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Sample records for ct imaging application

  1. Photon counting spectral CT versus conventional CT: comparative evaluation for breast imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Fritz, Shannon G.

    2011-04-01

    Spectral CT systems with photon counting detectors have more advantages compared to conventional CT systems. However, clinical applications have been hampered for a long time due to the high demands of clinical systems and limitations of spectroscopic x-ray detectors. Photon counting detector technology has gained considerable improvements in the past decade, and spectral CT has become a hot topic. Several experimental spectral CT systems are under investigation. The purpose of this work was to perform the first direct, side-by-side comparison of existing spectral CT technology with a mature clinical CT system based on a conventional energy integrating detector. We have built an experimental spectral CT system whose main parameters are similar to the parameters of a clinical CT system. The system uses a spectroscopic cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector. The detector includes two rows of CZT pixels with 256 pixels in each row. The pixel size is 1 × 1 mm2, and the maximum count rate is 2 Mcounts/pixel/s. The spectral CT system has a magnification factor of 1.62 and the source to detector and source to image distances of 85 and 53 cm, respectively. The above parameters are similar to those of the clinical CT system, Siemens Sensation 16, used for comparison. The two systems were compared by imaging spatial resolution and contrast resolution phantoms made from acrylic cylinders with 14 cm diameters. The resolution phantom included Al wires with 0.3, 0.6, and 1 mm diameters, and 0.25 g cc-1 CaCO3 contrast. The contrast phantom included contrast elements with 1.7, 5, and 15 mg cc-1 iodine, and 1.1, 3.3, and 10 mg cc-1 gadolinium. The phantoms were imaged with the two systems using 120 kVp tube voltage and 470 mR total skin exposure. The spectral CT showed CT numbers, image noise, and spatial and contrast resolutions to be similar within 10% compared to the Siemens 16 system, and provided an average of 10% higher CNR. However, the spectral CT system had a major

  2. Photon counting spectral CT versus conventional CT: comparative evaluation for breast imaging application.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M; Fritz, Shannon G

    2011-04-07

    Spectral CT systems with photon counting detectors have more advantages compared to conventional CT systems. However, clinical applications have been hampered for a long time due to the high demands of clinical systems and limitations of spectroscopic x-ray detectors. Photon counting detector technology has gained considerable improvements in the past decade, and spectral CT has become a hot topic. Several experimental spectral CT systems are under investigation. The purpose of this work was to perform the first direct, side-by-side comparison of existing spectral CT technology with a mature clinical CT system based on a conventional energy integrating detector. We have built an experimental spectral CT system whose main parameters are similar to the parameters of a clinical CT system. The system uses a spectroscopic cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector. The detector includes two rows of CZT pixels with 256 pixels in each row. The pixel size is 1 × 1 mm(2), and the maximum count rate is 2 Mcounts/pixel/s. The spectral CT system has a magnification factor of 1.62 and the source to detector and source to image distances of 85 and 53 cm, respectively. The above parameters are similar to those of the clinical CT system, Siemens Sensation 16, used for comparison. The two systems were compared by imaging spatial resolution and contrast resolution phantoms made from acrylic cylinders with 14 cm diameters. The resolution phantom included Al wires with 0.3, 0.6, and 1 mm diameters, and 0.25 g cc(-1) CaCO(3) contrast. The contrast phantom included contrast elements with 1.7, 5, and 15 mg cc(-1) iodine, and 1.1, 3.3, and 10 mg cc(-1) gadolinium. The phantoms were imaged with the two systems using 120 kVp tube voltage and 470 mR total skin exposure. The spectral CT showed CT numbers, image noise, and spatial and contrast resolutions to be similar within 10% compared to the Siemens 16 system, and provided an average of 10% higher CNR. However, the spectral CT system had a

  3. Neural network and its application to CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nikravesh, M.; Kovscek, A.R.; Patzek, T.W.

    1997-02-01

    We present an integrated approach to imaging the progress of air displacement by spontaneous imbibition of oil into sandstone. We combine Computerized Tomography (CT) scanning and neural network image processing. The main aspects of our approach are (I) visualization of the distribution of oil and air saturation by CT, (II) interpretation of CT scans using neural networks, and (III) reconstruction of 3-D images of oil saturation from the CT scans with a neural network model. Excellent agreement between the actual images and the neural network predictions is found.

  4. Application of curvelet transform for denoising of CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ławicki, Tomasz; Zhirnova, Oxana

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents a method of noise reduction in CT images by the curvelet transform. Noise affects the ability to visualize pathologic qualities and the living tissues structure in CT. Noise in CT images depends on the amount of discrete x-ray photons reaching the detector. In the CT images, noise is responsible for visibility reduction the low contrast areas and objects. Noisy picture may not be properly interpreted by a physician, especially for the case of detection of pathological changes in tissues. The tests were performed with the Shepp-Logan test image with additive Gaussian noise.

  5. Clinical applications of dual-energy CT in head and neck imaging.

    PubMed

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Mayich, Michael; Daftari-Besheli, Laleh; Gupta, Rajiv

    2016-03-01

    Dual-energy CT provides insights into the material properties of the tissues and can differentiate between tissues that have similar attenuation on conventional, single energy CT imaging. It has several useful and promising applications in head and neck imaging that an otolaryngologist could use to deliver improved clinical care. These applications include metal artifact reduction, atherosclerotic plaque and tumor characterization, detection of parathyroid lesions, and delineation of paranasal sinus ventilation. Dual-energy CT can potentially improve image quality, reduce radiation dose, and provide specific diagnostic information for certain head and neck lesions. This article reviews some current and potential otolaryngology applications of dual-energy CT.

  6. TU-D-BRB-02: Dual-Energy CT: Applications in Oncologic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Schoepf, U

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy CT technology is becoming increasingly available to the medical imaging community. In addition, several models of CT simulators sold for use in radiation therapy departments now feature dual-energy technology. The images provided by dual-energy CT scanners add new information to the radiation treatment planning process; multiple spectral components can be used to separate and identify material composition as well as generate virtual monoenergetic images. In turn, this information could be used to investigate pathologic processes, separate the properties of contrast agents from soft tissues, assess tissue response to therapy, and other applications of therapeutic interest. Additionally, the decomposition of materials in images could directly integrate with and impact the accuracy of dose calculation algorithms. This symposium will explore methods of generating dual-energy CT images, spectral and image analysis algorithms, current and future applications of interest in oncologic imaging, and unique considerations when using dualenergy CT images in the radiation treatment planning process.

  7. An evaluation on CT image acquisition method for medical VR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seong-wook; Ko, Junho; Yoo, Yon-sik; Kim, Yoonsang

    2017-02-01

    Recent medical virtual reality (VR) applications to minimize re-operations are being studied for improvements in surgical efficiency and reduction of operation error. The CT image acquisition method considering three-dimensional (3D) modeling for medical VR applications is important, because the realistic model is required for the actual human organ. However, the research for medical VR applications has focused on 3D modeling techniques and utilized 3D models. In addition, research on a CT image acquisition method considering 3D modeling has never been reported. The conventional CT image acquisition method involves scanning a limited area of the lesion for the diagnosis of doctors once or twice. However, the medical VR application is required to acquire the CT image considering patients' various postures and a wider area than the lesion. A wider area than the lesion is required because of the necessary process of comparing bilateral sides for dyskinesia diagnosis of the shoulder, pelvis, and leg. Moreover, patients' various postures are required due to the different effects on the musculoskeletal system. Therefore, in this paper, we perform a comparative experiment on the acquired CT images considering image area (unilateral/bilateral) and patients' postures (neutral/abducted). CT images are acquired from 10 patients for the experiments, and the acquired CT images are evaluated based on the length per pixel and the morphological deviation. Finally, by comparing the experiment results, we evaluate the CT image acquisition method for medical VR applications.

  8. Radial intensity projection for lumen: application to CT angiographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokubun, Hiroto; Miyazaki, Osamu; Hayashi, Hiromitsu

    2006-03-01

    For the diagnosis of lumen, such as plaque in the coronary and polyp in the colon, it is important to create the cross sectional image of tubular organ on the basis of luminal centerline (i.e., Curved Planar Reformation: CPR). However, since each CPR image has the only limited angle information, it may overlook objects of diagnostic importance. To overcome this limitation and improve diagnostic accuracy we have developed a method called Radial Intensity Projection for lumen (RIP) to create an image based on luminal centerline that integrates all directional information. RIP is executed as follows. At first image processing is performed on array of pixel in the orthogonal direction to a luminal centerline. Secondly, this image processing is performed repeatedly in the angle direction along a luminal centerline. Finally, RIP image, which incorporates all directional information based on luminal centerline, is created. In addition to developing the RIP method for the diagnosis of soft plaque, which is considered as one of the main causes of myocardial infarction, we have also developed the profile step imaging method (PSI). This is an algorithm for visualizing a level gradient point in the radial direction, paying attention to the fact that the gradient approaches zero at the region of soft plaque. We applied RIP method to the clinical image data of a coronary angiography, which has been scanned with the multi slice CT scanner. Using RIP method, it is possible to check the existence of calcified plaque present in the surrounding of a vessel wall without changing the view angle. We have also applied PSI method to the clinical image of a coronary angiography with a soft plaque. The PSI image overlaid on RIP image enables us to verify the high possibility of existing soft plaque. Moreover, the perspectively mapped RIP image to a half pipe object allows us to grasp the orientation of plaque more easily. RIP method is also effective for extended organs, such as peripheral

  9. Clinical Applications of a CT Window Blending Algorithm: RADIO (Relative Attenuation-Dependent Image Overlay).

    PubMed

    Mandell, Jacob C; Khurana, Bharti; Folio, Les R; Hyun, Hyewon; Smith, Stacy E; Dunne, Ruth M; Andriole, Katherine P

    2017-06-01

    A methodology is described using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Extendscript to process DICOM images with a Relative Attenuation-Dependent Image Overlay (RADIO) algorithm to visualize the full dynamic range of CT in one view, without requiring a change in window and level settings. The potential clinical uses for such an algorithm are described in a pictorial overview, including applications in emergency radiology, oncologic imaging, and nuclear medicine and molecular imaging.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of ethosomal contrast agents containing iodine for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hanjin; Cho, Young-Min; Lee, Kangtaek; Lee, Chang-Ha; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Bumsang

    2014-06-01

    As a first step in the development of novel liver-specific contrast agents using ethosomes for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications, we entrapped iodine within ethosomes, which are phospholipid vesicular carriers containing relatively high alcohol concentrations, synthesized using several types of alcohol, such as methanol, ethanol, and propanol. The iodine containing ethosomes that were prepared using methanol showed the smallest vesicle size (392 nm) and the highest CT density (1107 HU). The incorporation of cholesterol into the ethosomal contrast agents improved the stability of the ethosomes but made the vesicle size large. The ethosomal contrast agents were taken up well by macrophage cells and showed no cellular toxicity. The results demonstrated that ethosomes containing iodine, as prepared in this study, have potential as contrast agents for applications in CT imaging.

  11. Image quality and dose comparison among screen-film, computed, and CT scanned projection radiography: applications to CT urography.

    PubMed

    McCollough, C H; Bruesewitz, M R; Vrtiska, T J; King, B F; LeRoy, A J; Quam, J P; Hattery, R R

    2001-11-01

    To evaluate image quality and dose for abdominal imaging techniques that could be used as part of a computed tomographic (CT) urographic examination: screen-film (S-F) radiography or computed radiography (CR), performed with moving and stationary grids, and CT scanned projection radiography (CT SPR). An image quality phantom underwent imaging with moving and stationary grids with both a clinical S-F combination and CR plate. CT SPR was performed with six CT scanners at various milliampere second and kilovolt peak settings. Entrance skin exposure (ESE); spatial, contrast, and temporal resolutions; geometric accuracy; and artifacts were assessed. S-F or CR images, with either grid, provided image quality equivalent to that with the clinical standard, S-F with a moving grid. ESE values for both S-F and CR were 435 mR (112.2 microC/kg [1 mR = 0.258 microC/kg]) with a moving grid and 226 mR (58.3 microC/kg) with a stationary grid. All CT SPR images provided inferior spatial resolution compared with S-F or CR images. High-contrast objects generated substantial artifacts on CT SPR images. Compared with S-F, CR and CT SPR provided improved resolution of small low-contrast objects. The contrast between iodine and soft-tissue-mimicking structures on CT SPR images acquired at 80 kVp was twice that at 120 kVp. CT SPR images with acceptable noise levels required a midline ESE value of approximately 300 mR (77.4 microC/kg) at 80 kVp. S-F and CR provided better spatial resolution than did CT SPR. However, CT SPR provided improved low-contrast resolution compared with S-F, at exposures comparable to those used for S-F or CR.

  12. Development of prototype shielded cervical intracavitary brachytherapy applicators compatible with CT and MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Michael J.; Jackson, Edward F.; Gifford, Kent A.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Mourtada, Firas

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) is an integral part of the treatment regimen for cervical cancer and, generally, outcome in terms of local disease control and complications is a function of dose to the disease bed and critical structures, respectively. Therefore, it is paramount to accurately determine the dose given via ICBT to the tumor bed as well as critical structures. This is greatly facilitated through the use of advanced three-dimensional imaging modalities, such as CT and MR, to delineate critical and target structures with an ICBT applicator inserted in vivo. These methods are not possible when using a shielded applicator due to the image artifacts generated by interovoid shielding. The authors present two prototype shielded ICBT applicators that can be utilized for artifact-free CT image acquisition. They also investigate the MR amenability and dosimetry of a novel tungsten-alloy shielding material to extend the functionality of these devices. Methods: To accomplish artifact-free CT image acquisition, a ''step-and-shoot'' (S and S) methodology was utilized, which exploits the prototype applicators movable interovoid shielding. Both prototypes were placed in imaging phantoms that positioned the applicators in clinically applicable orientations. CT image sets were acquired of the prototype applicators as well as a shielded Fletcher-Williamson (sFW) ovoid. Artifacts present in each CT image set were qualitatively compared for each prototype applicator following the S and S methodology and the sFW. To test the novel tungsten-alloy shielding material's MR amenability, they constructed a phantom applicator that mimics the basic components of an ICBT ovoid. This phantom applicator positions the MR-compatible shields in orientations equivalent to the sFW bladder and rectal shields. MR images were acquired within a gadopentetate dimeglumine-doped water tank using standard pulse sequences and examined for artifacts. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations

  13. Development of prototype shielded cervical intracavitary brachytherapy applicators compatible with CT and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Price, Michael J; Jackson, Edward F; Gifford, Kent A; Eifel, Patricia J; Mourtada, Firas

    2009-12-01

    Intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) is an integral part of the treatment regimen for cervical cancer and, generally, outcome in terms of local disease control and complications is a function of dose to the disease bed and critical structures, respectively. Therefore, it is paramount to accurately determine the dose given via ICBT to the tumor bed as well as critical structures. This is greatly facilitated through the use of advanced three-dimensional imaging modalities, such as CT and MR, to delineate critical and target structures with an ICBT applicator inserted in vivo. These methods are not possible when using a shielded applicator due to the image artifacts generated by interovoid shielding. The authors present two prototype shielded ICBT applicators that can be utilized for artifact-free CT image acquisition. They also investigate the MR amenability and dosimetry of a novel tungsten-alloy shielding material to extend the functionality of these devices. To accomplish artifact-free CT image acquisition, a "step-and-shoot" (S&S) methodology was utilized, which exploits the prototype applicators movable interovoid shielding. Both prototypes were placed in imaging phantoms that positioned the applicators in clinically applicable orientations. CT image sets were acquired of the prototype applicators as well as a shielded Fletcher-Williamson (sFW) ovoid. Artifacts present in each CT image set were qualitatively compared for each prototype applicator following the S&S methodology and the sFW. To test the novel tungsten-alloy shielding material's MR amenability, they constructed a phantom applicator that mimics the basic components of an ICBT ovoid. This phantom applicator positions the MR-compatible shields in orientations equivalent to the sFW bladder and rectal shields. MR images were acquired within a gadopentetate dimeglumine-doped water tank using standard pulse sequences and examined for artifacts. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to match the

  14. An active contour model for medical image segmentation with application to brain CT image

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiaohua; Wang, Jiahui; Guo, Shuxu; Li, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) segmentation in computed tomography (CT) is a key step in computer-aided detection (CAD) of acute ischemic stroke. Because of image noise, low contrast and intensity inhomogeneity, CSF segmentation has been a challenging task. A region-based active contour model, which is insensitive to contour initialization and robust to intensity inhomogeneity, was developed for segmenting CSF in brain CT images. Methods: The energy function of the region-based active contour model is composed of a range domain kernel function, a space domain kernel function, and an edge indicator function. By minimizing the energy function, the region of edge elements of the target could be automatically identified in images with less dependence on initial contours. The energy function was optimized by means of the deepest descent method with a level set framework. An overlap rate between segmentation results and the reference standard was used to assess the segmentation accuracy. The authors evaluated the performance of the proposed method on both synthetic data and real brain CT images. They also compared the performance level of our method to those of region-scalable fitting (RSF) and global convex segment (GCS) models. Results: For the experiment of CSF segmentation in 67 brain CT images, their method achieved an average overlap rate of 66% compared to the average overlap rates of 16% and 46% from the RSF model and the GCS model, respectively. Conclusions: Their region-based active contour model has the ability to achieve accurate segmentation results in images with high noise level and intensity inhomogeneity. Therefore, their method has great potential in the segmentation of medical images and would be useful for developing CAD schemes for acute ischemic stroke in brain CT images. PMID:23387759

  15. Application of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for mouse dosimetry in micro-CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Courteau, Alan; Oudot, Alexandra; Collin, Bertrand; Ranouil, Julien; Morgand, Loïc; Raguin, Olivier; Walker, Paul; Brunotte, François

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Micro-CT is considered to be a powerful tool to investigate various models of disease on anesthetized animals. In longitudinal studies, the radiation dose delivered by the micro-CT to the same animal is a major concern as it could potentially induce spurious effects in experimental results. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) are a relatively new kind of detector used in radiation dosimetry for medical applications. The aim of this work was to assess the dose delivered by the CT component of a micro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT camera during a typical whole-body mouse study, using commercially available OSLDs based on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C crystals.Methods: CTDI (computed tomography dose index) was measured in micro-CT with a properly calibrated pencil ionization chamber using a rat-like phantom (60 mm in diameter) and a mouse-like phantom (30 mm in diameter). OSLDs were checked for reproducibility and linearity in the range of doses delivered by the micro-CT. Dose measurements obtained with OSLDs were compared to those of the ionization chamber to correct for the radiation quality dependence of OSLDs in the low-kV range. Doses to tissue were then investigated in phantoms and cadavers. A 30 mm diameter phantom, specifically designed to insert OSLDs, was used to assess radiation dose over a typical whole-body mouse imaging study. Eighteen healthy female BALB/c mice weighing 27.1 ± 0.8 g (1 SD) were euthanized for small animal measurements. OLSDs were placed externally or implanted internally in nine different locations by an experienced animal technician. Five commonly used micro-CT protocols were investigated.Results: CTDI measurements were between 78.0 ± 2.1 and 110.7 ± 3.0 mGy for the rat-like phantom and between 169.3 ± 4.6 and 203.6 ± 5.5 mGy for the mouse-like phantom. On average, the displayed CTDI at the operator console was underestimated by 1.19 for the rat-like phantom and 2.36 for the mouse

  16. Application of region selective embedded zerotree wavelet coder in CT image compression.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoli; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Qunjing; Hu, Cungang; Deng, Na; Li, Jianping

    2005-01-01

    Compression is necessary in medical image preservation because of the huge data quantity. Medical images are different from the common images because of their own characteristics, for example, part of information in CT image is useless, and it's a kind of resource waste to save this part information. The region selective EZW coder was proposed with which only useful part of image was selected and compressed, and the test image provides good result.

  17. A compressed sensing-based iterative algorithm for CT reconstruction and its possible application to phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueli; Luo, Shuqian

    2011-08-18

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a technology that obtains the tomogram of the observed objects. In real-world applications, especially the biomedical applications, lower radiation dose have been constantly pursued. To shorten scanning time and reduce radiation dose, one can decrease X-ray exposure time at each projection view or decrease the number of projections. Until quite recently, the traditional filtered back projection (FBP) method has been commonly exploited in CT image reconstruction. Applying the FBP method requires using a large amount of projection data. Especially when the exposure speed is limited by the mechanical characteristic of the imaging facilities, using FBP method may prolong scanning time and cumulate with a high dose of radiation consequently damaging the biological specimens. In this paper, we present a compressed sensing-based (CS-based) iterative algorithm for CT reconstruction. The algorithm minimizes the l1-norm of the sparse image as the constraint factor for the iteration procedure. With this method, we can reconstruct images from substantially reduced projection data and reduce the impact of artifacts introduced into the CT reconstructed image by insufficient projection information. To validate and evaluate the performance of this CS-base iterative algorithm, we carried out quantitative evaluation studies in imaging of both software Shepp-Logan phantom and real polystyrene sample. The former is completely absorption based and the later is imaged in phase contrast. The results show that the CS-based iterative algorithm can yield images with quality comparable to that obtained with existing FBP and traditional algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) algorithms. Compared with the common reconstruction from 180 projection images, this algorithm completes CT reconstruction from only 60 projection images, cuts the scan time, and maintains the acceptable quality of the reconstructed images.

  18. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Wang, Shi; Ma, Tianyu; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang

    2015-06-01

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance.

  19. Clinical application of a novel computer-aided detection system based on three-dimensional CT images on pulmonary nodule.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jian-Ye; Ye, Hai-Hong; Yang, Shi-Xiong; Jin, Ren-Chao; Huang, Qi-Liang; Wei, Yong-Chu; Huang, Si-Guang; Wang, Bin-Qiang; Ye, Jia-Zhou; Qin, Jian-Ying

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical application effects of a novel computer-aided detection (CAD) system based on three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) images on pulmonary nodule. 98 cases with pulmonary nodule (PN) in our hospital from Jun, 2009 to Jun, 2013 were analysed in this study. All cases underwent PN detection both by the simple spiral CT scan and by the computer-aided system based on 3D CT images, respectively. Postoperative pathological results were considered as the "gold standard", for both two checking methods, the diagnostic accuracies for determining benign and malignant PN were calculated. Under simple spiral CT scan method, 63 cases is malignant, including 50 true positive cases and 13 false positive cases from the "gold standard"; 35 cases is benign, 16 true negative case and 19 false negative cases, the Sensitivity 1 (Se1)=0.725, Specificity1 (Sp1)=0.448, Agreement rate1 (Kappa 1)=0.673, J1 (Youden's index 1)=0.173, LR(+)1=1.616, LR(-)1=0.499. Kappa 1=0.673 between the 0.4 and 0.75, has a moderate consistency. Underwent computer-aided detection (CAD) based on 3D CT method, 67cases is malignant, including 62 true positive cases and 7 false positive cases; 31 cases is benign, 24 true negative case and 7 false negative cases, Sensitivity 2 (Se2)=0.899, Specificity2 (Sp2)=0.828, Agreement rate (Kappa 2)=0.877, J2 (Youden's index 2)=0.727, LR(+)2=5.212, LR(-)2=0.123. Kappa 2=0.877 >0.75, has a good consistency. Computer-aided PN detecting system based on 3D CT images has better clinical application value, and can help doctor carry out early diagnosis of lung disease (such as cancer, etc.) through CT images.

  20. The clinical application and efficacy of percutaneous kyphoplasty via unilateral pedicular approach guided by CT image measurement

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Weifeng; Jia, Yongwei; Wang, Jianjie; Cheng, Liming

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical application and efficacy of percutaneous kyphoplasty via unilateral pedicular approach with the reference of preoperative CT image data. 73 cases (a total of 112 vertebrae) with thoracic and lumbar osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCF) received in our department were collected in this study and underwent percutaneous kyphoplasty via unilateral pedicular approach directed by CT image measurement with the operative time and fluoroscopic times recorded. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were used to assess the pain status and functional activity before and after operation and at the last follow-up, while X-ray and CT image were used to measure the height of the injured spinal middle column and kyphotic Cobb angle before and after operation. 73 cases (112 vertebrae) underwent percutaneous kyphoplasty successfully. Cement leakage occurred in 7 cases without obvious neurological symptoms, and they were followed up for 10 to 60 months with the average of 23 months; adjacent vertebral refractures occurred in 3 cases during the follow-up, and their symptoms were relieved after the second surgery. There was significant difference in the height of the injured spinal middle column and kyphotic Cobb angle before and after operation (P<0.05); there was significant difference in preoperative and postoperative VAS score and ODI values (P<0.05). Postoperative CT image data showed that puncture paths of the 110 vertebrae were consistent with preoperative ones sketched using the CT image, and the consistent rate of preoperative and postoperative measurement data was 98%. All patients could ambulate with brace within 2 days after operation without serious complications. In conclusion, percutaneous kyphoplasty via unilateral pedicular approach guided by preoperative CT image data is effective in treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures, and it is convenient and safe with high

  1. 2D wavelet-analysis-based calibration technique for flat-panel imaging detectors: application in cone beam volume CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Rongfeng; Conover, David L.

    1999-05-01

    The application of the newly developed flat panel x-ray imaging detector in cone beam volume CT has attracted increasing interest recently. Due to an imperfect solid state array manufacturing process, however, defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image unavoidably exist in all kinds of flat panel x-ray imaging detectors, which will cause severe streak and ring artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image and severely degrade image quality. A calibration technique, in which the artifacts resulting from the defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image can be reduced significantly, is presented in this paper. The detection of defective elements is distinctively based upon two-dimensional (2D) wavelet analysis. Because of its inherent localizability in recognizing singularities or discontinuities, wavelet analysis possesses the capability of detecting defective elements over a rather large x-ray exposure range, e.g., 20% to approximately 60% of the dynamic range of the detector used. Three-dimensional (3D) images of a low-contrast CT phantom have been reconstructed from projection images acquired by a flat panel x-ray imaging detector with and without calibration process applied. The artifacts caused individually by defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image have been separated and investigated in detail, and the correlation with each other have also been exposed explicitly. The investigation is enforced by quantitative analysis of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the image uniformity of the cone beam reconstruction image. It has been demonstrated that the ring and streak artifacts resulting from the imperfect performance of a flat panel x-ray imaging detector can be reduced dramatically, and then the image qualities of a cone beam reconstruction image, such as contrast resolution and image uniformity are improved significantly. Furthermore, with little modification, the calibration technique presented here is also applicable

  2. Growing applications of FDG PET-CT imaging in non-oncologic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Hongming; Codreanu, Ion

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As the number of clinical applications of 2-[fluorine 18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) grows, familiarity with the conditions that can be diagnosed by this modality and when relevant pieces of additional information can be obtained becomes increasingly important for both requesting physicians and nuclear medicine physicians or radiologists who interpret the findings. Apart from its heavy use in clinical oncology, FDG PET-CT is widely used in a variety of non-oncologic conditions interconnecting to such disciplines as general internal medicine, infectious diseases, cardiology, neurology, surgery, traumatology, orthopedics, pediatrics, endocrinology, rheumatology, psychiatry, neuropsychology, and cognitive neuroscience. The aim of this review was to summarize the current evidence of FDG PET-CT applications in evaluating non-oncologic pathologies and the relevant information it can add to achieve a final diagnosis. PMID:26060443

  3. Combined X-ray CT and mass spectrometry for biomedical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schioppa, E., Jr.; Ellis, S.; Bruinen, A. L.; Visser, J.; Heeren, R. M. A.; Uher, J.; Koffeman, E.

    2014-04-01

    Imaging technologies play a key role in many branches of science, especially in biology and medicine. They provide an invaluable insight into both internal structure and processes within a broad range of samples. There are many techniques that allow one to obtain images of an object. Different techniques are based on the analysis of a particular sample property by means of a dedicated imaging system, and as such, each imaging modality provides the researcher with different information. The use of multimodal imaging (imaging with several different techniques) can provide additional and complementary information that is not possible when employing a single imaging technique alone. In this study, we present for the first time a multi-modal imaging technique where X-ray computerized tomography (CT) is combined with mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). While X-ray CT provides 3-dimensional information regarding the internal structure of the sample based on X-ray absorption coefficients, MSI of thin sections acquired from the same sample allows the spatial distribution of many elements/molecules, each distinguished by its unique mass-to-charge ratio (m/z), to be determined within a single measurement and with a spatial resolution as low as 1 μm or even less. The aim of the work is to demonstrate how molecular information from MSI can be spatially correlated with 3D structural information acquired from X-ray CT. In these experiments, frozen samples are imaged in an X-ray CT setup using Medipix based detectors equipped with a CO2 cooled sample holder. Single projections are pre-processed before tomographic reconstruction using a signal-to-thickness calibration. In the second step, the object is sliced into thin sections (circa 20 μm) that are then imaged using both matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and secondary ion (SIMS) mass spectrometry, where the spatial distribution of specific molecules within the sample is determined. The

  4. Construction of Realistic Liver Phantoms from Patient Images using 3D Printer and Its Application in CT Image Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Vrieze, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Joel; Chen, Baiyu; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use 3D printing techniques to construct a realistic liver phantom with heterogeneous background and anatomic structures from patient CT images, and to use the phantom to assess image quality with filtered backprojection and iterative reconstruction algorithms. Patient CT images were segmented into liver tissues, contrast-enhanced vessels, and liver lesions using commercial software, based on which stereolithography (STL) files were created and sent to a commercial 3D printer. A 3D liver phantom was printed after assigning different printing materials to each object to simulate appropriate attenuation of each segmented object. As high opacity materials are not available for the printer, we printed hollow vessels and filled them with iodine solutions of adjusted concentration to represent enhance levels in contrast-enhanced liver scans. The printed phantom was then placed in a 35×26 cm oblong-shaped water phantom and scanned repeatedly at 4 dose levels. Images were reconstructed using standard filtered backprojection and an iterative reconstruction algorithm with 3 different strength settings. Heterogeneous liver background were observed from the CT images and the difference in CT numbers between lesions and background were representative for low contrast lesions in liver CT studies. CT numbers in vessels filled with iodine solutions represented the enhancement of liver arteries and veins. Images were run through a Channelized Hotelling model observer with Garbor channels and ROC analysis was performed. The AUC values showed performance improvement using the iterative reconstruction algorithm and the amount of improvement increased with strength setting. PMID:27721555

  5. Construction of Realistic Liver Phantoms from Patient Images using 3D Printer and Its Application in CT Image Quality Assessment.

    PubMed

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Vrieze, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Joel; Chen, Baiyu; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use 3D printing techniques to construct a realistic liver phantom with heterogeneous background and anatomic structures from patient CT images, and to use the phantom to assess image quality with filtered backprojection and iterative reconstruction algorithms. Patient CT images were segmented into liver tissues, contrast-enhanced vessels, and liver lesions using commercial software, based on which stereolithography (STL) files were created and sent to a commercial 3D printer. A 3D liver phantom was printed after assigning different printing materials to each object to simulate appropriate attenuation of each segmented object. As high opacity materials are not available for the printer, we printed hollow vessels and filled them with iodine solutions of adjusted concentration to represent enhance levels in contrast-enhanced liver scans. The printed phantom was then placed in a 35×26 cm oblong-shaped water phantom and scanned repeatedly at 4 dose levels. Images were reconstructed using standard filtered backprojection and an iterative reconstruction algorithm with 3 different strength settings. Heterogeneous liver background were observed from the CT images and the difference in CT numbers between lesions and background were representative for low contrast lesions in liver CT studies. CT numbers in vessels filled with iodine solutions represented the enhancement of liver arteries and veins. Images were run through a Channelized Hotelling model observer with Garbor channels and ROC analysis was performed. The AUC values showed performance improvement using the iterative reconstruction algorithm and the amount of improvement increased with strength setting.

  6. Construction of realistic liver phantoms from patient images using 3D printer and its application in CT image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Vrieze, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Joel; Chen, Baiyu; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to use 3D printing techniques to construct a realistic liver phantom with heterogeneous background and anatomic structures from patient CT images, and to use the phantom to assess image quality with filtered back-projection and iterative reconstruction algorithms. Patient CT images were segmented into liver tissues, contrast-enhanced vessels, and liver lesions using commercial software, based on which stereolithography (STL) files were created and sent to a commercial 3D printer. A 3D liver phantom was printed after assigning different printing materials to each object to simulate appropriate attenuation of each segmented object. As high opacity materials are not available for the printer, we printed hollow vessels and filled them with iodine solutions of adjusted concentration to represent enhance levels in contrast-enhanced liver scans. The printed phantom was then placed in a 35×26 cm oblong-shaped water phantom and scanned repeatedly at 4 dose levels. Images were reconstructed using standard filtered back-projection and an iterative reconstruction algorithm with 3 different strength settings. Heterogeneous liver background were observed from the CT images and the difference in CT numbers between lesions and background were representative for low contrast lesions in liver CT studies. CT numbers in vessels filled with iodine solutions represented the enhancement of liver arteries and veins. Images were run through a Channelized Hotelling model observer with Garbor channels and ROC analysis was performed. The AUC values showed performance improvement using the iterative reconstruction algorithm and the amount of improvement increased with strength setting.

  7. Joint Segmentation of Anatomical and Functional Images: Applications in Quantification of Lesions from PET, PET-CT, MRI-PET, and MRI-PET-CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Bagci, Ulas; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Mendhiratta, Neil; Foster, Brent; Xu, Ziyue; Yao, Jianhua; Chen, Xinjian; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for the joint segmentation of anatomical and functional images. Our proposed methodology unifies the domains of anatomical and functional images, represents them in a product lattice, and performs simultaneous delineation of regions based on random walk image segmentation. Furthermore, we also propose a simple yet effective object/background seed localization method to make the proposed segmentation process fully automatic. Our study uses PET, PET-CT, MRI-PET, and fused MRI-PET-CT scans (77 studies in all) from 56 patients who had various lesions in different body regions. We validated the effectiveness of the proposed method on different PET phantoms as well as on clinical images with respect to the ground truth segmentation provided by clinicians. Experimental results indicate that the presented method is superior to threshold and Bayesian methods commonly used in PET image segmentation, is more accurate and robust compared to the other PET-CT segmentation methods recently published in the literature, and also it is general in the sense of simultaneously segmenting multiple scans in real-time with high accuracy needed in routine clinical use. PMID:23837967

  8. Automated Segmentation and Object Classification of CT Images: Application to In Vivo Molecular Imaging of Avian Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jana; Zimmermann, Johannes; Saluz, Hans Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background. Although chick embryogenesis has been studied extensively, there has been growing interest in the investigation of skeletogenesis. In addition to improved poultry health and minimized economic loss, a greater understanding of skeletal abnormalities can also have implications for human medicine. True in vivo studies require noninvasive imaging techniques such as high-resolution microCT. However, the manual analysis of acquired images is both time consuming and subjective. Methods. We have developed a system for automated image segmentation that entails object-based image analysis followed by the classification of the extracted image objects. For image segmentation, a rule set was developed using Definiens image analysis software. The classification engine was implemented using the WEKA machine learning tool. Results. Our system reduces analysis time and observer bias while maintaining high accuracy. Applying the system to the quantification of long bone growth has allowed us to present the first true in ovo data for bone length growth recorded in the same chick embryos. Conclusions. The procedures developed represent an innovative approach for the automated segmentation, classification, quantification, and visualization of microCT images. MicroCT offers the possibility of performing longitudinal studies and thereby provides unique insights into the morpho- and embryogenesis of live chick embryos. PMID:23997760

  9. Automated cortical bone segmentation for multirow-detector CT imaging with validation and application to human studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Jin, Dakai; Chen, Cheng; Letuchy, Elena M.; Janz, Kathleen F.; Burns, Trudy L.; Torner, James C; Levy, Steven M.; Saha, Punam K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Cortical bone supports and protects human skeletal functions and plays an important role in determining bone strength and fracture risk. Cortical bone segmentation at a peripheral site using multirow-detector CT (MD-CT) imaging is useful for in vivo assessment of bone strength and fracture risk. Major challenges for the task emerge from limited spatial resolution, low signal-to-noise ratio, presence of cortical pores, and structural complexity over the transition between trabecular and cortical bones. An automated algorithm for cortical bone segmentation at the distal tibia from in vivo MD-CT imaging is presented and its performance and application are examined. Methods: The algorithm is completed in two major steps—(1) bone filling, alignment, and region-of-interest computation and (2) segmentation of cortical bone. After the first step, the following sequence of tasks is performed to accomplish cortical bone segmentation—(1) detection of marrow space and possible pores, (2) computation of cortical bone thickness, detection of recession points, and confirmation and filling of true pores, and (3) detection of endosteal boundary and delineation of cortical bone. Effective generalizations of several digital topologic and geometric techniques are introduced and a fully automated algorithm is presented for cortical bone segmentation. Results: An accuracy of 95.1% in terms of volume of agreement with manual outlining of cortical bone was observed in human MD-CT scans, while an accuracy of 88.5% was achieved when compared with manual outlining on postregistered high resolution micro-CT imaging. An intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.98 was obtained in cadaveric repeat scans. A pilot study was conducted to describe gender differences in cortical bone properties. This study involved 51 female and 46 male participants (age: 19–20 yr) from the Iowa Bone Development Study. Results from this pilot study suggest that, on average after adjustment for height

  10. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  11. Applications of nonlocal means algorithm in low-dose X-ray CT image processing and reconstruction: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong; Ma, Jianhua

    2017-03-01

    Low-dose X-ray computed tomography (LDCT) imaging is highly recommended for use in the clinic because of growing concerns over excessive radiation exposure. However, the CT images reconstructed by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method from low-dose acquisitions may be severely degraded with noise and streak artifacts due to excessive X-ray quantum noise, or with view-aliasing artifacts due to insufficient angular sampling. In 2005, the nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm was introduced as a non-iterative edge-preserving filter to denoise natural images corrupted by additive Gaussian noise, and showed superior performance. It has since been adapted and applied to many other image types and various inverse problems. This paper specifically reviews the applications of the NLM algorithm in LDCT image processing and reconstruction, and explicitly demonstrates its improving effects on the reconstructed CT image quality from low-dose acquisitions. The effectiveness of these applications on LDCT and their relative performance are described in detail.

  12. On two-parameter models of photon cross sections: application to dual-energy CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Jeffrey F; Li, Sicong; Devic, Slobodan; Whiting, Bruce R; Lerma, Fritz A

    2006-11-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the theoretically achievable accuracy in estimating photon cross sections at low energies (20-1000 keV) from idealized dual-energy x-ray computed tomography (CT) images. Cross-section estimation from dual-energy measurements requires a model that can accurately represent photon cross sections of any biological material as a function of energy by specifying only two characteristic parameters of the underlying material, e.g., effective atomic number and density. This paper evaluates the accuracy of two commonly used two-parameter cross-section models for postprocessing idealized measurements derived from dual-energy CT images. The parametric fit model (PFM) accounts for electron-binding effects and photoelectric absorption by power functions in atomic number and energy and scattering by the Klein-Nishina cross section. The basis-vector model (BVM) assumes that attenuation coefficients of any biological substance can be approximated by a linear combination of mass attenuation coefficients of two dissimilar basis substances. Both PFM and BVM were fit to a modern cross-section library for a range of elements and mixtures representative of naturally occurring biological materials (Z = 2-20). The PFM model, in conjunction with the effective atomic number approximation, yields estimated the total linear cross-section estimates with mean absolute and maximum error ranges of 0.6%-2.2% and 1%-6%, respectively. The corresponding error ranges for BVM estimates were 0.02%-0.15% and 0.1%-0.5%. However, for photoelectric absorption frequency, the PFM absolute mean and maximum errors were 10.8%-22.4% and 29%-50%, compared with corresponding BVM errors of 0.4%-11.3% and 0.5%-17.0%, respectively. Both models were found to exhibit similar sensitivities to image-intensity measurement uncertainties. Of the two models, BVM is the most promising approach for realizing dual-energy CT cross-section measurement.

  13. Preliminary application of high-definition CT Gemstone Spectral Imaging in hand and foot tendons.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kai; Zhang, Cheng-Qi; Li, Wei; Wang, Jun-Jun; Wang, Xin-Yi; Pang, Tao; Wang, Guang-Li; Liu, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of visualizing hand and foot tendon anatomy and disorders by Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) high-definition CT (HDCT). Thirty-five patients who suffered from hand or foot pain were scanned with GSI mode HDCT and MRI. Spectrum analysis was used to select the monochromatic images that provide the optimal contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for tendons. The image quality at the best selected monochromatic level and the conventional polychromatic images were compared. Tendon anatomy and disease were also analyzed at GSI and MRI. The monochromatic images at about 65 keV (mean 65.09 ± 2.98) provided the optimal CNR for hand and foot tendons. The image quality at the optimal selected monochromatic level was superior to conventional polychromatic images (p = 0.005, p < 0.05). GSI was useful in visualizing hand and foot tendon anatomy and disorders. There were no statistical differences between GSI and MRI with regard to tendon thickening (χ(2) = 0, p > 0.05), compression (χ(2) = 0.5, p > 0.05), absence (χ(2) = 0, p > 0.05) and rupture (χ(2) = 0, p > 0.05). GSI was significantly less sensitive than MRI in displaying tendon adhesion (χ(2) = 4.17, p < 0.05), degeneration (χ(2) = 4.17, p < 0.05), and tendinous sheath disease (χ(2) = 10.08, p < 0.05). GSI with monochromatic images at 65 keV displays clearly the most hand and foot tendon anatomy and disorders with image quality improved, as compared with conventional polychromatic images. It may be used solely or combined with MRI in clinical work, depending on individual patient disease condition.

  14. Omental infarct: CT imaging features.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Gervais, D A; Lee, P; Westra, S; Hahn, P F; Novelline, R A; Mueller, P R

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) features of acute omental infarction and to study the evolutionary changes on follow-up CT imaging. Fifteen cases of omental infarction were evaluated for their initial CT imaging features. The imaging features evaluated included size of the fatty lesion, location, peripheral rim, and relation to colon. CT findings were correlated with etiology, clinical presentation, and leukocytosis. Follow-up CT images were available in eight patients and the imaging features were studied. Eight omental infarcts were of unknown etiology and seven were secondary to abdominal surgery. In 53% of patients (eight of 15), the location of the omental infarct was in the right lower, mid, or upper quadrants. These eight right-side infarcts occurred in six patients with primary omental infarcts. In 13 of 14 patients who underwent CT within 15 days of onset of omental infarct, the margin of the lesion was ill defined. Primary omental (n = 8) infarcts were seen in younger patients (p = 0.02) and were larger on CT (p = 0.02) compared with secondary omental infarcts. CT findings evolved from an ill-defined, heterogeneous fat-density lesion to a well-defined, heterogeneous fat-density lesion with a peripheral hyperdense rim in all six secondary omental infarctions for which acute stage and follow-up CT images were available for interpretation. There is a significant difference in the age distribution and CT findings in terms of size of the omental infarction between primary and secondary etiologies. On follow-up CT, secondary omental infarcts progressively shrank and developed a well-defined, hyperdense rim around a fatty core.

  15. CT and MR image fusion of tandem and ring applicator using rigid registration in intracavitary brachytherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Oinam, Arun S; Tomar, Parsee; Patel, Firuza D; Singh, Lakhwant; Rai, Bhavana; Bahl, Amit

    2014-03-06

    The purpose of this study is to find the uncertainties in the reconstruction of MR compatible ring-tandem intracavitary applicators of high-dose rate image-based brachytherapy treatment planning using rigid registration of 3D MR and CT image fusion. Tandem and ring reconstruction in MR image based brachytherapy planning was done using rigid registration of CT and MR applicator geometries. Verifications of registration for applicator fusion were performed in six verification steps at three different sites of tandem ring applicator set. The first site consists of three errors at the level of ring plane in (1) cranio caudal shift (Cranial Shift) of ring plane along tandem axis, (2) antero-posterior shift (AP Shift) perpendicular to tandem axis on the plane containing the tandem, and (3) lateral shift (Lat Shift) perpendicular to the plane containing the tandem at the level of ring plane. The other two sites are the verifications at the tip of tandem and neck of the ring. The verification at the tip of tandem consists of two errors in (1) antero-posterior shift (AP Shift) perpendicular to tandem axis on the plane containing the tandem, and (2) lateral shift (Lat Shift) perpendicular to the plane containing the tandem. The third site of verification at the neck of the ring is the error due to the rotation of ring about tandem axis. The impact of translational errors from -5 mm to 5 mm in the step of 1 mm along x-, y-, and z-axis and three rotational errors about these axes from -19.1° to 19.1° in the step of 3.28° on dose-volume histogram parameters (D(2cc), D(1cc), D(0.1cc), and D(5cc) of bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, and D90 and D98 of HRCTV were also analyzed. Maximum registration errors along cranio-caudal direction was 2.2 mm (1 case), whereas the errors of 31 out of 34 cases of registration were found within 1.5 mm, and those of two cases were less than 2mm but greater than 1.5 mm. Maximum rotational error of ring about tandem axis was 3.15° (1.1 mm). In other

  16. CT image visualization: a conceptual introduction.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) postprocessing produces information-rich diagnostic images, transforming enormous amounts of x-ray attenuation data into clinical information that can assist in diagnosis and treatment. This article briefly reviews the history of the technological evolution of CT imaging equipment and provides a conceptual overview of scan data visualization processes. Trends in and examples of image postprocessing, segmentation, registration and fusion techniques, and computer-aided detection are described. Finally, the uses of these visualization algorithms in selected diagnostic imaging applications are discussed.

  17. A new method of content based medical image retrieval and its applications to CT imaging sign retrieval.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ling; Liu, Xiabi; Gao, Yan; Zhao, Yanfeng; Zhao, Xinming; Zhou, Chunwu

    2017-02-01

    This paper proposes a new method of content based medical image retrieval through considering fused, context-sensitive similarity. Firstly, we fuse the semantic and visual similarities between the query image and each image in the database as their pairwise similarities. Then, we construct a weighted graph whose nodes represent the images and edges measure their pairwise similarities. By using the shortest path algorithm over the weighted graph, we obtain a new similarity measure, context-sensitive similarity measure, between the query image and each database image to complete the retrieval process. Actually, we use the fused pairwise similarity to narrow down the semantic gap for obtaining a more accurate pairwise similarity measure, and spread it on the intrinsic data manifold to achieve the context-sensitive similarity for a better retrieval performance. The proposed method has been evaluated on the retrieval of the Common CT Imaging Signs of Lung Diseases (CISLs) and achieved not only better retrieval results but also the satisfactory computation efficiency.

  18. Suppression of high-density artifacts in x-ray CT images using temporal digital subtraction with application to cryotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baissalov, Roustem; Sandison, George A.; Donnelly, Bryan J.; Saliken, John C.; Muldrew, Ken; Rewcastle, John C.

    2000-06-01

    Image guidance of cryotherapy is usually performed using ultrasound or x-ray CT. Despite the ability of CT to display the full 3D structure of the iceball, including frozen and unfrozen regions, the quality of the images is compromised by the presence of high density streak artifacts. To suppress these artifacts we applied Temporal Digital Subtraction (TDS). This TDS method has the added advantage of improving the gray scale contrast between frozen and unfrozen tissue in the CT images. Two sets of CT images were taken of a phantom material, cryoprobes and a urethral warmer (UW) before and during the cryoprobe freeze cycle. The high density artifacts persisted in both image sets. TDS was performed on these two image sets using the corresponding mask image of unfrozen material and the same geometrical configuration of the cryoprobes and the UW. The resultant difference image had a significantly reduced content of the artifacts. This TDS can be used in x-ray CT assisted cryotherapy to significantly suppress or eliminate high density x-ray CT streak artifacts by digitally processing x-ray CT images. Applying TDS in cryotherapy will facilitate estimation of the amount and location of all frozen and unfrozen regions, potentially making cryotherapy safer and less operator dependent.

  19. Piecewise-diffeomorphic image registration: application to the motion estimation between 3D CT lung images with sliding conditions.

    PubMed

    Risser, Laurent; Vialard, François-Xavier; Baluwala, Habib Y; Schnabel, Julia A

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new strategy for modelling sliding conditions when registering 3D images in a piecewise-diffeomorphic framework. More specifically, our main contribution is the development of a mathematical formalism to perform Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping registration with sliding conditions. We also show how to adapt this formalism to the LogDemons diffeomorphic registration framework. We finally show how to apply this strategy to estimate the respiratory motion between 3D CT pulmonary images. Quantitative tests are performed on 2D and 3D synthetic images, as well as on real 3D lung images from the MICCAI EMPIRE10 challenge. Results show that our strategy estimates accurate mappings of entire 3D thoracic image volumes that exhibit a sliding motion, as opposed to conventional registration methods which are not capable of capturing discontinuous deformations at the thoracic cage boundary. They also show that although the deformations are not smooth across the location of sliding conditions, they are almost always invertible in the whole image domain. This would be helpful for radiotherapy planning and delivery. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Simultaneous detection of multiple elastic surfaces with application to tumor segmentation in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kang; Jolly, Marie-Pierre

    2008-03-01

    We present a new semi-supervised method for segmenting multiple interrelated object boundaries with spherical topology in volumetric images. The core of our method is a novel graph-theoretic algorithm that simultaneously detects multiple surfaces under smoothness, distance, and elasticity constraints. The algorithm computes the global optimum of an objective function that incorporates boundary, regional and surface elasticity information. A single straight line drawn by the user in a cross-sectional slice is the sole user input, which roughly indicates the extent of the object. We employ a multi-seeded Dijkstra-based range competition algorithm to pre-segment the object on two orthogonal multiplanar reformatted (MPR) planes that pass through the input line. Based on the 2D pre-segmentation results, we estimate the object and background intensity histograms, and employ an adaptive mean-shift mode-seeking process on the object histogram to automatically determine the number of surface layers to be segmented. The final multiple-surface segmentation is performed in an ellipsoidal coordinate frame constructed by an automated ellipsoid fitting procedure. We apply our method to the segmentation of liver lesions with necrosis or calcification, and various other tumors in CT images. For liver tumor segmentation, our method can simultaneously delineate both tumor and necrosis boundaries. This capability is unprecedented and is valuable for cancer diagnosis, treatment planning, and evaluation.

  1. Automated 3D closed surface segmentation: application to vertebral body segmentation in CT images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Xie, Yiting; Reeves, Anthony P

    2016-05-01

    A fully automated segmentation algorithm, progressive surface resolution (PSR), is presented in this paper to determine the closed surface of approximately convex blob-like structures that are common in biomedical imaging. The PSR algorithm was applied to the cortical surface segmentation of 460 vertebral bodies on 46 low-dose chest CT images, which can be potentially used for automated bone mineral density measurement and compression fracture detection. The target surface is realized by a closed triangular mesh, which thereby guarantees the enclosure. The surface vertices of the triangular mesh representation are constrained along radial trajectories that are uniformly distributed in 3D angle space. The segmentation is accomplished by determining for each radial trajectory the location of its intersection with the target surface. The surface is first initialized based on an input high confidence boundary image and then resolved progressively based on a dynamic attraction map in an order of decreasing degree of evidence regarding the target surface location. For the visual evaluation, the algorithm achieved acceptable segmentation for 99.35 % vertebral bodies. Quantitative evaluation was performed on 46 vertebral bodies and achieved overall mean Dice coefficient of 0.939 (with max [Formula: see text] 0.957, min [Formula: see text] 0.906 and standard deviation [Formula: see text] 0.011) using manual annotations as the ground truth. Both visual and quantitative evaluations demonstrate encouraging performance of the PSR algorithm. This novel surface resolution strategy provides uniform angular resolution for the segmented surface with computation complexity and runtime that are linearly constrained by the total number of vertices of the triangular mesh representation.

  2. Image-Guided Radiotherapy Using a Modified Industrial Micro-CT for Preclinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Manuela C.; Fleckenstein, Jens; Kirschner, Stefanie; Hartmann, Linda; Wenz, Frederik; Brockmann, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective Although radiotherapy is a key component of cancer treatment, its implementation into pre-clinical in vivo models with relatively small target volumes is frequently omitted either due to technical complexity or expected side effects hampering long-term observational studies. We here demonstrate how an affordable industrial micro-CT can be converted into a small animal IGRT device at very low costs. We also demonstrate the proof of principle for the case of partial brain irradiation of mice carrying orthotopic glioblastoma implants. Methods/Materials A commercially available micro-CT originally designed for non-destructive material analysis was used. It consists of a CNC manipulator, a transmission X-ray tube (10–160 kV) and a flat-panel detector, which was used together with custom-made steel collimators (1–5 mm aperture size). For radiation field characterization, an ionization chamber, water-equivalent slab phantoms and radiochromic films were used. A treatment planning tool was implemented using a C++ application. For proof of principle, NOD/SCID/γc−/− mice were orthotopically implanted with U87MG high-grade glioma cells and irradiated using the novel setup. Results The overall symmetry of the radiation field at 150 kV was 1.04±0.02%. The flatness was 4.99±0.63% and the penumbra widths were between 0.14 mm and 0.51 mm. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) ranged from 1.97 to 9.99 mm depending on the collimator aperture size. The dose depth curve along the central axis followed a typical shape of keV photons. Dose rates measured were 10.7 mGy/s in 1 mm and 7.6 mGy/s in 5 mm depth (5 mm collimator aperture size). Treatment of mice with a single dose of 10 Gy was tolerated well and resulted in central tumor necrosis consistent with therapeutic efficacy. Conclusion A conventional industrial micro-CT can be easily modified to allow effective small animal IGRT even of critical target volumes such as the brain. PMID:25993010

  3. A registration-based segmentation method with application to adiposity analysis of mice microCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Bing; Joshi, Anand; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Longo, Valter D.; Conti, Peter S.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2014-04-01

    Obesity is a global health problem, particularly in the U.S. where one third of adults are obese. A reliable and accurate method of quantifying obesity is necessary. Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) are two measures of obesity that reflect different associated health risks, but accurate measurements in humans or rodent models are difficult. In this paper we present an automatic, registration-based segmentation method for mouse adiposity studies using microCT images. We co-register the subject CT image and a mouse CT atlas. Our method is based on surface matching of the microCT image and an atlas. Surface-based elastic volume warping is used to match the internal anatomy. We acquired a whole body scan of a C57BL6/J mouse injected with contrast agent using microCT and created a whole body mouse atlas by manually delineate the boundaries of the mouse and major organs. For method verification we scanned a C57BL6/J mouse from the base of the skull to the distal tibia. We registered the obtained mouse CT image to our atlas. Preliminary results show that we can warp the atlas image to match the posture and shape of the subject CT image, which has significant differences from the atlas. We plan to use this software tool in longitudinal obesity studies using mouse models.

  4. Body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Zhao, Liming; Torigian, Drew A.

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid growth of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-based medical applications, body-wide anatomy recognition on whole-body PET/CT images becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem and seldom studied due to unclear anatomy reference frame and low spatial resolution of PET images as well as low contrast and spatial resolution of the associated low-dose CT images. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [15] whose applicability was demonstrated on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images in different body regions on 35 objects. The aim of the present work is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to low-dose CT and PET images toward automated body-wide disease quantification. Our adaptation of the previous AAR methodology to PET/CT images in this paper focuses on 16 objects in three body regions - thorax, abdomen, and pelvis - and consists of the following steps: collecting whole-body PET/CT images from existing patient image databases, delineating all objects in these images, modifying the previous hierarchical models built from diagnostic CT images to account for differences in appearance in low-dose CT and PET images, automatically locating objects in these images following object hierarchy, and evaluating performance. Our preliminary evaluations indicate that the performance of the AAR approach on low-dose CT images achieves object localization accuracy within about 2 voxels, which is comparable to the accuracies achieved on diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT images. Object recognition on low-dose CT images from PET/CT examinations without requiring diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT seems feasible.

  5. Reconstruction algorithm for polychromatic CT imaging: application to beam hardening correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, C. H.; Whalen, R. T.; Beaupre, G. S.; Yen, S. Y.; Napel, S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a new reconstruction algorithm for both single- and dual-energy computed tomography (CT) imaging. By incorporating the polychromatic characteristics of the X-ray beam into the reconstruction process, the algorithm is capable of eliminating beam hardening artifacts. The single energy version of the algorithm assumes that each voxel in the scan field can be expressed as a mixture of two known substances, for example, a mixture of trabecular bone and marrow, or a mixture of fat and flesh. These assumptions are easily satisfied in a quantitative computed tomography (QCT) setting. We have compared our algorithm to three commonly used single-energy correction techniques. Experimental results show that our algorithm is much more robust and accurate. We have also shown that QCT measurements obtained using our algorithm are five times more accurate than that from current QCT systems (using calibration). The dual-energy mode does not require any prior knowledge of the object in the scan field, and can be used to estimate the attenuation coefficient function of unknown materials. We have tested the dual-energy setup to obtain an accurate estimate for the attenuation coefficient function of K2 HPO4 solution.

  6. A strain energy filter for 3D vessel enhancement with application to pulmonary CT images.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Changyan; Staring, Marius; Shamonin, Denis; Reiber, Johan H C; Stolk, Jan; Stoel, Berend C

    2011-02-01

    The traditional Hessian-related vessel filters often suffer from detecting complex structures like bifurcations due to an over-simplified cylindrical model. To solve this problem, we present a shape-tuned strain energy density function to measure vessel likelihood in 3D medical images. This method is initially inspired by established stress-strain principles in mechanics. By considering the Hessian matrix as a stress tensor, the three invariants from orthogonal tensor decomposition are used independently or combined to formulate distinctive functions for vascular shape discrimination, brightness contrast and structure strength measuring. Moreover, a mathematical description of Hessian eigenvalues for general vessel shapes is obtained, based on an intensity continuity assumption, and a relative Hessian strength term is presented to ensure the dominance of second-order derivatives as well as suppress undesired step-edges. Finally, we adopt the multi-scale scheme to find an optimal solution through scale space. The proposed method is validated in experiments with a digital phantom and non-contrast-enhanced pulmonary CT data. It is shown that our model performed more effectively in enhancing vessel bifurcations and preserving details, compared to three existing filters.

  7. Development and application of local 3-D x-ray CT reconstruction software for imaging critical regions in large ceramic turbine rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Sivers, E.A.; Holloway, D.L.; Ellingson, W.A.; Ling, J.

    1992-12-31

    Current 3-D X-ray CT imaging technology is limited in some cases by the size and sensitivity of the X-ray detector. This limitation can be overcome to some degree by the use of region-of-interest (ROI) reconstruction software when only part of a larger object need be examined. However, images produced from ROI data often exhibit severe density shading if they are reconstructed by unaltered 3-D X-ray CT algorithms (called Global methods here). These density artifacts can be so severe that low-contrast features are hidden. Time-consuming methods introduced previously to remedy these artifacts require specialized processing to replace or approximate the missing data outside the desired volume. Although these methods are required for true densitometry measurements, in many NDT applications only the detection of internal features or relative density variations is required. In such cases, the use of Local (or Lamda) X-ray CT, which produces an ``edge-enhanced`` reconstruction and requires only minor modifications of the standard 3-D X-ray CT algorithm, is recommended. Since the primary difference between Global and Local CT concerns the design of the convolution filter, two versions of a Local CT fitter are discussed here. These two filters are used in a Local CT implementation to reconstruct 3D X-ray CT data. For comparison, Global CT using the Shepp-Logan variation of the fan-beam convolution fitter is used to reconstruct the same data. This comparison shows the relative merits of Local and Global CT for fairly noisy scans of large, green Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} pressure-slip-cast parts. The Feldkamp modification of fan-beam CT reconstruction is used in the reconstructions. In each case, real-number, reconstructed images are scaled linearly to optimize the available grey-scale levels in the images presented here.

  8. Potential applications of flat-panel volumetric CT in morphologic and functional small animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Greschus, Susanne; Kiessling, Fabian; Lichy, Matthias P; Moll, Jens; Mueller, Margareta M; Savai, Rajkumar; Rose, Frank; Ruppert, Clemens; Günther, Andreas; Luecke, Marcus; Fusenig, Norbert E; Semmler, Wolfhard; Traupe, Horst

    2005-08-01

    Noninvasive radiologic imaging has recently gained considerable interest in basic and preclinical research for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic efficacy. In this report, we introduce flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT) as a powerful new tool for noninvasive imaging of different organ systems in preclinical research. The three-dimensional visualization that is achieved by isotropic high-resolution datasets is illustrated for the skeleton, chest, abdominal organs, and brain of mice. The high image quality of chest scans enables the visualization of small lung nodules in an orthotopic lung cancer model and the reliable imaging of therapy side effects such as lung fibrosis. Using contrast-enhanced scans, fpVCT displayed the vascular trees of the brain, liver, and kidney down to the subsegmental level. Functional application of fpVCT in dynamic contrast-enhanced scans of the rat brain delivered physiologically reliable data of perfusion and tissue blood volume. Beyond scanning of small animal models as demonstrated here, fpVCT provides the ability to image animals up to the size of primates.

