Science.gov

Sample records for ct perfusion imaging

  1. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  2. Calibration free beam hardening correction for cardiac CT perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Jacob; Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) and coronary CTA have the potential to make CT an ideal noninvasive gate-keeper for invasive coronary angiography. However, beam hardening artifacts (BHA) prevent accurate blood flow calculation in MPI-CT. BH Correction (BHC) methods require either energy-sensitive CT, not widely available, or typically a calibration-based method. We developed a calibration-free, automatic BHC (ABHC) method suitable for MPI-CT. The algorithm works with any BHC method and iteratively determines model parameters using proposed BHA-specific cost function. In this work, we use the polynomial BHC extended to three materials. The image is segmented into soft tissue, bone, and iodine images, based on mean HU and temporal enhancement. Forward projections of bone and iodine images are obtained, and in each iteration polynomial correction is applied. Corrections are then back projected and combined to obtain the current iteration's BHC image. This process is iterated until cost is minimized. We evaluate the algorithm on simulated and physical phantom images and on preclinical MPI-CT data. The scans were obtained on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner (Philips Healthcare). Mono-energetic reconstructed images were used as the reference. In the simulated phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 12+/-2HU to 1+/-1HU and cupping was reduced by 81%. Similarly, in physical phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 48+/-6HU to 1+/-5HU and cupping was reduced by 86%. In preclinical MPI-CT images, BHA was reduced from 28+/-6 HU to less than 4+/-4HU at peak enhancement. Results suggest that the algorithm can be used to reduce BHA in conventional CT and improve MPI-CT accuracy.

  3. Incremental Value of Adenosine-induced Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging with Dual-Source CT at Cardiac CT Angiography1

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Filho, Jose A.; Blankstein, Ron; Shturman, Leonid D.; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Okada, David R.; Rogers, Ian S.; Ghoshhajra, Brian; Hoffmann, Udo; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Mamuya, Wilfred S.; Brady, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: First, to assess the feasibility of a protocol involving stress-induced perfusion evaluated at computed tomography (CT) combined with cardiac CT angiography in a single examination and second, to assess the incremental value of perfusion imaging over cardiac CT angiography in a dual-source technique for the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in a high-risk population. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval and informed patient consent were obtained before patient enrollment in the study. The study was HIPAA compliant. Thirty-five patients at high risk for CAD were prospectively enrolled for evaluation of the feasibility of CT perfusion imaging. All patients underwent retrospectively electrocardiographically gated (helical) adenosine stress CT perfusion imaging followed by prospectively electrocardiographically gated (axial) rest myocardial CT perfusion imaging. Analysis was performed in three steps: (a)Coronary arterial stenoses were scored for severity and reader confidence at cardiac CT angiography, (b)myocardial perfusion defects were identified and scored for severity and reversibility at CT perfusion imaging, and (c)coronary stenosis severity was reclassified according to perfusion findings at combined cardiac CT angiography and CT perfusion imaging. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), and positive predictive value (PPV) of cardiac CT angiography before and after CT perfusion analysis were calculated. Results: With use of a reference standard of greater than 50% stenosis at invasive angiography, all parameters of diagnostic accuracy increased after CT perfusion analysis: Sensitivity increased from 83% to 91%; specificity, from 71% to 91%; PPV, from 66% to 86%; and NPV, from 87% to 93%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve increased significantly, from 0.77 to 0.90 (P < .005). Conclusion: A combination protocol involving adenosine perfusion CT imaging and cardiac

  4. Lesion area detection using source image correlation coefficient for CT perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Fan Zhu; Rodriguez Gonzalez, David; Carpenter, Trevor; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2013-09-01

    Computer tomography (CT) perfusion imaging is widely used to calculate brain hemodynamic quantities such as cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and mean transit time that aid the diagnosis of acute stroke. Since perfusion source images contain more information than hemodynamic maps, good utilization of the source images can lead to better understanding than the hemodynamic maps alone. Correlation-coefficient tests are used in our approach to measure the similarity between healthy tissue time-concentration curves and unknown curves. This information is then used to differentiate penumbra and dead tissues from healthy tissues. The goal of the segmentation is to fully utilize information in the perfusion source images. Our method directly identifies suspected abnormal areas from perfusion source images and then delivers a suggested segmentation of healthy, penumbra, and dead tissue. This approach is designed to handle CT perfusion images, but it can also be used to detect lesion areas in magnetic resonance perfusion images.

  5. Dynamic CT perfusion image data compression for efficient parallel processing.

    PubMed

    Barros, Renan Sales; Olabarriaga, Silvia Delgado; Borst, Jordi; van Walderveen, Marianne A A; Posthuma, Jorrit S; Streekstra, Geert J; van Herk, Marcel; Majoie, Charles B L M; Marquering, Henk A

    2016-03-01

    The increasing size of medical imaging data, in particular time series such as CT perfusion (CTP), requires new and fast approaches to deliver timely results for acute care. Cloud architectures based on graphics processing units (GPUs) can provide the processing capacity required for delivering fast results. However, the size of CTP datasets makes transfers to cloud infrastructures time-consuming and therefore not suitable in acute situations. To reduce this transfer time, this work proposes a fast and lossless compression algorithm for CTP data. The algorithm exploits redundancies in the temporal dimension and keeps random read-only access to the image elements directly from the compressed data on the GPU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to present a GPU-ready method for medical image compression with random access to the image elements from the compressed data.

  6. Volume perfusion CT imaging of cerebral vasospasm: diagnostic performance of different perfusion maps.

    PubMed

    Othman, Ahmed E; Afat, Saif; Nikoubashman, Omid; Müller, Marguerite; Schubert, Gerrit Alexander; Bier, Georg; Brockmann, Marc A; Wiesmann, Martin; Brockmann, Carolin

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of different volume perfusion CT (VPCT) maps regarding the detection of cerebral vasospasm compared to angiographic findings. Forty-one datasets of 26 patients (57.5 ± 10.8 years, 18 F) with subarachnoid hemorrhage and suspected cerebral vasospasm, who underwent VPCT and angiography within 6 h, were included. Two neuroradiologists independently evaluated the presence and severity of vasospasm on perfusion maps on a 3-point Likert scale (0-no vasospasm, 1-vasospasm affecting <50 %, 2-vasospasm affecting >50 % of vascular territory). A third neuroradiologist independently assessed angiography for the presence and severity of vasospasm on a 3-point Likert scale (0-no vasospasm, 1-vasospasm affecting < 50 %, 2-vasospasm affecting > 50 % of vessel diameter). Perfusion maps of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), and time to drain (TTD) were evaluated regarding diagnostic accuracy for cerebral vasospasm with angiography as reference standard. Correlation analysis of vasospasm severity on perfusion maps and angiographic images was performed. Furthermore, inter-reader agreement was assessed regarding findings on perfusion maps. Diagnostic accuracy for TTD and MTT was significantly higher than for all other perfusion maps (TTD, AUC = 0.832; MTT, AUC = 0.791; p < 0.001). TTD revealed higher sensitivity than MTT (p = 0.007). The severity of vasospasm on TTD maps showed significantly higher correlation levels with angiography than all other perfusion maps (p ≤ 0.048). Inter-reader agreement was (almost) perfect for all perfusion maps (kappa ≥ 0.927). The results of this study indicate that TTD maps have the highest sensitivity for the detection of cerebral vasospasm and highest correlation with angiography regarding the severity of vasospasm.

  7. Perfusion measurements by micro-CT using prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS): initial phantom results.

    PubMed

    Nett, Brian E; Brauweiler, Robert; Kalender, Willi; Rowley, Howard; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2010-04-21

    Micro-CT scanning has become an accepted standard for anatomical imaging in small animal disease and genome mutation models. Concurrently, perfusion imaging via tracking contrast dynamics after injection of an iodinated contrast agent is a well-established tool for clinical CT scanners. However, perfusion imaging is not yet commercially available on the micro-CT platform due to limitations in both radiation dose and temporal resolution. Recent hardware developments in micro-CT scanners enable continuous imaging of a given volume through the use of a slip-ring gantry. Now that dynamic CT imaging is feasible, data may be acquired to measure tissue perfusion using a micro-CT scanner (CT Imaging, Erlangen, Germany). However, rapid imaging using micro-CT scanners leads to high image noise in individual time frames. Using the standard filtered backprojection (FBP) image reconstruction, images are prohibitively noisy for calculation of voxel-by-voxel perfusion maps. In this study, we apply prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) to reconstruct images with significantly lower noise variance. In perfusion phantom experiments performed on a micro-CT scanner, the PICCS reconstruction enabled a reduction to 1/16 of the noise variance of standard FBP reconstruction, without compromising the spatial or temporal resolution. This enables a significant increase in dose efficiency, and thus, significantly less exposure time is needed to acquire images amenable to perfusion processing. This reduction in required irradiation time enables voxel-by-voxel perfusion maps to be generated on micro-CT scanners. Sample perfusion maps using a deconvolution-based perfusion analysis are included to demonstrate the improvement in image quality using the PICCS algorithm.

  8. Perfusion measurements by micro-CT using Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS): Initial Phantom Results

    PubMed Central

    Nett, Brian E.; Brauweiler, Robert; Kalender, Willi; Rowley, Howard; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2010-01-01

    Micro-CT scanning has become an accepted standard for anatomical imaging in small animal disease and genome mutation models. Concurrently, perfusion imaging via tracking contrast dynamics after injection of an iodinated contrast agent is a well established tool on clinical CT scanners. However, perfusion imaging is not yet commercially available on the micro-CT platform. Recent hardware developments in micro-CT scanners enable continuous imaging of a given volume through the use of a slip-ring gantry. Now that dynamic CT imaging is feasible data may be acquired to measure tissue perfusion using a micro-CT scanner (CT Imaging, Erlangen, Germany). However, rapid imaging using micro-CT scanners leads to high image noise in individual time frames. Using the standard filterered backprojection (FBP) image reconstruction images are prohibitively noisy for calculation of voxel-by-voxel perfusion maps. Here we apply Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) to reconstruct images with significantly lower noise variance. In perfusion phantom experiments performed on a micro-CT scanner the PICCS reconstruction enabled a reduction to 1/16 of the noise variance of standard FBP reconstruction, without compromising the spatial or temporal resolution. This enables a significant increase in dose efficiency and thus significantly less exposure time is needed to acquire images amenable to perfusion processing. This reduction in required irradiation time enables voxel-by-voxel perfusion maps to be generated on micro-CT scanners. Sample perfusion maps using a deconvolution based perfusion analysis are included to demonstrate the improvement in image quality using the PICCS algorithm. PMID:20360635

  9. Diagnostic Performance of Dual-Energy CT Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging: Direct Comparison With Cardiovascular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sung Min; Song, Meong Gun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of stress perfusion dual-energy CT (DECT) and its incremental value when used with coronary CT angiography (CTA) for identifying hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. SUBJECTS AND METHODS One hundred patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease without chronic myocardial infarction detected with coronary CTA underwent stress perfusion DECT, stress cardiovascular perfusion MRI, and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stress perfusion DECT and cardiovascular stress perfusion MR images were used for detecting perfusion defects. Coronary CTA and ICA were evaluated in the detection of ≥ 50% coronary stenosis. The diagnostic performance of coronary CTA for detecting hemodynamically significant stenosis was assessed before and after stress perfusion DECT on a pervessel basis with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI as the reference standard. RESULTS The performance of stress perfusion DECT compared with cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI on a per-vessel basis in the detection of perfusion defects was sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 74%; positive predictive value, 73%; negative predictive value, 90%. Per segment, these values were sensitivity, 76%; specificity, 80%; positive predictive value, 63%; and negative predictive value, 88%. Compared with ICA and cardiovascular stress perfusion MRI per vessel territory the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of coronary CTA were 95%, 61%, 61%, and 95%. The values for stress perfusion DECT were 92%, 72%, 68%, and 94%. The values for coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT were 88%, 79%, 73%, and 91%. The ROC AUC increased from 0.78 to 0.84 (p = 0.02) with the use of coronary CTA and stress perfusion DECT compared with coronary CTA alone. CONCLUSION Stress perfusion DECT plays a complementary role in enhancing the accuracy of coronary CTA for identifying hemodynamically

  10. Development of Coronary Vasospasm during Adenosine-Stress Myocardial Perfusion CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jeong Gu; Choi, Seong Hoon; Kang, Byeong Seong; Bang, Min Seo; Kwon, Woon Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a short-acting coronary vasodilator, and it is widely used during pharmacological stress myocardial perfusion imaging. It has a well-established safety profile, and most of its side effects are known to be mild and transient. Until now, coronary vasospasm has been rarely reported as a side effect of adenosine during or after adenosine stress test. This study reports a case of coronary vasospasm which was documented on stress myocardial perfusion CT imaging during adenosine stress test.

  11. Comparison of stroke infarction between CT perfusion and diffusion weighted imaging: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd. Rahni, Ashrani Aizzuddin; Arka, Israna Hossain; Chellappan, Kalaivani; Mukari, Shahizon Azura; Law, Zhe Kang; Sahathevan, Ramesh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results of comparison of automatic segmentations of the infarct core, between that obtained from CT perfusion (based on time to peak parameter) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). For each patient, the two imaging volumes were automatically co-registered to a common frame of reference based on an acquired CT angiography image. The accuracy of image registration is measured by the overlap of the segmented brain from both images (CT perfusion and DWI), measured within their common field of view. Due to the limitations of the study, DWI was acquired as a follow up scan up to a week after initial CT based imaging. However, we found significant overlap of the segmented brain (Jaccard indices of approximately 0.8) and the percentage of infarcted brain tissue from the two modalities were still fairly highly correlated (correlation coefficient of approximately 0.9). The results are promising with more data needed in future for clinical inference.

  12. Steal phenomenon-induced lung perfusion defects in pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas: assessment with automated perfusion SPECT-CT fusion images.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Iwanaga, Hideyuki; Tokuda, Osamu; Okada, Munemasa; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2010-09-01

    Lung perfusion impairment in patients with pulmonary arteriovenous fistula (AVF) was evaluated by automated deep inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images. Participants were 14 patients with a single (N=6) or multiple nodular AVFs (N=8) diagnosed by contrast-enhanced CT scan and/or pulmonary angiography. After the injection of 185MBq Tc-99m-macroaggregated albumin, a whole-body scan was obtained to quantify an intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt. Subsequently, DIBrH SPECT was obtained using the continuous rotating acquisition mode of a dual-headed SPECT system, which was automatically coregistered with DIBrH CT. The anatomic relationship between AVF and perfusion defects was assessed on the fusion images. The whole-body scan depicted systemic organs indicating the presence of an intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt in all the patients. DIBrH SPECT showed 34 perfusion defects in these patients, which were located at the AVF and in the surrounding lungs of the AVF on the fusion images, regardless of the absence of morphologic abnormality on CT in all the patients. These defects were considered to be caused by the 'steal phenomenon' associated with the high and fast pulmonary arterial flow to each AVF, which were more extensive and severe in the multiple AVFs compared with a single AVF (P=0.0012), occasionally extending to the entire lobe with AVF or even to the adjacent lobe. In five patients, the fusion images detected a total of six tiny AVFs with unexpectedly extensive 'steal phenomenon'-induced defects, which had been missed by other radiological imaging techniques. The summed value of the shunt index estimated by the whole-body scan and the lung perfusion defect extent estimated by DIBrH SPECT was significantly correlated with PaO2 in all the patients (P < 0.0001), with a better correlation compared with the shunt index alone. In addition to the right-to-left shunt, 'steal phenomenon

  13. Impact of image denoising on image quality, quantitative parameters and sensitivity of ultra-low-dose volume perfusion CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Othman, Ahmed E; Brockmann, Carolin; Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikoubashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Wiesmann, Martin; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2016-01-01

    To examine the impact of denoising on ultra-low-dose volume perfusion CT (ULD-VPCT) imaging in acute stroke. Simulated ULD-VPCT data sets at 20 % dose rate were generated from perfusion data sets of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kVp/180 mAs. Four data sets were generated from each ULD-VPCT data set: not-denoised (ND); denoised using spatiotemporal filter (D1); denoised using quanta-stream diffusion technique (D2); combination of both methods (D1 + D2). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was measured in the resulting 100 data sets. Image quality, presence/absence of ischemic lesions, CBV and CBF scores according to a modified ASPECTS score were assessed by two blinded readers. SNR and qualitative scores were highest for D1 + D2 and lowest for ND (all p ≤ 0.001). In 25 % of the patients, ND maps were not assessable and therefore excluded from further analyses. Compared to original data sets, in D2 and D1 + D2, readers correctly identified all patients with ischemic lesions (sensitivity 1.0, kappa 1.0). Lesion size was most accurately estimated for D1 + D2 with a sensitivity of 1.0 (CBV) and 0.94 (CBF) and an inter-rater agreement of 1.0 and 0.92, respectively. An appropriate combination of denoising techniques applied in ULD-VPCT produces diagnostically sufficient perfusion maps at substantially reduced dose rates as low as 20 % of the normal scan. Perfusion-CT is an accurate tool for the detection of brain ischemias. The high associated radiation doses are a major drawback of brain perfusion CT. Decreasing tube current in perfusion CT increases image noise and deteriorates image quality. Combination of different image-denoising techniques produces sufficient image quality from ultra-low-dose perfusion CT.

  14. Robust cranial cavity segmentation in CT and CT perfusion images of trauma and suspected stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ajay; van Ginneken, Bram; Meijer, Frederick J A; van Dijk, Ewoud J; Prokop, Mathias; Manniesing, Rashindra

    2017-02-01

    A robust and accurate method is presented for the segmentation of the cranial cavity in computed tomography (CT) and CT perfusion (CTP) images. The method consists of multi-atlas registration with label fusion followed by a geodesic active contour levelset refinement of the segmentation. Pre-registration atlas selection based on differences in anterior skull anatomy reduces computation time whilst optimising performance. The method was evaluated on a large clinical dataset of 573 acute stroke and trauma patients that received a CT or CTP in our hospital in the period February 2015-December 2015. The database covers a large spectrum of the anatomical and pathological variations that is typically observed in everyday clinical practice. Three orthogonal slices were randomly selected per patient and manually annotated, resulting in 1659 reference annotations. Segmentations were initially visually inspected for the entire study cohort to assess failures. A total of 20 failures were reported. Quantitative evaluation in comparison to the reference dataset showed a mean Dice coefficient of 98.36 ±  2.59%. The results demonstrate that the method closely approaches the high performance of expert manual annotation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 4D micro-CT-based perfusion imaging in small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Johnston, S. M.; Lin, M.; Hedlund, L. W.; Johnson, G. A.

    2009-02-01

    Quantitative in-vivo imaging of lung perfusion in rodents can provide critical information for preclinical studies. However, the combined challenges of high temporal and spatial resolution have made routine quantitative perfusion imaging difficult in rodents. We have recently developed a dual tube/detector micro-CT scanner that is well suited to capture first-pass kinetics of a bolus of contrast agent used to compute perfusion information. Our approach is based on the paradigm that the same time density curves can be reproduced in a number of consecutive, small (i.e. 50μL) injections of iodinated contrast agent at a series of different angles. This reproducibility is ensured by the high-level integration of the imaging components of our system, with a micro-injector, a mechanical ventilator, and monitoring applications. Sampling is controlled through a biological pulse sequence implemented in LabVIEW. Image reconstruction is based on a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique implemented on a GPU. The capabilities of 4D micro-CT imaging are demonstrated in studies on lung perfusion in rats. We report 4D micro-CT imaging in the rat lung with a heartbeat temporal resolution of 140 ms and reconstructed voxels of 88 μm. The approach can be readily extended to a wide range of important preclinical models, such as tumor perfusion and angiogenesis, and renal function.

  16. LIVER FUNCTION AFTER IRRADIATION BASED UPON CT PORTAL VEIN PERFUSION IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Pan, Charlie; Balter, James M.; Platt, Joel F.; Francis, Isaac R.; Knol, James A.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The role of radiation in the treatment of intrahepatic cancer is limited by the development of radiation-induced liver disease (RILD), which occurs weeks after the course of radiation is completed. We hypothesized that, as the pathophysiology of RILD is veno-occlusive disease, we could assess individual and regional liver sensitivity to radiation by measuring liver perfusion during a course of treatment using dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) scanning. Materials and Methods Patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing conformal radiotherapy underwent DCE-CT (to measure perfusion distribution) and an indocyanine extraction study (to measure liver function) prior to, during, and one month after treatment. We wished to determine if the residual functioning liver (i.e. those regions showing portal vein perfusion) could be used to predict overall liver function after irradiation. Results Radiation doses from 45 to 84 Gy resulted in undectable regional portal vein perfusion one month after treatment. The volume of each liver with undectable portal vein perfusion ranged from 0% to 39% and depended both on the patient’s sensitivity and dose distribution. There was a significant correlation between indocyanine green clearance and the mean of the estimated portal vein perfusion in the functional liver parenchyma (P < .001). Conclusion This study reveals substantial individual variability in the sensitivity of the liver to irradiation. In addition, these findings suggest that hepatic perfusion imaging may be a marker for liver function, and has the potential to be a tool for individualizing therapy. PMID:17855011

  17. 320-row CT renal perfusion imaging in patients with aortic dissection: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongting; Liu, Jiayi; Wen, Zhaoying; Li, Yu; Sun, Zhonghua; Xu, Qin; Fan, Zhanming

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical value of renal perfusion imaging in patients with aortic dissection (AD) using 320-row computed tomography (CT), and to determine the relationship between renal CT perfusion imaging and various factors of aortic dissection. Methods Forty-three patients with AD who underwent 320-row CT renal perfusion before operation were prospectively enrolled in this study. Diagnosis of AD was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. Blood flow (BF) of bilateral renal perfusion was measured and analyzed. CT perfusion imaging signs of AD in relation to the type of AD, number of entry tears and the false lumen thrombus were observed and compared. Results The BF values of patients with type A AD were significantly lower than those of patients with type B AD (P = 0.004). No significant difference was found in the BF between different numbers of intimal tears (P = 0.288), but BF values were significantly higher in cases with a false lumen without thrombus and renal arteries arising from the true lumen than in those with thrombus (P = 0.036). The BF values measured between the true lumen, false lumen and overriding groups were different (P = 0.02), with the true lumen group having the highest. Also, the difference in BF values between true lumen and false lumen groups was statistically significant (P = 0.016), while no statistical significance was found in the other two groups (P > 0.05). The larger the size of intimal entry tears, the greater the BF values (P = 0.044). Conclusions This study shows a direct correlation between renal CT perfusion changes and AD, with the size, number of intimal tears, different types of AD, different renal artery origins and false lumen thrombosis, significantly affecting the perfusion values. PMID:28182709

  18. Correlation of iodine uptake and perfusion parameters between dual-energy CT imaging and first-pass dual-input perfusion CT in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoliang; Xu, Yanyan; Duan, Jianghui; Li, Chuandong; Sun, Hongliang; Wang, Wu

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the potential relationship between perfusion parameters from first-pass dual-input perfusion computed tomography (DI-PCT) and iodine uptake levels estimated from dual-energy CT (DE-CT).The pre-experimental part of this study included a dynamic DE-CT protocol in 15 patients to evaluate peak arterial enhancement of lung cancer based on time-attenuation curves, and the scan time of DE-CT was determined. In the prospective part of the study, 28 lung cancer patients underwent whole-volume perfusion CT and single-source DE-CT using 320-row CT. Pulmonary flow (PF, mL/min/100 mL), aortic flow (AF, mL/min/100 mL), and a perfusion index (PI = PF/[PF + AF]) were automatically generated by in-house commercial software using the dual-input maximum slope method for DI-PCT. For the dual-energy CT data, iodine uptake was estimated by the difference (λ) and the slope (λHU). λ was defined as the difference of CT values between 40 and 70 KeV monochromatic images in lung lesions. λHU was calculated by the following equation: λHU = |λ/(70 - 40)|. The DI-PCT and DE-CT parameters were analyzed by Pearson/Spearman correlation analysis, respectively.All subjects were pathologically proved as lung cancer patients (including 16 squamous cell carcinoma, 8 adenocarcinoma, and 4 small cell lung cancer) by surgery or CT-guided biopsy. Interobserver reproducibility in DI-PCT (PF, AF, PI) and DE-CT (λ, λHU) were relatively good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]Inter = 0.8726-0.9255, ICCInter = 0.8179-0.8842; ICCInter = 0.8881-0.9177, ICCInter = 0.9820-0.9970, ICCInter = 0.9780-0.9971, respectively). Correlation coefficient between λ and AF, and PF were as follows: 0.589 (P < .01) and 0.383 (P < .05). Correlation coefficient between λHU and AF, and PF were as follows: 0.564 (P < .01) and 0.388 (P < .05).Both the single-source DE-CT and dual-input CT perfusion analysis method can be applied to

  19. Radiation dose reduction in perfusion CT imaging of the brain: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Othman, Ahmed E; Afat, Saif; Brockmann, Marc A; Nikoubashman, Omid; Brockmann, Carolin; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Wiesmann, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Perfusion CT (PCT) of the brain is widely used in the settings of acute ischemic stroke and vasospasm monitoring. The high radiation dose associated with PCT is a central topic and has been a focus of interest for many researchers. Many studies have examined the effect of radiation dose reduction in PCT using different approaches. Reduction of tube current and tube voltage can be efficient and lead to a remarkable reduction of effective radiation dose while preserving acceptable image quality. The use of novel noise reduction techniques such as iterative reconstruction or spatiotemporal smoothing can produce sufficient image quality from low-dose perfusion protocols. Reduction of sampling frequency of perfusion images has only little potential to reduce radiation dose. In the present article we aimed to summarize the available data on radiation dose reduction in PCT imaging of the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Noise characteristics of CT perfusion imaging: how does noise propagate from source images to final perfusion maps?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral CT perfusion (CTP) imaging is playing an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of acute ischemic strokes. Meanwhile, the reliability of CTP-based ischemic lesion detection has been challenged due to the noisy appearance and low signal-to-noise ratio of CTP maps. To reduce noise and improve image quality, a rigorous study on the noise transfer properties of CTP systems is highly desirable to provide the needed scientific guidance. This paper concerns how noise in the CTP source images propagates to the final CTP maps. Both theoretical deviations and subsequent validation experiments demonstrated that, the noise level of background frames plays a dominant role in the noise of the cerebral blood volume (CBV) maps. This is in direct contradiction with the general belief that noise of non-background image frames is of greater importance in CTP imaging. The study found that when radiation doses delivered to the background frames and to all non-background frames are equal, lowest noise variance is achieved in the final CBV maps. This novel equality condition provides a practical means to optimize radiation dose delivery in CTP data acquisition: radiation exposures should be modulated between background frames and non-background frames so that the above equality condition is satisïnAed. For several typical CTP acquisition protocols, numerical simulations and in vivo canine experiment demonstrated that noise of CBV can be effectively reduced using the proposed exposure modulation method.

  1. The cerebral imaging using vessel-around method in the perfusion CT of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Choong-Il; Choi, Seung-Wook; Park, Seung-Chul; Shin, Yeong-Gil; Kim, Jae-Hyoung; Chong, Gi-Bong

    2005-04-01

    Perfusion CT has been successfully used as a functional imaging technique for diagnosis of patients with hyperacute stroke. However, the commonly used methods based on curve-fitting are time consuming. Numerous researchers have investigated to what extent Perfusion CT can be used for the quantitative assessment of cerebral ischemia and to rapidly obtain comprehensive information regarding the extent of ischemic damage in acute stroke patients. The aim of this study is to propose an alternative approach to rapidly obtain the brain perfusion mapping and to show the proposed cerebral flow imaging of the vessel and tissue in human brain be reliable and useful. Our main design concern was algorithmic speed, robustness and automation in order to allow its potential use in the emergency situation of acute stroke. To obtain a more effective mapping, we analyzed the signal characteristics of Perfusion CT and defined the vessel-around model which includes the vessel and tissue. We proposed a nonparametric vessel-around approach which automatically discriminates the vessel and tissue around vessel from non-interested brain matter stratifying the level of maximum enhancement of pixel-based TAC. The stratification of pixel-based TAC was executed using the mean and standard deviation of the signal intensity of each pixel and mapped to the cerebral flow imaging. The defined vessel-around model was used to show the cerebral flow imaging and to specify the area of markedly reduced perfusion with loss of function of still viable neurons. Perfusion CT is a fast and practical technique for routine clinical application. It provides substantial and important additional information for the selection of the optimal treatment strategy for patients with hyperacute stroke. The vessel-around approach reduces the computation time significantly when compared with the perfusion imaging using the GVF. The proposed cerebral imaging shows reliable results which are validated by physicians and

  2. Dependence of quantitative accuracy of CT perfusion imaging on system parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2017-03-01

    Deconvolution is a popular method to calculate parametric perfusion parameters from four dimensional CT perfusion (CTP) source images. During the deconvolution process, the four dimensional space is squeezed into three-dimensional space by removing the temporal dimension, and a prior knowledge is often used to suppress noise associated with the process. These additional complexities confound the understanding about deconvolution-based CTP imaging system and how its quantitative accuracy depends on parameters and sub-operations involved in the image formation process. Meanwhile, there has been a strong clinical need in answering this question, as physicians often rely heavily on the quantitative values of perfusion parameters to make diagnostic decisions, particularly during an emergent clinical situation (e.g. diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke). The purpose of this work was to develop a theoretical framework that quantitatively relates the quantification accuracy of parametric perfusion parameters with CTP acquisition and post-processing parameters. This goal was achieved with the help of a cascaded systems analysis for deconvolution-based CTP imaging systems. Based on the cascaded systems analysis, the quantitative relationship between regularization strength, source image noise, arterial input function, and the quantification accuracy of perfusion parameters was established. The theory could potentially be used to guide developments of CTP imaging technology for better quantification accuracy and lower radiation dose.

  3. Effects of radiation dose reduction in Volume Perfusion CT imaging of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Othman, Ahmed E; Brockmann, Carolin; Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikobashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A; Kim, Jong Hyo; Wiesmann, Martin

    2015-12-01

    To examine the influence of radiation dose reduction on image quality and sensitivity of Volume Perfusion CT (VPCT) maps regarding the detection of ischemic brain lesions. VPCT data of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kV and 180 mAs were included. Using realistic reduced-dose simulation, low-dose VPCT datasets with 144 mAs, 108 mAs, 72 mAs and 36 mAs (80 %, 60 %, 40 % and 20 % of the original levels) were generated, resulting in a total of 100 datasets. Perfusion maps were created and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements were performed. Qualitative analyses were conducted by two blinded readers, who also assessed the presence/absence of ischemic lesions and scored CBV and CBF maps using a modified ASPECTS-score. SNR of all low-dose datasets were significantly lower than those of the original datasets (p < .05). All datasets down to 72 mAs (40 %) yielded sufficient image quality and high sensitivity with excellent inter-observer-agreements, whereas 36 mAs datasets (20 %) yielded poor image quality in 15 % of the cases with lower sensitivity and inter-observer-agreements. Low-dose VPCT using decreased tube currents down to 72 mAs (40 % of original radiation dose) produces sufficient perfusion maps for the detection of ischemic brain lesions. • Perfusion CT is highly accurate for the detection of ischemic brain lesions • Perfusion CT results in high radiation exposure, therefore low-dose protocols are required • Reduction of tube current down to 72 mAs produces sufficient perfusion maps.

  4. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging: detection of ischemia in a porcine model with FFR verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic cardiac CT perfusion (CTP) is a high resolution, non-invasive technique for assessing myocardial blood ow (MBF), which in concert with coronary CT angiography enable CT to provide a unique, comprehensive, fast analysis of both coronary anatomy and functional ow. We assessed perfusion in a porcine model with and without coronary occlusion. To induce occlusion, each animal underwent left anterior descending (LAD) stent implantation and angioplasty balloon insertion. Normal ow condition was obtained with balloon completely de ated. Partial occlusion was induced by balloon in ation against the stent with FFR used to assess the extent of occlusion. Prospective ECG-triggered partial scan images were acquired at end systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Images were reconstructed using FBP and a hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose4, Philips Healthcare). Processing included: beam hardening (BH) correction, registration of image volumes using 3D cubic B-spline normalized mutual-information, and spatio-temporal bilateral ltering to reduce partial scan artifacts and noise variation. Absolute blood ow was calculated with a deconvolutionbased approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). Arterial input function was estimated from the left ventricle (LV) cavity. Regions of interest (ROIs) were identi ed in healthy and ischemic myocardium and compared in normal and occluded conditions. Under-perfusion was detected in the correct LAD territory and ow reduction agreed well with FFR measurements. Flow was reduced, on average, in LAD territories by 54%.

  5. Automated cardiac motion compensation in PET/CT for accurate reconstruction of PET myocardial perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Khawar; McGough, Robert J.; Berger, Kevin

    2008-10-01

    Error-free reconstruction of PET data with a registered CT attenuation map is essential for accurate quantification and interpretation of cardiac perfusion. Misalignment of the CT and PET data can produce an erroneous attenuation map that projects lung attenuation parameters onto the heart wall, thereby underestimating the attenuation and creating artifactual areas of hypoperfusion that can be misinterpreted as myocardial ischemia or infarction. The major causes of misregistration between CT and PET images are the respiratory motion, cardiac motion and gross physical motion of the patient. The misalignment artifact problem is overcome with automated cardiac registration software that minimizes the alignment error between the two modalities. Results show that the automated registration process works equally well for any respiratory phase in which the CT scan is acquired. Further evaluation of this procedure on 50 patients demonstrates that the automated registration software consistently aligns the two modalities, eliminating artifactual hypoperfusion in reconstructed PET images due to PET/CT misregistration. With this registration software, only one CT scan is required for PET/CT imaging, which reduces the radiation dose required for CT-based attenuation correction and improves the clinical workflow for PET/CT.

