocol optimization and aggressive bowtie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Yin, Zhye; Jin, Yannan; Wu, Mingye; Yao, Yangyang; Tao, Kun; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; De Man, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we propose to use patient-specific x-ray fluence control to reduce the radiation dose to sensitive organs while still achieving the desired image quality (IQ) in the region of interest (ROI). The mA modulation profile is optimized view by view, based on the sensitive organs and the ROI, which are obtained from an ultra-low-dose volumetric CT scout scan [1]. We use a clinical chest CT scan to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed concept: the breast region is selected as the sensitive organ region while the cardiac region is selected as IQ ROI. Two groups of simulations are performed based on the clinical CT dataset: (1) a constant mA scan adjusted based on the patient attenuation (120 kVp, 300 mA), which serves as baseline; (2) an optimized scan with aggressive bowtie and ROI centering combined with patient-specific mA modulation. The results shows that the combination of the aggressive bowtie and the optimized mA modulation can result in 40% dose reduction in the breast region, while the IQ in the cardiac region is maintained. More generally, this paper demonstrates the general concept of using a 3D scout scan for optimal scan planning.

  5. Poster — Thur Eve — 06: Dose assessment of cone beam CT imaging protocols as part of SPECT/CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkopi, E; Ross, AA

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To assess radiation dose from the cone beam CT (CBCT) component of SPECT/CT studies and to compare with other CT examinations performed in our institution. Methods: We used an anthropomorphic chest phantom and the 6 cc ion chamber to measure entrance breast dose for several CBCT and diagnostic CT acquisition protocols. The CBCT effective dose was calculated with ImPACT software; the CT effective dose was evaluated from the DLP value and conversion factor, dependent on the anatomic region. The RADAR medical procedure radiation dose calculator was used to assess the nuclear medicine component of exam dose. Results: The entrance dose to the breast measured with the anthropomorphic phantom was 0.48 mGy and 9.41 mGy for cardiac and chest CBCT scans; and 4.59 mGy for diagnostic thoracic CT. The effective doses were 0.2 mSv, 3.2 mSv and 2.8 mSv respectively. For a small patient represented by the anthropomorphic phantom, the dose from the diagnostic CT was lower than from the CBCT scan, as a result of the exposure reduction options available on modern CT scanners. The CBCT protocols used the same fixed scanning techniques. The diagnostic CT dose based on the patient data was 35% higher than the phantom dose. For most SPECT/CT studies the dose from the CBCT component was comparable with the dose from the radiopharmaceutical. Conclusions: The patient radiation dose from the cone beam CT scan can be higher than that from a diagnostic CT and should be taken into consideration in evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose.

  6. Assessment of phase based dose modulation for improved dose efficiency in cardiac CT on an anthropomorphic motion phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budde, Adam; Nilsen, Roy; Nett, Brian

    2014-03-01

    State of the art automatic exposure control modulates the tube current across view angle and Z based on patient anatomy for use in axial full scan reconstructions. Cardiac CT, however, uses a fundamentally different image reconstruction that applies a temporal weighting to reduce motion artifacts. This paper describes a phase based mA modulation that goes beyond axial and ECG modulation; it uses knowledge of the temporal view weighting applied within the reconstruction algorithm to improve dose efficiency in cardiac CT scanning. Using physical phantoms and synthetic noise emulation, we measure how knowledge of sinogram temporal weighting and the prescribed cardiac phase can be used to improve dose efficiency. First, we validated that a synthetic CT noise emulation method produced realistic image noise. Next, we used the CT noise emulation method to simulate mA modulation on scans of a physical anthropomorphic phantom where a motion profile corresponding to a heart rate of 60 beats per minute was used. The CT noise emulation method matched noise to lower dose scans across the image within 1.5% relative error. Using this noise emulation method to simulate modulating the mA while keeping the total dose constant, the image variance was reduced by an average of 11.9% on a scan with 50 msec padding, demonstrating improved dose efficiency. Radiation dose reduction in cardiac CT can be achieved while maintaining the same level of image noise through phase based dose modulation that incorporates knowledge of the cardiac reconstruction algorithm.

  7. Dose reduction in paediatric MDCT: general principles.

    PubMed

    Paterson, A; Frush, D P

    2007-06-01

    The number of multi-detector array computed tomography (MDCT) examinations performed per annum continues to increase in both the adult and paediatric populations. Estimates from 2003 suggested that CT contributed 17% of a radiology department's workload, yet was responsible for up to 75% of the collective population dose from medical radiation. The effective doses for some CT examinations today overlap with those argued to have an increased risk of cancer. This is especially pertinent for paediatric CT, as children are more radiosensitive than adults (and girls more radiosensitive than boys). In addition, children have a longer life ahead of them, in which radiation induced cancers may become manifest. Radiologists must be aware of these facts and practise the ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principle, when it comes to deciding CT protocols and parameters. PMID:17467387

  8. A review of patient dose and optimisation methods in adult and paediatric CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Dougeni, E; Faulkner, K; Panayiotakis, G

    2012-04-01

    An increasing number of publications and international reports on computed tomography (CT) have addressed important issues on optimised imaging practice and patient dose. This is partially due to recent technological developments as well as to the striking rise in the number of CT scans being requested. CT imaging has extended its role to newer applications, such as cardiac CT, CT colonography, angiography and urology. The proportion of paediatric patients undergoing CT scans has also increased. The published scientific literature was reviewed to collect information regarding effective dose levels during the most common CT examinations in adults and paediatrics. Large dose variations were observed (up to 32-fold) with some individual sites exceeding the recommended dose reference levels, indicating a large potential to reduce dose. Current estimates on radiation-related cancer risks are alarming. CT doses account for about 70% of collective dose in the UK and are amongst the highest in diagnostic radiology, however the majority of physicians underestimate the risk, demonstrating a decreased level of awareness. Exposure parameters are not always adjusted appropriately to the clinical question or to patient size, especially for children. Dose reduction techniques, such as tube-current modulation, low-tube voltage protocols, prospective echocardiography-triggered coronary angiography and iterative reconstruction algorithms can substantially decrease doses. An overview of optimisation studies is provided. The justification principle is discussed along with tools that assist clinicians in the decision-making process. There is the potential to eliminate clinically non-indicated CT scans by replacing them with alternative examinations especially for children or patients receiving multiple CT scans.

  9. Dose reconstruction for real-time patient-specific dose estimation in CT

    SciTech Connect

    De Man, Bruno Yin, Zhye; Wu, Mingye; FitzGerald, Paul; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Many recent computed tomography (CT) dose reduction approaches belong to one of three categories: statistical reconstruction algorithms, efficient x-ray detectors, and optimized CT acquisition schemes with precise control over the x-ray distribution. The latter category could greatly benefit from fast and accurate methods for dose estimation, which would enable real-time patient-specific protocol optimization. Methods: The authors present a new method for volumetrically reconstructing absorbed dose on a per-voxel basis, directly from the actual CT images. The authors’ specific implementation combines a distance-driven pencil-beam approach to model the first-order x-ray interactions with a set of Gaussian convolution kernels to model the higher-order x-ray interactions. The authors performed a number of 3D simulation experiments comparing the proposed method to a Monte Carlo based ground truth. Results: The authors’ results indicate that the proposed approach offers a good trade-off between accuracy and computational efficiency. The images show a good qualitative correspondence to Monte Carlo estimates. Preliminary quantitative results show errors below 10%, except in bone regions, where the authors see a bigger model mismatch. The computational complexity is similar to that of a low-resolution filtered-backprojection algorithm. Conclusions: The authors present a method for analytic dose reconstruction in CT, similar to the techniques used in radiation therapy planning with megavoltage energies. Future work will include refinements of the proposed method to improve the accuracy as well as a more extensive validation study. The proposed method is not intended to replace methods that track individual x-ray photons, but the authors expect that it may prove useful in applications where real-time patient-specific dose estimation is required.

  10. CT radiation dose optimization and estimation: an update for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2012-01-01

    In keeping with the increasing utilization of CT examinations, the greater concern about radiation hazards from examinations has been addressed. In this regard, CT radiation dose optimization has been given a great deal of attention by radiologists, referring physicians, technologists, and physicists. Dose-saving strategies are continuously evolving in terms of imaging techniques as well as dose management. Consequently, regular updates of this issue are necessary especially for radiologists who play a pivotal role in this activity. This review article will provide an update on how we can optimize CT dose in order to maximize the benefit-to-risk ratio of this clinically useful diagnostic imaging method. PMID:22247630

  11. A Simple Low-dose X-ray CT Simulation from High-dose Scan

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Dong; Huang, Jing; Bian, Zhaoying; Niu, Shanzhou; Zhang, Hua; Feng, Qianjin; Liang, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose X-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation from high-dose scan is required in optimizing radiation dose to patients. In this study, we propose a simple low-dose CT simulation strategy in sinogram domain using the raw data from high-dose scan. Specially, a relationship between the incident fluxes of low- and high- dose scans is first determined according to the repeated projection measurements and analysis. Second, the incident flux level of the simulated low-dose scan is generated by properly scaling the incident flux level of high-dose scan via the determined relationship in the first step. Third, the low-dose CT transmission data by energy integrating detection is simulated by adding a statistically independent Poisson noise distribution plus a statistically independent Gaussian noise distribution. Finally, a filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm is implemented to reconstruct the resultant low-dose CT images. The present low-dose simulation strategy is verified on the simulations and real scans by comparing it with the existing low-dose CT simulation tool. Experimental results demonstrated that the present low-dose CT simulation strategy can generate accurate low-dose CT sinogram data from high-dose scan in terms of qualitative and quantitative measurements. PMID:26543245

  12. Realistic simulation of reduced-dose CT with noise modeling and sinogram synthesis using DICOM CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Won Kim, Chang; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Reducing the patient dose while maintaining the diagnostic image quality during CT exams is the subject of a growing number of studies, in which simulations of reduced-dose CT with patient data have been used as an effective technique when exploring the potential of various dose reduction techniques. Difficulties in accessing raw sinogram data, however, have restricted the use of this technique to a limited number of institutions. Here, we present a novel reduced-dose CT simulation technique which provides realistic low-dose images without the requirement of raw sinogram data. Methods: Two key characteristics of CT systems, the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) and the algorithmic modulation transfer function (MTF), were measured for various combinations of object attenuation and tube currents by analyzing the noise power spectrum (NPS) of CT images obtained with a set of phantoms. Those measurements were used to develop a comprehensive CT noise model covering the reduced x-ray photon flux, object attenuation, system noise, and bow-tie filter, which was then employed to generate a simulated noise sinogram for the reduced-dose condition with the use of a synthetic sinogram generated from a reference CT image. The simulated noise sinogram was filtered with the algorithmic MTF and back-projected to create a noise CT image, which was then added to the reference CT image, finally providing a simulated reduced-dose CT image. The simulation performance was evaluated in terms of the degree of NPS similarity, the noise magnitude, the bow-tie filter effect, and the streak noise pattern at photon starvation sites with the set of phantom images. Results: The simulation results showed good agreement with actual low-dose CT images in terms of their visual appearance and in a quantitative evaluation test. The magnitude and shape of the NPS curves of the simulated low-dose images agreed well with those of real low-dose images, showing discrepancies of less than +/−3.2% in

  13. [CT-expo--a novel program for dose evaluation in CT].

    PubMed

    Stamm, G; Nagel, H D

    2002-12-01

    CT-Expo is a novel MS Excel application for assessing the radiation doses delivered to patients undergoing CT examinations, based on computational methods that were used to analyze the data collected in the German survey on CT practice in 1999. The program enables the calculation of all dose quantities of practical value, such as axial dose free-in-air, weighted CTDI, dose-length product, effective dose and uterine dose. In contrast to existing programs for CT dose assessment, CT-Expo offers a number of unique features, such as gender-specific dose calculation for all age groups (adults, children, newborns), applicability to all existing scanner models including correction of scanner-specific influences, and the possibility of comparison with the results from the German CT survey on CT practice. Three different application modules offer free and standardized dose calculations as well as a comprehensive benchmarking section including guidance on dose optimization. The program is available as shareware in both German and English version. Additional information and a demo version free of charge can be requested via e-mail from the author's address stamm.georg@mh-hannover. de) or from the web page http://www.mh-hannover.de/kliniken/radiologie/str_04.html.

  14. Limits of Ultra-Low Dose CT Attenuation Correction for PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M; Kinahan, Paul E

    2010-01-29

    We present an analysis of the effects of ultra-low dose X-ray computerized tomography (CT) based attenuation correction for positron emission tomography (PET). By ultra low dose we mean less than approximately 5 mAs or 0.5 mSv total effective whole body dose. The motivation is the increased interest in using respiratory motion information acquired during the CT scan for both phase-matched CT-based attenuation correction and for motion estimation. Since longer duration CT scans are desired, radiation dose to the patient can be a limiting factor. In this study we evaluate the impact of reducing photon flux rates in the CT data on the reconstructed PET image by using the CATSIM simulation tool for the CT component and the ASIM simulation tool for the PET component. The CT simulation includes effects of the x-ray tube spectra, beam conditioning, bowtie filter, detector noise, and bean hardening correction. The PET simulation includes the effect of attenuation and photon counting. Noise and bias in the PET image were evaluated from multiple realizations of test objects. We show that techniques can be used to significantly reduce the mAs needed for CT based attenuation correction if the CT is not used for diagnostic purposes. The limiting factor, however, is not the noise in the CT image but rather the bias introduced by CT sinogram elements with no detected flux. These results constrain the methods that can be used to lower CT dose in a manner suitable for attenuation correction of PET data. We conclude that ultra-low-dose CT for attenuation correction of PET data is feasible with current PET/CT scanners.

  15. Organ doses to adult patients for chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Sterzik, Alexander; Tipnis, Sameer; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to estimate organ doses for chest CT examinations using volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) data as well as accounting for patient weight. Methods: A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator) was used to compute organ doses for a 70 kg patient undergoing chest CT examinations, as well as volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) in a body CT dosimetry phantom at the same CT technique factors. Ratios of organ dose to CTDI{sub vol} (f{sub organ}) were generated as a function of anatomical location in the chest for the breasts, lungs, stomach, red bone marrow, liver, thyroid, liver, and thymus. Values of f{sub organ} were obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV for 1, 4, 16, and 64 slice CT scanners from two vendors. For constant CT techniques, we computed ratios of dose in water phantoms of differing diameter. By modeling patients of different weights as equivalent water cylinders of different diameters, we generated factors that permit the estimation of the organ doses in patients weighing between 50 and 100 kg who undergo chest CT examinations relative to the corresponding organ doses received by a 70 kg adult. Results: For a 32 cm long CT scan encompassing the complete lungs, values of f{sub organ} ranged from 1.7 (thymus) to 0.3 (stomach). Organs that are directly in the x-ray beam, and are completely irradiated, generally had f{sub organ} values well above 1 (i.e., breast, lung, heart, and thymus). Organs that are not completely irradiated in a total chest CT scan generally had f{sub organ} values that are less than 1 (e.g., red bone marrow, liver, and stomach). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV resulted in modest increases in f{sub organ} for the heart (9%) and thymus (8%), but resulted in larger increases for the breast (19%) and red bone marrow (21%). Adult patient chests have been modeled by water cylinders with diameters between

  16. Low Dose MDCT with Tube Current Modulation: Role in Detection of Urolithiasis and Patient Effective Dose Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Chandan; Sripathi, Smiti; Parakh, Anushri; Shrivastav, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urolithiasis is one of the major, recurring problem in young individuals and CT being the commonest diagnostic modality used. In order to reduce the radiation dose to the patient who are young and as stone formation is a recurring process; one of the simplest way would be, low dose CT along with tube current modulation. Aim Aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of low dose (70mAs) with standard dose (250mAs) protocol in detecting urolithiasis and to define the tube current and mean effective patient dose by these protocols. Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted in 200 patients over a period of 2 years with acute flank pain presentation. CT was performed in 100 cases with standard dose and another 100 with low dose protocol using tube current modulation. Sensitivity and specificity for calculus detection, percentage reduction of dose and tube current with low dose protocol was calculated. Results Urolithiasis was detected in 138 patients, 67 were examined by high dose and 71 were by low dose protocol. Sensitivity and Specificity of low dose protocol was 97.1% and 96.4% with similar results found in high BMI patients. Tube current modulation resulted in reduction of effective tube current by 12.17%. The mean effective patient dose for standard dose was 10.33 mSv whereas 2.92 mSv for low dose with 51.13–53.8% reduction in low dose protocol. Conclusion The study has reinforced that low-dose CT with tube current modulation is appropriate for diagnosis of urolithiasis with significant reduction in tube current and patient effective dose. PMID:27437322

  17. Methods for clinical evaluation of noise reduction techniques in abdominopelvic CT.

    PubMed

    Ehman, Eric C; Yu, Lifeng; Manduca, Armando; Hara, Amy K; Shiung, Maria M; Jondal, Dayna; Lake, David S; Paden, Robert G; Blezek, Daniel J; Bruesewitz, Michael R; McCollough, Cynthia H; Hough, David M; Fletcher, Joel G

    2014-01-01

    Most noise reduction methods involve nonlinear processes, and objective evaluation of image quality can be challenging, since image noise cannot be fully characterized on the sole basis of the noise level at computed tomography (CT). Noise spatial correlation (or noise texture) is closely related to the detection and characterization of low-contrast objects and may be quantified by analyzing the noise power spectrum. High-contrast spatial resolution can be measured using the modulation transfer function and section sensitivity profile and is generally unaffected by noise reduction. Detectability of low-contrast lesions can be evaluated subjectively at varying dose levels using phantoms containing low-contrast objects. Clinical applications with inherent high-contrast abnormalities (eg, CT for renal calculi, CT enterography) permit larger dose reductions with denoising techniques. In low-contrast tasks such as detection of metastases in solid organs, dose reduction is substantially more limited by loss of lesion conspicuity due to loss of low-contrast spatial resolution and coarsening of noise texture. Existing noise reduction strategies for dose reduction have a substantial impact on lowering the radiation dose at CT. To preserve the diagnostic benefit of CT examination, thoughtful utilization of these strategies must be based on the inherent lesion-to-background contrast and the anatomy of interest. The authors provide an overview of existing noise reduction strategies for low-dose abdominopelvic CT, including analytic reconstruction, image and projection space denoising, and iterative reconstruction; review qualitative and quantitative tools for evaluating these strategies; and discuss the strengths and limitations of individual noise reduction methods. PMID:25019428

  18. Development of CT scanner models for patient organ dose calculations using Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianwei

    There is a serious and growing concern about the CT dose delivered by diagnostic CT examinations or image-guided radiation therapy imaging procedures. To better understand and to accurately quantify radiation dose due to CT imaging, Monte Carlo based CT scanner models are needed. This dissertation describes the development, validation, and application of detailed CT scanner models including a GE LightSpeed 16 MDCT scanner and two image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners, kV CBCT and MV CBCT. The modeling process considered the energy spectrum, beam geometry and movement, and bowtie filter (BTF). The methodology of validating the scanner models using reported CTDI values was also developed and implemented. Finally, the organ doses to different patients undergoing CT scan were obtained by integrating the CT scanner models with anatomically-realistic patient phantoms. The tube current modulation (TCM) technique was also investigated for dose reduction. It was found that for RPI-AM, thyroid, kidneys and thymus received largest dose of 13.05, 11.41 and 11.56 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. For RPI-AF, thymus, small intestine and kidneys received largest dose of 10.28, 12.08 and 11.35 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. The dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. For MDCT with TCM schemas, the fetal dose can be reduced with 14%-25%. To demonstrate the applicability of the method proposed in this dissertation for modeling the CT scanner, additional MDCT scanner was modeled and validated by using the measured CTDI values. These results demonstrated that the

  19. Analysis of patient CT dose data using virtualdose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Richard

    X-ray computer tomography has many benefits to medical and research applications. Recently, over the last decade CT has had a large increase in usage in hospitals and medical diagnosis. In pediatric care, from 2000 to 2006, abdominal CT scans increased by 49 % and chest CT by 425 % in the emergency room (Broder 2007). Enormous amounts of effort have been performed across multiple academic and government groups to determine an accurate measure of organ dose to patients who undergo a CT scan due to the inherent risks with ionizing radiation. Considering these intrinsic risks, CT dose estimating software becomes a necessary tool that health care providers and radiologist must use to determine many metrics to base the risks versus rewards of having an x-ray CT scan. This thesis models the resultant organ dose as body mass increases for patients with all other related scan parameters fixed. In addition to this,this thesis compares a modern dose estimating software, VirtualDose CT to two other programs, CT-Expo and ImPACT CT. The comparison shows how the software's theoretical basis and the phantom they use to represent the human body affect the range of results in organ dose. CT-Expo and ImPACT CT dose estimating software uses a different model for anatomical representation of the organs in the human body and the results show how that approach dramatically changes the outcome. The results categorizes four datasets as compared to the three software types where the appropriate phantom was available. Modeling was done to simulate chest abdominal pelvis scans and whole body scans. Organ dose difference versus body mass index shows as body mass index (BMI) ranges from 23.5 kg/m 2 to 45 kg/m2 the amount of organ dose also trends a percent change from -4.58 to -176.19 %. Comparing organ dose difference with increasing x-ray tube potential from 120 kVp to 140 kVp the percent change in organ dose increases from 55 % to 65 % across all phantoms. In comparing VirtualDose to CT

  20. CT image noise reduction using rotational-invariant feature in Stockwell transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jian; Li, Zhoubo; Yu, Lifeng; Warner, Joshua; Blezek, Daniel; Erickson, Bradley

    2014-03-01

    Iterative reconstruction and other noise reduction methods have been employed in CT to improve image quality and to reduce radiation dose. The non-local means (NLM) filter emerges as a popular choice for image-based noise reduction in CT. However, the original NLM method cannot incorporate similar structures if they are in a rotational format, resulting in ineffective denoising in some locations of the image and non-uniform noise reduction across the image. We have developed a novel rotational-invariant image texture feature derived from the multiresolutional Stockwell-transform (ST), and applied it to CT image noise reduction so that similar structures can be identified and fully utilized even when they are in different orientations. We performed a computer simulation study in CT to demonstrate better efficiency in terms of utilizing redundant information in the image and more uniform noise reduction achieved by ST than by NLM.

  1. Spectrotemporal CT data acquisition and reconstruction at low dose

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Darin P.; Lee, Chang-Lung; Kirsch, David G.; Badea, Cristian T.

    2015-01-01

    problem using the split Bregman method and GPU-based implementations of backprojection, reprojection, and kernel regression. Using a preclinical mouse model, the authors apply the proposed algorithm to study myocardial injury following radiation treatment of breast cancer. Results: Quantitative 5D simulations are performed using the MOBY mouse phantom. Twenty data sets (ten cardiac phases, two energies) are reconstructed with 88 μm, isotropic voxels from 450 total projections acquired over a single 360° rotation. In vivo 5D myocardial injury data sets acquired in two mice injected with gold and iodine nanoparticles are also reconstructed with 20 data sets per mouse using the same acquisition parameters (dose: ∼60 mGy). For both the simulations and the in vivo data, the reconstruction quality is sufficient to perform material decomposition into gold and iodine maps to localize the extent of myocardial injury (gold accumulation) and to measure cardiac functional metrics (vascular iodine). Their 5D CT imaging protocol represents a 95% reduction in radiation dose per cardiac phase and energy and a 40-fold decrease in projection sampling time relative to their standard imaging protocol. Conclusions: Their 5D CT data acquisition and reconstruction protocol efficiently exploits the rank-sparse nature of spectral and temporal CT data to provide high-fidelity reconstruction results without increased radiation dose or sampling time. PMID:26520724

  2. Spectrotemporal CT data acquisition and reconstruction at low dose

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Darin P.; Badea, Cristian T.; Lee, Chang-Lung; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-11-15

    problem using the split Bregman method and GPU-based implementations of backprojection, reprojection, and kernel regression. Using a preclinical mouse model, the authors apply the proposed algorithm to study myocardial injury following radiation treatment of breast cancer. Results: Quantitative 5D simulations are performed using the MOBY mouse phantom. Twenty data sets (ten cardiac phases, two energies) are reconstructed with 88 μm, isotropic voxels from 450 total projections acquired over a single 360° rotation. In vivo 5D myocardial injury data sets acquired in two mice injected with gold and iodine nanoparticles are also reconstructed with 20 data sets per mouse using the same acquisition parameters (dose: ∼60 mGy). For both the simulations and the in vivo data, the reconstruction quality is sufficient to perform material decomposition into gold and iodine maps to localize the extent of myocardial injury (gold accumulation) and to measure cardiac functional metrics (vascular iodine). Their 5D CT imaging protocol represents a 95% reduction in radiation dose per cardiac phase and energy and a 40-fold decrease in projection sampling time relative to their standard imaging protocol. Conclusions: Their 5D CT data acquisition and reconstruction protocol efficiently exploits the rank-sparse nature of spectral and temporal CT data to provide high-fidelity reconstruction results without increased radiation dose or sampling time.

  3. TU-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: CT Dose Optimization Technologies II

    SciTech Connect

    Driesser, I; Angel, E

    2014-06-15

    their institutions. Here Siemens offers the right dose management tools for administrations to analyze and document dose, to train their clinical staff and to continuously optimize the application of the right dose in clinical routine. Siemens CT is not only adhering to the ALARA principle, but is inspired by it. With CARE Right Siemens show their commitment to the right dose in CT. Toshiba Aquilion CT Dose Management Tools Presentation Time: 11:45 - 12:15 PM A practical review of Toshiba’s CT dose management technologies from the physicist’s perspective. This presentation will include an overview of Toshiba’s CT dose reduction technologies and dose safeguards. Content will include answers to frequently asked questions relating to dose management, dose tracking, CTDI measurement, ACR accreditation, ACR QC, and protocol review on Toshiba CT systems. Specific topics will include the following: Toshiba’s mechanism of tube current modulation; Exposure record format and interpretation of the values; Dose reporting and dose safeguard tools; Use of AIDR 3D iterative reconstruction; The configuration of task specific image quality target and its integration with AIDR 3D; Tips for scanning the ACR phantom with wide beam geometry; Measuring CTDI for wide beam geometry; Discussion of daily QC procedures and specifications; Tips for annual QC evaluation; Protocol management tools.

  4. Simulation of dose reduction in tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Baath, Magnus

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Methods for simulating dose reduction are valuable tools in the work of optimizing radiographic examinations. Using such methods, clinical images can be simulated to have been collected at other, lower, dose levels without the need of additional patient exposure. A recent technology introduced to healthcare that needs optimization is tomosynthesis, where a number of low-dose projection images collected at different angles is used to reconstruct section images of an imaged object. The aim of the present work was to develop a method of simulating dose reduction for digital radiographic systems, suitable for tomosynthesis. Methods: The developed method uses information about the noise power spectrum (NPS) at the original dose level and the simulated dose level to create a noise image that is added to the original image to produce an image that has the same noise properties as an image actually collected at the simulated dose level. As the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of digital detectors operating at the low dose levels used for tomosynthesis may show a strong dependency on the dose level, it is important that a method for simulating dose reduction for tomosynthesis takes this dependency into account. By applying an experimentally determined relationship between pixel mean and pixel variance, variations in both dose and DQE in relevant dose ranges are taken into account. Results: The developed method was tested on a chest tomosynthesis system and was shown to produce NPS of simulated dose-reduced projection images that agreed well with the NPS of images actually collected at the simulated dose level. The simulated dose reduction method was also applied to tomosynthesis examinations of an anthropomorphic chest phantom, and the obtained noise in the reconstructed section images was very similar to that of an examination actually performed at the simulated dose level. Conclusions: In conclusion, the present article describes a method for simulating dose

  5. Radiation Dose to the Radiologist's Hand During Continuous CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckelhuber, Beate M. Leibecke, Thorsten; Schulz, Edda; Melchert, Uwe H.; Bergmann-Koester, Claudia U.; Helmberger, Thomas; Gellissen, Joerg

    2005-06-15

    Computed tomography fluoroscopy (CT fluoroscopy) enables real-time image control over the entire body with high geometric accuracy and, for the most part, without significant interfering artifacts, resulting in increased target accuracy, reduced intervention times, and improved biopsy specimens [1-4]. Depending on the procedure being used, higher radiation doses than in conventional CT-supported interventions might occur. Because the radiologist is present in the CT room during the intervention, he is exposed to additional radiation, which is an important aspect. Initial experience with CT fluoroscopically guided interventions is from the work of Katada et al. in 1994 [5] and only relatively few reports on radiation aspects in CT fluoroscopy are found in the literature [1, 2, 6-11]. To date, there are no reported injuries to patients and radiologists occurring with CT fluoroscopy. The time interval since the wide use of CT fluoroscopy is too short to have data on late effects to the operator using CT fluoroscopy on a daily basis. In addition, the spectrum of CT fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures will expand and more sophisticated procedures requiring longer fluoroscopy times will be performed. Thus, effective exposure reduction is very important. The purpose of our study was to assess the radiation dose to the operator's hand by using data from phantom measurements. In addition, we investigated the effect of a lead drape on the phantom surface adjacent to the scanning plane, the use of thin radiation protective gloves, and the use of different needle holders.

  6. Eye dose monitoring of PET/CT workers

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, U; O'Reilly, G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to measure eye dose [Hp(3)] to workers in a busy positron emission tomography (PET)/CT centre. Doses were compared with the proposed new annual dose limit of 20 mSv. Methods: We used a newly designed dosemeter to measure eye dose [Hp(3)]. Eye dosemeters were worn with an adjustable headband, with the dosemeter positioned adjacent to the left eye. The whole-body dose was also recorded using electronic personal dosemeter (EPD® Mk2; Thermo Electron Corporation, Waltham, MA). Exposed staff included radiographers, nurses and healthcare assistants. Results: The radiographers received the highest exposure of the staff groups studied, with one radiographer receiving an exposure of 0.5 mSv over the 3-month survey period. The estimated maximum eye dose for 1 year is approximately 2 mSv. The numeric value for eye dose was compared with the numeric value for personal dose equivalent to see if one could be used as an indicator for the other. From our data, a conservative estimate of eye dose Hp(3) (mSv) can be made as being up to approximately twice the numeric value for whole-body dose [Hp(10)] (mSv). Conclusion: Eye dose was found to be well within the new proposed annual limit at our PET/CT centre. Routine whole-body dose measurements may be a useful starting point for assessing whether eye dose monitoring should be prioritized in a PET facility. Advances in knowledge: Following the proposal of a reduced eye dose limit, this article provides new measurement data on staff eye doses for PET/CT workers. PMID:25109711

  7. The effects of gantry tilt on breast dose and image noise in cardiac CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Michael E.; Gandhi, Diksha; Schmidt, Taly Gilat; Stevens, Grant M.; Foley, W. Dennis

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This study investigated the effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on image noise and glandular breast dose in females during cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans. Reducing the dose to glandular breast tissue is important due to its high radiosensitivity and limited diagnostic significance in cardiac CT scans.Methods: Tilted-gantry acquisition was investigated through computer simulations and experimental measurements. Upon IRB approval, eight voxelized phantoms were constructed from previously acquired cardiac CT datasets. Monte Carlo simulations quantified the dose deposited in glandular breast tissue over a range of tilt angles. The effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on breast dose were measured on a clinical CT scanner (CT750HD, GE Healthcare) using an anthropomorphic phantom with MOSFET dosimeters in the breast regions. In both simulations and experiments, scans were performed at gantry tilt angles of 0°–30°, in 5° increments. The percent change in breast dose was calculated relative to the nontilted scan for all tilt angles. The percent change in noise standard deviation due to gantry tilt was calculated in all reconstructed simulated and experimental images.Results: Tilting the gantry reduced the breast dose in all simulated and experimental phantoms, with generally greater dose reduction at increased gantry tilts. For example, at 30° gantry tilt, the dosimeters located in the superior, middle, and inferior breast regions measured dose reductions of 74%, 61%, and 9%, respectively. The simulations estimated 0%–30% total breast dose reduction across the eight phantoms and range of tilt angles. However, tilted-gantry acquisition also increased the noise standard deviation in the simulated phantoms by 2%–50% due to increased pathlength through the iodine-filled heart. The experimental phantom, which did not contain iodine in the blood, demonstrated decreased breast dose and decreased noise at all gantry tilt angles.Conclusions: Tilting the

  8. Optical-CT imaging of complex 3D dose distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark; Kim, Leonard; Hugo, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    The limitations of conventional dosimeters restrict the comprehensiveness of verification that can be performed for advanced radiation treatments presenting an immediate and substantial problem for clinics attempting to implement these techniques. In essence, the rapid advances in the technology of radiation delivery have not been paralleled by corresponding advances in the ability to verify these treatments. Optical-CT gel-dosimetry is a relatively new technique with potential to address this imbalance by providing high resolution 3D dose maps in polymer and radiochromic gel dosimeters. We have constructed a 1st generation optical-CT scanner capable of high resolution 3D dosimetry and applied it to a number of simple and increasingly complex dose distributions including intensity-modulated-radiation-therapy (IMRT). Prior to application to IMRT, the robustness of optical-CT gel dosimetry was investigated on geometry and variable attenuation phantoms. Physical techniques and image processing methods were developed to minimize deleterious effects of refraction, reflection, and scattered laser light. Here we present results of investigations into achieving accurate high-resolution 3D dosimetry with optical-CT, and show clinical examples of 3D IMRT dosimetry verification. In conclusion, optical-CT gel dosimetry can provide high resolution 3D dose maps that greatly facilitate comprehensive verification of complex 3D radiation treatments. Good agreement was observed at high dose levels (>50%) between planned and measured dose distributions. Some systematic discrepancies were observed however (rms discrepancy 3% at high dose levels) indicating further work is required to eliminate confounding factors presently compromising the accuracy of optical-CT 3D gel-dosimetry.

  9. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle.

  10. CT effective dose per dose length product using ICRP 103 weighting factors

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Magill, Dennise; He Wenjun

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To generate effective dose per unit dose length product (E/DLP) conversion factors incorporating ICRP Publication 103 tissue weighting factors. Methods: Effective doses for CT examinations were obtained using the IMPACT Dosimetry Calculator using all 23 dose data sets that are offered by this spreadsheet. CT examinations were simulated for scans performed along the patient long axis for each dosimetry data set using a 4 cm beam width ranging from the upper thighs to top of the head. Five basic body regions (head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis), as well as combinations of the regions (head/neck, chest/abdomen, abdomen/pelvis, and chest/abdomen/pelvis) and whole body CT scans were investigated. Correction factors were generated that can be applied to convert E/DLP conversion factors based on ICRP 60 data to conversion factors that are valid for ICRP 103 data (i.e., E{sub 103}/E{sub 60}). Results: Use of ICRP 103 weighting factors increase effective doses for head scans by {approx}11%, for chest scans by {approx}20%, and decrease effective doses for pelvis scans by {approx}25%. Current E/DLP conversion factors are estimated to be 2.4 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for head CT examinations and range between 14 and 20 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for body CT examinations. Conclusions: Factors that enable patient CT doses to be adjusted to account for ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors are provided, which result in E/DLP factors that were increased in head and chest CT, reduced in pelvis CT, and showed no marked change in neck and abdomen CT.

  11. PET/CT-guided Interventions: Personnel Radiation Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, E. Ronan Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Hsu, Meier; Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures.MethodsIn this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound).ResultsThe median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06).ConclusionThe operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

  12. Friction Reduction for Microhole CT Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Newman; Patrick Kelleher; Edward Smalley

    2007-03-31

    The objective of this 24 month project focused on improving microhole coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) reliability and performance, while reducing the drilling cost and complexity associated with inclined/horizontal well sections. This was to be accomplished by eliminating the need for a downhole drilling tractor or other downhole coiled tubing (CT) friction mitigation techniques when drilling long (>2,000 ft.) of inclined/horizontal wellbore. The technical solution to be developed and evaluated in this project was based on vibrating the coiled tubing at surface to reduce the friction along the length of the downhole CT drillstring. The Phase 1 objective of this project centered on determining the optimum surface-applied vibration system design for downhole CT friction mitigation. Design of the system would be based on numerical modeling and laboratory testing of the CT friction mitigation achieved with various types of surface-applied vibration. A numerical model was developed to predict how far downhole the surface-applied vibration would travel. A vibration test fixture, simulating microhole CT drilling in a horizontal wellbore, was constructed and used to refine and validate the numerical model. Numerous tests, with varying surface-applied vibration parameters were evaluated in the vibration test fixture. The data indicated that as long as the axial force on the CT was less than the helical buckling load, axial vibration of the CT was effective at mitigating friction. However, surface-applied vibration only provided a small amount of friction mitigation as the helical buckling load on the CT was reached or exceeded. Since it would be impractical to assume that routine field operations be conducted at less than the helical buckling load of the CT, it was determined that this technical approach did not warrant the additional cost and maintenance issues that would be associated with the surface vibration equipment. As such, the project was

  13. SU-E-P-03: Implementing a Low Dose Lung Screening CT Program Meeting Regulatory Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    LaFrance, M; Marsh, S; O'Donnell, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide information pertaining to IROC Houston QA Center's (RPC) credentialing process for institutions participating in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Purpose: Provide guidance to the Radiology Departments with the intent of implementing a Low Dose CT Screening Program using different CT Scanners with multiple techniques within the framework of the required state regulations. Method: State Requirements for the purpose of implementing a Low Dose CT Lung Protocol required working with the Radiology and Pulmonary Department in setting up a Low Dose Screening Protocol designed to reduce the radiation burden to the patients enrolled. Radiation dose measurements (CTDIvol) for various CT manufacturers (Siemens16, Siemens 64, Philips 64, and Neusoft128) for three different weight based protocols. All scans were reviewed by the Radiologist. Prior to starting a low dose lung screening protocol, information had to be submitted to the state for approval. Performing a Healing Arts protocol requires extensive information. This not only includes name and address of the applicant but a detailed description of the disease, the x-ray examination and the population to be examined. The unit had to be tested by a qualified expert using the technique charts. The credentials of all the operators, the supervisors and the Radiologists had to be submitted to the state. Results: All the appropriate documentation was sent to the state for review. The measured results between the Low Dose Protocol versus the default Adult Chest Protocol showed that there was a dose reduction of 65% for small (100-150 lb.) patient, 75% for the Medium patient (151-250 lbs.), and a 55% reduction for the Large patient ( over 250 lbs.). Conclusion: Measured results indicated that the Low Dose Protocol indeed lowered the screening patient's radiation dose and the institution was able to submit the protocol to the State's regulators.

  14. Effect of shaped filter design on dose and image quality in breast CT.

    PubMed

    Lück, Ferdinand; Kolditz, Daniel; Hupfer, Martin; Kalender, Willi A

    2013-06-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of shaped filters specifically designed for dedicated breast computed tomography (CT) scanners on dose and image quality. Optimization of filter shape and material in fan direction was performed using two different design methods, one aiming at homogeneous noise distributions in the CT images and the other aiming at a uniform dose distribution in the breast. The optimal filter thickness as a function of fan angle was determined iteratively to fulfil the above mentioned criteria for each breast diameter. Different filter materials (aluminium, copper, carbon, polytetrafluoroethylene) and breast phantoms with diameters between 80-180 mm were investigated. Noise uniformity in the reconstructed images, obtained from CT simulations based on ray-tracing methods, and dose in the breast, calculated with a Monte Carlo software tool, were used as figure of merit. Furthermore, CT-value homogeneity, the distribution of noise in cone direction, spatial resolution from centre to periphery and the contrast-to-noise ratio weighted by dose (CNRD) were evaluated. In addition, the decrease of scatter due to shaped filters was investigated. Since only few or one filter are practical in clinical CT systems, the effects of one shaped filter for different breast diameters were also investigated. In this case the filter, designed for the largest breast diameter, was simulated at variable source-to-filter distances depending on breast diameter. With the filter design method aiming at uniform noise distribution best results were obtained for aluminium as the filter material. Noise uniformity improved from 20} down to 5} and dose was reduced by about 30-40} for all breast diameters. No decrease of noise uniformity in cone direction, CT-value homogeneity, spatial resolution and the CNRD was detected with the shaped filter. However, a small improvement of CNRD was observed. Furthermore, a scatter reduction of about 20-30} and a more

  15. Effect of shaped filter design on dose and image quality in breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lück, Ferdinand; Kolditz, Daniel; Hupfer, Martin; Kalender, Willi A.

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of shaped filters specifically designed for dedicated breast computed tomography (CT) scanners on dose and image quality. Optimization of filter shape and material in fan direction was performed using two different design methods, one aiming at homogeneous noise distributions in the CT images and the other aiming at a uniform dose distribution in the breast. The optimal filter thickness as a function of fan angle was determined iteratively to fulfil the above mentioned criteria for each breast diameter. Different filter materials (aluminium, copper, carbon, polytetrafluoroethylene) and breast phantoms with diameters between 80-180 mm were investigated. Noise uniformity in the reconstructed images, obtained from CT simulations based on ray-tracing methods, and dose in the breast, calculated with a Monte Carlo software tool, were used as figure of merit. Furthermore, CT-value homogeneity, the distribution of noise in cone direction, spatial resolution from centre to periphery and the contrast-to-noise ratio weighted by dose (CNRD) were evaluated. In addition, the decrease of scatter due to shaped filters was investigated. Since only few or one filter are practical in clinical CT systems, the effects of one shaped filter for different breast diameters were also investigated. In this case the filter, designed for the largest breast diameter, was simulated at variable source-to-filter distances depending on breast diameter. With the filter design method aiming at uniform noise distribution best results were obtained for aluminium as the filter material. Noise uniformity improved from 20} down to 5} and dose was reduced by about 30-40} for all breast diameters. No decrease of noise uniformity in cone direction, CT-value homogeneity, spatial resolution and the CNRD was detected with the shaped filter. However, a small improvement of CNRD was observed. Furthermore, a scatter reduction of about 20-30} and a more

  16. Dose calculation using megavoltage cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, Olivier . E-mail: Morin@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Chen, Josephine; Aubin, Michele; Gillis, Amy; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Bose, Supratik; Chen Hong; Descovich, Martina; Xia Ping; Pouliot, Jean

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of performing dose calculation on megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) of head-and-neck patients in order to track the dosimetric errors produced by anatomic changes. Methods and Materials: A simple geometric model was developed using a head-size water cylinder to correct an observed cupping artifact occurring with MVCBCT. The uniformity-corrected MVCBCT was calibrated for physical density. Beam arrangements and weights from the initial treatment plans defined using the conventional CT were applied to the MVCBCT image, and the dose distribution was recalculated. The dosimetric inaccuracies caused by the cupping artifact were evaluated on the water phantom images. An ideal test patient with no observable anatomic changes and a patient imaged with both CT and MVCBCT before and after considerable weight loss were used to clinically validate MVCBCT for dose calculation and to determine the dosimetric impact of large anatomic changes. Results: The nonuniformity of a head-size water phantom ({approx}30%) causes a dosimetric error of less than 5%. The uniformity correction method developed greatly reduces the cupping artifact, resulting in dosimetric inaccuracies of less than 1%. For the clinical cases, the agreement between the dose distributions calculated using MVCBCT and CT was better than 3% and 3 mm where all tissue was encompassed within the MVCBCT. Dose-volume histograms from the dose calculations on CT and MVCBCT were in excellent agreement. Conclusion: MVCBCT can be used to estimate the dosimetric impact of changing anatomy on several structures in the head-and-neck region.

  17. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Grosser, Oliver S.; Kupitz, Dennis; Ruf, Juri; Czuczwara, Damian; Steffen, Ingo G.; Furth, Christian; Thormann, Markus; Loewenthal, David; Ricke, Jens; Amthauer, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) with computed tomography (CT). Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) on the image quality of the low-dose CT images. Methodology/Principal Findings Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU) values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04). In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion/Significance In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality. PMID:26390216

  18. Lung Cancer Screening with Low Dose CT

    PubMed Central

    Caroline, Chiles

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The announcement of the results of the NLST, showing a 20% reduction in lung-cancer specific mortality with LDCT screening in a high risk population, marked a turning point in lung cancer screening. This was the first time that a randomized controlled trial had shown a mortality reduction with an imaging modality aimed at early detection of lung cancer. Current guidelines endorse LDCT screening for smokers and former smokers ages 55 to 74, with at least a 30 pack year smoking history. Adherence to published algorithms for nodule follow-up is strongly encouraged. Future directions for screening research include risk stratification for selection of the screening population, and improvements in the diagnostic follow-up for indeterminate pulmonary nodules. As with screening for other malignancies, screening for lung cancer with LDCT has revealed that there are indolent lung cancers which may not be fatal. More research is necessary if we are to maximize the risk-benefit ratio in lung cancer screening. PMID:24267709

  19. In vivo dosimetry for estimation of effective doses in multislice CT coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    De Denaro, M.; Bregant, P.; Severgnini, M.; De Guarrini, F.

    2007-10-15

    In vivo dosimetry represents a technique that has been widely employed to evaluate the dose to the patient mainly in radiotherapy. Considering the increment in dose to the population due to new high-dose multislice CT examinations, such as coronary angiography, it is becoming important to more accurately know the dose to the patient. The desire to know patient dose extends even to radiological examinations. Thermoluminescent dosimeters are considered the gold standard for in vivo dosimetry, but their use is time consuming. A rapid, less labor-intensive method has been developed to perform in vivo dosimetry using radiochromic film positioned next to the patient's skin. Multislice CT scanners allow the estimation of the effective dose to the patient from the dose length product (DLP) parameter, the value of which is displayed on the acquisition console, simply multiplying the DLP by published conversion factors. The method represents only an approximation based on standard size circular phantoms and neglects the actual size of the patient. More accurate evaluations can be carried out using software-based Monte Carlo simulations. However, these methods do not consider possible dose reduction techniques, such as automatic tube-current modulation. For 22 patients effective doses measured by in vivo dosimetry and calculated by software were compared. The technique of using in vivo dosimetry measured with radiochromic film appears a promising procedure for improving the assessment of the effective dose to the patient.

  20. Estimation of Radiation Dose in CT Based on Projection Data.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Yin, Zhye; De Man, Bruno; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-10-01

    Managing and optimizing radiation dose has become a core problem for the CT community. As a fundamental step for dose optimization, accurate and computationally efficient dose estimates are crucial. The purpose of this study was to devise a computationally efficient projection-based dose metric. The absorbed energy and object mass were individually modeled using the projection data. The absorbed energy was estimated using the difference between intensity of the primary photon and the exit photon. The mass was estimated using the volume under the attenuation profile. The feasibility of the approach was evaluated across phantoms with a broad size range, various kVp settings, and two bowtie filters, using a simulation tool, the Computer Assisted Tomography SIMulator (CATSIM) software. The accuracy of projection-based dose estimation was validated against Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The relationship between projection-based dose metric and MC dose estimate was evaluated using regression models. The projection-based dose metric showed a strong correlation with Monte Carlo dose estimates (R (2) > 0.94). The prediction errors for the projection-based dose metric were all below 15 %. This study demonstrated the feasibility of computationally efficient dose estimation requiring only the projection data.

  1. Optimizing radiation dose by varying age at pediatric temporal bone CT.

    PubMed

    Noto, Daichi; Funama, Yoshinori; Kitajima, Mika; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    We performed retrospective (first-step) and prospective (second-step) studies to evaluate the body information and noise on temporal bone computed tomography (CT) images in efforts to identify the optimized tube current yielding the greatest reduction in the radiation exposure of pediatric patients undergoing temporal bone CT studies. Our first-step study included 90 patients subjected to temporal bone CT. We recorded displayed volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), displayed dose-length product (DLP), image noise, and the patient age and sex. We then calculated the optimized tube current value with and without IR corresponding to the children's age based on the ratio of the noise on images from individuals older than 18 years. In our second-step study, we enrolled 23 pediatric patients and obtained CT scans using our optimized protocol. In both studies we applied identical analysis techniques. The diagnostic image quality was confirmed reading reports and a neuroradiologist. Our first-step study indicated that the mean image noise in children assigned to five ascending age groups from 2 to 12 years ranged from 167.59 to 211.44 Hounsfield units (HU). In the second-step study, the mean image noise in each age group was almost the same as the expected noise value and the diagnostic image quality was acceptable. The dose reduction was ranged from 57.5% to 37.5%. Optimization of the tube current-time product allows a radiation reduction without a loss in image quality in pediatric patients undergoing temporal bone CT. PMID:25679165

  2. MO-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Imaging: CT Dose Optimization Technologies I

    SciTech Connect

    Denison, K; Smith, S

    2014-06-15

    Partners in Solutions is an exciting new program in which AAPM partners with our vendors to present practical “hands-on” information about the equipment and software systems that we use in our clinics. The imaging topic this year is CT scanner dose optimization capabilities. Note that the sessions are being held in a special purpose room built on the Exhibit Hall Floor, to encourage further interaction with the vendors. Dose Optimization Capabilities of GE Computed Tomography Scanners Presentation Time: 11:15 – 11:45 AM GE Healthcare is dedicated to the delivery of high quality clinical images through the development of technologies, which optimize the application of ionizing radiation. In computed tomography, dose management solutions fall into four categories: employs projection data and statistical modeling to decrease noise in the reconstructed image - creating an opportunity for mA reduction in the acquisition of diagnostic images. Veo represents true Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBiR). Using high-level algorithms in tandem with advanced computing power, Veo enables lower pixel noise standard deviation and improved spatial resolution within a single image. Advanced Adaptive Image Filters allow for maintenance of spatial resolution while reducing image noise. Examples of adaptive image space filters include Neuro 3-D filters and Cardiac Noise Reduction Filters. AutomA adjusts mA along the z-axis and is the CT equivalent of auto exposure control in conventional x-ray systems. Dynamic Z-axis Tracking offers an additional opportunity for dose reduction in helical acquisitions while SmartTrack Z-axis Tracking serves to ensure beam, collimator and detector alignment during tube rotation. SmartmA provides angular mA modulation. ECG Helical Modulation reduces mA during the systolic phase of the heart cycle. SmartBeam optimization uses bowtie beam-shaping hardware and software to filter off-axis x-rays - minimizing dose and reducing x-ray scatter. The

  3. An improved analytical model for CT dose simulation with a new look at the theory of CT dose

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Robert L.; Munley, Michael T.; Bayram, Ersin

    2005-12-15

    Gagne [Med. Phys. 16, 29-37 (1989)] has previously described a model for predicting the sensitivity and dose profiles in the slice-width (z) direction for CT scanners. The model, developed prior to the advent of multidetector CT scanners, is still widely used; however, it does not account for the effect of anode tilt on the penumbra or include the heel effect, both of which are increasingly important for the wider beams (up to 40 mm) of contemporary, multidetector scanners. Additionally, it applied only on (or near) the axis of rotation, and did not incorporate the photon energy spectrum. The improved model described herein transcends all of the aforementioned limitations of the Gagne model, including extension to the peripheral phantom axes. Comparison of simulated and measured dose data provides experimental validation of the model, including verification of the superior match to the penumbra provided by the tilted-anode model, as well as the observable effects on the cumulative dose distribution. The initial motivation for the model was to simulate the quasiperiodic dose distribution on the peripheral, phantom axes resulting from a helical scan series in order to facilitate the implementation of an improved method of CT dose measurement utilizing a short ion chamber, as proposed by Dixon [Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)]. A more detailed set of guidelines for implementing such measurements is also presented in this paper. In addition, some fundamental principles governing CT dose which have not previously been clearly enunciated follow from the model, and a fundamental (energy-based) quantity dubbed 'CTDI-aperture' is introduced.

  4. An improved analytical model for CT dose simulation with a new look at the theory of CT dose.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Robert L; Munley, Michael T; Bayram, Ersin

    2005-12-01

    Gagne [Med. Phys. 16, 29-37 (1989)] has previously described a model for predicting the sensitivity and dose profiles in the slice-width (z) direction for CT scanners. The model, developed prior to the advent of multidetector CT scanners, is still widely used; however, it does not account for the effect of anode tilt on the penumbra or include the heel effect, both of which are increasingly important for the wider beams (up to 40 mm) of contemporary, multidetector scanners. Additionally, it applied only on (or near) the axis of rotation, and did not incorporate the photon energy spectrum. The improved model described herein transcends all of the aforementioned limitations of the Gagne model, including extension to the peripheral phantom axes. Comparison of simulated and measured dose data provides experimental validation of the model, including verification of the superior match to the penumbra provided by the tilted-anode model, as well as the observable effects on the cumulative dose distribution. The initial motivation for the model was to simulate the quasiperiodic dose distribution on the peripheral, phantom axes resulting from a helical scan series in order to facilitate the implementation of an improved method of CT dose measurement utilizing a short ion chamber, as proposed by Dixon [Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)]. A more detailed set of guidelines for implementing such measurements is also presented in this paper. In addition, some fundamental principles governing CT dose which have not previously been clearly enunciated follow from the model, and a fundamental (energy-based) quantity dubbed "CTDI-aperture" is introduced.

  5. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F; Long, Daniel J; Bolch, Wesley E; Liu, Bob; Xu, X George

    2015-07-21

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose--a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the 'software as a service (SaaS)' delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose's functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT-two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations.

  6. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F; Long, Daniel J; Bolch, Wesley E; Liu, Bob; Xu, X George

    2015-07-21

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose--a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the 'software as a service (SaaS)' delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose's functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT-two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations. PMID:26134511

  7. Estimating thyroid dose in pediatric CT exams from surface dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Senan, Rani; Mueller, Deborah L.; Hatab, Mustapha R.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of estimating pediatric thyroid doses from CT using surface neck doses. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters were used to measure the neck surface dose of 25 children ranging in ages between one and three years old. The neck circumference for each child was measured. The relationship between obtained surface doses and thyroid dose was studied using acrylic phantoms of various sizes and with holes of different depths. The ratios of hole-to-surface doses were used to convert patients' surface dose to thyroid dose. ImPACT software was utilized to calculate thyroid dose after applying the appropriate age correction factors. A paired t-test was performed to compare thyroid doses from our approach and ImPACT. The ratio of thyroid to surface dose was found to be 1.1. Thyroid doses ranged from 20 to 80 mGy. Comparison showed no statistical significance (p = 0.18). In addition, the average of surface dose variation along the z-axis in helical scans was studied and found to range between 5% (in 10 cm diameter phantom/24 mm collimation/pitch 1.0) and 8% (in 16 cm diameter phantom/12 mm collimation/pitch 0.7). We conclude that surface dose is an acceptable predictor for pediatric thyroid dose from CT. The uncertainty due to surface dose variability may be reduced if narrower collimation is used with a pitch factor close to 1.0. Also, the results did not show any effect of thyroid depth on the measured dose.

  8. Attenuation correction of PET cardiac data with low-dose average CT in PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama; Luo, Dershan; Liu, Hui H.; Chi Paichun, M.; Mar, Martha V.; Gladish, Gregory; Truong, Mylene; Erasmus, Jeremy Jr.; Liao Zhongxing; Macapinlac, H. A.

    2006-10-15

    We proposed a low-dose average computer tomography (ACT) for attenuation correction (AC) of the PET cardiac data in PET/CT. The ACT was obtained from a cine CT scan of over one breath cycle per couch position while the patient was free breathing. We applied this technique on four patients who underwent tumor imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG in PET/CT, whose PET data showed high uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the heart and whose CT and PET data had misregistration. All four patients did not have known myocardiac infarction or ischemia. The patients were injected with 555-740 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG and scanned 1 h after injection. The helical CT (HCT) data were acquired in 16 s for the coverage of 100 cm. The PET acquisition was 3 min per bed of 15 cm. The duration of cine CT acquisition per 2 cm was 5.9 s. We used a fast gantry rotation cycle time of 0.5 s to minimize motion induced reconstruction artifacts in the cine CT images, which were averaged to become the ACT images for AC of the PET data. The radiation dose was about 5 mGy for 5.9 s cine duration. The selection of 5.9 s was based on our analysis of the respiratory signals of 600 patients; 87% of the patients had average breath cycles of less than 6 s and 90% had standard deviations of less than 1 s in the period of breath cycle. In all four patient studies, registrations between the CT and the PET data were improved. An increase of average uptake in the anterior and the lateral walls up to 48% and a decrease of average uptake in the septal and the inferior walls up to 16% with ACT were observed. We also compared ACT and conventional slow scan CT (SSCT) of 4 s duration in one patient study and found ACT was better than SSCT in depicting average respiratory motion and the SSCT images showed motion-induced reconstruction artifacts. In conclusion, low-dose ACT improved registration of the CT and the PET data in the heart region in our study of four patients. ACT was superior than SSCT for depicting average respiration

  9. Low dose CT perfusion using k-means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisana, Francesco; Henzler, Thomas; Schönberg, Stefan; Klotz, Ernst; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We aim at improving low dose CT perfusion functional parameters maps and CT images quality, preserving quantitative information. In a dynamic CT perfusion dataset, each voxel is measured T times, where T is the number of acquired time points. In this sense, we can think about a voxel as a point in a T-dimensional space, where the coordinates of the voxels would be the values of its time attenuation curve (TAC). Starting from this idea, a k-means algorithm was designed to group voxels in K classes. A modified guided time-intensity profile similarity (gTIPS) filter was implemented and applied only for those voxels belonging to the same class. The approach was tested on a digital brain perfusion phantom as well as on clinical brain and body perfusion datasets, and compared to the original TIPS implementation. The TIPS filter showed the highest CNR improvement, but lowest spatial resolution. gTIPS proved to have the best combination of spatial resolution and CNR improvement for CT images, while k-gTIPS was superior to both gTIPS and TIPS in terms of perfusion maps image quality. We demonstrate k-means clustering analysis can be applied to denoise dynamic CT perfusion data and to improve functional maps. Beside the promising results, this approach has the major benefit of being independent from the perfusion model employed for functional parameters calculation. No similar approaches were found in literature.

  10. Fast reconstruction of low dose proton CT by sinogram interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, David C.; Sangild Sørensen, Thomas; Rit, Simon

    2016-08-01

    Proton computed tomography (CT) has been demonstrated as a promising image modality in particle therapy planning. It can reduce errors in particle range calculations and consequently improve dose calculations. Obtaining a high imaging resolution has traditionally required computationally expensive iterative reconstruction techniques to account for the multiple scattering of the protons. Recently, techniques for direct reconstruction have been developed, but these require a higher imaging dose than the iterative methods. No previous work has compared the image quality of the direct and the iterative methods. In this article, we extend the methodology for direct reconstruction to be applicable for low imaging doses and compare the obtained results with three state-of-the-art iterative algorithms. We find that the direct method yields comparable resolution and image quality to the iterative methods, even at 1 mSv dose levels, while yielding a twentyfold speedup in reconstruction time over previously published iterative algorithms.

  11. Techniques and tactics for optimizing CT dose in adults and children: state of the art and future advances.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Jack; MacKenzie, John D; Cody, Dianna D; Gould, Robert

    2014-03-01

    With growing concern over radiation exposure from CT, dose reduction and optimization have become important considerations. Many protocol factors and CT technologies influence this dose reduction effort, and as such, users should maintain a working knowledge of developments in the field. Individual patient factors and scanner-specific details also require care and expertise, which are vital to the success of any dose reduction effort. The authors review the content of the Virtual Symposium on Radiation Safety in Computed Tomography (University of California Dose Optimization and Standardization Endeavor), specifically that pertaining to the more practical aspects of dose optimization. These range from prescan tips to postscan factors, as well as protocol definition itself. Topics discussed include localizer radiograph acquisition, tube current modulation, reconstruction methods, and pediatric considerations, with the content biased toward a CT technologist or protocol manager. Near-term innovations, including new iterative reconstruction methods, tube potential modulation, and dual-energy CT, are presented, and their capability for dose reduction is briefly discussed.

  12. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F.; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Liu, Bob; Xu, X. George

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose—a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the ‘software as a service (SaaS)’ delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose’s functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT—two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations.

  13. Estimating radiation dose to organs of patients undergoing conventional and novel multidetector CT exams using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Erin

    Advances in Computed Tomography (CT) technology have led to an increase in the modality's diagnostic capabilities and therefore its utilization, which has in turn led to an increase in radiation exposure to the patient population. As a result, CT imaging currently constitutes approximately half of the collective exposure to ionizing radiation from medical procedures. In order to understand the radiation risk, it is necessary to estimate the radiation doses absorbed by patients undergoing CT imaging. The most widely accepted risk models are based on radiosensitive organ dose as opposed to whole body dose. In this research, radiosensitive organ dose was estimated using Monte Carlo based simulations incorporating detailed multidetector CT (MDCT) scanner models, specific scan protocols, and using patient models based on accurate patient anatomy and representing a range of patient sizes. Organ dose estimates were estimated for clinical MDCT exam protocols which pose a specific concern for radiosensitive organs or regions. These dose estimates include estimation of fetal dose for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen pelvis CT exams or undergoing exams to diagnose pulmonary embolism and venous thromboembolism. Breast and lung dose were estimated for patients undergoing coronary CTA imaging, conventional fixed tube current chest CT, and conventional tube current modulated (TCM) chest CT exams. The correlation of organ dose with patient size was quantified for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen/pelvis exams and for all breast and lung dose estimates presented. Novel dose reduction techniques were developed that incorporate organ location and are specifically designed to reduce close to radiosensitive organs during CT acquisition. A generalizable model was created for simulating conventional and novel attenuation-based TCM algorithms which can be used in simulations estimating organ dose for any patient model. The generalizable model is a significant contribution of this

  14. Pediatric organ dose measurements in axial and helical multislice CT

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Alanna; White, R. Allen; Mc-Nitt-Gray, Mike; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna

    2009-05-15

    An anthropomorphic pediatric phantom (5-yr-old equivalent) was used to determine organ doses at specific surface and internal locations resulting from computed tomography (CT) scans. This phantom contains four different tissue-equivalent materials: Soft tissue, bone, brain, and lung. It was imaged on a 64-channel CT scanner with three head protocols (one contiguous axial scan and two helical scans [pitch=0.516 and 0.984]) and four chest protocols (one contiguous axial scan and three helical scans [pitch=0.516, 0.984, and 1.375]). Effective mA s [=(tube currentxrotation time)/pitch] was kept nearly constant at 200 effective mA s for head and 290 effective mA s for chest protocols. Dose measurements were acquired using thermoluminescent dosimeter powder in capsules placed at locations internal to the phantom and on the phantom surface. The organs of interest were the brain, both eyes, thyroid, sternum, both breasts, and both lungs. The organ dose measurements from helical scans were lower than for contiguous axial scans by 0% to 25% even after adjusting for equivalent effective mA s. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in organ dose values between the 0.516 and 0.984 pitch values for both head and chest scans. The chest organ dose measurements obtained at a pitch of 1.375 were significantly higher than the dose values obtained at the other helical pitches used for chest scans (p<0.05). This difference was attributed to the automatic selection of the large focal spot due to a higher tube current value. These findings suggest that there may be a previously unsuspected radiation dose benefit associated with the use of helical scan mode during computed tomography scanning.

  15. Computational and human observer image quality evaluation of low dose, knowledge-based CT iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Miao, Jun; Brown, Kevin M.; Zabic, Stanislav; Raihani, Nilgoun; Wilson, David L.

    2015-10-15

    and model complexity according to AIC{sub c}. With parameters fixed, the model reasonably predicted detectability of human observers in blended FBP-IMR images. Semianalytic internal noise computation gave results equivalent to Monte Carlo, greatly speeding parameter estimation. Using Model-k4, the authors found an average detectability improvement of 2.7 ± 0.4 times that of FBP. IMR showed greater improvements in detectability with larger signals and relatively consistent improvements across signal contrast and x-ray dose. In the phantom tested, Model-k4 predicted an 82% dose reduction compared to FBP, verified with physical CT scans at 80% reduced dose. Conclusions: IMR improves detectability over FBP and may enable significant dose reductions. A channelized Hotelling observer with internal noise proportional to channel output standard deviation agreed well with human observers across a wide range of variables, even across reconstructions with drastically different image characteristics. Utility of the model observer was demonstrated by predicting the effect of image processing (blending), analyzing detectability improvements with IMR across dose, size, and contrast, and in guiding real CT scan dose reduction experiments. Such a model observer can be applied in optimizing parameters in advanced iterative reconstruction algorithms as well as guiding dose reduction protocols in physical CT experiments.

  16. Computational and human observer image quality evaluation of low dose, knowledge-based CT iterative reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Brown, Kevin M.; Zabic, Stanislav; Raihani, Nilgoun; Miao, Jun; Wilson, David L.

    2015-01-01

    model complexity according to AICc. With parameters fixed, the model reasonably predicted detectability of human observers in blended FBP-IMR images. Semianalytic internal noise computation gave results equivalent to Monte Carlo, greatly speeding parameter estimation. Using Model-k4, the authors found an average detectability improvement of 2.7 ± 0.4 times that of FBP. IMR showed greater improvements in detectability with larger signals and relatively consistent improvements across signal contrast and x-ray dose. In the phantom tested, Model-k4 predicted an 82% dose reduction compared to FBP, verified with physical CT scans at 80% reduced dose. Conclusions: IMR improves detectability over FBP and may enable significant dose reductions. A channelized Hotelling observer with internal noise proportional to channel output standard deviation agreed well with human observers across a wide range of variables, even across reconstructions with drastically different image characteristics. Utility of the model observer was demonstrated by predicting the effect of image processing (blending), analyzing detectability improvements with IMR across dose, size, and contrast, and in guiding real CT scan dose reduction experiments. Such a model observer can be applied in optimizing parameters in advanced iterative reconstruction algorithms as well as guiding dose reduction protocols in physical CT experiments. PMID:26429285

  17. Dose reduction in molecular breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Chowdhury, Samir; Hugg, James W.; Moats, Rex A.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) is the imaging of radiolabeled drugs, cells, or nanoparticles for breast cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment. Screening of broad populations of women for breast cancer with mammography has been augmented by the emergence of breast MRI in screening of women at high risk for breast cancer. Screening MBI may benefit the sub-population of women with dense breast tissue that obscures small tumors in mammography. Dedicated breast imaging equipment is necessary to enable detection of early-stage tumors less than 1 cm in size. Recent progress in the development of these instruments is reviewed. Pixellated CZT for single photon MBI imaging of 99mTc-sestamibi gives high detection sensitivity for early-stage tumors. The use of registered collimators in a near-field geometry gives significantly higher detection efficiency - a factor of 3.6-, which translates into an equivalent dose reduction factor given the same acquisition time. The radiation dose in the current MBI procedure has been reduced to the level of a four-view digital mammography study. In addition to screening of selected sub-populations, reduced MBI dose allows for dual-isotope, treatment planning, and repeated therapy assessment studies in the era of molecular medicine guided by quantitative molecular imaging.

  18. Statistical image reconstruction for low-dose CT using nonlocal means-based regularization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Ma, Jianhua; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yan; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-09-01

    Low-dose computed tomography (CT) imaging without sacrifice of clinical tasks is desirable due to the growing concerns about excessive radiation exposure to the patients. One common strategy to achieve low-dose CT imaging is to lower the milliampere-second (mAs) setting in data scanning protocol. However, the reconstructed CT images by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method from the low-mAs acquisitions may be severely degraded due to the excessive noise. Statistical image reconstruction (SIR) methods have shown potentials to significantly improve the reconstructed image quality from the low-mAs acquisitions, wherein the regularization plays a critical role and an established family of regularizations is based on the Markov random field (MRF) model. Inspired by the success of nonlocal means (NLM) in image processing applications, in this work, we propose to explore the NLM-based regularization for SIR to reconstruct low-dose CT images from low-mAs acquisitions. Experimental results with both digital and physical phantoms consistently demonstrated that SIR with the NLM-based regularization can achieve more gains than SIR with the well-known Gaussian MRF regularization or the generalized Gaussian MRF regularization and the conventional FBP method, in terms of image noise reduction and resolution preservation.

  19. Sinogram restoration for ultra-low-dose x-ray multi-slice helical CT by nonparametric regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lu; Siddiqui, Khan; Zhu, Bin; Tao, Yang; Siegel, Eliot

    2007-03-01

    During the last decade, x-ray computed tomography (CT) has been applied to screen large asymptomatic smoking and nonsmoking populations for early lung cancer detection. Because a larger population will be involved in such screening exams, more and more attention has been paid to studying low-dose, even ultra-low-dose x-ray CT. However, reducing CT radiation exposure will increase noise level in the sinogram, thereby degrading the quality of reconstructed CT images as well as causing more streak artifacts near the apices of the lung. Thus, how to reduce the noise levels and streak artifacts in the low-dose CT images is becoming a meaningful topic. Since multi-slice helical CT has replaced conventional stop-and-shoot CT in many clinical applications, this research mainly focused on the noise reduction issue in multi-slice helical CT. The experiment data were provided by Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16-Slice helical CT. It included both conventional CT data acquired under 120 kvp voltage and 119 mA current and ultra-low-dose CT data acquired under 120 kvp and 10 mA protocols. All other settings are the same as that of conventional CT. In this paper, a nonparametric smoothing method with thin plate smoothing splines and the roughness penalty was proposed to restore the ultra-low-dose CT raw data. Each projection frame was firstly divided into blocks, and then the 2D data in each block was fitted to a thin-plate smoothing splines' surface via minimizing a roughness-penalized least squares objective function. By doing so, the noise in each ultra-low-dose CT projection was reduced by leveraging the information contained not only within each individual projection profile, but also among nearby profiles. Finally the restored ultra-low-dose projection data were fed into standard filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm to reconstruct CT images. The rebuilt results as well as the comparison between proposed approach and traditional method were given in the results and

  20. A Survey of Pediatric CT Protocols and Radiation Doses in South Korean Hospitals to Optimize the Radiation Dose for Pediatric CT Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Yang, Dong Hyun; Cho, Young Ah; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jin Seong; Koo, Hyun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Children are at greater risk of radiation exposure than adults because the rapidly dividing cells of children tend to be more radiosensitive and they have a longer expected life time in which to develop potential radiation injury. Some studies have surveyed computed tomography (CT) radiation doses and several studies have established diagnostic reference levels according to patient age or body size; however, no survey of CT radiation doses with a large number of patients has yet been carried out in South Korea. The aim of the present study was to investigate the radiation dose in pediatric CT examinations performed throughout South Korea. From 512 CT (222 brain CT, 105 chest CT, and 185 abdominopelvic CT) scans that were referred to our tertiary hospital, a dose report sheet was available for retrospective analysis of CT scan protocols and dose, including the volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), effective dose, and size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). At 55.2%, multiphase CT was the most frequently performed protocol for abdominopelvic CT. Tube current modulation was applied most often in abdominopelvic CT and chest CT, accounting for 70.1% and 62.7%, respectively. Regarding the CT dose, the interquartile ranges of the CTDIvol were 11.1 to 22.5 (newborns), 16.6 to 39.1 (≤1 year), 14.6 to 41.7 (2–5 years), 23.5 to 44.1 (6–10 years), and 31.4 to 55.3 (≤15 years) for brain CT; 1.3 to 5.7 (≤1 year), 3.9 to 6.8 (2–5 years), 3.9 to 9.3 (6–10 years), and 7.7 to 13.8 (≤15 years) for chest CT; and 4.0 to 7.5 (≤1 year), 4.2 to 8.9 (2–5 years), 5.7 to 12.4 (6–10 years), and 7.6 to 16.6 (≤15 years) for abdominopelvic CT. The SSDE and CTDIvol were well correlated for patients <5 years old, whereas the CTDIvol was lower in patients ≥6 years old. Our study describes the various parameters and dosimetry metrics of pediatric CT in South Korea. The CTDIvol, DLP, and effective dose were generally lower than in German and UK

  1. Algorithm-enabled low-dose micro-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao; Bian, Junguo; Eaker, Diane R; Kline, Timothy L; Sidky, Emil Y; Ritman, Erik L; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-03-01

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is an important tool in biomedical research and preclinical applications that can provide visual inspection of and quantitative information about imaged small animals and biological samples such as vasculature specimens. Currently, micro-CT imaging uses projection data acquired at a large number (300-1000) of views, which can limit system throughput and potentially degrade image quality due to radiation-induced deformation or damage to the small animal or specimen. In this work, we have investigated low-dose micro-CT and its application to specimen imaging from substantially reduced projection data by using a recently developed algorithm, referred to as the adaptive-steepest-descent-projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) algorithm, which reconstructs an image through minimizing the image total-variation and enforcing data constraints. To validate and evaluate the performance of the ASD-POCS algorithm, we carried out quantitative evaluation studies in a number of tasks of practical interest in imaging of specimens of real animal organs. The results show that the ASD-POCS algorithm can yield images with quality comparable to that obtained with existing algorithms, while using one-sixth to one quarter of the 361-view data currently used in typical micro-CT specimen imaging.

  2. Segmentation of individual ribs from low-dose chest CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaesung; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2010-03-01

    Segmentation of individual ribs and other bone structures in chest CT images is important for anatomical analysis, as the segmented ribs may be used as a baseline reference for locating organs within a chest as well as for identification and measurement of any geometric abnormalities in the bone. In this paper we present a fully automated algorithm to segment the individual ribs from low-dose chest CT scans. The proposed algorithm consists of four main stages. First, all the high-intensity bone structure present in the scan is segmented. Second, the centerline of the spinal canal is identified using a distance transform of the bone segmentation. Then, the seed region for every rib is detected based on the identified centerline, and each rib is grown from the seed region and separated from the corresponding vertebra. This algorithm was evaluated using 115 low-dose chest CT scans from public databases with various slice thicknesses. The algorithm parameters were determined using 5 scans, and remaining 110 scans were used to evaluate the performance of the segmentation algorithm. The outcome of the algorithm was inspected by an author for the correctness of the segmentation. The results indicate that over 98% of the individual ribs were correctly segmented with the proposed algorithm.

  3. Low-dose CT for quantitative analysis in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The clinical use of serial quantitative computed tomography (CT) to characterize lung disease and guide the optimization of mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is limited by the risk of cumulative radiation exposure and by the difficulties and risks related to transferring patients to the CT room. We evaluated the effects of tube current-time product (mAs) variations on quantitative results in healthy lungs and in experimental ARDS in order to support the use of low-dose CT for quantitative analysis. Methods In 14 sheep chest CT was performed at baseline and after the induction of ARDS via intravenous oleic acid injection. For each CT session, two consecutive scans were obtained applying two different mAs: 60 mAs was paired with 140, 15 or 7.5 mAs. All other CT parameters were kept unaltered (tube voltage 120 kVp, collimation 32 × 0.5 mm, pitch 0.85, matrix 512 × 512, pixel size 0.625 × 0.625 mm). Quantitative results obtained at different mAs were compared via Bland-Altman analysis. Results Good agreement was observed between 60 mAs and 140 mAs and between 60 mAs and 15 mAs (all biases less than 1%). A further reduction of mAs to 7.5 mAs caused an increase in the bias of poorly aerated and nonaerated tissue (-2.9% and 2.4%, respectively) and determined a significant widening of the limits of agreement for the same compartments (-10.5% to 4.8% for poorly aerated tissue and -5.9% to 10.8% for nonaerated tissue). Estimated mean effective dose at 140, 60, 15 and 7.5 mAs corresponded to 17.8, 7.4, 2.0 and 0.9 mSv, respectively. Image noise of scans performed at 140, 60, 15 and 7.5 mAs corresponded to 10, 16, 38 and 74 Hounsfield units, respectively. Conclusions A reduction of effective dose up to 70% has been achieved with minimal effects on lung quantitative results. Low-dose computed tomography provides accurate quantitative results and could be used to characterize lung compartment distribution and

  4. 3D Dose Verification Using Tomotherapy CT Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Ke; Jones, Ryan; Yang Wensha; Saraiya, Siddharth; Schneider, Bernard; Chen Quan; Sobering, Geoff; Olivera, Gustavo; Read, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a three-dimensional dose verification method based on the exit dose using the onboard detector of tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study included 347 treatment fractions from 24 patients, including 10 prostate, 5 head and neck (HN), and 9 spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases. Detector sonograms were retrieved and back-projected to calculate entrance fluence, which was then forward-projected on the CT images to calculate the verification dose, which was compared with ion chamber and film measurement in the QA plans and with the planning dose in patient plans. Results: Root mean square (RMS) errors of 2.0%, 2.2%, and 2.0% were observed comparing the dose verification (DV) and the ion chamber measured point dose in the phantom plans for HN, prostate, and spinal SBRT patients, respectively. When cumulative dose in the entire treatment is considered, for HN patients, the error of the mean dose to the planning target volume (PTV) varied from 1.47% to 5.62% with a RMS error of 3.55%. For prostate patients, the error of the mean dose to the prostate target volume varied from -5.11% to 3.29%, with a RMS error of 2.49%. The RMS error of maximum doses to the bladder and the rectum were 2.34% (-4.17% to 2.61%) and 2.64% (-4.54% to 3.94%), respectively. For the nine spinal SBRT patients, the RMS error of the minimum dose to the PTV was 2.43% (-5.39% to 2.48%). The RMS error of maximum dose to the spinal cord was 1.05% (-2.86% to 0.89%). Conclusions: An excellent agreement was observed between the measurement and the verification dose. In the patient treatments, the agreement in doses to the majority of PTVs and organs at risk is within 5% for the cumulative treatment course doses. The dosimetric error strongly depends on the error in multileaf collimator leaf opening time with a sensitivity correlating to the gantry rotation period.

  5. Radiation Doses of Various CT Protocols: a Multicenter Longitudinal Observation Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Emerging concerns regarding the hazard from medical radiation including CT examinations has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to observe the longitudinal changes of CT radiation doses of various CT protocols and to estimate the long-term efforts of supervising radiologists to reduce medical radiation. Radiation dose data from 11 representative CT protocols were collected from 12 hospitals. Attending radiologists had collected CT radiation dose data in two time points, 2007 and 2010. They collected the volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) of each phase, number of phases, dose length product (DLP) of each phase, and types of scanned CT machines. From the collected data, total DLP and effective dose (ED) were calculated. CTDIvol, total DLP, and ED of 2007 and 2010 were compared according to CT protocols, CT machine type, and hospital. During the three years, CTDIvol had significantly decreased, except for dynamic CT of the liver. Total DLP and ED were significantly decreased in all 11 protocols. The decrement was more evident in newer CT scanners. However, there was substantial variability of changes of ED during the three years according to hospitals. Although there was variability according to protocols, machines, and hospital, CT radiation doses were decreased during the 3 years. This study showed the effects of decreased CT radiation dose by efforts of radiologists and medical society. PMID:26908984

  6. SU-E-I-86: Ultra-Low Dose Computed Tomography Attenuation Correction for Pediatric PET CT Using Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASiR™)

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S; Shulkin, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop ultra-low dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultra-low doses (10–35 mAs). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for eleven tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% CTDIvol (0.39/3.64; mGy) radiation dose from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUVbw) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation organ dose, as derived from patient exam size specific dose estimate (SSDE), was converted to effective dose using the standard ICRP report 103 method. Effective dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative patient population dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the non-dose reduced CTAC image down to 90% dose reduction. No change in SUVbw, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols reconstructed with ASiR and down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62%–86% (3.2/8.3−0.9/6.2; mSv). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from pre dose-reduced patient images. Conclusion: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CTAC dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for co

  7. The influence of novel CT reconstruction technique and ECG-gated technique on image quality and patient dose of cardiac computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Dyakov, I; Stoinova, V; Groudeva, V; Vassileva, J

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare image quality and patient dose in cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) in terms of volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI vol), dose length product (DLP) and effective dose, when changing from filtered back projection (FBP) to adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) reconstruction techniques. Further aim was to implement prospective electrocardiogram (ECG) gating for patient dose reduction. The study was performed with Aquilion ONE 320-row CT of Toshiba Medical Systems. Analysis of cardiac CT protocols was performed before and after integration of the new software. The AIDR technique showed more than 50 % reduction in CTDIvol values and 57 % in effective dose. The subjective evaluation of clinical images confirmed the adequate image quality acquired by the AIDR technique. The preliminary results indicated significant dose reduction when using prospective ECG gating by keeping the adequate diagnostic quality of clinical images. PMID:25836680

  8. Effective Dose of CT- and Fluoroscopy-Guided Perineural/Epidural Injections of the Lumbar Spine: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Gebhard Schmitz, Alexander; Borchardt, Dieter; Ewen, Klaus; Rothenburg, Thomas von; Koester, Odo; Jergas, Michael

    2006-02-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the effective radiation dose of perineural and epidural injections of the lumbar spine under computed tomography (CT) or fluoroscopic guidance with respect to dose-reduced protocols. We assessed the radiation dose with an Alderson Rando phantom at the lumbar segment L4/5 using 29 thermoluminescence dosimeters. Based on our clinical experience, 4-10 CT scans and 1-min fluoroscopy are appropriate. Effective doses were calculated for CT for a routine lumbar spine protocol and for maximum dose reduction; as well as for fluoroscopy in a continuous and a pulsed mode (3-15 pulses/s). Effective doses under CT guidance were 1.51 mSv for 4 scans and 3.53 mSv for 10 scans using a standard protocol and 0.22 mSv and 0.43 mSv for the low-dose protocol. In continuous mode, the effective doses ranged from 0.43 to 1.25 mSv for 1-3 min of fluoroscopy. Using 1 min of pulsed fluoroscopy, the effective dose was less than 0.1 mSv for 3 pulses/s. A consequent low-dose CT protocol reduces the effective dose compared to a standard lumbar spine protocol by more than 85%. The latter dose might be expected when applying about 1 min of continuous fluoroscopy for guidance. A pulsed mode further reduces the effective dose of fluoroscopy by 80-90%.

  9. Effects of sparse sampling schemes on image quality in low-dose CT

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Sajid; Lee, Taewon; Cho, Seungryong; Shin, Sukyoung; Lee, Rena

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Various scanning methods and image reconstruction algorithms are actively investigated for low-dose computed tomography (CT) that can potentially reduce a health-risk related to radiation dose. Particularly, compressive-sensing (CS) based algorithms have been successfully developed for reconstructing images from sparsely sampled data. Although these algorithms have shown promises in low-dose CT, it has not been studied how sparse sampling schemes affect image quality in CS-based image reconstruction. In this work, the authors present several sparse-sampling schemes for low-dose CT, quantitatively analyze their data property, and compare effects of the sampling schemes on the image quality.Methods: Data properties of several sampling schemes are analyzed with respect to the CS-based image reconstruction using two measures: sampling density and data incoherence. The authors present five different sparse sampling schemes, and simulated those schemes to achieve a targeted dose reduction. Dose reduction factors of about 75% and 87.5%, compared to a conventional scan, were tested. A fully sampled circular cone-beam CT data set was used as a reference, and sparse sampling has been realized numerically based on the CBCT data.Results: It is found that both sampling density and data incoherence affect the image quality in the CS-based reconstruction. Among the sampling schemes the authors investigated, the sparse-view, many-view undersampling (MVUS)-fine, and MVUS-moving cases have shown promising results. These sampling schemes produced images with similar image quality compared to the reference image and their structure similarity index values were higher than 0.92 in the mouse head scan with 75% dose reduction.Conclusions: The authors found that in CS-based image reconstructions both sampling density and data incoherence affect the image quality, and suggest that a sampling scheme should be devised and optimized by use of these indicators. With this strategic

  10. Evidence of dose saving in routine CT practice using iterative reconstruction derived from a national diagnostic reference level survey

    PubMed Central

    Hayton, A; Beveridge, T; Marks, P; Wallace, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence and significance of the use of iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on patient dose in CT in Australia. Methods: We examined survey data submitted to the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) National Diagnostic Reference Level Service (NDRLS) during 2013 and 2014. We compared median survey dose metrics with categorization by scan region and use of IR. Results: The use of IR results in a reduction in volume CT dose index of between 17% and 44% and a reduction in dose–length product of between 14% and 34% depending on the specific scan region. The reduction was highly significant (p < 0.001, Wilcoxon rank-sum test) for all six scan regions included in the NDRLS. Overall, 69% (806/1167) of surveys included in the analysis used IR. Conclusion: The use of IR in CT is achieving dose savings of 20–30% in routine practice in Australia. IR appears to be widely used by participants in the ARPANSA NDRLS with approximately 70% of surveys submitted employing this technique. Advances in knowledge: This study examines the impact of the use of IR on patient dose in CT on a national scale. PMID:26133224

  11. Personalized low dose CT via variable kVp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Jin, Yannan; Yao, Yangyang; Wu, Mingye; Yan, Ming; Tao, Kun; Yin, Zhye; De Man, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    Computerized Tomography (CT) is a powerful radiographic imaging technology but the health risk due to the exposure of x-ray radiation has drawn wide concern. In this study, we propose to use kVp modulation to reduce the radiation dose and achieve the personalized low dose CT. Two sets of simulation are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of kVp modulation and the corresponding calibration. The first simulation used the helical body phantom (HBP) that is an elliptical water cylinder with high density bone inserts. The second simulation uses the NCAT phantom to emulate the practical use of kVp modulation approach with region of interest (ROI) selected in the cardiac region. The kVp modulation profile could be optimized view by view based on the knowledge of patient attenuation. A second order correction is applied to eliminate the beam hardening artifacts. To simplify the calibration process, we first generate the calibration vectors for a few representative spectra and then acquire other calibration vectors with interpolation. The simulation results demonstrate the beam hardening artifacts in the images with kVp modulation can be eliminated with proper beam hardening correction. The results also show that the simplification of calibration did not impair the image quality: the calibration with the simplified and the complete vectors both eliminate the artifacts effectively and the results are comparable. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of kVp modulation and gives a practical way to calibrate the high order beam hardening artifacts.

  12. Algorithm for x-ray beam hardening and scatter correction in low-dose cone-beam CT: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenlei; Rong, Junyan; Gao, Peng; Liao, Qimei; Lu, HongBing

    2016-03-01

    X-ray scatter poses a significant limitation to image quality in cone-beam CT (CBCT), as well as beam hardening, resulting in image artifacts, contrast reduction, and lack of CT number accuracy. Meanwhile the x-ray radiation dose is also non-ignorable. Considerable scatter or beam hardening correction methods have been developed, independently, and rarely combined with low-dose CT reconstruction. In this paper, we combine scatter suppression with beam hardening correction for sparse-view CT reconstruction to improve CT image quality and reduce CT radiation. Firstly, scatter was measured, estimated, and removed using measurement-based methods, assuming that signal in the lead blocker shadow is only attributable to x-ray scatter. Secondly, beam hardening was modeled by estimating an equivalent attenuation coefficient at the effective energy, which was integrated into the forward projector of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART). Finally, the compressed sensing (CS) iterative reconstruction is carried out for sparse-view CT reconstruction to reduce the CT radiation. Preliminary Monte Carlo simulated experiments indicate that with only about 25% of conventional dose, our method reduces the magnitude of cupping artifact by a factor of 6.1, increases the contrast by a factor of 1.4 and the CNR by a factor of 15. The proposed method could provide good reconstructed image from a few view projections, with effective suppression of artifacts caused by scatter and beam hardening, as well as reducing the radiation dose. With this proposed framework and modeling, it may provide a new way for low-dose CT imaging.

  13. Effective doses from cone beam CT investigation of the jaws

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J; Johnson, B; Drage, NA

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the study was to calculate the effective dose delivered to the patient undergoing cone beam (CB) CT of the jaws and maxillofacial complex using the i-CAT Next Generation CBCT scanner (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA). Methods A RANDO® phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) containing thermoluminence dosemeters were scanned 10 times for each of the 6 imaging protocols. Effective doses for each protocol were calculated using the 1990 and approved 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommended tissue weighting factors (E1990, E2007). Results The effective dose for E1990 and E2007, respectively, were: full field of view (FOV) of the head, 47 μSv and 78 μSv; 13 cm scan of the jaws, 44 μSv and 77 μSv; 6 cm standard mandible, 35 μSv and 58 μSv; 6 cm high resolution mandible, 69 μSv and 113 μSv; 6 cm standard maxilla, 18 μSv and 32 μSv; and 6 cm high resolution maxilla, 35 μSv and 60 μSv. Conclusions Using the new generation of CBCT scanner, the effective dose is lower than the original generation machine for a similar FOV using the ICRP 2007 tissue weighting factors. PMID:22184626

  14. Comparison of effective radiation doses from X-ray, CT, and PET/CT in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma using a dose monitoring program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeun Yoon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the use of a dose monitoring program for calculating and comparing the diagnostic radiation doses in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed diagnostic and therapeutic imaging studies performed on pediatric patients with neuroblastoma from 2003 to 2014. We calculated the mean effective dose per exam for X-ray, conventional computed tomography (CT), and CT of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) from the data collected using a dose monitoring program (DoseTrack group) since October 2012. Using the data, we estimated the cumulative dose per person and the relative dose from each modality in all patients (Total group). The effective dose from PET was manually calculated for all patients. RESULTS We included 63 patients with a mean age of 3.2±3.5 years; 28 had a history of radiation therapy, with a mean irradiated dose of 31.9±23.2 Gy. The mean effective dose per exam was 0.04±0.19 mSv for X-ray, 1.09±1.11 mSv for CT, and 8.35±7.45 mSv for CT of PET/CT in 31 patients of the Dose-Track group. The mean estimated cumulative dose per patient in the Total group was 3.43±2.86 mSv from X-ray (8.5%), 7.66±6.09 mSv from CT (19.1%), 18.35±13.52 mSv from CT of PET/CT (45.7%), and 10.71±10.05 mSv from PET (26.7%). CONCLUSION CT of PET/CT contributed nearly half of the total cumulative dose in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. The radiation dose from X-ray was not negligible because of the large number of X-ray images. A dose monitoring program can be useful for calculating radiation doses in patients with cancer. PMID:27306659

  15. Dose distribution for dental cone beam CT and its implication for defining a dose index

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, R; Theodorakou, C; Walker, A; Bosmans, H; Jacobs, R; Horner, K; Bogaerts, R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the dose distribution for a range of cone beam CT (CBCT) units, investigating different field of view sizes, central and off-axis geometries, full or partial rotations of the X-ray tube and different clinically applied beam qualities. The implications of the dose distributions on the definition and practicality of a CBCT dose index were assessed. Methods Dose measurements on CBCT devices were performed by scanning cylindrical head-size water and polymethyl methacrylate phantoms, using thermoluminescent dosemeters, a small-volume ion chamber and radiochromic films. Results It was found that the dose distribution can be asymmetrical for dental CBCT exposures throughout a homogeneous phantom, owing to an asymmetrical positioning of the isocentre and/or partial rotation of the X-ray source. Furthermore, the scatter tail along the z-axis was found to have a distinct shape, generally resulting in a strong drop (90%) in absorbed dose outside the primary beam. Conclusions There is no optimal dose index available owing to the complicated exposure geometry of CBCT and the practical aspects of quality control measurements. Practical validation of different possible dose indices is needed, as well as the definition of conversion factors to patient dose. PMID:22752320

  16. Utilising pseudo-CT data for dose calculation and plan optimization in adaptive radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Brendan; Kumar, Shivani; Dowling, Jason; Begg, Jarrad; Lambert, Jonathan; Lim, Karen; Vinod, Shalini K; Greer, Peter B; Holloway, Lois

    2015-12-01

    To quantify the dose calculation error and resulting optimization uncertainty caused by performing inverse treatment planning on inaccurate electron density data (pseudo-CT) as needed for adaptive radiotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) based treatment planning. Planning Computer Tomography (CT) data from 10 cervix cancer patients was used to generate 4 pseudo-CT data sets. Each pseudo-CT was created based on an available method of assigning electron density to an anatomic image. An inversely modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan was developed on each planning CT. The dose calculation error caused by each pseudo-CT data set was quantified by comparing the dose calculated each pseudo-CT data set with that calculated on the original planning CT for the same IMRT plan. The optimization uncertainty introduced by the dose calculation error was quantified by re-optimizing the same optimization parameters on each pseudo-CT data set and comparing against the original planning CT. Dose differences were quantified by assessing the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD) for targets and relevant organs at risk. Across all pseudo-CT data sets and all organs, the absolute mean dose calculation error was 0.2 Gy, and was within 2 % of the prescription dose in 98.5 % of cases. Then absolute mean optimisation error was 0.3 Gy EUD, indicating that that inverse optimisation is impacted by the dose calculation error. However, the additional uncertainty introduced to plan optimisation is small compared the sources of variation which already exist. Use of inaccurate electron density data for inverse treatment planning results in a dose calculation error, which in turn introduces additional uncertainty into the plan optimization process. In this study, we showed that both of these effects are clinically acceptable for cervix cancer patients using four different pseudo-CT data sets. Dose calculation and inverse optimization on pseudo-CT is feasible for this patient cohort.

  17. Effect of leaded glasses and thyroid shielding on cone beam CT radiation dose in an adult female phantom

    PubMed Central

    Goren, AD; Prins, RD; Dauer, LT; Quinn, B; Al-Najjar, A; Faber, RD; Patchell, G; Branets, I; Colosi, DC

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to demonstrate the effectiveness of leaded glasses in reducing the lens of eye dose and of lead thyroid collars in reducing the dose to the thyroid gland of an adult female from dental cone beam CT (CBCT). The effect of collimation on the radiation dose in head organs is also examined. Methods: Dose measurements were conducted by placing optically stimulated luminescent dosemeters in an anthropomorphic female phantom. Eye lens dose was measured by placing a dosemeter on the anterior surface of the phantom eye location. All exposures were performed on one commercially available dental CBCT machine, using selected collimation and exposure techniques. Each scan technique was performed without any lead shielding and then repeated with lead shielding in place. To calculate the percent reduction from lead shielding, the dose measured with lead shielding was divided by the dose measured without lead shielding. The percent reduction from collimation was calculated by comparing the dose measured with collimation to the dose measured without collimation. Results: The dose to the internal eye for one of the scans without leaded glasses or thyroid shield was 0.450 cGy and with glasses and thyroid shield was 0.116 cGy (a 74% reduction). The reduction to the lens of the eye was from 0.396 cGy to 0.153 cGy (a 61% reduction). Without glasses or thyroid shield, the thyroid dose was 0.158 cGy; and when both glasses and shield were used, the thyroid dose was reduced to 0.091 cGy (a 42% reduction). Conclusions: Collimation alone reduced the dose to the brain by up to 91%, with a similar reduction in other organs. Based on these data, leaded glasses, thyroid collars and collimation minimize the dose to organs outside the field of view. PMID:23412460

  18. Low-Dose PET/CT and Full-Dose Contrast-Enhanced CT at the Initial Staging of Localized Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Sabaté-Llobera, Aida; Cortés-Romera, Montserrat; Mercadal, Santiago; Hernández-Gañán, Javier; Pomares, Helena; González-Barca, Eva; Gámez-Cenzano, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used as the reference imaging technique for the initial staging of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma until recent days, when the introduction of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging as a hybrid technique has become of routine use. However, the performance of both examinations is still common. The aim of this work was to compare the findings between low-dose 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT and full-dose contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT) in 28 patients with localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to PET/CT findings, in order to avoid the performance of ceCT. For each technique, a comparison in the number of nodal and extranodal involved regions was performed. PET/CT showed more lesions than ceCT in both nodal (41 vs. 36) and extranodal localizations (16 vs. 15). Disease staging according to both techniques was concordant in 22 patients (79%) and discordant in 6 patients (21%), changing treatment management in 3 patients (11%). PET/CT determined a better staging and therapeutic approach, making the performance of an additional ceCT unnecessary. PMID:27559300

  19. Low-Dose PET/CT and Full-Dose Contrast-Enhanced CT at the Initial Staging of Localized Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sabaté-Llobera, Aida; Cortés-Romera, Montserrat; Mercadal, Santiago; Hernández-Gañán, Javier; Pomares, Helena; González-Barca, Eva; Gámez-Cenzano, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used as the reference imaging technique for the initial staging of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma until recent days, when the introduction of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging as a hybrid technique has become of routine use. However, the performance of both examinations is still common. The aim of this work was to compare the findings between low-dose 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-d-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/CT and full-dose contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT) in 28 patients with localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to PET/CT findings, in order to avoid the performance of ceCT. For each technique, a comparison in the number of nodal and extranodal involved regions was performed. PET/CT showed more lesions than ceCT in both nodal (41 vs. 36) and extranodal localizations (16 vs. 15). Disease staging according to both techniques was concordant in 22 patients (79%) and discordant in 6 patients (21%), changing treatment management in 3 patients (11%). PET/CT determined a better staging and therapeutic approach, making the performance of an additional ceCT unnecessary.

  20. Investigating the low-dose limits of multidetector CT in lung nodule surveillance.

    PubMed

    Paul, N S; Siewerdsen, J H; Patsios, D; Chung, T B

    2007-09-01

    degradation and reduction in observer performance for all tasks occur at a dose of < or = 1 mGy. It is concluded that the size and attenuation of a nodule strongly influence the radiation dose required for confident evaluation with a minimum threshold value of 1-2 mGy (minimum dose CT). A prior knowledge of nodule size and attenuation is available from the baseline CT scan and is an important consideration in minimizing the radiation exposure required for nodule detection with surveillance CT.

  1. Novel iterative reconstruction method with optimal dose usage for partially redundant CT-acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, H.; Raupach, R.; Sunnegardh, J.; Allmendinger, T.; Klotz, E.; Stierstorfer, K.; Flohr, T.

    2015-11-01

    In CT imaging, a variety of applications exist which are strongly SNR limited. However, in some cases redundant data of the same body region provide additional quanta. Examples: in dual energy CT, the spatial resolution has to be compromised to provide good SNR for material decomposition. However, the respective spectral dataset of the same body region provides additional quanta which might be utilized to improve SNR of each spectral component. Perfusion CT is a high dose application, and dose reduction is highly desirable. However, a meaningful evaluation of perfusion parameters might be impaired by noisy time frames. On the other hand, the SNR of the average of all time frames is extremely high. In redundant CT acquisitions, multiple image datasets can be reconstructed and averaged to composite image data. These composite image data, however, might be compromised with respect to contrast resolution and/or spatial resolution and/or temporal resolution. These observations bring us to the idea of transferring high SNR of composite image data to low SNR ‘source’ image data, while maintaining their resolution. It has been shown that the noise characteristics of CT image data can be improved by iterative reconstruction (Popescu et al 2012 Book of Abstracts, 2nd CT Meeting (Salt Lake City, UT) p 148). In case of data dependent Gaussian noise it can be modelled with image-based iterative reconstruction at least in an approximate manner (Bruder et al 2011 Proc. SPIE 7961 79610J). We present a generalized update equation in image space, consisting of a linear combination of the previous update, a correction term which is constrained by the source image data, and a regularization prior, which is initialized by the composite image data. This iterative reconstruction approach we call bimodal reconstruction (BMR). Based on simulation data it is shown that BMR can improve low contrast detectability, substantially reduces the noise power and has the potential to recover

  2. Task-based image quality evaluation of iterative reconstruction methods for low dose CT using computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingyan; Fuld, Matthew K.; Fung, George S. K.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-04-01

    Iterative reconstruction (IR) methods for x-ray CT is a promising approach to improve image quality or reduce radiation dose to patients. The goal of this work was to use task based image quality measures and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) to evaluate both analytic and IR methods for clinical x-ray CT applications. We performed realistic computer simulations at five radiation dose levels, from a clinical reference low dose D0 to 25% D0. A fixed size and contrast lesion was inserted at different locations into the liver of the XCAT phantom to simulate a weak signal. The simulated data were reconstructed on a commercial CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) using the vendor-provided analytic (WFBP) and IR (SAFIRE) methods. The reconstructed images were analyzed by CHOs with both rotationally symmetric (RS) and rotationally oriented (RO) channels, and with different numbers of lesion locations (5, 10, and 20) in a signal known exactly (SKE), background known exactly but variable (BKEV) detection task. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used as a summary measure to compare the IR and analytic methods; the AUC was also used as the equal performance criterion to derive the potential dose reduction factor of IR. In general, there was a good agreement in the relative AUC values of different reconstruction methods using CHOs with RS and RO channels, although the CHO with RO channels achieved higher AUCs than RS channels. The improvement of IR over analytic methods depends on the dose level. The reference dose level D0 was based on a clinical low dose protocol, lower than the standard dose due to the use of IR methods. At 75% D0, the performance improvement was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The potential dose reduction factor also depended on the detection task. For the SKE/BKEV task involving 10 lesion locations, a dose reduction of at least 25% from D0 was achieved.

  3. Phantom based evaluation of CT to CBCT image registration for proton therapy dose recalculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Guillaume; Dedes, George; Zöllner, Christoph; Handrack, Josefine; Janssens, Guillaume; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan; Reiner, Michael; Paganelli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Kamp, Florian; Söhn, Matthias; Wilkens, Jan J.; Baroni, Guido; Belka, Claus; Parodi, Katia

    2015-01-01

    The ability to perform dose recalculation on the anatomy of the day is important in the context of adaptive proton therapy. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of deformable image registration (DIR) and cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging to generate the daily stopping power distribution of the patient. We investigated the deformation of the planning CT scan (pCT) onto daily CBCT images to generate a virtual CT (vCT) using a deformable phantom designed for the head and neck (H & N) region. The phantom was imaged at a planning CT scanner in planning configuration, yielding a pCT and in deformed, treatment day configuration, yielding a reference CT (refCT). The treatment day configuration was additionally scanned at a CBCT scanner. A Morphons DIR algorithm was used to generate a vCT. The accuracy of the vCT was evaluated by comparison to the refCT in terms of corresponding features as identified by an adaptive scale invariant feature transform (aSIFT) algorithm. Additionally, the vCT CT numbers were compared to those of the refCT using both profiles and regions of interest and the volumes and overlap (DICE coefficients) of various phantom structures were compared. The water equivalent thickness (WET) of the vCT, refCT and pCT were also compared to evaluate proton range differences. Proton dose distributions from the same initial fluence were calculated on the refCT, vCT and pCT and compared in terms of proton range. The method was tested on a clinical dataset using a replanning CT scan acquired close in time to a CBCT scan as reference using the WET evaluation. Results from the aSIFT investigation suggest a deformation accuracy of 2-3 mm. The use of the Morphon algorithm did not distort CT number intensity in uniform regions and WET differences between vCT and refCT were of the order of 2% of the proton range. This result was confirmed by proton dose calculations. The patient results were consistent with phantom observations. In conclusion, our phantom

  4. Experimental evaluation of actual delivered dose using mega-voltage cone-beam CT and direct point dose measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Kana; Kohno, Ryosuke; Nishioka, Shie; Shibuya, Toshiyuki; Ariji, Takaki; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2013-07-01

    Radiation therapy in patients is planned by using computed tomography (CT) images acquired before start of the treatment course. Here, tumor shrinkage or weight loss or both, which are common during the treatment course for patients with head-and-neck (H and N) cancer, causes unexpected differences from the plan, as well as dose uncertainty with the daily positional error of patients. For accurate clinical evaluation, it is essential to identify these anatomical changes and daily positional errors, as well as consequent dosimetric changes. To evaluate the actual delivered dose, the authors proposed direct dose measurement and dose calculation with mega-voltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT). The purpose of the present study was to experimentally evaluate dose calculation by MVCBCT. Furthermore, actual delivered dose was evaluated directly with accurate phantom setup. Because MVCBCT has CT-number variation, even when the analyzed object has a uniform density, a specific and simple CT-number correction method was developed and applied for the H and N site of a RANDO phantom. Dose distributions were calculated with the corrected MVCBCT images of a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom. Treatment processes from planning to beam delivery were performed for the H and N site of the RANDO phantom. The image-guided radiation therapy procedure was utilized for the phantom setup to improve measurement reliability. The calculated dose in the RANDO phantom was compared to the measured dose obtained by metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor detectors. In the polymethyl methacrylate phantom, the calculated and measured doses agreed within about +3%. In the RANDO phantom, the dose difference was less than +5%. The calculated dose based on simulation-CT agreed with the measured dose within±3%, even in the region with a high dose gradient. The actual delivered dose was successfully determined by dose calculation with MVCBCT, and the point dose measurement with the image

  5. Reduction of radiation exposure by lead curtain shielding in dedicated extremity cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C-H; Ryu, J H; Lee, Y-H

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A dedicated extremity cone beam CT (CBCT) was introduced recently, and is rapidly becoming an attractive modality for extremity imaging. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a curtain-shaped lead shielding in reducing the exposure of patients to scattered radiation in dedicated extremity CBCT. Methods: A dedicated extremity CBCT scanner was used. The lead shielding curtain was 42 × 60 cm with 0.5-mm lead equivalent. Scattered radiation dose from CBCT was measured using thermoluminescence dosimetry chips at 20 points, at different distances and directions from the CT gantry. Two sets of scattered radiation dose measurements were performed before and after installation of curtain-shaped lead shield, and the percentage reduction in dose in air was calculated. Results: Mean radiation exposure dose at measured points was 34.46 ± 48.40 μGy without curtains and 9.67 ± 4.53 μGy with curtains, exhibiting 71.94% reduction (p = 0.000). The use of lead shielding curtains significantly reduced scattered radiation at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m from the CT gantry, with percent reductions of 84.8%, 58.0% and 35.5%, respectively (p = 0.000, 0.000 and 0.002). The percent reduction in the diagonal (+45°, −45°) and vertical forward (0°) directions were 86.3%, 83.1% and 77.7%, respectively, and were statistically significant (p = 0.029, 0.020 and 0.041). Conclusion: Shielding with lead curtains suggests an easy and effective method for reducing patient exposure to radiation in extremity CBCT imaging. Advances in knowledge: Lead shielding curtains are an effective technique to reduce scattered radiation dose in dedicated extremity CBCT, with higher dose reduction closer to the gantry opening. PMID:25811096

  6. RADIANCE: An automated, enterprise-wide solution for archiving and reporting CT radiation dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Cook, Tessa S; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Steingall, Scott R; Maidment, Andrew D A; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in the ability to monitor, track, and report exposure to radiation from medical imaging. Historically, however, dose information has been stored on an image-based dose sheet, an arrangement that precludes widespread indexing. Although scanner manufacturers are beginning to include dose-related parameters in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) headers of imaging studies, there remains a vast repository of retrospective computed tomographic (CT) data with image-based dose sheets. Consequently, it is difficult for imaging centers to monitor their dose estimates or participate in the American College of Radiology (ACR) Dose Index Registry. An automated extraction software pipeline known as Radiation Dose Intelligent Analytics for CT Examinations (RADIANCE) has been designed that quickly and accurately parses CT dose sheets to extract and archive dose-related parameters. Optical character recognition of information in the dose sheet leads to creation of a text file, which along with the DICOM study header is parsed to extract dose-related data. The data are then stored in a relational database that can be queried for dose monitoring and report creation. RADIANCE allows efficient dose analysis of CT examinations and more effective education of technologists, radiologists, and referring physicians regarding patient exposure to radiation at CT. RADIANCE also allows compliance with the ACR's dose reporting guidelines and greater awareness of patient radiation dose, ultimately resulting in improved patient care and treatment.

  7. RADIANCE: An automated, enterprise-wide solution for archiving and reporting CT radiation dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Cook, Tessa S; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Steingall, Scott R; Maidment, Andrew D A; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in the ability to monitor, track, and report exposure to radiation from medical imaging. Historically, however, dose information has been stored on an image-based dose sheet, an arrangement that precludes widespread indexing. Although scanner manufacturers are beginning to include dose-related parameters in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) headers of imaging studies, there remains a vast repository of retrospective computed tomographic (CT) data with image-based dose sheets. Consequently, it is difficult for imaging centers to monitor their dose estimates or participate in the American College of Radiology (ACR) Dose Index Registry. An automated extraction software pipeline known as Radiation Dose Intelligent Analytics for CT Examinations (RADIANCE) has been designed that quickly and accurately parses CT dose sheets to extract and archive dose-related parameters. Optical character recognition of information in the dose sheet leads to creation of a text file, which along with the DICOM study header is parsed to extract dose-related data. The data are then stored in a relational database that can be queried for dose monitoring and report creation. RADIANCE allows efficient dose analysis of CT examinations and more effective education of technologists, radiologists, and referring physicians regarding patient exposure to radiation at CT. RADIANCE also allows compliance with the ACR's dose reporting guidelines and greater awareness of patient radiation dose, ultimately resulting in improved patient care and treatment. PMID:21969661

  8. SU-E-T-396: Dosimetric Accuracy of Proton Therapy for Patients with Metal Implants in CT Scans Using Metal Deletion Technique (MDT) Artifacts Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X; Kantor, M; Zhu, X; Frank, S; Sahoo, N; Li, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric accuracy for proton therapy patients with metal implants in CT using metal deletion technique (MDT) artifacts reduction. Methods: Proton dose accuracies under CT metal artifacts were first evaluated using a water phantom with cylindrical inserts of different materials (titanium and steel). Ranges and dose profiles along different beam angles were calculated using treatment planning system (Eclipse version 8.9) on uncorrected CT, MDT CT, and manually-corrected CT, where true Hounsfield units (water) were assigned to the streak artifacts. In patient studies, the treatment plans were developed on manually-corrected CTs, then recalculated on MDT and uncorrected CTs. DVH indices were compared between the dose distributions on all the CTs. Results: For water phantom study with 1/2 inch titanium insert, the proton range differences estimated by MDT CT were with 1% for all beam angles, while the range error can be up to 2.6% for uncorrected CT. For the study with 1 inch stainless steel insert, the maximum range error calculated by MDT CT was 1.09% among all the beam angles compared with maximum range error with 4.7% for uncorrected CT. The dose profiles calculated on MDT CTs for both titanium and steel inserts showed very good agreements with the ones calculated on manually-corrected CTs, while large dose discrepancies calculated using uncorrected CTs were observed in the distal end region of the proton beam. The patient study showed similar dose distribution and DVHs for organs near the metal artifacts recalculated on MDT CT compared with the ones calculated on manually-corrected CT, while the differences between uncorrected and corrected CTs were much pronounced. Conclusion: In proton therapy, large dose error could occur due to metal artifact. The MDT CT can be used for proton dose calculation to achieve similar dose accuracy as the current clinical practice using manual correction.

  9. Clinical evaluation of the iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm for CT simulation in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Axente, Marian; Von Eyben, Rie; Hristov, Dimitre; Paidi, Ajay; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Zeng, Chuan; Krauss, Andreas

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To clinically evaluate an iterative metal artifact reduction (IMAR) algorithm prototype in the radiation oncology clinic setting by testing for accuracy in CT number retrieval, relative dosimetric changes in regions affected by artifacts, and improvements in anatomical and shape conspicuity of corrected images. Methods: A phantom with known material inserts was scanned in the presence/absence of metal with different configurations of placement and sizes. The relative change in CT numbers from the reference data (CT with no metal) was analyzed. The CT studies were also used for dosimetric tests where dose distributions from both photon and proton beams were calculated. Dose differences and gamma analysis were calculated to quantify the relative changes between doses calculated on the different CT studies. Data from eight patients (all different treatment sites) were also used to quantify the differences between dose distributions before and after correction with IMAR, with no reference standard. A ranking experiment was also conducted to analyze the relative confidence of physicians delineating anatomy in the near vicinity of the metal implants. Results: IMAR corrected images proved to accurately retrieve CT numbers in the phantom study, independent of metal insert configuration, size of the metal, and acquisition energy. For plastic water, the mean difference between corrected images and reference images was −1.3 HU across all scenarios (N = 37) with a 90% confidence interval of [−2.4, −0.2] HU. While deviations were relatively higher in images with more metal content, IMAR was able to effectively correct the CT numbers independent of the quantity of metal. Residual errors in the CT numbers as well as some induced by the correction algorithm were found in the IMAR corrected images. However, the dose distributions calculated on IMAR corrected images were closer to the reference data in phantom studies. Relative spatial difference in the dose

  10. Changes realized from extended bit-depth and metal artifact reduction in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Glide-Hurst, C.; Chen, D.; Zhong, H.; Chetty, I. J.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: High-Z material in computed tomography (CT) yields metal artifacts that degrade image quality and may cause substantial errors in dose calculation. This study couples a metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm with enhanced 16-bit depth (vs standard 12-bit) to quantify potential gains in image quality and dosimetry. Methods: Extended CT to electron density (CT-ED) curves were derived from a tissue characterization phantom with titanium and stainless steel inserts scanned at 90-140 kVp for 12- and 16-bit reconstructions. MAR was applied to sinogram data (Brilliance BigBore CT scanner, Philips Healthcare, v.3.5). Monte Carlo simulation (MC-SIM) was performed on a simulated double hip prostheses case (Cerrobend rods embedded in a pelvic phantom) using BEAMnrc/Dosxyz (400 000 0000 histories, 6X, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} beam traversing Cerrobend rod). A phantom study was also conducted using a stainless steel rod embedded in solid water, and dosimetric verification was performed with Gafchromic film analysis (absolute difference and gamma analysis, 2% dose and 2 mm distance to agreement) for plans calculated with Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA, Eclipse v11.0) to elucidate changes between 12- and 16-bit data. Three patients (bony metastases to the femur and humerus, and a prostate cancer case) with metal implants were reconstructed using both bit depths, with dose calculated using AAA and derived CT-ED curves. Planar dose distributions were assessed via matrix analyses and using gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm. Results: For 12-bit images, CT numbers for titanium and stainless steel saturated at 3071 Hounsfield units (HU), whereas for 16-bit depth, mean CT numbers were much larger (e.g., titanium and stainless steel yielded HU of 8066.5 {+-} 56.6 and 13 588.5 {+-} 198.8 for 16-bit uncorrected scans at 120 kVp, respectively). MC-SIM was well-matched between 12- and 16-bit images except downstream of the Cerrobend rod, where 16-bit dose was {approx}6

  11. Evaluation of radiation dose delivered by cone beam CT and tomosynthesis employed for setup of external breast irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Winey, Brian; Zygmanski, Piotr; Lyatskaya, Yulia

    2009-01-15

    A systematic set of measurements is reported for evaluation of doses to critical organs resulting from cone-beam CT (CB-CT) and cone-beam tomosynthesis (CB-TS) as applied to breast setup for external beam irradiation. The specific focus of this study was on evaluation of doses from these modalities in a setting of volumetric breast imaging for target localization in radiotherapy treatments with the goal of minimizing radiation to healthy organs. Ion chamber measurements were performed in an anthropomorphic female thorax phantom at the center of each breast and lung and on the phantom surface at one anterior and two lateral locations (seven points total). The measurements were performed for three different isocenters located at the center of the phantom and at offset locations of the right and left breast. The dependence of the dose on angle selection for the CB-TS arc was also studied. For the most typical situation of centrally located CB-CT isocenter the measured doses ranged between 3 and 7 cGy, in good agreement with previous reports. Dose measurements were performed for a range of start/stop angles commonly used for CB-TS and the impact of direct and scatter dose on organs at risk was analyzed. All measured CB-TS doses were considerably lower than CB-CT doses, with greater decrease in dose for the organs outside of the beam (up to 98% decrease in dose). Remarkably, offsetting the isocenter towards the ipsilateral breast resulted on average to additional 46% dose reduction to organs at risk. The lowest doses to the contralateral breast and lung were less than 0.1 cGy when they were measured for the offset isocenter. The biggest reduction in dose was obtained by using CB-TS beams that completely avoid the critical organ. For points inside the CB-TS beam, the dose was reduced in a linear relation with distance from the center of the imaging arc. The data indicate that it is possible to reduce substantially radiation doses to the contralateral organs by proper

  12. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Zanca, F.; Jacobs, A.; Crijns, W.; De Wever, W.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure.

  13. Average radiation dose in standard CT examinations of the head: results of the 1990 NEXT survey.

    PubMed

    Conway, B J; McCrohan, J L; Antonsen, R G; Rueter, F G; Slayton, R J; Suleiman, O H

    1992-07-01

    In 1990, as part of the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) program, 252 computed tomographic (CT) systems were evaluated to measure radiation doses associated with standard head CT in adults. The multiple-scan average dose (MSAD) was used as the dose descriptor. For most of the systems, the MSAD at the midpoint on the central axis of a standard dosimetry phantom was between 34 and 55 mGy. Doses were as high as 140 mGy, and dose sometimes varied by a factor of two or more for identical CT units. This range indicates that dose can potentially be reduced by careful selection of standard CT techniques. Users of CT systems should be aware of radiation dose delivered with CT, dose ranges associated with different systems, and doses delivered with their particular unit, which requires that dose performance of CT systems be assessed by means of a protocol that allows comparison of data collected for identical and/or different units.

  14. Improving abdomen tumor low-dose CT images using a fast dictionary learning based processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shi, Luyao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Toumoulin, Christine

    2013-08-01

    In abdomen computed tomography (CT), repeated radiation exposures are often inevitable for cancer patients who receive surgery or radiotherapy guided by CT images. Low-dose scans should thus be considered in order to avoid the harm of accumulative x-ray radiation. This work is aimed at improving abdomen tumor CT images from low-dose scans by using a fast dictionary learning (DL) based processing. Stemming from sparse representation theory, the proposed patch-based DL approach allows effective suppression of both mottled noise and streak artifacts. The experiments carried out on clinical data show that the proposed method brings encouraging improvements in abdomen low-dose CT images with tumors.

  15. NCICT: a computational solution to estimate organ doses for pediatric and adult patients undergoing CT scans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Bolch, Wesley E; Moroz, Brian E; Folio, Les

    2015-12-01

    We developed computational methods and tools to assess organ doses for pediatric and adult patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations. We used the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference pediatric and adult phantoms combined with the Monte Carlo simulation of a reference CT scanner to establish comprehensive organ dose coefficients (DC), organ absorbed dose per unit volumetric CT Dose Index (CTDIvol) (mGy/mGy). We also developed methods to estimate organ doses with tube current modulation techniques and size specific dose estimates. A graphical user interface was designed to obtain user input of patient- and scan-specific parameters, and to calculate and display organ doses. A batch calculation routine was also integrated into the program to automatically calculate organ doses for a large number of patients. We entitled the computer program, National Cancer Institute dosimetry system for CT(NCICT). We compared our dose coefficients with those from CT-Expo, and evaluated the performance of our program using CT patient data. Our pediatric DCs show good agreements of organ dose estimation with those from CT-Expo except for thyroid. Our results support that the adult phantom in CT-Expo seems to represent a pediatric individual between 10 and 15 years rather than an adult. The comparison of CTDIvol values between NCICT and dose pages from 10 selected CT scans shows good agreements less than 12% except for two cases (up to 20%). The organ dose comparison between mean and modulated mAs shows that mean mAs-based calculation significantly overestimates dose (up to 2.4-fold) to the organs in close proximity to lungs in chest and chest-abdomen-pelvis scans. Our program provides more realistic anatomy based on the ICRP reference phantoms, higher age resolution, the most up-to-date bone marrow dosimetry, and several convenient features compared to previous tools. The NCICT will be available for research purpose in the near future.

  16. Characterization of a lead breast shielding for dose reduction in computed tomography*

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Paula Duarte; Granzotti, Cristiano Roberto Fabri; Santos, Yago da Silva; Brochi, Marco Aurelio Corte; de Azevedo-Marques, Paulo Mazzoncini

    2014-01-01

    Objective Several studies have been published regarding the use of bismuth shielding to protect the breast in computed tomography (CT) scans and, up to the writing of this article, only one publication about barium shielding was found. The present study was aimed at characterizing, for the first time, a lead breast shielding. Materials and Methods The percentage dose reduction and the influence of the shielding on quantitative imaging parameters were evaluated. Dose measurements were made on a CT equipment with the aid of specific phantoms and radiation detectors. A processing software assisted in the qualitative analysis evaluating variations in average CT number and noise on images. Results The authors observed a reduction in entrance dose by 30% and in CTDIvol by 17%. In all measurements, in agreement with studies in the literature, the utilization of cotton fiber as spacer object reduced significantly the presence of artifacts on the images. All the measurements demonstrated increase in the average CT number and noise on the images with the presence of the shielding. Conclusion As expected, the data observed with the use of lead shielding were of the same order as those found in the literature about bismuth shielding. PMID:25741089

  17. Prefecture-wide multi-centre radiation dose survey as a useful tool for CT dose optimisation: report of Gunma radiation dose study.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Nakajima, Takahito; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the usefulness for the dose optimisation of setting a diagnostic reference level (DRL) based on the results of a prefecture-wide multi-centre radiation dose survey and providing data feedback. All hospitals/clinics in the authors' prefecture with computed tomography (CT) scanners were requested to report data. The first survey was done in July 2011, and the results of dose-length products (DLPs) for each CT scanner were fed back to all hospitals/clinics, with DRL set from all the data. One year later, a second survey was done in the same manner. The medians of DLP in the upper abdomen, whole body and coronary CT in 2012 were significantly smaller than those of the 2011 survey. The interquartile ranges of DLP in the head, chest, pelvis and coronary CT were also smaller in 2012. Radiation dose survey with data feedback may be helpful for CT dose optimisation.

  18. Metal artifact reduction in CT via ray profile correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    In computed tomography (CT), metal implants increase the inconsistencies between the measured data and the linear assumption made by the analytical CT reconstruction algorithm. The inconsistencies appear in the form of dark and bright bands and streaks in the reconstructed image, collectively called metal artifacts. The standard method for metal artifact reduction (MAR) replaces the inconsistent data with the interpolated data. However, sinogram interpolation not only introduces new artifacts but it also suffers from the loss of detail near the implanted metals. With the help of a prior image that is usually estimated from the metal artifact-degraded image via computer vision techniques, improvements are feasible but still no MAR method exists that is widely accepted and utilized. We propose a technique that utilizes a prior image from a CT scan taken of the patient before implanting the metal objects. Hence there is a sufficient amount of structural similarity to cover the loss of detail around the metal implants. Using the prior scan and a segmentation or model of the metal implant our method then replaces sinogram interpolation with ray profile matching and estimation which yields much more reliable data estimates for the affected sinogram regions. As preliminary work, we built a new MAR framework on fan-beam geometry and tested it to remove simulated metal artifacts on a thorax phantom. The comparison with two representative sinogram correction based MAR methods shows very promising results.

  19. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images.

  20. Median prior constrained TV algorithm for sparse view low-dose CT reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Shangguan, Hong; Zhang, Quan; Zhu, Hongqing; Shu, Huazhong; Gui, Zhiguo

    2015-05-01

    It is known that lowering the X-ray tube current (mAs) or tube voltage (kVp) and simultaneously reducing the total number of X-ray views (sparse view) is an effective means to achieve low-dose in computed tomography (CT) scan. However, the associated image quality by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) usually degrades due to the excessive quantum noise. Although sparse-view CT reconstruction algorithm via total variation (TV), in the scanning protocol of reducing X-ray tube current, has been demonstrated to be able to result in significant radiation dose reduction while maintain image quality, noticeable patchy artifacts still exist in reconstructed images. In this study, to address the problem of patchy artifacts, we proposed a median prior constrained TV regularization to retain the image quality by introducing an auxiliary vector m in register with the object. Specifically, the approximate action of m is to draw, in each iteration, an object voxel toward its own local median, aiming to improve low-dose image quality with sparse-view projection measurements. Subsequently, an alternating optimization algorithm is adopted to optimize the associative objective function. We refer to the median prior constrained TV regularization as "TV_MP" for simplicity. Experimental results on digital phantoms and clinical phantom demonstrated that the proposed TV_MP with appropriate control parameters can not only ensure a higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image, but also its resolution compared with the original TV method.

  1. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images. PMID:26980176

  2. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-16

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images.

  3. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT: analysis of sparse view data acquisition and reconstruction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Rui, Xue; Cheng, Lishui; Long, Yong; Fu, Lin; Alessio, Adam M; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E; De Man, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    For PET/CT systems, PET image reconstruction requires corresponding CT images for anatomical localization and attenuation correction. In the case of PET respiratory gating, multiple gated CT scans can offer phase-matched attenuation and motion correction, at the expense of increased radiation dose. We aim to minimize the dose of the CT scan, while preserving adequate image quality for the purpose of PET attenuation correction by introducing sparse view CT data acquisition.We investigated sparse view CT acquisition protocols resulting in ultra-low dose CT scans designed for PET attenuation correction. We analyzed the tradeoffs between the number of views and the integrated tube current per view for a given dose using CT and PET simulations of a 3D NCAT phantom with lesions inserted into liver and lung. We simulated seven CT acquisition protocols with {984, 328, 123, 41, 24, 12, 8} views per rotation at a gantry speed of 0.35 s. One standard dose and four ultra-low dose levels, namely, 0.35 mAs, 0.175 mAs, 0.0875 mAs, and 0.043 75 mAs, were investigated. Both the analytical Feldkamp, Davis and Kress (FDK) algorithm and the Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm were used for CT image reconstruction. We also evaluated the impact of sinogram interpolation to estimate the missing projection measurements due to sparse view data acquisition. For MBIR, we used a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) cost function with an approximate total-variation (TV) regularizing penalty function. We compared a tube pulsing mode and a continuous exposure mode for sparse view data acquisition. Global PET ensemble root-mean-squares-error (RMSE) and local ensemble lesion activity error were used as quantitative evaluation metrics for PET image quality.With sparse view sampling, it is possible to greatly reduce the CT scan dose when it is primarily used for PET attenuation correction with little or no measureable effect on the PET image. For the four ultra-low dose levels

  4. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT: analysis of sparse view data acquisition and reconstruction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Rui, Xue; Cheng, Lishui; Long, Yong; Fu, Lin; Alessio, Adam M; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E; De Man, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    For PET/CT systems, PET image reconstruction requires corresponding CT images for anatomical localization and attenuation correction. In the case of PET respiratory gating, multiple gated CT scans can offer phase-matched attenuation and motion correction, at the expense of increased radiation dose. We aim to minimize the dose of the CT scan, while preserving adequate image quality for the purpose of PET attenuation correction by introducing sparse view CT data acquisition.We investigated sparse view CT acquisition protocols resulting in ultra-low dose CT scans designed for PET attenuation correction. We analyzed the tradeoffs between the number of views and the integrated tube current per view for a given dose using CT and PET simulations of a 3D NCAT phantom with lesions inserted into liver and lung. We simulated seven CT acquisition protocols with {984, 328, 123, 41, 24, 12, 8} views per rotation at a gantry speed of 0.35 s. One standard dose and four ultra-low dose levels, namely, 0.35 mAs, 0.175 mAs, 0.0875 mAs, and 0.043 75 mAs, were investigated. Both the analytical Feldkamp, Davis and Kress (FDK) algorithm and the Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm were used for CT image reconstruction. We also evaluated the impact of sinogram interpolation to estimate the missing projection measurements due to sparse view data acquisition. For MBIR, we used a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) cost function with an approximate total-variation (TV) regularizing penalty function. We compared a tube pulsing mode and a continuous exposure mode for sparse view data acquisition. Global PET ensemble root-mean-squares-error (RMSE) and local ensemble lesion activity error were used as quantitative evaluation metrics for PET image quality.With sparse view sampling, it is possible to greatly reduce the CT scan dose when it is primarily used for PET attenuation correction with little or no measureable effect on the PET image. For the four ultra-low dose levels

  5. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT: analysis of sparse view data acquisition and reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Xue; Cheng, Lishui; Long, Yong; Fu, Lin; Alessio, Adam M.; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.; De Man, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    For PET/CT systems, PET image reconstruction requires corresponding CT images for anatomical localization and attenuation correction. In the case of PET respiratory gating, multiple gated CT scans can offer phase-matched attenuation and motion correction, at the expense of increased radiation dose. We aim to minimize the dose of the CT scan, while preserving adequate image quality for the purpose of PET attenuation correction by introducing sparse view CT data acquisition. We investigated sparse view CT acquisition protocols resulting in ultra-low dose CT scans designed for PET attenuation correction. We analyzed the tradeoffs between the number of views and the integrated tube current per view for a given dose using CT and PET simulations of a 3D NCAT phantom with lesions inserted into liver and lung. We simulated seven CT acquisition protocols with {984, 328, 123, 41, 24, 12, 8} views per rotation at a gantry speed of 0.35 s. One standard dose and four ultra-low dose levels, namely, 0.35 mAs, 0.175 mAs, 0.0875 mAs, and 0.043 75 mAs, were investigated. Both the analytical Feldkamp, Davis and Kress (FDK) algorithm and the Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm were used for CT image reconstruction. We also evaluated the impact of sinogram interpolation to estimate the missing projection measurements due to sparse view data acquisition. For MBIR, we used a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) cost function with an approximate total-variation (TV) regularizing penalty function. We compared a tube pulsing mode and a continuous exposure mode for sparse view data acquisition. Global PET ensemble root-mean-squares-error (RMSE) and local ensemble lesion activity error were used as quantitative evaluation metrics for PET image quality. With sparse view sampling, it is possible to greatly reduce the CT scan dose when it is primarily used for PET attenuation correction with little or no measureable effect on the PET image. For the four ultra-low dose

  6. Clinical evaluation of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hua; Noel, Camille; Chen, Haijian; Harold Li, H.; Low, Daniel; Moore, Kevin; Klahr, Paul; Michalski, Jeff; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Severe artifacts in kilovoltage-CT simulation images caused by large metallic implants can significantly degrade the conspicuity and apparent CT Hounsfield number of targets and anatomic structures, jeopardize the confidence of anatomical segmentation, and introduce inaccuracies into the radiation therapy treatment planning process. This study evaluated the performance of the first commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) for radiation therapy, and investigated its clinical applications in treatment planning. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for the evaluation. The CIRS electron density phantom with known physical (and electron) density plugs and removable titanium implants was scanned on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore 16-slice CT simulator. The CT Hounsfield numbers of density plugs on both uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images were compared. Treatment planning accuracy was evaluated by comparing simulated dose distributions computed using the true density images, uncorrected images, and O-MAR corrected images. Ten CT image sets of patients with large hip implants were processed with the O-MAR function and evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point score for overall image quality, anatomical conspicuity, and CT Hounsfield number accuracy. By utilizing the same structure contours delineated from the O-MAR corrected images, clinical IMRT treatment plans for five patients were computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images, respectively, and compared. Results: Results of the phantom study indicated that CT Hounsfield number accuracy and noise were improved on the O-MAR corrected images, especially for images with bilateral metal implants. The {gamma} pass rates of the simulated dose distributions computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images referenced to those of the true densities were higher than 99.9% (even when using 1% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criterion), suggesting that dose

  7. Dosimetric Evaluation of Metal Artefact Reduction using Metal Artefact Reduction (MAR) Algorithm and Dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT) Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguda, Edcer Jerecho

    Purpose: Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the standard diagnostic imaging modalities for the evaluation of a patient's medical condition. In comparison to other imaging modalities such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), CT is a fast acquisition imaging device with higher spatial resolution and higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for bony structures. CT images are presented through a gray scale of independent values in Hounsfield units (HU). High HU-valued materials represent higher density. High density materials, such as metal, tend to erroneously increase the HU values around it due to reconstruction software limitations. This problem of increased HU values due to metal presence is referred to as metal artefacts. Hip prostheses, dental fillings, aneurysm clips, and spinal clips are a few examples of metal objects that are of clinical relevance. These implants create artefacts such as beam hardening and photon starvation that distort CT images and degrade image quality. This is of great significance because the distortions may cause improper evaluation of images and inaccurate dose calculation in the treatment planning system. Different algorithms are being developed to reduce these artefacts for better image quality for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. However, very limited information is available about the effect of artefact correction on dose calculation accuracy. This research study evaluates the dosimetric effect of metal artefact reduction algorithms on severe artefacts on CT images. This study uses Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI)-based MAR algorithm, projection-based Metal Artefact Reduction (MAR) algorithm, and the Dual-Energy method. Materials and Methods: The Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI)-based and SMART Metal Artefact Reduction (MAR) algorithms are metal artefact reduction protocols embedded in two different CT scanner models by General Electric (GE), and the Dual-Energy Imaging Method was developed at Duke University. All three

  8. Effects of the difference in tube voltage of the CT scanner on dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Dong Joo; Kim, Sung-woo; Jeong, Dong Hyeok; Moon, Young Min; Kim, Jung Ki

    2015-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) measures the attenuation coefficient of an object and converts the value assigned to each voxel into a CT number. In radiation therapy, the CT number, which is directly proportional to the linear attenuation coefficient, must be converted to an electron density for radiation dose calculations for cancer treatment. However, if various tube voltages are applied to take the patient's CT image without applying the specific CT number to the electron density conversion curve, the accuracy of the dose calculation is not assured. In this study, changes in CT numbers for different materials due to changes in the tube voltage were demonstrated, and the dose calculation errors in the percentage depth dose (PDD), along with a clinical case were analyzed. The maximum dose difference in the PDD from the treatment planning system (TPS) dose calculation and from the Monte Carlo simulation were 1.3% and 1.1%, respectively, when applying the same CT number to the electron density conversion curve for the 80-kVp and 140-kVp images. In the clinical case, different CT number to electron density conversion curves at tube voltage of 80 kVp and 140 kVp were applied to the same image and the maximum differences in the mean, maximum, and minimum doses were 1.1%, 1.2%, and 1.0%, respectively, at the central region of the phantom and 0.6%, 0.9%, and 0.8%, respectively, at the peripheral region of the phantom.

  9. SU-E-I-34: Evaluating Use of AEC to Lower Dose for Lung Cancer Screening CT Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Arbique, G; Anderson, J; Guild, J; Duan, X; Malguria, N; Omar, H; Brewington, C; Zhang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The National Lung Screening Trial mandated manual low dose CT technique factors, where up to a doubling of radiation output could be used over a regular to large patient size range. Recent guidance from the AAPM and ACR for lung cancer CT screening recommends radiation output adjustment for patient size either through AEC or a manual technique chart. This study evaluated the use of AEC for output control and dose reduction. Methods: The study was performed on a multidetector helical CT scanner (Aquillion ONE, Toshiba Medical) equipped with iterative reconstruction (ADIR-3D), AEC was adjusted with a standard deviation (SD) image quality noise index. The protocol SD parameter was incrementally increased to reduce patient population dose while image quality was evaluated by radiologist readers scoring the clinical utility of images on a Likert scale. Results: Plots of effective dose vs. body size (water cylinder diameter reported by the scanner) demonstrate monotonic increase in patient dose with increasing patient size. At the initial SD setting of 19 the average CTDIvol for a standard size patient was ∼ 2.0 mGy (1.2 mSv effective dose). This was reduced to ∼1.0 mGy (0.5 mSv) at an SD of 25 with no noticeable reduction in clinical utility of images as demonstrated by Likert scoring. Plots of effective patient diameter and BMI vs body size indicate that these metrics could also be used for manual technique charts. Conclusion: AEC offered consistent and reliable control of radiation output in this study. Dose for a standard size patient was reduced to one-third of the 3 mGy CTDIvol limit required for ACR accreditation of lung cancer CT screening. Gary Arbique: Research Grant, Toshiba America Medical Systems; Cecelia Brewington: Research Grant, Toshiba America Medical Systems; Di Zhang: Employee, Toshiba America Medical Systems.

  10. Average radiation doses in a standard head examination for 250 CT systems

    SciTech Connect

    McCrohan, J.L.; Patterson, J.F.; Gagne, R.M.; Goldstein, H.A.

    1987-04-01

    Approximately 250 computed tomography (CT) systems were surveyed in a nationwide study to determine the average radiation dose resulting from a typical adult head procedure. The multiple scan average dose (MSAD) was selected as the dose descriptor. For the typical adult CT head procedure, the MSAD was generally within 2.2-6.8 rads (22-68 mGy). Variations in dose by a factor of two or more were often seen for a given manufacturer and model. These dose ranges indicate a potential to reduce dose by carefully selecting imaging techniques. Overall, variations in dose can result from differences in the user's choice of technique (desired image quality) or from actual differences in scanner performance (caused by differences in collimation, filtration, or geometry). To use CT appropriately, a facility should consider dose as well as image quality in selecting optimal techniques for typical modes of operation.

  11. Average radiation doses in a standard head examination for 250 CT systems.

    PubMed

    McCrohan, J L; Patterson, J F; Gagne, R M; Goldstein, H A

    1987-04-01

    Approximately 250 computed tomography (CT) systems were surveyed in a nationwide study to determine the average radiation dose resulting from a typical adult head procedure. The multiple scan average dose (MSAD) was selected as the dose descriptor. For the typical adult CT head procedure, the MSAD was generally within 2.2-6.8 rads (22-68 mGy). Variations in dose by a factor of two or more were often seen for a given manufacturer and model. These dose ranges indicate a potential to reduce dose by carefully selecting imaging techniques. Overall, variations in dose can result from differences in the user's choice of technique (desired image quality) or from actual differences in scanner performance (caused by differences in collimation, filtration, or geometry). To use CT appropriately, a facility should consider dose as well as image quality in selecting optimal techniques for typical modes of operation.

  12. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor; Reynoso-Mejía, Alberto; Casares-Cruz, Katiuzka; Taboada-Barajas, Jesús

    2014-11-01

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  13. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor

    2014-11-07

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  14. SU-E-I-57: Evaluation and Optimization of Effective-Dose Using Different Beam-Hardening Filters in Clinical Pediatric Shunt CT Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, K; Aldoohan, S; Collier, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Study image optimization and radiation dose reduction in pediatric shunt CT scanning protocol through the use of different beam-hardening filters Methods: A 64-slice CT scanner at OU Childrens Hospital has been used to evaluate CT image contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and measure effective-doses based on the concept of CT dose index (CTDIvol) using the pediatric head shunt scanning protocol. The routine axial pediatric head shunt scanning protocol that has been optimized for the intrinsic x-ray tube filter has been used to evaluate CNR by acquiring images using the ACR approved CT-phantom and radiation dose CTphantom, which was used to measure CTDIvol. These results were set as reference points to study and evaluate the effects of adding different filtering materials (i.e. Tungsten, Tantalum, Titanium, Nickel and Copper filters) to the existing filter on image quality and radiation dose. To ensure optimal image quality, the scanner routine air calibration was run for each added filter. The image CNR was evaluated for different kVps and wide range of mAs values using above mentioned beam-hardening filters. These scanning protocols were run under axial as well as under helical techniques. The CTDIvol and the effective-dose were measured and calculated for all scanning protocols and added filtration, including the intrinsic x-ray tube filter. Results: Beam-hardening filter shapes energy spectrum, which reduces the dose by 27%. No noticeable changes in image low contrast detectability Conclusion: Effective-dose is very much dependent on the CTDIVol, which is further very much dependent on beam-hardening filters. Substantial reduction in effective-dose is realized using beam-hardening filters as compare to the intrinsic filter. This phantom study showed that significant radiation dose reduction could be achieved in CT pediatric shunt scanning protocols without compromising in diagnostic value of image quality.

  15. Dose and scatter characteristics of a novel cone beam CT system for musculoskeletal extremities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbijewski, W.; Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J.; Muhit, A.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-03-01

    A novel cone-beam CT (CBCT) system has been developed with promising capabilities for musculoskeletal imaging (e.g., weight-bearing extremities and combined radiographic / volumetric imaging). The prototype system demonstrates diagnostic-quality imaging performance, while the compact geometry and short scan orbit raise new considerations for scatter management and dose characterization that challenge conventional methods. The compact geometry leads to elevated, heterogeneous x-ray scatter distributions - even for small anatomical sites (e.g., knee or wrist), and the short scan orbit results in a non-uniform dose distribution. These complex dose and scatter distributions were investigated via experimental measurements and GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The combination provided a powerful basis for characterizing dose distributions in patient-specific anatomy, investigating the benefits of an antiscatter grid, and examining distinct contributions of coherent and incoherent scatter in artifact correction. Measurements with a 16 cm CTDI phantom show that the dose from the short-scan orbit (0.09 mGy/mAs at isocenter) varies from 0.16 to 0.05 mGy/mAs at various locations on the periphery (all obtained at 80 kVp). MC estimation agreed with dose measurements within 10-15%. Dose distribution in patient-specific anatomy was computed with MC, confirming such heterogeneity and highlighting the elevated energy deposition in bone (factor of ~5-10) compared to soft-tissue. Scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) up to ~1.5-2 was evident in some regions of the knee. A 10:1 antiscatter grid was found earlier to result in significant improvement in soft-tissue imaging performance without increase in dose. The results of MC simulations elucidated the mechanism behind scatter reduction in the presence of a grid. A ~3-fold reduction in average SPR was found in the MC simulations; however, a linear grid was found to impart additional heterogeneity in the scatter distribution

  16. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  17. Are there dangers in biologic dose reduction strategies?

    PubMed

    Chan, Christopher K Y; Holroyd, Christopher R; Mason, Alice; Zarroug, Jalaa; Edwards, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    Biologic dose reduction strategies, for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, have been assessed in multiple studies to assess outcomes compared to ongoing maintenance dosing. Whilst cessation in established disease usually leads to disease flare, dose tapering approaches for those achieving low disease activity often appear to be successful in the short term. However, tapering can be associated with a higher risk of losing disease control and rates of recapture of disease control using the original biologic dose vary between studies. Over relatively short periods of follow-up, a number of studies have shown no statistical difference in radiographic progression in patients tapering or discontinuing biologics. However, a Cochrane review found that radiographic and functional outcomes may be worse after TNF inhibitor discontinuation, and over long-term disease follow-up flares have been associated with radiographic progression and worse patient reported outcomes. To date, no studies of biological therapy dose reduction have specifically investigated the risk of increased immunogenicity or the effects on cardiovascular risk and other co-morbidities, although these remain important potential risks. In addition, whether there are greater dangers in certain dose reduction approaches such as a reduction in dose at the same frequency or a spacing of doses is not established.

  18. Prospective optimization of CT under tube current modulation: I. organ dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-03-01

    In an environment in which computed tomography (CT) has become an indispensable diagnostic tool employed with great frequency, dose concerns at the population level have become a subject of public attention. In that regard, optimizing radiation dose has become a core problem to the CT community. As a fundamental step to optimize radiation dose, it is crucial to effectively quantify radiation dose for a given CT exam. Such dose estimates need to be patient-specific to reflect individual radiation burden. It further needs to be prospective so that the scanning parameters can be dynamically adjusted before the scan is performed. The purpose of this study was to prospectively estimate organ dose in abdominopelvic CT exams under tube current modulation (TCM). CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose coefficients ( hfixed ) for fixed tube current were first estimated using a validated Monte Carlo simulation program and 58 computational phantoms. To account for the effect of TCM scheme, a weighted CTDIvol was computed for each organ based on the tube current modulation profile. The organ dose was predicted by multiplying the weighted CTDIvol with the organ dose coefficients ( hfixed ). To quantify prediction accuracy, each predicted organ dose was compared with organ dose simulated from Monte Carlo program with TCM profile explicitly modeled. The predicted organ dose showed good agreement with simulated organ dose across all organs and modulation strengths. For an average CTDIvol of a CT exam of 10 mGy, the absolute median error across all organs were 0.64 mGy (-0.21 and 0.97 for 25th and 75th percentiles, respectively). The percentage differences (normalized by CTDIvol of the exam) were within 15%. This study developed a quantitative model to predict organ dose under clinical abdominopelvic scans. Such information may aid in the optimization of CT protocols.

  19. Extracting Information From Previous Full-Dose CT Scan for Knowledge-Based Bayesian Reconstruction of Current Low-Dose CT Images.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Han, Hao; Liang, Zhengrong; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yan; Moore, William; Ma, Jianhua; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-03-01

    Markov random field (MRF) model has been widely employed in edge-preserving regional noise smoothing penalty to reconstruct piece-wise smooth images in the presence of noise, such as in low-dose computed tomography (LdCT). While it preserves edge sharpness, its regional smoothing may sacrifice tissue image textures, which have been recognized as useful imaging biomarkers, and thus it may compromise clinical tasks such as differentiating malignant vs. benign lesions, e.g., lung nodules or colon polyps. This study aims to shift the edge-preserving regional noise smoothing paradigm to texture-preserving framework for LdCT image reconstruction while retaining the advantage of MRF's neighborhood system on edge preservation. Specifically, we adapted the MRF model to incorporate the image textures of muscle, fat, bone, lung, etc. from previous full-dose CT (FdCT) scan as a priori knowledge for texture-preserving Bayesian reconstruction of current LdCT images. To show the feasibility of the proposed reconstruction framework, experiments using clinical patient scans were conducted. The experimental outcomes showed a dramatic gain by the a priori knowledge for LdCT image reconstruction using the commonly-used Haralick texture measures. Thus, it is conjectured that the texture-preserving LdCT reconstruction has advantages over the edge-preserving regional smoothing paradigm for texture-specific clinical applications.

  20. TH-C-18A-08: A Management Tool for CT Dose Monitoring, Analysis, and Protocol Review

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Chan, F; Newman, B; Larson, D; Leung, A; Fleischmann, D; Molvin, L; Marsh, D; Zorich, C; Phillips, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a customizable tool for enterprise-wide managing of CT protocols and analyzing radiation dose information of CT exams for a variety of quality control applications Methods: All clinical CT protocols implemented on the 11 CT scanners at our institution were extracted in digital format. The original protocols had been preset by our CT management team. A commercial CT dose tracking software (DoseWatch,GE healthcare,WI) was used to collect exam information (exam date, patient age etc.), scanning parameters, and radiation doses for all CT exams. We developed a Matlab-based program (MathWorks,MA) with graphic user interface which allows to analyze the scanning protocols with the actual dose estimates, and compare the data to national (ACR,AAPM) and internal reference values for CT quality control. Results: The CT protocol review portion of our tool allows the user to look up the scanning and image reconstruction parameters of any protocol on any of the installed CT systems among about 120 protocols per scanner. In the dose analysis tool, dose information of all CT exams (from 05/2013 to 02/2014) was stratified on a protocol level, and within a protocol down to series level, i.e. each individual exposure event. This allows numerical and graphical review of dose information of any combination of scanner models, protocols and series. The key functions of the tool include: statistics of CTDI, DLP and SSDE, dose monitoring using user-set CTDI/DLP/SSDE thresholds, look-up of any CT exam dose data, and CT protocol review. Conclusion: our inhouse CT management tool provides radiologists, technologists and administration a first-hand near real-time enterprise-wide knowledge on CT dose levels of different exam types. Medical physicists use this tool to manage CT protocols, compare and optimize dose levels across different scanner models. It provides technologists feedback on CT scanning operation, and knowledge on important dose baselines and thresholds.

  1. Effective radiation dose and eye lens dose in dental cone beam CT: effect of field of view and angle of rotation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, G; Theodorakou, C; Walker, A; Bosmans, H; Jacobs, R; Bogaerts, R; Horner, K

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the effect of field of view (FOV) and angle of rotation on radiation dose in dental cone beam CT (CBCT) and to define a preliminary volume–dose model. Methods: Organ and effective doses were estimated using 148 thermoluminescent dosemeters placed in an anthropomorphic phantom. Dose measurements were undertaken on a 3D Accuitomo 170 dental CBCT unit (J. Morita, Kyoto, Japan) using six FOVs as well as full-rotation (360°) and half-rotation (180°) protocols. Results: For the 360° rotation protocols, effective dose ranged between 54 µSv (4 × 4 cm, upper canine) and 303 µSv (17 × 12 cm, maxillofacial). An empirical relationship between FOV dimension and effective dose was derived. The use of a 180° rotation resulted in an average dose reduction of 45% compared with a 360° rotation. Eye lens doses ranged between 95 and 6861 µGy. Conclusion: Significant dose reduction can be achieved by reducing the FOV size, particularly the FOV height, of CBCT examinations to the actual region of interest. In some cases, a 180° rotation can be preferred, as it has the added value of reducing the scan time. Eye lens doses should be reduced by decreasing the height of the FOV rather than using inferior FOV positioning, as the latter would increase the effective dose considerably. Advances in knowledge: The effect of the FOV and rotation angle on the effective dose in dental CBCT was quantified. The dominant effect of FOV height was demonstrated. A preliminary model has been proposed, which could be used to predict effective dose as a function of FOV size and position. PMID:25189417

  2. A computer simulation method for low-dose CT images by use of real high-dose images: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Takenaga, Tomomi; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Goto, Makoto; Hatemura, Masahiro; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Shiraishi, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Practical simulations of low-dose CT images have a possibility of being helpful means for optimization of the CT exposure dose. Because current methods reported by several researchers are limited to specific vendor platforms and generally rely on raw sinogram data that are difficult to access, we have developed a new computerized scheme for producing simulated low-dose CT images from real high-dose images without use of raw sinogram data or of a particular phantom. Our computerized scheme for low-dose CT simulation was based on the addition of a simulated noise image to a real high-dose CT image reconstructed by the filtered back-projection algorithm. First, a sinogram was generated from the forward projection of a high-dose CT image. Then, an additional noise sinogram resulting from use of a reduced exposure dose was estimated from a predetermined noise model. Finally, a noise CT image was reconstructed with a predetermined filter and was added to the real high-dose CT image to create a simulated low-dose CT image. The noise power spectrum and modulation transfer function of the simulated low-dose images were very close to those of the real low-dose images. In order to confirm the feasibility of our method, we applied this method to clinical cases which were examined with the high dose initially and then followed with a low-dose CT. In conclusion, our proposed method could simulate the low-dose CT images from their real high-dose images with sufficient accuracy and could be used for determining the optimal dose setting for various clinical CT examinations.

  3. Variation of patient imaging doses with scanning parameters for linac-integrated kilovoltage cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiongfei; Wang, Yunlai; Lang, Jinyi; Wang, Pei; Li, Jie; Ge, Ruigang; Yang, Jack

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the Elekta kilovoltage CBCT doses and the associated technical protocols with patient dosimetry estimation. Image guidance technique with cone-beam CT (CBCT) in radiation oncology on a daily basis can deliver a significant dose to the patient. To evaluate the patient dose from LINAC-integrated kV cone beam CT imaging in image-guided radiotherapy. CT dose index (CTDI) were measured with PTW TM30009 CT ion chamber in air, in head phantom and body phantom, respectively; with different combinations of tube voltage, current, exposure time per frame, collimator and gantry rotation range. Dose length products (DLP) were subsequently calculated to account for volume integration effects. The CTDI and DLP were also compared to AcQSim™ simulator CT for routine clinical protocols. Both CTDIair and CTDIw depended quadratically on the voltage, while linearly on milliampere x seconds (mAs) settings. It was shown that CTDIw and DLP had very close relationship with the collimator settings and the gantry rotation ranges. Normalized CTDIw for Elekta XVI™ CBCT was lower than that of ACQSim simulator CT owing to its pulsed radiation output characteristics. CTDIw can be used to assess the patient dose in CBCT due to its simplicity for measurement and reproducibility. Regular measurement should be performed in QA & QC program. Optimal image parameters should be chosen to reduce patient dose during CBCT. PMID:26405932

  4. Dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jie; Thériault Lauzier, Pascal; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    A technique for dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS) in computed tomography (CT) is proposed in this work. In DR-PICCS, a standard FBP reconstructed image is forward projected to get a fully sampled projection data set. Meanwhile, it is low-pass filtered and used as the prior image in the PICCS reconstruction framework. Next, the prior image and the forward projection data are used together by the PICCS algorithm to obtain a low noise DR-PICCS reconstruction, which maintains the spatial resolution of the original FBP images. The spatial resolution of DR-PICCS was studied using a Catphan phantom by MTF measurement. The noise reduction factor, CT number change and noise texture were studied using human subject data consisting of 20 CT colonography exams performed under an IRB-approved protocol. In each human subject study, six ROIs (two soft tissue, two colonic air columns, and two subcutaneous fat) were selected for the CT number and noise measurements study. Skewness and kurtosis were used as figures of merit to indicate the noise texture. A Bland-Altman analysis was performed to study the accuracy of the CT number. The results showed that, compared with FBP reconstructions, the MTF curve shows very little change in DR-PICCS reconstructions, spatial resolution loss is less than 0.1 lp/cm, and the noise standard deviation can be reduced by a factor of 3 with DR-PICCS. The CT numbers in FBP and DR-PICCS reconstructions agree well, which indicates that DR-PICCS does not change CT numbers. The noise textures indicators measured from DR-PICCS images are in a similar range as FBP images.

  5. Ultra-low dose comprehensive cardiac CT imaging in a patient with acute myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tröbs, Monique; Brand, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan; Marwan, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The ability of contrast-enhanced CT to detect "late enhancement" in a fashion similar to magnetic resonance imaging has been previously reported. We report a case of acute myocarditis with coronary CT angiography as well as "late enhancement" imaging with ultra-low effective radiation dose. PMID:25439792

  6. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller

  7. Improving low-dose cardiac CT images using 3D sparse representation based processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Luyao; Chen, Yang; Luo, Limin

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) has been widely used in diagnoses of coronary artery diseases due to the continuously improving temporal and spatial resolution. When helical CT with a lower pitch scanning mode is used, the effective radiation dose can be significant when compared to other radiological exams. Many methods have been developed to reduce radiation dose in coronary CT exams including high pitch scans using dual source CT scanners and step-and-shot scanning mode for both single source and dual source CT scanners. Additionally, software methods have also been proposed to reduce noise in the reconstructed CT images and thus offering the opportunity to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the desired diagnostic performance of a certain imaging task. In this paper, we propose that low-dose scans should be considered in order to avoid the harm from accumulating unnecessary X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. Accordingly, in this paper, a 3D dictionary representation based image processing method is proposed to reduce CT image noise. Information on both spatial and temporal structure continuity is utilized in sparse representation to improve the performance of the image processing method. Clinical cases were used to validate the proposed method.

  8. Dose reduction in LDR brachytherapy by implanted prostate gold fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Lutgens, Ludy; Murrer, Lars; Afsharpour, Hossein; Haas-Kock, Danielle de; Visser, Peter; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric impact of gold fiducial markers (FM) implanted prior to external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seed implants performed in the context of combined therapy was investigated. Methods: A virtual water phantom was designed containing a single FM. Single and multi source scenarios were investigated by performing Monte Carlo dose calculations, along with the influence of varying orientation and distance of the FM with respect to the sources. Three prostate cancer patients treated with LDR brachytherapy for a recurrence following external beam radiotherapy with implanted FM were studied as surrogate cases to combined therapy. FM and brachytherapy seeds were identified on post implant CT scans and Monte Carlo dose calculations were performed with and without FM. The dosimetric impact of the FM was evaluated by quantifying the amplitude of dose shadows and the volume of cold spots. D{sub 90} was reported based on the post implant CT prostate contour. Results: Large shadows are observed in the single source-FM scenarios. As expected from geometric considerations, the shadows are dependent on source-FM distance and orientation. Large dose reductions are observed at the distal side of FM, while at the proximal side a dose enhancement is observed. In multisource scenarios, the importance of shadows appears mitigated, although FM at the periphery of the seed distribution caused underdosage (dose). In clinical cases, the FM reduced the dose to some voxels by up to 50% and generated shadows with extents of the order of 4 mm. Within the prostate contour, cold spots (<95% prescription dose) of the order of 20 mm{sup 3} were observed. D{sub 90} proved insensitive to the presence of FM for the cases selected. Conclusions: There is a major local impact of FM present in LDR brachytherapy seed implant dose distributions. Therefore, reduced tumor control could be expected from FM implanted in tumors, although

  9. Estimation of breast dose saving potential using a breast positioning technique for organ-based tube current modulated CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wanyi; Tian, Xiaoyu; Sturgeon, Gregory; Agasthya, Greeshma; Segars, William Paul; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    In thoracic CT, organ-based tube current modulation (OTCM) reduces breast dose by lowering the tube current in the 120° anterior dose reduction zone of patients. However, in practice the breasts usually expand to an angle larger than the dose reduction zone. This work aims to simulate a breast positioning technique (BPT) to constrain the breast tissue to within the dose reduction zone for OTCM and to evaluate the corresponding potential reduction in breast dose. Thirteen female anthropomorphic computational phantoms were studied (age range: 27-65 y.o., weight range: 52-105.8 kg). Each phantom was modeled in the supine position with and without application of the BPT. Attenuation-based tube current (ATCM, reference mA) was generated by a ray-tracing program, taking into account the patient attenuation change in the longitudinal and angular plane (CAREDose4D, Siemens Healthcare). OTCM was generated by reducing the mA to 20% between +/- 60° anterior of the patient and increasing the mA in the remaining projections correspondingly (X-CARE, Siemens Healthcare) to maintain the mean tube current. Breast tissue dose was estimated using a validated Monte Carlo program for a commercial scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare). Compared to standard tube current modulation, breast dose was significantly reduced using OTCM by 19.8+/-4.7%. With the BPT, breast dose was reduced by an additional 20.4+/-6.5% to 37.1+/-6.9%, using the same CTDIvol. BPT was more effective for phantoms simulating women with larger breasts with the average breast dose reduction of 30.2%, 39.2%, and 49.2% from OTCMBP to ATCM, using the same CTDIvol for phantoms with 0.5, 1.5, and 2.5 kg breasts, respectively. This study shows that a specially designed BPT improves the effectiveness of OTCM.

  10. A technique for multi-dimensional optimization of radiation dose, contrast dose, and image quality in CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Abadi, Ehsan; Sanders, Jeremiah; Becchetti, Marc; Zhang, Yakun; Agasthya, Greeshma; Segars, Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to substantiate the interdependency of image quality, radiation dose, and contrast material dose in CT towards the patient-specific optimization of the imaging protocols. The study deployed two phantom platforms. First, a variable sized phantom containing an iodinated insert was imaged on a representative CT scanner at multiple CTDI values. The contrast and noise were measured from the reconstructed images for each phantom diameter. Linearly related to iodine-concentration, contrast to noise ratio (CNR), was calculated for different iodine-concentration levels. Second, the analysis was extended to a recently developed suit of 58 virtual human models (5D-XCAT) with added contrast dynamics. Emulating a contrast-enhanced abdominal image procedure and targeting a peak-enhancement in aorta, each XCAT phantom was "imaged" using a CT simulation platform. 3D surfaces for each patient/size established the relationship between iodine-concentration, dose, and CNR. The Sensitivity of Ratio (SR), defined as ratio of change in iodine-concentration versus dose to yield a constant change in CNR was calculated and compared at high and low radiation dose for both phantom platforms. The results show that sensitivity of CNR to iodine concentration is larger at high radiation dose (up to 73%). The SR results were highly affected by radiation dose metric; CTDI or organ dose. Furthermore, results showed that the presence of contrast material could have a profound impact on optimization results (up to 45%).

  11. Acquisition, preprocessing, and reconstruction of ultralow dose volumetric CT scout for organ-based CT scan planning

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Zhye De Man, Bruno; Yao, Yangyang; Wu, Mingye; Montillo, Albert; Edic, Peter M.; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Traditionally, 2D radiographic preparatory scan images (scout scans) are used to plan diagnostic CT scans. However, a 3D CT volume with a full 3D organ segmentation map could provide superior information for customized scan planning and other purposes. A practical challenge is to design the volumetric scout acquisition and processing steps to provide good image quality (at least good enough to enable 3D organ segmentation) while delivering a radiation dose similar to that of the conventional 2D scout. Methods: The authors explored various acquisition methods, scan parameters, postprocessing methods, and reconstruction methods through simulation and cadaver data studies to achieve an ultralow dose 3D scout while simultaneously reducing the noise and maintaining the edge strength around the target organ. Results: In a simulation study, the 3D scout with the proposed acquisition, preprocessing, and reconstruction strategy provided a similar level of organ segmentation capability as a traditional 240 mAs diagnostic scan, based on noise and normalized edge strength metrics. At the same time, the proposed approach delivers only 1.25% of the dose of a traditional scan. In a cadaver study, the authors’ pictorial-structures based organ localization algorithm successfully located the major abdominal-thoracic organs from the ultralow dose 3D scout obtained with the proposed strategy. Conclusions: The authors demonstrated that images with a similar degree of segmentation capability (interpretability) as conventional dose CT scans can be achieved with an ultralow dose 3D scout acquisition and suitable postprocessing. Furthermore, the authors applied these techniques to real cadaver CT scans with a CTDI dose level of less than 0.1 mGy and successfully generated a 3D organ localization map.

  12. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Bakar, K. A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A. W.; Saripan, M. I.; Bradley, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, ~8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose.

  13. Estimating Radiation Dose Metrics for Patients Undergoing Tube Current Modulation CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kyle Lorin

    Computed tomography (CT) has long been a powerful tool in the diagnosis of disease, identification of tumors and guidance of interventional procedures. With CT examinations comes the concern of radiation exposure and the associated risks. In order to properly understand those risks on a patient-specific level, organ dose must be quantified for each CT scan. Some of the most widely used organ dose estimates are derived from fixed tube current (FTC) scans of a standard sized idealized patient model. However, in current clinical practice, patient size varies from neonates weighing just a few kg to morbidly obese patients weighing over 200 kg, and nearly all CT exams are performed with tube current modulation (TCM), a scanning technique that adjusts scanner output according to changes in patient attenuation. Methods to account for TCM in CT organ dose estimates have been previously demonstrated, but these methods are limited in scope and/or restricted to idealized TCM profiles that are not based on physical observations and not scanner specific (e.g. don't account for tube limits, scanner-specific effects, etc.). The goal of this work was to develop methods to estimate organ doses to patients undergoing CT scans that take into account both the patient size as well as the effects of TCM. This work started with the development and validation of methods to estimate scanner-specific TCM schemes for any voxelized patient model. An approach was developed to generate estimated TCM schemes that match actual TCM schemes that would have been acquired on the scanner for any patient model. Using this approach, TCM schemes were then generated for a variety of body CT protocols for a set of reference voxelized phantoms for which TCM information does not currently exist. These are whole body patient models representing a variety of sizes, ages and genders that have all radiosensitive organs identified. TCM schemes for these models facilitated Monte Carlo-based estimates of fully

  14. Evaluation of the effective dose of cone beam CT and multislice CT for temporomandibular joint examinations at optimized exposure levels

    PubMed Central

    Kadesjö, N; Benchimol, D; Falahat, B; Näsström, K

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effective dose to patients from temporomandibular joint examinations using a dental CBCT device and a multislice CT (MSCT) device, both before and after dose optimization. Methods: A Promax® 3D (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) dental CBCT and a LightSpeed VCT® (GE Healthcare, Little Chalfont, UK) multislice CT were used. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated from thermoluminescent dosemeters at 61 positions inside an anthropomorphic phantom at the exposure settings in clinical use. Optimized exposure protocols were obtained through an optimization study using a dry skull phantom, where four observers rated image quality taken at different exposure levels. The optimal exposure level was obtained when all included criteria were rated as acceptable or better by all observers. Results: The effective dose from a bilateral examination was 184 µSv for Promax 3D and 113 µSv for LightSpeed VCT before optimization. Post optimization, the bilateral effective dose was 92 µSv for Promax 3D and 124 µSv for LightSpeed VCT. Conclusions: At optimized exposure levels, the effective dose from CBCT was comparable to MSCT. PMID:26119344

  15. Antiscatter grids in mobile C-arm cone-beam CT: Effect on image quality and dose

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, S.; Stayman, J.W.; Zbijewski, W.; Schmidgunst, C.; Kleinszig, G.; Siewerdsen, J.H.

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray scatter is a major detriment to image quality in cone-beam CT (CBCT). Existing geometries exhibit strong differences in scatter susceptibility with more compact geometries, e.g., dental or musculoskeletal, benefiting from antiscatter grids, whereas in more extended geometries, e.g., IGRT, grid use carries tradeoffs in image quality per unit dose. This work assesses the tradeoffs in dose and image quality for grids applied in the context of low-dose CBCT on a mobile C-arm for image-guided surgery. Methods: Studies were performed on a mobile C-arm equipped with a flat-panel detector for high-quality CBCT. Antiscatter grids of grid ratio (GR) 6:1-12:1, 40 lp/cm, were tested in ''body'' surgery, i.e., spine, using protocols for bone and soft-tissue visibility in the thoracic and abdominal spine. Studies focused on grid orientation, CT number accuracy, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in quantitative phantoms at constant dose. Results: There was no effect of grid orientation on possible gridline artifacts, given accurate angle-dependent gain calibration. Incorrect calibration was found to result in gridline shadows in the projection data that imparted high-frequency artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Increasing GR reduced errors in CT number from 31%, thorax, and 37%, abdomen, for gridless operation to 2% and 10%, respectively, with a 12:1 grid, while image noise increased by up to 70%. The CNR of high-contrast objects was largely unaffected by grids, but low-contrast soft-tissues suffered reduction in CNR, 2%-65%, across the investigated GR at constant dose. Conclusions: While grids improved CT number accuracy, soft-tissue CNR was reduced due to attenuation of primary radiation. CNR could be restored by increasing dose by factors of {approx}1.6-2.5 depending on GR, e.g., increase from 4.6 mGy for the thorax and 12.5 mGy for the abdomen without antiscatter grids to approximately 12 mGy and 30 mGy, respectively, with a high-GR grid. However

  16. [Examination of Visual Effect in Low-dose Cerebral CT Perfusion Phantom Image Using Iterative Reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Ohmura, Tomomi; Lee, Yongbum; Takahashi, Noriyuki; Sato, Yuichiro; Ishida, Takato; Toyoshima, Hideto

    2015-11-01

    CT perfusion (CTP) is obtained cerebrovascular circulation image for assessment of stroke patients; however, at the expense of increased radiation dose by dynamic scan. Iterative reconstruction (IR) method is possible to decrease image noise, it has the potential to reduce radiation dose. The purpose of this study is to assess the visual effect of IR method by using a digital perfusion phantom. The digital perfusion phantom was created by reconstructed filtered back projection (FBP) method and IR method CT images that had five exposure doses. Various exposure dose cerebral blood flow (CBF) images were derived from deconvolution algorithm. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and visual assessment were compared among the various exposure dose and each reconstructions. Result of low exposure dose with IR method showed, compared with FBP method, high CNR in severe ischemic area, and visual assessment was significantly improvement. IR method is useful for improving image quality of low-dose CTP. PMID:26596197

  17. [Ultra-low dose chest CT: The end of chest radiograph?].

    PubMed

    Ludes, Claire; Schaal, Marysa; Labani, Aissam; Jeung, Mi-Young; Roy, Catherine; Ohana, Mickaël

    2016-03-01

    Ultra-low dose chest CT (ULD-CT) is acquired at a radiation dose lowered to that of a PA and lateral chest X-ray. Its image quality is degraded, yet remains diagnostic in many clinical indications. Technological improvements, with iterative reconstruction at the foreground, allowed a strong increase in the image quality obtained with this examination, which is achievable on most recent (<5 years) scanner. Established clinical indications of ULD-CT are increasing, and its non-inferiority compared to the reference "full dose" chest CT are currently demonstrated for the detection of solid nodules, for asbestos-related pleural diseases screening and for the monitoring of infectious pneumonia. Its current limitations are the obese patients (BMI>35) and the interstitial pneumonia, situations in which their performances are insufficient. PMID:26830922

  18. Lung cancer screening with low-dose chest CT: current issues.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Myeong Im

    2004-06-01

    Computed tomography offers many advantages over routine radiographs in screening for lung cancer, and it is clear that low-dose spiral CT screening can more frequently find considerably smaller lung cancers than previous detection tools. Recently, investigators have performed low-dose spiral CT scanning for screening of lung cancer, and have suggested that CT screening can depict lung cancers at smaller sizes and at earlier stages. With technological advances in spiral CT scanners, the detection rate of small noncalcified pulmonary nodules has markedly increased, with higher rates noted with thinner collimation of CT scanning. Unfortunately, the majority of these have proved to be benign, i.e. false positive results. If, even in part, CT features could be found to predict benign nodules without follow-up, the false-positive rate would be reduced, and consequently, the cost, emotional stress, radiation dose, morbidity and mortality associated with interventional procedures would also be reduced. There have been several studies trying to establish reliable CT features for benign lesions in small pulmonary nodules and to determine their outcome. Although these efforts have not completely resolved the issue of false positive results, it is expected that lessons will be learnt on how to manage these small nodules through experience with screening in the near future. Because pulmonary nodules on CT are much more common in Korea than in western countries, the management algorithm for screening CT-detected nodules should be modified according to different circumstances, with consensus among related physicians and radiologists. In addition, to enhance patient care and avoid misunderstanding of inherent limitation of CT screening by the screening subjects, physicians, hospital managers as well as radiologists should provide proper information regarding CT screening to the screenees.

  19. Dose reduction improvements in storage basins of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Fan-Hsiung F.

    1997-08-13

    Spent nuclear fuel in storage basins at the Hanford Site has corroded and contaminated basin water, which has leaked into the soil; the fuel also had deposited a layer of radioactive sludge on basin floors. The SNF is to be removed from the basins to protect the nearby Columbia River. Because the radiation level is high, measures have been taken to reduce the background dose rate to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) to prevent radiation doses from becoming the limiting factor for removal of the SW in the basins to long-term dry storage. All activities of the SNF Project require application of ALARA principles for the workers. On the basis of these principles dose reduction improvements have been made by first identifying radiological sources. Principal radiological sources in the basin are basin walls, basin water, recirculation piping and equipment. Dose reduction activities focus on cleaning and coating basin walls to permit raising the water level, hydrolasing piping, and placing lead plates. In addition, the transfer bay floor will be refinished to make decontamination easier and reduce worker exposures in the radiation field. The background dose rates in the basin will be estimated before each task commences and after it is completed; these dose reduction data will provide the basis for cost benefit analysis.

  20. Patient-size-dependent radiation dose optimisation technique for abdominal CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Ngaile, J E; Msaki, P; Kazema, R

    2012-01-01

    Since patient doses from computed tomography (CT) are relatively high, risk-benefit analysis requires dose to patients and image quality be optimised. The aim of this study was to develop a patient-dependent optimisation technique that uses patient diameter to select a combination of CT scanning parameters that minimise dose delivered to patients undergoing abdominal CT examinations. The study was performed using cylindrical phantoms of diameters ranging from 16 to 40 cm in order to establish the relationship between image degradation, CT scanning techniques, patient dose and patient size from two CT scanners. These relationships were established by scanning the phantoms using standard scanning technique followed by selected combinations of scanning parameters. The image noises through phantom images were determined using region of interest software available in both scanners. The energy depositions to the X-ray detector through phantoms were determined from measurements of CT dose index in air corrected for attenuation of the phantom materials. The results demonstrate that exposure settings (milliampere seconds) could be reduced by up to 82 % for smaller phantom relative to standard milliampere seconds, while detector signal could be reduced by up to 93 % for smaller phantom relative to energy depositions required when scanned using standard scanning protocols. It was further revealed that the use of the object-specific scanning parameters on studies performed with phantom of different diameters could reduce the incident radiation to small size object by up to 86 % to obtain the same image quality required for standard adult object. In view of the earlier mentioned fact, substantial dose saving from small-sized adults and children patients undergoing abdomen CT examinations could be achieved through optimal adjustment of CT scanning technique based on the patient transverse diameter.

  1. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Jan T. M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990’s. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10’s of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  2. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jan T M; Shrimpton, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990's. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10's of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners. PMID:27362736

  3. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jan T M; Shrimpton, Paul C

    2016-07-21

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990's. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10's of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  4. Prospective Evaluation of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) Algorithm in Abdominal CT: A comparison of reduced dose with standard dose imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Kim, David H.; Tang, Jie; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively study CT dose reduction using the “prior image constrained compressed sensing” (PICCS) reconstruction technique. Methods Immediately following routine standard dose (SD) abdominal MDCT, 50 patients (mean age, 57.7 years; mean BMI, 28.8) underwent a second reduced-dose (RD) scan (targeted dose reduction, 70-90%). DLP, CTDIvol and SSDE were compared. Several reconstruction algorithms (FBP, ASIR, and PICCS) were applied to the RD series. SD images with FBP served as reference standard. Two blinded readers evaluated each series for subjective image quality and focal lesion detection. Results Mean DLP, CTDIvol, and SSDE for RD series was 140.3 mGy*cm (median 79.4), 3.7 mGy (median 1.8), and 4.2 mGy (median 2.3) compared with 493.7 mGy*cm (median 345.8), 12.9 mGy (median 7.9 mGy) and 14.6 mGy (median 10.1) for SD series, respectively. Mean effective patient diameter was 30.1 cm (median 30), which translates to a mean SSDE reduction of 72% (p<0.001). RD-PICCS image quality score was 2.8±0.5, improved over the RD-FBP (1.7±0.7) and RD-ASIR(1.9±0.8)(p<0.001), but lower than SD (3.5±0.5)(p<0.001). Readers detected 81% (184/228) of focal lesions on RD-PICCS series, versus 67% (153/228) and 65% (149/228) for RD-FBP and RD-ASIR, respectively. Mean image noise was significantly reduced on RD-PICCS series (13.9 HU) compared with RD-FBP (57.2) and RD-ASIR (44.1) (p<0.001). Conclusion PICCS allows for marked dose reduction at abdominal CT with improved image quality and diagnostic performance over reduced-dose FBP and ASIR. Further study is needed to determine indication-specific dose reduction levels that preserve acceptable diagnostic accuracy relative to higher-dose protocols. PMID:24943136

  5. Novel brachytherapy treatment planning system utilizing dose rate dependent average cell survival, CT-simulator, and dose-volume histogram

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, R.; Fong, W.; Frankel, T.

    1995-12-31

    This report describes a new brachytherapy planning program that provides an evaluation of a given low or high dose rate treatment taking into account spatial dose heterogeneity and cell response to radiation. This brachytherapy scheme uses the images from a CT-Simulator (AcQSim, Picker International, Cleveland, Ohio) to simultaneously localize the seed positions and to axially scan the patient. This procedure helps to ensure accurate registration of the putative seed positions with the patient tissues and organs. The seed positions are determined by back-projecting positions of seeds or dummy seeds from the CT-Simulator setup scout images. Physicians delineate the tissues of interest on the axial slices. Dose is computed after assigning activity (low dose rate) of dwell times (high dose rate) to the Ir{sup 192} or I{sup 125} seed. The planar isodose distribution is superimposed onto axial cuts of the tissues and onto coronal or sagital views of the tissues following image reconstruction. Areal or volumetric calculations of the dose distribution within a given tissue are computed from the tissue outlines. The treatment plan computes (1) volume differential and cummulative dose histograms of the dose delivered to individual tissues, (2) the average, standard deviation, and coefficient of skewness of the dose distribution delivered to the individual tissues, (3) the average survival probability for a given radiation treatment.

  6. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Weidlich, Georg A.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities—fan beam and cone beam—was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient. PMID:27752404

  7. Assessment of the effects of CT dose in averaged x-ray CT images of a dose-sensitive polymer gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairn, T.; Kakakhel, M. B.; Johnston, H.; Jirasek, A.; Trapp, J. V.

    2015-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio achievable in x-ray computed tomography (CT) images of polymer gels can be increased by averaging over multiple scans of each sample. However, repeated scanning delivers a small additional dose to the gel which may compromise the accuracy of the dose measurement. In this study, a NIPAM-based polymer gel was irradiated and then CT scanned 25 times, with the resulting data used to derive an averaged image and a "zero-scan" image of the gel. Comparison between these two results and the first scan of the gel showed that the averaged and zero-scan images provided better contrast, higher contrast-to- noise and higher signal-to-noise than the initial scan. The pixel values (Hounsfield units, HU) in the averaged image were not noticeably elevated, compared to the zero-scan result and the gradients used in the linear extrapolation of the zero-scan images were small and symmetrically distributed around zero. These results indicate that the averaged image was not artificially lightened by the small, additional dose delivered during CT scanning. This work demonstrates the broader usefulness of the zero-scan method as a means to verify the dosimetric accuracy of gel images derived from averaged x-ray CT data.

  8. Dose conversion coefficients for CT examinations of adults with automatic tube current modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Becker, J.; Hoeschen, C.

    2010-10-01

    Automatic tube current modulation (TCM) is used in modern CT devices. This is implemented in the numerical calculation of dose conversion coefficients for CT examinations. For four models of adults, the female and male reference models of ICRP and ICRU and a lighter and a heavier female model, dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDIvol (DCCCT) have been computed with a Monte Carlo transport code for CT scans with and without TCM. It could be shown for both cases that reliable values for spiral CT scans are obtained when combining the results from an appropriate set of axial scans. The largest organ DCCCT are presented for typical CT examinations for all four models. The impact of TCM is greatest for chest, pelvis and whole-trunk CT examinations, where with TCM the effective DCCCT can be 20-25% lower than without TCM. Typical organs with strong dependence on TCM are thyroid, urinary bladder, lungs and oesophagus. While the DCCCT of thyroid and urinary bladder are mainly sensitive to angular TCM, the DCCCT of lungs and oesophagus are influenced primarily by longitudinal TCM. The impact of the body stature on the effective DCCCT is of the same order as the effect of TCM. Thus, for CT scans in the trunk region, accurate dose values can only be obtained when different sets of DCCCT are employed that are appropriate for the patient's sex and stature and the actual TCM settings.

  9. SU-C-12A-07: Effect of Vertical Position On Dose Reduction Using X-Care

    SciTech Connect

    Silosky, M; Marsh, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Reduction of absorbed dose to radiosensitive tissues is an important goal in diagnostic radiology. Siemens Medical has introduced a technique (X-CARE) to lower CT dose to anterior anatomy by reducing the tube current during 80° of rotation over radiosensitive tissues. Phantom studies have shown 30-40% dose reduction when phantoms are positioned at isocenter. However, for CT face and sinus exams, the center of the head is commonly positioned below isocenter. This work investigated the effects of vertical patient positioning on dose reduction using X-CARE. Methods: A 16cm Computed Tomography Dose Index phantom was scanned on a Siemens Definition Flash CT scanner using a routine head protocol, with the phantom positioned at scanner isocenter. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters were placed on the anterior and posterior sides of the phantom. The phantom was lowered in increments of 2cm and rescanned, up to 8cm below isocenter. The experiment was then repeated using the same scan parameters but adding the X-CARE technique. The mean dosimeter counts were determined for each phantom position, and the difference between XCARE and routine scans was plotted as a function of distance from isocenter. Results: With the phantom positioned at isocenter, using XCARE reduced dose to the anterior side of the phantom by 40%, compared to dose when X-CARE was not used. Positioned below isocenter, anterior dose was reduced by only 20-27%. Additionally, using X-CARE at isocenter reduced dose to the anterior portion of the phantom by 45.6% compared to scans performed without X-CARE 8cm below isocenter. Conclusion: While using X-CARE substantially reduced dose to the anterior side of the phantom, this effect was diminished when the phantom was positioned below isocenter, simulating common practice for face and sinus scans. This indicates that centering the head in the gantry will maximize the effect of X-CARE.

  10. Effects of shielding the radiosensitive superficial organs of ORNL pediatric phantoms on dose reduction in computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Parisa; Miri-Hakimabad, Hashem; Rafat-Motavalli, Laleh

    2014-01-01

    In computed tomography (CT), some superficial organs which have increased sensitivity to radiation, receive doses that are significant enough to be matter of concern. Therefore, in this study, the effects of using shields on the amount of dose reduction and image quality was investigated for pediatric imaging. Absorbed doses of breasts, eyes, thyroid and testes of a series of pediatric phantoms without and with different thickness of bismuth and lead were calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. Appropriate thicknesses of shields were chosen based on their weights, X-ray spectrum, and the amount of dose reduction. In addition, the effect of lead shield on image quality of a simple phantom was assessed quantitatively using region of interest (ROI) measurements. Considering the maximum reduction in absorbed doses and X-ray spectrum, using a lead shield with a maximum thickness of 0.4 mm would be appropriate for testes and thyroid and two other organs (which are exposed directly) should be protected with thinner shields. Moreover, the image quality assessment showed that lead was associated with significant increases in both noise and CT attenuation values, especially in the anterior of the phantom. Overall, the results suggested that shielding is a useful optimization tool in CT. PMID:25525312

  11. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W Paul; Dixon, Robert L; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Estimating organ dose for clinical patients requires accurate modeling of the patient anatomy and the dose field of the CT exam. The modeling of patient anatomy can be achieved using a library of representative computational phantoms (Samei et al 2014 Pediatr. Radiol. 44 460–7). The modeling of the dose field can be challenging for CT exams performed with a tube current modulation (TCM) technique. The purpose of this work was to effectively model the dose field for TCM exams using a convolution-based method. A framework was further proposed for prospective and retrospective organ dose estimation in clinical practice. The study included 60 adult patients (age range: 18–70 years, weight range: 60–180 kg). Patient-specific computational phantoms were generated based on patient CT image datasets. A previously validated Monte Carlo simulation program was used to model a clinical CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). A practical strategy was developed to achieve real-time organ dose estimation for a given clinical patient. CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients (hOrgan) under constant tube current were estimated and modeled as a function of patient size. Each clinical patient in the library was optimally matched to another computational phantom to obtain a representation of organ location/distribution. The patient organ distribution was convolved with a dose distribution profile to generate (CTDIvol)organ, convolution values that quantified the regional dose field for each organ. The organ dose was estimated by multiplying (CTDIvol)organ, convolution with the organ dose coefficients (hOrgan). To validate the accuracy of this dose estimation technique, the organ dose of the original clinical patient was estimated using Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled. The discrepancy between the estimated organ dose and dose simulated using TCM Monte Carlo program was quantified. We further compared the

  12. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. Paul; Dixon, Robert L.; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-05-01

    Estimating organ dose for clinical patients requires accurate modeling of the patient anatomy and the dose field of the CT exam. The modeling of patient anatomy can be achieved using a library of representative computational phantoms (Samei et al 2014 Pediatr. Radiol. 44 460–7). The modeling of the dose field can be challenging for CT exams performed with a tube current modulation (TCM) technique. The purpose of this work was to effectively model the dose field for TCM exams using a convolution-based method. A framework was further proposed for prospective and retrospective organ dose estimation in clinical practice. The study included 60 adult patients (age range: 18–70 years, weight range: 60–180 kg). Patient-specific computational phantoms were generated based on patient CT image datasets. A previously validated Monte Carlo simulation program was used to model a clinical CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). A practical strategy was developed to achieve real-time organ dose estimation for a given clinical patient. CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ) under constant tube current were estimated and modeled as a function of patient size. Each clinical patient in the library was optimally matched to another computational phantom to obtain a representation of organ location/distribution. The patient organ distribution was convolved with a dose distribution profile to generate {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} values that quantified the regional dose field for each organ. The organ dose was estimated by multiplying {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} with the organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ). To validate the accuracy of this dose estimation technique, the organ dose of the original clinical patient was estimated using Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled

  13. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. Paul; Dixon, Robert L.; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-05-01

    Estimating organ dose for clinical patients requires accurate modeling of the patient anatomy and the dose field of the CT exam. The modeling of patient anatomy can be achieved using a library of representative computational phantoms (Samei et al 2014 Pediatr. Radiol. 44 460-7). The modeling of the dose field can be challenging for CT exams performed with a tube current modulation (TCM) technique. The purpose of this work was to effectively model the dose field for TCM exams using a convolution-based method. A framework was further proposed for prospective and retrospective organ dose estimation in clinical practice. The study included 60 adult patients (age range: 18-70 years, weight range: 60-180 kg). Patient-specific computational phantoms were generated based on patient CT image datasets. A previously validated Monte Carlo simulation program was used to model a clinical CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). A practical strategy was developed to achieve real-time organ dose estimation for a given clinical patient. CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ) under constant tube current were estimated and modeled as a function of patient size. Each clinical patient in the library was optimally matched to another computational phantom to obtain a representation of organ location/distribution. The patient organ distribution was convolved with a dose distribution profile to generate {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} values that quantified the regional dose field for each organ. The organ dose was estimated by multiplying {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} with the organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ). To validate the accuracy of this dose estimation technique, the organ dose of the original clinical patient was estimated using Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled. The

  14. Very low-dose adult whole-body tumor imaging with F-18 FDG PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Naveed, Muhammad; McGrath, Mary; Lisi, Michele; Lavalley, Cathy; Feiglin, David

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if effective radiation dose due to PET component in adult whole-body tumor imaging with time-of-flight F-18 FDG PET/CT could be significantly reduced. We retrospectively analyzed data for 10 patients with the body mass index ranging from 25 to 50. We simulated F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose via reconstruction of simulated shorter acquisition time per bed position scans from the acquired list data. F-18 FDG whole-body scans were reconstructed using time-of-flight OSEM algorithm and advanced system modeling. Two groups of images were obtained: group A with a standard dose of F-18 FDG and standard reconstruction parameters and group B with simulated 25% dose and modified reconstruction parameters, respectively. Three nuclear medicine physicians blinded to the simulated activity independently reviewed the images and compared diagnostic quality of images. Based on the input from the physicians, we selected optimal modified reconstruction parameters for group B. In so obtained images, all the lesions observed in the group A were visible in the group B. The tumor SUV values were different in the group A, as compared to group B, respectively. However, no significant differences were reported in the final interpretation of the images from A and B groups. In conclusion, for a small number of patients, we have demonstrated that F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose, accompanied by appropriate modification of the reconstruction parameters provided adequate diagnostic quality of PET images acquired on time-of-flight PET/CT.

  15. Validity of the size-specific dose estimate in adults undergoing coronary CT angiography: comparison with the volume CT dose index.

    PubMed

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Funama, Yoshinori; Yuki, Hideaki; Nakaura, Takeshi; Kai, Noriyuki; Nozaki, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2015-12-01

    Size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) takes into account the patient size but remains to be fully validated for adult coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). We investigated the appropriateness of SSDE for accurate estimation of patient dose by comparing the SSDE and the volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) in adult CCTA. This prospective study received institutional review board approval, and informed consent was obtained from each patient. We enrolled 37 adults who underwent CCTA with a 320-row CT. High-sensitivity metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor dosimeters were placed on the anterior chest. CTDIvol reported by the scanner based on a 32-cm phantom was recorded. We measured chest diameter to convert CTDIvol to SSDE. Using linear regression, we then correlated SSDE with the mean measured skin dose. We also performed linear regression analyses between the skin dose/CTDIvol and the body mass index (BMI), and the skin dose/SSDE and BMI. There was a strong linear correlation (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) between SSDE (mean 37 ± 22 mGy) and mean skin dose (mean 17.7 ± 10 mGy). There was a moderate negative correlation between the skin dose/CTDIvol and BMI (r = 0.45, P < 0.01). The skin dose/SSDE was not affected by BMI (r = 0.06, P > 0.76). SSDE yields a more accurate estimation of the radiation dose without estimation errors attributable to the body size of adult patients undergoing CCTA. PMID:26440660

  16. Automated coronary artery calcification detection on low-dose chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia; Yankelevitz, David; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) measurement from low-dose CT images can be used to assess the risk of coronary artery disease. A fully automatic algorithm to detect and measure CAC from low-dose non-contrast, non-ECG-gated chest CT scans is presented. Based on the automatically detected CAC, the Agatston score (AS), mass score and volume score were computed. These were compared with scores obtained manually from standard-dose ECG-gated scans and low-dose un-gated scans of the same patient. The automatic algorithm segments the heart region based on other pre-segmented organs to provide a coronary region mask. The mitral valve and aortic valve calcification is identified and excluded. All remaining voxels greater than 180HU within the mask region are considered as CAC candidates. The heart segmentation algorithm was evaluated on 400 non-contrast cases with both low-dose and regular dose CT scans. By visual inspection, 371 (92.8%) of the segmentations were acceptable. The automated CAC detection algorithm was evaluated on 41 low-dose non-contrast CT scans. Manual markings were performed on both low-dose and standard-dose scans for these cases. Using linear regression, the correlation of the automatic AS with the standard-dose manual scores was 0.86; with the low-dose manual scores the correlation was 0.91. Standard risk categories were also computed. The automated method risk category agreed with manual markings of gated scans for 24 cases while 15 cases were 1 category off. For low-dose scans, the automatic method agreed with 33 cases while 7 cases were 1 category off.

  17. Examination using modern low dose Multislice-CT (MS-CT) in otorhinolaryngology in a six-week-old baby.

    PubMed

    Heidelberg, Sokiranski R; Heidelberg, Plinkert M; Istanbul, Yildiz F; Ulm, Pirsig W

    2016-06-01

    A 6-week-old girl suffered from a growing and recurrently bleeding mass of unrecognizable origin, obstructing the left nose. Using low-dose Multislice-CT the exact diagnostic localization could be found within one minute in the sleeping baby without sedation or general anesthesia. The result of this imaging enabled the successful complete microscopic removal of a hemangioma from the left inferior turbinate. Follow-up after 15 months showed normal nasal finds.

  18. Cosolvent-free polymer gel dosimeters with improved dose sensitivity and resolution for x-ray CT dose response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chain, J. N. M.; Jirasek, A.; Schreiner, L. J.; McAuley, K. B.

    2011-04-01

    This study reports new N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel recipes with increased dose sensitivity and improved dose resolution for x-ray CT readout. NIPAM can be used to increase the solubility of N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide (Bis) in aqueous solutions from approximately 3% to 5.5% by weight, enabling the manufacture of dosimeters containing up to 19.5%T, which is the total concentration of NIPAM and Bis by weight. Gelatin is shown to have a mild influence on dose sensitivity when gels are imaged using x-ray CT, and a stronger influence when gels are imaged optically. Phantoms that contain only 3% gelatin and 5 mM tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride are sufficiently stiff for dosimetry applications. The best cosolvent-free gel formulation has a dose sensitivity in the linear range (~0.88 H Gy-1) that is a small improvement compared to the best NIPAM-based gels that incorporate isopropanol as a cosolvent (~0.80 H Gy-1). This new gel formulation results in enhanced dose resolution (~0.052 Gy) for x-ray CT readout, making clinical applications of this imaging modality more feasible.

  19. Response of osteosarcoma to preoperative intravenous high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Mail, J.T.; Cohen, M.D.; Mirkin, L.D.; Provisor, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The histologic response of an osteosarcoma to preamputation high-dose methotrexate therapy can be used to determine the optimum maintenance chemotherapy regimen to be administered after amputation. This study evaluates computed tomography (CT) as a method of assessing the response of the tumor to the methotrexate therapy. Nine patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of an extremity had a CT scan of the tumor at initial presentation. This was compared with a second CT scan after four courses of high-dose intravenous methotrexate. Each set of scans was evaluated for changes in bony destruction, soft-tissue mass, pattern of calcification, and extent of tumor involvement of the marrow cavity. These findings were correlated with the histologic response of the tumor as measured by the degree of tumor necrosis. The changes seen on CT correlated well with the degree of the histologic response in seven of the nine patients.

  20. Statistical CT noise reduction with multiscale decomposition and penalized weighted least squares in the projection domain

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Shaojie; Tang Xiangyang

    2012-09-15

    Purposes: The suppression of noise in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging is of clinical relevance for diagnostic image quality and the potential for radiation dose saving. Toward this purpose, statistical noise reduction methods in either the image or projection domain have been proposed, which employ a multiscale decomposition to enhance the performance of noise suppression while maintaining image sharpness. Recognizing the advantages of noise suppression in the projection domain, the authors propose a projection domain multiscale penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) method, in which the angular sampling rate is explicitly taken into consideration to account for the possible variation of interview sampling rate in advanced clinical or preclinical applications. Methods: The projection domain multiscale PWLS method is derived by converting an isotropic diffusion partial differential equation in the image domain into the projection domain, wherein a multiscale decomposition is carried out. With adoption of the Markov random field or soft thresholding objective function, the projection domain multiscale PWLS method deals with noise at each scale. To compensate for the degradation in image sharpness caused by the projection domain multiscale PWLS method, an edge enhancement is carried out following the noise reduction. The performance of the proposed method is experimentally evaluated and verified using the projection data simulated by computer and acquired by a CT scanner. Results: The preliminary results show that the proposed projection domain multiscale PWLS method outperforms the projection domain single-scale PWLS method and the image domain multiscale anisotropic diffusion method in noise reduction. In addition, the proposed method can preserve image sharpness very well while the occurrence of 'salt-and-pepper' noise and mosaic artifacts can be avoided. Conclusions: Since the interview sampling rate is taken into account in the projection domain

  1. Poster — Thur Eve — 11: Validation of the orthopedic metallic artifact reduction tool for CT simulations at the Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J; Foottit, C

    2014-08-15

    Metallic implants in patients can produce image artifacts in kilovoltage CT simulation images which can introduce noise and inaccuracies in CT number, affecting anatomical segmentation and dose distributions. The commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm (O-MAR) (Philips Healthcare System) was recently made available on CT simulation scanners at our institution. This study validated the clinical use of O-MAR by investigating its effects on CT number and dose distributions. O-MAR corrected and uncorrected images were acquired with a Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT simulator of a cylindrical solid water phantom that contained various plugs (including metal) of known density. CT number accuracy was investigated by determining the mean and standard deviation in regions of interest (ROI) within each plug for uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images and comparing with no-metal image values. Dose distributions were calculated using the Monaco treatment planning system. Seven open fields were equally spaced about the phantom around a ROI near the center of the phantom. These were compared to a “correct” dose distribution calculated by overriding electron densities a no-metal phantom image to produce an image containing metal but no artifacts. An overall improvement in CT number and dose distribution accuracy was achieved by applying the O-MAR correction. Mean CT numbers and standard deviations were found to be generally improved. Exceptions included lung equivalent media, which is consistent with vendor specified contraindications. Dose profiles were found to vary by ±4% between uncorrected or O-MAR corrected images with O-MAR producing doses closer to ground truth.

  2. Low-dose preview for patient-specific, task-specific technique selection in cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Adam S.; Stayman, J. Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Vogt, Sebastian; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Khanna, A. Jay; Gallia, Gary L.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose : A method is presented for generating simulated low-dose cone-beam CT (CBCT) preview images from which patient- and task-specific minimum-dose protocols can be confidently selected prospectively in clinical scenarios involving repeat scans. Methods : In clinical scenarios involving a series of CBCT images, the low-dose preview (LDP) method operates upon the first scan to create a projection dataset that accurately simulates the effects of dose reduction in subsequent scans by injecting noise of proper magnitude and correlation, including both quantum and electronic readout noise as important components of image noise in flat-panel detector CBCT. Experiments were conducted to validate the LDP method in both a head phantom and a cadaveric torso by performing CBCT acquisitions spanning a wide dose range (head: 0.8–13.2 mGy, body: 0.8–12.4 mGy) with a prototype mobile C-arm system. After injecting correlated noise to simulate dose reduction, the projections were reconstructed using both conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and an iterative, model-based image reconstruction method (MBIR). The LDP images were then compared to real CBCT images in terms of noise magnitude, noise-power spectrum (NPS), spatial resolution, contrast, and artifacts. Results : For both FBP and MBIR, the LDP images exhibited accurate levels of spatial resolution and contrast that were unaffected by the correlated noise injection, as expected. Furthermore, the LDP image noise magnitude and NPS were in strong agreement with real CBCT images acquired at the corresponding, reduced dose level across the entire dose range considered. The noise magnitude agreed within 7% for both the head phantom and cadaveric torso, and the NPS showed a similar level of agreement up to the Nyquist frequency. Therefore, the LDP images were highly representative of real image quality across a broad range of dose and reconstruction methods. On the other hand, naïve injection ofuncorrelated noise

  3. SU-E-I-29: Care KV: Dose It Influence Radiation Dose in Non-Contrast Examination of CT Abdomen/pelvis?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Ganesh, H; Weir, V

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: CARE kV is a tool that automatically recommends optimal kV setting for individual patient for specific CT examination. The use of CARE kV depends on topogram and the user-selected contrast behavior. CARE kV is expected to reduce radiation dose while improving image quality. However, this may work only for certain groups of patients and/or certain CT examinations. This study is to investigate the effects of CARE kV on radiation dose of non-contrast examination of CT abdomen/pelvis. Methods: Radiation dose (CTDIvol and DLP) from patients who underwent abdomen/pelvis non-contrast examination with and without CARE kV were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were scanned in the same scanner (Siemens Somatom AS64). To mitigate any possible influences due to technologists’ unfamiliarity with the CARE kV, the data with CARE kV were retrieved 1.5 years after the start of CARE kV usage. T-test was used for significant difference in radiation dose. Results: Volume CTDIs and DLPs from 18 patients before and 24 patients after the use of CARE kV were obtained in a duration of one month. There is a slight increase in both average CTDIvol and average DLP with CARE kV compared to those without CARE kV (25.52 mGy vs. 22.65 mGy for CTDIvol; 1265.81 mGy-cm vs. 1199.19 mGy-cm). Statistically there was no significant difference. Without CARE kV, 140 kV was used in 9 of 18 patients, while with CARE KV, 140 kV was used in 15 of 24 patients. 80kV was not used in either group. Conclusion: The use of CARE kV may save time for protocol optimization and minimize variability among technologists. Radiation dose reduction was not observed in non-contrast examinations of CT abdomen/pelvis. This was partially because our CT protocols were tailored according to patient size before CARE kV and partially because of large size patients.

  4. Investigating CT to CBCT image registration for head and neck proton therapy as a tool for daily dose recalculation

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Nijhuis, Reinoud; Thieke, Christian; Reiner, Michael; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus; Dedes, George; Handrack, Josefine; Parodi, Katia; Janssens, Guillaume; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan; Kamp, Florian; Wilkens, Jan J.; Paganelli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) of head and neck (H and N) cancer patients may be improved by plan adaptation. The decision to adapt the treatment plan based on a dose recalculation on the current anatomy requires a diagnostic quality computed tomography (CT) scan of the patient. As gantry-mounted cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners are currently being offered by vendors, they may offer daily or weekly updates of patient anatomy. CBCT image quality may not be sufficient for accurate proton dose calculation and it is likely necessary to perform CBCT CT number correction. In this work, the authors investigated deformable image registration (DIR) of the planning CT (pCT) to the CBCT to generate a virtual CT (vCT) to be used for proton dose recalculation. Methods: Datasets of six H and N cancer patients undergoing photon intensity modulated radiation therapy were used in this study to validate the vCT approach. Each dataset contained a CBCT acquired within 3 days of a replanning CT (rpCT), in addition to a pCT. The pCT and rpCT were delineated by a physician. A Morphons algorithm was employed in this work to perform DIR of the pCT to CBCT following a rigid registration of the two images. The contours from the pCT were deformed using the vector field resulting from DIR to yield a contoured vCT. The DIR accuracy was evaluated with a scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm comparing automatically identified matching features between vCT and CBCT. The rpCT was used as reference for evaluation of the vCT. The vCT and rpCT CT numbers were converted to stopping power ratio and the water equivalent thickness (WET) was calculated. IMPT dose distributions from treatment plans optimized on the pCT were recalculated with a Monte Carlo algorithm on the rpCT and vCT for comparison in terms of gamma index, dose volume histogram (DVH) statistics as well as proton range. The DIR generated contours on the vCT were compared to physician-drawn contours on the rpCT

  5. SU-E-T-161: Evaluation of Dose Calculation Based On Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, T; Nakazawa, T; Saitou, Y; Nakata, A; Yano, M; Tateoka, K; Fujimoto, K; Sakata, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to convert pixel values in cone-beam CT (CBCT) using histograms of pixel values in the simulation CT (sim-CT) and the CBCT images and to evaluate the accuracy of dose calculation based on the CBCT. Methods: The sim-CT and CBCT images immediately before the treatment of 10 prostate cancer patients were acquired. Because of insufficient calibration of the pixel values in the CBCT, it is difficult to be directly used for dose calculation. The pixel values in the CBCT images were converted using an in-house program. A 7 fields treatment plans (original plan) created on the sim-CT images were applied to the CBCT images and the dose distributions were re-calculated with same monitor units (MUs). These prescription doses were compared with those of original plans. Results: In the results of the pixel values conversion in the CBCT images,the mean differences of pixel values for the prostate,subcutaneous adipose, muscle and right-femur were −10.78±34.60, 11.78±41.06, 29.49±36.99 and 0.14±31.15 respectively. In the results of the calculated doses, the mean differences of prescription doses for 7 fields were 4.13±0.95%, 0.34±0.86%, −0.05±0.55%, 1.35±0.98%, 1.77±0.56%, 0.89±0.69% and 1.69±0.71% respectively and as a whole, the difference of prescription dose was 1.54±0.4%. Conclusion: The dose calculation on the CBCT images achieve an accuracy of <2% by using this pixel values conversion program. This may enable implementation of efficient adaptive radiotherapy.

  6. SU-E-I-98: Dose Comparison for Pulmonary Embolism CT Studies: Single Energy Vs. Dual Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the size specific dose estimate (SSDE), dose length product (DLP) and noise relationship for pulmonary embolism studies evaluated by single source dual energy computed tomography (DECT) against conventional CT (CCT) studies in a busy cancer center and to determine the dose savings provided by DECT. Methods: An IRB-approved retrospective study was performed to determine the CTDIvol and DLP from a subset of patients scanned with both DECT and CCT over the past five years. We were able to identify 30 breast cancer patients (6 male, 24 female, age range 24 to 81) who had both DECT and CCT studies performed. DECT scans were performed with a GE HD 750 scanner (140/80 kVp, 480 mAs and 40 mm) and CCT scans were performed with a GE Lightspeed 16 slice scanner (120 kVp, 352 mAs, 20 mm). Image noise was measured by placing an ROI and recording the standard deviation of the mean HU along the descending aorta. Results: The average DECT patient size specific dose estimate was to be 14.2 ± 1.7 mGy as compared to 22.4 ± 2.7 mGy from CCT PE studies, which is a 37% reduction in the SSDE. The average DECT DLP was 721.8 ± 84.6 mGy-cm as compared to 981.8 ± 106.1 mGy-cm for CCT, which is a 26% decrease. Compared to CCT the image noise was found to decrease by 19% when using DECT for PE studies. Conclusion: DECT SSDE and DLP measurements indicate dose savings and image noise reduction when compared to CCT. In an environment that heavily debates CT patient doses, this study confirms the effectiveness of DECT in PE imaging.

  7. Low-dose high-resolution CT of lung parenchyma

    SciTech Connect

    Zwirewich, C.V.; Mayo, J.R.; Mueller, N.L. )

    1991-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of low-dose high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in the assessment of lung parenchyma, three observers reviewed the scans of 31 patients. The 1.5-mm-collimation, 2-second, 120-kVp scans were obtained at 20 and 200 mA at selected identical levels in the chest. The observers evaluated the visualization of normal pulmonary anatomy, various parenchymal abnormalities and their distribution, and artifacts. The low-dose and conventional scans were equivalent in the evaluation of vessels, lobar and segmental bronchi, and anatomy of secondary pulmonary lobules, and in characterizing the extent and distribution of reticulation, honeycomb cysts, and thickened interlobular septa. The low-dose technique failed to demonstrate ground-glass opacity in two of 10 cases (20%) and emphysema in one of nine cases (11%), in which they were evident but subtle on the high-dose scans. These differences were not statistically significant. Linear streak artifact was more prominent on images acquired with the low-dose technique, but the two techniques were judged equally diagnostic in 97% of cases. The authors conclude that HRCT images acquired at 20 mA yield anatomic information equivalent to that obtained with 200-mA scans in the majority of patients, without significant loss of spatial resolution or image degradation due to linear streak artifact.

  8. Development of a Radiation Dose Reporting Software for X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Aiping

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has experienced tremendous technological advances in recent years and has established itself as one of the most popular diagnostic imaging tools. While CT imaging clearly plays an invaluable role in modern medicine, its rapid adoption has resulted in a dramatic increase in the average medical radiation exposure to the worldwide and United States populations. Existing software tools for CT dose estimation and reporting are mostly based on patient phantoms that contain overly simplified anatomies insufficient in meeting the current and future needs. This dissertation describes the development of an easy-to-use software platform, “VirtualDose”, as a service to estimate and report the organ dose and effective dose values for patients undergoing the CT examinations. “VirtualDose” incorporates advanced models for the adult male and female, pregnant women, and children. To cover a large portion of the ignored obese patients that frequents the radiology clinics, a new set of obese male and female phantoms are also developed and applied to study the effects of the fat tissues on the CT radiation dose. Multi-detector CT scanners (MDCT) and clinical protocols, as well as the most recent effective dose algorithms from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 are adopted in “VirtualDose” to keep pace with the MDCT development and regulatory requirements. A new MDCT scanner model with both body and head bowtie filter is developed to cover both the head and body scanning modes. This model was validated through the clinical measurements. A comprehensive slice-by-slice database is established by deriving the data from a larger number of single axial scans simulated on the patient phantoms using different CT bowtie filters, beam thicknesses, and different tube voltages in the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) code. When compared to the existing CT dose software packages, organ dose data in this

  9. Radiation dose calculations for CT scans with tube current modulation using the approach to equilibrium function

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The approach to equilibrium function has been used previously to calculate the radiation dose to a shift-invariant medium undergoing CT scans with constant tube current [Li, Zhang, and Liu, Med. Phys. 39, 5347–5352 (2012)]. The authors have adapted this method to CT scans with tube current modulation (TCM). Methods: For a scan with variable tube current, the scan range was divided into multiple subscan ranges, each with a nearly constant tube current. Then the dose calculation algorithm presented previously was applied. For a clinical CT scan series that presented tube current per slice, the authors adopted an efficient approach that computed the longitudinal dose distribution for one scan length equal to the slice thickness, which center was at z = 0. The cumulative dose at a specific point was a summation of the contributions from all slices and the overscan. Results: The dose calculations performed for a total of four constant and variable tube current distributions agreed with the published results of Dixon and Boone [Med. Phys. 40, 111920 (14pp.) (2013)]. For an abdomen/pelvis scan of an anthropomorphic phantom (model ATOM 701-B, CIRS, Inc., VA) on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 scanner with 120 kV, N × T = 20 mm, pitch = 1.375, z axis current modulation (auto mA), and angular current modulation (smart mA), dose measurements were performed using two lines of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters, one of which was placed near the phantom center and the other on the surface. Dose calculations were performed on the central and peripheral axes of a cylinder containing water, whose cross-sectional mass was about equal to that of the ATOM phantom in its abdominal region, and the results agreed with the measurements within 28.4%. Conclusions: The described method provides an effective approach that takes into account subject size, scan length, and constant or variable tube current to evaluate CT dose to a shift-invariant medium. For a clinical CT scan

  10. Evaluation of a metal artifact reduction algorithm in CT studies used for proton radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Karin M; Ahnesjö, Anders; Vallhagen Dahlgren, Christina

    2014-09-08

    Metal objects in the body such as hip prostheses cause artifacts in CT images. When CT images degraded by artifacts are used for treatment planning of radiotherapy, the artifacts can yield inaccurate dose calculations and, for particle beams, erroneous penetration depths. A metal artifact reduction software (O-MAR) installed on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT has been tested for applications in treatment planning of proton radiotherapy. Hip prostheses mounted in a water phantom were used as test objects. Images without metal objects were acquired and used as reference data for the analysis of artifact-affected regions outside of the metal objects in both the O-MAR corrected and the uncorrected images. Water equivalent thicknesses (WET) based on proton stopping power data were calculated to quantify differences in the calculated proton beam penetration for the different image sets. The WET to a selected point of interest between the hip prostheses was calculated for several beam directions of clinical relevance. The results show that the calculated differences in WET relative to the reference case were decreased when the O-MAR algorithm was applied. WET differences up to 2.0 cm were seen in the uncorrected case while, for the O-MAR corrected case, the maximum difference was decreased to 0.4 cm. The O-MAR algorithm can significantly improve the accuracy in proton range calculations. However, there are some residual effects, and the use of proton beam directions along artifact streaks should only be used with caution and appropriate margins.

  11. Towards a comprehensive CT image segmentation for thoracic organ radiation dose estimation and reporting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Ruppertshofen, Heike; Vik, Torbjörn; Prinsen, Peter; Wiegert, Jens

    2014-03-01

    Administered dose of ionizing radiation during medical imaging is an issue of increasing concern for the patient, for the clinical community, and for respective regulatory bodies. CT radiation dose is currently estimated based on a set of very simplifying assumptions which do not take the actual body geometry and organ specific doses into account. This makes it very difficult to accurately report imaging related administered dose and to track it for different organs over the life of the patient. In this paper this deficit is addressed in a two-fold way. In a first step, the absorbed radiation dose in each image voxel is estimated based on a Monte-Carlo simulation of X-ray absorption and scattering. In a second step, the image is segmented into tissue types with different radio sensitivity. In combination this allows to calculate the effective dose as a weighted sum of the individual organ doses. The main purpose of this paper is to assess the feasibility of automatic organ specific dose estimation. With respect to a commercially applicable solution and respective robustness and efficiency requirements, we investigated the effect of dose sampling rather than integration over the organ volume. We focused on the thoracic anatomy as the exemplary body region, imaged frequently by CT. For image segmentation we applied a set of available approaches which allowed us to cover the main thoracic radio-sensitive tissue types. We applied the dose estimation approach to 10 thoracic CT datasets and evaluated segmentation accuracy and administered dose and could show that organ specific dose estimation can be achieved.

  12. Simulated and measured dose response characteristics of detectors used for CT dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakanen, Arvi

    2012-08-01

    A CT-SD16 semiconductor detector was calibrated in terms of the computed tomography (CT) air kerma index for the integration length L = 100 mm, CK,PMMA,100, in the cylindrical CT head and body dosimetry phantoms using a DCT10 pencil ionization chamber as a reference instrument. Using IEC RQT 9 120-kV x-ray radiation quality and 25-62.5 mm nominal beam widths free in air, a CK,PMMA,100(DCT10)/CK,PMMA,100(CT-SD16) ratio of 0.97 was observed, while in the centre of 300 mm long CT head and body dosimetry phantoms, CK,PMMA,100(DCT10)/CK,PMMA,100(CT-SD16) ratios ranged from 1.02 to 1.09. Using IEC RQT 8-10 radiation qualities free in air, Monte Carlo simulated dose response characteristics of CT-SD16 and DCT10 were comparable with those obtained from the measurements. Simulations were also used to determine CK,PMMA,100(DCT10) in the centre of the CT head and body phantoms. At IEC RQT 9 and 25-62.5 mm nominal beam widths, the relative values of the simulated dose agreed with the measured values within 2-10% for the head and body phantoms, respectively. A kq correction factor between dose measurements in the phantom and free in air was determined for the model of DCT10 and for the real detectors using measured CK,PMMA,100 data. Simulations were performed using the EGSnrc CAVRZ code.

  13. Image texture and radiation dose properties in CT.

    PubMed

    Mozejko, David; Kjernlie Andersen, Hilde; Pedersen, Marius; Waaler, Dag; Trægde Martinsen, Anne Catrine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare image noise properties of GE Discovery HD 750 and Toshiba Aquilion ONE. The uniformity section of a Catphan 600 image quality assurance phantom was scanned with both scanners, at different dose levels and with extension rings simulating patients of different sizes. 36 datasets were obtained and analyzed in terms of noise power spectrum. All the results prove that introduction of extension rings significantly altered the image quality with respect to noise properties. Without extension rings, the Toshiba scanner had lower total visible noise than GE (with GE as reference: FC18 had 82% and FC08 had 80% for 10 mGy, FC18 had 77% and FC08 74% for 15 mGy, FC18 had 80% and FC08 77% for 20 mGy). The total visible noise (TVN) for 20 and 15 mGy were similar for the phantom with the smallest additional extension ring, while Toshiba had higher TVN than GE for the 10 mGy dose level (120% FC18, 110% FC08). For the second and third ring, the GE images had lower TVN than Toshiba images for all dose levels (Toshiba TVN is greater than 155% for all cases). The results indi-cate that GE potentially has less image noise than Toshiba for larger patients. The Toshiba FC18 kernel had higher TVN than the Toshiba FC08 kernel with additional beam hardening correction for all dose levels and phantom sizes (120%, 107%, and 106% for FC18 compared to 110%, 98%, and 97%, for FC08, for 10, 15 and 20 mGy doses, respectively). PMID:27167260

  14. Development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations: interdependence of CT image artifact mitigation and tissue assignment.

    PubMed

    Miksys, N; Xu, C; Beaulieu, L; Thomson, R M

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates and compares CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR) methods and tissue assignment schemes (TAS) for the development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. Four MAR techniques are investigated to mitigate seed artifacts from post-implant CT images of a homogeneous phantom and eight prostate patients: a raw sinogram approach using the original CT scanner data and three methods (simple threshold replacement (STR), 3D median filter, and virtual sinogram) requiring only the reconstructed CT image. Virtual patient models are developed using six TAS ranging from the AAPM-ESTRO-ABG TG-186 basic approach of assigning uniform density tissues (resulting in a model not dependent on MAR) to more complex models assigning prostate, calcification, and mixtures of prostate and calcification using CT-derived densities. The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is employed to calculate dose distributions. All four MAR methods eliminate bright seed spot artifacts, and the image-based methods provide comparable mitigation of artifacts compared with the raw sinogram approach. However, each MAR technique has limitations: STR is unable to mitigate low CT number artifacts, the median filter blurs the image which challenges the preservation of tissue heterogeneities, and both sinogram approaches introduce new streaks. Large local dose differences are generally due to differences in voxel tissue-type rather than mass density. The largest differences in target dose metrics (D90, V100, V150), over 50% lower compared to the other models, are when uncorrected CT images are used with TAS that consider calcifications. Metrics found using models which include calcifications are generally a few percent lower than prostate-only models. Generally, metrics from any MAR method and any TAS which considers calcifications agree within 6%. Overall, the studied MAR methods and TAS show promise for further retrospective MC dose

  15. Development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations: interdependence of CT image artifact mitigation and tissue assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miksys, N.; Xu, C.; Beaulieu, L.; Thomson, R. M.

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates and compares CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR) methods and tissue assignment schemes (TAS) for the development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. Four MAR techniques are investigated to mitigate seed artifacts from post-implant CT images of a homogeneous phantom and eight prostate patients: a raw sinogram approach using the original CT scanner data and three methods (simple threshold replacement (STR), 3D median filter, and virtual sinogram) requiring only the reconstructed CT image. Virtual patient models are developed using six TAS ranging from the AAPM-ESTRO-ABG TG-186 basic approach of assigning uniform density tissues (resulting in a model not dependent on MAR) to more complex models assigning prostate, calcification, and mixtures of prostate and calcification using CT-derived densities. The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is employed to calculate dose distributions. All four MAR methods eliminate bright seed spot artifacts, and the image-based methods provide comparable mitigation of artifacts compared with the raw sinogram approach. However, each MAR technique has limitations: STR is unable to mitigate low CT number artifacts, the median filter blurs the image which challenges the preservation of tissue heterogeneities, and both sinogram approaches introduce new streaks. Large local dose differences are generally due to differences in voxel tissue-type rather than mass density. The largest differences in target dose metrics (D90, V100, V150), over 50% lower compared to the other models, are when uncorrected CT images are used with TAS that consider calcifications. Metrics found using models which include calcifications are generally a few percent lower than prostate-only models. Generally, metrics from any MAR method and any TAS which considers calcifications agree within 6%. Overall, the studied MAR methods and TAS show promise for further retrospective MC dose

  16. Development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations: interdependence of CT image artifact mitigation and tissue assignment.

    PubMed

    Miksys, N; Xu, C; Beaulieu, L; Thomson, R M

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates and compares CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR) methods and tissue assignment schemes (TAS) for the development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. Four MAR techniques are investigated to mitigate seed artifacts from post-implant CT images of a homogeneous phantom and eight prostate patients: a raw sinogram approach using the original CT scanner data and three methods (simple threshold replacement (STR), 3D median filter, and virtual sinogram) requiring only the reconstructed CT image. Virtual patient models are developed using six TAS ranging from the AAPM-ESTRO-ABG TG-186 basic approach of assigning uniform density tissues (resulting in a model not dependent on MAR) to more complex models assigning prostate, calcification, and mixtures of prostate and calcification using CT-derived densities. The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is employed to calculate dose distributions. All four MAR methods eliminate bright seed spot artifacts, and the image-based methods provide comparable mitigation of artifacts compared with the raw sinogram approach. However, each MAR technique has limitations: STR is unable to mitigate low CT number artifacts, the median filter blurs the image which challenges the preservation of tissue heterogeneities, and both sinogram approaches introduce new streaks. Large local dose differences are generally due to differences in voxel tissue-type rather than mass density. The largest differences in target dose metrics (D90, V100, V150), over 50% lower compared to the other models, are when uncorrected CT images are used with TAS that consider calcifications. Metrics found using models which include calcifications are generally a few percent lower than prostate-only models. Generally, metrics from any MAR method and any TAS which considers calcifications agree within 6%. Overall, the studied MAR methods and TAS show promise for further retrospective MC dose

  17. Enlarged longitudinal dose profiles in cone-beam CT and the need for modified dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kanae; Tsunoo, Takanori; Aoyama, Takahiko; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Murase, Kenya

    2005-04-01

    In order to examine phantom length necessary to assess radiation dose delivered to patients in cone-beam CT with an enlarged beamwidth, we measured dose profiles in cylindrical phantoms of sufficient length using a prototype 256-slice CT-scanner developed at our institute. Dose profiles parallel to the rotation axis were measured at the central and peripheral positions in PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) phantoms of 160 or 320 mm diameter and 900 mm length. For practical application, we joined unit cylinders (150 mm long) together to provide phantoms of 900 mm length. Dose profiles were measured with a pin photodiode sensor having a sensitive region of approximately 2.8x2.8 mm{sup 2} and 2.7 mm thickness. Beamwidths of the scanner were varied from 20 to 138 mm. Dose profile integrals (DPI) were calculated using the measured dose profiles for various beamwidths and integration ranges. For the body phantom (320-mm-diam phantom), 76% of the DPI was represented for a 20 mm beamwidth and 60% was represented for a 138 mm beamwidth if dose profiles were integrated over a 100 mm range, while more than 90% of the DPI was represented for beamwidths between 20 and 138 mm if integration was carried out over a 300 mm range. The phantom length and integration range for dosimetry of cone-beam CT needed to be more than 300 mm to represent more than 90% of the DPI for the body phantom with the beamwidth of more than 20 mm. Although we reached this conclusion using the prototype 256-slice CT-scanner, it may be applied to other multislice CT-scanners as well.

  18. Designing a phantom for dose evaluation in multi-slice CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, Samir; Badal, Andreu; Stern, Stanley H.; Kyprianou, Iacovos S.

    2010-04-01

    Accurately representing radiation dose delivered in MSCT is becoming a concern as the maximum beam width of some modern CT scanners tends to become wider than the 100 mm charge-collection length of the pencil ionization chamber generally used in CT dosimetry. We investigate two alternative methods of dose evaluation in CT scanners. We investigate two alternative approaches for better characterization of CT dose than conventional evaluation of CTDI100. First, we simulate dose profiles and energy deposition in phantoms longer than the typically used 14-15 cm length right-circular cylinders. Second we explore the accuracy and practicality of applying mathematical convolution to a scatter kernel in order to generate dose profiles. A basic requirement for any newly designed phantom is that it be able to capture approximately the same dose as would an infinitely long cylinder, but yet be of a size and weight that a person could easily carry and position. Using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo package, we simulated dose profiles in cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms of 10, 16, 20, 24 and 32 cm diameter and 15, 30 and 300 cm length. Beam widths were varied from 1 cm to 60 cm. Lengths necessary to include within the dose integrals values associated with the scatter tails as well as with the primary radiation of the profile were then calculated as the full width at five percent of maximum dose. The resulting lengths suggest that to accommodate wide beam widths, phantoms longer than those currently used are necessary. The results also suggest that using a longer phantom is a relatively more accurate approach, while using mathematical convolution is simpler and more practical to implement than using the long phantoms designed according to direct Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Profile of CT scan output dose in axial and helical modes using convolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anam, C.; Haryanto, F.; Widita, R.; Arif, I.; Dougherty, G.

    2016-03-01

    The profile of the CT scan output dose is crucial for establishing the patient dose profile. The purpose of this study is to investigate the profile of the CT scan output dose in both axial and helical modes using convolution. A single scan output dose profile (SSDP) in the center of a head phantom was measured using a solid-state detector. The multiple scan output dose profile (MSDP) in the axial mode was calculated using convolution between SSDP and delta function, whereas for the helical mode MSDP was calculated using convolution between SSDP and the rectangular function. MSDPs were calculated for a number of scans (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25). The multiple scan average dose (MSAD) for differing numbers of scans was compared to the value of CT dose index (CTDI). Finally, the edge values of MSDP for every scan number were compared to the corresponding MSAD values. MSDPs were successfully generated by using convolution between a SSDP and the appropriate function. We found that CTDI only accurately estimates MSAD when the number of scans was more than 10. We also found that the edge values of the profiles were 42% to 93% lower than that the corresponding MSADs.

  20. Influence of z overscanning on normalized effective doses calculated for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Karantanas, Apostolos; Karabekios, Spiros; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on normalized effective dose for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector-computed tomography (CT) examinations. Five commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patients and the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code were employed in the current study to simulate pediatric CT exposures. For all phantoms, axial and helical examinations at 120 kV tube voltage were simulated. Scans performed at 80 kV were also simulated. Sex-specific normalized effective doses were estimated for four standard CT examinations i.e., head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk, for all pediatric phantoms. Data for both axial and helical mode acquisition were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The validity of the Monte Carlo results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using thermoluminescence dosimetry and a physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantom simulating a 10-year-old child. In all cases normalized effective dose values were found to increase with increasing z overscanning. The percentage differences in normalized data between axial and helical scans may reach 43%, 70%, 36%, and 26% for head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Normalized data for female pediatric patients was in general higher compared to male patients for all ages, examined regions, and z overscanning values. For both male and female children, the normalized effective dose values were reduced as the age was increased. For the same typical exposure conditions, dose values decreased when lower tube voltage was used; for a 1-year-old child, for example, the effective dose was 3.8 times lower when 80 kV instead of 120 kV was used. Normalized data for the estimation of effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing standard axial and helical CT examinations on an

  1. A clinical evaluation of total variation-Stokes image reconstruction strategy for low-dose CT imaging of the chest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Moore, William; Bhattacharji, Priya; Liang, Zhengrong

    2015-03-01

    One hundred "normal-dose" computed tomography (CT) studies of the chest (i.e., 1,160 projection views, 120kVp, 100mAs) data sets were acquired from the patients who were scheduled for lung biopsy at Stony Brook University Hospital under informed consent approved by our Institutional Review Board. To mimic low-dose CT imaging scenario (i.e., sparse-view scan), sparse projection views were evenly extracted from the total 1,160 projections of each patient and the total radiation dose was reduced according to how many sparse views were selected. A standard filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was applied to the 1160 projections to produce reference images for comparison purpose. In the low-dose scenario, both the FBP and total variation-stokes (TVS) algorithms were applied to reconstruct the corresponding low-dose images. The reconstructed images were evaluated by an experienced thoracic radiologist against the reference images. Both the low-dose reconstructions and the reference images were displayed on a 4- megapixel monitor in soft tissue and lung windows. The images were graded by a five-point scale from 0 to 4 (0, nondiagnostic; 1, severe artifact with low confidence; 2, moderate artifact or moderate diagnostic confidences; 3, mild artifact or high confidence; 4, well depicted without artifacts). Quantitative evaluation measurements such as standard deviations for different tissue types and universal quality index were also studied and reported for the results. The evaluation concluded that the TVS can reduce the view number from 1,160 to 580 with slightly lower scores as the reference, resulting in a dose reduction to close 50%.

  2. Correction of CT artifacts and its influence on Monte Carlo dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Beaulieu, Luc; Palefsky, Steven; Verhaegen, Frank

    2007-06-15

    Computed tomography (CT) images of patients having metallic implants or dental fillings exhibit severe streaking artifacts. These artifacts may disallow tumor and organ delineation and compromise dose calculation outcomes in radiotherapy. We used a sinogram interpolation metal streaking artifact correction algorithm on several phantoms of exact-known compositions and on a prostate patient with two hip prostheses. We compared original CT images and artifact-corrected images of both. To evaluate the effect of the artifact correction on dose calculations, we performed Monte Carlo dose calculation in the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc code. For the phantoms, we performed calculations in the exact geometry, in the original CT geometry and in the artifact-corrected geometry for photon and electron beams. The maximum errors in 6 MV photon beam dose calculation were found to exceed 25% in original CT images when the standard DOSXYZnrc/CTCREATE calibration is used but less than 2% in artifact-corrected images when an extended calibration is used. The extended calibration includes an extra calibration point for a metal. The patient dose volume histograms of a hypothetical target irradiated by five 18 MV photon beams in a hypothetical treatment differ significantly in the original CT geometry and in the artifact-corrected geometry. This was found to be mostly due to miss-assignment of tissue voxels to air due to metal artifacts. We also developed a simple Monte Carlo model for a CT scanner and we simulated the contribution of scatter and beam hardening to metal streaking artifacts. We found that whereas beam hardening has a minor effect on metal artifacts, scatter is an important cause of these artifacts.

  3. SU-E-T-416: VMAT Dose Calculations Using Cone Beam CT Images: A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Kuo, J; Daroui, P; Ramsinghani, N; Al-Ghazi, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) images have been used routinely for patient positioning throughout the treatment course. However, use of CBCT for dose calculation is still investigational. The purpose of this study is to assess the utility of CBCT images for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) plan dose calculation. Methods: A CATPHAN 504 phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) was used to compare the dosimetric and geometric accuracy between conventional CT and CBCT (in both full and half fan modes). Hounsfield units (HU) profiles at different density areas were evaluated. A C shape target that surrounds a central avoidance structure was created and a VMAT plan was generated on the CT images and copied to the CBCT phantom images. Patient studies included three brain patients, and one head and neck (H'N) patient. VMAT plans generated on the patients treatment planning CT was applied to CBCT images obtained during the first treatment. Isodose distributions and dosevolume- histograms (DVHs) were compared. Results: For the phantom study, the HU difference between CT and CBCT is within 100 (maximum 96 HU for Teflon CBCT images in full fan mode). The impact of these differences on the calculated dose distributions was clinically insignificant. In both phantom and patient studies, target DVHs based on CBCT images were in excellent agreement with those based on planning CT images. Mean, Median, near minimum (D98%), and near maximum (D2%) doses agreed within 0-2.5%. A slightly larger discrepancy is observed in the patient studies compared to that seen in the phantom study, (0-1% vs. 0 - 2.5%). Conclusion: CBCT images can be used to accurately predict dosimetric results, without any HU correction. It is feasible to use CBCT to evaluate the actual dose delivered at each fraction. The dosimetric consequences resulting from tumor response and patient geometry changes could be monitored.

  4. Technique factors and their relationship to radiation dose in pendant geometry breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, John M.; Kwan, Alexander L. C.; Seibert, J. Anthony; Shah, Nikula; Lindfors, Karen K.; Nelson, Thomas R.

    2005-12-15

    The use of breast computed tomography (CT) as an alternative to mammography in some patients is being studied at several institutions. However, the radiation dosimetry issues associated with breast CT are markedly different than in the case of mammography. In this study, the spectral properties of an operational breast CT scanner were characterized both by physical measurement and computer modeling of the kVp-dependent spectra, from 40 to 110 kVp (Be window W anode with 0.30 mm added Cu filtration). Previously reported conversion factors, normalized glandular dose for CT-DgN(ct), derived from Monte Carlo methods, were used in concert with the output spectra of the breast scanner to compute the mean glandular dose to the breast based upon different combinations of x-ray technique factors (kVp and mAs). The mean glandular dose (MGD) was measured as a function of the compressed breast thickness (2-8 cm) and three different breast compositions (0%, 50%, and 100% glandular fractions) in four clinical mammography systems in our institution. The average MGD from these four systems was used to compute the technique factors for breast CT systems that would match the two-view mammographic dose levels. For a 14 cm diameter breast (equivalent to a 5 cm thick compressed breast in mammography), air kerma levels at the breast CT scanner's isocenter (468 mm from the source) of 4.4, 6.4, and 9.0 mGy were found to deliver equivalent mammography doses for 0%, 50%, and 100% glandular breasts (respectively) at 80 kVp. At 80 kVp (where air kerma was 11.3 mGy/100 mAs at the isocenter), 57 mAs (integrated over the entire scan) was required to match the mammography dose for a 14 cm 50% glandular breast. At 50 kVp, 360 mAs is required to match mammographic dose levels. Tables are provided for both air kerma at the isocenter and mAs for 0%, 50%, and 100% glandular breasts. Other issues that impact breast CT technique factors are also discussed.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy at several reduced radiation dose levels for CT imaging in the diagnosis of appendicitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Khatonabadi, Maryam; Kim, Hyun; Jude, Matilda; Zaragoza, Edward; Lee, Margaret; Patel, Maitraya; Poon, Cheryce; Douek, Michael; Andrews-Tang, Denise; Doepke, Laura; McNitt-Gray, Shawn; Cagnon, Chris; DeMarco, John; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: While several studies have investigated the tradeoffs between radiation dose and image quality (noise) in CT imaging, the purpose of this study was to take this analysis a step further by investigating the tradeoffs between patient radiation dose (including organ dose) and diagnostic accuracy in diagnosis of appendicitis using CT. Methods: This study was IRB approved and utilized data from 20 patients who underwent clinical CT exams for indications of appendicitis. Medical record review established true diagnosis of appendicitis, with 10 positives and 10 negatives. A validated software tool used raw projection data from each scan to create simulated images at lower dose levels (70%, 50%, 30%, 20% of original). An observer study was performed with 6 radiologists reviewing each case at each dose level in random order over several sessions. Readers assessed image quality and provided confidence in their diagnosis of appendicitis, each on a 5 point scale. Liver doses at each case and each dose level were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation based methods. Results: Overall diagnostic accuracy varies across dose levels: 92%, 93%, 91%, 90% and 90% across the 100%, 70%, 50%, 30% and 20% dose levels respectively. And it is 93%, 95%, 88%, 90% and 90% across the 13.5-22mGy, 9.6-13.5mGy, 6.4-9.6mGy, 4-6.4mGy, and 2-4mGy liver dose ranges respectively. Only 4 out of 600 observations were rated "unacceptable" for image quality. Conclusion: The results from this pilot study indicate that the diagnostic accuracy does not change dramatically even at significantly reduced radiation dose.

  6. Effect of tube current modulation for dose estimation using a simulation tool on body CT examination.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Ai; Matsunaga, Yuta; Kobayashi, Masanao; Suzuki, Shoichi; Matsubara, Kosuke; Chida, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of tube current modulation for dose estimation of a body computed tomography (CT) examination using a simulation tool. The authors also compared longitudinal variations in tube current values between iterative reconstruction (IR) and filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithms. One hundred patients underwent body CT examinations. The tube current values around 10 organ regions were recorded longitudinally from tube current information. The organ and effective doses were simulated by average tube current values and longitudinal modulated tube current values. The organ doses for the bladder and breast estimated by longitudinal modulated tube current values were 20 % higher and 25 % lower than those estimated using the average tube current values, respectively. The differences in effective doses were small (mean, 0.7 mSv). The longitudinal variations in tube current values were almost the same for the IR and FBP algorithms.

  7. Prospective estimation of organ dose in CT under tube current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) has been widely used worldwide as a tool for medical diagnosis and imaging. However, despite its significant clinical benefits, CT radiation dose at the population level has become a subject of public attention and concern. In this light, optimizing radiation dose has become a core responsibility for the CT community. As a fundamental step to manage and optimize dose, it may be beneficial to have accurate and prospective knowledge about the radiation dose for an individual patient. In this study, the authors developed a framework to prospectively estimate organ dose for chest and abdominopelvic CT exams under tube current modulation (TCM). Methods: The organ dose is mainly dependent on two key factors: patient anatomy and irradiation field. A prediction process was developed to accurately model both factors. To model the anatomical diversity and complexity in the patient population, the authors used a previously developed library of computational phantoms with broad distributions of sizes, ages, and genders. A selected clinical patient, represented by a computational phantom in the study, was optimally matched with another computational phantom in the library to obtain a representation of the patient’s anatomy. To model the irradiation field, a previously validated Monte Carlo program was used to model CT scanner systems. The tube current profiles were modeled using a ray-tracing program as previously reported that theoretically emulated the variability of modulation profiles from major CT machine manufacturers Li et al., [Phys. Med. Biol. 59, 4525–4548 (2014)]. The prediction of organ dose was achieved using the following process: (1) CTDI{sub vol}-normalized-organ dose coefficients (h{sub organ}) for fixed tube current were first estimated as the prediction basis for the computational phantoms; (2) each computation phantom, regarded as a clinical patient, was optimally matched with one computational phantom in the library; (3

  8. SU-E-I-32: Benchmarking Head CT Doses: A Pooled Vs. Protocol Specific Analysis of Radiation Doses in Adult Head CT Examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to collect CT dose index data from adult head exams to establish benchmarks based on either: (a) values pooled from all head exams or (b) values for specific protocols. One part of this was to investigate differences in scan frequency and CT dose index data for inpatients versus outpatients. Methods: We collected CT dose index data (CTDIvol) from adult head CT examinations performed at our medical facilities from Jan 1st to Dec 31th, 2014. Four of these scanners were used for inpatients, the other five were used for outpatients. All scanners used Tube Current Modulation. We used X-ray dose management software to mine dose index data and evaluate CTDIvol for 15807 inpatients and 4263 outpatients undergoing Routine Brain, Sinus, Facial/Mandible, Temporal Bone, CTA Brain and CTA Brain-Neck protocols, and combined across all protocols. Results: For inpatients, Routine Brain series represented 84% of total scans performed. For outpatients, Sinus scans represented the largest fraction (36%). The CTDIvol (mean ± SD) across all head protocols was 39 ± 30 mGy (min-max: 3.3–540 mGy). The CTDIvol for Routine Brain was 51 ± 6.2 mGy (min-max: 36–84 mGy). The values for Sinus were 24 ± 3.2 mGy (min-max: 13–44 mGy) and for Facial/Mandible were 22 ± 4.3 mGy (min-max: 14–46 mGy). The mean CTDIvol for inpatients and outpatients was similar across protocols with one exception (CTA Brain-Neck). Conclusion: There is substantial dose variation when results from all protocols are pooled together; this is primarily a function of the differences in technical factors of the protocols themselves. When protocols are analyzed separately, there is much less variability. While analyzing pooled data affords some utility, reviewing protocols segregated by clinical indication provides greater opportunity for optimization and establishing useful benchmarks.

  9. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Becker, Christoph D; Verdun, Francis R; Gervaz, Pascal; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) >or= 18.5. In slim patients (BMI<18.5), sensitivity to diagnose appendicitis was 50% (2/4) for LDCT and 100% (4/4) for standard CT, while specificity was identical for both techniques (67%, 2/3). LDCT may play a role in the diagnostic workup of patients with a BMI >or= 18.5.

  10. Texture-preserving Bayesian image reconstruction for low-dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Han, Hao; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Li, Lihong; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2016-03-01

    Markov random field (MRF) model has been widely used in Bayesian image reconstruction to reconstruct piecewise smooth images in the presence of noise, such as in low-dose X-ray computed tomography (LdCT). While it can preserve edge sharpness via edge-preserving potential function, its regional smoothing may sacrifice tissue image textures, which have been recognized as useful imaging biomarkers, and thus it compromises clinical tasks such as differentiating malignant vs. benign lesions, e.g., lung nodule or colon polyp. This study aims to shift the edge preserving regional noise smoothing paradigm to texture-preserving framework for LdCT image reconstruction while retaining the advantage of MRF's neighborhood system on edge preservation. Specifically, we adapted the MRF model to incorporate the image textures of lung, bone, fat, muscle, etc. from previous full-dose CT scan as a priori knowledge for texture-preserving Bayesian reconstruction of current LdCT images. To show the feasibility of proposed reconstruction framework, experiments using clinical patient scans (with lung nodule or colon polyp) were conducted. The experimental outcomes showed noticeable gain by the a priori knowledge for LdCT image reconstruction with the well-known Haralick texture measures. Thus, it is conjectured that texture-preserving LdCT reconstruction has advantages over edge-preserving regional smoothing paradigm for texture-specific clinical applications.

  11. MR-driven metal artifact reduction in PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Delso, G; Wollenweber, S; Lonn, A; Wiesinger, F; Veit-Haibach, P

    2013-04-01

    Among the proposed system architectures capable of delivering positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) datasets, tri-modality systems open an interesting field in which the synergies between these modalities can be exploited to address some of the problems encountered in standalone systems. In this paper we present a feasibility study of the correction of dental streak artifacts in computed tomography (CT)-based attenuation correction images using complementary MR data. The frequency and severity of metal artifacts in oncology patients was studied by inspecting the CT scans of 152 patients examined at our hospital. A prospective correction algorithm using CT and MR information to automatically locate and edit the region affected by metal artifacts was developed and tested retrospectively on data from 15 oncology patients referred for a PET/CT scan. In datasets without malignancies, the activity in Waldeyer's ring was used to measure the maximum uptake variation when the proposed correction was applied. The measured bias ranged from 10% to 30%. In datasets with malignancies on the slices affected by artifacts, the correction led to lesion uptake variations of 6.1% for a lesion 3 cm away from the implant, 1.5% for a lesion 7 cm away and <1% for a lesion 8 cm away.

  12. Dose reduction using a dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Fleischmann, Dominik; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors recently proposed a dynamic, prepatient x-ray attenuator capable of producing a piecewise-linear attenuation profile customized to each patient and viewing angle. This attenuator was intended to reduce scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), dynamic range, and dose by redistributing flux. In this work the authors tested the ability of the attenuator to reduce dose and SPR in simulations. Methods: The authors selected four clinical applications, including routine full field-of-view scans of the thorax and abdomen, and targeted reconstruction tasks for an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the pancreas. Raw data were estimated by forward projection of the image volume datasets. The dynamic attenuator was controlled to reduce dose while maintaining peak variance by solving a convex optimization problem, assuminga priori knowledge of the patient anatomy. In targeted reconstruction tasks, the noise in specific regions was given increased weighting. A system with a standard attenuator (or “bowtie filter”) was used as a reference, and used either convex optimized tube current modulation (TCM) or a standard TCM heuristic. The noise of the scan was determined analytically while the dose was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Scatter was also estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. The sensitivity of the dynamic attenuator to patient centering was also examined by shifting the abdomen in 2 cm intervals. Results: Compared to a reference system with optimized TCM, use of the dynamic attenuator reduced dose by about 30% in routine scans and 50% in targeted scans. Compared to the TCM heuristics which are typically used withouta priori knowledge, the dose reduction is about 50% for routine scans. The dynamic attenuator gives the ability to redistribute noise and variance and produces more uniform noise profiles than systems with a conventional bowtie filter. The SPR was also modestly reduced by 10% in the thorax and 24% in the abdomen. Imaging with the dynamic

  13. Low dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging using a statistical iterative reconstruction method

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Yinghua; Chen, Guang-Hong; Hacker, Timothy A.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging has the potential to provide both functional and anatomical information regarding coronary artery stenosis. However, radiation dose can be potentially high due to repeated scanning of the same region. The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of statistical iterative reconstruction to improve parametric maps of myocardial perfusion derived from a low tube current dynamic CT acquisition. Methods: Four pigs underwent high (500 mA) and low (25 mA) dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion scans with and without coronary occlusion. To delineate the affected myocardial territory, an N-13 ammonia PET perfusion scan was performed for each animal in each occlusion state. Filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction was first applied to all CT data sets. Then, a statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) method was applied to data sets acquired at low dose. Image voxel noise was matched between the low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. CT perfusion maps were compared among the low dose FBP, low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. Numerical simulations of a dynamic CT scan at high and low dose (20:1 ratio) were performed to quantitatively evaluate SIR and FBP performance in terms of flow map accuracy, precision, dose efficiency, and spatial resolution. Results: Forin vivo studies, the 500 mA FBP maps gave −88.4%, −96.0%, −76.7%, and −65.8% flow change in the occluded anterior region compared to the open-coronary scans (four animals). The percent changes in the 25 mA SIR maps were in good agreement, measuring −94.7%, −81.6%, −84.0%, and −72.2%. The 25 mA FBP maps gave unreliable flow measurements due to streaks caused by photon starvation (percent changes of +137.4%, +71.0%, −11.8%, and −3.5%). Agreement between 25 mA SIR and 500 mA FBP global flow was −9.7%, 8.8%, −3.1%, and 26.4%. The average variability of flow measurements in a nonoccluded region was 16.3%, 24.1%, and 937

  14. Validation of a deformable image registration technique for cone beam CT-based dose verification

    SciTech Connect

    Moteabbed, M. Sharp, G. C.; Wang, Y.; Trofimov, A.; Efstathiou, J. A.; Lu, H.-M.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: As radiation therapy evolves toward more adaptive techniques, image guidance plays an increasingly important role, not only in patient setup but also in monitoring the delivered dose and adapting the treatment to patient changes. This study aimed to validate a method for evaluation of delivered intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dose based on multimodal deformable image registration (DIR) for prostate treatments. Methods: A pelvic phantom was scanned with CT and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Both images were digitally deformed using two realistic patient-based deformation fields. The original CT was then registered to the deformed CBCT resulting in a secondary deformed CT. The registration quality was assessed as the ability of the DIR method to recover the artificially induced deformations. The primary and secondary deformed CT images as well as vector fields were compared to evaluate the efficacy of the registration method and it’s suitability to be used for dose calculation. PLASTIMATCH, a free and open source software was used for deformable image registration. A B-spline algorithm with optimized parameters was used to achieve the best registration quality. Geometric image evaluation was performed through voxel-based Hounsfield unit (HU) and vector field comparison. For dosimetric evaluation, IMRT treatment plans were created and optimized on the original CT image and recomputed on the two warped images to be compared. The dose volume histograms were compared for the warped structures that were identical in both warped images. This procedure was repeated for the phantom with full, half full, and empty bladder. Results: The results indicated mean HU differences of up to 120 between registered and ground-truth deformed CT images. However, when the CBCT intensities were calibrated using a region of interest (ROI)-based calibration curve, these differences were reduced by up to 60%. Similarly, the mean differences in average vector field

  15. Dose conversion coefficients for paediatric CT examinations with automatic tube current modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Becker, J.; Hoeschen, C.

    2012-10-01

    A common dose-saving technique used in modern CT devices is automatic tube current modulation (TCM), which was originally designed to also reduce the dose in paediatric CT patients. In order to be able to deduce detailed organ doses of paediatric models, dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDIvol for an eight-week-old baby and seven- and eight-year-old children have been computed accounting for TCM. The relative difference in organ dose conversion coefficients with and without TCM is for many organs and examinations less than 10%, but can in some cases amount up to 30%, e.g., for the thyroid in the chest CT of the seven-year-old child. Overall, the impact of TCM on the conversion coefficients increases with increasing age. Besides TCM, also the effect of collimation and tube voltage on organ dose conversion coefficients has been investigated. It could be shown that the normalization to CTDIvol leads to conversion coefficients that can in most cases be considered to be independent of collimation and tube voltage.

  16. Development of age-specific Japanese head phantoms for dose evaluation in paediatric head CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Fujii, K; Akahane, K; Yamauchi, M; Narai, K; Aoyama, T; Katsu, T; Obara, S; Imai, K; Ikeda, M

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the authors developed age-specific physical head phantoms simulating the physique of Japanese children for dose evaluation in paediatric head computed tomography (CT) examinations. Anatomical structures at 99 places in 0-, 0.5-, 1- and 3-y-old Japanese patients were measured using DICOM viewer software from CT images, and the head phantom of each age was designed. For trial manufacture, a 3-y-old head phantom consisting of acrylic resin and gypsum was produced by machine processing. Radiation doses for the head phantom were measured with radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeters and Si-pin photodiode dosemeters. To investigate whether the phantom shape was suitable for dose evaluation, organ doses in the same scan protocol were compared between the 3-y-old head and commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms having approximately the same head size. The doses of organs in both phantoms were equivalent. The authors' designed paediatric head phantom will be useful for dose evaluation in paediatric head CT examinations.

  17. Three-Dimensions Segmentation of Pulmonary Vascular Trees for Low Dose CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Jun; Huang, Ying; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Due to the low contrast and the partial volume effects, providing an accurate and in vivo analysis for pulmonary vascular trees from low dose CT scans is a challenging task. This paper proposes an automatic integration segmentation approach for the vascular trees in low dose CT scans. It consists of the following steps: firstly, lung volumes are acquired by the knowledge based method from the CT scans, and then the data are smoothed by the 3D Gaussian filter; secondly, two or three seeds are gotten by the adaptive 2D segmentation and the maximum area selecting from different position scans; thirdly, each seed as the start voxel is inputted for a quick multi-seeds 3D region growing to get vascular trees; finally, the trees are refined by the smooth filter. Through skeleton analyzing for the vascular trees, the results show that the proposed method can provide much better and lower level vascular branches.

  18. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric abdomen-pelvis CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a method for estimating patient-specific dose from abdomen-pelvis CT examinations and to investigate dose variation across patients in the same weight group. Our study consisted of seven pediatric patients in the same weight/protocol group, for whom full-body computer models were previously created based on the patients' CT data obtained for clinical indications. Organ and effective dose of these patients from an abdomen-pelvis scan protocol (LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120-kVp, 85-90 mA, 0.4-s gantry rotation period, 1.375-pitch, 40-mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for the same CT system. The seven patients had effective dose of 2.4-2.8 mSv, corresponding to normalized effective dose of 6.6-8.3 mSv/100mAs (coefficient of variation: 7.6%). Dose variations across the patients were small for large organs in the scan coverage (mean: 6.6%; range: 4.9%-9.2%), larger for small organs in the scan coverage (mean: 10.3%; range: 1.4%-15.6%), and the largest for organs partially or completely outside the scan coverage (mean: 14.8%; range: 5.7%-27.7%). Normalized effective dose correlated strongly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r = -0.94). Normalized dose to the kidney and the adrenal gland correlated strongly with mid-liver equivalent diameter (kidney: r = -0.97; adrenal glands: r = -0.98). Normalized dose to the small intestine correlated strongly with mid-intestine equivalent diameter (r = -0.97). These strong correlations suggest that patient-specific dose may be estimated for any other child in the same size group who undergoes the abdomen-pelvis scan.

  19. Lung Cancer Screening With Low-Dose CT in the United States.

    PubMed

    Eberth, Jan M

    2015-12-01

    The findings of the landmark National Lung Screening Trial (NLST)-showing a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality when screening with low-dose CT (LDCT), compared with chest radiography-marked a turning point in the field of lung cancer screening, influencing organizational recommendations and leading to increasing acceptance of LDCT for screening of individuals at high risk for lung cancer. However, many practices and institutions have experienced barriers in their attempts to implement successful screening programs; these include challenges in maintaining the same high caliber of screening programs as those in the NLST, confusion regarding insurance reimbursement protocols, and a lack of resources to help physicians discuss the specifics of LDCT screening with their patients. To address these challenges, standards are being established to ensure consistent quality of screening programs, including certification standards and protocols maintained by the ACR. In addition, the US Preventive Services Task Force's "B" rating, given to LDCT screening in late 2013, resulted in mandated private insurance coverage beginning in 2015 and the 2015 CMS coverage determination has spurred previously reluctant organizations to prepare for population-based screening. Despite these successes, protocols for billing and claims processing are still evolving and organizations are considering how best to implement the shared decision-making process required by CMS. Despite some procedural setbacks that have yet to be resolved, LDCT screening for individuals at high risk of lung cancer has grown substantially since its effectiveness was shown by the NLST in 2011. PMID:26614885

  20. Evaluation of a low-dose/slow-rotating SPECT-CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, M.; Aldridge, M.; Dickson, J.; Endozo, R.; Lozhkin, K.; Hutton, B. F.

    2008-05-01

    The 4-slice CT that forms part of the GE Infinia Hawkeye-4 SPECT-CT scanner (Hawkeye) is evaluated against the diagnostic 16-slice CT that is incorporated in the GE Discovery ST PET-CT system (DST). The x-ray tube of the slow-rotating Hawkeye system (23 s/rotation) operates at approximately a third of the dose of diagnostic systems as used for conventional diagnostic imaging. Image reconstruction is optimized for low noise. High-contrast spatial resolution significantly falls behind diagnostic figures: the average of MTF50 and MTF10 (resolution where the MTF has fallen to 50% and 10%) is 2.8 ± 0.1 cm-1 for Hawkeye and 5.3 ± 0.1 cm-1 for the DST (standard reconstruction filters). Resolution in the direction of the couch movement (z coordinate) is governed by the fixed Hawkeye slice width of 5 mm. Reconstruction accuracy is found to be increased by reducing the default z increment from 4.4 mm to 2.2 mm. Low-contrast object detectability is superior compared with diagnostic systems operating in the Hawkeye dose range. In the diagnostic dose regime, however, small low-contrast details remain visible in DST that are not detectable with Hawkeye. Although not of diagnostic quality, the low-dose Hawkeye provides appropriate data for SPECT attenuation correction and anatomical localization capability. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org

  1. A method to evaluate the dose increase in CT with iodinated contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, Ernesto; Lizio, Domenico; Settineri, Nicola; Di Pasquale, Andrea; Salamone, Ignazio; Pandolfo, Ignazio

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to develop a method to calculate the relative dose increase when a computerized tomography scan (CT) is carried out after administration of iodinated contrast medium, with respect to the same CT scan in absence of contrast medium. Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation in GEANT4 of anthropomorphic neck and abdomen phantoms exposed to a simplified model of CT scanner was set up in order to calculate the increase of dose to thyroid, liver, spleen, kidneys, and pancreas as a function of the quantity of iodine accumulated; a series of experimental measurements of Hounsfield unit (HU) increment for known concentrations of iodinated contrast medium was carried out on a Siemens Sensation 16 CT scanner in order to obtain a relationship between the increment in HU and the relative dose increase in the organs studied. The authors applied such a method to calculate the average dose increase in three patients who underwent standard CT protocols consisting of one native scan in absence of contrast, followed by a contrast-enhanced scan in venous phase. Results: The authors validated their GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation by comparing the resulting dose increases for iodine solutions in water with the ones presented in literature and with their experimental data obtained through a Roentgen therapy unit. The relative dose increases as a function of the iodine mass fraction accumulated and as a function of the Hounsfield unit increment between the contrast-enhanced scan and the native scan are presented. The data shown for the three patients exhibit an average relative dose increase between 22% for liver and 74% for kidneys; also, spleen (34%), pancreas (28%), and thyroid (48%) show a remarkable average increase. Conclusions: The method developed allows a simple evaluation of the dose increase when iodinated contrast medium is used in CT scans, basing on the increment in Hounsfield units observed on the patients' organs. Since many clinical protocols

  2. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner.

    PubMed

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Bär, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Grossmann, J Günter; Kachelrieß, Marc; Sterzing, Florian

    2015-12-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ Al=2.7 g/cm(3)), titanium (ρ Ti=4.5 g/cm(3)), steel (ρ steel=7.9 g/cm(3)) and tungsten (ρ W=19.3g/cm(3)) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV(Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ=10 g/cm(3)) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 keV. However, the dose uncertainty remains of the order of 10

  3. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner.

    PubMed

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Bär, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Grossmann, J Günter; Kachelrieß, Marc; Sterzing, Florian

    2015-12-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ Al=2.7 g/cm(3)), titanium (ρ Ti=4.5 g/cm(3)), steel (ρ steel=7.9 g/cm(3)) and tungsten (ρ W=19.3g/cm(3)) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV(Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ=10 g/cm(3)) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 keV. However, the dose uncertainty remains of the order of 10

  4. Validation of calculation algorithms for organ doses in CT by measurements on a 5 year old paediatric phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabin, Jérémie; Mencarelli, Alessandra; McMillan, Dayton; Romanyukha, Anna; Struelens, Lara; Lee, Choonsik

    2016-06-01

    Many organ dose calculation tools for computed tomography (CT) scans rely on the assumptions: (1) organ doses estimated for one CT scanner can be converted into organ doses for another CT scanner using the ratio of the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) between two CT scanners; and (2) helical scans can be approximated as the summation of axial slices covering the same scan range. The current study aims to validate experimentally these two assumptions. We performed organ dose measurements in a 5 year-old physical anthropomorphic phantom for five different CT scanners from four manufacturers. Absorbed doses to 22 organs were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters for head-to-torso scans. We then compared the measured organ doses with the values calculated from the National Cancer Institute dosimetry system for CT (NCICT) computer program, developed at the National Cancer Institute. Whereas the measured organ doses showed significant variability (coefficient of variation (CoV) up to 53% at 80 kV) across different scanner models, the CoV of organ doses normalised to CTDIvol substantially decreased (12% CoV on average at 80 kV). For most organs, the difference between measured and simulated organ doses was within  ±20% except for the bone marrow, breasts and ovaries. The discrepancies were further explained by additional Monte Carlo calculations of organ doses using a voxel phantom developed from CT images of the physical phantom. The results demonstrate that organ doses calculated for one CT scanner can be used to assess organ doses from other CT scanners with 20% uncertainty (k  =  1), for the scan settings considered in the study.

  5. Dose and image quality for a cone-beam C-arm CT system

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrig, Rebecca; Dixon, Robert; Payne, Thomas; Morin, Richard L.; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Strobel, Norbert

    2006-12-15

    We assess dose and image quality of a state-of-the-art angiographic C-arm system (Axiom Artis dTA, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) for three-dimensional neuro-imaging at various dose levels and tube voltages and an associated measurement method. Unlike conventional CT, the beam length covers the entire phantom, hence, the concept of computed tomography dose index (CTDI) is not the metric of choice, and one can revert to conventional dosimetry methods by directly measuring the dose at various points using a small ion chamber. This method allows us to define and compute a new dose metric that is appropriate for a direct comparison with the familiar CTDI{sub W} of conventional CT. A perception study involving the CATPHAN 600 indicates that one can expect to see at least the 9 mm inset with 0.5% nominal contrast at the recommended head-scan dose (60 mGy) when using tube voltages ranging from 70 kVp to 125 kVp. When analyzing the impact of tube voltage on image quality at a fixed dose, we found that lower tube voltages gave improved low contrast detectability for small-diameter objects. The relationships between kVp, image noise, dose, and contrast perception are discussed.

  6. HDRMC, an accelerated Monte Carlo dose calculator for high dose rate brachytherapy with CT-compatible applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Chibani, Omar C-M Ma, Charlie

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a new accelerated Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The new code (HDRMC) accounts for both tissue and nontissue heterogeneities (applicator and contrast medium). Methods: HDRMC uses a fast ray-tracing technique and detailed physics algorithms to transport photons through a 3D mesh of voxels representing the patient anatomy with applicator and contrast medium included. A precalculated phase space file for the{sup 192}Ir source is used as source term. HDRM is calibrated to calculated absolute dose for real plans. A postprocessing technique is used to include the exact density and composition of nontissue heterogeneities in the 3D phantom. Dwell positions and angular orientations of the source are reconstructed using data from the treatment planning system (TPS). Structure contours are also imported from the TPS to recalculate dose-volume histograms. Results: HDRMC was first benchmarked against the MCNP5 code for a single source in homogenous water and for a loaded gynecologic applicator in water. The accuracy of the voxel-based applicator model used in HDRMC was also verified by comparing 3D dose distributions and dose-volume parameters obtained using 1-mm{sup 3} versus 2-mm{sup 3} phantom resolutions. HDRMC can calculate the 3D dose distribution for a typical HDR cervix case with 2-mm resolution in 5 min on a single CPU. Examples of heterogeneity effects for two clinical cases (cervix and esophagus) were demonstrated using HDRMC. The neglect of tissue heterogeneity for the esophageal case leads to the overestimate of CTV D90, CTV D100, and spinal cord maximum dose by 3.2%, 3.9%, and 3.6%, respectively. Conclusions: A fast Monte Carlo code for CT-based dose calculations which does not require a prebuilt applicator model is developed for those HDR brachytherapy treatments that use CT-compatible applicators. Tissue and nontissue heterogeneities should be taken into account in modern HDR

  7. Low-Dose X-ray CT Reconstruction via Dictionary Learning

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiong; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures. PMID:22542666

  8. Low-dose X-ray CT reconstruction via dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Mou, Xuanqin; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2012-09-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures. PMID:22542666

  9. Image Quality and Radiation Dose for Prospectively Triggered Coronary CT Angiography: 128-Slice Single-Source CT versus First-Generation 64-Slice Dual-Source CT

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jin; Shi, He-shui; Han, Ping; Yu, Jie; Ma, Gui-na; Wu, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to compare the image quality and radiation dose of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) from prospectively triggered 128-slice CT (128-MSCT) versus dual-source 64-slice CT (DSCT). The study was approved by the Medical Ethics Committee at Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Eighty consecutive patients with stable heart rates lower than 70 bpm were enrolled. Forty patients were scanned with 128-MSCT, and the other 40 patients were scanned with DSCT. Two radiologists independently assessed the image quality in segments (diameter >1 mm) according to a three-point scale (1: excellent; 2: moderate; 3: insufficient). The CCTA radiation dose was calculated. Eighty patients with 526 segments in the 128-MSCT group and 544 segments in the DSCT group were evaluated. The image quality 1, 2 and 3 scores were 91.6%, 6.9% and 1.5%, respectively, for the 128-MSCT group and 97.6%, 1.7% and 0.7%, respectively, for the DSCT group, and there was a statistically significant inter-group difference (P ≤ 0.001). The effective doses were 3.0 mSv in the 128-MSCT group and 4.5 mSv in the DSCT group (P ≤ 0.001). Compared with DSCT, CCTA with prospectively triggered 128-MSCT had adequate image quality and a 33.3% lower radiation dose. PMID:27752040

  10. Deformable 3D-2D registration for CT and its application to low dose tomographic fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flach, Barbara; Brehm, Marcus; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Many applications in medical imaging include image registration for matching of images from the same or different modalities. In the case of full data sampling, the respective reconstructed images are usually of such a good image quality that standard deformable volume-to-volume (3D-3D) registration approaches can be applied. But research in temporal-correlated image reconstruction and dose reductions increases the number of cases where rawdata are available from only few projection angles. Here, deteriorated image quality leads to non-acceptable deformable volume-to-volume registration results. Therefore a registration approach is required that is robust against a decreasing number of projections defining the target position. We propose a deformable volume-to-rawdata (3D-2D) registration method that aims at finding a displacement vector field maximizing the alignment of a CT volume and the acquired rawdata based on the sum of squared differences in rawdata domain. The registration is constrained by a regularization term in accordance with a fluid-based diffusion. Both cost function components, the rawdata fidelity and the regularization term, are optimized in an alternating manner. The matching criterion is optimized by a conjugate gradient descent for nonlinear functions, while the regularization is realized by convolution of the vector fields with Gaussian kernels. We validate the proposed method and compare it to the demons algorithm, a well-known 3D-3D registration method. The comparison is done for a range of 4-60 target projections using datasets from low dose tomographic fluoroscopy as an application example. The results show a high correlation to the ground truth target position without introducing artifacts even in the case of very few projections. In particular the matching in the rawdata domain is improved compared to the 3D-3D registration for the investigated range. The proposed volume-to-rawdata registration increases the robustness regarding sparse

  11. Deformable 3D-2D registration for CT and its application to low dose tomographic fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flach, Barbara; Brehm, Marcus; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-12-21

    Many applications in medical imaging include image registration for matching of images from the same or different modalities. In the case of full data sampling, the respective reconstructed images are usually of such a good image quality that standard deformable volume-to-volume (3D-3D) registration approaches can be applied. But research in temporal-correlated image reconstruction and dose reductions increases the number of cases where rawdata are available from only few projection angles. Here, deteriorated image quality leads to non-acceptable deformable volume-to-volume registration results. Therefore a registration approach is required that is robust against a decreasing number of projections defining the target position. We propose a deformable volume-to-rawdata (3D-2D) registration method that aims at finding a displacement vector field maximizing the alignment of a CT volume and the acquired rawdata based on the sum of squared differences in rawdata domain. The registration is constrained by a regularization term in accordance with a fluid-based diffusion. Both cost function components, the rawdata fidelity and the regularization term, are optimized in an alternating manner. The matching criterion is optimized by a conjugate gradient descent for nonlinear functions, while the regularization is realized by convolution of the vector fields with Gaussian kernels. We validate the proposed method and compare it to the demons algorithm, a well-known 3D-3D registration method. The comparison is done for a range of 4-60 target projections using datasets from low dose tomographic fluoroscopy as an application example. The results show a high correlation to the ground truth target position without introducing artifacts even in the case of very few projections. In particular the matching in the rawdata domain is improved compared to the 3D-3D registration for the investigated range. The proposed volume-to-rawdata registration increases the robustness regarding sparse

  12. Value of Combined PET/CT for Radiation Planning in CT-Guided Percutaneous Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Single-Fraction Brachytherapy for Colorectal Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Ingo G.; Wust, Peter; Ruehl, Ricarda

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the additional value of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) for clinical target volume definition in the planning of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial brachytherapy for liver metastases. Patients and Methods: A total of 19 patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer treated in 25 sessions were included in the present study. All patients had undergone fluorodeoxyglucose-PET for patient evaluation before interstitial CT-guided brachytherapy. A contrast-enhanced CT scan of the upper abdomen was obtained for radiation planning. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined by a radiation oncologist and radiologist. After registration of the CT scan with the PET data set, the target volume was defined again using the fusion images. Results: PET revealed one additional liver lesion that was not visible on CT. The median CT-CTV (defined using CT and magnetic resonance imaging) was 68 cm{sup 3} (range 4-260). The PET/CT-CTV (median, 78 cm{sup 3}; range, 4-273) was significantly larger, with a median gain of 24.5% (interquartile range, 2.1-71.5%; p = .022). An increased CTV was observed in 15 cases and a decrease in 6; in 4 cases, the CT-CTV and PET/CT-CTV were equal. Incomplete dose coverage of PET/CT-CTVs was indicative of early local progression (p = .004); however, CT-based radiation plans did not show significant differences in the local control rates when stratified by dose coverage. Conclusion: Retrospective implementation of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET for CTV specification for CT-guided brachytherapy for colorectal liver metastases revealed a significant change in the CTVs. Additional PET-positive tumor regions with incomplete dose coverage could explain unexpected early local progression.

  13. CT dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene cylinders with diameters from 6 to 55 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: ICRU Report No. 87 Committee and AAPM Task Group 200 designed a three-sectional polyethylene phantom of 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in length for evaluating the midpoint dose D{sub L}(0) and its rise-to-the-equilibrium curve H(L) = D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq} from computed tomography (CT) scanning, where D{sub eq} is the equilibrium dose. To aid the use of the phantom in radiation dose assessment and to gain an understanding of dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene, the authors evaluated the short (20 cm) to long (60 cm) phantom dose ratio with a polyethylene diameter of 30 cm, assessed H(L) in polyethylene cylinders of 6–55 cm in diameters, and examined energy absorption in these cylinders. Methods: A GEANT4-based Monte Carlo program was used to simulate the single axial scans of polyethylene cylinders (diameters 6–55 cm and length 90 cm, as well as diameter 30 cm and lengths 20 and 60 cm) on a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare). Axial dose distributions were computed on the phantom central and peripheral axes. An average dose over the central 23 or 100 mm region was evaluated for modeling dose measurement using a 0.6 cm{sup 3} thimble chamber or a 10 cm long pencil ion chamber, respectively. The short (20 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were calculated for the 30 cm diameter polyethylene phantoms scanned at four tube voltages (80–140 kV) and a range of beam apertures (1–25 cm). H(L) was evaluated using the dose integrals computed with the 90 cm long phantoms. The resultant H(L) data were subsequently used to compute the fraction of the total energy absorbed inside or outside the scan range (E{sub in}/E or E{sub out}/E) on the phantom central and peripheral axes, where E = LD{sub eq} was the total energy absorbed along the z axis. Results: The midpoint dose in the 60 cm long polyethylene phantom was equal to that in the 90 cm long polyethylene phantom. The short-to-long phantom dose

  14. A model of CT dose profiles in Banach space; with applications to CT dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, Victor J.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper the scatter component of computed tomography dose profiles is modeled using the solution to a nonlinear ordinary differential equation. This scatter function is summed with a modeled primary function of approximate trapezoidal shape. The primary dose profile is modeled to include the analytic continuation of the Heaviside step function. A mathematical theory is developed in a Banach space. The modeled function is used to accurately fit data from a 256-slice GE Revolution scanner. A 60 cm long body phantom is assembled and used for data collection with both a pencil chamber and a Farmer-type chamber.

  15. Organ dose conversion coefficients for tube current modulated CT protocols for an adult population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wanyi; Tian, Xiaoyu; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Zhang, Yakun; Segars, William Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    In computed tomography (CT), patient-specific organ dose can be estimated using pre-calculated organ dose conversion coefficients (organ dose normalized by CTDIvol, h factor) database, taking into account patient size and scan coverage. The conversion coefficients have been previously estimated for routine body protocol classes, grouped by scan coverage, across an adult population for fixed tube current modulated CT. The coefficients, however, do not include the widely utilized tube current (mA) modulation scheme, which significantly impacts organ dose. This study aims to extend the h factors and the corresponding dose length product (DLP) to create effective dose conversion coefficients (k factor) database incorporating various tube current modulation strengths. Fifty-eight extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were included in this study representing population anatomy variation in clinical practice. Four mA profiles, representing weak to strong mA dependency on body attenuation, were generated for each phantom and protocol class. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate the organ dose. The organ dose and effective dose was further normalized by CTDIvol and DLP to derive the h factors and k factors, respectively. The h factors and k factors were summarized in an exponential regression model as a function of body size. Such a population-based mathematical model can provide a comprehensive organ dose estimation given body size and CTDIvol. The model was integrated into an iPhone app XCATdose version 2, enhancing the 1st version based upon fixed tube current modulation. With the organ dose calculator, physicists, physicians, and patients can conveniently estimate organ dose.

  16. SU-F-18C-12: On the Relationship of the Weighted Dose to the Surface Dose In Abdominal CT - Patient Size Dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y; Scott, A; Allahverdian, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: It is possible to measure the patient surface dose non-invasively using radiolucent dosimeters. However, the patient size specific weighted dose remains unknown. We attempted to study the weighted dose to surface dose relationship as the patient size varies in abdominal CT. Methods: Seven abdomen phantoms (CIRS TE series) simulating patients from an infant to a large adult were used. Size specific doses were measured with a 100 mm CT chamber under axial scans using a Siemens Sensation 64 (mCT) and a GE 750 HD. The scanner settings were 120 kVp, 200 mAs with fully opened collimations. Additional kVps (80, 100, 140) were added depending on the phantom sizes. The ratios (r) of the weighted CT dose (Dw) to the surface dose (Ds) were related to the phantom size (L) defined as the diameter resulting the equivalent cross-sectional area. Results: The Dw versus Ds ratio (r) was fitted to a linear relationship: r = 1.083 − 0.007L (R square = 0.995), and r = 1.064 − 0.007L (R square = 0.953), for Siemens Sensation 64 and GE 750 HD, respectively. The relationship appears to be independent of the scanner specifics. Conclusion: The surface dose to the weighted dose ratio decreases linearly as the patient size increases. The result is independent of the scanner specifics. The result can be used to obtain in vivo CT dosimetry in abdominal CT.

  17. Dosimetry concepts for scanner quality assurance and tissue dose assessment in micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hupfer, Martin; Kolditz, Daniel; Nowak, Tristan; Eisa, Fabian; Brauweiler, Robert; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: At present, no established methods exist for dosimetry in micro computed tomography (micro-CT). The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate practical concepts for both dosimetric scanner quality assurance and tissue dose assessment for micro-CT. Methods: The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was adapted to micro-CT and measurements of the CTDI both free in air and in the center of cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms of 20 and 32 mm diameter were performed in a 6 month interval with a 100 mm pencil ionization chamber calibrated for low tube voltages. For tissue dose assessment, z-profile measurements using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) were performed and both profile and CTDI measurements were compared to Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to validate an existing MC tool for use in micro-CT. The consistency of MC calculations and TLD measurements was further investigated in two mice cadavers. Results: CTDI was found to be a reproducible quantity for constancy tests on the micro-CT system under study, showing a linear dependence on tube voltage and being by definition proportional to mAs setting and z-collimation. The CTDI measured free in air showed larger systematic deviations after the 6 month interval compared to the CTDI measured in PMMA phantoms. MC calculations were found to match CTDI measurements within 3% when using x-ray spectra measured at our micro-CT installation and better than 10% when using x-ray spectra calculated from semi-empirical models. Visual inspection revealed good agreement for all z-profiles. The consistency of MC calculations and TLD measurements in mice was found to be better than 10% with a mean deviation of 4.5%. Conclusions: Our results show the CTDI implemented for micro-CT to be a promising candidate for dosimetric quality assurance measurements as it linearly reflects changes in tube voltage, mAs setting, and collimation used during the scan, encouraging further studies on a variety of

  18. Variation in CT pediatric head examination radiation dose: results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Kanal, Kalpana M; Graves, Janessa M; Vavilala, Monica S; Applegate, Kimberly E; Jarvik, Jeffrey G; Rivara, Frederick P

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to examine the variation in radiation dose, CT dose index volume (CTDIvol), and dose-length product (DLP) for pediatric head CT examinations as a function of hospital characteristics across the United States. MATERIALS AND METHODS. A survey inquiring about hospital information, CT scanners, pediatric head examination protocol, CTDIvol, and DLP was mailed to a representative sample of U.S. hospitals. Follow-up mailings were sent to nonrespondents. Descriptive characteristics of respondents and nonrespondents were compared using design-based Pearson chi-square tests. Dose estimates were compared across hospital characteristics using Bonferroni-adjusted Wald test. Hospital-level factors associated with dose estimates were evaluated using multiple linear regressions and modified Poisson regression models. RESULTS. Surveys were sent out to 751 hospitals; 292 responded to the survey, of which 253 were eligible (35.5% response rate, calculated as number of hospitals who completed surveys [n = 253] divided by sum of number who were eligible and initially consented [n = 712] plus estimated number who were eligible among those who refused [n = 1]). Most respondents reported using MDCT scanners (99.2%) and having a dedicated pediatric head CT protocol (93%). Estimated mean reported CTDIvol values were 27.3 mGy (95% CI, 24.4-30.1 mGy), and DLP values were 390.9 mGy × cm (95% CI, 346.6-435.1 mGy × cm). These values did not vary significantly by region, trauma level, teaching status, CT accreditation, number of CT scanners, or report of a dedicated pediatric CT protocol. However, estimated CTDIvol reported by children's hospitals was 19% lower than that reported by general hospitals (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION. Most hospitals (82%) report doses that meet American College of Radiology accreditation levels. However, [corrected] the mean CTDI(vol) at children's hospitals was approximately 7 mGy (21%, adjusted for covariates), lower than that

  19. CT of multiple sclerosis: reassessment of delayed scanning with high doses of contrast material

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, S.M.; Vinuela, F.; Fox, A.J.; Pelz, D.M.

    1985-09-01

    A prospective study involving 87 patients was carried out to evaluate the necessity for a high dose of contrast material in addition to delayed computed tomographic (CT) scanning for optimal detection of the lesions of multiple sclerosis in the brain. In patients with either clinically definite multiple sclerosis or laboratory-supported definite multiple sclerosis, CT scans were obtained with a uniform protocol. Lesions consistent with multiple sclerosis were demonstrated on the second scan in 54 patients. In 36 of these 54 patients, the high-dose delayed scan added information. These results are quite similar to those of a previous study from this institution using different patients, in whom the second scan was obtained immediately after the bolus injection of contrast material containing 40 g of organically bound iodine. The lack of real difference in the results of the two studies indicate that the increased dose, not just the delay in scanning, is necessary for a proper study.

  20. A framework to measure myocardial extracellular volume fraction using dual-phase low dose CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yixun; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T.; Bluemke, David A.; Nacif, Marcelo S.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECVF) is a surrogate imaging biomarker of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, a hallmark of pathologic ventricular remodeling. Low dose cardiac CT is emerging as a promising modality to detect diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis due to its fast acquisition and low radiation; however, the insufficient contrast in the low dose CT images poses great challenge to measure ECVF from the image. Methods: To deal with this difficulty, the authors present a complete ECVF measurement framework including a point-guided myocardial modeling, a deformable model-based myocardium segmentation, nonrigid registration of pre- and post-CT, and ECVF calculation. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on 20 patients by two observers. Compared to the manually delineated reference segmentations, the accuracy of our segmentation in terms of true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), and average surface distance (ASD), were 92.18% ± 3.52%, 0.31% ± 0.10%, 0.69 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. The interobserver variability measured by concordance correlation coefficient regarding TPVF, FPVF, and ASD were 0.95, 0.90, 0.94, respectively, demonstrating excellent agreement. Bland-Altman method showed 95% limits of agreement between ECVF at CT and ECVF at MR. Conclusions: The proposed framework demonstrates its efficiency, accuracy, and noninvasiveness in ECVF measurement and dramatically advances the ECVF at cardiac CT toward its clinical use.

  1. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In the present era of cone-beam CT scanners, the use of the standardized CTDI{sub 100} as a surrogate of the idealized CTDI is strongly discouraged and, consequently, so should be the use of the dose-length product (DLP) as an estimate of the total energy imparted to the patient. However, the DLP is still widely used as a reference quantity to normalize the effective dose for a given scan protocol mainly because the CTDI{sub 100} is an easy-to-measure quantity. The aim of this article is therefore to describe a method for radiation dose assessment in large cone-beam single axial scans, which leads to a straightforward estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient. The authors developed a method accessible to all medical physicists and easy to implement in clinical practice in an attempt to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose. Methods: The authors used commercially available material and a simple mathematical model. The method described herein is based on the dosimetry paradigm introduced by the AAPM Task Group 111. It consists of measuring the dose profiles at the center and the periphery of a long body phantom with a commercial solid-state detector. A weighted dose profile is then calculated from these measurements. To calculate the CT dosimetric quantities analytically, a Gaussian function was fitted to the dose profile data. Furthermore, the Gaussian model has the power to condense the z-axis information of the dose profile in two parameters: The single-scan central dose, f(0), and the width of the profile, {sigma}. To check the energy dependence of the solid-state detector, the authors compared the dose profiles to measurements made with a small volume ion chamber. To validate the overall method, the authors compared the CTDI{sub 100} calculated analytically to the measurement made with a 100 mm pencil ion chamber. Results: For the central and weighted dose profiles, the authors found a good

  2. Metal artifacts reduction in x-ray CT based on segmentation and forward-projection.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Shoukat; Fu, Jian; Fan, Dekai

    2014-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a powerful clinical diagnosis tool and has been used widely in many clinical and biological settings. Metal artifacts, caused by high density implants, are commonly encountered in clinical CT applications, thereby affecting the detection of abnormal structures and undermining CT's diagnostic value. In this paper, we developed a metal artifact reduction approach based on image segmentation and forward-projection. We further demonstrate the usefulness of our approach by using a biomedical specimen consisting of muscles, bones and metals. Our aim is to remove the inaccurate metal artifact pixels in the original CT slices and exactly reconstruct the soft-tissue using the forward projections with no metal information. During the reconstruction, artifacts are reduced by replacing the metal projection using the forward projection. The presented work is of interest for CT biomedical applications.

  3. Dose indices in dental cone beam CT and correlation with dose–area product

    PubMed Central

    Araki, K; Patil, S; Endo, A; Okano, T

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In the 2011 project “Safety and efficacy of a new and emerging dental X-ray modality (SEDENTEXCT)”, it was suggested that dose index (DI) and dose–area product (DAP) could be easily measured and used as diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), which would help in the management of radiation doses to patients in optimum exposure settings. Such indices could be directly related to effective dose. The purposes of this study, therefore, were to measure and calculate the DI and DAP in cone beam CT (CBCT) machines and to evaluate the correlation between the two. Methods: Dose measurements were performed on three-dimensional cone beam CT (3D-CBCT) machines [3D Accuitomo (J. Morita Mfg. Corp., Kyoto, Japan), Veraviewepocs (J. Morita Mfg. Corp.) and CS9300 (Carestream, New York, NY)] by exposing a cylindrical poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom using a CT ionization chamber. These dose measurements were used for the calculation of Dose Indices 1 and 2, according to the methodology suggested by SEDENTEXCT. The DAP was measured using a DAP meter that was attached to the detector to cover the entire irradiated area. Results: The DI1 ranged from 53.6 mR to 216.6 mR, the DI2 ranged from 77.1 mR to 325.0 mR and the DAP ranged from 101.1 mGy cm2 to 457.9 mGy cm2, depending on the machines and exposure settings. Index 2 had a better correlation with the DAP than Index 1. Conclusions: The DIs and DAP proposed by SEDENTEXCT may be useful for establishing DRLs for dental CBCT machines; however, further studies are necessary to determine which of these indices provide accurate dose estimates proportionally relating to the effective dose. PMID:23520392

  4. Effects of CT dose and nodule characteristics on lung-nodule detectability in a cohort of 90 national lung screening trial patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stefano; Lo, Pechin; Hoffman, John M.; Kim, H. J. Grace; Brown, Matthew S.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer screening CT is already performed at low dose. There are many techniques to reduce the dose even further, but it is not clear how such techniques will affect nodule detectability. In this work, we used an in-house CAD algorithm to evaluate detectability. 90348 patients and their raw CT data files were drawn from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) database. All scans were acquired at ~2 mGy CTDIvol with fixed tube current, 1 mm slice thickness, and B50 reconstruction kernel on a Sensation 64 scanner (Siemens Healthcare). We used the raw CT data to simulate two additional reduced-dose scans for each patient corresponding to 1 mGy (50%) and 0.5 mGy (25%). Radiologists' findings on the NLST reader forms indicated 65 nodules in the cohort, which we subdivided based on LungRADS criteria. For larger category 4 nodules, median sensitivities were 100% at all three dose levels, and mean sensitivity decreased with dose. For smaller nodules meeting the category 2 or 3 criteria, the dose dependence was less obvious. Overall, mean patient-level sensitivity varied from 38.5% at 100% dose to 40.4% at 50% dose, a difference of only 1.9%. However, the false-positive rate quadrupled from 1 per case at 100% dose to 4 per case at 25% dose. Dose reduction affected lung-nodule detectability differently depending on the LungRADS category, and the false-positive rate was very sensitive at sub-screening dose levels. Thus, care should be taken to adapt CAD for the very challenging noise characteristics of screening.

  5. Dose length products for the 10 most commonly ordered CT examinations in adults: analysis of three years of the ACR Dose Index Registry.

    PubMed

    Escalon, Joanna G; Chatfield, Mythreyi B; Sengupta, Debapriya; Loftus, Michael L

    2015-08-01

    As CT use steadily rises, concern over potential risks of radiation exposure from medical imaging has received increasing attention. Since May 2011, the ACR Dose Index Registry (DIR) has been open for general participation and has been collecting CT radiation dose data from an increasing number of facilities of various types. In this introductory review, we analyze the first three years of ACR DIR data, categorize the 10 most commonly performed CT examinations nationwide, review the variability of the recorded radiation dose indices for each, and take preliminary steps toward identifying possible factors associated with variability in dose indices. We believe that disseminating such information will help prompt informed improvements in standardization of CT protocols with respect to radiation dose. PMID:26250975

  6. Performance of a commercial optical CT scanner and polymer gel dosimeters for 3-D dose verification

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Wuu, C.-S.; Maryanski, Marek J.

    2004-11-01

    Performance analysis of a commercial three-dimensional (3-D) dose mapping system based on optical CT scanning of polymer gels is presented. The system consists of BANG{sup reg}3 polymer gels (MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT), OCTOPUS{sup TM} laser CT scanner (MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT), and an in-house developed software for optical CT image reconstruction and 3-D dose distribution comparison between the gel, film measurements and the radiation therapy treatment plans. Various sources of image noise (digitization, electronic, optical, and mechanical) generated by the scanner as well as optical uniformity of the polymer gel are analyzed. The performance of the scanner is further evaluated in terms of the reproducibility of the data acquisition process, the uncertainties at different levels of reconstructed optical density per unit length and the effects of scanning parameters. It is demonstrated that for BANG{sup registered}3 gel phantoms held in cylindrical plastic containers, the relative dose distribution can be reproduced by the scanner with an overall uncertainty of about 3% within approximately 75% of the radius of the container. In regions located closer to the container wall, however, the scanner generates erroneous optical density values that arise from the reflection and refraction of the laser rays at the interface between the gel and the container. The analysis of the accuracy of the polymer gel dosimeter is exemplified by the comparison of the gel/OCT-derived dose distributions with those from film measurements and a commercial treatment planning system (Cadplan, Varian Corporation, Palo Alto, CA) for a 6 cmx6 cm single field of 6 MV x rays and a 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plan. The gel measurements agree with the treatment plans and the film measurements within the '3%-or-2 mm' criterion throughout the usable, artifact-free central region of the gel volume. Discrepancies among the three data sets are analyzed.

  7. TH-C-18A-06: Combined CT Image Quality and Radiation Dose Monitoring Program Based On Patient Data to Assess Consistency of Clinical Imaging Across Scanner Models

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, O; Winslow, J; Samei, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: One of the principal challenges of clinical imaging is to achieve an ideal balance between image quality and radiation dose across multiple CT models. The number of scanners and protocols at large medical centers necessitates an automated quality assurance program to facilitate this objective. Therefore, the goal of this work was to implement an automated CT image quality and radiation dose monitoring program based on actual patient data and to use this program to assess consistency of protocols across CT scanner models. Methods: Patient CT scans are routed to a HIPPA compliant quality assurance server. CTDI, extracted using optical character recognition, and patient size, measured from the localizers, are used to calculate SSDE. A previously validated noise measurement algorithm determines the noise in uniform areas of the image across the scanned anatomy to generate a global noise level (GNL). Using this program, 2358 abdominopelvic scans acquired on three commercial CT scanners were analyzed. Median SSDE and GNL were compared across scanner models and trends in SSDE and GNL with patient size were used to determine the impact of differing automatic exposure control (AEC) algorithms. Results: There was a significant difference in both SSDE and GNL across scanner models (9–33% and 15–35% for SSDE and GNL, respectively). Adjusting all protocols to achieve the same image noise would reduce patient dose by 27–45% depending on scanner model. Additionally, differences in AEC methodologies across vendors resulted in disparate relationships of SSDE and GNL with patient size. Conclusion: The difference in noise across scanner models indicates that protocols are not optimally matched to achieve consistent image quality. Our results indicated substantial possibility for dose reduction while achieving more consistent image appearance. Finally, the difference in AEC methodologies suggests the need for size-specific CT protocols to minimize variability in image

  8. Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Naichang; Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran; Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James; Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

  9. Combining Automatic Tube Current Modulation with Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction for Low-Dose Chest CT Screening

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang-Hong; Jin, Er-Hu; He, Wen; Zhao, Li-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To reduce radiation dose while maintaining image quality in low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) by combining adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and automatic tube current modulation (ATCM). Methods Patients undergoing cancer screening (n = 200) were subjected to 64-slice multidetector chest CT scanning with ASIR and ATCM. Patients were divided into groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 (n = 50 each), with a noise index (NI) of 15, 20, 30, and 40, respectively. Each image set was reconstructed with 4 ASIR levels (0% ASIR, 30% ASIR, 50% ASIR, and 80% ASIR) in each group. Two radiologists assessed subjective image noise, image artifacts, and visibility of the anatomical structures. Objective image noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured, and effective dose (ED) was recorded. Results Increased NI was associated with increased subjective and objective image noise results (P<0.001), and SNR decreased with increasing NI (P<0.001). These values improved with increased ASIR levels (P<0.001). Images from all 4 groups were clinically diagnosable. Images with NI = 30 and 50% ASIR had average subjective image noise scores and nearly average anatomical structure visibility scores, with a mean objective image noise of 23.42 HU. The EDs for groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 were 2.79±1.17, 1.69±0.59, 0.74±0.29, and 0.37±0.22 mSv, respectively. Compared to group 1 (NI = 15), the ED reductions were 39.43%, 73.48%, and 86.74% for groups 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Conclusions Using NI = 30 with 50% ASIR in the chest CT protocol, we obtained average or above-average image quality but a reduced ED. PMID:24691208

  10. Tissue decomposition from dual energy CT data for MC based dose calculation in particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hünemohr, Nora Greilich, Steffen; Paganetti, Harald; Seco, Joao; Jäkel, Oliver

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The authors describe a novel method of predicting mass density and elemental mass fractions of tissues from dual energy CT (DECT) data for Monte Carlo (MC) based dose planning. Methods: The relative electron density ϱ{sub e} and effective atomic number Z{sub eff} are calculated for 71 tabulated tissue compositions. For MC simulations, the mass density is derived via one linear fit in the ϱ{sub e} that covers the entire range of tissue compositions (except lung tissue). Elemental mass fractions are predicted from the ϱ{sub e} and the Z{sub eff} in combination. Since particle therapy dose planning and verification is especially sensitive to accurate material assignment, differences to the ground truth are further analyzed for mass density, I-value predictions, and stopping power ratios (SPR) for ions. Dose studies with monoenergetic proton and carbon ions in 12 tissues which showed the largest differences of single energy CT (SECT) to DECT are presented with respect to range uncertainties. The standard approach (SECT) and the new DECT approach are compared to reference Bragg peak positions. Results: Mean deviations to ground truth in mass density predictions could be reduced for soft tissue from (0.5±0.6)% (SECT) to (0.2±0.2)% with the DECT method. Maximum SPR deviations could be reduced significantly for soft tissue from 3.1% (SECT) to 0.7% (DECT) and for bone tissue from 0.8% to 0.1%. MeanI-value deviations could be reduced for soft tissue from (1.1±1.4%, SECT) to (0.4±0.3%) with the presented method. Predictions of elemental composition were improved for every element. Mean and maximum deviations from ground truth of all elemental mass fractions could be reduced by at least a half with DECT compared to SECT (except soft tissue hydrogen and nitrogen where the reduction was slightly smaller). The carbon and oxygen mass fraction predictions profit especially from the DECT information. Dose studies showed that most of the 12 selected tissues would

  11. MO-G-18A-01: Radiation Dose Reducing Strategies in CT, Fluoroscopy and Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Mahesh, M; Gingold, E; Jones, A

    2014-06-15

    Advances in medical x-ray imaging have provided significant benefits to patient care. According to NCRP 160, there are more than 400 million x-ray procedures performed annually in the United States alone that contributes to nearly half of all the radiation exposure to the US population. Similar growth trends in medical x-ray imaging are observed worldwide. Apparent increase in number of medical x-ray imaging procedures, new protocols and the associated radiation dose and risk has drawn considerable attention. This has led to a number of technological innovations such as tube current modulation, iterative reconstruction algorithms, dose alerts, dose displays, flat panel digital detectors, high efficient digital detectors, storage phosphor radiography, variable filters, etc. that are enabling users to acquire medical x-ray images at a much lower radiation dose. Along with these, there are number of radiation dose optimization strategies that users can adapt to effectively lower radiation dose in medical x-ray procedures. The main objectives of this SAM course are to provide information and how to implement the various radiation dose optimization strategies in CT, Fluoroscopy and Radiography. Learning Objectives: To update impact of technological advances on dose optimization in medical imaging. To identify radiation optimization strategies in computed tomography. To describe strategies for configuring fluoroscopic equipment that yields optimal images at reasonable radiation dose. To assess ways to configure digital radiography systems and recommend ways to improve image quality at optimal dose.

  12. Effect of low-dose CT and iterative reconstruction on trabecular bone microstructure assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Felix K.; Baum, Thomas; Nasirudin, Radin A.; Mei, Kai; Garcia, Eduardo G.; Burgkart, Rainer; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Bauer, Jan S.; Noël, Peter B.

    2016-03-01

    The trabecular bone microstructure is an important factor in the development of osteoporosis. It is well known that its deterioration is one effect when osteoporosis occurs. Previous research showed that the analysis of trabecular bone microstructure enables more precise diagnoses of osteoporosis compared to a sole measurement of the mineral density. Microstructure parameters are assessed on volumetric images of the bone acquired either with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography or high-resolution computed tomography (CT), with only CT being applicable to the spine, which is one of clinically most relevant fracture sites. However, due to the high radiation exposure for imaging the whole spine these measurements are not applicable in current clinical routine. In this work, twelve vertebrae from three different donors were scanned with standard and low radiation dose. Trabecular bone microstructure parameters were assessed for CT images reconstructed with statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) and analytical filtered backprojection (FBP). The resulting structure parameters were correlated to the biomechanically determined fracture load of each vertebra. Microstructure parameters assessed for low-dose data reconstructed with SIR significantly correlated with fracture loads as well as parameters assessed for standard-dose data reconstructed with FBP. Ideal results were achieved with low to zero regularization strength yielding microstructure parameters not significantly different from those assessed for standard-dose FPB data. Moreover, in comparison to other approaches, superior noise-resolution trade-offs can be found with the proposed methods.

  13. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  14. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. P.; Dixon, R. L.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-03-01

    Among the various metrics that quantify radiation dose in computed tomography (CT), organ dose is one of the most representative quantities reflecting patient-specific radiation burden.1 Accurate estimation of organ dose requires one to effectively model the patient anatomy and the irradiation field. As illustrated in previous studies, the patient anatomy factor can be modeled using a library of computational phantoms with representative body habitus.2 However, the modeling of irradiation field can be practically challenging, especially for CT exams performed with tube current modulation. The central challenge is to effectively quantify the scatter irradiation field created by the dynamic change of tube current. In this study, we present a convolution-based technique to effectively quantify the primary and scatter irradiation field for TCM examinations. The organ dose for a given clinical patient can then be rapidly determined using the convolution-based method, a patient-matching technique, and a library of computational phantoms. 58 adult patients were included in this study (age range: 18-70 y.o., weight range: 60-180 kg). One computational phantom was created based on the clinical images of each patient. Each patient was optimally matched against one of the remaining 57 computational phantoms using a leave-one-out strategy. For each computational phantom, the organ dose coefficients (CTDIvol-normalized organ dose) under fixed tube current were simulated using a validated Monte Carlo simulation program. Such organ dose coefficients were multiplied by a scaling factor, (CTDIvol )organ, convolution that quantifies the regional irradiation field. The convolution-based organ dose was compared with the organ dose simulated from Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled on the original phantom created based on patient images. The estimation error was within 10% across all organs and modulation profiles for abdominopelvic examination. This strategy

  15. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a (60)Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  16. The relationship between organ dose and patient size in tube current modulated adult thoracic CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatonabadi, Maryam; Zhang, Di; Yang, Jeffrey; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris C.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2012-03-01

    Recently published AAPM Task Group 204 developed conversion coefficients that use scanner reported CTDIvol to estimate dose to the center of patient undergoing fixed tube current body exam. However, most performed CT exams use TCM to reduce dose to patients. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between organ dose and a variety of patient size metrics in adult chest CT scans that use tube current modulation (TCM). Monte Carlo simulations were performed for 32 voxelized models with contoured lungs and glandular breasts tissue, consisting of females and males. These simulations made use of patient's actual TCM data to estimate organ dose. Using image data, different size metrics were calculated, these measurements were all performed on one slice, at the level of patient's nipple. Estimated doses were normalized by scanner-reported CTDIvol and plotted versus different metrics. CTDIvol values were plotted versus different metrics to look at scanner's output versus size. The metrics performed similarly in terms of correlating with organ dose. Looking at each gender separately, for male models normalized lung dose showed a better linear correlation (r2=0.91) with effective diameter, while female models showed higher correlation (r2=0.59) with the anterior-posterior measurement. There was essentially no correlation observed between size and CTDIvol-normalized breast dose. However, a linear relationship was observed between absolute breast dose and size. Dose to lungs and breasts were consistently higher in females with similar size as males which could be due to shape and composition differences between genders in the thoracic region.

  17. Cyclosporine dose reduction by ketoconazole administration in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    First, M R; Schroeder, T J; Alexander, J W; Stephens, G W; Weiskittel, P; Myre, S A; Pesce, A J

    1991-02-01

    Cyclosporine metabolism occurs in the liver via hepatic cytochrome P-450 microsomal enzymes. Ketoconazole, an imidazole derivative, has been shown to inhibit the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system. Thirty-six renal transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine as part of a triple immunosuppressive drug regimen were started on 200 mg/day of oral ketoconazole. The dose of cyclosporine was reduced by 70% at the start of ketoconazole; this dose reduction was based on our previous experience with concomitant cyclosporine-ketoconazole therapy. Ketoconazole was started in patients who had been on cyclosporine for between 10 days and 74 months. The mean cyclosporine dose was 420 mg/day (5.9 mg/kg/day) before starting ketoconazole and 66 mg/day (0.9 mg/kg/day) one year after the addition of ketoconazole; this represents a cyclosporine dose reduction of 84.7% (P less than 0.0001). The mean trough whole-blood cyclosporine concentrations measured by HPLC, were 130 ng/mL preketoconazole and 149 ng/mL after 1 year of combination therapy. Mean serum creatinine and BUN levels were unchanged before and during ketoconazole administration, and no changes in liver function tests were noted. Cyclosporine pharmacokinetics were performed before and after at least three weeks of ketoconazole. Hourly whole-blood samples were measured by HPLC (parent cyclosporine only) and TDX (parent + metabolites). Combination therapy resulted in decreases in the maximum blood concentration and the steady-state volume of distribution divided by the fractional absorption, and increases in mean residence time and the parent-to-parent plus metabolite ratio (calculated by dividing the HPLC by the TDX value). The addition of ketoconazole to cyclosporine-treated patients resulted in a significant inhibition of cyclosporine metabolism and decrease in the dosage. There was minimal nephrotoxicity, and only four rejection episodes occurred on combined therapy. The concomitant administration of the two drugs was well

  18. Metal artifact reduction strategies for improved attenuation correction in hybrid PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Abdoli, Mehrsima; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-06-15

    Metallic implants are known to generate bright and dark streaking artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, which in turn propagate to corresponding functional positron emission tomography (PET) images during the CT-based attenuation correction procedure commonly used on hybrid clinical PET/CT scanners. Therefore, visual artifacts and overestimation and/or underestimation of the tracer uptake in regions adjacent to metallic implants are likely to occur and as such, inaccurate quantification of the tracer uptake and potential erroneous clinical interpretation of PET images is expected. Accurate quantification of PET data requires metal artifact reduction (MAR) of the CT images prior to the application of the CT-based attenuation correction procedure. In this review, the origins of metallic artifacts and their impact on clinical PET/CT imaging are discussed. Moreover, a brief overview of proposed MAR methods and their advantages and drawbacks is presented. Although most of the presented MAR methods are mainly developed for diagnostic CT imaging, their potential application in PET/CT imaging is highlighted. The challenges associated with comparative evaluation of these methods in a clinical environment in the absence of a gold standard are also discussed.

  19. Metal artifact reduction strategies for improved attenuation correction in hybrid PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Abdoli, Mehrsima; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-06-01

    Metallic implants are known to generate bright and dark streaking artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, which in turn propagate to corresponding functional positron emission tomography (PET) images during the CT-based attenuation correction procedure commonly used on hybrid clinical PET/CT scanners. Therefore, visual artifacts and overestimation and/or underestimation of the tracer uptake in regions adjacent to metallic implants are likely to occur and as such, inaccurate quantification of the tracer uptake and potential erroneous clinical interpretation of PET images is expected. Accurate quantification of PET data requires metal artifact reduction (MAR) of the CT images prior to the application of the CT-based attenuation correction procedure. In this review, the origins of metallic artifacts and their impact on clinical PET/CT imaging are discussed. Moreover, a brief overview of proposed MAR methods and their advantages and drawbacks is presented. Although most of the presented MAR methods are mainly developed for diagnostic CT imaging, their potential application in PET/CT imaging is highlighted. The challenges associated with comparative evaluation of these methods in a clinical environment in the absence of a gold standard are also discussed.

  20. SU-E-I-82: Improving CT Image Quality for Radiation Therapy Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms and Slightly Increasing Imaging Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Noid, G; Chen, G; Tai, A; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms are developed to improve CT image quality (IQ) by reducing noise without diminishing spatial resolution or contrast. For CT in radiation therapy (RT), slightly increasing imaging dose to improve IQ may be justified if it can substantially enhance structure delineation. The purpose of this study is to investigate and to quantify the IQ enhancement as a result of increasing imaging doses and using IR algorithms. Methods: CT images were acquired for phantoms, built to evaluate IQ metrics including spatial resolution, contrast and noise, with a variety of imaging protocols using a CT scanner (Definition AS Open, Siemens) installed inside a Linac room. Representative patients were scanned once the protocols were optimized. Both phantom and patient scans were reconstructed using the Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) and the Filtered Back Projection (FBP) methods. IQ metrics of the obtained CTs were compared. Results: IR techniques are demonstrated to preserve spatial resolution as measured by the point spread function and reduce noise in comparison to traditional FBP. Driven by the reduction in noise, the contrast to noise ratio is doubled by adopting the highest SAFIRE strength. As expected, increasing imaging dose reduces noise for both SAFIRE and FBP reconstructions. The contrast to noise increases from 3 to 5 by increasing the dose by a factor of 4. Similar IQ improvement was observed on the CTs for selected patients with pancreas and prostrate cancers. Conclusion: The IR techniques produce a measurable enhancement to CT IQ by reducing the noise. Increasing imaging dose further reduces noise independent of the IR techniques. The improved CT enables more accurate delineation of tumors and/or organs at risk during RT planning and delivery guidance.

  1. SU-E-I-43: Pediatric CT Dose and Image Quality Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G; Singh, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To design an approach to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging, and to evaluate expected performance. Methods: A methodology was designed to quantify relative image quality as a function of CT image acquisition parameters. Image contrast and image noise were used to indicate expected conspicuity of objects, and a wide-cone system was used to minimize scan time for motion avoidance. A decision framework was designed to select acquisition parameters as a weighted combination of image quality and dose. Phantom tests were used to acquire images at multiple techniques to demonstrate expected contrast, noise and dose. Anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts were imaged on a 160mm CT system with tube voltage capabilities as low as 70kVp. Previously acquired clinical images were used in conjunction with simulation tools to emulate images at different tube voltages and currents to assess human observer preferences. Results: Examination of image contrast, noise, dose and tube/generator capabilities indicates a clinical task and object-size dependent optimization. Phantom experiments confirm that system modeling can be used to achieve the desired image quality and noise performance. Observer studies indicate that clinical utilization of this optimization requires a modified approach to achieve the desired performance. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging. In addition, the methodology can be used in an automated parameter selection feature that can suggest techniques given a limited number of user inputs. G Stevens and R Singh are employees of GE Healthcare.

  2. Radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination using versatile optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salasiah, M.; Nordin, A. J.; Fathinul Fikri, A. S.; Hishar, H.; Tamchek, N.; Taiman, K.; Ahmad Bazli, A. K.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Mizanur, R.; Noor, Noramaliza M.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) provides a precise method in order to diagnose obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), compared to single photon emission tomography (SPECT). PET is suitable for obese and patients who underwent pharmacologic stress procedures. It has the ability to evaluate multivessel coronary artery disease by recording changes in left ventricular function from rest to peak stress and quantifying myocardial perfusion (in mL/min/g of tissue). However, the radiation dose to the radiosensitive organs has become crucial issues in the Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography(PET/CT) scanning procedure. The objective of this study was to estimate radiation dose to radiosensitive organs of patients who underwent PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination at Centre for Diagnostic Nuclear Imaging, Universiti Putra Malaysia in one month period using versatile optical fibres (Ge-B-doped Flat Fibre) and LiF (TLD-100 chips). All stress and rest paired myocardial perfusion PET/CT scans will be performed with the use of Rubidium-82 (82Rb). The optic fibres were loaded into plastic capsules and attached to patient's eyes, thyroid and breasts prior to the infusion of 82Rb, to accommodate the ten cases for the rest and stress PET scans. The results were compared with established thermoluminescence material, TLD-100 chips. The result shows that radiation dose given by TLD-100 and Germanium-Boron-doped Flat Fiber (Ge-B-doped Flat Fiber) for these five organs were comparable to each other where the p>0.05. For CT scans,thyroid received the highest dose compared to other organs. Meanwhile, for PET scans, breasts received the highest dose.

  3. Radiation Dose to the Thyroid and Gonads in Patients Undergoing Cardiac CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Behroozi, Hamid; Davoodi, Mohammad; Aghasi, Shahriar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present data show a global increase in the rate of cardiovascular disease. Cardiac CT angiography has developed as a fast and non-invasive cardiac imaging modality following the introduction of multi-slice computed tomogaraphy. Objectives: The aim of this study was to measure the radiation dose to the thyroid and pelvis regions in patients undergoing cardiac CT angiography using the Care Dose 4D method of 64-slice scanner. Patients and Methods: Eighty-one patients (41 males and 40 females) who were diagnosed with suspected coronary artery disease and were referred to Golestan Hospital, Imaging Department were recruited. Inclusion criteria were based on the protocol of multi-slice CT coronary angiography. The radiation dose to the thyroid and pelvis regions was measured using thermo luminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Results: The mean radiation dose to the thyroid in male and female subjects was 0.32 mSv and 0.41 mSv, respectively (P = 0.032) (total mean, 0.36 mSv). The mean radiation dose to the pelvis in male and female subjects was 81 μSv and 112 μSv, respectively (P = 0.026) (total mean, 96.5 μSv), Conclusions: The total mean radiation dose to the thyroid and gonads was 0.36 mSv, and 96.5 μSv, respectively for the subjects. These values were high for one organ in a single study. Gender can affect the radiation dose to the thyroid and gonads. This can be attributed to the anatomical characteristic differences of the male and female subjects. PMID:26060556

  4. Development of adaptive noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body images in a multi-detector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimaru, Eiji; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Okita, Izumi; Ninomiya, Yuuji; Tomoshige, Yukihiro; Kurokawa, Takehiro; Ono, Yutaka; Nakamura, Yuko; Suzuki, Masayuki

    2008-03-01

    Recently, several kinds of post-processing image filters which reduce the noise of computed tomography (CT) images have been proposed. However, these image filters are mostly for adults. Because these are not very effective in small (< 20 cm) display fields of view (FOV), we cannot use them for pediatric body images (e.g., premature babies and infant children). We have developed a new noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body CT images. This algorithm is based on a 3D post-processing in which the output pixel values are calculated by nonlinear interpolation in z-directions on original volumetric-data-sets. This algorithm does not need the in-plane (axial plane) processing, so the spatial resolution does not change. From the phantom studies, our algorithm could reduce SD up to 40% without affecting the spatial resolution of x-y plane and z-axis, and improved the CNR up to 30%. This newly developed filter algorithm will be useful for the diagnosis and radiation dose reduction of the pediatric body CT images.

  5. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-01

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  6. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-21

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  7. Dose heterogeneity correction for low-energy brachytherapy sources using dual-energy CT images.

    PubMed

    Mashouf, S; Lechtman, E; Lai, P; Keller, B M; Karotki, A; Beachey, D J; Pignol, J P

    2014-09-21

    Permanent seed implant brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism, which generates the dose in a homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM TG-186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. We have previously reported on a methodology where the absorbed dose in tissue can be obtained by multiplying the dose, calculated by the TG-43 formalism, by an inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF). In this work we make use of dual energy CT (DECT) images to extract ICF parameters. The advantage of DECT over conventional CT is that it eliminates the need for tissue segmentation as well as assignment of population based atomic compositions. DECT images of a heterogeneous phantom were acquired and the dose was calculated using both TG-43 and TG-43 [Formula: see text] formalisms. The results were compared to experimental measurements using Gafchromic films in the mid-plane of the phantom. For a seed implant configuration of 8 seeds spaced 1.5 cm apart in a cubic structure, the gamma passing score for 2%/2 mm criteria improved from 40.8% to 90.5% when ICF was applied to TG-43 dose distributions.

  8. Dose heterogeneity correction for low-energy brachytherapy sources using dual-energy CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashouf, S.; Lechtman, E.; Lai, P.; Keller, B. M.; Karotki, A.; Beachey, D. J.; Pignol, J. P.

    2014-09-01

    Permanent seed implant brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism, which generates the dose in a homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM TG-186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. We have previously reported on a methodology where the absorbed dose in tissue can be obtained by multiplying the dose, calculated by the TG-43 formalism, by an inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF). In this work we make use of dual energy CT (DECT) images to extract ICF parameters. The advantage of DECT over conventional CT is that it eliminates the need for tissue segmentation as well as assignment of population based atomic compositions. DECT images of a heterogeneous phantom were acquired and the dose was calculated using both TG-43 and TG-43 × \\text{ICF} formalisms. The results were compared to experimental measurements using Gafchromic films in the mid-plane of the phantom. For a seed implant configuration of 8 seeds spaced 1.5 cm apart in a cubic structure, the gamma passing score for 2%/2 mm criteria improved from 40.8% to 90.5% when ICF was applied to TG-43 dose distributions.

  9. A comprehensive study on decreasing the kilovoltage cone-beam CT dose by reducing the projection number.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bo; Lu, Haibin; Palta, Jatinder

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on registration accuracy and image qualities with a reduced number of planar projections used in volumetric imaging reconstruction. The ultimate goal is to evaluate the possibility of reducing the patient dose while maintaining registration accuracy under different projection-number schemes for various clinical sites. An Elekta Synergy Linear accelerator with an onboard CBCT system was used in this study. The quality of the Elekta XVI cone-beam three-dimensional volumetric images reconstructed with a decreasing number of projections was quantitatively evaluated by a Catphan phantom. Subsequently, we tested the registration accuracy of imaging data sets on three rigid anthropomorphic phantoms and three real patient sites under the reduced projection-number (as low as 1/6th) reconstruction of CBCT data with different rectilinear shifts and rota-tions. CBCT scan results of the Catphan phantom indicated the CBCT images got noisier when the number of projections was reduced, but their spatial resolution and uniformity were hardly affected. The maximum registration errors under the small amount transformation of the reference CT images were found to be within 0.7 mm translation and 0.3 masculine rotation. However, when the projection number was lower than one-fourth of the full set with a large amount of transformation of reference CT images, the registration could easily be trapped into local minima solutions for a nonrigid anatomy. We concluded, by using projection-number reduction strategy under conscientious care, imaging-guided localization procedure could achieve a lower patient dose without losing the registration accuracy for various clinical sites and situations. A faster scanning time is the main advantage compared to the mA decrease-based, dose-reduction method.

  10. Low-dose CT reconstruction via edge-preserving total variation regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Yuan, Kehong; Pan, Tinsu; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-09-01

    High radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) scans increases the lifetime risk of cancer and has become a major clinical concern. Recently, iterative reconstruction algorithms with total variation (TV) regularization have been developed to reconstruct CT images from highly undersampled data acquired at low mAs levels in order to reduce the imaging dose. Nonetheless, the low-contrast structures tend to be smoothed out by the TV regularization, posing a great challenge for the TV method. To solve this problem, in this work we develop an iterative CT reconstruction algorithm with edge-preserving TV (EPTV) regularization to reconstruct CT images from highly undersampled data obtained at low mAs levels. The CT image is reconstructed by minimizing energy consisting of an EPTV norm and a data fidelity term posed by the x-ray projections. The EPTV term is proposed to preferentially perform smoothing only on the non-edge part of the image in order to better preserve the edges, which is realized by introducing a penalty weight to the original TV norm. During the reconstruction process, the pixels at the edges would be gradually identified and given low penalty weight. Our iterative algorithm is implemented on graphics processing unit to improve its speed. We test our reconstruction algorithm on a digital NURBS-based cardiac-troso phantom, a physical chest phantom and a Catphan phantom. Reconstruction results from a conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm and a TV regularization method without edge-preserving penalty are also presented for comparison purposes. The experimental results illustrate that both the TV-based algorithm and our EPTV algorithm outperform the conventional FBP algorithm in suppressing the streaking artifacts and image noise under a low-dose context. Our edge-preserving algorithm is superior to the TV-based algorithm in that it can preserve more information of low-contrast structures and therefore maintain acceptable spatial resolution.

  11. National Survey of Radiation Dose and Image Quality in Adult CT Head Scans in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Jung; Mok, Greta S. P.; Tsai, Mang-Fen; Tsai, Wei-Ta; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tu, Chun-Yuan; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the influence of different variables on radiation dose and image quality based on a national database. Materials and Methods Taiwan’s Ministry of Health and Welfare requested all radiology departments to complete a questionnaire for each of their CT scanners. Information gathered included all scanning parameters for CT head scans. For the present analysis, CT machines were divided into three subgroups: single slice CT (Group A); multi-detector CT (MDCT) with 2-64 slices (Group B); and MDCT with more than 64 slices (Group C). Correlations between computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with cumulated tube rotation number (CTW(n)) and cumulated tube rotation time (CTW(s)), and sub group analyses of CTDI and SNR across the three groups were performed. Results CTDI values demonstrated a weak correlation (r = 0.33) with CTW(n) in Group A. SNR values demonstrated a weak negative correlation (r = -0.46) with CTW(n) in Group C. MDCT with higher slice numbers used more tube potential resulting in higher effective doses. There were both significantly lower CTDI and SNR values in helical mode than in axial mode in Group B, but not Group C. Conclusion CTW(n) and CTW(s) did not influence radiation output. Helical mode is more often used in MDCT and results in both lower CTDI and SNR compared to axial mode in MDCT with less than 64 slices. PMID:26125549

  12. A low dose simulation tool for CT systems with energy integrating detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zabic, Stanislav; Morton, Thomas; Brown, Kevin M.; Wang Qiu

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new strategy for simulating low-dose computed tomography (CT) scans using real scans of a higher dose as an input. The tool is verified against simulations and real scans and compared to other approaches found in the literature. Methods: The conditional variance identity is used to properly account for the variance of the input high-dose data, and a formula is derived for generating a new Poisson noise realization which has the same mean and variance as the true low-dose data. The authors also derive a formula for the inclusion of real samples of detector noise, properly scaled according to the level of the simulated x-ray signals. Results: The proposed method is shown to match real scans in number of experiments. Noise standard deviation measurements in simulated low-dose reconstructions of a 35 cm water phantom match real scans in a range from 500 to 10 mA with less than 5% error. Mean and variance of individual detector channels are shown to match closely across the detector array. Finally, the visual appearance of noise and streak artifacts is shown to match in real scans even under conditions of photon-starvation (with tube currents as low as 10 and 80 mA). Additionally, the proposed method is shown to be more accurate than previous approaches (1) in achieving the correct mean and variance in reconstructed images from pure-Poisson noise simulations (with no detector noise) under photon-starvation conditions, and (2) in simulating the correct noise level and detector noise artifacts in real low-dose scans. Conclusions: The proposed method can accurately simulate low-dose CT data starting from high-dose data, including effects from photon starvation and detector noise. This is potentially a very useful tool in helping to determine minimum dose requirements for a wide range of clinical protocols and advanced reconstruction algorithms.

  13. Electrocardiogram-gated coronary CT angiography dose estimates using ImPACT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masanao; Asada, Yasuki; Matsubara, Kosuke; Suzuki, Shouichi; Koshida, Kichiro; Matsunaga, Yuta; Haba, Tomonobu; Kawaguchi, Ai; Toyama, Hiroshi; Kato, Ryouichi

    2016-07-08

    The primary study objective was to assess radiation doses using a modified form of the Imaging Performance Assessment of Computed Tomography (CT) scanner (ImPACT) patient dosimetry for cardiac applications on an Aquilion ONE ViSION Edition scanner, including the Ca score, target computed tomography angiography (CTA), prospective CTA, continuous CTA/cardiac function analysis (CFA), and CTA/CFA modulation. Accordingly, we clarified the CT dose index (CTDI) to determine the relationship between heart rate (HR) and X-ray exposure. As a secondary objective, we compared radiation doses using modified ImPACT, a whole-body dosimetry phantom study, and the k-factor method to verify the validity of the dose results obtained with modified ImPACT. The effective dose determined for the reference person (4.66 mSv at 60 beats per minute (bpm) and 33.43 mSv at 90bpm) were approximately 10% less than those determined for the phantom study (5.28 mSv and 36.68 mSv). The effective doses according to the k-factor (0.014 mSv•mGy-1•cm-1; 2.57 mSv and 17.10 mSv) were significantly lower than those obtained with the other two methods. In the present study, we have shown that ImPACT, when modified for cardiac applications, can assess both absorbed and effective doses. The results of our dose comparison indicate that modified ImPACT dose assessment is a promising and practical method for evaluating coronary CTA.

  14. Electrocardiogram-gated coronary CT angiography dose estimates using ImPACT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masanao; Asada, Yasuki; Matsubara, Kosuke; Suzuki, Shouichi; Koshida, Kichiro; Matsunaga, Yuta; Haba, Tomonobu; Kawaguchi, Ai; Toyama, Hiroshi; Kato, Ryouichi

    2016-01-01

    The primary study objective was to assess radiation doses using a modified form of the Imaging Performance Assessment of Computed Tomography (CT) scanner (ImPACT) patient dosimetry for cardiac applications on an Aquilion ONE ViSION Edition scanner, including the Ca score, target computed tomography angiography (CTA), prospective CTA, continuous CTA/cardiac function analysis (CFA), and CTA/CFA modulation. Accordingly, we clarified the CT dose index (CTDI) to determine the relationship between heart rate (HR) and X-ray exposure. As a secondary objective, we compared radiation doses using modified ImPACT, a whole-body dosimetry phantom study, and the k-factor method to verify the validity of the dose results obtained with modified ImPACT. The effective dose determined for the reference person (4.66 mSv at 60 beats per minute (bpm) and 33.43 mSv at 90bpm) were approximately 10% less than those determined for the phantom study (5.28 mSv and 36.68 mSv). The effective doses according to the k-factor (0.014 mSv•mGy-1•cm-1; 2.57 mSv and 17.10 mSv) were significantly lower than those obtained with the other two methods. In the present study, we have shown that ImPACT, when modified for cardiac applications, can assess both absorbed and effective doses. The results of our dose comparison indicate that modified ImPACT dose assessment is a promising and practical method for evaluating coronary CTA. PMID:27455500

  15. Radiation dosimetry at CT fluoroscopy: physician's hand dose and development of needle holders.

    PubMed

    Kato, R; Katada, K; Anno, H; Suzuki, S; Ida, Y; Koga, S

    1996-11-01

    The radiation dose to physicians' hands without and with use of needle holders was determined at 10 computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided transthoracic needle biopsies. As measured with ionization chambers (tube voltage, 80 kVp; tube current, 30 mA), the mean absorbed dose rate without and with holders was 1.14 mGy/sec +/- 0.02 (standard deviation) and 0.019 mGy/sec +/- 0.001, respectively. The mean duration of CT fluoroscopy was 59 seconds in 10 biopsies performed with a holder and 82 seconds in 10 biopsies performed without a holder (difference not statistically significant). The needle holders did not cause any artifacts that interfered with the biopsy procedure.

  16. Scatter correction, intermediate view estimation and dose characterization in megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, Benjamin Koerner

    The ability to deliver conformal dose distributions in radiation therapy through intensity modulation and the potential for tumor dose escalation to improve treatment outcome has necessitated an increase in localization accuracy of inter- and intra-fractional patient geometry. Megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging using the treatment beam and onboard electronic portal imaging device is one option currently being studied for implementation in image-guided radiation therapy. However, routine clinical use is predicated upon continued improvements in image quality and patient dose delivered during acquisition. The formal statement of hypothesis for this investigation was that the conformity of planned to delivered dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy could be further enhanced through the application of kilovoltage scatter correction and intermediate view estimation techniques to megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging, and that normalized dose measurements could be acquired and inter-compared between multiple imaging geometries. The specific aims of this investigation were to: (1) incorporate the Feldkamp, Davis and Kress filtered backprojection algorithm into a program to reconstruct a voxelized linear attenuation coefficient dataset from a set of acquired megavoltage cone-beam CT projections, (2) characterize the effects on megavoltage cone-beam CT image quality resulting from the application of Intermediate View Interpolation and Intermediate View Reprojection techniques to limited-projection datasets, (3) incorporate the Scatter and Primary Estimation from Collimator Shadows (SPECS) algorithm into megavoltage cone-beam CT image reconstruction and determine the set of SPECS parameters which maximize image quality and quantitative accuracy, and (4) evaluate the normalized axial dose distributions received during megavoltage cone-beam CT image acquisition using radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in anthropomorphic pelvic and head and

  17. Longitudinal dose distribution and energy absorption in PMMA and water cylinders undergoing CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The knowledge of longitudinal dose distribution provides the most direct view of the accumulated dose in computed tomography (CT) scanning. The purpose of this work was to perform a comprehensive study of dose distribution width and energy absorption with a wide range of subject sizes and beam irradiated lengths. Methods: Cumulative dose distribution along the z-axis was calculated based on the previously published CT dose equilibration data by Li, Zhang, and Liu [Med. Phys. 40, 031903 (10pp.) (2013)] and a mechanism for computing dose on axial lines by Li, Zhang, and Liu [Med. Phys. 39, 5347–5352 (2012)]. Full width at half maximum (FWHM), full width at tenth maximum (FWTM), the total energy (E) absorbed in a small cylinder of unit mass per centimeter square about the central or peripheral axis, and the energy (E{sub in}) absorbed inside irradiated length (L) were subsequently extracted from the dose distribution. Results: Extensive results of FWHM, FWTM, and E{sub in}/E were presented on the central and peripheral axes of infinitely long PMMA (diameters 6–50 cm) and water (diameters 6–55 cm) cylinders with L < 100 cm. FWHM was greater than the primary beam width only on the central axes of large phantoms and also with L ranging from a few centimeter to about 33 cm. FWTM generally increased with phantom diameter, and could be up to 32 cm longer than irradiated length, depending on L, phantom diameter and axis, but was insensitive to phantom material (PMMA or water). E{sub in}/E increased with L and asymptotically approached unity for large L. As phantom diameter increased, E{sub in}/E generally decreased, but asymptotically approached constant levels on the peripheral axes of large phantoms. A heuristic explanation of dose distribution width results was presented. Conclusions: This study enables the reader to gain a comprehensive view of dose distribution width and energy absorption and provides useful data for estimating doses to organs inside or

  18. Can use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction reduce radiation dose in unenhanced head CT? An analysis of qualitative and quantitative image quality

    PubMed Central

    Heggen, Kristin Livelten; Pedersen, Hans Kristian; Andersen, Hilde Kjernlie; Martinsen, Anne Catrine T

    2016-01-01

    Background Iterative reconstruction can reduce image noise and thereby facilitate dose reduction. Purpose To evaluate qualitative and quantitative image quality for full dose and dose reduced head computed tomography (CT) protocols reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Material and Methods Fourteen patients undergoing follow-up head CT were included. All patients underwent full dose (FD) exam and subsequent 15% dose reduced (DR) exam, reconstructed using FBP and 30% ASIR. Qualitative image quality was assessed using visual grading characteristics. Quantitative image quality was assessed using ROI measurements in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), white matter, peripheral and central gray matter. Additionally, quantitative image quality was measured in Catphan and vendor’s water phantom. Results There was no significant difference in qualitative image quality between FD FBP and DR ASIR. Comparing same scan FBP versus ASIR, a noise reduction of 28.6% in CSF and between −3.7 and 3.5% in brain parenchyma was observed. Comparing FD FBP versus DR ASIR, a noise reduction of 25.7% in CSF, and −7.5 and 6.3% in brain parenchyma was observed. Image contrast increased in ASIR reconstructions. Contrast-to-noise ratio was improved in DR ASIR compared to FD FBP. In phantoms, noise reduction was in the range of 3 to 28% with image content. Conclusion There was no significant difference in qualitative image quality between full dose FBP and dose reduced ASIR. CNR improved in DR ASIR compared to FD FBP mostly due to increased contrast, not reduced noise. Therefore, we recommend using caution if reducing dose and applying ASIR to maintain image quality. PMID:27583169

  19. Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Andreas; Wigstroem, Lars; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Hornegger, Joachim; Zhu Lei; Strobel, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The combination of quickly rotating C-arm gantry with digital flat panel has enabled the acquisition of three-dimensional data (3D) in the interventional suite. However, image quality is still somewhat limited since the hardware has not been optimized for CT imaging. Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the ability to improve image quality by reducing the noise level and therewith the radiation dose without introducing noticeable blurring. By applying the filtering prior to 3D reconstruction, noise-induced streak artifacts are reduced as compared to processing in the image domain. Methods: 3D anisotropic adaptive filtering was used to process an ensemble of 2D x-ray views acquired along a circular trajectory around an object. After arranging the input data into a 3D space (2D projections + angle), the orientation of structures was estimated using a set of differently oriented filters. The resulting tensor representation of local orientation was utilized to control the anisotropic filtering. Low-pass filtering is applied only along structures to maintain high spatial frequency components perpendicular to these. The evaluation of the proposed algorithm includes numerical simulations, phantom experiments, and in-vivo data which were acquired using an AXIOM Artis dTA C-arm system (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany). Spatial resolution and noise levels were compared with and without adaptive filtering. A human observer study was carried out to evaluate low-contrast detectability. Results: The adaptive anisotropic filtering algorithm was found to significantly improve low-contrast detectability by reducing the noise level by half (reduction of the standard deviation in certain areas from 74 to 30 HU). Virtually no degradation of high contrast spatial resolution was observed in the modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis. Although the algorithm is computationally intensive, hardware acceleration using Nvidia's CUDA Interface provided an 8.9-fold

  20. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source dual-energy CT: Radiation dose and image quality

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lifeng; Christner, Jodie A.; Leng Shuai; Wang Jia; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the image quality of virtual monochromatic images synthesized from dual-source dual-energy computed tomography (CT) in comparison with conventional polychromatic single-energy CT for the same radiation dose. Methods: In dual-energy CT, besides the material-specific information, one may also synthesize monochromatic images at different energies, which can be used for routine diagnosis similar to conventional polychromatic single-energy images. In this work, the authors assessed whether virtual monochromatic images generated from dual-source CT scanners had an image quality similar to that of polychromatic single-energy images for the same radiation dose. First, the authors provided a theoretical analysis of the optimal monochromatic energy for either the minimum noise level or the highest iodine contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for a given patient size and dose partitioning between the low- and high-energy scans. Second, the authors performed an experimental study on a dual-source CT scanner to evaluate the noise and iodine CNR in monochromatic images. A thoracic phantom with three sizes of attenuating rings was used to represent four adult sizes. For each phantom size, three dose partitionings between the low-energy (80 kV) and the high-energy (140 kV) scans were used in the dual-energy scan. Monochromatic images at eight energies (40 to 110 keV) were generated for each scan. Phantoms were also scanned at each of the four polychromatic single energy (80, 100, 120, and 140 kV) with the same radiation dose. Results: The optimal virtual monochromatic energy depends on several factors: phantom size, partitioning of the radiation dose between low- and high-energy scans, and the image quality metrics to be optimized. With the increase of phantom size, the optimal monochromatic energy increased. With the increased percentage of radiation dose on the low energy scan, the optimal monochromatic energy decreased. When maximizing the iodine CNR in

  1. Detecting airway remodeling in COPD and emphysema using low-dose CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyanto, R.; Ceresa, M.; Muñoz-Barrutia, A.; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, C.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we quantitatively characterize lung airway remodeling caused by smoking-related emphysema and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), in low-dose CT scans. To that end, we established three groups of individuals: subjects with COPD (n=35), subjects with emphysema (n=38) and healthy smokers (n=28). All individuals underwent a low-dose CT scan, and the images were analyzed as described next. First the lung airways were segmented using a fast marching method and labeled according to its generation. Along each airway segment, cross-section images were resampled orthogonal to the airway axis. Next 128 rays were cast from the center of the airway lumen in each crosssection slice. Finally, we used an integral-based method, to measure lumen radius, wall thickness, mean wall percentage and mean peak wall attenuation on every cast ray. Our analysis shows that both the mean global wall thickness and the lumen radius of the airways of both COPD and emphysema groups were significantly different from those of the healthy group. In addition, the wall thickness change starts at the 3rd airway generation in the COPD patients compared with emphysema patients, who display the first significant changes starting in the 2nd generation. In conclusion, it is shown that airway remodeling happens in individuals suffering from either COPD or emphysema, with some local difference between both groups, and that we are able to detect and accurately quantify this process using images of low-dose CT scans.

  2. Investigation of iterative image reconstruction in low-dose breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Junguo; Yang, Kai; Boone, John M.; Han, Xiao; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2014-06-01

    There is interest in developing computed tomography (CT) dedicated to breast-cancer imaging. Because breast tissues are radiation-sensitive, the total radiation exposure in a breast-CT scan is kept low, often comparable to a typical two-view mammography exam, thus resulting in a challenging low-dose-data-reconstruction problem. In recent years, evidence has been found that suggests that iterative reconstruction may yield images of improved quality from low-dose data. In this work, based upon the constrained image total-variation minimization program and its numerical solver, i.e., the adaptive steepest descent-projection onto the convex set (ASD-POCS), we investigate and evaluate iterative image reconstructions from low-dose breast-CT data of patients, with a focus on identifying and determining key reconstruction parameters, devising surrogate utility metrics for characterizing reconstruction quality, and tailoring the program and ASD-POCS to the specific reconstruction task under consideration. The ASD-POCS reconstructions appear to outperform the corresponding clinical FDK reconstructions, in terms of subjective visualization and surrogate utility metrics.

  3. A method of estimating conceptus doses resulting from multidetector CT examinations during all stages of gestation

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, John; Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Current methods for the estimation of conceptus dose from multidetector CT (MDCT) examinations performed on the mother provide dose data for typical protocols with a fixed scan length. However, modified low-dose imaging protocols are frequently used during pregnancy. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for the estimation of conceptus dose from any MDCT examination of the trunk performed during all stages of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study to model the Siemens Sensation 16 and Sensation 64 MDCT scanners. Four mathematical phantoms were used, simulating women at 0, 3, 6, and 9 months of gestation. The contribution to the conceptus dose from single simulated scans was obtained at various positions across the phantoms. To investigate the effect of maternal body size and conceptus depth on conceptus dose, phantoms of different sizes were produced by adding layers of adipose tissue around the trunk of the mathematical phantoms. To verify MCNP results, conceptus dose measurements were carried out by means of three physical anthropomorphic phantoms, simulating pregnancy at 0, 3, and 6 months of gestation and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) crystals. Results: The results consist of Monte Carlo-generated normalized conceptus dose coefficients for single scans across the four mathematical phantoms. These coefficients were defined as the conceptus dose contribution from a single scan divided by the CTDI free-in-air measured with identical scanning parameters. Data have been produced to take into account the effect of maternal body size and conceptus position variations on conceptus dose. Conceptus doses measured with TLD crystals showed a difference of up to 19% compared to those estimated by mathematical simulations. Conclusions: Estimation of conceptus doses from MDCT examinations of the trunk performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be made

  4. Three dimensional dose distribution comparison of simple and complex acquisition trajectories in dedicated breast CT

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jainil P.; Mann, Steve D.; McKinley, Randolph L.; Tornai, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A novel breast CT system capable of arbitrary 3D trajectories has been developed to address cone beam sampling insufficiency as well as to image further into the patient’s chest wall. The purpose of this study was to characterize any trajectory-related differences in 3D x-ray dose distribution in a pendant target when imaged with different orbits. Methods: Two acquisition trajectories were evaluated: circular azimuthal (no-tilt) and sinusoidal (saddle) orbit with ±15° tilts around a pendant breast, using Monte Carlo simulations as well as physical measurements. Simulations were performed with tungsten (W) filtration of a W-anode source; the simulated source flux was normalized to the measured exposure of a W-anode source. A water-filled cylindrical phantom was divided into 1 cm3 voxels, and the cumulative energy deposited was tracked in each voxel. Energy deposited per voxel was converted to dose, yielding the 3D distributed dose volumes. Additionally, three cylindrical phantoms of different diameters (10, 12.5, and 15 cm) and an anthropomorphic breast phantom, initially filled with water (mimicking pure fibroglandular tissue) and then with a 75% methanol-25% water mixture (mimicking 50–50 fibroglandular-adipose tissues), were used to simulate the pendant breast geometry and scanned on the physical system. Ionization chamber calibrated radiochromic film was used to determine the dose delivered in a 2D plane through the center of the volume for a fully 3D CT scan using the different orbits. Results: Measured experimental results for the same exposure indicated that the mean dose measured throughout the central slice for different diameters ranged from 3.93 to 5.28 mGy, with the lowest average dose measured on the largest cylinder with water mimicking a homogeneously fibroglandular breast. These results align well with the cylinder phantom Monte Carlo studies which also showed a marginal difference in dose delivered by a saddle trajectory in the

  5. Iterative methods for dose reduction and image enhancement in tomography

    DOEpatents

    Miao, Jianwei; Fahimian, Benjamin Pooya

    2012-09-18

    A system and method for creating a three dimensional cross sectional image of an object by the reconstruction of its projections that have been iteratively refined through modification in object space and Fourier space is disclosed. The invention provides systems and methods for use with any tomographic imaging system that reconstructs an object from its projections. In one embodiment, the invention presents a method to eliminate interpolations present in conventional tomography. The method has been experimentally shown to provide higher resolution and improved image quality parameters over existing approaches. A primary benefit of the method is radiation dose reduction since the invention can produce an image of a desired quality with a fewer number projections than seen with conventional methods.

  6. CT Radiation Dose Management: A Comprehensive Optimization Process for Improving Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Parakh, Anushri; Kortesniemi, Mika; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2016-09-01

    Rising concerns of radiation exposure from computed tomography have caused various advances in dose reduction technologies. While proper justification and optimization of scans has been the main focus to address increasing doses, the value of dose management has been largely overlooked. The purpose of this article is to explain the importance of dose management, provide an overview of the available options for dose tracking, and discuss the importance of a dedicated dose team. The authors also describe how a digital radiation tracking software can be used for analyzing the big data on doses for auditing patient safety, scanner utilization, and productivity, all of which have enormous personal and institutional implications. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:27533027

  7. An evaluation of organ dose modulation on a GE optima CT660-computed tomography scanner.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Matthew T; Loader, Robert J; Stevens, Gregory C; Rowles, Nick P

    2016-01-01

    Organ Dose Modulation or ODM (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) was evaluated to characterize changes in CTDIvol, image noise, effective dose, and organ dose saving to patients. Three separate investigations were completed: a tube current modulation phantom was scanned with and without ODM, a CTDIvol phantom was scanned with ODM, and Monte Carlo simulations were performed. ODM was found to reduce the CTDIvol by approximately 20% whilst increasing the noise by approximately 14%. This was reflected in the dose distribution, where the anterior peripheral dose was reduced by approximately 40% whilst the identical poste-rior dose remained largely unaffected. Enabling ODM for the entire scan would reduce the effective dose by approximately 24%; however, this saving reduces to 5% if the images are matched for CTDIvol. These savings mostly originated from reductions in dose to the stomach, breasts, colon, bladder, and liver. ODM has the effect of a global reduction in CTDIvol with an associated increase in image noise. The benefit of ODM was found to be reduced when the dose-saving contribution from the reduced CTDIvol was removed. Given that there is a higher contribution to effective dose throughout the body from the anterior projections, consideration should be given to applying ODM throughout. PMID:27167255

  8. Order of magnitude reduction of fluoroscopic x-ray dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Abhinav; Robert, Normand; Machan, Lindsay; Deutsch, Meir; Kisselgoff, David; Babyn, Paul; Rowlands, John A.

    2012-03-01

    The role of fluoroscopic imaging is critical for diagnostic and image guided therapy. However, fluoroscopic imaging can require significant radiation leading to increased cancer risk and non-stochastic effects such as radiation burns. Our purpose is to reduce the exposure and dose to the patient by an order of magnitude in these procedures by use of the region of interest method. Method and Materials: Region of interest fluoroscopy (ROIF) uses a partial attenuator. The central region of the image has full exposure while the image periphery, there to provide context only, has a reduced exposure rate. ROIF using a static partial attenuator has been shown in our previous studies to reduce the dose area product (DAP) to the patient by at least 2.5 times. Significantly greater reductions in DAP would require improvements in flat panel detectors performance at low x-ray exposures or a different x-ray attenuation strategy. Thus we have investigated a second, dynamic, approach. We have constructed an x-ray shutter system allowing a normal x-ray exposure in the region of interest while reducing the number of x-ray exposures in the periphery through the rapid introduction, positioning and removal of an x-ray attenuating shutter to block radiation only for selected frames. This dynamic approach eliminates the DQE(0) loss associated with the use of static partial attenuator applied to every frame thus permitting a greater reduction in DAP. Results: We have compared the two methods by modeling and determined their fundamental limits.

  9. A study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios for CT scanning without table translation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob; Yang, Jie

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: For CT scanning in the stationary-table modes, AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the midpoint dose on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long phantoms. Currently, a long cylindrical phantom is usually not available in many clinical facilities. The use of a long phantom is also challenging because of the heavy weight. In order to shed light on assessing the midpoint dose in CT scanning without table movement, the authors present a study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios, and perform a cross-comparison of CT dose ratios on different scanner models. Methods: The authors performed Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations with a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare), and modeled dosimetry measurements using a 0.6 cm{sup 3} Farmer type chamber and a 10-cm long pencil ion chamber. The short (15 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were computed for two PMMA diameters (16 and 32 cm), two phantom axes (the center and the periphery), and a range of beam apertures (3–25 cm). The results were compared with the published data of previous studies with other multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanners and cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners. Results: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios changed with beam apertures but were insensitive to beam qualities (80–140 kV, the head and body bowtie filters) and MDCT and CBCT scanner models. Conclusions: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios enable medical physicists to make dosimetry measurements using the standard CT dosimetry phantoms and a Farmer chamber or a 10 cm long pencil chamber, and to assess the midpoint dose in long phantoms. This method provides an effective approach for the dosimetry of CBCT scanning in the stationary-table modes, and is useful for perfusion and interventional CT.

  10. A method to acquire CT organ dose map using OSL dosimeters and ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Da; Li, Xinhua; Gao, Yiming; Xu, X. George; Liu, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present the design and procedure of an experimental method for acquiring densely sampled organ dose map for CT applications, based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters “nanoDots” and standard ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms; and to provide the results of applying the method—a dose data set with good statistics for the comparison with Monte Carlo simulation result in the future. Methods: A standard ATOM phantom has densely located holes (in 3 × 3 cm or 1.5 × 1.5 cm grids), which are too small (5 mm in diameter) to host many types of dosimeters, including the nanoDots. The authors modified the conventional way in which nanoDots are used, by removing the OSL disks from the holders before inserting them inside a standard ATOM phantom for dose measurements. The authors solved three technical difficulties introduced by this modification: (1) energy dependent dose calibration for raw OSL readings; (2) influence of the brief background exposure of OSL disks to dimmed room light; (3) correct pairing between the dose readings and measurement locations. The authors acquired 100 dose measurements at various positions in the phantom, which was scanned using a clinical chest protocol with both angular and z-axis tube current modulations. Results: Dose calibration was performed according to the beam qualities inside the phantom as determined from an established Monte Carlo model of the scanner. The influence of the brief exposure to dimmed room light was evaluated and deemed negligible. Pairing between the OSL readings and measurement locations was ensured by the experimental design. The organ doses measured for a routine adult chest scan protocol ranged from 9.4 to 18.8 mGy, depending on the composition, location, and surrounding anatomy of the organs. The dose distribution across different slices of the phantom strongly depended on the z-axis mA modulation. In the same slice, doses to the soft tissues other than the spinal cord

  11. A method to acquire CT organ dose map using OSL dosimeters and ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Da; Li, Xinhua; Liu, Bob; Gao, Yiming; Xu, X. George

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To present the design and procedure of an experimental method for acquiring densely sampled organ dose map for CT applications, based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters “nanoDots” and standard ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms; and to provide the results of applying the method—a dose data set with good statistics for the comparison with Monte Carlo simulation result in the future.Methods: A standard ATOM phantom has densely located holes (in 3 × 3 cm or 1.5 × 1.5 cm grids), which are too small (5 mm in diameter) to host many types of dosimeters, including the nanoDots. The authors modified the conventional way in which nanoDots are used, by removing the OSL disks from the holders before inserting them inside a standard ATOM phantom for dose measurements. The authors solved three technical difficulties introduced by this modification: (1) energy dependent dose calibration for raw OSL readings; (2) influence of the brief background exposure of OSL disks to dimmed room light; (3) correct pairing between the dose readings and measurement locations. The authors acquired 100 dose measurements at various positions in the phantom, which was scanned using a clinical chest protocol with both angular and z-axis tube current modulations.Results: Dose calibration was performed according to the beam qualities inside the phantom as determined from an established Monte Carlo model of the scanner. The influence of the brief exposure to dimmed room light was evaluated and deemed negligible. Pairing between the OSL readings and measurement locations was ensured by the experimental design. The organ doses measured for a routine adult chest scan protocol ranged from 9.4 to 18.8 mGy, depending on the composition, location, and surrounding anatomy of the organs. The dose distribution across different slices of the phantom strongly depended on the z-axis mA modulation. In the same slice, doses to the soft tissues other than the spinal cord demonstrated

  12. TU-A-12A-07: CT-Based Biomarkers to Characterize Lung Lesion: Effects of CT Dose, Slice Thickness and Reconstruction Algorithm Based Upon a Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, B; Tan, Y; Tsai, W; Lu, L; Schwartz, L; So, J; Goldman, J; Lu, Z

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiogenomics promises the ability to study cancer tumor genotype from the phenotype obtained through radiographic imaging. However, little attention has been paid to the sensitivity of image features, the image-based biomarkers, to imaging acquisition techniques. This study explores the impact of CT dose, slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm on measuring image features using a thorax phantom. Methods: Twentyfour phantom lesions of known volume (1 and 2mm), shape (spherical, elliptical, lobular and spicular) and density (-630, -10 and +100 HU) were scanned on a GE VCT at four doses (25, 50, 100, and 200 mAs). For each scan, six image series were reconstructed at three slice thicknesses of 5, 2.5 and 1.25mm with continuous intervals, using the lung and standard reconstruction algorithms. The lesions were segmented with an in-house 3D algorithm. Fifty (50) image features representing lesion size, shape, edge, and density distribution/texture were computed. Regression method was employed to analyze the effect of CT dose, slice of thickness and reconstruction algorithm on these features adjusting 3 confounding factors (size, density and shape of phantom lesions). Results: The coefficients of CT dose, slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm are presented in Table 1 in the supplementary material. No significant difference was found between the image features calculated on low dose CT scans (25mAs and 50mAs). About 50% texture features were found statistically different between low doses and high doses (100 and 200mAs). Significant differences were found for almost all features when calculated on 1.25mm, 2.5mm, and 5mm slice thickness images. Reconstruction algorithms significantly affected all density-based image features, but not morphological features. Conclusions: There is a great need to standardize the CT imaging protocols for radiogenomics study because CT dose, slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm impact quantitative image features to

  13. MR Image Based Approach for Metal Artifact Reduction in X-Ray CT

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For decades, computed tomography (CT) images have been widely used to discover valuable anatomical information. Metallic implants such as dental fillings cause severe streaking artifacts which significantly degrade the quality of CT images. In this paper, we propose a new method for metal-artifact reduction using complementary magnetic resonance (MR) images. The method exploits the possibilities which arise from the use of emergent trimodality systems. The proposed algorithm corrects reconstructed CT images. The projected data which is affected by dental fillings is detected and the missing projections are replaced with data obtained from a corresponding MR image. A simulation study was conducted in order to compare the reconstructed images with images reconstructed through linear interpolation, which is a common metal-artifact reduction technique. The results show that the proposed method is successful in reducing severe metal artifacts without introducing significant amount of secondary artifacts. PMID:24302860

  14. Size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) provides a simple method to calculate organ dose for pediatric CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Bria M.; Brady, Samuel L. Kaufman, Robert A.; Mirro, Amy E.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation of size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) with absorbed organ dose, and to develop a simple methodology for estimating patient organ dose in a pediatric population (5–55 kg). Methods: Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms representing a range of pediatric body habitus were scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dose. Phantom absolute organ dose was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Organ dose correlation factors (CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}) were then multiplied by patient-specific SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. The CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were used to retrospectively estimate individual organ doses from 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic pediatric CT examinations, where mean patient weight was 22 kg ± 15 (range 5–55 kg), and mean patient age was 6 yrs ± 5 (range 4 months to 23 yrs). Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm; thus, showing appropriate scalability of the phantoms across the entire pediatric population in this study. IndividualCF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7–1.4) and abdominopelvic region (average 0.9; range 0.7–1.3) was near unity. For organ/tissue that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1–0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. A means to estimate patient organ dose was demonstrated. Calculated patient organ dose, using patient SSDE and CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}, was compared to

  15. Dose coefficients in pediatric and adult abdominopelvic CT based on 100 patient models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Paulson, Erik K.; Samei, Ehsan

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shown the feasibility of estimating patient dose from a CT exam using CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose (denoted as h), DLP-normalized-effective dose (denoted as k), and DLP-normalized-risk index (denoted as q). However, previous studies were limited to a small number of phantom models. The purpose of this work was to provide dose coefficients (h, k, and q) across a large number of computational models covering a broad range of patient anatomy, age, size percentile, and gender. The study consisted of 100 patient computer models (age range, 0 to 78 y.o.; weight range, 2-180 kg) including 42 pediatric models (age range, 0 to 16 y.o.; weight range, 2-80 kg) and 58 adult models (age range, 18 to 78 y.o.; weight range, 57-180 kg). Multi-detector array CT scanners from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) were included. A previously-validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate organ dose for each patient model and each scanner, from which h, k, and q were derived. The relationships between h, k, and q and patient characteristics (size, age, and gender) were ascertained. The differences in conversion coefficients across the scanners were further characterized. CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose (h) showed an exponential decrease with increasing patient size. For organs within the image coverage, the average differences of h across scanners were less than 15%. That value increased to 29% for organs on the periphery or outside the image coverage, and to 8% for distributed organs, respectively. The DLP-normalized-effective dose (k) decreased exponentially with increasing patient size. For a given gender, the DLP-normalized-risk index (q) showed an exponential decrease with both increasing patient size and patient age. The average differences in k and q across scanners were 8% and 10%, respectively. This study demonstrated that the knowledge of patient information and CTDIvol/DLP values may

  16. Effect of Body Habitus on Radiation Dose During CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Spine Injections.

    PubMed

    Viola, Ronald J; Nguyen, Giao B; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Stinnett, Sandra S; Hoang, Jenny K; Kranz, Peter G

    2014-10-31

    This study investigated the degree to which body habitus influences radiation dose during CT fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided lumbar epidural steroid injections (ESI). An anthropomorphic phantom containing metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detectors was scanned at two transverse levels to simulate upper and lower lumbar CTF-guided ESI. Circumferential layers of adipose-equivalent material were sequentially added to model patients of three sizes: small (cross-sectional dimensions 25×30 cm), average (34×39 cm), and oversize (43×48 cm). Point dose rates to skin and internal organs within the CTF beam were measured. Scattered point dose rates 5 cm from the radiation beam were also measured. Direct point dose rates to the internal organs ranged from 0.05-0.11 mGy/10mAs in the oversized phantom, and from 0.18-0.43 mGy/10mAs in the small phantom. Skin direct point dose rates ranged from 0.69-0.71 mGy/10mAs in the oversized phantom and 0.88-0.94 mGy/10mAs in the small phantom. This represents a 180-310% increase in organ point dose rates and 24-36% increase in skin point dose rates in the small habitus compared with the oversize habitus. Scatter point dose rates increased by 83-117% for the small compared to the oversize phantom. Decreasing body habitus results in substantial increases in direct organ and skin point doses as well as scattered dose during simulated CTF-guided procedures. Failure to account for individual variations in body habitus will result in inaccurate dose estimation and inappropriate choice of tube current in CTF-guided procedures.

  17. Effect of Body Habitus on Radiation Dose During CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Spine Injections.

    PubMed

    Viola, Ronald J; Nguyen, Giao B; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Stinnett, Sandra S; Hoang, Jenny K; Kranz, Peter G

    2014-10-31

    This study investigated the degree to which body habitus influences radiation dose during CT fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided lumbar epidural steroid injections (ESI). An anthropomorphic phantom containing metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detectors was scanned at two transverse levels to simulate upper and lower lumbar CTF-guided ESI. Circumferential layers of adipose-equivalent material were sequentially added to model patients of three sizes: small (cross-sectional dimensions 25×30 cm), average (34×39 cm), and oversize (43×48 cm). Point dose rates to skin and internal organs within the CTF beam were measured. Scattered point dose rates 5 cm from the radiation beam were also measured. Direct point dose rates to the internal organs ranged from 0.05-0.11 mGy/10mAs in the oversized phantom, and from 0.18-0.43 mGy/10mAs in the small phantom. Skin direct point dose rates ranged from 0.69-0.71 mGy/10mAs in the oversized phantom and 0.88-0.94 mGy/10mAs in the small phantom. This represents a 180-310% increase in organ point dose rates and 24-36% increase in skin point dose rates in the small habitus compared with the oversize habitus. Scatter point dose rates increased by 83-117% for the small compared to the oversize phantom. Decreasing body habitus results in substantial increases in direct organ and skin point doses as well as scattered dose during simulated CTF-guided procedures. Failure to account for individual variations in body habitus will result in inaccurate dose estimation and inappropriate choice of tube current in CTF-guided procedures. PMID:25363254

  18. Assessments of Coronary Artery Visibility and Radiation Dose in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease on Cardiac 128-slice CT and on Cardiac 64-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Huang, M; Zheng, J; Li, J; Liu, H; Liang, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coronary artery visibility and radiation dose in infants with CHD on cardiac 128-slice CT and on cardiac 64-slice CT. The images of 200 patients were analyzed in this study, 100 patients were selected randomly from a group of 789 infants (<1 years old) with CHD undergoing 128-slice CT prospective ECG-triggered axial scan, and 100 were selected randomly from 911 infants with CHD undergoing 64-slice CT retrospective ECG-gated spiral scan. The visibility of coronary artery segments was graded on a four-point scale. The coronary arteries were considered to be detected or visible when grade was 2 or higher. The visibility of the coronary artery segments and the radiation dose was compared between the two groups. Except for the rate of LM (96 vs. 99%), the detection rates of the total, LAD, LCX, RCA, and the proximal segment of the RCA in the 256-slice CT group were significantly higher than those in the 64-slice CT group (51.7, 53.33, 33.67, 53.33, and 99 vs. 34.8, 34.33, 18, 30.67, and 75%, respectively). The counts of visibility score (4/3/2/1) for the LM and the proximal segment of the RCA were 62/22/12/4 and 56/20/17/7, respectively, in the 128-slice CT group and 17/42/30/1 and 9/30/38/25, respectively, in the 64-slice CT group. There were significant differences, especially for score 4 and 3, between the two groups. The radiation dose in the 128-slice CT group was significantly decreased than those in the 64-slice CT group (CTDIvol 1.88 ± 0.51 vs. 5.61 ± 0.63 mGy; SSDE 4.48 ± 1.15 vs. 13.97 ± 1.52 mGy; effective radiation dose 1.36 ± 0.44 vs. 4.06 ± 0.7 mSv). With reduced radiation dose, the visibility of the coronary artery in infants with CHD via prospective ECG-triggered mode on a 128-slice CT is superior to that of the 64-slice CT using retrospective ECG-gated spiral mode.

  19. MO-E-17A-05: Individualized Patient Dosimetry in CT Using the Patient Dose (PATDOSE) Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, A; Boone, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation dose to the patient undergoing a CT examination has been the focus of many recent studies. While CTDIvol and SSDE-based methods are important tools for patient dose management, the CT image data provides important information with respect to CT dose and its distribution. Coupled with the known geometry and output factors (kV, mAs, pitch, etc.) of the CT scanner, the CT dataset can be used directly for computing absorbed dose. Methods: The HU numbers in a patient's CT data set can be converted to linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) with some assumptions. With this (PAT-DOSE) method, which is not Monte Carlo-based, the primary and scatter dose are computed separately. The primary dose is computed directly from the geometry of the scanner, x-ray spectrum, and the known patient LACs. Once the primary dose has been computed to all voxels in the patient, the scatter dose algorithm redistributes a fraction of the absorbed primary dose (based on the HU number of each source voxel), and the methods here invoke both tissue attenuation and absorption and solid angle geometry. The scatter dose algorithm can be run N times to include Nth-scatter redistribution. PAT-DOSE was deployed using simple PMMA phantoms, to validate its performance against Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. Results: Comparison between PAT-DOSE and MCNPX primary dose distributions showed excellent agreement for several scan lengths. The 1st-scatter dose distributions showed relatively higher-amplitude, long-range scatter tails for the PAT-DOSE algorithm then for MCNPX simulations. Conclusion: The PAT-DOSE algorithm provides a fast, deterministic assessment of the 3-D dose distribution in CT, making use of scanner geometry and the patient image data set. The preliminary implementation of the algorithm produces accurate primary dose distributions however achieving scatter distribution agreement is more challenging. Addressing the polyenergetic x-ray spectrum and spatially dependent

  20. The impact on CT dose of the variability in tube current modulation technology: a theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-08-01

    Body CT scans are routinely performed using tube-current-modulation (TCM) technology. There is notable variability across CT manufacturers in terms of how TCM technology is implemented. Some manufacturers aim to provide uniform image noise across body regions and patient sizes, whereas others aim to provide lower noise for smaller patients. The purpose of this study was to conduct a theoretical investigation to understand how manufacturer-dependent TCM scheme affects organ dose, and to develop a generic approach for assessing organ dose across TCM schemes. The adult reference female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom was used for this study. A ray-tracing method was developed to calculate the attenuation of the phantom for a given projection angle based on phantom anatomy, CT system geometry, x-ray energy spectrum, and bowtie filter filtration. The tube current (mA) for a given projection angle was then calculated as a log-linear function of the attenuation along that projection. The slope of this function, termed modulation control strength, α, was varied from 0 to 1 to emulate the variability in TCM technology. Using a validated Monte Carlo program, organ dose was simulated for five α values (α = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1) in the absence and presence of a realistic system mA limit. Organ dose was further normalized by volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDIvol) to obtain conversion factors (h factors) that are relatively independent of system specifics and scan parameters. For both chest and abdomen-pelvis scans and for 24 radiosensitive organs, organ dose conversion factors varied with α, following second-order polynomial equations. This result suggested the need for α-specific organ dose conversion factors (i.e., conversion factors specific to the modulation scheme used). On the other hand, across the full range of α values, organ dose in a TCM scan could be derived from the conversion factors established for a fixed-mA scan (hFIXED). This was possible by

  1. The Impact on CT Dose of the Variability in Tube Current Modulation Technology: a Theoretical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Body CT scans are routinely performed using tube-current-modulation (TCM) technology. There is notable variability across CT manufacturers in terms of how TCM technology is implemented. Some manufacturers aim to provide uniform image noise across body regions and patient sizes, whereas others aim to provide lower noise for smaller patients. The purpose of this study was to conduct a theoretical investigation to understand how manufacturer-dependent TCM scheme affects organ dose, and to develop a generic approach for assessing organ dose across TCM schemes. The adult reference female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom was used for this study. A ray-tracing method was developed to calculate the attenuation of the phantom for a given projection angle based on phantom anatomy, CT system geometry, X-ray energy spectrum, and bowtie filter filtration. The tube current (mA) for a given projection angle was then calculated as a log-linear function of the attenuation along that projection. The slope of this function, termed modulation control strength, α, was varied from 0 to 1 to emulate the variability in TCM technology. Using a validated Monte Carlo program, organ dose was simulated for five α values (α = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1) in the absence and presence of a realistic system mA limit. Organ dose was further normalized by volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDIvol) to obtain conversion factors (h factors) that are relatively independent of system specifics and scan parameters. For both chest and abdomen-pelvis scans and for 24 radiosensitive organs, organ dose conversion factors varied with α, following second-order polynomial equations. This result suggested the need for α-specific organ dose conversion factors (i.e., conversion factors specific to the modulation scheme used). On the other hand, across the full range of α values, organ dose in a TCM scan could be derived from the conversion factors established for a fixed-mA scan (hFIXED). This was possible by

  2. Assessing image quality and dose reduction of a new x-ray computed tomography iterative reconstruction algorithm using model observers

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu Kupinski, Matthew A.; Fan, Jiahua; Sainath, Paavana; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: A number of different techniques have been developed to reduce radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. In this paper, the authors will compare task-based measures of image quality of CT images reconstructed by two algorithms: conventional filtered back projection (FBP), and a new iterative reconstruction algorithm (IR). Methods: To assess image quality, the authors used the performance of a channelized Hotelling observer acting on reconstructed image slices. The selected channels are dense difference Gaussian channels (DDOG).A body phantom and a head phantom were imaged 50 times at different dose levels to obtain the data needed to assess image quality. The phantoms consisted of uniform backgrounds with low contrast signals embedded at various locations. The tasks the observer model performed included (1) detection of a signal of known location and shape, and (2) detection and localization of a signal of known shape. The employed DDOG channels are based on the response of the human visual system. Performance was assessed using the areas under ROC curves and areas under localization ROC curves. Results: For signal known exactly (SKE) and location unknown/signal shape known tasks with circular signals of different sizes and contrasts, the authors’ task-based measures showed that a FBP equivalent image quality can be achieved at lower dose levels using the IR algorithm. For the SKE case, the range of dose reduction is 50%–67% (head phantom) and 68%–82% (body phantom). For the study of location unknown/signal shape known, the dose reduction range can be reached at 67%–75% for head phantom and 67%–77% for body phantom case. These results suggest that the IR images at lower dose settings can reach the same image quality when compared to full dose conventional FBP images. Conclusions: The work presented provides an objective way to quantitatively assess the image quality of a newly introduced CT IR algorithm. The performance of the

  3. SU-E-J-218: Evaluation of CT Images Created Using a New Metal Artifact Reduction Reconstruction Algorithm for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Niemkiewicz, J; Palmiotti, A; Miner, M; Stunja, L; Bergene, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Metal in patients creates streak artifacts in CT images. When used for radiation treatment planning, these artifacts make it difficult to identify internal structures and affects radiation dose calculations, which depend on HU numbers for inhomogeneity correction. This work quantitatively evaluates a new metal artifact reduction (MAR) CT image reconstruction algorithm (GE Healthcare CT-0521-04.13-EN-US DOC1381483) when metal is present. Methods: A Gammex Model 467 Tissue Characterization phantom was used. CT images were taken of this phantom on a GE Optima580RT CT scanner with and without steel and titanium plugs using both the standard and MAR reconstruction algorithms. HU values were compared pixel by pixel to determine if the MAR algorithm altered the HUs of normal tissues when no metal is present, and to evaluate the effect of using the MAR algorithm when metal is present. Also, CT images of patients with internal metal objects using standard and MAR reconstruction algorithms were compared. Results: Comparing the standard and MAR reconstructed images of the phantom without metal, 95.0% of pixels were within ±35 HU and 98.0% of pixels were within ±85 HU. Also, the MAR reconstruction algorithm showed significant improvement in maintaining HUs of non-metallic regions in the images taken of the phantom with metal. HU Gamma analysis (2%, 2mm) of metal vs. non-metal phantom imaging using standard reconstruction resulted in an 84.8% pass rate compared to 96.6% for the MAR reconstructed images. CT images of patients with metal show significant artifact reduction when reconstructed with the MAR algorithm. Conclusion: CT imaging using the MAR reconstruction algorithm provides improved visualization of internal anatomy and more accurate HUs when metal is present compared to the standard reconstruction algorithm. MAR reconstructed CT images provide qualitative and quantitative improvements over current reconstruction algorithms, thus improving radiation

  4. Varying kVp as a means of reducing CT breast dose to pediatric patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, K. B.; Turner, A. C.; Khatonabadi, M.; McNitt-Gray, M. F.; Cagnon, C. H.; Cody, D. D.

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the possibility of reducing radiation dose to the breast tissue of pediatric females by using multiple tube voltages within a single CT examination. The peak kilovoltage (kVp) was adjusted when the x-ray beam was directly exposing the representative breast tissue of a 5-year-old, 10-year-old, and an adult female anthropomorphic phantom; this strategy was called kVp splitting and was emulated by using a different kVp over the anterior and posterior tube angles. Dose savings from kVp splitting were calculated relative to using a fixed kVp over all tube angles and the results indicated savings in all three phantoms when using 80 kVp over the posterior tube angles regardless of the anterior kVp. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with and without kVp splitting were performed to estimate absorbed breast dose in voxelized models constructed from the CT images of pediatric female patients; 80 kVp was used over the posterior tube angles. The MC simulations revealed breast dose savings of between 9.8% and 33% from using kVp splitting compared to simulations using a fixed kVp protocol with the anterior technique. Before this strategy could be implemented clinically, the development of suitable image reconstruction algorithms and the image quality of scans with kVp splitting would need further study.

  5. Automated segmentation of cardiac visceral fat in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Liang, Mingzhu; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac visceral fat was segmented from low-dose non-contrast chest CT images using a fully automated method. Cardiac visceral fat is defined as the fatty tissues surrounding the heart region, enclosed by the lungs and posterior to the sternum. It is measured by constraining the heart region with an Anatomy Label Map that contains robust segmentations of the lungs and other major organs and estimating the fatty tissue within this region. The algorithm was evaluated on 124 low-dose and 223 standard-dose non-contrast chest CT scans from two public datasets. Based on visual inspection, 343 cases had good cardiac visceral fat segmentation. For quantitative evaluation, manual markings of cardiac visceral fat regions were made in 3 image slices for 45 low-dose scans and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) was computed. The automated algorithm achieved an average DSC of 0.93. Cardiac visceral fat volume (CVFV), heart region volume (HRV) and their ratio were computed for each case. The correlation between cardiac visceral fat measurement and coronary artery and aortic calcification was also evaluated. Results indicated the automated algorithm for measuring cardiac visceral fat volume may be an alternative method to the traditional manual assessment of thoracic region fat content in the assessment of cardiovascular disease risk.

  6. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander, II; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution’s standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R^2  >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented.

  7. Automated detection and classification of interstitial lung diseases from low-dose CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Leader, Joseph K.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Sciurba, Frank C.; Gur, David

    2004-05-01

    We developed a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme to detect and quantitatively assess interstitial lung diseases (ILD) depicted on low-dose and multi-slice helical high-resolution computed tomography (CT) examinations. Eighteen CT cases acquired from patients who underwent routine low-dose whole-lung screening examinations for the detection of lung cancer were used to test the scheme. ILD was identified in all of these cases. The CAD scheme involves multiple steps to segment lung areas, identify suspicious ILD regions depicted on each CT slice, and generate volumetric ILD lesions by grouping and matching ILD regions detected on multiple adjacent slices. The scheme computes five "global" features for each identified ILD region, which include size (or volume), contrast, average local pixel value fluctuation, mean of stochastic fractal dimension, and geometric fractal dimension. Two sets of classification rules are applied to remove false-positive detections. The severity of ILD in each case was rated by one experienced chest radiologist into one of the three categories (mild, moderate, and severe). A distance-weighted k-nearest neighbor algorithm and round-robin validation method was applied to classify each testing case into one of the three categories of severity. In this experiment, the CAD scheme classified 78% (14 out of 18) cases into the same categories as rated by the radiologist.

  8. Computer-aided detection of early interstitial lung diseases using low-dose CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Tan, Jun; Wang, Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Leader, Joseph K.; Kim, Soo Hyung; Zheng, Bin

    2011-02-01

    This study aims to develop a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to detect early interstitial lung disease (ILD) using low-dose computed tomography (CT) examinations. The CAD scheme classifies each pixel depicted on the segmented lung areas into positive or negative groups for ILD using a mesh-grid-based region growth method and a multi-feature-based artificial neural network (ANN). A genetic algorithm was applied to select optimal image features and the ANN structure. In testing each CT examination, only pixels selected by the mesh-grid region growth method were analyzed and classified by the ANN to improve computational efficiency. All unselected pixels were classified as negative for ILD. After classifying all pixels into the positive and negative groups, CAD computed a detection score based on the ratio of the number of positive pixels to all pixels in the segmented lung areas, which indicates the likelihood of the test case being positive for ILD. When applying to an independent testing dataset of 15 positive and 15 negative cases, the CAD scheme yielded the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.884 ± 0.064) and 80.0% sensitivity at 85.7% specificity. The results demonstrated the feasibility of applying the CAD scheme to automatically detect early ILD using low-dose CT examinations.

  9. A Longitudinal Low Dose μCT Analysis of Bone Healing in Mice: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Di, Lu-Zhao; Couture, Vanessa; Leblanc, Elisabeth; Alinejad, Yasaman; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Lecomte, Roger; Berthod, François; Faucheux, Nathalie; Balg, Frédéric; Grenier, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Low dose microcomputed tomography (μCT) is a recently matured technique that enables the study of longitudinal bone healing and the testing of experimental treatments for bone repair. This imaging technique has been used for studying craniofacial repair in mice but not in an orthopedic context. This is mainly due to the size of the defects (approximately 1.0 mm) in long bone, which heal rapidly and may thus negatively impact the assessment of the effectiveness of experimental treatments. We developed a longitudinal low dose μCT scan analysis method combined with a new image segmentation and extraction software using Hounsfield unit (HU) scores to quantitatively monitor bone healing in small femoral cortical defects in live mice. We were able to reproducibly quantify bone healing longitudinally over time with three observers. We used high speed intramedullary reaming to prolong healing in order to circumvent the rapid healing typical of small defects. Bone healing prolongation combined with μCT imaging to study small bone defects in live mice thus shows potential as a promising tool for future preclinical research on bone healing. PMID:25431676

  10. Automated measurement of pulmonary artery in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Liang, Mingzhu; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    A new measurement of the pulmonary artery diameter is obtained where the artery may be robustly segmented between the heart and the artery bifurcation. An automated algorithm is presented that can make this pulmonary artery measurement in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images. The algorithm uses a cylinder matching method following geometric constraints obtained from other adjacent organs that have been previously segmented. This new measurement and the related ratio of pulmonary artery to aortic artery measurement are compared to traditional manual approaches for pulmonary artery characterization. The algorithm was qualitatively evaluated on 124 low-dose and 223 standard-dose non-contrast chest CT scans from two public datasets; 324 out of the 347 cases had good segmentations and in the other 23 cases there was significant boundary inaccuracy. For quantitative evaluation, the comparison was to manually marked pulmonary artery boundary in an axial slice in 45 cases; the resulting average Dice Similarity Coefficient was 0.88 (max 0.95, min 0.74). For the 45 cases with manual markings, the correlation between the automated pulmonary artery to ascending aorta diameter ratio and manual ratio at pulmonary artery bifurcation level was 0.81. Using Bland-Altman analysis, the mean difference of the two ratios was 0.03 and the limits of agreement was (-0.12, 0.18). This automated measurement may have utility as an alternative to the conventional manual measurement of pulmonary artery diameter at the bifurcation level especially in the context of noisy low-dose CT images.

  11. Size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) for a prototype orthopedic cone-beam CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Samuel; Packard, Nathan; Yorkston, John

    2014-03-01

    Patient specific dose evaluation and reporting is becoming increasingly important for x-ray imaging systems. Even imaging systems with lower patient dose such as CBCT scanners for extremities can benefit from accurate and size-specific dose assessment and reporting. This paper presents CTDI dose measurements performed on a prototype CBCT extremity imaging system across a range of body part sizes (5, 10, 16, and 20 cm effective diameter) and kVp (70, 80, and 90 kVp - with 0.1 mm Cu added filtration). The ratio of the CTDI measurements for the 5, 10, and 20 cm phantoms to the CTDI measurements for the 16 cm phantom were calculated and results were compared to size-specific dose estimates conversion factors (AAPM Report 204), which were evaluated on a conventional CT scanner. Due to the short scan nature of the system (220 degree acquisition angle), the dependence of CTDI values on the initial angular orientation of the phantom with respect to the imager was also evaluated. The study demonstrated that for a 220 degree acquisition sequence, the initial angular position of the conventional CTDI phantom with respect to the scanner does not significantly affect CTDI measurements (varying by less than 2% overall across the range of possible initial angular positions). The size-specific conversion factor was found to be comparable to the Report 204 factors for the large phantom size (20 cm) but lower, by up to 12%, for the 5 cm phantom (i.e., 1.35 for CBCT vs 1.54 for CT). The factors dependence on kVp was minimal, but dependence on kVp was most significant for smaller diameters. These results indicate that specific conversion factors need to be used for CBCT systems with short scans in order to provide more accurate dose reporting across the range of body sizes found in extremity scanners.

  12. Assessment of the dose reduction potential of a model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm using a task-based performance metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Samei, Ehsan; Richard, Samuel

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Different computed tomography (CT) reconstruction techniques offer different image quality attributes of resolution and noise, challenging the ability to compare their dose reduction potential against each other. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the task-based imaging performance of CT systems to enable the assessment of the dose performance of a model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) to that of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and a filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Methods: The ACR CT phantom (model 464) was imaged across a wide range of mA setting on a 64-slice CT scanner (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Waukesha, WI). Based on previous work, the resolution was evaluated in terms of a task-based modulation transfer function (MTF) using a circular-edge technique and images from the contrast inserts located in the ACR phantom. Noise performance was assessed in terms of the noise-power spectrum (NPS) measured from the uniform section of the phantom. The task-based MTF and NPS were combined with a task function to yield a task-based estimate of imaging performance, the detectability index (d′). The detectability index was computed as a function of dose for two imaging tasks corresponding to the detection of a relatively small and a relatively large feature (1.5 and 25 mm, respectively). The performance of MBIR in terms of the d′ was compared with that of ASIR and FBP to assess its dose reduction potential. Results: Results indicated that MBIR exhibits a variability spatial resolution with respect to object contrast and noise while significantly reducing image noise. The NPS measurements for MBIR indicated a noise texture with a low-pass quality compared to the typical midpass noise found in FBP-based CT images. At comparable dose, the d′ for MBIR was higher than those of FBP and ASIR by at least 61% and 19% for the small feature and the large feature tasks, respectively. Compared to FBP and ASIR, MBIR

  13. In vitro dose measurements in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Da; Padole, Atul; Li, Xinhua; Singh, Sarabjeet; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Lira, Diego; Liu, Tianyu; Shi, Jim Q.; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Xu, X. George; Liu, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a study of radiation dose measurements with a human cadaver scanned on a clinical CT scanner. Methods: Multiple point dose measurements were obtained with high-accuracy Thimble ionization chambers placed inside the stomach, liver, paravertebral gutter, ascending colon, left kidney, and urinary bladder of a human cadaver (183 cm in height and 67.5 kg in weight) whose abdomen/pelvis region was scanned repeatedly with a multidetector row CT. The flat energy response and precision of the dosimeters were verified, and the slight differences in each dosimeter's response were evaluated and corrected to attain high accuracy. In addition, skin doses were measured for radiosensitive organs outside the scanned region with OSL dosimeters: the right eye, thyroid, both nipples, and the right testicle. Three scan protocols were used, which shared most scan parameters but had different kVp and mA settings: 120-kVp automA, 120-kVp 300 mA, and 100-kVp 300 mA. For each protocol three repeated scans were performed. Results: The tube starting angle (TSA) was found to randomly vary around two major conditions, which caused large fluctuations in the repeated point dose measurements: for the 120-kVp 300 mA protocol this angle changed from approximately 110° to 290°, and caused 8% − 25% difference in the point dose measured at the stomach, liver, colon, and urinary bladder. When the fluctuations of the TSA were small (within 5°), the maximum coefficient of variance was approximately 3.3%. The soft tissue absorbed doses averaged from four locations near the center of the scanned region were 27.2 ± 3.3 and 16.5 ± 2.7 mGy for the 120 and 100-kVp fixed-mA scans, respectively. These values were consistent with the corresponding size specific dose estimates within 4%. The comparison of the per-100-mAs tissue doses from the three protocols revealed that: (1) dose levels at nonsuperficial locations in the TCM scans could not be accurately deduced by simply scaling the

  14. In vitro dose measurements in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Da; Padole, Atul; Li, Xinhua; Singh, Sarabjeet; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Lira, Diego; Shi, Jim Q.; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob; Liu, Tianyu; Xu, X. George

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To present a study of radiation dose measurements with a human cadaver scanned on a clinical CT scanner. Methods: Multiple point dose measurements were obtained with high-accuracy Thimble ionization chambers placed inside the stomach, liver, paravertebral gutter, ascending colon, left kidney, and urinary bladder of a human cadaver (183 cm in height and 67.5 kg in weight) whose abdomen/pelvis region was scanned repeatedly with a multidetector row CT. The flat energy response and precision of the dosimeters were verified, and the slight differences in each dosimeter's response were evaluated and corrected to attain high accuracy. In addition, skin doses were measured for radiosensitive organs outside the scanned region with OSL dosimeters: the right eye, thyroid, both nipples, and the right testicle. Three scan protocols were used, which shared most scan parameters but had different kVp and mA settings: 120-kVp automA, 120-kVp 300 mA, and 100-kVp 300 mA. For each protocol three repeated scans were performed. Results: The tube starting angle (TSA) was found to randomly vary around two major conditions, which caused large fluctuations in the repeated point dose measurements: for the 120-kVp 300 mA protocol this angle changed from approximately 110° to 290°, and caused 8% − 25% difference in the point dose measured at the stomach, liver, colon, and urinary bladder. When the fluctuations of the TSA were small (within 5°), the maximum coefficient of variance was approximately 3.3%. The soft tissue absorbed doses averaged from four locations near the center of the scanned region were 27.2 ± 3.3 and 16.5 ± 2.7 mGy for the 120 and 100-kVp fixed-mA scans, respectively. These values were consistent with the corresponding size specific dose estimates within 4%. The comparison of the per-100-mAs tissue doses from the three protocols revealed that: (1) dose levels at nonsuperficial locations in the TCM scans could not be accurately deduced by simply scaling the

  15. SU-E-I-85: Absorbed Dose Estimation for a Commercially Available MicroCT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, A; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y; Ren, L; Liu, H; Yang, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the simulated absorbed dose delivered for a typical scan from a commercially available microCT scanner in order to aid in the dose estimation. Methods: The simulations were conducted using the Geant4 Monte Carlo Toolkit (version 10) with the standard electromagnetic classes. The Quantum FX microCT scanner (PerkinElmer, Waltham, MA) was modeled incorporating the energy fluence and angular distributions of generated photons, spatial dimensions of nominal source-to-object and source-to-detector distances. The energy distribution was measured using a spectrometer (X-123CdTe, Amptek Inc., Bedford, USA) with a 300 angular spread from the source for the 90 kVp X-ray beams with no additional filtration. The nominal distances from the source to object consisted of three setups: 154.0 mm, 104.0 mm, and 51.96 mm. Our simulations recorded the dose absorbed in a cylindrical phantom of PMMA with a fixed length of 2 cm and varying radii (10, 20, 30 and 40 mm) using 100 million incident photons. The averaged absorbed dose in the object was then quantified for all setups. An exposure measurement of 417 mR was taken using a Radcal 9095 system utilizing 10×9–180 ion chamber with the given technique of 90 kVp, 63 μA, and 12 s. The exposure rate was also simulated with same setup to calculate the conversion factor of the beam current and the number of incident photons. Results: For a typical cone-beam scan with non-filtered 90kVp, the dose coefficients (the absorbed dose per mAs) were 2.614, 2.549 and 2.467 μGy/mAs under source to object distance of 104 mm for the object diameters of 10 mm, 20 mm and 30 mm, respectively. Conclusion: A look-up table was developed where an investigator can estimate the delivered dose using this particular microCT given the scanning protocol (kVp and mAs) as well as the size of the scanned object.

  16. Projection domain denoising method based on dictionary learning for low-dose CT image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Liyi; Sun, Yunshan; Zhang, Jingyu

    2015-01-01

    Reducing X-ray tube current is one of the widely used methods for decreasing the radiation dose. Unfortunately, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the projection data degrades simultaneously. To improve the quality of reconstructed images, a dictionary learning based penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) approach is proposed for sinogram denoising. The weighted least-squares considers the statistical characteristic of noise and the penalty models the sparsity of sinogram based on dictionary learning. Then reconstruct CT image using filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm from the denoised sinogram. The proposed method is particularly suitable for the projection data with low SNR. Experimental results show that the proposed method can get high-quality CT images when the signal to noise ratio of projection data declines sharply.

  17. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yakun; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Methods: A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDI{sub vol} and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. Results: The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose

  18. Estimation of paediatric organ and effective doses from dental cone beam CT using anthropomorphic phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Theodorakou, C; Walker, A; Horner, K; Pauwels, R; Bogaerts, R; Jacobs Dds, R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Cone beam CT (CBCT) is an emerging X-ray technology applied in dentomaxillofacial imaging. Previous published studies have estimated the effective dose and radiation risks using adult anthropomorphic phantoms for a wide range of CBCT units and imaging protocols. Methods Measurements were made five dental CBCT units for a range of imaging protocols, using 10-year-old and adolescent phantoms and thermoluminescent dosimeters. The purpose of the study was to estimate paediatric organ and effective doses from dental CBCT. Results The average effective doses to the 10-year-old and adolescent phantoms were 116 μSv and 79 μSv, respectively, which are similar to adult doses. The salivary glands received the highest organ dose and there was a fourfold increase in the thyroid dose of the 10-year-old relative to that of the adolescent because of its smaller size. The remainder tissues and salivary and thyroid glands contributed most significantly to the effective dose for a 10-year-old, whereas for an adolescent the remainder tissues and the salivary glands contributed the most significantly. It was found that the percentage attributable lifetime mortality risks were 0.002% and 0.001% for a 10-year-old and an adolescent patient, respectively, which are considerably higher than the risk to an adult having received the same doses. Conclusion It is therefore imperative that dental CBCT examinations on children should be fully justified over conventional X-ray imaging and that dose optimisation by field of view collimation is particularly important in young children. PMID:22308220

  19. The influence of patient centering on CT dose and image noise

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Thomas; Ge Zhanyu; Daly, Michael P.

    2007-07-15

    Although x-ray intensity shaping filters (bowtie filters) have been used since the introduction of some of the earliest CT scanner models, the clinical implications on dose and noise are not well understood. To achieve the intended dose and noise advantage requires the patient to be centered in the scan field of view. In this study we explore the implications of patient centering in clinical practice. We scanned various size and shape phantoms on a GE LightSpeed VCT scanner using each available source filter with the phantom centers positioned at 0, 3, and 6 cm below the center of rotation (isocenter). Surface doses were measured along with image noise over a large image region. Regression models of surface dose and noise were generated as a function of phantom size and centering error. Methods were also developed to determine the amount of miscentering using a scout scan projection radiograph (SPR). These models were then used to retrospectively evaluate 273 adult body patients for clinical implications. When miscentered by 3 and 6 cm, the surface dose on a 32 cm CTDI phantom increased by 18% and 41% while image noise also increased by 6% and 22%. The retrospective analysis of adult body scout SPR scans shows that 46% of patients were miscentered in elevation by 20-60 mm with a mean position 23 mm below the center of rotation (isocenter). The analysis indicated a surface dose penalty of up to 140% with a mean dose penalty of 33% assuming that tube current is increased to compensate for the increased noise due to miscentering. Clinical image quality and dose efficiency can be improved on scanners with bowtie filters if care is exercised when positioning patients. Automatically providing patient specific centering and scan parameter selection information can help the technologist improve workflow, achieve more consistent image quality and reduce patient dose.

  20. The influence of patient centering on CT dose and image noise.

    PubMed

    Toth, Thomas; Ge, Zhanyu; Daly, Michael P

    2007-07-01

    Although x-ray intensity shaping filters (bowtie filters) have been used since the introduction of some of the earliest CT scanner models, the clinical implications on dose and noise are not well understood. To achieve the intended dose and noise advantage requires the patient to be centered in the scan field of view. In this study we explore the implications of patient centering in clinical practice. We scanned various size and shape phantoms on a GE LightSpeed VCT scanner using each available source filter with the phantom centers positioned at 0, 3, and 6 cm below the center of rotation (isocenter). Surface doses were measured along with image noise over a large image region. Regression models of surface dose and noise were generated as a function of phantom size and centering error. Methods were also developed to determine the amount of miscentering using a scout scan projection radiograph (SPR). These models were then used to retrospectively evaluate 273 adult body patients for clinical implications. When miscentered by 3 and 6 cm, the surface dose on a 32 cm CTDI phantom increased by 18% and 41% while image noise also increased by 6% and 22%. The retrospective analysis of adult body scout SPR scans shows that 46% of patients were miscentered in elevation by 20-60 mm with a mean position 23 mm below the center of rotation (isocenter). The analysis indicated a surface dose penalty of up to 140% with a mean dose penalty of 33% assuming that tube current is increased to compensate for the increased noise due to miscentering. Clinical image quality and dose efficiency can be improved on scanners with bowtie filters if care is exercised when positioning patients. Automatically providing patient specific centering and scan parameter selection information can help the technologist improve workflow, achieve more consistent image quality and reduce patient dose.

  1. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography perfusion using spatial-temporal Bayesian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ruogu; Raj, Ashish; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2012-03-01

    In current computed tomography (CT) examinations, the associated X-ray radiation dose is of significant concern to patients and operators, especially CT perfusion (CTP) imaging that has higher radiation dose due to its cine scanning technique. A simple and cost-effective means to perform the examinations is to lower the milliampere-seconds (mAs) parameter as low as reasonably achievable in data acquisition. However, lowering the mAs parameter will unavoidably increase data noise and degrade CT perfusion maps greatly if no adequate noise control is applied during image reconstruction. To capture the essential dynamics of CT perfusion, a simple spatial-temporal Bayesian method that uses a piecewise parametric model of the residual function is used, and then the model parameters are estimated from a Bayesian formulation of prior smoothness constraints on perfusion parameters. From the fitted residual function, reliable CTP parameter maps are obtained from low dose CT data. The merit of this scheme exists in the combination of analytical piecewise residual function with Bayesian framework using a simpler prior spatial constrain for CT perfusion application. On a dataset of 22 patients, this dynamic spatial-temporal Bayesian model yielded an increase in signal-tonoise-ratio (SNR) of 78% and a decrease in mean-square-error (MSE) of 40% at low dose radiation of 43mA.

  2. Biplane interventional pediatric system with cone-beam CT: dose and image quality characterization for the default protocols.

    PubMed

    Corredoira, Eva; Vañó, Eliseo; Alejo, Luis; Ubeda, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Larraya, Federico; Garayoa, Julia

    2016-07-08

    The aim of this study was to assess image quality and radiation dose of a biplane angiographic system with cone-beam CT (CBCT) capability tuned for pediatric cardiac procedures. The results of this study can be used to explore dose reduction techniques. For pulsed fluoroscopy and cine modes, polymethyl methacrylate phantoms of various thicknesses and a Leeds TOR 18-FG test object were employed. Various fields of view (FOV) were selected. For CBCT, the study employed head and body dose phantoms, Catphan 504, and an anthropomorphic cardiology phantom. The study also compared two 3D rotational angiography protocols. The entrance surface air kerma per frame increases by a factor of 3-12 when comparing cine and fluoroscopy frames. The biggest difference in the signal-to- noise ratio between fluoroscopy and cine modes occurs at FOV 32 cm because fluoroscopy is acquired at a 1440 × 1440 pixel matrix size and in unbinned mode, whereas cine is acquired at 720 × 720 pixels and in binned mode. The high-contrast spatial resolution of cine is better than that of fluoroscopy, except for FOV 32 cm, because fluoroscopy mode with 32 cm FOV is unbinned. Acquiring CBCT series with a 16 cm head phantom using the standard dose protocol results in a threefold dose increase compared with the low-dose protocol. Although the amount of noise present in the images acquired with the low-dose protocol is much higher than that obtained with the standard mode, the images present better spatial resolution. A 1 mm diameter rod with 250 Hounsfield units can be distinguished in reconstructed images with an 8 mm slice width. Pediatric-specific protocols provide lower doses while maintaining sufficient image quality. The system offers a novel 3D imaging mode. The acquisition of CBCT images results in increased doses administered to the patients, but also provides further diagnostic information contained in the volumetric images. The assessed CBCT protocols provide images that are noisy, but with

  3. Biplane interventional pediatric system with cone-beam CT: dose and image quality characterization for the default protocols.

    PubMed

    Corredoira, Eva; Vañó, Eliseo; Alejo, Luis; Ubeda, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Larraya, Federico; Garayoa, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess image quality and radiation dose of a biplane angiographic system with cone-beam CT (CBCT) capability tuned for pediatric cardiac procedures. The results of this study can be used to explore dose reduction techniques. For pulsed fluoroscopy and cine modes, polymethyl methacrylate phantoms of various thicknesses and a Leeds TOR 18-FG test object were employed. Various fields of view (FOV) were selected. For CBCT, the study employed head and body dose phantoms, Catphan 504, and an anthropomorphic cardiology phantom. The study also compared two 3D rotational angiography protocols. The entrance surface air kerma per frame increases by a factor of 3-12 when comparing cine and fluoroscopy frames. The biggest difference in the signal-to- noise ratio between fluoroscopy and cine modes occurs at FOV 32 cm because fluoroscopy is acquired at a 1440 × 1440 pixel matrix size and in unbinned mode, whereas cine is acquired at 720 × 720 pixels and in binned mode. The high-contrast spatial resolution of cine is better than that of fluoroscopy, except for FOV 32 cm, because fluoroscopy mode with 32 cm FOV is unbinned. Acquiring CBCT series with a 16 cm head phantom using the standard dose protocol results in a threefold dose increase compared with the low-dose protocol. Although the amount of noise present in the images acquired with the low-dose protocol is much higher than that obtained with the standard mode, the images present better spatial resolution. A 1 mm diameter rod with 250 Hounsfield units can be distinguished in reconstructed images with an 8 mm slice width. Pediatric-specific protocols provide lower doses while maintaining sufficient image quality. The system offers a novel 3D imaging mode. The acquisition of CBCT images results in increased doses administered to the patients, but also provides further diagnostic information contained in the volumetric images. The assessed CBCT protocols provide images that are noisy, but with

  4. Effect of Bismuth Breast Shielding on Radiation Dose and Image Quality in Coronary CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Elliston, Carl D.; Groves, Daniel W.; Cheng, Bin; Wolff, Steven D.; Pearson, Gregory D. N.; Peters, M. Robert; Johnson, Lynne L.; Bokhari, Sabahat; Johnson, Gary W.; Bhatia, Ketan; Pozniakoff, Theodore; Brenner, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) is associated with high radiation dose to the female breasts. Bismuth breast shielding offers the potential to significantly reduce dose to the breasts and nearby organs, but the magnitude of this reduction and its impact on image quality and radiation dose have not been evaluated. Methods Radiation doses from CCTA to critical organs were determined using metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors positioned in a customized anthropomorphic whole-body dosimetry verification phantom. Image noise and signal were measured in regions of interest (ROIs) including the coronary arteries. Results With bismuth shielding, breast radiation dose was reduced 46–57% depending on breast size and scanning technique, with more moderate dose reduction to the heart, lungs, and esophagus. However, shielding significantly decreased image signal (by 14.6 HU) and contrast (by 28.4 HU), modestly but significantly increased image noise in ROIs in locations of coronary arteries, and decreased contrast-to-noise ratio by 20.9%.. Conclusions While bismuth breast shielding can significantly decrease radiation dose to critical organs, it is associated with an increase in image noise, decrease in contrast-to-noise, and changes tissue attenuation characteristics in the location of the coronary arteries. PMID:22068687

  5. A hybrid approach for rapid, accurate, and direct kilovoltage radiation dose calculations in CT voxel space

    SciTech Connect

    Kouznetsov, Alexei; Tambasco, Mauro

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a fast and accurate method that uses computed tomography (CT) voxel data to estimate absorbed radiation dose at a point of interest (POI) or series of POIs from a kilovoltage (kV) imaging procedure. Methods: The authors developed an approach that computes absorbed radiation dose at a POI by numerically evaluating the linear Boltzmann transport equation (LBTE) using a combination of deterministic and Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. This hybrid approach accounts for material heterogeneity with a level of accuracy comparable to the general MC algorithms. Also, the dose at a POI is computed within seconds using the Intel Core i7 CPU 920 2.67 GHz quad core architecture, and the calculations are performed using CT voxel data, making it flexible and feasible for clinical applications. To validate the method, the authors constructed and acquired a CT scan of a heterogeneous block phantom consisting of a succession of slab densities: Tissue (1.29 cm), bone (2.42 cm), lung (4.84 cm), bone (1.37 cm), and tissue (4.84 cm). Using the hybrid transport method, the authors computed the absorbed doses at a set of points along the central axis and x direction of the phantom for an isotropic 125 kVp photon spectral point source located along the central axis 92.7 cm above the phantom surface. The accuracy of the results was compared to those computed with MCNP, which was cross-validated with EGSnrc, and served as the benchmark for validation. Results: The error in the depth dose ranged from -1.45% to +1.39% with a mean and standard deviation of -0.12% and 0.66%, respectively. The error in the x profile ranged from -1.3% to +0.9%, with standard deviations of -0.3% and 0.5%, respectively. The number of photons required to achieve these results was 1x10{sup 6}. Conclusions: The voxel-based hybrid method evaluates the LBTE rapidly and accurately to estimate the absorbed x-ray dose at any POI or series of POIs from a kV imaging procedure.

  6. Effective dose of cone beam CT (CBCT) of the facial skeleton: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Okshi, A; Salé, H; Gunnarsson, M; Rohlin, M

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate effective dose of cone beam CT (CBCT) of the facial skeleton with focus on measurement methods and scanning protocols. Methods: A systematic review, which adhered to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews (PRISMA) Statement, of the literature up to April 2014 was conducted. Data sources included MEDLINE®, The Cochrane Library and Web of Science. A model was developed to underpin data extraction from 38 included studies. Results: Technical specifications of the CBCT units were insufficiently described. Heterogeneity in measurement methods and scanning protocols between studies made comparisons of effective doses of different CBCT units and scanning protocols difficult. Few studies related doses to image quality. Reported effective dose varied across studies, ranging between 9.7 and 197.0 μSv for field of views (FOVs) with height ≤5 cm, between 3.9 and 674.0 μSv for FOVs of heights 5.1–10.0 cm and between 8.8 and 1073.0 μSv for FOVs >10 cm. There was an inconsistency regarding reported effective dose of studies of the same CBCT unit with the same FOV dimensions. Conclusion: The review reveals a need for studies on radiation dosages related to image quality. Reporting quality of future studies has to be improved to facilitate comparison of effective doses obtained from examinations with different CBCT units and scanning protocols. A model with minimum data set on important parameters based on this observation is proposed. Advances in knowledge: Data important when estimating effective dose were insufficiently reported in most studies. A model with minimum data based on this observation is proposed. Few studies related effective dose to image quality. PMID:25486387

  7. Evaluation of radiation dose of triple rule-out coronary angiography protocols with different scan length using 256-slice CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chia-Jung; Lee, Jason J. S.; Chen, Liang-Kuang; Mok, Greta S. P.; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2011-10-01

    Triple rule-out coronary CT angiography (TRO-CTA) is a new approach for providing noninvasive visualization of coronary arteries with simultaneous evaluation of pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta and other intrathoracic structures. The increasing use of TRO-CTA examination with longer scan length is associated with the concerns about radiation dose and their corresponding cancer risk. The purpose of this study is to evaluate organ dose and effective dose for the TRO-CTA examination with 2 scan lengths: TRO std and TRO ext, using 256-slice CT. TRO-CTA examinations were performed on a 256-slice CT scanner without ECG-based tube current modulation. Absorbed organ doses were measured using an anthropomorphic phantom and thermal-luminance dosimeters (TLDs). Effective dose was determined by taking a sum of the measured absorbed organ doses multiplied with the tissue weighting factor based on ICRP-103, and compared to that calculated using the dose-length product (DLP) method. We obtained high organ doses in the thyroid, esophagus, breast, heart and lung in both TRO-CTA protocols. Effective doses of the TRO std and TRO ext protocols with the phantom method were 26.37 and 42.49 mSv, while those with the DLP method were 19.68 and 38.96 mSv, respectively. Our quantitative dose information establishes a relationship between radiation dose and scanning length, and can provide a practical guidance to best clinical practice.

  8. SU-E-I-63: Quantitative Evaluation of the Effects of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (OMAR) Software On CT Images for Radiotherapy Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jani, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: CT simulation for patients with metal implants can often be challenging due to artifacts that obscure tumor/target delineation and normal organ definition. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction (OMAR), a commercially available software, in reducing metal-induced artifacts and its effect on computed dose during treatment planning. Methods: CT images of water surrounding metallic cylindrical rods made of aluminum, copper and iron were studied in terms of Hounsfield Units (HU) spread. Metal-induced artifacts were characterized in terms of HU/Volume Histogram (HVH) using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Effects of OMAR on enhancing our ability to delineate organs on CT and subsequent dose computation were examined in nine (9) patients with hip implants and two (2) patients with breast tissue expanders. Results: Our study characterized water at 1000 HU with a standard deviation (SD) of about 20 HU. The HVHs allowed us to evaluate how the presence of metal changed the HU spread. For example, introducing a 2.54 cm diameter copper rod in water increased the SD in HU of the surrounding water from 20 to 209, representing an increase in artifacts. Subsequent use of OMAR brought the SD down to 78. Aluminum produced least artifacts whereas Iron showed largest amount of artifacts. In general, an increase in kVp and mA during CT scanning showed better effectiveness of OMAR in reducing artifacts. Our dose analysis showed that some isodose contours shifted by several mm with OMAR but infrequently and were nonsignificant in planning process. Computed volumes of various dose levels showed <2% change. Conclusions: In our experience, OMAR software greatly reduced the metal-induced CT artifacts for the majority of patients with implants, thereby improving our ability to delineate tumor and surrounding organs. OMAR had a clinically negligible effect on computed dose within tissues. Partially funded by unrestricted

  9. Dose measurements for dental cone-beam CT: a comparison with MSCT and panoramic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deman, P.; Atwal, P.; Duzenli, C.; Thakur, Y.; Ford, N. L.

    2014-06-01

    To date there is a lack of published information on appropriate methods to determine patient doses from dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) equipment. The goal of this study is to apply and extend the methods recommended in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report 111 for CBCT equipment to characterize dose and effective dose for a range of dental imaging equipment. A protocol derived from the one proposed by Dixon et al (2010 Technical Report 111, American Association of Physicist in Medicine, MD, USA), was applied to dose measurements of multi-slice CT, dental CBCT (small and large fields of view (FOV)) and a dental panoramic system. The computed tomography dose index protocol was also performed on the MSCT to compare both methods. The dose distributions in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom were characterized using a thimble ionization chamber and Gafchromic™ film (beam profiles). Gafchromic™ films were used to measure the dose distribution in an anthropomorphic phantom. A method was proposed to extend dose estimates to planes superior and inferior to the central plane. The dose normalized to 100 mAs measured in the center of the phantom for the large FOV dental CBCT (11.4 mGy/100 mAs) is two times lower than that of MSCT (20.7 mGy/100 mAs) for the same FOV, but approximately 15 times higher than for a panoramic system (0.6 mGy/100 mAs). The effective dose per scan (in clinical conditions) found for the dental CBCT are 167.60 ± 3.62, 61.30 ± 3.88 and 92.86 ± 7.76 mSv for the Kodak 9000 (fixed scan length of 3.7 cm), and the iCAT Next Generation for 6 cm and 13 cm scan lengths respectively. The method to extend the dose estimates from the central slice to superior and inferior slices indicates a good agreement between theory and measurement. The Gafchromic™ films provided useful beam profile data and 2D distributions of dose in phantom.

  10. Reduction of truncation artifacts in CT images via a discriminative dictionary representation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Li, Ke; Li, Yinsheng; Hsieh, Jiang; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-04-01

    When the scan field of view (SFOV) of a CT system is not large enough to enclose the entire cross-section of a patient, or the patient needs to be intentionally positioned partially outside the SFOV for certain clinical CT scans, truncation artifacts are often observed in the reconstructed CT images. Conventional wisdom to reduce truncation artifacts is to complete the truncated projection data via data extrapolation with different a priori assumptions. This paper presents a novel truncation artifact reduction method that directly works in the CT image domain. Specifically, a discriminative dictionary that includes a sub-dictionary of truncation artifacts and a sub-dictionary of non-artifact image information was used to separate a truncation artifact-contaminated image into two sub-images, one with reduced truncation artifacts, and the other one containing only the truncation artifacts. Both experimental phantom and retrospective human subject studies have been performed to characterize the performance of the proposed truncation artifact reduction method.

  11. An automated technique for estimating patient-specific regional imparted energy and dose in TCM CT exams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jeremiah W.; Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. Paul; Boone, John; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    Currently computed tomography (CT) dosimetry relies on CT dose index (CTDI) and size specific dose estimates (SSDE). Organ dose is a better metric of radiation burden. However, organ dose estimation requires precise knowledge of organ locations. Regional imparted energy and dose can also be used to quantify radiation burden. Estimating the imparted energy from CT exams is beneficial in that it does not require precise estimates of the organ size or location. This work investigated an automated technique for retrospectively estimating the imparted energy from chest and abdominopelvic tube current modulated (TCM) CT exams. Monte Carlo simulations of chest and abdominopelvic TCM CT examinations across various tube potentials and TCM strengths were performed on 58 adult computational extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms to develop relationships between scanned mass and imparted energy normalized by dose length product (DLP). An automated algorithm for calculating the scanned patient volume was further developed using an open source mesh generation toolbox. The scanned patient volume was then used to estimate the scanned mass accounting for diverse density within the scan region. The scanned mass and DLP from the exam were used to estimate the imparted energy to the patient using the knowledgebase developed from the Monte Carlo simulations. Patientspecific imparted energy estimates were made from 20 chest and 20 abdominopelvic clinical CT exams. The average imparted energy was 274 +/- 141 mJ and 681 +/- 376 mJ for the chest and abdominopelvic exams, respectively. This method can be used to estimate the regional imparted energy and/or regional dose in chest and abdominopelvic TCM CT exams across clinical operations.

  12. Evaluation of radiation dose and image quality of CT scan for whole-body pediatric PET/CT: A phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Liu, Shu-Hsin; Mok, Greta S. P.; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to tailor the CT imaging protocols for pediatric patients undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations with appropriate attention to radiation exposure while maintaining adequate image quality for anatomic delineation of PET findings and attenuation correction of PET emission data. Methods: The measurements were made by using three anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children with tube voltages of 80, 100, and 120 kVp, tube currents of 10, 40, 80, and 120 mA, and exposure time of 0.5 s at 1.75:1 pitch. Radiation dose estimates were derived from the dose-length product and were used to calculate risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer. The influence of image noise on image contrast and attenuation map for CT scans were evaluated based on Pearson's correlation coefficient and covariance, respectively. Multiple linear regression methods were used to investigate the effects of patient age, tube voltage, and tube current on radiation-induced cancer risk and image noise for CT scans. Results: The effective dose obtained using three anthropomorphic phantoms and 12 combinations of kVp and mA ranged from 0.09 to 4.08 mSv. Based on our results, CT scans acquired with 80 kVp/60 mA, 80 kVp/80 mA, and 100 kVp/60 mA could be performed on 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children, respectively, to minimize cancer risk due to CT scans while maintaining the accuracy of attenuation map and CT image contrast. The effective doses of the proposed protocols for 1-, 5- and 10-year-old children were 0.65, 0.86, and 1.065 mSv, respectively. Conclusions: Low-dose pediatric CT protocols were proposed to balance the tradeoff between radiation-induced cancer risk and image quality for patients ranging in age from 1 to 10 years old undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations.

  13. Energy and dose considerations for diffraction enhanced CT in small animal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Dean; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Parham, Christopher; Kao, Teresa; Zhong, Zhong

    2007-03-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) uses monochromatic x-rays coupled to an analyzer crystal to extract information about the refraction of x-rays within the object. Studies of excised biological tissues show that DEI has significant contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) advantages for soft tissue when compared to standard radiography. DEI differs from conventional CT in that its refraction contrast depends on x-ray energy as 1/E, thus the energy and dose considerations for conventional CT will be inappropriate. The goal of this study was to assess the optimal energy for in vivo CT imaging of a mouse head to obtain the largest soft tissue refraction CNR. Through a theoretical model, optimum refraction CNR for mouse brain imaging was found to be about 20 keV. The findings were tested experimentally using the DEI system at the X15A beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source. Using the parameters for optimized refraction CNR (20 keV, silicon [333] reflection), large image artifacts were caused by DEI's scatter-rejection properties. By increasing the x-ray energy and using a lower order diffraction, silicon [111], soft tissue features within the brain, including the hippocampus, could be resolved.

  14. Estimation of organ doses from kilovoltage cone-beam CT imaging used during radiotherapy patient position verification

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, Daniel E.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a practical method for estimating organ doses from kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) that can be performed with readily available phantoms and dosimeters. The accuracy of organ dose estimates made using the ImPACT patient dose calculator was also evaluated. Methods: A 100 mm pencil chamber and standard CT dose index (CTDI) phantoms were used to measure the cone-beam dose index (CBDI). A weighted CBDI (CBDI{sup w}) was then calculated from these measurements to represent the average volumetric dose in the CTDI phantom. By comparing CBDI{sup w} to the previously published organ doses, organ dose conversion coefficients were developed. The measured CBDI values were also used as inputs for the ImPACT calculator to estimate organ doses. All CBDI dose measurements were performed on both the Elekta XVI and Varian OBI at three clinically relevant locations: Head, chest, and pelvis. Results: The head, chest, and pelvis protocols yielded CBDI{sup w} values of 0.98, 16.62, and 24.13 mGy for the XVI system and 5.17, 6.14, and 21.57 mGy for the OBI system, respectively. Organ doses estimated with the ImPACT CT dose calculator showed a large range of variation from the previously measured organ doses, demonstrating its limitations for use with CBCT. Conclusions: The organ dose conversion coefficients developed in this work relate CBDI{sup w} values to organ doses previously measured using the same clinical protocols. Ultimately, these coefficients will allow for the quick estimation of organ doses from routine measurements performed using standard CTDI phantoms and pencil chambers.

  15. SU-E-I-36: A KWIC and Dirty Look at Dose Savings and Perfusion Metrics in Simulated CT Neuro Perfusion Exams

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J; Martin, T; Young, S; McNitt-Gray, M; Wang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: CT neuro perfusion scans are one of the highest dose exams. Methods to reduce dose include decreasing the number of projections acquired per gantry rotation, however conventional reconstruction of such scans leads to sampling artifacts. In this study we investigated a projection view-sharing reconstruction algorithm used in dynamic MRI – “K-space Weighted Image Contrast” (KWIC) – applied to simulated perfusion exams and evaluated dose savings and impacts on perfusion metrics. Methods: A FORBILD head phantom containing simulated time-varying objects was developed and a set of parallel-beam CT projection data was created. The simulated scans were 60 seconds long, 1152 projections per turn, with a rotation time of one second. No noise was simulated. 5mm, 10mm, and 50mm objects were modeled in the brain. A baseline, “full dose” simulation used all projections and reduced dose cases were simulated by downsampling the number of projections per turn from 1152 to 576 (50% dose), 288 (25% dose), and 144 (12.5% dose). KWIC was further evaluated at 72 projections per rotation (6.25%). One image per second was reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP) and KWIC. KWIC reconstructions utilized view cores of 36, 72, 144, and 288 views and 16, 8, 4, and 2 subapertures respectively. From the reconstructed images, time-to-peak (TTP), cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the FWHM of the perfusion curve were calculated and compared against reference values from the full-dose FBP data. Results: TTP, CBF, and the FWHM were unaffected by dose reduction (to 12.5%) and reconstruction method, however image quality was improved when using KWIC. Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that KWIC preserves image quality and perfusion metrics when under-sampling projections and that the unique contrast weighting of KWIC could provided substantial dose-savings for perfusion CT scans. Evaluation of KWIC in clinical CT data will be performed in the near future. R01 EB014922, NCI

  16. Cardiac computed tomography radiation dose reduction using interior reconstruction algorithm with the aorta and vertebra as known information.

    PubMed

    Bharkhada, Deepak; Yu, Hengyong; Ge, Shuping; Carr, J Jeffrey; Wang, Ge

    2009-01-01

    High x-ray radiation dose is a major public concern with the increasing use of multidetector computed tomography (CT) for diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. This issue must be effectively addressed by dose-reduction techniques. Recently, our group proved that an internal region of interest (ROI) can be exactly reconstructed solely from localized projections if a small subregion within the ROI is known. In this article, we propose to use attenuation values of the blood in aorta and vertebral bone to serve as the known information for localized cardiac CT. First, we describe a novel interior tomography approach that backprojects differential fan-beam or parallel-beam projections to obtain the Hilbert transform and then reconstructs the original image in an ROI using the iterative projection onto convex sets algorithm. Then, we develop a numerical phantom based on clinical cardiac CT images for simulations. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to use practical prior information and exactly reconstruct cardiovascular structures only from projection data along x-ray paths through the ROI.

  17. Influence of difference in cross-sectional dose profile in a CTDI phantom on X-ray CT dose estimation: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Haba, Tomonobu; Koyama, Shuji; Ida, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    The longitudinal dose profile in a computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom had been studied by many researchers. The cross-sectional dose profile in the CTDI phantom, however, has not been studied. It is also important to understand the cross-sectional dose profile in the CTDI phantom for dose estimation in X-ray CT. In this study, the cross-sectional dose profile in the CTDI phantom was calculated by use of a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method. A helical or a 320-detector-row cone-beam X-ray CT scanner was simulated. The cross-sectional dose profile in the CTDI phantom from surface to surface through the center point was calculated by MC simulation. The shape of the calculation region was a cylinder of 1-mm-diameter. The length of the cylinder was 23, 100, or 300 mm to represent various CT ionization chamber lengths. Detailed analyses of the energy depositions demonstrated that the cross-sectional dose profile was different in measurement methods and phantom sizes. In this study, we also focused on the validation of the weighting factor used in weighted CTDI (CTDI w ). As it stands now, the weighting factor used in CTDI w is (1/3, 2/3) for the (central, peripheral) axes. Our results showed that an equal weighting factor, which is (1/2, 1/2) for the (central, peripheral) axes, is more suitable to estimate the average cross-sectional dose when X-ray CT dose estimation is performed.

  18. Adaptive Tensor-Based Principal Component Analysis for Low-Dose CT Image Denoising

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Danni; Yang, Jian; Fan, Jingfan; Cong, Weijian; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has a revolutionized diagnostic radiology but involves large radiation doses that directly impact image quality. In this paper, we propose adaptive tensor-based principal component analysis (AT-PCA) algorithm for low-dose CT image denoising. Pixels in the image are presented by their nearby neighbors, and are modeled as a patch. Adaptive searching windows are calculated to find similar patches as training groups for further processing. Tensor-based PCA is used to obtain transformation matrices, and coefficients are sequentially shrunk by the linear minimum mean square error. Reconstructed patches are obtained, and a denoised image is finally achieved by aggregating all of these patches. The experimental results of the standard test image show that the best results are obtained with two denoising rounds according to six quantitative measures. For the experiment on the clinical images, the proposed AT-PCA method can suppress the noise, enhance the edge, and improve the image quality more effectively than NLM and KSVD denoising methods. PMID:25993566

  19. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jessie Y; Kerns, James R; Nute, Jessica L; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A; Stingo, Francesco C; Followill, David S; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE's monochromatic Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings, and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios. PMID:25585685

  20. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Kerns, James R.; Nute, Jessica L.; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Followill, David S.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2015-02-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios.

  1. Contrast adaptive total p-norm variation minimization approach to CT reconstruction for artifact reduction in reduced-view brain perfusion CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Won; Kim, Jong-Hyo

    2011-03-01

    Perfusion CT (PCT) examinations are getting more frequently used for diagnosis of acute brain diseases such as hemorrhage and infarction, because the functional map images it produces such as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and mean transit time (MTT) may provide critical information in the emergency work-up of patient care. However, a typical PCT scans the same slices several tens of times after injection of contrast agent, which leads to much increased radiation dose and is inevitability of growing concern for radiation-induced cancer risk. Reducing the number of views in projection in combination of TV minimization reconstruction technique is being regarded as an option for radiation reduction. However, reconstruction artifacts due to insufficient number of X-ray projections become problematic especially when high contrast enhancement signals are present or patient's motion occurred. In this study, we present a novel reconstruction technique using contrast-adaptive TpV minimization that can reduce reconstruction artifacts effectively by using different p-norms in high contrast and low contrast objects. In the proposed method, high contrast components are first reconstructed using thresholded projection data and low p-norm total variation to reflect sparseness in both projection and reconstruction spaces. Next, projection data are modified to contain only low contrast objects by creating projection data of reconstructed high contrast components and subtracting them from original projection data. Then, the low contrast projection data are reconstructed by using relatively high p-norm TV minimization technique, and are combined with the reconstructed high contrast component images to produce final reconstructed images. The proposed algorithm was applied to numerical phantom and a clinical data set of brain PCT exam, and the resultant images were compared with those using filtered back projection (FBP) and conventional TV

  2. Order of magnitude dose reduction in intraoral radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kircos, L.T.; Angin, L.L.; Lorton, L.

    1987-03-01

    This comparative clinical investigation concerns the radiation dose from intraoral radiography using E-speed film and rectangular and circular beam collimation. Dose to organs not of diagnostic importance (brain, lens of the eye, thyroid, and breast) is reduced by approximately an order of magnitude when rectangular collimation and E-speed film are used in periapical radiography. And dose to the thyroid and breast is further reduced by a third with the use of a full leaded apron and thyroid shield.

  3. Analytical equations for CT dose profiles derived using a scatter kernel of Monte Carlo parentage with broad applicability to CT dosimetry problems

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Robert L.; Boone, John M.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of the complete axial dose profile f(z), including its long scatter tails, provides the most complete (and flexible) description of the accumulated dose in CT scanning. The CTDI paradigm (including CTDI{sub vol}) requires shift-invariance along z (identical dose profiles spaced at equal intervals), and is therefore inapplicable to many of the new and complex shift-variant scan protocols, e.g., high dose perfusion studies using variable (or zero) pitch. In this work, a convolution-based beam model developed by Dixon et al.[Med. Phys. 32, 3712-3728, (2005)] updated with a scatter LSF kernel (or DSF) derived from a Monte Carlo simulation by Boone [Med. Phys. 36, 4547-4554 (2009)] is used to create an analytical equation for the axial dose profile f(z) in a cylindrical phantom. Using f(z), equations are derived which provide the analytical description of conventional (axial and helical) dose, demonstrating its physical underpinnings; and likewise for the peak axial dose f(0) appropriate to stationary phantom cone beam CT, (SCBCT). The methodology can also be applied to dose calculations in shift-variant scan protocols. This paper is an extension of our recent work Dixon and Boone [Med. Phys. 37, 2703-2718 (2010)], which dealt only with the properties of the peak dose f(0), its relationship to CTDI, and its appropriateness to SCBCT. Methods: The experimental beam profile data f(z) of Mori et al.[Med. Phys. 32, 1061-1069 (2005)] from a 256 channel prototype cone beam scanner for beam widths (apertures) ranging from a = 28 to 138 mm are used to corroborate the theoretical axial profiles in a 32 cm PMMA body phantom. Results: The theoretical functions f(z) closely-matched the central axis experimental profile data{sup 11} for all apertures (a = 28 -138 mm). Integration of f(z) likewise yields analytical equations for all the (CTDI-based) dosimetric quantities of conventional CT (including CTDI{sub L} itself) in addition to the peak dose f(0) relevant to

  4. CT metal artefact reduction of total knee prostheses using angled gantry multiplanar reformation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mark; Toms, Andoni P; Reid, Karen; Bugg, William

    2010-08-01

    This study was designed to determine whether or not acquiring CT images of total knee prostheses by using an angled gantry and multiplanar reformation can reduce beam hardening artefact. A CT phantom was created with a total knee prosthesis suspended in gelatine with a known attenuation. CT data was acquired with a gantry angled at 0 degrees, 5 degrees, 10 degrees and 15 degrees in both craniocaudal oblique planes. Axial images where then reformatted from these datasets. Two independent observers selected regions of interest to measure the mean and standard deviation (SD) of attenuation in the gelatine for all reformatted axial images. Artefact was measured as SD of the background attenuation and areas under the curve of SD for each gantry angle acquisition were compared. Inter-observer reliability was excellent (ICC=0.89, CI 0.875-0.908). The most accurate mean attenuation values for tissues around a TKR were obtained with a CT gantry using 10 degrees to 15 degrees anteroinferior to posterosuperior angulation. The smallest area under the curve for SD of attenuation for the whole prosthesis, and the femoral component in isolation, was obtained with a 5 degrees gantry angle in the same direction. The smallest area under the curve for the tibial component in isolation occurred with a gantry angle of 15 degrees. We conclude that acquiring CT data with a gantry angle can reduce metal artefact around a TKR. Optimal overall metal artefact reduction can be achieved with a small angle from anteroinferior to posterosuperior. Further selective artefact reduction around the tibial component can be achieved with larger angles.

  5. Implications of artefacts reduction in the planning CT originating from implanted fiducial markers.

    PubMed

    Kassim, Iskandar; Joosten, Hans; Barnhoorn, Jaco C; Heijmen, Ben J M; Dirkx, Maarten L P

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of metal artefact reduction (MAR) software to suppress artefacts in reconstructed computed tomography (CT) images originating from small metal objects, like tumor markers and surgical clips, was evaluated. In addition, possible implications of using digital reconstructed radiographs (DRRs), based on the MAR CT images, for setup verification were analyzed. A phantom and 15 patients with different tumor sites and implanted markers were imaged with a multislice CT scanner. The raw image data was reconstructed both with the clinically used filtered-backprojection (FBP) and with the MAR software. Using the MAR software, improvements in image quality were often observed in CT slices with markers or clips. Especially when several markers were located near to each other, fewer streak artefacts were observed than with the FBP algorithm. In addition, the shape and size of markers could be identified more accurately, reducing the contoured marker volumes by a factor of 2. For the phantom study, the CT numbers measured near to the markers corresponded more closely to the expected values. However, the MAR images were slightly more smoothed compared with the images reconstructed with FBP. For 8 prostate cancer patients in this study, the interobserver variation in 3D marker definition was similar (<0.4 mm) when using DRRs based on either FBP or MAR CT scans. Automatic marker matches also showed a similar success rate. However, differences in automatic match results up to 1 mm, caused by differences in the marker definition, were observed, which turned out to be (borderline) statistically significant (p = 0.06) for 2 patients. In conclusion, the MAR software might improve image quality by suppressing metal artefacts, probably allowing for a more reliable delineation of structures. When implanted markers or clips are used for setup verification, the accuracy may slightly be improved as well, which is relevant when using very tight clinical target volume (CTV) to

  6. How Much Is the Dose Varying between Follow-Up CT-Examinations Performed on the Same Scanner with the Same Imaging Protocol?

    PubMed Central

    Stecker, Franz Ferdinand; Guberina, Nika; Ringelstein, Adrian; Schlosser, Thomas; Theysohn, Jens Matthias; Forsting, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the dose variation between follow-up CT examinations, when a patient is examined several times on the same scanner with the identical scan protocol which comprised automated exposure control. Material and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the local ethics committee. The volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) and the dose-length-product (DLP) were recorded for 60 cancer patients (29 male, 31 female, mean age 60.1 years), who received 3 follow-up CT examinations each composed of a non-enhanced scan of the liver (LI-CT) and a contrast-enhanced scan of chest (CH-CT) and abdomen (AB-CT). Each examination was performed on the same scanner (Siemens Definition FLASH) equipped with automated exposure control (CARE Dose 4D and CARE KV) using the identical scan protocol. Results The median percentage difference in DLP between follow-up examinations was 9.6% for CH-CT, 10.3% for LI-CT, and 10.1% for AB-CT; the median percentage difference in CTDIvol 8.3% for CH-CT, 7.4% for LI-CT and 7.7% for AB-CT (p<0.0001 for all values). The maximum difference in DLP between follow-up examinations was 67.5% for CH-CT, 50.8% for LI-CT and 74.3% for AB-CT; the maximum difference in CTDIvol 62.9% for CH-CT, 47.2% for LI-CT, and 49% for AB-CT. Conclusion A significant variance in the radiation dose occurs between follow-up CT examinations when the same CT scanner and the identical imaging protocol are used in combination with automated exposure control. PMID:27050659

  7. Comparison of different dose reduction system in computed tomography for orthodontic applications

    PubMed Central

    FANUCCI, E.; FIASCHETTI, V.; OTTRIA, L.; MATALONI, M; ACAMPORA, V.; LIONE, R.; BARLATTANI, A.; SIMONETTI, G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY To correlate different CT system: MSCT (multislice computed tomography) with different acquisition parameters (100KV, 80KV), different reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) and CBCT (cone beam computed tomography) examination in terms of absorbed X-ray dose and diagnostic accuracy. 80 KV protocols compared with 100 KV protocols resulted in reduced total radiation dose without relevant loss of diagnostic image information and quality. CBCT protocols compared with 80 KV MSCT protocols resulted in reduced total radiation dose but loss of diagnostic image information and quality although no so relevant. In addition the new system applies to equipment ASIR applicable on MSCT allows 50% of the dose without compromising image quality. PMID:23285397

  8. Diagnostic Accuracy of CT Enterography for Active Inflammatory Terminal Ileal Crohn Disease: Comparison of Full-Dose and Half-Dose Images Reconstructed with FBP and Half-Dose Images with SAFIRE.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Namita S; Baker, Mark E; Goenka, Ajit H; Bullen, Jennifer A; Obuchowski, Nancy A; Remer, Erick M; Coppa, Christopher P; Einstein, David; Feldman, Myra K; Kanmaniraja, Devaraju; Purysko, Andrei S; Vahdat, Noushin; Primak, Andrew N; Karim, Wadih; Herts, Brian R

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy and image quality of computed tomographic (CT) enterographic images obtained at half dose and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with those of full-dose CT enterographic images reconstructed with FBP for active inflammatory terminal or neoterminal ileal Crohn disease. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was compliant with HIPAA and approved by the institutional review board. The requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. Ninety subjects (45 with active terminal ileal Crohn disease and 45 without Crohn disease) underwent CT enterography with a dual-source CT unit. The reference standard for confirmation of active Crohn disease was active terminal ileal Crohn disease based on ileocolonoscopy or established Crohn disease and imaging features of active terminal ileal Crohn disease. Data from both tubes were reconstructed with FBP (100% exposure); data from the primary tube (50% exposure) were reconstructed with FBP and SAFIRE strengths 3 and 4, yielding four datasets per CT enterographic examination. The mean volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) at full dose were 13.1 mGy (median, 7.36 mGy) and 15.9 mGy (median, 13.06 mGy), respectively, and those at half dose were 6.55 mGy (median, 3.68 mGy) and 7.95 mGy (median, 6.5 mGy). Images were subjectively evaluated by eight radiologists for quality and diagnostic confidence for Crohn disease. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were estimated, and the multireader, multicase analysis of variance method was used to compare reconstruction methods on the basis of a noninferiority margin of 0.05. Results The mean AUCs with half-dose scans (FBP, 0.908; SAFIRE 3, 0.935; SAFIRE 4, 0.924) were noninferior to the mean AUC with full-dose FBP scans (0.908; P < .003). The proportion of images with inferior quality was significantly higher with all

  9. SU-E-T-94: Daily Fraction Dose Recalculation Based On Rigid Registration Using Cone Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Bosse, C; Tuohy, R; Mavroidis, P; Shi, Z; Crownover, R; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To calculate the daily fraction dose for a CBCT recalculation based on rigid registration and compare it to the planned CT dose. Methods: For this study, 30 patients that were previously treated (10 SBRT lung, 10 prostate and 10 abdomen) were considered. The daily CBCT images were imported into the Pinnacle treatment planning system from Mosaic. The prescribing physician contoured the regions of interest (ROI) on each CBCT and then dose was computed on each CBCT. Each CBCT dose distribution was then compared against the plan. The evaluation was based on isodose line comparison and Dose Volume Histogram comparison. Results: In the case of lung patients the dose differences between daily dose and plan dose were considered small. The PTV coverage was not compromised and the dose to the organs at risk had negligible differences. Larger differences were observed for prostate and abdomen patients. In these cases, although the PTV doses did not change on a daily basis, the doses to the organs at risk had significant differences. For a prostate patient, the bladder dose at 35% volume was 2714.444 cGy for the CT plan and 2844.747, 2801.556, 3552.37, and 2970.968 cGy for subsequent CBCTs. For the PTV on a SBRT patient, however, the CT plan had a dose at 35% volume of 6917.71 cGy and 6815.385, 6892.5, 6896.25, and 6922.9 cGy for the CBCTs. Conclusion: Daily dose validation is feasible using CBCT and treatment planning system. It provides means to evaluate the course of treatment for the patient undergoing radiation therapy and can assist in the decision of the need of adaptation of the treatment plan.

  10. Heart region segmentation from low-dose CT scans: an anatomy based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Anthony P.; Biancardi, Alberto M.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2012-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in developed countries. The concurrent detection of heart diseases during low-dose whole-lung CT scans (LDCT), typically performed as part of a screening protocol, hinges on the accurate quantification of coronary calcification. The creation of fully automated methods is ideal as complete manual evaluation is imprecise, operator dependent, time consuming and thus costly. The technical challenges posed by LDCT scans in this context are mainly twofold. First, there is a high level image noise arising from the low radiation dose technique. Additionally, there is a variable amount of cardiac motion blurring due to the lack of electrocardiographic gating and the fact that heart rates differ between human subjects. As a consequence, the reliable segmentation of the heart, the first stage toward the implementation of morphologic heart abnormality detection, is also quite challenging. An automated computer method based on a sequential labeling of major organs and determination of anatomical landmarks has been evaluated on a public database of LDCT images. The novel algorithm builds from a robust segmentation of the bones and airways and embodies a stepwise refinement starting at the top of the lungs where image noise is at its lowest and where the carina provides a good calibration landmark. The segmentation is completed at the inferior wall of the heart where extensive image noise is accommodated. This method is based on the geometry of human anatomy and does not involve training through manual markings. Using visual inspection by an expert reader as a gold standard, the algorithm achieved successful heart and major vessel segmentation in 42 of 45 low-dose CT images. In the 3 remaining cases, the cardiac base was over segmented due to incorrect hemidiaphragm localization.

  11. Influence of model based iterative reconstruction algorithm on image quality of multiplanar reformations in reduced dose chest CT

    PubMed Central

    Dunet, Vincent; Hachulla, Anne-Lise; Grimm, Jochen; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Background Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) reduces image noise and improves image quality (IQ) but its influence on post-processing tools including maximal intensity projection (MIP) and minimal intensity projection (mIP) remains unknown. Purpose To evaluate the influence on IQ of MBIR on native, mIP, MIP axial and coronal reformats of reduced dose computed tomography (RD-CT) chest acquisition. Material and Methods Raw data of 50 patients, who underwent a standard dose CT (SD-CT) and a follow-up RD-CT with a CT dose index (CTDI) of 2–3 mGy, were reconstructed by MBIR and FBP. Native slices, 4-mm-thick MIP, and 3-mm-thick mIP axial and coronal reformats were generated. The relative IQ, subjective IQ, image noise, and number of artifacts were determined in order to compare different reconstructions of RD-CT with reference SD-CT. Results The lowest noise was observed with MBIR. RD-CT reconstructed by MBIR exhibited the best relative and subjective IQ on coronal view regardless of the post-processing tool. MBIR generated the lowest rate of artefacts on coronal mIP/MIP reformats and the highest one on axial reformats, mainly represented by distortions and stairsteps artifacts. Conclusion The MBIR algorithm reduces image noise but generates more artifacts than FBP on axial mIP and MIP reformats of RD-CT. Conversely, it significantly improves IQ on coronal views, without increasing artifacts, regardless of the post-processing technique.

  12. Influence of model based iterative reconstruction algorithm on image quality of multiplanar reformations in reduced dose chest CT

    PubMed Central

    Dunet, Vincent; Hachulla, Anne-Lise; Grimm, Jochen; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Background Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) reduces image noise and improves image quality (IQ) but its influence on post-processing tools including maximal intensity projection (MIP) and minimal intensity projection (mIP) remains unknown. Purpose To evaluate the influence on IQ of MBIR on native, mIP, MIP axial and coronal reformats of reduced dose computed tomography (RD-CT) chest acquisition. Material and Methods Raw data of 50 patients, who underwent a standard dose CT (SD-CT) and a follow-up RD-CT with a CT dose index (CTDI) of 2–3 mGy, were reconstructed by MBIR and FBP. Native slices, 4-mm-thick MIP, and 3-mm-thick mIP axial and coronal reformats were generated. The relative IQ, subjective IQ, image noise, and number of artifacts were determined in order to compare different reconstructions of RD-CT with reference SD-CT. Results The lowest noise was observed with MBIR. RD-CT reconstructed by MBIR exhibited the best relative and subjective IQ on coronal view regardless of the post-processing tool. MBIR generated the lowest rate of artefacts on coronal mIP/MIP reformats and the highest one on axial reformats, mainly represented by distortions and stairsteps artifacts. Conclusion The MBIR algorithm reduces image noise but generates more artifacts than FBP on axial mIP and MIP reformats of RD-CT. Conversely, it significantly improves IQ on coronal views, without increasing artifacts, regardless of the post-processing technique. PMID:27635253

  13. Patient- and cohort-specific dose and risk estimation for abdominopelvic CT: a study based on 100 patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this work was twofold: (a) to estimate patient- and cohort-specific radiation dose and cancer risk index for abdominopelvic computer tomography (CT) scans; (b) to evaluate the effects of patient anatomical characteristics (size, age, and gender) and CT scanner model on dose and risk conversion coefficients. The study included 100 patient models (42 pediatric models, 58 adult models) and multi-detector array CT scanners from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare). A previously-validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate organ dose for each patient model and each scanner, from which DLP-normalized-effective dose (k factor) and DLP-normalized-risk index values (q factor) were derived. The k factor showed exponential decrease with increasing patient size. For a given gender, q factor showed exponential decrease with both increasing patient size and patient age. The discrepancies in k and q factors across scanners were on average 8% and 15%, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility of estimating patient-specific organ dose and cohort-specific effective dose and risk index in abdominopelvic CT requiring only the knowledge of patient size, gender, and age.

  14. Reduction of motion blurring artifacts using respiratory gated CT in sinogram space: A quantitative evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Wei; Parikh, Parag J.; Hubenschmidt, James P.; Politte, David G.; Whiting, Bruce R.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Mutic, Sasa; Low, Daniel A.

    2005-11-15

    Techniques have been developed for reducing motion blurring artifacts by using respiratory gated computed tomography (CT) in sinogram space and quantitatively evaluating the artifact reduction. A synthetic sinogram was built from multiple scans intercepting a respiratory gating window. A gated CT image was then reconstructed using the filtered back-projection algorithm. Wedge phantoms, developed for quantifying the motion artifact reduction, were scanned while being moved using a computer-controlled linear stage. The resulting artifacts appeared between the high and low density regions as an apparent feature with a Hounsfield value that was the average of the two regions. A CT profile through these regions was fit using two error functions, each modeling the partial-volume averaging characteristics for the unmoving phantom. The motion artifact was quantified by determining the apparent distance between the two functions. The blurring artifact had a linear relationship with both the speed and the tangent of the wedge angles. When gating was employed, the blurring artifact was reduced systematically at the air-phantom interface. The gated image of phantoms moving at 20 mm/s showed similar blurring artifacts as the nongated image of phantoms moving at 10 mm/s. Nine patients were also scanned using the synchronized respiratory motion technique. Image artifacts were evaluated in the diaphragm, where high contrast interfaces intercepted the imaging plane. For patients, this respiratory gating technique reduced the blurring artifacts by 9%-41% at the lung-diaphragm interface.

  15. Effect of deformable registration on the dose calculated in radiation therapy planning CT scans of lung cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R.; Armato, Samuel G.; White, Bradley; Justusson, Julia; Contee, Clay; Malik, Renuka; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: To characterize the effects of deformable image registration of serial computed tomography (CT) scans on the radiation dose calculated from a treatment planning scan. Methods: Eighteen patients who received curative doses (≥60 Gy, 2 Gy/fraction) of photon radiation therapy for lung cancer treatment were retrospectively identified. For each patient, a diagnostic-quality pretherapy (4–75 days) CT scan and a treatment planning scan with an associated dose map were collected. To establish correspondence between scan pairs, a researcher manually identified anatomically corresponding landmark point pairs between the two scans. Pretherapy scan