  9. Hybrid imaging: integration of nuclear imaging and cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Di Carli, Marcelo F

    2009-05-01

    The integration of nuclear medicine cameras with multidetector CT scanners provides a unique opportunity to delineate cardiac and vascular anatomic abnormalities and their physiologic consequences in a single setting. By revealing the burden of anatomic coronary artery disease and its physiologic significance, hybrid imaging can provide unique information that may improve noninvasive diagnosis, risk assessment, and management of coronary artery disease. By integrating the detailed anatomic information from CT with the high sensitivity of radionuclide imaging to evaluate targeted molecular and cellular abnormalities, hybrid imaging may play a key role in shaping the future of molecular diagnostics and therapeutics. This article reviews potential clinical applications of hybrid imaging in cardiovascular disease.

  10. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung include gadolinium-enhanced perfusion imaging and hyperpolarized helium imaging, which can allow imaging of pulmonary ventilation and .measurement of the size of emphysematous spaces. PMID:18267192

  11. Application of contrast media in post-mortem imaging (CT and MRI).

    PubMed

    Grabherr, Silke; Grimm, Jochen; Baumann, Pia; Mangin, Patrice

    2015-09-01

    The application of contrast media in post-mortem radiology differs from clinical approaches in living patients. Post-mortem changes in the vascular system and the absence of blood flow lead to specific problems that have to be considered for the performance of post-mortem angiography. In addition, interpreting the images is challenging due to technique-related and post-mortem artefacts that have to be known and that are specific for each applied technique. Although the idea of injecting contrast media is old, classic methods are not simply transferable to modern radiological techniques in forensic medicine, as they are mostly dedicated to single-organ studies or applicable only shortly after death. With the introduction of modern imaging techniques, such as post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT) and post-mortem magnetic resonance (PMMR), to forensic death investigations, intensive research started to explore their advantages and limitations compared to conventional autopsy. PMCT has already become a routine investigation in several centres, and different techniques have been developed to better visualise the vascular system and organ parenchyma in PMCT. In contrast, the use of PMMR is still limited due to practical issues, and research is now starting in the field of PMMR angiography. This article gives an overview of the problems in post-mortem contrast media application, the various classic and modern techniques, and the issues to consider by using different media.

  12. Local respiratory motion correction for PET/CT imaging: Application to lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Fayad, H.; Visvikis, D.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Despite multiple methodologies already proposed to correct respiratory motion in the whole PET imaging field of view (FOV), such approaches have not found wide acceptance in clinical routine. An alternative can be the local respiratory motion correction (LRMC) of data corresponding to a given volume of interest (VOI: organ or tumor). Advantages of LRMC include the use of a simple motion model, faster execution times, and organ specific motion correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of LMRC using various motion models for oncology (lung lesion) applications. Methods: Both simulated (NURBS based 4D cardiac-torso phantom) and clinical studies (six patients) were used in the evaluation of the proposed LRMC approach. PET data were acquired in list-mode and synchronized with respiration. The implemented approach consists first in defining a VOI on the reconstructed motion average image. Gated PET images of the VOI are subsequently reconstructed using only lines of response passing through the selected VOI and are used in combination with a center of gravity or an affine/elastic registration algorithm to derive the transformation maps corresponding to the respiration effects. Those are finally integrated in the reconstruction process to produce a motion free image over the lesion regions. Results: Although the center of gravity or affine algorithm achieved similar performance for individual lesion motion correction, the elastic model, applied either locally or to the whole FOV, led to an overall superior performance. The spatial tumor location was altered by 89% and 81% for the elastic model applied locally or to the whole FOV, respectively (compared to 44% and 39% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). This resulted in similar associated overall tumor volume changes of 84% and 80%, respectively (compared to 75% and 71% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). The application of the nonrigid

  13. Fast analytical approach of application specific dose efficient spectrum selection for diagnostic CT imaging and PET attenuation correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Xue; Jin, Yannan; FitzGerald, Paul F.; Wu, Mingye; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; De Man, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used for a variety of applications, two of which include diagnostic imaging and attenuation correction for PET or SPECT imaging. Ideally, the x-ray tube spectrum should be optimized for the specific application to minimize the patient radiation dose while still providing the necessary information. In this study, we proposed a projection-based analytic approach for the analysis of contrast, noise, and bias. Dose normalized contrast to noise ratio (CNRD), inverse noise normalized by dose (IND) and bias are used as evaluation metrics to determine the optimal x-ray spectrum. Our simulation investigated the dose efficiency of the x-ray spectrum ranging from 40 kVp to 200 kVp. Water cylinders with diameters of 15 cm, 24 cm, and 35 cm were used in the simulation to cover a variety of patient sizes. The effects of electronic noise and pre-patient copper filtration were also evaluated. A customized 24 cm CTDI-like phantom with 13 mm diameter inserts filled with iodine (10 mg ml-1), tantalum (10 mg ml-1), water, and PMMA was measured with both standard (1.5 mGy) and ultra-low (0.2 mGy) dose to verify the simulation results at tube voltages of 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp. For contrast-enhanced diagnostic imaging, the simulation results indicated that for high dose without filtration, the optimal kVp for water contrast is approximately 100 kVp for a 15 cm water cylinder. However, the 60 kVp spectrum produces the highest CNRD for bone and iodine. The optimal kVp for tantalum has two selections: approximately 50 and 100 kVp. The kVp that maximizes CNRD increases when the object size increases. The trend in the CTDI phantom measurements agrees with the simulation results, which also agrees with previous studies. Copper filtration improved the dose efficiency for water and tantalum, but reduced the iodine and bone dose efficiency in a clinically-relevant range (70-140 kVp). Our study also shows that for CT-based attenuation

  14. CT Image Processing Using Public Digital Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Azzawi, Yu-Ming; Quinn, John F.; Glenn, William V.; Rothman, Stephen L.G.

    1984-01-01

    Nationwide commercial computer communication is now commonplace for those applications where digital dialogues are generally short and widely distributed, and where bandwidth does not exceed that of dial-up telephone lines. Image processing using such networks is prohibitive because of the large volume of data inherent to digital pictures. With a blend of increasing bandwidth and distributed processing, network image processing becomes possible. This paper examines characteristics of a digital image processing service for a nationwide network of CT scanner installations. Issues of image transmission, data compression, distributed processing, software maintenance, and interfacility communication are also discussed. Included are results that show the volume and type of processing experienced by a network of over 50 CT scanners for the last 32 months.

  15. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a good'' surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  16. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a ``good`` surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  17. An approach for quantitative image quality analysis for CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Amir; Cochran, Joe; Mooney, Doug; Regensburger, Joe

    2016-03-01

    An objective and standardized approach to assess image quality of Compute Tomography (CT) systems is required in a wide variety of imaging processes to identify CT systems appropriate for a given application. We present an overview of the framework we have developed to help standardize and to objectively assess CT image quality for different models of CT scanners used for security applications. Within this framework, we have developed methods to quantitatively measure metrics that should correlate with feature identification, detection accuracy and precision, and image registration capabilities of CT machines and to identify strengths and weaknesses in different CT imaging technologies in transportation security. To that end we have designed, developed and constructed phantoms that allow for systematic and repeatable measurements of roughly 88 image quality metrics, representing modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, noise power spectra, slice sensitivity profiles, streak artifacts, CT number uniformity, CT number consistency, object length accuracy, CT number path length consistency, and object registration. Furthermore, we have developed a sophisticated MATLAB based image analysis tool kit to analyze CT generated images of phantoms and report these metrics in a format that is standardized across the considered models of CT scanners, allowing for comparative image quality analysis within a CT model or between different CT models. In addition, we have developed a modified sparse principal component analysis (SPCA) method to generate a modified set of PCA components as compared to the standard principal component analysis (PCA) with sparse loadings in conjunction with Hotelling T2 statistical analysis method to compare, qualify, and detect faults in the tested systems.

  18. Application of dual-energy spectral CT imaging in differential diagnosis of bladder cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Anliang; Liu, Ailian; Liu, Jinghong; Tian, Shifeng; Wang, Heqing; Liu, Yijun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the clinical value of dual-energy spectral CT imaging in the differential diagnosis between bladder cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We retrospectively analyzed images of 118 patients who received pelvic dual-energy spectral CT imaging. These patients were later confirmed to have bladder cancer in 61 patients and BPH in 57 patients. CT values of the 2 lesion types from 40 to 140 keV were measured from the monochromatic spectral CT image to generate spectral HU curves. The slope of the spectral curve and the lesion effective atomic number were calculated. The measured parameters were analyzed with independent-sample Mann-Whitney U test. There was a statistically significant difference in CT value between the 2 groups from 40 to 90 keV, with the biggest difference at 40 keV (median and interquartile range: 83.3 HU and 22.9 HU vs 60.6 HU and 16.7 HU, Z = 5.932, P < 0.001). The slope of the spectral HU curve for bladder cancer was markedly higher than that of BPH (median and interquartile range: 0.48 and 0.23 vs 0.26 and 0.22, Z = 5.162, P < 0.001); the difference in effective atomic number (median and interquartile range: 7.99 and 0.21 vs 7.80 and 0.20, Z = 5.233, P < 0.001) was also statistically significant. Dual-energy spectral CT imaging provides high sensitivity and specificity for differentiating bladder cancer from benign prostate hyperplasia. PMID:28033269

  19. MULTIMODALITY IMAGING: BEYOND PET/CT AND SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Simon R.

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality imaging with PET/CT and SPECT/CT has become commonplace in clinical practice and in preclinical and basic medical research. Do other combinations of imaging modalities have a similar potential to impact medical science and clinical medicine? The combination of PET or SPECT with MRI is an area of active research at the present time, while other, perhaps less obvious combinations, including CT/MR and PET/optical also are being studied. In addition to the integration of the instrumentation, there are parallel developments in synthesizing imaging agents that can be viewed by multiple imaging modalities. Is the fusion of PET and SPECT with CT the ultimate answer in multimodality imaging, or is it just the first example of a more general trend towards harnessing the complementary nature of the different modalities on integrated imaging platforms? PMID:19646559

  20. Parametric modeling of the intervertebral disc space in 3D: application to CT images of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Korez, Robert; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2014-10-01

    Gradual degeneration of intervertebral discs of the lumbar spine is one of the most common causes of low back pain. Although conservative treatment for low back pain may provide relief to most individuals, surgical intervention may be required for individuals with significant continuing symptoms, which is usually performed by replacing the degenerated intervertebral disc with an artificial implant. For designing implants with good bone contact and continuous force distribution, the morphology of the intervertebral disc space and vertebral body endplates is of considerable importance. In this study, we propose a method for parametric modeling of the intervertebral disc space in three dimensions (3D) and show its application to computed tomography (CT) images of the lumbar spine. The initial 3D model of the intervertebral disc space is generated according to the superquadric approach and therefore represented by a truncated elliptical cone, which is initialized by parameters obtained from 3D models of adjacent vertebral bodies. In an optimization procedure, the 3D model of the intervertebral disc space is incrementally deformed by adding parameters that provide a more detailed morphometric description of the observed shape, and aligned to the observed intervertebral disc space in the 3D image. By applying the proposed method to CT images of 20 lumbar spines, the shape and pose of each of the 100 intervertebral disc spaces were represented by a 3D parametric model. The resulting mean (±standard deviation) accuracy of modeling was 1.06±0.98mm in terms of radial Euclidean distance against manually defined ground truth points, with the corresponding success rate of 93% (i.e. 93 out of 100 intervertebral disc spaces were modeled successfully). As the resulting 3D models provide a description of the shape of intervertebral disc spaces in a complete parametric form, morphometric analysis was straightforwardly enabled and allowed the computation of the corresponding

  1. Multi-resolution statistical image reconstruction for mitigation of truncation effects: application to cone-beam CT of the head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Hao; Webster Stayman, J.; Sisniega, Alejandro; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Xu, Jennifer; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David H.; Aygun, Nafi; Koliatsos, Vassilis E.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2017-01-01

    A prototype cone-beam CT (CBCT) head scanner featuring model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) has been recently developed and demonstrated the potential for reliable detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), which is vital to diagnosis of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic stroke. However, data truncation (e.g. due to the head holder) can result in artifacts that reduce image uniformity and challenge ICH detection. We propose a multi-resolution MBIR method with an extended reconstruction field of view (RFOV) to mitigate truncation effects in CBCT of the head. The image volume includes a fine voxel size in the (inner) nontruncated region and a coarse voxel size in the (outer) truncated region. This multi-resolution scheme allows extension of the RFOV to mitigate truncation effects while introducing minimal increase in computational complexity. The multi-resolution method was incorporated in a penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) reconstruction framework previously developed for CBCT of the head. Experiments involving an anthropomorphic head phantom with truncation due to a carbon-fiber holder were shown to result in severe artifacts in conventional single-resolution PWLS, whereas extending the RFOV within the multi-resolution framework strongly reduced truncation artifacts. For the same extended RFOV, the multi-resolution approach reduced computation time compared to the single-resolution approach (viz. time reduced by 40.7%, 83.0%, and over 95% for an image volume of 6003, 8003, 10003 voxels). Algorithm parameters (e.g. regularization strength, the ratio of the fine and coarse voxel size, and RFOV size) were investigated to guide reliable parameter selection. The findings provide a promising method for truncation artifact reduction in CBCT and may be useful for other MBIR methods and applications for which truncation is a challenge.

  2. Iterative framework for the joint segmentation and CT synthesis of MR images: application to MRI-only radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos, Ninon; Guerreiro, Filipa; McClelland, Jamie; Presles, Benoît; Modat, Marc; Nill, Simeon; Dearnaley, David; deSouza, Nandita; Oelfke, Uwe; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Ourselin, Sébastien; Cardoso, M. Jorge

    2017-06-01

    To tackle the problem of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-only radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP), we propose a multi-atlas information propagation scheme that jointly segments organs and generates pseudo x-ray computed tomography (CT) data from structural MR images (T1-weighted and T2-weighted). As the performance of the method strongly depends on the quality of the atlas database composed of multiple sets of aligned MR, CT and segmented images, we also propose a robust way of registering atlas MR and CT images, which combines structure-guided registration, and CT and MR image synthesis. We first evaluated the proposed framework in terms of segmentation and CT synthesis accuracy on 15 subjects with prostate cancer. The segmentations obtained with the proposed method were compared using the Dice score coefficient (DSC) to the manual segmentations. Mean DSCs of 0.73, 0.90, 0.77 and 0.90 were obtained for the prostate, bladder, rectum and femur heads, respectively. The mean absolute error (MAE) and the mean error (ME) were computed between the reference CTs (non-rigidly aligned to the MRs) and the pseudo CTs generated with the proposed method. The MAE was on average 45.7+/- 4.6 HU and the ME -1.6+/- 7.7 HU. We then performed a dosimetric evaluation by re-calculating plans on the pseudo CTs and comparing them to the plans optimised on the reference CTs. We compared the cumulative dose volume histograms (DVH) obtained for the pseudo CTs to the DVH obtained for the reference CTs in the planning target volume (PTV) located in the prostate, and in the organs at risk at different DVH points. We obtained average differences of -0.14 % in the PTV for {{D}98 % } , and between -0.14 % and 0.05% in the PTV, bladder, rectum and femur heads for D mean and {{D}2 % } . Overall, we demonstrate that the proposed framework is able to automatically generate accurate pseudo CT images and segmentations in the pelvic region, potentially bypassing the need for CT scan for accurate RTP.

  3. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2015-03-01

    numbers to quantify multi-energy PCS-CT images, application of K-edge filtered x-rays for improved soft tissue decomposition, and several others. The study suggests that the presented PCS-CT technology meets the requirements of a particular clinical application, i.e. dedicated breast CT.

  4. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2015-03-21

    numbers to quantify multi-energy PCS-CT images, application of K-edge filtered x-rays for improved soft tissue decomposition, and several others. The study suggests that the presented PCS-CT technology meets the requirements of a particular clinical application, i.e. dedicated breast CT.

  5. Clinical Application of Solid Model Based on Trabecular Tibia Bone CT Images Created by 3D Printer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaemo; Park, Chan-Soo; Kim, Yeoun-Jae; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work is to use a 3D solid model to predict the mechanical loads of human bone fracture risk associated with bone disease conditions according to biomechanical engineering parameters. We used special image processing tools for image segmentation and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction to generate meshes, which are necessary for the production of a solid model with a 3D printer from computed tomography (CT) images of the human tibia's trabecular and cortical bones. We examined the defects of the mechanism for the tibia's trabecular bones. Image processing tools and segmentation techniques were used to analyze bone structures and produce a solid model with a 3D printer. These days, bio-imaging (CT and magnetic resonance imaging) devices are able to display and reconstruct 3D anatomical details, and diagnostics are becoming increasingly vital to the quality of patient treatment planning and clinical treatment. Furthermore, radiographic images are being used to study biomechanical systems with several aims, namely, to describe and simulate the mechanical behavior of certain anatomical systems, to analyze pathological bone conditions, to study tissues structure and properties, and to create a solid model using a 3D printer to support surgical planning and reduce experimental costs. These days, research using image processing tools and segmentation techniques to analyze bone structures to produce a solid model with a 3D printer is rapidly becoming very important.

  6. Clinical Application of Solid Model Based on Trabecular Tibia Bone CT Images Created by 3D Printer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jaemo; Park, Chan-Soo; Kim, Yeoun-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this work is to use a 3D solid model to predict the mechanical loads of human bone fracture risk associated with bone disease conditions according to biomechanical engineering parameters. Methods We used special image processing tools for image segmentation and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction to generate meshes, which are necessary for the production of a solid model with a 3D printer from computed tomography (CT) images of the human tibia's trabecular and cortical bones. We examined the defects of the mechanism for the tibia's trabecular bones. Results Image processing tools and segmentation techniques were used to analyze bone structures and produce a solid model with a 3D printer. Conclusions These days, bio-imaging (CT and magnetic resonance imaging) devices are able to display and reconstruct 3D anatomical details, and diagnostics are becoming increasingly vital to the quality of patient treatment planning and clinical treatment. Furthermore, radiographic images are being used to study biomechanical systems with several aims, namely, to describe and simulate the mechanical behavior of certain anatomical systems, to analyze pathological bone conditions, to study tissues structure and properties, and to create a solid model using a 3D printer to support surgical planning and reduce experimental costs. These days, research using image processing tools and segmentation techniques to analyze bone structures to produce a solid model with a 3D printer is rapidly becoming very important. PMID:26279958

  7. 3D electron density imaging using single scattered x rays with application to breast CT and mammographic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Uytven, Eric Peter

    Screening mammography is the current standard in detecting breast cancer. However, its fundamental disadvantage is that it projects a 3D object into a 2D image. Small lesions are difficult to detect when superimposed over layers of normal tissue. Commercial Computed Tomography (CT) produces a true 3D image yet has a limited role in mammography due to relatively low resolution and contrast. With the intent of enhancing mammography and breast CT, we have developed an algorithm which can produce 3D electron density images using a single projection. Imaging an object with x rays produces a characteristic scattered photon spectrum at the detector plane. A known incident beam spectrum, beam shape, and arbitrary 3D matrix of electron density values enable a theoretical scattered photon distribution to be calculated. An iterative minimization algorithm is used to make changes to the electron density voxel matrix to reduce regular differences between the theoretical and the experimentally measured distributions. The object is characterized by the converged electron density image. This technique has been validated in simulation using data produced by the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system. At both mammographic and CT energies, a scanning polychromatic pencil beam was used to image breast tissue phantoms containing lesion-like inhomogeneities. The resulting Monte Carlo data is processed using a Nelder-Mead iterative algorithm (MATLAB) to produce the 3D matrix of electron density values. Resulting images have confirmed the ability of the algorithm to detect various 1x1x2.5 mm3 lesions with calcification content as low as 0.5% (p<0.005) at a dose comparable to mammography.

  8. The application of PET-CT to post-mastectomy regional radiation therapy using a deformable image registration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Sun; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Ahn, Seung Do; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Lee, Sang-Wook; Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Young Seok; Park, Jin-Hong; Cho, Byung Chul; Kim, Su Ssan

    2013-04-29

    To evaluate the utility of the preoperative PET-CT using deformable image registration (DIR) in the treatment of patients with locally advanced breast cancer and to find appropriate radiotherapy technique for further adequate treatment of axillary nodal area. Sixty-five breast cancer patients who had level II, III axillary or supraclavicular lymph node metastasis on ¹⁸F-FDG PET-CT and received postoperative radiotherapy after modified radical mastectomy were enrolled. One radiation oncologist contoured normal organs (axillary vessels, clavicular head, coracoids process and humeral head) and involved lymph nodes on PET-CT and simulation CT slices. After contouring, deformable image registration of PET-CT on simulation CT was carried out. To evaluate the performance of the DIR, Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and Center of mass (COM) were used. We created two plans, one was the historically designed three field plan and the other was the modified plan based on the location of axillary lymph node, and we compared the doses that irradiated the axillary lymph nodes. The DSCs for axillary artery, axillary vein, clavicular head, coracoids process and humeral head were 0.43 ± 0.15, 0.39 ± 0.20, 0.85 ± 0.10, 0.72 ± 0.20 and 0.77 ± 0.20, respectively. The distances between the COMs of axillary artery, axillary vein, clavicular head, coracoids process and humeral head in simulation CT and from PET-CT were 13.0 ±7.1, 20.2 ± 11.2, 4.4 ± 6.3, 3.7 ± 6.7, and 9.5 ± 25.0 mm, respectively. In the historically designed plan, only 57.7% of level II lymph nodes received more than 95% of prescribed dose and the coverage was improved to 70.0% with the modified plan (p < 0.01). For level III lymph nodes, the volumes received more than 95% of prescribed dose were similar in both plans (96.8 % vs 97.9%, p = 0.35). Deformable image registration of PET-CT on simulation CT was helpful in the identification of the location of the

  9. Automatic multiscale enhancement and segmentation of pulmonary vessels in CT pulmonary angiography images for CAD applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Chuan; Chan, H.-P.; Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chughtai, Aamer; Patel, Smita; Wei Jun; Ge Jun; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.

    2007-12-15

    The authors are developing a computerized pulmonary vessel segmentation method for a computer-aided pulmonary embolism (PE) detection system on computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) images. Because PE only occurs inside pulmonary arteries, an automatic and accurate segmentation of the pulmonary vessels in 3D CTPA images is an essential step for the PE CAD system. To segment the pulmonary vessels within the lung, the lung regions are first extracted using expectation-maximization (EM) analysis and morphological operations. The authors developed a 3D multiscale filtering technique to enhance the pulmonary vascular structures based on the analysis of eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix at multiple scales. A new response function of the filter was designed to enhance all vascular structures including the vessel bifurcations and suppress nonvessel structures such as the lymphoid tissues surrounding the vessels. An EM estimation is then used to segment the vascular structures by extracting the high response voxels at each scale. The vessel tree is finally reconstructed by integrating the segmented vessels at all scales based on a 'connected component' analysis. Two CTPA cases containing PEs were used to evaluate the performance of the system. One of these two cases also contained pleural effusion disease. Two experienced thoracic radiologists provided the gold standard of pulmonary vessels including both arteries and veins by manually tracking the arterial tree and marking the center of the vessels using a computer graphical user interface. The accuracy of vessel tree segmentation was evaluated by the percentage of the 'gold standard' vessel center points overlapping with the segmented vessels. The results show that 96.2% (2398/2494) and 96.3% (1910/1984) of the manually marked center points in the arteries overlapped with segmented vessels for the case without and with other lung diseases. For the manually marked center points in all vessels including arteries

  10. A new osteophyte segmentation method with applications to an anterior cruciate ligament transection rabbit femur model via micro-CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, G.; Elkins, J. M.; Coimbra, A.; Duong, L. T.; Williams, D. S.; Sonka, M.; Saha, P. K.

    2010-03-01

    Osteophyte is an additional bony growth on a normal bone surface limiting or stopping motion in a deteriorating joint. Detection and quantification of osteophytes from CT images is helpful in assessing disease status as well as treatment and surgery planning. However, it is difficult to segment osteophytes from healthy bones using simple thresholding or edge/texture features in CT imaging. Here, we present a new method, based on active shape model (ASM), to solve this problem and evaluate its application to ex vivo μCT images in an ACLT rabbit femur model. The common idea behind most ASM based segmentation methods is to first build a parametric shape model from a training dataset and during application, find a shape instance from the model that optimally fits to target image. However, it poses a fundamental difficulty for the current application because a diseased bone shape is significantly altered at regions with osteophyte deposition misguiding an ASM method that eventually leads to suboptimum segmentation results. Here, we introduce a new partial ASM method that uses bone shape over healthy regions and extrapolate its shape over diseased region following the underlying shape model. Once the healthy bone region is detected, osteophyte is segmented by subtracting partial-ASM derived shape from the overall diseased shape. Also, a new semi-automatic method is presented in this paper for efficiently building a 3D shape model for rabbit femur. The method has been applied to μCT images of 2-, 4-, and 8-week post ACLT and sham-treated rabbit femurs and results of reproducibility and sensitivity analyses of the new osteophyte segmentation method are presented.

  11. Dual-Energy CT: New Horizon in Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Goo, Jin Mo

    2017-01-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector.

  12. Dual-Energy CT: New Horizon in Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Jin Mo

    2017-01-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector. PMID:28670151

  13. 3D printing for orthopedic applications: from high resolution cone beam CT images to life size physical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Amiee; Ray, Lawrence A.; Dangi, Shusil; Ben-Zikri, Yehuda K.; Linte, Cristian A.

    2017-03-01

    With increasing resolution in image acquisition, the project explores capabilities of printing toward faithfully reflecting detail and features depicted in medical images. To improve safety and efficiency of orthopedic surgery and spatial conceptualization in training and education, this project focused on generating virtual models of orthopedic anatomy from clinical quality computed tomography (CT) image datasets and manufacturing life-size physical models of the anatomy using 3D printing tools. Beginning with raw micro CT data, several image segmentation techniques including thresholding, edge recognition, and region-growing algorithms available in packages such as ITK-SNAP, MITK, or Mimics, were utilized to separate bone from surrounding soft tissue. After converting the resulting data to a standard 3D printing format, stereolithography (STL), the STL file was edited using Meshlab, Netfabb, and Meshmixer. The editing process was necessary to ensure a fully connected surface (no loose elements), positive volume with manifold geometry (geometry possible in the 3D physical world), and a single, closed shell. The resulting surface was then imported into a "slicing" software to scale and orient for printing on a Flashforge Creator Pro. In printing, relationships between orientation, print bed volume, model quality, material use and cost, and print time were considered. We generated anatomical models of the hand, elbow, knee, ankle, and foot from both low-dose high-resolution cone-beam CT images acquired using the soon to be released scanner developed by Carestream, as well as scaled models of the skeletal anatomy of the arm and leg, together with life-size models of the hand and foot.

  14. [Diagnostic imaging--CT, dynamic CT, and others].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Hajime

    2011-10-01

    Technical advances have raised computed tomography(CT) as a strong diagnostic tool of clinical imaging. Emphysematous changes can be quantitatively analyzed as low attenuation area which correlated with diffusion capacity, quality of life, and nutritional states, but not so much with forced expiratory volume in one second. With co-analyzing airway wall thickness, those are possibly useful to understand phenotypes. Dynamics of airway during breathing can be visualized by dynamic CT such as electron-beam CT. Dynamic airway narrowing is a representative feature in emphysematous lung.

  15. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Grosser, Oliver S.; Kupitz, Dennis; Ruf, Juri; Czuczwara, Damian; Steffen, Ingo G.; Furth, Christian; Thormann, Markus; Loewenthal, David; Ricke, Jens; Amthauer, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) with computed tomography (CT). Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) on the image quality of the low-dose CT images. Methodology/Principal Findings Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU) values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04). In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion/Significance In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality. PMID:26390216

  16. Evaluation of patient dose using a virtual CT scanner: Applications to 4DCT simulation and Kilovoltage cone-beam imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMarco, J. J.; McNitt-Gray, M. F.; Cagnon, C. H.; Angel, E.; Agazaryan, N.; Zankl, M.

    2008-02-01

    This work evaluates the effects of patient size on radiation dose from simulation imaging studies such as four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT). 4DCT studies are scans that include temporal information, frequently incorporating highly over-sampled imaging series necessary for retrospective sorting as a function of respiratory phase. This type of imaging study can result in a significant dose increase to the patient due to the slower table speed as compared with a conventional axial or helical scan protocol. Kilovoltage cone-beam imaging is a relatively new imaging technique that requires an on-board kilovoltage x-ray tube and a flat-panel detector. Instead of porting individual reference fields, the kV tube and flat-panel detector are rotated about the patient producing a cone-beam CT data set (kV-CBCT). To perform these investigations, we used Monte Carlo simulation methods with detailed models of adult patients and virtual source models of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. The GSF family of three-dimensional, voxelized patient models, were implemented as input files using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The adult patient models represent a range of patient sizes and have all radiosensitive organs previously identified and segmented. Simulated 4DCT scans of each voxelized patient model were performed using a multi-detector CT source model that includes scanner specific spectra, bow-tie filtration, and helical source path. Standard MCNPX tally functions were applied to each model to estimate absolute organ dose based upon an air-kerma normalization measurement for nominal scanner operating parameters.

  17. Non-rigid registration of serial dedicated breast CT, longitudinal dedicated breast CT and PET/CT images using the diffeomorphic demons method.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jonathan; Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Joshi, Anand A; Ferrero, Andrea; Yang, Kai; Boone, John M; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2014-09-01

    Dedicated breast CT and PET/CT scanners provide detailed 3D anatomical and functional imaging data sets and are currently being investigated for applications in breast cancer management such as diagnosis, monitoring response to therapy and radiation therapy planning. Our objective was to evaluate the performance of the diffeomorphic demons (DD) non-rigid image registration method to spatially align 3D serial (pre- and post-contrast) dedicated breast computed tomography (CT), and longitudinally-acquired dedicated 3D breast CT and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT images. The algorithmic parameters of the DD method were optimized for the alignment of dedicated breast CT images using training data and fixed. The performance of the method for image alignment was quantitatively evaluated using three separate data sets; (1) serial breast CT pre- and post-contrast images of 20 women, (2) breast CT images of 20 women acquired before and after repositioning the subject on the scanner, and (3) dedicated breast PET/CT images of 7 women undergoing neo-adjuvant chemotherapy acquired pre-treatment and after 1 cycle of therapy. The DD registration method outperformed no registration (p < 0.001) and conventional affine registration (p ≤ 0.002) for serial and longitudinal breast CT and PET/CT image alignment. In spite of the large size of the imaging data, the computational cost of the DD method was found to be reasonable (3-5 min). Co-registration of dedicated breast CT and PET/CT images can be performed rapidly and reliably using the DD method. This is the first study evaluating the DD registration method for the alignment of dedicated breast CT and PET/CT images. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Recent Advances in Cardiac Computed Tomography: Dual Energy, Spectral and Molecular CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Danad, Ibrahim; Fayad, Zahi A.; Willemink, Martin J.; Min, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) evolved into a powerful diagnostic tool and it is impossible to imagine current clinical practice without CT imaging. Due to its widespread availability, ease of clinical application, superb sensitivity for detection of CAD, and non-invasive nature, CT has become a valuable tool within the armamentarium of the cardiologist. In the last few years, numerous technological advances in CT have occurred—including dual energy CT (DECT), spectral CT and CT-based molecular imaging. By harnessing the advances in technology, cardiac CT has advanced beyond the mere evaluation of coronary stenosis to an imaging modality tool that permits accurate plaque characterization, assessment of myocardial perfusion and even probing of molecular processes that are involved in coronary atherosclerosis. Novel innovations in CT contrast agents and pre-clinical spectral CT devices have paved the way for CT-based molecular imaging. PMID:26068288

  19. Imaging properties of gold nanoparticles: CT number dependence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Shu-Ju; Hsieh, Hui-Ling; Chao, Tsi-Chian

    2010-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a rapid research progress of molecular imaging technology. Many investigations in molecular imaging such as the nanoparticle applications in targeted drug delivery have been widely studied in several key small animal models. Various nanoparticles used as either the drug delivery carriers, imaging contrast mediums or target-specific therapeutic agents have established a novel research platform for biomedical related scientists and clinicians. Among these nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles have the unique non-toxic and stability properties. In this work, a commercially-available micro CT imaging system was used to specifically study the imaging properties for 15 nm spherical-shaped gold particles. Imaging properties were quantified by the CT numbers obtained from a series of photon energy levels in the micro CT scanner. We also compared the imaging results between gold nanoparticles and iodinated contrast medium to study the potential impact of gold nanoparticles served as the contrast agent.

  20. Iterative image reconstruction in spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Daniel; Michel, Eric; Kim, Hye S.; Kim, Jae G.; Han, Byung H.; Cho, Min H.; Lee, Soo Y.

    2012-03-01

    Scan time of spectral-CTs is much longer than conventional CTs due to limited number of x-ray photons detectable by photon-counting detectors. However, the spectral pixel information in spectral-CT has much richer information on physiological and pathological status of the tissues than the CT-number in conventional CT, which makes the spectral- CT one of the promising future imaging modalities. One simple way to reduce the scan time in spectral-CT imaging is to reduce the number of views in the acquisition of projection data. But, this may result in poorer SNR and strong streak artifacts which can severely compromise the image quality. In this work, spectral-CT projection data were obtained from a lab-built spectral-CT consisting of a single CdTe photon counting detector, a micro-focus x-ray tube and scan mechanics. For the image reconstruction, we used two iterative image reconstruction methods, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) and the total variation minimization based on conjugate gradient method (CG-TV), along with the filtered back-projection (FBP) to compare the image quality. From the imaging of the iodine containing phantoms, we have observed that SIRT and CG-TV are superior to the FBP method in terms of SNR and streak artifacts.

  1. CT & CBCT imaging: assessment of the orbits.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, David C

    2012-11-01

    The orbits can be visualized easily on routine or customized protocols for computed tomography (CT) or cone beam CT (CBCT) scans. Detailed orbital investigations are best performed with 3-dimensional imaging methods. CT scans are preferred for visualizing the osseous orbital anatomy and fissures while magnetic resonance imaging is preferred for evaluating tumors and inflammation. CBCT provides high-resolution anatomic data of the sinonasal spaces, airway, soft tissue surfaces, and bones but does not provide much detail within the soft tissues. This article discusses CBCT imaging of the orbits, osseous anatomy of the orbits, and CBCT investigation of selected orbital pathosis.

  2. Image filtering as an alternative to the application of a different reconstruction kernel in CT imaging: feasibility study in lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Masaki; Wada, Shinichi; Kayugawa, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Toru; Murao, Kohei

    2011-07-01

    While the acquisition of projection data in a computed tomography (CT) scanner is generally cqrried out once, the projection data is often removed from the system, making further reconstruction with a different reconstruction filter impossible. The reconstruction kernel is one of the most important parameters. To have access to all the reconstructions, either prior reconstructions with multiple kernels must be performed or the projection data must be stored. Each of these requirements would increase the burden on data archiving. This study aimed to design an effective method to achieve similar image quality using an image filtering technique in the image space, instead of a reconstruction filter in the projection space for CT imaging. The authors evaluated the clinical feasibility of the proposed method in lung cancer screening. The proposed technique is essentially the same as common image filtering, which performs processing in the spatial-frequency domain with a filter function. However, the filter function was determined based on the quantitative analysis of the point spread functions (PSFs) measured in the system. The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) were derived from the PSFs, and the ratio of the MTFs was used as the filter function. Therefore, using an image reconstructed with a kernel, an image reconstructed with a different kernel was obtained by filtering, which used the ratio of the MTFs obtained for the two kernels. The performance of the method was evaluated by using routine clinical images obtained from CT screening for lung cancer in five subjects. Filtered images for all combinations of three types of reconstruction kernels ("smooth," "standard," and "sharp" kernels) showed good agreement with original reconstructed images regarded as the gold standard. On the filtered images, abnormal shadows suspected as being lung cancers were identical to those on the reconstructed images. The standard deviations (SDs) for the difference between filtered

  3. Image filtering as an alternative to the application of a different reconstruction kernel in CT imaging: Feasibility study in lung cancer screening

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, Masaki; Wada, Shinichi; Kayugawa, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Toru; Murao, Kohei

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: While the acquisition of projection data in a computed tomography (CT) scanner is generally carried out once, the projection data is often removed from the system, making further reconstruction with a different reconstruction filter impossible. The reconstruction kernel is one of the most important parameters. To have access to all the reconstructions, either prior reconstructions with multiple kernels must be performed or the projection data must be stored. Each of these requirements would increase the burden on data archiving. This study aimed to design an effective method to achieve similar image quality using an image filtering technique in the image space, instead of a reconstruction filter in the projection space for CT imaging. The authors evaluated the clinical feasibility of the proposed method in lung cancer screening. Methods: The proposed technique is essentially the same as common image filtering, which performs processing in the spatial-frequency domain with a filter function. However, the filter function was determined based on the quantitative analysis of the point spread functions (PSFs) measured in the system. The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) were derived from the PSFs, and the ratio of the MTFs was used as the filter function. Therefore, using an image reconstructed with a kernel, an image reconstructed with a different kernel was obtained by filtering, which used the ratio of the MTFs obtained for the two kernels. The performance of the method was evaluated by using routine clinical images obtained from CT screening for lung cancer in five subjects. Results: Filtered images for all combinations of three types of reconstruction kernels (''smooth,''''standard,'' and ''sharp'' kernels) showed good agreement with original reconstructed images regarded as the gold standard. On the filtered images, abnormal shadows suspected as being lung cancers were identical to those on the reconstructed images. The standard deviations (SDs) for

  4. [Gatrointestinal imaging with multidetector CT and MRI].

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Filomenamila; Fonio, Paolo; Scardapane, Arnaldo; Giganti, Melchiore; Rubini, Giuseppe; Ferrante, Annunziata; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio

    2012-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important diagnostic tools for evaluating gastrointestinal disorders. A rigorous examination protocol is needed to achieve the best results. This paper describes the technical issues of CT and MRI for the study of gastrointestinal tracts (esophagus, stomach, small and large bowel).

  5. CT and MR imaging findings of sinonasal angiomatous polyps.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Man, Fengyuan; Deng, Kai; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Hao, Dapeng; Xu, Wenjian

    2014-03-01

    To characterize the CT and MR imaging findings of patients with sinonasal angiomatous polyps (SAPs) and evaluate their respective clinical value in the diagnosis of SAP. CT and MR imaging findings of 15 patients with pathologically proven SAP were examined. Assessed image features included location, size, margin, attenuation, and change of the bony walls of the sinonasal cavity on CT, and signal intensity and enhancement pattern on MR. On CT, the SAP was mostly isoattenuated with patches of slight hyperattenuation. Most lesions caused changes in the adjacent bone, including expansile remodeling (n=8), defect or destruction (n=7), and hyperostosis (n=6). All lesions examined by MR showed heterogeneous isointense signal intensity on T1-weighted images and mixed obvious hyperintense and hypointense signal intensity with linear hypointense septum internally (n=10), and hypointense peripheral rim on T2-weighted images (n=10). Postcontrast MR images demonstrated areas of heterogeneous and marked enhancement with an unenhanced hypointense rim and septa (n=7). CT and MR imaging have respective advantages in the diagnosis of SAP. Combined application of CT and MR examinations is necessary for patients with suspected SAP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. CT perfusion: principles, applications, and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ting-Yim

    2004-10-01

    The fast scanning speed of current slip-ring CT scanners has enabled the development of perfusion imaging techniques with intravenous injection of contrast medium. In a typical CT perfusion study, contrast medium is injected and rapid scanning at a frequency of 1-2 Hz is used to monitor the first circulation of the injected contrast medium through a 1-2 cm thick slab of tissue. From the acquired time-series of CT images, arteries can be identified within the tissue slab to derive the arterial contrast concentration curve, Ca(t) while each individual voxel produces a tissue residue curve, Q(t) for the corresponding tissue region. Deconvolution between the measured Ca(t) and Q(t) leads to the determination of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in brain studies. In this presentation, an important application of CT perfusion in acute stroke studies - the identification of the ischemic penumbra via the CBF/CBV mismatch and factors affecting the quantitative accuracy of deconvolution, including partial volume averaging, arterial delay and dispersion are discussed.

  7. Liver echinococcus - CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This upper abdominal CT scan shows multiple cysts in the liver, caused by dog tapeworm (echinococcus). Note the large circular cyst (seen on the left side of the screen) and multiple smaller cysts throughout ...

  8. Effect of Edge-Preserving Adaptive Image Filter on Low-Contrast Detectability in CT Systems: Application of ROC Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Miwa; Ota, Takamasa; Kainuma, Kazuhisa; Sayre, James W.; McNitt-Gray, Michael; Katada, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Objective. For the multislice CT (MSCT) systems with a larger number of detector rows, it is essential to employ dose-reduction techniques. As reported in previous studies, edge-preserving adaptive image filters, which selectively eliminate only the noise elements that are increased when the radiation dose is reduced without affecting the sharpness of images, have been developed. In the present study, we employed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to assess the effects of the quantum denoising system (QDS), which is an edge-preserving adaptive filter that we have developed, on low-contrast resolution, and to evaluate to what degree the radiation dose can be reduced while maintaining acceptable low-contrast resolution. Materials and Methods. The low-contrast phantoms (Catphan 412) were scanned at various tube current settings, and ROC analysis was then performed for the groups of images obtained with/without the use of QDS at each tube current to determine whether or not a target could be identified. The tube current settings for which the area under the ROC curve (Az value) was approximately 0.7 were determined for both groups of images with/without the use of QDS. Then, the radiation dose reduction ratio when QDS was used was calculated by converting the determined tube current to the radiation dose. Results. The use of the QDS edge-preserving adaptive image filter allowed the radiation dose to be reduced by up to 38%. Conclusion. The QDS was found to be useful for reducing the radiation dose without affecting the low-contrast resolution in MSCT studies. PMID:19043565

  9. CT substitutes derived from MR images reconstructed with parallel imaging.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Adam; Garpebring, Anders; Asklund, Thomas; Nyholm, Tufve

    2014-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) substitute images can be generated from ultrashort echo time (UTE) MRI sequences with radial k-space sampling. These CT substitutes can be used as ordinary CT images for PET attenuation correction and radiotherapy dose calculations. Parallel imaging allows faster acquisition of magnetic resonance (MR) images by exploiting differences in receiver coil element sensitivities. This study investigates whether non-Cartesian parallel imaging reconstruction can be used to improve CT substitutes generated from shorter examination times. The authors used gridding as well as two non-Cartesian parallel imaging reconstruction methods, SPIRiT and CG-SENSE, to reconstruct radial UTE and gradient echo (GE) data into images of the head for 23 patients. For each patient, images were reconstructed from the full dataset and from a number of subsampled datasets. The subsampled datasets simulated shorter acquisition times by containing fewer radial k-space spokes (1000, 2000, 3000, 5000, and 10,000 spokes) than the full dataset (30,000 spokes). For each combination of patient, reconstruction method, and number of spokes, the reconstructed UTE and GE images were used to generate a CT substitute. Each CT substitute image was compared to a real CT image of the same patient. The mean absolute deviation between the CT number in CT substitute and CT decreased when using SPIRiT as compared to gridding reconstruction. However, the reduction was small and the CT substitute algorithm was insensitive to moderate subsampling (≥ 5000 spokes) regardless of reconstruction method. For more severe subsampling (≤ 3000 spokes), corresponding to acquisition times less than a minute long, the CT substitute quality was deteriorated for all reconstruction methods but SPIRiT gave a reduction in the mean absolute deviation of down to 25 Hounsfield units compared to gridding. SPIRiT marginally improved the CT substitute quality for a given number of radial spokes as compared to

  10. NOTE: Suppression of high-density artefacts in x-ray CT images using temporal digital subtraction with application to cryotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baissalov, R.; Sandison, G. A.; Donnelly, B. J.; Saliken, J. C.; McKinnon, J. G.; Muldrew, K.; Rewcastle, J. C.

    2000-05-01

    Image guidance in cryotherapy is usually performed using ultrasound. Although not currently in routine clinical use, x-ray CT imaging is an alternative means of guidance that can display the full 3D structure of the iceball, including frozen and unfrozen regions. However, the quality of x-ray CT images is compromised by the presence of high-density streak artefacts. To suppress these artefacts we applied temporal digital subtraction (TDS). This TDS method has the added advantage of improving the grey-scale contrast between frozen and unfrozen tissue in the CT images. Two sets of CT images were taken of a phantom material, cryoprobes and a urethral warmer (UW) before and during the cryoprobe freeze cycle. The high-density artefacts persisted in both image sets. TDS was performed on these two image sets using the corresponding mask image of unfrozen material and the same geometrical configuration of the cryoprobes and the UW. The resultant difference image had a significantly reduced artefact content. Thus TDS can be used to significantly suppress or eliminate high-density CT streak artefacts without reducing the metallic content of the cryoprobes. In vivo study needs to be conducted to establish the utility of this TDS procedure for CT assisted prostate or liver cryotherapy. Applying TDS in x-ray CT guided cryotherapy will facilitate estimation of the number and location of all frozen and unfrozen regions, potentially making cryotherapy safer and less operator dependent.

  11. Comparison between human and model observer performance in low-contrast detection tasks in CT images: application to images reconstructed with filtered back projection and iterative algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Calzado, A; Geleijns, J; Joemai, R M S; Veldkamp, W J H

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare low-contrast detectability (LCDet) performance between a model [non–pre-whitening matched filter with an eye filter (NPWE)] and human observers in CT images reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative [adaptive iterative dose reduction three-dimensional (AIDR 3D; Toshiba Medical Systems, Zoetermeer, Netherlands)] algorithms. Methods: Images of the Catphan® phantom (Phantom Laboratories, New York, NY) were acquired with Aquilion ONE™ 320-detector row CT (Toshiba Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) at five tube current levels (20–500 mA range) and reconstructed with FBP and AIDR 3D. Samples containing either low-contrast objects (diameters, 2–15 mm) or background were extracted and analysed by the NPWE model and four human observers in a two-alternative forced choice detection task study. Proportion correct (PC) values were obtained for each analysed object and used to compare human and model observer performances. An efficiency factor (η) was calculated to normalize NPWE to human results. Results: Human and NPWE model PC values (normalized by the efficiency, η = 0.44) were highly correlated for the whole dose range. The Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients (95% confidence interval) between human and NPWE were 0.984 (0.972–0.991) for AIDR 3D and 0.984 (0.971–0.991) for FBP, respectively. Bland–Altman plots based on PC results showed excellent agreement between human and NPWE [mean absolute difference 0.5 ± 0.4%; range of differences (−4.7%, 5.6%)]. Conclusion: The NPWE model observer can predict human performance in LCDet tasks in phantom CT images reconstructed with FBP and AIDR 3D algorithms at different dose levels. Advances in knowledge: Quantitative assessment of LCDet in CT can accurately be performed using software based on a model observer. PMID:24837275

  12. Algorithm-enabled Low-dose Micro-CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Bian, Junguo; Eaker, Diane R.; Kline, Timothy L.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Ritman, Erik L.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2013-01-01

    Micro-CT is an important tool in biomedical research and preclinical applications that can provide visual inspection of and quantitative information about imaged small animals and biological samples such as vasculature specimens. Currently, micro-CT imaging uses projection data acquired at a large number (300 – 1000) of views, which can limit system throughput and potentially degrade image quality due to radiation-induced deformation or damage to the small animal or specimen. In this work, we have investigated low-dose micro-CT and its application to specimen imaging from substantially reduced projection data by using a recently developed algorithm, referred to as the adaptive-steepest-descent-projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) algorithm, which reconstructs an image through minimizing the image total-variation and enforcing data constraints. To validate and evaluate the performance of the ASD-POCS algorithm, we carried out quantitative evaluation studies in a number of tasks of practical interest in imaging of specimens of real animal organs. The results show that the ASD-POCS algorithm can yield images with quality comparable to that obtained with existing algorithms, while using one-sixth to one quarter of the 361-view data currently used in typical micro-CT specimen imaging. PMID:20977983

  13. CT Image Presentations For Oral Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Rothman, Stephen L. G.; Schwarz, Melvyn S.; Tivattanasuk, Eva S.

    1988-06-01

    Reformatted CT images of the mandible and maxilla are described as a planning aid to the surgical implantation of dental fixtures. Precisely scaled and cross referenced axial, oblique, CT generated panorex, and 3-D images are generated to help indicate where and how critical anatomic structures are positioned. This information guides the oral surgeon to those sites where dental implants have optimal osteotic support and least risk to sensitive neural tissue. Oblique images are generated at 1-2 mm increments along the arch of the mandible (or maxilla). Each oblique is oriented perpendicular to the local arch curvature. The adjoining five CT generated panorex views match the patient's mandibular (or maxilla) arch, with each of the views separated by twice the distance between axial CT slices. All views are mutually cross-referenced to show fine detail of the underlying mandibular (or maxilla) structure. Several exams are illustrated and benefit to subsequent surgery is assessed.

  14. Clinical application of FDG-PET/CT in metastatic infections.

    PubMed

    Kouijzer, Ilse J; Vos, Fidel J; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P; Oyen, Wim J

    2017-06-01

    FDG-PET/CT has proven its clinical value and cost-effectiveness in diagnosing metastatic infections in patients with Gram-positive bacteremia. In identification of metastatic foci, FDG-PET/CT is useful as a screening method when localizing symptoms are absent because it provides whole-body coverage. FDG-PET/CT detects early metabolic activity rather than the late anatomical changes as visualized by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. FDG-PET/CT allows more precise localization of infection within a shorter time span between injection and diagnosis as compared to conventional nuclear imaging. This review focuses on the clinical application of imaging of metastatic infectious diseases, with an emphasis on FDG-PET/CT putting it in perspective with other imaging modalities.

  15. Towards personalized interventional SPECT-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Gardiazabal, José; Esposito, Marco; Matthies, Philipp; Okur, Asli; Vogel, Jakob; Kraft, Silvan; Frisch, Benjamin; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2014-01-01

    The development of modern robotics and compact imaging detectors allows the transfer of diagnostic imaging modalities to the operating room, supporting surgeons to perform faster and safer procedures. An intervention that currently suffers from a lack of interventional imaging is radioembolization, a treatment for hepatic carcinoma. Currently, this procedure requires moving the patient from an angiography suite for preliminary catheterization and injection to a whole-body SPECT/CT for leakage detection, necessitating a second catheterization back in the angiography suite for the actual radioembolization. We propose an imaging setup that simplifies this procedure using a robotic approach to directly acquire an interventional SPECT/CT in the angiography suite. Using C-arm CT and a co-calibrated gamma camera mounted on a robotic arm, a personalized trajectory of the gamma camera is generated from the C-arm CT, enabling an interventional SPECT reconstruction that is inherently co-registered to the C-arm CT. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of this personalized interventional SPECT/CT imaging approach in a liver phantom study.

  16. Development and application of a tomographic model from CT images for calculating internal dose to a pregnant woman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chengyu

    Assessment of radiation dose and possible risk to a pregnant woman and her fetus is an important task in radiation protection. Although stylized models for male and female patients of different ages have been developed, tomographic models for pregnant women have not been developed to date. This dissertation presents an effort to construct a partial-body model of a pregnant woman from a set of CT images. The patient was 30-weeks pregnant, and the CT scan covered the portion of the body between the lower breast and the upper thigh in 70 slices, each 7 mm thick. The image resolution was 512 x 512 pixels in a 48 cm x 48 cm field. The images were carefully segmented to identify 34 organs and tissues, It has been found that the masses are different from the Reference Woman. The characteristics of the resulting model is discussed and compared with one existing stylized mathematical model for pregnant women. Based on this tomographic model, a Monte Carlo code, EGS4-VLSI, was used to derive Specific Absorbed Fractions. Monoenergetic and isotropic photon and electron emitters distributed in different source organs were assumed and the energies ranged from 10 keV to 4 MeV for photons and from 100 keV to 4 MeV for electrons. The results for high energy (>50 keV) photons showed general agreement with previous studies, however, the results for lower energy (<50 keV) photons showed differences of up to several hundreds percent for some source and target organs. For electron results, several tens of percent differences were found. Those differences can be explained by mass differences and the relative geometry differences between source and target organs. In summary, the stylized models for pregnant women are satisfactory for a very large size patient for most of the photon energies (between 50 keV and 4 MeV). However, a tomographic model has to be used to obtain acceptable dose assessments for electrons. The newly calculated SAF data set can provide the nuclear medicine dosimetry

  17. A tree-matching algorithm: Application to airways in CT images of subjects with the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morales Pinzón, Alfredo; Hernández Hoyos, Marcela; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Flórez-Valencia, Leonardo; Orkisz, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    To match anatomical trees such as airways, we propose a graph-based strategy combined with an appropriate distance function. The strategy was devised to cope with topological and geometrical differences that may arise between trees corresponding to the same subject, but extracted from images acquired in different conditions. The proposed distance function, called father/family distance, combines topological and geometrical information in a single measure, by calculating a sum of path-to-path distances between sub-trees of limited extent. To use it successfully, the branches of these sub-trees need to be brought closer, which is obtained by successively translating the roots of these sub-trees prior to their actual matching. The work herein presented contributes to a study of the acute respiratory distress syndrome, where a series of pulmonary CT images from the same subject is acquired at varying settings (pressure and volume) of the mechanical ventilation. The method was evaluated on 45 combinations of synthetic trees, as well as on 15 pairs of real airway trees: nine corresponding to end-expiration and end-inspiration with the same pressure, and six corresponding to end-inspiration with significantly different pressures. It achieved a high rate of successful matches with respect to a hand-made reference containing a total of 2391 matches in real data: sensitivity of 94.3% and precision of 92.8%, when using the basic parameter settings of the algorithm.

  18. Automated vertebra identification in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehm, Matthias; Klinder, Tobias; Kneser, Reinhard; Lorenz, Cristian

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we describe and compare methods for automatically identifying individual vertebrae in arbitrary CT images. The identification is an essential precondition for a subsequent model-based segmentation, which is used in a wide field of orthopedic, neurological, and oncological applications, e.g., spinal biopsies or the insertion of pedicle screws. Since adjacent vertebrae show similar characteristics, an automated labeling of the spine column is a very challenging task, especially if no surrounding reference structures can be taken into account. Furthermore, vertebra identification is complicated due to the fact that many images are bounded to a very limited field of view and may contain only few vertebrae. We propose and evaluate two methods for automatically labeling the spine column by evaluating similarities between given models and vertebral objects. In one method, object boundary information is taken into account by applying a Generalized Hough Transform (GHT) for each vertebral object. In the other method, appearance models containing mean gray value information are registered to each vertebral object using cross and local correlation as similarity measures for the optimization function. The GHT is advantageous in terms of computational performance but cuts back concerning the identification rate. A correct labeling of the vertebral column has been successfully performed on 93% of the test set consisting of 63 disparate input images using rigid image registration with local correlation as similarity measure.

  19. Dual-energy CT revisited with multidetector CT: review of principles and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay; Aktaş, Aykut

    2011-09-01

    Although dual-energy CT (DECT) was first conceived in the 1970s, it was not widely used for CT indications. Recently, the simultaneous acquisition of volumetric dual-energy data has been introduced using multidetector CT (MDCT) with two X-ray tubes and rapid kVp switching (gemstone spectral imaging). Two major advantages of DECT are material decomposition by acquiring two image series with different kVp and the elimination of misregistration artifacts. Hounsfield unit measurements by DECT are not absolute and can change depending on the kVp used for an acquisition. Typically, a combination of 80/140 kVp is used for DECT, but for some applications, 100/140 kVp is preferred. In this study, we summarized the clinical applications of DECT and included images that were acquired using the dual-source CT and rapid kVp switching. In general, unenhanced images can be avoided by using DECT for body and neurological applications; iodine can be removed from the image, and a virtual, non-contrast (water) image can be obtained. Neuroradiological applications allow for the removal of bone and calcium from the carotid and brain CT angiography. Thorax applications include perfusion imaging in patients with pulmonary thromboemboli and other chest diseases, xenon ventilation-perfusion imaging and solitary nodule characterization. Cardiac applications include dual-energy cardiac perfusion, viability and cardiac iron detection. The removal of calcific plaques from arteries, bone removal and aortic stent graft evaluation may be achieved in the vascular system. Abdominal applications include the detection and characterization of liver and pancreas masses, the diagnosis of steatosis and iron overload, DECT colonoscopy and CT cholangiography. Urinary system applications are urinary calculi characterization (uric acid vs. non-uric acid), renal cyst characterization and mass characterization. Musculoskeletal applications permit the differentiation of gout from pseudogout and a reduction of

  20. CT imaging with a mobile C-arm prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheryauka, Arvi; Tubbs, David; Langille, Vinton; Kalya, Prabhanjana; Smith, Brady; Cherone, Rocco

    2008-03-01

    Mobile X-ray imagery is an omnipresent tool in conventional musculoskeletal and soft tissue applications. The next generation of mobile C-arm systems can provide clinicians of minimally-invasive surgery and pain management procedures with both real-time high-resolution fluoroscopy and intra-operative CT imaging modalities. In this study, we research two C-arm CT experimental system configurations and evaluate their imaging capabilities. In a non-destructive evaluation configuration, the X-ray Tube - Detector assembly is stationary while an imaging object is placed on a rotating table. In a medical imaging configuration, the C-arm gantry moves around the patient and the table. In our research setting, we connect the participating devices through a Mobile X-Ray Imaging Environment known as MOXIE. MOXIE is a set of software applications for internal research at GE Healthcare - Surgery and used to examine imaging performance of experimental systems. Anthropomorphic phantom volume renderings and orthogonal slices of reconstructed images are obtained and displayed. The experimental C-arm CT results show CT-like image quality that may be suitable for interventional procedures, real-time data management, and, therefore, have great potential for effective use on the clinical floor.

  1. Validation of 3D ultrasound: CT registration of prostate images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firle, Evelyn A.; Wesarg, Stefan; Karangelis, Grigoris; Dold, Christian

    2003-05-01

    All over the world 20% of men are expected to develop prostate cancer sometime in his life. In addition to surgery - being the traditional treatment for cancer - the radiation treatment is getting more popular. The most interesting radiation treatment regarding prostate cancer is Brachytherapy radiation procedure. For the safe delivery of that therapy imaging is critically important. In several cases where a CT device is available a combination of the information provided by CT and 3D Ultrasound (U/S) images offers advantages in recognizing the borders of the lesion and delineating the region of treatment. For these applications the CT and U/S scans should be registered and fused in a multi-modal dataset. Purpose of the present development is a registration tool (registration, fusion and validation) for available CT volumes with 3D U/S images of the same anatomical region, i.e. the prostate. The combination of these two imaging modalities interlinks the advantages of the high-resolution CT imaging and low cost real-time U/S imaging and offers a multi-modality imaging environment for further target and anatomy delineation. This tool has been integrated into the visualization software "InViVo" which has been developed over several years in Fraunhofer IGD in Darmstadt.

  2. Lab-based x-ray nanoCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Mark; Allner, Sebastian; Ferstl, Simone; Dierolf, Martin; Tuohimaa, Tomi; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2017-03-01

    Due to the recent development of transmission X-ray tubes with very small focal spot sizes, laboratory-based CT imaging with sub-micron resolutions is nowadays possible. We recently developed a novel X-ray nanoCT setup featuring a prototype nanofocus X-ray source and a single-photon counting detector. The system is based on mere geometrical magnification and can reach resolutions of 200 nm. To demonstrate the potential of the nanoCT system for biomedical applications we show high resolution nanoCT data of a small piece of human tooth comprising coronal dentin. The reconstructed CT data clearly visualize the dentin tubules within the tooth piece.

  3. Characterizing anatomical variability in breast CT images

    PubMed Central

    Metheany, Kathrine G.; Abbey, Craig K.; Packard, Nathan; Boone, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work [Burgess , Med. Phys. 28, 419–437 (2001)] has shown that anatomical noise in projection mammography results in a power spectrum well modeled over a range of frequencies by a power law, and the exponent (β) of this power law plays a critical role in determining the size at which a growing lesion reaches the threshold for detection. In this study, the authors evaluated the power-law model for breast computed tomography (bCT) images, which can be thought of as thin sections through a three-dimensional (3D) volume. Under the assumption of a 3D power law describing the distribution of attenuation coefficients in the breast parenchyma, the authors derived the relationship between the power-law exponents of bCT and projection images and found it to be βsection=βproj−1. They evaluated this relationship on clinical images by comparing bCT images from a set of 43 patients to Burgess’ findings in mammography. They were able to make a direct comparison for 6 of these patients who had both a bCT exam and a digitized film-screen mammogram. They also evaluated segmented bCT images to investigate the extent to which the bCT power-law exponent can be explained by a binary model of attenuation coefficients based on the different attenuation of glandular and adipose tissue. The power-law model was found to be a good fit for bCT data over frequencies from 0.07to0.45cyc∕mm, where anatomical variability dominates the spectrum. The average exponent for bCT images was 1.86. This value is close to the theoretical prediction using Burgess’ published data for projection mammography and for the limited set of mammography data available from the authors’ patient sample. Exponents from the segmented bCT images (average value: 2.06) were systematically slightly higher than bCT images, with substantial correlation between the two (r=0.84). PMID:18975714

  4. Performance benchmarking of liver CT image segmentation and volume estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Jiayin; Tian, Qi; Liu, Jimmy J.; Qi, Yingyi; Leow, Wee Kheng; Han, Thazin; Wang, Shih-chang

    2008-03-01

    In recent years more and more computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems are being used routinely in hospitals. Image-based knowledge discovery plays important roles in many CAD applications, which have great potential to be integrated into the next-generation picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Robust medical image segmentation tools are essentials for such discovery in many CAD applications. In this paper we present a platform with necessary tools for performance benchmarking for algorithms of liver segmentation and volume estimation used for liver transplantation planning. It includes an abdominal computer tomography (CT) image database (DB), annotation tools, a ground truth DB, and performance measure protocols. The proposed architecture is generic and can be used for other organs and imaging modalities. In the current study, approximately 70 sets of abdominal CT images with normal livers have been collected and a user-friendly annotation tool is developed to generate ground truth data for a variety of organs, including 2D contours of liver, two kidneys, spleen, aorta and spinal canal. Abdominal organ segmentation algorithms using 2D atlases and 3D probabilistic atlases can be evaluated on the platform. Preliminary benchmark results from the liver segmentation algorithms which make use of statistical knowledge extracted from the abdominal CT image DB are also reported. We target to increase the CT scans to about 300 sets in the near future and plan to make the DBs built available to medical imaging research community for performance benchmarking of liver segmentation algorithms.

  5. Pulmonary CT image classification with evolutionary programming.

    PubMed

    Madsen, M T; Uppaluri, R; Hoffman, E A; McLennan, G

    1999-12-01

    It is often difficult to classify information in medical images from derived features. The purpose of this research was to investigate the use of evolutionary programming as a tool for selecting important features and generating algorithms to classify computed tomographic (CT) images of the lung. Training and test sets consisting of 11 features derived from multiple lung CT images were generated, along with an indicator of the target area from which features originated. The images included five parameters based on histogram analysis, 11 parameters based on run length and co-occurrence matrix measures, and the fractal dimension. Two classification experiments were performed. In the first, the classification task was to distinguish between the subtle but known differences between anterior and posterior portions of transverse lung CT sections. The second classification task was to distinguish normal lung CT images from emphysematous images. The performance of the evolutionary programming approach was compared with that of three statistical classifiers that used the same training and test sets. Evolutionary programming produced solutions that compared favorably with those of the statistical classifiers. In separating the anterior from the posterior lung sections, the evolutionary programming results were better than two of the three statistical approaches. The evolutionary programming approach correctly identified all the normal and abnormal lung images and accomplished this by using less features than the best statistical method. The results of this study demonstrate the utility of evolutionary programming as a tool for developing classification algorithms.

  6. Clinical application of 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principle of ALARA in pediatric CT imaging: "How many children can be protected from unnecessary radiation?".

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Kushaljit S; Krishna, Satheesh; Saxena, Akshay K; Sinha, Anindita; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Lee, Edward Y

    2015-09-01

    Practice of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle in the developed world is currently well established. However, there is striking lack of published data regarding such experience in the developing countries. Therefore, the goal of this study is to prospectively evaluate CT request forms to assess how many children could be protected from harmful radiation exposure if 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principles of ALARA are applied before obtaining CT imaging in a developing country. This can save children from potential radiation risks including development of brain cancer and leukemia. Consecutive CT request forms over a six month study period (May 16, 2013 to November 15, 2013) in a tertiary pediatric children's hospital in India were prospectively reviewed by two pediatric radiologists before obtaining CT imaging. First, 'Justification' of CT was evaluated and then 'Optimization' was applied for evaluation of appropriateness of the requested CT studies. The number (and percentage) of CT studies avoided by applying 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principle of ALARA were calculated. The difference in number of declined and optimized CT requests between CT requests from inpatient and outpatient departments was compared using Chi-Square test. A total of 1302 consecutive CT request forms were received during the study period. Some of the request forms (n=86; 6.61%) had requests for more than one (multiple) anatomical regions, hence, a total of 1392 different anatomical CT requests were received. Based on evaluation of the CT request forms for 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principle of ALARA by pediatric radiology reviewers, 111 individual anatomic part CT requests from 105 pediatric patients were avoided. Therefore, 8.06% (105 out of 1302 pediatric patients) were protected from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure.The rates of declined or optimized CT requests from inpatient department was significantly higher than that from outpatient

  7. Flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, technology, and applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajiv; Cheung, Arnold C; Bartling, Soenke H; Lisauskas, Jennifer; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas; Brady, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (CT) systems have an innovative design that allows coverage of a large volume per rotation, fluoroscopic and dynamic imaging, and high spatial resolution that permits visualization of complex human anatomy such as fine temporal bone structures and trabecular bone architecture. In simple terms, flat-panel volume CT scanners can be thought of as conventional multidetector CT scanners in which the detector rows have been replaced by an area detector. The flat-panel detector has wide z-axis coverage that enables imaging of entire organs in one axial acquisition. Its fluoroscopic and angiographic capabilities are useful for intraoperative and vascular applications. Furthermore, the high-volume coverage and continuous rotation of the detector may enable depiction of dynamic processes such as coronary blood flow and whole-brain perfusion. Other applications in which flat-panel volume CT may play a role include small-animal imaging, nondestructive testing in animal survival surgeries, and tissue-engineering experiments. Such versatility has led some to predict that flat-panel volume CT will gain importance in interventional and intraoperative applications, especially in specialties such as cardiac imaging, interventional neuroradiology, orthopedics, and otolaryngology. However, the contrast resolution of flat-panel volume CT is slightly inferior to that of multidetector CT, a higher radiation dose is needed to achieve a comparable signal-to-noise ratio, and a slower scintillator results in a longer scanning time.

  8. Generation of synthetic CT data using patient specific daily MR image data and image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melanie Kraus, Kim; Jäkel, Oliver; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Pfaffenberger, Asja

    2017-02-01

    To fully exploit the advantages of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning, a method is required to overcome the problem of lacking electron density information. We aim to establish and evaluate a new method for computed tomography (CT) data generation based on MRI and image registration. The thereby generated CT data is used for dose accumulation. We developed a process flow based on an initial pair of rigidly co-registered CT and T2-weighted MR image representing the same anatomical situation. Deformable image registration using anatomical landmarks is performed between the initial MRI data and daily MR images. The resulting transformation is applied to the initial CT, thus fractional CT data is generated. Furthermore, the dose for a photon intensity modulated RT (IMRT) or intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan is calculated on the generated fractional CT and accumulated on the initial CT via inverse transformation. The method is evaluated by the use of phantom CT and MRI data. Quantitative validation is performed by evaluation of the mean absolute error (MAE) between the measured and the generated CT. The effect on dose accumulation is examined by means of dose-volume parameters. One patient case is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method introduced here. Overall, CT data derivation lead to MAEs with a median of 37.0 HU ranging from 29.9 to 66.6 HU for all investigated tissues. The accuracy of image registration showed to be limited in the case of unexpected air cavities and at tissue boundaries. The comparisons of dose distributions based on measured and generated CT data agree well with the published literature. Differences in dose volume parameters kept within 1.6% and 3.2% for photon and proton RT, respectively. The method presented here is particularly suited for application in adaptive RT in current clinical routine, since only minor additional technical equipment is required.

  9. Development and validation of a hybrid simulation technique for cone beam CT: application to an oral imaging system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Pauwels, R; Marshall, N; Shaheen, E; Nuyts, J; Jacobs, R; Bosmans, H

    2011-09-21

    % difference for voxel values of the aluminum and air insert regions and <3% difference for voxel uniformity across the homogeneous PMMA region. The detector simulation by use of the MTF and NPS data exhibited a big influence on noise and the sharpness of the resulting images. The hybrid simulation technique is flexible and has wide applicability to CBCT systems.

  10. Development and validation of a hybrid simulation technique for cone beam CT: application to an oral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Pauwels, R.; Marshall, N.; Shaheen, E.; Nuyts, J.; Jacobs, R.; Bosmans, H.

    2011-09-01

    % difference for voxel values of the aluminum and air insert regions and <3% difference for voxel uniformity across the homogeneous PMMA region. The detector simulation by use of the MTF and NPS data exhibited a big influence on noise and the sharpness of the resulting images. The hybrid simulation technique is flexible and has wide applicability to CBCT systems.

  11. Metrology, applications and methods with high energy CT systems

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlmann, N.; Voland, V.; Salamon, M.; Hebele, S.; Boehnel, M.; Reims, N.; Schmitt, M.; Kasperl, S.

    2014-02-18

    The increase of Computed Tomography (CT) as an applicable metrology and Non Destructive Testing (NDT) method raises interest on developing the application fields to larger objects, which were rarely used in the past due to their requirements on the imaging system. Especially the classical X-ray generation techniques based on standard equipment restricted the applications of CT to typical material penetration lengths of only a few cm of steel. Even with accelerator technology that offers a suitable way to overcome these restrictions just the 2D radioscopy technique found a widespread application. Beside the production and detection of photons in the MeV range itself, the achievable image quality is limited using standard detectors due to the dominating absorption effect of Compton Scattering at high energies. Especially for CT reconstruction purposes these effects have to be considered on the development path from 2D to 3D imaging. Most High Energy CT applications are therefore based on line detectors shielding scattered radiation to a maximum with an increase in imaging quality but with time consuming large volume scan capabilities. In this contribution we present the High-Energy X-ray Imaging project at the Fraunhofer Development Centre for X-ray Technology with the characterization and the potential of the CT-system according to metrological and other application capabilities.

  12. Prior-image-based few-view cone beam CT for applications to daily scan in image-guided radiation therapy: preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seungryong; Pearson, Erik; Sidky, Emil Y.; Bian, Junguo; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2009-02-01

    Interfraction motion of a treatment target such as the prostate in radiation therapy (RT) is, in part, responsible for large planning target volume (PTV) margins and related side effects. Online adjustment of the treatment based on timely cone-beam CT (CBCT) images can be particularly useful for patients with large interfraction motion. However, radiation dose to the patient due to frequent CBCT poses a radiation safety concern. One unique feature of CBCT for interfraction motion detection is the availability of a prior anatomical image most of which has not changed. We propose an iterative algorithm, for image reconstruction from a very limited number of projections in CBCT, that is based on total variation (TV) minimization subject to the constraints of data fidelity and positivity and that utilizes anatomical image prior information. Numerical studies for a 2D fan-beam geometry suggests the proposed algorithm can potentially contribute to lowering the radiation dose to the patient by allowing satisfactory image reconstruction from a very limited number of projections.

  13. PET/CT for radiotherapy: image acquisition and data processing.

    PubMed

    Bettinardi, V; Picchio, M; Di Muzio, N; Gianolli, L; Messa, C; Gilardi, M C

    2010-10-01

    This paper focuses on acquisition and processing methods in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for radiotherapy (RT) applications. The recent technological evolutions of PET/CT systems are described. Particular emphasis is dedicated to the tools needed for the patient positioning and immobilization, to be used in PET/CT studies as well as during RT treatment sessions. The effect of organ and lesion motion due to patient's respiration on PET/CT imaging is discussed. Breathing protocols proposed to minimize PET/CT spatial mismatches in relation to respiratory movements are illustrated. The respiratory gated (RG) 4D-PET/CT techniques, developed to measure and compensate for organ and lesion motion, are then introduced. Finally a description is provided of different acquisition and data processing techniques, implemented with the aim at improving: i) image quality and quantitative accuracy of PET images, and ii) target volume definition and treatment planning in RT, by using specific and personalised motion information.

  14. Automatic lumbar spine measurement in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yunxiang; Zheng, Dong; Liao, Shu; Peng, Zhigang; Yan, Ruyi; Liu, Junhua; Dong, Zhongxing; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Zhan, Yiqiang; Fei, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Accurate lumbar spine measurement in CT images provides an essential way for quantitative spinal diseases analysis such as spondylolisthesis and scoliosis. In today's clinical workflow, the measurements are manually performed by radiologists and surgeons, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Therefore, automatic and accurate lumbar spine measurement algorithm becomes highly desirable. In this study, we propose a method to automatically calculate five different lumbar spine measurements in CT images. There are three main stages of the proposed method: First, a learning based spine labeling method, which integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information, is used to detect lumbar and sacrum vertebrae in CT images. Then, a multiatlases based image segmentation method is used to segment each lumbar vertebra and the sacrum based on the detection result. Finally, measurements are derived from the segmentation result of each vertebra. Our method has been evaluated on 138 spinal CT scans to automatically calculate five widely used clinical spine measurements. Experimental results show that our method can achieve more than 90% success rates across all the measurements. Our method also significantly improves the measurement efficiency compared to manual measurements. Besides benefiting the routine clinical diagnosis of spinal diseases, our method also enables the large scale data analytics for scientific and clinical researches.

  15. First application of liquid-metal-jet sources for small-animal imaging: High-resolution CT and phase-contrast tumor demarcation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Daniel H.; Lundstroem, Ulf; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Small-animal studies require images with high spatial resolution and high contrast due to the small scale of the structures. X-ray imaging systems for small animals are often limited by the microfocus source. Here, the authors investigate the applicability of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for such high-resolution small-animal imaging, both in tomography based on absorption and in soft-tissue tumor imaging based on in-line phase contrast. Methods: The experimental arrangement consists of a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, the small-animal object on a rotating stage, and an imaging detector. The source-to-object and object-to-detector distances are adjusted for the preferred contrast mechanism. Two different liquid-metal-jet sources are used, one circulating a Ga/In/Sn alloy and the other an In/Ga alloy for higher penetration through thick tissue. Both sources are operated at 40-50 W electron-beam power with {approx}7 {mu}m x-ray spots, providing high spatial resolution in absorption imaging and high spatial coherence for the phase-contrast imaging. Results: High-resolution absorption imaging is demonstrated on mice with CT, showing 50 {mu}m bone details in the reconstructed slices. High-resolution phase-contrast soft-tissue imaging shows clear demarcation of mm-sized tumors at much lower dose than is required in absorption. Conclusions: This is the first application of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for whole-body small-animal x-ray imaging. In absorption, the method allows high-resolution tomographic skeletal imaging with potential for significantly shorter exposure times due to the power scalability of liquid-metal-jet sources. In phase contrast, the authors use a simple in-line arrangement to show distinct tumor demarcation of few-mm-sized tumors. This is, to their knowledge, the first small-animal tumor visualization with a laboratory phase-contrast system.

  16. First application of liquid-metal-jet sources for small-animal imaging: high-resolution CT and phase-contrast tumor demarcation.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Daniel H; Lundström, Ulf; Westermark, Ulrica K; Arsenian Henriksson, Marie; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M

    2013-02-01

    Small-animal studies require images with high spatial resolution and high contrast due to the small scale of the structures. X-ray imaging systems for small animals are often limited by the microfocus source. Here, the authors investigate the applicability of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for such high-resolution small-animal imaging, both in tomography based on absorption and in soft-tissue tumor imaging based on in-line phase contrast. The experimental arrangement consists of a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, the small-animal object on a rotating stage, and an imaging detector. The source-to-object and object-to-detector distances are adjusted for the preferred contrast mechanism. Two different liquid-metal-jet sources are used, one circulating a Ga∕In∕Sn alloy and the other an In∕Ga alloy for higher penetration through thick tissue. Both sources are operated at 40-50 W electron-beam power with ∼7 μm x-ray spots, providing high spatial resolution in absorption imaging and high spatial coherence for the phase-contrast imaging. High-resolution absorption imaging is demonstrated on mice with CT, showing 50 μm bone details in the reconstructed slices. High-resolution phase-contrast soft-tissue imaging shows clear demarcation of mm-sized tumors at much lower dose than is required in absorption. This is the first application of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for whole-body small-animal x-ray imaging. In absorption, the method allows high-resolution tomographic skeletal imaging with potential for significantly shorter exposure times due to the power scalability of liquid-metal-jet sources. In phase contrast, the authors use a simple in-line arrangement to show distinct tumor demarcation of few-mm-sized tumors. This is, to their knowledge, the first small-animal tumor visualization with a laboratory phase-contrast system.

  17. A new osteophyte segmentation algorithm using partial shape model and its applications to rabbit femur anterior cruciate ligament transection via micro-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Saha, P K; Liang, G; Elkins, J M; Coimbra, A; Duong, L T; Williams, D S; Sonka, M

    2011-08-01

    Osteophyte is an additional bony growth on a normal bone surface limiting or stopping motion at a deteriorating joint. Detection and quantification of osteophytes from CT images is helpful in assessing disease status as well as treatment and surgery planning. However, it is difficult to distinguish between osteophytes and healthy bones using simple thresholding or edge/texture features due to the similarity of their material composition. In this paper, we present a new method primarily based active shape model (ASM) to solve this problem and evaluate its application to anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) rabbit femur model via CT imaging. The common idea behind most ASM based segmentation methods is to first build a parametric shape model from a training dataset and apply the model to find a shape instance in a target image. A common challenge with such approaches is that a diseased bone shape is significantly altered at regions with osteophyte deposition misguiding an ASM method and eventually leading to suboptimum segmentations. This difficulty is overcome using a new partial ASM method that uses bone shape over healthy regions and extrapolates it over the diseased region according to the underlying shape model. Finally, osteophytes are segmented by subtracting partial-ASM derived shape from the overall diseased shape. Also, a new semi-automatic method is presented in this paper for efficiently building a 3D shape model for an anatomic region using manual reference of a few anatomically defined fiducial landmarks that are highly reproducible on individuals. Accuracy of the method has been examined on simulated phantoms while reproducibility and sensitivity have been evaluated on CT images of 2-, 4- and 8-week post-ACLT and sham-treated rabbit femurs. Experimental results have shown that the method is highly accurate ( R2 = 0.99), reproducible (ICC = 0.97), and sensitive in detecting disease progression (p-values: 0.065,0.001 and < 0.001 for 2- vs. 4, 4

  18. A New Osteophyte Segmentation Algorithm Using the Partial Shape Model and Its Applications to Rabbit Femur Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection via Micro-CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, G.; Elkins, J. M.; Coimbra, A.; Duong, L. T.; Williams, D. S.; Sonka, M.

    2015-01-01

    Osteophyte is an additional bony growth on a normal bone surface limiting or stopping motion at a deteriorating joint. Detection and quantification of osteophytes from computed tomography (CT) images is helpful in assessing disease status as well as treatment and surgery planning. However, it is difficult to distinguish between osteophytes and healthy bones using simple thresholding or edge/texture features due to the similarity of their material composition. In this paper, we present a new method primarily based on the active shape model (ASM) to solve this problem and evaluate its application to the anterior cruciate ligament transaction (ACLT) rabbit femur model via micro-CT imaging. The common idea behind most ASM-based segmentation methods is to first build a parametric shape model from a training dataset and then apply the model to find a shape instance in a target image. A common challenge with such approaches is that a diseased bone shape is significantly altered at regions with osteophyte deposition misguiding an ASM method and eventually leading to suboptimum segmentations. This difficulty is overcome using a new partial-ASM method that uses bone shape over healthy regions and extrapolates it over the diseased region according to the underlying shape model. Finally, osteophytes are segmented by subtracting partial-ASM-derived shape from the overall diseased shape. Also, a new semiautomatic method is presented in this paper for efficiently building a 3-D shape model for an anatomic region using manual reference of a few anatomically defined fiducial landmarks that are highly reproducible on individuals. Accuracy of the method has been examined on simulated phantoms while reproducibility and sensitivity have been evaluated on micro-CT images of 2-, 4- and 8-week post-ACLT and sham-treated rabbit femurs. Experimental results have shown that the method is highly accurate (R2 = 0.99), reproducible (ICC = 0.97), and sensitive in detecting disease progression (p

  19. Fast parallel algorithm for CT image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Flores, Liubov A; Vidal, Vicent; Mayo, Patricia; Rodenas, Francisco; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2012-01-01

    In X-ray computed tomography (CT) the X rays are used to obtain the projection data needed to generate an image of the inside of an object. The image can be generated with different techniques. Iterative methods are more suitable for the reconstruction of images with high contrast and precision in noisy conditions and from a small number of projections. Their use may be important in portable scanners for their functionality in emergency situations. However, in practice, these methods are not widely used due to the high computational cost of their implementation. In this work we analyze iterative parallel image reconstruction with the Portable Extensive Toolkit for Scientific computation (PETSc).

  20. TU-D-BRB-01: Dual-Energy CT: Techniques in Acquisition and Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Pelc, N

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy CT technology is becoming increasingly available to the medical imaging community. In addition, several models of CT simulators sold for use in radiation therapy departments now feature dual-energy technology. The images provided by dual-energy CT scanners add new information to the radiation treatment planning process; multiple spectral components can be used to separate and identify material composition as well as generate virtual monoenergetic images. In turn, this information could be used to investigate pathologic processes, separate the properties of contrast agents from soft tissues, assess tissue response to therapy, and other applications of therapeutic interest. Additionally, the decomposition of materials in images could directly integrate with and impact the accuracy of dose calculation algorithms. This symposium will explore methods of generating dual-energy CT images, spectral and image analysis algorithms, current and future applications of interest in oncologic imaging, and unique considerations when using dualenergy CT images in the radiation treatment planning process.

  1. Patient position verification using CT images.

    PubMed

    Kress, J; Minohara, S; Endo, M; Debus, J; Kanai, T

    1999-06-01

    The use of ions in the radiotherapy of cancer patients requires an accurate patient positioning in order to exploit its potential benefits. Using CT images as the basis for the setup verification offers the advantage of a high in-plane resolution in combination with a geometrically accurate, volumetric information. Before each fraction a single CT slice is acquired at the isocenter level after the positioning procedure. This single slice is registered to the planning CT cube using automated image registration algorithms. Thus any erreonous translation or rotation can be detected and quantified. The registration process involves the interpolation of the volumetric data, the calculation of an energy function, and the minimization of this energy function. Several data interpolation functions as well as minimization algorithms were compared. CT studies with a head phantom were performed in which defined translations and rotations were simulated by moving a motor-driven treatment chair. Different slice thicknesses and anatomical sites were studied to investigate their potential influence on the registration accuracy. The accuracy of the registration was found to be a fraction of a voxel size for suitable combinations of algorithms (typically better than 0.16 mm/deg). A significant dependancy of the registration accuracy on the CT slice thickness and the anatomical site was found (the accuracy ranges from 0.05 mm/deg to 0.16 mm/deg depending on the site). The calculation time is dependant on the used algorithms and the magnitude of the setup error. For the standard combination of algorithms as proposed by the authors (Downhill Simplex minimization with Trilinear interpolation) the typical calculation time is about 20 s for a Sun UltraSPARC processor. Taking into account the mechanical accuracy of the setup device (motor-driven chair) the registration of CT images is thus a useful tool for detecting and quantifying any significant error in the patient position.

  2. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Fritscher, Carlos Cezar; Fritscher, Leandro Genehr; Concatto, Natália Henz; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer. PMID:26176525

  3. Multi-material decomposition of spectral CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Paulo R. S.; Bhotika, Rahul; Maddah, Mahnaz; Thomsen, Brian; Dutta, Sandeep; Licato, Paul E.; Joshi, Mukta C.

    2010-04-01

    Spectral Computed Tomography (Spectral CT), and in particular fast kVp switching dual-energy computed tomography, is an imaging modality that extends the capabilities of conventional computed tomography (CT). Spectral CT enables the estimation of the full linear attenuation curve of the imaged subject at each voxel in the CT volume, instead of a scalar image in Hounsfield units. Because the space of linear attenuation curves in the energy ranges of medical applications can be accurately described through a two-dimensional manifold, this decomposition procedure would be, in principle, limited to two materials. This paper describes an algorithm that overcomes this limitation, allowing for the estimation of N-tuples of material-decomposed images. The algorithm works by assuming that the mixing of substances and tissue types in the human body has the physicochemical properties of an ideal solution, which yields a model for the density of the imaged material mix. Under this model the mass attenuation curve of each voxel in the image can be estimated, immediately resulting in a material-decomposed image triplet. Decomposition into an arbitrary number of pre-selected materials can be achieved by automatically selecting adequate triplets from an application-specific material library. The decomposition is expressed in terms of the volume fractions of each constituent material in the mix; this provides for a straightforward, physically meaningful interpretation of the data. One important application of this technique is in the digital removal of contrast agent from a dual-energy exam, producing a virtual nonenhanced image, as well as in the quantification of the concentration of contrast observed in a targeted region, thus providing an accurate measure of tissue perfusion.

  4. Computer-Aided Diagnosis with Deep Learning Architecture: Applications to Breast Lesions in US Images and Pulmonary Nodules in CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jie-Zhi; Ni, Dong; Chou, Yi-Hong; Qin, Jing; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Shen, Dinggang; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-04-01

    This paper performs a comprehensive study on the deep-learning-based computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant nodules/lesions by avoiding the potential errors caused by inaccurate image processing results (e.g., boundary segmentation), as well as the classification bias resulting from a less robust feature set, as involved in most conventional CADx algorithms. Specifically, the stacked denoising auto-encoder (SDAE) is exploited on the two CADx applications for the differentiation of breast ultrasound lesions and lung CT nodules. The SDAE architecture is well equipped with the automatic feature exploration mechanism and noise tolerance advantage, and hence may be suitable to deal with the intrinsically noisy property of medical image data from various imaging modalities. To show the outperformance of SDAE-based CADx over the conventional scheme, two latest conventional CADx algorithms are implemented for comparison. 10 times of 10-fold cross-validations are conducted to illustrate the efficacy of the SDAE-based CADx algorithm. The experimental results show the significant performance boost by the SDAE-based CADx algorithm over the two conventional methods, suggesting that deep learning techniques can potentially change the design paradigm of the CADx systems without the need of explicit design and selection of problem-oriented features.

  5. Computer-Aided Diagnosis with Deep Learning Architecture: Applications to Breast Lesions in US Images and Pulmonary Nodules in CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jie-Zhi; Ni, Dong; Chou, Yi-Hong; Qin, Jing; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Shen, Dinggang; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-01-01

    This paper performs a comprehensive study on the deep-learning-based computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant nodules/lesions by avoiding the potential errors caused by inaccurate image processing results (e.g., boundary segmentation), as well as the classification bias resulting from a less robust feature set, as involved in most conventional CADx algorithms. Specifically, the stacked denoising auto-encoder (SDAE) is exploited on the two CADx applications for the differentiation of breast ultrasound lesions and lung CT nodules. The SDAE architecture is well equipped with the automatic feature exploration mechanism and noise tolerance advantage, and hence may be suitable to deal with the intrinsically noisy property of medical image data from various imaging modalities. To show the outperformance of SDAE-based CADx over the conventional scheme, two latest conventional CADx algorithms are implemented for comparison. 10 times of 10-fold cross-validations are conducted to illustrate the efficacy of the SDAE-based CADx algorithm. The experimental results show the significant performance boost by the SDAE-based CADx algorithm over the two conventional methods, suggesting that deep learning techniques can potentially change the design paradigm of the CADx systems without the need of explicit design and selection of problem-oriented features. PMID:27079888

  6. Computer-Aided Diagnosis with Deep Learning Architecture: Applications to Breast Lesions in US Images and Pulmonary Nodules in CT Scans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie-Zhi; Ni, Dong; Chou, Yi-Hong; Qin, Jing; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Shen, Dinggang; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-04-15

    This paper performs a comprehensive study on the deep-learning-based computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant nodules/lesions by avoiding the potential errors caused by inaccurate image processing results (e.g., boundary segmentation), as well as the classification bias resulting from a less robust feature set, as involved in most conventional CADx algorithms. Specifically, the stacked denoising auto-encoder (SDAE) is exploited on the two CADx applications for the differentiation of breast ultrasound lesions and lung CT nodules. The SDAE architecture is well equipped with the automatic feature exploration mechanism and noise tolerance advantage, and hence may be suitable to deal with the intrinsically noisy property of medical image data from various imaging modalities. To show the outperformance of SDAE-based CADx over the conventional scheme, two latest conventional CADx algorithms are implemented for comparison. 10 times of 10-fold cross-validations are conducted to illustrate the efficacy of the SDAE-based CADx algorithm. The experimental results show the significant performance boost by the SDAE-based CADx algorithm over the two conventional methods, suggesting that deep learning techniques can potentially change the design paradigm of the CADx systems without the need of explicit design and selection of problem-oriented features.

  7. Automatic anatomy recognition on CT images with pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lidong; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Tong, Yubing; Odhner, Dewey; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-03-01

    Body-wide anatomy recognition on CT images with pathology becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem because various diseases result in various abnormalities of objects such as shape and intensity patterns. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [1] whose applicability was demonstrated on near normal diagnostic CT images in different body regions on 35 organs. The aim of this paper is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to diagnostic CT images of patients with various pathologies as a first step toward automated body-wide disease quantification. The AAR approach consists of three main steps - model building, object recognition, and object delineation. In this paper, within the broader AAR framework, we describe a new strategy for object recognition to handle abnormal images. In the model building stage an optimal threshold interval is learned from near-normal training images for each object. This threshold is optimally tuned to the pathological manifestation of the object in the test image. Recognition is performed following a hierarchical representation of the objects. Experimental results for the abdominal body region based on 50 near-normal images used for model building and 20 abnormal images used for object recognition show that object localization accuracy within 2 voxels for liver and spleen and 3 voxels for kidney can be achieved with the new strategy.

  8. Assessment of CT image quality using a Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reginatto, M.; Anton, M.; Elster, C.

    2017-08-01

    One of the most promising approaches for evaluating CT image quality is task-specific quality assessment. This involves a simplified version of a clinical task, e.g. deciding whether an image belongs to the class of images that contain the signature of a lesion or not. Task-specific quality assessment can be done by model observers, which are mathematical procedures that carry out the classification task. The most widely used figure of merit for CT image quality is the area under the ROC curve (AUC), a quantity which characterizes the performance of a given model observer. In order to estimate AUC from a finite sample of images, different approaches from classical statistics have been suggested. The goal of this paper is to introduce task-specific quality assessment of CT images to metrology and to propose a novel Bayesian estimation of AUC for the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) applied to the task of detecting a lesion at a known image location. It is assumed that signal-present and signal-absent images follow multivariate normal distributions with the same covariance matrix. The Bayesian approach results in a posterior distribution for the AUC of the CHO which provides in addition a complete characterization of the uncertainty of this figure of merit. The approach is illustrated by its application to both simulated and experimental data.

  9. New insights on COPD imaging via CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sverzellati, N; Molinari, F; Pirronti, T; Bonomo, L; Spagnolo, P; Zompatori, M

    2007-01-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to quantify morphological features and investigate structure/function relationship in COPD. This approach allows a phenotypical definition of COPD patients, and might improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis and suggest new therapeutical options. In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has also become potentially suitable for the assessment of ventilation, perfusion and respiratory mechanics. This review focuses on the established clinical applications of CT, and novel CT and MRI techniques, which may prove valuable in evaluating the structural and functional damage in COPD. PMID:18229568

  10. Musculoskeletal applications of flat-panel volume CT.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Benjamin; Sarwar, Ammar; Bartling, Soenke H; Cheung, Arnold; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Bredella, Miriam A; Brady, Thomas J; Gupta, Rajiv

    2008-12-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT) is a recent development in imaging. We discuss some of the musculoskeletal applications of a high-resolution flat-panel CT scanner. FpVCT has four main advantages over conventional multidetector computed tomography (MDCT): high-resolution imaging; volumetric coverage; dynamic imaging; omni-scanning. The overall effective dose of fpVCT is comparable to that of MDCT scanning. Although current fpVCT technology has higher spatial resolution, its contrast resolution is slightly lower than that of MDCT (5-10HU vs. 1-3HU respectively). We discuss the efficacy and potential utility of fpVCT in various applications related to musculoskeletal radiology and review some novel applications for pediatric bones, soft tissues, tumor perfusion, and imaging of tissue-engineered bone growth. We further discuss high-resolution CT and omni-scanning (combines fluoroscopic and tomographic imaging).

  11. Periosteal ganglia: CT and MR imaging features.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, I F; Kenan, S; Hermann, G; Klein, M J; Lewis, M M

    1993-07-01

    The imaging features of four cases of periosteal ganglia were studied. Three lesions were located over the proximal shaft of the tibia, in proximity to the pes anserinus. The fourth lesion involved the distal shaft of the ulna. Three lesions had different degrees of external cortical erosion, scalloping, and thick spicules of periosteal bone on plain radiographs. The bone adjacent to the fourth lesion was not involved. Computed tomography (CT) showed these lesions to be sharply defined soft-tissue masses abutting the periosteum. All of the lesions had the same attenuation as fluid. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed the ganglia to be sharply defined masses that were isointense compared with neighboring muscles on T1-weighted images. There was markedly increased signal intensity compared with that of fat on T2-weighted images. The signal intensity on both types of images was homogeneous. The MR imaging features were consistent with the fluid nature of the lesions. Under the appropriate clinical circumstances, the MR imaging and CT features of periosteal ganglia are diagnostic.

  12. Combination of CT scanning and fluoroscopy imaging on a flat-panel CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Suess, Ch.; Schmidt, B.; Stierstorfer, K.; Popescu, S.; Brady, T.; Flohr, T.

    2006-03-01

    We developed and evaluated a prototype flat-panel detector based Volume CT (fpVCT) scanner. The fpVCT scanner consists of a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions). It provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at the isocenter. In addition to the standard tomographic scanning, fpVCT allows two new scan modes: (1) fluoroscopic imaging from any arbitrary rotation angle, and (2) continuous, time-resolved tomographic scanning of a dynamically changing viewing volume. Fluoroscopic imaging is feasible by modifying the standard CT gantry so that the imaging chain can be oriented along any user-selected rotation angle. Scanning with a stationary gantry, after it has been oriented, is equivalent to a conventional fluoroscopic examination. This scan mode enables combined use of high-resolution tomography and real-time fluoroscopy with a clinically usable field of view in the z direction. The second scan mode allows continuous observation of a timeevolving process such as perfusion. The gantry can be continuously rotated for up to 80 sec, with the rotation time ranging from 3 to 20 sec, to gather projection images of a dynamic process. The projection data, that provides a temporal log of the viewing volume, is then converted into multiple image stacks that capture the temporal evolution of a dynamic process. Studies using phantoms, ex vivo specimens, and live animals have confirmed that these new scanning modes are clinically usable and offer a unique view of the anatomy and physiology that heretofore has not been feasible using static CT scanning. At the current level of image quality and temporal resolution, several clinical applications such a dynamic angiography, tumor enhancement pattern and vascularity studies, organ perfusion, and interventional applications are in reach.

  13. Clinical application of in vivo treatment delivery verification based on PET/CT imaging of positron activity induced at high energy photon therapy.

    PubMed

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Andreassen, Björn; Jonsson, Cathrine; Noz, Marilyn E; Maguire, Gerald Q; Näfstadius, Peder; Näslund, Ingemar; Schoenahl, Frederic; Brahme, Anders

    2013-08-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo verification of radiation treatment with high energy photon beams using PET/CT to image the induced positron activity. The measurements of the positron activation induced in a preoperative rectal cancer patient and a prostate cancer patient following 50 MV photon treatments are presented. A total dose of 5 and 8 Gy, respectively, were delivered to the tumors. Imaging was performed with a 64-slice PET/CT scanner for 30 min, starting 7 min after the end of the treatment. The CT volume from the PET/CT and the treatment planning CT were coregistered by matching anatomical reference points in the patient. The treatment delivery was imaged in vivo based on the distribution of the induced positron emitters produced by photonuclear reactions in tissue mapped on to the associated dose distribution of the treatment plan. The results showed that spatial distribution of induced activity in both patients agreed well with the delivered beam portals of the treatment plans in the entrance subcutaneous fat regions but less so in blood and oxygen rich soft tissues. For the preoperative rectal cancer patient however, a 2 ± (0.5) cm misalignment was observed in the cranial-caudal direction of the patient between the induced activity distribution and treatment plan, indicating a beam patient setup error. No misalignment of this kind was seen in the prostate cancer patient. However, due to a fast patient setup error in the PET/CT scanner a slight mis-position of the patient in the PET/CT was observed in all three planes, resulting in a deformed activity distribution compared to the treatment plan. The present study indicates that the induced positron emitters by high energy photon beams can be measured quite accurately using PET imaging of subcutaneous fat to allow portal verification of the delivered treatment beams. Measurement of the induced activity in the patient 7 min after receiving 5 Gy involved count rates which were about

  14. Clinical application of in vivo treatment delivery verification based on PET/CT imaging of positron activity induced at high energy photon therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Andreassen, Björn; Jonsson, Cathrine; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Näfstadius, Peder; Näslund, Ingemar; Schoenahl, Frederic; Brahme, Anders

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo verification of radiation treatment with high energy photon beams using PET/CT to image the induced positron activity. The measurements of the positron activation induced in a preoperative rectal cancer patient and a prostate cancer patient following 50 MV photon treatments are presented. A total dose of 5 and 8 Gy, respectively, were delivered to the tumors. Imaging was performed with a 64-slice PET/CT scanner for 30 min, starting 7 min after the end of the treatment. The CT volume from the PET/CT and the treatment planning CT were coregistered by matching anatomical reference points in the patient. The treatment delivery was imaged in vivo based on the distribution of the induced positron emitters produced by photonuclear reactions in tissue mapped on to the associated dose distribution of the treatment plan. The results showed that spatial distribution of induced activity in both patients agreed well with the delivered beam portals of the treatment plans in the entrance subcutaneous fat regions but less so in blood and oxygen rich soft tissues. For the preoperative rectal cancer patient however, a 2 ± (0.5) cm misalignment was observed in the cranial-caudal direction of the patient between the induced activity distribution and treatment plan, indicating a beam patient setup error. No misalignment of this kind was seen in the prostate cancer patient. However, due to a fast patient setup error in the PET/CT scanner a slight mis-position of the patient in the PET/CT was observed in all three planes, resulting in a deformed activity distribution compared to the treatment plan. The present study indicates that the induced positron emitters by high energy photon beams can be measured quite accurately using PET imaging of subcutaneous fat to allow portal verification of the delivered treatment beams. Measurement of the induced activity in the patient 7 min after receiving 5 Gy involved count rates which were about

  15. Brain Imaging Using Mobile CT: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    John, Seby; Stock, Sarah; Cerejo, Russell; Uchino, Ken; Winners, Stacey; Russman, Andrew; Masaryk, Thomas; Rasmussen, Peter; Hussain, Muhammad S

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an invaluable tool in the diagnosis of many clinical conditions. Several advancements in biomedical engineering have achieved increase in speed, improvements in low-contrast detectability and image quality, and lower radiation. Portable or mobile CT constituted one such important advancement. It is especially useful in evaluating critically ill, intensive care unit patients by scanning them at bedside. A paradigm shift in utilization of mobile CT was its installation in ambulances for the management of acute stroke. Given the time sensitive nature of acute ischemic stroke, Mobile stroke units (MSU) were developed in Germany consisting of an ambulance equipped with a CT scanner, point of care laboratory system, along with teleradiological support. In a radical reconfiguration of stroke care, the MSU would bring the CT scanner to the stroke patient, without waiting for the patient at the emergency room. Two separate MSU projects in Saarland and Berlin demonstrated the safety and feasibility of this concept for prehospital stroke care, showing increased rate of intravenous thrombolysis and significant reduction in time to treatment compared to conventional care. MSU also improved the triage of patients to appropriate and specialized hospitals. Although multiple issues remain yet unanswered with the MSU concept including clinical outcome and cost-effectiveness, the MSU venture is visionary and enables delivery of life-saving and enhancing treatment for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. In this review, we discuss the development of mobile CT and its applications, with specific focus on its use in MSUs along with our institution's MSU experience.

  16. Seamless Insertion of Pulmonary Nodules in Chest CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Pezeshk, Aria; Sahiner, Berkman; Zeng, Rongping; Wunderlich, Adam; Chen, Weijie; Petrick, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    The availability of large medical image datasets is critical in many applications such as training and testing of computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems, evaluation of segmentation algorithms, and conducting perceptual studies. However, collection of data and establishment of ground truth for medical images are both costly and difficult. To address this problem, we are developing an image blending tool that allows users to modify or supplement existing datasets by seamlessly inserting a lesion extracted from a source image into a target image. In this study we focus on the application of this tool to pulmonary nodules in chest CT exams. We minimize the impact of user skill on the perceived quality of the composite image by limiting user involvement to two simple steps: the user first draws a casual boundary around a nodule in the source, and then selects the center of desired insertion area in the target. We demonstrate the performance of our system on clinical samples, and report the results of a reader study evaluating the realism of inserted nodules compared to clinical nodules. We further evaluate our image blending techniques using phantoms simulated under different noise levels and reconstruction filters. Specifically, we compute the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the Hotelling observer (HO) and noise power spectrum (NPS) of regions of interest enclosing native and inserted nodules, and compare the detectability, noise texture, and noise magnitude of inserted and native nodules. Our results indicate the viability of our approach for insertion of pulmonary nodules in clinical CT images. PMID:26080378

  17. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-02: Contrast Enhanced Cone Beam CT Imaging with Dual- Gantry Image Acquisition and Constrained Iterative Reconstruction-a Simulation Study for Liver Imaging Application

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Y; Gupta, S; Lai, C; Wang, T; Shaw, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Contrast time-density curves may help differentiate malignant tumors from normal tissues or benign tumors. Repetitive scans using conventional CT or cone beam CT techniques, which Result in unacceptably high dose, may not achieve the desired temporal resolution. In this study we describe and demonstrate a 4D imaging technique for imaging and quantifying contrast flows requiring only one or two 360° scans. Methods: A dual-gantry system is used to simultaneously acquire two projection images at orthogonal orientations. Following the scan, each or both of the two 360° projection sets are used to reconstruct an average contrast enhanced image set which is then segmented to form a 3D contrast map. Alternatively, a pre-injection scan may be made and used to reconstruct a pre-injection image set which is subtracted from the post-injection image set to form the 3D contrast map. Each of the two 360° projection sets is divided into 12 subsets, thus creating 12 pairs of 30° limited angle projection sets, each corresponding to a time spanning over 1/12 of the scanning time. Each pair of the projection sets are reconstructed as a time specific 3D image set with the maximum likelihood estimation iterative algorithm using the contrast map as the constraint. As a demonstration, a 4D abdominal phantom was constructed from clinical CT images with blood flow through the normal tissue and a tumor modeled and imaging process simulated. Results: We have successfully generated a 4D image phantom, and calculated the projection images. The time density curves derived from the reconstructed image set matched well with the flow model used to generate the phantom. Conclusion: Dual-gantry image acquisition and constrained iterative reconstruction algorithm may help to obtain time-density curves of contrast agents in blood flows, which may help differentiate malignant tumors from normal tissues or benign tumors.

  18. Computer-aided kidney segmentation on abdominal CT images.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daw-Tung; Lei, Chung-Chih; Hung, Siu-Wan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an effective model-based approach for computer-aided kidney segmentation of abdominal CT images with anatomic structure consideration is presented. This automatic segmentation system is expected to assist physicians in both clinical diagnosis and educational training. The proposed method is a coarse to fine segmentation approach divided into two stages. First, the candidate kidney region is extracted according to the statistical geometric location of kidney within the abdomen. This approach is applicable to images of different sizes by using the relative distance of the kidney region to the spine. The second stage identifies the kidney by a series of image processing operations. The main elements of the proposed system are: 1) the location of the spine is used as the landmark for coordinate references; 2) elliptic candidate kidney region extraction with progressive positioning on the consecutive CT images; 3) novel directional model for a more reliable kidney region seed point identification; and 4) adaptive region growing controlled by the properties of image homogeneity. In addition, in order to provide different views for the physicians, we have implemented a visualization tool that will automatically show the renal contour through the method of second-order neighborhood edge detection. We considered segmentation of kidney regions from CT scans that contain pathologies in clinical practice. The results of a series of tests on 358 images from 30 patients indicate an average correlation coefficient of up to 88% between automatic and manual segmentation.

  19. Prior image constrained image reconstruction in emerging computed tomography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Stephen T.

    Advances have been made in computed tomography (CT), especially in the past five years, by incorporating prior images into the image reconstruction process. In this dissertation, we investigate prior image constrained image reconstruction in three emerging CT applications: dual-energy CT, multi-energy photon-counting CT, and cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy. First, we investigate the application of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) in dual-energy CT, which has been called "one of the hottest research areas in CT." Phantom and animal studies are conducted using a state-of-the-art 64-slice GE Discovery 750 HD CT scanner to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose reduction in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging. Second, we extend the application of PICCS from dual-energy CT to multi-energy photon-counting CT, which has been called "one of the 12 topics in CT to be critical in the next decade." Numerical simulations are conducted to generate multiple energy bin images for a photon-counting CT acquisition and to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose efficiency improvement. Third, we investigate the performance of a newly proposed prior image constrained scatter correction technique to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT, which, when used in image-guided radiation therapy procedures, can assist in patient localization, and potentially, dose verification and adaptive radiation therapy. Phantom studies are conducted using a Varian 2100 EX system with an on-board imager to investigate the extent to which the prior image constrained scatter correction technique can mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT. Results show that these prior image constrained image reconstruction techniques can reduce radiation dose in dual-energy CT by 50% in phantom and animal studies in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging, can lead to radiation

  20. MO-G-17A-08: Applications of Quantitative PET/CT Imaging of Yttrium-90: A Tool for Improving Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Pasciak, A; Bradley, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Yttrium-90 (Y90) PET/CT post-treatment imaging of radioembolization has fostered significant interest from both the interventional radiology and nuclear medicine communities over the past few years. Recent literature has demonstrated high quantitative accuracy of Y90 PET at the activity concentrations common in radioembolization. However, few have explored methods in which this information can be clinically applied toward improving patient care. Methods: IRB approval and informed consent was obtained for over 35 Y90 post-treatment imaging studies, performed under 2 distinct protocols. In protocol 1, Y90 PET/CT provided quantitative post-treatment imaging, which was then converted into 3D maps of absorbed-dose. Both images and absorbed dose maps were used to manage patient care. In protocol 2, tumor absorbed-dose measurements from Y90 PET/CT were compared to known tumoricidal thresholds. If insufficient absorbed dose was delivered to the tumor, the patient would have an additional Y90 infusion the same day, providing truly patient-specific Y90 PET/CT based treatment-planning. Results: Y90 PET/CT allowed for a superior post-radioembolization evaluation of technical success compared with conventional Y90 bremsstrahlung SPECT. Due to the exceptional resolution of PET, a direct comparison between the distribution of radioembolization and pre-treatment planning intentions can be made. Further, quantification of tumor absorbed-dose directly from PET/CT imaging allows for the prediction of treatment efficacy based on a comparison with known tumoricidal thresholds. This immediate evaluation allowed treating physicians to consider additional or alternate therapies before discovering clinical failure weeks later. One protocol 2 patient was found to have a subtumoricidal absorbed dose following radioembolization. This patient received a same-day infusion of additional Y90 with identical catheter placement to the first infusion. A robust treatment response was seen on

  1. Dual source CT (DSCT) imaging of obese patients: evaluation of CT number accuracy, uniformity, and noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walz-Flannigan, A.; Schmidt, B.,; Apel, A.; Eusemann, C.; Yu, L.; McCollough, C. H.

    2009-02-01

    Obese patients present challenges in obtaining sufficient x-ray exposure over reasonable time periods for acceptable CT image quality. To overcome this limitation, the exposure can be divided between two x-ray sources using a dualsource (DS) CT system. However, cross-scatter issues in DS CT may also compromise image quality. We evaluated a DS CT system optimized for imaging obese patients, comparing the CT number accuracy and uniformity to the same images obtained with a single-source (SS) acquisition. The imaging modes were compared using both solid cylindrical PMMA phantoms and a semi-anthropomorphic thorax phantom fitted with extension rings to simulate different size patients. Clinical protocols were used and CTDIvol and kVp were held constant between SS and DS modes. Results demonstrated good agreement in CT number between SS and DS modes in CT number, with the DS mode showing better axial uniformity for the largest phantoms.

  2. Interior tomographic imaging of mouse heart in a carbon nanotube micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hao; Liu, Rui; Yu, Hengyong; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Kan, Lijuan; He, Jia-Qiang; Cao, Guohua

    2016-05-02

    The relatively high radiation dose from micro-CT is a cause for concern in preclinical research involving animal subjects. Interior region-of-interest (ROI) imaging was proposed for dose reduction, but has not been experimentally applied in micro-CT. Our aim is to implement interior ROI imaging in a carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source based micro-CT, and present the ROI image quality and radiation dose reduction for interior cardiac micro-CT imaging of a mouse heart in situ. An aperture collimator was mounted at the source-side to induce a small-sized cone beam (10 mm width) at the isocenter. Interior in situ micro-CT scans were conducted on a mouse carcass and several micro-CT phantoms. A GPU-accelerated hybrid iterative reconstruction algorithm was employed for volumetric image reconstruction. Radiation dose was measured for the same system operated at the interior and global micro-CT modes. Visual inspection demonstrated comparable image quality between two scan modes. Quantitative evaluation demonstrated high structural similarity index (up to 0.9614) with improved contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) on interior micro-CT mode. Interior micro-CT mode yielded significant reduction (up to 83.9%) for dose length product (DLP). This work demonstrates the applicability of using CNT x-ray source based interior micro-CT for preclinical imaging with significantly reduced radiation dose.

  3. Functional CT imaging of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Elizabeth; Milosevic, Michael F.; Haider, Masoom A.; Yeung, Ivan W. T.

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the distribution of blood flow (F), mean capillary transit time (Tc), capillary permeability (PS) and blood volume (vb) in prostate cancer using contrast-enhanced CT. Nine stage T2-T3 prostate cancer patients were enrolled in the study. Following bolus injection of a contrast agent, a time series of CT images of the prostate was acquired. Functional maps showing the distribution of F, Tc, PS and vb within the prostate were generated using a distributed parameter tracer kinetic model, the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model. The precision of the maps was assessed using covariance matrix analysis. Finally, maps were compared to the findings of standard clinical investigations. Eight of the functional maps demonstrated regions of increased F, PS and vb, the locations of which were consistent with the results of standard clinical investigations. However, model parameters other than F could only be measured precisely within regions of high F. In conclusion functional CT images of cancer-containing prostate glands demonstrate regions of elevated F, PS and vb. However, caution should be used when applying a complex tracer kinetic model to the study of prostate cancer since not all parameters can be measured precisely in all areas.

  4. Method for transforming CT images for attenuation correction in PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, Jonathan P.J.; Townsend, David W.; Rappoport, Vitaliy; Bendriem, Bernard

    2006-04-15

    A tube-voltage-dependent scheme is presented for transforming Hounsfield units (HU) measured by different computed tomography (CT) scanners at different x-ray tube voltages (kVp) to 511 keV linear attenuation values for attenuation correction in positron emission tomography (PET) data reconstruction. A Gammex 467 electron density CT phantom was imaged using a Siemens Sensation 16-slice CT, a Siemens Emotion 6-slice CT, a GE Lightspeed 16-slice CT, a Hitachi CXR 4-slice CT, and a Toshiba Aquilion 16-slice CT at kVp ranging from 80 to 140 kVp. All of these CT scanners are also available in combination with a PET scanner as a PET/CT tomograph. HU obtained for various reference tissue substitutes in the phantom were compared with the known linear attenuation values at 511 keV. The transformation, appropriate for lung, soft tissue, and bone, yields the function 9.6x10{sup -5}{center_dot}(HU+1000) below a threshold of {approx}50 HU and a{center_dot}(HU+1000)+b above the threshold, where a and b are fixed parameters that depend on the kVp setting. The use of the kVp-dependent scaling procedure leads to a significant improvement in reconstructed PET activity levels in phantom measurements, resolving errors of almost 40% otherwise seen for the case of dense bone phantoms at 80 kVp. Results are also presented for patient studies involving multiple CT scans at different kVp settings, which should all lead to the same 511 keV linear attenuation values. A linear fit to values obtained from 140 kVp CT images using the kVp-dependent scaling plotted as a function of the corresponding values obtained from 80 kVp CT images yielded y=1.003x-0.001 with an R{sup 2} value of 0.999, indicating that the same values are obtained to a high degree of accuracy.

  5. CT image construction of a totally deflated lung using deformable model extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi Naini, Ali; Pierce, Greg; Lee, Ting-Yim; and others

    2011-02-15

    intensity mean absolute difference between these two images was calculated to be at 1%. Tumor center as well as a number of anatomical fiducial markers were traced in different corresponding slices of the two images. The average misalignment obtained for the constructed CT image was (0.64, 0.39, 0.11) mm, which indicates a very desirable accuracy for lung brachytherapy applications. Conclusions: The image construction accuracy obtained in this research is suitable for intraoperative tasks; e.g., tumor localization and fusing with real time navigation data in lung brachytherapy. These applications involve image registration with intraoperative U.S. images in order to enhance their poor quality. The proposed technique is also useful for preoperative tasks such as planning of lung brachytherapy treatment.

  6. MR to CT Registration of Brains using Image Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Snehashis; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Prince, Jerry L; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-03-21

    Computed tomography (CT) is the standard imaging modality for patient dose calculation for radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) is used along with CT to identify brain structures due to its superior soft tissue contrast. Registration of MR and CT is necessary for accurate delineation of the tumor and other structures, and is critical in radiotherapy planning. Mutual information (MI) or its variants are typically used as a similarity metric to register MRI to CT. However, unlike CT, MRI intensity does not have an accepted calibrated intensity scale. Therefore, MI-based MR-CT registration may vary from scan to scan as MI depends on the joint histogram of the images. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic framework for MR-CT registration by synthesizing a synthetic CT image from MRI using a co-registered pair of MR and CT images as an atlas. Patches of the subject MRI are matched to the atlas and the synthetic CT patches are estimated in a probabilistic framework. The synthetic CT is registered to the original CT using a deformable registration and the computed deformation is applied to the MRI. In contrast to most existing methods, we do not need any manual intervention such as picking landmarks or regions of interests. The proposed method was validated on ten brain cancer patient cases, showing 25% improvement in MI and correlation between MR and CT images after registration compared to state-of-the-art registration methods.

  7. MR to CT registration of brains using image synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the preferred imaging modality for patient dose calculation for radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) is used along with CT to identify brain structures due to its superior soft tissue contrast. Registration of MR and CT is necessary for accurate delineation of the tumor and other structures, and is critical in radiotherapy planning. Mutual information (MI) or its variants are typically used as a similarity metric to register MRI to CT. However, unlike CT, MRI intensity does not have an accepted calibrated intensity scale. Therefore, MI-based MR-CT registration may vary from scan to scan as MI depends on the joint histogram of the images. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic framework for MR-CT registration by synthesizing a synthetic CT image from MRI using a co-registered pair of MR and CT images as an atlas. Patches of the subject MRI are matched to the atlas and the synthetic CT patches are estimated in a probabilistic framework. The synthetic CT is registered to the original CT using a deformable registration and the computed deformation is applied to the MRI. In contrast to most existing methods, we do not need any manual intervention such as picking landmarks or regions of interests. The proposed method was validated on ten brain cancer patient cases, showing 25% improvement in MI and correlation between MR and CT images after registration compared to state-of-the-art registration methods.

  8. Simulation and experimental studies of three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data based on compressed-sensing theory for potential applications to dental cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je, U. K.; Lee, M. S.; Cho, H. S.; Hong, D. K.; Park, Y. O.; Park, C. K.; Cho, H. M.; Choi, S. I.; Woo, T. H.

    2015-06-01

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic imaging, there are often challenges for image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data. In computed tomography (CT), for example, image reconstruction from sparse views and/or limited-angle (<360°) views would enable fast scanning with reduced imaging doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented a reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed-sensing (CS) theory, which exploits the sparseness of the gradient image with substantially high accuracy, for potential applications to low-dose, high-accurate dental cone-beam CT (CBCT). We performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics and also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in insufficient sampling problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images of superior accuracy from insufficient sampling data and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from insufficient data indicate that the CS-based algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality.

  9. CT Perfusion of the Liver: Principles and Applications in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hyung; Kamaya, Aya

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of molecularly targeted chemotherapeutics, there is an increasing need for defining new response criteria for therapeutic success because use of morphologic imaging alone may not fully assess tumor response. Computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging of the liver provides functional information about the microcirculation of normal parenchyma and focal liver lesions and is a promising technique for assessing the efficacy of various anticancer treatments. CT perfusion also shows promising results for diagnosing primary or metastatic tumors, for predicting early response to anticancer treatments, and for monitoring tumor recurrence after therapy. Many of the limitations of early CT perfusion studies performed in the liver, such as limited coverage, motion artifacts, and high radiation dose of CT, are being addressed by recent technical advances. These include a wide area detector with or without volumetric spiral or shuttle modes, motion correction algorithms, and new CT reconstruction technologies such as iterative algorithms. Although several issues related to perfusion imaging—such as paucity of large multicenter trials, limited accessibility of perfusion software, and lack of standardization in methods—remain unsolved, CT perfusion has now reached technical maturity, allowing for its use in assessing tumor vascularity in larger-scale prospective clinical trials. In this review, basic principles, current acquisition protocols, and pharmacokinetic models used for CT perfusion imaging of the liver are described. Various oncologic applications of CT perfusion of the liver are discussed and current challenges, as well as possible solutions, for CT perfusion are presented. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:25058132

  10. Landmark-guided diffeomorphic demons algorithm and its application to automatic segmentation of the whole spine and pelvis in CT images.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Shouhei; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Nemoto, Mitsutaka; Nomura, Yukihiro; Miki, Soichiro; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto; Ohtomo, Kuni; Shimizu, Akinobu

    2017-03-01

    A fully automatic multiatlas-based method for segmentation of the spine and pelvis in a torso CT volume is proposed. A novel landmark-guided diffeomorphic demons algorithm is used to register a given CT image to multiple atlas volumes. This algorithm can utilize both grayscale image information and given landmark coordinate information optimally. The segmentation has four steps. Firstly, 170 bony landmarks are detected in the given volume. Using these landmark positions, an atlas selection procedure is performed to reduce the computational cost of the following registration. Then the chosen atlas volumes are registered to the given CT image. Finally, voxelwise label voting is performed to determine the final segmentation result. The proposed method was evaluated using 50 torso CT datasets as well as the public SpineWeb dataset. As a result, a mean distance error of [Formula: see text] and a mean Dice coefficient of [Formula: see text] were achieved for the whole spine and the pelvic bones, which are competitive with other state-of-the-art methods. From the experimental results, the usefulness of the proposed segmentation method was validated.

  11. Coronary artery remodeling in non-contrast CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haiyong; Zheng, Mingna; Yang, Yanhua; Carr, J. Jeffery; Ge, Yaorong

    2012-03-01

    A significant cause of coronary artery disease is the coronary atherosclerosis which leads to stenosis of coronary arteries. It has been shown in recent studies, using intravascular ultrasound and contrast-enhanced CT, that early atherosclerosis causes positive coronary artery remodeling, defined as increases in the cross-sectional area. It is hypothesized that detection of artery remodeling using non-contrast CT can be an important factor in sub-clinical assessment of cardiac risk for asymptomatic subjects. However, measuring remodeling in coronary arteries in non-contrast CT images is a challenging task because coronary arteries are small and the intensity of coronary arteries is similar to that of surrounding tissues. Automatic segmentation algorithms that have been successful in segmenting coronary arteries in contrast-enhanced images do not perform well. To overcome these difficulties, we developed an interactive application to enable effective measurement of coronary artery remodeling in non-contrast CT images. This application is an extension to the 3D Slicer image analysis platform. It allows users to visualize and trace the centerline of arteries in cross sectional views. The artery centerlines are displayed in a three dimensional view overlaid on the original image volume and color-coded according to the artery labels. Using this 3D artery model, the user can sample the cross-sectional area of the arteries at selected points for remodeling assessment. Initial validation has demonstrated the effectiveness of this method. A pilot study also showed positive correlation of large coronary artery remodeling with highest lifetime risks. Further evaluation is underway using larger study size and more measurement points.

  12. Combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Paolo; Larobina, Michele; Di Lillo, Francesca; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Mettivier, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    In the field of nuclear medicine imaging, breast imaging for cancer diagnosis is still mainly based on 2D imaging techniques. Three-dimensional tomographic imaging with whole-body PET or SPECT scanners, when used for imaging the breast, has performance limits in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which can be overcome only with a dedicated instrumentation. However, only few hybrid imaging systems for PET/CT or SPECT/CT dedicated to the breast have been developed in the last decade, providing complementary functional and anatomical information on normal breast tissue and lesions. These systems are still under development and clinical trials on just few patients have been reported; no commercial dedicated breast PET/CT or SPECT/CT is available. This paper reviews combined dedicated breast PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners described in the recent literature, with focus on their technological aspects.

  13. Material Separation Using Dual-Energy CT: Current and Emerging Applications.

    PubMed

    Patino, Manuel; Prochowski, Andrea; Agrawal, Mukta D; Simeone, Frank J; Gupta, Rajiv; Hahn, Peter F; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) offers the opportunity to generate material-specific images on the basis of the atomic number Z and the unique mass attenuation coefficient of a particular material at different x-ray energies. Material-specific images provide qualitative and quantitative information about tissue composition and contrast media distribution. The most significant contribution of DE CT-based material characterization comes from the capability to assess iodine distribution through the creation of an image that exclusively shows iodine. These iodine-specific images increase tissue contrast and amplify subtle differences in attenuation between normal and abnormal tissues, improving lesion detection and characterization in the abdomen. In addition, DE CT enables computational removal of iodine influence from a CT image, generating virtual noncontrast images. Several additional materials, including calcium, fat, and uric acid, can be separated, permitting imaging assessment of metabolic imbalances, elemental deficiencies, and abnormal deposition of materials within tissues. The ability to obtain material-specific images from a single, contrast-enhanced CT acquisition can complement the anatomic knowledge with functional information, and may be used to reduce the radiation dose by decreasing the number of phases in a multiphasic CT examination. DE CT also enables generation of energy-specific and virtual monochromatic images. Clinical applications of DE CT leverage both material-specific images and virtual monochromatic images to expand the current role of CT and overcome several limitations of single-energy CT. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  14. Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Youngho; Gao, D.-W.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Dae, Michael W.; Franc, Benjamin L.

    2007-04-15

    We evaluated methods of imaging rat models of stroke in vivo using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system dedicated to small animal imaging (X-SPECT{sup TM}, Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). An animal model of ischemic stroke was developed for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging using the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) technique. The presence of cerebral ischemia was verified in ex vivo studies using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. In vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow was performed in rats following MCAO using dynamic planar imaging of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime with parallel hole collimation. This was followed immediately by in vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow with {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime in the same animals using 1-mm pinhole SPECT. Correlated computed tomography imaging was performed to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake. The animals were allowed to recover and ex vivo autoradiography was performed with separate administration of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime. Time activity curve of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime showed that the radiopharmaceutical uptake could be maintained for over 9 min. The activity would be expected to be relatively stable for a much longer period, although the data were only obtained for 9 min. TTC staining revealed sizable infarcts by visual observation of inexistence of TTC stain in infracted tissues of MCAO rat brains. In vivo SPECT imaging showed cerebral blood flow deficit in the MCAO model, and the in vivo imaging result was confirmed with ex vivo autoradiography. We have demonstrated a capability of imaging regions of cerebral blood flow deficit in MCAO rat brains in vivo using a pinhole SPECT dedicated to small animal imaging.

  15. CT imaging, then and now: a 30-year review of the economics of computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Stockburger, Wayne T

    2004-01-01

    The first computed tomography (CT) scanner in the US was installed in June 1973 at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. By the end of 1974, 44 similar systems had been installed at medical facilities around the country. Less than 4 years after the introduction of CT imaging in the US, at least 400 CT systems had been installed. The practice of pneumoencephalography was eliminated. The use of nuclear medicine brain scans significantly diminished. At the time, CT imaging was limited to head studies, but with the introduction of contrast agents and full body CT systems the changes in the practice of medicine became even more significant. CT imaging was hailed by the US medical community as the greatest advance in radiology since the discovery of x-rays. But the rapid spread of CT systems, their frequency of use, and the associated increase in healthcare costs combined to draw the attention of decision-makers within the federal and state governments, specifically to establish policies regarding the acquisition and use of diagnostic technologies. Initially, CT imaging was limited to neurological applications, but in the 30 years since its inception, capabilities and applications have been expanded as a result of the advancements in technology and software development. While neurological disorders are still a common reason for CT imaging, many other medical disciplines (oncology, emergency medicine, orthopedics, etc.) have found CT imaging to be the definitive tool for diagnostic information. As such, the clinical demand for CT imaging has steadily increased. Economically, the development of CT imaging has been one of success, even in the face of governmental action to restrict its acquisition and utilization by healthcare facilities. CTimaging has increased the cost of healthcare, but in turn has added unquantifiable value to the practice of medicine in the US.

  16. Accurate assessment and prediction of noise in clinical CT images.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (a) to devise a technique for measuring quantum noise in clinical body computed tomography (CT) images and (b) to develop a model for predicting that noise with high accuracy. The study included 83 clinical image sets at two dose levels (clinical and 50% reduced dose levels). The quantum noise in clinical images was measured by subtracting sequential slices and filtering out edges. Noise was then measured in the resultant uniform area. The noise measurement technique was validated using 17 clinical image cases and a turkey phantom. With a validated method to measure noise in clinical images, this noise was predicted by establishing the correlation between water-equivalent diameter (Dw) and noise in a variable-sized phantom and ascribing a noise level to the patient based on Dw estimated from CT image. The accuracy of this prediction model was validated using 66 clinical image sets. The error in noise measurement was within 1.5 HU across two reconstruction algorithms. In terms of noise prediction, across the 83 clinical image sets, the average discrepancies between predicted and measured noise were 6.9% and 6.6% for adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and filtered back projection reconstruction, respectively. This study proposed a practically applicable method to assess quantum noise in clinical images. The image-based measurement technique enables automatic quality control monitoring of image noise in clinical practice. Further, a phantom-based model can accurately predict quantum noise level in patient images. The prediction model can be used to quantitatively optimize individual protocol to achieve targeted noise level in clinical images.

  17. Improving image accuracy of region-of-interest in cone-beam CT using prior image.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiseoc; Kim, Jin Sung; Cho, Seungryong

    2014-03-06

    In diagnostic follow-ups of diseases, such as calcium scoring in kidney or fat content assessment in liver using repeated CT scans, quantitatively accurate and consistent CT values are desirable at a low cost of radiation dose to the patient. Region of-interest (ROI) imaging technique is considered a reasonable dose reduction method in CT scans for its shielding geometry outside the ROI. However, image artifacts in the reconstructed images caused by missing data outside the ROI may degrade overall image quality and, more importantly, can decrease image accuracy of the ROI substantially. In this study, we propose a method to increase image accuracy of the ROI and to reduce imaging radiation dose via utilizing the outside ROI data from prior scans in the repeated CT applications. We performed both numerical and experimental studies to validate our proposed method. In a numerical study, we used an XCAT phantom with its liver and stomach changing their sizes from one scan to another. Image accuracy of the liver has been improved as the error decreased from 44.4 HU to -0.1 HU by the proposed method, compared to an existing method of data extrapolation to compensate for the missing data outside the ROI. Repeated cone-beam CT (CBCT) images of a patient who went through daily CBCT scans for radiation therapy were also used to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method experimentally. The results showed improved image accuracy inside the ROI. The magnitude of error decreased from -73.2 HU to 18 HU, and effectively reduced image artifacts throughout the entire image.

  18. SU-E-I-73: Clinical Evaluation of CT Image Reconstructed Using Interior Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Ge, G; Winkler, M; Cong, W; Wang, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation dose reduction has been a long standing challenge in CT imaging of obese patients. Recent advances in interior tomography (reconstruction of an interior region of interest (ROI) from line integrals associated with only paths through the ROI) promise to achieve significant radiation dose reduction without compromising image quality. This study is to investigate the application of this technique in CT imaging through evaluating imaging quality reconstructed from patient data. Methods: Projection data were directly obtained from patients who had CT examinations in a Dual Source CT scanner (DSCT). Two detectors in a DSCT acquired projection data simultaneously. One detector provided projection data for full field of view (FOV, 50 cm) while another detectors provided truncated projection data for a FOV of 26 cm. Full FOV CT images were reconstructed using both filtered back projection and iterative algorithm; while interior tomography algorithm was implemented to reconstruct ROI images. For comparison reason, FBP was also used to reconstruct ROI images. Reconstructed CT images were evaluated by radiologists and compared with images from CT scanner. Results: The results show that the reconstructed ROI image was in excellent agreement with the truth inside the ROI, obtained from images from CT scanner, and the detailed features in the ROI were quantitatively accurate. Radiologists evaluation shows that CT images reconstructed with interior tomography met diagnosis requirements. Radiation dose may be reduced up to 50% using interior tomography, depending on patient size. Conclusion: This study shows that interior tomography can be readily employed in CT imaging for radiation dose reduction. It may be especially useful in imaging obese patients, whose subcutaneous tissue is less clinically relevant but may significantly increase radiation dose.

  19. The application of automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) on image quality and radiation dose at abdominal computed tomography (CT): A phantom study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Zhao, Xinming; Song, Junfeng; Guo, Ning; Zhu, Ying; Liu, Jianxin; Qi, Weiwei; Wu, Jing; Liang, Yuan; Feng, Shichao; Hu, Mancang; Zhou, Chunwu; Wang, Xiaoying; Hong, Nan

    2013-01-01

    Multi-phase spiral Computed tomography (CT) of abdomen has been widely used as an effective imaging modality to diagnose variety of diseases. As a result, the accumulated radiation exposure on the abdomen is substantially higher than other human organ regions. According to ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle, how to control radiation dose without compromising imaging quality becomes a research topic of high interest. However, how to achieve dose optimization of the abdomen CT examinations in Chinese patients have not been fully investigated in previous studies. In this study, we develop an abdomen-equivalent tissue model made by well-known CTP579 auxiliary testing model and the real CT data acquired from 68 Chinese male subjects. Combining with catphan600, we simulated the visibility of low and high contrast objects at adult abdomen under variety of x-ray dose levels. Using the automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) technique, we reduced the total radiation dose and identified a proper noise index (NI) for Chinese patients to maintain low or high contrast detectability of abdominal CT image. Our numerical experiments showed that in the phantom study for Chinese patients, when a NI was set at 10, the radiation dose reduced by 34.3% with low contrast objects detectable, while setting NI at 14 the dose level decreased by 65.1% without change the detectability of high contrast targets. The subjective ratings from three radiologists also yielded high consistence with Kappa > 0.75. This study demonstrated the feasibility of performing the CT dose optimization studies through a unique phantom with the ATCM method.

  20. Metal artifact reduction strategies for improved attenuation correction in hybrid PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Abdoli, Mehrsima; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-06-15

    Metallic implants are known to generate bright and dark streaking artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, which in turn propagate to corresponding functional positron emission tomography (PET) images during the CT-based attenuation correction procedure commonly used on hybrid clinical PET/CT scanners. Therefore, visual artifacts and overestimation and/or underestimation of the tracer uptake in regions adjacent to metallic implants are likely to occur and as such, inaccurate quantification of the tracer uptake and potential erroneous clinical interpretation of PET images is expected. Accurate quantification of PET data requires metal artifact reduction (MAR) of the CT images prior to the application of the CT-based attenuation correction procedure. In this review, the origins of metallic artifacts and their impact on clinical PET/CT imaging are discussed. Moreover, a brief overview of proposed MAR methods and their advantages and drawbacks is presented. Although most of the presented MAR methods are mainly developed for diagnostic CT imaging, their potential application in PET/CT imaging is highlighted. The challenges associated with comparative evaluation of these methods in a clinical environment in the absence of a gold standard are also discussed.

  1. A Robust Algorithm for Thickness Computation at Low Resolution and Its Application to In Vivo Trabecular Bone CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yinxiao; Jin, Dakai; Li, Cheng; Janz, Kathleen F.; Burns, Trudy L.; Torner, James C.; Levy, Steven M.; Saha, Punam K.

    2015-01-01

    Adult bone diseases, especially osteoporosis, lead to increased risk of fracture which in turn is associated with substantial morbidity, mortality, and financial costs. Clinically, osteoporosis is defined by low bone mineral density; however, increasing evidence suggests that the microarchitectural quality of trabecular bone (TB) is an important determinant of bone strength and fracture risk. Accurate measures of TB thickness and marrow spacing is of significant interest for early diagnosis of osteoporosis or treatment effects. Here, we present a new robust algorithm for computing TB thickness and marrow spacing at a low resolution achievable in vivo. The method uses a star-line tracing technique that effectively deals with partial voluming effects of in vivo imaging with voxel size comparable to TB thickness. Also, the method avoids the problem of digitization associated with conventional algorithms based on sampling distance transform along skeletons. Accuracy of the method was examined using computer-generated phantom images, while the robustness of the method was evaluated on human ankle specimens in terms of stability across a wide range of voxel sizes, repeat scan reproducibility under in vivo conditions, and correlation between thickness values computed at ex vivo and in vivo imaging resolutions. Also, the sensitivity of the method was examined by evaluating its ability to predict the bone strength of cadaveric specimens. Finally, the method was evaluated in a human study involving 40 healthy young-adult volunteers (age: 19–21 years; 20 males and 20 females) and ten athletes (age: 19–21 years; six males and four females). Across a wide range of voxel sizes, the new method is significantly more accurate and robust as compared to conventional methods. Both TB thickness and marrow spacing measures computed using the new method demonstrated strong associations (R2 ∈ [0.83, 0.87]) with bone strength. Also, the TB thickness and marrow spacing measures

  2. Nonneoplastic liver disease: evaluation with CT and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, S; Soyer, P A; Fishman, E K; Bluemke, D A

    1998-01-01

    A wide range of nontumorous hepatic diseases may have an impact on liver function and serve as indications for computed tomographic (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. New imaging techniques such as spiral CT and fast MR imaging aid in detecting and characterizing these disease processes and in assessing the extent of disease. Infectious liver disease (eg, hepatic abscess, echinococcal disease, fungal infection) typically has low attenuation at CT and high signal intensity at T2-weighted MR imaging. Cholangitis is characterized by ductal dilatation at both CT and MR imaging. In acute portal vein thrombosis, the thrombus has low attenuation at CT and is hyperintense relative to liver at MR imaging. Hepatic infarcts usually appear as well-circumscribed, peripheral, wedge-shaped areas of decreased attenuation at CT. The causes or complications of cirrhosis can be most readily identified with MR imaging. In patients with chronic radiation-induced hepatitis, CT shows the irradiated parenchyma as a region of increased attenuation, whereas T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging demonstrate geographic areas of low and high signal intensity, respectively. Hemachromatosis has homogeneously increased liver attenuation at CT and decreased signal intensity at gradient-echo MR imaging in particular. Familiarity with the CT and MR imaging features of the spectrum of nonneoplastic conditions of the liver is essential in making an accurate diagnosis.

  3. The impact of spectral filtration on image quality in micro-CT system.

    PubMed

    Ren, Liqiang; Ghani, Muhammad U; Wu, Di; Zheng, Bin; Chen, Yong; Yang, Kai; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-08

    This paper aims to evaluate the impact of spectral filtration on image quality in a microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) system. A mouse phantom comprising 11rods for modeling lung, muscle, adipose, and bones was scanned with 17 s and 2min, respectively. The current (μA) for each scan was adjusted to achieve identical entrance exposure to the phantom, providing a baseline for image quality evaluation. For each region of interest (ROI) within specific composition, CT number variations, noise levels, and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were evaluated from the reconstructed images. CT number variations and CNRs for bone with high density, muscle, and adipose were compared with theoretical predictions. The results show that the impact of spectral filtration on image quality indicators, such as CNR in a micro-CT system, is significantly associated with tissue characteristics. The findings may provide useful references for optimizing the scanning parameters of general micro-CT systems in future imaging applications.

  4. 4D CT lung ventilation images are affected by the 4D CT sorting method

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kabus, Sven; Lorenz, Cristian; Johnston, Eric; Maxim, Peter G.; Diehn, Maximilian; Eclov, Neville; Barquero, Cristian; Loo, Billy W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) ventilation imaging is a novel promising technique for lung functional imaging. The current standard 4D CT technique using phase-based sorting frequently results in artifacts, which may deteriorate the accuracy of ventilation imaging. The purpose of this study was to quantify the variability of 4D CT ventilation imaging due to 4D CT sorting. Methods: 4D CT image sets from nine lung cancer patients were each sorted by the phase-based method and anatomic similarity-based method, designed to reduce artifacts, with corresponding ventilation images created for each method. Artifacts in the resulting 4D CT images were quantified with the artifact score which was defined based on the difference between the normalized cross correlation for CT slices within a CT data segment and that for CT slices bordering the interface between adjacent CT data segments. The ventilation variation was quantified using voxel-based Spearman rank correlation coefficients for all lung voxels, and Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) for the spatial overlap of low-functional lung volumes. Furthermore, the correlations with matching single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation images (assumed ground truth) were evaluated for three patients to investigate which sorting method provides higher physiologic accuracy. Results: Anatomic similarity-based sorting reduced 4D CT artifacts compared to phase-based sorting (artifact score, 0.45 ± 0.14 vs 0.58 ± 0.24, p = 0.10 at peak-exhale; 0.63 ± 0.19 vs 0.71 ± 0.31, p = 0.25 at peak-inhale). The voxel-based correlation between the two ventilation images was 0.69 ± 0.26 on average, ranging from 0.03 to 0.85. The DSC was 0.71 ± 0.13 on average. Anatomic similarity-based sorting yielded significantly fewer lung voxels with paradoxical negative ventilation values than phase-based sorting (5.0 ± 2.6% vs 9.7 ± 8.4%, p = 0.05), and improved the correlation with SPECT ventilation regionally. Conclusions

  5. Upright cone beam CT imaging using the onboard imager

    SciTech Connect

    Fave, Xenia Martin, Rachael; Yang, Jinzhong; Balter, Peter; Court, Laurence; Carvalho, Luis; Pan, Tinsu

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Many patients could benefit from being treated in an upright position. The objectives of this study were to determine whether cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could be used to acquire upright images for treatment planning and to demonstrate whether reconstruction of upright images maintained accurate geometry and Hounsfield units (HUs). Methods: A TrueBeam linac was programmed in developer mode to take upright CBCT images. The gantry head was positioned at 0°, and the couch was rotated to 270°. The x-ray source and detector arms were extended to their lateral positions. The x-ray source and gantry remained stationary as fluoroscopic projections were taken and the couch was rotated from 270° to 90°. The x-ray tube current was normalized to deposit the same dose (measured using a calibrated Farmer ion chamber) as that received during a clinical helical CT scan to the center of a cylindrical, polyethylene phantom. To extend the field of view, two couch rotation scans were taken with the detector offset 15 cm superiorly and then 15 cm inferiorly. The images from these two scans were stitched together before reconstruction. Upright reconstructions were compared to reconstructions from simulation CT scans of the same phantoms. Two methods were investigated for correcting the HUs, including direct calibration and mapping the values from a simulation CT. Results: Overall geometry, spatial linearity, and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright reconstructions. Some artifacts were created and HU accuracy was compromised; however, these limitations could be removed by mapping the HUs from a simulation CT to the upright reconstruction for treatment planning. Conclusions: The feasibility of using the TrueBeam linac to take upright CBCT images was demonstrated. This technique is straightforward to implement and could be of enormous benefit to patients with thoracic tumors or those who find a supine position difficult to endure.

  6. CT scan range estimation using multiple body parts detection: let PACS learn the CT image content.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunliang; Lundström, Claes

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient CT scan range estimation method that is based on the analysis of image data itself instead of metadata analysis. This makes it possible to quantitatively compare the scan range of two studies. In our study, 3D stacks are first projected to 2D coronal images via a ray casting-like process. Trained 2D body part classifiers are then used to recognize different body parts in the projected image. The detected candidate regions go into a structure grouping process to eliminate false-positive detections. Finally, the scale and position of the patient relative to the projected figure are estimated based on the detected body parts via a structural voting. The start and end lines of the CT scan are projected to a standard human figure. The position readout is normalized so that the bottom of the feet represents 0.0, and the top of the head is 1.0. Classifiers for 18 body parts were trained using 184 CT scans. The final application was tested on 136 randomly selected heterogeneous CT scans. Ground truth was generated by asking two human observers to mark the start and end positions of each scan on the standard human figure. When compared with the human observers, the mean absolute error of the proposed method is 1.2% (max: 3.5%) and 1.6% (max: 5.4%) for the start and end positions, respectively. We proposed a scan range estimation method using multiple body parts detection and relative structure position analysis. In our preliminary tests, the proposed method delivered promising results.

  7. Applications of PET CT in clinical practice: Present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Durval Campos

    2007-02-01

    Radionuclide imaging and specially positron emission tomography (PET) has already demonstrated its benefits in three major medical subjects, i.e. neurology, cardiology and particularly clinical oncology. More recently the combination of PET and X-ray computed tomography (CT) as PET-CT led to a significant increment of the already large number of clinical applications of this imaging modality. This "anatomy-metabolic fusion" also known as Metabolic Imaging has its future assured if we can: (1) improve resolution reducing partial volume effect, (2) achieve very fast whole body imaging, (3) obtain accurate quantification of specific functions with higher contrast resolution and, if possible, (4) reduce exposure rates due to the unavoidable use of ionizing radiation.

  8. Edge extraction of CT medical image based on wavelet transform algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Li, Xinzheng; Lai, Weidong

    2011-06-01

    Since computer tomography (CT) image has been widely applied in clinic diagnostics, while for many applications the information directly provided by CT images is incomplete corrupted by noise or instrument defect, there has great demand to further the processing methods for improving the CT image quality. Among all image features, the edge profile of clinic focus has obvious influence on accurately translating CT image. In this paper, the wavelet filtering algorithm based on modulus maximum method is put forward to extract and enhance the CT image edges. Edges in the brain lobe CT image can be outlined after wavelet transform, during which the wavelet assigned as the first order derivative of Gauss function. Further manipulation through maximum threshold checking to the modulus have been attenuated the pseudo-edges. After segmented with the original CT image, the edge structure has been distinctly enhanced, and high contrast is achieved between the brain lobe microstructure and the artificially established edges. The proposed algorithm is more efficient than the common first order differential operator, for the latter it even deteriorates the edge features. The algorithm proposed in this article can be integrated in medical image analyzing software to obtain higher accuracy for symptom interpretation.

  9. Compact CT/SPECT Small-Animal Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Kastis, George A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Peterson, Todd E.; Barber, H. Bradford; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a dual-modality CT/SPECT imaging system for small-animal imaging applications. The X-ray system comprises a commercially available micro-focus X-ray tube and a CCD-based X-ray camera. X-ray transmission measurements are performed based on cone-beam geometry. Individual projections are acquired by rotating the animal about a vertical axis in front of the CCD detector. A high-resolution CT image is obtained after reconstruction using an ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction algorithm. The SPECT system utilizes a compact semiconductor camera module previously developed in our group. The module is mounted perpendicular to the X-ray tube/CCD combination. It consists of a 64×64 pixellated CdZnTe detector and a parallel-hole tungsten collimator. The field of view is 1 square inch. Planar projections for SPECT reconstruction are obtained by rotating the animal in front of the detector. Gamma-ray and X-ray images are presented of phantoms and mice. Procedures for merging the anatomical and functional images are discussed. PMID:26538684

  10. Elastic registration of multiphase CT images of liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heldmann, Stefan; Zidowitz, Stephan

    2009-02-01

    In this work we present a novel approach for elastic image registration of multi-phase contrast enhanced CT images of liver. A problem in registration of multiphase CT is that the images contain similar but complementary structures. In our application each image shows a different part of the vessel system, e.g., portal/hepatic venous/arterial, or biliary vessels. Portal, arterial and biliary vessels run in parallel and abut on each other forming the so called portal triad, while hepatic veins run independent. Naive registration will tend to align complementary vessel. Our new approach is based on minimizing a cost function consisting of a distance measure and a regularizer. For the distance we use the recently proposed normalized gradient field measure that focuses on the alignment of edges. For the regularizer we use the linear elastic potential. The key feature of our approach is an additional penalty term using segmentations of the different vessel systems in the images to avoid overlaps of complementary structures. We successfully demonstrate our new method by real data examples.

  11. A Flexible Method for Multi-Material Decomposition of Dual-Energy CT Images.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Paulo R S; Lamb, Peter; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2014-01-01

    The ability of dual-energy computed-tomographic (CT) systems to determine the concentration of constituent materials in a mixture, known as material decomposition, is the basis for many of dual-energy CT's clinical applications. However, the complex composition of tissues and organs in the human body poses a challenge for many material decomposition methods, which assume the presence of only two, or at most three, materials in the mixture. We developed a flexible, model-based method that extends dual-energy CT's core material decomposition capability to handle more complex situations, in which it is necessary to disambiguate among and quantify the concentration of a larger number of materials. The proposed method, named multi-material decomposition (MMD), was used to develop two image analysis algorithms. The first was virtual unenhancement (VUE), which digitally removes the effect of contrast agents from contrast-enhanced dual-energy CT exams. VUE has the ability to reduce patient dose and improve clinical workflow, and can be used in a number of clinical applications such as CT urography and CT angiography. The second algorithm developed was liver-fat quantification (LFQ), which accurately quantifies the fat concentration in the liver from dual-energy CT exams. LFQ can form the basis of a clinical application targeting the diagnosis and treatment of fatty liver disease. Using image data collected from a cohort consisting of 50 patients and from phantoms, the application of MMD to VUE and LFQ yielded quantitatively accurate results when compared against gold standards. Furthermore, consistent results were obtained across all phases of imaging (contrast-free and contrast-enhanced). This is of particular importance since most clinical protocols for abdominal imaging with CT call for multi-phase imaging. We conclude that MMD can successfully form the basis of a number of dual-energy CT image analysis algorithms, and has the potential to improve the clinical utility

  12. Statistical Reconstruction for Cone-Beam CT with a Post-Artifact-Correction Noise Model: Application to High-Quality Head Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Sisniega, A.; Xu, J.; Zbijewski, W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V.

    2015-01-01

    Non-contrast CT reliably detects fresh blood in the brain and is the current front-line imaging modality for intracranial hemorrhage such as that occurring in acute traumatic brain injury (contrast ~40-80 HU, size > 1 mm). We are developing flat-panel detector (FPD) cone-beam CT (CBCT) to facilitate such diagnosis in a low-cost, mobile platform suitable for point-of-care deployment. Such a system may offer benefits in the ICU, urgent care/concussion clinic, ambulance, and sports and military theatres. However, current FPD-CBCT systems face significant challenges that confound low-contrast, soft-tissue imaging. Artifact correction can overcome major sources of bias in FPD-CBCT but imparts noise amplification in filtered backprojection (FBP). Model-based reconstruction improves soft-tissue image quality compared to FBP by leveraging a high-fidelity forward model and image regularization. In this work, we develop a novel penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) image reconstruction method with a noise model that includes accurate modeling of the noise characteristics associated with the two dominant artifact corrections (scatter and beam-hardening) in CBCT and utilizes modified weights to compensate for noise amplification imparted by each correction. Experiments included real data acquired on a FPD-CBCT test-bench and an anthropomorphic head phantom emulating intra-parenchymal hemorrhage. The proposed PWLS method demonstrated superior noise-resolution tradeoffs in comparison to FBP and PWLS with conventional weights (viz., at matched 0.50 mm spatial resolution, CNR = 11.9 compared to CNR = 5.6 and CNR = 9.9, respectively) and substantially reduced image noise especially in challenging regions such as skull base. The results support the hypothesis that with high-fidelity artifact correction and statistical reconstruction using an accurate post-artifact-correction noise model, FPD-CBCT can achieve image quality allowing reliable detection of intracranial hemorrhage

  13. Iterative Image Reconstruction for Limited-Angle CT Using Optimized Initial Image

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jingyu; Qi, Hongliang; Xu, Yuan; Chen, Zijia; Li, Shulong; Zhou, Linghong

    2016-01-01

    Limited-angle computed tomography (CT) has great impact in some clinical applications. Existing iterative reconstruction algorithms could not reconstruct high-quality images, leading to severe artifacts nearby edges. Optimal selection of initial image would influence the iterative reconstruction performance but has not been studied deeply yet. In this work, we proposed to generate optimized initial image followed by total variation (TV) based iterative reconstruction considering the feature of image symmetry. The simulated data and real data reconstruction results indicate that the proposed method effectively removes the artifacts nearby edges. PMID:27066107

  14. Automatic Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Measurement in CT Images.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dong, Zhongxing; Yan, Ruyi; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Salganicoff, Marcos; Fei, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is one of the most common spinal diseases. It is caused by the anterior shift of a lumbar vertebrae relative to subjacent vertebrae. In current clinical practices, staging of spondylolisthesis is often conducted in a qualitative way. Although meyerding grading opens the door to stage spondylolisthesis in a more quantitative way, it relies on the manual measurement, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Thus, an automatic measurement algorithm becomes desirable for spondylolisthesis diagnosis and staging. However, there are two challenges. 1) Accurate detection of the most anterior and posterior points on the superior and inferior surfaces of each lumbar vertebrae. Due to the small size of the vertebrae, slight errors of detection may lead to significant measurement errors, hence, wrong disease stages. 2) Automatic localize and label each lumbar vertebrae is required to provide the semantic meaning of the measurement. It is difficult since different lumbar vertebraes have high similarity of both shape and image appearance. To resolve these challenges, a new auto measurement framework is proposed with two major contributions: First, a learning based spine labeling method that integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information is designed to detect lumbar vertebrae. Second, a hierarchical method using both the population information from atlases and domain-specific information in the target image is proposed for most anterior and posterior points positioning. Validated on 258 CT spondylolisthesis patients, our method shows very similar results to manual measurements by radiologists and significantly increases the measurement efficiency.

  15. TU-G-207-01: CT Imaging Using Energy-Sensitive Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, K.

    2015-06-15

    Last few years has witnessed the development of novel of X-ray imaging modalities, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT, and X-ray acoustic/fluorescence/luminescence imaging. This symposium will present the recent advances of these emerging X-ray imaging modalities and update the attendees with knowledge in various related topics, including X-ray photon-counting detectors, X-ray physics underlying the emerging applications beyond the traditional X-ray imaging, image reconstruction for the novel modalities, characterization and evaluation of the systems, and their practical implications. In addition, the concept and practical aspects of X-ray activatable targeted nanoparticles for molecular X-ray imaging will be discussed in the context of X-ray fluorescence and luminescence CT. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of various emerging X-ray imaging techniques, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT and X-ray fluorescence/luminescence CT. Discuss the practical need, technical aspects and current status of the emerging X-ray imaging modalities. Describe utility and future impact of the new generation of X-ray imaging applications.

  16. Acute Ischemic Stroke: Infarct Core Estimation on CT Angiography Source Images Depends on CT Angiography Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Pulli, Benjamin; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Hakimelahi, Reza; Chaudhry, Zeshan A.; Lev, Michael H.; Hirsch, Joshua A.; González, R. Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test whether the relationship between acute ischemic infarct size on concurrent computed tomographic (CT) angiography source images and diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance images is dependent on the parameters of CT angiography acquisition protocols. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study had institutional review board approval, and all records were HIPAA compliant. Data in 100 patients with anterior-circulation acute ischemic stroke and large vessel occlusion who underwent concurrent CT angiography and DW imaging within 9 hours of symptom onset were analyzed. Measured areas of hyperintensity at acute DW imaging were used as the standard of reference for infarct size. Information regarding lesion volumes and CT angiography protocol parameters was collected for each patient. For analysis, patients were divided into two groups on the basis of CT angiography protocol differences (patients in group 1 were imaged with the older, slower protocol). Intermethod agreement for infarct size was evaluated by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, as well as by using Spearman correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of marked (≥20%) overestimation of infarct size on CT angiography source images. Results: In group 1 (n = 35), median hypoattenuation volumes on CT angiography source images were slightly underestimated compared with DW imaging hyperintensity volumes (33.0 vs 41.6 mL, P = .01; ratio = 0.83), with high correlation (ρ = 0.91). In group 2 (n = 65), median volume on CT angiography source images was much larger than that on DW images (94.8 vs 17.8 mL, P < .0001; ratio = 3.5), with poor correlation (ρ = 0.49). This overestimation on CT angiography source images would have inappropriately excluded from reperfusion therapy 44.4% or 90.3% of patients eligible according to DW imaging criteria on the basis of a 100-mL absolute threshold or a 20% or greater mismatch threshold, respectively

  17. Classification of Hepatic Lesions From CT Images Using Texture Features and Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    forward selection, neural network, classification, liver CT images I. INTRODUCTION The use of medical imaging and tissue characterisation...implemented with NN techniques. NN�s have been applied successfully in classification problems in the field of medical imaging . In the current application

  18. Interactive machine learning for postprocessing CT images of hardwood logs

    Treesearch

    Erol Sarigul; A. Lynn Abbott; Daniel L. Schmoldt

    2003-01-01

    This paper concerns the nondestructive evaluation of hardwood logs through the analysis of computed tomography (CT) images. Several studies have shown that the commercial value of resulting boards can be increased substantially if log sawing strategies are chosen using prior knowledge of internal log defects. Although CT imaging offers a potential means of obtaining...

  19. Askin tumor: CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging findings and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tingting; Guan, Yubao; Chen, Yongxin; Li, Jingxu

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the imaging findings of Askin tumors on computed tomography (CT) and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET/CT).Seventeen cases of Askin tumors confirmed by histopathology were retrospectively analyzed in terms of CT (17 cases) and FDG-PET/CT data (6 cases).Fifteen of the tumors were located in the chest wall and the other 2 were in the anterior middle mediastinum. Of the 15 chest wall cases, 13 demonstrated irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses with cystic degeneration and necrosis, and 2 demonstrated homogeneous soft tissue masses on unenhanced CT scans. Two mediastinal tumors demonstrated the irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses. Calcifications were found in 2 tumors. The tumors demonstrated heterogeneously enhancement in 16 cases and homogeneous enhancement in 1 case on contrast-enhanced scans. FDG-PET/CT images revealed increased metabolic activity in all 6 cases undergone FDG-PET/CT scan, and the lesion SUVmax ranged from 4.0 to 18.6. At initial diagnosis, CT and FDG-PET/CT scans revealed rib destruction in 9 cases, pleural effusion in 9 cases, and lung metastasis in 1 case. At follow-up, 12 cases showed recurrence and/or metastases, 4 cases showed improvement or remained stable, and 1 was lost to follow-up.In summary, CT and FDG-PET/CT images of Askin tumors showed heterogeneous soft tissue masses in the chest wall and the mediastinum, accompanied by rib destruction, pleural effusion, and increased FDG uptake. CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging play important roles in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with Askin tumors.

  20. Ultrasmall dopamine-coated nanogolds: preparation, characteristics, and CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yao; Wu, Youshen; Liu, JiaJun; Zhan, Yonghua; Wu, Daocheng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Water-dispersible ultrasmall nanogolds (WDU AuNPs) and their dopamine-coated nanogolds (WDU AuNPs@DPAs) were prepared by a reduction method with sodium borohydride as a reducing agent and a stabilised agent of 2-mercaptosuccinic acid in aqueous solution. The effects of these nanoparticles on computed tomography (CT) imaging were evaluated. The size distributions and Zeta potential of the nanoparticles were measured with a Malvern size analyser, and nanoparticle morphology was observed by transmission electron microscopy. These characteristics were confirmed by Fourier transform spectroscopy and ultraviolet/visible spectra. It was found that WDU AuNPs@DPAs were 5.4 nm in size with clear core–shell structure. The 3-(4, 5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay results showed that the WDU AuNPs and WDU AuNPs@DPAs were hypotoxic to different cells. The WDU AuNPs@DPAs showed a much longer circulation time and a larger CT attenuation coefficient than iohexol and could be excreted by the kidney and bladder. These nanoparticles showed considerable potential for future application in CT imaging. PMID:27366201

  1. Estimating CT Image From MRI Data Using Structured Random Forest and Auto-Context Model.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tri; Gao, Yaozong; Kang, Jiayin; Wang, Li; Zhang, Pei; Lian, Jun; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging is an essential tool in various clinical diagnoses and radiotherapy treatment planning. Since CT image intensities are directly related to positron emission tomography (PET) attenuation coefficients, they are indispensable for attenuation correction (AC) of the PET images. However, due to the relatively high dose of radiation exposure in CT scan, it is advised to limit the acquisition of CT images. In addition, in the new PET and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging scanner, only MR images are available, which are unfortunately not directly applicable to AC. These issues greatly motivate the development of methods for reliable estimate of CT image from its corresponding MR image of the same subject. In this paper, we propose a learning-based method to tackle this challenging problem. Specifically, we first partition a given MR image into a set of patches. Then, for each patch, we use the structured random forest to directly predict a CT patch as a structured output, where a new ensemble model is also used to ensure the robust prediction. Image features are innovatively crafted to achieve multi-level sensitivity, with spatial information integrated through only rigid-body alignment to help avoiding the error-prone inter-subject deformable registration. Moreover, we use an auto-context model to iteratively refine the prediction. Finally, we combine all of the predicted CT patches to obtain the final prediction for the given MR image. We demonstrate the efficacy of our method on two datasets: human brain and prostate images. Experimental results show that our method can accurately predict CT images in various scenarios, even for the images undergoing large shape variation, and also outperforms two state-of-the-art methods.

  2. Estimating CT Image from MRI Data Using Structured Random Forest and Auto-context Model

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Tri; Gao, Yaozong; Kang, Jiayin; Wang, Li; Zhang, Pei; Lian, Jun; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging is an essential tool in various clinical diagnoses and radiotherapy treatment planning. Since CT image intensities are directly related to positron emission tomography (PET) attenuation coefficients, they are indispensable for attenuation correction (AC) of the PET images. However, due to the relatively high dose of radiation exposure in CT scan, it is advised to limit the acquisition of CT images. In addition, in the new PET and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging scanner, only MR images are available, which are unfortunately not directly applicable to AC. These issues greatly motivate the development of methods for reliable estimate of CT image from its corresponding MR image of the same subject. In this paper, we propose a learning-based method to tackle this challenging problem. Specifically, we first partition a given MR image into a set of patches. Then, for each patch, we use the structured random forest to directly predict a CT patch as a structured output, where a new ensemble model is also used to ensure the robust prediction. Image features are innovatively crafted to achieve multi-level sensitivity, with spatial information integrated through only rigid-body alignment to help avoiding the error-prone inter-subject deformable registration. Moreover, we use an auto-context model to iteratively refine the prediction. Finally, we combine all of the predicted CT patches to obtain the final prediction for the given MR image. We demonstrate the efficacy of our method on two datasets: human brain and prostate images. Experimental results show that our method can accurately predict CT images in various scenarios, even for the images undergoing large shape variation, and also outperforms two state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26241970

  3. Parametric boundary reconstruction algorithm for industrial CT metrology application.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhye; Khare, Kedar; De Man, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    High-energy X-ray computed tomography (CT) systems have been recently used to produce high-resolution images in various nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDT/NDE) applications. The accuracy of the dimensional information extracted from CT images is rapidly approaching the accuracy achieved with a coordinate measuring machine (CMM), the conventional approach to acquire the metrology information directly. On the other hand, CT systems generate the sinogram which is transformed mathematically to the pixel-based images. The dimensional information of the scanned object is extracted later by performing edge detection on reconstructed CT images. The dimensional accuracy of this approach is limited by the grid size of the pixel-based representation of CT images since the edge detection is performed on the pixel grid. Moreover, reconstructed CT images usually display various artifacts due to the underlying physical process and resulting object boundaries from the edge detection fail to represent the true boundaries of the scanned object. In this paper, a novel algorithm to reconstruct the boundaries of an object with uniform material composition and uniform density is presented. There are three major benefits in the proposed approach. First, since the boundary parameters are reconstructed instead of image pixels, the complexity of the reconstruction algorithm is significantly reduced. The iterative approach, which can be computationally intensive, will be practical with the parametric boundary reconstruction. Second, the object of interest in metrology can be represented more directly and accurately by the boundary parameters instead of the image pixels. By eliminating the extra edge detection step, the overall dimensional accuracy and process time can be improved. Third, since the parametric reconstruction approach shares the boundary representation with other conventional metrology modalities such as CMM, boundary information from other modalities can be directly

  4. An Iterative CT Reconstruction Algorithm for Fast Fluid Flow Imaging.

    PubMed

    Van Eyndhoven, Geert; Batenburg, K Joost; Kazantsev, Daniil; Van Nieuwenhove, Vincent; Lee, Peter D; Dobson, Katherine J; Sijbers, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The study of fluid flow through solid matter by computed tomography (CT) imaging has many applications, ranging from petroleum and aquifer engineering to biomedical, manufacturing, and environmental research. To avoid motion artifacts, current experiments are often limited to slow fluid flow dynamics. This severely limits the applicability of the technique. In this paper, a new iterative CT reconstruction algorithm for improved a temporal/spatial resolution in the imaging of fluid flow through solid matter is introduced. The proposed algorithm exploits prior knowledge in two ways. First, the time-varying object is assumed to consist of stationary (the solid matter) and dynamic regions (the fluid flow). Second, the attenuation curve of a particular voxel in the dynamic region is modeled by a piecewise constant function over time, which is in accordance with the actual advancing fluid/air boundary. Quantitative and qualitative results on different simulation experiments and a real neutron tomography data set show that, in comparison with the state-of-the-art algorithms, the proposed algorithm allows reconstruction from substantially fewer projections per rotation without image quality loss. Therefore, the temporal resolution can be substantially increased, and thus fluid flow experiments with faster dynamics can be performed.

  5. Classification of CT brain images based on deep learning networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaohong W; Hui, Rui; Tian, Zengmin

    2017-01-01

    While computerised tomography (CT) may have been the first imaging tool to study human brain, it has not yet been implemented into clinical decision making process for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). On the other hand, with the nature of being prevalent, inexpensive and non-invasive, CT does present diagnostic features of AD to a great extent. This study explores the significance and impact on the application of the burgeoning deep learning techniques to the task of classification of CT brain images, in particular utilising convolutional neural network (CNN), aiming at providing supplementary information for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Towards this end, three categories of CT images (N = 285) are clustered into three groups, which are AD, lesion (e.g. tumour) and normal ageing. In addition, considering the characteristics of this collection with larger thickness along the direction of depth (z) (~3-5 mm), an advanced CNN architecture is established integrating both 2D and 3D CNN networks. The fusion of the two CNN networks is subsequently coordinated based on the average of Softmax scores obtained from both networks consolidating 2D images along spatial axial directions and 3D segmented blocks respectively. As a result, the classification accuracy rates rendered by this elaborated CNN architecture are 85.2%, 80% and 95.3% for classes of AD, lesion and normal respectively with an average of 87.6%. Additionally, this improved CNN network appears to outperform the others when in comparison with 2D version only of CNN network as well as a number of state of the art hand-crafted approaches. As a result, these approaches deliver accuracy rates in percentage of 86.3, 85.6 ± 1.10, 86.3 ± 1.04, 85.2 ± 1.60, 83.1 ± 0.35 for 2D CNN, 2D SIFT, 2D KAZE, 3D SIFT and 3D KAZE respectively. The two major contributions of the paper constitute a new 3-D approach while applying deep learning technique to extract signature information

  6. Fast CT-CT fluoroscopy registration with respiratory motion compensation for image-guided lung intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Po; Xue, Zhong; Lu, Kongkuo; Yang, Jianhua; Wong, Stephen T.

    2012-02-01

    CT-fluoroscopy (CTF) is an efficient imaging method for guiding percutaneous lung interventions such as biopsy. During CTF-guided biopsy procedure, four to ten axial sectional images are captured in a very short time period to provide nearly real-time feedback to physicians, so that they can adjust the needle as it is advanced toward the target lesion. Although popularly used in clinics, this traditional CTF-guided intervention procedure may require frequent scans and cause unnecessary radiation exposure to clinicians and patients. In addition, CTF only generates limited slices of images and provides limited anatomical information. It also has limited response to respiratory movements and has narrow local anatomical dynamics. To better utilize CTF guidance, we propose a fast CT-CTF registration algorithm with respiratory motion estimation for image-guided lung intervention using electromagnetic (EM) guidance. With the pre-procedural exhale and inhale CT scans, it would be possible to estimate a series of CT images of the same patient at different respiratory phases. Then, once a CTF image is captured during the intervention, our algorithm can pick the best respiratory phase-matched 3D CT image and performs a fast deformable registration to warp the 3D CT toward the CTF. The new 3D CT image can be used to guide the intervention by superimposing the EM-guided needle location on it. Compared to the traditional repetitive CTF guidance, the registered CT integrates both 3D volumetric patient data and nearly real-time local anatomy for more effective and efficient guidance. In this new system, CTF is used as a nearly real-time sensor to overcome the discrepancies between static pre-procedural CT and the patient's anatomy, so as to provide global guidance that may be supplemented with electromagnetic (EM) tracking and to reduce the number of CTF scans needed. In the experiments, the comparative results showed that our fast CT-CTF algorithm can achieve better registration

  7. Denoising of polychromatic CT images based on their own noise properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji Hye; Chang, Yongjin; Ra, Jong Beom

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Because of high diagnostic accuracy and fast scan time, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in various clinical applications. Since the CT scan introduces radiation exposure to patients, however, dose reduction has recently been recognized as an important issue in CT imaging. However, low-dose CT causes an increase of noise in the image and thereby deteriorates the accuracy of diagnosis. In this paper, the authors develop an efficient denoising algorithm for low-dose CT images obtained using a polychromatic x-ray source. The algorithm is based on two steps: (i) estimation of space variant noise statistics, which are uniquely determined according to the system geometry and scanned object, and (ii) subsequent novel conversion of the estimated noise to Gaussian noise so that an existing high performance Gaussian noise filtering algorithm can be directly applied to CT images with non-Gaussian noise. Methods: For efficient polychromatic CT image denoising, the authors first reconstruct an image with the iterative maximum-likelihood polychromatic algorithm for CT to alleviate the beam-hardening problem. We then estimate the space-variant noise variance distribution on the image domain. Since there are many high performance denoising algorithms available for the Gaussian noise, image denoising can become much more efficient if they can be used. Hence, the authors propose a novel conversion scheme to transform the estimated space-variant noise to near Gaussian noise. In the suggested scheme, the authors first convert the image so that its mean and variance can have a linear relationship, and then produce a Gaussian image via variance stabilizing transform. The authors then apply a block matching 4D algorithm that is optimized for noise reduction of the Gaussian image, and reconvert the result to obtain a final denoised image. To examine the performance of the proposed method, an XCAT phantom simulation and a physical phantom experiment were conducted

  8. Denoising of polychromatic CT images based on their own noise properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hye; Chang, Yongjin; Ra, Jong Beom

    2016-05-01

    Because of high diagnostic accuracy and fast scan time, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in various clinical applications. Since the CT scan introduces radiation exposure to patients, however, dose reduction has recently been recognized as an important issue in CT imaging. However, low-dose CT causes an increase of noise in the image and thereby deteriorates the accuracy of diagnosis. In this paper, the authors develop an efficient denoising algorithm for low-dose CT images obtained using a polychromatic x-ray source. The algorithm is based on two steps: (i) estimation of space variant noise statistics, which are uniquely determined according to the system geometry and scanned object, and (ii) subsequent novel conversion of the estimated noise to Gaussian noise so that an existing high performance Gaussian noise filtering algorithm can be directly applied to CT images with non-Gaussian noise. For efficient polychromatic CT image denoising, the authors first reconstruct an image with the iterative maximum-likelihood polychromatic algorithm for CT to alleviate the beam-hardening problem. We then estimate the space-variant noise variance distribution on the image domain. Since there are many high performance denoising algorithms available for the Gaussian noise, image denoising can become much more efficient if they can be used. Hence, the authors propose a novel conversion scheme to transform the estimated space-variant noise to near Gaussian noise. In the suggested scheme, the authors first convert the image so that its mean and variance can have a linear relationship, and then produce a Gaussian image via variance stabilizing transform. The authors then apply a block matching 4D algorithm that is optimized for noise reduction of the Gaussian image, and reconvert the result to obtain a final denoised image. To examine the performance of the proposed method, an XCAT phantom simulation and a physical phantom experiment were conducted. Both simulation and

  9. Deformable Image Registration of CT and Truncated Cone-beam CT for Adaptive Radiation Therapy*

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Xin; Yan, Hao; Zhou, Linghong; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2013-01-01

    Truncation of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image, mainly caused by the limited field of view (FOV) of CBCT imaging, poses challenges to the problem of deformable image registration (DIR) between CT and CBCT images in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). The missing information outside the CBCT FOV usually causes incorrect deformations when a conventional DIR algorithm is utilized, which may introduce significant errors in subsequent operations such as dose calculation. In this paper, based on the observation that the missing information in the CBCT image domain does exist in the projection image domain, we propose to solve this problem by developing a hybrid deformation/reconstruction algorithm. As opposed to deforming the CT image to match the truncated CBCT image, the CT image is deformed such that its projections match all the corresponding projection images for the CBCT image. An iterative forward-backward projection algorithm is developed. Six head-and-neck cancer patient cases are used to evaluate our algorithm, five with simulated truncation and one with real truncation. It is found that our method can accurately register the CT image to the truncated CBCT image and is robust against image truncation when the portion of the truncated image is less than 40% of the total image. PMID:24169817

  10. Deformable image registration of CT and truncated cone-beam CT for adaptive radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Xin; Yan, Hao; Zhou, Linghong; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2013-11-01

    Truncation of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image, mainly caused by the limited field of view (FOV) of CBCT imaging, poses challenges to the problem of deformable image registration (DIR) between computed tomography (CT) and CBCT images in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). The missing information outside the CBCT FOV usually causes incorrect deformations when a conventional DIR algorithm is utilized, which may introduce significant errors in subsequent operations such as dose calculation. In this paper, based on the observation that the missing information in the CBCT image domain does exist in the projection image domain, we propose to solve this problem by developing a hybrid deformation/reconstruction algorithm. As opposed to deforming the CT image to match the truncated CBCT image, the CT image is deformed such that its projections match all the corresponding projection images for the CBCT image. An iterative forward-backward projection algorithm is developed. Six head-and-neck cancer patient cases are used to evaluate our algorithm, five with simulated truncation and one with real truncation. It is found that our method can accurately register the CT image to the truncated CBCT image and is robust against image truncation when the portion of the truncated image is less than 40% of the total image. Part of this work was presented at the 54th AAPM Annual Meeting (Charlotte, NC, USA, 29 July-2 August 2012).

  11. Calibration free beam hardening correction for cardiac CT perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Jacob; Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) and coronary CTA have the potential to make CT an ideal noninvasive gate-keeper for invasive coronary angiography. However, beam hardening artifacts (BHA) prevent accurate blood flow calculation in MPI-CT. BH Correction (BHC) methods require either energy-sensitive CT, not widely available, or typically a calibration-based method. We developed a calibration-free, automatic BHC (ABHC) method suitable for MPI-CT. The algorithm works with any BHC method and iteratively determines model parameters using proposed BHA-specific cost function. In this work, we use the polynomial BHC extended to three materials. The image is segmented into soft tissue, bone, and iodine images, based on mean HU and temporal enhancement. Forward projections of bone and iodine images are obtained, and in each iteration polynomial correction is applied. Corrections are then back projected and combined to obtain the current iteration's BHC image. This process is iterated until cost is minimized. We evaluate the algorithm on simulated and physical phantom images and on preclinical MPI-CT data. The scans were obtained on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner (Philips Healthcare). Mono-energetic reconstructed images were used as the reference. In the simulated phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 12+/-2HU to 1+/-1HU and cupping was reduced by 81%. Similarly, in physical phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 48+/-6HU to 1+/-5HU and cupping was reduced by 86%. In preclinical MPI-CT images, BHA was reduced from 28+/-6 HU to less than 4+/-4HU at peak enhancement. Results suggest that the algorithm can be used to reduce BHA in conventional CT and improve MPI-CT accuracy.

  12. Explosive Detection in Aviation Applications Using CT

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H E; Crawford, C R

    2011-02-15

    CT scanners are deployed world-wide to detect explosives in checked and carry-on baggage. Though very similar to single- and dual-energy multi-slice CT scanners used today in medical imaging, some recently developed explosives detection scanners employ multiple sources and detector arrays to eliminate mechanical rotation of a gantry, photon counting detectors for spectral imaging, and limited number of views to reduce cost. For each bag scanned, the resulting reconstructed images are first processed by automated threat recognition algorithms to screen for explosives and other threats. Human operators review the images only when these automated algorithms report the presence of possible threats. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has requirements for future scanners that include dealing with a larger number of threats, higher probability of detection, lower false alarm rates and lower operating costs. One tactic that DHS is pursuing to achieve these requirements is to augment the capabilities of the established security vendors with third-party algorithm developers. A third-party in this context refers to academics and companies other than the established vendors. DHS is particularly interested in exploring the model that has been used very successfully by the medical imaging industry, in which university researchers develop algorithms that are eventually deployed in commercial medical imaging equipment. The purpose of this paper is to discuss opportunities for third-parties to develop advanced reconstruction and threat detection algorithms.

  13. Quantitative image quality evaluation for cardiac CT reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Fan, Jiahua; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Balhorn, William; Okerlund, Darin R.

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining image quality in the presence of motion is always desirable and challenging in clinical Cardiac CT imaging. Different image-reconstruction algorithms are available on current commercial CT systems that attempt to achieve this goal. It is widely accepted that image-quality assessment should be task-based and involve specific tasks, observers, and associated figures of merits. In this work, we developed an observer model that performed the task of estimating the percentage of plaque in a vessel from CT images. We compared task performance of Cardiac CT image data reconstructed using a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm and the SnapShot Freeze (SSF) algorithm, each at default and optimal reconstruction cardiac phases. The purpose of this work is to design an approach for quantitative image-quality evaluation of temporal resolution for Cardiac CT systems. To simulate heart motion, a moving coronary type phantom synchronized with an ECG signal was used. Three different percentage plaques embedded in a 3 mm vessel phantom were imaged multiple times under motion free, 60 bpm, and 80 bpm heart rates. Static (motion free) images of this phantom were taken as reference images for image template generation. Independent ROIs from the 60 bpm and 80 bpm images were generated by vessel tracking. The observer performed estimation tasks using these ROIs. Ensemble mean square error (EMSE) was used as the figure of merit. Results suggest that the quality of SSF images is superior to the quality of FBP images in higher heart-rate scans.

  14. Lung imaging in rodents using dual energy micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Guo, X.; Clark, D.; Johnston, S. M.; Marshall, C.; Piantadosi, C.

    2012-03-01

    Dual energy CT imaging is expected to play a major role in the diagnostic arena as it provides material decomposition on an elemental basis. The purpose of this work is to investigate the use of dual energy micro-CT for the estimation of vascular, tissue, and air fractions in rodent lungs using a post-reconstruction three-material decomposition method. We have tested our method using both simulations and experimental work. Using simulations, we have estimated the accuracy limits of the decomposition for realistic micro-CT noise levels. Next, we performed experiments involving ex vivo lung imaging in which intact lungs were carefully removed from the thorax, were injected with an iodine-based contrast agent and inflated with air at different volume levels. Finally, we performed in vivo imaging studies in (n=5) C57BL/6 mice using fast prospective respiratory gating in endinspiration and end-expiration for three different levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Prior to imaging, mice were injected with a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. The mean accuracy values were for Air (95.5%), Blood (96%), and Tissue (92.4%). The absolute accuracy in determining all fraction materials was 94.6%. The minimum difference that we could detect in material fractions was 15%. As expected, an increase in PEEP levels for the living mouse resulted in statistically significant increases in air fractions at end-expiration, but no significant changes in end-inspiration. Our method has applicability in preclinical pulmonary studies where various physiological changes can occur as a result of genetic changes, lung disease, or drug effects.

  15. Principles of CT: radiation dose and image quality.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Lee W

    2007-12-01

    This article discusses CT radiation dose, the measurement of CT dose, and CT image quality. The most commonly used dose descriptor is CT dose index, which represents the dose to a location (e.g., depth) in a scanned volume from a complete series of slices. A weighted average of the CT dose index measured at the center and periphery of dose phantoms provides a convenient single-number estimate of patient dose for a procedure, and this value (or a related indicator that includes the scanned length) is often displayed on the operator's console. CT image quality, as in most imaging, is described in terms of contrast, spatial resolution, image noise, and artifacts. A strength of CT is its ability to visualize structures of low contrast in a subject, a task that is limited primarily by noise and is therefore closely associated with radiation dose: The higher the dose contributing to the image, the less apparent is image noise and the easier it is to perceive low-contrast structures. Spatial resolution is ultimately limited by sampling, but both image noise and resolution are strongly affected by the reconstruction filter. As a result, diagnostically acceptable image quality at acceptable doses of radiation requires appropriately designed clinical protocols, including appropriate kilovolt peaks, amperages, slice thicknesses, and reconstruction filters.

  16. Use of the CT images for BNCT calculation: development of BNCT treatment planning system and its applications to dose calculation for voxel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Ho; Han, Chi Young; Kim, Soon Young; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2004-01-01

    A BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) treatment planning system (BTPS) was developed for BNCT study and treatment planning. Three kinds of CT images, VHP, PINNACLE and DICOM images, were employed to make voxel phantoms for BNCT patient treatment using the BTPS. The thermal neutron, fast neutron, gamma and boron doses are calculated and background, tissue, and tumour doses for idealised standard reactor neutron field (ISRNF) neutron beam were calculated by using BTPS and MCNP code. It was noted that the total computing times needed for BNCT analysis could be greatly reduced since the BTPS system provides a dose analysis tool and a lengthy MCNP input in a short time. It is, thus, expected that the BTPS can significantly contribute the BNCT study for the treatment of patients.

  17. Ring artifacts removal from synchrotron CT image slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhouping; Wiebe, Sheldon; Chapman, Dean

    2013-06-01

    Ring artifacts can occur in reconstructed images from x-ray Computerized Tomography (CT) as full or partial concentric rings superimposed on the scanned structures. Due to the data corruption by those ring artifacts in CT images, qualitative and quantitative analysis of these images are compromised. In this paper, we propose to correct the ring artifacts on the reconstructed synchrotron radiation (SR) CT image slices. The proposed correction procedure includes the following steps: (1). transform the reconstructed CT images into polar coordinates; (2) apply discrete two-dimensional (2D) wavelet transform to the polar image to decompose it into four image components: low pass band image component, as well as the components from horizontal, vertical and diagonal details bands; (3). apply 2D Fourier transform to the vertical details band image component only, since the ring artifacts become vertical lines in the polar coordinates; (4). apply Gaussian filtering in Fourier domain along the abscissa direction to suppress the vertical lines, since the information of the vertical lines in Fourier domain is completely condensed to that direction; (5). perform inverse Fourier transform to get the corrected vertical details band image component; (6). perform inverse wavelet transform to get the corrected polar image; (7). transform the corrected polar image back to Cartesian coordinates to get the CT image slice with reduced ring artifacts. This approach has been successfully used on CT data acquired from the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamline in Canadian Light Source (CLS), and the results show that the ring artifacts in original SR CT images have been effectively suppressed with all the structure information in the image preserved.

  18. Application of sensitive, high-resolution imaging at a commercial lab-based X-ray micro-CT system using propagation-based phase retrieval.

    PubMed

    Bidola, P; Morgan, K; Willner, M; Fehringer, A; Allner, S; Prade, F; Pfeiffer, F; Achterhold, K

    2017-05-01

    Several dedicated commercial lab-based micro-computed tomography (μCT) systems exist, which provide high-resolution images of samples, with the capability to also deliver in-line phase contrast. X-ray phase contrast is particularly beneficial when visualizing very small features and weakly absorbing samples. The raw measured projections will include both phase and absorption effects. Extending our previous work that addressed the optimization of experimental conditions at the commercial ZEISS Xradia 500 Versa system, single-distance phase-contrast imaging is demonstrated on complex biological and material samples. From data captured at this system, we demonstrate extraction of the phase signal or the correction of the mixed image for the phase shift, and show how this procedure increases the contrast and removes artefacts. These high-quality images, measured without the use of a synchrotron X-ray source, demonstrate that highly sensitive, micrometre-resolution imaging of 3D volumes is widely accessible using commercially advanced laboratory devices. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. One-stop-shop stroke imaging with functional CT.

    PubMed

    Tong, Elizabeth; Komlosi, Peter; Wintermark, Max

    2015-12-01

    Advanced imaging techniques have extended beyond traditional anatomic imaging and progressed to dynamic, physiologic and functional imaging. Neuroimaging is no longer a mere diagnostic tool. Multimodal functional CT, comprising of NCCT, PCT and CTA, provides a one-stop-shop for rapid stroke imaging. Integrating those imaging findings with pertinent clinical information can help guide subsequent treatment decisions, medical management and follow-up imaging selection. This review article will briefly discuss the indication and utility of each modality in acute stroke imaging.

  20. A LabVIEW Platform for Preclinical Imaging Using Digital Subtraction Angiography and Micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Badea, Cristian T; Hedlund, Laurence W; Johnson, G Allan

    2013-01-01

    CT and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) are ubiquitous in the clinic. Their preclinical equivalents are valuable imaging methods for studying disease models and treatment. We have developed a dual source/detector X-ray imaging system that we have used for both micro-CT and DSA studies in rodents. The control of such a complex imaging system requires substantial software development for which we use the graphical language LabVIEW (National Instruments, Austin, TX, USA). This paper focuses on a LabVIEW platform that we have developed to enable anatomical and functional imaging with micro-CT and DSA. Our LabVIEW applications integrate and control all the elements of our system including a dual source/detector X-ray system, a mechanical ventilator, a physiological monitor, and a power microinjector for the vascular delivery of X-ray contrast agents. Various applications allow cardiac- and respiratory-gated acquisitions for both DSA and micro-CT studies. Our results illustrate the application of DSA for cardiopulmonary studies and vascular imaging of the liver and coronary arteries. We also show how DSA can be used for functional imaging of the kidney. Finally, the power of 4D micro-CT imaging using both prospective and retrospective gating is shown for cardiac imaging.

  1. A LabVIEW Platform for Preclinical Imaging Using Digital Subtraction Angiography and Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Badea, Cristian T.; Hedlund, Laurence W.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2013-01-01

    CT and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) are ubiquitous in the clinic. Their preclinical equivalents are valuable imaging methods for studying disease models and treatment. We have developed a dual source/detector X-ray imaging system that we have used for both micro-CT and DSA studies in rodents. The control of such a complex imaging system requires substantial software development for which we use the graphical language LabVIEW (National Instruments, Austin, TX, USA). This paper focuses on a LabVIEW platform that we have developed to enable anatomical and functional imaging with micro-CT and DSA. Our LabVIEW applications integrate and control all the elements of our system including a dual source/detector X-ray system, a mechanical ventilator, a physiological monitor, and a power microinjector for the vascular delivery of X-ray contrast agents. Various applications allow cardiac- and respiratory-gated acquisitions for both DSA and micro-CT studies. Our results illustrate the application of DSA for cardiopulmonary studies and vascular imaging of the liver and coronary arteries. We also show how DSA can be used for functional imaging of the kidney. Finally, the power of 4D micro-CT imaging using both prospective and retrospective gating is shown for cardiac imaging. PMID:27006920

  2. Iterative image-domain decomposition for dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Niu, Tianye; Dong, Xue; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2014-04-01

    Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging plays an important role in advanced imaging applications due to its capability of material decomposition. Direct decomposition via matrix inversion suffers from significant degradation of image signal-to-noise ratios, which reduces clinical values of DECT. Existing denoising algorithms achieve suboptimal performance since they suppress image noise either before or after the decomposition and do not fully explore the noise statistical properties of the decomposition process. In this work, the authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for noise suppression in DECT, using the full variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images. The proposed algorithm is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, the authors include the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. The regularization term enforces the image smoothness by calculating the square sum of neighboring pixel value differences. To retain the boundary sharpness of the decomposed images, the authors detect the edges in the CT images before decomposition. These edge pixels have small weights in the calculation of the regularization term. Distinct from the existing denoising algorithms applied on the images before or after decomposition, the method has an iterative process for noise suppression, with decomposition performed in each iteration. The authors implement the proposed algorithm using a standard conjugate gradient algorithm. The method performance is evaluated using an evaluation phantom (Catphan©600) and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The results are compared with those generated using direct matrix inversion with no noise suppression, a denoising method applied on the decomposed images, and an existing algorithm with similar formulation as the proposed method but

  3. Iterative image-domain decomposition for dual-energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Tianye; Dong, Xue; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging plays an important role in advanced imaging applications due to its capability of material decomposition. Direct decomposition via matrix inversion suffers from significant degradation of image signal-to-noise ratios, which reduces clinical values of DECT. Existing denoising algorithms achieve suboptimal performance since they suppress image noise either before or after the decomposition and do not fully explore the noise statistical properties of the decomposition process. In this work, the authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for noise suppression in DECT, using the full variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, the authors include the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. The regularization term enforces the image smoothness by calculating the square sum of neighboring pixel value differences. To retain the boundary sharpness of the decomposed images, the authors detect the edges in the CT images before decomposition. These edge pixels have small weights in the calculation of the regularization term. Distinct from the existing denoising algorithms applied on the images before or after decomposition, the method has an iterative process for noise suppression, with decomposition performed in each iteration. The authors implement the proposed algorithm using a standard conjugate gradient algorithm. The method performance is evaluated using an evaluation phantom (Catphan©600) and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The results are compared with those generated using direct matrix inversion with no noise suppression, a denoising method applied on the decomposed images, and an existing algorithm with similar formulation as the

  4. Statistical reconstruction for cone-beam CT with a post-artifact-correction noise model: application to high-quality head imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Sisniega, A.; Xu, J.; Zbijewski, W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-08-01

    Non-contrast CT reliably detects fresh blood in the brain and is the current front-line imaging modality for intracranial hemorrhage such as that occurring in acute traumatic brain injury (contrast ~40-80 HU, size  >  1 mm). We are developing flat-panel detector (FPD) cone-beam CT (CBCT) to facilitate such diagnosis in a low-cost, mobile platform suitable for point-of-care deployment. Such a system may offer benefits in the ICU, urgent care/concussion clinic, ambulance, and sports and military theatres. However, current FPD-CBCT systems face significant challenges that confound low-contrast, soft-tissue imaging. Artifact correction can overcome major sources of bias in FPD-CBCT but imparts noise amplification in filtered backprojection (FBP). Model-based reconstruction improves soft-tissue image quality compared to FBP by leveraging a high-fidelity forward model and image regularization. In this work, we develop a novel penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) image reconstruction method with a noise model that includes accurate modeling of the noise characteristics associated with the two dominant artifact corrections (scatter and beam-hardening) in CBCT and utilizes modified weights to compensate for noise amplification imparted by each correction. Experiments included real data acquired on a FPD-CBCT test-bench and an anthropomorphic head phantom emulating intra-parenchymal hemorrhage. The proposed PWLS method demonstrated superior noise-resolution tradeoffs in comparison to FBP and PWLS with conventional weights (viz. at matched 0.50 mm spatial resolution, CNR = 11.9 compared to CNR = 5.6 and CNR = 9.9, respectively) and substantially reduced image noise especially in challenging regions such as skull base. The results support the hypothesis that with high-fidelity artifact correction and statistical reconstruction using an accurate post-artifact-correction noise model, FPD-CBCT can achieve image quality allowing reliable detection of intracranial

  5. Recent Advances in Computed Tomographic Technology: Cardiopulmonary Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Tabari, Azadeh; Lo Gullo, Roberto; Murugan, Venkatesh; Otrakji, Alexi; Digumarthy, Subba; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2017-03-01

    Cardiothoracic diseases result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Chest computed tomography (CT) has been an imaging modality of choice for assessing a host of chest diseases, and technologic advances have enabled the emergence of coronary CT angiography as a robust noninvasive test for cardiac imaging. Technologic developments in CT have also enabled the application of dual-energy CT scanning for assessing pulmonary vascular and neoplastic processes. Concerns over increasing radiation dose from CT scanning are being addressed with introduction of more dose-efficient wide-area detector arrays and iterative reconstruction techniques. This review article discusses the technologic innovations in CT and their effect on cardiothoracic applications.

  6. Multimodal CT in stroke imaging: new concepts.

    PubMed

    Ledezma, Carlos J; Wintermark, Max

    2009-01-01

    A multimodal CT protocol provides a comprehensive noninvasive survey of acute stroke patients with accurate demonstration of the site of arterial occlusion and its hemodynamic tissue status. It combines widespread availability with the ability to provide functional characterization of cerebral ischemia, and could potentially allow more accurate selection of candidates for acute stroke reperfusion therapy. This article discusses the individual components of multimodal CT and addresses the potential role of a combined multimodal CT stroke protocol in acute stroke therapy.

  7. Low-cost printing of computerised tomography (CT) images where there is no dedicated CT camera.

    PubMed

    Tabari, Abdulkadir M

    2007-01-01

    Many developing countries still rely on conventional hard copy images to transfer information among physicians. We have developed a low-cost alternative method of printing computerised tomography (CT) scan images where there is no dedicated camera. A digital camera is used to photograph images from the CT scan screen monitor. The images are then transferred to a PC via a USB port, before being printed on glossy paper using an inkjet printer. The method can be applied to other imaging modalities like ultrasound and MRI and appears worthy of emulation elsewhere in the developing world where resources and technical expertise are scarce.

  8. Technical note: cone beam CT imaging for 3D image guided brachytherapy for gynecological HDR brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-05-01

    This paper focuses on a novel image guidance technique for gynecological brachytherapy treatment. The present standard technique is orthogonal x-ray imaging to reconstruct the 3D position of the applicator when the availability of CT or MR is limited. Our purpose is to introduce 3D planning in the brachytherapy suite using a cone beam CT (CBCT) scanner dedicated to brachytherapy. This would avoid moving the patient between imaging and treatment procedures which may cause applicator motion. This could be used to replace the x-ray images or to verify the treatment position immediately prior to dose delivery. The sources of CBCT imaging artifacts in the case of brachytherapy were identified and removed where possible. The image quality was further improved by modifying the x-ray tube voltage, modifying the compensator bowtie filter and optimizing technical parameters such as the detector gain or tube current. The image quality was adequate to reconstruct the applicators in the treatment planning system. The position of points A and the localization of the organs at risk (OAR) ICRU points is easily achieved. This allows identification of cases where the rectum had moved with respect to the ICRU point which would require asymmetrical source loading. A better visualization is a first step toward a better sparing of the OAR. Treatment planning for gynecological brachytherapy is aided by CBCT images. CBCT presents advantages over CT: acquisition in the treatment room and in the treatment position due to the larger clearance of the CBCT, thereby reducing problems associated to moving patients between rooms.

  9. Complex shoulder trauma: three-dimensional CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Kuhlman, J E; Fishman, E K; Ney, D R; Magid, D

    1988-11-01

    Volumetric three-dimensional imaging is a new technique for CT image processing which generates realistic, three-dimensional models of complex musculoskeletal anatomy from routine transaxial CT data. Volumetric three-dimensional imaging is particularly helpful in evaluating complex shoulder trauma, demonstrating significant advantages over plain film radiography. Multipartite fractures involving the shoulder girdle are displayed in a comprehensive fashion with 3D imaging. With volumetric imaging as implemented on a Pixar Imaging Computer, a 3D model of the injured shoulder can be generated with overlapping structures removed from view, and then rotated about the vertical and horizontal axis for better understanding of abnormal anatomy prior to surgical correction.

  10. CT Image Sequence Processing For Wood Defect Recognition

    Treesearch

    Dongping Zhu; R.W. Conners; Philip A. Araman

    1991-01-01

    The research reported in this paper explores a non-destructive testing application of x-ray computed tomography (CT) in the forest products industry. This application involves a computer vision system that uses CT to locate and identify internal defects in hardwood logs. The knowledge of log defects is critical in deciding whether to veneer or to saw up a log, and how...

  11. Texture-preserving Bayesian image reconstruction for low-dose CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Han, Hao; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Li, Lihong; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2016-03-01

    Markov random field (MRF) model has been widely used in Bayesian image reconstruction to reconstruct piecewise smooth images in the presence of noise, such as in low-dose X-ray computed tomography (LdCT). While it can preserve edge sharpness via edge-preserving potential function, its regional smoothing may sacrifice tissue image textures, which have been recognized as useful imaging biomarkers, and thus it compromises clinical tasks such as differentiating malignant vs. benign lesions, e.g., lung nodule or colon polyp. This study aims to shift the edge preserving regional noise smoothing paradigm to texture-preserving framework for LdCT image reconstruction while retaining the advantage of MRF's neighborhood system on edge preservation. Specifically, we adapted the MRF model to incorporate the image textures of lung, bone, fat, muscle, etc. from previous full-dose CT scan as a priori knowledge for texture-preserving Bayesian reconstruction of current LdCT images. To show the feasibility of proposed reconstruction framework, experiments using clinical patient scans (with lung nodule or colon polyp) were conducted. The experimental outcomes showed noticeable gain by the a priori knowledge for LdCT image reconstruction with the well-known Haralick texture measures. Thus, it is conjectured that texture-preserving LdCT reconstruction has advantages over edge-preserving regional smoothing paradigm for texture-specific clinical applications.

  12. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Imaging in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, M R A; Nanabala, Raviteja; Thomas, Boben

    2017-02-01

    The potential applications of Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT in the imaging of prostate cancer are now well established. A few case reports regarding the potential use of Ga-PSMA PET/CT in nonprostate cancer malignancies are also published. Apparently, the tumor neoangiogenesis is the mechanism attributed to increased Ga-PSMA uptake in the tumor sites in nonprostatic malignancies. We describe the use of Ga-PSMA PET/CT in imaging multiple myeloma. The intense Ga-PSMA avidity of the lesions also opens up the possibility of theranostics with Lu-PSMA.

  13. Vision 20/20: Simultaneous CT-MRI — Next chapter of multimodality imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ge Xi, Yan; Gjesteby, Lars; Getzin, Matthew; Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Vannier, Michael

    2015-10-15

    Multimodality imaging systems such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and MRI-PET are widely available, but a simultaneous CT-MRI instrument has not been developed. Synergies between independent modalities, e.g., CT, MRI, and PET/SPECT can be realized with image registration, but such postprocessing suffers from registration errors that can be avoided with synchronized data acquisition. The clinical potential of simultaneous CT-MRI is significant, especially in cardiovascular and oncologic applications where studies of the vulnerable plaque, response to cancer therapy, and kinetic and dynamic mechanisms of targeted agents are limited by current imaging technologies. The rationale, feasibility, and realization of simultaneous CT-MRI are described in this perspective paper. The enabling technologies include interior tomography, unique gantry designs, open magnet and RF sequences, and source and detector adaptation. Based on the experience with PET-CT, PET-MRI, and MRI-LINAC instrumentation where hardware innovation and performance optimization were instrumental to construct commercial systems, the authors provide top-level concepts for simultaneous CT-MRI to meet clinical requirements and new challenges. Simultaneous CT-MRI fills a major gap of modality coupling and represents a key step toward the so-called “omnitomography” defined as the integration of all relevant imaging modalities for systems biology and precision medicine.

  14. Vision 20/20: Simultaneous CT-MRI--Next chapter of multimodality imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ge; Kalra, Mannudeep; Murugan, Venkatesh; Xi, Yan; Gjesteby, Lars; Getzin, Matthew; Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Vannier, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Multimodality imaging systems such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and MRI-PET are widely available, but a simultaneous CT-MRI instrument has not been developed. Synergies between independent modalities, e.g., CT, MRI, and PET/SPECT can be realized with image registration, but such postprocessing suffers from registration errors that can be avoided with synchronized data acquisition. The clinical potential of simultaneous CT-MRI is significant, especially in cardiovascular and oncologic applications where studies of the vulnerable plaque, response to cancer therapy, and kinetic and dynamic mechanisms of targeted agents are limited by current imaging technologies. The rationale, feasibility, and realization of simultaneous CT-MRI are described in this perspective paper. The enabling technologies include interior tomography, unique gantry designs, open magnet and RF sequences, and source and detector adaptation. Based on the experience with PET-CT, PET-MRI, and MRI-LINAC instrumentation where hardware innovation and performance optimization were instrumental to construct commercial systems, the authors provide top-level concepts for simultaneous CT-MRI to meet clinical requirements and new challenges. Simultaneous CT-MRI fills a major gap of modality coupling and represents a key step toward the so-called "omnitomography" defined as the integration of all relevant imaging modalities for systems biology and precision medicine.

  15. Simultaneous CT angiography and whole-body CT is an effective imaging approach before multiorgan retrieval.

    PubMed

    Berthier, E; Ridereau-Zins, C; Dubé, L; Tchouante, P; Nedelcu, C; Lasocki, S; Aubé, C

    2017-03-01

    To assess the role of whole-body computed tomography (CT) for determining morphological suitability before multiorgan retrieval (MOR) in brain dead patients. Fifty-one clinically brain dead patients (21 women, 30 men; mean age 61 year±15) were included in this prospective, single center study. All patients had CT angiography of the brain and whole-body CT examination. CT images were evaluated for the presence of morphological abnormalities of lungs, liver and other abdominal organs and presence of vascular anatomical variants. The results of CT examinations were compared to intraoperative findings observed during organ harvesting and/or the results of histopathological analysis of biopsy specimens. The impact of whole-body CT examination on the harvesting process was evaluated. Ninety-five percent of vascular anatomical variants that were found intraoperatively were depicted on CT. CT density measurements predicted surgical finding of steatosis in 80% of patients. Whole-body CT changed the MOR strategy in 21/51 patients (41%) including 3 MOR cancellations and 8 grafts refusals, whereas organ harvesting was continued in 10 patients after histopathological analysis was performed. Selection of potential graft donors using whole-body CT is reliable and improves graft selection during MOR. Copyright © 2016 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. [Analysis of Factors on Clinical Application of Vehicle CT Shelter].

    PubMed

    Shuai, Wanjun; Chao, Yong; Liu, Shuai; Dong, Can; Gao, Huayong; Tan, Shulin; Niu, Fu

    2015-09-01

    To assure the clinical quality and requirement of CT shelter used in field environment, the factors related with the practical application were studied. The evaluation indicators of CT equipment were investigated. Based on the technical modification of vehicle shelter CT, the scanning conditions of shelter CT were analyzed. Moreover, the comparative study was done between shelter CT and common CT in hospitals. In result, in order to meet maneuverability application in the field, vehicle shelter CT was restrictive by the field conditions, traffic impacts and running requirement. The application of vehicle shelter CT was affected by the factors, such as mechanical stabilization, moving precision, power fluctuations and variations of temperature and humidity, etc. The results were helpful to improve the clinical quality of vehicle shelter CT and made a base for the quality control study in the future.

  17. Automated anatomical labeling algorithm of bronchial branches based on multi-slice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, J.; Saita, S.; Kubo, M.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Nishitani, H.; Ohmatsu, H.; Eguchi, K.; Moriyama, N.

    2006-03-01

    Multi-slice CT technology was developed, so, we can get clear contrast images and thin slice images. But doctors need to diagnosis many image, thus their load increases. Therefore, development of the algorithm that analyses lung internal-organs is expected. When doctors diagnose lung internal-organs, they understand it. So, detailed analyze of lung internal-organs is applicant to early detection of a nodule. Especially, analyzing bronchus provides that useful information of detection of airway disease and classification of the pulmonary vein and artery. In this paper, we describe a method for automated anatomical labeling algorithm of bronchial branches based on Multi-Slice CT images.

  18. Automated anatomical labeling algorithm of bronchial branches based on multi-slice CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, J.; Saita, S.; Kubo, M.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Nishitani, H.; Ohmatsu, H.; Eguchi, K.; Kaneko, M.; Kusumoto, M.; Kakinuma, R.; Moriyama, N.

    2007-03-01

    Multi-slice CT technology was developed, so, we can get clear contrast images and thin slice images. But doctors need to diagnosis many image, thus their load increases. Therefore, development of the algorithm that analyses lung internal-organs is expected. When doctors diagnose lung internal-organs, they understand it. So, detailed analyze of lung internal-organs is applicant to early detection of a nodule. Especially, analyzing bronchus provides that useful information of detection of airway disease and classification of the pulmonary vein and artery. In this paper, we describe a method for automated anatomical labeling algorithm of bronchial branches based on Multi-Slice CT images.

  19. Correlative Imaging in a Patient with Cystic Thymoma: CT, MR and PET/CT Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Valeria; Esposito, Alfredo; Maurea, Simone; Camera, Luigi; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Palmieri, Giovannella; Buonerba, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cystic thymoma is a rare variant of thymic neoplasm characterized by almost complete cystic degeneration with mixed internal structure. We describe a case of a 60 year-old woman with a cystic thymoma studied with advanced tomographic imaging stydies. CT, MRI and PET/CT with 18F-FDG were performed; volumetric CT and MRI images provided better anatomic evaluation for pre-operative assessment, while PET/CT was helpful for lesion characterization based on 18F-FDG uptake. Although imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative evaluation of cystic thymoma, final diagnosis still remains surgical. Case Report A 60-year-old woman with recent chest pain and no history of previous disease was admitted to our departement to investigate the result of a previous chest X-ray that showed bilateral mediastinal enlargement; for this purpose, enhanced chest CT scan was performed using a 64-rows scanner (Toshiba, Aquilion 64, Japan) before and after intravenous bolus administration of iodinated non ionic contrast agent; CT images demonstrated the presence of a large mediastinal mass (11×8 cm) located in the anterior mediastinum who extended from the anonymous vein to the cardio-phrenic space, compressing the left atrium and causing medium lobe atelectasis; bilateral pleural effusion was also present. Conclusions In conclusion, correlative imaging plays a foundamental role for the diagnostic evaluation of patient with cystic thymoma. In particular, volumetric CT and MRI studies can provide better anatomic informations regarding internal structure and local tumor spread for pre-operative assessment. Conversely, metabolic imaging using 18F-FDG PET/CT is helpful for lesion characterization differentiating benign from malignant lesion on the basis of intense tracer uptake. The role of PET/MRI is still under investigation. However, final diagnosis still remains surgical even though imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative patient management. PMID:25593635

  20. Unified heat kernel regression for diffusion, kernel smoothing and wavelets on manifolds and its application to mandible growth modeling in CT images.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moo K; Qiu, Anqi; Seo, Seongho; Vorperian, Houri K

    2015-05-01

    We present a novel kernel regression framework for smoothing scalar surface data using the Laplace-Beltrami eigenfunctions. Starting with the heat kernel constructed from the eigenfunctions, we formulate a new bivariate kernel regression framework as a weighted eigenfunction expansion with the heat kernel as the weights. The new kernel method is mathematically equivalent to isotropic heat diffusion, kernel smoothing and recently popular diffusion wavelets. The numerical implementation is validated on a unit sphere using spherical harmonics. As an illustration, the method is applied to characterize the localized growth pattern of mandible surfaces obtained in CT images between ages 0 and 20 by regressing the length of displacement vectors with respect to a surface template.

  1. Automatic nonrigid registration of whole body CT mice images.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Peterson, Todd E; Gore, John C; Dawant, Benoit M

    2008-04-01

    Three-dimensional intra- and intersubject registration of image volumes is important for tasks that include quantification of temporal/longitudinal changes, atlas-based segmentation, computing population averages, or voxel and tensor-based morphometry. While a number of methods have been proposed to address this problem, few have focused on the problem of registering whole body image volumes acquired either from humans or small animals. These image volumes typically contain a large number of articulated structures, which makes registration more difficult than the registration of head images, to which the majority of registration algorithms have been applied. This article presents a new method for the automatic registration of whole body computed tomography (CT) volumes, which consists of two main steps. Skeletons are first brought into approximate correspondence with a robust point-based method. Transformations so obtained are refined with an intensity-based nonrigid registration algorithm that includes spatial adaptation of the transformation's stiffness. The approach has been applied to whole body CT images of mice, to CT images of the human upper torso, and to human head and neck CT images. To validate the authors method on soft tissue structures, which are difficult to see in CT images, the authors use coregistered magnetic resonance images. They demonstrate that the approach they propose can successfully register image volumes even when these volumes are very different in size and shape or if they have been acquired with the subjects in different positions.

  2. Accuracy of 3D volumetric image registration based on CT, MR and PET/CT phantom experiments.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Xie, Huchen; Ning, Holly; Citrin, Deborah; Capala, Jacek; Maass-Moreno, Roberto; Guion, Peter; Arora, Barbara; Coleman, Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W

    2008-07-09

    Registration is critical for image-based treatment planning and image-guided treatment delivery. Although automatic registration is available, manual, visual-based image fusion using three orthogonal planar views (3P) is always employed clinically to verify and adjust an automatic registration result. However, the 3P fusion can be time consuming, observer dependent, as well as prone to errors, owing to the incomplete 3-dimensional (3D) volumetric image representations. It is also limited to single-pixel precision (the screen resolution). The 3D volumetric image registration (3DVIR) technique was developed to overcome these shortcomings. This technique introduces a 4th dimension in the registration criteria beyond the image volume, offering both visual and quantitative correlation of corresponding anatomic landmarks within the two registration images, facilitating a volumetric image alignment, and minimizing potential registration errors. The 3DVIR combines image classification in real-time to select and visualize a reliable anatomic landmark, rather than using all voxels for alignment. To determine the detection limit of the visual and quantitative 3DVIR criteria, slightly misaligned images were simulated and presented to eight clinical personnel for interpretation. Both of the criteria produce a detection limit of 0.1 mm and 0.1 degree. To determine the accuracy of the 3DVIR method, three imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET/CT) were used to acquire multiple phantom images with known spatial shifts. Lateral shifts were applied to these phantoms with displacement intervals of 5.0+/-0.1 mm. The accuracy of the 3DVIR technique was determined by comparing the image shifts determined through registration to the physical shifts made experimentally. The registration accuracy, together with precision, was found to be: 0.02+/-0.09 mm for CT/CT images, 0.03+/-0.07 mm for MR/MR images, and 0.03+/-0.35 mm for PET/CT images. This accuracy is consistent with the detection limit

  3. Imaging of inflammatory bowel disease: CT and MR.

    PubMed

    Zalis, Michael; Singh, Ajay K

    2004-01-01

    Cross-sectional imaging has come to play a central role in the imaging of the abdomen. Concurrent to this, the role of CT and MRI in the imaging of inflammatory bowel disease has also increased in importance. These modalities offer numerous advantages over more traditional methods of radiologic diagnosis, and provide essential information not only for initial diagnosis, but for management, follow-up and detection of potential complications. On the horizon are several derivative techniques involving CT and MRI, potentially in combination with PET imaging; these may further improve the specificity and sensitivity of imaging modalities for diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease.

  4. Compartment Syndrome After Varicose Vein Surgery Evidenced by CT Images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Min; Kim, Maru

    2016-03-01

    A 21-year-old man developed compartment syndrome after a varicose vein surgery. Because of a lack of appropriate diagnostic apparatus, it was not possible to measure calf pressure. The only diagnostic tool available was computed tomography (CT). With the aid of CT, faster diagnosis of the compartment syndrome was possible, leading to appropriate management. By providing unique CT images of a patient before and after having compartment syndrome and after a fasciotomy, this study could add valuable references for diagnosis of compartment syndrome using CT. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Automatic extraction of endocranial surfaces from CT images of crania

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hiromasa; Moriguchi, Masaki; Ogihara, Naomichi; Kondo, Osamu; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    The authors present a method for extracting polygon data of endocranial surfaces from CT images of human crania. Based on the fact that the endocast is the largest empty space in the crania, we automate a procedure for endocast extraction by integrating several image processing techniques. Given CT images of human crania, the proposed method extracts endocranial surfaces by the following three steps. The first step is binarization in order to fill void structures, such as diploic space and cracks in the skull. We use a void detection method based on mathematical morphology. The second step is watershed-based segmentation of the endocranial part from the binary image of the CT image. Here, we introduce an automatic initial seed assignment method for the endocranial region using the distance field of the binary image. The final step is partial polygonization of the CT images using the segmentation results as mask images. The resulting polygons represent only the endocranial part, and the closed manifold surfaces are computed even though the endocast is not isolated in the cranium. Since only the isovalue threshold and the size of void structures are required, the procedure is not dependent on the experience of the user. The present paper also demonstrates that the proposed method can extract polygon data of endocasts from CT images of various crania. PMID:28406901

  6. Point spread function modeling and image restoration for cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Huang, Kui-Dong; Shi, Yi-Kai; Xu, Zhe

    2015-03-01

    X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CT) has such notable features as high efficiency and precision, and is widely used in the fields of medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing, but the inherent imaging degradation reduces the quality of CT images. Aimed at the problems of projection image degradation and restoration in cone-beam CT, a point spread function (PSF) modeling method is proposed first. The general PSF model of cone-beam CT is established, and based on it, the PSF under arbitrary scanning conditions can be calculated directly for projection image restoration without the additional measurement, which greatly improved the application convenience of cone-beam CT. Secondly, a projection image restoration algorithm based on pre-filtering and pre-segmentation is proposed, which can make the edge contours in projection images and slice images clearer after restoration, and control the noise in the equivalent level to the original images. Finally, the experiments verified the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods. Supported by National Science and Technology Major Project of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology of China (2012ZX04007021), Young Scientists Fund of National Natural Science Foundation of China (51105315), Natural Science Basic Research Program of Shaanxi Province of China (2013JM7003) and Northwestern Polytechnical University Foundation for Fundamental Research (JC20120226, 3102014KYJD022)

  7. CT image quality over time: comparison of image quality for six different CT scanners over a six-year period.

    PubMed

    Roa, Ana Maria A; Andersen, Hilde K; Martinsen, Anne Catrine T

    2015-03-08

    UNSCEAR concluded that increased use of CT scanning caused dramatic changes in population dose. Therefore, international radiation protection authorities demand: 1) periodical quality assurance tests with respect to image quality and radiation dose, and 2) optimization of all examination protocols with respect to image quality and radiation dose. This study aimed to evaluate and analyze multiple image quality parameters and variability measured throughout time for six different CT scanners from four different vendors, in order to evaluate the current methodology for QA controls of CT systems. The results from this study indicate that there is minor drifting in the image noise and uniformity and in the spatial resolution over time for CT scanners, independent of vendors. The HU for different object densities vary between different CT scanner models from different vendors, and over time for one specific CT scanner. Future tests of interphantom and intraphantom variations, along with inclusion of more CT scanners, are necessary to establish robust baselines and recommendations of methodology for QA controls of CT systems, independent of model and vendor.

  8. Parametric dynamic F-18-FDG PET/CT breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Alphonso; Feiglin, David; Lipson, Edward; Mandel, James; McGraw, Wendy; Lee, Wei; Krol, Andrzej

    2008-03-01

    This study was undertaken to estimate metabolic tissue properties from dynamic breast F-18-FDG PET/CT image series and to display them as 3D parametric images. Each temporal PET series was obtained immediately after injection of 10 mCi of F-18-FDG and consisted of fifty 1- minute frames. Each consecutive frame was nonrigidly registered to the first frame using a finite element method (FEM) based model and fiducial skin markers. Nonlinear curve fitting of activity vs. time based on a realistic two-compartment model was performed for each voxel of the volume. Curve fitting was accomplished by application of the Levenburg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) that minimized X2. We evaluated which parameters are most suitable to determine the spatial extent and malignancy in suspicious lesions. In addition, Patlak modeling was applied to the data. A mixture model was constructed and provided a classification system for the breast tissue. It produced unbiased estimation of the spatial extent of the lesions. We conclude that nonrigid registration followed by voxel-by-voxel based nonlinear fitting to a realistic two-compartment model yields better quality parametric images, as compared to unprocessed dynamic breast PET time series. By comparison with the mixture model, we established that the total cumulated activity and maximum activity parametric images provide the best delineation of suspicious breast tissue lesions and hyperactive subregions within the lesion that cannot be discerned in unprocessed images.

  9. Castleman disease of the neck: CT and MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xin-Hua; Song, Hao-Ming; Liu, Qing-Yu; Cao, Yun; Li, Guo-Hong; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2014-11-01

    To characterize the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of Castleman disease of the neck. The imaging findings of 21 patients with Castleman disease of the neck were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 21 patients, 16 underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT scans; 5 underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI scans. The unenhanced CT images showed isolated or multiple well-defined homogenous mild hypodensity lesions in fifteen cases, and a heterogeneous nodule with central areas of mild hypodensity in one case. Calcification was not observed in any of the patients. In five patients, MR T1-weighted images revealed well-defined, homogeneous isointense or mild hyperintense lesions to the muscle; T2-weighted images showed these as intermediate hyperintense. Sixteen cases showed intermediate to marked homogeneous enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT or MR T1-weighted images. Of the other five cases that underwent double-phase CT scans, four showed mild or intermediate heterogeneous enhancement at the arterial phase, and homogeneous intermediate or marked enhancement at the venous phase; the remaining case showed mild and intermediate ring-enhancement with a central non-enhanced area at the arterial and venous phases, respectively. Castleman disease of the neck can be characterized as solitary or multiple well-defined, mild hypodensity or homogeneous intense lesions on plain CT/MR scans, and demonstrates intermediate and marked enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT/MR scans. On double-phase CT scans, Castleman disease often demonstrates mild enhancement at the arterial phase, and gradually uniform enhancement at venous phase. Double-phase enhanced CT or MRI may help to differentiate Castleman disease from other diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Deformable planning CT to cone-beam CT image registration in head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Jidong; Guerrero, Mariana; Chen, Wenjuan; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to implement and validate a deformable CT to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image registration method in head-and-neck cancer to eventually facilitate automatic target delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twelve head-and-neck cancer patients underwent a planning CT and weekly CBCT during the 5-7 week treatment period. The 12 planning CT images (moving images) of these patients were registered to their weekly CBCT images (fixed images) via the symmetric force Demons algorithm and using a multiresolution scheme. Histogram matching was used to compensate for the intensity difference between the two types of images. Using nine known anatomic points as registration targets, the accuracy of the registration was evaluated using the target registration error (TRE). In addition, region-of-interest (ROI) contours drawn on the planning CT were morphed to the CBCT images and the volume overlap index (VOI) between registered contours and manually delineated contours was evaluated. Results: The mean TRE value of the nine target points was less than 3.0 mm, the slice thickness of the planning CT. Of the 369 target points evaluated for registration accuracy, the average TRE value was 2.6{+-}0.6 mm. The mean TRE for bony tissue targets was 2.4{+-}0.2 mm, while the mean TRE for soft tissue targets was 2.8{+-}0.2 mm. The average VOI between the registered and manually delineated ROI contours was 76.2{+-}4.6%, which is consistent with that reported in previous studies. Conclusions: The authors have implemented and validated a deformable image registration method to register planning CT images to weekly CBCT images in head-and-neck cancer cases. The accuracy of the TRE values suggests that they can be used as a promising tool for automatic target delineation on CBCT.

  11. Image quality assessment for CT used on small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, Isabela Paredes; Agulles-Pedrós, Luis

    2016-07-01

    Image acquisition on a CT scanner is nowadays necessary in almost any kind of medical study. Its purpose, to produce anatomical images with the best achievable quality, implies the highest diagnostic radiation exposure to patients. Image quality can be measured quantitatively based on parameters such as noise, uniformity and resolution. This measure allows the determination of optimal parameters of operation for the scanner in order to get the best diagnostic image. A human Phillips CT scanner is the first one minded for veterinary-use exclusively in Colombia. The aim of this study was to measure the CT image quality parameters using an acrylic phantom and then, using the computational tool MatLab, determine these parameters as a function of current value and window of visualization, in order to reduce dose delivery by keeping the appropriate image quality.

  12. Image quality assessment for CT used on small animals

    SciTech Connect

    Cisneros, Isabela Paredes Agulles-Pedrós, Luis

    2016-07-07

    Image acquisition on a CT scanner is nowadays necessary in almost any kind of medical study. Its purpose, to produce anatomical images with the best achievable quality, implies the highest diagnostic radiation exposure to patients. Image quality can be measured quantitatively based on parameters such as noise, uniformity and resolution. This measure allows the determination of optimal parameters of operation for the scanner in order to get the best diagnostic image. A human Phillips CT scanner is the first one minded for veterinary-use exclusively in Colombia. The aim of this study was to measure the CT image quality parameters using an acrylic phantom and then, using the computational tool MATLAB, determine these parameters as a function of current value and window of visualization, in order to reduce dose delivery by keeping the appropriate image quality.

  13. Image Reconstruction for Hybrid True-Color Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Bennett, James; He, Peng; Zainon, Rafidah; Doesburg, Robert; Opie, Alex; Walsh, Mike; Shen, Haiou; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phillip; Mou, Xuanqin; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    X-ray micro-CT is an important imaging tool for biomedical researchers. Our group has recently proposed a hybrid “true-color” micro-CT system to improve contrast resolution with lower system cost and radiation dose. The system incorporates an energy-resolved photon-counting true-color detector into a conventional micro-CT configuration, and can be used for material decomposition. In this paper, we demonstrate an interior color-CT image reconstruction algorithm developed for this hybrid true-color micro-CT system. A compressive sensing-based statistical interior tomography method is employed to reconstruct each channel in the local spectral imaging chain, where the reconstructed global gray-scale image from the conventional imaging chain served as the initial guess. Principal component analysis was used to map the spectral reconstructions into the color space. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by numerical simulations, physical phantom experiments, and animal studies. The results confirm the merits of the proposed algorithm, and demonstrate the feasibility of the hybrid true-color micro-CT system. Additionally, a “color diffusion” phenomenon was observed whereby high-quality true-color images are produced not only inside the region of interest, but also in neighboring regions. It appears harnessing that this phenomenon could potentially reduce the color detector size for a given ROI, further reducing system cost and radiation dose. PMID:22481806

  14. Image reconstruction for hybrid true-color micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Bennett, James; He, Peng; Zainon, Rafidah; Doesburg, Robert; Opie, Alex; Walsh, Mike; Shen, Haiou; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phillip; Mou, Xuanqin; Wang, Ge

    2012-06-01

    X-ray micro-CT is an important imaging tool for biomedical researchers. Our group has recently proposed a hybrid "true-color" micro-CT system to improve contrast resolution with lower system cost and radiation dose. The system incorporates an energy-resolved photon-counting true-color detector into a conventional micro-CT configuration, and can be used for material decomposition. In this paper, we demonstrate an interior color-CT image reconstruction algorithm developed for this hybrid true-color micro-CT system. A compressive sensing-based statistical interior tomography method is employed to reconstruct each channel in the local spectral imaging chain, where the reconstructed global gray-scale image from the conventional imaging chain served as the initial guess. Principal component analysis was used to map the spectral reconstructions into the color space. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by numerical simulations, physical phantom experiments, and animal studies. The results confirm the merits of the proposed algorithm, and demonstrate the feasibility of the hybrid true-color micro-CT system. Additionally, a "color diffusion" phenomenon was observed whereby high-quality true-color images are produced not only inside the region of interest, but also in neighboring regions. It appears harnessing that this phenomenon could potentially reduce the color detector size for a given ROI, further reducing system cost and radiation dose.

  15. Relationship between solitary pulmonary nodule lung cancer and CT image features based on gradual clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weipeng

    2017-06-01

    The relationship between the medical characteristics of lung cancers and computer tomography (CT) images are explored so as to improve the early diagnosis rate of lung cancers. This research collected CT images of patients with solitary pulmonary nodule lung cancer, and used gradual clustering methodology to classify them. Preliminary classifications were made, followed by continuous modification and iteration to determine the optimal condensation point, until iteration stability was achieved. Reasonable classification results were obtained. the clustering results fell into 3 categories. The first type of patients was mostly female, with ages between 50 and 65 years. CT images of solitary pulmonary nodule lung cancer for this group contain complete lobulation and burr, with pleural indentation; The second type of patients was mostly male with ages between 50 and 80 years. CT images of solitary pulmonary nodule lung cancer for this group contain complete lobulation and burr, but with no pleural indentation; The third type of patients was also mostly male with ages between 50 and 80 years. CT images for this group showed no abnormalities. the application of gradual clustering methodology can scientifically classify CT image features of patients with lung cancer in the initial lesion stage. These findings provide the basis for early detection and treatment of malignant lesions in patients with lung cancer.

  16. Dual-modality brain PET-CT image segmentation based on adaptive use of functional and anatomical information.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Eberl, Stefan; Wen, Lingfeng; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2012-01-01

    Dual medical imaging modalities, such as PET-CT, are now a routine component of clinical practice. Medical image segmentation methods, however, have generally only been applied to single modality images. In this paper, we propose the dual-modality image segmentation model to segment brain PET-CT images into gray matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid. This model converts PET-CT image segmentation into an optimization process controlled simultaneously by PET and CT voxel values and spatial constraints. It is innovative in the creation and application of the modality discriminatory power (MDP) coefficient as a weighting scheme to adaptively combine the functional (PET) and anatomical (CT) information on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Our approach relies upon allowing the modality with higher discriminatory power to play a more important role in the segmentation process. We compared the proposed approach to three other image segmentation strategies, including PET-only based segmentation, combination of the results of independent PET image segmentation and CT image segmentation, and simultaneous segmentation of joint PET and CT images without an adaptive weighting scheme. Our results in 21 clinical studies showed that our approach provides the most accurate and reliable segmentation for brain PET-CT images.

  17. Semiautomatic brain morphometry from CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Windham, Joe P.; Peck, Donald J.

    1994-05-01

    Fast, accurate, and reproducible volume estimation is vital to the diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of many medical situations. We present the development and application of a semi-automatic method for estimating volumes of normal and abnormal brain tissues from computed tomography images. This method does not require manual drawing of the tissue boundaries. It is therefore expected to be faster and more reproducible than conventional methods. The steps of the new method are as follows. (1) The intracranial brain volume is segmented from the skull and background using thresholding and morphological operations. (2) The additive noise is suppressed (the image is restored) using a non-linear edge-preserving filter which preserves partial volume information on average. (3) The histogram of the resulting low-noise image is generated and the dominant peak is removed from it using a Gaussian model. (4) Minima and maxima of the resulting histogram are identified and using a minimum error criterion, the brain is segmented into the normal tissues (white matter and gray matter), cerebrospinal fluid, and lesions, if present. (5) Previous steps are repeated for each slice through the brain and the volume of each tissue type is estimated from the results. Details and significance of each step are explained. Experimental results using a simulation, a phantom, and selected clinical cases are presented.

  18. Reducing image noise in computed tomography (CT) colonography: effect of an integrated circuit CT detector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Leng, Shuai; Michalak, Gregory J; Vrieze, Thomas J; Duan, Xinhui; Qu, Mingliang; Shiung, Maria M; McCollough, Cynthia H; Fletcher, Joel G

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether the integrated circuit (IC) detector results in reduced noise in computed tomography (CT) colonography (CTC). Three hundred sixty-six consecutive patients underwent clinically indicated CTC using the same CT scanner system, except for a difference in CT detectors (IC or conventional). Image noise, patient size, and scanner radiation output (volume CT dose index) were quantitatively compared between patient cohorts using each detector system, with separate comparisons for the abdomen and pelvis. For the abdomen and pelvis, despite significantly larger patient sizes in the IC detector cohort (both P < 0.001), image noise was significantly lower (both P < 0.001), whereas volume CT dose index was unchanged (both P > 0.18). Based on the observed image noise reduction, radiation dose could alternatively be reduced by approximately 20% to result in similar levels of image noise. Computed tomography colonography images acquired using the IC detector had significantly lower noise than images acquired using the conventional detector. This noise reduction can permit further radiation dose reduction in CTC.

  19. FPGA-Accelerated Deformable Image Registration for Improved Target-Delineation During CT-Guided Interventions.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, O; Shekhar, R

    2007-06-01

    Minimally invasive image-guided interventions (IGIs) are time and cost efficient, minimize unintended damage to healthy tissue, and lead to faster patient recovery. With the advent of multislice computed tomography (CT), many IGIs are now being performed under volumetric CT guidance. Registering pre-and intraprocedural images for improved intraprocedural target delineation is a fundamental need in the IGI workflow. Earlier approaches to meet this need primarily employed rigid body approximation, which may not be valid because of nonrigid tissue misalignment between these images. Intensity-based automatic deformable registration is a promising option to correct for this misalignment; however, the long execution times of these algorithms have prevented their use in clinical workflow. This article presents a field-programmable gate array-based architecture for accelerated implementation of mutual information (Ml)-based deformable registration. The reported implementation reduces the execution time of MI-based deformable registration from hours to a few minutes. This work also demonstrates successful registration of abdominal intraprocedural noncontrast CT (iCT) images with preprocedural contrast-enhanced CT (preCT) and positron emission tomography (PET) images using the reported solution. The registration accuracy for this application was evaluated using 5 iCT-preCT and 5 iCT-PET image pairs. The registration accuracy of the hardware implementation is comparable with that achieved using a software implementation and is on the order of a few millimeters. This registration accuracy, coupled with the execution speed and compact implementation of the reported solution, makes it suitable for integration in the IGI-workflow.

  20. Extracting information from previous full-dose CT scan for knowledge-based Bayesian reconstruction of current low-dose CT images

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Han, Hao; Liang, Zhengrong; Hu, Yifan; Liu, Yan; Moore, William; Ma, Jianhua; Lu, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Markov random field (MRF) model has been widely employed in edge-preserving regional noise smoothing penalty to reconstruct piece-wise smooth images in the presence of noise, such as in low-dose computed tomography (LdCT). While it preserves edge sharpness, its regional smoothing may sacrifice tissue image textures, which have been recognized as useful imaging biomarkers, and thus it may compromise clinical tasks such as differentiating malignant vs. benign lesions, e.g., lung nodules or colon polyps. This study aims to shift the edge-preserving regional noise smoothing paradigm to texture-preserving framework for LdCT image reconstruction while retaining the advantage of MRF’s neighborhood system on edge preservation. Specifically, we adapted the MRF model to incorporate the image textures of muscle, fat, bone, lung, etc. from previous full-dose CT (FdCT) scan as a priori knowledge for texture-preserving Bayesian reconstruction of current LdCT images. To show the feasibility of the proposed reconstruction framework, experiments using clinical patient scans were conducted. The experimental outcomes showed a dramatic gain by the a priori knowledge for LdCT image reconstruction using the commonly-used Haralick texture measures. Thus, it is conjectured that the texture-preserving LdCT reconstruction has advantages over the edge-preserving regional smoothing paradigm for texture-specific clinical applications. PMID:26561284

  1. Comparison of CT scanning and radionuclide imaging in liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.L.; Esposito, F.S.

    1980-01-01

    Early experience with body CT suggested its usefulness in many diagnostic problems; jaundice, renal and pancreatic masses, and in the evaluation of relatively inaccessible parts of the body, such as the retroperitineum, mediastinum, and pelvis. Investigation of hepatic disease by CT was not unexpectedly compared to radionuclide liver scanning, the major preexisting modality for imaging the liver. In the evaluation of the jaundiced patient, CT rapidly assumed a major role, providing more specific information about the liver than the RN liver scan, as well as demonstrating adjacent organs. CT differentiate obstructive from non-obstructive jaundice. With respect to mass lesions of the liver, the RN liver scan is more sensitive than CT but less specific. The abnormalities on an isotope image of the liver consist of normal variants in configuration, extrinsic compression by adjacent structures, cysts, hemangiomata, abscesses, and neoplasms. These suspected lesions may then be better delineated by the CT image, and a more precise diagnosis made. The physiologic information provided by the RN liver scan is an added facet which is helpful in the patient with diffuse hepatic disease. The CT image will be normal in many of these patients, however, hemochromatosis and fatty infiltration lend themselves especially to density evaluation by CT. The evaluation of lymphoma is more thorough with CT. Structures other than the liver, such as lymph nodes, are visualized. Gallium, however, provides additional isotopic information in patients with lymphoma, and in addition, is known to be useful in the investigation of a febrile patient with an abscess. Newer isotopic agents expand hepatic imaging in other directions, visualizing the biliary tree and evaluating the jaundiced patient.

  2. Thoracic cancer imaging with PET/CT in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Pai-Chun Melinda

    Significance. Respiratory motion has been shown to cause artifacts in PET/CT imaging. This breathing artifact can have a significant impact on PET quantification and it can lead to large uncertainties when using PET for radiation therapy planning. We have demonstrated a promising solution to resolve the breathing artifact by acquiring respiration-averaged CT (ACT) for PET/CT. The purpose of this work was to optimize the ACT acquisition for clinical implementation and to evaluate the impact of ACT on PET/CT quantification. The hypothesis was that ACT is an effective method in removing the breathing artifact when compared to our current clinical protocol. Methods. Phase and cine approaches for acquiring ACT were investigated and the results of these two approaches were compared to the ACT generated from clinical 4DCT data sets (abbreviated as ACT10phs ). In the phase approach, ACT was generated based on combinations of selected respiratory phases; in the cine approach, ACT was generated based on cine images acquired over a fixed cine duration. The phase combination and cine duration that best approximated the ACT10phs were determined to be the optimized scanning parameters. 216 thoracic PET/CT patients were scanned with both current clinical and the ACT protocols. The effects of ACT on PET/CT quantification were assessed by comparing clinical PET/CT and ACT PET/CT using 3 metrics: PET/CT image alignment, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), and threshold segmented gross tumor volume (GTV). Results. ACT10phs can be best approximated to within 2% of SUV variation by phase averaging based on 4 representative phases, and to within 3% by cine image averaging based on >3s of cine duration. We implemented the cine approach on the PET/CT scanners and acquired 216 patient data sets. 68% of patients had breathing artifacts in their clinical PET/CT and the artifacts were removed/reduced in all corresponding ACT PET/CT. PET/CT quantification for lesions <50 cm3 and

  3. Non-Rigid Registration of Liver CT Images for CT-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; van Walsum, Theo

    2016-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous ablation for liver cancer treatment is a relevant technique for patients not eligible for surgery and with tumors that are inconspicuous on US imaging. The lack of real-time imaging and the use of a limited amount of CT contrast agent make targeting the tumor with the needle challenging. In this study, we evaluate a registration framework that allows the integration of diagnostic pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images and intra-operative non-contrast enhanced CT images to improve image guidance in the intervention. The liver and tumor are segmented in the pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images. Next, the contrast enhanced image is registered to the intra-operative CT images in a two-stage approach. First, the contrast-enhanced diagnostic image is non-rigidly registered to a non-contrast enhanced image that is conventionally acquired at the start of the intervention. In case the initial registration is not sufficiently accurate, a refinement step is applied using non-rigid registration method with a local rigidity term. In the second stage, the intra-operative CT-images that are used to check the needle position, which often consist of only a few slices, are registered rigidly to the intra-operative image that was acquired at the start of the intervention. Subsequently, the diagnostic image is registered to the current intra-operative image, using both transformations, this allows the visualization of the tumor region extracted from pre-operative data in the intra-operative CT images containing needle. The method is evaluated on imaging data of 19 patients at the Erasmus MC. Quantitative evaluation is performed using the Dice metric, mean surface distance of the liver border and corresponding landmarks in the diagnostic and the intra-operative images. The registration of the diagnostic CT image to the initial intra-operative CT image did not require a refinement step in 13 cases. For those cases, the resulting registration had a Dice

  4. Non-Rigid Registration of Liver CT Images for CT-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; Walsum, Theo van

    2016-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous ablation for liver cancer treatment is a relevant technique for patients not eligible for surgery and with tumors that are inconspicuous on US imaging. The lack of real-time imaging and the use of a limited amount of CT contrast agent make targeting the tumor with the needle challenging. In this study, we evaluate a registration framework that allows the integration of diagnostic pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images and intra-operative non-contrast enhanced CT images to improve image guidance in the intervention. The liver and tumor are segmented in the pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images. Next, the contrast enhanced image is registered to the intra-operative CT images in a two-stage approach. First, the contrast-enhanced diagnostic image is non-rigidly registered to a non-contrast enhanced image that is conventionally acquired at the start of the intervention. In case the initial registration is not sufficiently accurate, a refinement step is applied using non-rigid registration method with a local rigidity term. In the second stage, the intra-operative CT-images that are used to check the needle position, which often consist of only a few slices, are registered rigidly to the intra-operative image that was acquired at the start of the intervention. Subsequently, the diagnostic image is registered to the current intra-operative image, using both transformations, this allows the visualization of the tumor region extracted from pre-operative data in the intra-operative CT images containing needle. The method is evaluated on imaging data of 19 patients at the Erasmus MC. Quantitative evaluation is performed using the Dice metric, mean surface distance of the liver border and corresponding landmarks in the diagnostic and the intra-operative images. The registration of the diagnostic CT image to the initial intra-operative CT image did not require a refinement step in 13 cases. For those cases, the resulting registration had a Dice

  5. Distribution Atlas of Proliferating Bone Marrow in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Measured by FLT-PET/CT Imaging, With Potential Applicability in Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Belinda A.; Callahan, Jason; Bressel, Mathias; Simoens, Nathalie; Everitt, Sarah; Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Burbury, Kate; MacManus, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Proliferating bone marrow is exquisitely sensitive to ionizing radiation. Knowledge of its distribution could improve radiation therapy planning to minimize unnecessary marrow exposure and avoid consequential prolonged myelosuppression. [18F]-Fluoro-3-deoxy-3-L-fluorothymidine (FLT)–positron emission tomography (PET) is a novel imaging modality that provides detailed quantitative images of proliferating tissues, including bone marrow. We used FLT-PET imaging in cancer patients to produce an atlas of marrow distribution with potential clinical utility. Methods and Materials: The FLT-PET and fused CT scans of eligible patients with non-small cell lung cancer (no distant metastases, no prior cytotoxic exposure, no hematologic disorders) were reviewed. The proportions of skeletal FLT activity in 10 predefined bony regions were determined and compared according to age, sex, and recent smoking status. Results: Fifty-one patients were studied: 67% male; median age 68 (range, 31-87) years; 8% never smokers; 70% no smoking in the preceding 3 months. Significant differences in marrow distribution occurred between sex and age groups. No effect was detected from smoking in the preceding 3 months. Using the mean percentages of FLT uptake per body region, we created an atlas of the distribution of functional bone marrow in 4 subgroups defined by sex and age. Conclusions: This atlas has potential utility for estimating the distribution of active marrow in adult cancer patients to guide radiation therapy planning. However, because of interindividual variation it should be used with caution when radiation therapy risks ablating large proportions of active marrow; in such cases, individual FLT-PET scans may be required.

  6. Distribution Atlas of Proliferating Bone Marrow in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Measured by FLT-PET/CT Imaging, With Potential Applicability in Radiation Therapy Planning.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Belinda A; Callahan, Jason; Bressel, Mathias; Simoens, Nathalie; Everitt, Sarah; Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J; Burbury, Kate; MacManus, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Proliferating bone marrow is exquisitely sensitive to ionizing radiation. Knowledge of its distribution could improve radiation therapy planning to minimize unnecessary marrow exposure and avoid consequential prolonged myelosuppression. [18F]-Fluoro-3-deoxy-3-L-fluorothymidine (FLT)-positron emission tomography (PET) is a novel imaging modality that provides detailed quantitative images of proliferating tissues, including bone marrow. We used FLT-PET imaging in cancer patients to produce an atlas of marrow distribution with potential clinical utility. The FLT-PET and fused CT scans of eligible patients with non-small cell lung cancer (no distant metastases, no prior cytotoxic exposure, no hematologic disorders) were reviewed. The proportions of skeletal FLT activity in 10 predefined bony regions were determined and compared according to age, sex, and recent smoking status. Fifty-one patients were studied: 67% male; median age 68 (range, 31-87) years; 8% never smokers; 70% no smoking in the preceding 3 months. Significant differences in marrow distribution occurred between sex and age groups. No effect was detected from smoking in the preceding 3 months. Using the mean percentages of FLT uptake per body region, we created an atlas of the distribution of functional bone marrow in 4 subgroups defined by sex and age. This atlas has potential utility for estimating the distribution of active marrow in adult cancer patients to guide radiation therapy planning. However, because of interindividual variation it should be used with caution when radiation therapy risks ablating large proportions of active marrow; in such cases, individual FLT-PET scans may be required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Automatic segmentation of the prostate on CT images using deep learning and multi-atlas fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Zhang, Guoyi; Tade, Funmilayo; Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter; Master, Viraj; Fei, Baowei

    2017-02-01

    Automatic segmentation of the prostate on CT images has many applications in prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy. However, prostate CT image segmentation is challenging because of the low contrast of soft tissue on CT images. In this paper, we propose an automatic segmentation method by combining a deep learning method and multi-atlas refinement. First, instead of segmenting the whole image, we extract the region of interesting (ROI) to delete irrelevant regions. Then, we use the convolutional neural networks (CNN) to learn the deep features for distinguishing the prostate pixels from the non-prostate pixels in order to obtain the preliminary segmentation results. CNN can automatically learn the deep features adapting to the data, which are different from some handcrafted features. Finally, we select some similar atlases to refine the initial segmentation results. The proposed method has been evaluated on a dataset of 92 prostate CT images. Experimental results show that our method achieved a Dice similarity coefficient of 86.80% as compared to the manual segmentation. The deep learning based method can provide a useful tool for automatic segmentation of the prostate on CT images and thus can have a variety of clinical applications.

  8. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm3 CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0±5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0±6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0±4.0 mGy and 97.0±5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0±5.0 mGy. The author’s results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality. PMID:18841837

  9. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J.

    2008-09-15

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm{sup 3} CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0{+-}5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0{+-}6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0{+-}4.0 mGy and 97.0{+-}5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0{+-}5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

  10. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of lanthanide ions doped one-dimensional upconversion submicrocrystals and their potential application in vivo CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guo; Zhang, Chunlei; Zhou, Zhijun; Zhang, Xin; Ma, Jiebing; Li, Chao; Jin, Weilin; Cui, Daxiang

    2012-12-01

    Multi-functional rare-earth Yb3+ and Ln3+ (Ln = Er, Tm and Ho) ions doped one-dimensional (1-D) upconversion submicrocrystals (NaYF4 and NaGdF4) possessing upconversion luminescence, biocompatibility and magnetic properties have been synthesized by a one-pot hydrothermal method. Rare-earth Yb3+ and Ln3+ ions doped NaYF4 microrods (~1 μm in diameter, 3-5 μm in length) exhibit porous properties, and the average pore sizes are ~28.2 nm. They show paramagnetism in the magnetic range of -60 to -2 kOe and 2 to 60 kOe at 300 K, and exhibit near superparamagnetic behaviour at the magnetic range of -2 to 2 kOe. Saturation magnetization was ~12.1 emu g-1 at 2 K. The Yb3+ and Ln3+ ions doped NaGdF4 submicrocrystals (~100 nm in diameter, 200-300 nm in length) show paramagnetism at 300 K, and exhibit superparamagnetic behaviour with a saturation magnetization of 129.2 emu g-1 at 2 K. The magnetic properties of Yb3+ and Ln3+ ions doped 1-D upconversion submicrocrystals indicate they can be used for drug targeting under a magnetic field. Their unique upconversion emission (green for Yb3+/Er3+ and blue for Yb3+/Tm3+) under 980 nm laser excitation indicate that they could be used for specific luminescent immunolabeling and imaging. MTT assays reveal that 1-D upconversion submicrocrystals have satisfactory bio-affinity, where the viability keeps in good state even at a concentration of 500 μg mL-1, which is much higher than the concentration usually used in cell labelling. Luminescent microscopy images show that the morphologies of the cytoskeleton and cell nucleus are well maintained after incubating different concentrations of 1-D upconversion submicrocrystals. After injecting upconversion submicrocrystals into the mice (tumor sites or back normal tissue), a clearly distinguished CT signal was observed, indicating the synthesized 1-D submicrocrystals are effective for CT imaging in vivo.Multi-functional rare-earth Yb3+ and Ln3+ (Ln = Er, Tm and Ho) ions doped one-dimensional (1

  11. [Application of computed tomography (CT) examination for forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Urbanik, Andrzej; Chrzan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present a own experiences in usage of post mortem CT examination for forensic medicine. With the help of 16-slice CT scanner 181 corpses were examined. Obtained during acquisition imaging data are later developed with dedicated programmes. Analyzed images were extracted from axial sections, multiplanar reconstructions as well as 3D reconstructions. Gained information helped greatly when classical autopsy was performed by making it more accurate. A CT scan images recorded digitally enable to evaluate corpses at any time, despite processes of putrefaction or cremation. If possible CT examination should precede classical autopsy.

  12. MR and CT image fusion of the cervical spine: a noninvasive alternative to CT-myelography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Mirza, Sohail K.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Haynor, David R.

    2005-04-01

    CT-Myelography (CTM) is routinely used for planning surgery for degenerative disease of the spine, but its invasive nature, significant potential morbidity, and high costs make a noninvasive substitute desirable. We report our work on evaluating CT and MR image fusion as an alternative to CTM. Because the spine is only piecewise rigid, a multi-rigid approach to the registration of spinal CT and MR images was developed (SPIE 2004), in which the spine on CT images is first segmented into separate vertebrae, each of which is then rigidly registered with the corresponding vertebra on MR images. The results are then blended to obtain fusion images. Since they contain information from both modalities, we hypothesized that fusion images would be equivalent to CTM. To test this we selected 34 patients who had undergone MRI and CTM for degenerative disease of the cervical spine, and used the multi-rigid approach to produce fused images. A clinical vignette for each patient was created and presented along with either CT/MR fusion images or CTM images. A group of spine surgeons are asked to formulate detailed surgical plans based on each set of images, and the surgical plans are compared. A similar study assessing diagnostic agreement is being performed with neuroradiologists, who also assess the accuracy of registration. Our work to date has demonstrated the feasibility of segmentation and multi-rigid fusion in clinical cases and the acceptability of the questionnaire to physicians. Preliminary analysis of one surgeon's and one neuroradiologist"s evaluation has been performed.

  13. Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas: CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Horton, Karen M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-12-01

    CT currently plays a vital role in pancreatic cancer staging. Continued advancements in computers, scanner technology, and 3D software have improved CT detection of smaller masses and staging. In particular, the introduction of MDCT and real-time 3D volume-rendering software have greatly improved the visualization of the pancreas and adjacent vasculature. This progress will continue as manufacturers introduce the next generation of scanners, which can acquire up to 32 slices per second with ever faster scan times. The impact of these new scanners on diagnostic accuracy will need to be carefully evaluated.

  14. A minimum spanning forest based classification method for dedicated breast CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, Robert; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Fei, Baowei

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To develop and test an automated algorithm to classify different types of tissue in dedicated breast CT images. Methods: Images of a single breast of five different patients were acquired with a dedicated breast CT clinical prototype. The breast CT images were processed by a multiscale bilateral filter to reduce noise while keeping edge information and were corrected to overcome cupping artifacts. As skin and glandular tissue have similar CT values on breast CT images, morphologic processing is used to identify the skin based on its position information. A support vector machine (SVM) is trained and the resulting model used to create a pixelwise classification map of fat and glandular tissue. By combining the results of the skin mask with the SVM results, the breast tissue is classified as skin, fat, and glandular tissue. This map is then used to identify markers for a minimum spanning forest that is grown to segment the image using spatial and intensity information. To evaluate the authors’ classification method, they use DICE overlap ratios to compare the results of the automated classification to those obtained by manual segmentation on five patient images. Results: Comparison between the automatic and the manual segmentation shows that the minimum spanning forest based classification method was able to successfully classify dedicated breast CT image with average DICE ratios of 96.9%, 89.8%, and 89.5% for fat, glandular, and skin tissue, respectively. Conclusions: A 2D minimum spanning forest based classification method was proposed and evaluated for classifying the fat, skin, and glandular tissue in dedicated breast CT images. The classification method can be used for dense breast tissue quantification, radiation dose assessment, and other applications in breast imaging.

  15. A minimum spanning forest based classification method for dedicated breast CT images

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Robert; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and test an automated algorithm to classify different types of tissue in dedicated breast CT images. Methods: Images of a single breast of five different patients were acquired with a dedicated breast CT clinical prototype. The breast CT images were processed by a multiscale bilateral filter to reduce noise while keeping edge information and were corrected to overcome cupping artifacts. As skin and glandular tissue have similar CT values on breast CT images, morphologic processing is used to identify the skin based on its position information. A support vector machine (SVM) is trained and the resulting model used to create a pixelwise classification map of fat and glandular tissue. By combining the results of the skin mask with the SVM results, the breast tissue is classified as skin, fat, and glandular tissue. This map is then used to identify markers for a minimum spanning forest that is grown to segment the image using spatial and intensity information. To evaluate the authors’ classification method, they use DICE overlap ratios to compare the results of the automated classification to those obtained by manual segmentation on five patient images. Results: Comparison between the automatic and the manual segmentation shows that the minimum spanning forest based classification method was able to successfully classify dedicated breast CT image with average DICE ratios of 96.9%, 89.8%, and 89.5% for fat, glandular, and skin tissue, respectively. Conclusions: A 2D minimum spanning forest based classification method was proposed and evaluated for classifying the fat, skin, and glandular tissue in dedicated breast CT images. The classification method can be used for dense breast tissue quantification, radiation dose assessment, and other applications in breast imaging. PMID:26520712

  16. X-ray CT and NMR imaging of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.

    1986-03-01

    In little more than a decade, X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging have become the premier modalities of medical radiology. Both of these imaging techniques also promise to be useful tools in petrophysics and reservoir engineering, because CT and NMR can nondestructively image a host of physical and chemical properties of porous rocks and multiple fluid phases contained within their pores. The images are taken within seconds to minutes, at reservoir temperatures and pressures, with spatial resolution on the millimeter and submillimeter level. The physical properties imaged by the two techniques are complementary. CT images bulk density and effective atomic number. NMR images the nuclide concentration, M/sub 0/, of a variety of nuclei (/sup 1/H, /sup 19/F, /sup 23/Na, /sup 31/P, etc.), their longitudinal and transverse relaxation-time curves (t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/), and their chemical shift spectra. In rocks, CT images both rock matrix and pore fluids, while NMR images only mobile fluids and the interactions of these mobile fluids with the confining surfaces of the pores.

  17. Development of contrast-enhanced rodent imaging using functional CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yun; Stantz, Keith M.; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy; Steinmetz, Rosemary; Hutchins, Gary D.

    2003-05-01

    Micro-computed tomography (microCT) is capable of obtaining high-resolution images of skeletal tissues. However its image contrast among soft tissues remains inadequate for tumor detection. High speed functional computed tomography will be needed to image tumors by employing x-ray contrast medium. The functional microCT development will not only facilitate the image contrast enhancement among different tissues but also provide information of tumor physiology. To demonstrate the feasibility of functional CT in mouse imaging, sequential computed tomography is performed in mice after contrast material administration using a high-speed clinical CT scanner. Although the resolution of the clinical scanner is not sufficient to dissolve the anatomic details of rodents, bulky physiological parameters in major organs such as liver, kidney, pancreas, and ovaries (testicular) can be examined. For data analysis, a two-compartmental model is employed and implemented to characterize the tissue physiological parameters (regional blood flow, capillary permeability, and relative compartment volumes.) The measured contrast dynamics in kidneys are fitted with the compartmental model to derive the kidney tissue physiology. The study result suggests that it is feasible to extract mouse tissue physiology using functional CT imaging technology.

  18. Therapeutic response assessment using 3D ultrasound for hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer: Application of a personalized, 3D-printed tumor model using CT images

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ye Ra; Park, Sang Joon; Hur, Bo Yun; Han, Joon Koo

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims To evaluate accuracy and reliability of three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) for response evaluation of hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer (CRC) using a personalized 3D-printed tumor model. Methods Twenty patients with liver metastasis from CRC who underwent baseline and after chemotherapy CT, were retrospectively included. Personalized 3D-printed tumor models using CT were fabricated. Two radiologists measured volume of each 3D printing model using 3D US. With CT as a reference, we compared difference between CT and US tumor volume. The response evaluation was based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Results 3D US tumor volume showed no significant difference from CT volume (7.18 ± 5.44 mL, 8.31 ± 6.32 mL vs 7.42 ± 5.76 mL in CT, p>0.05). 3D US provided a high correlation coefficient with CT (r = 0.953, r = 0.97) as well as a high inter-observer intraclass correlation (0.978; 0.958–0.988). Regarding response, 3D US was in agreement with CT in 17 and 18 out of 20 patients for observer 1 and 2 with excellent agreement (κ = 0.961). Conclusions 3D US tumor volume using a personalized 3D-printed model is an accurate and reliable method for the response evaluation in comparison with CT tumor volume. PMID:28797089

  19. [CT imaging--towards patient- and indication-specific optimization].

    PubMed

    Kortesniemi, Mika; Lantto, Eila

    2015-01-01

    The same CT imaging program should not be applied to all patients, because the required image quality and dose of radiation vary according to the indications and regions. The programs should be optimized on the basis of indication, size of the patient and usage of intravenously administered iodine contrast agent. New technical options are available for reducing the radiation exposure. Additional means of optimization include proper definition of the region being imaged, avoidance of redundant series of images, selection of correct image quality, tube current and voltage, and new methods of calculating images. Patients' radiation exposure and clinical image quality should also be monitored.

  20. Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative {sup 99m}Tc SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (μ) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (σ ∼ 200–400 HU) resulted in low μ-maps noise (σ ∼ 1%–3%). Noise levels greater than ∼10% in 140 keV μ-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ∼15% in {sup 99m}Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 4 μGy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected μ values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in μ. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ∼100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in μ{sub 140} {sub keV} on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ∼10% into the reconstructed {sup 99m}Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because

  1. Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a single lesion (pulmonary nodule) in the right lung. This nodule is seen as the light circle in the upper portion of the dark area on the left side of the picture. A normal lung would look completely black in a CT scan.

  2. Acute small bowel ischemia: CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Enrica; Mortelé, Koenraad J; Ji, Hoon; Wiesner, Walter; Ros, Pablo R

    2003-10-01

    Small bowel ischemia is a disorder related to a variety of conditions resulting in interruption or reduction of the blood supply of the small intestine. It may present with various clinical and radiologic manifestations, and ranges pathologically from localized transient ischemia to catastrophic necrosis of the intestinal tract. The primary causes of insufficient blood flow to the small intestine are various and include thromboembolism (50% of cases), nonocclusive causes, bowel obstruction, neoplasms, vasculitis, abdominal inflammatory conditions, trauma, chemotherapy, radiation, and corrosive injury. Computed tomography (CT) can demonstrate changes because of ischemic bowel accurately, may be helpful in determining the primary cause of ischemia, and can demonstrate important coexistent findings or complications. However, common CT findings in acute small bowel ischemia are not specific and, therefore, it is often a combination of clinical, laboratory and radiologic signs that may lead to a correct diagnosis. Understanding the pathogenesis of various conditions leading to mesenteric ischemia and being familiar with the spectrum of diagnostic CT signs may help the radiologist recognize ischemic small bowel disease and avoid delayed diagnosis. The aim of this article is to provide a review of the pathogenesis and various causes of acute small bowel ischemia and to demonstrate the contribution of CT in the diagnosis of this complex disease.

  3. Imaging of Orthotopic Glioblastoma Xenografts in Mice Using a Clinical CT Scanner: Comparison with Micro-CT and Histology

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Stefanie; Mürle, Bettina; Felix, Manuela; Arns, Anna; Groden, Christoph; Wenz, Frederik; Hug, Andreas; Glatting, Gerhard; Kramer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is an increasing need for small animal in vivo imaging in murine orthotopic glioma models. Because dedicated small animal scanners are not available ubiquitously, the applicability of a clinical CT scanner for visualization and measurement of intracerebrally growing glioma xenografts in living mice was validated. Materials and Methods 2.5x106 U87MG cells were orthotopically implanted in NOD/SCID/ᵞc-/- mice (n = 9). Mice underwent contrast-enhanced (300 μl Iomeprol i.v.) imaging using a micro-CT (80 kV, 75 μAs, 360° rotation, 1,000 projections, scan time 33 s, resolution 40 x 40 x 53 μm) and a clinical CT scanner (4-row multislice detector; 120 kV, 150 mAs, slice thickness 0.5 mm, feed rotation 0.5 mm, resolution 98 x 98 x 500 μm). Mice were sacrificed and the brain was worked up histologically. In all modalities tumor volume was measured by two independent readers. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured from reconstructed CT-scans (0.5 mm slice thickness; n = 18). Results Tumor volumes (mean±SD mm3) were similar between both CT-modalities (micro-CT: 19.8±19.0, clinical CT: 19.8±18.8; Wilcoxon signed-rank test p = 0.813). Moreover, between reader analyses for each modality showed excellent agreement as demonstrated by correlation analysis (Spearman-Rho >0.9; p<0.01 for all correlations). Histologically measured tumor volumes (11.0±11.2) were significantly smaller due to shrinkage artifacts (p<0.05). CNR and SNR were 2.1±1.0 and 1.1±0.04 for micro-CT and 23.1±24.0 and 1.9±0.7 for the clinical CTscanner, respectively. Conclusion Clinical CT scanners may reliably be used for in vivo imaging and volumetric analysis of brain tumor growth in mice. PMID:27829015

  4. Newer CT applications and their alternatives: what is appropriate in children?

    PubMed

    Guillerman, R Paul

    2011-09-01

    Innovations in image acquisition and reconstruction technologies have greatly expanded the range of CT applications available in the routine clinical setting. CT images of sub-millimeter resolution can now be acquired of entire body regions in a few seconds or even sub-second time, allowing depiction of fine anatomical detail uncompromised by motion artifact. With sophisticated visualization software, image data can be processed into multiplanar, volume-rendered, cine and other formats to better display anatomical abnormalities and facilitate newer applications such as CT angiography, enterography, urography, tracheobronchography and cardiac CT. Newer applications including dual-energy material decomposition CT are furthering the transition of CT from a purely morphological to a combined anatomical, functional and metabolic imaging technique. These newer applications have largely been pioneered in adult populations, and heightened concern of the risk of carcinogenesis from ionizing radiation tempers dissemination of their use in children. Similar information can often be gleaned from alternative imaging modalities without ionizing radiation exposure, such as MRI and US, and what is most appropriate in children will depend on relative diagnostic efficacy, cost, availability and local expertise.

  5. Incremental Value of Adenosine-induced Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging with Dual-Source CT at Cardiac CT Angiography1

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Filho, Jose A.; Blankstein, Ron; Shturman, Leonid D.; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Okada, David R.; Rogers, Ian S.; Ghoshhajra, Brian; Hoffmann, Udo; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Mamuya, Wilfred S.; Brady, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: First, to assess the feasibility of a protocol involving stress-induced perfusion evaluated at computed tomography (CT) combined with cardiac CT angiography in a single examination and second, to assess the incremental value of perfusion imaging over cardiac CT angiography in a dual-source technique for the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in a high-risk population. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval and informed patient consent were obtained before patient enrollment in the study. The study was HIPAA compliant. Thirty-five patients at high risk for CAD were prospectively enrolled for evaluation of the feasibility of CT perfusion imaging. All patients underwent retrospectively electrocardiographically gated (helical) adenosine stress CT perfusion imaging followed by prospectively electrocardiographically gated (axial) rest myocardial CT perfusion imaging. Analysis was performed in three steps: (a)Coronary arterial stenoses were scored for severity and reader confidence at cardiac CT angiography, (b)myocardial perfusion defects were identified and scored for severity and reversibility at CT perfusion imaging, and (c)coronary stenosis severity was reclassified according to perfusion findings at combined cardiac CT angiography and CT perfusion imaging. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), and positive predictive value (PPV) of cardiac CT angiography before and after CT perfusion analysis were calculated. Results: With use of a reference standard of greater than 50% stenosis at invasive angiography, all parameters of diagnostic accuracy increased after CT perfusion analysis: Sensitivity increased from 83% to 91%; specificity, from 71% to 91%; PPV, from 66% to 86%; and NPV, from 87% to 93%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve increased significantly, from 0.77 to 0.90 (P < .005). Conclusion: A combination protocol involving adenosine perfusion CT imaging and cardiac

  6. MIND Demons for MR-to-CT deformable image registration in image-guided spine surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Khanna, A. J.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Prince, J. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Localization of target anatomy and critical structures defined in preoperative MR images can be achieved by means of multi-modality deformable registration to intraoperative CT. We propose a symmetric diffeomorphic deformable registration algorithm incorporating a modality independent neighborhood descriptor (MIND) and a robust Huber metric for MR-to-CT registration. Method: The method, called MIND Demons, solves for the deformation field between two images by optimizing an energy functional that incorporates both the forward and inverse deformations, smoothness on the velocity fields and the diffeomorphisms, a modality-insensitive similarity function suitable to multi-modality images, and constraints on geodesics in Lagrangian coordinates. Direct optimization (without relying on an exponential map of stationary velocity fields used in conventional diffeomorphic Demons) is carried out using a Gauss-Newton method for fast convergence. Registration performance and sensitivity to registration parameters were analyzed in simulation, in phantom experiments, and clinical studies emulating application in image-guided spine surgery, and results were compared to conventional mutual information (MI) free-form deformation (FFD), local MI (LMI) FFD, and normalized MI (NMI) Demons. Result: The method yielded sub-voxel invertibility (0.006 mm) and nonsingular spatial Jacobians with capability to preserve local orientation and topology. It demonstrated improved registration accuracy in comparison to the reference methods, with mean target registration error (TRE) of 1.5 mm compared to 10.9, 2.3, and 4.6 mm for MI FFD, LMI FFD, and NMI Demons methods, respectively. Validation in clinical studies demonstrated realistic deformation with sub-voxel TRE in cases of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. Conclusions: A modality-independent deformable registration method has been developed to estimate a

  7. MIND Demons for MR-to-CT Deformable Image Registration In Image-Guided Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Reaungamornrat, S.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Khanna, A. J.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Prince, J. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Localization of target anatomy and critical structures defined in preoperative MR images can be achieved by means of multi-modality deformable registration to intraoperative CT. We propose a symmetric diffeomorphic deformable registration algorithm incorporating a modality independent neighborhood descriptor (MIND) and a robust Huber metric for MR-to-CT registration. Method The method, called MIND Demons, solves for the deformation field between two images by optimizing an energy functional that incorporates both the forward and inverse deformations, smoothness on the velocity fields and the diffeomorphisms, a modality-insensitive similarity function suitable to multi-modality images, and constraints on geodesics in Lagrangian coordinates. Direct optimization (without relying on an exponential map of stationary velocity fields used in conventional diffeomorphic Demons) is carried out using a Gauss-Newton method for fast convergence. Registration performance and sensitivity to registration parameters were analyzed in simulation, in phantom experiments, and clinical studies emulating application in image-guided spine surgery, and results were compared to conventional mutual information (MI) free-form deformation (FFD), local MI (LMI) FFD, and normalized MI (NMI) Demons. Result The method yielded sub-voxel invertibility (0.006 mm) and nonsingular spatial Jacobians with capability to preserve local orientation and topology. It demonstrated improved registration accuracy in comparison to the reference methods, with mean target registration error (TRE) of 1.5 mm compared to 10.9, 2.3, and 4.6 mm for MI FFD, LMI FFD, and NMI Demons methods, respectively. Validation in clinical studies demonstrated realistic deformation with sub-voxel TRE in cases of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. Conclusions A modality-independent deformable registration method has been developed to estimate a viscoelastic diffeomorphic map between preoperative MR and intraoperative CT. The

  8. MIND Demons for MR-to-CT Deformable Image Registration In Image-Guided Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Reaungamornrat, S; De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Wolinsky, J-P; Khanna, A J; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Prince, J L; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-02-27

    Localization of target anatomy and critical structures defined in preoperative MR images can be achieved by means of multi-modality deformable registration to intraoperative CT. We propose a symmetric diffeomorphic deformable registration algorithm incorporating a modality independent neighborhood descriptor (MIND) and a robust Huber metric for MR-to-CT registration. The method, called MIND Demons, solves for the deformation field between two images by optimizing an energy functional that incorporates both the forward and inverse deformations, smoothness on the velocity fields and the diffeomorphisms, a modality-insensitive similarity function suitable to multi-modality images, and constraints on geodesics in Lagrangian coordinates. Direct optimization (without relying on an exponential map of stationary velocity fields used in conventional diffeomorphic Demons) is carried out using a Gauss-Newton method for fast convergence. Registration performance and sensitivity to registration parameters were analyzed in simulation, in phantom experiments, and clinical studies emulating application in image-guided spine surgery, and results were compared to conventional mutual information (MI) free-form deformation (FFD), local MI (LMI) FFD, and normalized MI (NMI) Demons. The method yielded sub-voxel invertibility (0.006 mm) and nonsingular spatial Jacobians with capability to preserve local orientation and topology. It demonstrated improved registration accuracy in comparison to the reference methods, with mean target registration error (TRE) of 1.5 mm compared to 10.9, 2.3, and 4.6 mm for MI FFD, LMI FFD, and NMI Demons methods, respectively. Validation in clinical studies demonstrated realistic deformation with sub-voxel TRE in cases of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. A modality-independent deformable registration method has been developed to estimate a viscoelastic diffeomorphic map between preoperative MR and intraoperative CT. The method yields registration

  9. Joint Lung CT Image Segmentation: A Hierarchical Bayesian Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wenjun; Ma, Luyao; Yang, Tiejun; Liang, Jiali

    2016-01-01

    Accurate lung CT image segmentation is of great clinical value, especially when it comes to delineate pathological regions including lung tumor. In this paper, we present a novel framework that jointly segments multiple lung computed tomography (CT) images via hierarchical Dirichlet process (HDP). In specifics, based on the assumption that lung CT images from different patients share similar image structure (organ sets and relative positioning), we derive a mathematical model to segment them simultaneously so that shared information across patients could be utilized to regularize each individual segmentation. Moreover, compared to many conventional models, the algorithm requires little manual involvement due to the nonparametric nature of Dirichlet process (DP). We validated proposed model upon clinical data consisting of healthy and abnormal (lung cancer) patients. We demonstrate that, because of the joint segmentation fashion, more accurate and consistent segmentations could be obtained. PMID:27611188

  10. Initial analysis of the middle problem in CT image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiansheng; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge

    2017-04-05

    The interior and exterior problems have been extensively studied in the field of reconstruction of computed tomography (CT) images, which lead to important theoretical and practical results. In this study, we formulate a middle problem of CT image reconstruction, which is more challenging than either the interior or exterior problems. In the middle problem of CT image reconstruction, projection data are measured through and only through the middle dough-like region, so that each projection profile misses data not only internally but also on both sides. For an object with a radially symmetric exterior, we proved that the middle problem could be uniquely solved if the middle ring-shaped zone is piecewise constant or there is a known sub-region inside this middle region. Then, we designed and evaluated a POCS-based algorithm for middle tomography, which is to reconstruct a middle image only from the available data. Finally, the remaining issues are also discussed for further research.

  11. [Micro-CT imaging of guinea pig cochlear].

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng-cheng; Jiang, Zi-dong; Zhang, Kai

    2012-12-25

    To employ micro-CT equipment for nondestructive three-dimensional (3D) imaging of internal ear. The guinea pigs were anesthetized by napental and bilateral cochleas harvested. Cochlea was fixed in glutaraldehyde before scanning of micro-CT. Two-dimensional (2D) images were acquired for a 3D model of reconstruction. The 2D images was distinct enough to visualize vestibular gallery, scala media, scala tympani, Reissner's membrane, velum, organ of Corti and spiral ganglion, etc. The 3D structure model was excellent for viewing and free to revolve in any axial direction. Micro-CT may allow nondestructive three-dimensional imaging of internal ear. As compared with the traditional method of morphology, this approach is able to save samples, easy to operate and has a high resolution. And it is more easily popularized than the synchrotron radiation approach.

  12. CT Imaging of Hardwood Logs for Lumber Production

    Treesearch

    Daniel L. Schmoldt; Pei Li; A. Lynn Abbott

    1996-01-01

    Hardwood sawmill operators need to improve the conversion of raw material (logs) into lumber. Internal log scanning provides detailed information that can aid log processors in improving lumber recovery. However, scanner data (i.e. tomographic images) need to be analyzed prior to presentation to saw operators. Automatic labeling of computer tomography (CT) images is...

  13. CT guided diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as blood, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer detection. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at wavelengths of 650 and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements, the width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an EMCCD camera with air cooling is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we report our effort and progress on the integration of the multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  14. Enabling image fusion for a CT guided needle placement robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifabadi, Reza; Xu, Sheng; Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Velusamy, Gnanasekar; Puhazhendi, Kaliyappan; Wood, Bradford J.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: This study presents development and integration of hardware and software that enables ultrasound (US) and computer tomography (CT) fusion for a FDA-approved CT-guided needle placement robot. Having real-time US image registered to a priori-taken intraoperative CT image provides more anatomic information during needle insertion, in order to target hard-to-see lesions or avoid critical structures invisible to CT, track target motion, and to better monitor ablation treatment zone in relation to the tumor location. Method: A passive encoded mechanical arm is developed for the robot in order to hold and track an abdominal US transducer. This 4 degrees of freedom (DOF) arm is designed to attach to the robot end-effector. The arm is locked by default and is released by a press of button. The arm is designed such that the needle is always in plane with US image. The articulated arm is calibrated to improve its accuracy. Custom designed software (OncoNav, NIH) was developed to fuse real-time US image to a priori-taken CT. Results: The accuracy of the end effector before and after passive arm calibration was 7.07mm +/- 4.14mm and 1.74mm +/-1.60mm, respectively. The accuracy of the US image to the arm calibration was 5mm. The feasibility of US-CT fusion using the proposed hardware and software was demonstrated in an abdominal commercial phantom. Conclusions: Calibration significantly improved the accuracy of the arm in US image tracking. Fusion of US to CT using the proposed hardware and software was feasible.

  15. A simple method for labeling CT images with respiratory states

    SciTech Connect

    Berlinger, Kajetan; Sauer, Otto; Vences, Lucia; Roth, Michael

    2006-09-15

    A method is described for labeling CT images with their respiratory state by a needle, connected to the patient's chest/abdomen. By means of a leverage the needle follows the abdominal respiratory motion. The needle is visible as a blurred spot in every CT slice. The method was tested with nine patients. A series of volume scans during free breathing was performed. The detected positions of the moving needle in every single slice were compared to each other thus enabling respiratory state assignment. The tool is an inexpensive alternative to complex respiratory measuring tools for four dimensional (4D) CT and was greatly accepted in the clinic due to its simplicity.

  16. Adaptively Tuned Iterative Low Dose CT Image Denoising

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, SayedMasoud; Paul, Narinder S.; Beheshti, Soosan; Cobbold, Richard S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Improving image quality is a critical objective in low dose computed tomography (CT) imaging and is the primary focus of CT image denoising. State-of-the-art CT denoising algorithms are mainly based on iterative minimization of an objective function, in which the performance is controlled by regularization parameters. To achieve the best results, these should be chosen carefully. However, the parameter selection is typically performed in an ad hoc manner, which can cause the algorithms to converge slowly or become trapped in a local minimum. To overcome these issues a noise confidence region evaluation (NCRE) method is used, which evaluates the denoising residuals iteratively and compares their statistics with those produced by additive noise. It then updates the parameters at the end of each iteration to achieve a better match to the noise statistics. By combining NCRE with the fundamentals of block matching and 3D filtering (BM3D) approach, a new iterative CT image denoising method is proposed. It is shown that this new denoising method improves the BM3D performance in terms of both the mean square error and a structural similarity index. Moreover, simulations and patient results show that this method preserves the clinically important details of low dose CT images together with a substantial noise reduction. PMID:26089972

  17. Pediatric renal leukemia: spectrum of CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Hilmes, Melissa A; Dillman, Jonathan R; Mody, Rajen J; Strouse, Peter J

    2008-04-01

    The kidneys are a site of extramedullary leukemic disease that can be readily detected by CT. To demonstrate the spectrum of CT findings in children with renal leukemic involvement. Twelve children were identified retrospectively as having renal leukemic involvement by contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen. Contrast-enhanced CT images through the kidneys of each patient were reviewed by two pediatric radiologists. Pertinent imaging findings and renal lengths were documented. The electronic medical record was accessed to obtain relevant clinical and pathologic information. Five patients with renal leukemic involvement presented with multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses, while three patients demonstrated large areas of wedge-shaped and geographic low attenuation. Four other patients presented with unique imaging findings, including a solitary unilateral low-attenuation mass, solitary bilateral low-attenuation masses, multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses including unilateral large conglomerate masses, and bilateral areas of ill-defined parenchymal low attenuation. Two patients showed unilateral nephromegaly, while eight other patients showed bilateral nephromegaly. Two patients had normal size kidneys. Two patients had elevated serum creatinine concentrations at the time of imaging. Renal leukemic involvement in children can present with a variety of CT imaging findings. Focal renal abnormalities as well as nephromegaly are frequently observed. Most commonly, renal leukemic involvement does not appear to impair renal function.

  18. Adaptively Tuned Iterative Low Dose CT Image Denoising.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, SayedMasoud; Paul, Narinder S; Beheshti, Soosan; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2015-01-01

    Improving image quality is a critical objective in low dose computed tomography (CT) imaging and is the primary focus of CT image denoising. State-of-the-art CT denoising algorithms are mainly based on iterative minimization of an objective function, in which the performance is controlled by regularization parameters. To achieve the best results, these should be chosen carefully. However, the parameter selection is typically performed in an ad hoc manner, which can cause the algorithms to converge slowly or become trapped in a local minimum. To overcome these issues a noise confidence region evaluation (NCRE) method is used, which evaluates the denoising residuals iteratively and compares their statistics with those produced by additive noise. It then updates the parameters at the end of each iteration to achieve a better match to the noise statistics. By combining NCRE with the fundamentals of block matching and 3D filtering (BM3D) approach, a new iterative CT image denoising method is proposed. It is shown that this new denoising method improves the BM3D performance in terms of both the mean square error and a structural similarity index. Moreover, simulations and patient results show that this method preserves the clinically important details of low dose CT images together with a substantial noise reduction.

  19. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Weidlich, Georg A.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities—fan beam and cone beam—was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient. PMID:27752404

  20. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities.

    PubMed

    Lechuga, Lawrence; Weidlich, Georg A

    2016-09-12

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities-fan beam and cone beam-was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient.

  1. Possible application of CT morphometry of the calcaneus and talus in forensic anthropological identification.

    PubMed

    Inamori-Kawamoto, Osamu; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Mustafa, Asmaa Mohammed Hishmat; Sogawa, Nozomi; Kanou, Tetsuya; Oritani, Shigeki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) data provide information for volumetric and radiographic density analysis. The present study investigated the application of virtual CT volumetry of the tarsal bones to estimation of the sex, stature, and body weight using postmortem CT (PMCT) data of forensic autopsy cases. Three-dimensional (3D) images of the bilateral foot bones of intact Japanese subjects after adolescence (age ≥ 15 years, n = 179, 100 males and 79 females) were reconstructed on an automated CT image analyzer system. Measured parameters were mass volume, mean CT value (HU), and total CT value of the talus and calcaneus. Mean CT values of these bones showed age-dependent decreases in elderly subjects over 60 years of age for both sexes, with significant sex-related differences especially in the elderly. The mass volumes and total CT values of the talus and calcaneus showed significant sex-related differences, and also moderate correlations with body height and weight for bilateral bones in all cases (r = 0.58-0.78, p < 0.0001); however, the correlations of these parameters of the female talus with body weight were insufficient (r = 0.41-0.61, p < 0.0001). These observations indicate the applicability of virtual CT morphometry of the talus and calcaneus using an automated analyzer to estimate the sex and stature in forensic identification; however, greater variations should be considered in body weight estimations of females.

  2. Inter-plane artifact suppression in tomosynthesis using 3D CT image data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    the proposed method. Conclusions The proposed tomosynthesis technique can improve image contrast with aids of 3D whole volume CT images. Even though local tomosynthesis needs extra 3D CT scanning, it may find clinical applications in special situations in which extra 3D CT scan is already available or allowed. PMID:22151538

  3. Inter-plane artifact suppression in tomosynthesis using 3D CT image data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae G; Jin, Seung O; Cho, Min H; Lee, Soo Y

    2011-12-10

    proposed tomosynthesis technique can improve image contrast with aids of 3D whole volume CT images. Even though local tomosynthesis needs extra 3D CT scanning, it may find clinical applications in special situations in which extra 3D CT scan is already available or allowed.

  4. Efficient iterative image reconstruction algorithm for dedicated breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antropova, Natalia; Sanchez, Adrian; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Boone, John; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-03-01

    Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) is currently being studied as a potential screening method for breast cancer. The X-ray exposure is set low to achieve an average glandular dose comparable to that of mammography, yielding projection data that contains high levels of noise. Iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithms may be well-suited for the system since they potentially reduce the effects of noise in the reconstructed images. However, IIR outcomes can be difficult to control since the algorithm parameters do not directly correspond to the image properties. Also, IIR algorithms are computationally demanding and have optimal parameter settings that depend on the size and shape of the breast and positioning of the patient. In this work, we design an efficient IIR algorithm with meaningful parameter specifications and that can be used on a large, diverse sample of bCT cases. The flexibility and efficiency of this method comes from having the final image produced by a linear combination of two separately reconstructed images - one containing gray level information and the other with enhanced high frequency components. Both of the images result from few iterations of separate IIR algorithms. The proposed algorithm depends on two parameters both of which have a well-defined impact on image quality. The algorithm is applied to numerous bCT cases from a dedicated bCT prototype system developed at University of California, Davis.

  5. Multiscale registration of planning CT and daily cone beam CT images for adaptive radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paquin, Dana; Levy, Doron; Xing Lei

    2009-01-15

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is the incorporation of daily images in the radiotherapy treatment process so that the treatment plan can be evaluated and modified to maximize the amount of radiation dose to the tumor while minimizing the amount of radiation delivered to healthy tissue. Registration of planning images with daily images is thus an important component of ART. In this article, the authors report their research on multiscale registration of planning computed tomography (CT) images with daily cone beam CT (CBCT) images. The multiscale algorithm is based on the hierarchical multiscale image decomposition of E. Tadmor, S. Nezzar, and L. Vese [Multiscale Model. Simul. 2(4), pp. 554-579 (2004)]. Registration is achieved by decomposing the images to be registered into a series of scales using the (BV, L{sup 2}) decomposition and initially registering the coarsest scales of the image using a landmark-based registration algorithm. The resulting transformation is then used as a starting point to deformably register the next coarse scales with one another. This procedure is iterated at each stage using the transformation computed by the previous scale registration as the starting point for the current registration. The authors present the results of studies of rectum, head-neck, and prostate CT-CBCT registration, and validate their registration method quantitatively using synthetic results in which the exact transformations our known, and qualitatively using clinical deformations in which the exact results are not known.

  6. Brain CT image similarity retrieval method based on uncertain location graph.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haiwei; Li, Pengyuan; Li, Qing; Han, Qilong; Feng, Xiaoning; Gao, Linlin

    2014-03-01

    A number of brain computed tomography (CT) images stored in hospitals that contain valuable information should be shared to support computer-aided diagnosis systems. Finding the similar brain CT images from the brain CT image database can effectively help doctors diagnose based on the earlier cases. However, the similarity retrieval for brain CT images requires much higher accuracy than the general images. In this paper, a new model of uncertain location graph (ULG) is presented for brain CT image modeling and similarity retrieval. According to the characteristics of brain CT image, we propose a novel method to model brain CT image to ULG based on brain CT image texture. Then, a scheme for ULG similarity retrieval is introduced. Furthermore, an effective index structure is applied to reduce the searching time. Experimental results reveal that our method functions well on brain CT images similarity retrieval with higher accuracy and efficiency.

  7. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A; Lonsdale, Markus; Coche, Emmanuel

    2010-09-01

    The positron emission tomography in combination with CT in hybrid, cross-modality imaging systems (PET/CT) gains more and more importance as a part of the treatment-planning procedure in radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET), as a integral part of nuclear medicine imaging and non-invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy. By the choice of the PET-Tracer, a variety of different metabolic processes can be visualized. First and foremost, this is the glucose metabolism of a tissue as well as for instance hypoxia or cell proliferation. This paper comprises the system characteristics of hybrid PET/CT systems. Acquisition and processing protocols are described in general and modifications to cope with the special needs in radiooncology. This starts with the different position of the patient on a special table top, continues with the use of the same fixation material as used for positioning of the patient in radiooncology while simulation and irradiation and leads to special processing protocols that include the delineation of the volumes that are subject to treatment planning and irradiation (PTV, GTV, CTV, etc.). General CT acquisition and processing parameters as well as the use of contrast enhancement of the CT are described. The possible risks and pitfalls the investigator could face during the hybrid-imaging procedure are explained and listed. The interdisciplinary use of different imaging modalities implies a increase of the volume of data created. These data need to be stored and communicated fast, safe and correct. Therefore, the DICOM-Standard provides objects and classes for this purpose (DICOM RT). Furthermore, the standard DICOM objects and classes for nuclear medicine (NM, PT) and

  8. Window classification of brain CT images in biomedical articles.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhiyun; Antani, Sameer; Long, L Rodney; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R

    2012-01-01

    Effective capability to search biomedical articles based on visual properties of article images may significantly augment information retrieval in the future. In this paper, we present a new method to classify the window setting types of brain CT images. Windowing is a technique frequently used in the evaluation of CT scans, and is used to enhance contrast for the particular tissue or abnormality type being evaluated. In particular, it provides radiologists with an enhanced view of certain types of cranial abnormalities, such as the skull lesions and bone dysplasia which are usually examined using the " bone window" setting and illustrated in biomedical articles using "bone window images". Due to the inherent large variations of images among articles, it is important that the proposed method is robust. Our algorithm attained 90% accuracy in classifying images as bone window or non-bone window in a 210 image data set.

  9. Molecular imaging for prostate cancer: Performance analysis of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT versus choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Michaud, L; Touijer, K A

    2017-06-01

    There is a need for a precise and reliable imaging to improve the management of prostate cancer. In recent years the PET/CT with choline has changed the handling of prostate cancer in Europe, and it is commonly used for initial stratification or for the diagnosis of a biochemical recurrence, although it does not lack limitations. Other markers are being tested, including the ligand of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), that seems to offer encouraging prospects. The goal of this piece of work was to critically review the role of choline and PSMA PET/CT in prostate cancer. A systematic literature review of databases PUBMED/MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted searching for articles fully published in English on the PET marker in prostate cancer and its clinical application. It seems as 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT is better than PET/CT in prostate cancer to detect primary prostate lesions, initial metastases in the lymph nodes and recurrence. However, further research is required to obtain high-level tests. Also, other PET markers are studied. Moreover, the emergence of a new PET/MR camera could change the performance of PET imaging. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. CT-PET weighted image fusion for separately scanned whole body rat

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jung W.; Kwon, Oh-Kyu; Scheinost, Dustin; Sinusas, Albert J.; Cline, Gary W.; Papademetris, Xenophon

    2012-01-01

    regular demons and the normalized mutual information (NMI)-based nonrigid free-form deformation (FFD) registration, the proposed weighted demons registration method shows average M-HD errors: 3.99 ± 1.37 (OSP = 10), 5.04 ± 1.59 (OSP = 20) and 5.92 ± 1.61 (OSP = ∞) with statistical significance (p < 0.0003) respectively, while NMI-based nonrigid FFD has average M-HD errors: 5.74 ± 1.73 (OSP = 10), 7.40 ± 7.84 (OSP = 20) and 9.83 ± 4.13 (OSP = ∞), and the regular demons has average M-HD errors: 6.79 ± 0.83 (OSP = 10), 9.19 ± 2.39 (OSP = 20) and 11.63 ± 3.99 (OSP = ∞), respectively. In addition to M-HD comparisons, the visual comparisons on the faint-edged region between the CT and the aligned PET images also show the encouraging improvements over the other methods. Conclusions: In the whole body multimodal registration between CT and PET images, the utilization of both the transmission-PET and the emission-PET images in the registration process by emphasizing particular regions of the transmission-PET image using an emission-PET image is effective. This method holds promise for other image fusion applications where multiple (more than two) input images should be registered into a single informative image. PMID:22225323

  11. CT vaginography: a new CT technique for imaging of upper and middle vaginal fistulas.

    PubMed

    Botsikas, Diomidis; Pluchino, Nicola; Kalovidouri, Anastasia; Platon, Alexandra; Montet, Xavier; Dallenbach, Patrick; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2017-05-01

    Different types of vaginal fistulas is a relatively uncommon condition in the Western world but very frequent in developing countries. In the past, conventional vaginography was the radiological examination of choice for exploring this condition. CT and MRI are now both used for this purpose. Our objective was to test the feasibility and to explore the potential role of a new CT imaging technique implementing vaginal introitus obstruction and opacification of the vagina with iodine contrast agent, to show patency of a fistula. We describe the technical protocol of CT-vaginography as performed in Geneva University Hospitals, including vaginal catheterization with a Foley catheter and obstruction of the introitus by inflating the balloon of the catheter. We also report three cases of patients with suspected vaginal fistula who underwent CT-vaginography. The examinations were technically successful. In one patient, it revealed the presence of fistulous pathways from the vaginal fornix along the bilateral infected surgical prostheses. In a second patient, it showed a fistula between the vagina and the necrotic cavity of a recurrent cervical cancer. In a third patient, it proved the absence of a suspected vaginal fistula. CT-vaginography is a technically feasible CT protocol that provides anatomical and functional information on clinically suspected vaginal fistulas. Advances in knowledge: After the abandon of conventional vaginography in the era of transaxial imaging, the current modalities of imaging vaginal fistulas provide excellent anatomical detail but less functional information concerning the permeability of a vaginal fistulous pathway. We propose the use of CT-vaginography, a technical protocol that we describe in detail.

  12. Prior CT imaging history for patients who undergo PAN CT for acute traumatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Kenter, Jeremy; Blow, Osbert; Krall, Scott P.; Gest, Albert; Smith, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Objective. A single PAN scan may provide more radiation to a patient than is felt to be safe within a one-year period. Our objective was to determine how many patients admitted to the trauma service following a PAN scan had prior CT imaging within our six-hospital system. Methods. We performed a secondary analysis of a prospectively collected trauma registry. The study was based at a level-two trauma center and five affiliated hospitals, which comprise 70.6% of all Emergency Department visits within a twelve county region of southern Texas. Electronic medical records were reviewed dating from the point of trauma evaluation back to December 5, 2005 to determine evidence of prior CT imaging. Results. There were 867 patients were admitted to the trauma service between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. 460 (53%) received a PAN scan and were included in the study group. The mean age of the study group was 37.7 ± 1.54 years old, 24.8% were female, and the mean ISS score was 13.4 ± 1.07. The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle collision (47%). 65 (14%; 95% CI [11–18]%) of the patients had at least one prior CT. The most common prior studies performed were: CT head (29%; 19–42%), CT Face (29%; 19–42%) and CT Abdomen and Pelvis (18%; 11–30%). Conclusion. Within our trauma registry, 14% of patients had prior CT imaging within our hospital system before their traumatic event and PAN scan. PMID:26056616

  13. Liver recognition based on statistical shape model in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Dehui; Jiang, Xueqing; Shi, Fei; Zhu, Weifang; Chen, Xinjian

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, an automatic method is proposed to recognize the liver on clinical 3D CT images. The proposed method effectively use statistical shape model of the liver. Our approach consist of three main parts: (1) model training, in which shape variability is detected using principal component analysis from the manual annotation; (2) model localization, in which a fast Euclidean distance transformation based method is able to localize the liver in CT images; (3) liver recognition, the initial mesh is locally and iteratively adapted to the liver boundary, which is constrained with the trained shape model. We validate our algorithm on a dataset which consists of 20 3D CT images obtained from different patients. The average ARVD was 8.99%, the average ASSD was 2.69mm, the average RMSD was 4.92mm, the average MSD was 28.841mm, and the average MSD was 13.31%.

  14. Automatic coronary calcium scoring using noncontrast and contrast CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Guanyu Chen, Yang; Shu, Huazhong; Ning, Xiufang; Sun, Qiaoyu; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Calcium scoring is widely used to assess the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Accurate coronary artery calcification detection in noncontrast CT image is a prerequisite step for coronary calcium scoring. Currently, calcified lesions in the coronary arteries are manually identified by radiologists in clinical practice. Thus, in this paper, a fully automatic calcium scoring method was developed to alleviate the work load of the radiologists or cardiologists. Methods: The challenge of automatic coronary calcification detection is to discriminate the calcification in the coronary arteries from the calcification in the other tissues. Since the anatomy of coronary arteries is difficult to be observed in the noncontrast CT images, the contrast CT image of the same patient is used to extract the regions of the aorta, heart, and coronary arteries. Then, a patient-specific region-of-interest (ROI) is generated in the noncontrast CT image according to the segmentation results in the contrast CT image. This patient-specific ROI focuses on the regions in the neighborhood of coronary arteries for calcification detection, which can eliminate the calcifications in the surrounding tissues. A support vector machine classifier is applied finally to refine the results by removing possible image noise. Furthermore, the calcified lesions in the noncontrast images belonging to the different main coronary arteries are identified automatically using the labeling results of the extracted coronary arteries. Results: Forty datasets from four different CT machine vendors were used to evaluate their algorithm, which were provided by the MICCAI 2014 Coronary Calcium Scoring (orCaScore) Challenge. The sensitivity and positive predictive value for the volume of detected calcifications are 0.989 and 0.948. Only one patient out of 40 patients had been assigned to the wrong risk category defined according to Agatston scores (0, 1–100, 101–300, >300) by comparing with the ground

  15. Fast pseudo-CT synthesis from MRI T1-weighted images using a patch-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrado-Carvajal, A.; Alcain, E.; Montemayor, A. S.; Herraiz, J. L.; Rozenholc, Y.; Hernandez-Tamames, J. A.; Adalsteinsson, E.; Wald, L. L.; Malpica, N.

    2015-12-01

    MRI-based bone segmentation is a challenging task because bone tissue and air both present low signal intensity on MR images, making it difficult to accurately delimit the bone boundaries. However, estimating bone from MRI images may allow decreasing patient ionization by removing the need of patient-specific CT acquisition in several applications. In this work, we propose a fast GPU-based pseudo-CT generation from a patient-specific MRI T1-weighted image using a group-wise patch-based approach and a limited MRI and CT atlas dictionary. For every voxel in the input MR image, we compute the similarity of the patch containing that voxel with the patches of all MR images in the database, which lie in a certain anatomical neighborhood. The pseudo-CT is obtained as a local weighted linear combination of the CT values of the corresponding patches. The algorithm was implemented in a GPU. The use of patch-based techniques allows a fast and accurate estimation of the pseudo-CT from MR T1-weighted images, with a similar accuracy as the patient-specific CT. The experimental normalized cross correlation reaches 0.9324±0.0048 for an atlas with 10 datasets. The high NCC values indicate how our method can accurately approximate the patient-specific CT. The GPU implementation led to a substantial decrease in computational time making the approach suitable for real applications.

  16. Statistical image reconstruction for low-dose CT using nonlocal means-based regularization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Ma, Jianhua; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yan; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-09-01

    Low-dose computed tomography (CT) imaging without sacrifice of clinical tasks is desirable due to the growing concerns about excessive radiation exposure to the patients. One common strategy to achieve low-dose CT imaging is to lower the milliampere-second (mAs) setting in data scanning protocol. However, the reconstructed CT images by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method from the low-mAs acquisitions may be severely degraded due to the excessive noise. Statistical image reconstruction (SIR) methods have shown potentials to significantly improve the reconstructed image quality from the low-mAs acquisitions, wherein the regularization plays a critical role and an established family of regularizations is based on the Markov random field (MRF) model. Inspired by the success of nonlocal means (NLM) in image processing applications, in this work, we propose to explore the NLM-based regularization for SIR to reconstruct low-dose CT images from low-mAs acquisitions. Experimental results with both digital and physical phantoms consistently demonstrated that SIR with the NLM-based regularization can achieve more gains than SIR with the well-known Gaussian MRF regularization or the generalized Gaussian MRF regularization and the conventional FBP method, in terms of image noise reduction and resolution preservation.

  17. Statistical image reconstruction for low-dose CT using nonlocal means-based regularization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Ma, Jianhua; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yan; Lu, Hongbing

    2014-01-01

    Low-dose computed tomography (CT) imaging without sacrifice of clinical tasks is desirable due to the growing concerns about excessive radiation exposure to the patients. One common strategy to achieve low-dose CT imaging is to lower the milliampere-second (mAs) setting in data scanning protocol. However, the reconstructed CT images by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method from the low-mAs acquisitions may be severely degraded due to the excessive noise. Statistical image reconstruction (SIR) methods have shown potentials to significantly improve the reconstructed image quality from the low-mAs acquisitions, wherein the regularization plays a critical role and an established family of regularizations is based on the Markov random field (MRF) model. Inspired by the success of nonlocal means (NLM) in image processing applications, in this work, we propose to explore the NLM-based regularization for SIR to reconstruct low-dose CT images from low-mAs acquisitions. Experimental results with both digital and physical phantoms consistently demonstrated that SIR with the NLM-based regularization can achieve more gains than SIR with the well-known Gaussian MRF regularization or the generalized Gaussian MRF regularization and the conventional FBP method, in terms of image noise reduction and resolution preservation. PMID:24881498

  18. Image analysis of pulmonary nodules using micro CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, Noboru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Fujii, Masashi; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Tateno, Yukio; Matsui, Eisuke

    2001-07-01

    We are developing a micro-computed tomography (micro CT) system for imaging pulmonary nodules. The purpose is to enhance the physician performance in accessing the micro- architecture of the nodule for classification between malignant and benign nodules. The basic components of the micro CT system consist of microfocus X-ray source, a specimen manipulator, and an image intensifier detector coupled to charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. 3D image reconstruction was performed by the slice. A standard fan- beam convolution and backprojection algorithm was used to reconstruct the center plane intersecting the X-ray source. The preprocessing of the 3D image reconstruction included the correction of the geometrical distortions and the shading artifact introduced by the image intensifier. The main advantage of the system is to obtain a high spatial resolution which ranges between b micrometers and 25 micrometers . In this work we report on preliminary studies performed with the micro CT for imaging resected tissues of normal and abnormal lung. Experimental results reveal micro architecture of lung tissues, such as alveolar wall, septal wall of pulmonary lobule, and bronchiole. From the results, the micro CT system is expected to have interesting potentials for high confidential differential diagnosis.

  19. From the RSNA refresher courses: CT angiography: clinical applications in the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Fishman, E K

    2001-10-01

    The development of spiral computed tomography (CT) and subsequently multidetector CT has provided unparalleled opportunities for advancement of CT technology and clinical applications. One of the most influential developments has been CT angiography, which is the use of thin-section CT combined with postprocessing of imaging data by using a variety of three-dimensional reconstruction techniques to produce vascular maps that equal or exceed those provided by classic angiography in many applications. In the evaluation of pancreatic disease, the use of multidetector CT angiography enables the radiologist to produce vascular maps that clearly show tumor invasion of vasculature and the relationship of vessels to pancreatic masses. Anatomic areas for which the three-dimensional display is especially helpful include the confluence of the portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein and the more distal portions of the portal vein. Preliminary studies indicate that CT angiography may prove beneficial in the evaluation of ischemic bowel and active Crohn disease. CT angiography has proved extremely valuable for applications such as preoperative planning for hepatic resection, preoperative evaluation and planning for liver transplantation, pretreatment planning for patients considered for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, and pretreatment evaluation of portal vein patency for a variety of reasons. CT angiography can also provide supplemental information in patients with cirrhosis, upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding due to varices, or primary extrahepatic neoplasms.

  20. PET/CT imaging and radioimmunotherapy of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tagawa, Scott T.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Turkbey, Baris; Capala, Jacek; Choyke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in oncology is emerging as an important imaging tool. The most common radiotracer for PET/CT in oncology, 18F- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is not very useful in prostate cancer. However, in recent years other PET tracers have improved the accuracy of PET/CT imaging of prostate cancer. Among these, choline, labelled with 18F or 11C, 11C-acetate and 18F- fluoride have demonstrated promising results, and other new radiopharmaceuticals are currently under development and evaluation in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Large prospective clinical PET/CT trials are needed to establish the role of PET/CT in prostate cancer patients. Because there are only limited available therapeutic options for advanced metastatic prostate cancer, there is an urgent need for the development of more effective treatment modalities that could improve outcome. Prostate cancer represents an attractive target for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for several reasons, including pattern of metastatic spread (lymph nodes and bone marrow, sites with good access to circulating antibodies), and small volume disease (ideal for antigen access and antibody delivery). Furthermore, prostate cancer is also radiation sensitive. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed by virtually all prostate cancers, and represents an attractive target for RIT. Anti PSMA RIT demonstrates antitumor activity and is well tolerated. Clinical trials are underway to further improve upon treatment efficacy and patient selection. This review focuses on the recent advances of clinical PET/CT imaging and RIT of prostate

  1. Pixel-feature hybrid fusion for PET/CT images.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yang-Ming; Nortmann, Charles A

    2011-02-01

    Color blending is a popular display method for functional and anatomic image fusion. The underlay image is typically displayed in grayscale, and the overlay image is displayed in pseudo colors. This pixel-level fusion provides too much information for reviewers to analyze quickly and effectively and clutters the display. To improve the fusion image reviewing speed and reduce the information clutter, a pixel-feature hybrid fusion method is proposed and tested for PET/CT images. Segments of the colormap are selectively masked to have a few discrete colors, and pixels displayed in the masked colors are made transparent. The colormap thus creates a false contouring effect on overlay images and allows the underlay to show through to give contours an anatomic context. The PET standardized uptake value (SUV) is used to control where colormap segments are masked. Examples show that SUV features can be extracted and blended with CT image instantaneously for viewing and diagnosis, and the non-feature part of the PET image is transparent. The proposed pixel-feature hybrid fusion highlights PET SUV features on CT images and reduces display clutters. It is easy to implement and can be used as complementarily to existing pixel-level fusion methods.

  2. A biological phantom for evaluation of CT image reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammin, J.; Fung, G. S. K.; Fishman, E. K.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, iterative algorithms have become popular in diagnostic CT imaging to reduce noise or radiation dose to the patient. The non-linear nature of these algorithms leads to non-linearities in the imaging chain. However, the methods to assess the performance of CT imaging systems were developed assuming the linear process of filtered backprojection (FBP). Those methods may not be suitable any longer when applied to non-linear systems. In order to evaluate the imaging performance, a phantom is typically scanned and the image quality is measured using various indices. For reasons of practicality, cost, and durability, those phantoms often consist of simple water containers with uniform cylinder inserts. However, these phantoms do not represent the rich structure and patterns of real tissue accurately. As a result, the measured image quality or detectability performance for lesions may not reflect the performance on clinical images. The discrepancy between estimated and real performance may be even larger for iterative methods which sometimes produce "plastic-like", patchy images with homogeneous patterns. Consequently, more realistic phantoms should be used to assess the performance of iterative algorithms. We designed and constructed a biological phantom consisting of porcine organs and tissue that models a human abdomen, including liver lesions. We scanned the phantom on a clinical CT scanner and compared basic image quality indices between filtered backprojection and an iterative reconstruction algorithm.

  3. Accurate registration of temporal CT images for pulmonary nodules detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jichao; Jiang, Luan; Li, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    Interpretation of temporal CT images could help the radiologists to detect some subtle interval changes in the sequential examinations. The purpose of this study was to develop a fully automated scheme for accurate registration of temporal CT images for pulmonary nodule detection. Our method consisted of three major registration steps. Firstly, affine transformation was applied in the segmented lung region to obtain global coarse registration images. Secondly, B-splines based free-form deformation (FFD) was used to refine the coarse registration images. Thirdly, Demons algorithm was performed to align the feature points extracted from the registered images in the second step and the reference images. Our database consisted of 91 temporal CT cases obtained from Beijing 301 Hospital and Shanghai Changzheng Hospital. The preliminary results showed that approximately 96.7% cases could obtain accurate registration based on subjective observation. The subtraction images of the reference images and the rigid and non-rigid registered images could effectively remove the normal structures (i.e. blood vessels) and retain the abnormalities (i.e. pulmonary nodules). This would be useful for the screening of lung cancer in our future study.

  4. Thorax: normal and benign pathologic patterns in FDG-PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Wachsmann, Jason W; Gerbaudo, Victor H

    2014-04-01

    This article describes the normal patterns of thoracic (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) biodistribution, and expands on the role of FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) for the evaluation of patients suffering from a spectrum of benign pathologic conditions that affect the chest. The discussion addresses the applications of FDG-PET/CT imaging in a wide variety of chest-related disorders. Familiarity with the normal thoracic biodistribution of FDG, coupled with knowledge of the potential nonmalignant causes of increased FDG uptake in the chest, is essential to minimize the incidence of incorrect interpretation of FDG-PET images in daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Segmentation of brain blood vessels using projections in 3-D CT angiography images.

    PubMed

    Babin, Danilo; Vansteenkiste, Ewout; Pizurica, Aleksandra; Philips, Wilfried

    2011-01-01

    Segmenting cerebral blood vessels is of great importance in diagnostic and clinical applications, especially in quantitative diagnostics and surgery on aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Segmentation of CT angiography images requires algorithms robust to high intensity noise, while being able to segment low-contrast vessels. Because of this, most of the existing methods require user intervention. In this work we propose an automatic algorithm for efficient segmentation of 3-D CT angiography images of cerebral blood vessels. Our method is robust to high intensity noise and is able to accurately segment blood vessels with high range of luminance values, as well as low-contrast vessels.

  6. Dedicated Cone-Beam CT System for Extremity Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Al Muhit, Abdullah; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Thawait, Gaurav K.; Stayman, J. Webster; Packard, Nathan; Senn, Robert; Yang, Dong; Foos, David H.; Yorkston, John; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide initial assessment of image quality and dose for a cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) scanner dedicated to extremity imaging. Materials and Methods A prototype cone-beam CT scanner has been developed for imaging the extremities, including the weight-bearing lower extremities. Initial technical assessment included evaluation of radiation dose measured as a function of kilovolt peak and tube output (in milliampere seconds), contrast resolution assessed in terms of the signal difference–to-noise ratio (SDNR), spatial resolution semiquantitatively assessed by using a line-pair module from a phantom, and qualitative evaluation of cadaver images for potential diagnostic value and image artifacts by an expert CT observer (musculoskeletal radiologist). Results The dose for a nominal scan protocol (80 kVp, 108 mAs) was 9 mGy (absolute dose measured at the center of a CT dose index phantom). SDNR was maximized with the 80-kVp scan technique, and contrast resolution was sufficient for visualization of muscle, fat, ligaments and/or tendons, cartilage joint space, and bone. Spatial resolution in the axial plane exceeded 15 line pairs per centimeter. Streaks associated with x-ray scatter (in thicker regions of the patient—eg, the knee), beam hardening (about cortical bone—eg, the femoral shaft), and cone-beam artifacts (at joint space surfaces oriented along the scanning plane—eg, the interphalangeal joints) presented a slight impediment to visualization. Cadaver images (elbow, hand, knee, and foot) demonstrated excellent visibility of bone detail and good soft-tissue visibility suitable to a broad spectrum of musculoskeletal indications. Conclusion A dedicated extremity cone-beam CT scanner capable of imaging upper and lower extremities (including weight-bearing examinations) provides sufficient image quality and favorable dose characteristics to warrant further evaluation for clinical use. © RSNA, 2013 Online supplemental material is available for

  7. The impact of spectral filtration on image quality in micro-CT system.

    PubMed

    Ren, Liqiang; Ghani, Muhammad U; Wu, Di; Zheng, Bin; Chen, Yong; Yang, Kai; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the impact of spectral filtration on image quality in a microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) system. A mouse phantom comprising 11 rods for modeling lung, muscle, adipose, and bones was scanned with 17 s and 2 min, respectively. The current (μA) for each scan was adjusted to achieve identical entrance exposure to the phantom, providing a baseline for image quality evaluation. For each region of interest (ROI) within specific composition, CT number variations, noise levels, and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were evaluated from the reconstructed images. CT number variations and CNRs for bone with high density, muscle, and adipose were compared with theoretical predictions. The results show that the impact of spectral filtration on image quality indicators, such as CNR in a micro-CT system, is significantly associated with tissue characteristics. The findings may provide useful references for optimizing the scanning parameters of general micro-CT systems in future imaging applications. PACS numbers: 87.57.C-, 87.57.Q-, 87.64.kd.

  8. Joint detection and segmentation of vertebral bodies in CT images by sparse representation error minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korez, Robert; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    Automated detection and segmentation of vertebral bodies from spinal computed tomography (CT) images is usually a prerequisite step for numerous spine-related medical applications, such as diagnosis, surgical planning and follow-up assessment of spinal pathologies. However, automated detection and segmentation are challenging tasks due to a relatively high degree of anatomical complexity, presence of unclear boundaries and articulation of vertebrae with each other. In this paper, we describe a sparse representation error minimization (SEM) framework for joint detection and segmentation of vertebral bodies in CT images. By minimizing the sparse representation error of sampled intensity values, we are able to recover the oriented bounding box (OBB) and segmentation binary mask for each vertebral body in the CT image. The performance of the proposed SEM framework was evaluated on five CT images of the thoracolumbar spine. The resulting Euclidean distance of 1:75+/-1:02 mm, computed between the center points of recovered and corresponding reference OBBs, and Dice coefficient of 92:3+/-2:7%, computed between the resulting and corresponding reference segmentation binary masks, indicate that the proposed framework can successfully detect and segment vertebral bodies in CT images of the thoracolumbar spine.

  9. Classification algorithm of pulmonary vein and artery based on multi-slice CT image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonekura, Taihei; Matsuhiro, Mikio; Saita, Shinsuke; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Nishitani, Hiromu; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2007-03-01

    Recently, multi-slice helical CT technology was developed. Unlike the conventional helical CT, we can obtain CT images of two or more slices with 1 time scan. Therefore, we can get many pictures with a clear contrast images and thin slice images in one time of scanning. The purpose of this presentation is to evaluate the proposed automatic extraction bronchus and pulmonary vein and artery on multi-slice CT images. The bronchus is extracted by application with region growing technique and the morphological filters, 3D distance transformation. These results indicate that the proposed algorithm provides the ability to accurately develop an automatic extraction algorithm of the bronchus on multi-slice CT images. In this report, we used pulmonary vein and artery marked by the doctor, It aims to discover an amount of the feature necessary for classifying the pulmonary vein and artery by using the anatomical feature. The classification of the pulmonary vein and artery is thought necessary information that it is state of tuber benign or malignity judgment. It is very important to separate the contact part of the lung blood vessel in classifying pulmonary vein and artery. Then, it aims to discover the feature of the contact part of the lung blood vessel in this report.

  10. Detection of increased vasa vasorum in artery walls: improving CT number accuracy using image deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Kishore; Leng, Shuai; Jorgensen, Steven M.; Abdurakhimova, Dilbar; Ritman, Erik L.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2017-03-01

    Changes in arterial wall perfusion are an indicator of early atherosclerosis. This is characterized by an increased spatial density of vasa vasorum (VV), the micro-vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the arterial wall. Detection of increased VV during contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) imaging is limited due to contamination from blooming effect from the contrast-enhanced lumen. We report the application of an image deconvolution technique using a measured system point-spread function, on CT data obtained from a photon-counting CT system to reduce blooming and to improve the CT number accuracy of arterial wall, which enhances detection of increased VV. A phantom study was performed to assess the accuracy of the deconvolution technique. A porcine model was created with enhanced VV in one carotid artery; the other carotid artery served as a control. CT images at an energy range of 25-120 keV were reconstructed. CT numbers were measured for multiple locations in the carotid walls and for multiple time points, pre and post contrast injection. The mean CT number in the carotid wall was compared between the left (increased VV) and right (control) carotid arteries. Prior to deconvolution, results showed similar mean CT numbers in the left and right carotid wall due to the contamination from blooming effect, limiting the detection of increased VV in the left carotid artery. After deconvolution, the mean CT number difference between the left and right carotid arteries was substantially increased at all the time points, enabling detection of the increased VV in the artery wall.

  11. TH-E-202-01: Pitfalls and Remedies in PET/CT Imaging for RT Planning.

    PubMed

    Pan, T

    2016-06-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: 1. Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning 2. The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy 3. PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment.

  12. CT, MR and SPECT imaging in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Duncan, R; Patterson, J; Hadley, D M; Macpherson, P; Brodie, M J; Bone, I; McGeorge, A P; Wyper, D J

    1990-01-01

    Cranial computed tomography (CT) with modified temporal lobe technique, 0.15T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were carried out on 30 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. Lateralising abnormalities were detected in 21/30 patients overall. Specific lesions were detected by CT in one patient and by MRI in seven patients (in one case bilateral). In addition CT detected asymmetry of the sylvian fissures or temporal horns in 10 patients, and MRI in eight patients. SPECT detected lateralising abnormalities in 19 patients (in five cases bilateral). It is concluded that low field MRI is superior to modified CT in demonstrating subtle structural lesions of the temporal lobe. Functional scanning with SPECT supports the evidence of origin of an epileptic focus in a substantial proportion of cases and may improve the selection of patients for surgery.

  13. Understanding and controlling the effect of lossy raw data compression on CT images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Adam S; Pelc, Norbert J

    2009-08-01

    The requirements for raw data transmission through a CT scanner slip ring, through the computation system, and for storage of raw CT data can be quite challenging as scanners continue to increase in speed and to collect more data per rotation. Although lossy compression greatly mitigates this problem, users must be cautious about how errors introduced manifest themselves in the reconstructed images. This paper describes two simple yet effective methods for controlling the effect of errors in raw data compression and describe the impact of each stage on the image errors. A CT system simulator (CATSIM, GE Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY) was used to generate raw CT datasets that simulate different regions of human anatomy. The raw data are digitized by a 20-bit ADC and companded by a log compander. Lossy compression is performed by quantization and is followed by JPEG-LS (lossless), which takes advantage of the correlations between neighboring measurements in the sinogram. Error feedback, a previously proposed method that controls the spatial distribution of reconstructed image errors, and projection filtering, a newly proposed method that takes advantage of the filtered backprojection reconstruction process, are applied independently (and combined) to study their intended impact on the control and behavior of the additional noise due to the compression methods used. The log compander and the projection filtering method considerably reduce image error levels, while error feedback pushes image errors toward the periphery of the field of view. The results for the images are a compression ratio (CR) of 3 that keeps peak compression errors under 1 HU and a CR of 9 that increases image noise by only 1 HU in common CT applications. Lossy compression can substantially reduce raw CT data size at low computational cost. The proposed methods have the flexibility to operate at a wide range of compression ratios and produce predictable, object-independent, and often

  14. Evaluation of segmentation using lung nodule phantom CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judy, Philip F.; Jacobson, Francine L.

    2001-07-01

    Segmentation of chest CT images has several purposes. In lung-cancer screening programs, for nodules below 5mm, growth measured from sequential CT scans is the primary indication of malignancy. Automatic segmentation procedures have been used as a means to insure a reliable measurement of lung nodule size. A lung nodule phantom was developed to evaluate the validity and reliability of size measurements using CT images. Thirty acrylic spheres and cubes (2-8 mm) were placed in a 15cm diameter disk of uniform-material that simulated the lung. To demonstrate the use of the phantom, it was scanned using out hospital's lung-cancer screening protocol. A simple, yet objective threshold technique was used to segment all of the images in which the objects were visible. All the pixels above a common threshold (the mean of the lung material and the acrylic CT numbers) were considered within the nodule. The relative bias did not depend on the shape of the objects and ranged from -18% for the 2 mm objects to -2.5% for 8-mm objects. DICOM image files of the phantom are available for investigators with an interest in using the images to evaluate and compare segmentation procedures.

  15. Open source deformable image registration system for treatment planning and recurrence CT scans : Validation in the head and neck region.

    PubMed

    Zukauskaite, Ruta; Brink, Carsten; Hansen, Christian Rønn; Bertelsen, Anders; Johansen, Jørgen; Grau, Cai; Eriksen, Jesper Grau

    2016-08-01

    Clinical application of deformable registration (DIR) of medical images remains limited due to sparse validation of DIR methods in specific situations, e. g. in case of cancer recurrences. In this study the accuracy of DIR for registration of planning CT (pCT) and recurrence CT (rCT) images of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients was evaluated. Twenty patients treated with definitive IMRT for HNSCC in 2010-2012 were included. For each patient, a pCT and an rCT scan were used. Median interval between the scans was 8.5 months. One observer manually contoured eight anatomical regions-of-interest (ROI) twice on pCT and once on rCT. pCT and rCT images were deformably registered using the open source software elastix. Mean surface distance (MSD) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between contours were used for validation of DIR. A measure for delineation uncertainty was estimated by assessing MSD from the re-delineations of the same ROI on pCT. DIR and manual contouring uncertainties were correlated with tissue volume and rigidity. MSD varied 1-3 mm for different ROIs for DIR and 1-1.5 mm for re-delineated ROIs performed on pCT. DSC for DIR varied between 0.58 and 0.79 for soft tissues and was 0.79 or higher for bony structures, and correlated with the volumes of ROIs (r = 0.5, p < 0.001) and tissue rigidity (r = 0.54, p < 0.001). DIR using elastix in HNSCC on planning and recurrence CT scans is feasible; an uncertainty of the method is close to the voxel size length of the planning CT images.

  16. Adaptive geodesic transform for segmentation of vertebrae on CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Shu, Liao; Hermosillo, Gerardo; Zhan, Yiqiang

    2014-03-01

    Vertebral segmentation is a critical first step in any quantitative evaluation of vertebral pathology using CT images. This is especially challenging because bone marrow tissue has the same intensity profile as the muscle surrounding the bone. Thus simple methods such as thresholding or adaptive k-means fail to accurately segment vertebrae. While several other algorithms such as level sets may be used for segmentation any algorithm that is clinically deployable has to work in under a few seconds. To address these dual challenges we present here, a new algorithm based on the geodesic distance transform that is capable of segmenting the spinal vertebrae in under one second. To achieve this we extend the theory of the geodesic distance transforms proposed in1 to incorporate high level anatomical knowledge through adaptive weighting of image gradients. Such knowledge may be provided by the user directly or may be automatically generated by another algorithm. We incorporate information 'learnt' using a previously published machine learning algorithm2 to segment the L1 to L5 vertebrae. While we present a particular application here, the adaptive geodesic transform is a generic concept which can be applied to segmentation of other organs as well.

  17. CT scan of the brain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAT scan (computed tomography) is a much more sensitive imaging technique than x-ray, allowing high definition not only of the bony structures, but of the soft tissues. Clear images of organs such as the brain, muscles, joint structures, veins ...

  18. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation.

  19. Disease quantification on PET/CT images without object delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Wu, Caiyun; Fitzpatrick, Danielle; Winchell, Nicole; Schuster, Stephen J.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2017-03-01

    The derivation of quantitative information from images to make quantitative radiology (QR) clinically practical continues to face a major image analysis hurdle because of image segmentation challenges. This paper presents a novel approach to disease quantification (DQ) via positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images that explores how to decouple DQ methods from explicit dependence on object segmentation through the use of only object recognition results to quantify disease burden. The concept of an object-dependent disease map is introduced to express disease severity without performing explicit delineation and partial volume correction of either objects or lesions. The parameters of the disease map are estimated from a set of training image data sets. The idea is illustrated on 20 lung lesions and 20 liver lesions derived from 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET/CT scans of patients with various types of cancers and also on 20 NEMA PET/CT phantom data sets. Our preliminary results show that, on phantom data sets, "disease burden" can be estimated to within 2% of known absolute true activity. Notwithstanding the difficulty in establishing true quantification on patient PET images, our results achieve 8% deviation from "true" estimates, with slightly larger deviations for small and diffuse lesions where establishing ground truth becomes really questionable, and smaller deviations for larger lesions where ground truth set up becomes more reliable. We are currently exploring extensions of the approach to include fully automated body-wide DQ, extensions to just CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone, to PET/CT performed with radiotracers other than FDG, and other functional forms of disease maps.

  20. Discriminative feature representation: an effective postprocessing solution to low dose CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Liu, Jin; Hu, Yining; Yang, Jian; Shi, Luyao; Shu, Huazhong; Gui, Zhiguo; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Luo, Limin

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposes a concise and effective approach termed discriminative feature representation (DFR) for low dose computerized tomography (LDCT) image processing, which is currently a challenging problem in medical imaging field. This DFR method assumes LDCT images as the superposition of desirable high dose CT (HDCT) 3D features and undesirable noise-artifact 3D features (the combined term of noise and artifact features induced by low dose scan protocols), and the decomposed HDCT features are used to provide the processed LDCT images with higher quality. The target HDCT features are solved via the DFR algorithm using a featured dictionary composed by atoms representing HDCT features and noise-artifact features. In this study, the featured dictionary is efficiently built using physical phantom images collected from the same CT scanner as the target clinical LDCT images to process. The proposed DFR method also has good robustness in parameter setting for different CT scanner types. This DFR method can be directly applied to process DICOM formatted LDCT images, and has good applicability to current CT systems. Comparative experiments with abdomen LDCT data validate the good performance of the proposed approach. This research was supported by National Natural Science Foundation under grants (81370040, 81530060), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and the Qing Lan Project in Jiangsu Province.

  1. "Conventional" CT images from spectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajbhandary, Paurakh L.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-03-01

    Spectral imaging systems need to be able to produce "conventional" images, and it's been shown that systems with energy discriminating detectors can achieve higher CNR than conventional systems by optimal weighting. Combining measured data in energy bins (EBs) and also combining basis material images have previously been proposed, but there are no studies systematically comparing the two methods. In this paper, we analytically evaluate the two methods for systems with ideal photon counting detectors using CNR and beam hardening (BH) artifact as metrics. For a 120-kVp polychromatic simulations of a water phantom with low contrast inserts, the difference of the optimal CNR between the two methods for the studied phantom is within 2%. For a polychromatic spectrum, beam-hardening artifacts are noticeable in EB weighted images (BH artifact of 3.8% for 8 EB and 6.9% for 2 EB), while weighted basis material images are free of such artifacts.

  2. WE-A-BRF-01: Dual-Energy CT Imaging in Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Molloi, S; Li, B; Yin, F; Chen, H

    2014-06-15

    The quantification accuracy of dual-energy imaging is influenced by the fundamentals of x-ray physics, system geometry, data acquisition hardware/protocol, system calibration, and image processing technique. This symposium will provide updates on the following advanced application areas: Mammography. Volumetric breast density techniques based on standard mammograms require estimation of breast thickness, which is difficult to accurately measure. By comparison, calculation of breast density using dual energy mammography does not require measurement of breast thickness. Dual energy mammography has been implemented using both energy integrating flat panel detectors in conjunction with beam energy switching and energy resolved photon counting detectors. These techniques have been optimized using simulation studies and validated using physical phantoms and postmortem breasts. Chemical decomposition was used as the gold standard for volumetric breast density measurement in postmortem breasts. Breast density measurements have also been compared with results from four-category BI-RADS density rankings, standard image thresholding and Fuzzy k-mean clustering techniques. These studies indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure volumetric breast density. Cardiovascular CT. The predicative accuracy of risk models for recurrent stroke and cardiac arrest depends heavily on accurate differentiation of thrombus or calcium from iodine in left atrial appendage or coronary arteries. The amount of energy separation is constrained by image noise; therefore, optimal kVp, beam filtration, and balanced flux are essential for the quantification accuracy of iodine and calcium. The basis materials are combined linearly to generate monochromatic energy images, where CT# accuracy and CNR are energy dependent. With optimal monochromatic energy, the mean iodine concentration for the thrombus, circulatory stasis, and control groups are significantly different. Risk

  3. Modern CT applications in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Garland, Melissa R; Lawler, Leo P; Whitaker, Brent R; Walker, Ian D F; Corl, Frank M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-01-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) is used primarily for diagnosis in humans, it can also be used to diagnose disease in veterinary patients. CT and associated three-dimensional reconstruction have a role in diagnosis of a range of illnesses in a variety of animals. In a sea turtle with failure to thrive, CT showed a nodal mass in the chest, granulomas in the lungs, and a ball in the stomach. CT of a sea dragon with balance and movement problems showed absence of the swim bladder. In a sloth with failure to thrive, CT allowed diagnosis of a coin in the intestine. CT of a puffin with failure to thrive showed a mass in the chest, which was found to be a hematoma. In a smooth-sided toad whose head was tilted to one side and who was circling in that direction, CT showed partial destruction of the temporal bone. CT of a domestic cat with listlessness showed a mass with focal calcification, which proved to be a leiomyosarcoma. CT of a sea otter showed pectus excavatum, which is caused by the animal smashing oysters against its chest. In a Japanese koi with abdominal swelling, CT allowed diagnosis of a hepatoma.

  4. Robust linear registration of CT images using random regression forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konukoglu, Ender; Criminisi, Antonio; Pathak, Sayan; Robertson, Duncan; White, Steve; Haynor, David; Siddiqui, Khan

    2011-03-01

    Global linear registration is a necessary first step for many different tasks in medical image analysis. Comparing longitudinal studies1, cross-modality fusion2, and many other applications depend heavily on the success of the automatic registration. The robustness and efficiency of this step is crucial as it affects all subsequent operations. Most common techniques cast the linear registration problem as the minimization of a global energy function based on the image intensities. Although these algorithms have proved useful, their robustness in fully automated scenarios is still an open question. In fact, the optimization step often gets caught in local minima yielding unsatisfactory results. Recent algorithms constrain the space of registration parameters by exploiting implicit or explicit organ segmentations, thus increasing robustness4,5. In this work we propose a novel robust algorithm for automatic global linear image registration. Our method uses random regression forests to estimate posterior probability distributions for the locations of anatomical structures - represented as axis aligned bounding boxes6. These posterior distributions are later integrated in a global linear registration algorithm. The biggest advantage of our algorithm is that it does not require pre-defined segmentations or regions. Yet it yields robust registration results. We compare the robustness of our algorithm with that of the state of the art Elastix toolbox7. Validation is performed via 1464 pair-wise registrations in a database of very diverse 3D CT images. We show that our method decreases the "failure" rate of the global linear registration from 12.5% (Elastix) to only 1.9%.

  5. Comprehensive evaluation of ten deformable image registration algorithms for contour propagation between CT and cone-beam CT images in adaptive head & neck radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuyu; Shi, Yinghua; Wu, Shuyu; Xiao, Yang; Gu, Xuejun; Zhou, Linghong

    2017-01-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is a critical technic in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for propagating contours between planning computerized tomography (CT) images and treatment CT/cone-beam CT (CBCT) images to account for organ deformation for treatment re-planning. To validate the ability and accuracy of DIR algorithms in organ at risk (OAR) contour mapping, ten intensity-based DIR strategies, which were classified into four categories—optical flow-based, demons-based, level-set-based and spline-based—were tested on planning CT and fractional CBCT images acquired from twenty-one head & neck (H&N) cancer patients who underwent 6~7-week intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Three similarity metrics, i.e., the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), the percentage error (PE) and the Hausdorff distance (HD), were employed to measure the agreement between the propagated contours and the physician-delineated ground truths of four OARs, including the vertebra (VTB), the vertebral foramen (VF), the parotid gland (PG) and the submandibular gland (SMG). It was found that the evaluated DIRs in this work did not necessarily outperform rigid registration. DIR performed better for bony structures than soft-tissue organs, and the DIR performance tended to vary for different ROIs with different degrees of deformation as the treatment proceeded. Generally, the optical flow-based DIR performed best, while the demons-based DIR usually ranked last except for a modified demons-based DISC used for CT-CBCT DIR. These experimental results suggest that the choice of a specific DIR algorithm depends on the image modality, anatomic site, magnitude of deformation and application. Therefore, careful examinations and modifications are required before accepting the auto-propagated contours, especially for automatic re-planning ART systems. PMID:28414799

  6. Dental imaging using laminar optical tomography and micro CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Feixiao; Ozturk, Mehmet S.; Intes, Xavier; Kotha, Shiva

    2014-02-01

    Dental lesions located in the pulp are quite difficult to identify based on anatomical contrast, and, hence, to diagnose using traditional imaging methods such as dental CT. However, such lesions could lead to functional and/or molecular optical contrast. Herein, we report on the preliminary investigation of using Laminar Optical Tomography (LOT) to image the pulp and root canals in teeth. LOT is a non-contact, high resolution, molecular and functional mesoscopic optical imaging modality. To investigate the potential of LOT for dental imaging, we injected an optical dye into ex vivo teeth samples and imaged them using LOT and micro-CT simultaneously. A rigid image registration between the LOT and micro-CT reconstruction was obtained, validating the potential of LOT to image molecular optical contrast deep in the teeth with accuracy, non-invasively. We demonstrate that LOT can retrieve the 3D bio-distribution of molecular probes at depths up to 2mm with a resolution of several hundred microns in teeth.

  7. Motion correction using anatomical information in PET/CT and PET/MR hybrid imaging.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Hadi; Lamare, Frederic; Merlin, Thibaut; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-03-01

    steps of all these motion correction methods in PET/CT and PET/MR imaging for whole body applications.

  8. Accuracy of CT-based attenuation correction in PET/CT bone imaging.

    PubMed

    Abella, Monica; Alessio, Adam M; Mankoff, David A; MacDonald, Lawrence R; Vaquero, Juan Jose; Desco, Manuel; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-05-07

    We evaluate the accuracy of scaling CT images for attenuation correction of PET data measured for bone. While the standard tri-linear approach has been well tested for soft tissues, the impact of CT-based attenuation correction on the accuracy of tracer uptake in bone has not been reported in detail. We measured the accuracy of attenuation coefficients of bovine femur segments and patient data using a tri-linear method applied to CT images obtained at different kVp settings. Attenuation values at 511 keV obtained with a (68)Ga/(68)Ge transmission scan were used as a reference standard. The impact of inaccurate attenuation images on PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) was then evaluated using simulated emission images and emission images from five patients with elevated levels of FDG uptake in bone at disease sites. The CT-based linear attenuation images of the bovine femur segments underestimated the true values by 2.9 ± 0.3% for cancellous bone regardless of kVp. For compact bone the underestimation ranged from 1.3% at 140 kVp to 14.1% at 80 kVp. In the patient scans at 140 kVp the underestimation was approximately 2% averaged over all bony regions. The sensitivity analysis indicated that errors in PET SUVs in bone are approximately proportional to errors in the estimated attenuation coefficients for the same regions. The variability in SUV bias also increased approximately linearly with the error in linear attenuation coefficients. These results suggest that bias in bone uptake SUVs of PET tracers ranges from 2.4% to 5.9% when using CT scans at 140 and 120 kVp for attenuation correction. Lower kVp scans have the potential for considerably more error in dense bone. This bias is present in any PET tracer with bone uptake but may be clinically insignificant for many imaging tasks. However, errors from CT-based attenuation correction methods should be carefully evaluated if quantitation of tracer uptake in bone is important.

  9. Accuracy of CT-Based Attenuation Correction in PET/CT Bone Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abella, Monica; Alessio, Adam M.; Mankoff, David A.; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Vaquero, Juan Jose; Desco, Manuel; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the accuracy of scaling CT images for attenuation correction of PET data measured for bone. While the standard tri-linear approach has been well-tested for soft tissues, the impact of CT-based attenuation correction on the accuracy of tracer uptake in bone has not been reported in detail. We measured the accuracy of attenuation coefficients of bovine femur segments and patient data using a tri-linear method applied to CT images obtained at different kVp settings. Attenuation values at 511 keV obtained with a 68Ga/68Ge transmission scan were used as a reference standard. The impact of inaccurate attenuation images on PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) was then evaluated using simulated emission images and emission images from five patients with elevated levels of FDG uptake in bone at disease sites. The CT-based linear attenuation images of the bovine femur segments underestimated the true values by 2.9±0.3% for cancellous bone regardless of kVp. For compact bone the underestimation ranged from 1.3% at 140 kVp to 14.1% at 80 kVp. In the patient scans at 140 kVp the underestimation was approximately 2% averaged over all bony regions. The sensitivity analysis indicated that errors in PET SUVs in bone are approximately proportional to errors in the estimated attenuation coefficients for the same regions. The variability in SUV bias also increased approximately linearly with the error in linear attenuation coefficients. These results suggest that bias in bone uptake SUVs of PET tracers range from 2.4% to 5.9% when using CT scans at 140 and 120 kVp for attenuation correction. Lower kVp scans have the potential for considerably more error in dense bone. This bias is present in any PET tracer with bone uptake but may be clinically insignificant for many imaging tasks. However, errors from CT-based attenuation correction methods should be carefully evaluated if quantitation of tracer uptake in bone is important. PMID:22481547

  10. Accuracy of CT-based attenuation correction in PET/CT bone imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abella, Monica; Alessio, Adam M.; Mankoff, David A.; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Vaquero, Juan Jose; Desco, Manuel; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-05-01

    We evaluate the accuracy of scaling CT images for attenuation correction of PET data measured for bone. While the standard tri-linear approach has been well tested for soft tissues, the impact of CT-based attenuation correction on the accuracy of tracer uptake in bone has not been reported in detail. We measured the accuracy of attenuation coefficients of bovine femur segments and patient data using a tri-linear method applied to CT images obtained at different kVp settings. Attenuation values at 511 keV obtained with a 68Ga/68Ge transmission scan were used as a reference standard. The impact of inaccurate attenuation images on PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) was then evaluated using simulated emission images and emission images from five patients with elevated levels of FDG uptake in bone at disease sites. The CT-based linear attenuation images of the bovine femur segments underestimated the true values by 2.9 ± 0.3% for cancellous bone regardless of kVp. For compact bone the underestimation ranged from 1.3% at 140 kVp to 14.1% at 80 kVp. In the patient scans at 140 kVp the underestimation was approximately 2% averaged over all bony regions. The sensitivity analysis indicated that errors in PET SUVs in bone are approximately proportional to errors in the estimated attenuation coefficients for the same regions. The variability in SUV bias also increased approximately linearly with the error in linear attenuation coefficients. These results suggest that bias in bone uptake SUVs of PET tracers ranges from 2.4% to 5.9% when using CT scans at 140 and 120 kVp for attenuation correction. Lower kVp scans have the potential for considerably more error in dense bone. This bias is present in any PET tracer with bone uptake but may be clinically insignificant for many imaging tasks. However, errors from CT-based attenuation correction methods should be carefully evaluated if quantitation of tracer uptake in bone is important.

  11. Self-Calibration of Cone-Beam CT Geometry Using 3D-2D Image Registration: Development and Application to Task-Based Imaging with a Robotic C-Arm

    PubMed Central

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G.; Uneri, A.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Robotic C-arm systems are capable of general noncircular orbits whose trajectories can be driven by the particular imaging task. However obtaining accurate calibrations for reconstruction in such geometries can be a challenging problem. This work proposes a method to perform a unique geometric calibration of an arbitrary C-arm orbit by registering 2D projections to a previously acquired 3D image to determine the transformation parameters representing the system geometry. Methods Experiments involved a cone-beam CT (CBCT) bench system, a robotic C-arm, and three phantoms. A robust 3D-2D registration process was used to compute the 9 degree of freedom (DOF) transformation between each projection and an existing 3D image by maximizing normalized gradient information with a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of the 3D volume. The quality of the resulting “self-calibration” was evaluated in terms of the agreement with an established calibration method using a BB phantom as well as image quality in the resulting CBCT reconstruction. Results The self-calibration yielded CBCT images without significant difference in spatial resolution from the standard (“true”) calibration methods (p-value >0.05 for all three phantoms), and the differences between CBCT images reconstructed using the “self” and “true” calibration methods were on the order of 10−3 mm−1. Maximum error in magnification was 3.2%, and back-projection ray placement was within 0.5 mm. Conclusion The proposed geometric “self” calibration provides a means for 3D imaging on general non-circular orbits in CBCT systems for which a geometric calibration is either not available or not reproducible. The method forms the basis of advanced “task-based” 3D imaging methods now in development for robotic C-arms. PMID:26388661

  12. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration: development and application to tasked-based imaging with a robotic C-arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G.; Uneri, A.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Robotic C-arm systems are capable of general noncircular orbits whose trajectories can be driven by the particular imaging task. However obtaining accurate calibrations for reconstruction in such geometries can be a challenging problem. This work proposes a method to perform a unique geometric calibration of an arbitrary C-arm orbit by registering 2D projections to a previously acquired 3D image to determine the transformation parameters representing the system geometry. Methods: Experiments involved a cone-beam CT (CBCT) bench system, a robotic C-arm, and three phantoms. A robust 3D-2D registration process was used to compute the 9 degree of freedom (DOF) transformation between each projection and an existing 3D image by maximizing normalized gradient information with a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of the 3D volume. The quality of the resulting "self-calibration" was evaluated in terms of the agreement with an established calibration method using a BB phantom as well as image quality in the resulting CBCT reconstruction. Results: The self-calibration yielded CBCT images without significant difference in spatial resolution from the standard ("true") calibration methods (p-value >0.05 for all three phantoms), and the differences between CBCT images reconstructed using the "self" and "true" calibration methods were on the order of 10-3 mm-1. Maximum error in magnification was 3.2%, and back-projection ray placement was within 0.5 mm. Conclusion: The proposed geometric "self" calibration provides a means for 3D imaging on general noncircular orbits in CBCT systems for which a geometric calibration is either not available or not reproducible. The method forms the basis of advanced "task-based" 3D imaging methods now in development for robotic C-arms.

  13. Computer aided detection of oral lesions on CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galib, S.; Islam, F.; Abir, M.; Lee, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    Oral lesions are important findings on computed tomography (CT) images. In this study, a fully automatic method to detect oral lesions in mandibular region from dental CT images is proposed. Two methods were developed to recognize two types of lesions namely (1) Close border (CB) lesions and (2) Open border (OB) lesions, which cover most of the lesion types that can be found on CT images. For the detection of CB lesions, fifteen features were extracted from each initial lesion candidates and multi layer perceptron (MLP) neural network was used to classify suspicious regions. Moreover, OB lesions were detected using a rule based image processing method, where no feature extraction or classification algorithm were used. The results were validated using a CT dataset of 52 patients, where 22 patients had abnormalities and 30 patients were normal. Using non-training dataset, CB detection algorithm yielded 71% sensitivity with 0.31 false positives per patient. Furthermore, OB detection algorithm achieved 100% sensitivity with 0.13 false positives per patient. Results suggest that, the proposed framework, which consists of two methods, has the potential to be used in clinical context, and assist radiologists for better diagnosis.

  14. CT Imaging, Data Reduction, and Visualization of Hardwood Logs

    Treesearch

    Daniel L. Schmoldt

    1996-01-01

    Computer tomography (CT) is a mathematical technique that, combined with noninvasive scanning such as x-ray imaging, has become a powerful tool to nondestructively test materials prior to use or to evaluate materials prior to processing. In the current context, hardwood lumber processing can benefit greatly by knowing what a log looks like prior to initial breakdown....

  15. Videotaped helical CT images for lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Iwano, S; Makino, N; Ikeda, M; Itoh, S; Ishihara, S; Tadokoro, M; Ishigaki, T

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this work was to determine a radiologist's ability to detect solitary pulmonary nodules on helical CT using both video (cine) viewing and film-based viewing. Sixty-five chest helical CT studies were reviewed. Six radiologists searched for 40 lung nodules on CT images presented in three formats. Film-based viewing of images at 10 and 5 mm increments was performed with a light box. Video viewing of the same examinations was performed in 5 mm increments at 2 frames/s. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) measured the observer's ability to detect nodules. The Az was 0.948 for the video viewing, 0.844 for 5 mm increment film-based viewing, and 0.879 for 10 mm increment film-based viewing. There were no statistically significant differences. Lung nodules can be detected with similar detection rates when viewing conventional film or videotaped helical CT images. Videotaped images incur a lower cost, an important consideration in mass screening for lung cancer.

  16. A dual micro-CT system for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Johnston, S.; Johnson, B.; Lin, M.; Hedlund, L. W.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2008-03-01

    Micro-CT is a non-invasive imaging modality usually used to assess morphology in small animals. In our previous work, we have demonstrated that functional micro-CT imaging is also possible. This paper describes a dual micro-CT system with two fixed x-ray/detectors developed to address such challenging tasks as cardiac or perfusion studies in small animals. A two-tube/detector system ensures simultaneous acquisition of two projections, thus reducing scanning time and the number of contrast injections in perfusion studies by a factor of two. The system is integrated with software developed in-house for cardio-respiratory monitoring and gating. The sampling geometry was optimized for 88 microns in such a way that the geometric blur of the focal spot matches the Nyquist sample at the detector. A geometric calibration procedure allows one to combine projection data from the two chains into a single reconstructed volume. Image quality was measured in terms of spatial resolution, uniformity, noise, and linearity. The modulation transfer function (MTF) at 10% is 3.4 lp/mm for single detector reconstructions and 2.3 lp/mm for dual tube/detector reconstructions. We attribute this loss in spatial resolution to the compounding of slight errors in the separate single chain calibrations. The dual micro-CT system is currently used in studies for morphological and functional imaging of both rats and mice.

  17. Osteosarcoma of the jaws: demographic and CT imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S; Shi, H; Yu, Q

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the patient demographic and CT imaging findings of primary osteosarcoma of the jaws. Methods 88 primary osteosarcomas of the jaws histopathologically diagnosed during 1997–2007 were reviewed. 21 cases of CT images were reviewed. Results Of 88 patients, 51 (58%) had tumours in the mandible and 37 (42%) in the maxilla. The mean age was 37.8 years (range 9–80 years). The male-to-female ratio was 1.32:1. The mean age of patients with mandibular lesions was 41.04 years and in those with maxillary lesions it was 33.3 years. CT imaging findings were available in 21 patients. In the maxilla (n = 9), all tumours (100%) arose from the alveolar ridge. In the mandible (n = 12), most tumours (9 cases, 75%), arose from the ramus and/or condyle. All except two lesions had the epicentrum within the medullary cavity of the involved bone. The presence of periosteal reaction was demonstrated in 13 cases (62%). Soft-tissue extension was present in 18 lesions (86%), with calcification identified in 13 (72%). Conclusions This study provides age, sex distribution, location and CT imaging features of primary osteosarcoma of the jaws. PMID:22074870

  18. Geometry-constraint-scan imaging for in-line phase contrast micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Yu, Guangyuan; Fan, Dekai

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) uses the phase shift that x-rays undergo when passing through matter, rather than their attenuation, as the imaging signal and may provide better image quality in soft-tissue and biomedical materials with low atomic number. Here a geometry-constraint-scan imaging technique for in-line phase contrast micro-CT is reported. It consists of two circular-trajectory scans with x-ray detector at different positions, the phase projection extraction method with the Fresnel free-propagation theory and the filter back-projection reconstruction algorithm. This method removes the contact-detector scan and the pure phase object assumption in classical in-line phase contrast Micro-CT. Consequently it relaxes the experimental conditions and improves the image contrast. This work comprises a numerical study of this technique and its experimental verification using a biomedical composite dataset measured at an x-ray tube source Micro-CT setup. The numerical and experimental results demonstrate the validity of the presented method. It will be of interest for a wide range of in-line phase contrast Micro-CT applications in biology and medicine.

  19. Texture-learning-based system for three-dimensional segmentation of renal parenchyma in abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cong-Qi; Chang, Yuan-Hsiang; Wang, Li-Jen; Wong, Yon-Choeng; Chiang, Yang-Jen; Jiang, Yan-Yau

    2009-02-01

    Abdominal CT images are commonly used for the diagnosis of kidney diseases. With the advances of CT technology, processing of CT images has become a challenging task mainly because of the large number of CT images being studied. This paper presents a texture-learning based system for the three-dimensional (3D) segmentation of renal parenchyma in abdominal CT images. The system is designed to automatically delineate renal parenchyma and is based on the texturelearning and the region-homogeneity-based approaches. The first approach is achieved with the texture analysis using the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) features and an artificial neural network (ANN) to determine if a pixel in the CT image is likely to fall within the renal parenchyma. The second approach incorporates a two-dimensional (2D) region growing to segment renal parenchyma in single CT image slice and a 3D region growing to propagate the segmentation results to neighboring CT image slices. The criterion for the region growing is a test of region-homogeneity which is defined by examining the ANN outputs. In system evaluation, 10 abdominal CT image sets were used. Automatic segmentation results were compared with manually segmentation results using the Dice similarity coefficient. Among the 10 CT image sets, our system has achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.87 that clearly shows a high correlation between the two segmentation results. Ultimately, our system could be incorporated in applications for the delineation of renal parenchyma or as a preprocessing in a CAD system of kidney diseases.

  20. A non-rigid registration method for serial lower extremity hybrid SPECT/CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jung W.; Scheinost, Dustin; Dione, Donald P.; Dobrucki, Lawrence W.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Papademetris, Xenophon

    2010-01-01

    Small animal X-ray computed tomographic (microCT) imaging of the lower extremities permits evaluation of arterial growth in models of hindlimb ischemia, and when applied serially can provide quantitative information about disease progression and aid in the evaluation of therapeutic interventions. The quantification of changes in tissue perfusion and concentration of molecular markers concurrently obtained using nuclear imaging requires the ability to non-rigidly register the microCT images over time, a task made more challenging by the potentially large changes in the positions of the legs due to articulation. While non-rigid registration methods have been extensively used in the evaluation of individual organs, application in whole body imaging has been limited, primarily because the scale of possible displacements and deformations is large resulting in poor convergence of most methods. In this paper we present a new method based on the extended demons algorithm that uses a level-set representation of the body contour and skeletal structure as an input. The proposed serial registration method reflects the natural physical moving combination of mouse anatomy in which the movement of bones is the framework for body movements, and the movement of skin constrains the detailed movements of the specific segmented body regions. We applied our method to both the registration of serial microCT mouse images and the quantification of microSPECT component of the serially hybrid microCT-SPECT images demonstrating improved performance as compared to existing registration techniques. PMID:20869902

  1. Cross-modality PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT imaging for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Zuo, Chang-Jing; Jia, Ning-Yang; Wang, Jian-Hua; Hu, Sheng-Ping; Yu, Zhong-Fei; Zheng, Yuan; Zhang, An-Yu; Feng, Xiao-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the diagnostic value of the cross-modality fusion images provided by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS: Data from 70 patients with pancreatic lesions who underwent CECT and PET/CT examinations at our hospital from August 2010 to October 2012 were analyzed. PET/CECT for the cross-modality image fusion was obtained using TureD software. The diagnostic efficiencies of PET/CT, CECT and PET/CECT were calculated and compared with each other using a χ2 test. P < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. RESULTS: Of the total 70 patients, 50 had PC and 20 had benign lesions. The differences in the sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy between CECT and PET/CECT in detecting PC were statistically significant (P < 0.05 for each). In 15 of the 31 patients with PC who underwent a surgical operation, peripancreatic vessel invasion was verified. The differences in the sensitivity, positive predictive value, NPV, and accuracy of CECT vs PET/CT and PET/CECT vs PET/CT in diagnosing peripancreatic vessel invasion were statistically significant (P < 0.05 for each). In 19 of the 31 patients with PC who underwent a surgical operation, regional lymph node metastasis was verified by postsurgical histology. There was no statistically significant difference among the three methods in detecting regional lymph node metastasis (P > 0.05 for each). In 17 of the 50 patients with PC confirmed by histology or clinical follow-up, distant metastasis was confirmed. The differences in the sensitivity and NPV between CECT and PET/CECT in detecting distant metastasis were statistically significant (P < 0.05 for each). CONCLUSION: Cross-modality image fusion of PET/CT and CECT is a convenient and effective method that can be used to diagnose and stage PC, compensating for the defects of PET/CT and CECT when they are conducted individually. PMID:25780297

  2. Comparison of CT and MR imaging in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Vymazal, Josef; Rulseh, Aaron M; Keller, Jiří; Janouskova, Ladislava

    2012-12-01

    Cerebrovascular disease represents a major source of global mortality and morbidity. Imaging examinations play a critical role in the management of stroke patients, from establishing the initial diagnosis to determining and guiding further treatment. In this article, current CT and MRI methods employed in the management of stroke patients are reviewed, with an emphasis on ischemic stroke. The advantages and disadvantages of these techniques are discussed, a number of cases emphasizing key points are presented, and a comparison between modern CT and MRI techniques is outlined. The major drawback of CT is the high radiation dose, while in MRI it is the more complicated and time-consuming aspect of the examination. • Cerebrovascular disease represents a major source of global mortality and morbidity • Imaging examinations play a critical role in the management of stroke patients • The penumbra may be seen with both CT and MRI; however, this concept may be overly simplistic • The major drawback of CT is the high radiation dose, while MRI is a more complicated examination.

  3. Statistical iterative material image reconstruction for spectral CT using a semi-empirical forward model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechlem, Korbinian; Ehn, Sebastian; Sellerer, Thorsten; Pfeiffer, Franz; Noël, Peter B.

    2017-03-01

    In spectral computed tomography (spectral CT), the additional information about the energy dependence of attenuation coefficients can be exploited to generate material selective images. These images have found applications in various areas such as artifact reduction, quantitative imaging or clinical diagnosis. However, significant noise amplification on material decomposed images remains a fundamental problem of spectral CT. Most spectral CT algorithms separate the process of material decomposition and image reconstruction. Separating these steps is suboptimal because the full statistical information contained in the spectral tomographic measurements cannot be exploited. Statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) techniques provide an alternative, mathematically elegant approach to obtaining material selective images with improved tradeoffs between noise and resolution. Furthermore, image reconstruction and material decomposition can be performed jointly. This is accomplished by a forward model which directly connects the (expected) spectral projection measurements and the material selective images. To obtain this forward model, detailed knowledge of the different photon energy spectra and the detector response was assumed in previous work. However, accurately determining the spectrum is often difficult in practice. In this work, a new algorithm for statistical iterative material decomposition is presented. It uses a semi-empirical forward model which relies on simple calibration measurements. Furthermore, an efficient optimization algorithm based on separable surrogate functions is employed. This partially negates one of the major shortcomings of SIR, namely high computational cost and long reconstruction times. Numerical simulations and real experiments show strongly improved image quality and reduced statistical bias compared to projection-based material decomposition.

  4. Simultaneous x-ray fluorescence and K-edge CT imaging with photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Li, Ruizhe; Zhang, Siyuan; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2016-10-01

    Rapid development of the X-ray phonon-counting detection technology brings tremendous research and application opportunities. In addition to improvements in conventional X-ray imaging performance such as radiation dose utilization and beam hardening correction, photon-counting detectors allows significantly more efficient X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and K-edge imaging, and promises a great potential of X-ray functional, cellular and molecular imaging. XRF is the characteristic emission of secondary X-ray photons from a material excited by initial X-rays. The phenomenon is widely used for chemical and elemental analysis. K-edge imaging identifies a material based on its chemically-specific absorption discontinuity over X-ray photon energy. In this paper, we try to combine XRF and K-edge signals from the contrast agents (e.g., iodine, gadolinium, gold nanoparticles) to simultaneously realize XFCT and K-edge CT imaging for superior image performance. As a prerequisite for this dual-modality imaging, the accurate energy calibration of multi-energy-bin photon-counting detectors is critically important. With the measured XRF data of different materials, we characterize the energy response function of a CZT detector for energy calibration and spectrum reconstruction, which can effectively improve the energy resolution and decrease the inconsistence of the photon counting detectors. Then, a simultaneous K-edge and X-ray fluorescence CT imaging (SKYFI) experimental setup is designed which includes a cone-beam X-ray tube, two separate photon counting detector arrays, a pin-hole collimator and a rotation stage. With a phantom containing gold nanoparticles the two types of XFCT and K-edge CT datasets are collected simultaneously. Then, XFCT and K-edge CT images are synergistically reconstructed in a same framework. Simulation results are presented and quantitative analyzed and compared with the separate XFCT and K-edge CT results.

  5. An improved level set method for vertebra CT image segmentation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical diagnosis and therapy for the lumbar disc herniation requires accurate vertebra segmentation. The complex anatomical structure and the degenerative deformations of the vertebrae makes its segmentation challenging. Methods An improved level set method, namely edge- and region-based level set method (ERBLS), is proposed for vertebra CT images segmentation. By considering the gradient information and local region characteristics of images, the proposed model can efficiently segment images with intensity inhomogeneity and blurry or discontinuous boundaries. To reduce the dependency on manual initialization in many active contour models and for an automatic segmentation, a simple initialization method for the level set function is built, which utilizes the Otsu threshold. In addition, the need of the costly re-initialization procedure is completely eliminated. Results Experimental results on both synthetic and real images demonstrated that the proposed ERBLS model is very robust and efficient. Compared with the well-known local binary fitting (LBF) model, our method is much more computationally efficient and much less sensitive to the initial contour. The proposed method has also applied to 56 patient data sets and produced very promising results. Conclusions An improved level set method suitable for vertebra CT images segmentation is proposed. It has the flexibility of segmenting the vertebra CT images with blurry or discontinuous edges, internal inhomogeneity and no need of re-initialization. PMID:23714300

  6. Clinical application of arterial spin-labeling MR imaging in patients with carotid stenosis: quantitative comparative study with single-photon emission CT.

    PubMed

    Uchihashi, Y; Hosoda, K; Zimine, I; Fujita, A; Fujii, M; Sugimura, K; Kohmura, E

    2011-09-01

    Arterial spin-labeling is an emerging technique for noninvasive measurement of cerebral perfusion, but concerns remain regarding the reliability of CBF quantification and clinical applications. Recently, an ASL implementation called QUASAR was proposed, and it was shown to have good reproducibility of CBF assessment in healthy volunteers. This study aimed to determine the utility of QUASAR for CBF assessment in patients with cerebrovascular diseases. Twenty patients with carotid stenosis underwent CBF quantification by ASL (QUASAR) within 3 days of performance of (123)I-iodoamphetamine-SPECT. CVR to acetazolamide also was assessed by ASL and SPECT. In surgically treated patients, the respective scans before and after the procedures were compared. Regional CBF and CVR values measured by ASL were significantly correlated and agreed with those measured by SPECT (r(s) = 0.92 and 0.88, respectively). A Bland-Altman plot demonstrated good agreement between 2 methods in terms of CBF quantification. Furthermore, ASL could detect pathologic states such as hypoperfusion, impaired vasoreactivity, and postoperative hyperperfusion, equivalent to SPECT. However, ASL tended to overestimate CBF values especially in high-perfusion regions. ASL perfusion MR imaging is clinically applicable and can be an alternative method for CBF assessment in patients with cerebrovascular diseases.

  7. Imaging lobular breast carcinoma: comparison of synchrotron radiation DEI-CT technique with clinical CT, mammography and histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, S.; Bravin, A.; Keyriläinen, J.; Fernández, M.; Suortti, P.; Thomlinson, W.; Tenhunen, M.; Virkkunen, P.; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M.-L.

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities for imaging cancer-bearing breast tissue samples are described and compared. The images include clinical mammograms and computed tomography (CT) images, CT images with partly coherent synchrotron radiation (SR), and CT and radiography images taken with SR using the diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The images are evaluated by a radiologist and compared with histopathological examination of the samples. Two cases of lobular carcinoma are studied in detail. The indications of cancer are very weak or invisible in the conventional images, but the morphological changes due to invasion of cancer become pronounced in the images taken by the DEI method. The strands penetrating adipose tissue are seen clearly in the DEI-CT images, and the histopathology confirms that some strands contain the so-called 'Indian file' formations of cancer cells. The radiation dose is carefully measured for each of the imaging modalities. The mean glandular dose (MGD) for 50% glandular breast tissue is about 1 mGy in conventional mammography and less than 0.25 mGy in projection DEI, while in the clinical CT imaging the MGD is very high, about 45 mGy. The entrance dose of 95 mGy in DEI-CT imaging gives rise to an MGD of 40 mGy, but the dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude, because the contrast is very large in most images.

  8. Dendrimers meet zwitterions: development of a unique antifouling nanoplatform for enhanced blood pool, lymph node and tumor CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhijuan; Wang, Yue; Zhu, Jingyi; Li, Xin; He, Yao; Qu, Jiao; Shen, Mingwu; Xia, Jindong; Shi, Xiangyang

    2017-08-31

    We report the synthesis and characterization of antifouling zwitterion carboxybetaine acrylamide (CBAA)-modified dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles (Au DENPs) for enhanced CT imaging applications. The CBAA-modified nanodevice displays a better protein resistance property, less macrophage cellular uptake and liver accumulation, and longer blood half-delay time than the PEGylated counterpart material, thereby enabling enhanced blood pool, lymph node, and tumor CT imaging.

  9. Hybrid detection of lung nodules on CT scan images

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Lin; Tan, Yongqiang; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The diversity of lung nodules poses difficulty for the current computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) schemes for lung nodule detection on computed tomography (CT) scan images, especially in large-scale CT screening studies. We proposed a novel CAD scheme based on a hybrid method to address the challenges of detection in diverse lung nodules. Methods: The hybrid method proposed in this paper integrates several existing and widely used algorithms in the field of nodule detection, including morphological operation, dot-enhancement based on Hessian matrix, fuzzy connectedness segmentation, local density maximum algorithm, geodesic distance map, and regression tree classification. All of the adopted algorithms were organized into tree structures with multi-nodes. Each node in the tree structure aimed to deal with one type of lung nodule. Results: The method has been evaluated on 294 CT scans from the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) dataset. The CT scans were randomly divided into two independent subsets: a training set (196 scans) and a test set (98 scans). In total, the 294 CT scans contained 631 lung nodules, which were annotated by at least two radiologists participating in the LIDC project. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the training set were 87% and 2.61%. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the testing set were 85.2% and 3.13%. Conclusions: The proposed hybrid method yielded high performance on the evaluation dataset and exhibits advantages over existing CAD schemes. We believe that the present method would be useful for a wide variety of CT imaging protocols used in both routine diagnosis and screening studies.

  10. Multimodal fluorescence mediated tomography and SPECT/CT for small animals imaging

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Metasebya; Nothdruft, Ralph E.; Akers, Walter; Edwards, W. Barry; Liang, Kexian; Xu, Baogang; Suddlow, Gail P.; Deghani, Hamid; Tai, Yuan-Chuan; Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Achilefu, Samuel; Culver, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    -localization of the MOMIA in a spatially coincident region on the co-registered FMT-SPECT-CT image may facilitate the development of the next generation preclinical and clinical multimodal optical-nuclear platform for a broad array of imaging applications. Due to the complementary information provided by the SPECT, CT and FMT imaging, this approach has potential to elucidate the underlying biological processes relevant to cancer diagnosis and therapy monitoring. PMID:23447655

  11. Current status of developments and applications of micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Ritman, Erik L

    2011-08-15

    Use of microscopic computed-tomography (micro-CT) scanning continues to grow in biomedical research. Laboratory-based micro-CT scanners, laboratory-based nano-CT scanners, and integrated micro-CT/SPECT and micro-CT/PET scanners are now manufactured for "turn-key" operation by a number of commercial vendors. In recent years a number of technical developments in X-ray sources and X-ray imaging arrays have broadened the utility of micro-CT. Of particular interest are photon-counting and energy-resolving detector arrays. These are being explored to maximize micro-CT image grayscale dynamic range and to further increase image contrast by utilizing the unique spectral attenuation characteristics of individual chemical elements. X-ray phase-shift images may increase contrast resolution and reduce radiation exposure. Although radiation exposure is becoming a concern with the drive for increased spatial and temporal resolution, especially for longitudinal studies, gated scans and limited scan-data-set reconstruction algorithms show great potential for keeping radiation exposure to a minimum.

  12. New developments in imaging: Sonography, cine-CT, MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, R.J.; Higgins, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The book can be conveniently subdivided into three sections: the first on magnetic resonance imaging the second on cine-computed tomography and the third on advances in ultrasound (US). The MR imaging section includes two chapters: the first on indications for MR in abdominal disease (a cookbook layout of indications for MR imaging versus CT) and the second on MR imaging of the heart. There are also chapters on MR imaging and US in the pelvis, contrast agent principles, and a chapter on imaging renal tumors. The third section, on US, contains chapters on the liver and gastrointenstinal disease, interventional US sonography during neurosurgery, state-of-the-art echocardiography. Doppler flow imaging, contrast media for sonography, endometrial sonography, and high-resolution US in the first trimester. The final chapter is presented as a scientific paper rather than as a chapter in a book and has no illustrations.

  13. A study on the effect of CT imaging acquisition parameters on lung nodule image interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shirley J.; Wantroba, Joseph S.; Raicu, Daniela S.; Furst, Jacob D.; Channin, David S.; Armato, Samuel G., III

    2009-02-01

    Most Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) research studies are performed using a single type of Computer Tomography (CT) scanner and therefore, do not take into account the effect of differences in the imaging acquisition scanner parameters. In this paper, we present a study on the effect of the CT parameters on the low-level image features automatically extracted from CT images for lung nodule interpretation. The study is an extension of our previous study where we showed that image features can be used to predict semantic characteristics of lung nodules such as margin, lobulation, spiculation, and texture. Using the Lung Image Data Consortium (LIDC) dataset, we propose to integrate the imaging acquisition parameters with the low-level image features to generate classification models for the nodules' semantic characteristics. Our preliminary results identify seven CT parameters (convolution kernel, reconstruction diameter, exposure, nodule location along the z-axis, distance source to patient, slice thickness, and kVp) as influential in producing classification rules for the LIDC semantic characteristics. Further post-processing analysis, which included running box plots and binning of values, identified four CT parameters: distance source to patient, kVp, nodule location, and rescale intercept. The identification of these parameters will create the premises to normalize the image features across different scanners and, in the long run, generate automatic rules for lung nodules interpretation independently of the CT scanner types.

  14. Cone-Beam CT with a Flat-Panel Detector: From Image Science to Image-Guided Surgery.

    PubMed

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2011-08-21

    The development of large-area flat-panel x-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions - for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck / skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  15. Cone-Beam CT with a Flat-Panel Detector: From Image Science to Image-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    The development of large-area flat-panel x-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions - for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck / skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  16. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2011-08-01

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions—for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in

  17. Automatic Annotation of Radiological Observations in Liver CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Francisco; Xu, Jiajing; Liu, Yi; Liu, Tiffany; Beaulieu, Christopher; Rubin, Daniel; Napel, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    We aim to predict radiological observations using computationally-derived imaging features extracted from computed tomography (CT) images. We created a dataset of 79 CT images containing liver lesions identified and annotated by a radiologist using a controlled vocabulary of 76 semantic terms. Computationally-derived features were extracted describing intensity, texture, shape, and edge sharpness. Traditional logistic regression was compared to L1-regularized logistic regression (LASSO) in order to predict the radiological observations using computational features. The approach was evaluated by leave one out cross-validation. Informative radiological observations such as lesion enhancement, hypervascular attenuation, and homogeneous retention were predicted well by computational features. By exploiting relationships between computational and semantic features, this approach could lead to more accurate and efficient radiology reporting. PMID:23304295

  18. Pros and cons of organ shielding for CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Samei, Ehsan

    2014-10-01

    With the increased importance of CT radiation dose to health care providers, patients and the general public, there is an increased responsibility to minimize patient dose effectively. Bismuth shields offer a simple strategy to reduce dose to certain anterior radiosensitive organs such as breasts and eyes. However, in order to reduce organ dose they must be used properly; improper use can lead to an actual increase in the patient dose. They also create a proportional increase in image noise in the section of the body adjacent to the shield and further reduce the quantitative precision of CT numbers. In addition, shielding can degrade the overall efficiency (by an order of approximately 10%) of the imaging process, reducing the theoretical image quality that can be expected from a certain level of patient dose. However, in spite of their significant disadvantages, there are certain clinical situations and practice considerations that provide qualified justification for their continued use.

  19. Fast and automatic ultrasound simulation from CT images.

    PubMed

    Cong, Weijian; Yang, Jian; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is currently widely used in clinical diagnosis because of its fast and safe imaging principles. As the anatomical structures present in an ultrasound image are not as clear as CT or MRI. Physicians usually need advance clinical knowledge and experience to distinguish diseased tissues. Fast simulation of ultrasound provides a cost-effective way for the training and correlation of ultrasound and the anatomic structures. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for fast simulation of ultrasound from a CT image. A multiscale method is developed to enhance tubular structures so as to simulate the blood flow. The acoustic response of common tissues is generated by weighted integration of adjacent regions on the ultrasound propagation path in the CT image, from which parameters, including attenuation, reflection, scattering, and noise, are estimated simultaneously. The thin-plate spline interpolation method is employed to transform the simulation image between polar and rectangular coordinate systems. The Kaiser window function is utilized to produce integration and radial blurring effects of multiple transducer elements. Experimental results show that the developed method is very fast and effective, allowing realistic ultrasound to be fast generated. Given that the developed method is fully automatic, it can be utilized for ultrasound guided navigation in clinical practice and for training purpose.

  20. Automatic labeling and segmentation of vertebrae in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasoulian, Abtin; Rohling, Robert N.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-03-01

    Labeling and segmentation of the spinal column from CT images is a pre-processing step for a range of image- guided interventions. State-of-the art techniques have focused either on image feature extraction or template matching for labeling of the vertebrae followed by segmentation of each vertebra. Recently, statistical multi- object models have been introduced to extract common statistical characteristics among several anatomies. In particular, we have created models for segmentation of the lumbar spine which are robust, accurate, and computationally tractable. In this paper, we reconstruct a statistical multi-vertebrae pose+shape model and utilize it in a novel framework for labeling and segmentation of the vertebra in a CT image. We validate our technique in terms of accuracy of the labeling and segmentation of CT images acquired from 56 subjects. The method correctly labels all vertebrae in 70% of patients and is only one level off for the remaining 30%. The mean distance error achieved for the segmentation is 2.1 +/- 0.7 mm.

  1. Comparison of full-scan and half-scan for cone beam breast CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lingyun; Shaw, Chris C.; Lai, Chao-jen; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Tu, Shu-ju; Liu, Xinming

    2006-03-01

    The half-scan cone beam technique, requiring a scan for 180° plus detector width only, can help achieve both shorter scan time as well as higher exposure in each individual projection image. This purpose of this paper is to investigate whether half-scan cone beam CT technique can provide acceptable images for clinical application. The half-scan cone beam reconstruction algorithm uses modified Parker's weighting function and reconstructs from slightly more than half of the projection views for full-scan, giving out promising results. A rotation phantom, stationary gantry bench top system was built to conduct experiments to evaluate half-scan cone beam breast CT technique. A post-mastectomy breast specimen, a stack of lunch meat slices embedded with various sizes of calcifications and a polycarbonate phantom inserted with glandular and adipose tissue equivalents are imaged and reconstructed for comparison study. A subset of full-scan projection images of a mastectomy specimen were extracted and used as the half-scan projection data for reconstruction. The results show half-scan reconstruction algorithm for cone beam breast CT images does not significantly degrade image quality when compared with the images of same or even half the radiation dose level. Our results are encouraging, emphasizing the potential advantages in the use of half-scan technique for cone beam breast imaging.

  2. A machine learning approach for body part recognition based on CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Keigo; Li, Yuanzhong; Ito, Wataru; Shimura, Kazuo

    2008-03-01

    Body part recognition based on CT slice images is very important for many applications in PACS and CAD systems. In this paper, we propose a novel approach that can recognize which body part a slice image belongs to robustly. We focus on how to effectively express and use the unique statistical information of the correlation between the CT value and the position information of each body part. We apply the machine learning method AdaBoost to express and use this statistical information. Our approach consists of a training process and a recognition process. In the training process, we first define the whole body using a set of specific classes to ensure that training images in the same class have a high similarity, and prepare a training image set (positive samples and negative samples) for each class. Second, the training images are normalized to a fixed size and rotation in each class. Third, features are calculated for each normalized training image. Finally, AdaBoosted histogram classifiers are trained. After the training process, each class has its own classifiers. In the recognition process, given a series of CT images, the scores of all classes for each slice image are calculated based on the classifiers obtained in the training process. Then, based on the scores of each slice and a simple model of body part sequence continuity, we use dynamic programming (DP) to eliminate false recognition results. Experimental results on 440 unknown series including lesions show that our approach has high a recognition rate.

  3. Deep learning methods to guide CT image reconstruction and reduce metal artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjesteby, Lars; Yang, Qingsong; Xi, Yan; Zhou, Ye; Zhang, Junping; Wang, Ge

    2017-03-01

    The rapidly-rising field of machine learning, including deep learning, has inspired applications across many disciplines. In medical imaging, deep learning has been primarily used for image processing and analysis. In this paper, we integrate a convolutional neural network (CNN) into the computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction process. Our first task is to monitor the quality of CT images during iterative reconstruction and decide when to stop the process according to an intelligent numerical observer instead of using a traditional stopping rule, such as a fixed error threshold or a maximum number of iterations. After training on ground truth images, the CNN was successful in guiding an iterative reconstruction process to yield high-quality images. Our second task is to improve a sinogram to correct for artifacts caused by metal objects. A large number of interpolation and normalization-based schemes were introduced for metal artifact reduction (MAR) over the past four decades. The NMAR algorithm is considered a state-of-the-art method, although residual errors often remain in the reconstructed images, especially in cases of multiple metal objects. Here we merge NMAR with deep learning in the projection domain to achieve additional correction in critical image regions. Our results indicate that deep learning can be a viable tool to address CT reconstruction challenges.

  4. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia secondary to Vaseline application to the tracheostomy in a laryngectomy patient: PET/CT and MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Gorospe, Luis; Gallego-Rivera, José Ignacio; Hervás-Morón, Asunción

    2013-01-01

    A 67-year-old female ex-smoker was referred to our hospital after chest radiographs revealed a nonresolving opacity in the right lower lung. Her past medical history was significant for laryngeal cancer. A whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (CT) confirmed an ill-defined fluorodeoxyglucose-avid peribronchial opacity in the right middle and inferior lobes. The CT component of the study showed focal areas of low attenuation within the lung opacity; these focal areas followed fat signal intensity on a magnetic resonance study, confirming the suspicion of exogenous lipoid pneumonia. The patient admitted to applying petroleum jelly (Vaseline) to her tracheostomy in order to moisturize the area around the stoma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nondestructive Evaluation of Hardwood Logs Using Automated Interpretation of CT Images

    Treesearch

    Daniel L. Schmoldt; Dongping Zhu; Richard W. Conners

    1993-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging is being used to examine the internal structure of hardwood logs. The following steps are used to automatically interpret CT images: (1) preprocessing to remove unwanted portions of the image, e.g., annual ring structure, (2) image-by-image segmentation to produce relatively homogeneous image areas, (3) volume growing to create volumes...

  6. Fluorine-18 labeled amino acids for tumor PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yiqiang; Liu, Xiaohui; Li, Jun; Yao, Huiqian; Yuan, Shuanghu

    2017-09-01

    Tumor glucose metabolism and amino acid metabolism are usually enhanced, (18)F-FDG for tumor glucose metabolism PET imaging has been clinically well known, but tumor amino acid metabolism PET imaging is not clinically familiar. Radiolabeled amino acids (AAs) are an important class of PET/CT tracers that target the upregulated amino acid transporters to show elevated amino acid metabolism in tumor cells. Radiolabeled amino acids were observed to have high uptake in tumor cells but low in normal tissues and inflammatory tissues. The radionuclides used in labeling amino acids include (15)O, (13)N, (11)C, (123)I, (18)F and (68)Ga, among which the most commonly used is (18)F [1]. Available data support the use of certain (18)F-labeled AAs for PET/CT imaging of gliomas, neuroendocrine tumors, prostate cancer and breast cancer [2, 3]. With the progress of the method of (18)F labeling AAs [4-6], (18)F-labeled AAs are well established for tumor PET/CT imaging. This review focuses on the current status of key clinical applications of 18F-labeled AAs in tumor PET/CT imaging.

  7. Quantitative CT imaging for adipose tissue analysis in mouse model of obesity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchadier, A.; Vidal, C.; Tafani, J.-P.; Ordureau, S.; Lédée, R.; Léger, C.

    2011-03-01

    In obese humans CT imaging is a validated method for follow up studies of adipose tissue distribution and quantification of visceral and subcutaneous fat. Equivalent methods in murine models of obesity are still lacking. Current small animal micro-CT involves long-term X-ray exposure precluding longitudinal studies. We have overcome this limitation by using a human medical CT which allows very fast 3D imaging (2 sec) and minimal radiation exposure. This work presents novel methods fitted to in vivo investigations of mice model of obesity, allowing (i) automated detection of adipose tissue in abdominal regions of interest, (ii) quantification of visceral and subcutaneous fat. For each mouse, 1000 slices (100μm thickness, 160 μm resolution) were acquired in 2 sec using a Toshiba medical CT (135 kV, 400mAs). A Gaussian mixture model of the Hounsfield curve of 2D slices was computed with the Expectation Maximization algorithm. Identification of each Gaussian part allowed the automatic classification of adipose tissue voxels. The abdominal region of interest (umbilical) was automatically detected as the slice showing the highest ratio of the Gaussian proportion between adipose and lean tissues. Segmentation of visceral and subcutaneous fat compartments was achieved with 2D 1/2 level set methods. Our results show that the application of human clinical CT to mice is a promising approach for the study of obesity, allowing valuable comparison between species using the same imaging materials and software analysis.

  8. CT ventilation functional image-based IMRT treatment plans are comparable to SPECT ventilation functional image-based plans.

    PubMed

    Kida, Satoshi; Bal, Matthieu; Kabus, Sven; Negahdar, Mohammadreza; Shan, Xin; Loo, Billy W; Keall, Paul J; Yamamoto, Tokihiro

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that CT ventilation functional image-based IMRT plans designed to avoid irradiating highly-functional lung regions are comparable to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation functional image-based plans. Three IMRT plans were created for eight thoracic cancer patients using: (1) CT ventilation functional images, (2) SPECT ventilation functional images, and (3) anatomic images (no functional images). CT ventilation images were created by deformable image registration of 4D-CT image data sets and quantitative analysis. The resulting plans were analyzed for the relationship between the deviations of CT-functional plan metrics from anatomic plan metrics (ΔCT-anatomic) and those of SPECT-functional plans (ΔSPECT-anatomic), and moreover for agreements of various metrics between the CT-functional and SPECT-functional plans. The relationship between ΔCT-anatomic and ΔSPECT-anatomic was strong (e.g., R=0.94; linear regression slope 0.71). The average differences and 95% limits of agreement between the CT-functional and SPECT-functional plan metrics (except for monitor units) for various structures were mostly less than 1% and 2%, respectively. This study demonstrated a reasonable agreement between the CT ventilation functional image-based IMRT plans and SPECT-functional plans, suggesting the potential for CT ventilation imaging to serve as a surrogate for SPECT ventilation in functional image-guided radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reduced image noise at low-dose multidetector CT of the abdomen with prior image constrained compressed sensing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lubner, Meghan G; Pickhardt, Perry J; Tang, Jie; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-07-01

    To assess the effect of prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) on noise reduction and image quality at low-dose computed tomography (CT). This HIPAA-compliant institutional review board-approved retrospective study was performed by using DICOM CT colonography data sets obtained in 20 adult patients. Informed consent was waived. Low-dose CT colonography was performed with 64-detector CT by using the standard protocol with mean effective dose per series of 3.06 mSv (range, 1.4-7.7 mSv). PICCS was applied to standard filtered back-projection (FBP) series. For FBP and PICCS series, mean and standard deviation (SD) of attenuation were obtained with 100-mm(2) circular region of interest (ROI) at six sites (240 soft-tissue, colonic gas, and subcutaneous fat measurements). Two abdominal radiologists reviewed two- and three-dimensional CT colonography displays and graded image quality with a five-point scale. Phantom studies were performed to compare spatial resolution and image quality between FBP and PICCS. Mean image noise and image quality scores were calculated and compared for clinical and phantom data sets. Bland-Altman, generalized estimating equation regression model, and Student t tests were used to obtain limits of agreement and to compare noise ratios and subjective image quality. Mean SD of attenuation (image noise) for ROIs was 38.0 for FBP and 12.2 for PICCS, corresponding to a noise-reduction factor of 3.1 (P < .001). Average noise reduction was 3.3 for soft tissue, 2.8 for air, and 3.0 for fat attenuation. Attenuation did not substantially change between FBP and PICCS images. Average two-dimensional image quality was 2.45 for FBP and 3.4 for PICCS (P < .001). Average three-dimensional image quality at three sites in the colon was 3.5 for FBP and 3.7 for PICCS (P = .34). Phantom data sets revealed no loss of spatial resolution in a line phantom and reduced noise in a liver tumor phantom when PICCS was compared with FBP. Application of PICCS to

  10. Adaptive image guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: A combined MRI-/CT-planning technique with MRI only at first fraction

    PubMed Central

    Nesvacil, Nicole; Pötter, Richard; Sturdza, Alina; Hegazy, Neamat; Federico, Mario; Kirisits, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate and test the feasibility of adaptive 3D image based BT planning for cervix cancer patients in settings with limited access to MRI, using a combination of MRI for the first BT fraction and planning of subsequent fractions on CT. Material and methods For 20 patients treated with EBRT and HDR BT with tandem/ring applicators two sets of treatment plans were compared. Scenario one is based on the “gold standard” with individual MRI-based treatment plans (applicator reconstruction, target contouring and dose optimization) for two BT applications with two fractions each. Scenario two is based on one initial MRI acquisition with an applicator in place for the planning of the two fractions of the first BT application and reuse of the target contour delineated on MRI for subsequent planning of the second application on CT. Transfer of the target from MRI of the first application to the CT of the second one was accomplished by use of an automatic applicator-based image registration procedure. Individual dose optimization of the second BT application was based on the transferred MRI target volume and OAR structures delineated on CT. DVH parameters were calculated for transferred target structures (virtual dose from MRI/CT plan) and CT-based OAR. The quality of the MRI/CT combination method was investigated by evaluating the CT-based dose distributions on MRI-based target and OAR contours of the same application (real dose from MRI/CT plan). Results The mean difference between the MRI based target volumes (HR CTVMRI2) and the structures transferred from MRI to CT (HR CTVCT2) was −1.7 ± 6.6 cm3 (−2.9 ± 20.4%) with a median of −0.7 cm3. The mean difference between the virtual and the real total D90, based on the MRI/CT combination technique was −1.5 ± 4.3 Gy EQD2. This indicates a small systematic underestimation of the real D90. Conclusions A combination of MRI for first fraction and subsequent CT based planning is feasible and easy

  11. Adaptive image guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a combined MRI-/CT-planning technique with MRI only at first fraction.

    PubMed

    Nesvacil, Nicole; Pötter, Richard; Sturdza, Alina; Hegazy, Neamat; Federico, Mario; Kirisits, Christian

    2013-04-01

    To investigate and test the feasibility of adaptive 3D image based BT planning for cervix cancer patients in settings with limited access to MRI, using a combination of MRI for the first BT fraction and planning of subsequent fractions on CT. For 20 patients treated with EBRT and HDR BT with tandem/ring applicators two sets of treatment plans were compared. Scenario one is based on the "gold standard" with individual MRI-based treatment plans (applicator reconstruction, target contouring and dose optimization) for two BT applications with two fractions each. Scenario two is based on one initial MRI acquisition with an applicator in place for the planning of the two fractions of the first BT application and reuse of the target contour delineated on MRI for subsequent planning of the second application on CT. Transfer of the target from MRI of the first application to the CT of the second one was accomplished by use of an automatic applicator-based image registration procedure. Individual dose optimization of the second BT application was based on the transferred MRI target volume and OAR structures delineated on CT. DVH parameters were calculated for transferred target structures (virtual dose from MRI/CT plan) and CT-based OAR. The quality of the MRI/CT combination method was investigated by evaluating the CT-based dose distributions on MRI-based target and OAR contours of the same application (real dose from MRI/CT plan). The mean difference between the MRI based target volumes (HR CTVMRI2) and the structures transferred from MRI to CT (HR CTVCT2) was -1.7±6.6 cm(3) (-2.9±20.4%) with a median of -0.7 cm(3). The mean difference between the virtual and the real total D90, based on the MRI/CT combination technique was -1.5±4.3 Gy EQD2. This indicates a small systematic underestimation of the real D90. A combination of MRI for first fraction and subsequent CT based planning is feasible and easy when automatic applicator-based image registration and target transfer

  12. Variability of Image Features Computed from Conventional and Respiratory-Gated PET/CT Images of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Jasmine A.; Budzevich, Mikalai; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Dilling, Thomas J.; Latifi, Kujtim; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2015-01-01

    Radiomics is being explored for potential applications in radiation therapy. How various imaging protocols affect quantitative image features is currently a highly active area of research. To assess the variability of image features derived from conventional [three-dimensional (3D)] and respiratory-gated (RG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images of lung cancer patients, image features were computed from 23 lung cancer patients. Both protocols for each patient were acquired during the same imaging session. PET tumor volumes were segmented using an adaptive technique which accounted for background. CT tumor volumes were delineated with a commercial segmentation tool. Using RG PET images, the tumor center of mass motion, length, and rotation were calculated. Fifty-six image features were extracted from all images consisting of shape descriptors, first-order features, and second-order texture features. Overall, 26.6% and 26.2% of total features demonstrated less than 5% difference between 3D and RG protocols for CT and PET, respectively. Between 10 RG phases in PET, 53.4% of features demonstrated percent differences less than 5%. The features with least variability for PET were sphericity, spherical disproportion, entropy (first and second order), sum entropy, information measure of correlation 2, Short Run Emphasis (SRE), Long Run Emphasis (LRE), and Run Percentage (RPC); and those for CT were minimum intensity, mean intensity, Root Mean Square (RMS), Short Run Emphasis (SRE), and RPC. Quantitative analysis using a 3D acquisition versus RG acquisition (to reduce the effects of motion) provided notably different image feature values. This study suggests that the variability between 3D and RG features is mainly due to the impact of respiratory motion. PMID:26692535

  13. CT Imaging of Coronary Stents: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Coronary stenting became a mainstay in coronary revascularization therapy. Despite tremendous advances in therapy, in-stent restenosis (ISR) remains a key problem after coronary stenting. Coronary CT angiography evolved as a valuable tool in the diagnostic workup of patients after coronary revascularization therapy. It has a negative predictive value in the range of 98% for ruling out significant ISR. As CT imaging of coronary stents depends on patient and stent characteristics, patient selection is crucial for success. Ideal candidates have stents with a diameter of 3 mm and more. Nevertheless, even with most recent CT scanners, about 8% of stents are not accessible mostly due to blooming or motion artifacts. While the diagnosis of ISR is currently based on the visual assessment of the stent lumen, functional information on the hemodynamic significance of in-stent stenosis became available with the most recent generation of dual source CT scanners. This paper provides a comprehensive overview on previous developments, current techniques, and clinical evidence for cardiac CT in patients with coronary artery stents. PMID:22997590

  14. Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of

  15. Synthesis and CT imaging of gold nanostructures with tunable optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Feng, Chao; Deng, Yida; Liu, Lei; Wu, Yating; Zhong, Cheng; Hu, Wenbin

    2014-09-01

    With a slight modification of typical seed-mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), a wide range of aspect ratios for nanorods, spherical and dumbbell-like GNPs were synthesized. Their unique optical properties such as localized surface plasmon resonance related to the distinct morphologies were investigated. On the basis of the preparation condition for short gold nanorods (GNRs), by varying the amounts of ascorbic acid, the morphological transition from rod to dumbbell occurred and the growth mechanism was proposed. Compared with conventional iodine-based contrast agents, GNPs exhibited preferable x-ray CT imaging effect, and are good candidates for x-ray CT contrast agents in biomedical applications.

  16. Validating automatic semantic annotation of anatomy in DICOM CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Sayan D.; Criminisi, Antonio; Shotton, Jamie; White, Steve; Robertson, Duncan; Sparks, Bobbi; Munasinghe, Indeera; Siddiqui, Khan

    2011-03-01

    In the current health-care environment, the time available for physicians to browse patients' scans is shrinking due to the rapid increase in the sheer number of images. This is further aggravated by mounting pressure to become more productive in the face of decreasing reimbursement. Hence, there is an urgent need to deliver technology which enables faster and effortless navigation through sub-volume image visualizations. Annotating image regions with semantic labels such as those derived from the RADLEX ontology can vastly enhance image navigation and sub-volume visualization. This paper uses random regression forests for efficient, automatic detection and localization of anatomical structures within DICOM 3D CT scans. A regression forest is a collection of decision trees which are trained to achieve direct mapping from voxels to organ location and size in a single pass. This paper focuses on comparing automated labeling with expert-annotated ground-truth results on a database of 50 highly variable CT scans. Initial investigations show that regression forest derived localization errors are smaller and more robust than those achieved by state-of-the-art global registration approaches. The simplicity of the algorithm's context-rich visual features yield typical runtimes of less than 10 seconds for a 5123 voxel DICOM CT series on a single-threaded, single-core machine running multiple trees; each tree taking less than a second. Furthermore, qualitative evaluation demonstrates that using the detected organs' locations as index into the image volume improves the efficiency of the navigational workflow in all the CT studies.

  17. Automated multidetector row CT dataset segmentation with an interactive watershed transform (IWT) algorithm: Part 2. Body CT angiographic and orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pamela T; Hahn, Horst K; Heath, David G; Fishman, Elliot K

    2008-12-01

    The preceding manuscript describes the principles behind the Interactive Watershed Transform (IWT) segmentation tool. The purpose of this manuscript is to illustrate the clinical utility of this editing technique for body multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) imaging. A series of cases demonstrates clinical applications where automated segmentation of skeletal structures with IWT is most useful. Both CT angiography and orthopedic applications are presented.

  18. Cochlear anatomy using micro computed tomography (μCT) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namkeun; Yoon, Yongjin; Steele, Charles; Puria, Sunil

    2008-02-01

    A novel micro computed tomography (μCT) image processing method was implemented to measure anatomical features of the gerbil and chinchilla cochleas, taking into account the bent modailosis axis. Measurements were made of the scala vestibule (SV) area, the scala tympani (SV) area, and the basilar membrane (BM) width using prepared cadaveric temporal bones. 3-D cochlear structures were obtained from the scanned images using a process described in this study. It was necessary to consider the sharp curvature of mododailosis axis near the basal region. The SV and ST areas were calculated from the μCT reconstructions and compared with existing data obtained by Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM), showing both qualitative and quantitative agreement. In addition to this, the width of the BM, which is the distance between the primary and secondary osseous spiral laminae, is calculated for the two animals and compared with previous data from the MRM method. For the gerbil cochlea, which does not have much cartilage in the osseous spiral lamina, the μCT-based BM width measurements show good agreement with previous data. The chinchilla BM, which contains more cartilage in the osseous spiral lamina than the gerbil, shows a large difference in the BM widths between the μCT and MRM methods. The SV area, ST area, and BM width measurements from this study can be used in building an anatomically based mathematical cochlear model.

  19. Segmentation of the ovine lung in 3D CT Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lijun; Hoffman, Eric A.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2004-04-01

    Pulmonary CT images can provide detailed information about the regional structure and function of the respiratory system. Prior to any of these analyses, however, the lungs must be identified in the CT data sets. A popular animal model for understanding lung physiology and pathophysiology is the sheep. In this paper we describe a lung segmentation algorithm for CT images of sheep. The algorithm has two main steps. The first step is lung extraction, which identifies the lung region using a technique based on optimal thresholding and connected components analysis. The second step is lung separation, which separates the left lung from the right lung by identifying the central fissure using an anatomy-based method incorporating dynamic programming and a line filter algorithm. The lung segmentation algorithm has been validated by comparing our automatic method to manual analysis for five pulmonary CT datasets. The RMS error between the computer-defined and manually-traced boundary is 0.96 mm. The segmentation requires approximately 10 minutes for a 512x512x400 dataset on a PC workstation (2.40 GHZ CPU, 2.0 GB RAM), while it takes human observer approximately two hours to accomplish the same task.

  20. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth Castro-Tejero, Pablo

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  1. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth; Castro-Tejero, Pablo

    2014-04-01

    Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ± 3% and ± 2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤ 15 mm, and breath period ≥ 3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath patterns of higher

  2. Three modality image registration of brain SPECT/CT and MR images for quantitative analysis of dopamine transporter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuzuho; Takeda, Yuta; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, Xiangrong; Matsusako, Masaki; Tanaka, Yuki; Hosoya, Kazuhiko; Nihei, Tsutomu; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Important features in Parkinson's disease (PD) are degenerations and losses of dopamine neurons in corpus striatum. 123I-FP-CIT can visualize activities of the dopamine neurons. The activity radio of background to corpus striatum is used for diagnosis of PD and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The specific activity can be observed in the corpus striatum on SPECT images, but the location and the shape of the corpus striatum on SPECT images only are often lost because of the low uptake. In contrast, MR images can visualize the locations of the corpus striatum. The purpose of this study was to realize a quantitative image analysis for the SPECT images by using image registration technique with brain MR images that can determine the region of corpus striatum. In this study, the image fusion technique was used to fuse SPECT and MR images by intervening CT image taken by SPECT/CT. The mutual information (MI) for image registration between CT and MR images was used for the registration. Six SPECT/CT and four MR scans of phantom materials are taken by changing the direction. As the results of the image registrations, 16 of 24 combinations were registered within 1.3mm. By applying the approach to 32 clinical SPECT/CT and MR cases, all of the cases were registered within 0.86mm. In conclusions, our registration method has a potential in superimposing MR images on SPECT images.

  3. Evaluation of deformable image registration and a motion model in CT images with limited features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Hu, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Kincaid, R.; Goodman, K. A.; Mageras, G. S.

    2012-05-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is increasingly used in radiotherapy applications and provides the basis for a previously described model of patient-specific respiratory motion. We examine the accuracy of a DIR algorithm and a motion model with respiration-correlated CT (RCCT) images of software phantom with known displacement fields, physical deformable abdominal phantom with implanted fiducials in the liver and small liver structures in patient images. The motion model is derived from a principal component analysis that relates volumetric deformations with the motion of the diaphragm or fiducials in the RCCT. Patient data analysis compares DIR with rigid registration as ground truth: the mean ± standard deviation 3D discrepancy of liver structure centroid positions is 2.0 ± 2.2 mm. DIR discrepancy in the software phantom is 3.8 ± 2.0 mm in lung and 3.7 ± 1.8 mm in abdomen; discrepancies near the chest wall are larger than indicated by image feature matching. Marker's 3D discrepancy in the physical phantom is 3.6 ± 2.8 mm. The results indicate that visible features in the images are important for guiding the DIR algorithm. Motion model accuracy is comparable to DIR, indicating that two principal components are sufficient to describe DIR-derived deformation in these datasets.

  4. Segmentation and Image Analysis of Abnormal Lungs at CT: Current Approaches, Challenges, and Future Trends.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Awais; Bagci, Ulas; Foster, Brent; Xu, Ziyue; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Folio, Les R; Udupa, Jayaram K; Mollura, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The computer-based process of identifying the boundaries of lung from surrounding thoracic tissue on computed tomographic (CT) images, which is called segmentation, is a vital first step in radiologic pulmonary image analysis. Many algorithms and software platforms provide image segmentation routines for quantification of lung abnormalities; however, nearly all of the current image segmentation approaches apply well only if the lungs exhibit minimal or no pathologic conditions. When moderate to high amounts of disease or abnormalities with a challenging shape or appearance exist in the lungs, computer-aided detection systems may be highly likely to fail to depict those abnormal regions because of inaccurate segmentation methods. In particular, abnormalities such as pleural effusions, consolidations, and masses often cause inaccurate lung segmentation, which greatly limits the use of image processing methods in clinical and research contexts. In this review, a critical summary of the current methods for lung segmentation on CT images is provided, with special emphasis on the accuracy and performance of the methods in cases with abnormalities and cases with exemplary pathologic findings. The currently available segmentation methods can be divided into five major classes: (a) thresholding-based, (b) region-based, (c) shape-based, (d) neighboring anatomy-guided, and (e) machine learning-based methods. The feasibility of each class and its shortcomings are explained and illustrated with the most common lung abnormalities observed on CT images. In an overview, practical applications and evolving technologies combining the presented approaches for the practicing radiologist are detailed.

  5. Nonrigid registration of dynamic breast F-18-FDG PET/CT images using deformable FEM model and CT image warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Alphonso; Krol, Andrzej; Unlu, Mehmet; Lipson, Edward; Mandel, James; McGraw, Wendy; Lee, Wei; Coman, Ioana; Feiglin, David

    2007-03-01

    This study was undertaken to correct for motion artifacts in dynamic breast F-18-FDG PET/CT images, to improve differential-image quality, and to increase accuracy of time-activity curves. Dynamic PET studies, with subjects prone, and breast suspended freely employed a protocol with 50 frames, each 1-minute long. A 30 s long CT scan was acquired immediately before the first PET frame. F-18-FDG was administered during the first PET time frame. Fiducial skin markers (FSMs) each containing ~0.5 μCi of Ge-68 were taped to each breast. In our PET/PET registration method we utilized CT data. For corresponding FSMs visible on the 1 st and n th frames, the geometrical centroids of FSMs were found and their displacement vectors were estimated and used to deform the finite element method (FEM) mesh of the CT image (registered with 1 st PET frame) to match the consecutive dynamic PET time frames. Each mesh was then deformed to match the 1 st PET frame using known FSM displacement vectors as FEM loads, and the warped PET timeframe volume was created. All PET time frames were thus nonrigidly registered with the first frame. An analogy between orthogonal components of the displacement field and the temperature distribution in steady-state heat transfer in solids is used, via standard heat-conduction FEM software with "conductivity" of surface elements set arbitrarily significantly higher than that of volume elements. Consequently, the surface reaches steady state before the volume. This prevents creation of concentrated FEM loads at the locations of FSMs and reaching incorrect FEM solution. We observe improved similarity between the 1 st and n th frames. The contrast and the spatial definition of metabolically hyperactive regions are superior in the registered 3D images compared to unregistered 3D images. Additional work is needed to eliminate small image artifacts due to FSMs.

  6. A segmentation and point-matching enhanced efficient deformable image registration method for dose accumulation between HDR CT images.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xin; Chen, Haibin; Yan, Hao; Zhou, Linghong; Mell, Loren K; Yashar, Catheryn M; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun; Gu, Xuejun; Cervino, Laura

    2015-04-07

    Deformable image registration (DIR) of fractional high-dose-rate (HDR) CT images is challenging due to the presence of applicators in the brachytherapy image. Point-to-point correspondence fails because of the undesired deformation vector fields (DVF) propagated from the applicator region (AR) to the surrounding tissues, which can potentially introduce significant DIR errors in dose mapping. This paper proposes a novel segmentation and point-matching enhanced efficient DIR (named SPEED) scheme to facilitate dose accumulation among HDR treatment fractions. In SPEED, a semi-automatic seed point generation approach is developed to obtain the incremented fore/background point sets to feed the random walks algorithm, which is used to segment and remove the AR, leaving empty AR cavities in the HDR CT images. A feature-based 'thin-plate-spline robust point matching' algorithm is then employed for AR cavity surface points matching. With the resulting mapping, a DVF defining on each voxel is estimated by B-spline approximation, which serves as the initial DVF for the subsequent Demons-based DIR between the AR-free HDR CT images. The calculated DVF via Demons combined with the initial one serve as the final DVF to map doses between HDR fractions. The segmentation and registration accuracy are quantitatively assessed by nine clinical HDR cases from three gynecological cancer patients. The quantitative analysis and visual inspection of the DIR results indicate that SPEED can suppress the impact of applicator on DIR, and accurately register HDR CT images as well as deform and add interfractional HDR doses.

  7. A segmentation and point-matching enhanced efficient deformable image registration method for dose accumulation between HDR CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Xin; Chen, Haibin; Yan, Hao; Zhou, Linghong; Mell, Loren K.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun; Gu, Xuejun; Cervino, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) of fractional high-dose-rate (HDR) CT images is challenging due to the presence of applicators in the brachytherapy image. Point-to-point correspondence fails because of the undesired deformation vector fields (DVF) propagated from the applicator region (AR) to the surrounding tissues, which can potentially introduce significant DIR errors in dose mapping. This paper proposes a novel segmentation and point-matching enhanced efficient DIR (named SPEED) scheme to facilitate dose accumulation among HDR treatment fractions. In SPEED, a semi-automatic seed point generation approach is developed to obtain the incremented fore/background point sets to feed the random walks algorithm, which is used to segment and remove the AR, leaving empty AR cavities in the HDR CT images. A feature-based ‘thin-plate-spline robust point matching’ algorithm is then employed for AR cavity surface points matching. With the resulting mapping, a DVF defining on each voxel is estimated by B-spline approximation, which serves as the initial DVF for the subsequent Demons-based DIR between the AR-free HDR CT images. The calculated DVF via Demons combined with the initial one serve as the final DVF to map doses between HDR fractions. The segmentation and registration accuracy are quantitatively assessed by nine clinical HDR cases from three gynecological cancer patients. The quantitative analysis and visual inspection of the DIR results indicate that SPEED can suppress the impact of applicator on DIR, and accurately register HDR CT images as well as deform and add interfractional HDR doses.

  8. Combining population and patient-specific characteristics for prostate segmentation on 3D CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Tade, Funmilayo; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-03-01

    Prostate segmentation on CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we explore the population and patient-specific characteristics for the segmentation of the prostate on CT images. Because population learning does not consider the inter-patient variations and because patient-specific learning may not perform well for different patients, we are combining the population and patient-specific information to improve segmentation performance. Specifically, we train a population model based on the population data and train a patient-specific model based on the manual segmentation on three slice of the new patient. We compute the similarity between the two models to explore the influence of applicable population knowledge on the specific patient. By combining the patient-specific knowledge with the influence, we can capture the population and patient-specific characteristics to calculate the probability of a pixel belonging to the prostate. Finally, we smooth the prostate surface according to the prostate-density value of the pixels in the distance transform image. We conducted the leave-one-out validation experiments on a set of CT volumes from 15 patients. Manual segmentation results from a radiologist serve as the gold standard for the evaluation. Experimental results show that our method achieved an average DSC of 85.1% as compared to the manual segmentation gold standard. This method outperformed the population learning method and the patient-specific learning approach alone. The CT segmentation method can have various applications in prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  9. Combining Population and Patient-Specific Characteristics for Prostate Segmentation on 3D CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Tade, Funmilayo; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-01-01

    Prostate segmentation on CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we explore the population and patient-specific characteristics for the segmentation of the prostate on CT images. Because population learning does not consider the inter-patient variations and because patient-specific learning may not perform well for different patients, we are combining the population and patient-specific information to improve segmentation performance. Specifically, we train a population model based on the population data and train a patient-specific model based on the manual segmentation on three slice of the new patient. We compute the similarity between the two models to explore the influence of applicable population knowledge on the specific patient. By combining the patient-specific knowledge with the influence, we can capture the population and patient-specific characteristics to calculate the probability of a pixel belonging to the prostate. Finally, we smooth the prostate surface according to the prostate-density value of the pixels in the distance transform image. We conducted the leave-one-out validation experiments on a set of CT volumes from 15 patients. Manual segmentation results from a radiologist serve as the gold standard for the evaluation. Experimental results show that our method achieved an average DSC of 85.1% as compared to the manual segmentation gold standard. This method outperformed the population learning method and the patient-specific learning approach alone. The CT segmentation method can have various applications in prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27660382

  10. Combining Population and Patient-Specific Characteristics for Prostate Segmentation on 3D CT Images.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Tade, Funmilayo; Schuster, David M; Fei, Baowei

    2016-02-27

    Prostate segmentation on CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we explore the population and patient-specific characteristics for the segmentation of the prostate on CT images. Because population learning does not consider the inter-patient variations and because patient-specific learning may not perform well for different patients, we are combining the population and patient-specific information to improve segmentation performance. Specifically, we train a population model based on the population data and train a patient-specific model based on the manual segmentation on three slice of the new patient. We compute the similarity between the two models to explore the influence of applicable population knowledge on the specific patient. By combining the patient-specific knowledge with the influence, we can capture the population and patient-specific characteristics to calculate the probability of a pixel belonging to the prostate. Finally, we smooth the prostate surface according to the prostate-density value of the pixels in the distance transform image. We conducted the leave-one-out validation experiments on a set of CT volumes from 15 patients. Manual segmentation results from a radiologist serve as the gold standard for the evaluation. Experimental results show that our method achieved an average DSC of 85.1% as compared to the manual segmentation gold standard. This method outperformed the population learning method and the patient-specific learning approach alone. The CT segmentation method can have various applications in prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  11. Effect of Third-generation Dual-source CT Technology on Image Quality of Low-dose Chest CT.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xin; Xu, Xiaoli; Song, Lan; DU, Qianni; Wang, Xiao; Jing, Zhengyu; Song, Wei

    2017-02-20

    Objective To evaluate the image quality and radiation dose of third-generation dual-source CT with tin filtration for spectral shaping and iterative reconstructions.Methods Thirty-five patients underwent low-dose CT (LDCT) for lung cancer screening on second-generation dual-source CT and follow-ups on third-generation dual-source CT. Image quality and radiation dose were compared between the two examinations.ResultsThe radiation dose of third-generation dual-source CT [dose-length product (DLP)(49.7±18.2)mGy·cm, effective dose (ED)(0.73±0.26)mSv] was lower than second-generation dual-source CT [DLP (86.37±13.44) mGy·cm, ED(1.20±0.42)mSv](t=6.01, P=0.000;t=6.57, P=0.000). The objective image noise of second-generation dual-source CT [(25.7±2.9)HU] was higher than that of third-generation dual-soure CT[(18.6±4.2)HU](t=5.24,P=0.000).The subjective image noise of second-generation dual-source CT [(4.60±0.49)scores] was significantly lower than that of third-generation dual-source CT [(4.80±0.40)scores] (t=4.15, P=0.000). Conclusion Chest CT for the detection of pulmonary nodules can be performed with third-generation dual-source CT that produces high image quality and low radiation dose when using a stellar infinity detector with spectral shaping.

  12. Automatic lung nodule matching on sequential CT images.

    PubMed

    Hong, Helen; Lee, Jeongjin; Yim, Yeny

    2008-05-01

    We propose an automatic segmentation and registration method that provides more efficient and robust matching of lung nodules in sequential chest computed tomography (CT) images. Our method consists of four steps. First, the lungs are extracted from chest CT images by the automatic segmentation method. Second, gross translational mismatch is corrected by optimal cube registration. This initial alignment does not require extracting any anatomical landmarks. Third, the initial alignment is step-by-step refined by hierarchical surface registration. To evaluate the distance measures between lung boundary points, a three-dimensional distance map is generated by narrow-band distance propagation, which drives fast and robust convergence to the optimal value. Finally, correspondences of manually detected nodules are established from the pairs with the smallest Euclidean distances. Experimental results show that our segmentation method accurately extracts lung boundaries and the registration method effectively finds the nodule correspondences.

  13. SU-D-BRB-01: 4D-CT Lung Ventilation Images Vary with 4D-CT Sorting Techniques.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Kabus, S; Lorenz, C; Johnston, E; Maxim, P; Loo, B; Keall, P

    2012-06-01

    4D-CT ventilation imaging is a novel promising technique for lung functional imaging and has potential as a biomarker for radiation pneumonitis, but has not been validated in human subjects. The current 4D- CT technique with phase-based sorting results in artifacts at an alarmingly high frequency (90%), which may introduce variations into ventilation calculations. The purpose of this study was to quantify the variability of 4D- CT ventilation imaging to 4D-CT sorting techniques. Two 4D-CT images were generated from the same data set by: (1) phase-based; (2) anatomic similarity- and abdominal displacement-based sorting for five patients. Two ventilation image sets (V_phase and V_anat) were then calculated by deformable image registration of peak-exhale and peak-inhale4D-CT images and quantification of regional volume change based on Hounsfield unit change. The variability of 4D-CT ventilation imaging wasquantified using the voxel-based Spearman rank correlation coefficients and Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) for the spatial overlap of segmented low- functional lung regions. The relationship between the abdominal motionrange variation and ventilation variation was also assessed using linearregression. Furthermore, the correlations between V_phase or V_anat and SPECT ventilation images (assumed ground-truth) were compared. In general, displacement- and anatomic similarity-based sorting reduced 4D- CT artifacts compared to phase-based sorting. The voxel-based correlationsbetween V_phase and V_anat were only moderate (range, 0.57-0.77). The DSCs for the low-functional lung regions were moderate to substantial (0.58-0.70). The relationship between the motion range variation and ventilation variation was strong on average (R2=0.79±0.25), suggesting that ventilation variations are related to 4D-CT artifacts. Vanat was found to improve correlations with SPECT ventilation images compared to V_phase. 4D-CT ventilation images vary markedly with 4D-CT sorting techniques. 4

  14. Anxiety of patients undergoing CT imaging-an underestimated problem?

    PubMed

    Heyer, Christoph M; Thüring, Johannes; Lemburg, Stefan P; Kreddig, Nina; Hasenbring, Monika; Dohna, Martha; Nicolas, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Prospective evaluation of anxiety in patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) imaging using a standardized state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI-S) and identification of possible risk factors. During a 9-month interval, patients undergoing CT were questioned using STAI-S. Additionally, 10 questions concerning specific procedure-related features (claustrophobia, radiation, administration of contrast, and so forth) were added. Moreover, sex, age, admitting subspecialty, organ region, reason for imaging, and prior imaging studies were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student t test and linear regression analysis; significance level was set to 5%. Of 6122 patients, 825 patients undergoing CT (14%) were included (67% men; average age, 54 ± 17 years). Average STAI was 42 ± 10 with women (45 ± 11 vs. 41 ± 10; P < .001) and patients who received intravenous contrast (43 ± 10 vs. 42 ± 11; P = .021) showing significantly higher anxiety levels compared to those without contrast. Patients with investigations of their extremities (41 ± 11 vs. 43 ± 10; P = .020) and trauma patients (41 ± 11 vs. 43 ± 10; P = .006) revealed significantly lower STAI results. Patients who had never received a CT scan before showed significantly greater STAI-S values than those with repeat studies (42 ± 10 vs. 41 ± 11; P = .036). Females had greater fears concerning examination results (P < .001), radiation exposure (P = .032), administration of contrast (P = .014), and claustrophobia (P < .001). Patients with known malignancies had a significantly higher level of anxiety concerning their CT results (P = .002). Anxiety does not only occur before MRI but also occur before CT. Its sources are manifold and include communication of CT results, administration of contrast agents, radiation exposure, and claustrophobia. In this setting, women seemed to be more receptive than men. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc

  15. Energy-resolved CT imaging with a photon-counting silicon-strip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Mats; Huber, Ben; Karlsson, Staffan; Liu, Xuejin; Chen, Han; Xu, Cheng; Yveborg, Moa; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats

    2014-11-01

    Photon-counting detectors are promising candidates for use in the next generation of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners. Among the foreseen benefits are higher spatial resolution, better trade-off between noise and dose and energy discriminating capabilities. Silicon is an attractive detector material because of its low cost, mature manufacturing process and high hole mobility. However, it is sometimes overlooked for CT applications because of its low absorption efficiency and high fraction of Compton scatter. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that silicon is a feasible material for CT detectors by showing energy-resolved CT images acquired with an 80 kVp x-ray tube spectrum using a photon-counting silicon-strip detector with eight energy thresholds developed in our group. We use a single detector module, consisting of a linear array of 50 0.5 × 0.4 mm detector elements, to image a phantom in a table-top lab setup. The phantom consists of a plastic cylinder with circular inserts containing water, fat and aqueous solutions of calcium, iodine and gadolinium, in different concentrations. By using basis material decomposition we obtain water, calcium, iodine and gadolinium basis images and demonstrate that these basis images can be used to separate the different materials in the inserts. We also show results showing that the detector has potential for quantitative measurements of substance concentrations.

  16. Energy-resolved CT imaging with a photon-counting silicon-strip detector.

    PubMed

    Persson, Mats; Huber, Ben; Karlsson, Staffan; Liu, Xuejin; Chen, Han; Xu, Cheng; Yveborg, Moa; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats

    2014-11-21

    Photon-counting detectors are promising candidates for use in the next generation of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners. Among the foreseen benefits are higher spatial resolution, better trade-off between noise and dose and energy discriminating capabilities. Silicon is an attractive detector material because of its low cost, mature manufacturing process and high hole mobility. However, it is sometimes overlooked for CT applications because of its low absorption efficiency and high fraction of Compton scatter. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that silicon is a feasible material for CT detectors by showing energy-resolved CT images acquired with an 80 kVp x-ray tube spectrum using a photon-counting silicon-strip detector with eight energy thresholds developed in our group. We use a single detector module, consisting of a linear array of 50 0.5×0.4 mm detector elements, to image a phantom in a table-top lab setup. The phantom consists of a plastic cylinder with circular inserts containing water, fat and aqueous solutions of calcium, iodine and gadolinium, in different concentrations. By using basis material decomposition we obtain water, calcium, iodine and gadolinium basis images and demonstrate that these basis images can be used to separate the different materials in the inserts. We also show results showing that the detector has potential for quantitative measurements of substance concentrations.

  17. Simulation of mammograms and tomosynthesis imaging with cone beam breast CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Shaw, Chris C.; Chen, Lingyun; Lai, Chao-jen; Liu, Xinming; Wang, Tianpeng

    2008-03-01

    The use of mammography techniques for the screening and diagnosis of breast cancers has been limited by the overlapping of cancer symptoms with normal tissue structures. To overcome this problem, two methods have been developed and actively investigated recently: digital tomosynthesis mammography and cone beam breast CT. Comparison study with these three techniques will be helpful to understand their difference and further might be supervise the direction of breast imaging. This paper describes and discusses about a technique using a general-purpose PC cluster to develop a parallel computer simulation model to simulate mammograms and tomosynthesis imaging with cone beam CT images of a mastectomy breast specimen. The breast model used in simulating mammography and tomosynthesis was developed by re-scaling the CT numbers of cone beam CT images from 80kVp to 20 kev. The compression of breast was simulated by deformation of the breast model. Re-projection software with parallel computation was developed and used to compute projection images of this simulated compressed breast for a stationary detector and a linearly shifted x-ray source. The resulting images were then used to reconstruct tomosynthesis mammograms using shift-and-add algorithms. It was found that MCs in cone beam CT images were not visible in regular mammograms but faintly visible in tomosynthesis images. The scatter signal and noise property needs to be simulated and incorporated in the future.

  18. Evaluation of on-board imager cone beam CT hounsfield units for treatment planning using rigid image registration.

    PubMed

    Rafic, Mohamathu; Ravindran, Paul

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the on-board imager cone beam CT (OBI-CBCT) Hounsfield units (HUs) for treatment planning. The HU-electron density (eD) calibration for CBCT, the CATphan504 phantom was used, and the CBCT HU (HUCBCT) consistency was studied by analyzing the CBCT images of Rando phantom and compared with planning CT. The latter study was also performed on CBCT images of 10 H&N patients. For comparison, the structures contoured and treatment plans generated on CT were transferred on to the CBCT after registration. The treatment plans were compared using gamma (g) index analysis and the plan comparison dose volume histograms (DVHPlanComp). Although the HU-eD calibration curves of both the planning CT and CBCT were found to be linear, differences in mean HU values were found in the region of interest (ROI) corresponding to Acrylic, Derlin, and Teflon, viz., 144 ± 11 HU, 193 ± 5 HU, and 257 ± 7 HU respectively. For all the cases, the consistency and reproducibility of HUCBCT values for low density medium agreed the HU CT except at regions of high density. Overall g-evaluation showed more than 94% pixels pass rate and DVH results showed small difference in the DVHPlanComp, Rando, and large differences in DVHPlanComp, patient for structures contoured at peripheral regions (PV) of CBCT images. We conclude that the pixel-to-pixel HU corrections for entire range of eD are not necessary for OBI-CBCT images. Application of local correction in the high-density and penumbral regions would facilitate the use of CBCT images for routine treatment planning.

  19. Imaging of cochlear implant electrode array with flat-detector CT and conventional multislice CT: comparison of image quality and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Struffert, Tobias; Hertel, Victoria; Kyriakou, Yannis; Krause, Jens; Engelhorn, Tobias; Schick, Bernhard; Iro, Heinrich; Hornung, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2010-04-01

    Cochlear implantation assessment is possible using commercially available standard flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT) protocols. Image quality is superior to multislice CT (MSCT). The radiation dose of FD-CT is lower in comparison with MSCT standard protocols and may therefore overcome the limitations of MSCT in the evaluation of cochlear implants. FD-CT offers higher spatial resolution than MSCT. Our objective was to compare the image quality of FD-CT to conventional MSCT in the visualization of a cochlear implant electrode array with respect to radiation exposure. An isolated temporal bone specimen was scanned using a commercially available FD-CT system and a 4 and 64 row MSCT scanner. Different scanning protocols were used. Image quality was assessed by four independent readers using a scoring system with different criteria describing delineation of the cochlea and the electrode array, image noise and spatial resolution. Radiation dose was measured using the CT dose index (CTDI) and a 16 cm acrylic phantom. Image quality was rated superior for FD-CT for all criteria by all readers. Single electrode contacts were only visible in FD-CT and assessment of implant position was improved by FD-CT. The radiation dose of FD-CT was half that of MSCT standard protocols.

  20. Design and optimization of a dedicated cone-beam CT system for musculoskeletal extremities imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbijewski, W.; De Jean, P.; Prakash, P.; Ding, Y.; Stayman, J. W.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Machado, A.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    The design, initial imaging performance, and model-based optimization of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) scanner for musculoskeletal extremities is presented. The system offers a compact scanner that complements conventional CT and MR by providing sub-mm isotropic spatial resolution, the ability to image weight-bearing extremities, and the capability for integrated real-time fluoroscopy and digital radiography. The scanner employs a flat-panel detector and a fixed anode x-ray source and has a field of view of ~ (20x20x20) cm3. The gantry allows a "standing" configuration for imaging of weight-bearing lower extremities and a "sitting" configuration for imaging of upper extremities and unloaded lower extremities. Cascaded systems analysis guided the selection of x-ray technique (e.g., kVp, filtration, and dose) and system design (e.g., magnification factor), yielding input-quantum-limited performance at detector signal of 100 times the electronic noise, while maintaining patient dose below 5 mGy (a factor of ~2-3 less than conventional CT). A magnification of 1.3 optimized tradeoffs between source and detector blur for a 0.5 mm focal spot. A custom antiscatter grid demonstrated significant reduction of artifacts without loss of contrast-to-noise ratio or increase in dose. Image quality in cadaveric specimens was assessed on a CBCT bench, demonstrating exquisite bone detail, visualization of intra-articular morphology, and soft-tissue visibility approaching that of diagnostic CT. The capability to image loaded extremities and conduct multi-modality CBCT/fluoroscopy with improved workflow compared to whole-body CT could be of value in a broad spectrum of applications, including orthopaedics, rheumatology, surgical planning, and treatment assessment. A clinical prototype has been constructed for deployment in pilot study trials.

  1. Lung fissure detection in CT images using global minimal paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appia, Vikram; Patil, Uday; Das, Bipul

    2010-03-01

    Pulmonary fissures separate human lungs into five distinct regions called lobes. Detection of fissure is essential for localization of the lobar distribution of lung diseases, surgical planning and follow-up. Treatment planning also requires calculation of the lobe volume. This volume estimation mandates accurate segmentation of the fissures. Presence of other structures (like vessels) near the fissure, along with its high variational probability in terms of position, shape etc. makes the lobe segmentation a challenging task. Also, false incomplete fissures and occurrence of diseases add to the complications of fissure detection. In this paper, we propose a semi-automated fissure segmentation algorithm using a minimal path approach on CT images. An energy function is defined such that the path integral over the fissure is the global minimum. Based on a few user defined points on a single slice of the CT image, the proposed algorithm minimizes a 2D energy function on the sagital slice computed using (a) intensity (b) distance of the vasculature, (c) curvature in 2D, (d) continuity in 3D. The fissure is the infimum energy path between a representative point on the fissure and nearest lung boundary point in this energy domain. The algorithm has been tested on 10 CT volume datasets acquired from GE scanners at multiple clinical sites. The datasets span through different pathological conditions and varying imaging artifacts.

  2. Nonrigid Image Registration for Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning With PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ireland, Rob H. . E-mail: r.ireland@sheffield.ac.uk; Dyker, Karen E.; Barber, David C.; Wood, Steven M.; Hanney, Michael B.; Tindale, Wendy B.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Conway, John; Robinson, Martin H.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Head and neck radiotherapy planning with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) requires the images to be reliably registered with treatment planning CT. Acquiring PET/CT in treatment position is problematic, and in practice for some patients it may be beneficial to use diagnostic PET/CT for radiotherapy planning. Therefore, the aim of this study was first to quantify the image registration accuracy of PET/CT to radiotherapy CT and, second, to assess whether PET/CT acquired in diagnostic position can be registered to planning CT. Methods and Materials: Positron emission tomography/CT acquired in diagnostic and treatment position for five patients with head and neck cancer was registered to radiotherapy planning CT using both rigid and nonrigid image registration. The root mean squared error for each method was calculated from a set of anatomic landmarks marked by four independent observers. Results: Nonrigid and rigid registration errors for treatment position PET/CT to planning CT were 2.77 {+-} 0.80 mm and 4.96 {+-} 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.001. Applying the nonrigid registration to diagnostic position PET/CT produced a more accurate match to the planning CT than rigid registration of treatment position PET/CT (3.20 {+-} 1.22 mm and 4.96 {+-} 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.012). Conclusions: Nonrigid registration provides a more accurate registration of head and neck PET/CT to treatment planning CT than rigid registration. In addition, nonrigid registration of PET/CT acquired with patients in a standardized, diagnostic position can provide images registered to planning CT with greater accuracy than a rigid registration of PET/CT images acquired in treatment position. This may allow greater flexibility in the timing of PET/CT for head and neck cancer patients due to undergo radiotherapy.

  3. SU-E-T-431: Feasiblity of Using CT Scout Images for 2D LDR Brachytherpay Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, J; Weaver, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: i) To show the feasibility of using CT scout images for 2D low-dose rate brachytherapy planning with BrachyVision (version 10.4); ii) to show their advantages and disadvantages over DRRs. Methods: A phantom was constructed to house a Fletcher-Suite applicator. The phantom is made of Styrofoam with metal BBs positioned at well-defined separations. These markers are used to assess the image distortion in the scout images. Unlike DRRs, scout images are distorted only in the direction normal to the couch direction; therefore, they needed to be scaled unidirectionally prior to importing into BrachyVision. In addition to confirming the scaling is performed correctly by measuring distances between well-positioned BB, we also compare a LDR plan using scout images to a 3D CT-based plan. Results: There is no distortion of the image along the couch direction due to the collimation of the CT scanner. The distortion in the transverse plane can be corrected by multiplying by the ratio of distances between source-to-isocenter and source-to-detector. The results show the distance separations between BBs as measured in scout images and by a caliber are within a few millimeters. Dosimetrically, the difference between the dose rates to points A and B based on scout images and on 3D CT are less than a few percents. The accuracy can be improved by correcting for the distortion on the transverse plane. Conclusion: It is possible to use CT scout images for 2D planning in BrachyVision. This is an advantage because scout images have no metal artifacts often present in CT images or DRRs. Another advantage is the lack of distortion in the couch direction. One major disadvantage is that the image distortion due to beam divergence can be large. This is due to the inherent short distance between source-to-isocenter and source-to-detector on a CT scanner.

  4. Semiautomatic segmentation of liver metastases on volumetric CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Jiayong; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and quantification of liver metastases on CT images are critical to surgery/radiation treatment planning and therapy response assessment. To date, there are no reliable methods to perform such segmentation automatically. In this work, the authors present a method for semiautomatic delineation of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced volumetric CT images. Methods: The first step is to manually place a seed region-of-interest (ROI) in the lesion on an image. This ROI will (1) serve as an internal marker and (2) assist in automatically identifying an external marker. With these two markers, lesion contour on the image can be accurately delineated using traditional watershed transformation. Density information will then be extracted from the segmented 2D lesion and help determine the 3D connected object that is a candidate of the lesion volume. The authors have developed a robust strategy to automatically determine internal and external markers for marker-controlled watershed segmentation. By manually placing a seed region-of-interest in the lesion to be delineated on a reference image, the method can automatically determine dual threshold values to approximately separate the lesion from its surrounding structures and refine the thresholds from the segmented lesion for the accurate segmentation of the lesion volume. This method was applied to 69 liver metastases (1.1–10.3 cm in diameter) from a total of 15 patients. An independent radiologist manually delineated all lesions and the resultant lesion volumes served as the “gold standard” for validation of the method’s accuracy. Results: The algorithm received a median overlap, overestimation ratio, and underestimation ratio of 82.3%, 6.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, and a median average boundary distance of 1.2 mm. Conclusions: Preliminary results have shown that volumes of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced CT images can be accurately estimated by a semiautomatic segmentation

  5. A very fast iterative algorithm for TV-regularized image reconstruction with applications to low-dose and few-view CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Fukashi; Nemoto, Takuya; Takaki, Keita

    2016-10-01

    This paper concerns iterative reconstruction for low-dose and few-view CT by minimizing a data-fidelity term regularized with the Total Variation (TV) penalty. We propose a very fast iterative algorithm to solve this problem. The algorithm derivation is outlined as follows. First, the original minimization problem is reformulated into the saddle point (primal-dual) problem by using the Lagrangian duality, to which we apply the first-order primal-dual iterative methods. Second, we precondition the iteration formula using the ramp filter of Filtered Backprojection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm in such a way that the problem solution is not altered. The resulting algorithm resembles the structure of so-called iterative FBP algorithm, and it converges to the exact minimizer of cost function very fast.

  6. An adaptive reconstruction algorithm for spectral CT regularized by a reference image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Miaoshi; Zhang, Yanbo; Liu, Rui; Guo, Shuxu; Yu, Hengyong

    2016-12-01

    The photon counting detector based spectral CT system is attracting increasing attention in the CT field. However, the spectral CT is still premature in terms of both hardware and software. To reconstruct high quality spectral images from low-dose projections, an adaptive image reconstruction algorithm is proposed that assumes a known reference image (RI). The idea is motivated by the fact that the reconstructed images from different spectral channels are highly correlated. If a high quality image of the same object is known, it can be used to improve the low-dose reconstruction of each individual channel. This is implemented by maximizing the patch-wise correlation between the object image and the RI. Extensive numerical simulations and preclinical mouse study demonstrate the feasibility and merits of the proposed algorithm. It also performs well for truncated local projections, and the surrounding area of the region- of-interest (ROI) can be more accurately reconstructed. Furthermore, a method is introduced to adaptively choose the step length, making the algorithm more feasible and easier for applications.

  7. 4D micro-CT-based perfusion imaging in small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Johnston, S. M.; Lin, M.; Hedlund, L. W.; Johnson, G. A.

    2009-02-01

    Quantitative in-vivo imaging of lung perfusion in rodents can provide critical information for preclinical studies. However, the combined challenges of high temporal and spatial resolution have made routine quantitative perfusion imaging difficult in rodents. We have recently developed a dual tube/detector micro-CT scanner that is well suited to capture first-pass kinetics of a bolus of contrast agent used to compute perfusion information. Our approach is based on the paradigm that the same time density curves can be reproduced in a number of consecutive, small (i.e. 50μL) injections of iodinated contrast agent at a series of different angles. This reproducibility is ensured by the high-level integration of the imaging components of our system, with a micro-injector, a mechanical ventilator, and monitoring applications. Sampling is controlled through a biological pulse sequence implemented in LabVIEW. Image reconstruction is based on a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique implemented on a GPU. The capabilities of 4D micro-CT imaging are demonstrated in studies on lung perfusion in rats. We report 4D micro-CT imaging in the rat lung with a heartbeat temporal resolution of 140 ms and reconstructed voxels of 88 μm. The approach can be readily extended to a wide range of important preclinical models, such as tumor perfusion and angiogenesis, and renal function.

  8. A curvelet transform approach for the fusion of MR and CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, F. E.; El-Dokany, I. M.; Saad, A. A.; Abd El-Samie, F. E.

    2010-02-01

    There are several medical imaging techniques such as the magnetic resonance (MR) and the computed tomography (CT) techniques. Both techniques give sophisticated characteristics of the region to be imaged. This paper proposes a curvelet based approach for fusing MR and CT images to obtain images with as much detail as possible, for the sake of medical diagnosis. This approach is based on the application of the additive wavelet transform (AWT) on both images and the segmentation of their detail planes into small overlapping tiles. The ridgelet transform is then applied on each of these tiles, and the fusion process is performed on the ridgelet transforms of the tiles. Simulation results show the superiority of the proposed curvelet fusion approach to the traditional fusion techniques like the multiresolution discrete wavelet transform (DWT) technique and the principal component analysis (PCA) technique. The fusion of MR and CT images in the presence of noise is also studied and the results reveal that unlike the DWT fusion technique, the proposed curvelet fusion approach doesn't require denoising.

  9. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  10. CT and MR imaging of odontoid abnormalities: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nishchint; Verma, Ritu; Garga, Umesh C; Baruah, Barinder P; Jain, Sachin K; Bhaskar, Surya N

    2016-01-01

    Odontoid process is the central pillar of the craniovertebral junction. Imaging of this small structure continues to be a challenge for the radiologists due to complex bony and ligamentous anatomy. A wide range of developmental and acquired abnormalities of odontoid have been identified. Their accurate radiologic evaluation is important as different lesions have markedly different clinical course, patient management, and prognosis. This article seeks to provide knowledge for interpreting appearances of odontoid on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with respect to various disease processes, along with providing a quick review of the embryology and relevant anatomy. PMID:27081234

  11. Diagnostic Imaging of Pulmonary Thromboembolism by Multidetector-row CT

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    For diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism, multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) is a minimally invasive imaging technique that can be performed rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity, and has been increasingly employed as the imaging modality of first choice for this disease. Since deep vein thrombosis in the legs, which is important as a thrombus source, can be evaluated immediately after the diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism, this diagnostic method is considered to provide important information when deciding on a comprehensive therapeutic strategy for this disease. PMID:23555409

  12. Volumetric applications for spiral CT in the thorax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Napel, Sandy; Leung, Ann N.

    1994-05-01

    Spiral computed tomography (CT) is a new technique for rapidly acquiring volumetric data within the body. By combining a continuous gantry rotation and table feed, it is possible to image the entire thorax within a single breath-hold. This eliminates the ventilatory misregistration seen with conventional thoracic CT, which can result in small pulmonary lesions being undetected. An additional advantage of a continuous data set is that axial sections can be reconstructed at arbitrary intervals along the spiral path, resulting in the generation of overlapping sections which diminish partial volume effects resulting from lesions that straddle adjacent sections. The rapid acquisition of spiral CT enables up to a 50% reduction in the total iodinated contrast dose required for routine thoracic CT scanning. This can be very important for imaging patients with cardiac and renal diseases and could reduce the cost of thoracic CT scanning. Alternatively, by combining a high flow peripheral intravenous iodinated contrast injection with a spiral CT acquisition, it is possible to obtain images of the vasculature, which demonstrate pulmonary arterial thrombi, aortic aneurysms and dissections, and congenital vascular anomalies in detail previously unattainable without direct arterial access.

  13. Quantifying Admissible Undersampling for Sparsity-Exploiting Iterative Image Reconstruction in X-Ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2014-01-01

    Iterative image</