  6. Radiation dose reduction in CT myocardial perfusion imaging using SMART-RECON.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinsheng; Speidel, Michael A; Francois, Christopher J; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2017-08-30

    In this work, a newly developed statistical model based image reconstruction (referred to as Simultaneous Multiple Artifacts Reduction in Tomographic RECONstruction (SMARTRECON) [1]) is applied to low dose computer tomography (CT) myocardial perfusion imaging (CT-MPI). This method uses the nuclear norm of the spatial-temporal image matrix of the CTMPI images as a regularizer, rather than a conventional spatial regularizer that incorporates image smoothness, edge preservation, or spatial sparsity into the reconstruction. In addition to providing the needed noise reduction for low-dose CT-MPI, SMART-RECON provides images with spatial resolution and noise power spectrum (NPS) properties which are independent of contrast and dose level. Both numerical simulations and in vivo animal studies were performed to validate the proposed method. In these studies, it was found that: (1) Quantitative accuracy of perfusion maps in CT-MPI was well maintained for radiation dose level as low as 10 mAs per image frame, compared with the reference standard of 200 mAs for conventional filtered backprojection (FBP); (2) Flow-occluded myocardium in the porcine heart was well delineated by SMART-RECON at 10 mAs per frame when compared with MBIR using spatial total variation (TV) as the regularizer (referred to as TV-SIR) or Spatial-Temporal TV (ST-TV-SIR); The CT-MPI results were confirmed with PET imaging; (3) Image sharpness in SMARTRECON images was nearly independent of image contrast level and radiation dose level, in stark contrast to TV-SIR and STTV- SIR which displayed a strong dependence on both image contrast and radiation dose level; (4) The structure of the dosenormalized NPS for the SMART-RECON method did not depend on dose, while the TV-SIR and ST-TV-SIR NPS structure was dose-dependent.

  7. Motion correction for improving the accuracy of dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Jed D.; Yin, Zhye; Xiong, Guanglei; Mittal, Priya; Dunham, Simon; Elmore, Kimberly; Edic, Peter M.; Min, James K.

    2016-03-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death globally [1]. Modern cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is highly effective at identifying and assessing coronary blockages associated with CAD. The diagnostic value of this anatomical information can be substantially increased in combination with a non-invasive, low-dose, correlative, quantitative measure of blood supply to the myocardium. While CT perfusion has shown promise of providing such indications of ischemia, artifacts due to motion, beam hardening, and other factors confound clinical findings and can limit quantitative accuracy. In this paper, we investigate the impact of applying a novel motion correction algorithm to correct for motion in the myocardium. This motion compensation algorithm (originally designed to correct for the motion of the coronary arteries in order to improve CCTA images) has been shown to provide substantial improvements in both overall image quality and diagnostic accuracy of CCTA. We have adapted this technique for application beyond the coronary arteries and present an assessment of its impact on image quality and quantitative accuracy within the context of dual-energy CT perfusion imaging. We conclude that motion correction is a promising technique that can help foster the routine clinical use of dual-energy CT perfusion. When combined, the anatomical information of CCTA and the hemodynamic information from dual-energy CT perfusion should facilitate better clinical decisions about which patients would benefit from treatments such as stent placement, drug therapy, or surgery and help other patients avoid the risks and costs associated with unnecessary, invasive, diagnostic coronary angiography procedures.

  8. Whole-brain CT perfusion imaging using increased sampling intervals: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guoquan; Chen, Weijian; Sun, Houzhang; Guo, Xianzhong; Yang, Yunjun; Tang, Kun; Liu, Jinjin

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of whole-brain perfusion imaging using the increased sampling interval protocol for 320-detector row dynamic-volume computed tomography (CT). A total of 12 volunteers were recruited. The novel protocols with 11 volumes (defined as protocol P11) and 15 volumes (defined as protocol P15) were performed on the volunteers to evaluate whether P11 and P15 are able to acquire comparable results to the standard protocol with 19 volumes (defined as protocol P19) according to the as-low-as-reasonably-achievable principle. All data were acquired using a dynamic-volume CT scanner with a 16 cm-wide detector with 320 rows. The scanned transverse images from volunteers were analyzed using the Volume-Engineered System workstation. The MedCalc software package was used for Bland-Altman analysis of all variables. The data inconsistency of mean transit time (MTT), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and time to peak (TTP) between P11/P15 and P19 were all <5%, and the data were trustworthy. The mean differences of MTT, CBV, CBF and TTP between P15 and P19 were less than those between P11 and P19. The consistencies of perfusion parameters acquired with protocols P15 and P19 were higher compared with those acquired with P11. In whole-brain perfusion, the new protocol P15 has higher consistency with P19 than P11, and the radiation dose may be reduced by ~16% without degradation of perfusion parameters. Therefore, P15 should be recommended as a routine procedure in whole-brain perfusion imaging.

  9. Whole-brain CT perfusion imaging using increased sampling intervals: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guoquan; Chen, Weijian; Sun, Houzhang; Guo, Xianzhong; Yang, Yunjun; Tang, Kun; Liu, Jinjin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of whole-brain perfusion imaging using the increased sampling interval protocol for 320-detector row dynamic-volume computed tomography (CT). A total of 12 volunteers were recruited. The novel protocols with 11 volumes (defined as protocol P11) and 15 volumes (defined as protocol P15) were performed on the volunteers to evaluate whether P11 and P15 are able to acquire comparable results to the standard protocol with 19 volumes (defined as protocol P19) according to the as-low-as-reasonably-achievable principle. All data were acquired using a dynamic-volume CT scanner with a 16 cm-wide detector with 320 rows. The scanned transverse images from volunteers were analyzed using the Volume-Engineered System workstation. The MedCalc software package was used for Bland-Altman analysis of all variables. The data inconsistency of mean transit time (MTT), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and time to peak (TTP) between P11/P15 and P19 were all <5%, and the data were trustworthy. The mean differences of MTT, CBV, CBF and TTP between P15 and P19 were less than those between P11 and P19. The consistencies of perfusion parameters acquired with protocols P15 and P19 were higher compared with those acquired with P11. In whole-brain perfusion, the new protocol P15 has higher consistency with P19 than P11, and the radiation dose may be reduced by ~16% without degradation of perfusion parameters. Therefore, P15 should be recommended as a routine procedure in whole-brain perfusion imaging. PMID:28962207

  10. Quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine ischemia model using a prototype spectral detector CT system.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Dhanantwari, Amar; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G; Wilson, David L

    2016-03-21

    We optimized and evaluated dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner. Simultaneous acquisition of energy sensitive projections on the SDCT system enabled projection-based material decomposition, which typically performs better than image-based decomposition required by some other system designs. In addition to virtual monoenergetic, or keV images, the SDCT provided conventional (kVp) images, allowing us to compare and contrast results. Physical phantom measurements demonstrated linearity of keV images, a requirement for quantitative perfusion. Comparisons of kVp to keV images demonstrated very significant reductions in tell-tale beam hardening (BH) artifacts in both phantom and pig images. In phantom images, consideration of iodine contrast to noise ratio and small residual BH artifacts suggested optimum processing at 70 keV. The processing pipeline for dynamic CTP measurements included 4D image registration, spatio-temporal noise filtering, and model-independent singular value decomposition deconvolution, automatically regularized using the L-curve criterion. In normal pig CTP, 70 keV perfusion estimates were homogeneous throughout the myocardium. At 120 kVp, flow was reduced by more than 20% on the BH-hypo-enhanced myocardium, a range that might falsely indicate actionable ischemia, considering the 0.8 threshold for actionable FFR. With partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery (FFR < 0.8), perfusion defects at 70 keV were correctly identified in the LAD territory. At 120 kVp, BH affected the size and flow in the ischemic area; e.g. with FFR ≈ 0.65, the anterior-to-lateral flow ratio was 0.29 ± 0.01, over-estimating stenosis severity as compared to 0.42 ± 0.01 (p < 0.05) at 70 keV. On the non-ischemic inferior wall (not a LAD territory), the flow ratio was 0.50 ± 0.04 falsely indicating an actionable ischemic condition in a healthy territory. This ratio was 1.00 ± 0.08 at 70 ke

  11. Quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine ischemia model using a prototype spectral detector CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Dhanantwari, Amar; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    We optimized and evaluated dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner. Simultaneous acquisition of energy sensitive projections on the SDCT system enabled projection-based material decomposition, which typically performs better than image-based decomposition required by some other system designs. In addition to virtual monoenergetic, or keV images, the SDCT provided conventional (kVp) images, allowing us to compare and contrast results. Physical phantom measurements demonstrated linearity of keV images, a requirement for quantitative perfusion. Comparisons of kVp to keV images demonstrated very significant reductions in tell-tale beam hardening (BH) artifacts in both phantom and pig images. In phantom images, consideration of iodine contrast to noise ratio and small residual BH artifacts suggested optimum processing at 70 keV. The processing pipeline for dynamic CTP measurements included 4D image registration, spatio-temporal noise filtering, and model-independent singular value decomposition deconvolution, automatically regularized using the L-curve criterion. In normal pig CTP, 70 keV perfusion estimates were homogeneous throughout the myocardium. At 120 kVp, flow was reduced by more than 20% on the BH-hypo-enhanced myocardium, a range that might falsely indicate actionable ischemia, considering the 0.8 threshold for actionable FFR. With partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery (FFR  <  0.8), perfusion defects at 70 keV were correctly identified in the LAD territory. At 120 kVp, BH affected the size and flow in the ischemic area; e.g. with FFR ≈ 0.65, the anterior-to-lateral flow ratio was 0.29  ±  0.01, over-estimating stenosis severity as compared to 0.42  ±  0.01 (p  <  0.05) at 70 keV. On the non-ischemic inferior wall (not a LAD territory), the flow ratio was 0.50  ±  0.04 falsely indicating an actionable ischemic condition in a healthy

  12. Low dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging using a statistical iterative reconstruction method

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Yinghua; Chen, Guang-Hong; Hacker, Timothy A.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging has the potential to provide both functional and anatomical information regarding coronary artery stenosis. However, radiation dose can be potentially high due to repeated scanning of the same region. The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of statistical iterative reconstruction to improve parametric maps of myocardial perfusion derived from a low tube current dynamic CT acquisition. Methods: Four pigs underwent high (500 mA) and low (25 mA) dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion scans with and without coronary occlusion. To delineate the affected myocardial territory, an N-13 ammonia PET perfusion scan was performed for each animal in each occlusion state. Filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction was first applied to all CT data sets. Then, a statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) method was applied to data sets acquired at low dose. Image voxel noise was matched between the low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. CT perfusion maps were compared among the low dose FBP, low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. Numerical simulations of a dynamic CT scan at high and low dose (20:1 ratio) were performed to quantitatively evaluate SIR and FBP performance in terms of flow map accuracy, precision, dose efficiency, and spatial resolution. Results: Forin vivo studies, the 500 mA FBP maps gave −88.4%, −96.0%, −76.7%, and −65.8% flow change in the occluded anterior region compared to the open-coronary scans (four animals). The percent changes in the 25 mA SIR maps were in good agreement, measuring −94.7%, −81.6%, −84.0%, and −72.2%. The 25 mA FBP maps gave unreliable flow measurements due to streaks caused by photon starvation (percent changes of +137.4%, +71.0%, −11.8%, and −3.5%). Agreement between 25 mA SIR and 500 mA FBP global flow was −9.7%, 8.8%, −3.1%, and 26.4%. The average variability of flow measurements in a nonoccluded region was 16.3%, 24.1%, and 937

  13. Low dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging using a statistical iterative reconstruction method

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yinghua; Chen, Guang-Hong; Hacker, Timothy A.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging has the potential to provide both functional and anatomical information regarding coronary artery stenosis. However, radiation dose can be potentially high due to repeated scanning of the same region. The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of statistical iterative reconstruction to improve parametric maps of myocardial perfusion derived from a low tube current dynamic CT acquisition. Methods: Four pigs underwent high (500 mA) and low (25 mA) dose dynamic CT myocardial perfusion scans with and without coronary occlusion. To delineate the affected myocardial territory, an N-13 ammonia PET perfusion scan was performed for each animal in each occlusion state. Filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction was first applied to all CT data sets. Then, a statistical iterative reconstruction (SIR) method was applied to data sets acquired at low dose. Image voxel noise was matched between the low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. CT perfusion maps were compared among the low dose FBP, low dose SIR and high dose FBP reconstructions. Numerical simulations of a dynamic CT scan at high and low dose (20:1 ratio) were performed to quantitatively evaluate SIR and FBP performance in terms of flow map accuracy, precision, dose efficiency, and spatial resolution. Results: Forin vivo studies, the 500 mA FBP maps gave −88.4%, −96.0%, −76.7%, and −65.8% flow change in the occluded anterior region compared to the open-coronary scans (four animals). The percent changes in the 25 mA SIR maps were in good agreement, measuring −94.7%, −81.6%, −84.0%, and −72.2%. The 25 mA FBP maps gave unreliable flow measurements due to streaks caused by photon starvation (percent changes of +137.4%, +71.0%, −11.8%, and −3.5%). Agreement between 25 mA SIR and 500 mA FBP global flow was −9.7%, 8.8%, −3.1%, and 26.4%. The average variability of flow measurements in a nonoccluded region was 16.3%, 24.1%, and 937

  14. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging of the myocardium using a wide-detector scanner: a semiquantitative analysis in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Muenzel, Daniela; Noël, Peter B; Gramer, Bettina M; Leber, Vivian; Schneider, Armin; Leber, Alexander; Vembar, Mani; Fingerle, Alexander A; Rummeny, Ernst J; Huber, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Functional assessment of myocardial perfusion in computed tomography (CT) is a challenge. To evaluate CT dynamic myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using a wide-detector scanner. Time to peak (TTP), peak enhancement (PE), upslope (US), and the area under the curve (AUC) were calculated in 12 pigs (256-slice multidetector CT scanner). The entire myocardium was covered by the scan volume. TTP was increased, and PE, US, and AUC were decreased in poststenotic myocardium. CT MPI with complete coverage of the myocardium is feasible, providing evaluation of the physiological significance of coronary artery stenosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cerebral blood volume imaging by flat detector computed tomography in comparison to conventional multislice perfusion CT.

    PubMed

    Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kloska, Stephan; Engelhorn, Tobias; Boese, Jan; Zellerhoff, Michael; Schwab, Stefan; Doerfler, Arnd

    2011-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that Flat Detector computed tomography (FD-CT) with intravenous contrast medium would allow the calculation of whole brain cerebral blood volume (CBV) mapping (FD-CBV) and would correlate with multislice Perfusion CT (PCT). Twenty five patients were investigated with FD-CBV and PCT. Correlation of the CBV maps of both techniques was carried out with measurements from six anatomical regions from both sides of the brain. Mean values of each region and the correlation coefficient were calculated. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to compare the two different imaging techniques. The image and data quality of both PCT and FD-CBV were suitable for evaluation in all patients. The mean CBV values of FD-CBV and PCT showed only minimal differences with overlapping standard deviation. The correlation coefficient was 0.79 (p < 0.01). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -0.077 ± 0.48 ml/100 g between FD-CBV and PCT CBV measurements, indicating that FD-CBV values were only slightly lower than those of PCT. CBV mapping with intravenous contrast medium using Flat Detector CT compared favourably with multislice PCT. The ability to assess cerebral perfusion within the angiographic suite may improve the management of ischaemic stroke and evaluation of the efficacy of dedicated therapies.

  16. Investigation of the potential causes of partial scan artifacts in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yinghua; Speidel, Michael; Szczykutowicz, Timothy; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there have been several findings regarding CT number variations (partial scan artifact or PSA) across time in dynamic myocardial perfusion studies with short scan gated reconstruction. These variations are correlated with the view angle range corresponding to the short scan acquisition for a given cardiac phase, which can vary from one cardiac cycle to another due to the asynchrony between heart rate and gantry rotation speed. In this study, we investigate several potential causes of PSA, including noise, beam hardening and scatter, using numerical simulations. In addition, we investigate partial scan artifact in a single source 64-slice diagnostic CT scanner in vivo data sets, and report its effect on perfusion analysis. Results indicated that among all three factors investigated, scatter can cause obvious partial scan artifact in dynamic myocardial perfusion imaging. Further, scatter is a low frequency phenomenon and is not heavily dependent on the changing contrasts, as both the frequency method and the virtual scan method are effective in reducing partial scan artifact. However, PSA does not necessarily lead to different blood volume maps compared to the full scan, because these maps are usually generated with a curve fitting procedure.

  17. Accuracy of the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score during the first 3 hours of middle cerebral artery stroke: comparison of noncontrast CT, CT angiography source images, and CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lin, K; Rapalino, O; Law, M; Babb, J S; Siller, K A; Pramanik, B K

    2008-05-01

    The Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) is a reliable method of delineating the extent of middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke. Our aim was to retrospectively compare the accuracy of ASPECTS on noncontrast CT, CT angiography (CTA) source images, and CT perfusion maps of cerebral blood volume (CBV) during the first 3 hours of middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke. First-time patients with MCA stroke who presented <3 hours from symptom onset and were evaluated by noncontrast CT/CTA/CT perfusion, had confirmed acute nonlacunar MCA infarct on diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) within 7 days, and had follow-up angiography were included. Patients were excluded for persistent MCA occlusion or stenosis. Two raters through consensus assigned an ASPECTS on the noncontrast CT, CTA source images, and the section-selective (2 x 12 mm coverage) CT perfusion CBV maps. ASPECTS on follow-up DWI served as the reference standard. For each CT technique, the detection rates of regional infarction, the mean ASPECTS, and the linear correlation to final ASPECTS were determined and compared. P values <.05 were considered significant. Twenty-eight patients satisfied the criteria with DWI performed at a mean of 50.3 hours (range, 22-125 hours) post-CT imaging. Of 280 ASPECTS regions, 100 were infarcted on DWI. The accuracy of noncontrast CT, CTA source images, and CT perfusion CBV for detecting regional infarct was 80.0%, 84.3%, and 96.8%, respectively (P < .0001). The mean ASPECTSs of noncontrast CT, CTA source images, CT perfusion CBV, and DWI were 8.4 +/- 1.8, 8.0 +/- 1.8, 6.8 +/- 1.9, and 6.5 +/- 1.8, respectively. The mean noncontrast CT and CTA source image ASPECTS was different from that of DWI (P < .05). Correlation of noncontrast CT, CTA source images, and CT perfusion CBV ASPECTS with final ASPECTS was r(2) = 0.34, r(2) = 0.42, and r(2) = 0.91, respectively. In a retrospective cohort of MCA infarcts imaged <3 hours from stroke onset, ASPECTS was most accurately determined

  18. EANM procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging with SPECT and SPECT/CT: 2015 revision.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Hein J; Acampa, Wanda; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos; Ballinger, Jim; Bengel, Frank; De Bondt, Pieter; Buechel, Ronny R; Cuocolo, Alberto; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L F; Flotats, Albert; Hacker, Marcus; Hindorf, Cecilia; Kaufmann, Philip A; Lindner, Oliver; Ljungberg, Michael; Lonsdale, Markus; Manrique, Alain; Minarik, David; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Slart, Riemer H J A; Trägårdh, Elin; de Wit, Tim C; Hesse, Birger

    2015-11-01

    Since the publication of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) procedural guidelines for radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in 2005, many small and some larger steps of progress have been made, improving MPI procedures. In this paper, the major changes from the updated 2015 procedural guidelines are highlighted, focusing on the important changes related to new instrumentation with improved image information and the possibility to reduce radiation exposure, which is further discussed in relation to the recent developments of new International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models. Introduction of the selective coronary vasodilator regadenoson and the use of coronary CT-contrast agents for hybrid imaging with SPECT/CT angiography are other important areas for nuclear cardiology that were not included in the previous guidelines. A large number of minor changes have been described in more detail in the fully revised version available at the EANM home page: http://eanm.org/publications/guidelines/2015_07_EANM_FINAL_myocardial_perfusion_guideline.pdf .

  19. Stroke prognosis by applying double thresholds on CT-perfusion-brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chokchaitam, Somchart; Santipromwong, Nittaya; Muengtaweepongsa, Sombat

    2013-03-01

    The CT-perfusion image shows information of brain abnormalities such as its size and location. Generally, neurologist diagnoses stroke disease using CT-perfusion images such as Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV). In our previous report, we applied threshold technique to divide amount of CBV and CBF into low and high level. Then, their levels are applied to identify normal tissue areas, dead tissue areas (infract core) and blood-cot tissue areas (infract penumbra). However, it's not totally correct, if the same threshold is applied to the whole area (it must depend on size of blood vessel in that area. In this report, we propose double thresholds to divided CBV and CBF into 3 levels: very low, medium and very high levels. Very low and very high levels are definitely implied to bad areas and good areas, respectively. The proposed double thresholds makes stroke prognosis more accurate. The simulation results confirm that our proposed results closed to results defined from neurologist comparing to the conventional results.

  20. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: an imaging review comparing MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion with multidetector CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, F P; Lima, C M A O; Coutinho, A C; Parente, D B; Bittencourt, L K; Bessa, L G P; Domingues, R C; Marchiori, E

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease that leads to substantial morbidity and eventual death. Pulmonary multidetector CT angiography (MDCTA), pulmonary MR angiography (MRA) and MR-derived pulmonary perfusion (MRPP) imaging are non-invasive imaging techniques for the differential diagnosis of PH. MDCTA is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, one of the most common causes of PH. MRA and MRPP are promising techniques that do not require the use of ionising radiation or iodinated contrast material, and can be useful for patients for whom such material cannot be used. This review compares the imaging aspects of pulmonary MRA and 64-row MDCTA in patients with chronic thromboembolic or idiopathic PH. PMID:22932061

  1. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: an imaging review comparing MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion with multidetector CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, F P; Lima, C M A O; Coutinho, A C; Parente, D B; Bittencourt, L K; Bessa, L G P; Domingues, R C; Marchiori, E

    2012-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease that leads to substantial morbidity and eventual death. Pulmonary multidetector CT angiography (MDCTA), pulmonary MR angiography (MRA) and MR-derived pulmonary perfusion (MRPP) imaging are non-invasive imaging techniques for the differential diagnosis of PH. MDCTA is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, one of the most common causes of PH. MRA and MRPP are promising techniques that do not require the use of ionising radiation or iodinated contrast material, and can be useful for patients for whom such material cannot be used. This review compares the imaging aspects of pulmonary MRA and 64-row MDCTA in patients with chronic thromboembolic or idiopathic PH.

  2. TU-EF-204-02: Hiigh Quality and Sub-MSv Cerebral CT Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ke; Niu, Kai; Wu, Yijing; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: CT Perfusion (CTP) imaging is of great importance in acute ischemic stroke management due to its potential to detect hypoperfused yet salvageable tissue and distinguish it from definitely unsalvageable tissue. However, current CTP imaging suffers from poor image quality and high radiation dose (up to 5 mSv). The purpose of this work was to demonstrate that technical innovations such as Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) have the potential to address these challenges and achieve high quality and sub-mSv CTP imaging. Methods: (1) A spatial-temporal 4D cascaded system model was developed to indentify the bottlenecks in the current CTP technology; (2) A task-based framework was developed to optimize the CTP system parameters; (3) Guided by (1) and (2), PICCS was customized for the reconstruction of CTP source images. Digital anthropomorphic perfusion phantoms, animal studies, and preliminary human subject studies were used to validate and evaluate the potentials of using these innovations to advance the CTP technology. Results: The 4D cascaded model was validated in both phantom and canine stroke models. Based upon this cascaded model, it has been discovered that, as long as the spatial resolution and noise properties of the 4D source CT images are given, the 3D MTF and NPS of the final CTP maps can be analytically derived for a given set of processing methods and parameters. The cascaded model analysis also identified that the most critical technical factor in CTP is how to acquire and reconstruct high quality source images; it has very little to do with the denoising techniques often used after parametric perfusion calculations. This explained why PICCS resulted in a five-fold dose reduction or substantial improvement in image quality. Conclusion: Technical innovations generated promising results towards achieving high quality and sub-mSv CTP imaging for reliable and safe assessment of acute ischemic strokes. K. Li, K. Niu, Y. Wu: Nothing to

  3. Diagnostic value of transmural perfusion ratio derived from dynamic CT-based myocardial perfusion imaging for the detection of haemodynamically relevant coronary artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Coenen, Adriaan; Lubbers, Marisa M; Kurata, Akira; Kono, Atsushi; Dedic, Admir; Chelu, Raluca G; Dijkshoorn, Marcel L; Rossi, Alexia; van Geuns, Robert-Jan M; Nieman, Koen

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the additional value of transmural perfusion ratio (TPR) in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging for detection of haemodynamically significant coronary artery disease compared with fractional flow reserve (FFR). Subjects with suspected or known coronary artery disease were prospectively included and underwent a CT-MPI examination. From the CT-MPI time-point data absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) values were temporally resolved using a hybrid deconvolution model. An absolute MBF value was measured in the suspected perfusion defect. TPR was defined as the ratio between the subendocardial and subepicardial MBF. TPR and MBF results were compared with invasive FFR using a threshold of 0.80. Forty-three patients and 94 territories were analysed. The area under the receiver operator curve was larger for MBF (0.78) compared with TPR (0.65, P = 0.026). No significant differences were found in diagnostic classification between MBF and TPR with a territory-based accuracy of 77 % (67-86 %) for MBF compared with 70 % (60-81 %) for TPR. Combined MBF and TPR classification did not improve the diagnostic classification. Dynamic CT-MPI-based transmural perfusion ratio predicts haemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. However, diagnostic performance of dynamic CT-MPI-derived TPR is inferior to quantified MBF and has limited incremental value. • The transmural perfusion ratio from dynamic CT-MPI predicts functional obstructive coronary artery disease • Performance of the transmural perfusion ratio is inferior to quantified myocardial blood flow • The incremental value of the transmural perfusion ratio is limited.

  4. Robust low-dose dynamic cerebral perfusion CT image restoration via coupled dictionary learning scheme.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiumei; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Shanli; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Hua; He, Ji; Lu, Lijun; Xi, Weiwen; Ma, Jianhua; Bian, Zhaoying

    2016-11-22

    Dynamic cerebral perfusion x-ray computed tomography (PCT) imaging has been advocated to quantitatively and qualitatively assess hemodynamic parameters in the diagnosis of acute stroke or chronic cerebrovascular diseases. However, the associated radiation dose is a significant concern to patients due to its dynamic scan protocol. To address this issue, in this paper we propose an image restoration method by utilizing coupled dictionary learning (CDL) scheme to yield clinically acceptable PCT images with low-dose data acquisition. Specifically, in the present CDL scheme, the 2D background information from the average of the baseline time frames of low-dose unenhanced CT images and the 3D enhancement information from normal-dose sequential cerebral PCT images are exploited to train the dictionary atoms respectively. After getting the two trained dictionaries, we couple them to represent the desired PCT images as spatio-temporal prior in objective function construction. Finally, the low-dose dynamic cerebral PCT images are restored by using a general DL image processing. To get a robust solution, the objective function is solved by using a modified dictionary learning based image restoration algorithm. The experimental results on clinical data show that the present method can yield more accurate kinetic enhanced details and diagnostic hemodynamic parameter maps than the state-of-the-art methods.

  5. CT Perfusion in Acute Stroke: "Black Holes" on Time-to-Peak Image Maps Indicate Unsalvageable Brain.

    PubMed

    Meagher, Ruairi; Shankar, Jai Jai Shiva

    2016-11-01

    CT perfusion is becoming important in acute stroke imaging to determine optimal patient-management strategies. The purpose of this study was to examine the predictive value of time-to-peak image maps and, specifically, a phenomenon coined a "black hole" for assessing infarcted brain tissue at the time of scan. Acute stroke patients were screened for the presence of black holes and their follow-up imaging (noncontrast CT or MR) was reviewed to assess for infarcted brain tissue. Of the 23 patients with signs of acute ischemia on CT perfusion, all had black holes. The black holes corresponded with areas of infarcted brain on follow-up imaging (specificity 100%). Black holes demonstrated significantly lower cerebral blood volumes (P < .001) and cerebral blood flow (P < .001) compared to immediately adjacent tissue. Black holes on time-to-peak image maps represent areas of unsalvageable brain. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  6. Interleaving cerebral CT perfusion with neck CT angiography. Part II: clinical implementation and image quality.

    PubMed

    Oei, Marcel T H; Meijer, Frederick J A; van der Woude, Willem-Jan; Smit, Ewoud J; van Ginneken, Bram; Manniesing, Rashindra; Prokop, Mathias

    2017-06-01

    Feasibility evaluation of the One-Step Stroke Protocol, which is an interleaved cerebral computed tomography perfusion (CTP) and neck volumetric computed tomography angiography (vCTA) scanning technique using wide-detector computed tomography, and to assess the image quality of vCTA. Twenty patients with suspicion of acute ischaemic stroke were prospectively scanned and evaluated with a head and neck CTA and with the One-Step Stroke Protocol. Arterial enhancement and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the carotid arteries was assessed. Three observers scored artefacts and image quality of the cervical arteries. The total z-coverage was evaluated. Mean enhancement in the carotid bifurcation was rated higher in the vCTA (595 ± 164 HU) than CTA (441 ± 117 HU). CNR was rated higher in vCTA. Image quality scores showed no significant difference in the region of the carotid bifurcation between vCTA and CTA. Lower neck image quality scores were slightly lower for vCTA due to artefacts, although not rated as diagnostically relevant. In ten patients, the origin of the left common carotid artery was missed by 1.6 ± 0.8 cm. Mean patient height was 1.8 ± 0.09 m. Carotid bifurcation and origin of vertebral arteries were covered in all patients. The One-Step Stroke Protocol is feasible with good diagnostic image quality of vCTA, although full z-coverage is limited in tall patients. • Interleaving cerebral CTP with neck CTA (One-Step Stroke Protocol) is feasible • Diagnostic quality of One-Step Stroke Protocol neck CTA is similar to conventional CTA • One-Step Stroke Protocol neck CTA suffers from streak artefacts in the lower neck • A limitation of One-Step Stroke Protocol CTA is lack of coverage in tall patients • Precise planning of One-Step Stroke Protocol neck CTA is necessary in tall patients.

  7. C-arm cone beam CT perfusion imaging in the angiographic suite: a comparison with MDCT perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Kai; Yang, Pengfei; Wu, Yijing; Struffert, Tobias; Doerfler, Arnd; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin; Strother, Charles; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose and background Perfusion imaging in the angiography suite may provide a way to reduce time from stroke onset to endovascular revascularization of patients with a large vessel occlusion. Our purpose was to compare CBCTP with MDCTP. Materials and Methods Data from seven subjects with both MDCTP and CBCTP were retrospectively processed and analyzed. Two algorithms were used to enhance temporal resolution, temporal sampling density and reduce noise of CBCT data before generating perfusion maps. Two readers performed qualitative image quality evaluation on maps using a 5-point scale. ROIs indicating CBF/CBV abnormalities were drawn. Quantitative analyses were performed using the Sørensen–Dice coefficients to quantify the similarity of abnormalities. A non-inferiority hypothesis was tested to compare CBCTP against CBCTP. Results Averaged image quality score for MDCTP and CBCTP images was 2.4 and 2.3 respectively. Averaged confidence scores in diagnosis were both 1.4 for MDCT and CBCT; averaged confidence scores on presence of a CBV/CBF mismatch was 1.7 (κ = 0.50) and 1.5 (κ = 0.64). For MDCTP and CBCTP maps the average score of confidence in making treatment decision was 1.4 (κ = 0.79) and 1.3 (κ = 0.90). Area under visual grading characteristic (AVGC) for the above four qualitative quality score showed an average AVGC of 0.50 with 95% confidence level cover centered at the mean for both readers. Sørensen–Dice coefficient for CBF maps is 0.81 and for CBV maps is 0.55. Conclusions After post-processing methods were applied to enhance image quality for CBCTP maps, the CBCTP maps were not inferior to those generated from MDCTP. PMID:26892987

  8. Evaluating the feasibility of C-arm CT for brain perfusion imaging: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, A.; Fieselmann, A.; Boese, J.; Rohkohl, C.; Hornegger, J.; Fahrig, R.

    2010-02-01

    C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) is increasingly being used to supplement 2D real-time data with 3D information. Temporal resolution is currently limited by the mechanical rotation speed of the C-arm which presents challenges for applications such as imaging of contrast flow in brain perfusion CT (PCT). We present a novel scheme where multiple scans are obtained at different start times with respect to the contrast injection. The data is interleaved temporally and interpolated during 3D reconstruction. For evaluation we developed a phantom to generate the range of temporal frequencies relevant for PCT. The highest requirements are for imaging the arterial input function (AIF) modeled as a gamma-variate function. Fourier transform analysis of the AIF showed that 90% of the spectral energy is contained at frequencies lower than 0.08Hz. We built an acrylic cylinder phantom of diameter 1.9 cm, with 25 sections of 1cm length each. Iodine concentration in each compartment was varied to produce a half-cycle sinusoid variation in HU in version 1, and 2.5 cycles in version 2 of the phantom. The phantom was moved linearly at speeds from 0.5cm/s to 4cm/s (temporal frequencies of 0.02Hz to 0.09Hz) and imaged using a C-arm system. Phantom CT numbers in a slice reconstructed at isocenter were measured and sinusoidal fits to the data were obtained. The fitted sinusoids had frequencies that were within 3+/-2% of the actual temporal frequencies of the sinusoid. This suggests that the imaging and reconstruction scheme is adequate for PCT imaging.

  9. Myocardial ischemia detection with single-phase CT perfusion in symptomatic patients using high-pitch helical image acquisition technique.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Bernhard; Deseive, Simon; Rampp, Martin; Todica, Andrei; Wermke, Marc; Martinoff, Stefan; Massberg, Steffen; Reiser, Maximilian F; Becker, Hans-Christoph; Hausleiter, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) suffers from a reduced diagnostic accuracy in patients with heavily calcified coronary arteries or prior myocardial revascularisation due to artefacts caused by calcifications and stent material. CT myocardial perfusion imaging (CTMPI) yields high potential for the detection of myocardial ischemia and might help to overcome the above mentioned limitations. We analysed CT single-phase perfusion using high-pitch helical image acquisition technique in patients with prior myocardial revascularisation. Thirty-six patients with an indication for invasive coronary angiography (28 with coronary stents, 2 with coronary artery bypass grafts and 6 with both) were included in this prospective study at two study sites. All patients were examined on a 2nd generation dual-source CT system. Stress CT images were obtained using a prospectively ECG-triggered single-phase high-pitch helical image acquisition technique. During stress the tracer for myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT imaging was administered. Rest CT images were acquired using prospectively ECG-triggered sequential CT. MP-SPECT imaging and invasive coronary angiography served as standard of reference. In this heavily diseased patient cohort CCTA alone showed a low overall diagnostic accuracy for detection of hemodynamically relevant coronary artery stenosis of only 31% on a per-patient base and 60% on a per-vessel base. Combining CCTA and CTMPI allowed for a significantly higher overall diagnostic accuracy of 78% on a per-patient base and 92% on a per-vessel base (p < 0.001). Mean radiation dose for stress CT scans was 0.9 mSv, mean radiation dose for rest CT scans was 5.0 mSv. In symptomatic patients with known coronary artery disease and prior myocardial revascularization combining CCTA and CTMPI showed significantly higher diagnostic accuracy in detection of hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis when compared to CCTA alone.

  10. Quantitative evaluation of beam-hardening artefact correction in dual-energy CT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Andreas M; Wichmann, Julian L; Schoepf, U Joseph; Wolla, Christopher D; Canstein, Christian; McQuiston, Andrew D; Krazinski, Aleksander W; De Cecco, Carlo N; Meinel, Felix G; Vogl, Thomas J; Geyer, Lucas L

    2016-09-01

    To assess quantitatively the impact of a novel reconstruction algorithm ("kernel") with beam-hardening correction (BHC) on beam-hardening artefacts of the myocardium at dual-energy CT myocardial perfusion imaging (DE-CTMPI). Rest-series of DE-CTMPI examinations from 14 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Six image series were reconstructed for each patient: a) 100 kV, b) 140 kV, and c) linearly blended MIX0.5, each with BHC (D33f kernel) and without (D30f kernel). Seven hundred and fifty-six myocardial regions were assessed. Seven equal regions of interest divided the myocardium in the axial section. Three subdivisions were created within these regions in areas prone to BHA. Reports of SPECT studies performed within 30 days of CT examination were used to confirm the presence and location of true perfusion defects. Paired student t-test was used for statistical evaluation. Overall mean myocardial attenuation was lower using BHC (D30f: 87.3 ± 24.1 HU; D33f: 85.5 ± 21.5 HU; p = 0.009). Overall relative difference from average myocardial attenuation (RDMA) was more homogeneous using BHC (D30f: -0.3 ± 11.4 %; D33f: 0.1 ± 10.1 %; p < 0.001). Changes in RDMA were greatest in the posterobasal myocardium (D30f: -16.2 ± 10.0 %; D33f: 3.4 ± 10.7 %; p < 0.001). A dedicated reconstruction algorithm with BHC can significantly reduce beam-hardening artefacts in DE-CTMPI. • Beam-hardening artefacts (BHA) cause interference with attenuation-based CT myocardial perfusion assessment (CTMPI). • BHA occur mostly in the posterobasal left ventricular wall. • Beam-hardening correction homogenized and decreased mean myocardial attenuation. • BHC can help avoid false-positive findings and increase specificity of static CTMPI.

  11. In vitro evaluation of the imaging accuracy of C-arm conebeam CT in cerebral perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, A; Fieselmann, A; Boese, J; Rohkohl, C; Hornegger, J; Fahrig, R

    2012-11-01

    The authors have developed a method to enable cerebral perfusion CT imaging using C-arm based conebeam CT (CBCT). This allows intraprocedural monitoring of brain perfusion during treatment of stroke. Briefly, the technique consists of acquiring multiple scans (each scan comprised of six sweeps) acquired at different time delays with respect to the start of the x-ray contrast agent injection. The projections are then reconstructed into angular blocks and interpolated at desired time points. The authors have previously demonstrated its feasibility in vivo using an animal model. In this paper, the authors describe an in vitro technique to evaluate the accuracy of their method for measuring the relevant temporal signals. The authors' evaluation method is based on the concept that any temporal signal can be represented by a Fourier series of weighted sinusoids. A sinusoidal phantom was developed by varying the concentration of iodine as successive steps of a sine wave. Each step corresponding to a different dilution of iodine contrast solution contained in partitions along a cylinder. By translating the phantom along the axis at different velocities, sinusoidal signals at different frequencies were generated. Using their image acquisition and reconstruction algorithm, these sinusoidal signals were imaged with a C-arm system and the 3D volumes were reconstructed. The average value in a slice was plotted as a function of time. The phantom was also imaged using a clinical CT system with 0.5 s rotation. C-arm CBCT results using 6, 3, 2, and 1 scan sequences were compared to those obtained using CT. Data were compared for linear velocities of the phantom ranging from 0.6 to 1 cm∕s. This covers the temporal frequencies up to 0.16 Hz corresponding to a frequency range within which 99% of the spectral energy for all temporal signals in cerebral perfusion imaging is contained. The errors in measurement of temporal frequencies are mostly below 2% for all multiscan sequences

  12. Clinical outcome and imaging follow-up in acute stroke patients with normal perfusion CT and normal CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Bernd; Küsel, Tobias; Leppien, Andreas; Michels, Peter; Müller-Jensen, Axel; Fiehler, Jens

    2011-02-01

    Acute stroke multimodal CT imaging (MMCT: non-enhanced CT, CT angiography, and CT perfusion (CTP)) may show normal results despite persistent clinical stroke. We prospectively evaluated the sensitivity/specificity of MMCT infarct detection and the clinical outcome in patients with normal MMCT findings. From April 2007 to April 2008, all patients with acute hemispheric stroke within 6 h of symptom onset who underwent complete MMCT and MRI follow-up imaging were included. MMCT analysis included occlusion type, early infarct hypodensities (EIH), mean transit time (MTT), and cerebral blood volume (CBV) maps according to Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS). Clinical assessment included symptom onset to CT scan (≤3 h/>3 h), the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score (admission/discharge), and the modified Rankin scale (mRS) 90 days after stroke onset. One hundred seven were included (mean age, 68.4 years; ≤3 h, n = 84; >3 h, n = 23; intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), n = 51; ≤3 h, n = 40; >3 h, n = 11). In patients with normal MMCT on admission (n = 54), follow-up MRT detected brain infarctions in 23 patients (lacunar strokes, n = 16; infratentorial strokes, n = 4; territorial infarction, n = 3). Sensitivity/specificity/positive predictive value/negative predictive value of any infarct detection was 69.5%/99.8%/99.9%/57.2% and of a any territorial infarct detection was 93.9%/99.9%/99.9%/93.6%, respectively. In univariate regression analysis (time to CT scan, ≤3 h/>3 h; IVT: yes/no; ASPECTS EIH/CBV/MTT, 10/<10), only the evidence of normal CTP (ASPECTS MTT = 10) had a statistically significant impact (p = 0.02) on a good outcome (mRS 0.1). MMCT sensitivity in acute lacunar or infratentorial stroke was poor. But, we found a high specifity and a fairly good sensitivity in territorial infarct detection. In acute stroke patients with normal MMCT findings on admission, a good clinical prognosis can be

  13. Automated quantitative Rb-82 3D PET/CT myocardial perfusion imaging: normal limits and correlation with invasive coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Ryo; Berman, Daniel S; Dey, Damini; Le Meunier, Ludovic; Hayes, Sean W; Fermin, Jimmy S; Cheng, Victor Y; Thomson, Louise E J; Friedman, John D; Germano, Guido; Slomka, Piotr J

    2012-04-01

    We aimed to characterize normal limits and to determine the diagnostic accuracy for an automated quantification of 3D 82-Rubidium (Rb-82) PET/CT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). We studied 125 consecutive patients undergoing Rb-82 PET/CT MPI, including patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) and invasive coronary angiography, and 42 patients with a low likelihood (LLk) of CAD. Normal limits for perfusion and function were derived from LLk patients. QPET software was used to quantify perfusion abnormality at rest and stress expressed as total perfusion deficit (TPD). Relative perfusion databases did not differ in any of the 17 segments between males and females. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for detection of CAD were 0.86 for identification of ≥50% and ≥70% stenosis. The sensitivity/specificity was 86%/86% for detecting ≥50% stenosis and 93%/77% for ≥70% stenosis, respectively. In regard to normal limits, mean rest and stress left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were 67% ± 10% and 75% ± 9%, respectively. Mean transient ischemic dilation ratio was 1.06 ± 0.14 and mean increase in LVEF with stress was 7.4% ± 6.1% (95th percentile of 0%). Normal limits have been established for 3D Rb-82 PET/CT analysis with QPET software. Fully automated quantification of myocardial perfusion PET data shows high diagnostic accuracy for detecting obstructive CAD.

  14. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Handayani, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Prakken, N. H. J.; Slart, R. H. J. A.; Oudkerk, M.; Van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Vliegenthart, R.; Sijens, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET). This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD), as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings. PMID:27088083

  15. Definition of vascular territories on myocardial perfusion images by integration with true coronary anatomy: a hybrid PET/CT analysis.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Mehrbod S; Lautamäki, Riikka; Merrill, Jennifer; Voicu, Corina; Epley, William; McBride, Gerald; Bengel, Frank M

    2010-02-01

    For interpretation of myocardial perfusion studies, tissue segments are usually assigned to coronary vascular territories based on general assumptions about the most frequent vascular distribution pattern. These assumptions may be inaccurate because of interindividual variability of coronary anatomy. This limitation may be overcome by hybrid imaging through the individual integration of coronary anatomy with myocardial tissue regions. We studied 71 consecutive patients who underwent (82)Rb perfusion PET/CT, including CT angiography, for work-up of coronary artery disease on a 64-slice PET/CT scanner. Coronary vessels as defined by CT were assigned to each of 17 myocardial segments for PET analysis using fusion images. Reassigned segmental maps were compared with standard assignment as proposed by the American Heart Association model, without knowledge of individual anatomy. The validity of segmental assignment was tested in 6 dogs by comparison of PET/CT with ex vivo dye staining of coronary territories. Dog studies showed excellent agreement between PET/CT-defined segments and ex vivo-stained territories (kappa, 0.80). In patients, 72% (51/71) demonstrated differences from the standard assignment in at least 1 myocardial segment; 112 of 1,207 segments were reassigned to nonstandard vascular territories. Most frequently, standard right coronary segments were reassigned to the left circumflex territory (39% of reassigned segments), standard circumflex segments were reassigned to the left anterior descending territory (30%), and standard left anterior descending segments were reassigned to either circumflex or right coronary (12% and 11%, respectively). In 27 studies with a myocardial perfusion defect, relative uptake in the vascular territory with the defect was significantly lower after CT-based reassignment and was higher in remote territories, resulting in better separation (ratio of defect to remote, 0.75 +/- 0.13 vs. 0.81 +/- 0.12 before reassignment; P = 0

  16. Comparison of quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging CT to fluorescent microsphere-based flow from high-resolution cryo-images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Li, Yuemeng; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) has the potential to provide quantitative measures of myocardial blood flow (MBF) which can aid the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. We evaluated the quantitative accuracy of MPI-CT in a porcine model of balloon-induced LAD coronary artery ischemia guided by fractional flow reserve (FFR). We quantified MBF at baseline (FFR=1.0) and under moderate ischemia (FFR=0.7) using MPI-CT and compared to fluorescent microsphere-based MBF from high-resolution cryo-images. Dynamic, contrast-enhanced CT images were obtained using a spectral detector CT (Philips Healthcare). Projection-based mono-energetic images were reconstructed and processed to obtain MBF. Three MBF quantification approaches were evaluated: singular value decomposition (SVD) with fixed Tikhonov regularization (ThSVD), SVD with regularization determined by the L-Curve criterion (LSVD), and Johnson-Wilson parameter estimation (JW). The three approaches over-estimated MBF compared to cryo-images. JW produced the most accurate MBF, with average error 33.3+/-19.2mL/min/100g, whereas LSVD and ThSVD had greater over-estimation, 59.5+/-28.3mL/min/100g and 78.3+/-25.6 mL/min/100g, respectively. Relative blood flow as assessed by a flow ratio of LAD-to-remote myocardium was strongly correlated between JW and cryo-imaging, with R2=0.97, compared to R2=0.88 and 0.78 for LSVD and ThSVD, respectively. We assessed tissue impulse response functions (IRFs) from each approach for sources of error. While JW was constrained to physiologic solutions, both LSVD and ThSVD produced IRFs with non-physiologic properties due to noise. The L-curve provided noise-adaptive regularization but did not eliminate non-physiologic IRF properties or optimize for MBF accuracy. These findings suggest that model-based MPI-CT approaches may be more appropriate for quantitative MBF estimation and that cryo-imaging can support the development of MPI-CT by providing spatial distributions of MBF.

  17. Assessment of anatomic relation between pulmonary perfusion and morphology in pulmonary emphysema with breath-hold SPECT-CT fusion images.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Iwanaga, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Noriko; Seto, Akiko; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2008-06-01

    Anatomic relation between pulmonary perfusion and morphology in pulmonary emphysema was assessed on deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images. Subjects were 38 patients with pulmonary emphysema and 11 non-smoker controls, who successfully underwent DIBrH and non-BrH perfusion SPECT using a dual-headed SPECT system during the period between January 2004 and June 2006. DIBrH SPECT was three-dimensionally co-registered with DIBrH CT to comprehend the relationship between lung perfusion defects and CT low attenuation areas (LAA). By comparing the appearance of lung perfusion on DIBrH with non-BrH SPECT, the correlation with the rate constant for the alveolar-capillary transfer of carbon monoxide (DLCO/VA) was compared between perfusion abnormalities on these SPECTs and LAA on CT. DIBrH SPECT provided fairly uniform perfusion in controls, but significantly enhanced perfusion heterogeneity when compared with non-BrH SPECT in pulmonary emphysema patients (P < 0.001). The reliable DIBrH SPECT-CT fusion images confirmed more extended perfusion defects than LAA on CT in majority (73%) of patients. Perfusion abnormalities on DIBrH SPECT were more closely correlated with DLCO/VA than LAA on CT (P < 0.05). DIBrH SPECT identifies affected lungs with perfusion abnormality better than does non-BrH SPECT in pulmonary emphysema. DIBrH SPECT-CT fusion images are useful for more accurately localizing affected lungs than morphologic CT alone in this disease.

  18. Effect of beam hardening on transmural myocardial perfusion quantification in myocardial CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    The detection of subendocardial ischemia exhibiting an abnormal transmural perfusion gradient (TPG) may help identify ischemic conditions due to micro-vascular dysfunction. We evaluated the effect of beam hardening (BH) artifacts on TPG quantification using myocardial CT perfusion (CTP). We used a prototype spectral detector CT scanner (Philips Healthcare) to acquire dynamic myocardial CTP scans in a porcine ischemia model with partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery guided by pressure wire-derived fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements. Conventional 120 kVp and 70 keV projection-based mono-energetic images were reconstructed from the same projection data and used to compute myocardial blood flow (MBF) using the Johnson-Wilson model. Under moderate LAD occlusion (FFR~0.7), we used three 5 mm short axis slices and divided the myocardium into three LAD segments and three remote segments. For each slice and each segment, we characterized TPG as the mean "endo-to-epi" transmural flow ratio (TFR). BH-induced hypoenhancement on the ischemic anterior wall at 120 kVp resulted in significantly lower mean TFR value as compared to the 70 keV TFR value (0.29+/-0.01 vs. 0.55+/-0.01 p<1e-05). No significant difference was measured between 120 kVp and 70 keV mean TFR values on segments moderately affected or unaffected by BH. In the entire ischemic LAD territory, 120 kVp mean endocardial flow was significantly reduced as compared to mean epicardial flow (15.80+/-10.98 vs. 40.85+/-23.44 ml/min/100g; p<1e-04). At 70 keV, BH was effectively minimized resulting in mean endocardial MBF of 40.85+/-15.3407 ml/min/100g vs. 74.09+/-5.07 ml/min/100g (p=0.0054) in the epicardium. We also found that BH artifact in the conventional 120 kVp images resulted in falsely reduced MBF measurements even under non-ischemic conditions.

  19. Evaluation of myocardial CT perfusion in patients presenting with acute chest pain to the emergency department: comparison with SPECT-myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Feuchtner, Gudrun Maria; Plank, Fabian; Pena, Constantino; Battle, Juan; Min, James; Leipsic, Jonathon; Labounty, Troy; Janowitz, Warren; Katzen, Barry; Ziffer, Jack; Cury, Ricardo C

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether evaluation of resting myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) from coronary CT angiography (CTA) datasets in patients presenting with chest pain (CP) to the emergency department (ED), might have added value to coronary CTA. 76 Patients (age 54.9 y±13; 32 (42%) women) presenting with CP to the ED underwent coronary 64-slice CTA. Myocardial perfusion defects were evaluated for CTP (American Heart Association 17-segment model) and compared with rest sestamibi single-photon emission CT myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI). CTA was assessed for >50% stenosis per vessel. CTP demonstrated a sensitivity of 92% and 89%, specificity of 95% and 99%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 80% and 82% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 98% and 99% for each patient and for each segment, respectively. CTA showed an accuracy of 92%, sensitivity of 70.4%, specificity of 95.5%, PPV 67.8%, and NPV of 95% compared with SPECT-MPI. When CTP findings were added to CTA the PPV improved from 67% to 90.1%. In patients presenting to the ED with CP, the evaluation of rest myocardial CTP demonstrates high diagnostic performance as compared with SPECT-MPI. Addition of CTP to CTA improves the accuracy of CTA, primarily by reducing rates of false-positive CTA.

  20. Prognostic Value of Combined CT Angiography and Myocardial Perfusion Imaging versus Invasive Coronary Angiography and Nuclear Stress Perfusion Imaging in the Prediction of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events: The CORE320 Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Marcus Y; Rochitte, Carlos E; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dewey, Marc; George, Richard T; Miller, Julie M; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Kunihiro; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Sakuma, Hajime; Laham, Roger; Vavere, Andrea L; Cerci, Rodrigo J; Mehra, Vishal C; Nomura, Cesar; Kofoed, Klaus F; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Scholte, Arthur J; Laule, Michael; Tan, Swee Yaw; Hoe, John; Paul, Narinder; Rybicki, Frank J; Brinker, Jeffrey A; Arai, Andrew E; Matheson, Matthew B; Cox, Christopher; Clouse, Melvin E; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Lima, João A C

    2017-07-01

    Purpose To compare the prognostic importance (time to major adverse cardiovascular event [MACE]) of combined computed tomography (CT) angiography and CT myocardial stress perfusion imaging with that of combined invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and stress single photon emission CT myocardial perfusion imaging. Materials and Methods This study was approved by all institutional review boards, and written informed consent was obtained. Between November 2009 and July 2011, 381 participants clinically referred for ICA and aged 45-85 years were enrolled in the Combined Noninvasive Coronary Angiography and Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Using 320-Detector Row Computed Tomography (CORE320) prospective multicenter diagnostic study. All images were analyzed in blinded independent core laboratories, and a panel of physicians adjudicated all adverse events. MACE was defined as revascularization (>30 days after index ICA), myocardial infarction, or cardiac death; hospitalization for chest pain or congestive heart failure; or arrhythmia. Late MACE was defined similarly, except for patients who underwent revascularization within the first 182 days after ICA, who were excluded. Comparisons of 2-year survival (time to MACE) used standard Kaplan-Meier curves and restricted mean survival times bootstrapped with 2000 replicates. Results An MACE (49 revascularizations, five myocardial infarctions, one cardiac death, nine hospitalizations for chest pain or congestive heart failure, and one arrhythmia) occurred in 51 of 379 patients (13.5%). The 2-year MACE-free rates for combined CT angiography and CT perfusion findings were 94% negative for coronary artery disease (CAD) versus 82% positive for CAD and were similar to combined ICA and single photon emission CT findings (93% negative for CAD vs 77% positive for CAD, P < .001 for both). Event-free rates for CT angiography and CT perfusion versus ICA and single photon emission CT for either positive or negative results were not

  1. Low-dose dynamic myocardial perfusion CT image reconstruction using pre-contrast normal-dose CT scan induced structure tensor total variation regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Changfei; Han, Ce; Gan, Guanghui; Deng, Zhenxiang; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yi, Jinling; Zheng, Xiaomin; Xie, Congying; Jin, Xiance

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic myocardial perfusion CT (DMP-CT) imaging provides quantitative functional information for diagnosis and risk stratification of coronary artery disease by calculating myocardial perfusion hemodynamic parameter (MPHP) maps. However, the level of radiation delivered by dynamic sequential scan protocol can be potentially high. The purpose of this work is to develop a pre-contrast normal-dose scan induced structure tensor total variation regularization based on the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criteria to improve the image quality of DMP-CT with a low-mAs CT acquisition. For simplicity, the present approach was termed as ‘PWLS-ndiSTV’. Specifically, the ndiSTV regularization takes into account the spatial-temporal structure information of DMP-CT data and further exploits the higher order derivatives of the objective images to enhance denoising performance. Subsequently, an effective optimization algorithm based on the split-Bregman approach was adopted to minimize the associative objective function. Evaluations with modified dynamic XCAT phantom and preclinical porcine datasets have demonstrated that the proposed PWLS-ndiSTV approach can achieve promising gains over other existing approaches in terms of noise-induced artifacts mitigation, edge details preservation, and accurate MPHP maps calculation.

  2. Feasibility of quantitative lung perfusion by 4D CT imaging by a new dynamic-scanning protocol in an animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Abtin, Fereidoun G.; Brown, Matt; McNitt-Gray, Mike

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to test a new dynamic Perfusion-CT imaging protocol in an animal model and investigate the feasibility of quantifying perfusion of lung parenchyma to perform functional analysis from 4D CT image data. A novel perfusion-CT protocol was designed with 25 scanning time points: the first at baseline and 24 scans after a bolus injection of contrast material. Post-contrast CT scanning images were acquired with a high sampling rate before the first blood recirculation and then a relatively low sampling rate until 10 minutes after administrating contrast agent. Lower radiation techniques were used to keep the radiation dose to an acceptable level. 2 Yorkshire swine with pulmonary emboli underwent this perfusion- CT protocol at suspended end inspiration. The software tools were designed to measure the quantitative perfusion parameters (perfusion, permeability, relative blood volume, blood flow, wash-in & wash-out enhancement) of voxel or interesting area of lung. The perfusion values were calculated for further lung functional analysis and presented visually as contrast enhancement maps for the volume being examined. The results show increased CT temporal sampling rate provides the feasibility of quantifying lung function and evaluating the pulmonary emboli. Differences between areas with known perfusion defects and those without perfusion defects were observed. In conclusion, the techniques to calculate the lung perfusion on animal model have potential application in human lung functional analysis such as evaluation of functional effects of pulmonary embolism. With further study, these techniques might be applicable in human lung parenchyma characterization and possibly for lung nodule characterization.

  3. CT-based attenuation and scatter correction compared with uniform attenuation correction in brain perfusion SPECT imaging for dementia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, Rebecca; Firbank, Michael J.; Lloyd, Jim; O'Brien, John T.

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated if the appearance and diagnostic accuracy of HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT images could be improved by using CT-based attenuation and scatter correction compared with the uniform attenuation correction method. A cohort of subjects who were clinically categorized as Alzheimer’s Disease (n=38 ), Dementia with Lewy Bodies (n=29 ) or healthy normal controls (n=30 ), underwent SPECT imaging with Tc-99m HMPAO and a separate CT scan. The SPECT images were processed using: (a) correction map derived from the subject’s CT scan or (b) the Chang uniform approximation for correction or (c) no attenuation correction. Images were visually inspected. The ratios between key regions of interest known to be affected or spared in each condition were calculated for each correction method, and the differences between these ratios were evaluated. The images produced using the different corrections were noted to be visually different. However, ROI analysis found similar statistically significant differences between control and dementia groups and between AD and DLB groups regardless of the correction map used. We did not identify an improvement in diagnostic accuracy in images which were corrected using CT-based attenuation and scatter correction, compared with those corrected using a uniform correction map.

  4. Intrahepatic peripheral cholangiocarcinoma (IPCC): comparison between perfusion ultrasound and CT imaging.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, M; Vecchiato, F; Cantisani, V; Barbi, E; Passamonti, M; Ricci, P; Malagò, R; Faccioli, N; Zamboni, G; Pozzi Mucelli, R

    2008-02-01

    This study was done to compare the perfusion patterns of intrahepatic peripheral cholangiocarcinoma (IPCC) on contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and dynamic computed tomography (CT). We retrospectively reviewed 23 histologically proven cases of IPCC. All lesions were studied by CEUS with sulfur hexafluoride-filled microbubbles coated with a phospholipid capsule, and by dynamic CT. Contrast-enhancement patterns were evaluated in the arterial phase (CEUS 10-20 s after the injection; CT 25-30 s after the injection) and in the delayed phase (CEUS 120 s after the injection; CT>2-3 min after the injection). Lesions were single in 18/23 cases (78%), single with nearby satellite lesions in 1/23 (4%) cases and multifocal with distant secondary lesions in 4/23 (17%) cases. Lesion diameter was 2-5 cm in 7/23 cases (30%), 5-7 cm in 13/23 cases (57%) and >7 cm in 3/23 (13%) cases. On CEUS, lesions were hypervascular in 16/23 cases (70%). On delayed-phase CEUS, 22/23 lesions (96%) were markedly hypoechoic. CT showed that the lesions were hypovascular in the arterial phase in 15/23 cases (66%) and hypervascular in 7/23 (30%) cases; one lesion (1/23; 4%) was isovascular. On delayed-phase CT, lesions were hyperdense in 17/23 cases (74%), hypodense in 5/23 (22%) cases and isodense in 1/23 (43%) cases. Enhancement discrepancy between delayed-phase CEUS (hypoechogenicity) and CT (hyperdensity) is common semiological findings in the study of IPCC.

  5. Quantitative Perfusion and Permeability Biomarkers in Brain Cancer from Tomographic CT and MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Eilaghi, Armin; Yeung, Timothy; d’Esterre, Christopher; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav; Easaw, Jay; Fainardi, Enrico; Lee, Ting-Yim; Frayne, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion and permeability imaging, using computed tomography and magnetic resonance systems, are important techniques for assessing the vascular supply and hemodynamics of healthy brain parenchyma and tumors. These techniques can measure blood flow, blood volume, and blood–brain barrier permeability surface area product and, thus, may provide information complementary to clinical and pathological assessments. These have been used as biomarkers to enhance the treatment planning process, to optimize treatment decision-making, and to enable monitoring of the treatment noninvasively. In this review, the principles of magnetic resonance and computed tomography dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion and permeability imaging are described (with an emphasis on their commonalities), and the potential values of these techniques for differentiating high-grade gliomas from other brain lesions, distinguishing true progression from posttreatment effects, and predicting survival after radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and antiangiogenic treatments are presented. PMID:27398030

  6. Ventilation/perfusion SPECT or SPECT/CT for lung function imaging in patients with pulmonary emphysema?

    PubMed

    Froeling, Vera; Heimann, Uwe; Huebner, Ralf-Harto; Kroencke, Thomas J; Maurer, Martin H; Doellinger, Felix; Geisel, Dominik; Hamm, Bernd; Brenner, Winfried; Schreiter, Nils F

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the utility of attenuation correction (AC) of V/P SPECT images for patients with pulmonary emphysema. Twenty-one patients (mean age 67.6 years) with pulmonary emphysema who underwent V/P SPECT/CT were included. AC/non-AC V/P SPECT images were compared visually and semiquantitatively. Visual comparison of AC/non-AC images was based on a 5-point likert scale. Semiquantitative comparison assessed absolute counts per lung (aCpLu) and lung lobe (aCpLo) for AC/non-AC images using software-based analysis; percentage counts (PC = (aCpLo/aCpLu) × 100) were calculated. Correlation between AC/non-AC V/P SPECT images was analyzed using Spearman's rho correlation coefficient; differences were tested for significance with the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Visual analysis revealed high conformity for AC and non-AC V/P SPECT images. Semiquantitative analysis of PC in AC/non-AC images had an excellent correlation and showed no significant differences in perfusion (ρ = 0.986) or ventilation (ρ = 0.979, p = 0.809) SPECT/CT images. AC of V/P SPECT images for lung lobe-based function imaging in patients with pulmonary emphysema do not improve visual or semiquantitative image analysis.

  7. Denoising and artefact reduction in dynamic flat detector CT perfusion imaging using high speed acquisition: first experimental and clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manhart, Michael T.; Aichert, André; Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kowarschik, Markus; Maier, Andreas K.; Hornegger, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2014-08-01

    Flat detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) is a novel technique using C-arm angiography systems for interventional dynamic tissue perfusion measurement with high potential benefits for catheter-guided treatment of stroke. However, FD-CTP is challenging since C-arms rotate slower than conventional CT systems. Furthermore, noise and artefacts affect the measurement of contrast agent flow in tissue. Recent robotic C-arms are able to use high speed protocols (HSP), which allow sampling of the contrast agent flow with improved temporal resolution. However, low angular sampling of projection images leads to streak artefacts, which are translated to the perfusion maps. We recently introduced the FDK-JBF denoising technique based on Feldkamp (FDK) reconstruction followed by joint bilateral filtering (JBF). As this edge-preserving noise reduction preserves streak artefacts, an empirical streak reduction (SR) technique is presented in this work. The SR method exploits spatial and temporal information in the form of total variation and time-curve analysis to detect and remove streaks. The novel approach is evaluated in a numerical brain phantom and a patient study. An improved noise and artefact reduction compared to existing post-processing methods and faster computation speed compared to an algebraic reconstruction method are achieved.

  8. Denoising and artefact reduction in dynamic flat detector CT perfusion imaging using high speed acquisition: first experimental and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Manhart, Michael T; Aichert, André; Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kowarschik, Markus; Maier, Andreas K; Hornegger, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2014-08-21

    Flat detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) is a novel technique using C-arm angiography systems for interventional dynamic tissue perfusion measurement with high potential benefits for catheter-guided treatment of stroke. However, FD-CTP is challenging since C-arms rotate slower than conventional CT systems. Furthermore, noise and artefacts affect the measurement of contrast agent flow in tissue. Recent robotic C-arms are able to use high speed protocols (HSP), which allow sampling of the contrast agent flow with improved temporal resolution. However, low angular sampling of projection images leads to streak artefacts, which are translated to the perfusion maps. We recently introduced the FDK-JBF denoising technique based on Feldkamp (FDK) reconstruction followed by joint bilateral filtering (JBF). As this edge-preserving noise reduction preserves streak artefacts, an empirical streak reduction (SR) technique is presented in this work. The SR method exploits spatial and temporal information in the form of total variation and time-curve analysis to detect and remove streaks. The novel approach is evaluated in a numerical brain phantom and a patient study. An improved noise and artefact reduction compared to existing post-processing methods and faster computation speed compared to an algebraic reconstruction method are achieved.

  9. Volume of myocardium perfused by coronary artery branches as estimated from 3D micro-CT images of rat hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Patricia E.; Naessens, Lauren C.; Seaman, Catherine A.; Reyes, Denise A.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2000-04-01

    Average myocardial perfusion is remarkably consistent throughout the heart wall under resting conditions and the velocity of blood flow is fairly reproducible from artery to artery. Based on these observations, and the fact that flow through an artery is the product of arterial cross-sectional area and blood flow velocity, we would expect the volume of myocardium perfused to be proportional to the cross-sectional area of the coronary artery perfusing that volume of myocardium. This relationship has been confirmed by others in pigs, dogs and humans. To test the body size-dependence of this relationship we used the hearts from rats, 3 through 25 weeks of age. The coronary arteries were infused with radiopaque microfil polymer and the hearts scanned in a micro- CT scanner. Using these 3D images we measured the volume of myocardium and the arterial cross-sectional area of the artery that perfused that volume of myocardium. The average constant of proportionality was found to be 0.15 +/- 0.08 cm3/mm2. Our data showed no statistically different estimates of the constant of proportionality in the rat hearts of different ages nor between the left and right coronary arteries. This constant is smaller than that observed in large animals and humans, but this difference is consistent with the body mass-dependence on metabolic rate.

  10. Evaluation of Extrahepatic Perfusion of Anticancer Drugs in the Right Gastric Arterial Region on Fused Images Using Combined CT/SPECT: Is Extrahepatic Perfusion Predictive of Gastric Toxicity?

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Morishita, Shouji; Takamori, Hiroshi; Chikamoto, Akira; Kanemitsu, Keiichirou; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-15

    Background. Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is effective for treating primary and metastatic carcinomas of the liver. Since hepatic arteries also supply the stomach and duodenum, HAI may result in unwanted infusion into the upper gastrointestinal tract and consequent gastric toxicity. Using fused images obtained with a combined SPECT/CT system, we assessed extrahepatic perfusion (EHP) and its correlation with gastrointestinal toxicity in patients receiving HAI. Methods. We studied 41 patients with primary or metastatic carcinoma of the liver who received HAI chemotherapy consisting of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. All underwent abdominal SPECT using a {sup 99m}Tc-MAA (185 MBq) instrument and an injection rate of 0.1 ml/min, identical to the chemotherapy infusion rate. Delivery was through an implantable port. We analyzed the distribution of the anticancer agent on fused images and the relationship between EHP of the right gastric arterial region and gastric toxicity. All patients underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS). Results. Of the 41 patients, 11 (27%) manifested enhancement of the duodenal and gastric pyloric region on fused images. EGDS at the time of reservoir placement detected gastric ulcers in 10 of these patients. Conclusion. Fusion imaging with combined SPECT/CT reflects the actual distribution of the infused anticancer agents. The detection of EHP on fused images is predictive of the direct gastric toxicity from anticancer agents in patients undergoing HAI.

  11. TU-A-9A-10: Verification of Photoacoustic Computed Tomography Perfusion Imaging Using DCE-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, A; Krutulis, M; Verleker, A; Stantz, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We propose to verify quantifiable perfusion information generated by a Photoacoustic Computed Tomography (PCT) scanner using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT (DCE-CT), and to investigate physicsbased models of acoustic properties of tissue and photon transport to improve quantification. These corrections first necessitate a skin identifying algorithms to reduce speed-of-sound blurring and empirical photon correction methods. Methods: Xenograft mice (n=5) of breast cancer was imaged using DCE-CT which was followed by DCE-PCT. To obtain CT perfusion data, each mouse was i.v. injected (0.2mL Isovue @0.5mL/min) and subsequent radio-opaque time curves fit to a 2-compartmental model on a voxel-wise basis. For DCE-PCT, different concentrations of ICG (250, 125, and 62.5 micro-Molar) were injected at the same rate, but also acquired at different sampling rates (3, 6, and 12 seconds). The time intensity curves from PCT were fit to a 1-compartmental model on a voxel by voxel basis. The images were coregistered (Oncentra) based on the structural similarities of the tumor vasculature after which we compared both the contrastenhanced dynamics and the vascular physiology. Results: Moderate to high doses of ICG impact the washin phase of the PCT contrast due to photon losses as a function of depth. A semi-automatic algorithm has been developed to identify the skin margin, and subsequent MC and empirical models of photon transport and variations in speed-of-sound are being evaluated. Conclusion: From our results we find that there is a need to apply photon and speed-of-sound corrections to our PCT data to improve the quantifiable image data at depth in the tumor for PCT. The dose and injection rate may help in reducing large systematic effects. Our project is partially funded by a NIH SBIR grant.

  12. Iterative reconstruction for CT perfusion with a prior-image induced hybrid nonlocal means regularization: Phantom studies

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Lyu, Qingwen; Ma, Jianhua; Wang, Jing

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: In computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging, an initial phase CT acquired with a high-dose protocol can be used to improve the image quality of later phase CT acquired with a low-dose protocol. For dynamic regions, signals in the later low-dose CT may not be completely recovered if the initial CT heavily regularizes the iterative reconstruction process. The authors propose a hybrid nonlocal means (hNLM) regularization model for iterative reconstruction of low-dose CTP to overcome the limitation of the conventional prior-image induced penalty. Methods: The hybrid penalty was constructed by combining the NLM of the initial phase high-dose CT in the stationary region and later phase low-dose CT in the dynamic region. The stationary and dynamic regions were determined by the similarity between the initial high-dose scan and later low-dose scan. The similarity was defined as a Gaussian kernel-based distance between the patch-window of the same pixel in the two scans, and its measurement was then used to weigh the influence of the initial high-dose CT. For regions with high similarity (e.g., stationary region), initial high-dose CT played a dominant role for regularizing the solution. For regions with low similarity (e.g., dynamic region), the regularization relied on a low-dose scan itself. This new hNLM penalty was incorporated into the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) for CTP reconstruction. Digital and physical phantom studies were performed to evaluate the PWLS-hNLM algorithm. Results: Both phantom studies showed that the PWLS-hNLM algorithm is superior to the conventional prior-image induced penalty term without considering the signal changes within the dynamic region. In the dynamic region of the Catphan phantom, the reconstruction error measured by root mean square error was reduced by 42.9% in PWLS-hNLM reconstructed image. Conclusions: The PWLS-hNLM algorithm can effectively use the initial high-dose CT to reconstruct low-dose CTP in the

  13. TU-G-204-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): Dynamic CT Myocardial Perfusion Measurement and Its Comparison to Fractional Flow Reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Hubbard, L; Groves, E; Sadeghi, B; Javan, H; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a first pass analysis (FPA) technique for CT perfusion measurement in a swine animal and its validation using fractional flow reserve (FFR) as a reference standard. Methods: Swine were placed under anesthesia and relevant physiologic parameters were continuously recorded. Intra-coronary adenosine was administered to induce maximum hyperemia. A pressure wire was advanced distal to the first diagonal branch of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery for FFR measurements and a balloon dilation catheter was inserted over the pressure wire into the proximal LAD to create varying levels of stenosis. Images were acquired with a 320-row wide volume CT scanner. Three main coronary perfusion beds were delineated in the myocardium using arteries extracted from CT angiography images using a minimum energy hypothesis. The integrated density in the perfusion bed was used to calculate perfusion using the FPA technique. The perfusion in the LAD bed over a range of stenosis severity was measured. The measured fractional perfusion was compared to FFR and linear regression was performed. Results: The measured fractional perfusion using the FPA technique (P-FPA) and FFR were related as P-FPA = 1.06FFR – 0.06 (r{sup 2} = 0.86). The perfusion measurements were calculated with only three to five total CT volume scans, which drastically reduces the radiation dose as compared with the existing techniques requiring 15–20 volume scans. Conclusion: The measured perfusion using the first pass analysis technique showed good correlation with FFR measurements as a reference standard. The technique for perfusion measurement can potentially make a substantial reduction in radiation dose as compared with the existing techniques.

  14. CT perfusion: principles, applications, and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ting-Yim

    2004-10-01

    The fast scanning speed of current slip-ring CT scanners has enabled the development of perfusion imaging techniques with intravenous injection of contrast medium. In a typical CT perfusion study, contrast medium is injected and rapid scanning at a frequency of 1-2 Hz is used to monitor the first circulation of the injected contrast medium through a 1-2 cm thick slab of tissue. From the acquired time-series of CT images, arteries can be identified within the tissue slab to derive the arterial contrast concentration curve, Ca(t) while each individual voxel produces a tissue residue curve, Q(t) for the corresponding tissue region. Deconvolution between the measured Ca(t) and Q(t) leads to the determination of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in brain studies. In this presentation, an important application of CT perfusion in acute stroke studies - the identification of the ischemic penumbra via the CBF/CBV mismatch and factors affecting the quantitative accuracy of deconvolution, including partial volume averaging, arterial delay and dispersion are discussed.

  15. Relative filling time delay based on CT perfusion source imaging: a simple method to predict outcome in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Cao, W; Campbell, B C V; Dong, Q; Davis, S M; Yan, B

    2014-09-01

    Collateral vessel status is strongly associated with clinical outcome in ischemic stroke but can be challenging to assess. The aim of this study was to develop a tomography perfusion source imaging-based assessment of collateral vessel status. Consecutive patients with ischemic stroke who received intravenous thrombolysis or intra-arterial reperfusion therapy after CTP were retrospectively analyzed. In those with middle cerebral artery or internal carotid artery occlusion, CT perfusion source imaging was used to identify the relative filling time delay between the normal MCA Sylvian branches and those in the affected hemisphere. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression were used to assess the association of the relative filling time delay with the 24-hour Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score based on noncontrast CT and the 90-day modified Rankin Scale score. There were 217 patients treated in 2009-2011 who had CTP data, of whom 60 had MCA or ICA occlusion and 55 had 90-day mRS data. The intraclass correlation coefficient for relative filling time delay was 0.95. Relative filling time delay was correlated with 24-hour ASPECTS (Spearman ρ=-0.674; P<.001) and 90-day mRS score (ρ=0.516, P<.01). Increased relative filling time delay was associated with poor radiologic outcome (ASPECTS, 0-7) (area under the curve=0.79, P<.001) and poor functional outcome (mRS score, 3-6) (area under the curve=0.77, P=.001). In multivariate logistic regression, the association of longer relative filling time delay with poor outcome remained significant, independent of age, sex, and baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score. Relative filling time delay is a useful independent predictor of clinical outcome after ischemic stroke. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. Dose reduction assessment in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging in a porcine balloon-induced-ischemia model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the use of an advanced hybrid iterative reconstruction (IR) technique (iDose4, Philips Health- care) for low dose dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging. A porcine model was created to mimic coronary stenosis through partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a balloon catheter. The severity of LAD occlusion was adjusted with FFR measurements. Dynamic CT images were acquired at end-systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Various corrections were applied to the acquired scans to reduce motion and imaging artifacts. Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) was computed with a deconvolution-based approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). We compared a high and a low dose radiation protocol corresponding to two different tube-voltage/tube-current combinations (80kV p/100mAs and 120kV p/150mAs). The corresponding radiation doses for these protocols are 7.8mSv and 34.3mSV , respectively. The images were reconstructed using conventional FBP and three noise-reduction strengths of the IR method, iDose. Flow contrast-to-noise ratio, CNRf, as obtained from MBF maps, was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of reconstruction on contrast between normal and ischemic myocardial tissue. Preliminary results showed that the use of iDose to reconstruct low dose images provide better or comparable CNRf to that of high dose images reconstructed with FBP, suggesting significant dose savings. CNRf was improved with the three used levels of iDose compared to FBP for both protocols. When using the entire 4D dynamic sequence for MBF computation, a 77% dose reduction was achieved, while considering only half the scans (i.e., every other heart cycle) allowed even further dose reduction while maintaining relatively higher CNRf.

  17. Low-dose dynamic myocardial perfusion CT imaging using a motion adaptive sparsity prior.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhaoying; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Zhang; Gong, Changfei; Tian, Xiumei; Yan, Gang; Huang, Jing; Guo, Hong; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Ma, Jianhua

    2017-09-01

    Dynamic myocardial perfusion computed tomography (DM-PCT) imaging offers benefits over quantitative assessment of myocardial blood flow (MBF) for diagnosis and risk stratification of coronary artery disease. However, one major drawback of DM-PCT imaging is that a high radiation level is imparted by repeated scanning. To address this issue, in this work, we developed a statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm based on the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) scheme by incorporating a motion adaptive sparsity prior (MASP) model to achieve high-quality DM-PCT imaging with low tube current dynamic data acquisition. For simplicity, we refer to the proposed algorithm as "PWLS-MASP''. The MASP models both the spatial and temporal structured sparsity of DM-PCT sequence images with the assumption that the differences between adjacent frames after motion correction are sparse in the gradient image domain. To validate and evaluate the effectiveness of the present PWLS-MASP algorithm thoroughly, a modified XCAT phantom and preclinical porcine DM-PCT dataset were used in the study. The present PWLS-MASP algorithm can obtain high-quality DM-PCT images in both phantom and porcine cases, and outperforms the existing filtered back-projection algorithm and PWLS-based algorithms with total variation regularization (PWLS-TV) and robust principal component analysis regularization (PWLS-RPCA) in terms of noise reduction, streak artifacts mitigation, and time density curve estimation. Moreover, the PWLS-MASP algorithm can yield more accurate diagnostic hemodynamic parametric maps than the PWLS-TV and PWLS-RPCA algorithms. The study indicates that there is a substantial advantage in using the present PWLS-MASP algorithm for low-dose DM-PCT, and potentially in other dynamic tomography areas. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  18. CT Perfusion of the Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create ... process. Nearly all CT scanners now have special computer programs that help to increase image quality at lower ...

  19. Comparison of Partial Volume Effects in Arterial and Venous Contrast Curves in CT Brain Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Alan J.; Bennink, Edwin; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Viergever, Max A.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Smit, Ewoud J.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In brain CT perfusion (CTP), the arterial contrast bolus is scaled to have the same area under the curve (AUC) as the venous outflow to correct for partial volume effects (PVE). This scaling is based on the assumption that large veins are unaffected by PVE. Measurement of the internal carotid artery (ICA), usually unaffected by PVE due to its large diameter, may avoid the need for partial volume correction. The aims of this work are to examine i) the assumptions behind PVE correction and ii) the potential of selecting the ICA obviating correction for PVE. Methods The AUC of the ICA and sagittal sinus were measured in CTP datasets from 52 patients. The AUCs were determined by i) using commercial CTP software based on a Gaussian curve-fitting to the time attenuation curve, and ii) by simple integration of the time attenuation curve over a time interval. In addition, frames acquired up to 3 minutes after first bolus passage were used to examine the ratio of arterial and venous enhancement. The impact of selecting the ICA without PVE correction was illustrated by reporting cerebral blood volume (CBV) measurements. Results In 49 of 52 patients, the AUC of the ICA was significantly larger than that of the sagittal sinus (p = 0.017). Measured after the first pass bolus, contrast enhancement remained 50% higher in the ICA just after the first pass bolus, and 30% higher 3 minutes later. CBV measurements were significantly lowered when the ICA was used without PVE correction. Conclusions Contradicting the assumptions underlying PVE correction, contrast in the ICA was significantly higher than in the sagittal sinus, even 3 minutes after the first pass of the contrast bolus. PVE correction might lead to overestimation of CBV if the CBV is calculated using the AUC of the time attenuation curves. PMID:24858308

  20. Perfusion CT and US of colorectal cancer liver metastases: a correlative study of two dynamic imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Meijerink, Martijn R; van Waesberghe, Jan Hein T M; van Schaik, Cors; Boven, Epie; van der Veldt, Astrid A M; van den Tol, Petrousjka; Meijer, Sybren; van Kuijk, Cornelis

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between dynamic-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and first-pass dynamic-contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) of normal appearing liver parenchyma and of colorectal cancer liver metastases. Thirty patients with hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer underwent DCE-CT and DCE-US. To obtain DCE-US reproducibility measurements, double contrast-passages (2 × 2.4 mL SonoVue intravenous) were acquired. From several DCE-US-derived perfusion indices, the slope-value scored best with a reproducibility concordance correlation coefficient ranging from 0.75-0.93 and overall highest correlation to DCE-CT-derived variables (r = 0.52 to 0.73). The DCE-US-based tumor-to-liver perfusion gradient also showed a low test-retest variability and moderately correlated to DCE-CT (concordance correlation coefficient 0.87-0.92; r = 0.57 to 0.59). To conclude, DCE-US-based slope-value and tumor-to-liver perfusion gradient correlate best with DCE-CT perfusion values. However, both techniques cannot be used interchangeably. DCE-US should be restricted for studies in which a considerable change in perfusion is expected and for patients with a relatively high tumor blood flow at baseline.

  1. CT Perfusion of the Liver: Principles and Applications in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hyung; Kamaya, Aya

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of molecularly targeted chemotherapeutics, there is an increasing need for defining new response criteria for therapeutic success because use of morphologic imaging alone may not fully assess tumor response. Computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging of the liver provides functional information about the microcirculation of normal parenchyma and focal liver lesions and is a promising technique for assessing the efficacy of various anticancer treatments. CT perfusion also shows promising results for diagnosing primary or metastatic tumors, for predicting early response to anticancer treatments, and for monitoring tumor recurrence after therapy. Many of the limitations of early CT perfusion studies performed in the liver, such as limited coverage, motion artifacts, and high radiation dose of CT, are being addressed by recent technical advances. These include a wide area detector with or without volumetric spiral or shuttle modes, motion correction algorithms, and new CT reconstruction technologies such as iterative algorithms. Although several issues related to perfusion imaging—such as paucity of large multicenter trials, limited accessibility of perfusion software, and lack of standardization in methods—remain unsolved, CT perfusion has now reached technical maturity, allowing for its use in assessing tumor vascularity in larger-scale prospective clinical trials. In this review, basic principles, current acquisition protocols, and pharmacokinetic models used for CT perfusion imaging of the liver are described. Various oncologic applications of CT perfusion of the liver are discussed and current challenges, as well as possible solutions, for CT perfusion are presented. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:25058132

  2. Technical Note: Evaluation of a 160-mm/256-row CT scanner for whole-heart quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    So, Aaron; Imai, Yasuhiro; Nett, Brian; Jackson, John; Nett, Liz; Hsieh, Jiang; Wisenberg, Gerald; Teefy, Patrick; Yadegari, Andrew; Islam, Ali; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-08-01

    The authors investigated the performance of a recently introduced 160-mm/256-row CT system for low dose quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) imaging of the whole heart. This platform is equipped with a gantry capable of rotating at 280 ms per full cycle, a second generation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR-V) to correct for image noise arising from low tube voltage potential/tube current dynamic scanning, and image reconstruction algorithms to tackle beam-hardening, cone-beam, and partial-scan effects. Phantom studies were performed to investigate the effectiveness of image noise and artifact reduction with a GE Healthcare Revolution CT system for three acquisition protocols used in quantitative CT MP imaging: 100, 120, and 140 kVp/25 mAs. The heart chambers of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were filled with iodinated contrast solution at different concentrations (contrast levels) to simulate the circulation of contrast through the heart in quantitative CT MP imaging. To evaluate beam-hardening correction, the phantom was scanned at each contrast level to measure the changes in CT number (in Hounsfield unit or HU) in the water-filled region surrounding the heart chambers with respect to baseline. To evaluate cone-beam artifact correction, differences in mean water HU between the central and peripheral slices were compared. Partial-scan artifact correction was evaluated from the fluctuation of mean water HU in successive partial scans. To evaluate image noise reduction, a small hollow region adjacent to the heart chambers was filled with diluted contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio in the region before and after noise correction with ASiR-V was compared. The quality of MP maps acquired with the CT system was also evaluated in porcine CT MP studies. Myocardial infarct was induced in a farm pig from a transient occlusion of the distal left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a catheter-based interventional procedure. MP maps were generated

  3. Automated quality control of emission-transmission misalignment for attenuation correction in myocardial perfusion imaging with SPECT-CT systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Caputlu-Wilson, Serpil F; Shi, Hongcheng; Galt, James R; Faber, Tracy L; Garcia, Ernest V

    2006-01-01

    Emission-transmission misalignment with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-computed tomography (CT) systems can impair attenuation correction (AC) in myocardial perfusion imaging. This study was performed to develop automated quality control (Auto-QC) to detect critical misalignment that can significantly impact AC. Auto-QC was developed to segment myocardium and mediastinum from emission and transmission reconstructions, respectively. Myocardium-mediastinum mismatch was used as the quality-control index (QCI). The QCI threshold for acceptable AC was determined with NCAT (NURBS [nonuniform rational B-spline]-based cardiac torso phantom) simulation and verified with 2 patients with minimal misalignment. Compromised data sets, generated by shifting the attenuation maps by 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 pixels along left-right, up-down, and head-foot directions, respectively, were qualitatively and quantitatively compared with the unshifted data sets. Auto-QC was tested with the 2 verification patients and 41 additional patients. Shifts by more than 1 pixel along any direction compromised AC. Auto-QC with the QCI threshold (3%) had highly concordant results with manual quality control in the detection of critical misalignment (sensitivity of 88% and 90% and specificity of 93% and 95% for the tests by use of the 2 verification patients and 41 additional patients, respectively). QCI quantitatively represented the severity of misalignment. Auto-QC can help clinicians be aware of critical misalignment and can assist in realignment of SPECT and CT images.

  4. 64-Slice spiral CT perfusion combined with vascular imaging of acute ischemic stroke for assessment of infarct core and penumbra

    PubMed Central

    BAO, DANG-ZHEN; BAO, HUAN-YING; YAO, LI-ZHAI; PAN, YUN-GAO; ZHU, XIN-RUI; YANG, XIAO-SONG; WANG, HE; HUANG, YI-NING

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the value of computed tomography perfusion (CTP) parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT) and time-to-peak (TP), in a clinical study of patients with stroke. Additionally, we determined which parameter or combination of parameters are reliable in detecting the presence of an infarct and penumbra. CTP was performed within 24 h of the onset of symptoms in 20 patients with possible stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed 3-7 days later and the threshold of the CTP was adjusted according to the results to provide CT images that correlated with the MRI; the MRI results were taken as the gold standard. CBV, CBF and TP contrast agent enhancement were calculated using the CT results. The CTP results were compared with the MRI findings. All CTP parameters were reliable in detecting the penumbra (P<0.001). In these parameters, changes of MTT were the most useful. CTP revealed various changes in CBF, CBV, MTT and TP in ischemic areas. CTP parameters were also reliable in detecting the infarct core (P<0.001). We determined that when detecting the penumbra, all CTP parameters are reliable, and when detecting cerebral ischemia, a combination of parameters should be used. PMID:23935734

  5. C-arm cone beam CT perfusion imaging using the SMART-RECON algorithm to improve temporal sampling density and temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinsheng; Niu, Kai; Li, Ke; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin; Strother, Charles; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a newly developed reconstruction algorithm, Synchronized MultiArtifact Reduction with Tomographic RECONstruction (SMART-RECON), was applied to C-arm cone beam CT perfusion (CBCTP) imaging. This algorithm contains a special rank regularizer, designed to reduce limited-view artifacts associated with super- short scan reconstructions. As a result, high temporal sampling and temporal resolution image reconstructions were achieved using an interventional C-arm x-ray system. The algorithm was evaluated in terms of the fidelity of the dynamic contrast update curves and the accuracy of perfusion parameters through numerical simulation studies. Results shows that, not only were the dynamic curves accurately recovered (relative root mean square error ∈ [3%, 5%] compared with [13%, 22%] for FBP), but also the noise in the final perfusion maps was dramatically reduced. Compared with filtered backprojection, SMART-RECON generated CBCTP maps with much improved capability in differentiating lesions with perfusion deficits from the surrounding healthy brain tissues.

  6. Low dose CT perfusion using k-means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisana, Francesco; Henzler, Thomas; Schönberg, Stefan; Klotz, Ernst; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We aim at improving low dose CT perfusion functional parameters maps and CT images quality, preserving quantitative information. In a dynamic CT perfusion dataset, each voxel is measured T times, where T is the number of acquired time points. In this sense, we can think about a voxel as a point in a T-dimensional space, where the coordinates of the voxels would be the values of its time attenuation curve (TAC). Starting from this idea, a k-means algorithm was designed to group voxels in K classes. A modified guided time-intensity profile similarity (gTIPS) filter was implemented and applied only for those voxels belonging to the same class. The approach was tested on a digital brain perfusion phantom as well as on clinical brain and body perfusion datasets, and compared to the original TIPS implementation. The TIPS filter showed the highest CNR improvement, but lowest spatial resolution. gTIPS proved to have the best combination of spatial resolution and CNR improvement for CT images, while k-gTIPS was superior to both gTIPS and TIPS in terms of perfusion maps image quality. We demonstrate k-means clustering analysis can be applied to denoise dynamic CT perfusion data and to improve functional maps. Beside the promising results, this approach has the major benefit of being independent from the perfusion model employed for functional parameters calculation. No similar approaches were found in literature.

  7. Dual-energy lung perfusion and ventilation CT in children.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2013-03-01

    Dual-energy thoracic CT provides two key insights into lung physiology, i.e. regional perfusion and ventilation, and has been actively investigated to find clinically relevant applications since the introduction of dual-source CT. This functional information provided by dual-energy thoracic CT is supplementary because high-resolution thoracic anatomy is entirely preserved on dual-energy thoracic CT. In addition, virtual non-contrast imaging can omit pre-contrast scanning. In this respect, dual-energy CT imaging technique is at least dose-neutral, which is a critical requirement for paediatric imaging. In this review, imaging protocols, analysis methods, clinical applications and diagnostic pitfalls of dual-energy thoracic CT for evaluating lung perfusion and ventilation in children are described.

  8. Dynamic perfusion CT in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Timothy Pok Chi; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav; Fainardi, Enrico; Macdonald, David; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic perfusion CT (PCT) is an imaging technique for assessing the vascular supply and hemodynamics of brain tumors by measuring blood flow, blood volume, and permeability-surface area product. These PCT parameters provide information complementary to histopathologic assessments and have been used for grading brain tumors, distinguishing high-grade gliomas from other brain lesions, differentiating true progression from post-treatment effects, and predicting prognosis after treatments. In this review, the basic principles of PCT are described, and applications of PCT of brain tumors are discussed. The advantages and current challenges, along with possible solutions, of PCT are presented. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Image quality, radiation dose and diagnostic accuracy of 70 kVp whole brain volumetric CT perfusion imaging: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao Kun; Ni, Qian Qian; Schoepf, U Joseph; Zhou, Chang Sheng; Chen, Guo Zhong; Luo, Song; Fuller, Stephen R; De Cecco, Carlo N; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate image quality and diagnostic accuracy for acute infarct detection and radiation dose of 70 kVp whole brain CT perfusion (CTP) and CT angiography (CTA) reconstructed from CTP source data. Patients were divided into three groups (n = 50 each): group A, 80 kVp, 21 scanning time points; groups B, 70 kVp, 21 scanning time points; group C, 70 kVp, 17 scanning time points. Objective and subjective image quality of CTP and CTA were compared. Diagnostic accuracy for detecting acute infarct and cerebral artery stenosis ≥ 50 % was calculated for CTP and CTA with diffusion weighted imaging and digital subtraction angiography as reference standards. Effective radiation dose was compared. There were no differences in any perfusion parameter value between three groups (P > 0.05). No difference was found in subjective image quality between three groups (P > 0.05). Diagnostic accuracy for detecting acute infarct and vascular stenosis showed no difference between three groups (P > 0.05). Compared with group A, radiation doses of groups B and C were decreased by 28 % and 37 % (both P < 0.001), respectively. Compared with 80 kVp protocol, 70 kVp brain CTP allows comparable vascular and perfusion assessment and lower radiation dose while maintaining high diagnostic accuracy in detecting acute infarct. • 70 kVp whole brain CTP can provide diagnostic image quality. • 70 kVp CTP diagnostic accuracy was maintained vs. 80 kVp protocol. • 70 kVp CTP radiation doses were lower than 80 kVp protocol.

  10. Initial experience of dual-energy lung perfusion CT using a dual-source CT system in children.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2010-09-01

    Initial experience of dual-source dual-energy (DE) lung perfusion CT in children is described. In addition to traditional identification of pulmonary emboli, the assessment of lung perfusion is technically feasible with dual-source DE CT in children with acceptable radiation dose. This article describes how to perform dual-source DE lung perfusion CT in children, including the optimization of intravenous injection method and CT dose parameters. How to produce weighted-average CT images for the assessment of pulmonary emboli and colour-coded perfusion maps for the assessment of regional lung perfusion is also detailed. Lung perfusion status can then be evaluated on perfusion maps by means of either qualitative or quantitative analysis. Potential advantages and disadvantages of this emerging CT technique compared to lung perfusion scintigraphy and cardiac MRI are discussed.

  11. Comparison of CT perfusion summary maps to early diffusion-weighted images in suspected acute middle cerebral artery stroke.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Payabvash, Seyedmehdi; Salazar, Pascal; Jagadeesan, Bharathi; Palmer, Christopher S; Truwit, Charles L; McKinney, Alexander M

    2015-04-01

    To assess the accuracy and reliability of one vendor's (Vital Images, Toshiba Medical, Minnetonka, MN) automated CT perfusion (CTP) summary maps in identification and volume estimation of infarcted tissue in patients with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) distribution infarcts. From 1085 CTP examinations over 5.5 years, 43 diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)-positive patients were included who underwent both CTP and DWI <12 h after symptom onset, with another 43 age-matched patients as controls (DWI-negative). Automated delay-corrected postprocessing software (DC-SVD) generated both infarct "core only" and "core+penumbra" CTP summary maps. Three reviewers independently tabulated Alberta Stroke Program Early CT scores (ASPECTS) of both CTP summary maps and coregistered DWI. Of 86 included patients, 36 had DWI infarct volumes ≤70 ml, 7 had volumes >70 ml, and 43 were negative; the automated CTP "core only" map correctly classified each as >70 ml or ≤70 ml, while the "core+penumbra" map misclassified 4 as >70 ml. There were strong correlations between DWI volume with both summary map-based volumes: "core only" (r=0.93), and "core+penumbra" (r=0.77) (both p<0.0001). Agreement between ASPECTS scores of infarct core on DWI with summary maps was 0.65-0.74 for "core only" map, and 0.61-0.65 for "core+penumbra" (both p<0.0001). Using DWI-based ASPECTS scores as the standard, the accuracy of the CTP-based maps were 79.1-86.0% for the "core only" map, and 83.7-88.4% for "core+penumbra." Automated CTP summary maps appear to be relatively accurate in both the detection of acute MCA distribution infarcts, and the discrimination of volumes using a 70 ml threshold. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in {sup 68}Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L.; Jackson, Price; Siva, Shankar

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: {sup 68}Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration

  13. Effects of registration error on parametric response map analysis: a simulation study using liver CT-perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lausch, A.; Jensen, N. K. G.; Chen, J.; Lee, T. Y.; Lock, M.; Wong, E.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of registration error (RE) on parametric response map (PRM) analysis of pre and post-radiotherapy (RT) functional images. Methods: Arterial blood flow maps (ABF) were generated from the CT-perfusion scans of 5 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. ABF values within each patient map were modified to produce seven new ABF maps simulating 7 distinct post-RT functional change scenarios. Ground truth PRMs were generated for each patient by comparing the simulated and original ABF maps. Each simulated ABF map was then deformed by different magnitudes of realistic respiratory motion in order to simulate RE. PRMs were generated for each of the deformed maps and then compared to the ground truth PRMs to produce estimates of RE-induced misclassification. Main findings: The percentage of voxels misclassified as decreasing, no change, and increasing, increased with RE For all patients, increasing RE was observed to increase the number of high post-RT ABF voxels associated with low pre-RT ABF voxels and vice versa. 3 mm of average tumour RE resulted in 18-45% tumour voxel misclassification rates. Conclusions: RE induced misclassification posed challenges for PRM analysis in the liver where registration accuracy tends to be lower. Quantitative understanding of the sensitivity of the PRM method to registration error is required if PRMs are to be used to guide radiation therapy dose painting techniques.

  14. Standardized perfusion value: universal CT contrast enhancement scale that correlates with FDG PET in lung nodules.

    PubMed

    Miles, K A; Griffiths, M R; Fuentes, M A

    2001-08-01

    The standardized enhancement value and standardized perfusion value allow comparison between different methods for quantification of contrast enhancement during computed tomography (CT). Standard perfusion values calculated from CT measurements of perfusion within pulmonary nodules compared favorably with those derived from previously reported enhancement data and correlated with standardized uptake values obtained from positron emission tomographic images (r = 0.8, P <.01).

  15. Reduction of image noise in low tube current dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging using HYPR processing: a time-attenuation curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Speidel, Michael A; Bateman, Courtney L; Tao, Yinghua; Raval, Amish N; Hacker, Timothy A; Reeder, Scott B; Van Lysel, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a HighlY constrained backPRojection (HYPR) image processing method for the reduction of image noise in low tube current time-resolved CT myocardial perfusion scans. The effect of this method on myocardial time-attenuation curve noise and fidelity is evaluated in an animal model, using varying levels of tube current. CT perfusion scans of four healthy pigs (42-59 kg) were acquired at 500, 250, 100, 50, 25, and 10 mA on a 64-slice scanner (4 cm axial coverage, 120 kV, 0.4 s∕rotation, 50 s scan duration). For each scan a sequence of ECG-gated images centered on 75% R-R was reconstructed using short-scan filtered back projection (FBP). HYPR processing was applied to the scans acquired at less than 500 mA using parameters designed to maintain the voxel noise level in the 500-mA FBP images. The processing method generates a series of composite images by averaging over a sliding time window and then multiplies the composite images by weighting images to restore temporal fidelity to the image sequence. HYPR voxel noise relative to FBP noise was measured in AHA myocardial segment numbers 1, 5, 6, and 7 at each mA. To quantify the agreement between HYPR and FBP time-attenuation curves (TACs), Bland-Altman analysis was performed on TACs measured in full myocardial segments. The relative degree of TAC fluctuation in smaller subvolumes was quantified by calculating the root mean square deviation of a TAC about the gamma variate curve fit to the TAC data. HYPR image sequences were produced using 2, 7, and 20 beat composite windows for the 250, 100, and 50 mA scans, respectively. At 25 and 10 mA, all available beats were used in the composite (41-60; average 50). A 7-voxel-wide 3D cubic filter kernel was used to form weighting images. The average ratio of HYPR voxel noise to 500-mA FBP voxel noise was 1.06, 1.10, 0.97, 1.11, and 2.15 for HYPR scans at 250, 100, 50, 25, and 10 mA. The average limits-of-agreement between HYPR and FBP TAC values measured 0

  16. Reduction of image noise in low tube current dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging using HYPR processing: A time-attenuation curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    Speidel, Michael A.; Bateman, Courtney L.; Tao, Yinghua; Raval, Amish N.; Hacker, Timothy A.; Reeder, Scott B.; Van Lysel, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study describes a HighlY constrained backPRojection (HYPR) image processing method for the reduction of image noise in low tube current time-resolved CT myocardial perfusion scans. The effect of this method on myocardial time-attenuation curve noise and fidelity is evaluated in an animal model, using varying levels of tube current. Methods: CT perfusion scans of four healthy pigs (42–59 kg) were acquired at 500, 250, 100, 50, 25, and 10 mA on a 64-slice scanner (4 cm axial coverage, 120 kV, 0.4 s/rotation, 50 s scan duration). For each scan a sequence of ECG-gated images centered on 75% R-R was reconstructed using short-scan filtered back projection (FBP). HYPR processing was applied to the scans acquired at less than 500 mA using parameters designed to maintain the voxel noise level in the 500-mA FBP images. The processing method generates a series of composite images by averaging over a sliding time window and then multiplies the composite images by weighting images to restore temporal fidelity to the image sequence. HYPR voxel noise relative to FBP noise was measured in AHA myocardial segment numbers 1, 5, 6, and 7 at each mA. To quantify the agreement between HYPR and FBP time-attenuation curves (TACs), Bland-Altman analysis was performed on TACs measured in full myocardial segments. The relative degree of TAC fluctuation in smaller subvolumes was quantified by calculating the root mean square deviation of a TAC about the gamma variate curve fit to the TAC data. Results: HYPR image sequences were produced using 2, 7, and 20 beat composite windows for the 250, 100, and 50 mA scans, respectively. At 25 and 10 mA, all available beats were used in the composite (41–60; average 50). A 7-voxel-wide 3D cubic filter kernel was used to form weighting images. The average ratio of HYPR voxel noise to 500-mA FBP voxel noise was 1.06, 1.10, 0.97, 1.11, and 2.15 for HYPR scans at 250, 100, 50, 25, and 10 mA. The average limits-of-agreement between HYPR and

  17. Intracranial CT angiography obtained from a cerebral CT perfusion examination

    SciTech Connect

    Gratama van Andel, H. A. F.; Venema, H. W.; Majoie, C. B.; Den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2009-04-15

    CT perfusion (CTP) examinations of the brain are performed increasingly for the evaluation of cerebral blood flow in patients with stroke and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Of the same patient often also a CT angiography (CTA) examination is performed. This study investigates the possibility to obtain CTA images from the CTP examination, thereby possibly obviating the CTA examination. This would save the patient exposure to radiation, contrast, and time. Each CTP frame is a CTA image with a varying amount of contrast enhancement and with high noise. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) we combined all 3D images into one 3D image after registration to correct for patient motion between time frames. Image combination consists of weighted averaging in which the weighting factor of each frame is proportional to the arterial contrast. It can be shown that the arterial CNR is maximized in this procedure. An additional advantage of the use of the time series of CTP images is that automatic differentiation between arteries and veins is possible. This feature was used to mask veins in the resulting 3D images to enhance visibility of arteries in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. With a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanner (64x0.625 mm) CTP examinations of eight patients were performed on 80 mm of brain using the toggling table technique. The CTP examination consisted of a time series of 15 3D images (2x64x0.625 mm; 80 kV; 150 mAs each) with an interval of 4 s. The authors measured the CNR in images obtained with weighted averaging, images obtained with plain averaging, and images with maximal arterial enhancement. The authors also compared CNR and quality of the images with that of regular CTA examinations and examined the effectiveness of automatic vein masking in MIP images. The CNR of the weighted averaged images is, on the average, 1.73 times the CNR of an image at maximal arterial enhancement in the CTP series, where the use of plain averaging

  18. Dual-energy perfusion-CT of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Klauss, M; Stiller, W; Pahn, G; Fritz, F; Kieser, M; Werner, J; Kauczor, H U; Grenacher, L

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of dual-energy CT (DECT)-perfusion of pancreatic carcinomas for assessing the differences in perfusion, permeability and blood volume of healthy pancreatic tissue and histopathologically confirmed solid pancreatic carcinoma. 24 patients with histologically proven pancreatic carcinoma were examined prospectively with a 64-slice dual source CT using a dynamic sequence of 34 dual-energy (DE) acquisitions every 1.5s (80 ml of iodinated contrast material, 370 mg/ml, flow rate 5 ml/s). 80 kV(p), 140 kV(p), and weighted average (linearly blended M0.3) 120 kV(p)-equivalent dual-energy perfusion image data sets were evaluated with a body-perfusion CT tool (Body-PCT, Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) for estimating perfusion, permeability, and blood volume values. Color-coded parameter maps were generated. In all 24 patients dual-energy CT-perfusion was. All carcinomas could be identified in the color-coded perfusion maps. Calculated perfusion, permeability and blood volume values were significantly lower in pancreatic carcinomas compared to healthy pancreatic tissue. Weighted average 120 kV(p)-equivalent perfusion-, permeability- and blood volume-values determined from DE image data were 0.27 ± 0.04 min(-1) vs. 0.91 ± 0.04 min(-1) (p<0.0001), 0.5 ± 0.07 *0.5 min(-1) vs. 0.67 ± 0.05 *0.5 min(-1) (p=0.06) and 0.49 ± 0.07 min(-1) vs. 1.28 ± 0.11 min(-1) (p<0.0001). Compared with 80 and 140 kV(p) the standard deviations of the kV(p)120 kV(p)-equivalent values were manifestly smaller. Dual-energy CT-perfusion of the pancreas is feasible. The use of DECT improves the accuracy of CT-perfusion of the pancreas by fully exploiting the advantages of enhanced iodine contrast at 80 kV(p) in combination with the noise reduction at 140 kV(p). Therefore using dual-energy perfusion data could improve the delineation of pancreatic carcinomas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of CT-based attenuation correction of rat microSPECT images on relative myocardial perfusion and quantitative tracer uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Strydhorst, Jared H. Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Our goal in this work was to investigate the impact of CT-based attenuation correction on measurements of rat myocardial perfusion with {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 201}Tl single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods: Eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin and scanned in a small animal pinhole SPECT/CT scanner. Scans were repeated weekly over a period of 5 weeks. Eight additional rats were injected with {sup 201}Tl and also scanned following a similar protocol. The images were reconstructed with and without attenuation correction, and the relative perfusion was analyzed with the commercial cardiac analysis software. The absolute uptake of {sup 99m}Tc in the heart was also quantified with and without attenuation correction. Results: For {sup 99m}Tc imaging, relative segmental perfusion changed by up to +2.1%/−1.8% as a result of attenuation correction. Relative changes of +3.6%/−1.0% were observed for the {sup 201}Tl images. Interscan and inter-rat reproducibilities of relative segmental perfusion were 2.7% and 3.9%, respectively, for the uncorrected {sup 99m}Tc scans, and 3.6% and 4.3%, respectively, for the {sup 201}Tl scans, and were not significantly affected by attenuation correction for either tracer. Attenuation correction also significantly increased the measured absolute uptake of tetrofosmin and significantly altered the relationship between the rat weight and tracer uptake. Conclusions: Our results show that attenuation correction has a small but statistically significant impact on the relative perfusion measurements in some segments of the heart and does not adversely affect reproducibility. Attenuation correction had a small but statistically significant impact on measured absolute tracer uptake.

  20. Characteristics of images of angiographically proven normal coronary arteries acquired by adenosine-stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT-IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT with CT attenuation correction changed stepwise.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Teruyuki; Tanaka, Haruki; Kozono, Nami; Tanakamaru, Yoshiki; Idei, Naomi; Ohashi, Norihiko; Ohtsubo, Hideki; Okada, Takenori; Yasunobu, Yuji; Kaseda, Shunichi

    2015-04-01

    Although several studies have shown the diagnostic and prognostic value of CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images for diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD), this issue remains a matter of debate. To clarify the characteristics of CT-AC SPECT images that might potentially improve diagnostic performance, we analyzed images acquired using adenosine-stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT equipped with IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT (SPECT/CT-IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT) from patients with angiographically proven normal coronary arteries after changing the CT attenuation correction (CT-AC) in a stepwise manner. We enrolled 72 patients (Male 36, Female 36) with normal coronary arteries according to findings of invasive coronary angiography or CT-angiography within three months after a SPECT/CT study. Projection images were reconstructed at CT-AC values of (-), 40, 60, 80 and 100 % using a CT number conversion program according to our definition and analyzed using polar maps according to sex. CT attenuation corrected segments were located from the mid- and apical-inferior spread through the mid- and apical-septal regions and finally to the basal-anterior and basal- and mid-lateral regions in males, and from the mid-inferior region through the mid-septal and mid-anterior, and mid-lateral regions in females as the CT-AC values increased. Segments with maximal mean counts shifted from the apical-anterior to mid-anterolateral region under both stress and rest conditions in males, whereas such segments shifted from the apical-septal to the mid-anteroseptal region under both stress and rest conditions in females. We clarified which part of the myocardium and to which degree CT-AC affects it in adenosine-stress thallium-201 myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT-IQ[Symbol: see text]SPECT images by changing the CT-AC value stepwise. We also identified sex-specific shifts of segments with maximal mean counts that changed as

  1. Tissue-specific sparse deconvolution for brain CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruogu; Jiang, Haodi; Huang, Junzhou

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing perfusion maps in low-dose computed tomography perfusion (CTP) for cerebrovascular disease diagnosis is a challenging task, especially for low-contrast tissue categories where infarct core and ischemic penumbra usually occur. Sparse perfusion deconvolution has been recently proposed to effectively improve the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of low-dose perfusion CT by extracting the complementary information from the high-dose perfusion maps to restore the low-dose using a joint spatio-temporal model. However the low-contrast tissue classes where infarct core and ischemic penumbra are likely to occur in cerebral perfusion CT tend to be over-smoothed, leading to loss of essential biomarkers. In this paper, we propose a tissue-specific sparse deconvolution approach to preserve the subtle perfusion information in the low-contrast tissue classes. We first build tissue-specific dictionaries from segmentations of high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning, and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation for block-wise tissue segments on the low-dose CTP data. Extensive validation on clinical datasets of patients with cerebrovascular disease demonstrates the superior performance of our proposed method compared to state-of-art, and potentially improve diagnostic accuracy by increasing the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissues in the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Low yield of ventilation and perfusion imaging for the evaluation of pulmonary embolism after indeterminate CT pulmonary angiography.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R; Cox, Mougnyan; Poplawski, Michael; Lyshchik, Andrej

    2017-04-12

    Ventilation and perfusion (VQ) imaging is common following suboptimal CT pulmonary angiogram (CTPA) for pulmonary embolism (PE) evaluation; however, the results of this diagnostic pathway are unclear. The purpose of our study is to determine the incidence of PE diagnosed on VQ scans performed in patients with suboptimal CTPAs. One hundred twenty-two suboptimal CTPAs with subsequent VQ scans within 1 week were retrospectively identified. VQ reports utilizing modified ​prospective investigation of pulmonary embolism diagnosis (PIOPED) and prospective investigative study of acute pulmonary embolism diagnosis (PISAPED) criteria were evaluated for presence of PE; intermediate probability, high probability, and PE present were considered PE positive. Three hundred consecutive reports of each diagnostic CTPA and diagnostic VQ studies were reviewed to estimate baseline PE positive rates at our institution. These were compared to the positive VQ scan rate after suboptimal CTPA by Fisher's exact test. Reported reason for suboptimal CTPA was noted. When contrast bolus timing was suboptimal, we measured main pulmonary artery (mPA) Hounsfield units (HU). Potential alternative diagnoses in CTPA reports were noted. 97.5% (119/122) of VQ scans following suboptimal CTPA were negative for PE, and 2.5% (3/122) were positive for PE. This was significantly lower than baseline PE positive rate of 10.7% (32/300, p < 0.01) for VQ imaging, and 10.3% (31/300, p < 0.01) for CTPA at our institution. Most (79.5%) CTPAs were suboptimal due to contrast timing. Average mPA density in these cases was 164 ± 61 HU. Most of these studies ruled out central PE. Potential alternative diagnosis was reported in 34/122 (28%) of suboptimal CTPAs, for which pneumonia accounted 59%. There is very low incidence of PE diagnosed on VQ imaging performed after suboptimal CTPA. This may be attributed to the ability of most suboptimal CTPAs to rule out central PE.

  3. Dynamic CT head phantom for perfusion and angiography studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, K.; Blazeski, A.; Dannecker, K.; Lee, Q. Y.; Holscher, C.; Donahue, C.; van Kampen, W.

    2010-03-01

    Contrast imaging is a compelling enhancement for the portable, flat panel-based brain CT scanner currently under development at Xoran. Due to the relative low temporal resolution of flat panel detectors, enabling tomographic imaging on such platform requires optimizing the imaging and injection protocols. A dynamic CT head phantom was designed to facilitate this task. The Dynamic Perfusion and Angiography Model (PAM), mimics tissue attenuation in CT images, provides physiological timing for angiography and perfusion studies, and moves fluid with properties similar to those of blood. The design consists of an arterial system, which contains bifurcating vessels that feed into perfusion chambers, mimicking blood flow through capillaries and smaller vessels, and a venous system, which is symmetrical to the arterial side and drains the perfusion chambers. The variation of geometry and flow rate in the phantom provides the physiological total time that fluid spends in the head, and the difference in material densities correlates to CT numbers for biological tissues. This paper discusses the design of Dynamic PAM and shows experimental results demonstrating its ability to realistically simulate blood flow. Results of dynamic imaging studies of the phantom are also presented.

  4. [Preliminary study on assessment of lexiscan-induced blood-brain barrier opening and its level by CT perfusion imaging].

    PubMed

    Duan, Y; Yang, B Q; Chang, C C; Zhou, J; Li, H Y; Xu, Z H; Wang, Z W; Li, D Y

    2016-09-20

    Objective: To evaluate the level of lexiscan-induced blood-brain barrier opening of healthy rabbits via CT perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) scan. Methods: Between November 2014 and May 2015, thirty New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned into three groups: the experimental group A1 which received one injection of lexiscan(1 ml/kg); the experimental group A2 which received three times injection of lexiscan(total dose: 1.5 ml/kg), finished within 15 minutes; the control group B which was injected the same volume normal saline(1 ml/kg), after 30 minutes, CT PWI scan was performed. Then cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT) and permeability surface(PS) of the region of interest of each group were acquired and compared statistically. Five cases of each group were injected with 2% Evans blue intravenously posterior to imaging. After one hour of infusion, all the animals were killed. Their brains were examined for the determination of Evans blue distribution. Results: Both the values of CBF and CBV and the staining with Evans blue of the group A1(CBF: (89.88±2.21), (81.42±4.28) ml·(100 g)(-1)·min(-1); CBV: (3.97±0.43), (3.66±0.16) ml/g)and group A2 (CBF: (75.16±0.84), (63.66±7.21) ml·(100 g)(-1)·min(-1); CBV: (4.07±0.01), (3.75±0.05) ml/g) were higher than those of the group B(CBF: (20.08±5.08), (14.58±8.62) ml·(100 g)(-1)·min(-1); CBV: (0.85±0.04), (0.65±0.17) ml/g), the differences were all statistically significant (all P<0.01). While there was no statistically difference between group A1 and group A2(P>0.05). The value of PS of the group A2((22.43±8.09), (20.20±7.01)ml·(100 g)(-1)·min(-1) )was higher than that of group A1((13.82±4.44), (10.12±2.44)ml·(100 g)(-1)·min(-1)) and group B(0.00, 0.00)(the lowest one), the differences were all statistically significant(all P<0.01). The value of MTT of the group A1((2.50±0.82, 2.47±0.10) s) had no statistical difference with group A2 and group B

  5. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung include gadolinium-enhanced perfusion imaging and hyperpolarized helium imaging, which can allow imaging of pulmonary ventilation and .measurement of the size of emphysematous spaces. PMID:18267192

  6. Diagnostic Performance of Resting CT Myocardial Perfusion in Patients With Possible Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Kelley R.; Busey, Janet; Mitsumori, Lee M.; Strote, Jared; Caldwell, James H.; Busch, Joshua H.; Shuman, William P.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Coronary CT angiography has high sensitivity, but modest specificity, to detect acute coronary syndrome. We studied whether adding resting CT myocardial perfusion imaging improved the detection of acute coronary syndrome. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Patients with low-to-intermediate cardiac risk presenting with possible acute coronary syndrome received both the standard of care evaluation and a research thoracic 64-MDCT examination. Patients with an obstructive (> 50%) stenosis or a nonevaluable coronary segment on CT were diagnosed with possible acute coronary syndrome. CT perfusion was determined by applying gray and color Hounsfield unit maps to resting CT angiography images. Adjudicated patient diagnoses were based on the standard of care and 3-month follow-up. Patient-level diagnostic performance for acute coronary syndrome was calculated for coronary CT, CT perfusion, and combined techniques. RESULTS A total of 105 patients were enrolled. Of the nine (9%) patients with acute coronary syndrome, all had obstructive CT stenoses but only three had abnormal CT perfusion. CT perfusion was normal in all other patients. To detect acute coronary syndrome, CT angiography had 100% sensitivity, 89% specificity, and a positive predictive value of 45%. For CT perfusion, specificity and positive predictive value were each 100%, and sensitivity was 33%. Combined cardiac CT and CT perfusion had similar specificity but a higher positive predictive value (100%) than did CT angiography. CONCLUSION Resting CT perfusion using CT angiographic images may have high specificity and may improve CT positive predictive value for acute coronary syndrome without added radiation and contrast. However, normal resting CT perfusion cannot exclude acute coronary syndrome. PMID:23617513

  7. Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging using thallium-201 with a novel multifocal collimator SPECT/CT: IQ-SPECT versus conventional protocols in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Wakabayash, Hiroshi; Okuda, Koichi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2015-06-01

    A novel multifocal collimator, IQ-SPECT (Siemens) consists of SMARTZOOM, cardio-centric and 3D iterative SPECT reconstruction and makes it possible to perform MPI scans in a short time. The aims are to delineate the normal uptake in thallium-201 ((201)Tl) SPECT in each acquisition method and to compare the distribution between new and conventional protocol, especially in patients with normal imaging. Forty patients (eight women, mean age of 75 years) who underwent myocardial perfusion imaging were included in the study. All patients underwent one-day protocol perfusion scan after an adenosine-stress test and at rest after administering (201)Tl and showed normal results. Acquisition was performed on a Symbia T6 equipped with a conventional dual-headed gamma camera system (Siemens ECAM) and with a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator. Imaging was performed with a conventional system followed by IQ-SPECT/computed tomography (CT). Reconstruction was performed with or without X-ray CT-derived attenuation correction (AC). Two nuclear physicians blinded to clinical information interpreted all myocardial perfusion images. A semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion was analyzed by a 17-segment model with a 5-point visual scoring. The uptake of each segment was measured and left ventricular functions were analyzed by QPS software. IQ-SPECT provided good or excellent image quality. The quality of IQ-SPECT images without AC was similar to those of conventional LEHR study. Mid-inferior defect score (0.3 ± 0.5) in the conventional LEHR study was increased significantly in IQ-SPECT with AC (0 ± 0). IQ-SPECT with AC improved the mid-inferior decreased perfusion shown in conventional images. The apical tracer count in IQ-SPECT with AC was decreased compared to that in LEHR (0.1 ± 0.3 vs. 0.5 ± 0.7, p < 0.05). The left ventricular ejection fraction from IQ-SPECT was significantly higher than that from the LEHR collimator (p = 0.0009). The images of IQ-SPECT acquired in a

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of CT perfusion imaging for detecting acute ischemic stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Biesbroek, J M; Niesten, J M; Dankbaar, J W; Biessels, G J; Velthuis, B K; Reitsma, J B; van der Schaaf, I C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of CT perfusion (CTP) for the detection of ischemic stroke by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis of published reports. We searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library using the terms 'perfusion computed tomography', 'ischemic stroke' and synonyms. We included studies that: (1) reported original data, (2) studied the diagnostic value of CTP for detecting ischemic stroke, (3) used MRI-DWI, follow-up MRI or follow-up CT as the reference standard, (4) included at least 10 patients who were suspected of ischemic stroke, and (5) reported the number of true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives for the diagnosis of ischemic stroke. Fifteen studies were finally included in the current review with a total of 1,107 patients. A pooled analysis resulted in a sensitivity of 80% (95% confidence interval, CI: 72-86%) and a specificity of 95% (95% CI: 86-98%). Almost two thirds of the false negatives were due to small lacunar infarcts; the remaining false negatives were mostly due to limited coverage. The current systematic review shows that CTP has a high sensitivity and a very high specificity for detecting infarcts. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Evaluation of CT Perfusion Biomarkers of Tumor Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qi; Yeung, Timothy Pok Chi; Lee, Ting-Yim; Bauman, Glenn; Crukley, Cathie; Morrison, Laura; Hoffman, Lisa; Yartsev, Slav

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor hypoxia is associated with treatment resistance to cancer therapies. Hypoxia can be investigated by immunohistopathologic methods but such procedure is invasive. A non-invasive method to interrogate tumor hypoxia is an attractive option as such method can provide information before, during, and after treatment for personalized therapies. Our study evaluated the correlations between computed tomography (CT) perfusion parameters and immunohistopathologic measurement of tumor hypoxia. Methods Wistar rats, 18 controls and 19 treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), implanted with the C6 glioma tumor were imaged using CT perfusion on average every five days to monitor tumor growth. A final CT perfusion scan and the brain were obtained on average 14 days (8–22 days) after tumor implantation. Tumor hypoxia was detected immunohistopathologically with pimonidazole. The tumor, necrotic, and pimonidazole-positive areas on histology samples were measured. Percent necrotic area and percent hypoxic areas were calculated. Tumor volume (TV), blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and permeability-surface area product (PS) were obtained from the CT perfusion studies. Correlations between CT perfusion parameters and histological parameters were assessed by Spearman’s ρ correlation. A Bonferroni-corrected P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results BF and BV showed significant correlations with percent hypoxic area ρ = -0.88, P < 0.001 and ρ = -0.81, P < 0.001, respectively, for control animals and ρ = -0.7, P < 0.001 and ρ = -0.6, P = 0.003, respectively, for all animals, while TV and BV were correlated (ρ = -0.64, P = 0.01 and ρ = -0.43, P = 0.043, respectively) with percent necrotic area. PS was not correlated with either percent necrotic or percent hypoxic areas. Conclusions Percent hypoxic area provided significant correlations with BF and BV, suggesting that CT perfusion parameters are potential non-invasive imaging biomarkers of tumor

  10. Three-dimensional imaging of the mouse heart and vasculature using micro-CT and whole-body perfusion of iodine or phosphotungstic acid.

    PubMed

    Dunmore-Buyze, P Joy; Tate, Elsbeth; Xiang, Fu-li; Detombe, Sarah A; Nong, Zengxuan; Pickering, J Geoffrey; Drangova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have investigated histological staining compounds as micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) contrast agents, delivered by soaking tissue specimens in stain and relying on passive diffusion for agent uptake. This study describes a perfusion approach using iodine or phosphotungstic acid (PTA) stains, delivered to an intact mouse, to capitalize on the microvasculature as a delivery conduit for parenchymal staining and direct contact for staining artery walls. Twelve C57BL/6 mice, arterially perfused with either 25% Lugol's solution or 5% PTA solution were scanned intact and reconstructed with 26 µm isotropic voxels. The animals were fixed and the heart and surrounding vessels were excised, embedded and scanned; isolated heart images were reconstructed with 13 µm isotropic voxels. Myocardial enhancement and artery diameters were measured. Both stains successfully enhanced the myocardium and vessel walls. Interestingly, Lugol's solution provided a significantly higher enhancement of the myocardium than PTA [2502 ± 437 vs 656 ± 178 Hounsfield units (HU); p < 0.0001], delineating myofiber architecture and orientation. There was no significant difference in vessel wall enhancement (Lugol's, 1036 ± 635 HU; PTA, 738 ± 124 HU; p = 0.29), but coronary arteries were more effectively segmented from the PTA-stained hearts, enabling segmented imaging of fifth- order coronary artery branches. The combination of whole mouse perfusion delivery and use of heavy metal-containing stains affords high-resolution imaging of the mouse heart and vasculature by micro-CT. The differential imaging patterns of Lugol's- and PTA-stained tissues reveals new opportunities for micro-analyses of cardiac and vascular tissues.

  11. Deriving the Intrahepatic Arteriovenous Shunt Rate from CT Images and Biochemical Data Instead of from Arterial Perfusion Scintigraphy in Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, Toshiro Seki, Hiroshi; Shiina, Makoto

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate a method for predicting the intrahepatic arteriovenous shunt rate from computed tomography (CT) images and biochemical data, instead of from arterial perfusion scintigraphy, because adverse exacerbated systemic effects may be induced in cases where a high shunt rate exists. CT and arterial perfusion scintigraphy were performed in patients with liver metastases from gastric or colorectal cancer. Biochemical data and tumor marker levels of 33 enrolled patients were measured. The results were statistically verified by multiple regression analysis. The total metastatic hepatic tumor volume (V{sub metastasized}), residual hepatic parenchyma volume (V{sub residual}; calculated from CT images), and biochemical data were treated as independent variables; the intrahepatic arteriovenous (IHAV) shunt rate (calculated from scintigraphy) was treated as a dependent variable. The IHAV shunt rate was 15.1 {+-} 11.9%. Based on the correlation matrixes, the best correlation coefficient of 0.84 was established between the IHAV shunt rate and V{sub metastasized} (p < 0.01). In the multiple regression analysis with the IHAV shunt rate as the dependent variable, the coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) was 0.75, which was significant at the 0.1% level with two significant independent variables (V{sub metastasized} and V{sub residual}). The standardized regression coefficients ({beta}) of V{sub metastasized} and V{sub residual} were significant at the 0.1 and 5% levels, respectively. Based on this result, we can obtain a predicted value of IHAV shunt rate (p < 0.001) using CT images. When a high shunt rate was predicted, beneficial and consistent clinical monitoring can be initiated in, for example, hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy.

  12. Imaging of myocardial perfusion with magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Barkhausen, Jörg; Hunold, Peter; Jochims, Markus; Debatin, Jörg F

    2004-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is currently the leading cause of death in developed nations. Reflecting the complexity of cardiac function and morphology, noninvasive diagnosis of CAD represents a major challenge for medical imaging. Although coronary artery stenoses can be depicted with magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) techniques, its functional or hemodynamic impact frequently remains elusive. Therefore, there is growing interest in other, target organ-specific parameters such as myocardial function at stress and first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging to assess myocardial blood flow. This review explores the pathophysiologic background, recent technical developments, and current clinical status of first-pass MR imaging (MRI) of myocardial perfusion.

  13. Imaging of cardiac perfusion of free-breathing small animals using dynamic phase-correlated micro-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Sawall, Stefan; Kuntz, Jan; Socher, Michaela; Knaup, Michael; Hess, Andreas; Bartling, Soenke; Kachelriess, Marc

    2012-12-15

    Purpose:Mouse models of cardiac diseases have proven to be a valuable tool in preclinical research. The high cardiac and respiratory rates of free breathing mice prohibit conventional in vivo cardiac perfusion studies using computed tomography even if gating methods are applied. This makes a sacrification of the animals unavoidable and only allows for the application of ex vivo methods. Methods: To overcome this issue the authors propose a low dose scan protocol and an associated reconstruction algorithm that allows for in vivo imaging of cardiac perfusion and associated processes that are retrospectively synchronized to the respiratory and cardiac motion of the animal. The scan protocol consists of repetitive injections of contrast media within several consecutive scans while the ECG, respiratory motion, and timestamp of contrast injection are recorded and synchronized to the acquired projections. The iterative reconstruction algorithm employs a six-dimensional edge-preserving filter to provide low-noise, motion artifact-free images of the animal examined using the authors' low dose scan protocol. Results: The reconstructions obtained show that the complete temporal bolus evolution can be visualized and quantified in any desired combination of cardiac and respiratory phase including reperfusion phases. The proposed reconstruction method thereby keeps the administered radiation dose at a minimum and thus reduces metabolic inference to the animal allowing for longitudinal studies. Conclusions: The authors' low dose scan protocol and phase-correlated dynamic reconstruction algorithm allow for an easy and effective way to visualize phase-correlated perfusion processes in routine laboratory studies using free-breathing mice.

  14. Detection of ischaemic myocardial lesions with coronary CT angiography and adenosine-stress dynamic perfusion imaging using a 128-slice dual-source CT: diagnostic performance in comparison with cardiac MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S M; Choi, J-H; Chang, S-A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the diagnostic performance of adenosine-stress dynamic CT perfusion (ASDCTP) imaging and coronary CT angiography (CCTA) for the detection of ischaemic myocardial lesions using 128-slice dual-source CT compared with that of 1.5 T cardiac MRI. Methods: This prospective study included 33 patients (61±8 years, 82% male) with suspected coronary artery diseases who underwent ASDCTP imaging and adenosine-stress cardiac MRI. Two investigators independently evaluated ASDCTP images in correlation with significant coronary stenosis on CCTA using two different thresholds of 50% and 70% diameter stenosis. Hypoattenuated myocardial lesions on ASDCTP associated with significant coronary stenoses on CCTA were regarded as true perfusion defects. All estimates of diagnostic performance were calculated and compared with those of cardiac MRI. Results: With use of a threshold of 50% diameter stenosis on CCTA, the diagnostic estimates per-myocardial segment were as follows: sensitivity, 81% [95% confidence interval (CI): 70–92%]; specificity, 94% (95% CI: 92–96%); and accuracy 93% (95% CI: 91–95%). With use of a threshold of 70%, the diagnostic estimates were as follows: sensitivity, 48% (95% CI: 34–62%); specificity, 99% (95% CI: 98–100%); and accuracy, 94% (95% CI: 92–96%). Conclusion: Dynamic CTP using 128-slice dual-source CT enables the assessment of the physiological significance of coronary artery lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in patients with clinically suspected coronary artery disease. Advances in knowledge: Combined CCTA and ASDCTP yielded high accuracy in the detection of perfusion defects regardless of the threshold of significant coronary stenosis. PMID:24096592

  15. Time Efficiency and Diagnostic Accuracy of New Automated Myocardial Perfusion Analysis Software in 320-Row CT Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rief, Matthias; Stenzel, Fabian; Kranz, Anisha; Schlattmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the time efficiency and diagnostic accuracy of automated myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) image analysis software. Materials and Methods 320-row CTP was performed in 30 patients, and analyses were conducted independently by three different blinded readers by the use of two recent software releases (version 4.6 and novel version 4.71GR001, Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan). Analysis times were compared, and automated epi- and endocardial contour detection was subjectively rated in five categories (excellent, good, fair, poor and very poor). As semi-quantitative perfusion parameters, myocardial attenuation and transmural perfusion ratio (TPR) were calculated for each myocardial segment and agreement was tested by using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Conventional coronary angiography served as reference standard. Results The analysis time was significantly reduced with the novel automated software version as compared with the former release (Reader 1: 43:08 ± 11:39 min vs. 09:47 ± 04:51 min, Reader 2: 42:07 ± 06:44 min vs. 09:42 ± 02:50 min and Reader 3: 21:38 ± 3:44 min vs. 07:34 ± 02:12 min; p < 0.001 for all). Epi- and endocardial contour detection for the novel software was rated to be significantly better (p < 0.001) than with the former software. ICCs demonstrated strong agreement (≥ 0.75) for myocardial attenuation in 93% and for TPR in 82%. Diagnostic accuracy for the two software versions was not significantly different (p = 0.169) as compared with conventional coronary angiography. Conclusion The novel automated CTP analysis software offers enhanced time efficiency with an improvement by a factor of about four, while maintaining diagnostic accuracy. PMID:23323027

  16. Simulation evaluation of quantitative myocardial perfusion assessment from cardiac CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2014-03-01

    Contrast enhancement on cardiac CT provides valuable information about myocardial perfusion and methods have been proposed to assess perfusion with static and dynamic acquisitions. There is a lack of knowledge and consensus on the appropriate approach to ensure 1) sufficient diagnostic accuracy for clinical decisions and 2) low radiation doses for patient safety. This work developed a thorough dynamic CT simulation and several accepted blood flow estimation techniques to evaluate the performance of perfusion assessment across a range of acquisition and estimation scenarios. Cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (Flow = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml/g/min, cardiac output = 3,5,8 L/min). CT acquisitions were simulated with a validated CT simulator incorporating polyenergetic data acquisition and realistic x-ray flux levels for dynamic acquisitions with a range of scenarios including 1, 2, 3 sec sampling for 30 sec with 25, 70, 140 mAs. Images were generated using conventional image reconstruction with additional image-based beam hardening correction to account for iodine content. Time attenuation curves were extracted for multiple regions around the myocardium and used to estimate flow. In total, 2,700 independent realizations of dynamic sequences were generated and multiple MBF estimation methods were applied to each of these. Evaluation of quantitative kinetic modeling yielded blood flow estimates with an root mean square error (RMSE) of ~0.6 ml/g/min averaged across multiple scenarios. Semi-quantitative modeling and qualitative static imaging resulted in significantly more error (RMSE = ~1.2 and ~1.2 ml/min/g respectively). For quantitative methods, dose reduction through reduced temporal sampling or reduced tube current had comparable impact on the MBF estimate fidelity. On average, half dose acquisitions increased the RMSE of estimates by only 18% suggesting that substantial dose reductions can be employed in the context of quantitative myocardial

  17. Iterative image reconstruction for cerebral perfusion CT using a pre-contrast scan induced edge-preserving prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Yang; Huang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong; Feng, Qianjing; Chen, Wufan

    2012-11-01

    Cerebral perfusion x-ray computed tomography (PCT) imaging, which detects and characterizes the ischemic penumbra, and assesses blood-brain barrier permeability with acute stroke or chronic cerebrovascular diseases, has been developed extensively over the past decades. However, due to its sequential scan protocol, the associated radiation dose has raised significant concerns to patients. Therefore, in this study we developed an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on the maximum a posterior (MAP) principle to yield a clinically acceptable cerebral PCT image with lower milliampere-seconds (mA s). To preserve the edges of the reconstructed image, an edge-preserving prior was designed using a normal-dose pre-contrast unenhanced scan. For simplicity, the present algorithm was termed as ‘MAP-ndiNLM’. Evaluations with the digital phantom and the simulated low-dose clinical brain PCT datasets clearly demonstrate that the MAP-ndiNLM method can achieve more significant gains than the existing FBP and MAP-Huber algorithms with better image noise reduction, low-contrast object detection and resolution preservation. More importantly, the MAP-ndiNLM method can yield more accurate kinetic enhanced details and diagnostic hemodynamic parameter maps than the MAP-Huber method.

  18. Feasibility of dual-low scheme combined with iterative reconstruction technique in acute cerebral infarction volume CT whole brain perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Gong, Yi; Shi, Yibing; Hua, Rong; Zhang, Qingshan

    2017-07-01

    The feasibility of application of low-concentration contrast agent and low tube voltage combined with iterative reconstruction in whole brain computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging of patients with acute cerebral infarction was investigated. Fifty-nine patients who underwent whole brain CTP examination and diagnosed with acute cerebral infarction from September 2014 to March 2016 were selected. Patients were randomly divided into groups A and B. There were 28 cases in group A [tube voltage, 100 kV; contrast agent, iohexol (350 mg I/ml), reconstructed by filtered back projection] and 31 cases in group B [tube voltage, 80 kV; contrast agent, iodixanol (270 mg I/ml), reconstructed by algebraic reconstruction technique]. The artery CT value, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), dose length product, effective dose (ED) of radiation and brain iodine intake of both groups were measured and statistically analyzed. Two physicians carried out kappa (κ) analysis on the consistency of image quality evaluation. The difference in subjective image quality evaluation between the groups was tested by χ(2). The differences in CT value, SNR, CNR, CTP and CT angiography subjective image quality evaluation between both groups were not statistically significant (P>0.05); the diagnosis rate of the acute infarcts between the two groups was not significantly different; while the ED and iodine intake in group B (dual low-dose group) were lower than group A. In conclusion, combination of low tube voltage and iterative reconstruction technique, and application of low-concentration contrast agent (270 mg I/ml) in whole brain CTP examination reduced ED and iodine intake without compromising image quality, thereby reducing the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy.

  19. Diagnostic Performance of First-Pass Myocardial Perfusion Imaging without Stress with Computed Tomography (CT) Compared with Coronary CT Angiography Alone, with Fractional Flow Reserve as the Reference Standard.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Kazuhiro; Miyoshi, Toru; Miki, Takashi; Koyama, Yasushi; Sato, Shuhei; Kanazawa, Susumu; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in combination with first-pass CT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has a better diagnostic performance than CCTA alone, compared with invasive coronary angiography as the reference standard. The aim of this study was to investigate the additional diagnostic value of first-pass CT-MPI without stress for detecting hemodynamic significance of coronary stenosis, compared with invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR). We recruited 53 patients with suspected coronary artery disease undergoing both CCTA and first-pass CT-MPI without stress and invasive FFR, and 75 vessels were analyzed. We used the same raw data for CCTA and CT-MPI. First-pass CT-MPI was reconstructed by examining the diastolic signal densities as a bull's eye map. Invasive FFR <0.8 was considered as positive. On per-vessel analysis, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for CCTA plus first-pass CT-MPI and CCTA alone was 0.81 (0.73-0.90) and 0.70 (0.61-0.81), respectively (P = 0.036). CCTA plus first-pass CT-MPI without stress showed 0.73 sensitivity, 0.74 specificity, 0.53 positive predictive value, and 0.87 negative predictive value for detecting hemodynamically significant coronary stenosis. First-pass CT-MPI without stress correctly reclassified 38% of CCTA false-positive vessels as true negative. First-pass CT-MPI without stress combined with CCTA demonstrated excellent diagnostic accuracy, compared with invasive FFR as the reference standard. This technique could complement CCTA for diagnosis of coronary artery disease.

  20. NOTE: Estimating perfusion using microCT to locate microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marxen, M.; Paget, C.; Yu, L. X.; Henkelman, R. M.

    2006-01-01

    The injection of microspheres into the blood stream has been a common method to measure the spatial distribution of blood flow (perfusion). A technique to conduct this kind of measurement in small animal organs is presented using silver-coated microspheres with a diameter of 16 µm and high-resolution computed tomography (microCT) to detect individual microspheres. Phantom experiments demonstrate the detectability of individual spheres. The distribution of microspheres within a rat heart is given as an example. Using non-destructive, three-dimensional imaging for microsphere detection avoids the cumbersome dissection of the organ into samples or slices and their subsequent registration. The detection of individual spheres allows high-resolution measurements of perfusion and arbitrary definition of regions of interest. These, in turn, allow for accurate statistical analysis of perfusion such as relative dispersion curves.

  1. Improving quantitative CT perfusion parameter measurements using principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Timothy Pok Chi; Dekaban, Mark; De Haan, Nathan; Morrison, Laura; Hoffman, Lisa; Bureau, Yves; Chen, Xiaogang; Yartsev, Slav; Bauman, Glenn; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the improvements in measurements of blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and permeability-surface area product (PS) after principal component analysis (PCA) filtering of computed tomography (CT) perfusion images. To evaluate the improvement in CT perfusion image quality with poor contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in vivo. A digital phantom with CT perfusion images reflecting known values of BF, BV, and PS was created and was filtered using PCA. Intraclass correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman analysis were used to assess reliability of measurements and reduction in measurement errors, respectively. Rats with C6 gliomas were imaged using CT perfusion, and the raw CT perfusion images were filtered using PCA. Differences in CNR, BF, BV, and PS before and after PCA filtering were assessed using repeated measures analysis of variance. From simulation, mean errors decreased from 12.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] = -19.5 to 45.0) to 1.4 mL/min/100 g (CI = -27.6 to 30.4), 0.2 (CI = -1.1 to 1.4) to -0.1 mL/100 g (CI = -1.1 to 0.8), and 2.9 (CI = -2.4 to 8.1) to 0.2 mL/min/100 g (CI = -3.5 to 3.9) for BF, BV, and PS, respectively. Map noise in BF, BV, and PS were decreased from 51.0 (CI = -3.5 to 105.5) to 11.6 mL/min/100 g (CI = -7.9 to 31.2), 2.0 (CI = 0.7 to 3.3) to 0.5 mL/100 g (CI = 0.1 to 1.0), and 8.3 (CI = -0.8 to 17.5) to 1.4 mL/min/100 g (CI = -0.4 to 3.1), respectively. For experiments, CNR significantly improved with PCA filtering in normal brain (P < .05) and tumor (P < .05). Tumor and brain BFs were significantly different from each other after PCA filtering with four principal components (P < .05). PCA improved image CNR in vivo and reduced the measurement errors of BF, BV, and PS from simulation. A minimum of four principal components is recommended. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. CT Assessment of Myocardial Perfusion and Fractional Flow Reserve.

    PubMed

    Hulten, Edward; Ahmadi, Amir; Blankstein, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) offers a non-invasive method to detect coronary plaque and stenosis. However, to date, CTA has been most useful as a method of ruling out coronary artery disease (CAD) among patients with low to intermediate pretest probability of significant CAD. The reduced specificity of CTA for detecting physiologically significant stenosis is a known limitation of this technique, particularly since some patients require additional functional testing following CTA. Therefore, intense interest has focused on the development of methods to determine the functional significance of anatomical lesions identified by CTA. This article will discuss two emerging methods: stress myocardial perfusion imaging using CT, or CT perfusion, and computer simulation of fractional flow reserve. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The added value of hybrid ventilation/perfusion SPECT/CT in patients with stable COPD or apparently healthy smokers. Cancer-suspected CT findings in the lungs are common when hybrid imaging is used

    PubMed Central

    Jögi, Jonas; Markstad, Hanna; Tufvesson, Ellen; Bjermer, Leif; Bajc, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Ventilation/perfusion (V/P) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is recognized as a diagnostic method with potential beyond the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. V/P SPECT identifies functional impairment in diseases such as heart failure (HF), pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The development of hybrid SPECT/computed tomography (CT) systems, combining functional with morphological imaging through the addition of low-dose CT (LDCT), may be useful in COPD, as these patients are prone to lung cancer and other comorbidities. The aim of this study was to investigate the added value of LDCT among healthy smokers and patients with stable COPD, when examined with V/P SPECT/CT hybrid imaging. Sixty-nine subjects, 55 with COPD (GOLD I–IV) and 14 apparently healthy smokers, were examined with V/P SPECT and LDCT hybrid imaging. Spirometry was used to verify COPD grade. Only one apparently healthy smoker and three COPD patients had a normal or nearly normal V/P SPECT. All other patients showed various degrees of airway obstruction, even when spirometry was normal. The same interpretation was reached on both modalities in 39% of the patients. LDCT made V/P SPECT interpretation more certain in 9% of the patients and, in 52%, LDCT provided additional diagnoses. LDCT better characterized the type of emphysema in 12 patients. In 19 cases, tumor-suspected changes were reported. Three of these 19 patients (ie, 4.3% of all subjects) were in the end confirmed to have lung cancer. The majority of LDCT findings were not regarded as clinically significant. V/P SPECT identified perfusion patterns consistent with decompensated left ventricular HF in 14 COPD patients. In 16 patients (23%), perfusion defects were observed. HF and perfusion defects were not recognized with LDCT. In COPD patients and long-time smokers, hybrid imaging had added value compared to V/P SPECT alone, by identifying patients with lung malignancy and more clearly identifying

  4. The added value of hybrid ventilation/perfusion SPECT/CT in patients with stable COPD or apparently healthy smokers. Cancer-suspected CT findings in the lungs are common when hybrid imaging is used.

    PubMed

    Jögi, Jonas; Markstad, Hanna; Tufvesson, Ellen; Bjermer, Leif; Bajc, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Ventilation/perfusion (V/P) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is recognized as a diagnostic method with potential beyond the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. V/P SPECT identifies functional impairment in diseases such as heart failure (HF), pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The development of hybrid SPECT/computed tomography (CT) systems, combining functional with morphological imaging through the addition of low-dose CT (LDCT), may be useful in COPD, as these patients are prone to lung cancer and other comorbidities. The aim of this study was to investigate the added value of LDCT among healthy smokers and patients with stable COPD, when examined with V/P SPECT/CT hybrid imaging. Sixty-nine subjects, 55 with COPD (GOLD I-IV) and 14 apparently healthy smokers, were examined with V/P SPECT and LDCT hybrid imaging. Spirometry was used to verify COPD grade. Only one apparently healthy smoker and three COPD patients had a normal or nearly normal V/P SPECT. All other patients showed various degrees of airway obstruction, even when spirometry was normal. The same interpretation was reached on both modalities in 39% of the patients. LDCT made V/P SPECT interpretation more certain in 9% of the patients and, in 52%, LDCT provided additional diagnoses. LDCT better characterized the type of emphysema in 12 patients. In 19 cases, tumor-suspected changes were reported. Three of these 19 patients (ie, 4.3% of all subjects) were in the end confirmed to have lung cancer. The majority of LDCT findings were not regarded as clinically significant. V/P SPECT identified perfusion patterns consistent with decompensated left ventricular HF in 14 COPD patients. In 16 patients (23%), perfusion defects were observed. HF and perfusion defects were not recognized with LDCT. In COPD patients and long-time smokers, hybrid imaging had added value compared to V/P SPECT alone, by identifying patients with lung malignancy and more clearly identifying

  5. Physiologic evaluation of ischemia using cardiac CT: current status of CT myocardial perfusion and CT fractional flow reserve.

    PubMed

    Choi, Andrew D; Joly, Joanna M; Chen, Marcus Y; Weigold, Wm Guy

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac CT, specifically coronary CT angiography (CTA), is an established technology which detects anatomically significant coronary artery disease with a high sensitivity and negative predictive value compared with invasive coronary angiography. However, the limited ability of CTA to determine the physiologic significance of intermediate coronary stenoses remains a shortcoming compared with other noninvasive methods such as single-photon emission CT, stress echocardiography, and stress cardiac magnetic resonance. Two methods have been investigated recently: (1) myocardial CT perfusion and (2) fractional flow reserve (FFR) computed from CT (FFRCT). Improving diagnostic accuracy by combining the anatomic aspects of coronary CTA with a physiologic assessment via CT perfusion or FFRCT may reduce the need for additional testing to evaluate for ischemia, reduce downstream costs and risks associated with an invasive procedure, and lead to improved patient outcomes. Given a rapidly expanding body of research in this field, this comparative review summarizes the present literature while contrasting the benefits, limitations, and future directions in myocardial CT perfusion and FFRCT imaging. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Noise reduction and functional maps image quality improvement in dynamic CT perfusion using a new k-means clustering guided bilateral filter (KMGB).

    PubMed

    Pisana, Francesco; Henzler, Thomas; Schönberg, Stefan; Klotz, Ernst; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2017-07-01

    Dynamic CT perfusion (CTP) consists in repeated acquisitions of the same volume in different time steps, slightly before, during and slightly afterwards the injection of contrast media. Important functional information can be derived for each voxel, which reflect the local hemodynamic properties and hence the metabolism of the tissue. Different approaches are being investigated to exploit data redundancy and prior knowledge for noise reduction of such datasets, ranging from iterative reconstruction schemes to high dimensional filters. We propose a new spatial bilateral filter which makes use of the k-means clustering algorithm and of an optimal calculated guiding image. We named the proposed filter as k-means clustering guided bilateral filter (KMGB). In this study, the KMGB filter is compared with the partial temporal non-local means filter (PATEN), with the time-intensity profile similarity (TIPS) filter, and with a new version derived from it, by introducing the guiding image (GB-TIPS). All the filters were tested on a digital in-house developed brain CTP phantom, were noise was added to simulate 80 kV and 200 mAs (default scanning parameters), 100 mAs and 30 mAs. Moreover, the filters performances were tested on 7 noisy clinical datasets with different pathologies in different body regions. The original contribution of our work is two-fold: first we propose an efficient algorithm to calculate a guiding image to improve the results of the TIPS filter, secondly we propose the introduction of the k-means clustering step and demonstrate how this can potentially replace the TIPS part of the filter obtaining better results at lower computational efforts. As expected, in the GB-TIPS, the introduction of the guiding image limits the over-smoothing of the TIPS filter, improving spatial resolution by more than 50%. Furthermore, replacing the time-intensity profile similarity calculation with a fuzzy k-means clustering strategy (KMGB) allows to control the edge preserving

  7. Myocardial CT perfusion for the prediction of obstructive coronary artery disease, valuable or not?

    PubMed

    van Rosendael, Alexander R; de Graaf, Michiel A; Scholte, Arthur J

    2015-02-01

    Adenosine stress myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is a relatively new myocardial perfusion imaging technique. Together with coronary CT angiography (CTA) it provides anatomic and functional information of coronary artery disease (CAD). In previous studies, the combination of these techniques demonstrated to be valuable for identifying hemodynamically significant stenoses. George et al., performed a secondary analysis on the CORE320 study and compared the diagnostic performance of CTP to single positron emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) to diagnose obstructive CAD (defined as ≥50% luminal stenosis). In this editorial the results and limitations of the study are discussed, as well as opportunities that this new perfusion technique brings with it.

  8. Evaluation of Intrahepatic Perfusion on Fusion Imaging Using a Combined CT/SPECT System: Influence of Anatomic Variations on Hemodynamic Modification Before Installation of Implantable Port Systems for Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Takamori, Hiroshi; Chikamoto, Akira; Kanemitsu, Keiichirou; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-15

    Background. In some patients with hepatic tumors, anatomic variations in the hepatic arteries may require hemodynamic modification to render effective hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy delivered via implantable port systems. We used a combined CT/SPECT system to obtain fused images of the intrahepatic perfusion patterns in patients with such anatomic variations and assessed their effects on the treatment response of hepatic tumors. Methods. Using a combined SPECT/CT system, we obtained fused images in 110 patients with malignant liver tumors (n = 75) or liver metastasis from unresectable pancreatic cancer (n = 35). Patients with anatomic hepatic arteries variations underwent hemodynamic modification before the placement of implantable port systems for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy. We evaluated their intrahepatic perfusion patterns and the initial treatment response of their liver tumors. The perfusion patterns on the fused images were classified as homogeneous, local hypoperfusion, and/or perfusion defect. Using the WHO criteria of complete response (CR), partial response (PR), no change (NC), and progressive disease (PD), we evaluated the patients' tumor responses after 3 months on multislice helical CT scans. The treatment was regarded as effective in patients who achieved a complete response or partial response. Results. Anatomic hepatic artery variations were present in 15 of the 110 patients (13.6%); 5 manifested replacement of the left hepatic artery (LHA), 8 of the right hepatic artery (RHA), and 1 each had replacement of the RHA and LHA, and replacement of the LHA plus an accessory RHA. In 13 of these 15 patients (87%), occlusion with metallic coils was successful. On fusion imaging, the perfusion patterns were recorded as homogeneous in 6 patients (43%), as hypoperfusion in 7 (50%), and 1 patient had a perfusion defect (7.1%) in the embolized arterial region. Of the 8 patients with RHA replacement, 4 manifested a homogeneous distribution and

  9. Effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kenya; Nanjo, Takafumi; Satoshi, Ii; Miyazaki, Shohei; Hirata, Masaaki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Kudo, Masayuki; Sasaki, Kousuke; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using multi-detector row CT (MDCT). Following the standard CT perfusion study protocol, continuous (cine) scans (1 s/rotation × 60 s) consisting of four 5 mm thick contiguous slices were performed using an MDCT scanner with a tube voltage of 80 kVp and a tube current of 200 mA. We generated the simulated images with tube currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA by adding the corresponding noise to the raw scan data of the original image acquired above using a noise simulation tool. From the original and simulated images, we generated the functional images of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in seven patients with cerebrovascular disease, and compared the correlation coefficients (CCs) between the perfusion parameter values obtained from the original and simulated images. The coefficients of variation (CVs) in the white matter were also compared. The CC values deteriorated with decreasing tube current. There was a significant difference between 50 mA and 100 mA for all perfusion parameters. The CV values increased with decreasing tube current. There were significant differences between 50 mA and 100 mA and between 100 mA and 150 mA for CBF. For CBV and MTT, there was also a significant difference between 150 mA and 200 mA. This study will be useful for understanding the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using MDCT, and for selecting the tube current.

  10. Effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kenya; Nanjo, Takafumi; Ii, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Shohei; Hirata, Masaaki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Kudo, Masayuki; Sasaki, Kousuke; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2005-11-07

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using multi-detector row CT (MDCT). Following the standard CT perfusion study protocol, continuous (cine) scans (1 s/rotation x 60 s) consisting of four 5 mm thick contiguous slices were performed using an MDCT scanner with a tube voltage of 80 kVp and a tube current of 200 mA. We generated the simulated images with tube currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA by adding the corresponding noise to the raw scan data of the original image acquired above using a noise simulation tool. From the original and simulated images, we generated the functional images of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in seven patients with cerebrovascular disease, and compared the correlation coefficients (CCs) between the perfusion parameter values obtained from the original and simulated images. The coefficients of variation (CVs) in the white matter were also compared. The CC values deteriorated with decreasing tube current. There was a significant difference between 50 mA and 100 mA for all perfusion parameters. The CV values increased with decreasing tube current. There were significant differences between 50 mA and 100 mA and between 100 mA and 150 mA for CBF. For CBV and MTT, there was also a significant difference between 150 mA and 200 mA. This study will be useful for understanding the effect of x-ray tube current on the accuracy of cerebral perfusion parameters obtained by CT perfusion studies using MDCT, and for selecting the tube current.

  11. Dynamic CT perfusion measurement in a cardiac phantom.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-10-01

    Widespread clinical implementation of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion has been hampered by its limited accuracy and high radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of a dynamic CT myocardial perfusion technique based on first pass analysis (FPA). To test the FPA technique, a pulsatile pump was used to generate known perfusion rates in a range of 0.96-2.49 mL/min/g. All the known perfusion rates were determined using an ultrasonic flow probe and the known mass of the perfusion volume. FPA and maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion rates were measured using volume scans acquired from a 320-slice CT scanner, and then compared to the known perfusion rates. The measured perfusion using FPA (P(FPA)), with two volume scans, and the maximum slope model (P(MSM)) were related to known perfusion (P(K)) by P(FPA) = 0.91P(K) + 0.06 (r = 0.98) and P(MSM) = 0.25P(K) - 0.02 (r = 0.96), respectively. The standard error of estimate for the FPA technique, using two volume scans, and the MSM was 0.14 and 0.30 mL/min/g, respectively. The estimated radiation dose required for the FPA technique with two volume scans and the MSM was 2.6 and 11.7-17.5 mSv, respectively. Therefore, the FPA technique can yield accurate perfusion measurements using as few as two volume scans, corresponding to approximately a factor of four reductions in radiation dose as compared with the currently available MSM. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that the FPA technique can make accurate dynamic CT perfusion measurements over a range of clinically relevant perfusion rates, while substantially reducing radiation dose, as compared to currently available dynamic CT perfusion techniques.

  12. Image quality of mean temporal arterial and mean temporal portal venous phase images calculated from low dose dynamic volume perfusion CT datasets in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Henzler, T; Gawlitza, J; Diehl, S; Wilhelm, T; Schoenberg, S O; Jin, Z Y; Xue, H D; Smakic, A

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) provides valuable information on tissue perfusion in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and pancreatic cancer. However, currently dVPCT is often performed in addition to conventional CT acquisitions due to the limited morphologic image quality of dose optimized dVPCT protocols. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare objective and subjective image quality, lesion detectability and radiation dose between mean temporal arterial (mTA) and mean temporal portal venous (mTPV) images calculated from low dose dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) datasets with linearly blended 120-kVp arterial and portal venous datasets in patients with HCC and pancreatic cancer. All patients gave written informed consent for this institutional review board-approved HIPAA compliant study. 27 consecutive patients (18 men, 9 women, mean age, 69.1 years±9.4) with histologically proven HCC or suspected pancreatic cancer were prospectively enrolled. The study CT protocol included a dVPCT protocol performed with 70 or 80kVp tube voltage (18 spiral acquisitions, 71.2s total acquisition times) and standard dual-energy (90/150kVpSn) arterial and portal venous acquisition performed 25min after the dVPCT. The mTA and mTPV images were manually reconstructed from the 3 to 5 best visually selected single arterial and 3 to 5 best single portal venous phases dVPCT dataset. The linearly blended 120-kVp images were calculated from dual-energy CT (DECT) raw data. Image noise, SNR, and CNR of the liver, abdominal aorta (AA) and main portal vein (PV) were compared between the mTA/mTPV and the linearly blended 120-kVp dual-energy arterial and portal venous datasets, respectively. Subjective image quality was evaluated by two radiologists regarding subjective image noise, sharpness and overall diagnostic image quality using a 5-point Likert Scale. In addition, liver lesion detectability was performed for each liver segment by the two radiologists using the

  13. Helical CT study of cerebral perfusion and related hemodynamic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenic, Aleksa; Lee, Ting-Yim; Craen, Rosemary A.; Gelb, Adrian W.

    1997-05-01

    A convenient method for assessing cerebral perfusion and related functional parameters has been developed using a third generation slip-ring CT scanner. Dynamic contrast- enhanced scanning at the same level was employed to image the cerebral circulation at the rate of 1 image per second. Using data acquired with this non-helical mode of scanning, we have developed a method for the simultaneous in-vivo determination of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT). These measurements are given in the same physiological units as positron emission tomography. In order to obtain accurate measurements of these parameters, methods were also developed to correct for recirculation and partial volume averaging in imaging small blood vessels. We have used 6 New Zealand white rabbits in our studies. For each rabbit, up to 3 CT measurements of CBF, CBV, and MTT were made at normocapnia under isoflurane anesthesia. Coronal sections through the brain were imaged while simultaneously imaging either a brain artery or the ear artery. Images were acquired for 1 minute as Isovue 300 was injected intravenously. In the acquired CT images, regions of interest in brain parenchyma and an artery were drawn. For each region of interest, the mean CT number in pre-contrast images was subtracted from the mean in post-contrast images to calculate the contrast concentration curves for the brain regions Q(t) and the arterial region Ca(t). Using a robust deconvolution method, the MTT was determined. CBV was then determined from the ratio of the areas of Q(t) and Ca(t). Finally, CBF was calculated from the Central Volume Principle. The mean regional CBF, CBV and MTT values were 73.3 +/- 5.1 ml/min/100g, 1.93 +/- 0.12 ml/100g and 1.80 +/- 0.18 s respectively. IN order to validate our CT CBF measurements, we also measured CBF using the well- established technique of microspheres with each CT study. The feasibility of our CT method to measure CBF accurately was

  14. Assessment of lung tumor response by perfusion CT.

    PubMed

    Coche, E

    2013-01-01

    Perfusion CT permits evaluation of lung cancer angiogenesis and response to therapy by demonstrating alterations in lung tumor vascularity. It is advocated that perfusion CT performed shortly after initiating therapy may provide a better evaluation of physiological changes rather than the conventional size assessment obtained with RECIST. The radiation dose,the volume of contrast medium delivered to the patient and the reproducibility of blood flow parameters remain an issue for this type of investigation.

  15. Stability of radiomic features in CT perfusion maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogowicz, M.; Riesterer, O.; Bundschuh, R. A.; Veit-Haibach, P.; Hüllner, M.; Studer, G.; Stieb, S.; Glatz, S.; Pruschy, M.; Guckenberger, M.; Tanadini-Lang, S.

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to identify a set of stable radiomic parameters in CT perfusion (CTP) maps with respect to CTP calculation factors and image discretization, as an input for future prognostic models for local tumor response to chemo-radiotherapy. Pre-treatment CTP images of eleven patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma and eleven patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were analyzed. 315 radiomic parameters were studied per perfusion map (blood volume, blood flow and mean transit time). Radiomics robustness was investigated regarding the potentially standardizable (image discretization method, Hounsfield unit (HU) threshold, voxel size and temporal resolution) and non-standardizable (artery contouring and noise threshold) perfusion calculation factors using the intraclass correlation (ICC). To gain added value for our model radiomic parameters correlated with tumor volume, a well-known predictive factor for local tumor response to chemo-radiotherapy, were excluded from the analysis. The remaining stable radiomic parameters were grouped according to inter-parameter Spearman correlations and for each group the parameter with the highest ICC was included in the final set. The acceptance level was 0.9 and 0.7 for the ICC and correlation, respectively. The image discretization method using fixed number of bins or fixed intervals gave a similar number of stable radiomic parameters (around 40%). The potentially standardizable factors introduced more variability into radiomic parameters than the non-standardizable ones with 56-98% and 43-58% instability rates, respectively. The highest variability was observed for voxel size (instability rate  >97% for both patient cohorts). Without standardization of CTP calculation factors none of the studied radiomic parameters were stable. After standardization with respect to non-standardizable factors ten radiomic parameters were stable for both patient cohorts after correction for inter-parameter correlations. Voxel size

  16. Stability of radiomic features in CT perfusion maps.

    PubMed

    Bogowicz, M; Riesterer, O; Bundschuh, R A; Veit-Haibach, P; Hüllner, M; Studer, G; Stieb, S; Glatz, S; Pruschy, M; Guckenberger, M; Tanadini-Lang, S

    2016-12-21

    This study aimed to identify a set of stable radiomic parameters in CT perfusion (CTP) maps with respect to CTP calculation factors and image discretization, as an input for future prognostic models for local tumor response to chemo-radiotherapy. Pre-treatment CTP images of eleven patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma and eleven patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were analyzed. 315 radiomic parameters were studied per perfusion map (blood volume, blood flow and mean transit time). Radiomics robustness was investigated regarding the potentially standardizable (image discretization method, Hounsfield unit (HU) threshold, voxel size and temporal resolution) and non-standardizable (artery contouring and noise threshold) perfusion calculation factors using the intraclass correlation (ICC). To gain added value for our model radiomic parameters correlated with tumor volume, a well-known predictive factor for local tumor response to chemo-radiotherapy, were excluded from the analysis. The remaining stable radiomic parameters were grouped according to inter-parameter Spearman correlations and for each group the parameter with the highest ICC was included in the final set. The acceptance level was 0.9 and 0.7 for the ICC and correlation, respectively. The image discretization method using fixed number of bins or fixed intervals gave a similar number of stable radiomic parameters (around 40%). The potentially standardizable factors introduced more variability into radiomic parameters than the non-standardizable ones with 56-98% and 43-58% instability rates, respectively. The highest variability was observed for voxel size (instability rate  >97% for both patient cohorts). Without standardization of CTP calculation factors none of the studied radiomic parameters were stable. After standardization with respect to non-standardizable factors ten radiomic parameters were stable for both patient cohorts after correction for inter-parameter correlations. Voxel size

  17. Comparison of computed tomography perfusion and magnetic resonance imaging perfusion-diffusion mismatch in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Bruce C V; Christensen, Søren; Levi, Christopher R; Desmond, Patricia M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Davis, Stephen M; Parsons, Mark W

    2012-10-01

    Perfusion imaging has the potential to select patients most likely to respond to thrombolysis. We tested the correspondence of computed tomography perfusion (CTP)-derived mismatch with contemporaneous perfusion-diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Acute ischemic stroke patients 3 to 6 hours after onset had CTP and perfusion-diffusion MRI within 1 hour, before thrombolysis. Relative cerebral blood flow (relCBF) and time to peak of the deconvolved tissue residue function (Tmax) were calculated. The diffusion lesion (diffusion-weighted imaging) was registered to the CTP slabs and manually outlined to its maximal visual extent. Volumetric accuracy of CT-relCBF infarct core (compared with diffusion-weighted imaging) was tested. To reduce false-positive low CBF regions, relCBF core was restricted to voxels within a relative time-to-peak (relTTP) >4 seconds for lesion region of interest. The MR-Tmax >6 seconds perfusion lesion was automatically segmented and registered to CTP. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis determined the optimal CT-Tmax threshold to match MR-Tmax >6 seconds. Agreement of these CT parameters with MR perfusion-diffusion mismatch in coregistered slabs was assessed (mismatch ratio >1.2, absolute mismatch >10 mL, infarct core <70 mL). In analysis of 49 patients (mean onset to CT, 213 minutes; mean CT to MR, 31 minutes), constraining relCBF <31% within the automated relTTP perfusion lesion region of interest reduced the median magnitude of volumetric error (vs diffusion-weighted imaging) from 47.5 mL to 15.8 mL (P<0.001). The optimal CT-Tmax threshold to match MR-Tmax >6 seconds was 6.2 seconds (95% confidence interval, 5.6-7.3 seconds; sensitivity, 91%; specificity, 70%; area under the curve, 0.87). Using CT-Tmax >6 seconds "penumbra" and relTTP-constrained relCBF "core," CT-based and MRI-based mismatch status was concordant in 90% (kappa=0.80). Quantitative CTP mismatch classification using relCBF and Tmax is similar to perfusion

  18. CT perfusion evidence of early global cerebral hypoperfusion after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage with cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Burns, Joseph D; Jacob, Jeffrey T; Luetmer, Patrick H; Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2010-04-01

    Cardiac arrest and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage both cause sudden, severe cerebral hypoperfusion at ictus. Animal studies indicate that the resultant microvascular dysfunction and cerebral perfusion abnormalities are important determinants of the associated cerebral injury in both conditions. Although this suggests that perfusion imaging might be a useful tool for prognostication in patients with these conditions, this hypothesis has not been thoroughly investigated in humans. Case report. A 49-year-old man developed cardiac arrest upon rupture of an intracranial aneurysm. When he arrived at our institution 10 h later, he was comatose, had neurogenic hyperventilation, absent corneal reflexes, and continuous multifocal myoclonus. Despite normal intracranial pressure, normal cerebral perfusion pressure, normal flow in the proximal cerebral arteries on CT angiography, and a lack of diffuse cerebral edema, CT perfusion imaging performed 12 h after ictus showed severe, diffuse hypoperfusion. After the development of refractory intracranial hypertension, physiologic support was withdrawn and the patient died. Early global cerebral hypoperfusion can be demonstrated by CT perfusion imaging after cardiac arrest associated with high-grade aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and may be indicative of poor neurologic outcome. CT perfusion should be investigated as a prognostic tool in these conditions.

  19. Comparison of Intrahepatic and Pancreatic Perfusion on Fusion Images Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Assessment of Efficacy of Combined Continuous Arterial Infusion and Systemic Chemotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osama Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takamori, Hiroshi; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro; Baba, Hideo

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images using a combined single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT system and to evaluate the efficacy of combined continuous transcatheter arterial infusion (CTAI) and systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Materials and Methods. CTAI was performed in 33 patients (22 men, 11 women; age range, 35-77 years; mean age, 60 years) with stage IV pancreatic cancer with liver metastasis. The reservoir was transcutaneously implanted with the help of angiography. The systemic administration of gemcitabine was combined with the infusion of 5-fluorouracil via the reservoir. In all patients we obtained fusion images using a combined SPECT/CT system. Pancreatic perfusion on fusion images was classified as perfusion presence or as perfusion absent in the pancreatic cancer. Using WHO criteria we recorded the tumor response after 3 months on multislice helical CT scans. Treatment effects were evaluated based on the pancreatic cancer, liver metastasis, and factors such as intrahepatic and pancreatic perfusion on fusion images. For statistical analysis we used the chi-square test; survival was evaluated by the Kaplan Meier method (log-rank test). Results. On fusion images, pancreatic and intrahepatic perfusion was recorded as hot spot and as homogeneous distribution, respectively, in 18 patients (55%) and as cold spot and heterogeneous distribution, respectively, in 15 (45%). Patients with hot spot in the pancreatic tumor and homogeneous distribution in the liver manifested better treatment results (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Patients with hot spot both in the pancreatic cancer and in the liver survived longer than those with cold spot in the pancreatic cancer and heterogeneous distribution in the liver (median {+-} SD, 16.0 {+-} 3.7 vs. 8.0 {+-} 1.4 months; p < 0.05). Conclusions. We conclude that in patients with advanced

  20. [CT perfusion for assessment of brain stem ischemic lesions].

    PubMed

    Saifullina, E I; Iksanova, G R

    2007-01-01

    Modern neurovisualization modalities - CT and MRI with cerebral circulation assessment was used for diagnosis of cerebrovascular disturbances in patients admitted to the Emergency Care Hospital of Ufa. CT and MRI perfusion methods appeared to be highly effective both in diagnosis and treatment efficacy monitoring of acute stroke.

  1. Focal iodine defects on color-coded iodine perfusion maps of dual-energy pulmonary CT angiography images: a potential diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mi-Jin; Park, Chang Min; Lee, Chang-Hyun; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Hyun Ju

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to systematically investigate focal iodine defects found in patients without other CT evidence for pulmonary embolism on color-coded iodine perfusion maps of dual-energy pulmonary CT angiography scans. Forty-three patients (mean age, 56.9 years; range, 29-88 years) who underwent pulmonary CT angiography using dual-energy CT from November 2007 to February 2008 but who had no pulmonary embolism were included in our study. Dark orange- or black-colored areas on color-coded iodine perfusion maps were interpreted as focal iodine defects. Two radiologists recorded the presence, location, and characteristics of the focal iodine defects in consensus and evaluated the examinations with regard to the causes of the focal iodine defects. Focal iodine defects were found in 41 patients (95%). The most commonly involved segments were the anterior segment of the right upper lobe (33/38, 86.8%), the apical segment of the right upper lobe (32/38, 84.2%), the medial segment of the right middle lobe (32/38, 84.2%), the apicoposterior segment of the left upper lobe (35/42, 83.3%), the superior and inferior lingular segments of the left upper lobe (23/42, 54.8%), and the medial-basal segment of the right lower lobe (11/32, 34.4%). Beam-hardening artifacts caused by contrast material in the superior vena cava accounted for nearly all defects in the apices of both upper lobes. Cardiac motion was the most common cause of defects in right middle lobe and left upper lobe lingular segments, and diaphragmatic motion was the most common cause in the lung bases. Knowledge of the focal iodine defects not related to pulmonary embolism leads to more accurate interpretation of dual-energy pulmonary CT angiography scans.

  2. Low-dose 4D myocardial perfusion with x-ray micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. P.; Badea, C. T.

    2017-03-01

    X-ray CT is widely used, both clinically and pre-clinically, for fast, high-resolution, anatomic imaging; however, compelling opportunities exist to expand its use in functional imaging applications. For instance, temporally-resolved CT data can detail cardiac motion and blood flow dynamics for one-stop cardiovascular CT imaging procedures. In previous work, we demonstrated efficient, low-dose projection acquisition and reconstruction strategies for cardiac micro-CT imaging and for multiple-injection micro-CT perfusion imaging. Here, we extend this previous work with regularization based on rank-sparse kernel regression and on filtration with the Karhunen-Loeve transform. Using a dual source, prospectively gated sampling strategy which produces an approximately uniform distribution of projections, we apply this revised algorithm to the assessment of both myocardial perfusion and cardiac functional metrics from the same set of projection data. We test the algorithm in simulations using a modified version of the MOBY mouse phantom which contains realistic perfusion and cardiac dynamics. The proposed algorithm reduces the reconstruction error by 81% relative to unregularized, algebraic reconstruction. The results confirm our ability to simultaneously solve for cardiac temporal motion and perfusion dynamics. In future work, we will apply the algorithm and sampling protocol to small animal cardiac studies.

  3. [Determination of iodine content in the left ventricular myocardium of healthy subjects using dual-source dual-energy CT myocardial first perfusion imaging: a preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Chen, Z X; Wang, G; Liang, L; Lu, X R; Guo, Q H; Zhai, Y N; Shi, X N

    2017-05-24

    Objective: To analyze the normal value of the iodine content in the left ventricular myocardium of healthy subjects and to observe if there is a segmental differences on iodine distribution by using the second generation dual-source dual-energy computed tomography myocardial first perfusion imaging. Methods: In this retrospective study, 42 healthy subjects, who admitted to our department between January to June 2016, with normal second generation dual-source dual-energy computed tomography and coronary CT angioghphy (CTA), electrocardiogram (ECG) results, normal cardiac, hepatic, renal function, normal myocardial enzymes results were enrolled, data from 38 out of 42 subjects with satisfactory image quality were analyzed using Siemens Dual Energy-Heart PBV image processing software.In accordance with the standards of the American Heart Association myocardial 17 fractionation method, content of iodine was measured at different segmental left ventricular myocardium and aorta (left coronary artery from the opening level). The standardized containing iodine value (nIC) was calculated. Results: The iodine content of left ventricular myocardium in normal subjects was 3.1-7.8 mg/ml.The nIC of myocardium from 1st to 17th segments was 0.28±0.06, 0.31±0.07, 0.30±0.07, 0.30±0.04, 0.28±0.04, 0.29±0.05, 0.29±0.01, 0.30±0.07, 0.31±0.07, 0.27±0.06, 0.28±0.08, 0.28±0.07, 0.29±0.08, 0.31±0.07, 0.27±0.06, 0.29±0.06 and 0.21±0.07, respectively.The nIC of the 17th segment was the lowest and was significantly lower than in other segments (all P<0.05), the nIC was similar among the rest 16 segments (all P>0.05). Conclusion: The normal iodine content range in left ventricle myocardium is 3.1-7.8 mg/ml, and the lowest iodine content is detected in the apex and which is significantly lower than the other left ventricular segments.

  4. Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging in myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Kadota, K.; Kambara, H.; Torizuka, K.

    1985-08-01

    TI-201 myocardial perfusion imaging was performed in six patients with clinically documented myocarditis. Each case manifested electrocardiographic abnormalities with elevation of serum cardiac enzymes and no significant stenosis of the coronary arteries observed on angiogram. Resting TI-201 images were visually assessed by three observers. Focal perfusion defects were observed in three cases (50%), among which two showed multiple perfusion defects. Emission computed tomography using TI-201 clearly delineated multifocal lesions in the first case. On the other hand, no significant perfusion defects were noted in the remaining three cases. Thus, myocarditis should be considered as one of the disease entities that may produce perfusion defects on TI-201 myocardial imaging.

  5. CAD system for automatic analysis of CT perfusion maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachaj, T.; Ogiela, M. R.

    2011-03-01

    In this article, authors present novel algorithms developed for the computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) system for analysis of dynamic brain perfusion, computer tomography (CT) maps, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral blood volume (CBV). Those methods perform both quantitative analysis [detection and measurement and description with brain anatomy atlas (AA) of potential asymmetries/lesions] and qualitative analysis (semantic interpretation of visualized symptoms). The semantic interpretation (decision about type of lesion: ischemic/hemorrhagic, is the brain tissue at risk of infraction or not) of visualized symptoms is done by, so-called, cognitive inference processes allowing for reasoning on character of pathological regions based on specialist image knowledge. The whole system is implemented in.NET platform (C# programming language) and can be used on any standard PC computer with.NET framework installed.

  6. Pre-procedural combined coronary angiography and stress myocardial perfusion imaging using 320-detector CT in unprotected left main and ostial left anterior descending artery intervention.

    PubMed

    Ko, Brian S; Crossett, Marcus; Seneviratne, Sujith K

    2015-07-01

    Pre-procedural anatomic and functional coronary assessment plays a crucial role in selection of patients suitable for unprotected left main percutaneous coronary intervention. Combined coronary computed tomography angiography and adenosine stress computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging is a non-invasive technique which may provide this information. This is the first report describing its use to assist patient selection and procedural planning prior to elective left main and ostial left anterior descending artery coronary intervention.

  7. Hepatocellular nodules in liver cirrhosis: state of the art CT evaluation (perfusion CT/volume helical shuttle scan/dual-energy CT, etc.).

    PubMed

    Okada, Masahiro; Kim, Tonsok; Murakami, Takamichi

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain the role of advanced liver CT imaging, including perfusion CT, dual-energy CT, and volume helical shuttle (VHS) scanning, with regard to its clinical applications. Perfusion CT is a promising method for calculating hepatic blood flow and portal blood flow, including microcirculation, using a color-encoded display of parameters obtained from the liver time-density curve, with iodine contrast agent. Tumor angiogenesis and assessment of the response to antiangiogenesis treatment (e.g., Sorafenib) can be analyzed by perfusion CT of the liver. VHS scan has very high temporal resolution due to the reciprocating movement employed during scanning, enabling the acquisition of 24 scans of the whole liver in the arterial dominant phase during a 40-s breath hold, and a reduction in radiation dose. Dual-energy CT enables differentiation of materials and tissues based on their CT density values, using two different energy spectra. This method includes a low tube voltage CT technique that increases the contrast enhancement of vascular structures while simultaneously reducing radiation dose. Images obtained at the preferred settings of low tube voltage and high tube current, with dose reduction in the hepatic arterial phase, are useful for detecting hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma.

  8. Characterization and correction of beam-hardening artifacts during dynamic volume CT assessment of myocardial perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Kakuya; George, Richard T; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Lima, João A C; Lardo, Albert C

    2010-07-01

    To fully characterize beam-hardening effects caused by iodinated contrast medium in the left ventricular (LV) cavity and aorta in the assessment of myocardial perfusion at computed tomography (CT) and to validate a beam-hardening artifact correction algorithm that considers fluid-filled vessels and chambers important sources of beam hardening. The Johns Hopkins University animal care and use committee approved all procedures. An anatomically correct LV and myocardial phantom to characterize beam-hardening artifacts was designed. Following validation in the phantom, the beam-hardening correction (BHC) algorithm was applied to 256-detector row dynamic volume CT images in a canine ischemia model (n = 5) during adenosine stress, and the effect of beam hardening was determined by comparing regional dynamic volume CT perfusion metrics (myocardial upslope normalized by maximum LV blood pool attenuation) with microsphere-derived myocardial blood flow (MBF). A paired Student t test was used to compare continuous variables from the same subject but under different conditions, while linear regression analysis was performed to estimate the slope and statistical significance of the relationship between CT-derived perfusion metrics and microsphere-derived MBF. Beam-hardening artifacts were successfully reproduced in phantom studies and were eliminated with the BHC algorithm. The correlation coefficient of CT-derived perfusion metrics and microsphere-derived MBF improved from 0.60 to 0.74 (P > .05) following correction in the animal model. Beam-hardening artifacts confound dynamic volume CT assessment of myocardial perfusion. Application of the BHC algorithm is helpful for improving accuracy of myocardial perfusion at dynamic volume CT.

  9. Contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for pulmonary diseases: basics and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Miura, Sachiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of regional pulmonary perfusion as well as nodule and tumor perfusions in various pulmonary diseases are currently performed by means of nuclear medicine studies requiring radioactive macroaggregates, dual-energy computed tomography (CT), and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques and unenhanced and dynamic first-pass contrast enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as time-resolved three-dimensional or four-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Perfusion scintigraphy, single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and SPECT fused with CT have been established as clinically available scintigraphic methods; however, they are limited by perfusion information with poor spatial resolution and other shortcomings. Although positron emission tomography with 15O water can measure absolute pulmonary perfusion, it requires a cyclotron for generation of a tracer with an extremely short half-life (2 min), and can only be performed for academic purposes. Therefore, clinicians are concentrating their efforts on the application of CT-based and MRI-based quantitative and qualitative perfusion assessment to various pulmonary diseases. This review article covers 1) the basics of dual-energy CT and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques, 2) the basics of time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI, and 3) clinical applications of contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for patients with pulmonary nodule, lung cancer, and pulmonary vascular diseases. We believe that these new techniques can be useful in routine clinical practice for not only thoracic oncology patients, but also patients with different pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:27523813

  10. Contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for pulmonary diseases: basics and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Miura, Sachiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of regional pulmonary perfusion as well as nodule and tumor perfusions in various pulmonary diseases are currently performed by means of nuclear medicine studies requiring radioactive macroaggregates, dual-energy computed tomography (CT), and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques and unenhanced and dynamic first-pass contrast enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as time-resolved three-dimensional or four-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Perfusion scintigraphy, single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and SPECT fused with CT have been established as clinically available scintigraphic methods; however, they are limited by perfusion information with poor spatial resolution and other shortcomings. Although positron emission tomography with 15O water can measure absolute pulmonary perfusion, it requires a cyclotron for generation of a tracer with an extremely short half-life (2 min), and can only be performed for academic purposes. Therefore, clinicians are concentrating their efforts on the application of CT-based and MRI-based quantitative and qualitative perfusion assessment to various pulmonary diseases. This review article covers 1) the basics of dual-energy CT and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion CT techniques, 2) the basics of time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA and dynamic first-pass contrast-enhanced perfusion MRI, and 3) clinical applications of contrast-enhanced CT- and MRI-based perfusion assessment for patients with pulmonary nodule, lung cancer, and pulmonary vascular diseases. We believe that these new techniques can be useful in routine clinical practice for not only thoracic oncology patients, but also patients with different pulmonary vascular diseases.

  11. Myocardial CT perfusion for the prediction of obstructive coronary artery disease, valuable or not?

    PubMed Central

    van Rosendael, Alexander R.; de Graaf, Michiel A.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine stress myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is a relatively new myocardial perfusion imaging technique. Together with coronary CT angiography (CTA) it provides anatomic and functional information of coronary artery disease (CAD). In previous studies, the combination of these techniques demonstrated to be valuable for identifying hemodynamically significant stenoses. George et al., performed a secondary analysis on the CORE320 study and compared the diagnostic performance of CTP to single positron emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) to diagnose obstructive CAD (defined as ≥50% luminal stenosis). In this editorial the results and limitations of the study are discussed, as well as opportunities that this new perfusion technique brings with it. PMID:25774350

  12. Reversible changes in diffusion- and perfusion-based imaging in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ning; Wong, Andrew K; Lipinski, Lindsay J; Mokin, Maxim; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2016-02-01

    Diffusion- and perfusion-based imaging studies are regularly used in patients with ischemic stroke. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is a rare cause of stroke and is primarily treated by systemic anticoagulation. Endovascular intervention can be considered in cases of failed medical therapy, yet the prognostic value of diffusion- and perfusion-based imaging for CVST has not been clearly established. We present a patient with CVST whose abnormal findings on MRI and CT perfusion images were largely reversed after endovascular treatment.

  13. In Acute Stroke, Can CT Perfusion-Derived Cerebral Blood Volume Maps Substitute for Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in Identifying the Ischemic Core?

    PubMed Central

    Copen, William A.; Morais, Livia T.; Wu, Ona; Schwamm, Lee H.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; González, R. Gilberto; Yoo, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In the treatment of patients with suspected acute ischemic stroke, increasing evidence suggests the importance of measuring the volume of the irreversibly injured “ischemic core.” The gold standard method for doing this in the clinical setting is diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI), but many authors suggest that maps of regional cerebral blood volume (CBV) derived from computed tomography perfusion imaging (CTP) can substitute for DWI. We sought to determine whether DWI and CTP-derived CBV maps are equivalent in measuring core volume. Methods 58 patients with suspected stroke underwent CTP and DWI within 6 hours of symptom onset. We measured low-CBV lesion volumes using three methods: “objective absolute,” i.e. the volume of tissue with CBV below each of six published absolute thresholds (0.9–2.5 mL/100 g), “objective relative,” whose six thresholds (51%-60%) were fractions of mean contralateral CBV, and “subjective,” in which two radiologists (R1, R2) outlined lesions subjectively. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of each method, threshold, and radiologist in detecting infarction, and the degree to which each over- or underestimated the DWI core volume. Additionally, in the subset of 32 patients for whom follow-up CT or MRI was available, we measured the proportion of CBV- or DWI-defined core lesions that exceeded the follow-up infarct volume, and the maximum amount by which this occurred. Results DWI was positive in 72% (42/58) of patients. CBV maps’ sensitivity/specificity in identifying DWI-positive patients were 100%/0% for both objective methods with all thresholds, 43%/94% for R1, and 83%/44% for R2. Mean core overestimation was 156–699 mL for objective absolute thresholds, and 127–200 mL for objective relative thresholds. For R1 and R2, respectively, mean±SD subjective overestimation were -11±26 mL and -11±23 mL, but subjective volumes differed from DWI volumes by up to 117 and 124

  14. Whole-Brain Computed Tomographic Perfusion Imaging in Acute Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Ciambella, Chelsey C.; Masud, Muhammad W.; Levy, Elad I.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (VST) can be difficult to diagnose because of its diverse clinical presentation. The utility of perfusion imaging for diagnosing VST is not well understood. Summary We retrospectively reviewed cases of acute VST in patients who underwent whole-brain (320-detector-row) computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging in combination with craniocervical CT venography. Perfusion maps that were analyzed included cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time, and time to peak. Among the 10 patients with acute VST included in this study, 9 had perfusion abnormalities. All perfusion abnormalities were localized in areas adjacent to the occluded sinus and did not match typical anterior or posterior circulation arterial territories. Bilateral perfusion deficits were seen in 4 cases. In 2 cases, parenchymal hemorrhage was diagnosed on noncontrast CT imaging; in those cases, focal CBV and CBF were reduced. Key Messages Whole-brain CT perfusion imaging with 320-detector-row scanners can further assist in establishing the diagnosis of VST by detecting perfusion abnormalities corresponding to venous and not arterial territories. CT perfusion could assist in the differentiation between focal reversible changes, such as those caused by vasogenic edema, and irreversible changes due to infarction. PMID:27051406

  15. 4D micro-CT for cardiac and perfusion applications with view under sampling.

    PubMed

    Badea, Cristian T; Johnston, Samuel M; Qi, Yi; Johnson, G Allan

    2011-06-07

    Micro-CT is commonly used in preclinical studies to provide anatomical information. There is growing interest in obtaining functional measurements from 4D micro-CT. We report here strategies for 4D micro-CT with a focus on two applications: (i) cardiac imaging based on retrospective gating and (ii) pulmonary perfusion using multiple contrast injections/rotations paradigm. A dual source micro-CT system is used for image acquisition with a sampling rate of 20 projections per second. The cardiac micro-CT protocol involves the use of a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. Fast scanning of free breathing mice is achieved using retrospective gating. The ECG and respiratory signals are used to sort projections into ten cardiac phases. The pulmonary perfusion protocol uses a conventional contrast agent (Isovue 370) delivered by a micro-injector in four injections separated by 2 min intervals to allow for clearance. Each injection is synchronized with the rotation of the animal, and each of the four rotations is started with an angular offset of 22.5 from the starting angle of the previous rotation. Both cardiac and perfusion protocols result in an irregular angular distribution of projections that causes significant streaking artifacts in reconstructions when using traditional filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms. The reconstruction involves the use of the point spread function of the micro-CT system for each time point, and the analysis of the distribution of the reconstructed data in the Fourier domain. This enables us to correct for angular inconsistencies via deconvolution and identify regions where data is missing. The missing regions are filled with data from a high quality but temporally averaged prior image reconstructed with all available projections. Simulations indicate that deconvolution successfully removes the streaking artifacts while preserving temporal information. 4D cardiac micro-CT in a mouse was performed with adequate image quality at isotropic

  16. CT angiography and CT perfusion improve prediction of infarct volume in patients with anterior circulation stroke.

    PubMed

    van Seeters, Tom; Biessels, Geert Jan; Kappelle, L Jaap; van der Schaaf, Irene C; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Horsch, Alexander D; Niesten, Joris M; Luitse, Merel J A; Majoie, Charles B L M; Vos, Jan Albert; Schonewille, Wouter J; van Walderveen, Marianne A A; Wermer, Marieke J H; Duijm, Lucien E M; Keizer, Koos; Bot, Joseph C J; Visser, Marieke C; van der Lugt, Aad; Dippel, Diederik W J; Kesselring, F Oskar H W; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Lycklama À Nijeholt, Geert J; Boiten, Jelis; van Rooij, Willem Jan; de Kort, Paul L M; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Meijer, Frederick J A; Pleiter, C Constantijn; Mali, Willem P T M; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Velthuis, Birgitta K

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether baseline CT angiography (CTA) and CT perfusion (CTP) in acute ischemic stroke could improve prediction of infarct presence and infarct volume on follow-up imaging. We analyzed 906 patients with suspected anterior circulation stroke from the prospective multicenter Dutch acute stroke study (DUST). All patients underwent baseline non-contrast CT, CTA, and CTP and follow-up non-contrast CT/MRI after 3 days. Multivariable regression models were developed including patient characteristics and non-contrast CT, and subsequently, CTA and CTP measures were added. The increase in area under the curve (AUC) and R (2) was assessed to determine the additional value of CTA and CTP. At follow-up, 612 patients (67.5%) had a detectable infarct on CT/MRI; median infarct volume was 14.8 mL (interquartile range (IQR) 2.8-69.6). Regarding infarct presence, the AUC of 0.82 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79-0.85) for patient characteristics and non-contrast CT was improved with addition of CTA measures (AUC 0.85 (95% CI 0.82-0.87); p < 0.001) and was even higher after addition of CTP measures (AUC 0.89 (95% CI 0.87-0.91); p < 0.001) and combined CTA/CTP measures (AUC 0.89 (95% CI 0.87-0.91); p < 0.001). For infarct volume, adding combined CTA/CTP measures (R (2) = 0.58) was superior to patient characteristics and non-contrast CT alone (R (2) = 0.44) and to addition of CTA alone (R (2) = 0.55) or CTP alone (R (2) = 0.54; all p < 0.001). In the acute stage, CTA and CTP have additional value over patient characteristics and non-contrast CT for predicting infarct presence and infarct volume on follow-up imaging. These findings could be applied for patient selection in future trials on ischemic stroke treatment.

  17. Adenosine-stress dynamic myocardial perfusion imaging using 128-slice dual-source CT in patients with normal body mass indices: effect of tube voltage, tube current, and iodine concentration on image quality and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Mok; Cho, Young Kwon; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality and radiation dose in adenosine-stress dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging using different tube voltages, tube current settings, and contrast materials containing different iodine concentrations in subjects with normal body mass indices (BMI). We included 92 patients (BMI range, 18.5-24.8) who underwent dynamic CTP for the evaluation of coronary artery disease using a 128-slice dual-source computed tomography. The protocols employed the following dynamic scan parameters: protocol I with 100 kV, fixed tube current (FTC), and medium-concentration contrast material (MC, 350 mg iodine/mL); protocol II with 100 kV, automatic tube current modulation (ATCM), and MC; protocol III with 100 kV, ATCM, and high-concentration contrast material (HC, 400 mg iodine/mL); protocol IV with 80 kV, adopted FTC, and HC. Subjective image quality on a 1-3 point scale and objective image quality with respect to the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were assessed. Protocol IV showed higher CNR and SNR than the other protocols (P < 0.01), while the CNR and SNR values did not significantly differ among the other three protocols. There was no significant difference in subjective image quality among the protocols. The radiation dose in protocol IV was the lowest among the protocols (P < 0.01), while protocol IV resulted in a 54% overall reduction in mean effective radiation dose compared with protocol I. Dynamic myocardial CTP performed at 80 kV with adapted FTC provided high CNR and SNR while preserving subjective image quality and reducing radiation exposure.

  18. Hepatic perfusion abnormalities during CT angiography: Detection and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeny, P.C.; Marks, W.M.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-seven perfusion abnormalities were detected in 17 of 50 patients who underwent computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the liver. All but one of the perfusion abnormalities occurred in patients with primary or metastatic liver tumors. Perfusion abnormalities were lobar in nine cases, segmental in 11, and subsegmental in seven; 14 were hypoperfusion and 13 were hyperperfusion abnormalities. The causes for the abnormalities included nonperfusion of a replaced hepatic artery (n = 11), cirrhosis and nodular regeneration (n = 3), altered hepatic hemodynamics (e.g., siphoning, laminar flow) caused by tumor (n = 7), contrast media washout from a nonperfused vessel (n = 1), compression of adjacent hepatic parenchyma (n = 1), and unknown (n = 4). Differentiation of perfusion abnormalities from tumor usually can be made by comparing the morphology of the known tumor with the suspected perfusion abnormality, changes of each on delayed CTA scans, and review of initial angiograms and other imaging studies.

  19. A 4D CT digital phantom of an individual human brain for perfusion analysis.

    PubMed

    Manniesing, Rashindra; Brune, Christoph; van Ginneken, Bram; Prokop, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Brain perfusion is of key importance to assess brain function. Modern CT scanners can acquire perfusion maps of the cerebral parenchyma in vivo at submillimeter resolution. These perfusion maps give insights into the hemodynamics of the cerebral parenchyma and are critical for example for treatment decisions in acute stroke. However, the relations between acquisition parameters, tissue attenuation curves, and perfusion values are still poorly understood and cannot be unraveled by studies involving humans because of ethical concerns. We present a 4D CT digital phantom specific for an individual human brain to analyze these relations in a bottom-up fashion. Validation of the signal and noise components was based on 1,000 phantom simulations of 20 patient imaging data. This framework was applied to quantitatively assess the relation between radiation dose and perfusion values, and to quantify the signal-to-noise ratios of penumbra regions with decreasing sizes in white and gray matter. This is the first 4D CT digital phantom that enables to address clinical questions without having to expose the patient to additional radiation dose.

  20. A 4D CT digital phantom of an individual human brain for perfusion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brune, Christoph; van Ginneken, Bram; Prokop, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Brain perfusion is of key importance to assess brain function. Modern CT scanners can acquire perfusion maps of the cerebral parenchyma in vivo at submillimeter resolution. These perfusion maps give insights into the hemodynamics of the cerebral parenchyma and are critical for example for treatment decisions in acute stroke. However, the relations between acquisition parameters, tissue attenuation curves, and perfusion values are still poorly understood and cannot be unraveled by studies involving humans because of ethical concerns. We present a 4D CT digital phantom specific for an individual human brain to analyze these relations in a bottom-up fashion. Validation of the signal and noise components was based on 1,000 phantom simulations of 20 patient imaging data. This framework was applied to quantitatively assess the relation between radiation dose and perfusion values, and to quantify the signal-to-noise ratios of penumbra regions with decreasing sizes in white and gray matter. This is the first 4D CT digital phantom that enables to address clinical questions without having to expose the patient to additional radiation dose. PMID:27917312

  1. Value or waste: Perfusion imaging following radiofrequency ablation - early experience.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Stefan F; Vahldiek, Janis L; Tummler, Katja; Poch, Franz; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Hiebl, Bernhard; Lehmann, Kai S; Hamm, B; Niehues, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an evolving technique in treatment of hepatic malignant tumors. By heating local tissue it leads to coagulative necrotic areas around the ablation probe. Temperature falls with increasing distance to the probe, risking incomplete necrosis at the margins of the RFA-induced lesion. Therefore, immediate non-invasive and precise detection of incomplete ablation is necessary for early enlargement of the ablation if needed. This in vivo pig study compares early experiences of immediate post-interventional computed tomography (CT) perfusion volume analysis to macroscopic and CT image evaluation in healthy pig liver. RFA was performed in vivo in healthy pig livers. Different CT perfusion algorithms (Maximum slope analysis and Patlak plot) were used to quantify three different perfusion parameters. Data points were acquired from rectangular grids. These grids were semiautomatically overlayed to macroscopic images documented after liver explantation. Each data point was visually assigned to zones defined as "inner" and "outer necrotic zone", "margin" or "vital tissue". Significant differences between necrotic zones and vital tissue are shown for equivalent blood volume (p <  0.0001), arterial flow (p <  0.01) and flow extraction product (p <  0.001). Looking at equivalent blood volume and flow extraction product, there were also significant differences (EquivBV: p <  0.0001, FE: p <  0.001) between margins, necrotic and vital areas. In a porcine model these early results could show that all of the used CT perfusion parameters allowed discrimination of necrosis from vital tissue after RFA at high levels of significance. In addition, the parameters EquivBV and FE that give an estimate of the tissue blood volume and the permeability, were able to precisely discern different zones also seen macroscopically. From this data CT perfusion analysis could be precise tool for measurement and visualization of ablated liver lesions and

  2. Feasibility of Flat Panel Detector CT in Perfusion Assessment of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations: Initial Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M; Okell, T W; Gloor, M; Chappell, M A; Jezzard, P; Bieri, O; Byrne, J V

    2017-02-16

    The different results from flat panel detector CT in various pathologies have provoked some discussion. Our aim was to assess the role of flat panel detector CT in brain arteriovenous malformations, which has not yet been assessed. Five patients with brain arteriovenous malformations were studied with flat panel detector CT, DSC-MR imaging, and vessel-encoded pseudocontinuous arterial spin-labeling. In glomerular brain arteriovenous malformations, perfusion was highest next to the brain arteriovenous malformation with decreasing values with increasing distance from the lesion. An inverse tendency was observed in the proliferative brain arteriovenous malformation. Flat panel detector CT, originally thought to measure blood volume, correlated more closely with arterial spin-labeling-CBF and DSC-CBF than with DSC-CBV. We conclude that flat panel detector CT perfusion depends on the time point chosen for data collection, which is triggered too early in these patients (ie, when contrast agent appears in the superior sagittal sinus after rapid shunting through the brain arteriovenous malformation). This finding, in combination with high data variability, makes flat panel detector CT inappropriate for perfusion assessment in brain arteriovenous malformations.

  3. A comparative analysis of the dependences of the hemodynamic parameters on changes in ROI's position in perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Namgung, Jang-Sun; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Yoon, Dae-Young; Lee, Han-Joo

    2013-05-01

    This study performed a comparative analysis of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), and mean time-to-peak (TTP) obtained by changing the region of interest's (ROI) anatomical positions, during CT brain perfusion. We acquired axial source images of perfusion CT from 20 patients undergoing CT perfusion exams due to brain trauma. Subsequently, the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP values were calculated through data-processing of the perfusion CT images. The color scales for the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP maps were obtained using the image data. Anterior cerebral artery (ACA) was taken as the standard ROI for the calculations of the perfusion values. Differences in the hemodynamic average values were compared in a quantitative analysis by placing ROI and the dividing axial images into proximal, middle, and distal segments anatomically. By performing the qualitative analysis using a blind test, we observed changes in the sensory characteristics by using the color scales of the CBV, CBF, and MTT maps in the proximal, middle, and distal segments. According to the qualitative analysis, no differences were found in CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP values of the proximal, middle, and distal segments and no changes were detected in the color scales of the the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP maps in the proximal, middle, and distal segments. We anticipate that the results of the study will useful in assessing brain trauma patients using by perfusion imaging.

  4. CT Perfusion ASPECTS in the Evaluation of Acute Ischemic Stroke: Thrombolytic Therapy Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sillanpaa, Niko; Saarinen, Jukka T.; Rusanen, Harri; Hakomaki, Jari; Lahteela, Arto; Numminen, Heikki; Elovaara, Irina; Dastidar, Prasun; Soimakallio, Seppo

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Advances in the management of acute ischemic stroke and medical imaging are creating pressure to replace the rigid one-third middle cerebral artery (MCA) and non-contrast-enhanced CT (NCCT) Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) thresholds used for the selection of patients eligible for intravenous thrombolytic therapy. The identification of potentially salvageable ischemic brain tissue lies at the core of this issue. In this study, the role of CT perfusion ASPECTS in the detection of reversible ischemia was analyzed. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and imaging data of 92 consecutive patients who received intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute (duration <3 h) ischemic stroke. Most of the patients underwent admission multimodal CT, and all patients had follow-up NCCT at 24 h. ASPECTS was assigned to all modalities and correlated with clinical and imaging parameters. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine optimal thresholds for different parameters to predict clinical outcome. Results A perfusion defect could be detected in 50% of the patients. ASPECTS correlated inversely with the clinical outcome in the following order: follow-up NCCT > cerebral blood volume (CBV) > mean transit time (MTT) > admission NCCT. The follow-up NCCT and the CBV displayed a statistically significant difference from the admission NCCT, while the MTT did not reach statistical significance. The threshold that best differentiated between good and bad clinical outcome on admission was CBV ASPECTS ≥7. In patients with CT perfusion ASPECTS mismatch, MTT and CBV ASPECTS essentially provided the lower and upper limits for the follow-up NCCT ASPECTS, thus defining the spectrum of possible outcomes. Furthermore, CT perfusion ASPECTS mismatch strongly correlated (r = 0.83) with the mismatch between the tissue at risk and the final infarct, i.e. the amount of salvaged tissue. This finding suggests

  5. Evaluation of anterior mediastinal solid tumors by CT perfusion: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bakan, Selim; Kandemirli, Sedat Giray; Dikici, Atilla Süleyman; Erşen, Ezel; Yıldırım, Onur; Samancı, Cesur; Batur, Şebnem; Çebi Olgun, Deniz; Kantarcı, Fatih; Akman, Canan

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to assess the role of computed tomography (CT) perfusion in differentiation of thymoma from thymic hyperplasia, lymphoma, thymic carcinoma, and lung cancer invading anterior mediastinum. In this study, 25 patients with an anterior mediastinal lesion underwent CT perfusion imaging from January 2015 to February 2016. Diagnoses included thymoma (n=7), thymic hyperplasia (n=8), lymphoma (n=4), thymic carcinoma (n=3), and invasive lung cancer (n=3). Lymphoma, thymic carcinoma, and lung cancer were grouped as malignant tumors for statistical analysis. Values for blood flow, blood volume, and permeability surface were measured in CT perfusion. Blood flow and blood volume values were higher in thymoma in comparison to thymic hyperplasia; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Blood volume values were significantly higher in thymoma (mean, 11.4 mL/100 mL; range, 5.2-20.2 mL/100 mL) compared with lymphoma (mean, 5.3 mL/100 mL; range, 2.5-7.2 mL/100 mL) (P = 0.023). Blood flow and blood volume values were significantly higher in thymoma compared with non-thymoma malignant tumors (P = 0.025). CT perfusion is helpful in differentiating thymoma from non-thymoma malignancies including lymphoma, thymic carcinoma, and invasive lung cancer involving the anterior mediastinum.

  6. Evaluation of anterior mediastinal solid tumors by CT perfusion: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Bakan, Selim; Kandemirli, Sedat Giray; Dikici, Atilla Süleyman; Erşen, Ezel; Yıldırım, Onur; Samancı, Cesur; Batur, Şebnem; Olgun, Deniz Çebi; Kantarcı, Fatih; Akman, Canan

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to assess the role of computed tomography (CT) perfusion in differentiation of thymoma from thymic hyperplasia, lymphoma, thymic carcinoma, and lung cancer invading anterior mediastinum. METHODS In this study, 25 patients with an anterior mediastinal lesion underwent CT perfusion imaging from January 2015 to February 2016. Diagnoses included thymoma (n=7), thymic hyperplasia (n=8), lymphoma (n=4), thymic carcinoma (n=3), and invasive lung cancer (n=3). Lymphoma, thymic carcinoma, and lung cancer were grouped as malignant tumors for statistical analysis. Values for blood flow, blood volume, and permeability surface were measured in CT perfusion. RESULTS Blood flow and blood volume values were higher in thymoma in comparison to thymic hyperplasia; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Blood volume values were significantly higher in thymoma (mean, 11.4 mL/100 mL; range, 5.2–20.2 mL/100 mL) compared with lymphoma (mean, 5.3 mL/100 mL; range, 2.5–7.2 mL/100 mL) (P = 0.023). Blood flow and blood volume values were significantly higher in thymoma compared with non-thymoma malignant tumors (P = 0.025). CONCLUSION CT perfusion is helpful in differentiating thymoma from non-thymoma malignancies including lymphoma, thymic carcinoma, and invasive lung cancer involving the anterior mediastinum. PMID:27924778

  7. Correlation between CT perfusion parameters and Fuhrman grade in pTlb renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Kang, Qinqin; Wei, Qiang; Xu, Bing; Ye, Hui; Wang, Tiegong; Lu, Yayun; Lu, Jianping

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the correlation of CT perfusion parameters with the Fuhrman grade in pT1b (4-7 cm) renal cell carcinoma (RCC). CT perfusion imaging and Fuhrman pathological grading of pT1b RCC were performed in 48 patients (10 grade 1, 27 grade 2, 9 grade 3, and 2 grade 4). Equivalent blood volume (BV Equiv), permeability surface area product (PS), and blood flow (BF) of tumors were measured. Grade 1 and 2 were defined as low-grade group (n = 37), meanwhile high-grade group (n = 11) included grade 3 and 4. Comparisons of CT perfusion parameters and tumor size of the two different groups were performed. Correlations between CT perfusion parameters, Fuhrman grade (grade 1, 2, 3, and 4), and tumor size were assessed. PS was significantly lower in high grade than in low-grade pT1b RCC (P = 0.004). However, no significant differences were found in BV Equiv and BF between the two groups (P > 0.05 for both). The optimal threshold value, sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the ROC curve for distinguishing the two groups using PS were 68.8 mL/100 g/min, 0.7, 0.8, and 0.8, respectively. Negative significant correlation was observed between PS and Fuhrman grade (r = -0.338, P = 0.019). The PS of pT1b RCC had negative significant correlation with Fuhrman grade. CT perfusion appeared to be a non-invasive means to predict high Fuhrman grade of pT1b RCC preoperatively and guide the optimal treatment for the patient.

  8. Prediction of outcome in patients with suspected acute ischaemic stroke with CT perfusion and CT angiography: the Dutch acute stroke trial (DUST) study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prediction of clinical outcome in the acute stage of ischaemic stroke can be difficult when based on patient characteristics, clinical findings and on non-contrast CT. CT perfusion and CT angiography may provide additional prognostic information and guide treatment in the early stage. We present the study protocol of the Dutch acute Stroke Trial (DUST). The DUST aims to assess the prognostic value of CT perfusion and CT angiography in predicting stroke outcome, in addition to patient characteristics and non-contrast CT. For this purpose, individualised prediction models for clinical outcome after stroke based on the best predictors from patient characteristics and CT imaging will be developed and validated. Methods/design The DUST is a prospective multi-centre cohort study in 1500 patients with suspected acute ischaemic stroke. All patients undergo non-contrast CT, CT perfusion and CT angiography within 9 hours after onset of the neurological deficits, and, if possible, follow-up imaging after 3 days. The primary outcome is a dichotomised score on the modified Rankin Scale, assessed at 90 days. A score of 0–2 represents good outcome, and a score of 3–6 represents poor outcome. Three logistic regression models will be developed, including patient characteristics and non-contrast CT (model A), with addition of CT angiography (model B), and CT perfusion parameters (model C). Model derivation will be performed in 60% of the study population, and model validation in the remaining 40% of the patients. Additional prognostic value of the models will be determined with the area under the curve (AUC) from the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, calibration plots, assessment of goodness-of-fit, and likelihood ratio tests. Discussion This study will provide insight in the added prognostic value of CTP and CTA parameters in outcome prediction of acute stroke patients. The prediction models that will be developed in this study may help guide future

  9. Feasibility of extended-coverage perfusion and dynamic computer tomography (CT) angiography using toggling-table technique on 64-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Jun; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Junpei; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Kiguchi, Masao; Fujioka, Chikako; Kurisu, Kaoru; Awai, Kazuo

    2011-07-01

    The major drawbacks of brain computed tomography (CT) perfusion are limited coverage in the z-axis, radiation exposure and the use of contrast medium, all of which increase when CT angiography (CTA) is performed with double acquisitions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the 'toggling-table' technique using a 40-mm detector. The clinical usefulness of CT perfusion and 4D-CTA (time-resolved 3D-CTA), as well as the time taken and radiation exposure, were assessed in 14 non-ischemic patients clinically indicated for CT perfusion and CTA. A perfusion map and 4D-CTA was successfully achieved in all patients. The total time needed for scanning and processing was approximately 30 min per examination. The 80-mm CT perfusion coverage and 4D-CTA images were advantageous for analyses of the anatomy and widely distributed lesions. The estimated effective radiation dose was 2.22 mSv, and the amount of contrast media was 40 mL. The 'toggling-table' technique acts as a 'one-stop-shop' protocol for perfusion mapping and 4D-CTA over a wide area, following a single contrast injection and scan. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of volume perfusion CT in the diagnosis of pathologies of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Grözinger, G; Grözinger, A; Horger, M

    2014-12-01

    The review discusses the potential role of volume perfusion CT (VPCT) in the diagnosis and follow-up of different pathologies of the pancreas. VPCT enables a differentiation of different pancreatic tumors like adenocarcinoma or neuroendocrine tumors based on functional parameters like blood flow, blood volume and permeability. Furthermore, the article discusses the potential indications for VPCT imaging of inflammatory diseases of the pancreas such as acute or chronic pancreatitis and autoimmune pancreatitis.

  11. Low dose dynamic myocardial CT perfusion using advanced iterative reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Brendan L.; Fahmi, Rachid; Fuqua, Christopher; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) can provide quantitative functional information for the assessment of coronary artery disease. However, x-ray dose in dynamic CTP is high, typically from 10mSv to >20mSv. We compared the dose reduction potential of advanced iterative reconstruction, Iterative Model Reconstruction (IMR, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio) to hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose4) and filtered back projection (FBP). Dynamic CTP scans were obtained using a porcine model with balloon-induced ischemia in the left anterior descending coronary artery to prescribed fractional flow reserve values. High dose dynamic CTP scans were acquired at 100kVp/100mAs with effective dose of 23mSv. Low dose scans at 75mAs, 50mAs, and 25mAs were simulated by adding x-ray quantum noise and detector electronic noise to the projection space data. Images were reconstructed with FBP, iDose4, and IMR at each dose level. Image quality in static CTP images was assessed by SNR and CNR. Blood flow was obtained using a dynamic CTP analysis pipeline and blood flow image quality was assessed using flow-SNR and flow-CNR. IMR showed highest static image quality according to SNR and CNR. Blood flow in FBP was increasingly over-estimated at reduced dose. Flow was more consistent for iDose4 from 100mAs to 50mAs, but was over-estimated at 25mAs. IMR was most consistent from 100mAs to 25mAs. Static images and flow maps for 100mAs FBP, 50mAs iDose4, and 25mAs IMR showed comparable, clear ischemia, CNR, and flow-CNR values. These results suggest that IMR can enable dynamic CTP at significantly reduced dose, at 5.8mSv or 25% of the comparable 23mSv FBP protocol.

  12. Deconvolution-Based CT and MR Brain Perfusion Measurement: Theoretical Model Revisited and Practical Implementation Details.

    PubMed

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Kowarschik, Markus; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Hornegger, Joachim; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Deconvolution-based analysis of CT and MR brain perfusion data is widely used in clinical practice and it is still a topic of ongoing research activities. In this paper, we present a comprehensive derivation and explanation of the underlying physiological model for intravascular tracer systems. We also discuss practical details that are needed to properly implement algorithms for perfusion analysis. Our description of the practical computer implementation is focused on the most frequently employed algebraic deconvolution methods based on the singular value decomposition. In particular, we further discuss the need for regularization in order to obtain physiologically reasonable results. We include an overview of relevant preprocessing steps and provide numerous references to the literature. We cover both CT and MR brain perfusion imaging in this paper because they share many common aspects. The combination of both the theoretical as well as the practical aspects of perfusion analysis explicitly emphasizes the simplifications to the underlying physiological model that are necessary in order to apply it to measured data acquired with current CT and MR scanners.

  13. Whole brain CT perfusion deficits using 320-detector-row CT scanner in TIA patients are associated with ABCD2 score.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Bijal K; Mustafa, Ghulam; McMurtray, Aaron; Masud, Mohammed W; Gunukula, Sameer K; Kamal, Haris; Kandel, Amit; Beltagy, Abdelrahman; Li, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Transient ischemic attacks (TIA) are cerebral ischemic events without infarction. The uses of CT perfusion (CTP) techniques such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), time to peak (TTP), mean transit time (MTT) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) provide real time data about ischemia. It has been shown that CTP changes occur in less sensitive CTP scanners in patients with TIA. Larger detector row CTP (whole brain perfusion studies) may show that CTP abnormalities are more prevalent than previously noted. It is also unclear if these changes are associated with TIA severity. To demonstrate that TIA patients are associated with perfusion deficits using whole brain 320-detector-row CT perfusion, and to determine an association between ABCD2 score and perfusion deficit using whole brain perfusion. We retrospectively reviewed all TIA patients for CTP deficits from 2008-2010. Perfusion imaging was reviewed at admission; and it was determined if a perfusion deficit was present along with vascular territory involved. Of 364 TIA patients, 62 patients had CTP deficits. The largest group of patients had MCA territory involved with 48 of 62 patients (77.42%). The most common perfusion abnormality was increased TTP with 46 patients (74.19%). The ABCD2 score was reviewed in association with perfusion deficit. Increased age >60, severe hypertension (>180/100 mmHg), patients with speech abnormalities, and duration of symptoms >10 min were associated with a perfusion deficit but history of diabetes or minimal/moderate hypertension (140/90-179/99 mmHg) was not. There was no association between motor deficit and perfusion abnormality. Perfusion deficits are found in TIA patients using whole brain CTP and associated with components of the ABCD2 score.

  14. Role of perfusion imaging in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Sillanpää, N

    2013-03-01

    Imaging has a central role in the diagnosis and classification of acute stroke, the triage of patients to different treatment approaches and the prediction of the clinical outcome and the risk of hemorrhagic complications. A multimodal imaging protocol that includes a perfusion study allows diagnostics beyond anatomical findings by enabling the characterization of the ischemic brain tissue and the cerebral hemodynamic state. This information potentially leads to more accurate clinical decision making with the intention to select the right patients for different revascularization therapies regardless of fixed time windows. Perfusion imaging enables the detection and quantification of the irreversibly damaged infarct core and the at-risk penumbra. Parameters derived from perfusion studies can serve as surrogate markers for stroke severity and are independent predictors of the clinical outcome and the occurrence of hemorrhagic complications. The validation and standardization of the perfusion methodology is still ongoing. Currently there is emerging but no high level evidence that perfusion imaging improves the clinical outcome or has a direct impact on the decision to treat the patient with intravenous thrombolytic therapy or intra-arterial interventions. Thus, definite guidelines on the role of the perfusion imaging in the context of acute stroke cannot yet be given.

  15. Management of Liver Cancer Argon-helium Knife Therapy with Functional Computer Tomography Perfusion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbo; Shu, Shengjie; Li, Jinping; Jiang, Huijie

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the change in blood perfusion of liver cancer following argon-helium knife treatment with functional computer tomography perfusion imaging. Twenty-seven patients with primary liver cancer treated with argon-helium knife and were included in this study. Plain computer tomography (CT) and computer tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging were conducted in all patients before and after treatment. Perfusion parameters including blood flows, blood volume, hepatic artery perfusion fraction, hepatic artery perfusion, and hepatic portal venous perfusion were used for evaluating therapeutic effect. All parameters in liver cancer were significantly decreased after argon-helium knife treatment (p < 0.05 to all). Significant decrease in hepatic artery perfusion was also observed in pericancerous liver tissue, but other parameters kept constant. CT perfusion imaging is able to detect decrease in blood perfusion of liver cancer post-argon-helium knife therapy. Therefore, CTP imaging would play an important role for liver cancer management followed argon-helium knife therapy.

  16. Ventilation and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Grzegorz; Eichinger, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Summary A close interaction between the respiratory pump, pulmonary parenchyma and blood circulation is essential for a normal lung function. Many pulmonary diseases present, especially in their initial phase, a variable regional impairment of ventilation and perfusion. In the last decades various techniques have been established to measure the lung function. Besides the global pulmonary function tests (PFTs) imaging techniques gained increasing importance to detect local variations in lung function, especially for ventilation and perfusion assessment. Imaging modalities allow for a deeper regional insight into pathophysiological processes and enable improved planning of invasive procedures. In contrast to computed tomography (CT) and the nuclear medicine techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as a radiation free imaging modality gained increasing importance since the early 1990 for the assessment of pulmonary function. The major inherent problems of lung tissue, namely the low proton density and the pulmonary and cardiac motion, were overcome in the last years by a constant progress in MR technology. Some MR techniques are still under development, a process which is driven by scientific questions regarding the physiology and pathophysiology of pulmonary diseases, as well as by the need for fast and robust clinically applicable imaging techniques as safe therapy monitoring tools. MRI can be considered a promising ionizing-free alternative to techniques like CT or nuclear medicine techniques for the evaluation of lung function. The goal of this article is to provide an overview on selected MRI techniques for the assessment of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. PMID:22802864

  17. Ventilation-perfusion imaging in pulmonary papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Espinola, D; Rupani, H; Camargo, E E; Wagner, H N

    1981-11-01

    Three children with laryngeal papillomas involving the lungs had serial ventilation-perfusion scintigrams to assess results of therapy designed to reduce the bronchial involvement. Different imaging patterns were observed depending on size, number, and location of lesions. In early parenchymal involvement a ventilation-perfusion mismatch was seen. The initial and follow-up studies correlated well with clinical and radiographic findings. This noninvasive procedure is helpful in evaluating ventilatory and perfusion impairment in these patients as well as their response to treatment.

  18. Ventilation-perfusion imaging in pulmonary papillomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Espinola, D.; Rupani, H.; Camargo, E.E.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Three children with laryngeal papillomas involving the lungs had serial ventilation-perfusion scintigrams to assess results of therapy designed to reduce the bronchial involvement. Different imaging patterns were observed depending on size, number, and location of lesions. In early parenchymal involvement a ventilation-perfusion mismatch was seen. The initial and follow-up studies correlated well with clinical and radiographic findings. This noninvasive procedure is helpful in evaluating ventilatory and perfusion impairment in these patients as well as their response to treatment.

  19. TU-G-204-03: Dynamic CT Myocardial Perfusion Measurement Using First Pass Analysis and Maximum Slope Models

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, L; Ziemer, B; Sadeghi, B; Javan, H; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion measurement using first pass analysis (FPA) and maximum slope models. Methods: A swine animal model was prepared by percutaneous advancement of an angioplasty balloon into the proximal left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery to induce varying degrees of stenosis. Maximal hyperaemia was achieved in the LAD with an intracoronary adenosine drip (240 µg/min). Serial microsphere and contrast (370 mg/mL iodine, 30 mL, 5mL/s) injections were made over a range of induced stenoses, and dynamic imaging was performed using a 320-row CT scanner at 100 kVp and 200 mA. The FPA CT perfusion technique was used to make vessel-specific myocardial perfusion measurements. CT perfusion measurements using the FPA and maximum slope models were validated using colored microspheres as the reference gold standard. Results: Perfusion measurements using the FPA technique (P-FPA) showed good correlation with minimal offset when compared to perfusion measurements using microspheres (P- Micro) as the reference standard (P -FPA = 0.96 P-Micro + 0.05, R{sup 2} = 0.97, RMSE = 0.19 mL/min/g). In contrast, the maximum slope model technique (P-MS) was shown to underestimate perfusion when compared to microsphere perfusion measurements (P-MS = 0.42 P -Micro −0.48, R{sup 2} = 0.94, RMSE = 3.3 mL/min/g). Conclusion: The results indicate the potential for significant improvements in accuracy of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion measurement using the first pass analysis technique as compared with the standard maximum slope model.

  20. Fractal analysis in radiological and nuclear medicine perfusion imaging: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Michallek, Florian; Dewey, Marc

    2014-01-01

    To provide an overview of recent research in fractal analysis of tissue perfusion imaging, using standard radiological and nuclear medicine imaging techniques including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and to discuss implications for different fields of application. A systematic review of fractal analysis for tissue perfusion imaging was performed by searching the databases MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE (via Ovid) and ISI Web of Science. Thirty-seven eligible studies were identified. Fractal analysis was performed on perfusion imaging of tumours, lung, myocardium, kidney, skeletal muscle and cerebral diseases. Clinically, different aspects of tumour perfusion and cerebral diseases were successfully evaluated including detection and classification. In physiological settings, it was shown that perfusion under different conditions and in various organs can be properly described using fractal analysis. Fractal analysis is a suitable method for quantifying heterogeneity from radiological and nuclear medicine perfusion images under a variety of conditions and in different organs. Further research is required to exploit physiologically proven fractal behaviour in the clinical setting. • Fractal analysis of perfusion images can be successfully performed. • Tumour, pulmonary, myocardial, renal, skeletal muscle and cerebral perfusion have already been examined. • Clinical applications of fractal analysis include tumour and brain perfusion assessment. • Fractal analysis is a suitable method for quantifying perfusion heterogeneity. • Fractal analysis requires further research concerning the development of clinical applications.

  1. [Quantitative CT perfusion measurements in characterization of solitary pulmonary nodules: new insights and limitations].

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Guerrini, Susanna; Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo; Rossi, Michele; Fonio, Paolo; Mazzei, Francesco Giuseppe; Volterrani, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) scans remain the basis of morphologic evaluation in the characterization of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs), perfusion CT can represent an additional feasible technique offering reproducible measurements, at least in SPNs with a diameter >10 mm. In particular, CT perfusion could reduce the number of SPNs, diagnosed as undetermined at morphologic CT, avoiding long term follow-up CT, FDG-PET studies, biopsy or unnecessary surgery with a significant reduction in healthcare costs. In order to reduce the radiation dose, an optimization of the CT perfusion protocol could be obtained using axial mode acquisition, using shorter acquisition time and adaptative statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm.

  2. Assessment of the reproducibility of postprocessing dynamic CT perfusion data.

    PubMed

    Fiorella, David; Heiserman, Joseph; Prenger, Erin; Partovi, Shahram

    2004-01-01

    Commercially available software programs for the conversion of dynamic CT perfusion (CTP) source data into cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and mean transit time (MTT) maps require operators to subjectively define parameters that are used in subsequent postprocessing calculations. Our purpose was to define the variability of CBV, CBF, and MTT values derived from CTP maps generated from the same source data postprocessed by three different CT technologists (CTTs). Raw data derived from dynamic CTP examinations performed in 20 subjects were postprocessed seven times by three experienced CTTs. Parenchymal regions of interest derived from each map (CBV, CBF, and MTT) were compared. The CBF maps generated by each technologist were also qualitatively assessed. Decisions made by each analyzer during postprocessing were assessed. The intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.73 (95% CI, 0.64-0.81), 0.87 (0.83-0.91) and 0.89 (0.85-0.93), for the CBV, CBF, and MTT parenchymal regions of interest, respectively. All individual correlation coefficients between data sets were significant to a P value <.05. Measurement error, made solely on the basis of different technologists postprocessing the same source data and expressed as the coefficients of variation, were 31%, 30%, and 14% for CBV, CBF, and MTT, respectively. The selection of the arterial input function (AIF) region of interest, venous function region of interest, and preenhancement interval were very reproducible. The technologists differed significantly with respect to the selection of the postenhancement image (PoEI) (P <.01). A retrospective review of the individual CBF maps indicated that variance in the PoEI selection accounted for much of the variation in the qualitative appearance of the CBF maps generated by different technologists. The PoEI was selected to demarcate the baseline of the AIF time-attenuation curve. It is likely that this method of PoEI selection significantly contributed

  3. Comparison of cerebral blood flow data obtained by computed tomography (CT) perfusion with that obtained by xenon CT using 320-row CT.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Tanizaki, Yoshio; Kimura, Hiroaki; Akaji, Kazunori; Kano, Tadashige; Suzuki, Kentaro; Takayama, Youhei; Kanzawa, Takao; Shidoh, Satoka; Nakazawa, Masaki; Yoshida, Kazunari; Mihara, Ban

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) data obtained by computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging have been shown to be qualitative data rather than quantitative, in contrast with data obtained by other imaging methods, such as xenon CT (XeCT) imaging. Thus, interpatient comparisons of CBF values themselves obtained by CTP may be inaccurate. In this study, we have compared CBF ratios as well as CBF values obtained from CTP-CBF data to those obtained from XeCT-CBF data for the same patients to determine CTP-CBF parameters that can be used for interpatient comparisons. The data used in the present study were obtained as volume data using 320-row CT. The volume data were applied to an automated region of interest-determining software (3DSRT, version 3.5.2 ) and converted to 59 slices of 2 mm interval standardized images. In the present study, we reviewed 10 patients with occlusive cerebrovascular diseases (CVDs) undergoing both CTP and XeCT in the same period. Our study shows that ratios of CBF measurements, such as hemodynamic stress distribution (perforator-to-cortical flow ratio of middle cerebral artery [MCA] region) or the left/right ratio for the region of the MCA, calculated using CTP data have been shown to correlate well with the same ratios calculated using XeCT data. These results suggest that such CBF ratios could be useful for generating interpatient comparisons of CTP-CBF data obtained by 320-row CT among patients with occlusive CVD.

  4. Stress-first Myocardial Perfusion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Nasir; Parker, Matthew W; Henzlova, Milena J; Duvall, William Lane

    2016-02-01

    Stress-first approaches to myocardial perfusion imaging provide diagnostically and prognostically accurate perfusion data equivalent to a full rest-stress study, save time in the imaging laboratory, and reduce the radiation exposure to patients and laboratory staff. Converting a nuclear cardiology laboratory from a conventional rest-stress strategy to a stress-first approach involves challenges such as the need for attenuation correction, triage of patients to an appropriate protocol, real-time review of stress images, and consideration of differential reimbursement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Whole-organ perfusion of the pancreas using dynamic volume CT in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma: acquisition technique, post-processing and initial results.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Sonja; Kloeters, Christian; Meyer, Henning; Hein, Patrick; Hilbig, Andreas; Rogalla, Patrik

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a whole-organ perfusion protocol of the pancreas in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma and to analyse perfusion differences between normal and diseased pancreatic tissue. Thirty patients with primary pancreatic malignancy were imaged on a 320-slice CT unit. Twenty-nine cancers were histologically proven. CT data acquisition was started manually after contrast-material injection (8 ml/s, 350 mg iodine/ml) and dynamic density measurements in the right ventricle. After image registration, perfusion was determined with the gradient-relationship technique and volume regions-of-interest were defined for perfusion measurements. Contrast time-density curves and perfusion maps were generated. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for analysis of normal distribution and Kruskal-Wallis test (nonparametric ANOVA) with Bonferroni correction for multiple stacked comparisons. In all 30 patients the entire pancreas was imaged, and registration could be completed in all cases. Perfusion of pancreatic carcinomas was significantly lower than of normal pancreatic tissue (P < 0.001) and could be visualized on colored perfusion maps. The 320-slice CT allows complete dynamic visualization of the pancreas and enables calculation of whole-organ perfusion maps. Perfusion imaging carries the potential to improve detection of pancreatic cancers due to the perfusion differences.

  6. 4D micro-CT for cardiac and perfusion applications with view under sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, Cristian T.; Johnston, Samuel M.; Qi, Yi; Johnson, G. Allan

    2011-06-01

    Micro-CT is commonly used in preclinical studies to provide anatomical information. There is growing interest in obtaining functional measurements from 4D micro-CT. We report here strategies for 4D micro-CT with a focus on two applications: (i) cardiac imaging based on retrospective gating and (ii) pulmonary perfusion using multiple contrast injections/rotations paradigm. A dual source micro-CT system is used for image acquisition with a sampling rate of 20 projections per second. The cardiac micro-CT protocol involves the use of a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. Fast scanning of free breathing mice is achieved using retrospective gating. The ECG and respiratory signals are used to sort projections into ten cardiac phases. The pulmonary perfusion protocol uses a conventional contrast agent (Isovue 370) delivered by a micro-injector in four injections separated by 2 min intervals to allow for clearance. Each injection is synchronized with the rotation of the animal, and each of the four rotations is started with an angular offset of 22.5 from the starting angle of the previous rotation. Both cardiac and perfusion protocols result in an irregular angular distribution of projections that causes significant streaking artifacts in reconstructions when using traditional filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms. The reconstruction involves the use of the point spread function of the micro-CT system for each time point, and the analysis of the distribution of the reconstructed data in the Fourier domain. This enables us to correct for angular inconsistencies via deconvolution and identify regions where data is missing. The missing regions are filled with data from a high quality but temporally averaged prior image reconstructed with all available projections. Simulations indicate that deconvolution successfully removes the streaking artifacts while preserving temporal information. 4D cardiac micro-CT in a mouse was performed with adequate image quality at isotropic

  7. Clinical Use of CT Perfusion For Diagnosis and Prediction of Lesion Growth in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Huisa, Branko N; Neil, William P; Schrader, Ronald; Maya, Marcel; Pereira, Benedict; Bruce, Nhu T; Lyden, Patrick D

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose CT perfusion (CTP) mapping in research centers correlates well with diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) lesions and may accurately differentiate the infarct core from ischemic penumbra. The value of CTP in real-world clinical practice has not been fully established. We investigated the yield of CTP– derived cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transient time (MTT) for the detection of cerebral ischemia and ischemic penumbra in a sample of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients. Methods We studied 165 patients with initial clinical symptoms suggestive of AIS. All patients had an initial non-contrast head CT, CT Perfusion (CTP), CT angiogram (CTA) and follow up brain MRI. The obtained perfusion images were used for image processing. CBV, MTT and DWI lesion volumes were visually estimated and manually traced. Statistical analysis was done using R-2.14.and SAS 9.1. Results All normal DWI sequences had normal CBV and MTT studies (N=89). Seventy-three patients had acute DWI lesions. CBV was abnormal in 23.3% and MTT was abnormal in 42.5% of these patients. There was a high specificity (91.8%)but poor sensitivity (40.0%) for MTT maps predicting positive DWI. Spearman correlation was significant between MTT and DWI lesions (ρ=0.66, p>0.0001) only for abnormal MTT and DWI lesions>0cc. CBV lesions did not correlate with final DWI. Conclusions In real-world use, acute imaging with CTP did not predict stroke or DWI lesions with sufficient accuracy. Our findings argue against the use of CTP for screening AIS patients until real-world implementations match the accuracy reported from specialized research centers. PMID:23253533

  8. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: Sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. PMID:23542422

  9. Interleaving cerebral CT perfusion with neck CT angiography part I. Proof of concept and accuracy of cerebral perfusion values.

    PubMed

    Oei, Marcel T H; Meijer, Frederick J A; van der Woude, Willem-Jan; Smit, Ewoud J; van Ginneken, Bram; Prokop, Mathias; Manniesing, Rashindra

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel One-Step-Stroke protocol for wide-detector CT scanners that interleaves cerebral CTP with volumetric neck CTA (vCTA). We evaluate whether the resulting time gap in CTP affects the accuracy of CTP values. Cerebral CTP maps were retrospectively obtained from 20 patients with suspicion of acute ischemic stroke and served as the reference standard. To simulate a 4 s gap for interleaving CTP with vCTA, we eliminated one acquisition at various time points of CTP starting from the bolus-arrival-time(BAT). Optimal timing of the vCTA was evaluated. At the time point with least errors, we evaluated elimination of a second time point (6 s gap). Mean absolute percentage errors of all perfusion values remained below 10 % in all patients when eliminating any one time point in the CTP sequence starting from the BAT. Acquiring the vCTA 2 s after reaching a threshold of 70HU resulted in the lowest errors (mean <3.0 %). Eliminating a second time point still resulted in mean errors <3.5 %. CBF/CBV showed no significant differences in perfusion values except MTT. However, the percentage errors were always below 10 % compared to the original protocol. Interleaving cerebral CTP with neck CTA is feasible with minor effects on the perfusion values. • Removing a single CTP acquisition has minor effects on calculated perfusion values • Calculated perfusion values errors depend on timing of skipping a CTP acquisition • Qualitative evaluation of CTP was not influenced by removing two time points • Neck CTA is optimally timed in the upslope of arterial enhancement.

  10. Performance comparison between static and dynamic cardiac CT on perfusion quantitation and patient classification tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac CT acquisitions for perfusion assessment can be performed in a dynamic or static mode. In this simulation study, we evaluate the relative classification and quantification performance of these modes for assessing myocardial blood flow (MBF). In the dynamic method, a series of low dose cardiac CT acquisitions yields data on contrast bolus dynamics over time; these data are fit with a model to give a quantitative MBF estimate. In the static method, a single CT acquisition is obtained, and the relative CT numbers in the myocardium are used to infer perfusion states. The static method does not directly yield a quantitative estimate of MBF, but these estimates can be roughly approximated by introducing assumed linear relationships between CT number and MBF, consistent with the ways such images are typically visually interpreted. Data obtained by either method may be used for a variety of clinical tasks, including 1) stratifying patients into differing categories of ischemia and 2) using the quantitative MBF estimate directly to evaluate ischemic disease severity. Through simulations, we evaluate the performance on each of these tasks. The dynamic method has very low bias in MBF estimates, making it particularly suitable for quantitative estimation. At matched radiation dose levels, ROC analysis demonstrated that the static method, with its high bias but generally lower variance, has superior performance in stratifying patients, especially for larger patients.

  11. Computed tomography perfusion imaging denoising using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fan; Carpenter, Trevor; Rodriguez Gonzalez, David; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2012-06-01

    Brain perfusion weighted images acquired using dynamic contrast studies have an important clinical role in acute stroke diagnosis and treatment decisions. However, computed tomography (CT) images suffer from low contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) as a consequence of the limitation of the exposure to radiation of the patient. As a consequence, the developments of methods for improving the CNR are valuable. The majority of existing approaches for denoising CT images are optimized for 3D (spatial) information, including spatial decimation (spatially weighted mean filters) and techniques based on wavelet and curvelet transforms. However, perfusion imaging data is 4D as it also contains temporal information. Our approach using Gaussian process regression (GPR), which takes advantage of the temporal information, to reduce the noise level. Over the entire image, GPR gains a 99% CNR improvement over the raw images and also improves the quality of haemodynamic maps allowing a better identification of edges and detailed information. At the level of individual voxel, GPR provides a stable baseline, helps us to identify key parameters from tissue time-concentration curves and reduces the oscillations in the curve. GPR is superior to the comparable techniques used in this study.

  12. Ga-68 MAA Perfusion 4D-PET/CT Scanning Allows for Functional Lung Avoidance Using Conformal Radiation Therapy Planning.

    PubMed

    Siva, Shankar; Devereux, Thomas; Ball, David L; MacManus, Michael P; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Kron, Tomas; Bressel, Mathias; Foroudi, Farshad; Plumridge, Nikki; Steinfort, Daniel; Shaw, Mark; Callahan, Jason; Hicks, Rodney J; Hofman, Michael S

    2016-02-01

    Ga-68-macroaggregated albumin ((68)Ga-perfusion) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a novel imaging technique for the assessment of functional lung volumes. The purpose of this study was to use this imaging technique for functional adaptation of definitive radiotherapy plans in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This was a prospective clinical trial of patients with NSCLC who received definitive 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy to 60 Gy in 30 fx and underwent pretreatment respiratory-gated (4-dimensional [4D]) perfusion PET/CT. The "perfused" lung volume was defined as all lung parenchyma taking up radiotracer, and the "well-perfused" lung volume was contoured using a visually adapted threshold of 30% maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max). Alternate 3D conformal plans were subsequently created and optimized to avoid perfused and well-perfused lung volumes. Functional dose volumetrics were compared using mean lung dose (MLD), V5 (volume receiving 5 Gy or more), V10, V20, V30, V40, V50, and V60 parameters. Fourteen consecutive patients had alternate radiotherapy plans created based on functional lung volumes. When considering the original treatment plan, the dose to perfused and well-perfused functional lung volumes was similar to that of the conventional anatomical lung volumes with an average MLD of 12.15, 12.67, and 12.11 Gy, respectively. Plans optimized for well-perfused lung improved functional V30, V40, V50, and V60 metrics (all P values <.05). The functional MLD of well-perfused lung was improved by a median of 0.86 Gy, P < .01. However, plans optimized for perfused lung only showed significant improvement in the functional V60 dose parameter (median 1.00%, P = .04) but at a detriment of a worse functional V5 (median 3.33%, P = .05). This study demonstrates proof of principle that 4D-perfusion PET/CT may enable functional lung avoidance during treatment planning of patients with NSCLC. Radiotherapy plans

  13. Cerebral perfusion imaging with bolus harmonic imaging (Honorable Mention Poster Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kier, Christian; Toth, Daniel; Meyer-Wiethe, Karsten; Schindler, Angela; Cangur, Hakan; Seidel, Gunter; Aach, Til

    2005-04-01

    Fast visualisation of cerebral microcirculation supports diagnosis of acute stroke. However, the commonly used CT/MRI-based methods are time consuming, costly and not applicable to every patient. The bolus perfusion harmonic imaging (BHI) method is an ultrasound imaging technique which makes use of the fact, that ultrasound contrast agents unlike biological tissues resonate at harmonic frequencies. Exploiting this effect, the contrast between perfused and non-perfused areas can be improved. Thus, BHI overcomes the low signal-to-noise ratio of transcranial ultrasound and the high impedance of the skull. By analysing image sequences, visualising the qualitative characteristics of an US contrast agent bolus injection becomes possible. The analysis consists of calculating four perfusion-related parameters, Local Peak Intensity, Time To Peak, Area Under Curve, and Average Rising, from the time/intensity curve and providing them as colour-coded images. For calculating these parameters the fundamental assumption is that image intensity corresponds to contrast agent concentration which in turn shows the perfusion of the corresponding brain region. In a clinical study on patients suffering from acute ischemic stroke it is shown that some of the parameters correlate significantly to the infarction area. Thus, BHI becomes a less time-consuming and inexpensive bedside method for diagnosis of cerebral perfusion deficits.

  14. Noncontrast perfusion single-photon emission CT/CT scanning: a new test for the expedited, high-accuracy diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Lorenzoni, Alice; Fox, Josef J; Rademaker, Jürgen; Vander Els, Nicholas; Grewal, Ravinder K; Strauss, H William; Schöder, Heiko

    2014-05-01

    Standard ventilation and perfusion (V˙/Q˙) scintigraphy uses planar images for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). To evaluate whether tomographic imaging improves the diagnostic accuracy of the procedure, we compared noncontrast perfusion single-photon emission CT (Q˙-SPECT)/CT scans with planar V˙/Q˙scans in patients at high risk for PE. Between 2006 and 2010, most patients referred for diagnosis of PE underwent both Q˙-SPECT/CT scan and planar V˙/Q˙scintigraphy. All scans were reviewed retrospectively by four observers; planar scans were read with modified Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) II and Prospective Investigative Study of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PISA-PED) criteria. On Q˙-SPECT/CT scan, any wedge-shaped peripheral perfusion defect occupying > 50% of a segment without corresponding pulmonary parenchymal or pleural disease was considered to show PE. The final diagnosis was established with a composite reference standard that included ECG, ultrasound of lower-extremity veins, D-dimer levels, CT pulmonary angiography (when available), and clinical follow-up for at least 3 months. One hundred six patients with cancer and mean Wells score of 4.4 had sufficient follow-up; 22 patients were given a final diagnosis of PE, and 84 patients were given a final diagnosis of no PE. According to PIOPED II, 13 studies were graded as intermediate probability. Sensitivity and specificity for PE were 50% and 98%, respectively, based on PIOPED II criteria; 86% and 93%, respectively, based on PISA-PED criteria; and 91% and 94%, respectively, based on Q˙-SPECT/CT scan. Seventy-six patients had additional relevant findings on the CT image of the Q˙-SPECT/CT scan. Noncontrast Q˙-SPECT/CT imaging has a higher accuracy than planar V˙/Q˙imaging based on PIOPED II criteria in patients with cancer and a high risk for PE.

  15. Meta-Analysis of Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-06

    Coronary Disease; Echocardiography; Fractional Flow Reserve, Myocardial; Hemodynamics; Humans; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Myocardial Perfusion Imaging; Perfusion; Predictive Value of Tests; Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography; Positron Emission Tomography; Multidetector Computed Tomography; Echocardiography, Stress; