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Sample records for ct head-to-head comparison

  1. Myocardial CT Perfusion Imaging and SPECT for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: A Head-to-Head Comparison from the CORE320 Multicenter Diagnostic Performance Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Vishal C.; Chen, Marcus Y.; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Miller, Julie M.; Matheson, Matthew B.; Vavere, Andrea L.; Kofoed, Klaus F.; Rochitte, Carlos E.; Dewey, Marc; Yaw, Tan S.; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Brenner, Winfried; Cox, Christopher; Clouse, Melvin E.; Lima, João A. C.; Di Carli, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic performance of myocardial computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of anatomically significant coronary artery disease (CAD) as depicted at invasive coronary angiography. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Sixteen centers enrolled 381 patients from November 2009 to July 2011. Patients underwent rest and adenosine stress CT perfusion imaging and rest and either exercise or pharmacologic stress SPECT before and within 60 days of coronary angiography. Images from CT perfusion imaging, SPECT, and coronary angiography were interpreted at blinded, independent core laboratories. The primary diagnostic parameter was the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated with use of prespecified cutoffs. The reference standard was a stenosis of at least 50% at coronary angiography as determined with quantitative methods. Results CAD was diagnosed in 229 of the 381 patients (60%). The per-patient sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of CAD (stenosis ≥50%) were 88% (202 of 229 patients) and 55% (83 of 152 patients), respectively, for CT perfusion imaging and 62% (143 of 229 patients) and 67% (102 of 152 patients) for SPECT, with Az values of 0.78 (95% confidence interval: 0.74, 0.82) and 0.69 (95% confidence interval: 0.64, 0.74) (P = .001). The sensitivity of CT perfusion imaging for single- and multivessel CAD was higher than that of SPECT, with sensitivities for left main, three-vessel, two-vessel, and one-vessel disease of 92%, 92%, 89%, and 83%, respectively, for CT perfusion imaging and 75%, 79%, 68%, and 41%, respectively, for SPECT. Conclusion The overall performance of myocardial CT perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of anatomic CAD (stenosis ≥50%), as demonstrated with the

  2. Head-to-Head Comparison of Anti-Inflammatory Performance of Known Natural Products In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Allijn, Iris E.; Vaessen, Stefan F. C.; Quarles van Ufford, Linda C.; Beukelman, Kees J.; de Winther, Menno P. J.; Storm, Gert; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an important therapeutic target. Due to their potency, steroidal drugs dominate the current treatment of inflammatory disorders. However, steroidal drugs can also exert a broad range of side effects and appear not always effective. This calls for the development of alternative drugs with a different mechanism of action, which are likely to be found in the field of natural products (NPs). For many NPs strong anti-inflammatory effects have been described, but usually investigating a single compound in a single assay. In this study, eight promising NPs were selected and tested against the strong anti-inflammatory drug prednisolone. For this head-to-head comparison, in vitro assays were used which represent different pathways of the inflammatory response: TNF-α and IL-6 expression by macrophages, IL-8 expression by colon epithelial cells, ROS production in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and platelet activation in whole blood. Performance profiles were established which allowed us to identify curcumin, berberine chloride and epigallocatechin gallate as potential alternatives for prednisolone or other glucocorticoids in inflammation. PMID:27163931

  3. A Head-to-head Comparison between SurgiMend and Epiflex in 127 Breast Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Nadine; Brunnert, Klaus; Sauerwald, Axel; Puppe, Julian; Warm, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of acellular dermal matrices (ADM) has become a widely used option in breast reconstruction. A great deal of literature is available, totaling over 2400 ADM reconstructions. Nonetheless, head-to-head comparisons between SurgiMend and Epiflex are not yet reported. In fact, this is the first clinical data report on the use of Epiflex. This work will, therefore, compare postoperative complication rates and costs for these ADMs. Methods: This analysis is a retrospective review of a single surgeon’s 6-year experience with both SurgiMend—an acellular bovine dermal collagen matrix for soft-tissue reconstruction and Epiflex—a decellularized human skin tissue from 2008 to 2013. Results: One hundred patients had a total of 127 implant-based reconstructions using SurgiMend (64 cases; 50.4%) or Epiflex (63 cases; 49.6%). Gross complication rates were 11.1% for SurgiMend and 40.6% for Epiflex including hematoma, postoperative skin irritation, infection, necrosis, and revision surgery. The most common complication was postoperative red breast syndrome. Severe complications requiring revision surgery were significantly increased in patients treated with Epiflex (12.5%) compared with SurgiMend (4.8%). Conclusions: This retrospective analysis favors the use of SurgiMend over Epiflex because of significantly lower gross complication rates. Severe complication rates are comparable with those reported in literature for both products. Although results promote the use of SurgiMend, the single surgeon retrospective nature of this work limits its clinical impact. PMID:26180740

  4. Nanomedicines for Inflammatory Arthritis: Head-To-Head Comparison of Glucocorticoid-Containing Polymers, Micelles and Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Crielaard, Bart J.; Dusad, Anand; Lele, Subodh M.; Rijcken, Cristianne J. F.; Metselaar, Josbert M; Kostková, Hana; Etrych, Tomáš; Ulbrich, Karel; Kiessling, Fabian; Mikuls, Ted R.; Hennink, Wim E.; Storm, Gert; Lammers, Twan; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    As an emerging research direction, nanomedicine has been increasingly utilized to treat inflammatory diseases. In this head-to-head comparison study, four established nanomedicine formulations of dexamethasone, including liposomes (L-Dex), core-crosslinked micelles (M-Dex), slow releasing polymeric prodrugs (P-Dex-slow) and fast releasing polymeric prodrugs (P-Dex-fast), were evaluated in an adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model with an equivalent dose treatment design. It was found that after a single i.v. injection, the formulations with the slower drug release kinetics (i.e. M-Dex and P-Dex-slow) maintained longer duration of therapeutic activity than those with relatively faster drug release kinetics, resulting in better joint protection. This finding will be instructional in the future development and optimization of nanomedicines for the clinical management of rheumatoid arthritis. The outcome of this study also illustrates the value of such head-to-head comparison studies in translational nanomedicine research. PMID:24341611

  5. Head-To-Head Comparison of Different Solubility-Enabling Formulations of Etoposide and Their Consequent Solubility-Permeability Interplay.

    PubMed

    Beig, Avital; Miller, Jonathan M; Lindley, David; Carr, Robert A; Zocharski, Philip; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a head-to-head comparison of different solubility-enabling formulations, and their consequent solubility-permeability interplay. The low-solubility anticancer drug etoposide was formulated in several strengths of four solubility-enabling formulations: hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, the cosolvent polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG-400), the surfactant sodium lauryl sulfate, and an amorphous solid dispersion formulation. The ability of these formulations to increase the solubility of etoposide was investigated, followed by permeability studies using the parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) and examination of the consequent solubility-permeability interplay. All formulations significantly increased etoposide's apparent solubility. The cyclodextrin-, surfactant-, and cosolvent-based formulations resulted in a concomitant decreased permeability that could be modeled directly from the proportional increase in the apparent solubility. On the contrary, etoposide permeability remained constant when using the ASD formulation, irrespective of the increased apparent solubility provided by the formulation. In conclusion, supersaturation resulting from the amorphous form overcomes the solubility-permeability tradeoff associated with other formulation techniques. Accounting for the solubility-permeability interplay may allow to develop better solubility-enabling formulations, thereby maximizing the overall absorption of lipophilic orally administered drugs.

  6. Head-to-head comparison of protocol modifications for the generation of collagen-induced arthritis in a specific-pathogen free facility using DBA/1 mice.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Sherry; Strait, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a widely used mouse model for studying inflammatory arthritis (IA). However, CIA induction protocols differ between laboratories, and direct comparison between protocol variations has not been reported. To address this issue, DBA/1 mice housed in conventional and specific-pathogen free (SPF) facilities were administered various combinations of two doses of collagen type II (CII) in complete (CFA) or incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA); some mice were also injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or additional CII at specific intervals. Mice were evaluated for IA over the subsequent 2 months. Depending directly on the combination of CII, CFA, IFA, and LPS used, the incidence of IA ranged between 20%-100%, and severity extended from mild to severe even in an SPF environment. Our results demonstrate for the first time in head-to-head comparisons that specific variations in the use of CII, CFA, IFA, and LPS can induce a range of arthritic disease intensity and severity in an SPF facility. Thus, distinct experimental settings can be designed for robust assessment of factors that either exacerbate or inhibit arthritis pathogenesis. Furthermore, by achieving 100% incidence in an SPF facility, the protocols provide a practical and humane benefit by reducing the number of mice necessary for experimental assessment. PMID:26956089

  7. H3N2 Mismatch of 2014-15 Northern Hemisphere Influenza Vaccines and Head-to-head Comparison between Human and Ferret Antisera derived Antigenic Maps.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hang; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Ye, Zhiping; Plant, Ewan P; Zhao, Yangqing; Xu, Yifei; Li, Xing; Finch, Courtney; Zhao, Nan; Kawano, Toshiaki; Zoueva, Olga; Chiang, Meng-Jung; Jing, Xianghong; Lin, Zhengshi; Zhang, Anding; Zhu, Yanhong

    2015-01-01

    The poor performance of 2014-15 Northern Hemisphere (NH) influenza vaccines was attributed to mismatched H3N2 component with circulating epidemic strains. Using human serum samples collected from 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2014-15 NH influenza vaccine trials, we assessed their cross-reactive hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibody responses against recent H3 epidemic isolates. All three populations (children, adults, and older adults) vaccinated with the 2014-15 NH egg- or cell-based vaccine, showed >50% reduction in HAI post-vaccination geometric mean titers against epidemic H3 isolates from those against egg-grown H3 vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 (TX/12e). The 2014-15 NH vaccines, regardless of production type, failed to further extend HAI cross-reactivity against H3 epidemic strains from previous seasonal vaccines. Head-to-head comparison between ferret and human antisera derived antigenic maps revealed different antigenic patterns among representative egg- and cell-grown H3 viruses characterized. Molecular modeling indicated that the mutations of epidemic H3 strains were mainly located in antibody-binding sites A and B as compared with TX/12e. To improve vaccine strain selection, human serologic testing on vaccination-induced cross-reactivity need be emphasized along with virus antigenic characterization by ferret model.

  8. H3N2 Mismatch of 2014-15 Northern Hemisphere Influenza Vaccines and Head-to-head Comparison between Human and Ferret Antisera derived Antigenic Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hang; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Ye, Zhiping; Plant, Ewan P.; Zhao, Yangqing; Xu, Yifei; Li, Xing; Finch, Courtney; Zhao, Nan; Kawano, Toshiaki; Zoueva, Olga; Chiang, Meng-Jung; Jing, Xianghong; Lin, Zhengshi; Zhang, Anding; Zhu, Yanhong

    2015-10-01

    The poor performance of 2014-15 Northern Hemisphere (NH) influenza vaccines was attributed to mismatched H3N2 component with circulating epidemic strains. Using human serum samples collected from 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2014-15 NH influenza vaccine trials, we assessed their cross-reactive hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibody responses against recent H3 epidemic isolates. All three populations (children, adults, and older adults) vaccinated with the 2014-15 NH egg- or cell-based vaccine, showed >50% reduction in HAI post-vaccination geometric mean titers against epidemic H3 isolates from those against egg-grown H3 vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 (TX/12e). The 2014-15 NH vaccines, regardless of production type, failed to further extend HAI cross-reactivity against H3 epidemic strains from previous seasonal vaccines. Head-to-head comparison between ferret and human antisera derived antigenic maps revealed different antigenic patterns among representative egg- and cell-grown H3 viruses characterized. Molecular modeling indicated that the mutations of epidemic H3 strains were mainly located in antibody-binding sites A and B as compared with TX/12e. To improve vaccine strain selection, human serologic testing on vaccination-induced cross-reactivity need be emphasized along with virus antigenic characterization by ferret model.

  9. H3N2 Mismatch of 2014–15 Northern Hemisphere Influenza Vaccines and Head-to-head Comparison between Human and Ferret Antisera derived Antigenic Maps

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hang; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Ye, Zhiping; Plant, Ewan P.; Zhao, Yangqing; Xu, Yifei; Li, Xing; Finch, Courtney; Zhao, Nan; Kawano, Toshiaki; Zoueva, Olga; Chiang, Meng-Jung; Jing, Xianghong; Lin, Zhengshi; Zhang, Anding; Zhu, Yanhong

    2015-01-01

    The poor performance of 2014–15 Northern Hemisphere (NH) influenza vaccines was attributed to mismatched H3N2 component with circulating epidemic strains. Using human serum samples collected from 2009–10, 2010–11 and 2014–15 NH influenza vaccine trials, we assessed their cross-reactive hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibody responses against recent H3 epidemic isolates. All three populations (children, adults, and older adults) vaccinated with the 2014–15 NH egg- or cell-based vaccine, showed >50% reduction in HAI post-vaccination geometric mean titers against epidemic H3 isolates from those against egg-grown H3 vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 (TX/12e). The 2014–15 NH vaccines, regardless of production type, failed to further extend HAI cross-reactivity against H3 epidemic strains from previous seasonal vaccines. Head-to-head comparison between ferret and human antisera derived antigenic maps revealed different antigenic patterns among representative egg- and cell-grown H3 viruses characterized. Molecular modeling indicated that the mutations of epidemic H3 strains were mainly located in antibody-binding sites A and B as compared with TX/12e. To improve vaccine strain selection, human serologic testing on vaccination-induced cross-reactivity need be emphasized along with virus antigenic characterization by ferret model. PMID:26472175

  10. H3N2 Mismatch of 2014-15 Northern Hemisphere Influenza Vaccines and Head-to-head Comparison between Human and Ferret Antisera derived Antigenic Maps.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hang; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Ye, Zhiping; Plant, Ewan P; Zhao, Yangqing; Xu, Yifei; Li, Xing; Finch, Courtney; Zhao, Nan; Kawano, Toshiaki; Zoueva, Olga; Chiang, Meng-Jung; Jing, Xianghong; Lin, Zhengshi; Zhang, Anding; Zhu, Yanhong

    2015-01-01

    The poor performance of 2014-15 Northern Hemisphere (NH) influenza vaccines was attributed to mismatched H3N2 component with circulating epidemic strains. Using human serum samples collected from 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2014-15 NH influenza vaccine trials, we assessed their cross-reactive hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibody responses against recent H3 epidemic isolates. All three populations (children, adults, and older adults) vaccinated with the 2014-15 NH egg- or cell-based vaccine, showed >50% reduction in HAI post-vaccination geometric mean titers against epidemic H3 isolates from those against egg-grown H3 vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 (TX/12e). The 2014-15 NH vaccines, regardless of production type, failed to further extend HAI cross-reactivity against H3 epidemic strains from previous seasonal vaccines. Head-to-head comparison between ferret and human antisera derived antigenic maps revealed different antigenic patterns among representative egg- and cell-grown H3 viruses characterized. Molecular modeling indicated that the mutations of epidemic H3 strains were mainly located in antibody-binding sites A and B as compared with TX/12e. To improve vaccine strain selection, human serologic testing on vaccination-induced cross-reactivity need be emphasized along with virus antigenic characterization by ferret model. PMID:26472175

  11. Head-to-head comparison of three vaccination strategies based on DNA and raw insect-derived recombinant proteins against Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Todolí, Felicitat; Rodríguez-Cortés, Alhelí; Núñez, María Del Carmen; Laurenti, Márcia D; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Rodríguez, Fernando; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Escribano, José M; Alberola, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic diseases plague billions of people among the poorest, killing millions annually, and causing additional millions of disability-adjusted life years lost. Leishmaniases affect more than 12 million people, with over 350 million people at risk. There is an urgent need for efficacious and cheap vaccines and treatments against visceral leishmaniasis (VL), its most severe form. Several vaccination strategies have been proposed but to date no head-to-head comparison was undertaken to assess which is the best in a clinical model of the disease. We simultaneously assayed three vaccination strategies against VL in the hamster model, using KMPII, TRYP, LACK, and PAPLE22 vaccine candidate antigens. Four groups of hamsters were immunized using the following approaches: 1) raw extracts of baculovirus-infected Trichoplusia ni larvae expressing individually one of the four recombinant proteins (PROT); 2) naked pVAX1 plasmids carrying the four genes individually (DNA); 3) a heterologous prime-boost (HPB) strategy involving DNA followed by PROT (DNA-PROT); and 4) a Control including empty pVAX1 plasmid followed by raw extract of wild-type baculovirus-infected T. ni larvae. Hamsters were challenged with L. infantum promastigotes and maintained for 20 weeks. While PROT vaccine was not protective, DNA vaccination achieved protection in spleen. Only DNA-PROT vaccination induced significant NO production by macrophages, accompanied by a significant parasitological protection in spleen and blood. Thus, the DNA-PROT strategy elicits strong immune responses and high parasitological protection in the clinical model of VL, better than its corresponding naked DNA or protein versions. Furthermore, we show that naked DNA coupled with raw recombinant proteins produced in insect larvae biofactories -the cheapest way of producing DNA-PROT vaccines- is a practical and cost-effective way for potential "off the shelf" supplying vaccines at very low prices for the protection against

  12. Head-to-Head Comparison of Three Vaccination Strategies Based on DNA and Raw Insect-Derived Recombinant Proteins against Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, María del Carmen; Laurenti, Márcia D.; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Rodríguez, Fernando; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Escribano, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic diseases plague billions of people among the poorest, killing millions annually, and causing additional millions of disability-adjusted life years lost. Leishmaniases affect more than 12 million people, with over 350 million people at risk. There is an urgent need for efficacious and cheap vaccines and treatments against visceral leishmaniasis (VL), its most severe form. Several vaccination strategies have been proposed but to date no head-to-head comparison was undertaken to assess which is the best in a clinical model of the disease. We simultaneously assayed three vaccination strategies against VL in the hamster model, using KMPII, TRYP, LACK, and PAPLE22 vaccine candidate antigens. Four groups of hamsters were immunized using the following approaches: 1) raw extracts of baculovirus-infected Trichoplusia ni larvae expressing individually one of the four recombinant proteins (PROT); 2) naked pVAX1 plasmids carrying the four genes individually (DNA); 3) a heterologous prime-boost (HPB) strategy involving DNA followed by PROT (DNA-PROT); and 4) a Control including empty pVAX1 plasmid followed by raw extract of wild-type baculovirus-infected T. ni larvae. Hamsters were challenged with L. infantum promastigotes and maintained for 20 weeks. While PROT vaccine was not protective, DNA vaccination achieved protection in spleen. Only DNA-PROT vaccination induced significant NO production by macrophages, accompanied by a significant parasitological protection in spleen and blood. Thus, the DNA-PROT strategy elicits strong immune responses and high parasitological protection in the clinical model of VL, better than its corresponding naked DNA or protein versions. Furthermore, we show that naked DNA coupled with raw recombinant proteins produced in insect larvae biofactories –the cheapest way of producing DNA-PROT vaccines– is a practical and cost-effective way for potential “off the shelf” supplying vaccines at very low prices for the protection against

  13. Head-to-head comparisons of metabolic side effects of second generation antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Komossa, Katja; Schwarz, Sandra; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Lobos, Claudia Asenjo; Kissling, Werner; Davis, John M; Leucht, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Objective The metabolic side effects of second-generation antipsychotics (SGA) are serious and have not been compared head to head in a meta-analysis. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies comparing the metabolic side effects of the following SGAs head-to-head: amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone, zotepine. Method We searched the register of the Cochrane schizophrenia group (last search May 2007), supplemented by MEDLINE and EMBASE (last search January 2009) for randomized, blinded studies comparing the above mentioned SGA in the treatment of schizophrenia or related disorders. At least three reviewers extracted the data independently. The primary outcome was weight change. We also assessed changes of cholesterol and glucose. The results were combined in a meta-analysis. Results We included 48 studies with 105 relevant arms. Olanzapine produced more weight gain than all other second-generation antipsychotics except for clozapine where no difference was found. Clozapine produced more weight gain than risperidone, risperidone more than amisulpride, and sertindole more than risperidone. Olanzapine produced more cholesterol increase than aripiprazole, risperidone and ziprasidone. (No differences with amisulpride, clozapine and quetiapine were found). Quetiapine produced more cholesterol increase than risperidone and ziprasidone. Olanzapine produced more increase in glucose than amisulpride, aripiprazole, quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone; no difference was found with clozapine. Conclusions Some SGAs lead to substantially more metabolic side effects than other SGAs. When choosing an SGA for an individual patient these side effects with their potential cause of secondary diseases must be weighed against efficacy and characteristics of the individual patient. PMID:20692814

  14. Pharmacoeconomic comparison of aripiprazole once-monthly and paliperidone palmitate from a head-to-head clinical trial in schizophrenia: a US analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sapin, Christophe; Hartry, Ann; Kamat, Siddhesh A.; Beillat, Maud; Baker, Ross A.; Eramo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia presents a substantial clinical and economic burden to the health-care system. In QUAlity of LIfe with AbiliFY Maintena (QUALIFY), a randomized head-to-head study of aripiprazole once-monthly 400 mg (AOM 400) compared with paliperidone palmitate (PP; 78–234 mg/mo), AOM 400 demonstrated greater improvement in health-related quality of life and functioning in patients with stable schizophrenia. The present analysis used health economics assessment data collected during the QUALIFY study to determine the direct medical and pharmacy costs and the cost-effectiveness associated with each treatment over 6 months. Compared with those receiving PP, patients receiving AOM 400 incurred significantly lower direct total costs ($8908±186 vs $9675±190, p=0.005) and treatment costs ($7967±113 vs $8706±116, p<0.001). Effectiveness results in the subset of patients included in the cost analyses were similar to the overall population: mean (95% CI) improvement in Heinrichs-Carpenter Quality of Life Scale total score was greater with AOM 400 (5.97 [3.87; 8.08]) compared with PP (2.85 [0.56; 5.08]). Likewise, Clinical Global Impression–Severity improved more in the AOM 400 group (−0.59 [−0.71; −0.47]) compared with PP group (−0.37 [−0.46; −0.27]). Therefore, the analysis of data from stabilized patients with schizophrenia in the QUALIFY study indicated that AOM 400 is associated with lower health-care costs and greater effectiveness compared with PP and thus represents the economically dominant strategy. PMID:27708677

  15. Head-to-Head Comparison of Ultra-High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Diode Array Detection versus Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for the Quantitative Analysis of the Silymarin Complex in Silybum marianum Fruit Extracts.

    PubMed

    Cheilari, Antigoni; Sturm, Sonja; Intelmann, Daniel; Seger, Christoph; Stuppner, Hermann

    2016-02-24

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) spectroscopy is known as an excellent alternative to chromatography-based mixture analysis. NMR spectroscopy is a non-destructive method, needs only limited sample preparation, and can be readily automated. A head-to-head comparison of qNMR to an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (uHPLC-DAD)-based quantitative analysis of six flavonolignan congeners (silychristin, silydianin, silybin A, silybin B, isosilybin A, and isosilybin B) of the Silybum marianum silymarin complex is presented. Both assays showed similar performance characteristics (linear range, accuracy, precision, and limits of quantitation) with analysis times below 30 min/sample. The assays were applied to industrial S. marianum extracts (AC samples) and to extracts locally prepared from S. marianum fruits (PL samples). An assay comparison by Bland-Altman plots (relative method bias AC samples, -0.1%; 2SD range, ±5.1%; relative method bias PL samples, -0.3%; 2SD range, ±7.8%) and Passing-Bablok regression analysis (slope and intercept for AC and PL samples not significantly different from 1.00 and 0.00, respectively; Spearman's coefficient of rank correlation, >0.99) did show that qNMR and uHPLC-DAD can be used interchangeably to quantitate flavonolignans in the silymarin complex.

  16. Head to Head Comparison of Two Point-of-care Platelet Function Tests Used for Assessment of On-clopidogrel Platelet Reactivity in Chinese Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yi; Zhang, Jia-Hui; Tang, Xiao-Fang; He, Chen; Ma, Yuan-Liang; Xu, Jing-Jing; Song, Ying; Liu, Ru; Meng, Xian-Min; Song, Lei; Wang, Miao; Gao, Run-Lin; Yuan, Jin-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Platelet function tests are widely used in clinical practice to guide personalized antiplatelet therapy. In China, the thromboelastography (TEG) test has been well accepted in clinics, whereas VerifyNow, mainly used for scientific research, has not been used in routine clinical practice. The aim of the current study was to compare these two point-of-care platelet function tests and to analyze the consistency between the two tests for evaluating on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity in Chinese acute myocardial infarction patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods: A total of 184 patients admitted to Fuwai Hospital between August 2014 and May 2015 were enrolled in the study. On-clopidogrel platelet reactivity was assessed 3 days after PCI by TEG and VerifyNow using adenosine diphosphate as an agonist. Based on the previous reports, an inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) <30% for TEG or a P2Y12 reaction unit (PRU) >230 for VerifyNow was defined as high on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity (HPR). An IPA >70% or a PRU <178 was defined as low on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity (LPR). Correlation and agreement between the two methods were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient (r) and kappa value (κ), respectively. Results: Our results showed that VerifyNow and TEG had a moderate but significant correlation in evaluating platelet reactivity (r = −0.511). A significant although poor agreement (κ = 0.225) in identifying HPR and a significantly moderate agreement in identifying LPR (κ = 0.412) were observed between TEG and VerifyNow. By using TEG as the reference for comparison, the cutoff values of VerifyNow for the Chinese patients in this study were identified as PRU >205 for HPR and PRU <169 for LPR. Conclusions: By comparing VerifyNow to TEG which has been widely used in clinics, VerifyNow could be an attractive alternative to TEG for monitoring on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity in Chinese patients. PMID:27647183

  17. The Head to Head That Had to Happen: A Case Study of Television Sport and Entrepreneurship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whannel, Garry

    The race between Mary Decker and Zola Budd, a head to head confrontation in the 1985 Olympic Games, is examined within the broader context of the transformation taking place in sports as a result of the combined efforts of television and the economic forces of sponsorship. Athletics is going through this process of transformation both economically…

  18. Head-to-head coiled arrangement of the subunits of the animal fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Andrzej; Ghosal, Alokesh; Joshi, Anil K; Witkowska, H Ewa; Asturias, Francisco J; Smith, Stuart

    2004-12-01

    The role of the beta-ketoacyl synthase domains in dimerization of the 2505 residue subunits of the multifunctional animal FAS has been evaluated by a combination of crosslinking and characterization of several truncated forms of the protein. Polypeptides containing only the N-terminal 971 residues can form dimers, but polypeptides lacking only the N-terminal 422 residue beta-ketoacyl synthase domain cannot. FAS subunits can be crosslinked with spacer lengths as short as 6 A, via cysteine residues engineered near the N terminus of the full-length polypeptides. The proximity of the N-terminal beta-ketoacyl synthase domains and their essential role in dimerization is consistent with a revised model for the FAS in which a head-to-head arrangement of two coiled subunits facilitates functional interactions between the dimeric beta-ketoacyl synthase and the acyl carrier protein domains of either subunit.

  19. Head-to-head running race simulation alters pacing strategy, performance, and mood state.

    PubMed

    Tomazini, Fabiano; Pasqua, Leonardo A; Damasceno, Mayara V; Silva-Cavalcante, Marcos D; de Oliveira, Fernando R; Lima-Silva, Adriano E; Bertuzzi, Rômulo

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of the presence and absence of competitors on pacing, overall running performance, and mood state during a self-paced 3-km run. Nine recreational runners participated in this study. They performed the following tests: a) an incremental test to exhaustion to measure the respiratory compensation point (RCP), maximal oxygen uptake, and peak treadmill speed; b) a submaximal speed constant test to measure running economy; and c) two 3-km running time trials performed collectively (COL, head-to-head competition) or individually (IND, performed alone) to establish pacing and running performance. The COL condition was formed of a group of four runners or five runners. Runners were grouped by matched performance times and to retain head-to-head characteristics.A mood state profile questionnaire was completed before and after the 3-km running time trial. The overall performance was better in the COL than in the IND (11.75 ± 0.05 min vs. 12.25 ± 0.06 min, respectively; p = 0.04). The running speeds during the first 500 m were significantly greater in COL (16.8 ± 2.16 km·h−1) than in IND (15.3 ± 2.45 km·h−1) (p = 0.03).The gain in running speed from IND to COL during the first 400 m (i.e. running speed in COL less running speed in IND) was significantly correlated with the RCP (r = 0.88; p = 0.05). The vigor score significantly decreased from pre- to post-running in COL (p=0.05), but not in IND (p=0.20). Additionally, the post running vigor was significantly higher in IND compared to COL (p = 0.03).These findings suggested that the presence of competitors induces a fast start, which results in an improved overall performance and reduced post-exercise vigor scores, compared to an individual run.

  20. Head-to-head running race simulation alters pacing strategy, performance, and mood state.

    PubMed

    Tomazini, Fabiano; Pasqua, Leonardo A; Damasceno, Mayara V; Silva-Cavalcante, Marcos D; de Oliveira, Fernando R; Lima-Silva, Adriano E; Bertuzzi, Rômulo

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of the presence and absence of competitors on pacing, overall running performance, and mood state during a self-paced 3-km run. Nine recreational runners participated in this study. They performed the following tests: a) an incremental test to exhaustion to measure the respiratory compensation point (RCP), maximal oxygen uptake, and peak treadmill speed; b) a submaximal speed constant test to measure running economy; and c) two 3-km running time trials performed collectively (COL, head-to-head competition) or individually (IND, performed alone) to establish pacing and running performance. The COL condition was formed of a group of four runners or five runners. Runners were grouped by matched performance times and to retain head-to-head characteristics.A mood state profile questionnaire was completed before and after the 3-km running time trial. The overall performance was better in the COL than in the IND (11.75 ± 0.05 min vs. 12.25 ± 0.06 min, respectively; p = 0.04). The running speeds during the first 500 m were significantly greater in COL (16.8 ± 2.16 km·h−1) than in IND (15.3 ± 2.45 km·h−1) (p = 0.03).The gain in running speed from IND to COL during the first 400 m (i.e. running speed in COL less running speed in IND) was significantly correlated with the RCP (r = 0.88; p = 0.05). The vigor score significantly decreased from pre- to post-running in COL (p=0.05), but not in IND (p=0.20). Additionally, the post running vigor was significantly higher in IND compared to COL (p = 0.03).These findings suggested that the presence of competitors induces a fast start, which results in an improved overall performance and reduced post-exercise vigor scores, compared to an individual run. PMID:26013576

  1. Imaging of myocardial viability: a head-to-head comparison among nuclear, echocardiographic, and angiographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Marzullo, P; Parodi, O; Picano, E; Sambuceti, G; Reisenhofer, B; Gimelli, A; Distante, A; L'Abbate, A

    1993-09-01

    The relationship between radioisotopic, echocardiographic, and angiographic markers of myocardial viability is still to be defined. To this purpose, 14 patients with previous myocardial infarction were studied using a multiparametric approach. Each patient underwent, on separate days, rest thallium 201 and technetium 99m Sestamibi planar scintigraphy, dobutamine/dipyridamole stress echocardiography, and coronary angiography; 11 of these patients underwent also dipyridamole echocardiographic testing. Thallium 201 and Sestamibi uptakes at rest were expressed as percentage of maximal activity in each projection using a 13 segment model. Dobutamine and dipyridamole stress echocardiography were analyzed using a score index ranging from 1 (normokinesis) to 4 (dyskinesis) and a similar segmentation. Coronary angiography was analyzed by quantitative approach. In all patients, follow-up echocardiography was performed following coronary revascularization. Before revascularization, 75 segments showed regional dyssynergies. Thallium 201 showed the highest sensitivity and specificity in the preoperative identification of viability, whereas Sestamibi was affected by a significant number of false-negative studies. Among echocardiographic techniques, dobutamine was slightly superior to dipyridamole in the detection of viable segments. The degree of coronary stenosis failed to predict the recovery of function following by-pass graft or angioplasty in almost all segments; however, in case of occlusion, most viable segments were perfused by adequately collateralized coronary arteries.

  2. POP-pincer osmium-polyhydrides: head-to-head (Z)-dimerization of terminal alkynes.

    PubMed

    Alós, Joaquín; Bolaño, Tamara; Esteruelas, Miguel A; Oliván, Montserrat; Oñate, Enrique; Valencia, Marta

    2013-05-20

    A wide range of osmium-polyhydride complexes stabilized by the POP-pincer ligand xant(P(i)Pr2)2 (9,9-dimethyl-4,5-bis(diisopropylphosphino)xanthene) have been synthesized through cis-OsCl2{κ-S-(DMSO)4} (1, DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide). Treatment of toluene solutions of this adduct with the diphosphine, under reflux, leads to OsCl2{xant(P(i)Pr2)2}(κ-S-DMSO) (2). The reaction of 2 with H2 in the presence of Et3N affords OsH3Cl{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (3), which can be also prepared by addition of xant(P(i)Pr2)2 to toluene solutions of the unsaturated d(4)-trihydride OsH3Cl(P(i)Pr3)2 (5). Complex 3 reductively eliminates H2 in toluene at 90 °C. In the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide, the resulting monohydride is trapped by the S-donor molecule to give OsHCl{xant(P(i)Pr2)2}(κ-S-DMSO) (6). The reaction of 2 with H2 is sensible to the Brønsted base. Thus, in contrast to Et3N, NaH removes both chloride ligands and the hexahydride OsH6{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (7), containing a κ(2)-P-binding diphosphine, is formed under 3 atm of hydrogen at 50 °C. Complex 7 releases a H2 molecule to yield the tetrahydride OsH4{xant(P(i)Pr2)2} (8), which can be also prepared by reaction of OsH6(P(i)Pr3)2 (9) with xant(P(i)Pr2)2. Complex 8 reduces H(+) to give, in addition to H2, the oxidized OsH4-species [OsH4(OTf){xant(P(i)Pr2)2}](+) (10, OTf = trifluoromethanesulfonate). The redox process occurs in two stages via the OsH5-cation [OsH5{xant(P(i)Pr2)2}](+) (11). The metal oxidation state four can be recovered. The addition of acetonitrile to 10 leads to [OsH2(η(2)-H2)(CH3CN){xant(P(i)Pr2)2}](2+) (12). The deprotonation of 12 yields the osmium(IV) trihydride [OsH3(CH3CN){xant(P(i)Pr2)2}](+) (13), which is also formed by addition of HOTf to the acetonitrile solutions of 8. The latter is further an efficient catalyst precursor for the head-to-head (Z)-dimerization of phenylacetylene and tert-butylacetylene. During the activation process of the tetrahydride, the bis(alkynyl)vinylidene derivatives Os

  3. The Efficacy of Natalizumab versus Fingolimod for Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review, Indirect Evidence from Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trials and Meta-Analysis of Observational Head-to-Head Trials

    PubMed Central

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H.; Mavridis, Dimitris; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Dardiotis, Efthymios; Heliopoulos, Ioannis; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; Karapanayiotides, Theodoros; Kilidireas, Constantinos; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M.; Voumvourakis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Background Although Fingolimod (FGD) and Natalizumab (NTZ) appear to be effective in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), they have never been directly compared in a randomized clinical trial (RCT). Methods and Findings We evaluated the comparative efficacy of FGD vs. NTZ using a meta-analytical approach. Data from placebo-controlled RCTs was used for indirect comparisons and observational data was utilized for head-to-head comparisons. We identified 3 RCTs (2498 patients) and 5 observational studies (2576 patients). NTZ was associated with a greater reduction in the 2-year annualized relapse rate (ARR; SMDindirect = -0.24;95% CI: from -0.44 to -0.04; p = 0.005) and with the probability of no disease activity at 2 years (ORindirect:1.82, 95% CI: from 1.05 to 3.15) compared to FGD, while no differences between the two therapies were found in the proportion of patients who remained relapse-free (ORindirect = 1.20;95% CI: from 0.84 to 1.71) and those with disability progression (ORindirect = 0.76;95% CI: from 0.48 to 1.21) at 2 years. In the analysis of observational data, we found no significant differences between NTZ and FGD in the 2-year ARR (SMD = -0.05; 95% CI: from -0.26 to 0.16), and 2-year disability progression (OR:1.08;95% CI: from 0.77 to 1.52). However, NTZ-treated patients were more likely to remain relapse-free at 2-years compared to FGD (OR: 2.19;95% CI: from 1.15 to 4.18; p = z0.020). Conclusions Indirect analyses of RCT data and head-to-head comparisons of observational findings indicate that NTZ may be more effective than FGD in terms of disease activity reduction in patients with RRMS. However, head-to-head RCTs are required to independently confirm this preliminary observation. PMID:27684943

  4. A Fused α-β “Mini-spectrin” Mimics the Intact Erythrocyte Spectrin Head-to-head Tetramer*

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Sandra L.; Li, Donghai; Maksimova, Yelena; Gallagher, Patrick G.; Speicher, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Head-to-head assembly of two spectrin heterodimers to form an actin-cross-linking tetramer is a physiologically dynamic interaction that contributes to red cell membrane integrity. Recombinant β-spectrin C-terminal and α-spectrin N-terminal peptides can form tetramer-like univalent complexes, but they cannot evaluate effects of the open-closed dimer interactions or lateral associations of the two-spectrin strands on tetramer formation. In this study we produced and characterized a fused “mini-spectrin dimer” containing the β-spectrin C-terminal region linked to the α-spectrin N-terminal region. This fused mini-spectrin mimics structural and functional properties of intact, full-length dimers and tetramers, including lateral association of the α and β subunits in the dimer and formation of a closed dimer. High performance liquid chromatography gel filtration analyses of this mini-spectrin provide the first direct non-imaging experimental evidence for open and closed spectrin dimers and show that dimer-tetramer-oligomer interconversion is slow at low temperatures and accelerated at 30 °C, analogous to full-length spectrin. This protein exhibits wild type dimer-tetramer dissociation constants of ∼1 μm at 30 °C, independent of initial oligomeric state. Conformational states of the mini-spectrin dimer were probed further using chemical cross-linking, which identified distinct groups of cross-links for “open” and “closed” dimers and confirmed the N-terminal region of α-spectrin remains highly flexible in the complex, exhibiting closely analogous structures to those observed for the isolated α-spectrin N-terminal using NMR (Park, S., Caffrey, M. S., Johnson, M. E., and Fung, L. W. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 21837–21844). This fusion protein should serve as a useful template for structural and functional studies of the divalent tetramer site. PMID:20139081

  5. Head to Head Comparison of Stress Echocardiography with Exercise Electrocardiography for the Detection of Coronary Artery Stenosis in Women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Su-A; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Hong, Soon Jun; Park, Seong-Mi; Shin, Mi Seung; Kim, Myung-A; Hong, Kyoung-Soon; Shin, Gil Ja

    2016-01-01

    Background Exercise-stress electrocardiography (ECG) is initially recommended for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. But its value has been questioned in women because of suboptimal diagnostic accuracy. Stress echocardiography had been reported to have comparable test accuracy in women. But the data comparing the diagnostic accuracy of exercise-stress ECG and stress echocardiography directly are few. The aim of the study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of exercise-stress ECG and dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) in Korean women. Methods 202 consecutive female patients who presented with chest pain in outpatient clinic, and who underwent treadmill exercise test (TET), DSE and coronary angiography were included for the study. The diagnostic accuracy TET and DSE were calculated by the definition of > 50% or > 75% coronary artery stenosis (CAS). Results The sensitivity and specificity were higher with DSE (70.4, 94.6%) than TET (53.7, 73.6%) for detection of > 50% CAS. The higher accuracy of DSE was maintained after exclusion of the patients who could not achieve over 85% age predicted heart rate before ischemia induction. DSE also showed greater diagnostic accuracy than TET by > 75% CAS criteria, and in subsets of patient with intermediate pretest probability. Conclusion In the diagnosis of CAS, DSE showed higher accuracy than TET in female patients who presented with chest pain. As well as the test accuracy, adequate stress was more feasible with DSE than TET. These finding suggests DSE may be used as the first-line diagnostic tool in the detection of CAS in women with chest pain. PMID:27358706

  6. PubMed vs. HighWire Press: a head-to-head comparison of two medical literature search engines.

    PubMed

    Vanhecke, Thomas E; Barnes, Michael A; Zimmerman, Janet; Shoichet, Sandor

    2007-09-01

    PubMed and HighWire Press are both useful medical literature search engines available for free to anyone on the internet. We measured retrieval accuracy, number of results generated, retrieval speed, features and search tools on HighWire Press and PubMed using the quick search features of each. We found that using HighWire Press resulted in a higher likelihood of retrieving the desired article and higher number of search results than the same search on PubMed. PubMed was faster than HighWire Press in delivering search results regardless of search settings. There are considerable differences in search features between these two search engines.

  7. Charge compensation of head-to-head and tail-to-tail domain walls in barium titanate and its influence on conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Yinan; Genenko, Yuri A.; Xu, Bai-Xiang

    2014-07-28

    The effect of the polarization charge compensation by ionic and electronic space charges on domain properties in ferroelectrics with semiconducting features is considered, in particular, the conductivity of head-to-head and tail-to-tail domain walls is studied. It is shown that the domain wall conductivity that is enhanced by electrons or holes depends on the configuration and the types of domains as well as on the energy levels and concentrations of the defects involved. Phase field simulation results are used to explain recent equivocal experimental results on conductivity of charged domain walls in different ferroelectrics.

  8. A novel and widespread class of ketosynthase is responsible for the head-to-head condensation of two acyl moieties in bacterial pyrone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kresovic, Darko; Schempp, Florence; Cheikh-Ali, Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Summary The biosynthesis of photopyrones, novel quorum sensing signals in Photorhabdus, has been studied by heterologous expression of the photopyrone synthase PpyS catalyzing the head-to-head condensation of two acyl moieties. The biochemical mechanism of pyrone formation has been investigated by amino acid exchange and bioinformatic analysis. Additionally, the evolutionary origin of PpyS has been studied by phylogenetic analyses also revealing homologous enzymes in Pseudomonas sp. GM30 responsible for the biosynthesis of pseudopyronines including a novel derivative. Moreover this novel class of ketosynthases is only distantly related to other pyrone-forming enzymes identified in the biosynthesis of the potent antibiotics myxopyronin and corallopyronin. PMID:26425196

  9. 2,5-Dialkylresorcinol Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aurantiaca: Novel Head-to-Head Condensation of Two Fatty Acid-Derived Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Nowak-Thompson, Brian; Hammer, Philip E.; Hill, D. Steven; Stafford, Jill; Torkewitz, Nancy; Gaffney, Thomas D.; Lam, Stephen T.; Molnár, István; Ligon, James M.

    2003-01-01

    2-Hexyl-5-propylresorcinol is the predominant analog of several dialkylresorcinols produced by Pseudomonas aurantiaca (Pseudomonas fluorescens BL915). We isolated and characterized three biosynthetic genes that encode an acyl carrier protein, a β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III, and a protein of unknown function, all of which collectively allow heterologous production of 2-hexyl-5-propylresorcinol in Escherichia coli. Two regulatory genes exhibiting similarity to members of the AraC family of transcriptional regulators are also present in the identified gene cluster. Based on the deduced functions of the proteins encoded by the gene cluster and the observed incorporation of labeled carbons from octanoic acid into 2-hexyl-5-propylresorcinol, we propose that dialkylresorcinols are derived from medium-chain-length fatty acids by an unusual head-to-head condensation of β-ketoacyl thioester intermediates. Genomic evidence suggests that there is a similar pathway for the biosynthesis of the flexirubin-type pigments in certain bacteria belonging to the order Cytophagales. PMID:12533461

  10. Two-dimensional electron gases at head-to-head and tail-to-tail domain walls in ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Fernández, Pablo; Íñiguez, Jorge; Junquera, Javier

    Symmetry breaking at ferroelectric domain walls gives rise to new physical properties, offering the opportunity to use the domain walls themselves as a functional separate object in a device. One example is the appearance of an enhanced conductivity at the boundaries between ferroelectric domains in oxides. A realistic first-principles simulation of the domains walls is limited to highly-symmetric cleanly-cut walls in order to keep the number of atoms in the simulation box small. Here we use a recently developed second-principles method that treats all the lattice degrees of freedom and the relevant electronic ones on the same foot with high accuracy at a modest computational cost. We apply it to the demading physical problem of head-to-head (HH) and tail-to-tail (TT) domain walls in ferroelectric PbTiO3 thin films. These interfaces present a large and unfavourable electrostatic energy due to the polarization-induced bound charge at the domain wall. An accurate simulation should capture eventual charge transfers between the walls, and the concomitant electron-lattice coupling. We show how the polarization discontinuity in HH and TT domain walls in PbTiO3 thin films can be effectively screened by the formation of two-dimensional electron gases of electrons and holes. Finantial support from MINECO Grant No. FIS2012-37549-C05-04.

  11. Functional outcomes from a head-to-head, randomized, double-blind trial of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate and atomoxetine in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and an inadequate response to methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Peter; Häge, Alexander; Coghill, David R; Caballero, Beatriz; Adeyi, Ben; Anderson, Colleen S; Sikirica, Vanja; Cardo, Esther

    2016-02-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with functional impairments in multiple domains of patients' lives. A secondary objective of this randomized, active-controlled, head-to-head, double-blind, dose-optimized clinical trial was to compare the effects of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) and atomoxetine (ATX) on functional impairment in children and adolescents with ADHD. Patients aged 6-17 years with an ADHD Rating Scale IV total score ≥ 28 and an inadequate response to methylphenidate treatment (judged by investigators) were randomized (1:1) to once-daily LDX or ATX for 9 weeks. Parents/guardians completed the Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale-Parent Report (WFIRS-P) at baseline and at week 9 or early termination. p values were nominal and not corrected for multiple comparisons. Of 267 randomized patients, 200 completed the study (LDX 99, ATX 101). At baseline, mean WFIRS-P total score in the LDX group was 0.95 [standard deviation (SD) 0.474; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.87, 1.03] and in the ATX group was 0.91 (0.513; 0.82, 1.00). Scores in all WFIRS-P domains improved from baseline to endpoint in both groups, with least-squares mean changes in total score of -0.35 (95% CI -0.42, -0.29) for LDX and -0.27 (-0.33, -0.20) for ATX. The difference between LDX and ATX was statistically significant (p < 0.05) for the Learning and School (effect size of LDX vs ATX, 0.43) and Social Activities (0.34) domains and for total score (0.27). Both treatments reduced functional impairment in children and adolescents with ADHD; LDX was statistically significantly more effective than ATX in two of six domains and in total score.

  12. A head-to-head randomized clinical trial of methylphenidate and atomoxetine treatment for executive function in adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hsing-Chang; Shang, Chi-Yung; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Lin, Yu-Ju; Huang, Hui-Chun; Yang, Li-Kuang

    2013-10-01

    Results regarding the effects of methylphenidate and atomoxetine on executive functions were inconsistent and no study has directly compared the efficacy of these two medications in improving executive functions in adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We conducted an 8-10 wk, open-label, head-to-head, randomized clinical trial involving adults with a clinical diagnosis of ADHD confirmed by psychiatric interview. The two treatment arms were immediate-release methylphenidate (IR-methylphenidate) (n = 31) and atomoxetine once daily (n = 32). Executive functions were assessed by the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB), including spatial working memory, spatial span, intra-extra dimensional set shifts, rapid visual information processing and Stockings of Cambridge (SOC). In addition to the symptom assessments at baseline (week 0), visit 2 (week 4-5) and visit 3 (week 8–10), they received CANTAB assessments at baseline and visit 3 (60.4 ± 6.3 d). Compared to baseline, adults treated with atomoxetine showed significant improvement in spatial working memory, spatial short-term memory, sustained attention and spatial planning at visit 3; adults treated with IR-methylphenidate showed significant improvement in spatial working memory at visit 3. Comparing the magnitude of improvement in executive functions between these two medications, the effect was generally similar for the two groups, although atomoxetine might have significantly greater efficacy than IR-methylphenidate in terms of improving spatial planning (SOC). Our results provide evidence to support that both IR-methylphenidate and atomoxetine improved various executive functions in adults with ADHD with greater improvement in atomoxetine than IR-methylphenidate in spatial planning.

  13. Head to Head Comparison of Short-Term Treatment with the NAD+ Precursor Nicotinamide Mononucleotide (NMN) and 6 Weeks of Exercise in Obese Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Golam M.; Youngson, Neil A.; Sinclair, David A.; Morris, Margaret J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is well known to be a major cause of several chronic metabolic diseases, which can be partially counteracted by exercise. This is due, in part, to an upregulation of mitochondrial activity through increased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). Recent studies have shown that NAD+ levels can be increased by using the NAD+ precursor, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) leading to the suggestion that NMN could be a useful intervention in diet related metabolic disorders. In this study we compared the metabolic, and especially mitochondrial-associated, effects of exercise and NMN in ameliorating the consequences of high-fat diet (HFD) induced obesity in mice. Sixty female 5 week old C57BL6/J mice were allocated across five groups: Chow sedentary: CS; Chow exercise: CEX; HFD sedentary: HS; HFD NMN: HNMN; HFD exercise: HEX (12/group). After 6 weeks of diet, exercise groups underwent treadmill exercise (15 m/min for 45 min), 6 days per week for 6 weeks. NMN or vehicle (500 mg/kg body weight) was injected (i.p.) daily for the last 17 days. No significant alteration in body weight was observed in response to exercise or NMN. The HFD significantly altered adiposity, glucose tolerance, plasma insulin, NADH levels and citrate synthase activity in muscle and liver. HEX and HNMN groups both showed significantly improved glucose tolerance compared to the HS group. NAD+ levels were increased significantly both in muscle and liver by NMN whereas exercise increased NAD+ only in muscle. Both NMN and exercise ameliorated the HFD-induced reduction in liver citrate synthase activity. However, exercise, but not NMN, ameliorated citrate synthase activity in muscle. Overall these data suggest that while exercise and NMN-supplementation can induce similar reversal of the glucose intolerance induced by obesity, they are associated with tissue-specific effects and differential alterations to mitochondrial function in muscle and liver. PMID:27594836

  14. Head to Head Comparison of Short-Term Treatment with the NAD(+) Precursor Nicotinamide Mononucleotide (NMN) and 6 Weeks of Exercise in Obese Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Golam M; Youngson, Neil A; Sinclair, David A; Morris, Margaret J

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is well known to be a major cause of several chronic metabolic diseases, which can be partially counteracted by exercise. This is due, in part, to an upregulation of mitochondrial activity through increased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)). Recent studies have shown that NAD(+) levels can be increased by using the NAD(+) precursor, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) leading to the suggestion that NMN could be a useful intervention in diet related metabolic disorders. In this study we compared the metabolic, and especially mitochondrial-associated, effects of exercise and NMN in ameliorating the consequences of high-fat diet (HFD) induced obesity in mice. Sixty female 5 week old C57BL6/J mice were allocated across five groups: Chow sedentary: CS; Chow exercise: CEX; HFD sedentary: HS; HFD NMN: HNMN; HFD exercise: HEX (12/group). After 6 weeks of diet, exercise groups underwent treadmill exercise (15 m/min for 45 min), 6 days per week for 6 weeks. NMN or vehicle (500 mg/kg body weight) was injected (i.p.) daily for the last 17 days. No significant alteration in body weight was observed in response to exercise or NMN. The HFD significantly altered adiposity, glucose tolerance, plasma insulin, NADH levels and citrate synthase activity in muscle and liver. HEX and HNMN groups both showed significantly improved glucose tolerance compared to the HS group. NAD(+) levels were increased significantly both in muscle and liver by NMN whereas exercise increased NAD(+) only in muscle. Both NMN and exercise ameliorated the HFD-induced reduction in liver citrate synthase activity. However, exercise, but not NMN, ameliorated citrate synthase activity in muscle. Overall these data suggest that while exercise and NMN-supplementation can induce similar reversal of the glucose intolerance induced by obesity, they are associated with tissue-specific effects and differential alterations to mitochondrial function in muscle and liver. PMID:27594836

  15. Multi-Institutional External Validation of Seminal Vesicle Invasion Nomograms: Head-to-Head Comparison of Gallina Nomogram Versus 2007 Partin Tables

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, Kevin C.; Capitanio, Umberto; Jeldres, Claudio; Arjane, Philippe; Perrotte, Paul; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Lee, David I.; Shalhav, Arieh L.; Zagaja, Gregory P.; Shikanov, Sergey A.; Gofrit, Ofer N.; Thong, Alan E.; Albala, David M.; Sun, Leon; Karakiewicz, Pierre I.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: The Partin tables represent one of the most widely used prostate cancer staging tools for seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) prediction. Recently, Gallina et al. reported a novel staging tool for the prediction of SVI that further incorporated the use of the percentage of positive biopsy cores. We performed an external validation of the Gallina et al. nomogram and the 2007 Partin tables in a large, multi-institutional North American cohort of men treated with robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Clinical and pathologic data were prospectively gathered from 2,606 patients treated with robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy at one of four North American robotic referral centers between 2002 and 2007. Discrimination was quantified with the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve. The calibration compared the predicted and observed SVI rates throughout the entire range of predictions. Results: At robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy, SVI was recorded in 4.2% of patients. The discriminant properties of the Gallina et al. nomogram resulted in 81% accuracy compared with 78% for the 2007 Partin tables. The Gallina et al. nomogram overestimated the true rate of SVI. Conversely, the Partin tables underestimated the true rate of SVI. Conclusion: The Gallina et al. nomogram offers greater accuracy (81%) than the 2007 Partin tables (78%). However, both tools are associated with calibration limitations that need to be acknowledged and considered before their implementation into clinical practice.

  16. Head to Head Comparison of Short-Term Treatment with the NAD+ Precursor Nicotinamide Mononucleotide (NMN) and 6 Weeks of Exercise in Obese Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Golam M.; Youngson, Neil A.; Sinclair, David A.; Morris, Margaret J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is well known to be a major cause of several chronic metabolic diseases, which can be partially counteracted by exercise. This is due, in part, to an upregulation of mitochondrial activity through increased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). Recent studies have shown that NAD+ levels can be increased by using the NAD+ precursor, nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) leading to the suggestion that NMN could be a useful intervention in diet related metabolic disorders. In this study we compared the metabolic, and especially mitochondrial-associated, effects of exercise and NMN in ameliorating the consequences of high-fat diet (HFD) induced obesity in mice. Sixty female 5 week old C57BL6/J mice were allocated across five groups: Chow sedentary: CS; Chow exercise: CEX; HFD sedentary: HS; HFD NMN: HNMN; HFD exercise: HEX (12/group). After 6 weeks of diet, exercise groups underwent treadmill exercise (15 m/min for 45 min), 6 days per week for 6 weeks. NMN or vehicle (500 mg/kg body weight) was injected (i.p.) daily for the last 17 days. No significant alteration in body weight was observed in response to exercise or NMN. The HFD significantly altered adiposity, glucose tolerance, plasma insulin, NADH levels and citrate synthase activity in muscle and liver. HEX and HNMN groups both showed significantly improved glucose tolerance compared to the HS group. NAD+ levels were increased significantly both in muscle and liver by NMN whereas exercise increased NAD+ only in muscle. Both NMN and exercise ameliorated the HFD-induced reduction in liver citrate synthase activity. However, exercise, but not NMN, ameliorated citrate synthase activity in muscle. Overall these data suggest that while exercise and NMN-supplementation can induce similar reversal of the glucose intolerance induced by obesity, they are associated with tissue-specific effects and differential alterations to mitochondrial function in muscle and liver.

  17. Head-to-Head Comparison of Two Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) Schemes for Characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii Outbreak and Sporadic Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Stefanik, Danuta; Wisplinghoff, Hilmar; Seifert, Harald

    2016-01-01

    To compare the two Acinetobacter baumannii multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) schemes and to assess their suitability to aid in outbreak analysis we investigated the molecular epidemiology of 99 Acinetobacter baumannii isolates representing outbreak-related and sporadic isolates from 24 hospitals in four different countries (Germany, Poland, Sweden, and Turkey). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used as the reference method to determine the epidemiologic relatedness of isolates and compared to MLST using both the Oxford and Pasteur scheme. Rep-PCR was used to define international clonal lineages (IC). We identified 26 unique outbreak strains and 21 sporadic strains. The majority of outbreaks were associated with carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii harbouring oxacillinase OXA-23-like and corresponding to IC 2. Sequence types (STs) obtained from the Oxford scheme correlate well with PFGE patterns, while the STs of the Pasteur scheme are more in accordance with rep-PCR grouping, but neither one is mirroring completely the results of the comparator. On two occasions the Oxford scheme identified two different STs within a single outbreak where PFGE patterns had only one band difference. The CCs of both MLST schemes were able to define clonal clusters that were concordant with the ICs determined by rep-PCR. IC4 corresponds to the previously described CC15 Pasteur (= CC103 Oxford). It can be concluded that both MLST schemes are valuable tools for population-based studies. In addition, the higher discriminatory power of the Oxford scheme that compares with the resolution obtained with PFGE can often aid in outbreak analysis. PMID:27071077

  18. Helical 4D CT and Comparison with Cine 4D CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tinsu

    4D CT was one of the most important developments in radiation oncology in the last decade. Its early development in single slice CT and commercialization in multi-slice CT has radically changed our practice in radiation treatment of lung cancer, and has enabled the stereotactic radiosurgery of early stage lung cancer. In this chapter, we will document the history of 4D CT development, detail the data sufficiency condition governing the 4D CT data collection; present the design of the commercial helical 4D CTs from Philips and Siemens; compare the differences between the helical 4D CT and the GE cine 4D CT in data acquisition, slice thickness, acquisition time and work flow; review the respiratory monitoring devices; and understand the causes of image artifacts in 4D CT.

  19. The CaTin1 (Capsicum annuum TMV-induced clone 1) and CaTin1-2 genes are linked head-to-head and share a bidirectional promoter.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ryoung; Kim, Min Jung; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2003-05-01

    CaTin1 was expressed relatively early in the TMV-inoculated leaves of hot pepper which is resistant to TMV-P(0) infection. Interestingly, there was another homologous gene (CaTin1-2) located in front of CaTin1 in a head-to-head fashion and they shared a single promoter. The expression profile of the CaTin1-2 was very similar to CaTin1 in all the treatments except the slower induction time compared to CaTin1 upon TMV-P(0) inoculation. The promoter analysis of CaTin1 and CaTin1-2 revealed bidirectionality both in cis-elements and activity. The CaTin1-2 promoter had two TATA-boxes, four GCC-boxes, the root responsive element, and a W1-box. The ethylene-inducible promoter activity depended on GCC-boxes and TMV-inducible activity of the CaTin1-2 promoter reached its highest activity when this promoter had a W1-box.

  20. Primary hyperaldosteronism: comparison of CT, adrenal venography, and venous sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Geisinger, M.A.; Zelch, M.G.; Bravo, E.L.; Risius, B.F.; O'Donovan, P.B.; Borkowski, G.P.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-nine patients with primary hyperaldosteronism were evaluated with computed tomography (CT), adrenal venous sampling, and adrenal venography. Twenty-three patients had aldosteronomas and six had bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia. Sixteen (70%) of the adenomas were accurately located by CT. All nodules of 1.5 cm or larger diameter and 50% of nodules 1.0 to 1.4 cm in diameter were demonstrated. Nodules of less than 1.0 cm in diameter generally were not detected. High-resolution CT appeared more sensitive than standard CT (75% vs 58%). Adrenal venous sampling for aldosterone assay was the most sensitive of the three methods, localizing 22 (96%) of the 23 adenomas. Eighteen (78%) of the adenomas were identified by adrenal venography, although two patients with bilateral cortical hyperplasia were mistakenly diagnosed as having a small adenoma. No such false-positive studies were encountered with CT or adrenal venous sampling.

  1. Evaluation of a head-to-head study of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate and atomoxetine: evaluation of Dittmann RW, Cardo E, Nagy P, et al. Efficacy and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate and atomoxetine in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a head-to-head, randomised, double-blind, Phase IIIb study. CNS Drugs 2013;27:1081-1092. doi: 10.1007/s40263-013-0104-8 ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01106430.

    PubMed

    Banaschewski, Tobias; Rothermel, Boris; Poustka, Luise

    2014-09-01

    Here, we evaluate a report of a head-to-head study of the prodrug stimulant lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) and the non-stimulant atomoxetine hydrochloride (ATX) in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). An inadequate response to previous methylphenidate (MPH) treatment was a notable inclusion criterion. The primary efficacy outcome of a more rapid clinical response to LDX than to ATX was predictable from the known properties of the two drugs. However, secondary efficacy outcomes indicated that LDX was significantly more effective than ATX in relieving investigator-rated symptoms of ADHD, with an effect size of 0.56. Safety and tolerability profiles were consistent with the known properties of LDX and ATX. Despite some issues with the study design, the conclusion that LDX is more effective than ATX over the short term appears robust. In addition, the magnitude of improvement with both treatments indicated that previous MPH treatment is not a factor affecting the potential for patients to benefit from LDX or ATX. The results may help to inform clinical practice in Europe, where LDX is approved for treating children and adolescents with ADHD and a previous inadequate response to MPH, and in other regions where generic MPH formulations are typically the first-line therapeutic option.

  2. Correlative Imaging in a Patient with Cystic Thymoma: CT, MR and PET/CT Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Valeria; Esposito, Alfredo; Maurea, Simone; Camera, Luigi; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Palmieri, Giovannella; Buonerba, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cystic thymoma is a rare variant of thymic neoplasm characterized by almost complete cystic degeneration with mixed internal structure. We describe a case of a 60 year-old woman with a cystic thymoma studied with advanced tomographic imaging stydies. CT, MRI and PET/CT with 18F-FDG were performed; volumetric CT and MRI images provided better anatomic evaluation for pre-operative assessment, while PET/CT was helpful for lesion characterization based on 18F-FDG uptake. Although imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative evaluation of cystic thymoma, final diagnosis still remains surgical. Case Report A 60-year-old woman with recent chest pain and no history of previous disease was admitted to our departement to investigate the result of a previous chest X-ray that showed bilateral mediastinal enlargement; for this purpose, enhanced chest CT scan was performed using a 64-rows scanner (Toshiba, Aquilion 64, Japan) before and after intravenous bolus administration of iodinated non ionic contrast agent; CT images demonstrated the presence of a large mediastinal mass (11×8 cm) located in the anterior mediastinum who extended from the anonymous vein to the cardio-phrenic space, compressing the left atrium and causing medium lobe atelectasis; bilateral pleural effusion was also present. Conclusions In conclusion, correlative imaging plays a foundamental role for the diagnostic evaluation of patient with cystic thymoma. In particular, volumetric CT and MRI studies can provide better anatomic informations regarding internal structure and local tumor spread for pre-operative assessment. Conversely, metabolic imaging using 18F-FDG PET/CT is helpful for lesion characterization differentiating benign from malignant lesion on the basis of intense tracer uptake. The role of PET/MRI is still under investigation. However, final diagnosis still remains surgical even though imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative patient management. PMID:25593635

  3. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Weidlich, Georg A.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities—fan beam and cone beam—was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient. PMID:27752404

  4. The genes for the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) chains of human basement membrane collagen type IV are arranged head-to-head and separated by a bidirectional promoter of unique structure.

    PubMed Central

    Pöschl, E; Pollner, R; Kühn, K

    1988-01-01

    The human basement membrane specific collagen type IV is a heterotrimer composed of two alpha 1(IV) chains and one alpha 2(IV) chain. A partial genomic EcoRI library was screened with cDNA clones representing the 5' end regions of the alpha 1(IV) and the alpha 2(IV) mRNA. A 2.2-kb genomic fragment was isolated and sequenced, which contains the 5' terminal exons of both genes located in close vicinity. The two genes were found to be arranged in opposite direction, head-to-head, separated only by a short region of 127 bp, apparently representing promoters of both genes as indicated by the existence of typical sequence motifs (CAT-box, SP1 consensus sequence). These data suggest that the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) genes use a common, bidirectional promoter. The striking symmetrical arrangement of sequence elements within the promoter may be of basic importance for the coordination of bidirectional transcription. The promoter region had no detectable transcriptional activity in transient gene expression assays after fusion to the chloramphenicol acetylase (CAT) gene in either direction, indicating the necessity of additional elements for efficient and tissue-specific expression of both genes. Constructs containing different segments of both genes failed to identify regions with enhancing activity for the homologous collagen type IV promoter. When the heterologous HSV thymidine kinase promoter was used, a negatively acting region was identified. This indicates that the alpha 1(IV) and alpha 2(IV) promoter activity is controlled by additional regulatory elements present on distant portions of both genes. Images PMID:2846280

  5. [Comparison between CT and NMR images. Physical aspects].

    PubMed

    Poretti, G

    1984-10-27

    On the basis of simple physical considerations, parameters influencing the computer tomograph (CT) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pictures are compared. In the case of the CT, only X-ray tube voltage and radiation intensity (i.e. dose to the patient) can be altered. Changing the X-ray tube voltage alone produces no special diagnostic advantages, unless the method is supplemented, for a specific body region, by separate determination of the "Hounsfield number" in Compton or photoelectric numbers. However, the method is associated with relatively major measurement and evaluation problems. A survey of the principles of the NMR technique is followed by a brief explanation of the so-called "tissue parameters" and "measurement parameters" which influence picture quality in the NMR technique. Despite certain advantages it can scarcely be expected that the NMR technique will replace the CT technique in the next few years: it is very probable, however, that a shift to specific examinations will occur in the case of the latter.

  6. Comparison between x-ray tube-based and synchrotron radiation-based μCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunke, Oliver; Brockdorf, Kathleen; Drews, Susanne; Müller, Bert; Donath, Tilman; Herzen, Julia; Beckmann, Felix

    2008-08-01

    Nowadays, X-ray tube-based high-resolution CT systems are widely used in scientific research and industrial applications. But the potential, convenience and economy of these lab systems is often underestimated. The present paper shows the comparison of sophisticated conventional μCT with synchrotron radiation-based μCT (SRμCT). The different aspects and characteristics of both approaches like spatial and density resolution, penetration depth, scanning time or sample size is described in detail. The tube-based μCT measurements were performed with a granite-based nanotom®-CT system (phoenix|x-ray, Wunstorf, Germany) equipped with a 180 kV - 15 W high-power nanofocus® tube with tungsten or molybdenum targets. The tube offers a wide range of applications from scanning low absorbing samples in nanofocus® mode with voxel sizes below 500 nm and highly absorbing objects in the high power mode with focal spot and voxel sizes of a few microns. The SRμCT measurements were carried out with the absorption contrast set-up at the beamlines W 2 and BW 2 at HASYLAB/DESY, operated by the GKSS Research Center. The range of samples examined covers materials of very different absorption levels and related photon energies for the CT scans. Both quantitative and qualitative comparisons of CT scans using biomedical specimens with rather low X-ray absorption such as parts of the human spine as well as using composites from the field of materials science are shown.

  7. Comparison of stroke infarction between CT perfusion and diffusion weighted imaging: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd. Rahni, Ashrani Aizzuddin; Arka, Israna Hossain; Chellappan, Kalaivani; Mukari, Shahizon Azura; Law, Zhe Kang; Sahathevan, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results of comparison of automatic segmentations of the infarct core, between that obtained from CT perfusion (based on time to peak parameter) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). For each patient, the two imaging volumes were automatically co-registered to a common frame of reference based on an acquired CT angiography image. The accuracy of image registration is measured by the overlap of the segmented brain from both images (CT perfusion and DWI), measured within their common field of view. Due to the limitations of the study, DWI was acquired as a follow up scan up to a week after initial CT based imaging. However, we found significant overlap of the segmented brain (Jaccard indices of approximately 0.8) and the percentage of infarcted brain tissue from the two modalities were still fairly highly correlated (correlation coefficient of approximately 0.9). The results are promising with more data needed in future for clinical inference.

  8. Development of CCD-based optical computed tomography and comparison with single-beam optical CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on the development of CCD-based optical computed tomography (CT) CT-s2. A commercially available 10× fast optical computed tomography scanner (OCTOPUSTM-10X, MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT, USA) was used for comparison. NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter was used to validate the performance of CT-s2. The gamma pass rate can reach 96.00% when using a 3% dose difference and 3 mm dose-to-agreement criteria. The results of CT-s2 are as good as those of the single-beam optical-CT scanner, but the scanning time of CT-s2 is only one-tenth of that of the single-beam optical-CT scanner.

  9. Experimental comparison of empirical material decomposition methods for spectral CT.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Kevin C; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2015-04-21

    Material composition can be estimated from spectral information acquired using photon counting x-ray detectors with pulse height analysis. Non-ideal effects in photon counting x-ray detectors such as charge-sharing, k-escape, and pulse-pileup distort the detected spectrum, which can cause material decomposition errors. This work compared the performance of two empirical decomposition methods: a neural network estimator and a linearized maximum likelihood estimator with correction (A-table method). The two investigated methods differ in how they model the nonlinear relationship between the spectral measurements and material decomposition estimates. The bias and standard deviation of material decomposition estimates were compared for the two methods, using both simulations and experiments with a photon-counting x-ray detector. Both the neural network and A-table methods demonstrated a similar performance for the simulated data. The neural network had lower standard deviation for nearly all thicknesses of the test materials in the collimated (low scatter) and uncollimated (higher scatter) experimental data. In the experimental study of Teflon thicknesses, non-ideal detector effects demonstrated a potential bias of 11-28%, which was reduced to 0.1-11% using the proposed empirical methods. Overall, the results demonstrated preliminary experimental feasibility of empirical material decomposition for spectral CT using photon-counting detectors.

  10. Experimental comparison of empirical material decomposition methods for spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Kevin C.; Gilat Schmidt, Taly

    2015-04-01

    Material composition can be estimated from spectral information acquired using photon counting x-ray detectors with pulse height analysis. Non-ideal effects in photon counting x-ray detectors such as charge-sharing, k-escape, and pulse-pileup distort the detected spectrum, which can cause material decomposition errors. This work compared the performance of two empirical decomposition methods: a neural network estimator and a linearized maximum likelihood estimator with correction (A-table method). The two investigated methods differ in how they model the nonlinear relationship between the spectral measurements and material decomposition estimates. The bias and standard deviation of material decomposition estimates were compared for the two methods, using both simulations and experiments with a photon-counting x-ray detector. Both the neural network and A-table methods demonstrated a similar performance for the simulated data. The neural network had lower standard deviation for nearly all thicknesses of the test materials in the collimated (low scatter) and uncollimated (higher scatter) experimental data. In the experimental study of Teflon thicknesses, non-ideal detector effects demonstrated a potential bias of 11-28%, which was reduced to 0.1-11% using the proposed empirical methods. Overall, the results demonstrated preliminary experimental feasibility of empirical material decomposition for spectral CT using photon-counting detectors.

  11. Experimental Comparison of Empirical Material Decomposition Methods for Spectral CT

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Kevin C.; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2015-01-01

    Material composition can be estimated from spectral information acquired using photon counting x-ray detectors with pulse height analysis. Non-ideal effects in photon counting x-ray detectors such as charge-sharing, k-escape, and pulse-pileup distort the detected spectrum, which can cause material decomposition errors. This work compared the performance of two empirical decomposition methods: a neural network estimator and a linearized maximum likelihood estimator with correction (A-table method). The two investigated methods differ in how they model the nonlinear relationship between the spectral measurements and material decomposition estimates. The bias and standard deviation of material decomposition estimates were compared for the two methods, using both simulations and experiments with a photon-counting x-ray detector. Both the neural network and A-table methods demonstrated similar performance for the simulated data. The neural network had lower standard deviation for nearly all thicknesses of the test materials in the collimated (low scatter) and uncollimated (higher scatter) experimental data. In the experimental study of Teflon thicknesses, non-ideal detector effects demonstrated a potential bias of 11–28%, which was reduced to 0.1–11% using the proposed empirical methods. Overall, the results demonstrated preliminary experimental feasibility of empirical material decomposition for spectral CT using photon-counting detectors. PMID:25813054

  12. Detection of Primary Malignancy and Metastases with FDG PET/CT in Patients with Cholangiocarcinomas: Lesion-based Comparison with Contrast Enhanced CT

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Youssef; Mariano, Aladin T.; Lu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The current National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Guidelines consider the role of 2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (FDG PET/CT) in the evaluation of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) as "uncertain," and have recommended contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) but not FDG PET/CT as a routine imaging test for CCA workup. We set out to compare the diagnostic performance of FDG PET/CT and CECT in patients with CCA. The retrospective study included patients with CCA who underwent FDG PET/CT and CECT within 2-month interval between 2011 and 2013 in our hospital. Lesion-based comparison was conducted. Final diagnoses were made based on the composite clinical and imaging data with minimal 6-month follow-up. A total of 18 patients with 28-paired tests were included. There is a total of 142 true malignant lesions as revealed by the 6-paired pre-treatment and 22-paired post-treatment tests. On a lesion-based analysis, the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs), and accuracies of PET/CT and CECT for detection of CCA were 96.5%, 55.5%, 97.2%, 50.0%, 94.1% and 62.2%, 66.7%, 96.7%, 10.0%, 62.5%, respectively. FDG PET/CT detected more intrahepatic malignant and extrahepatic metastases; and had significant higher sensitivity, NPV, and accuracy than CECT, while similar in specificity and PPV. No true positive lesion detected on CECT that was missed on PET/CT, and none of the false negative lesions on PET/CT were detected on CECT. Six patients had paired pretreatment tests, and FDG PET/CT results changed planned management in three patients. Our data suggest that FDG PET/CT detect more primary and metastatic lesions and lead to considerable changes in treatment plan in comparison with CECT. PMID:27651736

  13. Detection of Primary Malignancy and Metastases with FDG PET/CT in Patients with Cholangiocarcinomas: Lesion-based Comparison with Contrast Enhanced CT

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Youssef; Mariano, Aladin T.; Lu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The current National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Guidelines consider the role of 2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (FDG PET/CT) in the evaluation of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) as "uncertain," and have recommended contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) but not FDG PET/CT as a routine imaging test for CCA workup. We set out to compare the diagnostic performance of FDG PET/CT and CECT in patients with CCA. The retrospective study included patients with CCA who underwent FDG PET/CT and CECT within 2-month interval between 2011 and 2013 in our hospital. Lesion-based comparison was conducted. Final diagnoses were made based on the composite clinical and imaging data with minimal 6-month follow-up. A total of 18 patients with 28-paired tests were included. There is a total of 142 true malignant lesions as revealed by the 6-paired pre-treatment and 22-paired post-treatment tests. On a lesion-based analysis, the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs), and accuracies of PET/CT and CECT for detection of CCA were 96.5%, 55.5%, 97.2%, 50.0%, 94.1% and 62.2%, 66.7%, 96.7%, 10.0%, 62.5%, respectively. FDG PET/CT detected more intrahepatic malignant and extrahepatic metastases; and had significant higher sensitivity, NPV, and accuracy than CECT, while similar in specificity and PPV. No true positive lesion detected on CECT that was missed on PET/CT, and none of the false negative lesions on PET/CT were detected on CECT. Six patients had paired pretreatment tests, and FDG PET/CT results changed planned management in three patients. Our data suggest that FDG PET/CT detect more primary and metastatic lesions and lead to considerable changes in treatment plan in comparison with CECT.

  14. Detection of Primary Malignancy and Metastases with FDG PET/CT in Patients with Cholangiocarcinomas: Lesion-based Comparison with Contrast Enhanced CT.

    PubMed

    Elias, Youssef; Mariano, Aladin T; Lu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    The current National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Guidelines consider the role of 2-deoxy-2-(18)F-fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (FDG PET/CT) in the evaluation of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) as "uncertain," and have recommended contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) but not FDG PET/CT as a routine imaging test for CCA workup. We set out to compare the diagnostic performance of FDG PET/CT and CECT in patients with CCA. The retrospective study included patients with CCA who underwent FDG PET/CT and CECT within 2-month interval between 2011 and 2013 in our hospital. Lesion-based comparison was conducted. Final diagnoses were made based on the composite clinical and imaging data with minimal 6-month follow-up. A total of 18 patients with 28-paired tests were included. There is a total of 142 true malignant lesions as revealed by the 6-paired pre-treatment and 22-paired post-treatment tests. On a lesion-based analysis, the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs), and accuracies of PET/CT and CECT for detection of CCA were 96.5%, 55.5%, 97.2%, 50.0%, 94.1% and 62.2%, 66.7%, 96.7%, 10.0%, 62.5%, respectively. FDG PET/CT detected more intrahepatic malignant and extrahepatic metastases; and had significant higher sensitivity, NPV, and accuracy than CECT, while similar in specificity and PPV. No true positive lesion detected on CECT that was missed on PET/CT, and none of the false negative lesions on PET/CT were detected on CECT. Six patients had paired pretreatment tests, and FDG PET/CT results changed planned management in three patients. Our data suggest that FDG PET/CT detect more primary and metastatic lesions and lead to considerable changes in treatment plan in comparison with CECT. PMID:27651736

  15. Comparison of CT-derived Ventilation Maps with Deposition Patterns of Inhaled Microspheres in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Lamm, W. J.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Krueger, Melissa; Glenny, Robb W.; Corley, Richard A.

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Computer models for inhalation toxicology and drug-aerosol delivery studies rely on ventilation pattern inputs for predictions of particle deposition and vapor uptake. However, changes in lung mechanics due to disease can impact airflow dynamics and model results. It has been demonstrated that non-invasive, in vivo, 4DCT imaging (3D imaging at multiple time points in the breathing cycle) can be used to map heterogeneities in ventilation patterns under healthy and disease conditions. The purpose of this study was to validate ventilation patterns measured from CT imaging by exposing the same rats to an aerosol of fluorescent microspheres (FMS) and examining particle deposition patterns using cryomicrotome imaging. Materials and Methods: Six male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with elastase to a single lobe to induce a heterogeneous disease. After four weeks, rats were imaged over the breathing cycle by CT then immediately exposed to an aerosol of ~1µm FMS for ~5 minutes. After the exposure, the lungs were excised and prepared for cryomicrotome imaging, where a 3D image of FMS deposition was acquired using serial sectioning. Cryomicrotome images were spatially registered to match the live CT images to facilitate direct quantitative comparisons of FMS signal intensity with the CT-based ventilation maps. Results: Comparisons of fractional ventilation in contiguous, non-overlapping, 3D regions between CT-based ventilation maps and FMS images showed strong correlations in fractional ventilation (r=0.888, p<0.0001). Conclusion: We conclude that ventilation maps derived from CT imaging are predictive of the 1µm aerosol deposition used in ventilation-perfusion heterogeneity inhalation studies.

  16. Comparison of CT-derived ventilation maps with deposition patterns of inhaled microspheres in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Richard E.; Lamm, Wayne J.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Krueger, Melissa A.; Glenny, Robb W.; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Computer models for inhalation toxicology and drug-aerosol delivery studies rely on ventilation pattern inputs for predictions of particle deposition and vapor uptake. However, changes in lung mechanics due to disease can impact airflow dynamics and model results. It has been demonstrated that non-invasive, in vivo, 4DCT imaging (3D imaging at multiple time points in the breathing cycle) can be used to map heterogeneities in ventilation patterns under healthy and disease conditions. The purpose of this study was to validate ventilation patterns measured from CT imaging by exposing the same rats to an aerosol of fluorescent microspheres (FMS) and examining particle deposition patterns using cryomicrotome imaging. Materials and Methods Six male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with elastase to a single lobe to induce a heterogeneous disease. After four weeks, rats were imaged over the breathing cycle by CT then immediately exposed to an aerosol of ~1μm FMS for ~5 minutes. After the exposure, the lungs were excised and prepared for cryomicrotome imaging, where a 3D image of FMS deposition was acquired using serial sectioning. Cryomicrotome images were spatially registered to match the live CT images to facilitate direct quantitative comparisons of FMS signal intensity with the CT-based ventilation maps. Results Comparisons of fractional ventilation in contiguous, non-overlapping, 3D regions between CT-based ventilation maps and FMS images showed strong correlations in fractional ventilation (r=0.888, p<0.0001). Conclusion We conclude that ventilation maps derived from CT imaging are predictive of the 1μm aerosol deposition used in ventilation-perfusion heterogeneity inhalation studies. PMID:25513951

  17. Comparison of SPECT/CT, MRI and CT in diagnosis of skull base bone invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-xu; Han, Peng-hui; Zhang, Guo-qian; Wang, Rui-hao; Ge, Yong-bin; Ren, Zhi-gang; Li, Jian-sheng; Fu, Wen-hai

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is crucial for correct staging, assessing treatment response and contouring the tumor target in radiotherapy planning, as well as improving the patient's prognosis. To compare the diagnostic efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for the detection of skull base invasion in NPC. Sixty untreated patients with histologically proven NPC underwent SPECT/CT imaging, contrast-enhanced MRI and CT. Of the 60 patients, 30 had skull base invasion confirmed by the final results of contrast-enhanced MRI, CT and six-month follow-up imaging (MRI and CT). The diagnostic efficacy of the three imaging modalities in detecting skull base invasion was evaluated. The rates of positive findings of skull base invasion for SPECT/CT, MRI and CT were 53.3%, 48.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 93.3%, 86.7% and 90.0% for SPECT/CT fusion imaging, 96.7%, 100.0% and 98.3% for contrast-enhanced MRI, and 66.7%, 100.0% and 83.3% for contrast-enhanced CT. MRI showed the best performance for the diagnosis of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, followed closely by SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT had poorer specificity than that of both MRI and CT, while CT had the lowest sensitivity.

  18. Head-to-Head Comparison of the RNA-Based Aptima Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Assay and the DNA-Based Hybrid Capture 2 HPV Test in a Routine Screening Population of Women Aged 30 to 60 Years in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Sven; Neis, Klaus-Joachim; Castanon, Alejandra; Iftner, Angelika; Holz, Barbara; Staebler, Annette; Henes, Melanie; Rall, Katharina; Haedicke, Juliane; von Weyhern, Claus Hann; Clad, Andreas; Brucker, Sara; Sasieni, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Testing for E6/E7 mRNA in cells infected with high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) might improve the specificity of HPV testing for the identification of cervical precancerous lesions. Here we compared the RNA-based Aptima HPV (AHPV) assay (Hologic) and the DNA-based Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) HPV test (Qiagen) to liquid-based cytology (LBC) for women undergoing routine cervical screening. A total of 10,040 women, 30 to 60 years of age, were invited to participate in the study, 9,451 of whom were included in the analysis. Specimens were tested centrally by LBC, the AHPV test, and the HC2 test, and women who tested positive on any test were referred for colposcopy. Genotyping was performed on all HR-HPV-positive samples. Test characteristics were calculated based on histological review. As a result, we identified 90 women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ (CIN2+), including 43 women with CIN3+. Sensitivity differences between the AHPV test and the HC2 test in detecting CIN2+ (P = 0.180) or CIN3+ (P = 0.0625) lesions were statistically nonsignificant. Of three CIN3 cases that were missed with the AHPV test, two cases presented lesion-free cones and one had a non-HR HPV67 infection. The specificity (

  19. Head-to-head comparison of intensive lifestyle intervention (U-TURN) versus conventional multifactorial care in patients with type 2 diabetes: protocol and rationale for an assessor-blinded, parallel group and randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Hansen, Katrine B; Johansen, Mette Y; Pedersen, Maria; Zacho, Morten; Hansen, Louise S; Kofoed, Katja; Thomsen, Katja; Jensen, Mette S; Nielsen, Rasmus O; MacDonald, Chris; Langberg, Henning; Vaag, Allan A; Pedersen, Bente K; Karstoft, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current pharmacological therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are challenged by lack of sustainability and borderline firm evidence of real long-term health benefits. Accordingly, lifestyle intervention remains the corner stone in the management of T2D. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the optimal intervention programmes in T2D ensuring both compliance as well as long-term health outcomes. Our objective is to assess the effects of an intensive lifestyle intervention (the U-TURN intervention) on glycaemic control in patients with T2D. Our hypothesis is that intensive lifestyle changes are equally effective as standard diabetes care, including pharmacological treatment in maintaining glycaemic control (ie, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c)) in patients with T2D. Furthermore, we expect that intensive lifestyle changes will decrease the need for antidiabetic medications. Methods and analysis The study is an assessor-blinded, parallel group and a 1-year randomised trial. The primary outcome is change in glycaemic control (HbA1c), with the key secondary outcome being reductions in antidiabetic medication. Participants will be patients with T2D (T2D duration <10 years) without complications who are randomised into an intensive lifestyle intervention (U-TURN) or a standard care intervention in a 2:1 fashion. Both groups will be exposed to the same standardised, blinded, target-driven pharmacological treatment and can thus maintain, increase, reduce or discontinue the pharmacological treatment. The decision is based on the standardised algorithm. The U-TURN intervention consists of increased training and basal physical activity level, and an antidiabetic diet including an intended weight loss. The standard care group as well as the U-TURN group is offered individual diabetes management counselling on top of the pharmacological treatment. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the Scientific Ethical Committee at the Capital Region of Denmark (H-1–2014–114). Positive, negative or inconclusive findings will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals, at national and international conferences. Trial registration number NCT02417012. PMID:26656025

  20. Head-to-head comparison of an intradermal and a virosome influenza vaccine in patients over the age of 60: evaluation of immunogenicity, cross-protection, safety and tolerability.

    PubMed

    Ansaldi, Filippo; Orsi, Andrea; de Florentiis, Daniela; Parodi, Valentina; Rappazzo, Emanuela; Coppelli, Martina; Durando, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo

    2013-03-01

    In the present study we first compare immunogenicity against vaccine and heterologous circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 strains, tolerability and safety of intradermal Intanza 15 μg and of virosomal adjuvanted, intramuscularly delivered influenza vaccine, Inflexal V, in healthy elderly volunteers. Five-hundred participants were enrolled in the study and randomly assigned to the two vaccine groups to receive either one dose of Intanza 15 μg or Inflexal V vaccine. All subjects reported solicited local and systemic reactions occurred within 7 d after vaccination and unsolicited adverse events up to 21 d post-immunization and any serious adverse event appeared during the study. A subset of 55 participants was randomly selected for immunogenicity and cross-protection evaluations. Serum samples were collected before and 1 and 3 mo after immunization. Antibody responses were measured using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) against all viruses used in the study and neutralization (NT) assays against A(H1N1)pdm09 strains. At least one of the CHMP criteria for influenza vaccine approval in the elderly was met by virosomal vaccine against all the tested viruses; intradermal vaccine met all criteria against all strains. Several parameters of immune response against strains with a different antigenic pattern from that of vaccine A/California/04/09(H1N1)pdm09 were significantly higher in the intradermal vaccine group compared with the virosomal group. Safety and systemic tolerability of both vaccines were excellent, but injection site reactions occurred significantly more frequently in the intradermal vaccination group. Immunogenicity of Intanza 15 μg intradermal vaccine tended to be higher than that of Inflexal V against heterologous strains in healthy elderly.

  1. A Head-to-Head Comparison of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) With the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4 (PDQ-4) in Predicting the General Level of Personality Pathology Among Community Dwelling Subjects.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Andrea; Somma, Antonella; Borroni, Serena; Maffei, Cesare; Markon, Kristian E; Krueger, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    In order to evaluate if measures of DSM-5 Alternative PD Model domains predicted interview-based scores of general personality pathology when compared to self-report measures of DSM-IV Axis II/DSM-5 Section II PD criteria, 300 Italian community adults were administered the Iowa Personality Disorder Screen (IPDS) interview, the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5), and the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4+ (PDQ-4+). Multiple regression analyses showed that the five PID-5 domain scales collectively explained an adequate rate of the variance of the IPDS interview total score. This result was slightly lower than the amount of variance in the IPDS total score explained by the 10 PDQ-4+ scales. The PID-5 traits scales performed better than the PDQ-4+, although the difference was marginal. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that the PID-5 domain and trait scales provided a moderate, but significant increase in the prediction of the general level of personality pathology above and beyond the PDQ-4+ scales.

  2. Special computer-aided computed tomography (CT) volume measurement and comparison method for pulmonary tuberculosis (TB)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingming; Sun, Zhaogang; Xie, Ruming; Gao, Mengqiu; Li, Chuanyou

    2015-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) manifestations in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients are complex and could not be quantitatively evaluated. We aimed to establish a new method to objectively measure the lung injury level in PTB by thoracic CT and make quantitative comparisons. In the retrospective study, a total of 360 adults were selected and divided into four groups according to their CT manifestations and medical history: Normal group, PTB group, PTB with diabetes mellitus (DM) group and Death caused by PTB group. Five additional patients who had continuous CT scans were chosen for preliminary longitudinal analysis. We established a new computer-aided CT volume measurement and comparison method for PTB patients (CACTV-PTB) which measured lung volume (LV) and thoracic volume (TV). RLT was calculated as the ratio of LV to TV and comparisons were performed among different groups. Standardized RLT (SRLT) was used in the longitudinal analysis among different patients. In the Normal group, LV and TV were positively correlated in linear regression (Ŷ=-0.5+0.46X, R2=0.796, P<0.01). RLT values were significantly different among four groups (Normal: 0.40±0.05, PTB: 0.37±0.08, PTB+DM: 0.34±0.06, Death: 0.23±0.04). The curves of SRLT value from different patients shared a same start point and could be compared directly. Utilizing the novel objective method CACTV-PTB makes it possible to compare the severity and dynamic change among different PTB patients. Our early experience also suggested that the lung injury is severer in the PTB+DM group than in the PTB group. PMID:26628995

  3. Evaluation of the ΔV 4D CT ventilation calculation method using in vivo xenon CT ventilation data and comparison to other methods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Geoffrey G; Latifi, Kujtim; Du, Kaifang; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Christensen, Gary E; Ding, Kai; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G

    2016-01-01

    Ventilation distribution calculation using 4D CT has shown promising potential in several clinical applications. This study evaluated the direct geometric ventilation calculation method, namely the ΔV method, with xenon-enhanced CT (XeCT) ventilation data from four sheep, and compared it with two other published meth-ods, the Jacobian and the Hounsfield unit (HU) methods. Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were used for the evaluation and comparison. The average SCC with one standard deviation was 0.44 ± 0.13 with a range between 0.29 and 0.61 between the XeCT and ΔV ventilation distributions. The average DSC value for lower 30% ventilation volumes between the XeCT and ΔV ventilation distributions was 0.55 ± 0.07 with a range between 0.48 and 0.63. Ventilation difference introduced by deformable image registration errors improved with smoothing. In conclusion, ventilation distributions generated using ΔV-4D CT and deformable image registration are in reasonably agreement with the in vivo XeCT measured ventilation distribution. PMID:27074479

  4. A retrospective comparison of smart prep and test bolus multi-detector CT pulmonary angiography protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Suckling, Tara; Smith, Tony; Reed, Warren

    2013-06-15

    Optimal arterial opacification is crucial in imaging the pulmonary arteries using computed tomography (CT). This poses the challenge of precisely timing data acquisition to coincide with the transit of the contrast bolus through the pulmonary vasculature. The aim of this quality assurance exercise was to investigate if a change in CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) scanning protocol resulted in improved opacification of the pulmonary arteries. Comparison was made between the smart prep protocol (SPP) and the test bolus protocol (TBP) for opacification in the pulmonary trunk. A total of 160 CTPA examinations (80 using each protocol) performed between January 2010 and February 2011 were assessed retrospectively. CT attenuation coefficients were measured in Hounsfield Units (HU) using regions of interest at the level of the pulmonary trunk. The average pixel value, standard deviation (SD), maximum, and minimum were recorded. For each of these variables a mean value was then calculated and compared for these two CTPA protocols. Minimum opacification of 200 HU was achieved in 98% of the TBP sample but only 90% of the SPP sample. The average CT attenuation over the pulmonary trunk for the SPP was 329 (SD = ±21) HU, whereas for the TBP it was 396 (SD = ±22) HU (P = 0.0017). The TBP also recorded higher maximum (P = 0.0024) and minimum (P = 0.0039) levels of opacification. This study has found that a TBP resulted in significantly better opacification of the pulmonary trunk than the SPP.

  5. Comparison of CT and PET-CT based planning of radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Topkan, Erkan; Yavuz, Ali A; Aydin, Mehmet; Onal, Cem; Yapar, Fuat; Yavuz, Melek N

    2008-01-01

    Background To compare computed tomography (CT) with co-registered positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) as the basis for delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) in unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). Methods Fourteen patients with unresectable LAPC had both CT and PET images acquired. For each patient, two three-dimensional conformal plans were made using the CT and PET-CT fusion data sets. We analyzed differences in treatment plans and doses of radiation to primary tumors and critical organs. Results Changes in GTV delineation were necessary in 5 patients based on PET-CT information. In these patients, the average increase in GTV was 29.7%, due to the incorporation of additional lymph node metastases and extension of the primary tumor beyond that defined by CT. For all patients, the GTVCT versus GTVPET-CT was 92.5 ± 32.3 cm3 versus 104.5 ± 32.6 cm3 (p = 0.009). Toxicity analysis revealed no clinically significant differences between two plans with regard to doses to critical organs. Conclusion Co-registration of PET and CT information in unresectable LAPC may improve the delineation of GTV and theoretically reduce the likelihood of geographic misses. PMID:18808725

  6. Comparison of volumetric breast density estimations from mammography and thorax CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geeraert, N.; Klausz, R.; Cockmartin, L.; Muller, S.; Bosmans, H.; Bloch, I.

    2014-08-01

    Breast density has become an important issue in current breast cancer screening, both as a recognized risk factor for breast cancer and by decreasing screening efficiency by the masking effect. Different qualitative and quantitative methods have been proposed to evaluate area-based breast density and volumetric breast density (VBD). We propose a validation method comparing the computation of VBD obtained from digital mammographic images (VBDMX) with the computation of VBD from thorax CT images (VBDCT). We computed VBDMX by applying a conversion function to the pixel values in the mammographic images, based on models determined from images of breast equivalent material. VBDCT is computed from the average Hounsfield Unit (HU) over the manually delineated breast volume in the CT images. This average HU is then compared to the HU of adipose and fibroglandular tissues from patient images. The VBDMX method was applied to 663 mammographic patient images taken on two Siemens Inspiration (hospL) and one GE Senographe Essential (hospJ). For the comparison study, we collected images from patients who had a thorax CT and a mammography screening exam within the same year. In total, thorax CT images corresponding to 40 breasts (hospL) and 47 breasts (hospJ) were retrieved. Averaged over the 663 mammographic images the median VBDMX was 14.7% . The density distribution and the inverse correlation between VBDMX and breast thickness were found as expected. The average difference between VBDMX and VBDCT is smaller for hospJ (4%) than for hospL (10%). This study shows the possibility to compare VBDMX with the VBD from thorax CT exams, without additional examinations. In spite of the limitations caused by poorly defined breast limits, the calibration of mammographic images to local VBD provides opportunities for further quantitative evaluations.

  7. Level set algorithms comparison for multi-slice CT left ventricle segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Ruben; La Cruz, Alexandra; Ordoñes, Andrés.; Pesántez, Daniel; Morocho, Villie; Vanegas, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    The comparison of several Level Set algorithms is performed with respect to 2D left ventricle segmentation in Multi-Slice CT images. Five algorithms are compared by calculating the Dice coefficient between the resulting segmentation contour and a reference contour traced by a cardiologist. The algorithms are also tested on images contaminated with Gaussian noise for several values of PSNR. Additionally an algorithm for providing the initialization shape is proposed. This algorithm is based on a combination of mathematical morphology tools with watershed and region growing algorithms. Results on the set of test images are promising and suggest the extension to 3{D MSCT database segmentation.

  8. Comparison of full-scan and half-scan for cone beam breast CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lingyun; Shaw, Chris C.; Lai, Chao-jen; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Tu, Shu-ju; Liu, Xinming

    2006-03-01

    The half-scan cone beam technique, requiring a scan for 180° plus detector width only, can help achieve both shorter scan time as well as higher exposure in each individual projection image. This purpose of this paper is to investigate whether half-scan cone beam CT technique can provide acceptable images for clinical application. The half-scan cone beam reconstruction algorithm uses modified Parker's weighting function and reconstructs from slightly more than half of the projection views for full-scan, giving out promising results. A rotation phantom, stationary gantry bench top system was built to conduct experiments to evaluate half-scan cone beam breast CT technique. A post-mastectomy breast specimen, a stack of lunch meat slices embedded with various sizes of calcifications and a polycarbonate phantom inserted with glandular and adipose tissue equivalents are imaged and reconstructed for comparison study. A subset of full-scan projection images of a mastectomy specimen were extracted and used as the half-scan projection data for reconstruction. The results show half-scan reconstruction algorithm for cone beam breast CT images does not significantly degrade image quality when compared with the images of same or even half the radiation dose level. Our results are encouraging, emphasizing the potential advantages in the use of half-scan technique for cone beam breast imaging.

  9. Comparison of FDG-PET/CT and CT for Delineation of Lumpectomy Cavity for Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C. Lavely, William C.; Frassica, Deborah A.; Myers, Lee T.; Asrari, Fariba; Wahl, Richard L.; Zellars, Richard C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The success of partial breast irradiation critically depends on proper target localization. We examined the use of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) for improved lumpectomy cavity (LC) delineation and treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Twelve breast cancer patients underwent FDG-PET/CT on a GE Discovery scanner with a median time from surgery to PET/CT of 49 days. The LC was contoured on the CT scan by a radiation oncologist and, together with a nuclear medicine physician, on the PET/CT scan. The volumes were calculated and compared in each patient. Treatment planning target volumes (PTVs) were calculated by expanding the margin 2 cm beyond the LC, maintaining a 5-mm margin from the skin and chest wall, and the treatment plans were evaluated. In addition, a study with a patient-like phantom was conducted to evaluate the effect that the window/level settings might have on contouring. Results: The margin of the LC was well visualized on all FDG-PET images. The phantom results indicated that the difference between the known volume and the FDG-PET-delineated volume was <10%, regardless of the window/level settings. The PET/CT volumes were larger than the CT volumes in all cases (median volume ratio, 1.68; range, 1.24-2.45; p = 0.004). The PET/CT-based PTVs were also larger than the CT-based PTV (median volume ratio, 1.16; range, 1.08-1.64; p = 0.006). In 9 of 12 patients, a CT-based treatment plan did not provide adequate coverage of the PET/CT-based PTV (99% of the PTV received <95% of the prescribed dose), resulting in substantial cold spots in some plans. In these cases, treatment plans were generated which were specifically designed to cover the larger PET/CT-based PTV. Although these plans showed an increased dose to the normal tissues, the increases were modest: the non-target breast volume receiving {>=}50 Gy, lung volume receiving {>=}30 Gy, and heart volume receiving {>=}5 Gy increased by 5

  10. Imaging lobular breast carcinoma: comparison of synchrotron radiation DEI-CT technique with clinical CT, mammography and histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, S.; Bravin, A.; Keyriläinen, J.; Fernández, M.; Suortti, P.; Thomlinson, W.; Tenhunen, M.; Virkkunen, P.; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M.-L.

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities for imaging cancer-bearing breast tissue samples are described and compared. The images include clinical mammograms and computed tomography (CT) images, CT images with partly coherent synchrotron radiation (SR), and CT and radiography images taken with SR using the diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The images are evaluated by a radiologist and compared with histopathological examination of the samples. Two cases of lobular carcinoma are studied in detail. The indications of cancer are very weak or invisible in the conventional images, but the morphological changes due to invasion of cancer become pronounced in the images taken by the DEI method. The strands penetrating adipose tissue are seen clearly in the DEI-CT images, and the histopathology confirms that some strands contain the so-called 'Indian file' formations of cancer cells. The radiation dose is carefully measured for each of the imaging modalities. The mean glandular dose (MGD) for 50% glandular breast tissue is about 1 mGy in conventional mammography and less than 0.25 mGy in projection DEI, while in the clinical CT imaging the MGD is very high, about 45 mGy. The entrance dose of 95 mGy in DEI-CT imaging gives rise to an MGD of 40 mGy, but the dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude, because the contrast is very large in most images.

  11. Machine-learning based comparison of CT-perfusion maps and dual energy CT for pancreatic tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Michael; Skornitzke, Stephan; Weber, Christian; Fritz, Franziska; Mayer, Philipp; Koell, Marco; Stiller, Wolfram; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.

    2016-03-01

    Perfusion CT is well-suited for diagnosis of pancreatic tumors but tends to be associated with a high radiation exposure. Dual-energy CT (DECT) might be an alternative to perfusion CT, offering correlating contrasts while being acquired at lower radiation doses. While previous studies compared intensities of Dual Energy iodine maps and CT-perfusion maps, no study has assessed the combined discriminative power of all information that can be generated from an acquisition of both functional imaging methods. We therefore propose the use of a machine learning algorithm for assessing the amount of information that becomes available by the combination of multiple images. For this, we train a classifier on both imaging methods, using a new approach that allows us to train only from small regions of interests (ROIs). This makes our study comparable to other - ROI-based analysis - and still allows comparing the ability of both classifiers to discriminate between healthy and tumorous tissue. We were able to train classifiers that yield DICE scores over 80% with both imaging methods. This indicates that Dual Energy Iodine maps might be used for diagnosis of pancreatic tumors instead of Perfusion CT, although the detection rate is lower. We also present tumor risk maps that visualize possible tumorous areas in an intuitive way and can be used during diagnosis as an additional information source.

  12. Percutaneous Bone Biopsies: Comparison between Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT and CT-Scan Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Tselikas, Lambros Joskin, Julien; Roquet, Florian; Farouil, Geoffroy; Dreuil, Serge; Hakimé, Antoine Teriitehau, Christophe; Auperin, Anne; Baere, Thierry de Deschamps, Frederic

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to compare the accuracy of targeting and the radiation dose of bone biopsies performed either under fluoroscopic guidance using a cone-beam CT with real-time 3D image fusion software (FP-CBCT-guidance) or under conventional computed tomography guidance (CT-guidance).MethodsSixty-eight consecutive patients with a bone lesion were prospectively included. The bone biopsies were scheduled under FP-CBCT-guidance or under CT-guidance according to operating room availability. Thirty-four patients underwent a bone biopsy under FP-CBCT and 34 under CT-guidance. We prospectively compared the two guidance modalities for their technical success, accuracy, puncture time, and pathological success rate. Patient and physician radiation doses also were compared.ResultsAll biopsies were technically successful, with both guidance modalities. Accuracy was significantly better using FP-CBCT-guidance (3 and 5 mm respectively: p = 0.003). There was no significant difference in puncture time (32 and 31 min respectively, p = 0.51) nor in pathological results (88 and 88 % of pathological success respectively, p = 1). Patient radiation doses were significantly lower with FP-CBCT (45 vs. 136 mSv, p < 0.0001). The percentage of operators who received a dose higher than 0.001 mSv (dosimeter detection dose threshold) was lower with FP-CBCT than CT-guidance (27 vs. 59 %, p = 0.01).ConclusionsFP-CBCT-guidance for bone biopsy is accurate and reduces patient and operator radiation doses compared with CT-guidance.

  13. Local variations in bone mineral density: a comparison of OCT versus x-ray micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugryumova, Nadya; Stevens-Smith, Jenna; Scutt, Andrew; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2008-02-01

    We describe variations in the degree of mineralisation within the subchondral bone plate of the equine metacarpophalangeal joint. A comparison of Optical Coherence Tomography, Micro CT, and SEM techniques was performed. These data are compared between sites on a healthy sample and at points on an osteoarthritically degenerated sample. No significant correlation was found between the optical scattering coefficient and the micro-CT derived BMD for comparisons between different sites on the bone surface. Also OCT demonstrated a larger regional variation in scattering coefficient than did micro CT for bone mineral density. This suggests that the optical scattering coefficient of bone is not related solely to the volume-density of calcium-phosphate. Patches of lower optical scattering coefficient were found in the bone structure that was related to the osteoarthritic lesion area on the overlying cartilage. Areas of microcracking, as revealed by both SEM and micro CT produced distinctive granularity in the OCT images. In further experiments, OCT was compared with micro CT and mechanical strength testing (3-point bending) in a small animal model of cardiovascular disease (cholesterol overload in mice). In the cardiovascular diseased mice, micro-CT of the trabecular bone did not demonstrate a significant change in trabecular bone mineral density before and after administration of the high cholesterol diet. However mechanical testing demonstrated a decrease in mechanical strength and OCT demonstrated a corresponding statistically significant decrease in optical scattering of the bone.

  14. Comparison of near-infrared spectroscopy with CT cerebral blood flow measurements in newborn piglets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Derek W.; Picot, Paul A.; Springett, Roger; Delpy, David T.; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2001-05-01

    Severely premature infants are often at high risk of cerebral hemorrhage or ischemic injury due to their inability to properly regulate blood flow to the brain. If blood flow is too high, the infant is at risk of cerebral hemorrhage, while too little blood flow can result in ischemic injury. The purpose of this research is to design and develop a means of non-invasively measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Such a device would greatly aid the diagnosis and monitoring of afflicted infants. Previous attempts to measure CBF with NIRS have achieved limited success. In this study we acquired high signal-to-noise NIR spectrum from 600 to 980 nm with a cooled CCD spectrometer. This spectrometer enables the differential path length factor (DPF) to be estimated with accuracy using a second derivative technique described by Matcher et al. The validity of our new approach is determined via direct comparison with a previously validated computed tomography (CT) method. Three newborn piglets were studied. CBF measurements were performed at various partial arterial CO2 tensions (PaCO2) using both the NIRS and CT methods. The results of the two methods correlate well with a relationship of CBFCT equals -4.30 + 1.05 CBFNIRS (r2 equals 0.96).

  15. Spectral CT in the Demonstration of the Pancreatic Arteries and Their Branches: A Comparison With Conventional CT

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Sun, Ying-Shi; Qi, Li-Ping; Li, Ying; Zhu, Hai-Bin; Li, Xiao-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of monochromatic images of spectral computed tomographic (CT) in the visualization of the pancreatic arteries compared with polychromatic CT images. We conducted a case–control study in a group of 26 consecutive patients with monochromatic CT and contrasted the results against a control group of 26 consecutive patients with polychromatic CT. The CNR (contrast-to-noise ratio), SIR (signal intensity ratio), SNR (signal to noise ratio), and image noise were measured. A 5-score classification system was used to evaluate the branch order of pancreatic arteries. The course of pancreatic arteries was compared. Compared with polychromatic images, the CNR, SIR, and SNR obtained by monochromatic images were increased by 64.74%, 23.99%, and 39.50%. Branch visualization of PSPDA (posterior superior pancreaticoduodenal artery), ASPDA (anterior superior pancreaticoduodenal artery), and DPA (dorsal pancreatic artery) was better at monochromatic images than at polychromatic images. The display rate was significantly better in monochromatic images for the second and third segments of PSPDA, total course of ASPDA, and artery of uncinate process. Compared with polychromatic images, monochromatic images can improve the visualization of pancreatic arteries. PMID:26886636

  16. Comparison of CT-Number and Gray Scale Value of Different Dental Materials and Hard Tissues in CT and CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Emadi, Naghmeh; Safi, Yaser; Akbarzadeh Bagheban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) are valuable diagnostic aids for many clinical applications. This study was designed to compare the gray scale value (GSV) and Hounsfield unit (HU) of selected dental materials and various hard tissues using CT or CBCT. Methods and Materials: Three samples of all test materials including amalgam (AM), composite resin (CR), glass ionomer (GI), zinc-oxide eugenol (ZOE), calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement, AH-26 root canal sealer (AH-26), gutta-percha (GP), Coltosol (Col), Dycal (DL), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), zinc phosphate (ZP), and polycarbonate cement (PC) were prepared and scanned together with samples of bone, dentin and enamel using two CBCT devices, Scanora 3D (S3D) and NewTom VGi (NTV) and a spiral CT (SCT) scanner (Somatom Emotion 16 multislice spiral CT);. Subsequently, the HU and GSV values were determined and evaluated. The data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The level of significance was determined at 0.05. Results: There were significant differences among the three different scanners (P<0.05). The differences between HU/GSV values of 12 selected dental materials using NTV was significant (P<0.05) and for S3D and SCT was insignificant (P>0.05). All tested materials showed maximum values in S3D and SCT (3094 and 3071, respectively); however, bone and dentin showed low/medium values (P<0.05). In contrast, the tested materials and tissues showed a range of values in NTV (366 to15383; P<0.05). Conclusion: Scanner system can influence the obtained HU/GSV of dental materials. NTV can discriminate various dental materials, in contrast to S3D/SCT scanners. NTV may be a more useful diagnostic aid for clinical practice. PMID:25386210

  17. Quantitative comparison of noise texture across CT scanners from different manufacturers

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Justin B.; Christianson, Olav; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare noise texture across computed tomography (CT) scanners from different manufacturers using the noise power spectrum (NPS). Methods: The American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom (Gammex 464, Gammex, Inc., Middleton, WI) was imaged on two scanners: Discovery CT 750HD (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and SOMATOM Definition Flash (Siemens Healthcare, Germany), using a consistent acquisition protocol (120 kVp, 0.625/0.6 mm slice thickness, 250 mAs, and 22 cm field of view). Images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection and a wide selection of reconstruction kernels. For each image set, the 2D NPS were estimated from the uniform section of the phantom. The 2D spectra were normalized by their integral value, radially averaged, and filtered by the human visual response function. A systematic kernel-by-kernel comparison across manufacturers was performed by computing the root mean square difference (RMSD) and the peak frequency difference (PFD) between the NPS from different kernels. GE and Siemens kernels were compared and kernel pairs that minimized the RMSD and |PFD| were identified. Results: The RMSD (|PFD|) values between the NPS of GE and Siemens kernels varied from 0.01 mm{sup 2} (0.002 mm{sup -1}) to 0.29 mm{sup 2} (0.74 mm{sup -1}). The GE kernels 'Soft,''Standard,''Chest,' and 'Lung' closely matched the Siemens kernels 'B35f,''B43f,''B41f,' and 'B80f' (RMSD < 0.05 mm{sup 2}, |PFD| < 0.02 mm{sup -1}, respectively). The GE 'Bone,''Bone+,' and 'Edge' kernels all matched most closely with Siemens 'B75f' kernel but with sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values up to 0.18 mm{sup 2} and 0.41 mm{sup -1}, respectively. These sizeable RMSD and |PFD| values corresponded to visually perceivable differences in the noise texture of the images. Conclusions: It is possible to use the NPS to quantitatively compare noise texture across CT systems. The degree to which similar texture across scanners could be achieved varies and is

  18. A direct comparison of the sensitivity of CT and MR cardiac perfusion using a myocardial perfusion phantom

    PubMed Central

    Otton, James; Morton, Geraint; Schuster, Andreas; Bigalke, Boris; Marano, Riccardo; Olivotti, Luca; Nagel, Eike; Chiribiri, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Background Direct comparison of CT and magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion techniques has been limited and in vivo assessment is affected by physiological variability, timing of image acquisition, and parameter selection. Objective We precisely compared high-resolution k-t SENSE MR cardiac perfusion at 3 T with single-phase CT perfusion (CTP) under identical imaging conditions. Methods We used a customized MR imaging and CT compatible dynamic myocardial perfusion phantom to represent the human circulation. CT perfusion studies were performed with a Philips iCT (256 slice) CT, with isotropic resolution of 0.6 mm3. MR perfusion was performed with k-t SENSE acceleration at 3 T and spatial resolution of 1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm. The image contrast between normal and underperfused myocardial compartments was quantified at various perfusion and photon energy settings. Noise estimates were based on published clinical data. Results Contrast by CTP highly depends on photon energy and also timing of imaging within the myocardial perfusion upslope. For an identical myocardial perfusion deficit, the native image contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) generated by CT and MR are similar. If slice averaging is used, the CNR of a perfusion deficit is expected to be greater for CTP than MR perfusion (MRP). Perfect timing during single time point CTP imaging is difficult to achieve, and CNR by CT decreases by 24%–31% two seconds from the optimal imaging time point. Although single-phase CT perfusion offers higher spatial resolution, MRP allows multiple time point sampling and quantitative analysis. Conclusion The ability of CTP and current optimal MRP techniques to detect simulated myocardial perfusion deficits is similar. PMID:23622506

  19. Unusual Presentation of Bladder Paraganglioma: Comparison of 131I MIBG SPECT/CT and 68Ga DOTANOC PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tarun Kumar; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Gupta, Nitin; Shukla, Jaya; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Extraadrenal chromaffin cell-related tumors or paragangliomas are rare, especially in the bladder, accounting for less than 1% of cases. We report a 16-year-old boy who presented with hematuria and paroxysmal headache and was found to have a prostatic growth infiltrating the urinary bladder on anatomical imaging. Iodine-131 (131I) metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) whole-body scanning and subsequently gallium-68 (68Ga) DOTANOC positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were performed. The MIBG scan revealed a non-tracer-avid soft-tissue mass, while DOTANOC PET/CT revealed a tracer-avid primary soft-tissue mass involving the urinary bladder and prostate with metastasis to the iliac lymph nodes. He underwent surgical management; histopathology of the surgical specimen revealed a bladder paraganglioma, whereas the prostate was found to be free of tumor. PMID:26912984

  20. Comparison of CT and fiberoptic bronchoscopy in the evaluation of bronchial disease.

    PubMed

    Naidich, D P; Lee, J J; Garay, S M; McCauley, D I; Aranda, C P; Boyd, A D

    1987-01-01

    CT was compared to fiberoptic bronchoscopy in a large series of patients to study the value of CT for visualizing bronchial disease. CT scans were available for review in 64 cases in which focal airway disease was identified with fiberoptic bronchoscopy and in 38 patients in whom the airways appeared normal at bronchoscopy. CT was positive in 59 of 64 cases in which lesions were detected endoscopically. If the results are analyzed according to the extent of involvement of individual bronchi, CT successfully identified 88 (90%) of 98 lesions. CT correctly excluded disease in 35 (92%) of 38 cases that were subsequently verified to be normal by fiberoptic bronchoscopy. In no case was the diagnosis of malignancy missed by CT. While extremely accurate in detecting focal lesions, CT was inaccurate in predicting whether a given abnormality was endobronchial, submucosal, or extrinsic (peribronchial). In three cases CT failed to detect submucosal extension into the left mainstream bronchus, which has important implications concerning the value of CT in staging bronchial malignancy. It is concluded that CT is helpful when bronchoscopy is contraindicated or refused. CT may also be used in selected cases when there is low clinical suspicion of endobronchial disease and as a complementary procedure to fiberoptic bronchoscopy for outlining the exact location of major mediastinal and hilar vessels, lymph nodes, and tumor in relation to adjacent airways. PMID:3491497

  1. Quantification of Pathologic Air Trapping in Lung Transplant Patients Using CT Density Mapping: Comparison with Other CT Air Trapping Measures.

    PubMed

    Solyanik, Olga; Hollmann, Patrick; Dettmer, Sabine; Kaireit, Till; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Wacker, Frank; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Shin, Hoen-oh

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether density mapping (DM) is more accurate for detection and quantification of pathologic air trapping (pAT) in patients after lung transplantation compared to other CT air trapping measures. One-hundred forty-seven lung and heart-lung transplant recipients underwent CT-examinations at functional residual capacity (FRC) and total lung capacity (TLC) and PFT six months after lung transplantation. Quantification of air trapping was performed with the threshold-based method in expiration (EXP), density mapping (DM) and the expiratory to inspiratory ratio of the mean lung density (E/I-ratio MLD). A non-rigid registration of inspiration-expiration CT-data with a following voxel-to-voxel mapping was carried out for DM. Systematic variation of attenuation ranges was performed for EXP and DM and correlated with the ratio of residual volume to total lung capacity (RV/TLC) by Spearman rank correlation test. AT was considered pathologic if RV/TLC was above the 95th percentile of the predicted upper limit of normal values. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. The optimal attenuation range for the EXP method was from -790 HU to -950 HU (EXP(-790 to -950HU)) (r = 0.524, p<0.001) to detect air trapping. Within the segmented lung parenchyma, AT was best defined as voxel difference less than 80 HU between expiration and registered inspiration using the DM method. DM correlated best with RV/TLC (r = 0.663, p<0.001). DM and E/I-ratio MLD showed a larger AUC (0.78; 95% CI 0.69-0.86; 0.76, 95% CI 0.67-0.85) than EXP(-790 HU to -950 HU) (0.71, 95% CI 0.63-0.78). DM and E/I-ratio MLD showed better correlation with RV/TLC and are more suited quantitative CT-methods to detect pAT in lung transplant patients than the EXP(-790HU to -950HU).

  2. Personalized estimates of radiation dose from dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population and comparison with diagnostic mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M.; Conover, David L.

    2013-11-01

    This study retrospectively analyzed the mean glandular dose (MGD) to 133 breasts from 132 subjects, all women, who participated in a clinical trial evaluating dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population. The clinical trial was conducted in adherence to a protocol approved by institutional review boards and the study participants provided written informed consent. Individual estimates of MGD to each breast from dedicated breast CT was obtained by combining x-ray beam characteristics with estimates of breast dimensions and fibroglandular fraction from volumetric breast CT images, and using normalized glandular dose coefficients. For each study participant and for the breast corresponding to that imaged with breast CT, an estimate of the MGD from diagnostic mammography (including supplemental views) was obtained from the DICOM image headers for comparison. This estimate uses normalized glandular dose coefficients corresponding to a breast with 50% fibroglandular weight fraction. The median fibroglandular weight fraction for the study cohort determined from volumetric breast CT images was 15%. Hence, the MGD from diagnostic mammography was corrected to be representative of the study cohort. Individualized estimates of MGD from breast CT ranged from 5.7 to 27.8 mGy. Corresponding to the breasts imaged with breast CT, the MGD from diagnostic mammography ranged from 2.6 to 31.6 mGy. The mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from dedicated breast CT exam were 13.9 ± 4.6 and 12.6, respectively. For the corresponding breasts, the mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from diagnostic mammography were 12.4 ± 6.3 and 11.1, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that at the 0.05 level, the distributions of MGD from dedicated breast CT and diagnostic mammography were significantly different (Wilcoxon signed ranks test, p = 0.007). While the interquartile range and the range (maximum-minimum) of MGD from dedicated breast CT was lower than

  3. Comparison of dosimetry between PET/CT and PET alone using (11)C-ITMM.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiteru; Sakata, Muneyuki; Oda, Keiichi; Wagatsuma, Kei; Toyohara, Jun; Ishibashi, Kenji; Ishii, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2016-03-01

    We used a new tracer, N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino) pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-4-(11)C-methoxy-N-methylbenzamide ((11)C-ITMM), to compare radiation doses from positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with previously published doses from PET alone. Twelve healthy volunteers [six males (mean age ± SD, 27.7 ± 6.7 years) and six females (31.8 ± 14.5 years)] in 12 examinations were recruited. Dose estimations from PET/CT were compared with those from PET alone. Regions of interest (ROIs) in PET/CT were delineated on the basis of low-dose CT (LD-CT) images acquired during PET/CT. Internal and external radiation doses were estimated using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 and CT-Expo software. The effective dose (ED) for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT was estimated to be 4.7 ± 0.5 μSv/MBq for the male subjects and 4.1 ± 0.7 μSv/MBq for the female subjects. The mean ED for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET alone in a previous report was estimated to be 4.6 ± 0.3 μSv/MBq (males, n = 3). The ED values for (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT in the male subjects were almost identical to those from PET alone. The absorbed doses (ADs) of the gallbladder, stomach, red bone marrow, and spleen calculated from PET/CT were significantly different from those calculated from PET alone. The EDs of (11)C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT were almost identical to those calculated from PET alone. The ADs in several organs calculated from PET/CT differed from those from PET alone. LD-CT images acquired during PET/CT may facilitate organ identification.

  4. Comparison of bone histomorphometry and μCT for evaluating bone quality in tail-suspended rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lian-Wen; Huang, Yun-Fei; Wang, Ying; Luan, Hui-Qin; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2014-10-01

    Astronauts often suffer from microgravity-induced osteoporosis due to their time in space. Bone histomorphometry, the 'gold standard' technique for detecting bone quality, is widely used in the evaluation of osteoporosis. This study investigates whether μCT has the same application value as histomorphometry in the evaluation of weightlessness-induced bone loss. A total of 24 SD rats were distributed into three groups (n = 8, each): tail-suspension (TS), TS plus active exercise (TSA), and control (CON). After 21 days, bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and μCT, and microstructure was measured by μCT and histomorphometry. BMD was found to have decreased significantly in TS and TSA compared with the CON group. The results of the μCT measurements showed that a change in BMD mainly occurred in the trabecular bone, and the trabecular BMD increased significantly in the TSA compared with the TS group. The comparison of μCT and histomorphometry showed that TS led to a significant decrease in bone volume (BV/TV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and trabecular number (Tb.N), and it led to an increase in trabecular separation (Tb.Sp). However, active exercise can prevent these changes. Significant differences in most parameters between TSA and CON were found by μCT but not by histomorphometry. Additionally, the parameters of these two methods are highly correlated. Therefore, the application value of μCT is as good as histomorphometry and DXA in the diagnosis of weightlessness-induced osteoporosis and is even better in evaluating the efficacy of exercise.

  5. Computer-aided CT coronary artery stenosis detection: comparison with human reading and quantitative coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Rief, Matthias; Kranz, Anisha; Hartmann, Lisa; Roehle, Robert; Laule, Michael; Dewey, Marc

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate computer-aided stenosis detection for computed tomography coronary angiography (CTA) in comparison with human reading and conventional coronary angiography (CCA) as the reference standard. 50 patients underwent CTA and CCA and out of these 44 were evaluable for computer-aided stenosis detection. The diagnostic performance of the software and of human reading were compared and quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) served as the reference standard for the detection of significant stenosis (>50 %). Overall, three readers with high (reader 1), intermediate (reader 2) and low (reader 3) experience in cardiac CT imaging performed the manual CTA evaluation on a commercially available workstation, whereas the automated software processed the datasets without any human interaction. The prevalence of coronary artery disease was 41 % (18/44) and QCA indicated significant stenosis (>50 %) in 33 coronary vessels. The automated software accurately diagnosed 18 individuals with significant coronary artery disease (CAD), and correctly ruled out CAD in 10 patients. In summary the sensitivity of computer-aided detection was 100 %/94 % (per-patient/per-vessel) and the specificity was 38 %/70 %, the positive predictive value (PPV) was 53 %/42 % and the negative predictive value (NPV) was 100 %/98 %. In comparison, reader 1-3 showed per-patient sensitivities of 100/94/89 %, specificities of 73/69/50 %, PPVs of 72/68/55 % and NPVs of 100/95/87 %. Computer-aided detection yields a high NPV that is comparable to more experienced human readers. However, PPV is rather low and in the range of an unexperienced reader.

  6. Vertebral rotation measurement: a summary and comparison of common radiographic and CT methods

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Gabrielle C; Hill, Doug L; Le, Lawrence H; Raso, Jim V; Lou, Edmond H

    2008-01-01

    Current research has provided a more comprehensive understanding of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) as a three-dimensional spinal deformity, encompassing both lateral and rotational components. Apart from quantifying curve severity using the Cobb angle, vertebral rotation has become increasingly prominent in the study of scoliosis. It demonstrates significance in both preoperative and postoperative assessment, providing better appreciation of the impact of bracing or surgical interventions. In the past, the need for computer resources, digitizers and custom software limited studies of rotation to research performed after a patient left the scoliosis clinic. With advanced technology, however, rotation measurements are now more feasible. While numerous vertebral rotation measurement methods have been developed and tested, thorough comparisons of these are still relatively unexplored. This review discusses the advantages and disadvantages of six common measurement techniques based on technology most pertinent in clinical settings: radiography (Cobb, Nash-Moe, Perdriolle and Stokes' method) and computer tomography (CT) imaging (Aaro-Dahlborn and Ho's method). Better insight into the clinical suitability of rotation measurement methods currently available is presented, along with a discussion of critical concerns that should be addressed in future studies and development of new methods. PMID:18976498

  7. Evaluation of bone substitute materials: comparison of flat-panel based volume CT to conventional multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, Sebastian; Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Sachlos, Elefterios; Haberstroh, Jörg; Scheifele, Christian; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Voss, Pit Jacob; Veigel, Egle; Smedek, Jörg; Ganter, Philip; Tuna, Taskin; Gutwald, Ralf; Palmowski, Moritz

    2013-10-01

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a key factor in bone regeneration within the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Despite this in vivo analysis of tissue-engineered-constructs to monitor bone rehabilitation are difficult to conduct. Novel high-resolving flat-panel based volume CTs (fp-VCT) are increasingly used for imaging bone structures. This study compares the potential value of novel fp-VCT with conventional multidetector CT (MDCT) based on a sheep sinus floor elevation model. Calcium-hydroxyapatite reinforced collagen scaffolds were populated with autologous osteoblasts and implanted into sheep maxillary sinus. After 8, 16 and 24 weeks MDCT and fp-VCT scans were performed to investigate the volume of the augmented area; densities of cancellous and compact bone were assessed as comparative values. fp-VCT imaging resulted in higher spatial resolution, which was advantageous when separating closely related anatomical structures (i.e. trabecular and compact bone, biomaterials). Fp-VCT facilitated imaging of alterations occurring in test specimens over time. fp-VCTs therefore displayed high volume coverage, dynamic imaging potential and superior performance when investigating superfine bone structures and bone remodelling of biomaterials. Thus, fp-VCTs may be a suitable instrument for intraoperative imaging and future in vivo tissue-engineering studies.

  8. Comparison of CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Manual and CT-Guided Robotic Positioning System for In Vivo Needle Placements in Swine Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis, F.; Takaki, H.; Laskhmanan, M.; Durack, J. C.; Erinjeri, J. P.; Getrajdman, G. I.; Maybody, M.; Sofocleous, C. T.; Solomon, S. B.; Srimathveeravalli, G.

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo compare CT fluoroscopy-guided manual and CT-guided robotic positioning system (RPS)-assisted needle placement by experienced IR physicians to targets in swine liver.Materials and MethodsManual and RPS-assisted needle placement was performed by six experienced IR physicians to four 5 mm fiducial seeds placed in swine liver (n = 6). Placement performance was assessed for placement accuracy, procedure time, number of confirmatory scans, needle manipulations, and procedure radiation dose. Intra-modality difference in performance for each physician was assessed using paired t test. Inter-physician performance variation for each modality was analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis test.ResultsPaired comparison of manual and RPS-assisted placements to a target by the same physician indicated accuracy outcomes was not statistically different (manual: 4.53 mm; RPS: 4.66 mm; p = 0.41), but manual placement resulted in higher total radiation dose (manual: 1075.77 mGy/cm; RPS: 636.4 mGy/cm; p = 0.03), required more confirmation scans (manual: 6.6; RPS: 1.6; p < 0.0001) and needle manipulations (manual: 4.6; RPS: 0.4; p < 0.0001). Procedure time for RPS was longer than manual placement (manual: 6.12 min; RPS: 9.7 min; p = 0.0003). Comparison of inter-physician performance during manual placement indicated significant differences in the time taken to complete placements (p = 0.008) and number of repositions (p = 0.04) but not in other study measures (p > 0.05). Comparison of inter-physician performance during RPS-assisted placement suggested statistically significant differences in procedure time (p = 0.02) and not in other study measures (p > 0.05).ConclusionsCT-guided RPS-assisted needle placement reduced radiation dose, number of confirmatory scans, and needle manipulations when compared to manual needle placement by experienced IR physicians, with equivalent accuracy.

  9. Low grade coal worker's pneumoconiosis. Comparison of CT and chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Gevenois, P A; Pichot, E; Dargent, F; Dedeire, S; Vande Weyer, R; De Vuyst, P

    1994-07-01

    We compared CT with chest radiography (CR) in the assessment of low grade coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) in a population of 83 subjects. All subjects had a high-voltage p.a. CR, graded according to the ILO classification between 0/0 and 1/1, a conventional CT (CCT) using contiguous 1-cm-thick sections on the entire thorax and a set of 10 high-resolution CT (HRCT) images. CR and CT were separately read by consensus by 2 teams of 2 trained readers. CR was coded 0/0 in 9 subjects; 0/1 in 31; 1/0 in 28; 1/1 in 15. Among these groups of patients, micronodules were detected by CT in respectively 2 (22%), 14 (45%), 17 (61%) and 10 (67%) patients. In all groups, micronodules were more often detected by CT when the opacities detected on CR were scored as rounded (p, q) than irregular (s, t). Among the patients graded 0/0 or 0/1, CT showed micronodules in 40%. By contrast, among the patients graded 1/0 or 1/1, CT did not show micronodules in 37%, but revealed in numerous patients that opacities detected on CR were related to bronchiectasis and/or emphysema only. Comparative analysis of HRCT and CCT showed that both techniques are complementary and proved the usefulness of CCT in the detection or confirmation of low profusion of micronodules.

  10. Multimodal imaging of the human temporal bone: A comparison of CT and optical scanning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voie, Arne H.; Whiting, Bruce; Skinner, Margaret; Neely, J. Gail; Lee, Kenneth; Holden, Tim; Brunsden, Barry

    2003-10-01

    A collaborative effort between Washington University in St. Louis and Spencer Technologies in Seattle, WA has been undertaken to create a multimodal 3D reconstruction of the human cochlea and vestibular system. The goal of this project is to improve the accuracy of in vivo CT reconstructions of implanted cochleae, and to expand the knowledge of high-resolution anatomical detail provided by orthogonal-plane optical sectioning (OPFOS). At WUSL, computed tomography (CT) images of the cochlea are used to determine the position of cochlear implant electrodes relative to target auditory neurons. The cochlear implant position is determined using pre- and post-operative CT scans. The CT volumes are cross-registered to align the semicircular canals and internal auditory canal, which have a unique configuration in 3-D space. The head of a human body donor was scanned with a clinical CT device, after which the temporal bones were removed, fixed in formalin and trimmed prior to scanning with a laboratory Micro CT scanner. Following CT, the temporal bones were sent to the OPFOS Imaging Lab at Spencer Technologies for a further analysis. 3-D reconstructions of CT and OPFOS imaging modalities were compared, and results are presented. [Work supported by NIDCD Grants R44-03623-5 and R01-00581-13.

  11. A comparison of micro-CT and thin section analysis of Lateglacial glaciolacustrine varves from Glen Roy, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendle, Jacob M.; Palmer, Adrian P.; Carr, Simon J.

    2015-04-01

    Despite the prevalence of thin section analysis in studies of Quaternary sediments, there are limitations associated with the production of thin sections (sediment modification) and the inherently 2D view that a thin section affords. Non-destructive and rapid scanning technologies such as X-ray computed microtomography (μCT) enable material samples to be visualised and analysed in 3D. In a Quaternary context, however, such techniques are in their infancy. This paper assesses the optimum approach to μCT analysis of Quaternary sediments, applying the method on Lateglacial glaciolacustrine varves from Glen Roy, Scotland. Scan datasets are examined at each stage of the thin section process and comparisons are made between 2D μCT images and thin sections for the recognition of 2D sediment features, with further appraisal of 3D models to identify 3D sediment structures. Comparable sediment features are observed in 2D μCT images and thin sections, however, the μCT imaging resolution determines the precision of microfacies descriptions. Additional 3D structures are distinguished from volumetric models that are otherwise impossible to identify in thin section slides. These 3D structures can locally alter sediment properties (e.g. layer thickness) as seen in 2D thin sections and/or digital images, although such variation cannot be detected with these media. It has been demonstrated that clear benefits exist in understanding the 3D structure of Quaternary sediments, both prior to thin-sectioning to avoid complicating (e.g. deformation) structures, and after thin-sectioning to establish the complex 3D context of 2D datasets. It is recommended that μCT and thin section techniques are applied in parallel in future studies, which will profit from the integration of 'true' 3D data. It is also advised that samples are scanned soon after field sampling, due to the significant modification of in situ sediment structures that can occur during thin section processing.

  12. Comparison of human and automatic segmentations of kidneys from CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Manjori; Stough, Joshua; Chi, Y.-Y.; Muller, Keith; Tracton, Gregg; Pizer, Stephen M.; Chaney, Edward L. . E-mail: chaney@med.unc.edu

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: A controlled observer study was conducted to compare a method for automatic image segmentation with conventional user-guided segmentation of right and left kidneys from planning computerized tomographic (CT) images. Methods and materials: Deformable shape models called m-reps were used to automatically segment right and left kidneys from 12 target CT images, and the results were compared with careful manual segmentations performed by two human experts. M-rep models were trained based on manual segmentations from a collection of images that did not include the targets. Segmentation using m-reps began with interactive initialization to position the kidney model over the target kidney in the image data. Fully automatic segmentation proceeded through two stages at successively smaller spatial scales. At the first stage, a global similarity transformation of the kidney model was computed to position the model closer to the target kidney. The similarity transformation was followed by large-scale deformations based on principal geodesic analysis (PGA). During the second stage, the medial atoms comprising the m-rep model were deformed one by one. This procedure was iterated until no changes were observed. The transformations and deformations at both stages were driven by optimizing an objective function with two terms. One term penalized the currently deformed m-rep by an amount proportional to its deviation from the mean m-rep derived from PGA of the training segmentations. The second term computed a model-to-image match term based on the goodness of match of the trained intensity template for the currently deformed m-rep with the corresponding intensity data in the target image. Human and m-rep segmentations were compared using quantitative metrics provided in a toolset called Valmet. Metrics reported in this article include (1) percent volume overlap; (2) mean surface distance between two segmentations; and (3) maximum surface separation (Hausdorff distance

  13. Comparison of 4D-microSPECT and microCT for murine cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Befera, Nicholas T.; Badea, Cristian T.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to compare a new generation of four-dimensional (4D) microSPECT with microCT for quantitative in vivo assessment of murine cardiac function. Procedures 4D isotropic cardiac images were acquired from normal C57BL/6 mice with either microSPECT at 350-micron resolution (n=6) or microCT at 88-micron resolution (n=6). One additional mouse with myocardial infarction (MI) was scanned with both modalities. Prior to imaging, mice were injected with either 99mTc -tetrofosmin for microSPECT, or a liposomal blood pool contrast agent for microCT. Segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) was performed using Vitrea (Vital Images) software, to derive global and regional function. Results Measures of global LV function between microSPECT and microCT groups were comparable (e.g. ejection fraction=71±6%-microSPECT and 68±4%-microCT). Regional functional indices (wall motion, wall thickening, regional ejection fraction) were also similar for the two modalities. In the mouse with MI, microSPECT identified a large perfusion defect that was not evident with microCT. Conclusions Despite lower spatial resolution, microSPECT was comparable to microCT in the quantitative evaluation of cardiac function. MicroSPECT offers an advantage over microCT in the ability to evaluate myocardial perfusion radiotracer distribution and function simultaneously. MicroSPECT should be considered as an alternative to microCT and MR for preclinical cardiac imaging in the mouse. PMID:24037175

  14. Segmental Comparison of Peripheral Arteries by Doppler Ultrasound and CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Ram Kumar; Ganesan, Prakash; Mayavan, Manibharathi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diseases of peripheral arterial system are one of the common causes of limb pain, especially in elderly patients. Here we analyse non invasive imaging of peripheral arterial segments. Aim Aim of the study was to compare arterial diseases of extremities using Doppler ultrasound and CT angiography, and to find the better non-invasive modality of choice. Materials and Methods Fifty patients {14 patients with upper limb complaints (15 upper limbs) and 36 patients with lower limb complaints (72 lower limbs)} of peripheral arterial disease underwent Doppler ultrasound (USG) and CT Angiogram (CTA). Arterial systems divided into anatomic segments and luminal narrowing were compared using gray scale Doppler ultrasound and axial images of arterial phase of CT angiogram. Using statistical methods, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of Doppler ultrasound and CT angiography were determined. Results Six hundred and nineteen arterial segments were studied with CT angiography and Doppler ultrasound. Of which 226 diseased segments were identified in CT angiography. Doppler overestimated narrowing by one grade in 47 segments, by two grade in 11 segments, by three grades in 30 segments and by four grades in 22 segments; underestimated by one grade in 28 segments, by two grades in 9 segments, by three grades in 5 segments and by four grades in 3 segments. Significant statistical difference exists between Doppler USG and CT angiography. Doppler showed good correlation with CT angiography in 74%, but, Doppler overestimated stenosis grade in a significant percentage. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of Doppler USG compared with CT angiography was 93.36%, 82.44%, and 86.42%. Conclusion Duplex Doppler can be the first investigation in excluding peripheral arterial disease, especially for evaluation of infra inguinal region of lower limbs and from second part of the subclavian artery in upper limbs. PMID:27042556

  15. A clinical comparison of CT1341, ketamine, and xylazine in cats.

    PubMed

    Haskins, S C; Peiffer, R L; Stowe, C M

    1975-10-01

    The new anesthetic agent CT1341 was compared to ketamine and xylazine in experimental and clinical situations with cats. Anesthesia with CT1341 was characterized by fast recovery times, good muscle relaxation, eyelid closure, occasional vomition, defecation, or urination during induction and recovery, generally smooth induction, and occasional hyperreflexive recoveries with much sneezing. The agent was moderately hypotensive, but caused little change in heart rate, central venous pressure, arterial pH, or blood gases. PMID:1190595

  16. [CT and MR virtual colonscopy: indications, limits and comparison with conventional colonscopy].

    PubMed

    Bertini, L; Campagnano, S; Lanciotti, S; Fiorello, S; Fabiani, B; Graziani, M G; Gualdi, G F

    2006-01-01

    Virtual endoscopy is a new method for studying the colon; it consists in acquisition of CT and MR images and to elaborate them with a workstation, to create endoluminal vision as like as traditional colonscopy, permitting the complete exploration of colonic lumen, also with stenotic tumors. The analysis of the differences between CT and MR colography shows like these two techniques present both advantages and disadvantages, such as the impossibility to perform MR in patients with pace-maker or in claustrophobic patients and the impossibility to perform CT with iodated agents in patients with renal failure or with a story of adverse reactions. The increased use of these techniques is due to the high sensitivity of last-generation CT and MR machine, to the increased spatial resolution, to specific softwares for digital cleaning of colon, to the introduction of high-end workstations and to the possibility of computed assisted diagnosis (CAD). So, it is desiderable that the increasing spread of multidetector CT devices and the future technical innovations, should have the effect to increase culture and experience in various diagnostic centers about CT-colography, making possible the spreading of virtual endoscopy as a screening tool.

  17. Comparison of spiral CT and US in the evaluation of pediatric urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Oner, S; Oto, A; Tekgul, S; Koroglu, M; Hascicek, M; Sahin, A; Akhan, O

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the value of spiral computerized tomography (CT) in detecting urolithiasis in pediatric patients and compare its efficacy with ultrasound (US). Twenty-nine infants aged between 2 to 94 months with clinical presentation suggestive of urolithiasis and a negative or indeterminate plain film were included in the study. Abdominal US and spiral CT were performed in all patients. Presence, size and localization of stones were noted for each patient on both CT and US. The diagnosis of urolithiasis was confirmed by passage of stones spontaneously, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), surgery, or clinical follow-up. Presence of stones was confirmed in 23 of 29 patients (79%). Eight patients had single stone and the remaining 15 had multiple stones either in a single localization (single kidney or single ureter) or multiple localizations. Spiral CT detected 57 stones (45 renal and 12 ureteral). US detected 34 stones (59.6%) in 18 (78.2%) patients. US was able to localize 31 stones (68.8%) in 21 kidneys (75%), and 3 stones (25%) in 11 ureters (27.2%). Spiral CT is very effective in the diagnosis of pediatric urolithiasis. Spiral CT is more efficient than US in imaging pediatric patients with symptoms and signs of urolithiasis, when KUB is inconclusive.

  18. Comparison of CT and MRI in Diagnosis of Laryngeal Carcinoma with Anterior Vocal Commissure Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-hui; Zhao, Jing; Li, Zeng-hong; Yang, Wei-qiang; Liu, Qi-hong; Yang, Zhi-yun; Liao, Bing; Li, Xiao-ling; Wang, Bin; Qin, Hao; Luo, Jie; Lv, Ke-xing; Wen, Wei-ping; Lei, Wen-bin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the accuracy of CT and MRI in determining the invasion of thyroid cartilage by and the T staging of laryngeal carcinoma with anterior vocal commissure (AVC) involvement. A total of 26 cases of laryngeal carcinomas with AVC involvement from May 2012 to January 2014 underwent enhanced CT and MRI scan, out of whom 6 patients also underwent diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging(DWI). T staging and thyroid cartilage involvement were evaluated. All the surgical specimens underwent serial section and were reviewed by two senior pathologists independently. When compared with pathologic staging, the accuracy was 88.46% (23/26) of MRI scan (with a 95% confidence interval 37~77%) and 57.69% (15/26) of CT scan (with a 95% confidence interval 70~98%), respectively (P < 0.01). We also reported three cases who were misdiagnosed on CT or MRI about either the thyroid cartilage was involved or not, and one case of preliminary study of DWI. Compared to CT, MRI exhibited a higher accuracy rate on T staging of laryngeal carcinomas with AVC involvement. Combined utility of CT and MRI could help improve the accuracy of assessment of thyroid cartilage involvement and T staging of laryngeal carcinomas with AVC involvement. PMID:27480073

  19. Localized Prostate Cancer Detection with 18F FACBC PET/CT: Comparison with MR Imaging and Histopathologic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Esther; Shih, Joanna; Pinto, Peter A.; Merino, Maria J.; Lindenberg, Maria L.; Bernardo, Marcelino; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Adler, Stephen; Owenius, Rikard; Choyke, Peter L.; Kurdziel, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize uptake of 1-amino-3-fluorine 18-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (18F FACBC) in patients with localized prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and normal prostate tissue and to evaluate its potential utility in delineation of intraprostatic cancers in histopathologically confirmed localized prostate cancer in comparison with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study. Twenty-one men underwent dynamic and static abdominopelvic 18F FACBC combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) and multiparametric (MP) 3-T endorectal MR imaging before robotic-assisted prostatectomy. PET/CT and MR images were coregistered by using pelvic bones as fiducial markers; this was followed by manual adjustments. Whole-mount histopathologic specimens were sliced with an MR-based patient-specific mold. 18F FACBC PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) were compared with those at MR imaging and histopathologic analysis for lesion- and sector-based (20 sectors per patient) analysis. Positive and negative predictive values for each modality were estimated by using generalized estimating equations with logit link function and working independence correlation structure. Results 18F FACBC tumor uptake was rapid but reversible. It peaked 3.6 minutes after injection and reached a relative plateau at 15–20 minutes (SUVmax[15–20min]). Mean prostate tumor SUVmax(15–20min) was significantly higher than that of the normal prostate (4.5 ± 0.5 vs 2.7 ± 0.5) (P < .001); however, it was not significantly different from that of BPH (4.3 ± 0.6) (P = .27). Sector-based comparison with histopathologic analysis, including all tumors, revealed sensitivity and specificity of 67% and 66%, respectively, for 18F FACBC PET/CT and 73% and 79%, respectively, for T2-weighted MR imaging. 18F FACBC PET/CT and MP MR

  20. A Comparison of daily megavoltage CT and ultrasound image guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Cheng; Kainz, Kristofer; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen

    2008-12-15

    In order to quantify the differences between ultrasound-imaging and megavoltage-CT (MVCT) daily prostate localization in prostate-cancer radiotherapy and their dosimetric impacts, daily shifts were analyzed for a total of 140 prostate cancer patients; 106 positioned using ultrasound-based imaging [B-mode Acquisition and Targeting (BAT)], and 34 using the MVCT from a TomoTherapy Hi-Art unit. The shifts indicated by the two systems were compared statistically along the right/left (R/L), superior/inferior (S/I), and anterior/posterior (A/P) directions. The systematic and random variations among the daily alignments were calculated. Margins to account for these shifts were estimated. The mean shifts and standard deviations along the R/L, S/I, and A/P directions were -0.11{+-}3.80, 0.67{+-}4.67, and 2.71{+-}6.31 mm for BAT localizations and -0.98{+-}5.13, 0.27{+-}3.35, and 1.00{+-}4.22 mm for MVCT localizations, respectively. The systematic and random variations in daily shifts based on MVCT were generally smaller than those based on BAT, especially along the A/P direction. A t-test showed this difference to be statistically significant. The planning target volume margins in the A/P direction estimated to account for daily variations were 8.81 and 14.66 mm based on MVCT and BAT data, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the daily prostate movement pattern between the first few fractions and the remaining fractions. Dosimetric comparison of MVCT and BAT prostate alignments was performed for seven fractions from a patient. The degradation from the plan caused by the MVCT alignment is trivial, while that by BAT is substantial. The MVCT technique results in smaller variations in daily shifts than ultrasound imaging, indicating that MVCT is more reliable and precise for prostate localization. Ultrasound-based localization may overestimate the daily prostate motion, particularly in the A/P direction, negatively impacting prostate dose coverage

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of mediastinal and hilar masses: comparison with CT

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, R.G.; Glazer, H.S.; Roper, C.L.; Lee, J.K.T.; Murphy, W.A.

    1985-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compared to computed tomography (CT) of the mediastinum and/or hila in 37 patients with bronchogenic carcinoma (35 unresectable for cure) and 11 patients with other masses. Spin-echo pulse sequences using a short pulse repetition rate (TR) and short echo delay (TE) were most helpful for detection of abnormal soft-tissue mediastinal and hilar masses. The accuracy of MRI and CT in staging bronchogenic carcinoma for curative resectability/nonresectability was comparable. Several pitfalls in MRI evaluation of the mediastinum were identified. By MRI the esophagus may be misinterpreted as an enlarged retrotracheal lymph node unless serial scans are studied. Small adjacent lymph nodes shown individually by CT may appear as a single enlarged lymph node by MRI due to partial-volume averaging. Because of the requirement for patient selection and the identified pitfalls of MRI, CT remains the radiologic procedure of choice in the staging of patients with bronchogenic carcinoma and the evaluation of other mediastinal and hilar masses at present. However, because of the ability to show blood vessels without an intravascular contrast agent, MRI is useful in evaluating patients with potential contrast allergy and solving diagnostic problems not solved by CT.

  2. Performance comparison between static and dynamic cardiac CT on perfusion quantitation and patient classification tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac CT acquisitions for perfusion assessment can be performed in a dynamic or static mode. In this simulation study, we evaluate the relative classification and quantification performance of these modes for assessing myocardial blood flow (MBF). In the dynamic method, a series of low dose cardiac CT acquisitions yields data on contrast bolus dynamics over time; these data are fit with a model to give a quantitative MBF estimate. In the static method, a single CT acquisition is obtained, and the relative CT numbers in the myocardium are used to infer perfusion states. The static method does not directly yield a quantitative estimate of MBF, but these estimates can be roughly approximated by introducing assumed linear relationships between CT number and MBF, consistent with the ways such images are typically visually interpreted. Data obtained by either method may be used for a variety of clinical tasks, including 1) stratifying patients into differing categories of ischemia and 2) using the quantitative MBF estimate directly to evaluate ischemic disease severity. Through simulations, we evaluate the performance on each of these tasks. The dynamic method has very low bias in MBF estimates, making it particularly suitable for quantitative estimation. At matched radiation dose levels, ROC analysis demonstrated that the static method, with its high bias but generally lower variance, has superior performance in stratifying patients, especially for larger patients.

  3. Comparison of Preoperative Temporal Bone CT with Intraoperative Findings in Patients with Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Rogha, Mehrdad; Hashemi, Sayyed Mostafa; Mokhtarinejad, Farhad; Eshaghian, Afrooz; Dadgostar, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cholesteatoma is traditionally diagnosed by otoscopic examination and treated by surgery. The necessity for imaging in an uncomplicated case is controversial. This study was planned to investigate the usefulness of a preoperative high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan in depicting the status of middle ear structures in the presence of cholesteatoma and also to compare the correspondence between pre- and intraoperative CT findings in patients with cholesteatoma. Materials and Methods: This prospective descriptive study was performed from January 2009 to May 2011 in 36 patients with cholesteatoma who were referred to the Kashani and Al-Zahra Clinics of Otolaryngology. Preoperative high-resolution temporal bone CT scans (axial and coronal views) were carried out and compared with intraoperative findings. Results: Evaluation of 36 patients and their CT scans revealed excellent correlation for sigmoid plate erosion, widening of aditus, and erosion of scutum; good correlation for erosion of malleus and tegmen; moderate correlation for lateral canal fistula (LCF) and erosion of mastoid air cells; and poor correlation for facial nerve dehiscence (FND), incus, and stapes erosion. Conclusion: A preoperative CT scan may be helpful in relation to diagnosis and decision making for surgery in cases of cholesteatoma and ossicular erosion. The CT scan can accurately predict the extent of disease and is helpful for detection of lateral canal fistula, erosions of dural plate, and ossicular erosions. However it is not able to distinguish between cholesteatoma and mucosal disease, facial nerve dehiscency, incus, and stapes erosion. PMID:24505568

  4. Measurement of lateral acetabular coverage: a comparison between CT and plain radiography

    PubMed Central

    Chadayammuri, Vivek; Garabekyan, Tigran; Jesse, Mary-Kristen; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Strickland, Colin; Milligan, Kenneth; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2015-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the degree of absolute agreement between measurements of lateral center-edge angle (LCEA) on plain radiography (XR) and computed tomography (CT) in a consecutive cohort of 205 patients (410 hips) undergoing hip arthroscopy. Preoperative measurements of the LCEA were performed bilaterally utilizing standardized anteroposterior radiographs and coronal reformatted CT scans. Demographic variables including age, gender, height, weight, BMI and clinical diagnosis were recorded for all patients. Overall, measured values of the LCEA were 2.1° larger on CT compared with XR (32.9° versus 30.8°, P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis revealed the highest mean difference in hips with acetabular dysplasia and concomitant cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) [mean difference (CT–XR) 5.5°, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.7°–7.3°, P = 0.011], followed by hips with isolated acetabular dysplasia (mean difference [CT–XR] 4.9°, 95% CI 2.7°–7.0°, P < 0.001). In contrast, 119 (29.0%) of the hips demonstrated larger measurements of the LCEA on 25 XR relative to CT. Of these hips, 20 (16.8%) had pincer-FAI and 25 had cam-FAI (21.0%), representing a significantly higher proportion compared with all other clinical subgroups (P = 0.045 and 0.036, respectively). Our study demonstrates measured values of the LCEA are consistently inflated on CT relative to XR for a wide variety of hip pathologies, highlighting the need for standardization and validation of CT-based measurements to improve the quality of clinical decision making. Level of Evidence: Diagnostic Level II. PMID:27011864

  5. Fluid collections in the intraperitoneal and extraperitoneal spaces: comparison of MR and CT

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.M.; Weinreb, J.C.; Maravilla, K.R.

    1985-06-01

    Fourteen patients with abnormal subdiaphragmatic fluid collections were examined with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. MR and CT provided equivalent information concerning the presence and extent of fluid collections in 13 of the 14 cases. Image acquisitions with two different repetition times (TRs) and two echo times (TEs) were necessary, in most cases, to detect and discriminate between different types of pathologic fluids. Transudative ascites demonstrated long T1 and T2 relaxation times, whereas abscesses, phlegmon, pancreatic pseudocyst, exudative pancreatitis, and chronic hematoma demonstrated an intermediate or short T1 and a long T2.

  6. Fluid collections in the intraperitoneal and extraperitoneal spaces: comparison of MR and CT.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J M; Weinreb, J C; Maravilla, K R

    1985-06-01

    Fourteen patients with abnormal subdiaphragmatic fluid collections (eight intraperitoneal, two extraperitoneal, and four intra- and extraperitoneal) were examined with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. MR and CT provided equivalent information concerning the presence and extent of fluid collections in 13 of the 14 cases. Image acquisitions with two different repetition times (TRs) and two echo times (TEs) were necessary, in most cases, to detect and discriminate between different types of pathologic fluids. Transudative ascites demonstrated long T1 and T2 relaxation times, whereas abscesses, phlegmon, pancreatic pseudocyst, exudative pancreatitis, and chronic hematoma demonstrated an intermediate or short T1 and a long T2.

  7. Cerebral blood flow in volunteers measured by PET and Xe CT/CBF. A comparison.

    PubMed

    Bergholt, B; Ostergaard, L; von Oettingen, G; Johannsen, P; Poulsen, P H; Bundgaard, H; Asboe, H; Cold, G E; Gjedde, A; Gyldensted, C; Astrup, J

    2000-02-01

    Aim of this study was to compare two quantitative CBF methods. Seven young, healthy volunteers were studied with PET (15-0 labelled water) and afterwards with Xe CT/CBF (30% xenon in oxygen, 3 minutes wash-in, 5 minutes washout protocol). Xe CT/CBF showed greater differences between high and low flow areas than PET CBF. Correlation was found within subjects between ROI's, but no agreement or correlation between the methods could be demonstrated. The disagreement in this study could be due to changes in PCO2.

  8. Comparison of several artificial neural network classifiers for CT images of hardwood logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoldt, Daniel L.; He, Jing; Abbott, A. Lynn

    1998-02-01

    Knowledge of internal log defects, obtained by scanning, is critical to efficiency improvements for future hardwood sawmills. Nevertheless, before computed tomography (CT) scanning can be applied in industrial operations, we need to automatically interpret scan information so that it can provide the saw operator with the information necessary to make proper sawing decisions. Our current approach to automatically label features in CT images of hardwood logs classifies each pixel individually using a back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) and feature vectors that include a small, local neighborhood of pixels and the distance of the target pixel to the center of the log. Initially, this ANN was able to classify clearwood, bark, decay, knots, and voids in CT images of two species of oak with 95% pixel-wise accuracy. Recently we have investigated other ANN classifiers, comparing 2D versus 3D neighborhoods and species-dependent (single species) versus species- independent (multiple species) classifiers using oak, yellow poplar, and cherry CT images. When considered individually, the resulting species-dependent classifiers yield similar levels of accuracy (96 - 98%). 3D neighborhoods work better for multiple-species classifiers and 2D is better for single-species. Under certain conditions there is no statistical difference in accuracy between single- and multiple-species classifiers, suggesting that a multiple- species classifier can be applied broadly with high accuracy.

  9. Accuracy assessment of 3D bone reconstructions using CT: an intro comparison.

    PubMed

    Lalone, Emily A; Willing, Ryan T; Shannon, Hannah L; King, Graham J W; Johnson, James A

    2015-08-01

    Computed tomography provides high contrast imaging of the joint anatomy and is used routinely to reconstruct 3D models of the osseous and cartilage geometry (CT arthrography) for use in the design of orthopedic implants, for computer assisted surgeries and computational dynamic and structural analysis. The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of bone and cartilage surface model reconstructions by comparing reconstructed geometries with bone digitizations obtained using an optical tracking system. Bone surface digitizations obtained in this study determined the ground truth measure for the underlying geometry. We evaluated the use of a commercially available reconstruction technique using clinical CT scanning protocols using the elbow joint as an example of a surface with complex geometry. To assess the accuracies of the reconstructed models (8 fresh frozen cadaveric specimens) against the ground truth bony digitization-as defined by this study-proximity mapping was used to calculate residual error. The overall mean error was less than 0.4 mm in the cortical region and 0.3 mm in the subchondral region of the bone. Similarly creating 3D cartilage surface models from CT scans using air contrast had a mean error of less than 0.3 mm. Results from this study indicate that clinical CT scanning protocols and commonly used and commercially available reconstruction algorithms can create models which accurately represent the true geometry.

  10. CT pulmonary densitovolumetry in patients with acromegaly: a comparison between active disease and controlled disease

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, Gustavo B; Carvalho, Alysson R S; Machado, Dequitier C; Mogami, Roberto; Melo, Pedro L

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our purpose was to compare the findings of CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function in patients with active acromegaly and controlled acromegaly and, secondarily, to correlate these findings. Methods: 11 patients with active acromegaly, 18 patients with controlled acromegaly and 17 control subjects, all non-smokers, underwent quantification of lung volume using multidetector CT (Q-MDCT) and pulmonary function tests. Results: Patients with active acromegaly had larger total lung mass (TLM) values than the controls and larger amounts of non-aerated compartments than the other two groups. Patients with active acromegaly also had larger amounts of poorly aerated compartments than the other two groups, a difference that was observed in both total lung volume (TLV) and TLM. TLV as measured by inspiratory Q-MDCT correlated significantly with total lung capacity, whereas TLV measured using expiratory Q-MDCT correlated significantly with functional residual capacity. Conclusion: Patients with active acromegaly have more lung mass and larger amounts of non-aerated and poorly aerated compartments. There is a relationship between the findings of CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function test parameters. Advances in knowledge: Although the nature of our results demands further investigation, our data suggest that both CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function tests can be used as useful tools for patients with acromegaly by assisting in the prediction of disease activity. PMID:26246281

  11. Comparison of blood flow models and acquisitions for quantitative myocardial perfusion estimation from dynamic CT.

    PubMed

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R; La Riviere, Patrick J; Alessio, Adam M

    2014-04-01

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be estimated from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) cardiac CT acquisitions, leading to quantitative assessment of regional perfusion. The need for low radiation dose and the lack of consensus on MBF estimation methods motivates this study to refine the selection of acquisition protocols and models for CT-derived MBF. DCE cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (MBF = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml (min g)(-1), cardiac output = 3, 5, 8 L min(-1)). Patient kinetics were generated by a mathematical model of iodine exchange incorporating numerous physiological features including heterogenenous microvascular flow, permeability and capillary contrast gradients. CT acquisitions were simulated for multiple realizations of realistic x-ray flux levels. CT acquisitions that reduce radiation exposure were implemented by varying both temporal sampling (1, 2, and 3 s sampling intervals) and tube currents (140, 70, and 25 mAs). For all acquisitions, we compared three quantitative MBF estimation methods (two-compartment model, an axially-distributed model, and the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneous model) and a qualitative slope-based method. In total, over 11 000 time attenuation curves were used to evaluate MBF estimation in multiple patient and imaging scenarios. After iodine-based beam hardening correction, the slope method consistently underestimated flow by on average 47.5% and the quantitative models provided estimates with less than 6.5% average bias and increasing variance with increasing dose reductions. The three quantitative models performed equally well, offering estimates with essentially identical root mean squared error (RMSE) for matched acquisitions. MBF estimates using the qualitative slope method were inferior in terms of bias and RMSE compared to the quantitative methods. MBF estimate error was equal at matched dose reductions for all quantitative methods and range of techniques evaluated. This

  12. Comparison of blood flow models and acquisitions for quantitative myocardial perfusion estimation from dynamic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2014-04-01

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be estimated from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) cardiac CT acquisitions, leading to quantitative assessment of regional perfusion. The need for low radiation dose and the lack of consensus on MBF estimation methods motivates this study to refine the selection of acquisition protocols and models for CT-derived MBF. DCE cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (MBF = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml (min g)-1, cardiac output = 3, 5, 8 L min-1). Patient kinetics were generated by a mathematical model of iodine exchange incorporating numerous physiological features including heterogenenous microvascular flow, permeability and capillary contrast gradients. CT acquisitions were simulated for multiple realizations of realistic x-ray flux levels. CT acquisitions that reduce radiation exposure were implemented by varying both temporal sampling (1, 2, and 3 s sampling intervals) and tube currents (140, 70, and 25 mAs). For all acquisitions, we compared three quantitative MBF estimation methods (two-compartment model, an axially-distributed model, and the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneous model) and a qualitative slope-based method. In total, over 11 000 time attenuation curves were used to evaluate MBF estimation in multiple patient and imaging scenarios. After iodine-based beam hardening correction, the slope method consistently underestimated flow by on average 47.5% and the quantitative models provided estimates with less than 6.5% average bias and increasing variance with increasing dose reductions. The three quantitative models performed equally well, offering estimates with essentially identical root mean squared error (RMSE) for matched acquisitions. MBF estimates using the qualitative slope method were inferior in terms of bias and RMSE compared to the quantitative methods. MBF estimate error was equal at matched dose reductions for all quantitative methods and range of techniques evaluated. This suggests that

  13. Comparison of SNOMED CT versus Medcin Terminology Concept Coverage for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Montella, Diane; Brown, Steven H.; Elkin, Peter L.; Jackson, James C.; Rosenbloom, S. Trent; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind; Welsh, Gail; Cotton, Bryan; Guillamondegui, Oscar D.; Lew, Henry; Taber, Katherine H.; Tupler, Larry A.; Vanderploeg, Rodney; Speroff, Theodore

    2011-01-01

    Background: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a “signature” injury of the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Structured electronic data regarding TBI findings is important for research, population health and other secondary uses but requires appropriate underlying standard terminologies to ensure interoperability and reuse. Currently the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) uses the terminology SNOMED CT and the Department of Defense (DOD) uses Medcin. Methods: We developed a comprehensive case definition of mild TBI composed of 68 clinical terms. Using automated and manual techniques, we evaluated how well the mild TBI case definition terms could be represented by SNOMED CT and Medcin, and compared the results. We performed additional analysis stratified by whether the concepts were rated by a TBI expert panel as having High, Medium, or Low importance to the definition of mild TBI. Results: SNOMED CT sensitivity (recall) was 90% overall for coverage of mild TBI concepts, and Medcin sensitivity was 49%, p < 0.001 (using McNemar’s chi square). Positive predictive value (precision) for each was 100%. SNOMED CT outperformed Medcin for concept coverage independent of import rating by our TBI experts. Discussion: SNOMED CT was significantly better able to represent mild TBI concepts than Medcin. This finding may inform data gathering, management and sharing, and data exchange strategies between the VA and DOD for active duty soldiers and veterans with mild TBI. Since mild TBI is an important condition in the civilian population as well, the current study results may be useful also for the general medical setting. PMID:22195156

  14. Comparison of 64-Detector CT Colonography and Conventional Colonoscopy in the Detection of Colorectal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Devir, Cigdem; Kebapci, Mahmut; Temel, Tuncer; Ozakyol, Aysegul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Colon cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. The early detection of colorectal cancer using screening programs is important for managing early-stage colorectal cancers and polyps. Modalities that allow examination of the entire colon are conventional colonoscopy, double contrast barium enema examination and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) colonography. Objectives: To compare CT colonography and conventional colonoscopy results and to evaluate the accuracy of CT colonography for detecting colorectal lesions. Patients and Methods: In a prospective study performed at Gastroenterology and Radiology Departments of Medical Faculty of Eskisehir Osmangazi University, CT colonography and colonoscopy results of 31 patients with family history of colorectal carcinoma, personal or family history of colorectal polyps, lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, change in bowel habits, iron deficiency anemia and abdominal pain were compared. Regardless of the size, CT colonography and conventional colonoscopy findings for all the lesions were cross - tabulated and the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. To assess the agreement between CT colonography and conventional colonoscopy examinations, the Kappa coefficient of agreementt was used. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS ver 15.0. Results: Regardless of the size, MDCT colonography showed 83% sensitivity and 95% specificity, with a positive predictive value of 95% and a negative predictive value of 83% for the detection of colorectal polyps and masses. MDCT colonography displayed 92% sensitivity and 95% specificity, with a positive predictive value of 92% and a negative predictive value of 95% for polyps ≥ 10 mm. For polyps between 6mm and 9 mm, MDCT colonography displayed 75% sensitivity and 100% specificity, with a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 90%. For polyps ≤ 5 mm MDCT

  15. Comparison of DCE-CT models for quantitative evaluation of Ktrans in larynx tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterbroek, J.; Bennink, E.; Philippens, M. E. P.; Raaijmakers, C. P. J.; Viergever, M. A.; de Jong, H. W. A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) can be used to estimate blood perfusion and vessel permeability in tumors. Tumor induced angiogenesis is generally associated with disorganized microvasculature with increased permeability or leakage. Estimated vascular leakage (Ktrans) values and their reliability greatly depend on the perfusion model used. To identify the preferred model for larynx tumor analysis, several perfusion models frequently used for estimating permeability were compared in this study. DCE-CT scans were acquired for 16 larynx cancer patients. Larynx tumors were delineated based on whole-mount histopathology after laryngectomy. DCE-CT data within these delineated volumes were analyzed using the Patlak and Logan plots, the Extended Tofts Model (ETM), the Adiabatic Approximation to the Tissue Homogeneity model (AATH) and a variant of AATH with fixed transit time (AATHFT). Akaike’s Information Criterion (AIC) was used to identify the best fitting model. Ktrans values from all models were compared with this best fitting model. Correlation strength was tested with two-tailed Spearman’s rank correlation and further examined using Bland-Altman plots. AATHFT was found to be the best fitting model. The overall median of individual patient medians Ktrans estimates were 14.3, 15.1, 16.1, 2.6 and 22.5 mL/100 g min  -  1 for AATH, AATHFT, ETM, Patlak and Logan, respectively. Ktrans estimates for all models except Patlak were strongly correlated (P  <  0.001). Bland-Altman plots show large biases but no significant deviating trend for any model other than Patlak. AATHFT was found to be the preferred model among those tested for estimation of Ktrans in larynx tumors.

  16. Comparison of two detector systems for cone beam CT small animal imaging - a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yang; Shaw, Chris C; Liu, Xinming; Altunbas, Mustafa C; Wang, Tianpeng; Chen, Lingyun; Tu, Shu-Ju; Kappadath, S Cheenu; Lai, Chao-Jen

    2006-03-01

    To compare two detector systems - one based on the charge-coupled device (CCD) and image amplifier, the other based on a-Si/CsI flat panel, for cone beam computed-tomography (CT) imaging of small animals.A high resolution, high framing rate detector system for the cone beam CT imaging of small animals was developed. The system consists of a 2048x3072x12 bit CCD optically coupled to an image amplifier and an x-ray phosphor screen. The CCD has an intrinsic pixel size of 12 mum but the effective pixel size can be adjusted through the magnification adjustment of the optical coupling systems. The system is used in conjunction with an x-ray source and a rotating stage for holding and rotating the scanned object in the cone beam CT imaging experiments. The advantages of the system include but are not limited to the ability to adjust the effective pixel size and to achieve extremely high spatial resolution and temporal resolution. However, the need to use optical coupling compromises the detective quanta efficiency (DQE) of the system. In this paper, the imaging characteristics of the system were presented and compared with those of an a-Si/CsI flat-panel detector system. PMID:18160972

  17. Comparison of two detector systems for cone beam CT small animal imaging - a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yang; Shaw, Chris C.; Liu, Xinming; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Chen, Lingyun; Tu, Shu-Ju; Kappadath, S. Cheenu; Lai, Chao-Jen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To compare two detector systems - one based on the charge-coupled device (CCD) and image amplifier, the other based on a-Si/CsI flat panel, for cone beam computed-tomography (CT) imaging of small animals. A high resolution, high framing rate detector system for the cone beam CT imaging of small animals was developed. The system consists of a 2048×3072×12 bit CCD optically coupled to an image amplifier and an x-ray phosphor screen. The CCD has an intrinsic pixel size of 12 μm but the effective pixel size can be adjusted through the magnification adjustment of the optical coupling systems. The system is used in conjunction with an x-ray source and a rotating stage for holding and rotating the scanned object in the cone beam CT imaging experiments. The advantages of the system include but are not limited to the ability to adjust the effective pixel size and to achieve extremely high spatial resolution and temporal resolution. However, the need to use optical coupling compromises the detective quanta efficiency (DQE) of the system. In this paper, the imaging characteristics of the system were presented and compared with those of an a-Si/CsI flat-panel detector system. PMID:18160972

  18. The relevance of MRI for patient modeling in head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: A comparison of CT and CT-MRI based tissue segmentation on simulated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaart, René F. Paulides, Margarethus M.; Fortunati, Valerio; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F.; Lugt, Aad van der

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, head and neck (H and N) hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is solely based on computed tomography (CT) images. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior soft-tissue contrast over CT. The purpose of the authors’ study is to investigate the relevance of using MRI in addition to CT for patient modeling in H and N HTP. Methods: CT and MRI scans were acquired for 11 patients in an immobilization mask. Three observers manually segmented on CT, MRI T1 weighted (MRI-T1w), and MRI T2 weighted (MRI-T2w) images the following thermo-sensitive tissues: cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, myelum, sclera, lens, vitreous humor, and the optical nerve. For these tissues that are used for patient modeling in H and N HTP, the interobserver variation of manual tissue segmentation in CT and MRI was quantified with the mean surface distance (MSD). Next, the authors compared the impact of CT and CT and MRI based patient models on the predicted temperatures. For each tissue, the modality was selected that led to the lowest observer variation and inserted this in the combined CT and MRI based patient model (CT and MRI), after a deformable image registration. In addition, a patient model with a detailed segmentation of brain tissues (including white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) was created (CT and MRI{sub db}). To quantify the relevance of MRI based segmentation for H and N HTP, the authors compared the predicted maximum temperatures in the segmented tissues (T{sub max}) and the corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR) of the patient models based on (1) CT, (2) CT and MRI, and (3) CT and MRI{sub db}. Results: In MRI, a similar or reduced interobserver variation was found compared to CT (maximum of median MSD in CT: 0.93 mm, MRI-T1w: 0.72 mm, MRI-T2w: 0.66 mm). Only for the optical nerve the interobserver variation is significantly lower in CT compared to MRI (median MSD in CT: 0.58 mm, MRI-T1w: 1.27 mm, MRI-T2w: 1.40 mm

  19. Quantitative assessment of emphysema from whole lung CT scans: comparison with visual grading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Apanosovich, Tatiyana V.; Wang, Jianwei; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2009-02-01

    Emphysema is a disease of the lungs that destroys the alveolar air sacs and induces long-term respiratory dysfunction. CT scans allow for imaging of the anatomical basis of emphysema and for visual assessment by radiologists of the extent present in the lungs. Several measures have been introduced for the quantification of the extent of disease directly from CT data in order to add to the qualitative assessments made by radiologists. In this paper we compare emphysema index, mean lung density, histogram percentiles, and the fractal dimension to visual grade in order to evaluate the predictability of radiologist visual scoring of emphysema from low-dose CT scans through quantitative scores, in order to determine which measures can be useful as surrogates for visual assessment. All measures were computed over nine divisions of the lung field (whole lung, individual lungs, and upper/middle/lower thirds of each lung) for each of 148 low-dose, whole lung scans. In addition, a visual grade of each section was also given by an expert radiologist. One-way ANOVA and multinomial logistic regression were used to determine the ability of the measures to predict visual grade from quantitative score. We found that all measures were able to distinguish between normal and severe grades (p<0.01), and between mild/moderate and all other grades (p<0.05). However, no measure was able to distinguish between mild and moderate cases. Approximately 65% prediction accuracy was achieved from using quantitative score to predict visual grade, with 73% if mild and moderate cases are considered as a single class.

  20. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Zanca, F.; Jacobs, A.; Crijns, W.; De Wever, W.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure.

  1. Comparison of methods for assessing geometric efficiency on multi-detector CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Berris, Theocharis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E; Damilakis, John

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare the film method against the method based on a new CT slice detector in assessing geometric efficiency (GE) of x-ray beams utilized by a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Measurements of GE were performed using radiographic films and a solid state CT slice detector for all beam qualities, collimations and focal spot sizes available on an MDCT scanner. Repeatability of GE measurements was assessed. The radiographic film and the solid state detector methods were compared to each other in regard to efficacy in measuring free-in-air GE. The values of GE determined using the radiographic film method were found to range between 48.5% and 90.6%. Differences between values obtained with the radiographic film method and corresponding values obtained with the solid state detector were less than 10% exceeding 5% for only one case. Both methods show that wide beams have higher GE values compared to thin ones. The use of large instead of small focal spot was found to deteriorate GE values by up to 23.1%. Beam quality did not seem to influence GE of the various collimations. When thin beam collimations are employed, a considerable amount of the radiation is wasted for non-imaging purposes. Both film and solid state probe methods are capable of measuring GE of thin as well as wide collimations. The solid state detector is the easiest to use, however its usefulness is reduced by the fact that it cannot measure dose profiles of beam collimations available for step-and-shoot mode of operation.

  2. MRI experience with multiple sclerosis - Comparison to CT and clinical status

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, L.; Carr, T.; Nicholson, R.L.

    1985-05-01

    A Multiple Sclerosis (M.S.) Protocol was set--SEB (1000/60) volume acquisition and selected single slices SEC (1000/120) and IR (1500/450). Single slices SE 500/30, 1500/30 and 1530/60 were obtained for T1 and T2 calculation. New software and coils permitted multi-slice multi-echo acquisition so the Protocol was changed to multi-slice multi-echo transaxial SE 2120/60-120, and the T1 and T2 sets. The study consisted of 62 known M.S. patients and 35 controls. Of the 62 M.S. patients, 58 (94%) were positive on NMR. Thirty-two of these patients had CT scans of which 17 (53%) were positive. Of the 35 controls, 2 were positive on NMR for a false positive rate of 6%. The relative sensitivity of NMR, Double Dose Delayed CT(DDD) and contrast CT in the clinically early progressive group is 87%, 60% and 45% respectively. In the chronic stable group, the sensitivity is 100% for NMR and 55% for DDD. The NMR lesions were graded on a scale of 1 - 4 and the authors found poor correlation with either duration of disease or Kurtzke Functional Scale. The T1, T2 values showed good differentiation between white matter and lesions, although differentiation between lesions and grey matter was poor. White matter has T1 of 328 +- 28 and T2 of 85 +- 22, grey matter T1 of 515 +- 37 and T2 of 96 +- 32 and lesions T1 of 530 +- 76 and T2 of 106 +- 27. They conclude that multi-slice SE 2120/60-120 NMR imaging has proven to be a valuable tool in the clinical diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis. Most of the lesions seen are asymptomatic and the number, size and distribution of lesions have little correlation with severity or acuity of the disease.

  3. Skeletal dosimetry based on µCT images of trabecular bone: update and comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, R.; Cassola, V. F.; Vieira, J. W.; Khoury, H. J.; de Oliveira Lira, C. A. B.; Robson Brown, K.

    2012-06-01

    Two skeletal dosimetry methods using µCT images of human bone have recently been developed: the paired-image radiation transport (PIRT) model introduced by researchers at the University of Florida (UF) in the US and the systematic-periodic cluster (SPC) method developed by researchers at the Federal University of Pernambuco in Brazil. Both methods use µCT images of trabecular bone (TB) to model spongiosa regions of human bones containing marrow cavities segmented into soft tissue volumes of active marrow (AM), trabecular inactive marrow and the bone endosteum (BE), which is a 50 µm thick layer of marrow on all TB surfaces and on cortical bone surfaces next to TB as well as inside the medullary cavities. With respect to the radiation absorbed dose, the AM and the BE are sensitive soft tissues for the induction of leukaemia and bone cancer, respectively. The two methods differ mainly with respect to the number of bone sites and the size of the µCT images used in Monte Carlo calculations and they apply different methods to simulate exposure from radiation sources located outside the skeleton. The PIRT method calculates dosimetric quantities in isolated human bones while the SPC method uses human bones embedded in the body of a phantom which contains all relevant organs and soft tissues. Consequently, the SPC method calculates absorbed dose to the AM and to the BE from particles emitted by radionuclides concentrated in organs or from radiation sources located outside the human body in one calculation step. In order to allow for similar calculations of AM and BE absorbed doses using the PIRT method, the so-called dose response functions (DRFs) have been developed based on absorbed fractions (AFs) of energy for electrons isotropically emitted in skeletal tissues. The DRFs can be used to transform the photon fluence in homogeneous spongiosa regions into absorbed dose to AM and BE. This paper will compare AM and BE AFs of energy from electrons emitted in skeletal

  4. Performance comparison of two commercial BGO-based PET/CT scanners using NEMA NU 2-2001

    SciTech Connect

    Bolard, Gregory; Prior, John O.; Modolo, Luca; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Kosinski, Marek; Wastiel, Claude; Malterre, Jerome; Bulling, Shelley; Bochud, Francois; Verdun, Francis R.

    2007-07-15

    Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners play a major role in medicine for in vivo imaging in an increasing number of diseases in oncology, cardiology, neurology, and psychiatry. With the advent of short-lived radioisotopes other than {sup 18}F and newer scanners, there is a need to optimize radioisotope activity and acquisition protocols, as well as to compare scanner performances on an objective basis. The Discovery-LS (D-LS) was among the first clinical PET/CT scanners to be developed and has been extensively characterized with older National Electrical Manufacturer Association (NEMA) NU 2-1994 standards. At the time of publication of the latest version of the standards (NU 2-2001) that have been adapted for whole-body imaging under clinical conditions, more recent models from the same manufacturer, i.e., Discovery-ST (D-ST) and Discovery-STE (D-STE), were commercially available. We report on the full characterization both in the two- and three-dimensional acquisition mode of the D-LS according to latest NEMA NU 2-2001 standards (spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate performance, accuracy of count losses, and random coincidence correction and image quality), as well as a detailed comparison with the newer D-ST widely used and whose characteristics are already published.

  5. Comparison of information-preserving and information-losing data-compression algorithms for CT images.

    PubMed

    Bramble, J M

    1989-02-01

    Data compression increases the number of images that can be stored on magnetic disks or tape and reduces the time required for transmission of images between stations. Two algorithms for data compression are compared in application to computed tomographic (CT) images. The first, an information-preserving algorithm combining differential and Huffman encoding, allows reconstruction of the original image. A second algorithm alters the image in a clinically acceptable manner. This second algorithm combines two processes: the suppression of data outside of the head or body and the combination of differential and Huffman encoding. Because the final image is not an exact copy, the second algorithm is information losing. Application of the information-preserving algorithm can double or triple the number of CT images that can be stored on hard disk or magnetic tape. This algorithm may also double or triple the speed with which images may be transmitted. The information-losing algorithm can increase storage or transmission speed by a factor of five. The computation time on this system is excessive, but dedicated hardware is available to allow efficient implementation.

  6. Comparison of effective radiation doses from X-ray, CT, and PET/CT in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma using a dose monitoring program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeun Yoon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the use of a dose monitoring program for calculating and comparing the diagnostic radiation doses in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed diagnostic and therapeutic imaging studies performed on pediatric patients with neuroblastoma from 2003 to 2014. We calculated the mean effective dose per exam for X-ray, conventional computed tomography (CT), and CT of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) from the data collected using a dose monitoring program (DoseTrack group) since October 2012. Using the data, we estimated the cumulative dose per person and the relative dose from each modality in all patients (Total group). The effective dose from PET was manually calculated for all patients. RESULTS We included 63 patients with a mean age of 3.2±3.5 years; 28 had a history of radiation therapy, with a mean irradiated dose of 31.9±23.2 Gy. The mean effective dose per exam was 0.04±0.19 mSv for X-ray, 1.09±1.11 mSv for CT, and 8.35±7.45 mSv for CT of PET/CT in 31 patients of the Dose-Track group. The mean estimated cumulative dose per patient in the Total group was 3.43±2.86 mSv from X-ray (8.5%), 7.66±6.09 mSv from CT (19.1%), 18.35±13.52 mSv from CT of PET/CT (45.7%), and 10.71±10.05 mSv from PET (26.7%). CONCLUSION CT of PET/CT contributed nearly half of the total cumulative dose in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. The radiation dose from X-ray was not negligible because of the large number of X-ray images. A dose monitoring program can be useful for calculating radiation doses in patients with cancer. PMID:27306659

  7. X-ray CT analyses, models and numerical simulations: a comparison with petrophysical analyses in an experimental CO2 study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Steven; Pudlo, Dieter; Enzmann, Frieder; Reitenbach, Viktor; Albrecht, Daniel; Ganzer, Leonhard; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    An essential part of the collaborative research project H2STORE (hydrogen to store), which is funded by the German government, was a comparison of various analytical methods for characterizing reservoir sandstones from different stratigraphic units. In this context Permian, Triassic and Tertiary reservoir sandstones were analysed. Rock core materials, provided by RWE Gasspeicher GmbH (Dortmund, Germany), GDF Suez E&P Deutschland GmbH (Lingen, Germany), E.ON Gas Storage GmbH (Essen, Germany) and RAG Rohöl-Aufsuchungs Aktiengesellschaft (Vienna, Austria), were processed by different laboratory techniques; thin sections were prepared, rock fragments were crushed and cubes of 1 cm edge length and plugs 3 to 5 cm in length with a diameter of about 2.5 cm were sawn from macroscopic homogeneous cores. With this prepared sample material, polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, coupled with image analyses, specific surface area measurements (after Brunauer, Emmet and Teller, 1938; BET), He-porosity and N2-permeability measurements and high-resolution microcomputer tomography (μ-CT), which were used for numerical simulations, were applied. All these methods were practised on most of the same sample material, before and on selected Permian sandstones also after static CO2 experiments under reservoir conditions. A major concern in comparing the results of these methods is an appraisal of the reliability of the given porosity, permeability and mineral-specific reactive (inner) surface area data. The CO2 experiments modified the petrophysical as well as the mineralogical/geochemical rock properties. These changes are detectable by all applied analytical methods. Nevertheless, a major outcome of the high-resolution μ-CT analyses and following numerical data simulations was that quite similar data sets and data interpretations were maintained by the different petrophysical standard methods. Moreover, the μ-CT analyses are not only time saving, but also

  8. Three dimensional dose distribution comparison of simple and complex acquisition trajectories in dedicated breast CT

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jainil P.; Mann, Steve D.; McKinley, Randolph L.; Tornai, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A novel breast CT system capable of arbitrary 3D trajectories has been developed to address cone beam sampling insufficiency as well as to image further into the patient’s chest wall. The purpose of this study was to characterize any trajectory-related differences in 3D x-ray dose distribution in a pendant target when imaged with different orbits. Methods: Two acquisition trajectories were evaluated: circular azimuthal (no-tilt) and sinusoidal (saddle) orbit with ±15° tilts around a pendant breast, using Monte Carlo simulations as well as physical measurements. Simulations were performed with tungsten (W) filtration of a W-anode source; the simulated source flux was normalized to the measured exposure of a W-anode source. A water-filled cylindrical phantom was divided into 1 cm3 voxels, and the cumulative energy deposited was tracked in each voxel. Energy deposited per voxel was converted to dose, yielding the 3D distributed dose volumes. Additionally, three cylindrical phantoms of different diameters (10, 12.5, and 15 cm) and an anthropomorphic breast phantom, initially filled with water (mimicking pure fibroglandular tissue) and then with a 75% methanol-25% water mixture (mimicking 50–50 fibroglandular-adipose tissues), were used to simulate the pendant breast geometry and scanned on the physical system. Ionization chamber calibrated radiochromic film was used to determine the dose delivered in a 2D plane through the center of the volume for a fully 3D CT scan using the different orbits. Results: Measured experimental results for the same exposure indicated that the mean dose measured throughout the central slice for different diameters ranged from 3.93 to 5.28 mGy, with the lowest average dose measured on the largest cylinder with water mimicking a homogeneously fibroglandular breast. These results align well with the cylinder phantom Monte Carlo studies which also showed a marginal difference in dose delivered by a saddle trajectory in the

  9. BrachyView: multiple seed position reconstruction and comparison with CT post-implant dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnaghy, S.; Loo, K. J.; Cutajar, D. L.; Jalayer, M.; Tenconi, C.; Favoino, M.; Rietti, R.; Tartaglia, M.; Carriero, F.; Safavi-Naeini, M.; Bucci, J.; Jakubek, J.; Pospisil, S.; Zaider, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Petasecca, M.

    2016-05-01

    BrachyView is a novel in-body imaging system utilising high-resolution pixelated silicon detectors (Timepix) and a pinhole collimator for brachytherapy source localisation. Recent studies have investigated various options for real-time intraoperative dynamic dose treatment planning to increase the quality of implants. In a previous proof-of-concept study, the justification of the pinhole concept was shown, allowing for the next step whereby multiple active seeds are implanted into a PMMA phantom to simulate a more realistic clinical scenario. In this study, 20 seeds were implanted and imaged using a lead pinhole of 400 μ m diameter. BrachyView was able to resolve the seed positions within 1-2 mm of expected positions, which was verified by co-registering with a full clinical post-implant CT scan.

  10. Diagnostic Performance of Dual-Energy CT Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: Direct Comparison With Cardiovascular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sung Min; Song, Meong Gun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion dual-energy CT (DECT) and its incremental value when used with coronary CT angiography (CTA) for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS One hundred patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease without chronic myocardial infarction detected with coronary CTA underwent stress perfusion DECT, stress cardiovascular perfusion MRI, and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stress perfusion DECT and cardiovascular stress perfusion MR images were used for detecting perfusion defects. Coronary CTA and ICA were evaluated in the detection of ≥ 50% coronary stenosis. The diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detecting hemodynamically significant stenosis was assessed before and after stress perfusion DECT on a pervessel basis with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI as the reference standard. RESULTS The performance of stress perfusion DECT compared with cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI on a per-vessel basis in the detection of perfusion defects was sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 74%; positive predictive value, 73%; negative predictive value, 90%. Per segment, these values were sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 80%; positive predictive value, 63%; and negative predictive value, 88%. Compared with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI per vessel territory the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary CTA were 95%, 61%, 61%, and 95%. The values for stress perfusion DECT were 92%, 72%, 68%, and 94%. The values for coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT were 88%, 79%, 73%, and 91%. The ROC AUC increased from 0.78 to 0.84 (p = 0.02) with the use of coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT compared with coronary CTA alone. CONCLUSION Stress perfusion DECT plays a complementary role in enhancing the accuracy of coronary CTA for identifying hemodynamically

  11. Comparison of manual vs. automated multimodality (CT-MRI) image registration for brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Abhirup; Santiago, Roberto J.; Smith, Ryan; Kassaee, Alireza . E-mail: Kassaee@xrt.upenn.edu

    2005-03-31

    Computed tomgoraphy-magnetic resonance imaging (CT-MRI) registrations are routinely used for target-volume delineation of brain tumors. We clinically use 2 software packages based on manual operation and 1 automated package with 2 different algorithms: chamfer matching using bony structures, and mutual information using intensity patterns. In all registration algorithms, a minimum of 3 pairs of identical anatomical and preferably noncoplanar landmarks is used on each of the 2 image sets. In manual registration, the program registers these points and links the image sets using a 3-dimensional (3D) transformation. In automated registration, the 3 landmarks are used as an initial starting point and further processing is done to complete the registration. Using our registration packages, registration of CT and MRI was performed on 10 patients. We scored the results of each registration set based on the amount of time spent, the accuracy reported by the software, and a final evaluation. We evaluated each software program by measuring the residual error between 'matched' points on the right and left globes and the posterior fossa for fused image slices. In general, manual registration showed higher misalignment between corresponding points compared to automated registration using intensity matching. This error had no directional dependence and was, most of the time, larger for a larger structure in both registration techniques. Automated algorithm based on intensity matching also gave the best results in terms of registration accuracy, irrespective of whether or not the initial landmarks were chosen carefully, when compared to that done using bone matching algorithm. Intensity-matching algorithm required the least amount of user-time and provided better accuracy.

  12. Contrast agent comparison for three-dimensional micro-CT angiography: A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Kingston, Mitchell J; Perriman, Diana M; Neeman, Teresa; Smith, Paul N; Webb, Alexandra L

    2016-07-01

    Barium sulfate and lead oxide contrast media are frequently used for cadaver-based angiography studies. These contrast media have not previously been compared to determine which is optimal for the visualisation and measurement of blood vessels. In this study, the lower limb vessels of 16 embalmed Wistar rats, and four sets of cannulae of known diameter, were injected with one of three different contrast agents (barium sulfate and resin, barium sulfate and gelatin, and lead oxide combined with milk powder). All were then scanned using micro-computed tomography (CT) angiography and 3-D reconstructions generated. The number of branching generations of the rat lower limb vessels were counted and compared between the contrast agents using ANOVA. The diameter of the contrast-filled cannulae, were measured and used to calculate the accuracy of the measurements by comparing the bias and variance of the estimates. Intra- and inter-observer reliability were calculated using intra-class correlation coefficients. There was no significant difference (mean difference [MD] 0.05; MD 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.83 to 0.93) between the number of branching generations for barium sulfate-resin and lead oxide-milk powder. Barium sulfate-resin demonstrated less bias and less variance of the estimates (MD 0.03; standard deviation [SD] 1.96 mm) compared to lead oxide-milk powder (MD 0.11; SD 1.96 mm) for measurements of contrast-filled cannulae scanned at high resolution. Barium sulfate-resin proved to be more accurate than lead oxide-milk powder for high resolution micro-CT scans and is preferred due to its non-toxicity. This technique could be applied to any embalmed specimen model. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27075920

  13. Comparisons of obesity assessments in over-weight elementary students using anthropometry, BIA, CT and DEXA

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ok-Kyeong; Rhee, Yang-Keun; Park, Tae-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Obesity was characterized in Korean elementary students using different obesity assessment tests on 103 overweight elementary students from three schools of Jeonbuk Province. The body mass index (BMI) and obesity index (OI) were compared, and the data using DEXA and CT were compared with the data using BIA and a tape measure. The results of this study are as follows: first, 27 students who were classified as obese by OI were classified as overweight by BMI, and 3 students who were classified as standard weight by BMI were classified as overweight by OI. Secondly, by DEXA and BIA measurements, there was 1.51% difference in body fat percentage (boys 1.66%, girls 1.17%) and the difference in body fat mass between boys and girls was 0.77 kg (boys 0.85 kg, girls 0.59 kg), but those differences in body fat percentage and mass were not statistically significant. Thirdly, the average total abdominal fat (TAF) measured by CT scans of obese children was more significantly related with subcutaneous fat (r = 0.983, P < 0.01) than visceral fat (r = 0.640, P < 0.01). Also, TAF were highest significant with waist circumference by a tape measure (r = 0.744, P < 0.01). In summary, as there are some differences of assessment results between two obesity test methods (BMI, OI), we need more definite standards to determine the degree of obesity. The BIA seems to be the most simple and effective way to measure body fat mass, whereas waist/hip ratio (WHR) using a tape measurer is considered to be the most effective method for assessing abdominal fat in elementary students. PMID:20461201

  14. Comparison of CT and MR in 400 patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.G. Jr.; Waluch, V.; Yadley, R.A.; Wycoff, R.R.

    1984-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) (0.35T) and computed tomography (CT) were compared in 400 consecutive patients with suspected disease of the brain and cervical spinal cord. Of 325 positive diagnoses, MR detected abnormality while CT was normal in 93; MR was more specific in 68; MR and CT gave equivalent information in 129; CT was more specific in 32; and CT was positive while MR was normal in 3. MR was superior to CT in detection of multiple sclerosis, subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy, posterior fossa infarcts and tumors, small extra-axial fluid collections, and cervical syringomyelia. CT was preferable in evaluation of meningiomas and separation of tumor from edema. CT takes less time and may be preferable in patients with acute trauma as well as very young or elderly individuals. Thus the two studies should be considered complementary.

  15. Forming Simulation of Thick AFP Laminates and Comparison with Live CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutz, Daniel; Vermilyea, Mark; Bel, Sylvain; Hinterhölzl, Roland

    2016-08-01

    Automated fiber placement (AFP) process can be used to manufacture laminates by laying up unidirectional slit tapes along a desired path and placing multiple layers on top of each other. Usually, the slit tapes are placed direct onto the tooling to attain the final part geometry. Alternatively, the laminate can be built up on a planar substrate and can be subsequently formed into the final shape. This kind of processing allows manufacturing highly curved parts, which may not be possible with the direct placement. In the present work a forming simulation of thick AFP laminates is developed to predict the tapes' orientations and delamination as well as transverse tape spread-ups and separations during the forming process. The simulation model is built up through the material characterization experiments. Validation is performed comparing the results of the simulation vs. the experimental forming on two generic geometries. An optical inspection is made on the external layers of the laminates. In a second step, live computer tomography (CT) scans are used to inspect the tapes within an AFP laminate during forming of an L- and a Z-flange. Tapes re-orientation, gaps and tapes widening are observed experimentally and compared to the simulation results. The simulation is capable to predict the tows orientation and provides indicators concerning the tows spread-up and separation.

  16. Comparisons of Derived Metrics from Computed Tomography (CT) Scanned Images of Fluvial Sediment from Gravel-Bed Flume Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voepel, Hal; Ahmed, Sharif; Hodge, Rebecca; Leyland, Julian; Sear, David

    2016-04-01

    Uncertainty in bedload estimates for gravel bed rivers is largely driven by our inability to characterize arrangement, orientation and resultant forces of fluvial sediment in river beds. Water working of grains leads to structural differences between areas of the bed through particle sorting, packing, imbrication, mortaring and degree of bed armoring. In this study, non-destructive, micro-focus X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging in 3D is used to visualize, quantify and assess the internal geometry of sections of a flume bed that have been extracted keeping their fabric intact. Flume experiments were conducted at 1:1 scaling of our prototype river. From the volume, center of mass, points of contact, and protrusion of individual grains derived from 3D scan data we estimate 3D static force properties at the grain-scale such as pivoting angles, buoyancy and gravity forces, and local grain exposure. Here metrics are derived for images from two flume experiments: one with a bed of coarse grains (>4mm) and the other where sand and clay were incorporated into the coarse flume bed. In addition to deriving force networks, comparison of metrics such as critical shear stress, pivot angles, grain distributions, principle axis orientation, and pore space over depth are made. This is the first time bed stability has been studied in 3D using CT scanned images of sediment from the bed surface to depths well into the subsurface. The derived metrics, inter-granular relationships and characterization of bed structures will lead to improved bedload estimates with reduced uncertainty, as well as improved understanding of relationships between sediment structure, grain size distribution and channel topography.

  17. Comparison of the Reliability of Anatomic Landmarks based on PA Cephalometric Radiographs and 3D CT Scans in Patients with Facial Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Pooja; Jain, Pradeep; Panwar, Vasim Raja

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Conventional cephalometry is an inexpensive and well-established method for evaluating patients with dentofacial deformities. However, patients with major deformities and in particular asymmetric cases are difficult to evaluate by conventional cephalometry. Reliable and accurate evaluation in the orbital and midfacial region in craniofacial syndrome patients is difficult due to inherent geometric magnification, distortion and the superpositioning of the craniofacial structures on cephalograms. Both two- and three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) have been proposed to alleviate some of these difficulties. Aims and objectives The aim of our study is to compare the reliability of anatomic cephalometric points obtained from the two modalities: Conventional posteroanterior cephalograms and 3D CT of patients with facial asymmetry, by comparison of intra- and interobserver variation of points recorded from frontal X-ray to those recorded from 3D CT. Materials and methods The sample included nine patients (5 males and 4 females) with an age range of 14 to 21 years and a mean age of 17.11 years, whose treatment plan called for correction of facial asymmetry. All CT scans were measured twice by two investigators with 2 weeks separation for determination of intraobserver and interobserver variability. Similarly, all measurement points on the frontal cephalograms were traced twice with 2 weeks separation. The tracings were superimposed and the average distance between replicate points readings were used as a measure of intra- and interobserver reliability. Intra-and interobserver variations are calculated for each method and the data were imported directly into the statistical program, SPSS 10.0.1 for windows. Results Intraobserver variations of points defined on 3D CT were small compared with frontal cephalograms. The intraobserver variations ranged from 0 (A1, B1) to 0.6 mm with the variations less than 0.5 mm for most of the points. Interobserver variations

  18. Comparison of demons deformable registration-based methods for texture analysis of serial thoracic CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.; Fei, Xianhan M.; Tuohy, Rachel E.; Armato, Samuel G.

    2013-02-01

    To determine how 19 image texture features may be altered by three image registration methods, "normal" baseline and follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans from 27 patients were analyzed. Nineteen texture feature values were calculated in over 1,000 32x32-pixel regions of interest (ROIs) randomly placed in each baseline scan. All three methods used demons registration to map baseline scan ROIs to anatomically matched locations in the corresponding transformed follow-up scan. For the first method, the follow-up scan transformation was subsampled to achieve a voxel size identical to that of the baseline scan. For the second method, the follow-up scan was transformed through affine registration to achieve global alignment with the baseline scan. For the third method, the follow-up scan was directly deformed to the baseline scan using demons deformable registration. Feature values in matched ROIs were compared using Bland- Altman 95% limits of agreement. For each feature, the range spanned by the 95% limits was normalized to the mean feature value to obtain the normalized range of agreement, nRoA. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to compare nRoA values across features for the three methods. Significance for individual tests was adjusted using the Bonferroni method. nRoA was significantly smaller for affine-registered scans than for the resampled scans (p=0.003), indicating lower feature value variability between baseline and follow-up scan ROIs using this method. For both of these methods, however, nRoA was significantly higher than when feature values were calculated directly on demons-deformed followup scans (p<0.001). Across features and methods, nRoA values remained below 26%.

  19. Ex vivo comparison of Galileos cone beam CT and intraoral radiographs in detecting occlusal caries

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, S; Tyndall, D; Wright, JT; Everett, E

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of cone beam CT (CBCT) with intraoral radiographs for detection of occlusal caries. Methods A set of 60 extracted teeth were imaged using a Sirona Galileos CBCT system (Sirona Dental Systems, Bensheim, Germany) and an intraoral Planmeca® system (Planmeca OY, Helsinki, Finland). Six observers looked at both modalities and used a five-point confidence scale to evaluate presence or absence of occlusal caries. Histology was used as the gold standard. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and weighted kappa statistics were used for statistical analysis. Differences in the area under the curve (AUC) values between observers and modalities were analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Differences in sensitivity and specificity were analysed using the Wilcoxon test. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability was assessed by weighted kappa scores. Results The mean value and standard deviation of AUC was 0.719 ± 0.038 for CBCT and 0.649 ± 0.062 for the intraoral radiographs. The ANOVA results demonstrated that there was no significant difference between the modalities and the observers. The interobserver kappa for pairs of observers ranged from fair to substantial for bitewings (0.244–0.543) and CBCT (0.152–0.401). Four out of six observers reported higher sensitivity but lower specificity with CBCT. The Wilcoxon exact p-value showed no difference in sensitivity (0.175) or specificity (0.573) between the two modalities. Conclusion Based on the results we conclude that the Sirona CBCT unit cannot be used for the sole purpose of looking at occlusal caries. PMID:22184471

  20. Comparison of Partial Volume Effects in Arterial and Venous Contrast Curves in CT Brain Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Alan J.; Bennink, Edwin; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Viergever, Max A.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Smit, Ewoud J.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In brain CT perfusion (CTP), the arterial contrast bolus is scaled to have the same area under the curve (AUC) as the venous outflow to correct for partial volume effects (PVE). This scaling is based on the assumption that large veins are unaffected by PVE. Measurement of the internal carotid artery (ICA), usually unaffected by PVE due to its large diameter, may avoid the need for partial volume correction. The aims of this work are to examine i) the assumptions behind PVE correction and ii) the potential of selecting the ICA obviating correction for PVE. Methods The AUC of the ICA and sagittal sinus were measured in CTP datasets from 52 patients. The AUCs were determined by i) using commercial CTP software based on a Gaussian curve-fitting to the time attenuation curve, and ii) by simple integration of the time attenuation curve over a time interval. In addition, frames acquired up to 3 minutes after first bolus passage were used to examine the ratio of arterial and venous enhancement. The impact of selecting the ICA without PVE correction was illustrated by reporting cerebral blood volume (CBV) measurements. Results In 49 of 52 patients, the AUC of the ICA was significantly larger than that of the sagittal sinus (p = 0.017). Measured after the first pass bolus, contrast enhancement remained 50% higher in the ICA just after the first pass bolus, and 30% higher 3 minutes later. CBV measurements were significantly lowered when the ICA was used without PVE correction. Conclusions Contradicting the assumptions underlying PVE correction, contrast in the ICA was significantly higher than in the sagittal sinus, even 3 minutes after the first pass of the contrast bolus. PVE correction might lead to overestimation of CBV if the CBV is calculated using the AUC of the time attenuation curves. PMID:24858308

  1. Monte Carlo comparison of x-ray and proton CT for range calculations of proton therapy beams.

    PubMed

    Arbor, N; Dauvergne, D; Dedes, G; Létang, J M; Parodi, K; Quiñones, C T; Testa, E; Rit, S

    2015-10-01

    Proton computed tomography (CT) has been described as a solution for imaging the proton stopping power of patient tissues, therefore reducing the uncertainty of the conversion of x-ray CT images to relative stopping power (RSP) maps and its associated margins. This study aimed to investigate this assertion under the assumption of ideal detection systems. We have developed a Monte Carlo framework to assess proton CT performances for the main steps of a proton therapy treatment planning, i.e. proton or x-ray CT imaging, conversion to RSP maps based on the calibration of a tissue phantom, and proton dose simulations. Irradiations of a computational phantom with pencil beams were simulated on various anatomical sites and the proton range was assessed on the reference, the proton CT-based and the x-ray CT-based material maps. Errors on the tissue's RSP reconstructed from proton CT were found to be significantly smaller and less dependent on the tissue distribution. The imaging dose was also found to be much more uniform and conformal to the primary beam. The mean absolute deviation for range calculations based on x-ray CT varies from 0.18 to 2.01 mm depending on the localization, while it is smaller than 0.1 mm for proton CT. Under the assumption of a perfect detection system, proton range predictions based on proton CT are therefore both more accurate and more uniform than those based on x-ray CT.

  2. Comparison of Three Commercial Molecular Assays for Detection of Rifampin and Isoniazid Resistance among Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in a High-HIV-Prevalence Setting.

    PubMed

    Strydom, K; Ismail, F; Matabane, M M Z; Onwuegbuna, O; Omar, S V; Ismail, N

    2015-09-01

    In a head-to-head comparison of the MTBDRplus version 2.0 (Hain Lifescience), the Xpert MTB/RIF (Cepheid), and the Anyplex MTB/NTM (Seegene) assays, we demonstrated equal sensitivity (59/61; 96.7%) and specificity (53/54; 98.1%) for detecting rifampin resistance with further analysis of discordances. The Xpert assay does not detect isoniazid resistance while the Anyplex assay showed high false positivity. PMID:26135869

  3. Equal sensitivity of the new generation QuantiFERON-TB Gold plus in direct comparison with the previous test version QuantiFERON-TB Gold IT.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, H; Avsar, K; Göres, R; Mavi, S-C; Hofmann-Thiel, S

    2016-08-01

    QuantiFERON-TB Gold IT analyses interferon-γ release from CD4(+) T cells after stimulation with specific tuberculosis (TB) antigens. Its sensitivity is approximately 80% for active TB. A new test generation (QFTGplus) also analyses the response of CD8(+) T cells. We investigated both test generations in a direct head-to-head comparison in a German pulmonary hospital. Sensitivity rates for active TB were identical, no matter whether diagnosis was bacteriologically confirmed or not.

  4. Estimation of lung motion fields in 4D CT data by variational non-linear intensity-based registration: A comparison and evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Werner, René; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz; Ehrhardt, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Accurate and robust estimation of motion fields in respiration-correlated CT (4D CT) images, usually performed by non-linear registration of the temporal CT frames, is a precondition for the analysis of patient-specific breathing dynamics and subsequent image-supported diagnostics and treatment planning. In this work, we present a comprehensive comparison and evaluation study of non-linear registration variants applied to the task of lung motion estimation in thoracic 4D CT data. In contrast to existing multi-institutional comparison studies (e.g. MIDRAS and EMPIRE10), we focus on the specific but common class of variational intensity-based non-parametric registration and analyze the impact of the different main building blocks of the underlying optimization problem: the distance measure to be minimized, the regularization approach and the transformation space considered during optimization. In total, 90 different combinations of building block instances are compared. Evaluated on proprietary and publicly accessible 4D CT images, landmark-based registration errors (TRE) between 1.14 and 1.20 mm for the most accurate registration variants demonstrate competitive performance of the applied general registration framework compared to other state-of-the-art approaches for lung CT registration. Although some specific trends can be observed, effects of interchanging individual instances of the building blocks on the TRE are in general rather small (no single outstanding registration variant existing); the same level of accuracy is, however, associated with significantly different degrees of motion field smoothness and computational demands. Consequently, the building block combination of choice will depend on application-specific requirements on motion field characteristics.

  5. Dose measurements for dental cone-beam CT: a comparison with MSCT and panoramic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deman, P.; Atwal, P.; Duzenli, C.; Thakur, Y.; Ford, N. L.

    2014-06-01

    To date there is a lack of published information on appropriate methods to determine patient doses from dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) equipment. The goal of this study is to apply and extend the methods recommended in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report 111 for CBCT equipment to characterize dose and effective dose for a range of dental imaging equipment. A protocol derived from the one proposed by Dixon et al (2010 Technical Report 111, American Association of Physicist in Medicine, MD, USA), was applied to dose measurements of multi-slice CT, dental CBCT (small and large fields of view (FOV)) and a dental panoramic system. The computed tomography dose index protocol was also performed on the MSCT to compare both methods. The dose distributions in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom were characterized using a thimble ionization chamber and Gafchromic™ film (beam profiles). Gafchromic™ films were used to measure the dose distribution in an anthropomorphic phantom. A method was proposed to extend dose estimates to planes superior and inferior to the central plane. The dose normalized to 100 mAs measured in the center of the phantom for the large FOV dental CBCT (11.4 mGy/100 mAs) is two times lower than that of MSCT (20.7 mGy/100 mAs) for the same FOV, but approximately 15 times higher than for a panoramic system (0.6 mGy/100 mAs). The effective dose per scan (in clinical conditions) found for the dental CBCT are 167.60 ± 3.62, 61.30 ± 3.88 and 92.86 ± 7.76 mSv for the Kodak 9000 (fixed scan length of 3.7 cm), and the iCAT Next Generation for 6 cm and 13 cm scan lengths respectively. The method to extend the dose estimates from the central slice to superior and inferior slices indicates a good agreement between theory and measurement. The Gafchromic™ films provided useful beam profile data and 2D distributions of dose in phantom.

  6. Comparison of CLASS and ITK-SNAP in segmentation of urinary bladder in CT urography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Kenny; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Caoili, Elaine M.; Cohan, Richard H.; Zhou, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    We are developing a computerized method for bladder segmentation in CT urography (CTU) for computeraided diagnosis of bladder cancer. We have developed a Conjoint Level set Analysis and Segmentation System (CLASS) consisting of four stages: preprocessing and initial segmentation, 3D and 2D level set segmentation, and post-processing. In case the bladder contains regions filled with intravenous (IV) contrast and without contrast, CLASS segments the noncontrast (NC) region and the contrast (C) filled region separately and conjoins the contours. In this study, we compared the performance of CLASS to ITK-SNAP 2.4, which is a publicly available software application for segmentation of structures in 3D medical images. ITK-SNAP performs segmentation by using the edge-based level set on preprocessed images. The level set were initialized by manually placing a sphere at the boundary between the C and NC parts of the bladders with C and NC regions, and in the middle of the bladders that had only C or NC region. Level set parameters and the number of iterations were chosen after experimentation with bladder cases. Segmentation performances were compared using 30 randomly selected bladders. 3D hand-segmented contours were obtained as reference standard, and computerized segmentation accuracy was evaluated in terms of the average volume intersection %, average % volume error, average absolute % volume error, average minimum distance, and average Jaccard index. For CLASS, the values for these performance metrics were 79.0±8.2%, 16.1±16.3%, 19.9±11.1%, 3.5±1.3 mm, 75.7±8.4%, respectively. For ITK-SNAP, the corresponding values were 78.8±8.2%, 8.3±33.1%, 24.2±23.7%, 5.2±2.6 mm, 71.0±15.4%, respectively. CLASS on average performed better and exhibited less variations than ITK-SNAP for bladder segmentation.

  7. Noise-resolution tradeoffs in x-ray CT imaging: A comparison of penalized alternating minimization and filtered backprojection algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Joshua D.; Politte, David G.; Whiting, Bruce R.; O'Sullivan, Joseph A.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In comparison with conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms for x-ray computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction, statistical algorithms directly incorporate the random nature of the data and do not assume CT data are linear, noiseless functions of the attenuation line integral. Thus, it has been hypothesized that statistical image reconstruction may support a more favorable tradeoff than FBP between image noise and spatial resolution in dose-limited applications. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the noise-resolution tradeoff for the alternating minimization (AM) algorithm regularized using a nonquadratic penalty function. Methods: Idealized monoenergetic CT projection data with Poisson noise were simulated for two phantoms with inserts of varying contrast (7%-238%) and distance from the field-of-view (FOV) center (2-6.5 cm). Images were reconstructed for the simulated projection data by the FBP algorithm and two penalty function parameter values of the penalized AM algorithm. Each algorithm was run with a range of smoothing strengths to allow quantification of the noise-resolution tradeoff curve. Image noise is quantified as the standard deviation in the water background around each contrast insert. Modulation transfer functions (MTFs) were calculated from six-parameter model fits to oversampled edge-spread functions defined by the circular contrast-insert edges as a metric of local resolution. The integral of the MTF up to 0.5 lp/mm was adopted as a single-parameter measure of local spatial resolution. Results: The penalized AM algorithm noise-resolution tradeoff curve was always more favorable than that of the FBP algorithm. While resolution and noise are found to vary as a function of distance from the FOV center differently for the two algorithms, the ratio of noises when matching the resolution metric is relatively uniform over the image. The ratio of AM-to-FBP image variances, a predictor of dose-reduction potential, was

  8. Characterization of focal liver lesions with SonoVue®-enhanced sonography: International multicenter-study in comparison to CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Trillaud, Hervé; Bruel, Jean-Michel; Valette, Pierre-Jean; Vilgrain, Valérie; Schmutz, Gérard; Oyen, Raymond; Jakubowski, Wieslaw; Danes, Jan; Valek, Vlastimil; Greis, Christian

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate in a multicenter study whether the sonographic characterization of focal liver lesions can be improved using SonoVue®-enhancement; and to compare this method with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: One hundred and thirty four patients with one focal liver lesion detected in baseline ultrasound (US) were examined with conventional US, contrast-enhanced US (n = 134), contrast-enhanced CT (n = 115) and/or dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (n = 70). The lesions were classified as malignant, benign or indeterminate and the type of lesion was determined. The final diagnosis based on the combined information of all imaging examinations, clinical information and histology (n = 32) was used. Comparisons were made to see whether the addition of contrast-enhanced US led to the improvement of the characterization of doubtful focal liver lesions. RESULTS: In comparison with unenhanced US, SonoVue® markedly improves sensitivity and specificity for the characterization (malignant/benign) of focal liver lesions. In comparison with CT and/or dynamic MRI, SonoVue®-enhanced sonography applied for characterization of focal liver lesions was 30.2% more sensitive in the recognition of malignancy and 16.1% more specific in the exclusion of malignancy and overall 22.9% more accurate. In the subgroup with confirmative histology available (n = 30), sensitivity was 95.5% (CEUS), 72.2% (CT) and 81.8% (MRI), and specificity was 75.0% (CEUS), 37.5% (CT) and 42.9% (MRI). The sensitivity and specificity of CEUS for the identification of focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and hemangiomas was 100% and 87%, resulting in an accuracy of 94.5%. CONCLUSION: SonoVue®-enhanced sonography emerges as the most sensitive, most specific and thus most accurate imaging modality for the characterization of focal liver lesions. PMID:19673015

  9. TU-C-12A-11: Comparisons Between Cu-ATSM PET and DCE-CT Kinetic Parameters in Canine Sinonasal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    La Fontaine, M; Bradshaw, T; Kubicek, L; Forrest, L; Jeraj, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Regions of poor perfusion within tumors may be associated with higher hypoxic levels. This study aimed to test this hypothesis by comparing measurements of hypoxia from Cu-ATSM PET to vasculature kinetic parameters from DCE-CT kinetic analysis. Methods: Ten canine patients with sinonasal tumors received one Cu-ATSM PET/CT scan and three DCE-CT scans prior to treatment. Cu-ATSM PET/CT and DCE-CT scans were registered and resampled to matching voxel dimensions. Kinetic analysis was performed on DCE-CT scans and for each patient, the resulting kinetic parameter values from the three DCE-CT scans were averaged together. Cu-ATSM SUVs were spatially correlated (r{sub spatial}) on a voxel-to-voxel basis against the following DCE-CT kinetic parameters: transit time (t{sub 1}), blood flow (F), vasculature fraction (v{sub 1}), and permeability (PS). In addition, whole-tumor comparisons were performed by correlating (r{sub ROI}) the mean Cu-ATSM SUV (SUV{sub mean}) with median kinetic parameter values. Results: The spatial correlations (r{sub spatial}) were poor and ranged from -0.04 to 0.21 for all kinetic parameters. These low spatial correlations may be due to high variability in the DCE-CT kinetic parameter voxel values between scans. In our hypothesis, t{sub 1} was expected to have a positive correlation, while F was expected to have a negative correlation to hypoxia. However, in wholetumor analysis the opposite was found for both t{sub 1} (r{sub ROI} = -0.25) and F (r{sub ROI} = 0.56). PS and v{sub 1} may depict angiogenic responses to hypoxia and found positive correlations to Cu-ATSM SUV for PS (r{sub ROI} = 0.41), and v{sub 1} (r{sub ROI} = 0.57). Conclusion: Low spatial correlations were found between Cu-ATSM uptake and DCE-CT vasculature parameters, implying that poor perfusion is not associated with higher hypoxic regions. Across patients, the most hypoxic tumors tended to have higher blood flow values, which is contrary to our initial hypothesis. Funding

  10. MO-E-17A-03: Monte Carlo CT Dose Calculation: A Comparison Between Experiment and Simulation Using ARCHER-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T; Du, X; Su, L; Gao, Y; Ji, W; Xu, X; Zhang, D; Shi, J; Liu, B; Kalra, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the CT doses derived from the experiments and GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, using a human cadaver and ATOM phantom. Methods: The cadaver of an 88-year old male and the ATOM phantom were scanned by a GE LightSpeed Pro 16 MDCT. For the cadaver study, the Thimble chambers (Model 10×5−0.6CT and 10×6−0.6CT) were used to measure the absorbed dose in different deep and superficial organs. Whole-body scans were first performed to construct a complete image database for MC simulations. Abdomen/pelvis helical scans were then conducted using 120/100 kVps, 300 mAs and a pitch factor of 1.375:1. For the ATOM phantom study, the OSL dosimeters were used and helical scans were performed using 120 kVp and x, y, z tube current modulation (TCM). For the MC simulations, sufficient particles were run in both cases such that the statistical errors of the results by ARCHER-CT were limited to 1%. Results: For the human cadaver scan, the doses to the stomach, liver, colon, left kidney, pancreas and urinary bladder were compared. The difference between experiments and simulations was within 19% for the 120 kVp and 25% for the 100 kVp. For the ATOM phantom scan, the doses to the lung, thyroid, esophagus, heart, stomach, liver, spleen, kidneys and thymus were compared. The difference was 39.2% for the esophagus, and within 16% for all other organs. Conclusion: In this study the experimental and simulated CT doses were compared. Their difference is primarily attributed to the systematic errors of the MC simulations, including the accuracy of the bowtie filter modeling, and the algorithm to generate voxelized phantom from DICOM images. The experimental error is considered small and may arise from the dosimeters. R01 grant (R01EB015478) from National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering.

  11. Monte Carlo comparison of x-ray and proton CT for range calculations of proton therapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbor, N.; Dauvergne, D.; Dedes, G.; Létang, J. M.; Parodi, K.; Quiñones, C. T.; Testa, E.; Rit, S.

    2015-10-01

    Proton computed tomography (CT) has been described as a solution for imaging the proton stopping power of patient tissues, therefore reducing the uncertainty of the conversion of x-ray CT images to relative stopping power (RSP) maps and its associated margins. This study aimed to investigate this assertion under the assumption of ideal detection systems. We have developed a Monte Carlo framework to assess proton CT performances for the main steps of a proton therapy treatment planning, i.e. proton or x-ray CT imaging, conversion to RSP maps based on the calibration of a tissue phantom, and proton dose simulations. Irradiations of a computational phantom with pencil beams were simulated on various anatomical sites and the proton range was assessed on the reference, the proton CT-based and the x-ray CT-based material maps. Errors on the tissue’s RSP reconstructed from proton CT were found to be significantly smaller and less dependent on the tissue distribution. The imaging dose was also found to be much more uniform and conformal to the primary beam. The mean absolute deviation for range calculations based on x-ray CT varies from 0.18 to 2.01 mm depending on the localization, while it is smaller than 0.1 mm for proton CT. Under the assumption of a perfect detection system, proton range predictions based on proton CT are therefore both more accurate and more uniform than those based on x-ray CT.

  12. Comparison and Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for CT- and MR-Based Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Gaffney, David K.; Beriwal, Sushil; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Lee Burnett, Omer; D'Souza, David P.; Patil, Nikhilesh; Haddock, Michael G.; Jhingran, Anuja; Jones, Ellen L.; Kunos, Charles A.; Lee, Larissa J.; Mayr, Nina A.; Petersen, Ivy; Petric, Primoz; Portelance, Lorraine; Small, William; Strauss, Jonathan B.; and others

    2014-10-01

    Objective: To create and compare consensus clinical target volume (CTV) contours for computed tomography (CT) and 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance (MR) image-based cervical-cancer brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three experts in gynecologic radiation oncology contoured the same 3 cervical cancer brachytherapy cases: 1 stage IIB near-complete response (CR) case with a tandem and ovoid, 1 stage IIB partial response (PR) case with tandem and ovoid with needles, and 1 stage IB2 CR case with a tandem and ring applicator. The CT contours were completed before the MRI contours. These were analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with κ statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. The conformity index was calculated for each of the 6 data sets. Dice coefficients were generated to compare the CT and MR contours of the same case. Results: For all 3 cases, the mean tumor volume was smaller on MR than on CT (P<.001). The κ and conformity index estimates were slightly higher for CT, indicating a higher level of agreement on CT. The Dice coefficients were 89% for the stage IB2 case with a CR, 74% for the stage IIB case with a PR, and 57% for the stage IIB case with a CR. Conclusion: In a comparison of MR-contoured with CT-contoured CTV volumes, the higher level of agreement on CT may be due to the more distinct contrast medium visible on the images at the time of brachytherapy. MR at the time of brachytherapy may be of greatest benefit in patients with large tumors with parametrial extension that have a partial or complete response to external beam. On the basis of these results, a 95% consensus volume was generated for CT and for MR. Online contouring atlases are available for instruction at (http://www.nrgoncology.org/Resources/ContouringAtlases/GYNCervicalBrachytherapy.aspx)

  13. Coronary artery bypass graft flow: qualitative evaluation with cine single-detector row CT and comparison with findings at angiography.

    PubMed

    Tello, Richard; Hartnell, George G; Costello, Philip; Ecker, Christian P

    2002-09-01

    A four-point ordinal-scale qualitative flow index was used for assessment of patency of 75 coronary artery bypass grafts in 26 patients examined with spiral computed tomography (CT). CT findings were compared with selective graft angiographic findings. Of 54 open grafts, 52 were patent at initial selective graft angiography and 50 were patent at spiral CT; accuracy rates were 97% (73 of 75) and 95% (71 of 75), respectively. Spiral CT flow index agreed with angiographically determined flow in 85% (95% CI: 0.77, 0.93) of grafts. The kappa statistic demonstrated very good to excellent intermodality (0.75) and interobserver (0.89) agreement. Spiral CT may be a feasible means of assessing quality of flow in bypass grafts. PMID:12202732

  14. Emphysema quantification from CT scans using novel application of diaphragm curvature estimation: comparison with standard quantification methods and pulmonary function data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Barr, R. Graham

    2009-02-01

    Emphysema is a disease of the lungs that destroys the alveolar air sacs and induces long-term respiratory dysfunction. CT scans allow for the imaging of the anatomical basis of emphysema and quantification of the underlying disease state. Several measures have been introduced for the quantification emphysema directly from CT data; most,however, are based on the analysis of density information provided by the CT scans, which vary by scanner and can be hard to standardize across sites and time. Given that one of the anatomical variations associated with the progression of emphysema is the flatting of the diaphragm due to the loss of elasticity in the lung parenchyma, curvature analysis of the diaphragm would provide information about emphysema from CT. Therefore, we propose a new, non-density based measure of the curvature of the diaphragm that would allow for further quantification methods in a robust manner. To evaluate the new method, 24 whole-lung scans were analyzed using the ratios of the lung height and diaphragm width to diaphragm height as curvature estimates as well as using the emphysema index as comparison. Pearson correlation coefficients showed a strong trend of several of the proposed diaphragm curvature measures to have higher correlations, of up to r=0.57, with DLCO% and VA than did the emphysema index. Furthermore, we found emphysema index to have only a 0.27 correlation to the proposed measures, indicating that the proposed measures evaluate different aspects of the disease.

  15. Three-dimensional visual truth of the normal airway tree for use as a quantitative comparison to micro-CT reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiesse, Jacqueline; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; de Ryk, Jessica; Namati, Eman; Leinen, Jessica; Recheis, Wolfgang A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    Mouse models are important for pulmonary research to gain insight into structure and function in normal and diseased states, thereby extending knowledge of human disease conditions. The flexibility of human disease induction into mice, due to their similar genome, along with their short gestation cycle makes mouse models highly suitable as investigative tools. Advancements in non-invasive imaging technology, with the development of micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), have aided representation of disease states in these small pulmonary system models. The generation ofμCT 3D airway reconstructions has to date provided a means to examine structural changes associated with disease. The degree of accuracy ofμCT is uncertain. Consequently, the reliability of quantitative measurements is questionable. We have developed a method of sectioning and imaging the whole mouse lung using the Large Image Microscope Array (LIMA) as the gold standard for comparison. Fixed normal mouse lungs were embedded in agarose and 250μm sections of tissue were removed while the remaining tissue block was imaged with a stereomicroscope. A complete dataset of the mouse lung was acquired in this fashion. Following planar image registration, the airways were manually segmented using an in-house built software program PASS. Amira was then used render the 3D isosurface from the segmentations. The resulting 3D model of the normal mouse airway tree developed from pathology images was then quantitatively assessed and used as the standard to compare the accuracy of structural measurements obtained from μ-CT.

  16. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle.

  17. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Hillengass, Jens; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Mosebach, Jennifer; Pan, Leyun; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    PET/MRI represents a promising hybrid imaging modality with several potential clinical applications. Although PET/MRI seems highly attractive in the diagnostic approach of multiple myeloma (MM), its role has not yet been evaluated. The aims of this prospective study are to evaluate the feasibility of 18F-FDG PET/MRI in detection of MM lesions, and to investigate the reproducibility of bone marrow lesions detection and quantitative data of 18F-FDG uptake between the functional (PET) component of PET/CT and PET/MRI in MM patients. The study includes 30 MM patients. All patients initially underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT (60 min p.i.), followed by PET/MRI (120 min p.i.). PET/CT and PET/MRI data were assessed and compared based on qualitative (lesion detection) and quantitative (SUV) evaluation. The hybrid PET/MRI system provided good image quality in all cases without artefacts. PET/MRI identified 65 of the 69 lesions, which were detectable with PET/CT (94.2%). Quantitative PET evaluations showed the following mean values in MM lesions: SUVaverage=5.5 and SUVmax=7.9 for PET/CT; SUVaverage=3.9 and SUVmax=5.8 for PET/MRI. Both SUVaverage and SUVmax were significantly higher on PET/CT than on PET/MRI. Spearman correlation analysis demonstrated a strong correlation between both lesional SUVaverage (r=0.744) and lesional SUVmax (r=0.855) values derived from PET/CT and PET/MRI. Regarding detection of myeloma skeletal lesions, PET/MRI exhibited equivalent performance to PET/CT. In terms of tracer uptake quantitation, a significant correlation between the two techniques was demonstrated, despite the statistically significant differences in lesional SUVs between PET/CT and PET/MRI. PMID:26550538

  18. Comparison of rankings for lean meat based on results from a CT scanner and a video image analysis system.

    PubMed

    Jay, N P; van de Ven, R J; Hopkins, D L

    2014-10-01

    Coopworth cross lambs born over three years were examined in this study. Differences between two machines; a computer tomography (CT) scanner and a VIAScan® system for the estimation of carcase lean weight in lamb carcases was examined. The CT scanner provided a significantly higher estimate of carcase lean. The rank correlation (0.84) between the CT scanner and the VIAScan® system for the prediction of carcase lean was significant, but there was a different ranking for carcase lean depending on which machine was used. This has important ramifications for the use of VIAScan® data in the New Zealand Sheep Improvement Ltd genetic programme.

  19. Reference standard and statistical model for intersite and temporal comparisons of CT attenuation in a multicenter quantitative lung study

    PubMed Central

    Sieren, J. P.; Newell, J. D.; Judy, P. F.; Lynch, D. A.; Chan, K. S.; Guo, J.; Hoffman, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to detect and analyze anomalies between a large number of computed tomography (CT) scanners, tracked over time, utilized to collect human pulmonary CT data for a national multicenter study: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease genetic epidemiology study (COPDGene). Methods: A custom designed CT reference standard “Test Object” has been developed to evaluate the relevant differences in CT attenuation between CT scanners in COPDGene. The materials used in the Test Object to assess CT scanner accuracy and precision included lung equivalent foam (−856 HU), internal air (−1000 HU), water (0 HU), and acrylic (120 HU). Nineteen examples of the Test Object were manufactured. Initially, all Test Objects were scanned on the same CT scanner before the Test Objects were sent to the 20 specific sites and 42 individual CT scanners that were used in the study. The Test Objects were scanned over 17 months while the COPDGene study continued to recruit subjects. A mixed linear effect statistical analysis of the CT scans on the 19 Test Objects was performed. The statistical model reflected influence of reconstruction kernels, tube current, individual Test Objects, CT scanner models, and temporal consistency on CT attenuation. Results: Depending on the Test Object material, there were significant differences between reconstruction kernels, tube current, individual Test Objects, CT scanner models, and temporal consistency. The two Test Object materials of most interest were lung equivalent foam and internal air. With lung equivalent foam, there were significant (p < 0.05) differences between the Siemens B31 (−856.6, ±0.82; mean ± SE) and the GE Standard (−856.6 ± 0.83) reconstruction kernel relative to the Siemens B35 reference standard (−852.5 ± 1.4). Comparing lung equivalent foam attenuation there were also significant differences between CT scanner models (p < 0.01), tube current (p < 0.005), and in temporal consistency (p

  20. Validity of the size-specific dose estimate in adults undergoing coronary CT angiography: comparison with the volume CT dose index.

    PubMed

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Funama, Yoshinori; Yuki, Hideaki; Nakaura, Takeshi; Kai, Noriyuki; Nozaki, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2015-12-01

    Size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) takes into account the patient size but remains to be fully validated for adult coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). We investigated the appropriateness of SSDE for accurate estimation of patient dose by comparing the SSDE and the volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) in adult CCTA. This prospective study received institutional review board approval, and informed consent was obtained from each patient. We enrolled 37 adults who underwent CCTA with a 320-row CT. High-sensitivity metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor dosimeters were placed on the anterior chest. CTDIvol reported by the scanner based on a 32-cm phantom was recorded. We measured chest diameter to convert CTDIvol to SSDE. Using linear regression, we then correlated SSDE with the mean measured skin dose. We also performed linear regression analyses between the skin dose/CTDIvol and the body mass index (BMI), and the skin dose/SSDE and BMI. There was a strong linear correlation (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) between SSDE (mean 37 ± 22 mGy) and mean skin dose (mean 17.7 ± 10 mGy). There was a moderate negative correlation between the skin dose/CTDIvol and BMI (r = 0.45, P < 0.01). The skin dose/SSDE was not affected by BMI (r = 0.06, P > 0.76). SSDE yields a more accurate estimation of the radiation dose without estimation errors attributable to the body size of adult patients undergoing CCTA. PMID:26440660

  1. Comparison of Scientific Calipers and Computer-Enabled CT Review for the Measurement of Skull Base and Craniomaxillofacial Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Citardi, Martin J.; Herrmann, Brian; Hollenbeak, Chris S.; Stack, Brendan C.; Cooper, Margaret; Bucholz, Richard D.

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, cadaveric studies and plain-film cephalometrics provided information about craniomaxillofacial proportions and measurements; however, advances in computer technology now permit software-based review of computed tomography (CT)-based models. Distances between standardized anatomic points were measured on five dried human skulls with standard scientific calipers (Geneva Gauge, Albany, NY) and through computer workstation (StealthStation 2.6.4, Medtronic Surgical Navigation Technology, Louisville, CO) review of corresponding CT scans. Differences in measurements between the caliper and CT model were not statistically significant for each parameter. Measurements obtained by computer workstation CT review of the cranial skull base are an accurate representation of actual bony anatomy. Such information has important implications for surgical planning and clinical research. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:17167599

  2. Comparison of an alternative and existing binning methods to reduce the acquisition duration of 4D PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Didierlaurent, David Ribes, Sophie; Caselles, Olivier; Jaudet, Cyril; Dierickx, Lawrence O.; Zerdoud, Slimane; Brillouet, Severine; Weits, Kathleen; Batatia, Hadj; Courbon, Frédéric

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion is a source of artifacts that reduce image quality in PET. Four dimensional (4D) PET/CT is one approach to overcome this problem. Existing techniques to limiting the effects of respiratory motions are based on prospective phase binning which requires a long acquisition duration (15–25 min). This time is uncomfortable for the patients and limits the clinical exploitation of 4D PET/CT. In this work, the authors evaluated an existing method and an alternative retrospective binning method to reduce the acquisition duration of 4D PET/CT. Methods: The authors studied an existing mixed-amplitude binning (MAB) method and an alternative binning method by mixed-phases (MPhB). Before implementing MPhB, they analyzed the regularity of the breathing patterns in patients. They studied the breathing signal drift and missing CT slices that could be challenging for implementing MAB. They compared the performance of MAB and MPhB with current binning methods to measure the maximum uptake, internal volume, and maximal range of tumor motion. Results: MPhB can be implemented depending on an optimal phase (in average, the exhalation peak phase −4.1% of the entire breathing cycle duration). Signal drift of patients was in average 35% relative to the breathing amplitude. Even after correcting this drift, MAB was feasible in 4D CT for only 64% of patients. No significant differences appeared between the different binning methods to measure the maximum uptake, internal volume, and maximal range of tumor motion. The authors also determined the inaccuracies of MAB and MPhB to measure the maximum amplitude of tumor motion with three bins (less than 3 mm for movement inferior to 12 mm, up to 6.4 mm for a 21 mm movement). Conclusions: The authors proposed an alternative binning method by mixed-phase binning that halves the acquisition duration of 4D PET/CT. Mixed-amplitude binning was challenging because of signal drift and missing CT slices. They showed that more

  3. SU-E-I-84: Accuracy Comparison of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using In-Air Micro-CT Image Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y; Fullerton, G; Goins, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor volume is considered as a better predictor for therapy response monitoring and tumor staging over Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. In this study, the accuracy of subcutaneous rodent tumor volumes using preclinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and ultrasound (US) equipment and with an external caliper was compared using in-air micro-CT image volume of excised tumors determined as reference tumor volume in our prior study. Methods: MR, US and micro-CT images of subcutaneous SCC4 head and neck tumor xenografts were acquired 4, 6, 9, 11 and 13 days after tumor cell inoculation. Before MR and US scans, caliper measurements were made. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging and ex vivo caliper measurements were performed. Tumor volumes were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three image modalities and caliper, and compared with reference tumor volume by linear regression analysis as well as Bland-Altman plots. A one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) test was also performed to compare volumes among caliper measurements. Results: The correlation coefficients (R2) of the regression lines for tumor volumes measured by the three imaging modalities and caliper were 0.9939, 0.9669, 0.9806, 0.9274, 0.9619 and 0.9819 for MRI, US and micro-CT, caliperbeforeMRI, caliperbeforeUS and ex vivo caliper respectively. In Bland-Altman plots, the average of tumor volume difference from reference tumor volume (bias) was significant for caliper and micro- CT, but not for MRI and US. Comparison of caliper measurements showed a significant difference (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Using the in-air micro-CT image volume, tumor volume measured by MRI was the most accurate among the three imaging modalities. In vivo caliper volume measurements showed unreliability while ex

  4. A comparison of CT- and ultrasound-based imaging to localize the prostate for external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    McNair, Helen A. . E-mail: Helen.McNair@rmh.nhs.uk; Mangar, Stephen A.; Coffey, Jerome; Shoulders, Beverley; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Norman, Andrew; Staffurth, John; Sohaib, S. Aslam; Warrington, Alan P.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the accuracy of NOMOS B-mode acquisition and targeting system (BAT) compared with computed tomography (CT) in localizing the prostate. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients were CT scanned, and the prostate was localized by 3 observers using the BAT system. The BAT couch shift measurements were compared with the CT localization. Six of the patients had gold markers present in the prostate, and the prostate movement determined by BAT was compared with the movement determined by the gold markers. Results: Using the BAT system, the 3 observers determined the prostate position to be a mean of 1-5 mm over all directions with respect to the CT. The proportion of readings with a difference >3 mm between the observers was in the range of 25% to 44%. The prostate movement based on gold markers was an average of 3-5 mm different from that measured by BAT. The literature assessing the accuracy and reproducibility on BAT is summarized and compared with our findings. Conclusions: We have found that there are systematic differences between the BAT-defined prostate position compared with that estimated on CT using gold grain marker seeds.

  5. The evaluation and comparison of kidney length obtained from axial cuts in spiral CT scan with its true length

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Mehdi; Rahimi, Farshad; Tajadini, Mohammadhasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increased size of kidney is the main symptom of pyelonephritis and renal ischemia in children. Ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) scan methods are the imaging methods for evaluating the urogenital system. The aim of this study is to compare the kidney length obtained from spiral CT scan with the true length obtained from multi-slice CT. Materials and Methods: From 100 patients 200 kidneys were examined in Alzahra Hospital in 2012. Multi-slice CT was used to obtain coronal and sagittal cuts to find the length of kidneys. Results: The mean values of true size of axial sections of the right and left kidneys were 108.37 ± 12.3 mm and 109.74 ± 13.6 mm, respectively. The mean difference of axial sections’ lengths in the right and left kidneys was 1.37 ± 1.22 mm. The mean values of length in the spiral CT scan of the right and left kidneys were 98.61 ± 15.8 mm and 103.11 ± 15.9 mm, respectively. The difference in the estimated size by multi-slice CT scan in oblique and axial images was significant (9.77 ± 1.19 mm and 6.63 ± 0.8 mm for the right and left kidneys, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The average size of both kidneys determined in axial images was smaller than the actual size. The estimation of kidney size in axial images is not reliable, and to obtain the actual size, it is required to have the coronal and sagittal cuts with proper quality, which could be achieved by multi-slice method. PMID:25709984

  6. Comparison of quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging CT to fluorescent microsphere-based flow from high-resolution cryo-images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Li, Yuemeng; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) has the potential to provide quantitative measures of myocardial blood flow (MBF) which can aid the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. We evaluated the quantitative accuracy of MPI-CT in a porcine model of balloon-induced LAD coronary artery ischemia guided by fractional flow reserve (FFR). We quantified MBF at baseline (FFR=1.0) and under moderate ischemia (FFR=0.7) using MPI-CT and compared to fluorescent microsphere-based MBF from high-resolution cryo-images. Dynamic, contrast-enhanced CT images were obtained using a spectral detector CT (Philips Healthcare). Projection-based mono-energetic images were reconstructed and processed to obtain MBF. Three MBF quantification approaches were evaluated: singular value decomposition (SVD) with fixed Tikhonov regularization (ThSVD), SVD with regularization determined by the L-Curve criterion (LSVD), and Johnson-Wilson parameter estimation (JW). The three approaches over-estimated MBF compared to cryo-images. JW produced the most accurate MBF, with average error 33.3+/-19.2mL/min/100g, whereas LSVD and ThSVD had greater over-estimation, 59.5+/-28.3mL/min/100g and 78.3+/-25.6 mL/min/100g, respectively. Relative blood flow as assessed by a flow ratio of LAD-to-remote myocardium was strongly correlated between JW and cryo-imaging, with R2=0.97, compared to R2=0.88 and 0.78 for LSVD and ThSVD, respectively. We assessed tissue impulse response functions (IRFs) from each approach for sources of error. While JW was constrained to physiologic solutions, both LSVD and ThSVD produced IRFs with non-physiologic properties due to noise. The L-curve provided noise-adaptive regularization but did not eliminate non-physiologic IRF properties or optimize for MBF accuracy. These findings suggest that model-based MPI-CT approaches may be more appropriate for quantitative MBF estimation and that cryo-imaging can support the development of MPI-CT by providing spatial distributions of MBF.

  7. Real medical benefit assessed by indirect comparison.

    PubMed

    Falissard, Bruno; Zylberman, Myriam; Cucherat, Michel; Izard, Valérie; Meyer, François

    2009-01-01

    Frequently, in data packages submitted for Marketing Approval to the CHMP, there is a lack of relevant head-to-head comparisons of medicinal products that could enable national authorities responsible for the approval of reimbursement to assess the Added Therapeutic Value (ASMR) of new clinical entities or line extensions of existing therapies.Indirect or mixed treatment comparisons (MTC) are methods stemming from the field of meta-analysis that have been designed to tackle this problem. Adjusted indirect comparisons, meta-regressions, mixed models, Bayesian network analyses pool results of randomised controlled trials (RCTs), enabling a quantitative synthesis.The REAL procedure, recently developed by the HAS (French National Authority for Health), is a mixture of an MTC and effect model based on expert opinions. It is intended to translate the efficacy observed in the trials into effectiveness expected in day-to-day clinical practice in France. PMID:19671436

  8. Real medical benefit assessed by indirect comparison.

    PubMed

    Falissard, Bruno; Zylberman, Myriam; Cucherat, Michel; Izard, Valérie; Meyer, François

    2009-01-01

    Frequently, in data packages submitted for Marketing Approval to the CHMP, there is a lack of relevant head-to-head comparisons of medicinal products that could enable national authorities responsible for the approval of reimbursement to assess the Added Therapeutic Value (ASMR) of new clinical entities or line extensions of existing therapies.Indirect or mixed treatment comparisons (MTC) are methods stemming from the field of meta-analysis that have been designed to tackle this problem. Adjusted indirect comparisons, meta-regressions, mixed models, Bayesian network analyses pool results of randomised controlled trials (RCTs), enabling a quantitative synthesis.The REAL procedure, recently developed by the HAS (French National Authority for Health), is a mixture of an MTC and effect model based on expert opinions. It is intended to translate the efficacy observed in the trials into effectiveness expected in day-to-day clinical practice in France.

  9. 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT Versus Histopathology in Primary Localized Prostate Cancer: A Voxel-Wise Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Zamboglou, Constantinos; Schiller, Florian; Fechter, Tobias; Wieser, Gesche; Jilg, Cordula Annette; Chirindel, Alin; Salman, Nasr; Drendel, Vanessa; Werner, Martin; Mix, Michael; Meyer, Philipp Tobias; Grosu, Anca Ligia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We performed a voxel-wise comparison of 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT with prostate histopathology to evaluate the performance of 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA for the detection and delineation of primary prostate cancer (PCa). Methodology: Nine patients with histopathological proven primary PCa underwent 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT followed by radical prostatectomy. Resected prostates were scanned by ex-vivo CT in a special localizer and histopathologically prepared. Histopathological information was matched to ex-vivo CT. PCa volume (PCa-histo) and non-PCa tissue in the prostate (NPCa-histo) were processed to obtain a PCa-model, which was adjusted to PET-resolution (histo-PET). Each histo-PET was coregistered to in-vivo PSMA-PET/CT data. Results: Analysis of spatial overlap between histo-PET and PSMA PET revealed highly significant correlations (p < 10-5) in nine patients and moderate to high coefficients of determination (R²) from 42 to 82 % with an average of 60 ± 14 % in eight patients (in one patient R2 = 7 %). Mean SUVmean in PCa-histo and NPCa-histo was 5.6 ± 6.1 and 3.3 ± 2.5 (p = 0.012). Voxel-wise receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses comparing the prediction by PSMA-PET with the non-smoothed tumor distribution from histopathology yielded an average area under the curve of 0.83 ± 0.12. Absolute and relative SUV (normalized to SUVmax) thresholds for achieving at least 90 % sensitivity were 3.19 ± 3.35 and 0.28 ± 0.09, respectively. Conclusions: Voxel-wise analyses revealed good correlations of 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT and histopathology in eight out of nine patients. Thus, PSMA-PET allows a reliable detection and delineation of PCa as basis for PET-guided focal therapies. PMID:27446496

  10. In vivo comparison of tantalum, tungsten, and bismuth enteric contrast agents to complement intravenous iodine for double-contrast dual-energy CT of the bowel.

    PubMed

    Rathnayake, Samira; Mongan, John; Torres, Andrew S; Colborn, Robert; Gao, Dong-Wei; Yeh, Benjamin M; Fu, Yanjun

    2016-07-01

    To assess the ability of dual-energy CT (DECT) to separate intravenous contrast of bowel wall from intraluminal contrast, we scanned 16 rabbits on a clinical DECT scanner: n = 3 using only iodinated intravenous contrast, and n = 13 double-contrast enhanced scans using iodinated intravenous contrast and experimental enteric non-iodinated contrast agents in the bowel lumen (five bismuth, four tungsten, and four tantalum based). Representative image pairs from conventional CT images and DECT iodine density maps of small bowel (116 pairs from 232 images) were viewed by four abdominal imaging attending radiologists to independently score each comparison pair on a visual analog scale (-100 to +100%) for (1) preference in small bowel wall visualization and (2) preference in completeness of intraluminal enteric contrast subtraction. Median small bowel wall visualization was scored 39 and 42 percentage points (95% CI 30-44% and 36-45%, both p < 0.001) higher for double-contrast DECT than for conventional CT with enteric tungsten and tantalum contrast, respectively. Median small bowel wall visualization for double-contrast DECT was scored 29 and 35 percentage points (95% CI 20-35% and 33-39%, both p < 0.001) higher with enteric tungsten and tantalum, respectively, than with bismuth contrast. Median completeness of intraluminal enteric contrast subtraction in double-contrast DECT iodine density maps was scored 28 and 29 percentage points (95% CI 15-31% and 28-33%, both p < 0.001) higher with enteric tungsten and tantalum, respectively, than with bismuth contrast. Results suggest that in vivo double-contrast DECT with iodinated intravenous and either tantalum- or tungsten-based enteric contrast provides better visualization of small bowel than conventional CT. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. In vivo comparison of tantalum, tungsten, and bismuth enteric contrast agents to complement intravenous iodine for double-contrast dual-energy CT of the bowel.

    PubMed

    Rathnayake, Samira; Mongan, John; Torres, Andrew S; Colborn, Robert; Gao, Dong-Wei; Yeh, Benjamin M; Fu, Yanjun

    2016-07-01

    To assess the ability of dual-energy CT (DECT) to separate intravenous contrast of bowel wall from intraluminal contrast, we scanned 16 rabbits on a clinical DECT scanner: n = 3 using only iodinated intravenous contrast, and n = 13 double-contrast enhanced scans using iodinated intravenous contrast and experimental enteric non-iodinated contrast agents in the bowel lumen (five bismuth, four tungsten, and four tantalum based). Representative image pairs from conventional CT images and DECT iodine density maps of small bowel (116 pairs from 232 images) were viewed by four abdominal imaging attending radiologists to independently score each comparison pair on a visual analog scale (-100 to +100%) for (1) preference in small bowel wall visualization and (2) preference in completeness of intraluminal enteric contrast subtraction. Median small bowel wall visualization was scored 39 and 42 percentage points (95% CI 30-44% and 36-45%, both p < 0.001) higher for double-contrast DECT than for conventional CT with enteric tungsten and tantalum contrast, respectively. Median small bowel wall visualization for double-contrast DECT was scored 29 and 35 percentage points (95% CI 20-35% and 33-39%, both p < 0.001) higher with enteric tungsten and tantalum, respectively, than with bismuth contrast. Median completeness of intraluminal enteric contrast subtraction in double-contrast DECT iodine density maps was scored 28 and 29 percentage points (95% CI 15-31% and 28-33%, both p < 0.001) higher with enteric tungsten and tantalum, respectively, than with bismuth contrast. Results suggest that in vivo double-contrast DECT with iodinated intravenous and either tantalum- or tungsten-based enteric contrast provides better visualization of small bowel than conventional CT. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26892945

  12. Chondroitin sulfate iron colloid-enhanced MR imaging in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Comparison with CT during arterial portography.

    PubMed

    Kamba, M; Suto, Y; Kato, T

    1994-11-01

    Chondroitin sulfate iron colloid (CSIC) was used as an MR contrast agent for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The findings of 25 surgically confirmed HCCs in 19 patients were retrospectively analyzed. T1-, T2- and proton density-weighted spin echo MR images were obtained before and after i.v. injection of 23.6 microM Fe/kg of CSIC. Unenhanced and CSIC-enhanced MR images and images obtained by CT during arterial portography (CT-AP) were correlated with surgical pathology findings. The sensitivities of CSIC-enhanced and unenhanced MR imaging, and CT-AP were 92%, 80%, and 88%, respectively. No significant differences were noted. Portal flow abnormalities demonstrated by CT-AP did not affect the detection of HCC by CSIC-enhanced MR imaging. CSIC-enhancement at MR imaging was a disadvantage in the detection of lesions less than 1 cm in diameter. CSIC-enhanced MR imaging is a supplemental method for the detection of HCC.

  13. A comparison study of radiation exposure to patients during EVAR and Dyna CT in an angiosuite vs. an operating theatre.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Andrea; Michelagnoli, Stefano; Chisci, Emiliano; Mazzocchi, Silvia; Panci, Simone; Didona, Annamaria; Ghirelli, Alessandro; Zatelli, Giovanna

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the patient dosimetric impact of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), both in an operating theatre (OR) and in an angiosuite (AS), with the facility of Dynamic CT (Dyna CT, Siemens AG, Berlin, Germany). One hundred and forty-six consecutive EVAR procedures dating from May 2011 to March 2013 were analysed. These were performed either in an OR (n = 97) using a mobile C-arm or in an AS (n = 49) equipped with a ceiling-mounted angiography system. Air kerma area product (P(KA)) and total air kerma at reference point (K(a,r)) values were reported for all procedures and Dyna CT. Radiation exposure during EVAR was quite low in the majority of patients but nearly 50 % higher if performed in AS vs. OR. Median Dyna CT K(a,r) was the same as an entire EVAR procedure in OR. The higher patient's radiation exposure recorded in the AS should be balanced with the technical advantages given to the EVAR procedure.

  14. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yakun; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Methods: A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDI{sub vol} and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. Results: The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose

  15. CT -- Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special x-ray ... Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  16. Comparison of analytical and numerical approaches for CT-based aberration correction in transcranial passive acoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ryan M.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections are employed in transcranial ultrasound both for therapy and imaging. In this study, analytical and numerical approaches for calculating aberration corrections based on CT data were compared, with a particular focus on their application to transcranial passive imaging. Two models were investigated: a three-dimensional full-wave numerical model (Connor and Hynynen 2004 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 51 1693-706) based on the Westervelt equation, and an analytical method (Clement and Hynynen 2002 Ultrasound Med. Biol. 28 617-24) similar to that currently employed by commercial brain therapy systems. Trans-skull time delay corrections calculated from each model were applied to data acquired by a sparse hemispherical (30 cm diameter) receiver array (128 piezoceramic discs: 2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) passively listening through ex vivo human skullcaps (n  =  4) to emissions from a narrow-band, fixed source emitter (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency). Measurements were taken at various locations within the cranial cavity by moving the source around the field using a three-axis positioning system. Images generated through passive beamforming using CT-based skull corrections were compared with those obtained through an invasive source-based approach, as well as images formed without skull corrections, using the main lobe volume, positional shift, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio as metrics for image quality. For each CT-based model, corrections achieved by allowing for heterogeneous skull acoustical parameters in simulation outperformed the corresponding case where homogeneous parameters were assumed. Of the CT-based methods investigated, the full-wave model provided the best imaging results at the cost of computational complexity. These results highlight the importance of accurately modeling trans-skull propagation when calculating CT-based aberration corrections

  17. Volume doubling time of lung cancers detected in a chest radiograph mass screening program: Comparison with CT screening

    PubMed Central

    KANASHIKI, MAKI; TOMIZAWA, TAKUJI; YAMAGUCHI, IWAO; KURISHIMA, KOICHI; HIZAWA, NOBUYUKI; ISHIKAWA, HIROICHI; KAGOHASHI, KATSUNORI; SATOH, HIROAKI

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the volume doubling time (VDT) of lung cancer detected in our annual chest radiograph screening program and to compare it with those previously reported for computed tomography (CT) screening. In total, 209 patients who had a measurable tumor shadow and a history of participating in our chest radiograph mass screening program between 2006 and 2009 were included in this study. Indirect roentgenograms for patients with lung cancer were converted into digital images, and the section showing the tumor was enlarged on the monitor to a size of 0.01 mm. The mean VDT for all the patients was 158 days. Only 3.8% of the patients had a VDT of more than 400 days. In 140 patients with adenocarcinoma, the mean VDT was 177 days, and 5.0% of these patients had a VDT of more than 400 days. In the 44 patients with squamous cell carcinoma, the mean VDT was 133 days, and only 2.3% of these patients had a VDT of more than 400 days. These results were different from those previously reported for CT screening. In several reports on CT screening, more than 20% of the lung cancers had VDTs of more than 400 days. Since it is common knowledge that there are ‘indolent’ lung cancers with a VDT of more than 400 days, screening by annual chest radiography with rare overdiagnosis may need to be reconsidered. PMID:22970048

  18. Comparison of effective dose and lifetime risk of cancer incidence of CT attenuation correction acquisitions and radiopharmaceutical administration for myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Szczepura, K; Hogg, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To measure the organ dose and calculate effective dose from CT attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisitions from four commonly used gamma camera single photon emission CT/CT systems. Methods: CTAC dosimetry data was collected using thermoluminescent dosemeters on GE Healthcare's Infinia™ Hawkeye™ (GE Healthcare, Buckinghamshire, UK) four- and single-slice systems, Siemens Symbia™ T6 (Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) and the Philips Precedence (Philips Healthcare, Amsterdam, Netherlands). Organ and effective dose from the administration of 99mTc-tetrofosmin and 99mTc-sestamibi were calculated using International Commission of Radiological Protection reports 80 and 106. Using these data, the lifetime biological risk was calculated. Results: The Siemens Symbia gave the lowest CTAC dose (1.8 mSv) followed by the GE Infinia Hawkeye single-slice (1.9 mSv), GE Infinia Hawkeye four-slice (2.5 mSv) and Philips Precedence v. 3.0. Doses were significantly lower than the calculated doses from radiopharmaceutical administration (11 and 14 mSv for 99mTc-tetrofosmin and 99mTc-sestamibi, respectively). Overall lifetime biological risks were lower, which suggests that using CTAC data posed minimal risk to the patient. Comparison of data for breast tissue demonstrated a higher risk than that from the radiopharmaceutical administration. Conclusion: CTAC doses were confirmed to be much lower than those from radiopharmaceutical administration. The localized nature of the CTAC exposure compared to the radiopharmaceutical biological distribution indicated dose and risk to the breast to be higher. Advances in knowledge: This research proved that CTAC is a comparatively low-dose acquisition. However, it has been shown that there is increased risk for breast tissue especially in the younger patients. As per legislation, justification is required and CTAC should only be used in situations that demonstrate sufficient net benefit. PMID:24998249

  19. An in vitro CT Comparison of Gutta-Percha Removal with Two Rotary Systems and Hedstrom Files

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pankaj; Bharath, Makonahalli Jaganath; Sahadev, Chickmagravalli Krishnegowda; Makonahalli Ramachandra, Praveen Kumar; Rao, Yogesh; Ali, Ambereen; Mohamed, Shahnawaz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the efficacy of NiTi mechanical rotary instrumentation and Hedstrom file for gutta-percha/sealer removal computed tomography (CT) was utilized in vitro. Materials and Methods Thirty extracted human single rooted teeth, each with a single canal were selected. The samples were decoronated with a double faced diamond disk to have 17-mm root; teeth roots were instrumented with K-files up to master apical file #30 using step back technique. Samples were obturated using cold lateral condensation of gutta-percha and AH Plus root canal sealer. The teeth were then randomly divided into three groups of 10 specimens each. After 2 weeks 3-dimensional images of the roots were obtained by CT and the volume of root filling mass was measured. All the canals were then retreated by either the ProTaper retreatment files, Mtwo retreatment files or Hedstrom files. The canals were irrigated with 2 mL of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite irrigating solution during each change of instrument. The volume of remaining filling materials after the retreatment procedures was assessed by CT. Statistical analysis was performed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test. Results Neither of studied systems completely removed the root filling material. No significant difference was observed between the rotary systems. The volume of remaining filling materials was significantly less in rotary instrumentation than hand files. There was no significant difference for debris extruded from the apical foramen between the groups. Conclusion Under the experimental conditions, Mtwo and ProTaper retreatment files left less gutta-percha and sealer than H files; however, complete removal of filling materials was not achieved by the three systems investigated. PMID:23717331

  20. Comparison of Multidetector CT and Gadobutrol-Enhanced MR Imaging for Evaluation of Small, Solid Pancreatic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Tae Won; Kim, Jung Hoon; Yu, Mi Hye; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and MRI for lesion conspicuity, as well as the detection and characterization of small solid pancreatic lesions (SPLs). Materials and Methods 193 patients with small SPLs (< 3 cm) and 52 patients with normal pancreas who underwent both multiphasic MDCT and gadobutrol-enhanced MRI were included in our study. Two radiologists blinded to the pathologic diagnoses independently reviewed those images, and determined the detection of "SPL per se" and "SPL in consideration of secondary features", the lesion conspicuity, the probability of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and the most likely specific diagnosis. Results The sensitivity of MRI for "detection of SPL per se" was significantly higher than that of CT in both reviewers: 92.7% (179/193) and 97.9% (189/193), respectively, for reviewer 1 (p = 0.031) and 90.7% (175/193) and 99.5% (192/193), respectively, for reviewer 2 (p < 0.001). In addition, MRI provided better lesion conspicuity than MDCT for both reviewers (p < 0.001). However, CT and MRI did not show significant difference in sensitivity for "detection of SPL in consideration of secondary features", specificity for SPL detection, and differentiation of PDAC vs. non-PDAC (p > 0.05). The accuracies of CT and MRI for making a specific diagnosis were as follows: 85.7% (210/245) vs. 86.9% (213/245), respectively, for reviewer 1 (p = 0.736), and 91.8% (225/245) vs. 93.5% (229/245), respectively, for reviewer 2 (p = 0.454). Conclusion MRI showed better lesion conspicuity than MDCT, but did not show significantly different diagnostic performance compared with MDCT for detecting and characterizing small SPLs. PMID:27390542

  1. Simultaneous measurements of cerebral blood flow by the xenon/CT method and the microsphere method. A comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, D.; Yonas, H.; Jackson, D.L.; Wolfson, S.K. Jr.; Rockette, H.; Good, W.F.; Cook, E.E.; Arena, V.C.; Willy, J.A.; Maitz, G.S.

    1985-10-01

    Simultaneous measurements of cerebral blood flow have been performed in baboons to assess the correlation between the acute and invasive nondiffusible microsphere technique and the noninvasive xenon-enhanced CT method. Blood flows in small tissue volumes (approximately 1 cm3) were directly compared. The results of these studies demonstrate a statistically significant association between the two methods (P less than .001). Similar correlations were obtained by both the Kendall tau (tau) and the Spearman (r) methods. The problems and limitations of such correlations are discussed.

  2. Patient-specific models of wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm: a comparison between MR and CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Putter, Sander; Breeuwer, Marcel; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Kose, Ursula; Gerritsen, Frans A.

    2006-03-01

    Finite element method based patient-specific wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) may provide a more accurate rupture risk predictor than the currently used maximum transverse diameter. In this study, we have investigated the sensitivity of the wall stress in AAA with respect to geometrical variations. We have acquired MR and CT images for four patients with AAA. Three individual users have delineated the AAA vessel wall contours on the image slices. These contours were used to generate synthetic feature images for a deformable model based segmentation method. We investigated the reproducibility and the influence of the user variability on the wall stress. For sufficiently smooth models of the AAA wall, the peak wall stress is reproducible for three out of the four AAA geometries. The 0.99 percentiles of the wall stress show excellent reproducibility for all four AAAs. The variations induced by user variability are larger than the errors caused by the segmentation variability. The influence of the user variability appears to be similar for MR and CT. We conclude that the peak wall stress in AAA is sensitive to small geometrical variations. To increase reproducibility it appears to be best not to allow too much geometrical detail in the simulations. This could be achieved either by using a sufficiently smooth geometry representation or by using a more robust statistical parameter derived from the wall stress distribution.

  3. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 02: A comparison of dose reduction methods on image quality for cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R; Buckley, LA

    2014-08-15

    Modern radiotherapy uses highly conformai dose distributions and therefore relies on daily image guidance for accurate patient positioning. Kilovoltage cone beam CT is one technique that is routinely used for patient set-up and results in a high dose to the patient relative to planar imaging techniques. This study uses an Elekta Synergy linac equipped with XVI cone beam CT to investigate the impact of various imaging parameters on dose and image quality. Dose and image quality are assessed as functions of x-ray tube voltage, tube current and the number of projections in the scan. In each case, the dose measurements confirm that as each parameter increases the dose increases. The assessment of high contrast resolution shows little dependence on changes to the image technique. However, low contrast visibility suggests a trade off between dose and image quality. Particularly for changes in tube potential, the dose increases much faster as a function of voltage than the corresponding increase in low contrast image quality. This suggests using moderate values of the peak tube voltage (100 – 120 kVp) since higher values result in significant dose increases with little gain in image quality. Measurements also indicate that increasing tube current achieves the greatest degree of improvement in the low contrast visibility. The results of this study highlight the need to establish careful imaging protocols to limit dose to the patient and to limit changes to the imaging parameters to those cases where there is a clear clinical requirement for improved image quality.

  4. Diagnostic capability of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced liver MRI for diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison with multi-detector CT.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Yuko; Hieda, Masashi; Akiyama, Naoko; Terada, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Noriaki; Nishiki, Masayo; Kono, Hirotaka; Kohno, Hiroshi; Irei, Toshimitsu; Yoshikawa, Yukinobu; Kuraoka, Kazuya; Taniyama, Kiyomi; Awai, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic capability of gadoxetate disodium (Gd-EOB)-MRI for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared with multidetector CT (MDCT). Fifty patients with 57 surgically proven HCCs who underwent Gd-EOB-MRI and MDCT from March 2008 to June 2011 were evaluated. Two observers evaluated MR and CT on a lesion-by-lesion basis. We analyzed sensitivity by grading on a 5-point scale, the degree of arterial enhancement and the differences in histological grades in the diffusion-weighted images (DWI). The results showed that the sensitivity of Gd-EOB-MRI was higher than that of MDCT especially for HCCs that were 1 cm in diameter or smaller. The hepatobiliary phase was useful for the detecting of small HCC. We had few cases in which it was difficult to judge HCC in the arterial enhancement between MRI and MDCT. In the diffusion-weighted image, well differentiated HCC tended to show a low signal intensity, and poorly differentiated HCC tended to show a high signal intensity. In moderately differentiated HCC's, the mean diameter of the high signal intensity group was larger than that of the low signal intensity group (24.5 mm vs. 15.8 mm). In conclusion, Gd-EOB-MRI tended to show higher sensitivity compared to MDCT in the detection of HCC.

  5. SU-E-I-17: Comparison of Two Novel Algorithms for the Modulation Transfer Function of CT Using a Simple Cylindrical Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, S; Youn, H; Kim, H; Jeon, H; Park, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare and analyze two novel algorithms for the assessment of modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of computed tomography (CT) systems using a simple acrylic cylindrical phantom Method and Materials: Images of the acrylic cylindrical phantom were acquired by a GE LightSpeed 16 RT (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) using 120 kVp, 330 mA, 2.5 mm slice thickness, 10 cm field-of view (FOV), four reconstruction kernels (e.g. standard, soft, detail, bone, and lung). Two different algorithms were used to analyze images for MTF assessment. First, Richard et al. suggested a task-based MTF assessment method through an edge spread function (ESF) which described pixel intensities as a function of distance from the center. The MTF was obtained as the absolute value of Fourier transform of the differentiated ESF. Second, Ohkubo et al. devised an effective method to determine the point spread function (PSF) of CT system accompanied with verification. The line spread function (LSF), which was the one-dimensional integration of the PSF, was used to obtain the MTF. We validated the reliability of two above-mentioned methods through the comparison with a conventional method using a thin tungsten wire phantom. Results: The measured MTFs by two methods were mostly similar each other for standard, soft, and detail kernels. In 0.6 lp/mm, the MTF difference between two methods were 0.012(standard), 0.004(soft), and 0.037(detail). They also coincided with the MTF by the conventional method well. However, there were considerable distinctions for bone and lung kernels containing edge enhancement that might cause undershoots near the peak of the LSF. Conclusions: We compared two novel methods to assess task-based MTFs for clinical CT systems especially using a simple acrylic cylindrical phantom with high-convenience and low-cost, and validated them against a conventional method. This work can provide a practical solution to users for the quality assurance of CT.

  6. Comparison between traditional laboratory tests, permeability measurements and CT-based fluid flow modelling for cultural heritage applications.

    PubMed

    De Boever, Wesley; Bultreys, Tom; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we examine the possibility to use on-site permeability measurements for cultural heritage applications as an alternative for traditional laboratory tests such as determination of the capillary absorption coefficient. These on-site measurements, performed with a portable air permeameter, were correlated with the pore network properties of eight sandstones and one granular limestone that are discussed in this paper. The network properties of the 9 materials tested in this study were obtained from micro-computed tomography (μCT) and compared to measurements and calculations of permeability and the capillary absorption rate of the stones under investigation, in order to find the correlation between pore network characteristics and fluid management characteristics of these sandstones. Results show a good correlation between capillary absorption, permeability and network properties, opening the possibility of using on-site permeability measurements as a standard method in cultural heritage applications.

  7. Comparison of Iohexol-380 and Iohexol-350 for Coronary CT Angiography: A Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind Phase 3 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Ah; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Kim, Sung Jin; Kim, Young-Ju; Kim, Yookyung; Sung, Yon Mi; Song, Soon-Young; Oh, Yu-Whan; Yong, Hwan Seok; Lee, Heon; Jeon, Eui-Yong; Jin, Gong-Yong; Choi, Byoung Wook; Choi, Sang-Il

    2016-01-01

    Objective This multi-center, randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial was conducted to compare the safety and efficacy of contrast agents iohexol-380 and iohexol-350 for coronary CT angiography in healthy subjects. Materials and Methods Volunteers were randomized to receive 420 mgI/kg of either iohexol-350 or iohexol-380 using a flow rate of 4 mL/sec. All adverse events were recorded. Two blinded readers independently reviewed the CT images and conflicting results were resolved by a third reader. Luminal attenuations (ascending aorta, left main coronary artery, and left ventricle) in Hounsfield units (HUs) and image quality on a 4-point scale were calculated. Results A total of 225 subjects were given contrast media (115 with iohexol-380 and 110 with iohexol-350). There was no difference in number of adverse drug reactions between groups: 75 events in 56 (48.7%) of 115 subjects in the iohexol-380 group vs. 74 events in 51 (46.4%) of 110 subjects in the iohexol-350 group (p = 0.690). No severe adverse drug reactions were recorded. Neither group showed an increase in serum creatinine. Significant differences in mean density between the groups was found in the ascending aorta: 375.8 ± 71.4 HU with iohexol-380 vs. 356.3 ± 61.5 HU with iohexol-350 (p = 0.030). No significant differences in image quality scores between both groups were observed for all three anatomic evaluations (all, p > 0.05). Conclusion Iohexol-380 provides improved enhancement of the ascending aorta and similar attenuation of the coronary arteries without any increase in adverse drug reactions, as compared with iohexol-350 using an identical amount of total iodine. PMID:27134522

  8. Comparison of physical quality assurance between Scanora 3D and 3D Accuitomo 80 dental CT scanners

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ahmed S.; Fteita, Dareen; Kulmala, Jarmo

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in dentistry has proven to be useful in the diagnosis and treatment planning of several oral and maxillofacial diseases. The quality of the resulting image is dictated by many factors related to the patient, unit, and operator. Materials and methods In this work, two dental CBCT units, namely Scanora 3D and 3D Accuitomo 80, were assessed and compared in terms of quantitative effective dose delivered to specific locations in a dosimetry phantom. Resolution and contrast were evaluated in only 3D Accuitomo 80 using special quality assurance phantoms. Results Scanora 3D, with less radiation time, showed less dosing values compared to 3D Accuitomo 80 (mean 0.33 mSv, SD±0.16 vs. 0.18 mSv, SD±0.1). Using paired t-test, no significant difference was found in Accuitomo two scan sessions (p>0.05), while it was highly significant in Scanora (p>0.05). The modulation transfer function value (at 2 lp/mm), in both measurements, was found to be 4.4%. The contrast assessment of 3D Accuitomo 80 in the two measurements showed few differences, for example, the grayscale values were the same (SD=0) while the noise level was slightly different (SD=0 and 0.67, respectively). Conclusions The radiation dose values in these two CBCT units are significantly less than those encountered in systemic CT scans. However, the dose seems to be affected more by changing the field of view rather than the voltage or amperage. The low doses were at the expense of the image quality produced, which was still acceptable. Although the spatial resolution and contrast were inferior to the medical images produced in systemic CT units, the present results recommend adopting CBCTs in maxillofacial imaging because of low radiation dose and adequate image quality. PMID:26091832

  9. Comparison of Two Deformable Registration Algorithms in the Presence of Radiologic Change Between Serial Lung CT Scans.

    PubMed

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R; White, Bradley; Justusson, Julia; Straus, Christopher; Malik, Renuka; Al-Hallaq, Hania A; Armato, Samuel G

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the image registration accuracy achieved using two deformable registration algorithms when radiation-induced normal tissue changes were present between serial computed tomography (CT) scans. Two thoracic CT scans were collected for each of 24 patients who underwent radiation therapy (RT) treatment for lung cancer, eight of whom experienced radiologically evident normal tissue damage between pre- and post-RT scan acquisition. For each patient, 100 landmark point pairs were manually placed in anatomically corresponding locations between each pre- and post-RT scan. Each post-RT scan was then registered to the pre-RT scan using (1) the Plastimatch demons algorithm and (2) the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm. The registration accuracy for each scan pair was evaluated by comparing the distance between landmark points that were manually placed in the post-RT scans and points that were automatically mapped from pre- to post-RT scans using the displacement vector fields output by the two registration algorithms. For both algorithms, the registration accuracy was significantly decreased when normal tissue damage was present in the post-RT scan. Using the Plastimatch algorithm, registration accuracy was 2.4 mm, on average, in the absence of radiation-induced damage and 4.6 mm, on average, in the presence of damage. When the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm was instead used, registration errors decreased to 1.3 mm, on average, in the absence of damage and 2.5 mm, on average, when damage was present. This work demonstrated that the presence of lung tissue changes introduced following RT treatment for lung cancer can significantly decrease the registration accuracy achieved using deformable registration.

  10. Comparison of Two Deformable Registration Algorithms in the Presence of Radiologic Change Between Serial Lung CT Scans.

    PubMed

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R; White, Bradley; Justusson, Julia; Straus, Christopher; Malik, Renuka; Al-Hallaq, Hania A; Armato, Samuel G

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the image registration accuracy achieved using two deformable registration algorithms when radiation-induced normal tissue changes were present between serial computed tomography (CT) scans. Two thoracic CT scans were collected for each of 24 patients who underwent radiation therapy (RT) treatment for lung cancer, eight of whom experienced radiologically evident normal tissue damage between pre- and post-RT scan acquisition. For each patient, 100 landmark point pairs were manually placed in anatomically corresponding locations between each pre- and post-RT scan. Each post-RT scan was then registered to the pre-RT scan using (1) the Plastimatch demons algorithm and (2) the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm. The registration accuracy for each scan pair was evaluated by comparing the distance between landmark points that were manually placed in the post-RT scans and points that were automatically mapped from pre- to post-RT scans using the displacement vector fields output by the two registration algorithms. For both algorithms, the registration accuracy was significantly decreased when normal tissue damage was present in the post-RT scan. Using the Plastimatch algorithm, registration accuracy was 2.4 mm, on average, in the absence of radiation-induced damage and 4.6 mm, on average, in the presence of damage. When the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm was instead used, registration errors decreased to 1.3 mm, on average, in the absence of damage and 2.5 mm, on average, when damage was present. This work demonstrated that the presence of lung tissue changes introduced following RT treatment for lung cancer can significantly decrease the registration accuracy achieved using deformable registration. PMID:25822396

  11. Size-based emphysema cluster analysis on low attenuation area in 3D volumetric CT: comparison with pulmonary functional test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minho; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Sang Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Oh, Sang Young

    2015-03-01

    To quantify low attenuation area (LAA) of emphysematous regions according to cluster size in 3D volumetric CT data of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and to compare these indices with their pulmonary functional test (PFT). Sixty patients with COPD were scanned by a more than 16-multi detector row CT scanner (Siemens Sensation 16 and 64) within 0.75mm collimation. Based on these LAA masks, a length scale analysis to estimate each emphysema LAA's size was performed as follows. At first, Gaussian low pass filter from 30mm to 1mm kernel size with 1mm interval on the mask was performed from large to small size, iteratively. Centroid voxels resistant to the each filter were selected and dilated by the size of the kernel, which was regarded as the specific size emphysema mask. The slopes of area and number of size based LAA (slope of semi-log plot) were analyzed and compared with PFT. PFT parameters including DLco, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC were significantly (all p-value< 0.002) correlated with the slopes (r-values; -0.73, 0.54, 0.69, respectively) and EI (r-values; -0.84, -0.60, -0.68, respectively). In addition, the D independently contributed regression for FEV1 and FEV1/FVC (adjust R sq. of regression study: EI only, 0.70, 0.45; EI and D, 0.71, 0.51, respectively). By the size based LAA segmentation and analysis, we evaluated the Ds of area, number, and distribution of size based LAA, which would be independent factors for predictor of PFT parameters.

  12. SU-E-I-98: Dose Comparison for Pulmonary Embolism CT Studies: Single Energy Vs. Dual Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the size specific dose estimate (SSDE), dose length product (DLP) and noise relationship for pulmonary embolism studies evaluated by single source dual energy computed tomography (DECT) against conventional CT (CCT) studies in a busy cancer center and to determine the dose savings provided by DECT. Methods: An IRB-approved retrospective study was performed to determine the CTDIvol and DLP from a subset of patients scanned with both DECT and CCT over the past five years. We were able to identify 30 breast cancer patients (6 male, 24 female, age range 24 to 81) who had both DECT and CCT studies performed. DECT scans were performed with a GE HD 750 scanner (140/80 kVp, 480 mAs and 40 mm) and CCT scans were performed with a GE Lightspeed 16 slice scanner (120 kVp, 352 mAs, 20 mm). Image noise was measured by placing an ROI and recording the standard deviation of the mean HU along the descending aorta. Results: The average DECT patient size specific dose estimate was to be 14.2 ± 1.7 mGy as compared to 22.4 ± 2.7 mGy from CCT PE studies, which is a 37% reduction in the SSDE. The average DECT DLP was 721.8 ± 84.6 mGy-cm as compared to 981.8 ± 106.1 mGy-cm for CCT, which is a 26% decrease. Compared to CCT the image noise was found to decrease by 19% when using DECT for PE studies. Conclusion: DECT SSDE and DLP measurements indicate dose savings and image noise reduction when compared to CCT. In an environment that heavily debates CT patient doses, this study confirms the effectiveness of DECT in PE imaging.

  13. Head to Head: The Role of Academic Competition in Undergraduate Anatomical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Nuland, Sonya E.; Roach, Victoria A.; Wilson, Timothy D.; Belliveau, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Competition is a key element in many educational games and is often adopted by educators in an effort to motivate and excite their students. Yet, the use of academic competition in educational institutions remains the subject of much debate. Opponents argue that academic competition causes an increase in student anxiety and divides their…

  14. Head to head: The role of academic competition in undergraduate anatomical education.

    PubMed

    Van Nuland, Sonya E; Roach, Victoria A; Wilson, Timothy D; Belliveau, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Competition is a key element in many educational games and is often adopted by educators in an effort to motivate and excite their students. Yet, the use of academic competition in educational institutions remains the subject of much debate. Opponents argue that academic competition causes an increase in student anxiety and divides their attention. However, if the contexts of academic competition are defined, could the inclusion of a game-like competition in a university course be a viable and beneficial method of engaging students? Students (n = 67) were recruited from an undergraduate human anatomy course at Western University. Using a crossover design, students were exposed to a competitive tournament either at the time of their first term test or second term test. The anatomical knowledge of participating students was assessed prior to the start of the study using a baseline anatomy test. Following treatment with an online competitive anatomy tournament, student's term test grades and final course grades were analyzed. Both the second term test scores (F(2,64) = 3.743, P = 0.029) and overall course grades (F(2,64) = 3.356, P = 0.041) were found to be significantly different (P < 0.05) for individuals in the competitive group when compared to their non-competing peers. As suggested by the literature where organized competition in the classroom correlates to improved academic performance, this study uncovered significant results pertaining to increased academic performance resulting from participating in tournament-based competition. In light of these positive results, further exploration of the effects of academic competition on student performance across age brackets and disciplines is warranted. PMID:25319077

  15. Head-to-head domain wall structures in wide permalloy strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estévez, Virginia; Laurson, Lasse

    2015-02-01

    We analyze the equilibrium micromagnetic domain wall structures encountered in Permalloy strips of a wide range of thicknesses and widths, with strip widths up to several micrometers. By performing an extensive set of micromagnetic simulations, we show that the equilibrium phase diagram of the domain wall structures exhibits in addition to the previously found structures (symmetric and asymmetric transverse walls, vortex wall) also double vortex and triple vortex domain walls for large enough strip widths and thicknesses. Also several metastable domain wall structures are found for wide and/or thick strips. We discuss the details of the relaxation process from random magnetization initial states towards the stable domain wall structure and show that our results are robust with respect to changes of, e.g., the magnitude of the Gilbert damping constant and details of the initial conditions.

  16. Head to head: The role of academic competition in undergraduate anatomical education.

    PubMed

    Van Nuland, Sonya E; Roach, Victoria A; Wilson, Timothy D; Belliveau, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Competition is a key element in many educational games and is often adopted by educators in an effort to motivate and excite their students. Yet, the use of academic competition in educational institutions remains the subject of much debate. Opponents argue that academic competition causes an increase in student anxiety and divides their attention. However, if the contexts of academic competition are defined, could the inclusion of a game-like competition in a university course be a viable and beneficial method of engaging students? Students (n = 67) were recruited from an undergraduate human anatomy course at Western University. Using a crossover design, students were exposed to a competitive tournament either at the time of their first term test or second term test. The anatomical knowledge of participating students was assessed prior to the start of the study using a baseline anatomy test. Following treatment with an online competitive anatomy tournament, student's term test grades and final course grades were analyzed. Both the second term test scores (F(2,64) = 3.743, P = 0.029) and overall course grades (F(2,64) = 3.356, P = 0.041) were found to be significantly different (P < 0.05) for individuals in the competitive group when compared to their non-competing peers. As suggested by the literature where organized competition in the classroom correlates to improved academic performance, this study uncovered significant results pertaining to increased academic performance resulting from participating in tournament-based competition. In light of these positive results, further exploration of the effects of academic competition on student performance across age brackets and disciplines is warranted.

  17. CT Pulmonary Angiography at Reduced Radiation Exposure and Contrast Material Volume Using Iterative Model Reconstruction and iDose4 Technique in Comparison to FBP

    PubMed Central

    Laqmani, Azien; Kurfürst, Maximillian; Butscheidt, Sebastian; Sehner, Susanne; Schmidt-Holtz, Jakob; Behzadi, Cyrus; Nagel, Hans Dieter; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess image quality of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) at reduced radiation exposure (RD-CTPA) and contrast medium (CM) volume using two different iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms (iDose4 and iterative model reconstruction (IMR)) in comparison to filtered back projection (FBP). Materials and Methods 52 patients (body weight < 100 kg, mean BMI: 23.9) with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) underwent RD-CTPA (tube voltage: 80 kV; mean CTDIvol: 1.9 mGy) using 40 ml CM. Data were reconstructed using FBP and two different IR algorithms (iDose4 and IMR). Subjective and objective image quality and conspicuity of PE were assessed in central, segmental, and subsegmental arteries. Results Noise reduction of 55% was achieved with iDose4 and of 85% with IMR compared to FBP. Contrast-to-noise ratio significantly increased with iDose4 and IMR compared to FBP (p<0.05). Subjective image quality was rated significantly higher at IMR reconstructions in comparison to iDose4 and FBP. Conspicuity of central and segmental PE significantly improved with the use of IMR. In subsegmental arteries, iDose4 was superior to IMR. Conclusions CTPA at reduced radiation exposure and contrast medium volume is feasible with the use of IMR, which provides improved image quality and conspicuity of pulmonary embolism in central and segmental arteries. PMID:27611448

  18. Automated bone removal in CT angiography: Comparison of methods based on single energy and dual energy scans

    SciTech Connect

    Straten, Marcel van; Schaap, Michiel; Dijkshoorn, Marcel L.; Greuter, Marcel J.; Lugt, Aad van der; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dual energy based methods for bone removal in computed tomography angiography (CTA) images and compare these with single energy based methods that use an additional, nonenhanced, CT scan. Methods: Four different bone removal methods were applied to CT scans of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom, acquired with a second generation dual source CT scanner. The methods differed by the way information on the presence of bone was obtained (either by using an additional, nonenhanced scan or by scanning with two tube voltages at the same time) and by the way the bone was removed from the CTA images (either by masking or subtracting the bone). The phantom contained parts which mimic vessels of various diameters in direct contact with bone. Both a quantitative and qualitative analysis of image quality after bone removal was performed. Image quality was quantified by the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) normalized to the square root of the dose (CNRD). At locations where vessels touch bone, the quality of the bone removal and the vessel preservation were visually assessed. The dual energy based methods were assessed with and without the addition of a 0.4 mm tin filter to the high voltage x-ray tube filtration. For each bone removal method, the dose required to obtain a certain CNR after bone removal was compared with the dose of a reference scan with the same CNR but without automated bone removal. The CNRD value of the reference scan was maximized by choosing the lowest tube voltage available. Results: All methods removed the bone completely. CNRD values were higher for the masking based methods than for the subtraction based methods. Single energy based methods had a higher CNRD value than the corresponding dual energy based methods. For the subtraction based dual energy method, tin filtration improved the CNRD value with approximately 50%. For the masking based dual energy method, it was easier to differentiate between iodine and bone when tin filtration

  19. Assessment of Vascularity in Hepatic Alveolar Echinococcosis: Comparison of Quantified Dual-Energy CT with Histopathologic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yi; Li, Jiaqi; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Hu; Li, Tingting; Liu, Hui; Liu, Wenya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether dual-energy computer tomography(DECT) could determine the angiographic vascularity of alveolar echinococcosis lesions by comparing the quantitative iodine concentration (IC) with the microvascular density (MVD). Material and Methods Twenty-five patients (16 men, 9 women; mean age, 40.9 ± 13.8 years) with confirmed hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (HAE) underwent DECT of the abdomen, consisting of arterial phase (AP), portal venous phase (PVP), and delayed phase (DP) scanning, in dual-source mode (100 kV/140 kV). Image data were processed with a DECT software algorithm that was designed for the evaluation of iodine distribution in the different layers (marginal zone, solid and cystic) of the lesions. The CT patterns of HAE lesions were classified into three types: solid type, pseudocystic type and ‘geographic map’ (mixed) type. The IC measurements in different layers and different types of lesions were statistically compared. MVD was examined using CD34 immunohistochemical staining of the resected HAE tissue and scored based on the percentage of positively stained cells and their intensity. Pearson’s correlation analysis was used to evaluate the potential correlation between DECT parameters and MVD. Results A total of 27 HAE lesions were evaluated, of which 9 were solid type, 3 were pseudocystic type and 15 were mixed type. The mean lesion size was 100.7 ± 47.3 mm. There was a significant difference in the IC measurements between different layers of HAE lesions during each scan phase (p < 0.001). The IC in the marginal zone was significantly higher than in the solid and cystic components in AP (2.15 mg/mL vs. 0.17 or 0.01 mg/mL), PVP (3.08 mg/mL vs. 0.1 or 0.02 mg/mL), and DP (2.93 mg/mL vs. 0.04 or 0.02 mg/mL). No significant difference was found among the different CT patterns of HAE lesions. Positive expression of CD34 in the marginal zones surrounding HAE lesions was found in 92.5% (25/27) of lesions, of which 18.5% (5

  20. A comparison of lesion detection accuracy using digital mammography and flat-panel CT breast imaging (Honorable Mention Poster Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xing; Vedula, Aruna A.; Thacker, Samta; Glick, Stephen J.

    2005-04-01

    Although conventional mammography is currently the best modality to detect early breast cancer, it is limited in that the recorded image represents the superposition of a 3D object onto a 2D plane. As an alternative, cone-beam CT breast imaging with a CsI based flat-panel imager (CTBI) has been proposed with the ability to provide 3D visualization of breast tissue. To investigate possible improvements in lesion detection accuracy using CTBI over digital mammography (DM), a computer simulation study was conducted using simulated lesions embedded into a structured 3D breast model. The computer simulation realistically modeled x-ray transport through a breast model, as well as the signal and noise propagation through the flat-panel imager. Polyenergetic x-ray spectra of W/Al 50 kVp for CTBI and Mo/Mo 28 kVp for DM were modeled. For the CTBI simulation, the intensity of the x-ray spectra for each projection view was determined so as to provide a total mean glandular dose (MGD) of 4 mGy, which is approximately equivalent to that given in a conventional two-view screening mammography study. Since only one DM view was investigated here, the intensity of the DM x-ray spectra was defined to give 2 mGy MGD. Irregular lesions were simulated by using a stochastic growth algorithm providing lesions with an effective diameter of 5 mm. Breast tissue was simulated by generating an ensemble of backgrounds with a power law spectrum. To evaluate lesion detection accuracy, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was performed with 4 observers reading an ensemble of images for each case. The average area under the ROC curves (Az) was 0.94 for CTBI, and 0.81 for DM. Results indicate that a 5 mm lesion embedded in a structured breast phantom can be detected by CT breast imaging with statistically significant higher confidence than with digital mammography.

  1. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  2. Cone beam CT for determining breast cancer margin: an initial experience and its comparison with mammography and specimen radiograph

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Juan; Shaw, Chris; Lai, CJ; Rong, John; Wang, Jian; Liu, Wenya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the ability of cone beam CT (CBCT) in determining the breast cancer margin using, to compare the results with mammography and specimen radiography, and to explore the clinical potential of CBCT for breast imaging. Methods: Specimens of 46 breast cancer patients were imaged by using a prototype CBCT system. Each patient underwent mammography, CBCT and X-ray of breast surgical specimen within 6 months. Images of mammography, breast surgical specimen radiography and CBCT were evaluated by an experienced radiologist. Indicators, such as: morphology, glitch, density, invasion, structural distortion and calcification, were observed. Result: There was no significant difference of the calcification, glitch and morphology among three methods. However, there was significant difference in indicators of breast tumor invasion among three methods. There was statistical significance in detecting invasions of breast cancer cells in peripheral tissues among three methods. Conclusion: CBCT shows no superiority over mammography and specimen radiography in determining tumor’s outline and detecting calcification. On the other hand, CBCT demonstrates its advantage in determining the 3 dimensional position of a lesion which could be a potential clinical application in future practices of breast imaging. PMID:26629005

  3. [Intra-articular calcaneus fracture. Classification in CT as a prerequisite for therapeutic decision and quantitative comparison].

    PubMed

    Brunner, U; Kenn, R W; Slawik, J; Schweiberer, L

    1992-07-01

    Whether conservative or operative management is selected for intra-articular fractures of the os calcis depends on subjective factors and on the surgeon's experience. There is no classification available that allows ranking of such fractures according to the extent of destruction and the degree of dislocation at the same time. CT scans of 44 calcaneal fractures have been used to elaborate a new classification system for calcaneal surfaces. According to the involvement of joint surfaces, especially of the posterior facet, the degree of dislocation and the number of fragments of the posterior facet, six classes are defined. Within each class of fracture, the formation of "steps" in the posterior facet, widening of the heel, loss of height and deviation of axes are quantified. The new classification provides an instrument for use in the evaluation of joint destruction and dislocation. It helps to provide an objective basis for decisions between functional treatment and open reduction with internal fixation and for prospective analysis of fracture treatment.

  4. Image Quality of 3rd Generation Spiral Cranial Dual-Source CT in Combination with an Advanced Model Iterative Reconstruction Technique: A Prospective Intra-Individual Comparison Study to Standard Sequential Cranial CT Using Identical Radiation Dose

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Holger; Maros, Máté E.; Meyer, Mathias; Förster, Alex; Haubenreisser, Holger; Kurth, Stefan; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Flohr, Thomas; Leidecker, Christianne; Groden, Christoph; Scharf, Johann; Henzler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To prospectively intra-individually compare image quality of a 3rd generation Dual-Source-CT (DSCT) spiral cranial CT (cCT) to a sequential 4-slice Multi-Slice-CT (MSCT) while maintaining identical intra-individual radiation dose levels. Methods 35 patients, who had a non-contrast enhanced sequential cCT examination on a 4-slice MDCT within the past 12 months, underwent a spiral cCT scan on a 3rd generation DSCT. CTDIvol identical to initial 4-slice MDCT was applied. Data was reconstructed using filtered backward projection (FBP) and 3rd-generation iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithm at 5 different IR strength levels. Two neuroradiologists independently evaluated subjective image quality using a 4-point Likert-scale and objective image quality was assessed in white matter and nucleus caudatus with signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) being subsequently calculated. Results Subjective image quality of all spiral cCT datasets was rated significantly higher compared to the 4-slice MDCT sequential acquisitions (p<0.05). Mean SNR was significantly higher in all spiral compared to sequential cCT datasets with mean SNR improvement of 61.65% (p*Bonferroni0.05<0.0024). Subjective image quality improved with increasing IR levels. Conclusion Combination of 3rd-generation DSCT spiral cCT with an advanced model IR technique significantly improves subjective and objective image quality compared to a standard sequential cCT acquisition acquired at identical dose levels. PMID:26288186

  5. Percutaneous CT-Guided Biopsy of the Lung: Comparison Between Aspiration and Automated Cutting Needles Using a Coaxial Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, Francois; Latrabe, Valerie; Vergier, Beatrice; Michel, Philippe

    2000-07-15

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy and complication rate of two different CT-guided transthoracic needle biopsy techniques: fine needle aspiration and an automated biopsy device.Methods: Two consecutive series of respectively 125 (group A) and 98 (group B) biopsies performed using 20-22 gauge coaxial fine needle aspiration (group A) and an automated 19.5 gauge coaxial biopsy device (group B) were compared in terms of their accuracy and complication rate.Results: Groups A and B included respectively 100 (80%) and 77 (79%) malignant lesions and 25 (20%) and 18 (21%) benign lesions. No significant difference was found between the two series concerning patients, lesions, and procedural variables. For a diagnosis of malignancy, a statistically significant difference in sensitivity was found (82.7% vs 97.4%) between results obtained with the automated biopsy device and fine needle aspiration respectively. For a diagnosis of malignancy, the false negative rate of the biopsy result was significantly higher (p <0.005) in group A (17%) than in group B (2.6%). For a specific diagnosis of benignity, no statistically significant difference was found between the two groups (44% vs 26%) but the automated biopsy device provided fewer indeterminate cases. There was no difference between the two groups concerning the pneumothorax rate, which was 20% in group A and 15% in group B, or the hemoptysis rate, which was 2.4% in group A and 4% in group B.Conclusion: For a diagnosis of malignancy when a cytopathologist is not available on-site, automated biopsy devices provide a lower rate of false negative results and a similar complication rate to fine needle aspiration.

  6. Peri-infarct ischaemia assessed by cardiovascular MRI: comparison with quantitative perfusion single photon emission CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cochet, H; Bullier, E; Ragot, C; Gilbert, S H; Pucheu, Y; Laurent, F; Coste, P; Bordenave, L; Montaudon, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To develop a new method for the cardiac MR (CMR) quantification of peri-infarct ischaemia using fused perfusion and delayed–enhanced images and to evaluate this method using quantitative single photon emission CT (SPECT) imaging as a reference. Methods: 40 patients presenting with peri-infarct ischaemia on a routine stress 99mTc-SPECT imaging were recruited. Within 8 days of the SPECT study, myocardial perfusion was evaluated using stress adenosine CMR. Using fused perfusion and delayed–enhanced images, peri-infarct ischaemia was quantified as the percentage of myocardium with stress-induced perfusion defect that was adjacent to and larger than a scar. This parameter was compared with both the percent myocardium ischaemia (SD%) and the ischaemic total perfusion deficit (TPD). The diagnostic performance of CMR in detection of significant coronary artery stenosis (of ≥70%) was also determined. Results: On SPECT imaging, in addition to peri-infarct ischaemia, reversible perfusion abnormalities were detected in a remote zone in seven patients. In the 33 patients presenting with only peri-infarct ischaemia, the agreement between CMR peri-infarct ischaemia and both SD% and ischaemic TPD was excellent [intraclass coefficient of correlation (ICC) = 0.969 and ICC = 0.877, respectively]. CMR-defined peri-infarct ischaemia for the detection of a significant coronary artery stenosis showed an areas under receiver–operating characteristic curve of 0.856 (95% confidence interval, 0.680–0.939). The best cut-off value was 8.1% and allowed a 72% sensitivity, 96% specificity, 60% negative predictive value and 97% positive predictive value. Conclusion: This proof-of-concept study shows that CMR imaging has the potential as a test for quantification of peri-infarct ischaemia. Advances in knowledge: This study demonstrates the proof of concept of a commonly known intuitive idea, that is, evaluating the peri-infarct ischaemic burden by subtracting delayed

  7. CT-Based Evaluation of Tumor Volume After Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy of Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity: Comparison with Clinical Remission Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Stefan Turowski, Bernd; Berkefeld, Joachim; Kovacs, Adorjan F.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To assess the volume of locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity and the oropharynx before and after intra-arterial (i.a.) chemotherapy by means of computed tomography and to compare these data with clinically determined treatment response of the same patient population. Methods. Eighty-eight patients with histologically proven, advanced carcinoma of the oral cavity and/or the oropharynx (local tumor stages T3/4) received neoadjuvant i.a. chemotherapy with cisplatin as part of a multimodal therapeutic regimen, comprising (1) local chemotherapy, (2) surgery, and (3) combined radio-chemotherapy. Three weeks after the intervention, residual disease was evaluated radiologically by measurement of the tumor volume and clinically by inspection and palpation of the primary tumor according to WHO criteria. Results. Comparison of treatment response according to radiological and clinical criteria respectively revealed complete remission in 5% vs. 8% (p < 0.05), partial remission in 30% vs. 31%, stable disease in 61% vs. 58%, and tumor progression in 5% vs. 2%. Conclusion. Radiological volumetry and clinical evaluation found comparable response rates after local chemotherapy. However, in patients with good response after local treatment, volumetric measurement with CT may help to distinguish between partial and complete remission. Thus, radiological tumor volumetry provides precise and differentiated information about tumor response and should be used as an additional tool in treatment monitoring after local chemotherapy.

  8. An indirect comparison of HbA1c treatment effect with albiglutide and exenatide 2.0 mg QW using the Bucher method

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alan A; Parks, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    No head-to-head comparisons exist between once-weekly (QW) glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists; accordingly, this indirect comparison was conducted to evaluate the comparative efficacy of QW albiglutide vs QW exenatide. Following a systematic literature search, it was determined that HARMONY 7 and DURATION 6, Phase III trials for albiglutide and exenatide, respectively, were similar in study design and baseline characteristics and included a common comparator arm, making them suitable for an indirect comparison using the Bucher method. The primary endpoint of change from baseline in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) with albiglutide 50 mg QW and exenatide 2.0 mg QW was compared and tested for noninferiority. The indirect comparison showed a treatment difference of 0.0% (95% confidence interval: −0.189% to 0.189%) in mean change in HbA1c from baseline, and albiglutide 50 mg was noninferior to exenatide 2.0 mg QW at the noninferiority margin of 0.3%. In the absence of a head-to-head trial, these results can be used in pharmacoeconomic analysis and to inform health technology assessment and clinical decision making. PMID:27274297

  9. Comparison of the effects of salmon calcitonin (sCT) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in a number of in vivo and in vitro tests

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, S.P.; Brase, D.; Cooper, C.; Dewey, W.L.

    1986-03-05

    sCT and CGRP have been shown previously to have multiple activities in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent work has shown that CGRP (15 ..mu..g) intraventricularly (IVT) produces a naloxone reversible 37% inhibition in the p-phenylquinone test (PPQ) accompanied by severe diarrhea. The ED50 of sCT in the PPQ test is 362 ng and this effect is not reversed totally by naloxone. The onset of CGRP is more rapid than that of sCT. sCT and CGRP (10/sup -6/M) both produce naloxone reversible inhibition of the electrically stimulated guinea pig ileum (GPI) (25% and 50% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP (10/sup -6/ M) produce contracture (15% and 40% respectively) of the non-stimulated GPI that is not blocked by atropine. Both sCT and CGRP block the naloxone-induced contracture of the morphine (MS04) dependent ilea (29% and 68% respectively). Both sCT and CGRP produce biphasic shifts in the MS04 acetylcholine dose-effect curves in the stimulated and nonstimulated GPI, respectively. Neither sCT nor CGRP (10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -4/ M) displaces /sup 3/H-naloxone binding to mouse brain membranes. Both sCT and CGRP may produce their effects by modulation of CA/sup +2/ fluxes in the CNS and GPI.

  10. Three-dimensional texture analysis of contrast enhanced CT images for treatment response assessment in Hodgkin lymphoma: Comparison with F-18-FDG PET

    SciTech Connect

    Knogler, Thomas; El-Rabadi, Karem; Weber, Michael; Karanikas, Georgios; Mayerhoefer, Marius E.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional (3D) texture analysis (TA) of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) images for treatment response assessment in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), compared with F-18-fludeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT. Methods: 3D TA of 48 lymph nodes in 29 patients was performed on venous-phase CE-CT images before and after chemotherapy. All lymph nodes showed pathologically elevated FDG uptake at baseline. A stepwise logistic regression with forward selection was performed to identify classic CT parameters and texture features (TF) that enable the separation of complete response (CR) and persistent disease. Results: The TF fraction of image in runs, calculated for the 45° direction, was able to correctly identify CR with an accuracy of 75%, a sensitivity of 79.3%, and a specificity of 68.4%. Classical CT features achieved an accuracy of 75%, a sensitivity of 86.2%, and a specificity of 57.9%, whereas the combination of TF and CT imaging achieved an accuracy of 83.3%, a sensitivity of 86.2%, and a specificity of 78.9%. Conclusions: 3D TA of CE-CT images is potentially useful to identify nodal residual disease in HL, with a performance comparable to that of classical CT parameters. Best results are achieved when TA and classical CT features are combined.

  11. Kilovoltage cone-beam CT imaging dose during breast radiotherapy: A dose comparison between a left and right breast setup

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Alexandra; Holloway, Lois; Begg, Jarrad; Nelson, Vinod; Metcalfe, Peter

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the delivered dose from a kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) acquired in breast treatment position for a left and right breast setup. The dose was measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters positioned within a female anthropomorphic phantom at organ locations. Imaging was performed on an Elekta Synergy XVI system with the phantom setup on a breast board. The image protocol involved 120 kVp, 140 mAs, and a 270° arc rotation clockwise 0° to 270° for the left breast setup and 270° to 180° for the right breast setup (maximum arc rotations possible). The dose delivered to the left breast, right breast, and heart was 5.1 mGy, 3.9 mGy, and 4.0 mGy for the left breast setup kV-CBCT, and 6.4 mGy, 6.0 mGy, and 4.8 mGy for the right breast setup kV-CBCT, respectively. The rotation arc of the kV-CBCT influenced the dose delivered, with the right breast setup kV-CBCT found to deliver a dose of up to 4 mGy or 105% higher to the treated breast′s surface in comparison with the left breast setup. This is attributed to the kV-CBCT source being more proximal to the anterior of the phantom for a right breast setup, whereas the source is more proximal to the posterior of the patient for a left-side scan.

  12. Antiresorptive treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis: review of randomized clinical studies and rationale for the Evista alendronate comparison (EVA) trial.

    PubMed

    Lufkin, Edward G; Sarkar, Somnath; Kulkarni, Pandurang M; Ciaccia, Angelina V; Siddhanti, Suresh; Stock, John; Plouffe, Leo

    2004-03-01

    Standard pharmacological antiresorptive therapy for the prevention and/or treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis now consists of four categories of drugs: estrogens, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), bisphosponates, and calcitonin. All of these drugs have been studied in randomized controlled trials, but meaningful comparisons of the efficacy of drugs have been difficult due to differences in baseline risks for fracture and differences in study design, including calcium and vitamin D supplementation, definition of fracture, and discontinuation rates. The current paper reviews results from pivotal studies of antiresorptive therapies with fracture as a primary endpoint, as well as head-to-head trials comparing these therapies using surrogate markers of fracture risk, and introduces the first head-to-head trial with fracture as a primary endpoint. The Evista Alendronate Comparison (EVA) trial, a multi-center, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized trial with two active treatment arms is currently underway to compare directly the osteoporotic fracture risk reduction efficacy of raloxifene and alendronate in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis as defined by bone mineral density. The results from this trial will permit more informed judgment by practitioners and provider groups concerning the relative clinical utility of these two drugs.

  13. Comparison of SPECT/CT and MRI in Diagnosing Symptomatic Lesions in Ankle and Foot Pain Patients: Diagnostic Performance and Relation to Lesion Type

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Seunggyun; Hong, Sung Hwan; Paeng, Jin Chul; Lee, Dong Yeon; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Arya, Amitabh; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Keon Wook

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of SPECT/CT and MRI in patients with ankle and foot pain, with regard to the lesion types. Materials and Methods Fifty consecutive patients with ankle and foot pain, who underwent 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT and MRI, were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Symptomatic lesions were determined based on clinical examination and response to treatment. On MRI and SPECT/CT, detected lesions were classified as bone, ligament/tendon, and joint lesions. Uptake on SPECT/CT was assessed using a 4-grade system. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of SPECT/CT and MRI were evaluated in all detected lesions and each lesion type. Diagnostic value of uptake grade was analyzed using receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis, and diagnostic performance was compared using Chi-square or McNemar tests. Results In overall lesions, the sensitivity, PPV and NPV of SPECT/CT for symptomatic lesions were 93%, 56%, 91%, and they were 98%, 48%, 95% for MRI. There was no significant difference between SPECT/CT and MRI. However, the specificity of SPECT/CT was significantly higher than that of MRI (48% versus 24%, P = 0.016). Uptake grade on SPECT/CT was significantly higher in symptomatic lesions (P < 0.001), and its area under curve on ROC analysis was 0.787. In the analysis of each lesion type, the specificity of SPECT/CT was poor in joint lesions compared with other lesion types and MRI (P < 0.001, respectively). MRI exhibited lower specificity than SPECT/CT in bone lesions (P = 0.004) and ligament/tendon lesions (P < 0.001). Conclusions SPECT/CT has MRI-comparable diagnostic performance for symptomatic lesions in ankle and foot pain patients. SPECT/CT and MRI exhibit different diagnostic specificity in different lesion types. SPECT/CT may be used as a complementary imaging method to MRI for enhancing diagnostic specificity. PMID:25668182

  14. Comparison of cone beam CT scans with enhanced photostimulated phosphor plate images in the detection of root fracture of endodontically treated teeth

    PubMed Central

    Bechara, B; McMahan, C A; Noujeim, M; Faddoul, T; Moore, W S; Teixeira, F B; Geha, H

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Two-dimensional intraoral radiography is the most common tool for diagnosing root fractures (RFs). Cone beam CT (CBCT) is widely used to depict RFs in endodontically treated teeth. Beam hardening and other artefacts caused by gutta percha may result in an incorrect diagnosis when using CBCT only. A comparison of two CBCT machines with photostimulated phosphor (PSP) plate images enhanced with the equalization tool was carried out to detect RFs in endodontically treated teeth. Methods: 66 roots were collected, decoronated and treated endodontically using the same technique with gutta percha. 33 of these roots were randomly selected and fractured; the 2 root fragments were glued together with 1 layer of methyl methacrylate and placed randomly in 8 prepared beef rib fragments. Large fields of view (FOVs) were acquired with one CBCT unit and small FOVs with the second CBCT unit. Periapical radiographs (using intraoral PSP plates) were also acquired. A contrast enhancement tool was used when evaluating the PSP plate images. Results: Small FOV images had significantly higher accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) and sensitivity in detecting RFs than PSP plates and large FOV images. The specificity of the enhanced PSP images was higher than, although not significantly higher than, the small FOV images and was significantly higher than the large FOV images. Conclusions: CBCT small FOVs should be acquired for depicting RFs of endodontically treated teeth. Images obtained using PSP plates had the lowest rate of false-positive results and their use can save the patient a radiation dose. PMID:23625067

  15. Indirect comparisons of therapeutic interventions

    PubMed Central

    Schöttker, Ben; Lühmann, Dagmar; Boulkhemair, Dalila; Raspe, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    Health political background The comparison of the effectiveness of health technologies is not only laid down in German law (Social Code Book V, § 139 and § 35b) but also constitutes a central element of clinical guidelines and decision making in health care. Tools supporting decision making (e. g. Health Technology Assessments (HTA)) are therefore in need of a valid methodological repertoire for these comparisons. Scientific background Randomised controlled head-to-head trials which directly compare the effects of different therapies are considered the gold standard methodological approach for the comparison of the efficacy of interventions. Because this type of trial is rarely found, comparisons of efficacy often need to rely on indirect comparisons whose validity is being controversially debated. Research questions Research questions for the current assessment are: Which (statistical) methods for indirect comparisons of therapeutic interventions do exist, how often are they applied and how valid are their results in comparison to the results of head-to-head trials? Methods In a systematic literature research all medical databases of the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI) are searched for methodological papers as well as applications of indirect comparisons in systematic reviews. Results of the literature analysis are summarized qualitatively for the characterisation of methods and quantitatively for the frequency of their application. The validity of the results from indirect comparisons is checked by comparing them to the results from the gold standard – a direct comparison. Data sets from systematic reviews which use both direct and indirect comparisons are tested for consistency by of the z-statistic. Results 29 methodological papers and 106 applications of indirect methods in systematic reviews are being analysed. Four methods for indirect comparisons can be identified: Unadjusted indirect comparisons include, independent of

  16. Myocardial Extracellular Volume Fraction with Dual-Energy Equilibrium Contrast-enhanced Cardiac CT in Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy: A Prospective Comparison with Cardiac MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Jeong; Im, Dong Jin; Youn, Jong-Chan; Chang, Suyon; Suh, Young Joo; Hong, Yoo Jin; Kim, Young Jin; Hur, Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of equilibrium contrast material-enhanced dual-energy cardiac computed tomography (CT) to determine extracellular volume fraction (ECV) in nonischemic cardiomyopathy (CMP) compared with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board; informed consent was obtained. Seven healthy subjects and 23 patients (six with hypertrophic CMP, nine with dilated CMP, four with amyloidosis, and four with sarcoidosis) (mean age ± standard deviation, 57.33 years ± 14.82; 19 male participants [63.3%]) were prospectively enrolled. Twelve minutes after contrast material injection (1.8 mL/kg at 3 mL/sec), dual-energy cardiac CT was performed. ECV was measured by two observers independently. Hematocrit levels were compared between healthy subjects and patients with the Mann-Whitney U test. In per-subject analysis, interobserver agreement for CT was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and intertest agreement between MR imaging and CT was assessed with Bland-Altman analysis. In per-segment analysis, Student t tests in the linear mixed model were used to compare ECV on CT images between healthy subjects and patients. Results Hematocrit level was 43.44% ± 1.80 for healthy subjects and 41.23% ± 5.61 for patients with MR imaging (P = .16) and 43.50% ± 1.92 for healthy subjects and 41.35% ± 5.92 for patients with CT (P = .15). For observer 1 in per-subject analysis, ECV was 34.18% ± 8.98 for MR imaging and 34.48% ± 8.97 for CT. For observer 2, myocardial ECV was 34.42% ± 9.03 for MR imaging and 33.98% ± 9.05 for CT. Interobserver agreement for ECV at CT was excellent (ICC = 0.987). Bland-Altman analysis between MR imaging and CT showed a small bias (-0.06%), with 95% limits of agreement of -1.19 and 1.79. Compared with healthy subjects, patients with hypertrophic CMP, dilated CMP, amyloidosis, and sarcoidosis had significantly higher myocardial ECV at dual

  17. A comparison of the psychological burden of PET/MRI and PET/CT scans and association to initial state anxiety and previous imaging experiences

    PubMed Central

    Neriman, D; Hoath, J; Millner, L; Endozo, R; Azzopardi, G; O'Meara, C; Bomanji, J; Groves, A M

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the level of psychological burden experienced by patients undergoing positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI scanning compared with PET/CT. Methods: 100 adult patients referred for PET/CT and underwent PET/MRI scanning were eligible. Initial state, psychological burden of PET/CT and PET/MRI, scan satisfaction and preference were assessed using a purpose-designed questionnaire, comprising 61 five-point Likert scale questions and a three-point tick box question indicating preference between PET/CT and PET/MRI. State anxiety was assessed using the state portion of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests compared psychological burden experienced by participants following PET/CT and PET/MRI scan. Results: A greater level of psychological burden was experienced by patients during PET/MRI than PET/CT p ≤ 0.001, consistent with patients' preference for PET/CT over PET/MRI (p = 0.013). There was a significant relationship between PET/CT psychological burden and initial state (r = 0.386, p ≤ 0.001). No significant relationship was identified between Initial state and psychological burden of PET MRI (r = −0.089; p = 217). There was a significant relationship between psychological burden of PET/CT and PET/MRI (r = 0.354; p = 0.001). Conclusion: Patients' experience increased psychological burden during PET/MRI compared with PET/CT. Previous scanning experiences and patients' interactions prior to and during PET/MRI improved patient satisfaction. Interventions could be implemented to improve imaging outcome. Advances in knowledge: This study provides evidence for the increased psychological burden of PET/MRI compared with PET/CT, and that people prefer the PET/CT procedure. We have shown that the patients who expressed a preference for PET/MRI demonstrated significantly lower psychological burden for that procedure than those that preferred PET/CT, which indicates that the benefit of reduced

  18. Myocardial Extracellular Volume Fraction with Dual-Energy Equilibrium Contrast-enhanced Cardiac CT in Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy: A Prospective Comparison with Cardiac MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Jeong; Im, Dong Jin; Youn, Jong-Chan; Chang, Suyon; Suh, Young Joo; Hong, Yoo Jin; Kim, Young Jin; Hur, Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of equilibrium contrast material-enhanced dual-energy cardiac computed tomography (CT) to determine extracellular volume fraction (ECV) in nonischemic cardiomyopathy (CMP) compared with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board; informed consent was obtained. Seven healthy subjects and 23 patients (six with hypertrophic CMP, nine with dilated CMP, four with amyloidosis, and four with sarcoidosis) (mean age ± standard deviation, 57.33 years ± 14.82; 19 male participants [63.3%]) were prospectively enrolled. Twelve minutes after contrast material injection (1.8 mL/kg at 3 mL/sec), dual-energy cardiac CT was performed. ECV was measured by two observers independently. Hematocrit levels were compared between healthy subjects and patients with the Mann-Whitney U test. In per-subject analysis, interobserver agreement for CT was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and intertest agreement between MR imaging and CT was assessed with Bland-Altman analysis. In per-segment analysis, Student t tests in the linear mixed model were used to compare ECV on CT images between healthy subjects and patients. Results Hematocrit level was 43.44% ± 1.80 for healthy subjects and 41.23% ± 5.61 for patients with MR imaging (P = .16) and 43.50% ± 1.92 for healthy subjects and 41.35% ± 5.92 for patients with CT (P = .15). For observer 1 in per-subject analysis, ECV was 34.18% ± 8.98 for MR imaging and 34.48% ± 8.97 for CT. For observer 2, myocardial ECV was 34.42% ± 9.03 for MR imaging and 33.98% ± 9.05 for CT. Interobserver agreement for ECV at CT was excellent (ICC = 0.987). Bland-Altman analysis between MR imaging and CT showed a small bias (-0.06%), with 95% limits of agreement of -1.19 and 1.79. Compared with healthy subjects, patients with hypertrophic CMP, dilated CMP, amyloidosis, and sarcoidosis had significantly higher myocardial ECV at dual

  19. SU-E-J-141: Comparison of Dose Calculation On Automatically Generated MRBased ED Maps and Corresponding Patient CT for Clinical Prostate EBRT Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Schadewaldt, N; Schulz, H; Helle, M; Renisch, S; Frantzen-Steneker, M; Heide, U

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of computing radiation dose on automatically generated MR-based simulated CT images compared to true patient CTs. Methods: Six prostate cancer patients received a regular planning CT for RT planning as well as a conventional 3D fast-field dual-echo scan on a Philips 3.0T Achieva, adding approximately 2 min of scan time to the clinical protocol. Simulated CTs (simCT) where synthesized by assigning known average CT values to the tissue classes air, water, fat, cortical and cancellous bone. For this, Dixon reconstruction of the nearly out-of-phase (echo 1) and in-phase images (echo 2) allowed for water and fat classification. Model based bone segmentation was performed on a combination of the DIXON images. A subsequent automatic threshold divides into cortical and cancellous bone. For validation, the simCT was registered to the true CT and clinical treatment plans were re-computed on the simCT in pinnacle{sup 3}. To differentiate effects related to the 5 tissue classes and changes in the patient anatomy not compensated by rigid registration, we also calculate the dose on a stratified CT, where HU values are sorted in to the same 5 tissue classes as the simCT. Results: Dose and volume parameters on PTV and risk organs as used for the clinical approval were compared. All deviations are below 1.1%, except the anal sphincter mean dose, which is at most 2.2%, but well below clinical acceptance threshold. Average deviations are below 0.4% for PTV and risk organs and 1.3% for the anal sphincter. The deviations of the stratifiedCT are in the same range as for the simCT. All plans would have passed clinical acceptance thresholds on the simulated CT images. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the clinical usability of MR based dose calculation with the presented Dixon acquisition and subsequent fully automatic image processing. N. Schadewaldt, H. Schulz, M. Helle and S. Renisch are employed by Phlips Technologie Innovative Techonologies, a

  20. Using SNOMED CT to identify a crossmap between two classification systems: a comparison with an expert-based and a data-driven strategy.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi-Raiez, Ferishta; Cornet, Ronald; Bosman, Rob J; Joore, Hans; de Keizer, Nicolette F

    2010-01-01

    A crossmap between successive versions of classification systems is necessary to maintain the continuity of health care documentation. A reference terminology can serve as an intermediary to support this task. Within this study we evaluated the use of SNOMED CT to create a crossmap between two versions of an intensive care classification system. Firstly, the SNOMED CT crossmap was compared with an expert-based and a data-driven crossmap. Next, the influence of these crossmap strategies on the health care outcome was evaluated. For 50% of the analyzed cases, the three mapping strategies resulted in the same crossmaps. In other cases, there was an overlap between the SNOMED CT crossmaps and the crossmaps provided by one of the two other strategies. Differences in the crossmap results had however no significant influence on the health care outcomes. SNOMED CT can be used as an intermediary to solve the problem of crossmapping between versions of classification systems.

  1. In vivo micro-CT imaging of untreated and irradiated orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts in mice: capabilities, limitations and a comparison with bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Stefanie; Felix, Manuela C; Hartmann, Linda; Bierbaum, Miriam; Maros, Máté E; Kerl, Hans U; Wenz, Frederik; Glatting, Gerhard; Kramer, Martin; Giordano, Frank A; Brockmann, Marc A

    2015-04-01

    Small animal imaging is of increasing relevance in biomedical research. Studies systematically assessing the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced in vivo micro-CT of orthotopic glioma xenografts in mice do not exist. NOD/SCID/γc(-/-) mice (n = 27) underwent intracerebral implantation of 2.5 × 10(6) GFP-Luciferase-transduced U87MG cells. Mice underwent bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to detect tumor growth and afterwards repeated contrast-enhanced (300 µl Iomeprol i.v.) micro-CT imaging (80 kV, 75 µAs, 360° rotation, 1,000 projections, 33 s scan time, resolution 40 × 40 × 53 µm, 0.5 Gy/scan). Presence of tumors, tumor diameter and tumor volume in micro-CT were rated by two independent readers. Results were compared with histological analyses. Six mice with tumors confirmed by micro-CT received fractionated irradiation (3 × 5 Gy every other day) using the micro-CT (5 mm pencil beam geometry). Repeated micro-CT scans were tolerated well. Tumor engraftment rate was 74 % (n = 20). In micro-CT, mean tumor volume was 30 ± 33 mm(3), and the smallest detectable tumor measured 360 × 620 µm. The inter-rater agreement (n = 51 micro-CT scans) for the item tumor yes/no was excellent (Spearman-Rho = 0.862, p < 0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of micro-CT were 0.95 and 0.71, respectively (PPV = 0.91, NPV = 0.83). BLI on day 21 after tumor implantation had a sensitivity and specificity of 0.90 and 1.0, respectively (PPV = 1.0, NPV = 0.5). Maximum tumor diameter and volume in micro-CT and histology correlated excellently (tumor diameter: 0.929, p < 0.001; tumor volume: 0.969, p < 0.001, n = 17). Irradiated animals showed a large central tumor necrosis. Longitudinal contrast enhanced micro-CT imaging of brain tumor growth in live mice is feasible at high sensitivity levels and with excellent inter-rater agreement and allows visualization of radiation effects.

  2. Development and Validation of a Simple Conversion Model for Comparison of Intracerebral Hemorrhage Volumes Measured on CT and Gradient Recalled Echo MRI

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Richard E.; Warach, Steven; Schaewe, Timothy J.; Copenhaver, Brittany R.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Vespa, Paul; Martin, Neil; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Gradient recalled echo MRI (GRE) has been shown to be as accurate as CT for the detection of acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, because of the differences in the signal parameter being detected, apparent hemorrhage size is expected to vary by imaging modality, with GRE providing larger volumes attributable to susceptibility effects. Methods Image data from patients participating in 3 ICH studies were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with acute ICH were included if (1) concurrent MRI and CT were performed within 72 hours of symptom onset, and (2) each modality was performed within 240 minutes of each other. ICH volumes were calculated using a semiautomated image analysis program. The least squares method was used to develop a conversion equation based on a linear regression of GRE volume on CT volume. Results Thirty-six patients met inclusion criteria. MRI was performed first in 18, CT first in 18. Mean hemorrhage volume was 25.2cc (range 0.1 to 83.9cc) on CT and 32.7cc (range 0.1 to 98.7cc) measured on GRE. A linear relationship defined by CT Volume=GRE Volume*0.8 (Spearman’s correlation coefficient=0.992, P<0.001) was derived. Conclusions Acute ICH volumes as measured on GRE pulse sequences are consistently larger than CT volumes. A simple mathematical conversion model has been developed: CT volume=0.8*GRE volume. This formula can be used in studies using both imaging modalities, across different studies, or to track ICH growth over time independent of imaging modality in an individual patient. PMID:18483414

  3. TU-A-12A-02: Novel Lung Ventilation Imaging with Single Energy CT After Single Inhalation of Xenon: Comparison with SPECT Ventilation Images

    SciTech Connect

    Negahdar, M; Yamamoto, T; Shultz, D; Gable, L; Shan, X; Mittra, E; Loo, B; Maxim, P; Diehn, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a novel lung functional imaging method to determine the spatial distribution of xenon (Xe) gas in a single inhalation as a measure of regional ventilation. We compare Xe-CT ventilation to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation, which is the current clinical reference. Regional lung ventilation information may be useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of pulmonary diseases such as COPD, radiotherapy planning, and assessing the progression of toxicity after radiation therapy. Methods: In an IRB-approved clinical study, Xe-CT and SPECT ventilation scans were acquired for three patients including one patient with severe emphysema and two lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. For Xe- CT, we acquired two breath-hold single energy CT images of the entire lung with inspiration of 100% O2 and a mixture of 70% Xe and 30% O2, respectively. A video biofeedback system was used to achieve reproducible breath-holds. We used deformable image registration to align the breathhold images with each other to accurately subtract them, producing a map of the distribution of Xe as a surrogate of lung ventilation. We divided each lung into twelve parts and correlated the Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement at each part with the SPECT ventilation count of the corresponding part of the lung. Results: The mean of the Pearson linear correlation coefficient values between the Xe-CT and ventilation SPECT count for all three patients were 0.62 (p<0.01). The Xe-CT image had a higher resolution than SPECT, and did not show central airway deposition artifacts that were present in the SPECT image. Conclusion: We developed a rapid, safe, clinically practical, and potentially widely accessible method for regional lung functional imaging. We demonstrated strong correlations between the Xe-CT ventilation image and SPECT ventilation image as the clinical reference. This ongoing study will investigate more patients to confirm this finding.

  4. Canadian CT head rule and New Orleans Criteria in mild traumatic brain injury: comparison at a tertiary referral hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mata-Mbemba, Daddy; Mugikura, Shunji; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Murata, Takaki; Kato, Yumiko; Tatewaki, Yasuko; Takase, Kei; Kushimoto, Shigeki; Tominaga, Teiji; Takahashi, Shoki

    2016-01-01

    We compared Canadian computed tomography (CT) head rule (CCHR) and New Orleans Criteria (NOC) in predicting important CT findings in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). We included 142 consecutive patients with mild TBI [Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 13-15] who showed at least one of the risk factors stated in the CCHR or the NOC. We introduced two scores: a Canadian from the CCHR and a New Orleans from the NOC. A patient's score represented a sum of the number of positive items. We examined the relationship between scores or items and the presence of important CT findings. Only the Canadian was significantly associated with important CT findings in multivariate analyses and showed higher area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) either in all 142 patients (GCS 13-15: P = 0.0130; AUC = 0.69) or in the 67 with a GCS = 15 (P = 0.0128, AUC = 0.73). Of items, ">60 years" or "≥65 years" included in either guideline was the strongest predictor of important CT finding, followed by "GCS < 15 after 2 h" included only in the CCHR. In a tertiary referral hospital in Japan, CCHR had higher performance than the NOC in predicting important CT findings. PMID:27026873

  5. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT, MRI and SPECT in the diagnosis of local residual/recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Junbao; Pei, Su; Zhu, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the overall diagnostic value of MRI, SPECT and 18F-FDG PET/CT in detecting local NPC residual/recurrence with a meta-analysis. We performed a systematic review with meta-analyses to compare the diagnostic performance of nuclear magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) as imaging modalities for the detection of local residual or recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). MEDLINE, EMBASE and publisher databases were searched in December 2014. Methodological quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) tool. Pooled estimation and subgroup analysis data were obtained by statistical analysis. Seventeen studies were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity estimates for 18F-FDGPET/CT (90%) and SPECT (85%) were not significantly higher than MRI (77%) (p=0.096 and 0.164, respectively). The pooled specificity estimates for 18F-FDGPET/CT (93%) and SPECT (81%) were significantly higher than MRI (76%) (p=0.033 and 0.042, respectively). The pooled DOR (Diagnostic odds ratio) estimates for 18F-FDGPET/CT (73.27) were significantly higher than MRI (12.09) (p=0.019) while the pooled DOR estimates for SPECT (78.69) were not significantly higher than MRI (12.09) (p=0.872). For 18F-FDGPET/CT, there were no significant differences between PET-CT and PET on all of the variables including sensitivity, specificity, PLR (Positive likelihood ratio), NLR (Negative likelihood ratio) and DOR (P>0.05). For SPECT, there were no significant differences between 201TI-SPECT and MIBI-SPECT on all of the variables including sensitivity, specificity, PLR, NLR and DOR (P>0.05). Both 18F-FDGPET/CT and SPECT are very accurate for the detection of local residual or recurrent NPC, they are superior to MRI in distinguishing recurrent NPC from fibrosis or scar tissue after RT in irradiated

  6. Comparison of non-sedated brain MRI and CT for the detection of acute traumatic injury in children 6 years of age or less.

    PubMed

    Young, Joseph Yeen; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Caruso, Paul Albert; Rincon, Sandra Patricia

    2016-08-01

    CT is considered the first-line study for acute intracranial injury in children because of its availability, detection of acute hemorrhage, and lack of sedation. An MRI study with rapidly acquired sequences can obviate the need for sedation and radiation. We compared the detection rate of rapid non-sedated brain MRI to CT for traumatic head injury in young children. We reviewed a series of children 6 years of age or less who presented to our ED during a 5-year period with head trauma and received a non-sedated brain MRI and CT within 24 h of injury. Most MRI studies were limited to triplane T2 and susceptibility sequences. Two neuroradiologists reviewed the MRIs and CTs and assessed the following findings: fracture, epidural hematoma (EDH)/subdural hematoma (SDH), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and parenchymal injury. Thirty of 33 patients had radiologically identified traumatic injuries. There was an overall agreement of 82 % between the two modalities. Skull fracture was the only injury subtype which had a statistically significant difference in detection between CT and MRI (p = 0.0001), with MRI missing 14 of 21 fractures detected on CT. While not statistically significant, MRI had a higher detection rate of EDH/SDH (p = 0.34), SAH (p = 0.07), and parenchymal injuries (p = 0.50). Non-sedated MRI has similar detection rates to CT for intracranial injury in young children presenting with acute head trauma and may be an alternative to CT in select patients. PMID:27166965

  7. Comparison of diagnostic performance of CT and MRI for abdominal staging of pediatric renal tumors: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Servaes, Sabah; Naranjo, Arlene; Geller, James I.; Ehrlich, Peter F.; Gow, Kenneth W.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Gratias, Eric; Mullen, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background CT and MRI are both used for abdominal staging of pediatric renal tumors. The diagnostic performance of the two modalities for local and regional staging of renal tumors has not been systematically evaluated. Objective To compare the diagnostic performance of CT and MRI for local staging of pediatric renal tumors. Materials and methods The study population was derived from the AREN03B2 study of the Children's Oncology Group. Baseline abdominal imaging performed with both CT and MRI within 30 days of nephrectomy was available for retrospective review in 82 renal tumor cases. Each case was evaluated for capsular penetration, lymph node metastasis, tumor thrombus, preoperative tumor rupture, and synchronous contralateral lesions. The surgical and pathological findings at central review were the reference standard. Results The sensitivity of CT and MRI for detecting capsular penetration was 68.6% and 62.9%, respectively (P=0.73), while specificity was 86.5% and 83.8% (P=1.0). The sensitivity of CT and MRI for detecting lymph node metastasis was 76.5% and 52.9% (P=0.22), and specificity was 90.4% and 92.3% (P=1.0). Synchronous contralateral lesions were identified by CT in 4/9 cases and by MRI in 7/9 cases. Conclusion CT and MRI have similar diagnostic performance for detection of lymph node metastasis and capsular penetration. MR detected more contralateral synchronous lesions; however these were present in a very small number of cases. Either modality can be used for initial loco–regional staging of pediatric renal tumors. PMID:25135711

  8. The adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V technique for radiation dose reduction in abdominal CT: comparison with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinhan; Oh, Jongyeong; Kim, Dongwon; Cho, Junghyun; Kim, Sanghyun; Lee, Sangyun; Lee, Jihyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether reduced radiation dose abdominal CT images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction V (ASIR-V) compromise the depiction of clinically competent features when compared with the currently used routine radiation dose CT images reconstructed with ASIR. Methods: 27 consecutive patients (mean body mass index: 23.55 kg m−2 underwent CT of the abdomen at two time points. At the first time point, abdominal CT was scanned at 21.45 noise index levels of automatic current modulation at 120 kV. Images were reconstructed with 40% ASIR, the routine protocol of Dong-A University Hospital. At the second time point, follow-up scans were performed at 30 noise index levels. Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), 40% ASIR, 30% ASIR-V, 50% ASIR-V and 70% ASIR-V for the reduced radiation dose. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses of image quality were conducted. The CT dose index was also recorded. Results: At the follow-up study, the mean dose reduction relative to the currently used common radiation dose was 35.37% (range: 19–49%). The overall subjective image quality and diagnostic acceptability of the 50% ASIR-V scores at the reduced radiation dose were nearly identical to those recorded when using the initial routine-dose CT with 40% ASIR. Subjective ratings of the qualitative analysis revealed that of all reduced radiation dose CT series reconstructed, 30% ASIR-V and 50% ASIR-V were associated with higher image quality with lower noise and artefacts as well as good sharpness when compared with 40% ASIR and FBP. However, the sharpness score at 70% ASIR-V was considered to be worse than that at 40% ASIR. Objective image noise for 50% ASIR-V was 34.24% and 46.34% which was lower than 40% ASIR and FBP. Conclusion: Abdominal CT images reconstructed with ASIR-V facilitate radiation dose reductions of to 35% when compared with the ASIR. Advances in knowledge: This study represents the first

  9. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) for Echographic Detection of Hepato Cellular Carcinoma in Cirrhotic Patients Previously Treated with Multiple Techniques: Comparison of Conventional US, Spiral CT and 3-Dimensional CEUS with Navigator Technique (3DNav CEUS).

    PubMed

    Giangregorio, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    A commercially available technique named "NAVIGATOR" (Esaote, Italy) easily enables a 3-D reconstruction of a single 2-D acquisition of Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) imaging of the whole liver (with a volumetric correction thanks to the electromagnetic device of NAVIGATOR). Aim of the study was to evaluate this "panoramic" technique in comparison with conventional US and spiral CT in the detection of new hepatic lesions. 144 cirrhotic patients (previously treated for hepato cellular carcinoma (HCC)) in follow-up with detection of 98 new nodules (N), 28 multinodular (Nmulti), 14 loco-regional regrowth (LR) 94 efficaciously treated without new nodules (neg) and four multinodular without new nodules, were submitted to 200 examinations with this new technique from November 2008 to November 2009. 3DNavCEUS was performed using SonoVue (Bracco), as contrast agent, and a machine (Technos MPX, Esaote). Spiral CT and 3DNav CEUS were performed in the same month during follow up. Sens.,Spec.,diagn.-Acc.,PPV and NPV were evaluated; comparison and differences between the techniques were obtained with chi-square (SPSS release-15). Final diagnosis was: 98 new lesions (N) (one to three), 28 multinodular HCC (Nmulti) and 14 loco-regional regrowth (LR); in 94 no more lesions were observed during follow-up; conventional US obtained: 58 N (+18 multinodularN and 8 LR), 40 false negative (+10 Nmulti and 6 LR) (sens:59.2, spec:100%, Diagn Accur:73.6, PPV:100; NPV:70.1); spiral CT obtained: 84N (+26-multinodularN and 14-LR), 14 false-negative (+2-Nmulti), and one false-positive (sens:85.7, spec:97.9%, Diagn Accur:90.9, PPV:97.7; NPV:86.8); 3DNAV obtained: 92N (+28 multinodularN and 14LR), 6 false-negative, and two false-positives (sens:93.9, spec:97.9%, Diagn Accur:95.6, PPV:97.9; NPV:93.9). 3-DNav CEUS is significantly better than US and almost similar to spiral CT for detection of new HCC. This technique, in particular, showed the presence of lesions even in the cases not detected

  10. Lactose malabsorption testing in daily clinical practice: a critical retrospective analysis and comparison of the hydrogen/methane breath test and genetic test (c/t-13910 polymorphism) results.

    PubMed

    Enko, Dietmar; Rezanka, Erwin; Stolba, Robert; Halwachs-Baumann, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a retrospective evaluation and comparison of the hydrogen/methane (H2/CH4) breath test and genetic test (C/T-13910 polymorphism) results in lactose malabsorption testing. In total 263 consecutive patients with suspected lactose malabsorption were included in this study. They underwent the H2/CH4 breath test following the ingestion of 50 g lactose and were tested for the C/T-13910 polymorphism. In total 51 patients (19.4%) had a C/C-13910 genotype, indicating primary lactose malabsorption. Only 19 patients (7.2%) also had a positive H2/CH4 breath test. All in all 136 patients (51.69%) had a C/T-13910 and 76 patients (28.91%) a T/T-13910 genotype, indicating lactase persistence. Four patients (1.5%) with the C/T-13910 genotype and one patient (0.4%) with the T/T-13910 genotype had a positive H2/CH4 breath test result, indicating secondary lactose malabsorption. Cohen's Kappa measuring agreement between the two methods was 0.44. Twenty patients (7.6%) with a positive H2/CH4 peak within 60 minutes after lactose ingestion were classified as patients with lactose-dependent small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). In conclusion, only moderate agreement between the breath test and the genetic test was shown. Secondary lactose malabsorption as well as preanalytical limitations of the combined H2/CH4 breath test procedure can cause discrepant results. This trial is registered with K-42-13. PMID:24829570

  11. Does the Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced Liver MRI Impact on the Treatment of Patients with Colorectal Cancer? Comparison Study with 18F-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji-Won; Oh, Soon Nam; Choi, Joon Il; Choi, Moon Hyung; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Lee, Myung Ah; Yoo, Young-Kyung; Oh, Seong Taek

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the value of Gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI in the preoperative staging of colorectal cancer and estimated the clinical impact of liver MRI in the management plan of liver metastasis. Methods. We identified 108 patients who underwent PET/CT and liver MRI as preoperative evaluation of colorectal cancer, between January 2011 and December 2013. We evaluated the per nodule sensitivity of PET/CT and liver MRI for liver metastasis. Management plan changes were estimated for patients with metastatic nodules newly detected on liver MRI, to assess the clinical impact. Results. We enrolled 131 metastatic nodules (mean size 1.6 cm) in 41 patients (mean age 65 years). The per nodule sensitivities of PET/CT and liver MRI were both 100% for nodules measuring 2 cm or larger but were significantly different for nodules measuring less than 2 cm (59.8% and 95.1%, resp., P = 0.0001). At least one more metastatic nodule was detected on MRI in 16 patients. Among these, 7 patients indicated changes of management plan after performing MRI. Conclusions. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI detected more metastatic nodules compared with PET/CT, especially for small (<2 cm) nodules. The newly detected nodules induced management plan change in 43.8% (7/16) of patients. PMID:27022613

  12. Staging of Primary Abdominal Lymphomas: Comparison of Whole-Body MRI with Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Stecco, Alessandro; Buemi, Francesco; Quagliozzi, Martina; Lombardi, Mariangela; Santagostino, Alberto; Sacchetti, Gian Mauro; Carriero, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of whole-body MRI with diffusion-weighted sequences (WB-DW-MRI) with that of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the staging of patients with primary gastrointestinal lymphoma. Methods. This retrospective study involved 17 untreated patients with primary abdominal gastrointestinal lymphoma. All patients underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT and WB-DW-MRI. Histopathology findings or at least 6 months of clinical and radiological follow-up was the gold standard. The Musshoff-modified Ann Arbor system was used for staging, and diagnostic accuracy was evaluated on a per-node basis. Results. WB-DW-MRI exhibited 100% sensitivity, 96.3% specificity, and 96.1% and 100% positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and PPV and NPV of PET/CT were 95.9%, 100%, and 100% and 96.4%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the two techniques (p = 0.05). The weighted kappa agreement statistics with a 95% confidence interval were 0.97 (0.95–0.99) between the two MRI readers and 0.87 (0.82–0.92) between the two methods. Conclusions. WB-DW-MRI appears to have a comparable diagnostic value to 18F-FDG-PET/CT in staging patients with gastrointestinal lymphoma. PMID:26798331

  13. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Boone, J M; Abbey, C K; Hargreaves, J; Bateni, C; Lindfors, K K; Yang, K; Nosratieh, A; Hernandez, A; Gazi, P

    2015-04-21

    The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33, 0.71, 1.5 and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast.The percent correct of the human observer's responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p < 0.05) better in the case of thin-section images, compared to thick section images similar to mammography, for all but the 1 mm lesion diameter lesions. For example, the average of three radiologist's performance for 3 mm diameter lesions was 92% correct for thin section breast CT images while it was 67% for the simulated projection images. A gradual reduction in observer performance was observed as the section thickness increased beyond about 1 mm. While a performance difference based on breast density was seen in both breast CT and the projection image results, the average radiologist performance using breast CT images in dense breasts outperformed the performance using simulated projection images in fatty breasts for all lesion diameters except 11 mm. The average radiologist performance outperformed that of the average physicist observer, however trends

  14. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Boone, JM; Abbey, CK; Hargreaves, J; Bateni, C; Lindfors, KK; Yang, K; Nosratieh, A; Hernandez, A; Gazi, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Methods Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33 mm, 0.71 mm, 1.5 mm, and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast. Results The percent correct of the human observer’s responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p<0.05) better in the case of thin-section images, compared to thick section images similar to mammography, for all but the 1 mm lesion diameter lesions. For example, the average of three radiologist’s performance for 3 mm diameter lesions was 92 % correct for thin section breast CT images while it was 67 % for the simulated projection images. A gradual reduction in observer performance was observed as the section thickness increased beyond about 1 mm. While a performance difference based on breast density was seen in both breast CT and the projection image results, the average radiologist performance using breast CT images in dense breasts outperformed the performance using simulated projection images in fatty breasts for all lesion diameters except 11 mm. The average radiologist performance outperformed that of the

  15. Comparison of extended field-of-view reconstructions in C-arm flat-detector CT using patient size, shape or attenuation information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolditz, Daniel; Meyer, Michael; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kalender, Willi A.

    2011-01-01

    In C-arm-based flat-detector computed tomography (FDCT) it frequently happens that the patient exceeds the scan field of view (SFOV) in the transaxial direction because of the limited detector size. This results in data truncation and CT image artefacts. In this work three truncation correction approaches for extended field-of-view (EFOV) reconstructions have been implemented and evaluated. An FDCT-based method estimates the patient size and shape from the truncated projections by fitting an elliptical model to the raw data in order to apply an extrapolation. In a camera-based approach the patient is sampled with an optical tracking system and this information is used to apply an extrapolation. In a CT-based method the projections are completed by artificial projection data obtained from the CT data acquired in an earlier exam. For all methods the extended projections are filtered and backprojected with a standard Feldkamp-type algorithm. Quantitative evaluations have been performed by simulations of voxelized phantoms on the basis of the root mean square deviation and a quality factor Q (Q = 1 represents the ideal correction). Measurements with a C-arm FDCT system have been used to validate the simulations and to investigate the practical applicability using anthropomorphic phantoms which caused truncation in all projections. The proposed approaches enlarged the FOV to cover wider patient cross-sections. Thus, image quality inside and outside the SFOV has been improved. Best results have been obtained using the CT-based method, followed by the camera-based and the FDCT-based truncation correction. For simulations, quality factors up to 0.98 have been achieved. Truncation-induced cupping artefacts have been reduced, e.g., from 218% to less than 1% for the measurements. The proposed truncation correction approaches for EFOV reconstructions are an effective way to ensure accurate CT values inside the SFOV and to recover peripheral information outside the SFOV.

  16. MRI-based IMRT planning for MR-linac: comparison between CT- and MRI-based plans for pancreatic and prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Prior, Phil; Chen, Xinfeng; Botros, Maikel; Paulson, Eric S; Lawton, Colleen; Erickson, Beth; Li, X Allen

    2016-05-21

    The treatment planning in radiation therapy (RT) can be arranged to combine benefits of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) together to maintain dose calculation accuracy and improved target delineation. Our aim is study the dosimetric impact of uniform relative electron density assignment on IMRT treatment planning with additional consideration given to the effect of a 1.5 T transverse magnetic field (TMF) in MR-Linac. A series of intensity modulated RT (IMRT) plans were generated for two representative tumor sites, pancreas and prostate, using CT and MRI datasets. Representative CT-based IMRT plans were generated to assess the impact of different electron density (ED) assignment on plan quality using CT without the presence of a 1.5 T TMF. The relative ED (rED) values used were taken from the ICRU report 46. Four types of rED assignment in the organs at risk (OARs), the planning target volumes (PTV) and in the non-specified tissue (NST) were considered. Dose was recalculated (no optimization) using a Monaco 5.09.07a research planning system employing Monte Carlo calculations with an option to include TMF. To investigate the dosimetric effect of different rED assignment, the dose-volume parameters (DVPs) obtained from these specific rED plans were compared to those obtained from the original plans based on CT. Overall, we found that uniform rED assignment results in differences in DVPs within 3% for the PTV and 5% for OAR. The presence of 1.5 T TMF on IMRT DVPs resulted in differences that were generally within 3% of the Gold St for both the pancreas and prostate. The combination of uniform rED assignment and TMF produced differences in DVPs that were within 4-5% of the Gold St. Larger differences in DVPs were observed for OARs on T2-based plans. The effects of using different rED assignments and the presence of 1.5 T TMF for pancreas and prostate IMRT plans are generally within 3% and 5% of PTV and OAR Gold St values. There are

  17. MRI-based IMRT planning for MR-linac: comparison between CT- and MRI-based plans for pancreatic and prostate cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, Phil; Chen, Xinfeng; Botros, Maikel; Paulson, Eric S.; Lawton, Colleen; Erickson, Beth; Li, X. Allen

    2016-05-01

    The treatment planning in radiation therapy (RT) can be arranged to combine benefits of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) together to maintain dose calculation accuracy and improved target delineation. Our aim is study the dosimetric impact of uniform relative electron density assignment on IMRT treatment planning with additional consideration given to the effect of a 1.5 T transverse magnetic field (TMF) in MR-Linac. A series of intensity modulated RT (IMRT) plans were generated for two representative tumor sites, pancreas and prostate, using CT and MRI datasets. Representative CT-based IMRT plans were generated to assess the impact of different electron density (ED) assignment on plan quality using CT without the presence of a 1.5 T TMF. The relative ED (rED) values used were taken from the ICRU report 46. Four types of rED assignment in the organs at risk (OARs), the planning target volumes (PTV) and in the non-specified tissue (NST) were considered. Dose was recalculated (no optimization) using a Monaco 5.09.07a research planning system employing Monte Carlo calculations with an option to include TMF. To investigate the dosimetric effect of different rED assignment, the dose-volume parameters (DVPs) obtained from these specific rED plans were compared to those obtained from the original plans based on CT. Overall, we found that uniform rED assignment results in differences in DVPs within 3% for the PTV and 5% for OAR. The presence of 1.5 T TMF on IMRT DVPs resulted in differences that were generally within 3% of the Gold St for both the pancreas and prostate. The combination of uniform rED assignment and TMF produced differences in DVPs that were within 4-5% of the Gold St. Larger differences in DVPs were observed for OARs on T2-based plans. The effects of using different rED assignments and the presence of 1.5 T TMF for pancreas and prostate IMRT plans are generally within 3% and 5% of PTV and OAR Gold St values. There are

  18. Radiation dose reduction to the breast in thoracic CT: Comparison of bismuth shielding, organ-based tube current modulation, and use of a globally decreased tube current

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jia; Duan Xinhui; Christner, Jodie A.; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate dose performance and image quality in thoracic CT using three techniques to reduce dose to the breast: bismuth shielding, organ-based tube current modulation (TCM) and global tube current reduction. Methods: Semi-anthropomorphic thorax phantoms of four different sizes (15, 30, 35, and 40 cm lateral width) were used for dose measurement and image quality assessment. Four scans were performed on each phantom using 100 or 120 kV with a clinical CT scanner: (1) reference scan; (2) scan with bismuth breast shield of an appropriate thickness; (3) scan with organ-based TCM; and (4) scan with a global reduction in tube current chosen to match the dose reduction from bismuth shielding. Dose to the breast was measured with an ion chamber on the surface of the phantom. Image quality was evaluated by measuring the mean and standard deviation of CT numbers within the lung and heart regions. Results: Compared to the reference scan, dose to the breast region was decreased by about 21% for the 15-cm phantom with a pediatric (2-ply) shield and by about 37% for the 30, 35, and 40-cm phantoms with adult (4-ply) shields. Organ-based TCM decreased the dose by 12% for the 15-cm phantom, and 34-39% for the 30, 35, and 40-cm phantoms. Global lowering of the tube current reduced breast dose by 23% for the 15-cm phantom and 39% for the 30, 35, and 40-cm phantoms. In phantoms of all four sizes, image noise was increased in both the lung and heart regions with bismuth shielding. No significant increase in noise was observed with organ-based TCM. Decreasing tube current globally led to similar noise increases as bismuth shielding. Streak and beam hardening artifacts, and a resulting artifactual increase in CT numbers, were observed for scans with bismuth shields, but not for organ-based TCM or global tube current reduction. Conclusions: Organ-based TCM produces dose reduction to the breast similar to that achieved with bismuth shielding for

  19. MRI-based IMRT planning for MR-linac: comparison between CT- and MRI-based plans for pancreatic and prostate cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, Phil; Chen, Xinfeng; Botros, Maikel; Paulson, Eric S.; Lawton, Colleen; Erickson, Beth; Li, X. Allen

    2016-05-01

    The treatment planning in radiation therapy (RT) can be arranged to combine benefits of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) together to maintain dose calculation accuracy and improved target delineation. Our aim is study the dosimetric impact of uniform relative electron density assignment on IMRT treatment planning with additional consideration given to the effect of a 1.5 T transverse magnetic field (TMF) in MR-Linac. A series of intensity modulated RT (IMRT) plans were generated for two representative tumor sites, pancreas and prostate, using CT and MRI datasets. Representative CT-based IMRT plans were generated to assess the impact of different electron density (ED) assignment on plan quality using CT without the presence of a 1.5 T TMF. The relative ED (rED) values used were taken from the ICRU report 46. Four types of rED assignment in the organs at risk (OARs), the planning target volumes (PTV) and in the non-specified tissue (NST) were considered. Dose was recalculated (no optimization) using a Monaco 5.09.07a research planning system employing Monte Carlo calculations with an option to include TMF. To investigate the dosimetric effect of different rED assignment, the dose-volume parameters (DVPs) obtained from these specific rED plans were compared to those obtained from the original plans based on CT. Overall, we found that uniform rED assignment results in differences in DVPs within 3% for the PTV and 5% for OAR. The presence of 1.5 T TMF on IMRT DVPs resulted in differences that were generally within 3% of the Gold St for both the pancreas and prostate. The combination of uniform rED assignment and TMF produced differences in DVPs that were within 4–5% of the Gold St. Larger differences in DVPs were observed for OARs on T2-based plans. The effects of using different rED assignments and the presence of 1.5 T TMF for pancreas and prostate IMRT plans are generally within 3% and 5% of PTV and OAR Gold St values. There are

  20. Comparison of the accuracy of 99mTc-3P4-RGD2 SPECT and CT in diagnosing solitary pulmonary nodules

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haishan; Gao, Shi; Chen, Bin; Cheng, Guanghui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare technetium-99m-(polyethylene glycol-4)3-(Arg-Gly-Asp)2 (99mTc-3P4-RGD2) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and computed tomography (CT) in the noninvasive differentiation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). The present study prospectively investigated a consecutive series of 24 patients with SPN, who were newly diagnosed using radiography between September 2012 and January 2014. All patients underwent 99mTc-3P4-RGD2 SPECT and CT scans using a dual-head variable-angle γ-camera equipped with high-resolution collimators. A blinded panel of two thoracic radiologists for CT and three nuclear physicians for SPECT analyzed the images using a 5-grade scale. The SPECT images were also semi-quantitatively evaluated using tumor to non-tumor localization ratios (T/NT). The results were verified by pathological examination of the biopsy material obtained from each patient with SPN, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated from these results. The present results revealed that there were 17 malignant and 7 benign SPNs among the 24 patients with SPN. The mean size of the SPN was 2.1±0.6 cm. Sensitivity of visual analysis for SPECT and CT were 100.0 and 82.4%, respectively, and specificity was 71.4% for the two methods. When the T/NT SPECT semiquantitative analysis (ratio, 1.64) was used as a cut-off, the sensitivity and specificity of SPECT were 100.0 and 71.4%, respectively. The areas under the ROC curves were 0.840 for visual analysis of SPECT [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.600–1.000], 0.849 for semiquantitative analysis of SPECT (95% CI, 0.618–1.000) and 0.815 for CT (95% CI, 0.626–1.000). In conclusion, the present results suggest that 99mTc-3P4-RGD2 SPECT is more accurate than CT in the detection of malignant SPN, and visual analysis appears to be sufficient for the characterization of SPN. PMID:27698821

  1. Comparison of the accuracy of 99mTc-3P4-RGD2 SPECT and CT in diagnosing solitary pulmonary nodules

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haishan; Gao, Shi; Chen, Bin; Cheng, Guanghui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare technetium-99m-(polyethylene glycol-4)3-(Arg-Gly-Asp)2 (99mTc-3P4-RGD2) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and computed tomography (CT) in the noninvasive differentiation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). The present study prospectively investigated a consecutive series of 24 patients with SPN, who were newly diagnosed using radiography between September 2012 and January 2014. All patients underwent 99mTc-3P4-RGD2 SPECT and CT scans using a dual-head variable-angle γ-camera equipped with high-resolution collimators. A blinded panel of two thoracic radiologists for CT and three nuclear physicians for SPECT analyzed the images using a 5-grade scale. The SPECT images were also semi-quantitatively evaluated using tumor to non-tumor localization ratios (T/NT). The results were verified by pathological examination of the biopsy material obtained from each patient with SPN, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated from these results. The present results revealed that there were 17 malignant and 7 benign SPNs among the 24 patients with SPN. The mean size of the SPN was 2.1±0.6 cm. Sensitivity of visual analysis for SPECT and CT were 100.0 and 82.4%, respectively, and specificity was 71.4% for the two methods. When the T/NT SPECT semiquantitative analysis (ratio, 1.64) was used as a cut-off, the sensitivity and specificity of SPECT were 100.0 and 71.4%, respectively. The areas under the ROC curves were 0.840 for visual analysis of SPECT [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.600–1.000], 0.849 for semiquantitative analysis of SPECT (95% CI, 0.618–1.000) and 0.815 for CT (95% CI, 0.626–1.000). In conclusion, the present results suggest that 99mTc-3P4-RGD2 SPECT is more accurate than CT in the detection of malignant SPN, and visual analysis appears to be sufficient for the characterization of SPN.

  2. Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yakun; Li Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated

  3. Comparison of aPTT and CT Parameter of the ROTEM Test to Monitor Heparin Anti-Coagulation Effect in ICU Patients: an Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Atabak; Nikeish, Masoomeh; Etezadi, Farhad; Pourfakhr, Pejman; Imani, Farsad; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Shariat Moharari, Reza

    2015-10-01

    Heparin is frequently used in different clinical settings to reduce the coagulating ability of the blood. Because of probable adverse effects owing to heparin therapy and regarding variability of patients' responses to heparin, which make it very unreliable, it seems prudent to monitor meticulously its effects on the human body. There are a lot of laboratory tests to watch its effects on the body for example; aPTT and ROTEM are the most widely used tests that are performed today. We aimed to compare the aPTT test results against changes of CT parameter of the ROTEM test due to heparin administration. This study was conducted on 45 critically ill patients who needed to receive heparin according to their clinical status. All patients received 550 to 1500 unit heparin per hour (on average 17.5 unit heparin per kilogram weight). While the patients were under infusion of heparin, two blood samples (5 ml) were taken from a newly established cubital vein, just five hours after commencement of heparin therapy. One sample was used for aPTT and the other one for ROTEM. The correlation between aPTT and the changes of CT parameter of the ROTEM with heparin dosage and infusion was the primary outcome. The correlation between heparin therapy and the changes of other parameters like MCF, CFT, and a number of platelets were the secondary outcome of the study. The only significant correlation was between changes of CT and aPTT (P=0.000). The other variables were not correlated. Changes of CT parameter of ROTEM test can be used for monitoring of reduced coagulability during heparin infusion instead of aPTT test. PMID:26615378

  4. Comparison of SPECT imaging using monoclonal antibodies with computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US) for detection of recurrences of colorectal carcinoma: A prospective clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Chatal, J.F.; Saccavini, J.C.; Douillard, J.Y.; Curtet, C.; Kremer, M.; Le Mevel, B.

    1985-05-01

    A prospective clinical study compared SPECT imaging, ultrasonography (US), and computed tomography (CT) in 22 patients clinically or biologically (increased CEA and/or CA 19-9 serum concentration) suspected of recurrence of colorectal carcinoma. The recordings were performed 3 to 5 days after injection of 111 to 129.5 MBq of cocktail of I-131-labeled anti-CEA and 19-9 (F(ab')2 fragments) monoclonal antibodies. Twenty nine tumor sites were demonstrated by surgery or concordant results of conventional diagnostic methods. SPECT visualized 21 of these 29 tumor sites (72%). It was negative in 4 cases with no demonstrated recurrence (by any method and follow-up). With respect to localization of tumor sites, SPECT visualized 7/12 liver metastases, 8/8 local pelvic recurrences and 6/8 abdominal recurrences. CT and US, systematically performed blind after SPECT, respectively visualized 9/10 and 9/12 liver metastases, 7/12 and 4/13 pelvic and abdominal recurrences. Image interpretation of SPECT was difficult due to poor tumor contrast and the large number of low-intensity, nonspecific radioactive foci. A focus had to recur in at least 3 successive slices to be considered pathological. Four tumor sites were visualized with SPECT and not with US and CT (negative or uncertain results). SPECT would appear to be useful for localizing pelvic or abdominal recurrences in cases in which interpretation of US and CT images is difficult, often because their nonspecific approach does not make it possible to differentiate a tumor recurrence from post-operative anatomical changes.

  5. Comparison between human and model observer performance in low-contrast detection tasks in CT images: application to images reconstructed with filtered back projection and iterative algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Calzado, A; Geleijns, J; Joemai, R M S; Veldkamp, W J H

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare low-contrast detectability (LCDet) performance between a model [non–pre-whitening matched filter with an eye filter (NPWE)] and human observers in CT images reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative [adaptive iterative dose reduction three-dimensional (AIDR 3D; Toshiba Medical Systems, Zoetermeer, Netherlands)] algorithms. Methods: Images of the Catphan® phantom (Phantom Laboratories, New York, NY) were acquired with Aquilion ONE™ 320-detector row CT (Toshiba Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) at five tube current levels (20–500 mA range) and reconstructed with FBP and AIDR 3D. Samples containing either low-contrast objects (diameters, 2–15 mm) or background were extracted and analysed by the NPWE model and four human observers in a two-alternative forced choice detection task study. Proportion correct (PC) values were obtained for each analysed object and used to compare human and model observer performances. An efficiency factor (η) was calculated to normalize NPWE to human results. Results: Human and NPWE model PC values (normalized by the efficiency, η = 0.44) were highly correlated for the whole dose range. The Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients (95% confidence interval) between human and NPWE were 0.984 (0.972–0.991) for AIDR 3D and 0.984 (0.971–0.991) for FBP, respectively. Bland–Altman plots based on PC results showed excellent agreement between human and NPWE [mean absolute difference 0.5 ± 0.4%; range of differences (−4.7%, 5.6%)]. Conclusion: The NPWE model observer can predict human performance in LCDet tasks in phantom CT images reconstructed with FBP and AIDR 3D algorithms at different dose levels. Advances in knowledge: Quantitative assessment of LCDet in CT can accurately be performed using software based on a model observer. PMID:24837275

  6. Comparison of aPTT and CT Parameter of the ROTEM Test to Monitor Heparin Anti-Coagulation Effect in ICU Patients: an Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Atabak; Nikeish, Masoomeh; Etezadi, Farhad; Pourfakhr, Pejman; Imani, Farsad; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Shariat Moharari, Reza

    2015-10-01

    Heparin is frequently used in different clinical settings to reduce the coagulating ability of the blood. Because of probable adverse effects owing to heparin therapy and regarding variability of patients' responses to heparin, which make it very unreliable, it seems prudent to monitor meticulously its effects on the human body. There are a lot of laboratory tests to watch its effects on the body for example; aPTT and ROTEM are the most widely used tests that are performed today. We aimed to compare the aPTT test results against changes of CT parameter of the ROTEM test due to heparin administration. This study was conducted on 45 critically ill patients who needed to receive heparin according to their clinical status. All patients received 550 to 1500 unit heparin per hour (on average 17.5 unit heparin per kilogram weight). While the patients were under infusion of heparin, two blood samples (5 ml) were taken from a newly established cubital vein, just five hours after commencement of heparin therapy. One sample was used for aPTT and the other one for ROTEM. The correlation between aPTT and the changes of CT parameter of the ROTEM with heparin dosage and infusion was the primary outcome. The correlation between heparin therapy and the changes of other parameters like MCF, CFT, and a number of platelets were the secondary outcome of the study. The only significant correlation was between changes of CT and aPTT (P=0.000). The other variables were not correlated. Changes of CT parameter of ROTEM test can be used for monitoring of reduced coagulability during heparin infusion instead of aPTT test.

  7. Application of F-18-Sodium Fluoride (NaF) Dynamic PET-CT (dPET-CT) for Defect Healing: A Comparison of Biomaterials in an Experimental Osteoporotic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Caixia; Alt, Volker; Pan, Leyun; Thormann, Ulrich; Schnettler, Reinhard; Strauss, Ludwig G.; Heinemann, Sascha; Schumacher, Matthias; Gelinsky, Michael; Nies, Berthold; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the current study was to measure and compare the effect of various biomaterials for the healing of osteoporotic bone defects in the rat femur using 18F-sodium fluoride dPET-CT. Material/Methods Osteoporosis was induced by ovariectomy and a calcium-restricted diet. After 3 months, rats were operated on to create a 4-mm wedge-shaped defect in the distal metaphyseal femur. Bone substitution materials of calcium phosphate cement (CPC), composites of collagen and silica, and iron foams with interconnecting pores were inserted. Strontium or bisphosphonate, which are well known for having positive effects in osteoporosis treatment, were added into the materials. Eighteen weeks after osteoporosis induction and 6 weeks following femoral surgery, dPET-CT studies scan were performed with 18F-Sodium Fluoride. Standardized uptake values (SUVs) and a 2-tissue compartmental learning-machine model (K1-k4, vessel density [VB], influx [ki]) were used for quantitative analysis. Results k3, reflecting the formation of fluoroapatite, revealed a statistically significant increase at the biomaterial-bone interface due to the Sr release from strontium-modified calcium phosphate cement (SrCPC) compared to CPC, which demonstrated enhanced new bone formation. In addition, k3 as measured in the porous scaffold silica/collagen xerogel (Sc-B30), showed a significant increase based on Wilcoxon rank-sum test (p<0.05) as compared with monolithic silica/collagen xerogel (B30) in the defect region. Furthermore, ki, reflecting the net plasma clearance of tracer to bone mineral measured in the iron foam with coating of the bisphosphonate zoledronic acid (Fe-BP), was enhanced as compared with plain iron foam (Fe) in the defect region. Conclusions k3 was the most significant parameter for the characterization of healing processes and revealed the best differentiation between the 2 different biomaterials. PET scanning using 18F-sodium fluoride seems to be a sensitive and useful

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen ... and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  9. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  10. Comparison of 128-Slice Low-Dose Prospective ECG-Gated CT Scanning and Trans-Thoracic Echocardiography for the Diagnosis of Complex Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Guilin; Miao, Ying; Bin, Jingwen; Deng, Sheng; Liu, Taowen; Jiang, Hongchun; Chen, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare prospective ECG-gated multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) and trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE) in the diagnosis of complex congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods This was a prospective study of consecutive patients with complex CHD (age <7 years) treated at a tertiary hospital between May 2013 and May 2015. All patients were imaged with TTE and prospective ECG-gated 128-slice spiral CT in the week before surgery. Effective radiation dose (ED) was calculated from volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP). Image quality (5-point scale) was assessed independently by two radiologists. Using surgical findings as the reference, the diagnostic capabilities of MSCT and TTE were compared. Results Thirty-five patients (19 males) aged 1.59±1.58 years (range, 3 days to 74 months) were included. CTDIvol, DLP and ED were 0.90±0.24 mGy, 12.9±4.7 mGy∙cm and 0.64±0.21 mSv (range, 0.358–1.196 mSv), respectively. Image quality score was 4.3±0.5, and all images met the diagnostic requirements. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for diagnosing CHD were 97.2%, 99.8%, 99.0%, and 99.5%, respectively, for MSCT, and 90.6%, 99.8%, 99.0%, and 98.4%, respectively, for TTE. MSCT not only had a higher sensitivity than TTE overall (97.2% vs. 90.6%; P<0.05), but was much more sensitive for the diagnosis of extracardiac vascular abnormalities (92.0% vs. 68.0%; P<0.05). Conclusion 128-slice low-dose prospective ECG-gated CT scanning has important clinical value in the diagnosis of complex CHD in children, complementing and extending the findings of TTE. PMID:27788237

  11. SU-E-T-86: Comparison of Two Commercially Available Programs for the Evaluation of Delivered Daily Dose Using Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Tuohy, R; Bosse, C; Mavroidis, P; Shi, Z; Crownover, R; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, two commercially available programs were compared for the evaluation of delivered daily dose using cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: Thirty (n=30) patients previously treated in our clinic (10 prostate, 10 SBRT lung and 10 abdomen) were used in this study. The patients' plans were optimized and calculated using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. The daily CBCT scans were imported into Velocity and RayStation along with the corresponding planning CTs, structure sets and 3D dose distributions for each patient. The organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on each CBCT by the prescribing physician and were included in the evaluation of the daily delivered dose. Each CBCT was registered to the planning CT, once with rigid registration and then again, separately, with deformable registration. After registering each CBCT, the dose distribution from the planning CT was overlaid and the dose volume histograms (DVH) for the OAR and the planning target volumes (PTV) were calculated. Results: For prostate patients, we observed daily volume changes for the OARs. The DVH analysis for those patients showed variation in the sparing of the OARs while PTV coverage remained virtually unchanged using both Velocity and RayStation systems. Similar results were observed for abdominal patients. In contrast, for SBRT lung patients, the DVH for the OARs and target were comparable to those from the initial treatment plan. Differences in organ volume and organ doses were also observed when comparing the daily fractions using deformable and rigid registrations. Conclusion: By using daily CBCT dose reconstruction, we proved PTV coverage for prostate and abdominal targets is adequate. However, there is significant dosimetric change for the OARs. For lung SBRT patients, the delivered daily dose for both PTV and OAR is comparable to the planned dose with no significant differences.

  12. Comparison of Planned Versus Actual Dose Delivered for External Beam Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Cone-Beam CT and Deformable Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Yasmin; Kim, Leonard; Wloch, Jennifer; Chi, Y.; Liang, J.; Martinez, Alvaro; Yan Di; Vicini, Frank

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the adequacy of dose delivery to the clinical target volume (CTV) using external beam (EB) accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients treated with EB APBI underwent cone beam CT (CBCT) before each fraction and daily helical CT (HCT) scans to determine setup errors and calculate the dose per fraction. For 12 patients, an in-house image-intensity-based deformable registration program was used to register the HCTs to the planning CT and generate the cumulative dose. Treatment was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. EB APBI constraints from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 Phase III protocol were used. Results: The mean setup error per CBCT registration was 9 {+-} 5 mm. Dose-volume histogram analysis showed only one patient (8%) with a decrease in the CTV V90 (8% underdosage). All other patients demonstrated adequate target coverage. PTV{sub E}VAL V90 was on average 3% (range, 0%-16%) less than planned. For the ipsilateral breast, four patients had an increase in V50 ({<=}1% increase) and three patients had an increase in V100 ({<=}9% increase). Only one patient showed an increase >5%. Four patients had an increase in ipsilateral lung V30 (maximum 3%), and one had an increase in heart V5 (1%). Four patients had an increase in MaxDose (maximum 89 cGy). Conclusions: The current CTV-to-PTV margin of 10 mm appears sufficient for {approx}92% of patients treated with EB APBI. Although expansion of the population PTV margin to 14 mm would provide {approx}97% confidence level for CTV coverage, online image guidance should be considered.

  13. Virtual hybrid bronchoscopy using PET/CT data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Seemann, Marcus D.

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the possibilities, advantages and limitations of virtual bronchoscopy using data sets from positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT). Eight consecutive patients with lung cancer underwent PET/CT. PET was performed with F-18-labelled 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D: -glucose ((18)F-FDG). The tracheobronchial system was segmented with a volume-growing algorithm, using the CT data sets, and visualized with a shaded-surface rendering method. The primary tumours and the lymph node metastases were segmented for virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the CT data set and for virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy using the PET/CT data set. Virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the low-dose or diagnostic CT facilitates the detection of anatomical/morphological structure changes of the tracheobronchial system. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy was superior to virtual CT-bronchoscopy in the detection of lymph node metastases (P=0.001), because it uses the CT information and the molecular/metabolic information from PET. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy with a transparent colour-coded shaded-surface rendering model is expected to improve the diagnostic accuracy of identification and characterization of malignancies, assessment of tumour staging, differentiation of viable tumour tissue from atelectases and scars, verification of infections, evaluation of therapeutic response and detection of an early stage of recurrence that is not detectable or is misjudged in comparison with virtual CT-bronchoscopy.

  14. Comparison of standardized uptake values measured on F-NaF PET/CT scans using three different tube current intensities

    PubMed Central

    Valadares, Agnes Araujo; Duarte, Paulo Schiavom; Woellner, Eduardo Bechtloff; Coura-Filho, George Barberio; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze standardized uptake values (SUVs) using three different tube current intensities for attenuation correction on 18FNaF PET/CT scans. Materials and Methods A total of 254 18F-NaF PET/CT studies were analyzed using 10, 20 and 30 mAs. The SUVs were calculated in volumes of interest (VOIs) drawn on three skeletal regions, namely, right proximal humeral diaphysis (RH), right proximal femoral diaphysis (RF), and first lumbar vertebra (LV1) in a total of 712 VOIs. The analyses covered 675 regions classified as normal (236 RH, 232 RF, and 207 LV1). Results Mean SUV for each skeletal region was 3.8, 5.4 and 14.4 for RH, RF, and LV1, respectively. As the studies were grouped according to mAs value, the mean SUV values were 3.8, 3.9 and 3.7 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RH region; 5.4, 5.5 and 5.4 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the RF region; 13.8, 14.9 and 14.5 for 10, 20 and 30 mAs, respectively, in the LV1 region. Conclusion The three tube current values yielded similar results for SUV calculation. PMID:25798003

  15. Hemodynamic Changes Caused by Flow Diverters in Rabbit Aneurysm Models: Comparison of Virtual and Realistic FD Deployments Based on Micro-CT Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinyu; Deng, Benqiang; Fang, Yibin; Yu, Ying; Cheng, Jiyong; Wang, Shengzhang; Wang, Kuizhong; Liu, Jian-Min; Huang, Qinghai

    2013-01-01

    Adjusting hemodynamics via flow diverter (FD) implantation is emerging as a novel method of treating cerebral aneurysms. However, most previous FD-related hemodynamic studies were based on virtual FD deployment, which may produce different hemodynamic outcomes than realistic (in vivo) FD deployment. We compared hemodynamics between virtual FD and realistic FD deployments in rabbit aneurysm models using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. FDs were implanted for aneurysms in 14 rabbits. Vascular models based on rabbit-specific angiograms were reconstructed for CFD studies. Real FD configurations were reconstructed based on micro-CT scans after sacrifice, while virtual FD configurations were constructed with SolidWorks software. Hemodynamic parameters before and after FD deployment were analyzed. According to the metal coverage (MC) of implanted FDs calculated based on micro-CT reconstruction, 14 rabbits were divided into two groups (A, MC >35%; B, MC <35%). Normalized mean wall shear stress (WSS), relative residence time (RRT), inflow velocity, and inflow volume in Group A were significantly different (P<0.05) from virtual FD deployment, but pressure was not (P>0.05). The normalized mean WSS in Group A after realistic FD implantation was significantly lower than that of Group B. All parameters in Group B exhibited no significant difference between realistic and virtual FDs. This study confirmed MC-correlated differences in hemodynamic parameters between realistic and virtual FD deployment.

  16. Comparison between coronary plaque 64-slice spiral CT characteristics and risk factors of coronary artery disease patients in Chinese Han population and Mongolian

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Zhigang; Yang, Xiaoguang; Han, Xiaodong; Dong, Peide; Liu, Aishi

    2013-01-01

    Objective : To compare the coronary atherosclerotic plaque 64-slice spiral CT characteristics and the risk factors of Han (in Inner Mongolia) and Mongolian coronary artery disease patients. Metho d s: The plaques of 126 Mongolian and 269 Han patients were analyzed by 64-slice spiral CT coronary angiography. Their gender, age, height, body mass, the history of hypertension, diabetes, smoking and family diseases, the levels of triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were compared. Results: The incidence of plaques (P <0.05), the proportion of plaques in the circumflex branch (P <0.05), the proportion of medium-severe lumen stenosis induced by plaques (P <0.05), and the proportion of obstructive plaque involved multi-branch (P <0.05) of the Mongolian patients were higher. The plaque compositions of the two groups did not differ significantly (P> 0.05). The body mass index of the Mongolian patients was higher (P <0.05). The hypertension, diabetes, smoking history, TG, TC, HDL-C and LDL-C of the two groups did not differ significantly (P> 0.05). Conclusion: The higher incidence of coronary atherosclerotic plaques and the more severe lesions of the Mongolian patients may be related to their higher body mass index. PMID:24353662

  17. First-pass perfusion imaging of solitary pulmonary nodules with 64-detector row CT: comparison of perfusion parameters of malignant and benign lesions.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Yang, Z-G; Chen, T-W; Yu, J-Q; Sun, J-Y; Chen, H-J

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of first-pass whole nodule perfusion imaging in the differentiation of benign and malignant solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). 77 patients with non-calcified SPNs (46 malignant, 22 benign and 9 active inflammatory) underwent first-pass perfusion imaging with a 64-detector row CT scanner. Perfusion, peak enhancement intensity (PEI), time to peak (TTP) and blood volume (BV) were measured and statistically compared among different groups. Mean perfusion, PEI and BV for benign SPNs were significantly lower than those for malignant nodules (p<0.05) and active infections (p<0.05), but the differences were not statistically significant between malignant tumours and active infections (p>0.05). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that SPNs with perfusion greater than 30.6 ml min(-1) ml(-1), PEI higher than 23.3 HU or BV larger than 12.2 ml per 100 g were more likely to be malignant. In conclusion, first-pass perfusion imaging with 64-detector row CT is a feasible way of assessing whole nodule perfusion and helpful in differentiating benign from malignant SPNs.

  18. Comparison between beam-stop and beam-hole array scatter correction techniques for industrial X-ray cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schörner, K.; Goldammer, M.; Stephan, J.

    2011-02-01

    In industrial X-ray cone-beam computed tomography, the inspection of large-scale samples is important because of increasing demands on their quality and long-term mechanical resilience. Large-scale samples, for example made of aluminum or iron, are strongly scattering X-rays. Scattered radiation leads to artifacts such as cupping, streaks, and a reduction in contrast in the reconstructed CT-volume. We propose a scatter correction method based on sampling primary signals by employing a beam-hole array (BHA). In this indirect method, a scatter estimate is calculated by subtraction of the sampled primary signal from the total signal, the latter taken from an image where the BHA is absent. This technique is considered complementary to the better known beam-stop array (BSA) method. The two scatter estimation methods are compared here with respect to geometric effects, scatter-to-total ratio and practicability. Scatter estimation with the BHA method yields more accurate scatter estimates in off-centered regions, and a lower scatter-to-total ratio in critical image regions where the primary signal is very low. Scatter correction with the proposed BHA method is then applied to a ceramic specimen from power generation technologies. In the reconstructed CT volume, cupping almost completely vanishes and contrast is enhanced significantly.

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  20. Head-to-Head Evaluation of the Pro-Cite and Sci-Mate Bibliographic Database Management Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saari, David S.; Foster, George A., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Compares two full featured database management systems for bibliographic information in terms of programs and documentation; record creation and editing; online database citations; search procedures; access to references in external text files; sorting and printing functions; style sheets; indexes; and file operations. (four references) (CLB)

  1. Benchmarking a novel ultrasound-CT fusion system for respiratory motion management in radiotherapy: Assessment of spatio-temporal characteristics and comparison to 4DCT

    SciTech Connect

    Molloy, J. A.; Oldham, S. A.

    2008-01-15

    Management of respiratory motion during radiation therapy requires treatment planning and simulation using imaging modalities that possess sufficient spatio-temporal accuracy and precision. An investigation into the use of a novel ultrasound (United States) imaging system for assessment of respiratory motion is presented, exploiting its good soft tissue contrast and temporal precision. The system dynamically superimposes the appropriate image plane sampled from a reference CT data set with the corresponding US B-mode image. An articulating arm is used for spatial registration. While the focus of the study was to quantify the system's ability to track respiratory motion, certain unique spatial calibration procedures were devised that render the software potentially valuable to the general research community. These include direct access to all transformation matrix elements and image scaling factors, a manual latency correction function, and a three-point spatial registration procedure that allows the system to be used in any room possessing a traditional radiotherapy laser localization system. Counter-intuitively, it was discovered that a manual procedure for calibrating certain transformation matrix elements produced superior accuracy to that of an algorithmic Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method. The absolute spatial accuracy was verified by comparing the physical locations of phantom test objects measured using the spatially registered US system, and using data from a 3DCT scan of the phantom as a reference. The spatial accuracy of the display superposition was also tested in a similar manner. The system's dynamic properties were then assessed using three methods. First, the overall system response time was studied using a programmable motion phantom. This included US video update, articulating arm update, CT data set resampling, and image display. The next investigation verified the system's ability to measure the range of motion of a moving anatomical test

  2. PET/CT Dose Planning for Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiation Therapy (VMAT) -Comparison with Conventional Approach in Advanced Prostate Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Kairemo, Kalevi; Rasulova, Nigora; Kiljunen, Timo; Partanen, Kaarina; Kangasmäki, Aki; Joensuu, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging is the only way of defining biological target volume (BTV) for externalbeam radiation therapy (EBRT) and may be used for advanced targeting in dose planning and dose painting. There are, however, no reports about the EBRT response when dose planning is based on BTV target definition in advanced prostate cancer. Clinical and biochemical results of two clinically equal group of patients with advanced prostate cancer patients were compared. Both groups were treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) based on target definition by PET/CT (1(st) group) or conventional imaging (2(nd) group). Biochemical relapse occurred in 16.6% (in 1 out of 6) of the patients in the first group and 50% (3 out of 6) patients in the second group during the follow up period. Clinical manifestation of disease occurred in 33% (2 out of 6) patients of the first group and in 5 out of 6 (83,3%) patients in the second one. 4 patients in the first group had no biochemical relapse and no clinical manifestation during the follow up period. The difference in the duration of progression free period was statistically significant between the groups (p<0.010) being in the first group 16.5±5.4 (10-24) months and 4.6±2.9 (2-10) months in the second one. Because patients with PET/CT based VMAT had lower incidence of biochemical relapse, less clinical manifestations and longer, statistically significant duration of progression free period as compared to patients treated with VMAT based on conventional imaging, our preliminary results suggest introducing BTV definition based on PET imaging for VMAT in the EBRT of prostate cancer.

  3. 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the assessment of pulmonary solitary nodules: comparison of different analysis methods and risk variables in the prediction of malignancy

    PubMed Central

    García Vicente, Ana María; Honguero Martínez, Antonio Francisco; Jiménez Londoño, Germán Andrés; Vega Caicedo, Carlos Hugo; León Atance, Pablo; Soriano Castrejón, Ángel María

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the diagnostic performance of different metabolical, morphological and clinical criteria for correct presurgical classification of the solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN). Methods Fifty-five patients, with SPN were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent preoperative 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). Maximum diameter in CT, maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax), histopathologic result, age, smoking history and gender were obtained. Different criteria were established to classify a SPN as malignant: (I) visually detectable metabolism, (II) SUVmax >2.5 regardless of SPN diameter, (III) SUVmax threshold depending of SPN diameter, and (IV) ratio SUVmax/diameter greater than 1. For each criterion, statistical diagnostic parameters were obtained. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to select the best diagnostic SUVmax and SUVmax/diameter cutoff. Additionally, a predictive model of malignancy of the SPN was derived by multivariate logistic regression. Results Fifteen SPN (27.3%) were benign and 40 (72.7%) malignant. The mean values ± standard deviation (SD) of SPN diameter and SUVmax were 1.93±0.57 cm and 3.93±2.67 respectively. Sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of the different diagnostic criteria were (I): 97.5% and 13.1%; (II) 67.5% and 53.3%; (III) 70% and 53.3%; and (IV) 85% and 33.3%, respectively. The SUVmax cut-off value with the best diagnostic performance was 1.95 (Se: 80%; Sp: 53.3%). The predictive model had a Se of 87.5% and Sp of 46.7%. The SUVmax was independent variables to predict malignancy. Conclusions The assessment by semiquantitative methods did not improve the Se of visual analysis. The limited Sp was independent on the method used. However, the predictive model combining SUVmax and age was the best diagnostic approach. PMID:26207210

  4. Treatment of Adults With Treatment-Resistant Depression: Electroconvulsive Therapy Plus Antidepressant or Electroconvulsive Therapy Alone? Evidence From an Indirect Comparison Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Guo-Min; Tian, Xu; Shuai, Ting; Yi, Li-Juan; Zeng, Zi; Liu, Shuang; Zhou, Jian-Guo; Wang, Yan

    2015-07-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and antidepressant are the effective treatment alternatives for patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD); however, the effects and safety of the ECT plus antidepressant relative to ECT alone remain controversial. We decide to assess the potential of ECT plus antidepressant compared with ECT alone by undertaking an indirect comparison meta-analysis.Databases from PubMed, ISI Web of Science, CENTRAL, Clinicaltrials.gov, EMBASE, CBM (China Biomediccal Literatures Database), and CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure) were searched for relevant studies through November 21, 2014. Literature was screened, data were extracted and methodological quality of the eligible trial was assessed by 2 independent reviewers accordingly. Then, head-to-head and indirect comparison meta-analyses were carried out.A total of 17 studies which including 13 studies regarding ECT plus antidepressant versus antidepressant alone and 4 studies concerning ECT versus antidepressant alone containing a total of 1098 patients were incorporated into this meta-analysis. The head-to-head comparison suggested that response rate can be improved in the ECT plus antidepressant (RR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.55-2.14) and ECT alone group (RR, 2.24, 95% CI, 1.51-3.33) compared with antidepressant alone, respectively; adverse complications including memory deterioration and somatization were not significantly increased except incidence of memory deterioration in ECT plus antidepressant in the 4th weeks after treatment (RR, 0.09, 95% CI, 0.02-0.49). Indirect comparison meta-analysis showed that no significant differences were detected in response rate and memory deterioration between ECT plus antidepressant and ECT alone. However, ECT plus antidepressant increased the incidence of memory deterioration relative to ECT alone.With present evidence, the regime of ECT plus antidepressant should not be preferentially recommended to treat the patients with TRD relative to ECT

  5. Repositioning accuracy of two different mask systems-3D revisited: Comparison using true 3D/3D matching with cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit . E-mail: judit.boda-heggemann@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Walter, Cornelia; Rahn, Angelika; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Loeb, Iris; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: The repositioning accuracy of mask-based fixation systems has been assessed with two-dimensional/two-dimensional or two-dimensional/three-dimensional (3D) matching. We analyzed the accuracy of commercially available head mask systems, using true 3D/3D matching, with X-ray volume imaging and cone-beam CT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients receiving radiotherapy (intracranial/head-and-neck tumors) were evaluated (14 patients with rigid and 7 with thermoplastic masks). X-ray volume imaging was analyzed online and offline separately for the skull and neck regions. Translation/rotation errors of the target isocenter were analyzed. Four patients were treated to neck sites. For these patients, repositioning was aided by additional body tattoos. A separate analysis of the setup error on the basis of the registration of the cervical vertebra was performed. The residual error after correction and intrafractional motility were calculated. Results: The mean length of the displacement vector for rigid masks was 0.312 {+-} 0.152 cm (intracranial) and 0.586 {+-} 0.294 cm (neck). For the thermoplastic masks, the value was 0.472 {+-} 0.174 cm (intracranial) and 0.726 {+-} 0.445 cm (neck). Rigid masks with body tattoos had a displacement vector length in the neck region of 0.35 {+-} 0.197 cm. The intracranial residual error and intrafractional motility after X-ray volume imaging correction for rigid masks was 0.188 {+-} 0.074 cm, and was 0.134 {+-} 0.14 cm for thermoplastic masks. Conclusions: The results of our study have demonstrated that rigid masks have a high intracranial repositioning accuracy per se. Given the small residual error and intrafractional movement, thermoplastic masks may also be used for high-precision treatments when combined with cone-beam CT. The neck region repositioning accuracy was worse than the intracranial accuracy in both cases. However, body tattoos and image guidance improved the accuracy. Finally, the combination of both mask

  6. Factors affecting uncertainty in lung nodule volume estimation with CT: comparisons of findings from two estimation methods in a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Zeng, Rongping; Myers, Kyle J.; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    This work aimed to compare two different types of volume estimation methods (a model-based and a segmentationbased method) in terms of identifying factors affecting measurement uncertainty. Twenty-nine synthetic nodules with varying size, radiodensity, and shape were placed in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom and scanned with a 16- detector row CT scanner. Ten repeat scans were acquired using three exposures and two slice collimations, and were reconstructed with varying slice thicknesses. Nodule volumes were estimated from the reconstructed data using a matched-filter and a segmentation approach. Log transformed volumes were used to obtain measurement error with truth obtained through micro-CT. ANOVA and multiple linear regression were applied to measurement error to identify significant factors affecting volume estimation for each method. Root mean square of measurement errors (RMSE) for meaningful subgroups, repeatability coefficients (RC) for different imaging protocols, and reproducibility coefficients (RDC) for thin and thick collimation conditions were evaluated. Results showed that for both methods, nodule size, shape and slice thickness were significant factors. Collimation was significant for the matched-filter method. RMSEs for matched-filter measurements were in general smaller than segmentation. To achieve RMSE on the order of 15% or less for {5, 8, 9, 10mm} nodules, the corresponding maximum allowable slice thicknesses were {3, 5, 5, 5mm} for the matched-filter and {0.8, 3, 3, 3mm} for the segmentation method. RCs showed similar patterns for both methods, increasing with slice thickness. For 8-10mm nodules, the measurements were highly repeatable provided the slice thickness was ≤3mm, regardless of method and across varying acquisition conditions. RDCs were lower for thin collimation than thick collimation protocols. While RDC of matched filter volume estimation results was always lower than segmentation results, for 8-10mm nodules with thin

  7. Prospective Evaluation of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) Algorithm in Abdominal CT: A comparison of reduced dose with standard dose imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Kim, David H.; Tang, Jie; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively study CT dose reduction using the “prior image constrained compressed sensing” (PICCS) reconstruction technique. Methods Immediately following routine standard dose (SD) abdominal MDCT, 50 patients (mean age, 57.7 years; mean BMI, 28.8) underwent a second reduced-dose (RD) scan (targeted dose reduction, 70-90%). DLP, CTDIvol and SSDE were compared. Several reconstruction algorithms (FBP, ASIR, and PICCS) were applied to the RD series. SD images with FBP served as reference standard. Two blinded readers evaluated each series for subjective image quality and focal lesion detection. Results Mean DLP, CTDIvol, and SSDE for RD series was 140.3 mGy*cm (median 79.4), 3.7 mGy (median 1.8), and 4.2 mGy (median 2.3) compared with 493.7 mGy*cm (median 345.8), 12.9 mGy (median 7.9 mGy) and 14.6 mGy (median 10.1) for SD series, respectively. Mean effective patient diameter was 30.1 cm (median 30), which translates to a mean SSDE reduction of 72% (p<0.001). RD-PICCS image quality score was 2.8±0.5, improved over the RD-FBP (1.7±0.7) and RD-ASIR(1.9±0.8)(p<0.001), but lower than SD (3.5±0.5)(p<0.001). Readers detected 81% (184/228) of focal lesions on RD-PICCS series, versus 67% (153/228) and 65% (149/228) for RD-FBP and RD-ASIR, respectively. Mean image noise was significantly reduced on RD-PICCS series (13.9 HU) compared with RD-FBP (57.2) and RD-ASIR (44.1) (p<0.001). Conclusion PICCS allows for marked dose reduction at abdominal CT with improved image quality and diagnostic performance over reduced-dose FBP and ASIR. Further study is needed to determine indication-specific dose reduction levels that preserve acceptable diagnostic accuracy relative to higher-dose protocols. PMID:24943136

  8. Comparison on Response and Dissolution Rates Between Ursodeoxycholic Acid Alone or in Combination With Chenodeoxycholic Acid for Gallstone Dissolution According to Stone Density on CT Scan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Min; Hyun, Jong Jin; Choi, In Young; Yeom, Suk Keu; Kim, Seung Young; Jung, Sung Woo; Jung, Young Kul; Koo, Ja Seol; Yim, Hyung Joon; Lee, Hong Sik; Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Chang Duck

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Medical dissolution of gallstone is usually performed on radiolucent gallstones in a functioning gallbladder. However, absence of visible gallstone on plain abdominal x-ray does not always preclude calcification. This study aims to compare the response and dissolution rates between ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) alone or in combination with chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) according to stone density on computed tomography (CT) scan. A total of 126 patients underwent dissolution therapy with either UDCA alone or combination of CDCA and UDCA (CNU) from December 2010 to March 2014 at Korea University Ansan Hospital. In the end, 81 patients (CNU group = 44, UDCA group = 37) completed dissolution therapy for 6 months. Dissolution rate (percentage reduction in the gallstone volume) and response to therapy (complete dissolution or partial dissolution defined as reduction in stone volume of >50%) were compared between the 2 groups. Dissolution and response rates of sludge was also compared between the 2 groups. The overall response rate was 50.6% (CNU group 43.2% vs UDCA group 59.5%, P = 0.14), and the overall dissolution rate was 48.34% (CNU group 41.5% vs UDCA group 56.5%, P = 0.13). When analyzed according to stone density, response rate was 33.3%, 87.1%, 30.0%, and 6.2% for hypodense, isodense, hyperdense, and calcified stones, respectively. Response rate (85.7% vs 88.2%, P = 0.83) and dissolution rate (81.01% vs 85.38%, P = 0.17) of isodense stones were similar between CNU and UDCA group. When only sludge was considered, the overall response rate was 87.5% (CNU group 71.4% vs UDCA group 94.1%, P = 0.19), and the overall dissolution rate was 85.42% (CNU group 67.9% vs UDCA group 92.7%, P = 0.23). Patients with isodense gallstones and sludge showed much better response to dissolution therapy with CNU and UDCA showing comparable efficacy. Therefore, CT scan should be performed before medication therapy if stone dissolution is intended

  9. High-pitch coronary CT angiography at 70 kVp with low contrast medium volume: comparison of 80 and 100 kVp high-pitch protocols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Qi, Li; De Cecco, Carlo N; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Spearman, James V; Schoepf, U Joseph; Lu, Guang Ming

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate image quality and radiation dose of prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered high-pitch coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) at 70 kVp and 30 mL contrast medium.One hundred fifty patients with a heart rate ≤70 beats per minute (bpm) underwent CCTA using a second-generation dual-source computed tomography (CT) scanner and were randomized into 3 groups according to tube voltage and contrast medium volume (370 mg/mL iodine concentration) (100 kVp group, 100 kVp/60 mL, n = 55; 80 kVp group, 80 kVp/60 mL, n = 44; 70 kVp group, 70 kVp/30 mL, n = 51). Objective and subjective image quality along with the effect of heart rate (HR) and body mass index (BMI) was evaluated and compared between the groups. Radiation dose was estimated for each patient.CT attenuation and image noise were higher in the 80 and 70 kVp groups than in the 100 kVp group (all P < 0.001). Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were lower in the 70 kVp group than in the 80 and 100 kVp groups (all P < 0.05). There was no difference for subjective image quality between the groups (P > 0.05). HR did not affect subjective image quality (all P > 0.05), while patients with BMI <23 kg/m had higher image quality than patients with BMI ≥23 kg/m (P < 0.05). Compared with the 100 kVp group, the radiation dose of the 70 kVp group was reduced by 75%.In conclusion, prospectively ECG-triggered high-pitch 70 kVp/30 mL CCTA can obtain diagnostic image quality with lower radiation dose in selected patients with BMI <23 kg/m compared with 80/100 kVp/60 mL CCTA. PMID:25396334

  10. ProTaper and WaveOne systems three-dimensional comparison of device parameters after the shaping technique. A micro-CT study on simulated root canals

    PubMed Central

    Dioguardi, Mario; Troiano, Giuseppe; Laino, Luigi; Russo, Lucio Lo; Giannatempo, Giovanni; Lauritano, Floriana; Cicciù, Marco; Muzio, Lorenzo Lo

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to highlights possible differences in the volume of shaping and canal surface area after the using of common endodontic devices ProTaper Universal and WaveOne systems. Methods: Forty ISO 15, 0.02 taper, S-shaped endo-training Blocks (Dentsply, Maillefer) were assigned in two groups (n = 20 for each group). For each block the initial working length (WL) was evaluated with a 10 K-files (Dentsply Maillefer), so the glide path was created with PathFile 1, 2 and 3 (Dentsply Maillefer) at the WL. After that, simulated canals in the group 1 were shaped with S1, S2, F1 and F2 at WL; while in group 2 it was used single-file WaveOne primary in reciprocating motion. After shaping, the resin blocks were analysed with Skyscan 1172 scanner (Skyscan, Kontich, Belgium) and then volumetrically at a source voltage of 65 kV and a source current of 153 uA. Results: No statistically differences (P > 0.05) have been found in terms of volume and surface area after the use of ProTaper Universal and WaveOne systems. Conclusions: Although, results from micro-CT analysis revealed that Wave One result in a decrease of volume and surface area of shaping than ProTaper Universal, differences are not statistically significant. PMID:26770376

  11. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  12. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-04

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  13. CT appearance of splenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  14. Evaluation of the cone beam CT for internal target volume localization in lung stereotactic radiotherapy in comparison with 4D MIP images

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lu; Chen, Xiaoming; Lin, Mu-Han; Lin, Teh; Fan, Jiajin; Jin, Lihui; Ma, Charlie M.; Xue, Jun

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether the three-dimensional cone-beam CT (CBCT) is clinically equivalent to the four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstructed images for internal target volume (ITV) localization in image-guided lung stereotactic radiotherapy.Methods: A ball-shaped polystyrene phantom with built-in cube, sphere, and cone of known volumes was attached to a motor-driven platform, which simulates a sinusoidal movement with changeable motion amplitude and frequency. Target motion was simulated in the patient in a superior-inferior (S-I) direction with three motion periods and 2 cm peak-to-peak amplitudes. The Varian onboard Exact-Arms kV CBCT system and the GE LightSpeed four-slice CT integrated with the respiratory-position-management 4DCT scanner were used to scan the moving phantom. MIP images were generated from the 4DCT images. The clinical equivalence of the two sets of images was evaluated by comparing the extreme locations of the moving objects along the motion direction, the centroid position of the ITV, and the ITV volumes that were contoured automatically by Velocity or calculated with an imaging gradient method. The authors compared the ITV volumes determined by the above methods with those theoretically predicted by taking into account the physical object dimensions and the motion amplitudes. The extreme locations were determined by the gradient method along the S-I axis through the center of the object. The centroid positions were determined by autocenter functions. The effect of motion period on the volume sizes was also studied.Results: It was found that the extreme locations of the objects determined from the two image modalities agreed with each other satisfactorily. They were not affected by the motion period. The average difference between the two modalities in the extreme locations was 0.68% for the cube, 1.35% for the sphere, and 0.5% for the cone, respectively. The maximum difference in the

  15. Radical Prostatectomy versus External Beam Radiotherapy for cT1-4N0M0 Prostate Cancer: Comparison of Patient Outcomes Including Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Satoru; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Morikawa, Teppei; Kakutani, Shigenori; Takeshima, Yuta; Miyazaki, Hideyo; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Tohru; Kume, Haruki; Homma, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Background Although radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) have been considered as comparable treatments for localized prostate cancer (PC), it is controversial which treatment is better. The present study aimed to compare outcomes, including mortality, of RP and EBRT for localized PC. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 891 patients with cT1-4N0M0 PC who underwent either RP (n = 569) or EBRT (n = 322) with curative intent at our single institution between 2005 and 2012. Of the EBRT patients, 302 (93.8%) underwent intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). Related to these, other-cause mortality (OCM) was also calculated. Biochemical recurrence-free survival was assessed as a secondary endpoint. Cox proportional hazards model was used for multivariate analysis. Results Median follow-up durations were 53 and 45 months, and median ages were 66 and 70 years (P <0.0001), in the RP and EBRT groups, respectively. As a whole, significantly better prognoses of the RP group than the EBRT group were observed for both OS and CSS, although OCM was significantly higher in the EBRT group. There was no death from PC in men with low and intermediate D’Amico risks, except one with intermediate-risk in the EBRT group. In high-risk patients, significantly more patients died from PC in the EBRT group than the RP group. Multivariate analysis demonstrated the RP group to be an independent prognostic factor for better CSS. On the other hand, the EBRT group had a significantly longer biochemical recurrence-free survival than the RP group. Conclusions Mortality outcomes of both RP and EBRT were generally favorable in low and intermediate risk patients. Improvement of CSS in high risk patients was seen in patients receiving RP over those receiving EBRT. PMID:26506569

  16. Prospective versus retrospective ECG-gated 64-detector coronary CT angiography for evaluation of coronary artery bypass graft patency: comparison of image quality, radiation dose and diagnostic accuracy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hwan; Chun, Eun Ju; Choi, Sang Il; Vembar, Mani; Lim, Cheong; Park, Kay-Hyun; Choi, Dong-Ju

    2011-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate image quality, radiation dose and diagnostic accuracy of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) with a prospectively gated transverse-axial scan (PGT) compared with a retrospectively gated helical scan (RGH), using a 64-slice scanner in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Of the 131 consecutive patients that underwent CABG using 64-slice multidetector row computed tomography during 2008, patients with heart rate (HR) of <75 beats/minute (bpm), and HR variation <10 bpm were included in the study. PGT was performed on 39 patients with 93 grafts, with RGH performed on 43 patients with 102 grafts. Image quality (1: excellent-4: poor) and estimated radiation dose were compared between the two groups. Of these, a total of 64 segments in 26 patients were subjected to invasive coronary angiography (ICA) for clinical reasons. Diagnostic accuracy of CCTA for evaluation of graft was performed between the two groups with ICA as a reference standard in terms of significant stenosis (≥ 50% of luminal stenosis). The image quality was not statistically different in the two groups. Mean effective radiation dose was 6.5 mSv in PGT-group, which was significantly lower than that in the RGH-group (21.2 mSv; P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between the two groups (PGT-group versus RGH-group; 93.1% versus 91.4%). PGT can achieve dose reductions of up to 70% compared to RGH while maintaining image quality and high diagnostic accuracy in patients undergoing CABG. PMID:21678128

  17. CT angiography of neonates and infants: comparison of radiation dose and image quality of target mode prospectively ECG-gated 320-MDCT and ungated helical 64-MDCT.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Siddharth P; Golriz, Farahnaz; Atweh, Lamya A; Zhang, Wei; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose and image quality of target mode prospectively ECG-gated volumetric CT angiography (CTA) performed with a 320-MDCT scanner compared with the radiation dose and image quality of ungated helical CTA performed with a 64-MDCT scanner. MATERIALS AND METHODS. An experience with CTA for cardiovascular indications in neonates and infants 0-6 months old was retrospectively assessed. Radiation doses and quantitative and qualitative image quality scores of 28 CTA examinations performed with a 320-MDCT scanner and volumetric target mode prospective ECG gating plus iterative reconstruction (target mode) were compared with the doses and scores of 28 CTA examinations performed with a 64-MDCT scanner and ungated helical scanning plus filtered back projection reconstruction (ungated mode). All target mode studies were performed during free breathing. Seven ungated CTA examinations (25%) were performed with general endotracheal anesthesia. The findings of 17 preoperative CTA examinations performed in target mode were also compared with surgical reports for evaluation of diagnostic accuracy. RESULTS. All studies performed with target mode technique were diagnostic for the main clinical indication. Effective doses were significantly lower in the target mode group (0.51 ± 0.19 mSv) compared with the ungated mode group (4.8 ± 1.4 mSv) (p < 0.0001). Quantitative analysis revealed no statistically significant difference between the two groups with respect to signal-to-noise ratio (of pulmonary artery and aorta) and contrast-to-noise ratio. Subjective image quality was significantly better with target mode than with ungated mode (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION. Target mode prospectively ECG-gated volumetric scanning with iterative reconstruction performed with a 320-MDCT scanner has several benefits in cardiovascular imaging of neonates and infants, including low radiation dose, improved image quality, high diagnostic

  18. In vitro description of a new technique for stapled side-to-side jejunocecal anastomosis in horses and CT scan anatomical comparison with other techniques

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Stapled jejunocecal anastomoses are commonly performed in equine abdominal surgery. They carry higher complication rates compared to handsewn techniques. In human surgery various causes likely to lead to failure of stapled techniques have been evaluated, including staple line failure. Recently Freeman proposed a technique to perform a stapled jejunocecal anastomosis in horses while avoiding blind pouch formation. The aim of this study is to describe a method for stapled side-to-side jejunocecal anastomosis in horses and to compare it with other techniques with computed tomography to assess stomal area, shape and blind pouch size. Methods Intestinal specimens comprising the cecum, ileum and jejunum from 18 horses were collected and were divided into three groups. In Group S a standard stapled side-to-side jejunocecal anastomosis was performed. In Group F the anastomosis was performed using a modified technique proposed by Freeman. In Group G the anastomosis was performed with a modified technique proposed by the authors. Inflated bowel segments were CT scanned to obtain a MultiPlanar Reconstruction of the stoma and afferent small intestine before calculating the cross-sectional area of each of these regions. The ratio of the measured areas was compared between the three techniques. The volume of the blind-end pouch was measured and its ratio with the intestinal area compared between techniques. The cecum was opened and the length of the stoma measured with a caliper and compared to the intended initial length. Results The stomal/intestinal area ratio was not significantly different between techniques. No statistically significant difference was found in the stomal ideal/real perimeter ratio. There was no statistically significant difference in the intended/real stomal length ratio, and all techniques featured an increase in stomal length ranging from 2 to 12 %. Blind pouch formation was a consistent finding in Group S and was virtually absent in Groups F

  19. Comparison of the effectiveness of using the optic strut and tuberculum sellae as radiological landmarks in diagnosing paraclinoid aneurysms with CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chih-Hsiang; Lin, Chung-Jung; Lin, Chun-Fu; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Min-Hsiung; Hsu, Sanford P C; Shih, Yang-Hsin

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The treatment of paraclinoid aneurysms remains challenging. It is important to determine the exact location of the paraclinoid aneurysm when considering treatment options. The authors herein evaluated the effectiveness of using the optic strut (OS) and tuberculum sellae (TS) as radiographic landmarks for distinguishing between intradural and extradural paraclinoid aneurysms on source images from CT angiography (CTA). METHODS Between January 2010 and September 2013, a total of 49 surgical patients with the preoperative diagnoses of paraclinoid aneurysm and 1 symptomatic cavernous-clinoid aneurysm were retrospectively identified. With the source images from CTA, the OS and the TS were used as landmarks to predict the location of the paraclinoid aneurysm and its relation to the distal dural ring (DDR). The operative findings were examined to confirm the definitive location of the paraclinoid aneurysm. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the diagnostic effectiveness of the landmarks. RESULTS Nineteen patients without preoperative CTA were excluded. The remaining 30 patients comprised the current study. The intraoperative findings confirmed 12 intradural, 12 transitional, and 6 extradural paraclinoid aneurysms, the diagnoses of which were significantly related to the type of aneurysm (p < 0.05) but not factors like sex, age, laterality of aneurysm, or relation of the aneurysm to the ophthalmic artery on digital subtraction angiography. To measure agreement with the correct diagnosis, the OS as a reference point was far superior to the TS (Cohen's kappa coefficients 0.462 and 0.138 for the OS and the TS, respectively). For paraclinoid aneurysms of the medial or posterior type, using the base of the OS as a reference point tended to overestimate intradural paraclinoid aneurysms. The receiver operating characteristic curve indicated that if the aneurysmal neck traverses the axial plane 2 mm above the base of the OS, the aneurysm is most likely to grow

  20. Image quality of CT angiography with model-based iterative reconstruction in young children with congenital heart disease: comparison with filtered back projection and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Son, Sung Sil; Choo, Ki Seok; Jeon, Ung Bae; Jeon, Gye Rok; Nam, Kyung Jin; Kim, Tae Un; Yeom, Jeong A; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Jeong, Dong Wook; Lim, Soo Jin

    2015-06-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the image quality of CT angiography (CTA) reconstructed by model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) and to compare this with images obtained by filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) in newborns and infants with congenital heart disease (CHD). Thirty-seven children (age 4.8 ± 3.7 months; weight 4.79 ± 0.47 kg) with suspected CHD underwent CTA on a 64detector MDCT without ECG gating (80 kVp, 40 mA using tube current modulation). Total dose length product was recorded in all patients. Images were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Objective image qualities (density, noise) were measured in the great vessels and heart chambers. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated by measuring the density and noise of myocardial walls. Two radiologists evaluated images for subjective noise, diagnostic confidence, and sharpness at the level prior to the first branch of the main pulmonary artery. Images were compared with respect to reconstruction method, and reconstruction times were measured. Images from all patients were diagnostic, and the effective dose was 0.22 mSv. The objective image noise of MBIR was significantly lower than those of FBP and ASIR in the great vessels and heart chambers (P < 0.05); however, with respect to attenuations in the four chambers, ascending aorta, descending aorta, and pulmonary trunk, no statistically significant difference was observed among the three methods (P > 0.05). Mean CNR values were 8.73 for FBP, 14.54 for ASIR, and 22.95 for MBIR. In addition, the subjective image noise of MBIR was significantly lower than those of the others (P < 0.01). Furthermore, while FBP had the highest score for image sharpness, ASIR had the highest score for diagnostic confidence (P < 0.05), and mean reconstruction times were 5.1 ± 2.3 s for FBP and ASIR and 15.1 ± 2.4 min for MBIR. While CTA with MBIR in newborns and infants with CHD can reduce image noise and

  1. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  2. SU-E-J-47: Comparison of Online Image Registrations of Varian TrueBeam Cone-Beam CT and BrainLab ExacTrac Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J; Shi, W; Andrews, D; Werner-Wasik, M; Yu, Y; Liu, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To compare online image registrations of TrueBeam cone-beam CT (CBCT) and BrainLab ExacTrac imaging systems. Methods Tests were performed on a Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator (Version 2.0), which is integrated with a BrainLab ExacTrac imaging system (Version 6.0.5). The study was focused on comparing the online image registrations for translational shifts. A Rando head phantom was placed on treatment couch and immobilized with a BrainLab mask. The phantom was shifted by moving the couch translationally for 8 mm with a step size of 1 mm, in vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. At each location, the phantom was imaged with CBCT and ExacTrac x-ray. CBCT images were registered with TrueBeam and ExacTrac online registration algorithms, respectively. And ExacTrac x-ray image registrations were performed. Shifts calculated from different registrations were compared with nominal couch shifts. Results The averages and ranges of absolute differences between couch shifts and calculated phantom shifts obtained from ExacTrac x-ray registration, ExacTrac CBCT registration with default window, ExaxTrac CBCT registration with adjusted window (bone), Truebeam CBCT registration with bone window, and Truebeam CBCT registration with soft tissue window, were: 0.07 (0.02–0.14), 0.14 (0.01–0.35), 0.12 (0.02–0.28), 0.09 (0–0.20), and 0.06 (0–0.10) mm, in vertical direction; 0.06 (0.01–0.12), 0.27 (0.07–0.57), 0.23 (0.02–0.48), 0.04 (0–0.10), and 0.08 (0– 0.20) mm, in longitudinal direction; 0.05 (0.01–0.21), 0.35 (0.14–0.80), 0.25 (0.01–0.56), 0.19 (0–0.40), and 0.20 (0–0.40) mm, in lateral direction. Conclusion The shifts calculated from ExacTrac x-ray and TrueBeam CBCT registrations were close to each other (the differences between were less than 0.40 mm in any direction), and had better agreements with couch shifts than those from ExacTrac CBCT registrations. There were no significant differences between True

  3. Accuracy of Ultrasound-Based Image Guidance for Daily Positioning of the Upper Abdomen: An Online Comparison With Cone Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit Mennemeyer, Philipp; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Riesenacker, Nadja; Kuepper, Beate; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy can improve protection of organs at risk when large abdominal target volumes are irradiated. We estimated the daily positioning accuracy of ultrasound-based image guidance for abdominal target volumes by a direct comparison of daily imaging obtained with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Daily positioning (n = 83 positionings) of 15 patients was completed by using ultrasound guidance after an initial CBCT was obtained. Residual error after ultrasound was estimated by comparison with a second CBCT. Ultrasound image quality was visually rated using a scale of 1 to 4. Results: Of 15 patients, 7 patients had good sonographic imaging quality, 5 patients had satisfactory sonographic quality, and 3 patients were excluded because of unsatisfactory sonographic quality. When image quality was good, residual errors after ultrasound were -0.1 {+-} 3.11 mm in the x direction (left-right; group systematic error M = -0.09 mm; standard deviation [SD] of systematic error, {sigma} = 1.37 mm; SD of the random error, {sigma} = 2.99 mm), 0.93 {+-} 4.31 mm in the y direction (superior-inferior, M = 1.12 mm; {sigma} = 2.96 mm; {sigma} = 3.39 mm), and 0.71 {+-} 3.15 mm in the z direction (anteroposterior; M = 1.01 mm; {sigma} = 2.46 mm; {sigma} = 2.24 mm). For patients with satisfactory image quality, residual error after ultrasound was -0.6 {+-} 5.26 mm in the x (M = 0.07 mm; {sigma} = 5.67 mm; {sigma} = 4.86 mm), 1.76 {+-} 4.92 mm in the y (M = 3.54 mm; {sigma} = 4.1 mm; {sigma} = 5.29 mm), and 1.19 {+-} 4.75 mm in the z (M = 0.82 mm; {sigma} = 2.86 mm; {sigma} = 3.05 mm) directions. Conclusions: In patients from whom good sonographic image quality could be obtained, ultrasound improved daily positioning accuracy. In the case of satisfactory image quality, ultrasound guidance improved accuracy compared to that of skin marks only minimally. If sonographic image quality was unsatisfactory, daily CBCT

  4. PET/CT-Based Dosimetry in 90Y-Microsphere Selective Internal Radiation Therapy: Single Cohort Comparison With Pretreatment Planning on 99mTc-MAA Imaging and Correlation With Treatment Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yoo Sung; Paeng, Jin Chul; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Keon Wook

    2015-01-01

    Abstract 90Y PET/CT can be acquired after 90Y-microsphere selective radiation internal therapy (SIRT) to describe radioactivity distribution. We performed dosimetry using 90Y-microsphere PET/CT data to evaluate treatment efficacy and appropriateness of activity planning from 99mTc-MAA scan and SPECT/CT. Twenty-three patients with liver malignancy were included in the study. 99mTc-MAA was injected during planning angiography and whole body 99mTc-MAA scan and liver SPECT/CT were acquired. After SIRT using 90Y-resin microsphere, 90Y-microsphere PET/CT was acquired. A partition model (PM) using 4 compartments (tumor, intarget normal liver, out-target normal liver, and lung) was adopted, and absorbed dose to each compartment was calculated based on measurements from 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT and 90Y-microsphere PET/CT, respectively, to be compared with each other. Progression-free survival (PFS) was evaluated in terms of tumor absorbed doses calculated by 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT and 90Y-microsphere PET/CT results. Lung shunt fraction was overestimated on 99mTc-MAA scan compared with 90Y-microsphere PET/CT (0.060 ± 0.037 vs. 0.018 ± 0.026, P < 0.01). Tumor absorbed dose exhibited a close correlation between the results from 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT and 90Y-microsphere PET/CT (r = 0.64, P < 0.01), although the result from 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT was significantly lower than that from 90Y-microsphere PET/CT (135.4 ± 64.2 Gy vs. 185.0 ± 87.8 Gy, P < 0.01). Absorbed dose to in-target normal liver was overestimated on 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT compared with PET/CT (62.6 ± 38.2 Gy vs. 45.2 ± 32.0 Gy, P = 0.02). Absorbed dose to out-target normal liver did not differ between 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT and 90Y-microsphere PET/CT (P = 0.49). Patients with tumor absorbed dose >200 Gy on 90Y-microsphere PET/CT had longer PFS than those with tumor absorbed dose ≤200 Gy (286 ± 56 days vs. 92 ± 20 days, P = 0.046). Tumor absorbed dose calculated by 99m

  5. Future generation CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Walter, Deborah; De Man, Bruno; Iatrou, Maria; Edic, Peter M

    2004-02-01

    X-ray CT technology has been available for more than 30 years, yet continued technological advances have kept CT imaging at the forefront of medical imaging innovation. Consequently, the number of clinical CT applications has increased steadily. Other imaging modalities might be superior to CT imaging for some specific applications, but no other single modality is more often used in chest imaging today. Future technological developments in the area of high-resolution detectors, high-capacity x-ray tubes, advanced reconstruction algorithms, and improved visualization techniques will continue to expand the imaging capability. Future CT imaging technology will combine improved imaging capability with advanced and specific computer-assisted tools, which will expand the usefulness of CT imaging in many areas.

  6. PET/CT artifacts.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, Todd M; Mehta, Ajeet S; Mehta, Amar S; Laymon, Charles M; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W

    2011-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in positron emission tomography/computed tomographic (PET/CT) imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for AC. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT.

  7. Esophageal carcinoma: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Quint, L.E.; Glazer, G.M.; Orringer, M.B.; Gross, B.H.

    1985-04-01

    Preoperative CT scans of 33 patients with esophageal cancer were reviewed to assess staging accuracy and define the role of CT in patients being considered for transhiatal blunt esophagectomy. Surgical and pathological verification was obtained in all cases. Only 13 tumors were staged correctly according to the TNM classification. In addition, CT was not useful in assessing resectability because of its low accuracy in evaluating aortic invasion and the fact that few patients had tracheobronchial or aortic invasion or hepatic metastases at presentation.

  8. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  9. Prognostic Value of FDG-PET, Based on the Revised Response Criteria, in Patients with Malignant Lymphoma: A Comparison with CT/MRI Evaluations, Based on the International Working Group/Cotswolds Meeting Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Isohashi, Kayako; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Kato, Hiroki; Fukushima, Kentaro; Maeda, Tetsuo; Watabe, Tadashi; Shimosegawa, Eku; Kanakura, Yuzuru; Hatazawa, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Post-treatment evaluations by CT/MRI (based on the International Working Group/Cotswolds meeting guidelines) and PET (based on Revised Response Criteria), were examined in terms of progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with malignant lymphoma (ML). Methods: 79 patients, undergoing CT/MRI for the examination of suspected lesions and whole-body PET/CT before and after therapy, were included in the study during April 2007-January 2013. The relationship between post-treatment evaluations (CT/MRI and PET) and PFS during the follow-up period was examined, using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The patients were grouped according to the histological type into Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and other histological types. The association between post-treatment evaluations (PET or PET combined with CT/MRI) and PFS was examined separately. Moreover, the relationship between disease recurrence and serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor, lactic dehydrogenase, and C-reactive protein levels was evaluated before and after the treatment. Results: Patients with incomplete remission on both CT/MRI and PET had a significantly shorter PFS, compared to patients with complete remission on both CT/MRI and PET and those exhibiting incomplete remission on CT/MRI and complete remission on PET (P<0.001). Post-treatment PET evaluations were strongly correlated with patient outcomes in cases with HL or DLBCL (P<0.01) and other histological types (P<0.001). In patients with HL or DLBCL, incomplete remission on both CT/MRI and PET was associated with a significantly shorter PFS, compared to patients with complete remission on both CT/MRI and PET (P<0.05) and those showing incomplete remission on CT/MRI and complete remission on PET (P<0.01). In patients with other histological types, incomplete remission on both CT/MRI and PET was associated with a significantly shorter PFS, compared to cases with complete remission on both CT/MRI and PET (P<0

  10. Comparison of {sup 18}F-Fluorothymidine and {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in Delineating Gross Tumor Volume by Optimal Threshold in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Thoracic Esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Han Dali; Yu Jinming; Yu Yonghua; Zhang Guifang; Zhong Xiaojun; Lu Jie; Yin Yong; Fu Zheng; Mu Dianbin; Zhang Baijiang; He Wei; Huo Zhijun; Liu Xijun; Kong Lei; Zhao Shuqiang; Sun Xiangyu

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the optimal method of using {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) simulation to delineate the gross tumor volume (GTV) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma verified by pathologic examination and compare the results with those using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT. Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients were enrolled and underwent both FLT and FDG PET/CT. The GTVs with biologic information were delineated using seven different methods in FLT PET/CT and three different methods in FDG PET/CT. The results were compared with the pathologic gross tumor length, and the optimal threshold was obtained. Next, we compared the simulation plans using the optimal threshold of FLT and FDG PET/CT. The radiation dose was prescribed as 60 Gy in 30 fractions with a precise radiotherapy technique. Results: The mean +- standard deviation pathologic gross tumor length was 4.94 +- 2.21 cm. On FLT PET/CT, the length of the standardized uptake value 1.4 was 4.91 +- 2.43 cm. On FDG PET/CT, the length of the standardized uptake value 2.5 was 5.10 +- 2.18 cm, both of which seemed more approximate to the pathologic gross tumor length. The differences in the bilateral lung volume receiving >=20 Gy, heart volume receiving >=40 Gy, and the maximal dose received by spinal cord between FLT and FDG were not significant. However, the values for mean lung dose, bilateral lung volume receiving >=5, >=10, >=30, >=40, and >=50 Gy, mean heart dose, and heart volume receiving >=30 Gy using FLT PET/CT-based planning were significant lower than those using FDG PET/CT. Conclusion: A standardized uptake value cutoff of 1.4 on FLT PET/CT and one of 2.5 on FDG PET/CT provided the closest estimation of GTV length. Finally, FLT PET/CT-based treatment planning provided potential benefits to the lungs and heart.

  11. [CT-expo--a novel program for dose evaluation in CT].

    PubMed

    Stamm, G; Nagel, H D

    2002-12-01

    CT-Expo is a novel MS Excel application for assessing the radiation doses delivered to patients undergoing CT examinations, based on computational methods that were used to analyze the data collected in the German survey on CT practice in 1999. The program enables the calculation of all dose quantities of practical value, such as axial dose free-in-air, weighted CTDI, dose-length product, effective dose and uterine dose. In contrast to existing programs for CT dose assessment, CT-Expo offers a number of unique features, such as gender-specific dose calculation for all age groups (adults, children, newborns), applicability to all existing scanner models including correction of scanner-specific influences, and the possibility of comparison with the results from the German CT survey on CT practice. Three different application modules offer free and standardized dose calculations as well as a comprehensive benchmarking section including guidance on dose optimization. The program is available as shareware in both German and English version. Additional information and a demo version free of charge can be requested via e-mail from the author's address stamm.georg@mh-hannover. de) or from the web page http://www.mh-hannover.de/kliniken/radiologie/str_04.html.

  12. CT of Gastric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guniganti, Preethi; Bradenham, Courtney H; Raptis, Constantine; Menias, Christine O; Mellnick, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms among adult patients seeking care in the emergency department, and, with the increased use of computed tomography (CT) to image patients with these complaints, radiologists will more frequently encounter a variety of emergent gastric pathologic conditions on CT studies. Familiarity with the CT appearance of emergent gastric conditions is important, as the clinical presentation is often nonspecific and the radiologist may be the first to recognize gastric disease as the cause of a patient's symptoms. Although endoscopy and barium fluoroscopy remain important tools for evaluating patients with suspected gastric disease in the outpatient setting, compared with CT these modalities enable less comprehensive evaluation of patients with nonspecific complaints and are less readily available in the acute setting. Endoscopy is also more invasive than CT and has greater potential risks. Although the mucosal detail of CT is relatively poor compared with barium fluoroscopy or endoscopy, CT can be used with the appropriate imaging protocols to identify inflammatory conditions of the stomach ranging from gastritis to peptic ulcer disease. In addition, CT can readily demonstrate the various complications of gastric disease, including perforation, obstruction, and hemorrhage, which may direct further clinical, endoscopic, or surgical management. We will review the normal anatomy of the stomach and discuss emergent gastric disease with a focus on the usual clinical presentation, typical imaging appearance, and differentiating features, as well as potential imaging pitfalls.

  13. A method for benchmarking CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Al-Farsi, A; Michael, G; Thiele, D

    2005-09-01

    This study involved the development of an objective method to compare the performance of five CT scanners for the purpose of benchmarking. The method used to assess the scanners was to determine the dose-normalised noise at a spatial resolution of 5.5 cm(-1). This gave a dose-normalised percent noise between 0.37% and 0.76%. The scanners were also assessed for radiation dose to patients undergoing abdomen and head CT examinations. Patients' dose-length product (DLP) for the abdomen clinical examinations varied from 305 to 685 mGy-cm, and for the head clinical examinations from 333 to 900 mGy-cm. The study results demonstrated that the comparison of dose and spatial resolution normalised percent noise levels is a useful method of comparing CT scanner performance.

  14. The utility of dual bioelectrical impedance analysis in detecting intra-abdominal fat area in obese patients during weight reduction therapy in comparison with waist circumference and abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Yamakage, Hajime; Ito, Ryo; Tochiya, Mayu; Muranaka, Kazuya; Tanaka, Masashi; Matsuo, Yoshiyuki; Odori, Shinji; Kono, Shigeo; Shimatsu, Akira; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    An increase in intra-abdominal fat area (IAFA) is an essential component of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Waist circumference (WC) is not a precise measure of IAFA, and computed tomography (CT) is unsuitable for frequent monitoring. Here, we examined utility of a dual bioelectrical impedance analysis (Dual BIA) for measuring IAFA in obese patients during weight reduction. Fat distribution was measured by Dual BIA and CT in 100 obese outpatients. All fat areas including total, IAFA, and subcutaneous fat by Dual BIA were more closely correlated with those by CT than WC. Estimated IAFA by Dual BIA was significantly correlated with number of MetS components as well as CT, but WC was not. Furthermore, in 61 obese patients who received 6-month weight reduction therapy, estimated IAFA by Dual BIA showed an earlier and greater decrease as well as that by CT than WC and BMI. In addition, decrease in estimated IAFA by Dual BIA through weight reduction had a higher correlation with decrease in IAFA by CT, than WC. This study is the first to demonstrate that the change in estimated IAFA by Dual BIA was highly correlated with that in IAFA by CT during weight reduction therapy. Our findings also indicate that estimated IAFA by Dual BIA is, potentially, a better indicator of severity of MetS, cardiovascular risk factors, and effectiveness of weight reduction than WC, and equal to IAFA by CT. Estimated IAFA by Dual BIA may be useful for monitoring the effectiveness of weight reduction therapy in obese patients.

  15. SNOMED CT in pathology.

    PubMed

    García-Rojo, Marcial; Daniel, Christel; Laurinavicius, Arvydas

    2012-01-01

    Pathology information systems have been using SNOMED II for many years, and in most cases, they are in a migration process to SNOMED CT. COST Action IC0604 (EURO-TELEPATH) has considered terminology normalization one of its strategic objectives. This paper reviews the use of SNOMED CT in healthcare, with a special focus in pathology. Nowadays, SNOMED CT is mainly used for concept search and coding of clinical data. Some ontological errors found in SNOMED CT are described. The Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) initiative has fostered the use of SNOMED CT, also in Pathology, as recommended in the Supplement Anatomic Pathology Structured Reports of the IHE Anatomic Pathology Technical Framework. Rule governing concept post-coordination is also described. Some recent initiatives are trying to define a SNOMED CT subset for Pathology. The Spanish Society of Pathology has defined a subset for specimens and procedures in Pathology. Regarding diagnosis coding, the morphological abnormality sub-hierarchy of SNOMED CT need to be significantly extended and improved to become useful for pathologists. A consensus is needed to encode pathology reports with the adequate hierarchies and concepts. This will make the implementation of pathology structured reports more feasible.

  16. Metrology with μCT: precision challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppes, Alexander; Neuser, Eberhard

    2008-08-01

    Over the last years computed tomography (CT) with conventional x-ray sources has evolved from imaging method in medicine to a well established technology for industrial applications in the field of material science, microelectronics, geology, etc. By using modern microfocus and nanofocus® X-ray tubes, parts can be scanned with sub-micrometer resolutions. Currently, micro-CT is used more and more as a technology for metrological applications. Especially if complex parts with hidden or difficult accessible surfaces have to be measured, CT offers big advantages comparing with conventional tactile or optical coordinate measuring machines (CMMs): high density of measurement points and fast capturing of the complete sample's geometry. When using this modern technology the question arises how precise a CT based CMM can measure in comparison to conventional CMMs? To characterize the metrological capabilities of a tactile or optical CMM, internationally standardized characteristics like length measurement error and probing error are used. To increase the acceptance of CT as a metrological method, the definition and usage of these parameters is important. In this paper, an overview of the process chain in CT based metrology will be given and metrological characteristics will be described. With the help of a special material standard designed and calibrated by PTB-National Metrology Institute of Germany-the influence of methods for beam hardening correction and for surface extraction on the metrological characteristics will be analyzed. It will be shown that with modern micro-CT systems length measurement error of less than 1μm for an object diameter of 20 mm can be reached.

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic ... Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic ... X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses About ...

  19. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - pelvis; Computed axial tomography scan - pelvis; Computed tomography scan - pelvis; CT scan - pelvis ... creates detailed pictures of the body, including the pelvis and areas near the pelvis. The test may ...

  20. Pediatric CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  1. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... on film. Three-dimensional (3D) models of the leg can be created by adding the slices together. ...

  2. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the colon using a hand-held squeeze bulb. Sometimes an electronic pump is used to deliver ... When you enter the CT scanner room, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ...

  3. CT Angiography (CTA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CT Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ...

  4. Phantom based evaluation of CT to CBCT image registration for proton therapy dose recalculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Guillaume; Dedes, George; Zöllner, Christoph; Handrack, Josefine; Janssens, Guillaume; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan; Reiner, Michael; Paganelli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Kamp, Florian; Söhn, Matthias; Wilkens, Jan J.; Baroni, Guido; Belka, Claus; Parodi, Katia

    2015-01-01

    The ability to perform dose recalculation on the anatomy of the day is important in the context of adaptive proton therapy. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of deformable image registration (DIR) and cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging to generate the daily stopping power distribution of the patient. We investigated the deformation of the planning CT scan (pCT) onto daily CBCT images to generate a virtual CT (vCT) using a deformable phantom designed for the head and neck (H & N) region. The phantom was imaged at a planning CT scanner in planning configuration, yielding a pCT and in deformed, treatment day configuration, yielding a reference CT (refCT). The treatment day configuration was additionally scanned at a CBCT scanner. A Morphons DIR algorithm was used to generate a vCT. The accuracy of the vCT was evaluated by comparison to the refCT in terms of corresponding features as identified by an adaptive scale invariant feature transform (aSIFT) algorithm. Additionally, the vCT CT numbers were compared to those of the refCT using both profiles and regions of interest and the volumes and overlap (DICE coefficients) of various phantom structures were compared. The water equivalent thickness (WET) of the vCT, refCT and pCT were also compared to evaluate proton range differences. Proton dose distributions from the same initial fluence were calculated on the refCT, vCT and pCT and compared in terms of proton range. The method was tested on a clinical dataset using a replanning CT scan acquired close in time to a CBCT scan as reference using the WET evaluation. Results from the aSIFT investigation suggest a deformation accuracy of 2-3 mm. The use of the Morphon algorithm did not distort CT number intensity in uniform regions and WET differences between vCT and refCT were of the order of 2% of the proton range. This result was confirmed by proton dose calculations. The patient results were consistent with phantom observations. In conclusion, our phantom

  5. SU-E-T-70: Commissioning a Multislice CT Scanner for X-Ray CT Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, H; Hilts, M; Jirasek, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To commission a multislice computed tomography (CT) scanner for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD). Methods: Commissioning was performed for a 16-slice CT scanner using images acquired through a 1L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine for comparison purposes. The variability in CT number associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background image subtraction technique. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by comparing image noise and uniformity to that of the single slice machine. The consistency in CT number across slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also evaluated. Finally, the variability in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load was measured for the multislice scanner and compared to the tube load effects observed on the single slice machine. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in CT number across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image quality for the multislice machine was found to be comparable to that of the single slice scanner. Further study showed CT number was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thickness examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to imaging a large volume using a single slice scanner. Conclusion: A multislice CT scanner has been commissioning for CT PGD, allowing images of an entire dose distribution to be acquired in a matter of minutes. Funding support provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering

  6. Test of 3D CT reconstructions by EM + TV algorithm from undersampled data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evseev, Ivan; Ahmann, Francielle; da Silva, Hamilton P.; Schelin, Hugo R.; Yevseyeva, Olga; Klock, Márgio C. L.

    2013-05-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in medical imaging for diagnosis and therapy. However, CT imaging is connected with ionization radiation exposure of patients. Therefore, the dose reduction is an essential issue in CT. In 2011, the Expectation Maximization and Total Variation Based Model for CT Reconstruction (EM+TV) was proposed. This method can reconstruct a better image using less CT projections in comparison with the usual filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Thus, it could significantly reduce the overall dose of radiation in CT. This work reports the results of an independent numerical simulation for cone beam CT geometry with alternative virtual phantoms. As in the original report, the 3D CT images of 128×128×128 virtual phantoms were reconstructed. It was not possible to implement phantoms with lager dimensions because of the slowness of code execution even by the CORE i7 CPU.

  7. Test of 3D CT reconstructions by EM + TV algorithm from undersampled data

    SciTech Connect

    Evseev, Ivan; Ahmann, Francielle; Silva, Hamilton P. da

    2013-05-06

    Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in medical imaging for diagnosis and therapy. However, CT imaging is connected with ionization radiation exposure of patients. Therefore, the dose reduction is an essential issue in CT. In 2011, the Expectation Maximization and Total Variation Based Model for CT Reconstruction (EM+TV) was proposed. This method can reconstruct a better image using less CT projections in comparison with the usual filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Thus, it could significantly reduce the overall dose of radiation in CT. This work reports the results of an independent numerical simulation for cone beam CT geometry with alternative virtual phantoms. As in the original report, the 3D CT images of 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 virtual phantoms were reconstructed. It was not possible to implement phantoms with lager dimensions because of the slowness of code execution even by the CORE i7 CPU.

  8. Characterization of suppressor T cells for antibody production by chicken spleen cells. II. Comparison of CT8+ cells from concanavalin A-injected normal and bursa cell-injected agammaglobulinaemic chickens.

    PubMed Central

    Quere, P; Bhogal, B S; Thorbecke, G J

    1990-01-01

    The phenotypes of two different types of suppressor T cells in the chicken, both capable of inhibiting secondary antibody responses in vitro, were determined. The first of these, induced by injection of concanavalin A (Con A) into normal chickens, was CT8+, TcR2+ (alpha beta), CT4-, TcR1- (gamma delta). These cells appeared to exhibit histamine type 2 (H2) receptors, as they adhered to cimetidine-BSA-coated dishes. Moreover, cimetidine added to the medium at 2 x 10(-4) M completely prevented the suppression induced by these suppressor cells. The second type of 'suppressor' T-cell studied, induced in agammaglobulinaemic (A gamma) chickens by injection of bursa cells, exhibited the same phenotype, but was insensitive to cimetidine and did not adhere to cimetidine-BSA-coated dishes, indicating heterogeneity with respect to H2 receptor expression on CT8+ chicken T cells with suppressor activity. The results also showed that a relatively larger proportion of CT8+ than of CT4+ cells adhered to cimetidine-BSA-coated dishes and thus appeared to be H2 receptor positive. TcR1 (gamma delta) cells did not contribute significantly to the antigen non-specific suppressor effects examined in this study. PMID:2149123

  9. Diagnostic Accuracy of CT Enterography for Active Inflammatory Terminal Ileal Crohn Disease: Comparison of Full-Dose and Half-Dose Images Reconstructed with FBP and Half-Dose Images with SAFIRE.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Namita S; Baker, Mark E; Goenka, Ajit H; Bullen, Jennifer A; Obuchowski, Nancy A; Remer, Erick M; Coppa, Christopher P; Einstein, David; Feldman, Myra K; Kanmaniraja, Devaraju; Purysko, Andrei S; Vahdat, Noushin; Primak, Andrew N; Karim, Wadih; Herts, Brian R

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy and image quality of computed tomographic (CT) enterographic images obtained at half dose and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with those of full-dose CT enterographic images reconstructed with FBP for active inflammatory terminal or neoterminal ileal Crohn disease. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was compliant with HIPAA and approved by the institutional review board. The requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. Ninety subjects (45 with active terminal ileal Crohn disease and 45 without Crohn disease) underwent CT enterography with a dual-source CT unit. The reference standard for confirmation of active Crohn disease was active terminal ileal Crohn disease based on ileocolonoscopy or established Crohn disease and imaging features of active terminal ileal Crohn disease. Data from both tubes were reconstructed with FBP (100% exposure); data from the primary tube (50% exposure) were reconstructed with FBP and SAFIRE strengths 3 and 4, yielding four datasets per CT enterographic examination. The mean volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) at full dose were 13.1 mGy (median, 7.36 mGy) and 15.9 mGy (median, 13.06 mGy), respectively, and those at half dose were 6.55 mGy (median, 3.68 mGy) and 7.95 mGy (median, 6.5 mGy). Images were subjectively evaluated by eight radiologists for quality and diagnostic confidence for Crohn disease. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were estimated, and the multireader, multicase analysis of variance method was used to compare reconstruction methods on the basis of a noninferiority margin of 0.05. Results The mean AUCs with half-dose scans (FBP, 0.908; SAFIRE 3, 0.935; SAFIRE 4, 0.924) were noninferior to the mean AUC with full-dose FBP scans (0.908; P < .003). The proportion of images with inferior quality was significantly higher with all

  10. Literature review of SNOMED CT use

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dennis; de Keizer, Nicolette; Lau, Francis; Cornet, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this paper is to report on the use of the systematised nomenclature of medicine clinical terms (SNOMED CT) by providing an overview of published papers. Methods Published papers on SNOMED CT between 2001 and 2012 were identified using PubMed and Embase databases using the keywords ‘systematised nomenclature of medicine’ and ‘SNOMED CT’. For each paper the following characteristics were retrieved: SNOMED CT focus category (ie, indeterminate, theoretical, pre-development/design, implementation and evaluation/commodity), usage category (eg, prospective content coverage, used to classify or code in a study), medical domain and country. Results Our search strategy identified 488 papers. A comparison between the papers published between 2001–6 and 2007–12 showed an increase in every SNOMED CT focus category. The number of papers classified as ‘theoretical’ increased from 46 to 78, ‘pre-development/design’ increased from 61 to 173 and ‘implementation’ increased from 10 to 34. Papers classified as ‘evaluation/commodity’ only started to appear from 2010. Conclusions The majority of studies focused on ‘theoretical’ and ‘pre-development/design’. This is still encouraging as SNOMED CT is being harmonized with other standardized terminologies and is being evaluated to determine the content coverage of local terms, which is usually one of the first steps towards adoption. Most implementations are not published in the scientific literature, requiring a look beyond the scientific literature to gain insights into SNOMED CT implementations. PMID:23828173

  11. Low-Dose PET/CT and Full-Dose Contrast-Enhanced CT at the Initial Staging of Localized Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Sabaté-Llobera, Aida; Cortés-Romera, Montserrat; Mercadal, Santiago; Hernández-Gañán, Javier; Pomares, Helena; González-Barca, Eva; Gámez-Cenzano, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used as the reference imaging technique for the initial staging of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma until recent days, when the introduction of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging as a hybrid technique has become of routine use. However, the performance of both examinations is still common. The aim of this work was to compare the findings between low-dose 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT and full-dose contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT) in 28 patients with localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to PET/CT findings, in order to avoid the performance of ceCT. For each technique, a comparison in the number of nodal and extranodal involved regions was performed. PET/CT showed more lesions than ceCT in both nodal (41 vs. 36) and extranodal localizations (16 vs. 15). Disease staging according to both techniques was concordant in 22 patients (79%) and discordant in 6 patients (21%), changing treatment management in 3 patients (11%). PET/CT determined a better staging and therapeutic approach, making the performance of an additional ceCT unnecessary. PMID:27559300

  12. Low-Dose PET/CT and Full-Dose Contrast-Enhanced CT at the Initial Staging of Localized Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sabaté-Llobera, Aida; Cortés-Romera, Montserrat; Mercadal, Santiago; Hernández-Gañán, Javier; Pomares, Helena; González-Barca, Eva; Gámez-Cenzano, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used as the reference imaging technique for the initial staging of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma until recent days, when the introduction of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging as a hybrid technique has become of routine use. However, the performance of both examinations is still common. The aim of this work was to compare the findings between low-dose 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-d-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/CT and full-dose contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT) in 28 patients with localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to PET/CT findings, in order to avoid the performance of ceCT. For each technique, a comparison in the number of nodal and extranodal involved regions was performed. PET/CT showed more lesions than ceCT in both nodal (41 vs. 36) and extranodal localizations (16 vs. 15). Disease staging according to both techniques was concordant in 22 patients (79%) and discordant in 6 patients (21%), changing treatment management in 3 patients (11%). PET/CT determined a better staging and therapeutic approach, making the performance of an additional ceCT unnecessary.

  13. Thin-Section CT Characteristics and Longitudinal CT Follow-up of Chemotherapy Induced Interstitial Pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han Na; Kim, Mi Young; Koo, Hyun Jung; Kim, Sung-Soo; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Lee, Jae Cheol; Song, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe the computed tomography (CT) features of chemotherapy-induced interstitial pneumonitis (CIIP) with longitudinal follow-up. The study was approved by the local ethics committee. One hundred consecutive patients with CIIP between May 2005 and March 2015 were retrospectively enrolled. The initial CT was reviewed by 2 independent chest radiologists and categorized into 1 of 4 CT patterns in accordance with the 2013 guidelines for idiopathic interstitial pneumonia: nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), organizing pneumonia (OP), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) mimicking desquamative interstitial pneumonitis, and diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). We assessed semiquantitative analysis on a 5% scale to assess the extent of parenchymal abnormalities (emphysema, reticulation, ground-glass opacity, consolidation, honeycombing cyst) and their distribution on initial (n = 100), subsequent (n = 87), and second follow-up CT (n = 48). Interval changes in extent on follow-up CT were compared using paired t test. The clinic-radiologic factors were compared between Group 1 (NSIP and OP patterns) and Group 2 (HP and DAD patterns) using χ2 and independent t tests. The most common pattern of CIIP on the initial CT was HP (51%), followed by NSIP (23%), OP (20%), and DAD (6%). Diffuse ground-glass opacity was the most common pulmonary abnormality. The predominant distribution was bilateral (99%) and symmetric (82%), with no craniocaudal (60%) or axial (79%) dominance. Subsequent and second follow-up CTs showed decreased extent of total pulmonary abnormalities (P < 0.001, respectively). In comparison with Group 1 CIIP, Group 2 CIIP was more likely to be caused by molecularly targeted drugs (P = 0.030), appeared earlier (P = 0.034), and underwent more complete resolution (P < 0.001). Use of a CT pattern–recognition approach to CIIP is appropriate and practical in interpreting radiological findings. PMID:26765442

  14. Correlation of CT perfusion and CT volumetry in patients with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Anna; Zimny, Anna; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Both brain atrophy and decrease of perfusion are observed in dementive diseases. The aim of the study was to correlate the results of brain perfusion CT (pCT) and CT volumetry in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Material/Methods: Forty-eight patients with AD (mean age of 71.3 years) underwent brain pCT and CT volumetry. The pCT was performed at the level of basal ganglia after the injection of contrast medium (50 ml, 4 ml/sec.) with serial scanning (delay 7 sec, 50 scans, 1 scan/sec). Volumetric measurements were carried out on the basis of source images, with the use of a dedicated CT software combined with manual outlining of the regions of interest in extracerebral and intraventricular CSF spaces. Perfusion parameters of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) from the grey matter of frontal and temporal as well as basal ganglia were compared statistically with the volumetric measurements of frontal and temporal cortical atrophy as well as subcortical atrophy. Results: A statistically significant positive correlation was found between the values of CBF and CBV in the basal ganglia and the volumes of the lateral and third ventricles. The comparison of CBF and CBV results with the volumetric measurements in the areas of the frontal and temporal lobes showed mostly negative correlations, but none of them was of statistical significance. Conclusions: In patients with AD, the degree of cortical atrophy is not correlated with the decrease of perfusion in the grey matter and subcortical atrophy is not correlated with the decrease of perfusion in the basal ganglia region. It suggests that functional and structural changes in AD are not related to each other. PMID:22802771

  15. Research on radiation exposure from CT part of hybrid camera and diagnostic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solný, Pavel; Zimák, Jaroslav

    2014-11-01

    Research on radiation exposure from CT part of hybrid camera in seven different Departments of Nuclear Medicine (DNM) was conducted. Processed data and effective dose (E) estimations led to the idea of phantom verification and comparison of absorbed doses and software estimation. Anonymous data from about 100 examinations from each DNM was gathered. Acquired data was processed and utilized by dose estimation programs (ExPACT, ImPACT, ImpactDose) with respect to the type of examination and examination procedures. Individual effective doses were calculated using enlisted programs. Preserving the same procedure in dose estimation process allows us to compare the resulting E. Some differences and disproportions during dose estimation led to the idea of estimated E verification. Consequently, two different sets of about 100 of TLD 100H detectors were calibrated for measurement inside the Aldersnon RANDO Anthropomorphic Phantom. Standard examination protocols were examined using a 2 Slice CT- part of hybrid SPECT/CT. Moreover, phantom exposure from body examining protocol for 32 Slice and 64 Slice diagnostic CT scanner was also verified. Absorbed dose (DT,R) measured using TLD detectors was compared with software estimation of equivalent dose HT values, computed by E estimation software. Though, only limited number of cavities for detectors enabled measurement within the regions of lung, liver, thyroid and spleen-pancreas region, some basic comparison is possible.

  16. Pyogenic myositis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Butler, G.J.; Maguire, J.H.; Nagel, J.S.

    1988-11-01

    Computed tomography and gallium scintigraphy uncovered clinically occult muscle infection in eight patients. The CT findings included enlargement of the muscle, effacement of the intramuscular fat planes, fluid density, rim enhancement, and involvement of the underlying bone. Computed tomography suggested the diagnosis in seven of eight cases. Gallium scintigraphy was positive in all seven cases in which it was performed.

  17. Seventh-generation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, G. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new dual-drum CT system architecture has been recently introduced with the potential to achieve significantly higher temporal resolution than is currently possible in medical imaging CT. The concept relies only on known technologies; in particular rotation speeds several times higher than what is possible today could be achieved leveraging typical x-ray tube designs and capabilities. However, the architecture lends itself to the development of a new arrangement of x-ray sources in a toroidal vacuum envelope containing a rotating cathode ring and a (optionally rotating) shared anode ring to potentially obtain increased individual beam power as well as increase total exposure per rotation. The new x-ray source sub-system design builds on previously described concepts and could make the provision of multiple conventional high-power cathodes in a CT system practical by distributing the anode target between the cathodes. In particular, relying on known magnetic-levitation technologies, it is in principle possible to more than double the relative speed of the electron-beam with respect to the target, thus potentially leading to significant individual beam power increases as compared to today's state-of-the-art. In one embodiment, the proposed design can be naturally leveraged by the dual-drum CT concept previously described to alleviate the problem of arranging a number of conventional rotating anode-stem x-ray tubes and power conditioners on the limited space of a CT gantry. In another embodiment, a system with three cathodes is suggested leveraging the architecture previously proposed by Franke.

  18. Technical aspects of CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Maravilla, K R; Pastel, M S

    1978-01-01

    The advent of computed tomography (CT) has initiated a technological revolution which continues to the present time. A brief review of basic principles of CT scanning is presented, and the evolution of modern CT scanner systems is traced. Some early indications of future trends are also presented.

  19. Clinical application of CT and CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy in patients with indeterminate pulmonary nodules*

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Luciana Vargas; Souza, Arthur Soares

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical application of CT and CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (CT-PTNB) in patients with indeterminate pulmonary nodules (IPNs). METHODS: We retrospectively studied 113 patients with PNs undergoing CT and CT-PTNB. Variables such as gender, age at diagnosis, smoking status, CT findings, and CT-PTNB techniques were analyzed. Data analysis was performed with the Student's t-test for independent samples the chi-square test, and normal approximation test for comparison of two proportions. RESULTS: Of the 113 patients studied, 68 (60.2%) were male and 78 (69%) were smokers. The diameter of malignant lesions ranged from 2.6 cm to 10.0 cm. Most of the IPNs (85%) were located in the peripheral region. The biopsied IPNs were found to be malignant in 88 patients (77.8%) and benign in 25 (22.2%). Adenocarcinoma was the most common malignant tumor, affecting older patients. The IPN diameter was significantly greater in patients with malignant PNs than in those with benign IPNs (p < 0.001). Having regular contour correlated significantly with an IPN being benign (p = 0.022), whereas spiculated IPNs and bosselated IPNs were more often malignant (in 50.7% and 28.7%, respectively). Homogeneous attenuation and necrosis were more common in patients with malignant lesions (51.9% and 26.9%, respectively) CONCLUSIONS: In our sample, CT and CT-PTNB were useful in distinguishing between malignant and benign IPNs. Advanced age and smoking were significantly associated with malignancy. Certain CT findings related to IPNs (larger diameter, spiculated borders, homogeneous attenuation, and necrosis) were associated with malignancy. PMID:25210960

  20. [Comparative evaluation of ultrasonography, computerized tomography, angiography and lipiodol CT in defining extent of hepatocarcinoma. A multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Dalla Palma, L; Pozzi Mucelli, R; Sponza, M; Bartolozzi, C; De Santis, M; Gandini, G; Mannella, P; Matricardi, L; Rossi, C; Simonetti, G

    1995-03-01

    The authors report the results of a multicentric trial on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, whose lesions were confirmed with biopsy or by high (> 400 ng/ml) alpha-fetoprotein levels. The series consisted of 149 patients examined in 8 different centers and submitted to ultrasonography (US), Computed Tomography (CT) before and after contrast agent administration, angiography and Lipiodol CT. According to lesion size and number, the patients were divided with each imaging modality into three groups: a) group 1: unifocal HCC < 5 cm diameter; b) group 2: multifocal HCC with 2-3 nodules and/or tumor mass < 80 ml; c) multifocal HCC with more than 3 nodules (with total tumor mass not exceeding 40% of liver volume) or with total tumor mass > 80 ml. In 77 patients all the examinations were available for comparison. US and CT diagnosed more patients as belonging to group 1 than angiography and Lipiodol CT, while more patients were classified as groups 2 and 3 with angiography and Lipiodol CT, meaning that US and CT may understage some HCC cases (about 15%) because they show a lower number of nodules. This observation was confirmed by the direct comparison between US and Lipiodol CT (in 114 patients), CT and Lipiodol CT (in 103 patients) and angiography and Lipiodol CT (in 116 patients). US and Lipiodol CT were in disagreement in 18 cases, CT and Lipiodol CT in 16 cases and angiography and Lipiodol CT in 13 cases. In most of these cases, Lipiodol CT showed more lesions than the other techniques. The size of the undetected lesions was small, ranging few mm to 2 cm in nearly all cases. To conclude, the results of this multicentric trial show that Lipiodol CT is a fundamental tool to evaluate HCC extent. In contrast, conventional CT appeared not to add any significant piece of information and can therefore be excluded from the diagnostic protocol of HCC.

  1. Comparison of transesophageal Doppler methods with angiography for evaluation of the severity of mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Flachskampf, F A; Frieske, R; Engelhard, B; Grenner, H; Frielingsdorf, J; Beck, F; Reineke, T; Thomas, J D; Hanrath, P

    1998-09-01

    Doppler evaluation of mitral regurgitation remains difficult; thus, a head-to-head comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of Doppler methods was undertaken. Fifty patients with native mitral regurgitation underwent multiplane transesophageal echocardiography within 5 days of catheterization. Angiographic grade of mitral regurgitation and, in 20 patients with grade II-IV regurgitation, invasively determined regurgitant stroke volume were compared with color Doppler area, regurgitant jet diameter, ratio of systolic to diastolic peak pulmonary venous flow velocities, and (based on the proximal convergence zone) maximal regurgitant flow rate and regurgitant orifice area. Rank correlation coefficients of angiographic grade with Doppler parameters were 0.61 for color jet area, -0.61 for pulmonary venous flow velocity ratio, 0.69 for color jet diameter, 0.79 for maximal regurgitant flow rate, and 0.78 for regurgitant orifice area (all P < .01). Convergence zone-based parameters also correlated best (r=0.73) with invasively determined regurgitant stroke volume. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis confirmed higher diagnostic accuracy for proximal jet width and proximal convergence zone parameters than for color jet area or pulmonary venous flow velocity ratio. Proximal convergence zone parameters and proximal color jet diameter best distinguished severe from mild forms of mitral regurgitation. PMID:9758380

  2. Comparison of point-of-care-compatible lysis methods for bacteria and viruses.

    PubMed

    Heiniger, Erin K; Buser, Joshua R; Mireles, Lillian; Zhang, Xiaohong; Ladd, Paula D; Lutz, Barry R; Yager, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Nucleic acid sample preparation has been an especially challenging barrier to point-of-care nucleic acid amplification tests in low-resource settings. Here we provide a head-to-head comparison of methods for lysis of, and nucleic acid release from, several pathogenic bacteria and viruses-methods that are adaptable to point-of-care usage in low-resource settings. Digestion with achromopeptidase, a mixture of proteases and peptidoglycan-specific hydrolases, followed by thermal deactivation in a boiling water bath, effectively released amplifiable nucleic acid from Staphylococcus aureus, Bordetella pertussis, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza virus. Achromopeptidase was functional after dehydration and reconstitution, even after eleven months of dry storage without refrigeration. Mechanical lysis methods proved to be effective against a hard-to-lyse Mycobacterium species, and a miniature bead-mill, the AudioLyse, is shown to be capable of releasing amplifiable DNA and RNA from this species. We conclude that point-of-care-compatible sample preparation methods for nucleic acid tests need not introduce amplification inhibitors, and can provide amplification-ready lysates from a wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens.

  3. Comparison of point-of-care-compatible lysis methods for bacteria and viruses.

    PubMed

    Heiniger, Erin K; Buser, Joshua R; Mireles, Lillian; Zhang, Xiaohong; Ladd, Paula D; Lutz, Barry R; Yager, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Nucleic acid sample preparation has been an especially challenging barrier to point-of-care nucleic acid amplification tests in low-resource settings. Here we provide a head-to-head comparison of methods for lysis of, and nucleic acid release from, several pathogenic bacteria and viruses-methods that are adaptable to point-of-care usage in low-resource settings. Digestion with achromopeptidase, a mixture of proteases and peptidoglycan-specific hydrolases, followed by thermal deactivation in a boiling water bath, effectively released amplifiable nucleic acid from Staphylococcus aureus, Bordetella pertussis, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza virus. Achromopeptidase was functional after dehydration and reconstitution, even after eleven months of dry storage without refrigeration. Mechanical lysis methods proved to be effective against a hard-to-lyse Mycobacterium species, and a miniature bead-mill, the AudioLyse, is shown to be capable of releasing amplifiable DNA and RNA from this species. We conclude that point-of-care-compatible sample preparation methods for nucleic acid tests need not introduce amplification inhibitors, and can provide amplification-ready lysates from a wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens. PMID:27424294

  4. Efficacy of biological agents administered as monotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis: a Bayesian mixed-treatment comparison analysis

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, Alberto; Bizzi, Emanuele; Egan, Colin Gerard; Bernardi, Mauro; Petrella, Lea

    2015-01-01

    Background Biological agents provide an important therapeutic alternative for rheumatoid arthritis patients refractory to conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Few head-to-head comparative trials are available. Purpose The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the relative efficacy of different biologic agents indicated for use as monotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods A systemic literature search was performed on electronic databases to identify articles reporting double-blind randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of biologic agents indicated for monotherapy. Efficacy was assessed using American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20, 50, and 70 criteria at 16–24 weeks. Relative efficacy was estimated using Bayesian mixed-treatment comparison models. Outcome measures were expressed as odds ratio and 95% credible intervals. Results Ten randomized controlled trials were selected for data extraction and analysis. Mixed-treatment comparison analysis revealed that tocilizumab offered 100% probability of being the best treatment for inducing an ACR20 response versus placebo, methotrexate, adalimumab, or etanercept. Likewise, for ACR50 and ACR70 outcome responses, tocilizumab had a 99.8% or 98.7% probability of being the best treatment, respectively, compared to other treatments or placebo. Tocilizumab increased the relative probability of being the best treatment (vs methotrexate) by 3.2-fold (odds ratio: 2.1–3.89) for all ACR outcomes. Conclusion Tocilizumab offered the greatest possibility of obtaining an ACR20, ACR50, and ACR70 outcome vs other monotherapies or placebo. PMID:26366085

  5. Comparison of Whole-Body (18)F FDG PET/MR Imaging and Whole-Body (18)F FDG PET/CT in Terms of Lesion Detection and Radiation Dose in Patients with Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Melsaether, Amy N; Raad, Roy A; Pujara, Akshat C; Ponzo, Fabio D; Pysarenko, Kristine M; Jhaveri, Komal; Babb, James S; Sigmund, Eric E; Kim, Sungheon G; Moy, Linda A

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To compare fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with (18)F FDG combined PET and computed tomography (CT) in terms of organ-specific metastatic lesion detection and radiation dose in patients with breast cancer. Materials and Methods From July 2012 to October 2013, this institutional review board-approved HIPAA-compliant prospective study included 51 patients with breast cancer (50 women; mean age, 56 years; range, 32-76 years; one man; aged 70 years) who completed PET/MR imaging with diffusion-weighted and contrast material-enhanced sequences after unenhanced PET/CT. Written informed consent for study participation was obtained. Two independent readers for each modality recorded site and number of lesions. Imaging and clinical follow-up, with consensus in two cases, served as the reference standard. Results There were 242 distant metastatic lesions in 30 patients, 18 breast cancers in 17 patients, and 19 positive axillary nodes in eight patients. On a per-patient basis, PET/MR imaging with diffusion-weighted and contrast-enhanced sequences depicted distant (30 of 30 [100%] for readers 1 and 2) and axillary (eight of eight [100%] for reader 1, seven of eight [88%] for reader 2) metastatic disease at rates similar to those of unenhanced PET/CT (distant metastatic disease: 28 of 29 [96%] for readers 3 and 4, P = .50; axillary metastatic disease: seven of eight [88%] for readers 3 and 4, P > .99) and outperformed PET/CT in the detection of breast cancer (17 of 17 [100%] for readers 1 and 2 vs 11 of 17 [65%] for reader 3 and 10 of 17 [59%] for reader 4; P < .001). PET/MR imaging showed increased sensitivity for liver (40 of 40 [100%] for reader 1 and 32 of 40 [80%] for reader 2 vs 30 of 40 [75%] for reader 3 and 28 of 40 [70%] for reader 4; P < .001) and bone (105 of 107 [98%] for reader 1 and 102 of 107 [95%] for reader 2 vs 106 of 107 [99%] for reader 3 and 93 of 107 [87

  6. Comparison of Whole-Body 18F FDG PET/MR Imaging and Whole-Body 18F FDG PET/CT in Terms of Lesion Detection and Radiation Dose in Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melsaether, Amy N.; Raad, Roy A.; Pujara, Akshat C.; Ponzo, Fabio D.; Pysarenko, Kristine M.; Jhaveri, Komal; Babb, James S.; Sigmund, Eric E.; Kim, Sungheon G.; Moy, Linda A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare fluorine 18 (18F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 18F FDG combined PET and computed tomography (CT) in terms of organ-specific metastatic lesion detection and radiation dose in patients with breast cancer. Materials and Methods From July 2012 to October 2013, this institutional review board–approved HIPAA-compliant prospective study included 51 patients with breast cancer (50 women; mean age, 56 years; range, 32–76 years; one man; aged 70 years) who completed PET/MR imaging with diffusion-weighted and contrast material–enhanced sequences after unenhanced PET/CT. Written informed consent for study participation was obtained. Two independent readers for each modality recorded site and number of lesions. Imaging and clinical follow-up, with consensus in two cases, served as the reference standard. Results There were 242 distant metastatic lesions in 30 patients, 18 breast cancers in 17 patients, and 19 positive axillary nodes in eight patients. On a per-patient basis, PET/MR imaging with diffusion-weighted and contrast-enhanced sequences depicted distant (30 of 30 [100%] for readers 1 and 2) and axillary (eight of eight [100%] for reader 1, seven of eight [88%] for reader 2) metastatic disease at rates similar to those of unenhanced PET/CT (distant metastatic disease: 28 of 29 [96%] for readers 3 and 4, P = .50; axillary metastatic disease: seven of eight [88%] for readers 3 and 4, P > .99) and outperformed PET/CT in the detection of breast cancer (17 of 17 [100%] for readers 1 and 2 vs 11 of 17 [65%] for reader 3 and 10 of 17 [59%] for reader 4; P < .001). PET/MR imaging showed increased sensitivity for liver (40 of 40 [100%] for reader 1 and 32 of 40 [80%] for reader 2 vs 30 of 40 [75%] for reader 3 and 28 of 40 [70%] for reader 4; P < .001) and bone (105 of 107 [98%] for reader 1 and 102 of 107 [95%] for reader 2 vs 106 of 107 [99%] for reader 3 and 93 of 107 [87

  7. Investigating CT to CBCT image registration for head and neck proton therapy as a tool for daily dose recalculation

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Nijhuis, Reinoud; Thieke, Christian; Reiner, Michael; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus; Dedes, George; Handrack, Josefine; Parodi, Katia; Janssens, Guillaume; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan; Kamp, Florian; Wilkens, Jan J.; Paganelli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) of head and neck (H and N) cancer patients may be improved by plan adaptation. The decision to adapt the treatment plan based on a dose recalculation on the current anatomy requires a diagnostic quality computed tomography (CT) scan of the patient. As gantry-mounted cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners are currently being offered by vendors, they may offer daily or weekly updates of patient anatomy. CBCT image quality may not be sufficient for accurate proton dose calculation and it is likely necessary to perform CBCT CT number correction. In this work, the authors investigated deformable image registration (DIR) of the planning CT (pCT) to the CBCT to generate a virtual CT (vCT) to be used for proton dose recalculation. Methods: Datasets of six H and N cancer patients undergoing photon intensity modulated radiation therapy were used in this study to validate the vCT approach. Each dataset contained a CBCT acquired within 3 days of a replanning CT (rpCT), in addition to a pCT. The pCT and rpCT were delineated by a physician. A Morphons algorithm was employed in this work to perform DIR of the pCT to CBCT following a rigid registration of the two images. The contours from the pCT were deformed using the vector field resulting from DIR to yield a contoured vCT. The DIR accuracy was evaluated with a scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm comparing automatically identified matching features between vCT and CBCT. The rpCT was used as reference for evaluation of the vCT. The vCT and rpCT CT numbers were converted to stopping power ratio and the water equivalent thickness (WET) was calculated. IMPT dose distributions from treatment plans optimized on the pCT were recalculated with a Monte Carlo algorithm on the rpCT and vCT for comparison in terms of gamma index, dose volume histogram (DVH) statistics as well as proton range. The DIR generated contours on the vCT were compared to physician-drawn contours on the rpCT

  8. Image quality and attenuation values of multi detector CT coronary angiography using high iodine-concentration contrast material: A comparison of the use of iopromide 370 and iomeprol 400

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Yeh, Dae Wook; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Lee, Won Jae; Lim, Hyo Keun

    2010-01-01

    Background: Effects of high iodine-concentration contrast material on the image quality of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) have not been well evaluated. Purpose: To compare the image quality and attenuation values of CCTA between patients administered iopromide 370 and iomeprol 400 with the use of 64-slice multidetector CT. Material and Methods: Patients were prospectively enrolled and were randomized into two groups (group A, 151 patients received iopromide 370, iodine flux = 1.48 g I/s; group B, 146 patients received iomeprol 400, iodine flux = 1.60 g I/s). CT attenuation was measured in the coronary arteries and great arteries and measurements were standardized based on an iodine flux of 1.5 0 g I/s. The image quality of 15 coronary artery segments was graded by two radiologists in consensus with the use of a four-point scale (1 = excellent to 4 = poor enhancement). Non-parametric statistical approaches were used to compare the two groups. Results: The median attenuation values in the coronary arteries were 454 HU and 464 HU for iopromide 370 and iomeprol 400, respectively, and they did not differ (P = 0.26). When standardizing for an iodine flux, significantly higher attenuation values were found for iopromide 370 (median = 460 HU, range = 216-791 HU) compared with iomeprol 400 (median = 435 HU, range = 195—758 HU) (P = 0.006). The median image quality score of coronary arterial segments was 1 (range 1—2) for both groups (P = 0.84). Conclusion: The attenuation values in the coronary arteries after injection of the same amount of two high iodine-concentration contrast materials at the same flow rate with different iodine fluxes are similar with no difference in image quality. With standardization for an iodine flux, the attenuation is significantly higher when using iopromide 370. PMID:20849317

  9. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of the OleC protein from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia involved in head-to-head hydrocarbon biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Frias, JA; Goblirsch, BR; Wackett, LP; Wilmot, CM

    2010-08-28

    OleC, a biosynthetic enzyme involved in microbial hydrocarbon biosynthesis, has been crystallized. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 3.4 A resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P3(1)21 or P3(2)21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 98.8, c = 141.0 A.

  10. Crystal Structures of Xanthomonas campestris OleA Reveal Features That Promote Head-to-Head Condensation of Two Long-Chain Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Goblirsch, BR; Frias, JA; Wackett, LP; Wilmot, CM

    2012-05-22

    OleA is a thiolase superfamily enzyme that has been shown to catalyze the condensation of two long-chain fatty acylcoenzyme A (CoA) substrates. The enzyme is part of a larger gene cluster responsible for generating long-chain olefin products, a potential biofuel precursor. In thiolase superfamily enzymes, catalysis is achieved via a ping-pong mechanism. The first substrate forms a covalent intermediate with an active site cysteine that is followed by reaction with the second substrate. For OleA, this conjugation proceeds by a nondecarboxylative Claisen condensation. The OleA from Xanthomonas campestris has been crystallized and its structure determined, along with inhibitor-bound and xenon-derivatized structures, to improve our understanding of substrate positioning in the context of enzyme turnover. OleA is the first characterized thiolase superfamily member that has two long-chain alkyl substrates that need to be bound simultaneously and therefore uniquely requires an additional alkyl binding channel. The location of the fatty acid biosynthesis inhibitor, cerulenin, that possesses an alkyl chain length in the range of known OleA substrates, in conjunction with a single xenon binding site, leads to the putative assignment of this novel alkyl binding channel. Structural overlays between the OleA homologues, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase and the fatty acid biosynthesis enzyme FabH, allow assignment of the two remaining channels: one for the thioester-containing pantetheinate arm and the second for the alkyl group of one substrate. A short beta-hairpin region is ordered in only one of the crystal forms, and that may suggest open and closed states relevant for substrate binding. Cys143 is the conserved catalytic cysteine within the superfamily, and the site of alkylation by cerulenin. The alkylated structure suggests that a glutamic acid residue (Glu117 beta) likely promotes Claisen condensation by acting as the catalytic base. Unexpectedly, Glu117 beta comes from the other monomer of the physiological dimer.

  11. Crystal Structures of Xanthomonas campestris OleA Reveal Features That Promote Head-to-Head Condensation of Two Long-Chain Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Goblirsch, Brandon R.; Frias, Janice A.; Wackett, Lawrence P.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2012-10-25

    OleA is a thiolase superfamily enzyme that has been shown to catalyze the condensation of two long-chain fatty acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) substrates. The enzyme is part of a larger gene cluster responsible for generating long-chain olefin products, a potential biofuel precursor. In thiolase superfamily enzymes, catalysis is achieved via a ping-pong mechanism. The first substrate forms a covalent intermediate with an active site cysteine that is followed by reaction with the second substrate. For OleA, this conjugation proceeds by a nondecarboxylative Claisen condensation. The OleA from Xanthomonas campestris has been crystallized and its structure determined, along with inhibitor-bound and xenon-derivatized structures, to improve our understanding of substrate positioning in the context of enzyme turnover. OleA is the first characterized thiolase superfamily member that has two long-chain alkyl substrates that need to be bound simultaneously and therefore uniquely requires an additional alkyl binding channel. The location of the fatty acid biosynthesis inhibitor, cerulenin, that possesses an alkyl chain length in the range of known OleA substrates, in conjunction with a single xenon binding site, leads to the putative assignment of this novel alkyl binding channel. Structural overlays between the OleA homologues, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase and the fatty acid biosynthesis enzyme FabH, allow assignment of the two remaining channels: one for the thioester-containing pantetheinate arm and the second for the alkyl group of one substrate. A short {beta}-hairpin region is ordered in only one of the crystal forms, and that may suggest open and closed states relevant for substrate binding. Cys143 is the conserved catalytic cysteine within the superfamily, and the site of alkylation by cerulenin. The alkylated structure suggests that a glutamic acid residue (Glu117{beta}) likely promotes Claisen condensation by acting as the catalytic base. Unexpectedly, Glu117{beta} comes from the other monomer of the physiological dimer.

  12. Treatment Selection Choices Should Not Be Based on Benefits or Costs Alone: A Head-to-Head Randomized Controlled Trial of Antiviral Drugs for Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Davitkov, Perica; Chandar, Apoorva Krishna; Hirsch, Amy; Compan, Anita; Silveira, Marina G.; Anthony, Donald D.; Smith, Suzanne; Gideon, Clare; Bonomo, Robert A.; Falck-Ytter, Yngve

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinicians often face dilemmas with decisions related to formulary choices when two similar drugs are simultaneously available in the market. We studied the comparative safety, effectiveness, and treatment costs of the two first generation direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA), boceprevir and telaprevir as uncertainty existed regarding the drug of choice between these two seemingly equally Hepatitis-C treatment options. Methods We randomly assigned 50 patients in an open-label, pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT) at a VA Medical Center to either boceprevir or telaprevir in combination with peginterferon and ribavirin, stratified by the presence of cirrhosis and prior treatment experience. Tolerability was assessed at each visit and reasons for discontinuation of treatment and severity of adverse events due to PI treatment were adjudicated using a blinded adjudication committee. The primary outcome was difference in tolerability between boceprevir vs. telaprevir. Secondary outcomes included viral response rates and cost-per cure achieved. Results Higher rates of treatment discontinuations and/or severe DAA associated adverse events were seen in 10/25 (40%) patients randomized to telaprevir compared to 2/25 (8%) patients randomized to boceprevir (RR: 5; 95% CI: 1.2, 20; p<0.01). Cure rates did not appear to be significantly different between groups (telaprevir vs. boceprevir: RR 1.23; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.99; p = 0.39). On an intention-to-treat basis, total cost per cure was $44,329 for boceprevir vs. $57,115 for telaprevir. The significant side effect profile of telaprevir combined with the availability of highly efficacious second generation DAAs led to the early discontinuation of the trial. Conclusion Telaprevir is associated with a significantly higher rate of severe adverse events leading to treatment discontinuations, hospitalizations or severe anemia and a substantially higher cost per SVR when compared to boceprevir. Real-time, point of care, pragmatic randomized controlled trials are necessary for guidance beyond just acquisition costs and to make evidence-based formulary selections when multiple effective treatments are available. (Clinicaltrials.gov registration: NCT02113631). PMID:27741230

  13. A comparison of 3D poly(ε-caprolactone) tissue engineering scaffolds produced with conventional and additive manufacturing techniques by means of quantitative analysis of SR μ-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, F.; Intranuovo, F.; Mohammadi, S.; Domingos, M.; Favia, P.; Tromba, G.

    2013-07-01

    The technique used to produce a 3D tissue engineering (TE) scaffold is of fundamental importance in order to guarantee its proper morphological characteristics. An accurate assessment of the resulting structural properties is therefore crucial in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the produced scaffold. Synchrotron radiation (SR) computed microtomography (μ-CT) combined with further image analysis seems to be one of the most effective techniques to this aim. However, a quantitative assessment of the morphological parameters directly from the reconstructed images is a non trivial task. This study considers two different poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds fabricated with a conventional technique (Solvent Casting Particulate Leaching, SCPL) and an additive manufacturing (AM) technique (BioCell Printing), respectively. With the first technique it is possible to produce scaffolds with random, non-regular, rounded pore geometry. The AM technique instead is able to produce scaffolds with square-shaped interconnected pores of regular dimension. Therefore, the final morphology of the AM scaffolds can be predicted and the resulting model can be used for the validation of the applied imaging and image analysis protocols. It is here reported a SR μ-CT image analysis approach that is able to effectively and accurately reveal the differences in the pore- and throat-size distributions as well as connectivity of both AM and SCPL scaffolds.

  14. CT evaluation of intracholecystic bile

    SciTech Connect

    Rebner, M.; Ruggieri, P.M.; Gross, B.H.; Glazer, G.M.

    1985-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used to detect a variety of gallbladder abnormalities, but the accuracy of routine abdominal CT in evaluating intracholecystic bile has not been established. Forty-six patients were identified in whom abdominal CT and sonography were performed within 1 week of each other. Using sonographic results as the standard, sensitivity specificity, and accuracy of CT gallbladder evaluation were calculated; both initial CT interpretations and retrospective review of scans were used for this analysis. In the retrospective review, visual interpretation of gallbladder images and measurement of intracholecystic bile attenuation were analyzed. The most common cause of high-attenuation bile in the series was sludge, a cause not previously reported. It was concluded that intracholecystic bile is poorly evaluated on routine abdominal CT, particularly because of low sensitivity in disease detection.

  15. Analysis of patient CT dose data using virtualdose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Richard

    X-ray computer tomography has many benefits to medical and research applications. Recently, over the last decade CT has had a large increase in usage in hospitals and medical diagnosis. In pediatric care, from 2000 to 2006, abdominal CT scans increased by 49 % and chest CT by 425 % in the emergency room (Broder 2007). Enormous amounts of effort have been performed across multiple academic and government groups to determine an accurate measure of organ dose to patients who undergo a CT scan due to the inherent risks with ionizing radiation. Considering these intrinsic risks, CT dose estimating software becomes a necessary tool that health care providers and radiologist must use to determine many metrics to base the risks versus rewards of having an x-ray CT scan. This thesis models the resultant organ dose as body mass increases for patients with all other related scan parameters fixed. In addition to this,this thesis compares a modern dose estimating software, VirtualDose CT to two other programs, CT-Expo and ImPACT CT. The comparison shows how the software's theoretical basis and the phantom they use to represent the human body affect the range of results in organ dose. CT-Expo and ImPACT CT dose estimating software uses a different model for anatomical representation of the organs in the human body and the results show how that approach dramatically changes the outcome. The results categorizes four datasets as compared to the three software types where the appropriate phantom was available. Modeling was done to simulate chest abdominal pelvis scans and whole body scans. Organ dose difference versus body mass index shows as body mass index (BMI) ranges from 23.5 kg/m 2 to 45 kg/m2 the amount of organ dose also trends a percent change from -4.58 to -176.19 %. Comparing organ dose difference with increasing x-ray tube potential from 120 kVp to 140 kVp the percent change in organ dose increases from 55 % to 65 % across all phantoms. In comparing VirtualDose to CT

  16. Evaluation of CT-based SUV normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devriese, Joke; Beels, Laurence; Maes, Alex; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Pottel, Hans

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine patients’ lean body mass (LBM) and lean tissue (LT) mass using a computed tomography (CT)-based method, and to compare standardized uptake value (SUV) normalized by these parameters to conventionally normalized SUVs. Head-to-toe positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examinations were retrospectively retrieved and semi-automatically segmented into tissue types based on thresholding of CT Hounsfield units (HU). The following HU ranges were used for determination of CT-estimated LBM and LT (LBMCT and LTCT):  -180 to  -7 for adipose tissue (AT), -6 to 142 for LT, and 143 to 3010 for bone tissue (BT). Formula-estimated LBMs were calculated using formulas of James (1976 Research on Obesity: a Report of the DHSS/MRC Group (London: HMSO)) and Janmahasatian et al (2005 Clin. Pharmacokinet. 44 1051-65), and body surface area (BSA) was calculated using the DuBois formula (Dubois and Dubois 1989 Nutrition 5 303-11). The CT segmentation method was validated by comparing total patient body weight (BW) to CT-estimated BW (BWCT). LBMCT was compared to formula-based estimates (LBMJames and LBMJanma). SUVs in two healthy reference tissues, liver and mediastinum, were normalized for the aforementioned parameters and compared to each other in terms of variability and dependence on normalization factors and BW. Comparison of actual BW to BWCT shows a non-significant difference of 0.8 kg. LBMJames estimates are significantly higher than LBMJanma with differences of 4.7 kg for female and 1.0 kg for male patients. Formula-based LBM estimates do not significantly differ from LBMCT, neither for men nor for women. The coefficient of variation (CV) of SUV normalized for LBMJames (SUVLBM-James) (12.3%) was significantly reduced in liver compared to SUVBW (15.4%). All SUV variances in mediastinum were significantly reduced (CVs were 11.1-12.2%) compared to SUVBW (15.5%), except SUVBSA (15.2%). Only SUVBW and SUVLBM-James show

  17. Evaluation of CT-based SUV normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devriese, Joke; Beels, Laurence; Maes, Alex; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Pottel, Hans

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine patients’ lean body mass (LBM) and lean tissue (LT) mass using a computed tomography (CT)-based method, and to compare standardized uptake value (SUV) normalized by these parameters to conventionally normalized SUVs. Head-to-toe positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examinations were retrospectively retrieved and semi-automatically segmented into tissue types based on thresholding of CT Hounsfield units (HU). The following HU ranges were used for determination of CT-estimated LBM and LT (LBMCT and LTCT):  ‑180 to  ‑7 for adipose tissue (AT), ‑6 to 142 for LT, and 143 to 3010 for bone tissue (BT). Formula-estimated LBMs were calculated using formulas of James (1976 Research on Obesity: a Report of the DHSS/MRC Group (London: HMSO)) and Janmahasatian et al (2005 Clin. Pharmacokinet. 44 1051–65), and body surface area (BSA) was calculated using the DuBois formula (Dubois and Dubois 1989 Nutrition 5 303–11). The CT segmentation method was validated by comparing total patient body weight (BW) to CT-estimated BW (BWCT). LBMCT was compared to formula-based estimates (LBMJames and LBMJanma). SUVs in two healthy reference tissues, liver and mediastinum, were normalized for the aforementioned parameters and compared to each other in terms of variability and dependence on normalization factors and BW. Comparison of actual BW to BWCT shows a non-significant difference of 0.8 kg. LBMJames estimates are significantly higher than LBMJanma with differences of 4.7 kg for female and 1.0 kg for male patients. Formula-based LBM estimates do not significantly differ from LBMCT, neither for men nor for women. The coefficient of variation (CV) of SUV normalized for LBMJames (SUVLBM-James) (12.3%) was significantly reduced in liver compared to SUVBW (15.4%). All SUV variances in mediastinum were significantly reduced (CVs were 11.1–12.2%) compared to SUVBW (15.5%), except SUVBSA (15.2%). Only SUVBW and SUVLBM

  18. Evaluation of CT-based SUV normalization.

    PubMed

    Devriese, Joke; Beels, Laurence; Maes, Alex; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Pottel, Hans

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine patients' lean body mass (LBM) and lean tissue (LT) mass using a computed tomography (CT)-based method, and to compare standardized uptake value (SUV) normalized by these parameters to conventionally normalized SUVs. Head-to-toe positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examinations were retrospectively retrieved and semi-automatically segmented into tissue types based on thresholding of CT Hounsfield units (HU). The following HU ranges were used for determination of CT-estimated LBM and LT (LBMCT and LTCT):  -180 to  -7 for adipose tissue (AT), -6 to 142 for LT, and 143 to 3010 for bone tissue (BT). Formula-estimated LBMs were calculated using formulas of James (1976 Research on Obesity: a Report of the DHSS/MRC Group (London: HMSO)) and Janmahasatian et al (2005 Clin. Pharmacokinet. 44 1051-65), and body surface area (BSA) was calculated using the DuBois formula (Dubois and Dubois 1989 Nutrition 5 303-11). The CT segmentation method was validated by comparing total patient body weight (BW) to CT-estimated BW (BWCT). LBMCT was compared to formula-based estimates (LBMJames and LBMJanma). SUVs in two healthy reference tissues, liver and mediastinum, were normalized for the aforementioned parameters and compared to each other in terms of variability and dependence on normalization factors and BW. Comparison of actual BW to BWCT shows a non-significant difference of 0.8 kg. LBMJames estimates are significantly higher than LBMJanma with differences of 4.7 kg for female and 1.0 kg for male patients. Formula-based LBM estimates do not significantly differ from LBMCT, neither for men nor for women. The coefficient of variation (CV) of SUV normalized for LBMJames (SUVLBM-James) (12.3%) was significantly reduced in liver compared to SUVBW (15.4%). All SUV variances in mediastinum were significantly reduced (CVs were 11.1-12.2%) compared to SUVBW (15.5%), except SUVBSA (15.2%). Only SUVBW and SUVLBM-James show independence

  19. CT findings of atrial myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, F.; Kohno, A.; Saitoh, R.; Shigeta, A.

    1984-04-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of six atrial myxomas was analyzed. Five of the myxomas were located in the left atrium and one was in the right atrium. The margin of the myxoma was at least slightly lobulated in five cases and the content was inhomogeneous in all. Calcification was demonstrated in three cases. The site of attachment of the myxoma was demonstrated by CT to be the arial septum in all cases. The CT finding correlated well with the operative findings. It is concluded that it is possible with CT to diagnose atrial myxoma by the location and nature of the intracardiac mass and to differentiate it from thrombus.

  20. Chronic osteomyelitis examined by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Helms, C.A.; Trafton, P.

    1985-01-01

    CT examination of 25 patients who had acute exacerbations of chronic osteomyelitis allowed for the correct identification of single or multiple sequestra in 14 surgical patients. Plain radiographs were equivocal for sequestra in seven of these patients, because the sequestra were too small or because diffuse bony sclerosis was present. CT also demonstrated a foreign body and five soft tissue abscesses not suspected on the basis of plain radiographs. CT studies, which helped guide the operative approach, were also useful in treating those patients whose plain radiographs were positive for sequestra. The authors review the potential role of CT in evaluating patients with chronic osteomyelitis.

  1. Comparison of Intrahepatic and Pancreatic Perfusion on Fusion Images Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Assessment of Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osama Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takamori, Hiroshi; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro; Baba, Hideo

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images using a combined single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT system and to evaluate the efficacy of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Materials and Methods. CTAI was performed in 33 patients (22 men, 11 women; age range, 35-77 years; mean age, 60 years) with stage IV pancreatic cancer with liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. In all patients we obtained fusion images using a combined SPECT/CT system. Pancreatic perfusion on fusion images was classified as perfusion presence or as perfusion absent in the pancreatic cancer. Using WHO criteria we recorded the tumor response after 3 months on multislice helical CT scans. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the pancreatic cancer, liver metastasis, and factors such as intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images. For statistical analysis we used the chi-square test; survival was evaluated by the Kaplan Meier method (log-rank test). Results. On fusion images, pancreatic and intrahepatic perfusion was recorded as hot spot and as homogeneous distribution, respectively, in 18 patients (55%) and as cold spot and heterogeneous distribution, respectively, in 15 (45%). Patients with hot spot in the pancreatic tumor and homogeneous distribution in the liver manifested better treatment results (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Patients with hot spot both in the pancreatic cancer and in the liver survived longer than those with cold spot in the pancreatic cancer and heterogeneous distribution in the liver (median {+-} SD, 16.0 {+-} 3.7 vs. 8.0 {+-} 1.4 months; p < 0.05). Conclusions. We conclude that in patients with advanced

  2. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT of head and neck tumors: perfusion measurements using a distributed-parameter tracer kinetic model. Initial results and comparison with deconvolution-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisdas, Sotirios; Konstantinou, George N.; Sherng Lee, Puor; Thng, Choon Hua; Wagenblast, Jens; Baghi, Mehran; San Koh, Tong

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a two-compartment distributed-parameter (DP) tracer kinetic model to generate functional images of several physiologic parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced CT data obtained of patients with extracranial head and neck tumors and to compare the DP functional images to those obtained by deconvolution-based DCE-CT data analysis. We performed post-processing of DCE-CT studies, obtained from 15 patients with benign and malignant head and neck cancer. We introduced a DP model of the impulse residue function for a capillary-tissue exchange unit, which accounts for the processes of convective transport and capillary-tissue exchange. The calculated parametric maps represented blood flow (F), intravascular blood volume (v1), extravascular extracellular blood volume (v2), vascular transit time (t1), permeability-surface area product (PS), transfer ratios k12 and k21, and the fraction of extracted tracer (E). Based on the same regions of interest (ROI) analysis, we calculated the tumor blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and mean transit time (MTT) by using a modified deconvolution-based analysis taking into account the extravasation of the contrast agent for PS imaging. We compared the corresponding values by using Bland-Altman plot analysis. We outlined 73 ROIs including tumor sites, lymph nodes and normal tissue. The Bland-Altman plot analysis revealed that the two methods showed an accepted degree of agreement for blood flow, and, thus, can be used interchangeably for measuring this parameter. Slightly worse agreement was observed between v1 in the DP model and BV but even here the two tracer kinetic analyses can be used interchangeably. Under consideration of whether both techniques may be used interchangeably was the case of t1 and MTT, as well as for measurements of the PS values. The application of the proposed DP model is feasible in the clinical routine and it can be used interchangeably for measuring

  3. Comparative Genomics of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Strains Ty2 and CT18†

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wen; Liou, Shian-Ren; Plunkett III, Guy; Mayhew, George F.; Rose, Debra J.; Burland, Valerie; Kodoyianni, Voula; Schwartz, David C.; Blattner, Frederick R.

    2003-01-01

    We present the 4.8-Mb complete genome sequence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain Ty2, a human-specific pathogen causing typhoid fever. A comparison with the genome sequence of recently isolated S. enterica serovar Typhi strain CT18 showed that 29 of the 4,646 predicted genes in Ty2 are unique to this strain, while 84 genes are unique to CT18. Both genomes contain more than 200 pseudogenes; 9 of these genes in CT18 are intact in Ty2, while 11 intact CT18 genes are pseudogenes in Ty2. A half-genome interreplichore inversion in Ty2 relative to CT18 was confirmed. The two strains exhibit differences in prophages, insertion sequences, and island structures. While CT18 carries two plasmids, one conferring multiple drug resistance, Ty2 has no plasmids and is sensitive to antibiotics. PMID:12644504

  4. Prospects for in vivo estimation of photon linear attenuation coefficients using postprocessing dual-energy CT imaging on a commercial scanner: Comparison of analytic and polyenergetic statistical reconstruction algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Joshua D. Yu, Yaduo; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Whiting, Bruce R.; O’Sullivan, Joseph A.; Politte, David G.; Klahr, Paul H.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Accurate patient-specific photon cross-section information is needed to support more accurate model-based dose calculation for low energy photon-emitting modalities in medicine such as brachytherapy and kilovoltage x-ray imaging procedures. A postprocessing dual-energy CT (pDECT) technique for noninvasivein vivo estimation of photon linear attenuation coefficients has been experimentally implemented on a commercial CT scanner and its accuracy assessed in idealized phantom geometries. Methods: Eight test materials of known composition and density were used to compare pDECT-estimated linear attenuation coefficients to NIST reference values over an energy range from 10 keV to 1 MeV. As statistical image reconstruction (SIR) has been shown to reconstruct images with less random and systematic error than conventional filtered backprojection (FBP), the pDECT technique was implemented with both an in-house polyenergetic SIR algorithm, alternating minimization (AM), as well as a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm. Improvement from increased spectral separation was also investigated by filtering the high-energy beam with an additional 0.5 mm of tin. The law of propagated uncertainty was employed to assess the sensitivity of the pDECT process to errors in reconstructed images. Results: Mean pDECT-estimated linear attenuation coefficients for the eight test materials agreed within 1% of NIST reference values for energies from 1 MeV down to 30 keV, with mean errors rising to between 3% and 6% at 10 keV, indicating that the method is unbiased when measurement and calibration phantom geometries are matched. Reconstruction with FBP and AM algorithms conferred similar mean pDECT accuracy. However, single-voxel pDECT estimates reconstructed on a 1 × 1 × 3 mm{sup 3} grid are shown to be highly sensitive to reconstructed image uncertainty; in some cases pDECT attenuation coefficient estimates exhibited standard deviations on the order of 20% around the mean

  5. Radiation Therapy Alone in cT1-3N0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Who Are Unfit for Surgical Resection or Stereotactic Radiation Therapy: Comparison of Risk-Adaptive Dose Schedules

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Kyung; Noh, Jae Myoung; Ahn, Yong Chan; Oh, Dongryul; Pyo, Hongryull

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High dose definitive radiation therapy (RT) alone is recommended to patients with cT1-3N0 non-small cell lung cancer, who are unfit for surgery or stereotactic RT. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness following RT alone using two different modest hypofractionation dose schemes. Materials and Methods Between 2001 and 2014, 124 patients underwent RT alone. From 2001 till 2010, 60 Gy in 20 fractions was delivered to 79 patients (group 1). Since 2011, 60 Gy in 20 fractions (group 2, 20 patients), and 60 Gy in 15 fractions (group 3, 25 patients) were selectively chosen depending on estimated risk of esophagitis. Results At follow-up of 16.7 months, 2-year rates of local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 62.6%, 39.1%, and 59.1%, respectively. Overall survival was significantly better in group 3 (p=0.002). In multivariate analyses, cT3 was the most powerful adverse factor affecting clinical outcomes. Incidence and severity of radiation pneumonitis were not different among groups, while no patients developed grade 2 esophagitis in group 3 (p=0.003). Under current Korean Health Insurance Policy, RT cost per person was 22.5% less in group 3 compared with others. Conclusion The current study demonstrated that 60 Gy in 15 fractions instead of 60 Gy in 20 fractions resulted in comparable clinical outcomes with excellent safety, direct cost saving, and improved convenience to the patients with tumors located at ≥ 1.5 cm from the esophagus. PMID:26987393

  6. Optimising μCT imaging of the middle and inner cat ear.

    PubMed

    Seifert, H; Röher, U; Staszyk, C; Angrisani, N; Dziuba, D; Meyer-Lindenberg, A

    2012-04-01

    This study's aim was to determine the optimal scan parameters for imaging the middle and inner ear of the cat with micro-computertomography (μCT). Besides, the study set out to assess whether adequate image quality can be obtained to use μCT in diagnostics and research on cat ears. For optimisation, μCT imaging of two cat skull preparations was performed using 36 different scanning protocols. The μCT-scans were evaluated by four experienced experts with regard to the image quality and detail detectability. By compiling a ranking of the results, the best possible scan parameters could be determined. From a third cat's skull, a μCT-scan, using these optimised scan parameters, and a comparative clinical CT-scan were acquired. Afterwards, histological specimens of the ears were produced which were compared to the μCT-images. The comparison shows that the osseous structures are depicted in detail. Although soft tissues cannot be differentiated, the osseous structures serve as valuable spatial orientation of relevant nerves and muscles. Clinical CT can depict many anatomical structures which can also be seen on μCT-images, but these appear a lot less sharp and also less detailed than with μCT.

  7. Comparison of Endoscopic Vacuum Therapy and Endoscopic Stent Implantation With Self-Expandable Metal Stent in Treating Postsurgical Gastroesophageal Leakage.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae J; Jeong, Yeon S; Park, Young S; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol M; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Dong H

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the more effective therapy for the postsurgical gastroesophageal leakage by a head-to-head comparison of endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) and endoscopic stent implantation with self-expandable metal stent (E-SEMS). In this hospital-based, retrospective, observative study, the patients were classified into 2 groups. Those treated with EVT were assigned to the EVT group (n = 7), and those treated with E-SMS were assigned to the E-SEMS group (n = 11). We evaluated the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes between the 2 groups. All 7 patients (100%) were treated with EVT, but only 7 of 11 patients (63.6%) in the stenting group were treated successfully. The median time to clinical success was 19.5 (5-21) days in the EVT group and 27.0 (3-84) days in the E-SEMS group. The median hospital stay was 37.1 (13-128) days in the EVT group and 87.3 (17-366) days in the E-SEMS group. The complicaion rate was lower in the EVT group (0/7, 0.0%) than that in the E-SEMS group (6/11, 54.5%) with statistically significant difference (P = 0.042). EVT is more effective and has fewer adverse effects than E-SMS therapy as a treatment for postsurgical gastroesophageal leakage.

  8. Comparison of Endoscopic Vacuum Therapy and Endoscopic Stent Implantation With Self-Expandable Metal Stent in Treating Postsurgical Gastroesophageal Leakage

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae J.; Jeong, Yeon S.; Park, Young S.; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol M.; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Dong H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to evaluate the more effective therapy for the postsurgical gastroesophageal leakage by a head-to-head comparison of endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) and endoscopic stent implantation with self-expandable metal stent (E-SEMS). In this hospital-based, retrospective, observative study, the patients were classified into 2 groups. Those treated with EVT were assigned to the EVT group (n = 7), and those treated with E-SMS were assigned to the E-SEMS group (n = 11). We evaluated the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes between the 2 groups. All 7 patients (100%) were treated with EVT, but only 7 of 11 patients (63.6%) in the stenting group were treated successfully. The median time to clinical success was 19.5 (5–21) days in the EVT group and 27.0 (3–84) days in the E-SEMS group. The median hospital stay was 37.1 (13–128) days in the EVT group and 87.3 (17–366) days in the E-SEMS group. The complicaion rate was lower in the EVT group (0/7, 0.0%) than that in the E-SEMS group (6/11, 54.5%) with statistically significant difference (P = 0.042). EVT is more effective and has fewer adverse effects than E-SMS therapy as a treatment for postsurgical gastroesophageal leakage. PMID:27100431

  9. Comparison of Endoscopic Vacuum Therapy and Endoscopic Stent Implantation With Self-Expandable Metal Stent in Treating Postsurgical Gastroesophageal Leakage.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae J; Jeong, Yeon S; Park, Young S; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol M; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Dong H

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the more effective therapy for the postsurgical gastroesophageal leakage by a head-to-head comparison of endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) and endoscopic stent implantation with self-expandable metal stent (E-SEMS). In this hospital-based, retrospective, observative study, the patients were classified into 2 groups. Those treated with EVT were assigned to the EVT group (n = 7), and those treated with E-SMS were assigned to the E-SEMS group (n = 11). We evaluated the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes between the 2 groups. All 7 patients (100%) were treated with EVT, but only 7 of 11 patients (63.6%) in the stenting group were treated successfully. The median time to clinical success was 19.5 (5-21) days in the EVT group and 27.0 (3-84) days in the E-SEMS group. The median hospital stay was 37.1 (13-128) days in the EVT group and 87.3 (17-366) days in the E-SEMS group. The complicaion rate was lower in the EVT group (0/7, 0.0%) than that in the E-SEMS group (6/11, 54.5%) with statistically significant difference (P = 0.042). EVT is more effective and has fewer adverse effects than E-SMS therapy as a treatment for postsurgical gastroesophageal leakage. PMID:27100431

  10. A comparison of directed search target detection versus in-scene target detection in Worldview-2 datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, S.

    2015-05-01

    Since the events of September 11, 2001, the intelligence focus has moved from large order-of-battle targets to small targets of opportunity. Additionally, the business community has discovered the use of remotely sensed data to anticipate demand and derive data on their competition. This requires the finer spectral and spatial fidelity now available to recognize those targets. This work hypothesizes that directed searches using calibrated data perform at least as well as inscene manually intensive target detection searches. It uses calibrated Worldview-2 multispectral images with NEF generated signatures and standard detection algorithms to compare bespoke directed search capabilities against ENVI™ in-scene search capabilities. Multiple execution runs are performed at increasing thresholds to generate detection rates. These rates are plotted and statistically analyzed. While individual head-to-head comparison results vary, 88% of the directed searches performed at least as well as in-scene searches with 50% clearly outperforming in-scene methods. The results strongly support the premise that directed searches perform at least as well as comparable in-scene searches.

  11. Comparison of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes, Cardiovascular Progenitors, and Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells for Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sarah; Chong, James J.H.; Paige, Sharon L.; Iwata, Mineo; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Keller, Gordon; Reinecke, Hans; Murry, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-CMs) can improve the contractility of injured hearts. We hypothesized that mesodermal cardiovascular progenitors (hESC-CVPs), capable of generating vascular cells in addition to cardiomyocytes, would provide superior repair by contributing to multiple components of myocardium. We performed a head-to-head comparison of hESC-CMs and hESC-CVPs and compared these with the most commonly used clinical cell type, human bone marrow mononuclear cells (hBM-MNCs). In a nude rat model of myocardial infarction, hESC-CMs and hESC-CVPs generated comparable grafts. Both similarly improved systolic function and ventricular dilation. Furthermore, only rare human vessels formed from hESC-CVPs. hBM-MNCs attenuated ventricular dilation and enhanced host vascularization without engrafting long-term or improving contractility. Thus, hESC-CMs and CVPs show similar efficacy for cardiac repair, and both are more efficient than hBM-MNCs. However, hESC-CVPs do not form larger grafts or more significant numbers of human vessels in the infarcted heart. PMID:26607951

  12. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  13. A variational approach to bone segmentation in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, Jeff; Tahmasebi, Amir M.; Mansouri, Abdol-Reza

    2011-03-01

    We present a variational approach for segmenting bone structures in Computed Tomography (CT) images. We introduce a novel functional on the space of image segmentations, and subsequently minimize this functional through a gradient descent partial differential equation. The functional we propose provides a measure of similarity of the intensity characteristics of the bone and tissue regions through a comparison of their cumulative distribution functions; minimizing this similarity measure therefore yields the maximal separation between the two regions. We perform the minimization of our proposed functional using level set partial differential equations; in addition to numerical stability, this yields topology independence, which is especially useful in the context of CT bone segmentation where a bone region may consist of several disjoint pieces. Finally, we present an extensive validation of our method against expert manual segmentation on CT images of the wrist, ankle, foot, and pelvis.

  14. CT Angiography after 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Leipsic, Jonathon; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5–15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography. PMID:24848958

  15. The feasibility of a 64-slice MDCT for detection of the Adamkiewicz artery: comparison of the detection rate of intravenous injection CT angiography using a 64-slice MDCT versus intra-arterial and intravenous injection CT angiography using a 16-slice MDCT.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Tatsuya; Kono, Atsushi K; Negi, Noriyuki; Hashimura, Hiromi; Uotani, Kensuke; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-12-01

    Identification of the Adamkiewicz artery (AKA) using CT angiography (CTA) is crucial in patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) or aortic dissection (AD). The purpose of this study was to compare the AKA detection rate of intravenous injection with a 64-slice MDCT (IV64) versus a 16-slice MDCT (IV16) as well as by CTA using intra-arterial injection with a 16-slice MDCT (IA16). A retrospective review of 160 consecutive patients who underwent CTA was performed. There were 108 TAA and 52 AD cases, 105 of whom were examined with IV64, 15 with IV16, and 40 with IA16. The AKA detectability for each imaging method was assessed, and the factors influencing the detectability were analyzed by multivariate analysis. The detection rates for IV64, IV16, and IA16 were 85.7, 60.0, and 80.0 %, respectively, with IV64 being more sensitive than IV16 (P = 0.025). The detection rate for AD patients was 66.7 % with IV64, which was similar to IV16 (57.1 %) and IA16 (66.8 %). On the other hand, the detection rate for TAA patients was 93.3 % with IV64, which was higher than IV16 (62.5 %, P = 0.021) and similar to IA16 (88.0 %). Multivariate analysis demonstrated the independent factors for AKA detectability were TAA versus AD (P = 0.005, Odds ratio = 3.98) and IV64 versus IV16 (P = 0.037, Odds ratio = 4.03). The detection rate was higher for IV64 than for IV16, especially for TAA patients, while the rate was similar between IV64 and invasive IA16. A 64-slice MDCT thus provides a less invasive visualization of the AKA.

  16. Surface-based registration of liver in ultrasound and CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghan, Ehsan; Lu, Kongkuo; Yan, Pingkun; Tahmasebi, Amir; Xu, Sheng; Wood, Bradford J.; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Venkatesan, Aradhana; Kruecker, Jochen

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging is an attractive modality for real-time image-guided interventions. Fusion of US imaging with a diagnostic imaging modality such as CT shows great potential in minimally invasive applications such as liver biopsy and ablation. However, significantly different representation of liver in US and CT turns this image fusion into a challenging task, in particular if some of the CT scans may be obtained without contrast agents. The liver surface, including the diaphragm immediately adjacent to it, typically appears as a hyper-echoic region in the ultrasound image if the proper imaging window and depth setting are used. The liver surface is also well visualized in both contrast and non-contrast CT scans, thus making the diaphragm or liver surface one of the few attractive common features for registration of US and non-contrast CT. We propose a fusion method based on point-to-volume registration of liver surface segmented in CT to a processed electromagnetically (EM) tracked US volume. In this approach, first, the US image is pre-processed in order to enhance the liver surface features. In addition, non-imaging information from the EM-tracking system is used to initialize and constrain the registration process. We tested our algorithm in comparison with a manually corrected vessel-based registration method using 8 pairs of tracked US and contrast CT volumes. The registration method was able to achieve an average deviation of 12.8mm from the ground truth measured as the root mean square Euclidean distance for control points distributed throughout the US volume. Our results show that if the US image acquisition is optimized for imaging of the diaphragm, high registration success rates are achievable.

  17. Reducing CT dose in myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Emma; Dixon, Kat L

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the radiation dose arising from computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction to single photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging studies without adversely affecting its accuracy. Using the Perspex CTDI phantom with the Xi detector to measure dose, CT scans were acquired using the Siemens Symbia T over the full range of CT settings available. Using the default setting 'AECmean', the measured dose at the centre of the phantom was 1.68 mGy and the breast dose from the scout view was 0.30 mGy. The lowest dose was achieved using the dose modulation setting in which the doses were reduced to 1.21 mGy and undetectable (<0.01 mGy), respectively. To observe the effect of changing these settings, 30 patients received a stress scan with default CT settings and a rest scan utilizing single photon emission computed tomography-guided CT and the dose modulation CT settings. Results showed a mean effective dose reduction of 23.6%. The dose reduction was greatest for larger patients, with the largest dose reduction for one patient being 72%. There was no apparent difference in attenuation correction between the two sets of resultant images. These new lower-dose settings are now applied to all clinical myocardial perfusion imaging studies. PMID:26302461

  18. Comparison Between 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb Geochronometers at ca. 2.1 Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Renne, P. R.; Min, K.; Schmitz, M. D.; Bowring, S. A.; de Wit, M. J.; Morelli, C.

    2001-12-01

    Recent sudies have revealed 1-2% age bias between conventional calibrations of the 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb geochronologic methods applied to quickly cooled volcanic rocks whose isotopic systems should be uncomplicated by differential retention of radiogenic daughter isotopes. The U-Pb system serves as an ideal basis for comparison because of its rigorous internal reliability criteria and precisely-determined decay constants via alpha counting. Studies capable of providing useful comparison have been limited to samples younger than 1.1 Ga, which offers useful constraints primarily on 40Ar/40K of 40Ar/39Ar standards and the electron capture decay constant of 40K. The magnitude of observed bias for these samples is within the range of realistically propagated errors in those quantities. The beta decay constant of 40K is comparably poorly constrained, leading to ambiguities about early solar system cooling rates among other issues, and is more difficult to test directly due to a paucity of appropriate (e.g., minimally altered with demonstrably simple thermal history) rocks for comparison. A strikingly fresh hornblende-biotite dacite from the Eglab region of the Requibat massif, West Africa, offers an exceptional opportunity for head-to-head comparison of the two geochronometers at nearly twice the age limit currently available. Zircons from this unit are concordant to nearly concordant.and indicate an age of ca 2076 Ma. 40Ar/39Ar analysis of individual hornblende grains, step-heated with a CO2 laser, reveal some complexities but generally yield plateau ages of 2050-2060 Ma based on IUGS 1977 decay constants and 28.02 Ma for the Fish Canyon sanidine. Thus the bias between 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb systems in this case is of order 1%, suggesting that relative error in the conventional beta decay constant is somewhat less than that of the electron capture constant for 40K.

  19. Thin-Section CT Characteristics and Longitudinal CT Follow-up of Chemotherapy Induced Interstitial Pneumonitis: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Na; Kim, Mi Young; Koo, Hyun Jung; Kim, Sung-Soo; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Lee, Jae Cheol; Song, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    To describe the computed tomography (CT) features of chemotherapy-induced interstitial pneumonitis (CIIP) with longitudinal follow-up.The study was approved by the local ethics committee. One hundred consecutive patients with CIIP between May 2005 and March 2015 were retrospectively enrolled. The initial CT was reviewed by 2 independent chest radiologists and categorized into 1 of 4 CT patterns in accordance with the 2013 guidelines for idiopathic interstitial pneumonia: nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), organizing pneumonia (OP), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) mimicking desquamative interstitial pneumonitis, and diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). We assessed semiquantitative analysis on a 5% scale to assess the extent of parenchymal abnormalities (emphysema, reticulation, ground-glass opacity, consolidation, honeycombing cyst) and their distribution on initial (n = 100), subsequent (n = 87), and second follow-up CT (n = 48). Interval changes in extent on follow-up CT were compared using paired t test. The clinic-radiologic factors were compared between Group 1 (NSIP and OP patterns) and Group 2 (HP and DAD patterns) using χ and independent t tests.The most common pattern of CIIP on the initial CT was HP (51%), followed by NSIP (23%), OP (20%), and DAD (6%). Diffuse ground-glass opacity was the most common pulmonary abnormality. The predominant distribution was bilateral (99%) and symmetric (82%), with no craniocaudal (60%) or axial (79%) dominance. Subsequent and second follow-up CTs showed decreased extent of total pulmonary abnormalities (P < 0.001, respectively). In comparison with Group 1 CIIP, Group 2 CIIP was more likely to be caused by molecularly targeted drugs (P = 0.030), appeared earlier (P = 0.034), and underwent more complete resolution (P < 0.001). Use of a CT pattern-recognition approach to CIIP is appropriate and practical in interpreting radiological findings. PMID:26765442

  20. Gated CT imaging using a free-breathing respiration signal from flow-volume spirometry

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Warren D.; Kwok, Young; Deyoung, Chad; Zacharapoulos, Nicholas; Pepelea, Mark; Klahr, Paul; Yu, Cedric X.

    2005-12-15

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is known to cause artifacts on free-breathing spiral CT images used in treatment planning. This leads to inaccurate delineation of target volumes on planning CT images. Flow-volume spirometry has been used previously for breath-holds during CT scans and radiation treatments using the active breathing control (ABC) system. We have developed a prototype by extending the flow-volume spirometer device to obtain gated CT scans using a PQ 5000 single-slice CT scanner. To test our prototype, we designed motion phantoms to compare image quality obtained with and without gated CT scan acquisition. Spiral and axial (nongated and gated) CT scans were obtained of phantoms with motion periods of 3-5 s and amplitudes of 0.5-2 cm. Errors observed in the volume estimate of these structures were as much as 30% with moving phantoms during CT simulation. Application of motion-gated CT with active breathing control reduced these errors to within 5%. Motion-gated CT was then implemented in patients and the results are presented for two clinical cases: lung and abdomen. In each case, gated scans were acquired at end-inhalation, end-exhalation in addition to a conventional free-breathing (nongated) scan. The gated CT scans revealed reduced artifacts compared with the conventional free-breathing scan. Differences of up to 20% in the volume of the structures were observed between gated and free-breathing scans. A comparison of the overlap of structures between the gated and free-breathing scans revealed misalignment of the structures. These results demonstrate the ability of flow-volume spirometry to reduce errors in target volumes via gating during CT imaging.

  1. Multiple myeloma: evaluation by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiman, J.S.; McLeod, R.A.; Kyle, R.A.; Beabout, J.W.

    1985-02-01

    Although patients who have multiple myeloma usually have straightforward clinical symptoms and corroborative radiographs, in some instances, these patients will present atypically, with symptoms suggesting active disease but radiographs that are normal or nonspecific. The authors reviewed the records of 32 patients who had documented multiple myeloma and had undergone CT examinations, assessing the value of those examinations. Although CT is not indicated in all patients who have multiple myeloma, it is especially useful in patients who have bone pain and normal or nonspecific radiographs. CT provided confirmatory information in all cases in which lesions were seen on radiographs. CT also frequently demonstrated a greater extent of disease than could be appreciated on the radiographs.

  2. Children, CT Scan and Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bajoghli, Morteza; Bajoghli, Farshad; Tayari, Nazila; Rouzbahani, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Children are more sensitive to radiation than adults. Computerized tomography (CT) consists of 25 % of all medical imaging. It was estimated that more than 2% of all carcinomas in the USA are due to CT scans. There is an ongoing focus on the reduction of CT scan radiation dose. Awareness about risk-benefits of CT has increased. Reduction of radiological exam is an important issue because the accumulation effects of radiation can be hazardous. In addition, proper protocol should be followed for diagnostic procedures of ionization radiation and computerized tomography. Effective radiation dose should range from 0.8 to 10.5 millisievert. The same protocol should be followed in different hospitals as well. Basic principles of radiation protection should be monitored. As much as possible, both technician and radiologist must be present during computerized tomography for children, and MRI and ultrasound should be replaced if possible. PMID:21566776

  3. CT Demonstration of Caput Medusae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Edward C.; Vilensky, Joel A.

    2009-01-01

    Maximum intensity and volume rendered CT displays of caput medusae are provided to demonstrate both the anatomy and physiology of this portosystemic shunt associated with portal hypertension. (Contains 2 figures.)

  4. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    MedlinePlus

    ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual colonoscopy) ... time and for your attention! Spotlight Recently posted: Video: Ultrasound-guided Breast Biopsy Video: Breast MRI Video: ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross- ... CT, it is possible to obtain very detailed pictures of the heart and blood vessels in children, ...

  6. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This is an illustrated text on computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine with an emphasis on the role and value of multiplanar imaging for helping determine diagnoses. The book has adequate discussion of scanning techniques for the different regions, interpretations of various abnormalities, degenerative disk disease, and different diagnoses. There is a 50-page chapter on detailed sectional anatomy of the spine and useful chapters on the postoperative spine and the planning and performing of spinal surgery with CT multiplanar reconstruction. There are comprehensive chapters on spinal tumors and trauma. The final two chapters of the book are devoted to CT image processing using digital networks and CT applications of medical computer graphics.

  7. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  8. CT Perfusion of the Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... scanning combines special x-ray equipment with sophisticated computers to produce multiple images or pictures of the ... being studied can then be examined on a computer monitor, printed or transferred to a CD. CT ...

  9. Patient radiation doses for electron beam CT.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Isabel A; Dance, David R; Skinner, Claire L; Evans, Phil M

    2005-08-01

    A Monte Carlo based computer model has been developed for electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) to calculate organ and effective doses in a humanoid hermaphrodite phantom. The program has been validated by comparison with experimental measurements of the CT dose index in standard head and body CT dose phantoms; agreement to better than 8% has been found. The robustness of the model has been established by varying the input parameters. The amount of energy deposited at the 12:00 position of the standard body CT dose phantom is most susceptible to rotation angle, whereas that in the central region is strongly influenced by the beam quality. The program has been used to investigate the changes in organ absorbed doses arising from partial and full rotation about supine and prone subjects. Superficial organs experience the largest changes in absorbed dose with a change in subject orientation and for partial rotation. Effective doses for typical clinical scan protocols have been calculated and compared with values obtained using existing dosimetry techniques based on full rotation. Calculations which make use of Monte Carlo conversion factors for the scanner that best matches the EBCT dosimetric characteristics consistently overestimate the effective dose in supine subjects by typically 20%, and underestimate the effective dose in prone subjects by typically 13%. These factors can therefore be used to correct values obtained in this way. Empirical dosimetric techniques based on the dose-length product yield errors as great as 77%. This is due to the sensitivity of the dose length product to individual scan lengths. The magnitude of these errors is reduced if empirical dosimetric techniques based on the average absorbed dose in the irradiated volume (CTDIvol) are used. Therefore conversion factors specific to EBCT have been calculated to convert the CTDIvol to an effective dose. PMID:16193782

  10. Patient radiation doses for electron beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, Isabel A.; Dance, David R.; Skinner, Claire L.; Evans, Phil M.

    2005-08-15

    A Monte Carlo based computer model has been developed for electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) to calculate organ and effective doses in a humanoid hermaphrodite phantom. The program has been validated by comparison with experimental measurements of the CT dose index in standard head and body CT dose phantoms; agreement to better than 8% has been found. The robustness of the model has been established by varying the input parameters. The amount of energy deposited at the 12:00 position of the standard body CT dose phantom is most susceptible to rotation angle, whereas that in the central region is strongly influenced by the beam quality. The program has been used to investigate the changes in organ absorbed doses arising from partial and full rotation about supine and prone subjects. Superficial organs experience the largest changes in absorbed dose with a change in subject orientation and for partial rotation. Effective doses for typical clinical scan protocols have been calculated and compared with values obtained using existing dosimetry techniques based on full rotation. Calculations which make use of Monte Carlo conversion factors for the scanner that best matches the EBCT dosimetric characteristics consistently overestimate the effective dose in supine subjects by typically 20%, and underestimate the effective dose in prone subjects by typically 13%. These factors can therefore be used to correct values obtained in this way. Empirical dosimetric techniques based on the dose-length product yield errors as great as 77%. This is due to the sensitivity of the dose length product to individual scan lengths. The magnitude of these errors is reduced if empirical dosimetric techniques based on the average absorbed dose in the irradiated volume (CTDI{sub vol}) are used. Therefore conversion factors specific to EBCT have been calculated to convert the CTDI{sub vol} to an effective dose.

  11. First results from a hybrid prototype CT scanner for exploring benefits of quantum-counting in clinical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, S.; Hannemann, T.; Kraft, E.; Kreisler, B.; Niederloehner, D.; Stierstorfer, K.; Flohr, T.

    2012-03-01

    μWe introduce a novel hybrid prototype scanner built to explore benefits of the quantum-counting technique in the context of clinical CT. The scanner is equipped with two measurement systems. One is a CdTe-based counting detector with 22cm field-of-view. Its revised ASIC architecture allows configuration of the counter thresholds of the 225m small sub-pixels in chess patterns, enabling data acquisition in four energy bins or studying high-flux scenarios with pile-up trigger. The other one is a conventional GOS-based energy-integrating detector from a clinical CT scanner. The integration of both detection technologies in one CT scanner provides two major advantages. It allows direct comparison of image quality and contrast reproduction as well as instantaneous quantification of the relative dose usage and material separation performance achievable with counting techniques. In addition, data from the conventional detector can be used as complementary information during reconstruction of the images from the counting device. In this paper we present CT images acquired with the hybrid prototype scanner, illustrate its underlying conceptual methods, and provide first experimental results quantifying clinical benefits of quantum-counting CT.

  12. Initiation and propagation of complex 3D networks of cracks in heterogeneous quasi-brittle materials: Direct comparison between in situ testing-microCT experiments and phase field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Yvonnet, J.; Bornert, M.; Chateau, C.

    2016-10-01

    We provide the first direct comparisons, to our knowledge, of complex 3D micro cracking initiation and propagation in heterogeneous quasi-brittle materials modelled by the phase field numerical method and observed in X-ray microtomography images recorded during in situ mechanical testing. Some material parameters of the damage model, including the process zone (internal) length, are identified by an inverse approach combining experimental data and 3D simulations. A new technique is developed to study the micro cracking at a finer scale by prescribing the local displacements measured by digital volume correlation over the boundary of a small sub-volume inside the sample during the numerical simulations. The comparisons, performed on several samples of lightweight plaster and concrete, show a remarkable quantitative agreement between the 3D crack morphology obtained by the model and by the experiments, without any a priori knowledge about the location of the initiation of the cracks in the numerical model. The results indicate that the crack paths can be predicted in a fully deterministic way in spite of the highly random geometry of the microstructure and the brittle nature of its constituents.

  13. Comparison of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen–Based 18F-DCFBC PET/CT to Conventional Imaging Modalities for Detection of Hormone-Naïve and Castration-Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Macura, Katarzyna J.; Ciarallo, Anthony; Mena, Esther; Blackford, Amanda; Nadal, Rosa; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Carducci, Michael A.; Ross, Ashley E.; Kantoff, Philip W.; Holt, Daniel P.; Dannals, Robert F.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pomper, Martin G.; Cho, Steve Y.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional imaging modalities (CIMs) have limited sensitivity and specificity for detection of metastatic prostate cancer. We examined the potential of a first-in-class radiofluorinated small-molecule inhibitor of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), N-[N-[(S)-1,3-dicarboxypropyl]carbamoyl]-4-18F-fluorobenzyl-l-cysteine (18F-DCFBC), to detect metastatic hormone-naïve (HNPC) and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods Seventeen patients were prospectively enrolled (9 HNPC and 8 CRPC); 16 had CIM evidence of new or progressive metastatic prostate cancer and 1 had high clinical suspicion of metastatic disease. 18F-DCFBC PET/CT imaging was obtained with 2 successive PET scans starting at 2 h after injection. Patients were imaged with CIM at approximately the time of PET. A lesion-by-lesion analysis of PET to CIM was performed in the context of either HNPC or CRPC. The patients were followed with available clinical imaging as a reference standard to determine the true nature of identified lesions on PET and CIM. Results On the lesion-by-lesion analysis, 18F-DCFBC PET was able to detect a larger number of lesions (592 positive with 63 equivocal) than CIM (520 positive with 61 equivocal) overall, in both HNPC and CRPC patients. 18F-DCFBC PET detection of lymph nodes, bone lesions, and visceral lesions was superior to CIM. When intrapatient clustering effects were considered, 18F-DCFBC PET was estimated to be positive in a large proportion of lesions that would be negative or equivocal on CIM (0.45). On follow-up, the sensitivity of 18F-DCFBC PET (0.92) was superior to CIM (0.71). 18F-DCFBC tumor uptake was increased at the later PET time point (∼2.5 h after injection), with background uptake showing a decreasing trend on later PET. Conclusion PET imaging with 18F-DCFBC, a small-molecule PSMA-targeted radiotracer, detected more lesions than CIM and promises to diagnose and stage patients with metastatic prostate cancer more accurately than current

  14. Ct2 Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    The patient is an 80-year-old man who presented with gross hematuria. His past medical history indicates he was a cigarette smoker with 50 pack/years. He was successfully treated for carcinoma of the lung 7 years ago. He received chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. He has mild COPD but has a good performance status. His laboratory studies do not indicate any abnormalities in terms of renal function. He does not have any significant cardiac disease. He has a medium build. He had prostate cancer and underwent a successful radical prostatectomy 10 years ago. His PSA is undetectable. He has some urinary incontinence and wears two pads/day. He underwent the appropriate investigations for gross hematuria. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was normal with the exception of a 4-cm posterior mass in the bladder. There was no hydronephrosis and no enlarged lymph nodes. He underwent a transurethral resection of a solitary bladder tumor performed by another urologist. The tumor was described as large and sessile. It was located on the posterior wall and was approximately 4 cm. The bimanual examination did not reveal a mass. The pathology report stated that the tumor was a high-grade urothelial carcinoma with invasion into the muscularis propria. There was no lymphovascular invasion. I performed a reTURBT, and at that procedure, I did not identify any obvious tumor but the prior resection site was evident. I resected the prior tumor site quite extensively both in depth and width. The pathology revealed only focal carcinoma in situ. There was ample muscle in the specimen and there was some fat as well. As stated, they were free of any cancer. The patient is receptive to any treatment approach.

  15. Ct2 Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    The patient is an 80-year-old man who presented with gross hematuria. His past medical history indicates he was a cigarette smoker with 50 pack/years. He was successfully treated for carcinoma of the lung 7 years ago. He received chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. He has mild COPD but has a good performance status. His laboratory studies do not indicate any abnormalities in terms of renal function. He does not have any significant cardiac disease. He has a medium build. He had prostate cancer and underwent a successful radical prostatectomy 10 years ago. His PSA is undetectable. He has some urinary incontinence and wears two pads/day. He underwent the appropriate investigations for gross hematuria. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was normal with the exception of a 4-cm posterior mass in the bladder. There was no hydronephrosis and no enlarged lymph nodes. He underwent a transurethral resection of a solitary bladder tumor performed by another urologist. The tumor was described as large and sessile. It was located on the posterior wall and was approximately 4 cm. The bimanual examination did not reveal a mass. The pathology report stated that the tumor was a high-grade urothelial carcinoma with invasion into the muscularis propria. There was no lymphovascular invasion. I performed a reTURBT, and at that procedure, I did not identify any obvious tumor but the prior resection site was evident. I resected the prior tumor site quite extensively both in depth and width. The pathology revealed only focal carcinoma in situ. There was ample muscle in the specimen and there was some fat as well. As stated, they were free of any cancer. The patient is receptive to any treatment approach. PMID:27457483

  16. Performance Comparison of Wireless Sensor Network Standard Protocols in an Aerospace Environment: ISA100.11a and ZigBee Pro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Raymond S.; Barton, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Standards-based wireless sensor network (WSN) protocols are promising candidates for spacecraft avionics systems, offering unprecedented instrumentation flexibility and expandability. Ensuring reliable data transport is key, however, when migrating from wired to wireless data gathering systems. In this paper, we conduct a rigorous laboratory analysis of the relative performances of the ZigBee Pro and ISA100.11a protocols in a representative crewed aerospace environment. Since both operate in the 2.4 GHz radio frequency (RF) band shared by systems such as Wi-Fi, they are subject at times to potentially debilitating RF interference. We compare goodput (application-level throughput) achievable by both under varying levels of 802.11g Wi-Fi traffic. We conclude that while the simpler, more inexpensive ZigBee Pro protocol performs well under moderate levels of interference, the more complex and costly ISA100.11a protocol is needed to ensure reliable data delivery under heavier interference. This paper represents the first published, rigorous analysis of WSN protocols in an aerospace environment that we are aware of and the first published head-to-head comparison of ZigBee Pro and ISA100.11a.

  17. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  18. Image quality and radiation reduction of 320-row area detector CT coronary angiography with optimal tube voltage selection and an automatic exposure control system: comparison with body mass index-adapted protocol.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jiyeon; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal; Shim, Hackjoon; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-06-01

    To assess the image quality and radiation exposure of 320-row area detector computed tomography (320-ADCT) coronary angiography with optimal tube voltage selection with the guidance of an automatic exposure control system in comparison with a body mass index (BMI)-adapted protocol. Twenty-two patients (study group) underwent 320-ADCT coronary angiography using an automatic exposure control system with the target standard deviation value of 33 as the image quality index and the lowest possible tube voltage. For comparison, a sex- and BMI-matched group (control group, n = 22) using a BMI-adapted protocol was established. Images of both groups were reconstructed by an iterative reconstruction algorithm. For objective evaluation of the image quality, image noise, vessel density, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) were measured. Two blinded readers then subjectively graded the image quality using a four-point scale (1: nondiagnostic to 4: excellent). Radiation exposure was also measured. Although the study group tended to show higher image noise (14.1 ± 3.6 vs. 9.3 ± 2.2 HU, P = 0.111) and higher vessel density (665.5 ± 161 vs. 498 ± 143 HU, P = 0.430) than the control group, the differences were not significant. There was no significant difference between the two groups for SNR (52.5 ± 19.2 vs. 60.6 ± 21.8, P = 0.729), CNR (57.0 ± 19.8 vs. 67.8 ± 23.3, P = 0.531), or subjective image quality scores (3.47 ± 0.55 vs. 3.59 ± 0.56, P = 0.960). However, radiation exposure was significantly reduced by 42 % in the study group (1.9 ± 0.8 vs. 3.6 ± 0.4 mSv, P = 0.003). Optimal tube voltage selection with the guidance of an automatic exposure control system in 320-ADCT coronary angiography allows substantial radiation reduction without significant impairment of image quality, compared to the results obtained using a BMI-based protocol. PMID:25604967

  19. Image quality and radiation reduction of 320-row area detector CT coronary angiography with optimal tube voltage selection and an automatic exposure control system: comparison with body mass index-adapted protocol.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jiyeon; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal; Shim, Hackjoon; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-06-01

    To assess the image quality and radiation exposure of 320-row area detector computed tomography (320-ADCT) coronary angiography with optimal tube voltage selection with the guidance of an automatic exposure control system in comparison with a body mass index (BMI)-adapted protocol. Twenty-two patients (study group) underwent 320-ADCT coronary angiography using an automatic exposure control system with the target standard deviation value of 33 as the image quality index and the lowest possible tube voltage. For comparison, a sex- and BMI-matched group (control group, n = 22) using a BMI-adapted protocol was established. Images of both groups were reconstructed by an iterative reconstruction algorithm. For objective evaluation of the image quality, image noise, vessel density, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and contrast to noise ratio (CNR) were measured. Two blinded readers then subjectively graded the image quality using a four-point scale (1: nondiagnostic to 4: excellent). Radiation exposure was also measured. Although the study group tended to show higher image noise (14.1 ± 3.6 vs. 9.3 ± 2.2 HU, P = 0.111) and higher vessel density (665.5 ± 161 vs. 498 ± 143 HU, P = 0.430) than the control group, the differences were not significant. There was no significant difference between the two groups for SNR (52.5 ± 19.2 vs. 60.6 ± 21.8, P = 0.729), CNR (57.0 ± 19.8 vs. 67.8 ± 23.3, P = 0.531), or subjective image quality scores (3.47 ± 0.55 vs. 3.59 ± 0.56, P = 0.960). However, radiation exposure was significantly reduced by 42 % in the study group (1.9 ± 0.8 vs. 3.6 ± 0.4 mSv, P = 0.003). Optimal tube voltage selection with the guidance of an automatic exposure control system in 320-ADCT coronary angiography allows substantial radiation reduction without significant impairment of image quality, compared to the results obtained using a BMI-based protocol.

  20. New horizons in cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    den Harder, A M; Willemink, M J; de Jong, P A; Schilham, A M R; Rajiah, P; Takx, R A P; Leiner, T

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, cardiovascular computed tomography angiography (CCTA) was associated with considerable radiation doses. The introduction of tube current modulation and automatic tube potential selection as well as high-pitch prospective ECG-triggering and iterative reconstruction offer the ability to decrease dose with approximately one order of magnitude, often to sub-millisievert dose levels. In parallel, advancements in computational technology have enabled the measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR) from CCTA data (FFRCT). This technique shows potential to replace invasively measured FFR to select patients in need of coronary intervention. Furthermore, developments in scanner hardware have led to the introduction of dual-energy and photon-counting CT, which offer the possibility of material decomposition imaging. Dual-energy CT reduces beam hardening, which enables CCTA in patients with a high calcium burden and more robust myocardial CT perfusion imaging. Future-generation CT systems will be capable of counting individual X-ray photons. Photon-counting CT is promising and may result in a substantial further radiation dose reduction, vastly increased spatial resolution, and the introduction of a whole new class of contrast agents. PMID:26932775

  1. Method comparison of automated matching software-assisted cone-beam CT and stereoscopic kilovoltage x-ray positional verification image-guided radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: a prospective analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Clifton D.; Scarbrough, Todd J.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Choi, Mehee; Ting, Joe Y.; Wang, Samuel J.; Papanikolaou, Niko; Rosenthal, David I.

    2009-12-01

    We sought to characterize interchangeability and agreement between cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital stereoscopic kV x-ray (KVX) acquisition, two methods of isocenter positional verification currently used for IGRT of head and neck cancers (HNC). A cohort of 33 patients were near-simultaneously imaged by in-room KVX and CBCT. KVX and CBCT shifts were suggested using manufacturer software for the lateral (X), vertical (Y) and longitudinal (Z) dimensions. Intra-method repeatability, systematic and random error components were calculated for each imaging modality, as were recipe-based PTV expansion margins. Inter-method agreement in each axis was compared using limits of agreement (LOA) methodology, concordance analysis and orthogonal regression. 100 daily positional assessments were performed before daily therapy in 33 patients with head and neck cancer. Systematic error was greater for CBCT in all axes, with larger random error components in the Y- and Z-axis. Repeatability ranged from 9 to 14 mm for all axes, with CBCT showing greater repeatability in 2/3 axes. LOA showed paired shifts to agree 95% of the time within ±11.3 mm in the X-axis, ±9.4 mm in the Y-axis and ±5.5 mm in the Z-axis. Concordance ranged from 'mediocre' to 'satisfactory'. Proportional bias was noted between paired X- and Z-axis measures, with a constant bias component in the Z-axis. Our data suggest non-negligible differences in software-derived CBCT and KVX image-guided directional shifts using formal method comparison statistics. A correction was made to the first line of page 7404 of this article on 26 November 2009. The corrected electronic version is identical to the print version.

  2. Pulmonary Perfused Blood Volume with Dual-Energy CT as Surrogate for Pulmonary Perfusion Assessed with Dynamic Multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Fuld, Matthew K.; Halaweish, Ahmed F.; Haynes, Susan E.; Divekar, Abhay A.; Guo, Junfeng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare measurements of regional pulmonary perfused blood volume (PBV) and pulmonary blood flow (PBF) obtained with computed tomography (CT) in two pig models. Materials and Methods: The institutional animal care and use committee approved all animal studies. CT-derived PBF and PBV were determined in four anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, supine swine by using two methods for creating pulmonary parenchymal perfusion heterogeneity. Two animals were examined after sequentially moving a pulmonary arterial balloon catheter from a distal to a central location, and two others were examined over a range of static airway pressures, which varied the extents of regional PBF. Lung sections were divided into blocks and Pearson correlation coefficients calculated to compare matching regions between the two methods. Results: CT-derived PBF, CT-derived PBV, and their associated coefficients of variation (CV) were closely correlated on a region-by-region basis in both the balloon occlusion (Pearson R = 0.91 and 0.73 for animals 1 and 2, respectively; Pearson R = 0.98 and 0.87 for comparison of normalized mean and CV for animals 1 and 2, respectively) and lung inflation studies (Pearson R = 0.94 and 0.74 for animals 3 and 4, respectively; Pearson R = 0.94 and 0.69 for normalized mean and CV for animals 3 and 4, respectively). When accounting for region-based effects, correlations remained highly significant at the P < .001 level. Conclusion: CT-derived PBV heterogeneity is a suitable surrogate for CT-derived PBF heterogeneity. ©RSNA, 2012 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.12112789/-/DC1 PMID:23192773

  3. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  4. Renal applications of dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Ravi K; Platt, Joel F

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy CT is being increasingly used for abdominal imaging due to its incremental benefit of material characterization without significant increase in radiation dose. Knowledge of the different dual-energy CT acquisition techniques and image processing algorithms is essential to optimize imaging protocols and understand potential limitations while using dual-energy CT renal imaging such as urinary calculi characterization, assessment of renal masses and in CT urography. This review article provides an overview of the current dual-energy CT techniques and use of dual-energy CT in renal imaging.

  5. "High-precision, reconstructed 3D model" of skull scanned by conebeam CT: Reproducibility verified using CAD/CAM data.

    PubMed

    Katsumura, Seiko; Sato, Keita; Ikawa, Tomoko; Yamamura, Keiko; Ando, Eriko; Shigeta, Yuko; Ogawa, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning has recently been introduced into forensic medicine and dentistry. However, the presence of metal restorations in the dentition can adversely affect the quality of three-dimensional reconstruction from CT scans. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the reproducibility of a "high-precision, reconstructed 3D model" obtained from a conebeam CT scan of dentition, a method that might be particularly helpful in forensic medicine. We took conebeam CT and helical CT images of three dry skulls marked with 47 measuring points; reconstructed three-dimensional images; and measured the distances between the points in the 3D images with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) marker. We found that in comparison with the helical CT, conebeam CT is capable of reproducing measurements closer to those obtained from the actual samples. In conclusion, our study indicated that the image-reproduction from a conebeam CT scan was more accurate than that from a helical CT scan. Furthermore, the "high-precision reconstructed 3D model" facilitates reliable visualization of full-sized oral and maxillofacial regions in both helical and conebeam CT scans. PMID:26832374

  6. Respiratory Motional Effect on Cone-Beam CT in Lung Radiation Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Ju-Young Nam, Taek-Keun; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Chung, Woong-Ki; Yoon, Mee-Sun; Nah, Byunk-Sik

    2009-07-01

    The cone-beam CT (CBCT), which is acquired using an on-board imager (OBI) attached to a linear accelerator, is used effectively in the verification of setup accuracy for lung radiation surgery. In this study, the respiratory organ motional effect on the CBCT was evaluated with a properly devised phantom system, and the level of possible error in conditions of a real clinical process was assessed. In a comparison study between the CBCT in static status and CBCT images acquired in 20 different motional cases, we confirmed that the image quality and information of CBCT were degraded, with an increase of motional ranges in the region of inhomogeneous structures. The 4D-CT MIP (50{approx}55%) for the planning of lung radiation surgery and the 4D-CT MIP (full phase) were compared with CBCT in the various motional cases for the evaluation of the influence of the motional effect on CBCT in the process of the setup error correction. The average ratio of relative difference between plan CT: 4D-CT MIP (50%{approx}55%) and CBCT was 5.79% and between plan CT: 4D-CT MIP (50%{approx}55%) and 4D-CT MIP (full phase) was 42.95% in the phantom study. In the analysis of clinical cases of lung radiation surgery, the gross tumor volumes were compared in each CT image. The average ratio of relative difference between plan CT: 4D-CT MIP (50{approx}55%) and CBCT was 10.72% and between plan CT: 4D-CT MIP (50{approx}55%) and 4D-CT MIP (full phase) was 28.19%. These results showed that, although a respiratory organ motional effect on CBCT introduced variation in image quality, the error as a result of this variation could be estimated relatively low in the setup error correction for a gated-lung radiation surgery when the planning was performed in 4D-CT MIP (50{approx}55%), which already included a related signal of motional effect.

  7. NCICT: a computational solution to estimate organ doses for pediatric and adult patients undergoing CT scans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Bolch, Wesley E; Moroz, Brian E; Folio, Les

    2015-12-01

    We developed computational methods and tools to assess organ doses for pediatric and adult patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations. We used the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference pediatric and adult phantoms combined with the Monte Carlo simulation of a reference CT scanner to establish comprehensive organ dose coefficients (DC), organ absorbed dose per unit volumetric CT Dose Index (CTDIvol) (mGy/mGy). We also developed methods to estimate organ doses with tube current modulation techniques and size specific dose estimates. A graphical user interface was designed to obtain user input of patient- and scan-specific parameters, and to calculate and display organ doses. A batch calculation routine was also integrated into the program to automatically calculate organ doses for a large number of patients. We entitled the computer program, National Cancer Institute dosimetry system for CT(NCICT). We compared our dose coefficients with those from CT-Expo, and evaluated the performance of our program using CT patient data. Our pediatric DCs show good agreements of organ dose estimation with those from CT-Expo except for thyroid. Our results support that the adult phantom in CT-Expo seems to represent a pediatric individual between 10 and 15 years rather than an adult. The comparison of CTDIvol values between NCICT and dose pages from 10 selected CT scans shows good agreements less than 12% except for two cases (up to 20%). The organ dose comparison between mean and modulated mAs shows that mean mAs-based calculation significantly overestimates dose (up to 2.4-fold) to the organs in close proximity to lungs in chest and chest-abdomen-pelvis scans. Our program provides more realistic anatomy based on the ICRP reference phantoms, higher age resolution, the most up-to-date bone marrow dosimetry, and several convenient features compared to previous tools. The NCICT will be available for research purpose in the near future.

  8. SPECT/CT Fusion in the Diagnosis of Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Monzen, Yoshio; Tamura, Akihisa; Okazaki, Hajime; Kurose, Taichi; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Kuraoka, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): In this study, we aimed to analyze the relationship between the diagnostic ability of fused single photon emission computed tomography/ computed tomography (SPECT/CT) images in localization of parathyroid lesions and the size of adenomas or hyperplastic glands. Methods: Five patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and 4 patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) were imaged 15 and 120 minutes after the intravenous injection of technetium99m-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI). All patients underwent surgery and 5 parathyroid adenomas and 10 hyperplastic glands were detected. Pathologic findings were correlated with imaging results. Results: The SPECT/CT fusion images were able to detect all parathyroid adenomas even with the greatest axial diameter of 0.6 cm. Planar scintigraphy and SPECT imaging could not detect parathyroid adenomas with an axial diameter of 1.0 to 1.2 cm. Four out of 10 (40%) hyperplastic parathyroid glands were diagnosed, using planar and SPECT imaging and 5 out of 10 (50%) hyperplastic parathyroid glands were localized, using SPECT/CT fusion images. Conclusion: SPECT/CT fusion imaging is a more useful tool for localization of parathyroid lesions, particularly parathyroid adenomas, in comparison with planar and or SPECT imaging. PMID:27408883

  9. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  10. Lipeo-sCT: a novel reversible lipidized salmon calcitonin derivative, its biophysical properties and hypocalcemic activity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weiqiang; Lim, Lee-Yong

    2009-05-12

    We have previously described the design and synthesis of Mal-sCT and compared its biological activity with its reversible counterpart, REAL-sCT. Mal-sCT was salmon calcitonin (sCT) conjugated with two molecules of an epsilon-maleimido lysine derivative of palmitic acid via non-reversible thioether bonds at its cysteine residues while REAL-sCT was sCT conjugated with two molecules of a cysteine derivative of palmitic acid via reducible disulfide bonds at its cysteine residues. Neither compounds when dissolved in water could reproducibly improved the oral deliverability of sCT. The purpose of this study was to characterize and evaluate Lipeo-sCT, a novel sCT analog conjugated via reducible disulfide bonds with two amphiphilic groups consisting of a hydrophobic hexadecyl moiety attached via an ether bond to a hydrophilic triethylene glycol moiety. Lipeo-sCT was successfully synthesized by a 4-step reaction, purified and identified by ESI-MS. Analysis by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) suggested it had a propensity to form aggregates in water, although the aggregation behavior was controllable by modulating solvent polarity. MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay indicated a lack of cytotoxicity against the Caco-2 cells at up to 100 microM. Compared with sCT, Lipeo-sCT lowered plasma calcium to comparable levels when injected subcutaneously at 0.15 mg/kg into female Wistar rats, but the hypocalcemic activity of Lipeo-sCT was prolonged by at least 6 more hours. This was attributable to a continual regeneration of sCT from Lipeo-sCT. sCT was detectable in plasma 8h following subcutaneous injection of Lipeo-sCT (1.90 mg/kg), while Lipeo-sCT was not observed in plasma at all time points. By comparison, sCT was detectable in plasma for less than 2.5h following subcutaneous injection at an equivalent dose (1.50mg/kg). Data from this study complement those of previous studies, and add to the body of

  11. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  12. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 3,2015 ... facts MDCT is a very fast type of computed tomography (CT) scan. MDCT creates pictures of the healthy ...

  13. Pocket atlas of normal CT anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, J.B.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a quick reference for interpreting CT scans of the extracranial organs. This collection of 41 CT scans covers all the major organs of the body: neck and larynx; chest; abdomen; male pelvis; and female pelvis.

  14. Comparative assessment of onabotulinumtoxinA and mirabegron for overactive bladder: an indirect treatment comparison

    PubMed Central

    Freemantle, Nick; Ginsberg, David A; McCool, Rachael; Fleetwood, Kelly; Arber, Mick; Khalaf, Kristin; Loveman, Clara; Ni, Quanhong; Glanville, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Context OnabotulinumtoxinA and mirabegron have recently gained marketing authorisation to treat symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB). Objective To evaluate the relative efficacy of mirabegron and onabotulinumtoxinA in patients with idiopathic OAB. Design Network meta-analysis. Data sources A search of 9 electronic databases, review documents, guidelines and websites. Methods Randomised trials comparing any licensed dose of onabotulinumtoxinA or mirabegron with each other, anticholinergic drugs or placebo were eligible (19 randomised trials were identified). 1 reviewer extracted data from the studies and a second reviewer checked the data. Candidate trials were assessed for similarity and networks were developed for each outcome. Bayesian network meta-analysis was conducted using both fixed-effects and random-effects models. When there were differences in mean baseline values between mirabegron and onabotulinumtoxinA trials they were adjusted for using network meta-regression (NMR). Results No studies directly comparing onabotulinumtoxinA to mirabegron were identified. A network was created for each of the 7 outcomes, with 3–9 studies included in each individual network. The trials included in the networks were broadly similar. Patients in the onabotulinumtoxinA trials had more urinary incontinence and urgency episodes at baseline than patients in the mirabegron trials and these differences were adjusted for using NMR. Both onabotulinumtoxinA and mirabegron were more efficacious than placebo at reducing the frequency of urinary incontinence, urgency, urination and nocturia. OnabotulinumtoxinA was more efficacious than mirabegron (50 and 25 mg) in completely resolving daily episodes of urinary incontinence and urgency and in reducing the frequency of urinary incontinence, urgency and urination. NMR supported the results of the network meta-analysis. Conclusions In the absence of head-to-head trials comparing onabotulinumtoxinA to mirabegron, this indirect

  15. The role of adalimumab in rheumatic and autoimmune disorders: comparison with other biologic agents

    PubMed Central

    Reimold, Andreas M

    2012-01-01

    Adalimumab (ADA) is a biologic medication that dampens inflammatory pathways by binding to the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved ADA as a medication for use in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn’s disease, psoriasis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This year marks 10 years of clinical experience with ADA. Long-term extension studies of some of the initial clinical trials, as well as data from large patient registries, are demonstrating ongoing benefit for responders. Potential side effects such as increased risk of infection, lymphoma, congestive heart failure, and demyelination continue to be examined, as the available data are not unanimous in showing an increase in incidence. In balancing both the advantages and the disadvantages of using ADA, the drug’s overall effectiveness and its availability for use in patients with hepatic or renal comorbidities are weighed against the high cost. ADA is expected to have a leading role in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions for years to come. Future studies will need to address the optimal sequence of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics to use, combinations of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics, and head-to-head comparisons of biologics in clinical trials. For those who go into clinical remission on an anti-tumor necrosis factor medication, unanswered questions remain about identifying the patients who can maintain the remission off all drugs, or at least off injected medication. Given the cost of biologic drugs, even studies that increase the interval between drug doses in well-controlled patients could provide financial benefits.

  16. CT "halo sign" in pulmonary tuberculoma.

    PubMed

    Gaeta, M; Volta, S; Stroscio, S; Romeo, P; Pandolfo, I

    1992-01-01

    The CT halo sign has been described as the CT finding of a low-attenuation zone surrounding a pulmonary nodule. It is an early clue to the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. We describe a case of CT halo sign associated with a pulmonary tuberculoma. Therefore, we think that a diagnosis other than invasive pulmonary aspergillosis should be considered in the presence of the CT halo sign in immunocompetent patients.

  17. CT Scans - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... الأشعة المقطعية الحاسوبية - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) CT (Computerized Tomography) Scan CT ( ... 扫描 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) CT (Computerized Tomography) Scan CT ( ...

  18. SU-E-I-73: Clinical Evaluation of CT Image Reconstructed Using Interior Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Ge, G; Winkler, M; Cong, W; Wang, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation dose reduction has been a long standing challenge in CT imaging of obese patients. Recent advances in interior tomography (reconstruction of an interior region of interest (ROI) from line integrals associated with only paths through the ROI) promise to achieve significant radiation dose reduction without compromising image quality. This study is to investigate the application of this technique in CT imaging through evaluating imaging quality reconstructed from patient data. Methods: Projection data were directly obtained from patients who had CT examinations in a Dual Source CT scanner (DSCT). Two detectors in a DSCT acquired projection data simultaneously. One detector provided projection data for full field of view (FOV, 50 cm) while another detectors provided truncated projection data for a FOV of 26 cm. Full FOV CT images were reconstructed using both filtered back projection and iterative algorithm; while interior tomography algorithm was implemented to reconstruct ROI images. For comparison reason, FBP was also used to reconstruct ROI images. Reconstructed CT images were evaluated by radiologists and compared with images from CT scanner. Results: The results show that the reconstructed ROI image was in excellent agreement with the truth inside the ROI, obtained from images from CT scanner, and the detailed features in the ROI were quantitatively accurate. Radiologists evaluation shows that CT images reconstructed with interior tomography met diagnosis requirements. Radiation dose may be reduced up to 50% using interior tomography, depending on patient size. Conclusion: This study shows that interior tomography can be readily employed in CT imaging for radiation dose reduction. It may be especially useful in imaging obese patients, whose subcutaneous tissue is less clinically relevant but may significantly increase radiation dose.

  19. Study on Neurological Manifestations of Eclampsia & Findings of CT scan of Brain.

    PubMed

    Begum, F; Nahar, K; Ahmed, M U; Ferdousi, R A; Akter, F A; Rahman, M M

    2015-10-01

    This cross sectional study was carried out in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital during the period of January 2011 to December 2012 to evaluate neurological manifestations in eclampsia by CT scan of brain. A total 35 patients with eclampsia were studied, who underwent CT scan of brain in Radiology & Imaging Department of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital. The study patients were divided into two groups, those who had changes in brain on CT scan (Group A) & those who had no changes in brain on CT scan (Group B). Finally the study variables were compared between these two groups. Each selected patient fulfilling the criteria was sent to the department of Radiology & Imaging for CT scanning of brain. In antepartum cases of eclampsia CT scan of brain were done after delivery/ termination of pregnancy. In all cases, CT scan of brain was done within 72 hours of admission. Out of 35 patients total 85.72% had changes in brain on CT scan & 14.28% had no changes in brain on CT scan. Among them 45.72% patients had cerebral oedema, 37.14% had cerebral infarct & 2.86% patients had intracerebral haemorrhage. Comparison of neurological parameters were done & showed that there were statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding headache, visual disturbance, hypereflexia & depression of consciousness. There was no statistically significant difference regarding aphasia & hemiplegia between the two groups. So the CT scan of brain has been useful in demonstrating the lesion of brain in patients with eclampsia & also helpful to evaluate the neurological manifestations in eclampsia.

  20. CT Innovators Reunion: Where Are They Now?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    Each year, "Campus Technology" ("CT") gazes across higher ed horizons to identify the most innovative IT programs at colleges and universities around the globe. The projects "CT" profiles are inspiring examples of technology making a difference on campus--at least at that moment. The question is, have they stood the test of time? "CT" followed up…

  1. SU-E-J-120: Comparing 4D CT Computed Ventilation to Lung Function Measured with Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, B; Chen, Q

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To correlate ventilation parameters computed from 4D CT to ventilation, profusion, and gas exchange measured with hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI for a set of lung cancer patients. Methods: Hyperpolarized Xe-129 MRI lung scans were acquired for lung cancer patients, before and after radiation therapy, measuring ventilation, perfusion, and gas exchange. In the standard clinical workflow, these patients also received 4D CT scans before treatment. Ventilation was computed from 4D CT using deformable image registration (DIR). All phases of the 4D CT scan were registered using a B-spline deformable registration. Ventilation at the voxel level was then computed for each phase based on a Jacobian volume expansion metric, yielding phase sorted ventilation images. Ventilation based upon 4D CT and Xe-129 MRI were co-registered, allowing qualitative visual comparison and qualitative comparison via the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Analysis shows a weak correlation between hyperpolarized Xe-129 MRI and 4D CT DIR ventilation, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.17 to 0.22. Further work will refine the DIR parameters to optimize the correlation. The weak correlation could be due to the limitations of 4D CT, registration algorithms, or the Xe-129 MRI imaging. Continued development will refine parameters to optimize correlation. Conclusion: Current analysis yields a minimal correlation between 4D CT DIR and Xe-129 MRI ventilation. Funding provided by the 2014 George Amorino Pilot Grant in Radiation Oncology at the University of Virginia.

  2. Filtered back-projection reconstruction for attenuation proton CT along most likely paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiñones, C. T.; Létang, J. M.; Rit, S.

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates the attenuation of a proton beam to reconstruct the map of the linear attenuation coefficient of a material which is mainly caused by the inelastic interactions of protons with matter. Attenuation proton computed tomography (pCT) suffers from a poor spatial resolution due to multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) of protons in matter, similarly to the conventional energy-loss pCT. We therefore adapted a recent filtered back-projection algorithm along the most likely path (MLP) of protons for energy-loss pCT (Rit et al 2013) to attenuation pCT assuming a pCT scanner that can track the position and the direction of protons before and after the scanned object. Monte Carlo simulations of pCT acquisitions of density and spatial resolution phantoms were performed to characterize the new algorithm using Geant4 (via Gate). Attenuation pCT assumes an energy-independent inelastic cross-section, and the impact of the energy dependence of the inelastic cross-section below 100 MeV showed a capping artifact when the residual energy was below 100 MeV behind the object. The statistical limitation has been determined analytically and it was found that the noise in attenuation pCT images is 411 times and 278 times higher than the noise in energy-loss pCT images for the same imaging dose at 200 MeV and 300 MeV, respectively. Comparison of the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT images with a conventional straight-line path binning showed that incorporating the MLP estimates during reconstruction improves the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT. Moreover, regardless of the significant noise in attenuation pCT images, the spatial resolution of attenuation pCT was better than that of conventional energy-loss pCT in some studied situations thanks to the interplay of MCS and attenuation known as the West-Sherwood effect.

  3. Overview of multisource CT systems and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun; Lu, Yang; Zhuang, Tiange; Wang, Ge

    2010-09-01

    Multiple-source cone-beam scanning is a promising mode for dynamic volumetric CT/micro-CT. The first dynamic CT system is the Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (DSR) built in 1979. The pursuance for higher temporal resolution has largely driven the development of CT technology, and recently led to the emergence of Siemens dual-source CT scanner. Given the impact and limitation of dual-source cardiac CT, triple-source cone-beam CT seems a natural extension for future cardiac CT. Our work shows that trinity (triple-source architecture) is superior to duality (dual-source architecture) for helical cone-beam CT in terms of exact reconstruction. In particular, a triple-source helical scan allows a perfect mosaic of longitudinally truncated cone-beam data to satisfy the Orlov condition and yields better noise performance than the dual-source counterpart. In the (2N+1)-source helical CT case, the more sources, the higher temporal resolution. In the N-source saddle CT case, a triple-source scan offers the best temporal resolution for continuous dynamic exact reconstruction of a central volume. The recently developed multi-source cone-beam algorithms include an exact backprojection-filtration (BPF) approach and a "slow" exact filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm for (2N+1)-source helical CT, two fast quasi-exact FBP algorithms for triple-source helical CT, as well as a fast exact FBP algorithm for triple-source saddle CT. Some latest ideas will be also discussed, such as multi-source interior tomography and multi-beam field-emission x-ray CT.

  4. Average radiation dose in standard CT examinations of the head: results of the 1990 NEXT survey.

    PubMed

    Conway, B J; McCrohan, J L; Antonsen, R G; Rueter, F G; Slayton, R J; Suleiman, O H

    1992-07-01

    In 1990, as part of the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) program, 252 computed tomographic (CT) systems were evaluated to measure radiation doses associated with standard head CT in adults. The multiple-scan average dose (MSAD) was used as the dose descriptor. For most of the systems, the MSAD at the midpoint on the central axis of a standard dosimetry phantom was between 34 and 55 mGy. Doses were as high as 140 mGy, and dose sometimes varied by a factor of two or more for identical CT units. This range indicates that dose can potentially be reduced by careful selection of standard CT techniques. Users of CT systems should be aware of radiation dose delivered with CT, dose ranges associated with different systems, and doses delivered with their particular unit, which requires that dose performance of CT systems be assessed by means of a protocol that allows comparison of data collected for identical and/or different units.

  5. CFD simulations of a deforming human lung using dynamic and static CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2015-11-01

    The authors have developed a CFD model to simulate airflow in deforming lungs using dynamic (4D) CT images. After obtaining the surface mesh for one CT image, we deformed the surface mesh to match other CT images using an image registration technique. During the CFD simulations, we deformed the surface mesh by cubic interpolation as a function of lung volume, and deformed the volume mesh using a computational solid mechanics-based algorithm. To investigate the effect of CT scanning method and relative hysteresis with respect to lung volume on pressure drop along the central airways, we performed CFD simulations using different numbers of 4D and static CT images of one healthy subject. Based on the simulation with 13 4DCT images, we found that air flow fractions in airways remain nearly constant over time. By comparing the simulations with 13, 2, and 1 4DCT images, we found that the overall effect of relative hysteresis of lung structure on pressure drop along each branch at peak inspiration was 12%, and the effect of deformation was 16%. As a result of the comparison between simulations with 2 and 1 of 4D and static CT images, the effect of CT scanning method was 16-39%, depending on the deformation of the lung. NIH grants R01-HL094315, U01-HL114494, R01-HL112986, and S10-RR022421. Computer time provided by XSEDE.

  6. Conflicting or complementary role of computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in the assessment of thymic cancer and thymoma: our experience and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Scagliori, Elena; Evangelista, Laura; Panunzio, Annalori; Calabrese, Fiorella; Nannini, Nazarena; Polverosi, Roberta; Pomerri, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in patients with thymic cancer and thymoma at initial staging. Methods We retrospectively reviewed CT and PET/CT scans of 26 patients with a thymic cancer (n = 9) or thymoma (n = 17). Chest CT findings documented were qualitative and quantitative. Both qualitative and semiquantitative data were recovered by PET/CT. The comparisons among histological entities, outcome, and qualitative data from CT and PET/CT were made by non-parametric analysis. Results PET/CT resulted positive in 15/17 patients with thymoma. CT was available in 5/9 (56%) patients with thymic cancer and in 3/17 with thymoma. All quantitative CT parameters were significantly higher in patients with thymic cancer than thymoma (maximum axial diameter: 45 vs. 20 mm, maximum longitudinal diameter: 69 vs. 21 mm and volume: 77.91 vs. 4.52 mL; all P < 0.05). Conversely, only metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis were significantly different in patients with thymic cancer than thymoma (126.53 vs. 6.03 cm3 and 246.05 vs. 20.32, respectively; both P < 0.05). After a median follow-up time of 17.45 months, four recurrences of disease occurred: three in patients with thymic cancer and one with a type B2 thymoma. CT volume in patients with recurrent disease was 102.19 mL versus a median value of 62.5 mL in six disease-free patients. MTV was higher in the recurrent than disease-free patient subset (143.3 vs. 81.13 cm3), although not statistically significant (P = 0.075). Conclusion Our preliminary results demonstrated that both morphological and metabolic volume could be useful from a diagnostic and prognostic point of view in thymic cancer and thymoma patients. A large multi-center clinical trial experience for confirming the findings of this study seems mandatory. PMID:26273398

  7. μPET imaging of the pharmacokinetic behavior of medium and high molar mass (89)Zr-labeled poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) in comparison to poly(ethylene glycol).

    PubMed

    Wyffels, Leonie; Verbrugghen, Thomas; Monnery, Bryn D; Glassner, Mathias; Stroobants, Sigrid; Hoogenboom, Richard; Staelens, Steven

    2016-08-10

    Poly(2-oxazoline)s are a promising class of polymers for biomedical applications and a versatile alternative to poly(ethylene glycol)s (PEG). In this work, the pharmacokinetic behavior of well defined (89)Zr-labeled poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline)s (PEtOx) was evaluated and compared to that of (89)Zr-labeled PEG, both with varying molar mass. Amine-terminated PEtOx of low dispersity in a molar mass range of 20 to 110kDa and PEG of 20 and 40kDa were functionalized with a desferrioxamine chelator and radiolabeled with (89)Zr. The tissue distribution of both radiolabeled PEtOx and PEG polymers was studied by means of micro Positron Emission Tomography (μPET) molecular imaging in mice longitudinally up to 1week post injection, followed by ex vivo biodistribution. As previously described for other classes of non-ionic polymers, the blood clearance of PEtOx decreased with molar mass. The cut off for glomerular filtration of PEtOx is likely to be around 40kDa. The head to head comparison of PEG and PEtOx revealed that the biodistribution is mostly dominated by polymer chain length and not polymer molar mass. This study constitutes an important addition to further establishing PEtOx as a promising polymer in biomedical applications. PMID:27235979

  8. Comparison of computed tomography dose reporting software.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, A; Sun, Z; Pongnapang, N; Ng, K-H

    2012-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) dose reporting software facilitates the estimation of doses to patients undergoing CT examinations. In this study, comparison of three software packages, i.e. CT-Expo (version 1.5, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany), ImPACT CT Patients Dosimetry Calculator (version 0.99×, Imaging Performance Assessment on Computed Tomography, www.impactscan.org) and WinDose (version 2.1a, Wellhofer Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany), has been made in terms of their calculation algorithm and the results of calculated doses. Estimations were performed for head, chest, abdominal and pelvic examinations based on the protocols recommended by European guidelines using single-slice CT (SSCT) (Siemens Somatom Plus 4, Erlangen, Germany) and multi-slice CT (MSCT) (Siemens Sensation 16, Erlangen, Germany) for software-based female and male phantoms. The results showed that there are some differences in final dose reporting provided by these software packages. There are deviations of effective doses produced by these software packages. Percentages of coefficient of variance range from 3.3 to 23.4 % in SSCT and from 10.6 to 43.8 % in MSCT. It is important that researchers state the name of the software that is used to estimate the various CT dose quantities. Users must also understand the equivalent terminologies between the information obtained from the CT console and the software packages in order to use the software correctly.

  9. An assessment of the iPad 2 as a CT teleradiology tool using brain CT with subtle intracranial hemorrhage under conventional illumination.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon Bum; Choi, Hyuk Joong; Lee, Jeong Hun; Kang, Bo Seung

    2013-08-01

    We examined the potential of the iPad 2 as a teleradiologic tool for evaluating brain computed tomography (CT) with subtle hemorrhage in the conventional lighting conditions which are common situations in the remote CT reading. The comparison of the clinician's performance was undertaken through detecting hemorrhage by the iPad 2 and the clinical liquid crystal display (LCD) monitor. We selected 100 brain CT exams performed for head trauma or headache. Fifty had subtle radiological signs of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), while the other 50 showed no significant abnormality. Five emergency medicine physicians reviewed these brain CT scans using the iPad 2 and the LCD monitor, scoring the probability of ICH on each exam on a five-point scale. Result showed high sensitivities and specificities in both devices. We generated receiver operating characteristic curves and calculated the average area under the curve of the iPad 2 and the LCD (0.935 and 0.900). Using the iPad 2 and reliable internet connectivity, clinicians can provide remote evaluation of brain CT with subtle hemorrhage under suboptimal viewing condition. Considering the distinct advantages of the iPad 2, the popular out-of-hospital use of mobile CT teleradiology would be anticipated soon.

  10. Progress in SPECT/CT imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Youngho; Franc, Benjamin L; Hawkins, Randall A; Wong, Kenneth H; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2006-08-01

    images obtained using the standard reconstruction technique. The experimental reconstruction algorithm improved spatial resolution, reduced streak artifacts, and yielded a better correlation with anatomic details of CT in comparison to conventional reconstruction methods (e.g., filtered back-projection or OSEM with attenuation correction only). Images produced with the experimental algorithm produced a subjective improvement in the confidence of interpretation for 11 of 12 studies. There were also changes in interpretations for 4 of 12 studies although the changes were not sufficient to alter prognosis or the patient treatment plan. PMID:16866563

  11. Progress in SPECT/CT imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Youngho; Franc, Benjamin L; Hawkins, Randall A; Wong, Kenneth H; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2006-08-01

    images obtained using the standard reconstruction technique. The experimental reconstruction algorithm improved spatial resolution, reduced streak artifacts, and yielded a better correlation with anatomic details of CT in comparison to conventional reconstruction methods (e.g., filtered back-projection or OSEM with attenuation correction only). Images produced with the experimental algorithm produced a subjective improvement in the confidence of interpretation for 11 of 12 studies. There were also changes in interpretations for 4 of 12 studies although the changes were not sufficient to alter prognosis or the patient treatment plan.

  12. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-01-21

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging. PMID:22156174

  13. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  14. Acute intestinal anisakiasis: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, H N; Avcu, S; Pauwels, W; Mortelé, K J; De Backer, A I

    2012-09-01

    Small bowel anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease that results from consumption of raw or insufficiently pickled, salted, smoked, or cooked wild marine fish infected with Anisakis larvae. We report a case of intestinal anisakiasis in a 63-year-old woman presenting with acute onset of abdominal complaints one day after ingestion of raw wild-caught herring from the Northsea. Computed tomography (CT) scanning demonstrated thickening of the distal small bowel wall, mucosa with hyperenhancement, mural stratification, fluid accumulation within dilated small-bowel loops and hyperemia of mesenteric vessels. In patients with a recent history of eating raw marine fish presenting with acute onset of abdominal complaints and CT features of acute small bowel inflammation the possibility of anisakiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal syndromes.

  15. SU-E-J-72: Dosimetric Study of Cone-Beam CT-Based Radiation Treatment Planning Using a Patient-Specific Stepwise CT-Density Table

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S; Le, Q; Mutaf, Y; Yi, B; D’Souza, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess dose calculation accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) based treatment plans using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density conversion table in comparison to conventional CT-based treatment plans. Methods: Unlike CT-based treatment planning which use fixed CT-density table, this study used patient-specific CT-density table to minimize the errors in reconstructed mass densities due to the effects of CBCT Hounsfield unit (HU) uncertainties. The patient-specific CT-density table was a stepwise function which maps HUs to only 6 classes of materials with different mass densities: air (0.00121g/cm3), lung (0.26g/cm3), adipose (0.95g/cm3), tissue (1.05 g/cm3), cartilage/bone (1.6g/cm3), and other (3g/cm3). HU thresholds to define different materials were adjusted for each CBCT via best match with the known tissue types in these images. Dose distributions were compared between CT-based plans and CBCT-based plans (IMRT/VMAT) for four types of treatment sites: head and neck (HN), lung, pancreas, and pelvis. For dosimetric comparison, PTV mean dose in both plans were compared. A gamma analysis was also performed to directly compare dosimetry in the two plans. Results: Compared to CT-based plans, the differences for PTV mean dose were 0.1% for pelvis, 1.1% for pancreas, 1.8% for lung, and −2.5% for HN in CBCT-based plans. The gamma passing rate was 99.8% for pelvis, 99.6% for pancreas, and 99.3% for lung with 3%/3mm criteria, and 80.5% for head and neck with 5%/3mm criteria. Different dosimetry accuracy level was observed: 1% for pelvis, 3% for lung and pancreas, and 5% for head and neck. Conclusion: By converting CBCT data to 6 classes of materials for dose calculation, 3% of dose calculation accuracy can be achieved for anatomical sites studied here, except HN which had a 5% accuracy. CBCT-based treatment planning using a patient-specific stepwise CT-density table can facilitate the evaluation of dosimetry changes resulting from variation in patient anatomy.

  16. Postmortem pulmonary CT in hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Wolf; Thali, Michael; Giugni, Giannina; Winklhofer, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    Fatal hypothermia has been associated with pulmonary edema. With postmortem full body computed tomography scanning (PMCT), the lungs can also be examined for CT attenuation. In fatal hypothermia cases low CT attenuation appeared to prevail in the lungs. We compared 14 cases of fatal hypothermia with an age-sex matched control group. Additionally, 4 cases of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning were examined. Furthermore, 10 test cases were examined to test predictability based on PMCT. Two readers measured CT attenuation on four different axial slices across the lungs (blinded to case group and other reader's results). Hypothermia was associated with statistically significantly lower lung PMCT attenuation and lower lung weights than controls, and there was a dose-effect relationship at an environmental temperature cutoff of 2 °C. CO poisoning yielded low pulmonary attenuation but higher lung weights. General model based prediction yielded a 94% probability for fatal hypothermia deaths and a 21% probability for non-hypothermia deaths in the test group. Increased breathing rate is known to accompany both CO poisoning and hypothermia, so this could partly explain the low PMCT lung attenuation due to an oxygen dissociation curve left shift. A more marked distension in fatal hypothermia, compared to CO poisoning, indicates that further, possibly different mechanisms, are involved in these cases. Increased dead space and increased stiffness to deflation (but not inflation) appear to be effects of inhaling cold air (but not CO) that may explain the difference in low PMCT attenuation seen in hypothermia cases. PMID:25326676

  17. CT-assisted agile manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, James H.; Yancey, Robert N.

    1996-11-01

    The next century will witness at least two great revolutions in the way goods are produced. First, workers will use the medium of virtual reality in all aspects of marketing, research, development, prototyping, manufacturing, sales and service. Second, market forces will drive manufacturing towards small-lot production and just-in-time delivery. Already, we can discern the merging of these megatrends into what some are calling agile manufacturing. Under this new paradigm, parts and processes will be designed and engineered within the mind of a computer, tooled and manufactured by the offspring of today's rapid prototyping equipment, and evaluated for performance and reliability by advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques and sophisticated computational models. Computed tomography (CT) is the premier example of an NDE method suitable for future agile manufacturing activities. It is the only modality that provides convenient access to the full suite of engineering data that users will need to avail themselves of computer- aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, and computer- aided engineering capabilities, as well as newly emerging reverse engineering, rapid prototyping and solid freeform fabrication technologies. As such, CT is assured a central, utilitarian role in future industrial operations. An overview of this exciting future for industrial CT is presented.

  18. Postmortem pulmonary CT in hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Wolf; Thali, Michael; Giugni, Giannina; Winklhofer, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    Fatal hypothermia has been associated with pulmonary edema. With postmortem full body computed tomography scanning (PMCT), the lungs can also be examined for CT attenuation. In fatal hypothermia cases low CT attenuation appeared to prevail in the lungs. We compared 14 cases of fatal hypothermia with an age-sex matched control group. Additionally, 4 cases of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning were examined. Furthermore, 10 test cases were examined to test predictability based on PMCT. Two readers measured CT attenuation on four different axial slices across the lungs (blinded to case group and other reader's results). Hypothermia was associated with statistically significantly lower lung PMCT attenuation and lower lung weights than controls, and there was a dose-effect relationship at an environmental temperature cutoff of 2 °C. CO poisoning yielded low pulmonary attenuation but higher lung weights. General model based prediction yielded a 94% probability for fatal hypothermia deaths and a 21% probability for non-hypothermia deaths in the test group. Increased breathing rate is known to accompany both CO poisoning and hypothermia, so this could partly explain the low PMCT lung attenuation due to an oxygen dissociation curve left shift. A more marked distension in fatal hypothermia, compared to CO poisoning, indicates that further, possibly different mechanisms, are involved in these cases. Increased dead space and increased stiffness to deflation (but not inflation) appear to be effects of inhaling cold air (but not CO) that may explain the difference in low PMCT attenuation seen in hypothermia cases.

  19. SU-C-9A-06: The Impact of CT Image Used for Attenuation Correction in 4D-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Y; Bowsher, J; Yan, S; Cai, J; Das, S; Yin, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the appropriateness of using 3D non-gated CT image for attenuation correction (AC) in a 4D-PET (gated PET) imaging protocol used in radiotherapy treatment planning simulation. Methods: The 4D-PET imaging protocol in a Siemens PET/CT simulator (Biograph mCT, Siemens Medical Solutions, Hoffman Estates, IL) was evaluated. CIRS Dynamic Thorax Phantom (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA) with a moving glass sphere (8 mL) in the middle of its thorax portion was used in the experiments. The glass was filled with {sup 18}F-FDG and was in a longitudinal motion derived from a real patient breathing pattern. Varian RPM system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was used for respiratory gating. Both phase-gating and amplitude-gating methods were tested. The clinical imaging protocol was modified to use three different CT images for AC in 4D-PET reconstruction: first is to use a single-phase CT image to mimic actual clinical protocol (single-CT-PET); second is to use the average intensity projection CT (AveIP-CT) derived from 4D-CT scanning (AveIP-CT-PET); third is to use 4D-CT image to do the phase-matched AC (phase-matching- PET). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) and volume of the moving target (glass sphere) with threshold of 40% SUVmax were calculated for comparison between 4D-PET images derived with different AC methods. Results: The SUVmax varied 7.3%±6.9% over the breathing cycle in single-CT-PET, compared to 2.5%±2.8% in AveIP-CT-PET and 1.3%±1.2% in phasematching PET. The SUVmax in single-CT-PET differed by up to 15% from those in phase-matching-PET. The target volumes measured from single- CT-PET images also presented variations up to 10% among different phases of 4D PET in both phase-gating and amplitude-gating experiments. Conclusion: Attenuation correction using non-gated CT in 4D-PET imaging is not optimal process for quantitative analysis. Clinical 4D-PET imaging protocols should consider phase-matched 4D-CT image if available to achieve better accuracy.

  20. Regularized reconstruction in quantitative SPECT using CT side information from hybrid imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewaraja, Yuni K.; Koral, Kenneth F.; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2010-05-01

    A penalized-likelihood (PL) SPECT reconstruction method using a modified regularizer that accounts for anatomical boundary side information was implemented to achieve accurate estimates of both the total target activity and the activity distribution within targets. In both simulations and experimental I-131 phantom studies, reconstructions from (1) penalized likelihood employing CT-side information-based regularization (PL-CT), (2) penalized likelihood with edge preserving regularization (no CT) and (3) penalized likelihood with conventional spatially invariant quadratic regularization (no CT) were compared with (4) ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM), which is the iterative algorithm conventionally used in clinics for quantitative SPECT. Evaluations included phantom studies with perfect and imperfect side information and studies with uniform and non-uniform activity distributions in the target. For targets with uniform activity, the PL-CT images and profiles were closest to the 'truth', avoided the edge offshoots evident with OSEM and minimized the blurring across boundaries evident with regularization without CT information. Apart from visual comparison, reconstruction accuracy was evaluated using the bias and standard deviation (STD) of the total target activity estimate and the root mean square error (RMSE) of the activity distribution within the target. PL-CT reconstruction reduced both bias and RMSE compared with regularization without side information. When compared with unregularized OSEM, PL-CT reduced RMSE and STD while bias was comparable. For targets with non-uniform activity, these improvements with PL-CT were observed only when the change in activity was matched by a change in the anatomical image and the corresponding inner boundary was also used to control the regularization. In summary, the present work demonstrates the potential of using CT side information to obtain improved estimates of the activity distribution in targets without

  1. Precise 3D dimensional metrology using high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (μCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunke, Oliver; Santillan, Javier; Suppes, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    Over the past decade computed tomography (CT) with conventional x-ray sources has evolved from an imaging method in medicine to a well established technology for industrial applications in fields such as material science, light metals and plastics processing, microelectronics and geology. By using modern microfocus and nanofocus X-ray tubes, parts can be scanned with sub-micrometer resolutions. Currently, micro-CT is a technology increasingly used for metrology applications in the automotive industry. CT offers big advantages compared with conventional tactile or optical coordinate measuring machines (CMMs). This is of greater importance if complex parts with hidden or difficult accessible surfaces have to be measured. In these cases, CT offers the advantage of a high density of measurement points and a non-destructive and fast capturing of the sample's complete geometry. When using this growing technology the question arises how precise a μCT based CMM can measure as compared to conventional and established methods for coordinate measurements. For characterizing the metrological capabilities of a tactile or optical CMM, internationally standardized parameters like length measurement error and probing error are defined and used. To increase the acceptance of CT as a metrological method, our work seeks to clarify the definition and usage of parameters used in the field of metrology as these apply to CT. In this paper, an overview of the process chain in CT based metrology will be given and metrological characteristics will be described. For the potential user of CT as 3D metrology tool it is important to show the measurement accuracy and repeatability on realistic samples. Following a discussion of CT metrology techniques, two samples are discussed. The first compares a measured CT Data set to CAD data using CMM data as a standard for comparison of results. The second data second realistic data set will compare the results of applying both the CMM method of

  2. Dual-energy micro-CT imaging of pulmonary airway obstruction: correlation with micro-SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Befera, N.; Clark, D.; Qi, Y.; Johnson, G. A.

    2014-03-01

    To match recent clinical dual energy (DE) CT studies focusing on the lung, similar developments for DE micro-CT of the rodent lung are required. Our group has been actively engaged in designing pulmonary gating techniques for micro- CT, and has also introduced the first DE micro-CT imaging method of the rodent lung. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of DE micro-CT imaging for the evaluation of airway obstruction in mice, and to compare the method with micro single photon emission computed tomography (micro-SPECT) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA). The results suggest that the induced pulmonary airway obstruction causes either atelectasis, or air-trapping similar to asthma or chronic bronchitis. Atelectasis could only be detected at early time points in DE micro-CT images, and is associated with a large increase in blood fraction and decrease in air fraction. Air trapping had an opposite effect with larger air fraction and decreased blood fraction shown by DE micro-CT. The decrease in perfusion to the hypoventilated lung (hypoxic vasoconstriction) is also seen in micro-SPECT. The proposed DE micro-CT technique for imaging localized airway obstruction performed well in our evaluation, and provides a higher resolution compared to micro-SPECT. Both DE micro-CT and micro-SPECT provide critical, quantitative lung biomarkers for image-based anatomical and functional information in the small animal. The methods are readily linked to clinical methods allowing direct comparison of preclinical and clinical results.

  3. Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the Carcinoma of the Uterus: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Musto, Alessandra; Grassetto, Gaia; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Rampin, Lucia; Fuster, David; Giammarile, Francesco; Colletti, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    In the present review we reported the value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT in face of uterine cancer, in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. Moreover, we made a comparison with the other imaging techniques currently used to evacuate these tumors including contrast-enhanced CT, contrast enhanced-MRI and transvaginal ultrasonography. FDG PET/CT has been reported to be of particular value in detecting occult metastatic lesions, in prediction of response to treatment and as a pro-gnostic factor. PMID:25323881

  4. Preoperative staging of colorectal cancer: CT vs. integrated FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang Soo; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Min, Jung Jun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Chung, Tae Woong; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2008-01-01

    Accurate preoperative staging is essential in determining the optimal therapeutic planning for individual patients. The computed tomography (CT) in the preoperative staging of colorectal cancer, even if controversial, may be useful for planning surgery and/or neoadjuvant therapy, particularly when local tumor extension into adjacent organs or distant metastases are detected. There have been significant changes in the CT technology with the advent of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scanner. Advances in CT technology have raised interest in the potential role of CT for detection and staging of colorectal cancer. In recent studies, MDCT with MPR images has shown promising accuracy in the evaluation of local extent and nodal involvement of colorectal cancer. Combined PET/CT images have significant advantages over either alone because it provides both functional and anatomical data. Therefore, it is natural to expect that PET/CT would improve the accuracy of preoperative staging of colorectal cancer. The most significant additional information provided by PET/CT relates to the accurate detection of distant metastases. For the evaluation of patients with colorectal cancer, CT has relative advantages over PET/CT in regard to the depth of tumor invasion through the wall, extramural extension, and regional lymph node metastases. PET/CT should be performed on selected patients with suggestive but inconclusive metastatic lesions with CT. In addition, PET/CT with dedicated CT protocols, such as contrast-enhanced PET/CT and PET/CT colonography, may replace the diagnostic CT for the preoperative staging of colorectal cancer.

  5. Improvement of the cine-CT based 4D-CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Tinsu; Sun Xiaojun; Luo Dershan

    2007-11-15

    An improved 4D-CT utility has been developed on the GE LightSpeed multislice CT (MSCT) and Discovery PET/CT scanners, which have the cine CT scan capability. Two new features have been added in this 4D-CT over the commercial Advantage 4D-CT from GE. One feature was a new tool for disabling parts of the respiratory signal with irregular respiration and improving the accuracy of phase determination for the respiratory signal from the Varian real-time positioning and monitoring (RPM) system before sorting of the cine CT images into the 4D-CT images. The second feature was to allow generation of the maximum-intensity-projection (MIP), average (AVG) and minimum-intensity-projection (mip) CT images from the cine CT images without a respiratory signal. The implementation enables the assessment of tumor motion in treatment planning with the MIP, AVG, and mip CT images on the GE MSCT and PET/CT scanners without the RPM and the Advantage 4D-CT with a GE Advantage windows workstation. Several clinical examples are included to illustrate this new application.

  6. Metal artifact reduction in CT via ray profile correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    In computed tomography (CT), metal implants increase the inconsistencies between the measured data and the linear assumption made by the analytical CT reconstruction algorithm. The inconsistencies appear in the form of dark and bright bands and streaks in the reconstructed image, collectively called metal artifacts. The standard method for metal artifact reduction (MAR) replaces the inconsistent data with the interpolated data. However, sinogram interpolation not only introduces new artifacts but it also suffers from the loss of detail near the implanted metals. With the help of a prior image that is usually estimated from the metal artifact-degraded image via computer vision techniques, improvements are feasible but still no MAR method exists that is widely accepted and utilized. We propose a technique that utilizes a prior image from a CT scan taken of the patient before implanting the metal objects. Hence there is a sufficient amount of structural similarity to cover the loss of detail around the metal implants. Using the prior scan and a segmentation or model of the metal implant our method then replaces sinogram interpolation with ray profile matching and estimation which yields much more reliable data estimates for the affected sinogram regions. As preliminary work, we built a new MAR framework on fan-beam geometry and tested it to remove simulated metal artifacts on a thorax phantom. The comparison with two representative sinogram correction based MAR methods shows very promising results.

  7. CT projection estimation and applications to fast and local reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, Guy M.

    1999-05-01

    In this paper, a straightforward method of estimating the CT projections is applied to simplified pre-processing, simplified reconstruction filtering, and to low-dose and local CT image reconstruction. The method relies on the projection- to-projection data redundancy that is shown to exist in CT. In the pre-processing application, the output of a few, angularly sparse fully pre-processed projections, is utilized in a linearization model to estimate directly the output of pre- processing for all the other projections. In the reconstruction filtering application, and with projection i and k being fully filtered, intermediate projection j low frequency components are estimated by a linear combination of projections i and k. That estimate is then subtracted from projection j, and the resulting high-frequency components are then filtered without zeropadding. By linearity the same combination of fully filtered projections i and k is added back to projection j. A factor two simplification is obtained, that can be leveraged for reconstruction speed or cost reduction. The local reconstruction application builds on the filtering method, by showing that truncated data is sufficient for calculating a filtered projection high-frequencies, while a very simple projection completion model is shown to be effective in estimating the low frequencies. Image quality comparisons are described.

  8. CT assessment of silicosis in exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Bégin, R; Bergeron, D; Samson, L; Boctor, M; Cantin, A

    1987-03-01

    For evaluation of the clinical usefulness of CT of the thorax in workers exposed to silica, 58 workers with long-term exposure to silica in the granite and foundry industries of the Eastern Townships of Quebec were examined. CT scans were compared with standard posteroanterior chest radiographs by using the International Labour Office 1980 grading system for silicosis. Six areas of the lung in each patient were assessed by both techniques for profusion (number) of opacities (small nodules), coalescence, and the presence of large opacities. CT scans and chest radiographs yielded similar average scores for detection of opacities. CT identified significantly more coalescence and large opacities in patients with simple silicosis. In patients with complicated silicosis, CT results were comparable with those of chest radiographs. CT of the thorax in workers exposed to silica does not identify more patients with minimal parenchymal disease, but it does detect earlier changes of coalescence.

  9. Gastric interposition following transhiatal esophagectomy: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, B.H.; Agha, F.P.; Glazer, G.M.; Orringer, M.B.

    1985-04-01

    Transhiatal esophagectomy without thoracotomy (THE) but with gastric interposition results in less morbidity and mortality than standard transpleural esophagectomy with thoracotomy. Barium examination has been the primary radiographic study following THE for detecting postoperative complications. The authors reviewed computed tomography (CT) scans of 21 patients who had undergone THE and correlated CT appearance with clinical status and with findings of the barium studies. Local mediastinal recurrent neoplasm was detected by CT in seven patients; barium study within 2 weeks of the CT scan failed to detect tumor recurrence in three of these patients. CT is the modality of choice for detecting locally recurrent neoplasm and distant metastases following THE and may also be helpful in patients with postoperative mediastinal abscess. Normal mediastinal CT anatomy after esophagectomy is reviewed in order to warn against pitfalls in scan interpretation.

  10. The assessment of industrial CT's probing error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yushu; Gao, Sitian; Song, Xu; Li, Dongsheng; Li, Wei; Li, Qi; Li, Shi; Chen, Siwen

    2014-11-01

    Similar to traditional CMM, probing error of industrial CT is used for assessing the 3D measurement error of the machine in a very small measurement volume. A research on the assessment of probing error of industrial CT is conducted here. Lots of assessment tests are carried out on the industrial CT Metrotom1500 in the National institute of metrology, using standard balls with different size and materials. The test results demonstrate that probing error of industrial CT can be affected seriously by the measurement strategy and standard balls. According to some further analysis about the test results, the assessment strategy of industrial CT's probing error is concluded preliminary, which can ensure the comparability of the assessment results in different industrial CT system.

  11. Efficacy comparison between simple mixed-dilution and simple mid-dilution on-line hemodiafiltration techniques: a crossover study.

    PubMed

    Susantitaphong, Paweena; Tiranathanagul, Khajohn; Katavetin, Pisut; Hanwiwatwong, Orawadee; Wittayalertpanya, Supeecha; Praditpornsilpa, Kearkiat; Tungsanga, Kriang; Eiam-Ong, Somchai

    2012-12-01

    Mid-dilution and mixed-dilution on-line hemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) techniques are innovated to overcome the limitations of two standard techniques including predilution and postdilution. Unfortunately, the head-to-head comparisons between these two novel techniques in the same study are still limited. Moreover, the original mid-dilution and mixed-dilution OL-HDF need special dialyzers and special machines. In the present study, simple mid-dilution and simple mixed-dilution OL-HDF were settled with the aim for clinical use in general hemodialysis (HD) centers. The efficacies of uremic toxins removal between both modalities were measured and compared. This prospective randomized crossover study was conducted on 12 stable HD patients undergoing simple mixed-dilution and simple mid-dilution OL-HDF techniques. HD prescriptions were similar in both techniques. The dialysis efficacies were determined by calculating small- (urea, creatinine, and phosphate) and middle-molecule (beta-2 microglobulin [β2M]) removal. Moreover, potential complications such as high transmembrane pressure (TMP) and protein loss were also observed. Simple mixed-dilution OL-HDF provided significantly greater clearances of urea, creatinine, and β2M when compared with the simple mid-dilution OL-HDF techniques. Phosphate clearances in both techniques were comparable. In addition, TMP and dialysate albumin loss were not different. There were no intradialytic complications in both techniques. Simple mixed-dilution OL-HDF could provide greater efficacy for small- and middle-molecule clearances and acceptable potential risks, while phosphate removal is comparable.

  12. Autonomic Evaluation of Patients With Gastroparesis and Neurostimulation: Comparisons of Direct/Systemic and Indirect/Cardiac Measures

    PubMed Central

    Stocker, Abigail; Abell, Thomas L.; Rashed, Hani; Kedar, Archana; Boatright, Ben; Chen, Jiande

    2016-01-01

    Background Disorders of nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and related problems often are manifestations of gastrointestinal, neuromuscular, and/or autonomic dysfunction. Many of these patients respond to neurostimulation, either gastric electrical stimulation or electroacupuncture. Both of these therapeutic techniques appear to influence the autonomic nervous system which can be evaluated directly by traditional testing and indirectly by heart rate variability. Methods We studied patients undergoing gastric neuromodulation by both systemic autonomic testing (39 patients, six males and 33 females, mean age 38 years) and systemic autonomic testing and heart rate variability (35 patients, seven males and 28 females, mean age 37 years) testing before and after gastric neuromodulation. We also performed a pilot study using both systemic autonomic testing and heart rate variability in a small number of patients (five patients, all females, mean age 48.6 years) with diabetic gastroparesis at baseline to compare the two techniques at baseline. Systemic autonomic testing and heart rate variability were performed with standardized techniques and gastric electrical stimulation was performed as previously described with electrodes implanted serosally in the myenteric plexus. Results Both systemic autonomic testing and heart rate variability measures were often abnormal at baseline and showed changes after gastric neuromodulation therapy in two groups of symptomatic patients. Pilot data on a small group of similar patients with systemic automatic nervous measures and heart rate variability showed good concordance between the two techniques. Conclusions Both traditional direct autonomic measures and indirect measures such as heart rate variability were evaluated, including a pilot study of both methods in the same patient group. Both appear to be useful in evaluation of patients at baseline and after stimulation therapies; however, a future full head-to-head comparison is

  13. Cortical Tremor (CT) with coincident orthostatic movements.

    PubMed

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Frucht, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Cortical tremor (CT) is a form of cortical reflex myoclonus that can mimic essential tremor (ET). Clinical features that are helpful in distinguishing CT from ET are the irregular and jerky appearance of the movements. We report two patients with CT with coexisting orthostatic movements, either orthostatic tremor (OT) or myoclonus, who experienced functional improvement in both cortical myoclonus and orthostatic movements when treated with levetiracetam. PMID:26788343

  14. Normal conus medullaris: CT criteria for recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Grogan, J.P.; Daniels, D.L.; Williams, I.L.; Rauschning, W.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-06-01

    The normal CT configuration and dimension of the conus medullaris and adjacent spinal cord were determined in 30 patients who had no clinical evidence of conus compression. CT studies were also correlated with anatomic sections in cadavers. The normal conus on CT has a distinctive oval configuration, an arterior sulcus, and a posterior promontory. The anteroposterior diameter ranged from 5 to 8 mm; the transverse diameter from 8 to 11 mm. Intramedullary processes altered both the dimensions and configuration of the conus.

  15. Radiation dose measurements in coronary CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Sun, Zhonghua

    2013-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography is associated with high radiation dose and this has raised serious concerns in the literature. Awareness of various parameters for dose estimates and measurements of coronary CT angiography plays an important role in increasing our understanding of the radiation exposure to patients, thus, contributing to the implementation of dose-saving strategies. This article provides an overview of the radiation dose quantity and its measurement during coronary CT angiography procedures. PMID:24392190

  16. Laxative-free CT colonography

    PubMed Central

    Slater, A; Betts, M; D'Costa, H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine if the introduction of faecal tagging to CT colonography (CTC) made the examination easier to tolerate or reduced the number of false-positives. Methods Our department changed bowel preparation for CT colonography from Picolax (Ferring Pharmaceuticals Ltd, London, UK) to Gastrografin® (Bracco Diagnostics Inc, Princeton, NJ) only with a modified diet. Questionnaires were given to a subgroup of patients within these cohorts. The numbers of false-positives were compared between two cohorts before and after this change. false-positives were defined as lesions reported on CT that were not confirmed by subsequent endoscopic examination. Polyps were matched if they were in the same or adjacent segments, and were within 5 mm of the reported size. Results 412 patients were identified from the Picolax cohort, and 116 from the Gastrografin cohort. 62 patients in each group completed questionnaires. Gastrografin produced less diarrhoea; 34% had five or more bowel motions in the previous day and night, compared with 77% for Picolax (p<0.001), although more patients found drinking it unpleasant compared with Picolax (85% reported drinking Picolax as “easy” vs 61% for Gastrografin; p=0.002). Picolax produced more non-diagnostic examinations, although this difference was not statistically significant. There was not a significant reduction in the numbers of false-positives (2 out of 112 for Gastrografin group, 14 out of 389 for the Picolax group; p=0.54). Conclusion Switching from Picolax to Gastrografin as a CTC preparation technique produced less diarrhoea, but did not reduce the number of false-positives. PMID:22167512

  17. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung include gadolinium-enhanced perfusion imaging and hyperpolarized helium imaging, which can allow imaging of pulmonary ventilation and .measurement of the size of emphysematous spaces. PMID:18267192

  18. CT Colonography: Pitfalls in Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Pickhardt, Perry J.; Kim, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis As with any radiologic imaging test, there are a number of potential interpretive pitfalls at CT colonography (CTC) that need to be recognized and handled appropriately. Perhaps the single most important step in learning to avoid most of these diagnostic traps is simply to be aware of their existence. With a little experience, most of these potential pitfalls will be easily recognized. This review will systematically cover the key pitfalls confronting the radiologist at CTC interpretation, primarily dividing them into those related to technique and those related to underlying anatomy. Tips and pointers for how to effectively handle these potential pitfalls are included. PMID:23182508

  19. CT image construction of a totally deflated lung using deformable model extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi Naini, Ali; Pierce, Greg; Lee, Ting-Yim; and others

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A novel technique is proposed to construct CT image of a totally deflated lung from a free-breathing 4D-CT image sequence acquired preoperatively. Such a constructed CT image is very useful in performing tumor ablative procedures such as lung brachytherapy. Tumor ablative procedures are frequently performed while the lung is totally deflated. Deflating the lung during such procedures renders preoperative images ineffective for targeting the tumor. Furthermore, the problem cannot be solved using intraoperative ultrasound (U.S.) images because U.S. images are very sensitive to small residual amount of air remaining in the deflated lung. One possible solution to address these issues is to register high quality preoperative CT images of the deflated lung with their corresponding low quality intraoperative U.S. images. However, given that such preoperative images correspond to an inflated lung, such CT images need to be processed to construct CT images pertaining to the lung's deflated state. Methods: To obtain the CT images of deflated lung, we present a novel image construction technique using extrapolated deformable registration to predict the deformation the lung undergoes during full deflation. The proposed construction technique involves estimating the lung's air volume in each preoperative image automatically in order to track the respiration phase of each 4D-CT image throughout a respiratory cycle; i.e., the technique does not need any external marker to form a respiratory signal in the process of curve fitting and extrapolation. The extrapolated deformation field is then applied on a preoperative reference image in order to construct the totally deflated lung's CT image. The technique was evaluated experimentally using ex vivo porcine lung. Results: The ex vivo lung experiments led to very encouraging results. In comparison with the CT image of the deflated lung we acquired for the purpose of validation, the constructed CT image was very similar. The

  20. Pediatric CT quality management and improvement program.

    PubMed

    Larson, David B; Molvin, Lior Z; Wang, Jia; Chan, Frandics P; Newman, Beverley; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2014-10-01

    Modern CT is a powerful yet increasingly complex technology that continues to rapidly evolve; optimal clinical implementation as well as appropriate quality management and improvement in CT are challenging but attainable. This article outlines the organizational structure on which a CT quality management and improvement program can be built, followed by a discussion of common as well as pediatric-specific challenges. Organizational elements of a CT quality management and improvement program include the formulation of clear objectives; definition of the roles and responsibilities of key personnel; implementation of a technologist training, coaching and feedback program; and use of an efficient and accurate monitoring system. Key personnel and roles include a radiologist as the CT director, a qualified CT medical physicist, as well as technologists with specific responsibilities and adequate time dedicated to operation management, CT protocol management and CT technologist education. Common challenges in managing a clinical CT operation are related to the complexity of newly introduced technology, of training and communication and of performance monitoring. Challenges specific to pediatric patients include the importance of including patient size in protocol and dose considerations, a lower tolerance for error in these patients, and a smaller sample size from which to learn and improve.

  1. [Development of real-time CT fluoroscopy].

    PubMed

    Katada, K; Anno, H; Takeshita, G; Ogura, Y; Koga, S; Ida, Y; Nonomura, K; Kanno, T; Ohashi, A; Sata, S

    1994-10-25

    A new CT system that permits real-time monitoring of CT images was developed. Phantom and volunteer studies revealed that the images were displayed at a rate of six per second with a delay time of 0.83 second with clinically sufficient resolution (256 x 256) using the newly developed fast image processor and partial-reconstruction algorithm. The clinical trial of stereotactic aspiration of intracerebral hematoma was successful. The initial trial with CT fluoroscopy revealed potential usefulness of the system in biopsy and other CT-guided interventions. PMID:9261196

  2. Imaging and PET-PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Von Schulthess, Gustav K; Hany, Thomas F

    2008-03-01

    PET-CT has grown because the lack of anatomic landmarks in PET makes "hardware-fusion" to anatomic cross-sectional data extremely useful. Addition of CT to PET improves specificity, but also sensitivity, and adding PET to CT adds sensitivity and specificity in tumor imaging. The synergistic advantage of adding CT is that the attenuation correction needed for PET data can also be derived from the CT data. This makes PET-CT 25-30% faster than PET alone, leading to higher patient throughput and a more comfortable examination for patients typically lasting 20 minutes or less. FDG-PET-CT appears to provide relevant information in the staging and therapy monitoring of many tumors, such as lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, gynaecological cancers, melanoma and many others, with the notable exception of prostatic cancer. For this cancer, choline derivatives may possibly become useful radiopharmaceuticals. The published literature on the applications of FDG-PET-CT in oncology is still limited but several well-designed studies have demonstrated the benefits of PET-CT.

  3. An auxiliary CT tabletop for radiography at the time of CT.

    PubMed

    McCollough, C H; Daly, T R; King, B F; LeRoy, A J

    2001-01-01

    An auxiliary CT tabletop was designed and manufactured such that radiographic images might be acquired, with use of a ceiling-mounted X-ray tube, without removing the patient from the CT table. The tabletop required no modifications to the original CT table housing and did not produce artifacts in the CT images. Radiographs obtained with the overhead X-ray tube and auxiliary tabletop demonstrated image quality equivalent to traditional radiographs.

  4. A study on the change in image quality before and after an attenuation correction with the use of a CT image in a SPECT/CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong-Soon; Kim, Woo-Hyun; Shim, Dong-Oh; Kim, Ho-Sung; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan

    2012-12-01

    This study compared the SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) images before and after applying an attenuation correction by using the CT (computed tomography) image in a SPECT/CT scan and examined depending of the change in image quality on the CT dose. A flangeless Esser PET (positron emission tomography) Phantom was used to evaluate the image quality for the Precedence 16 SPECT/CT system manufactured by Philips. The experimental method was to obtain a SPECT image and a CT image of a flangeless Esser PET Phantom to acquire an attenuation-corrected SPECT image. A ROI (region of interest) was then set up at a hot spot of the acquired image to measure the SNR (signal to noise ratio) and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) and to compare the image quality with that of an unattenuation-corrected SPECT image. To evaluate the quality of a SPECT image, we set the ROI as a cylinder diameter (25, 16, 12, and 8 mm) and the BKG (background) radioactivity of the phantom images was obtained when each CT condition was changed. Subsequently, the counts were compared to measure the SNR. The FWHM of the smallest cylinder (8 mm) was measured to compare the image quality. A comparison of the SPECT images with and without attenuation correction revealed 5.01-fold, 4.77 fold, 4.43-fold, 4.38-fold, and 5.13-fold differences in SNR for the 25-mm cylinder, 16-mm cylinder, 12-mm cylinder, 8-mm cylinder, and BKG, respectively. In the phantom image obtained when the CT dose was changed, the FWHM of the 8-mm cylinder showed almost no difference under each condition regardless of the changes in kVp and mAs.

  5. A novel CT-FFR method for the coronary artery based on 4D-CT image analysis and structural and fluid analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirohata, K.; Kano, A.; Goryu, A.; Ooga, J.; Hongo, T.; Higashi, S.; Fujisawa, Y.; Wakai, S.; Arakita, K.; Ikeda, Y.; Kaminaga, S.; Ko, B. S.; Seneviratne, S. K.

    2015-03-01

    Non invasive fractional flow reserve derived from CT coronary angiography (CT-FFR) has to date been typically performed using the principles of fluid analysis in which a lumped parameter coronary vascular bed model is assigned to represent the impedance of the downstream coronary vascular networks absent in the computational domain for each coronary outlet. This approach may have a number of limitations. It may not account for the impact of the myocardial contraction and relaxation during the cardiac cycle, patient-specific boundary conditions for coronary artery outlets and vessel stiffness. We have developed a novel approach based on 4D-CT image tracking (registration) and structural and fluid analysis, to address these issues. In our approach, we analyzed the deformation variation of vessels and the volume variation of vessels, primarily from 70% to 100% of cardiac phase, to better define boundary conditions and stiffness of vessels. We used a statistical estimation method based on a hierarchical Bayes model to integrate 4D-CT measurements and structural and fluid analysis data. Under these analysis conditions, we performed structural and fluid analysis to determine pressure, flow rate and CT-FFR. The consistency of this method has been verified by a comparison of 4D-CTFFR analysis results derived from five clinical 4D-CT datasets with invasive measurements of FFR. Additionally, phantom experiments of flexible tubes with/without stenosis using pulsating pumps, flow sensors and pressure sensors were performed. Our results show that the proposed 4D-CT-FFR analysis method has the potential to accurately estimate the effect of coronary artery stenosis on blood flow.

  6. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth Castro-Tejero, Pablo

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  7. Utilizing a simple CT dosimetry phantom for the comprehension of the operational characteristics of CT AEC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tsalafoutas, Ioannis A.; Varsamidis, Athanasios; Thalassinou, Stella; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios P.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of the nested polymethylacrylate (PMMA) phantom (which is available in many CT facilities for CTDI measurements), as a tool for the presentation and comparison of the ways that two different CT automatic exposure control (AEC) systems respond to a phantom when various scan parameters and AEC protocols are modified.Methods: By offsetting the two phantom's components (the head phantom and the body ring) half-way along their longitudinal axis, a phantom with three sections of different x-ray attenuation was created. Scan projection radiographs (SPRs) and helical scans of the three-section phantom were performed on a Toshiba Aquilion 64 and a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanners, with different scan parameter selections [scan direction, pitch factor, slice thickness, and reconstruction interval (ST/RI), AEC protocol, and tube potential used for the SPRs]. The dose length product (DLP) values of each scan were recorded and the tube current (mA) values of the reconstructed CT images were plotted against the respective Z-axis positions on the phantom. Furthermore, measurements of the noise levels at the center of each phantom section were performed to assess the impact of mA modulation on image quality.Results: The mA modulation patterns of the two CT scanners were very dissimilar. The mA variations were more pronounced for Aquilion 64, where changes in any of the aforementioned scan parameters affected both the mA modulations curves and DLP values. However, the noise levels were affected only by changes in pitch, ST/RI, and AEC protocol selections. For Brilliance 64, changes in pitch affected the mA modulation curves but not the DLP values, whereas only AEC protocol and SPR tube potential selection variations affected both the mA modulation curves and DLP values. The noise levels increased for smaller ST/RI, larger weight category AEC protocol, and larger SPR tube potential selection.Conclusions: The nested PMMA dosimetry phantom can be

  8. Intracranial CT angiography obtained from a cerebral CT perfusion examination

    SciTech Connect

    Gratama van Andel, H. A. F.; Venema, H. W.; Majoie, C. B.; Den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2009-04-15

    CT perfusion (CTP) examinations of the brain are performed increasingly for the evaluation of cerebral blood flow in patients with stroke and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Of the same patient often also a CT angiography (CTA) examination is performed. This study investigates the possibility to obtain CTA images from the CTP examination, thereby possibly obviating the CTA examination. This would save the patient exposure to radiation, contrast, and time. Each CTP frame is a CTA image with a varying amount of contrast enhancement and with high noise. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) we combined all 3D images into one 3D image after registration to correct for patient motion between time frames. Image combination consists of weighted averaging in which the weighting factor of each frame is proportional to the arterial contrast. It can be shown that the arterial CNR is maximized in this procedure. An additional advantage of the use of the time series of CTP images is that automatic differentiation between arteries and veins is possible. This feature was used to mask veins in the resulting 3D images to enhance visibility of arteries in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. With a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanner (64x0.625 mm) CTP examinations of eight patients were performed on 80 mm of brain using the toggling table technique. The CTP examination consisted of a time series of 15 3D images (2x64x0.625 mm; 80 kV; 150 mAs each) with an interval of 4 s. The authors measured the CNR in images obtained with weighted averaging, images obtained with plain averaging, and images with maximal arterial enhancement. The authors also compared CNR and quality of the images with that of regular CTA examinations and examined the effectiveness of automatic vein masking in MIP images. The CNR of the weighted averaged images is, on the average, 1.73 times the CNR of an image at maximal arterial enhanceme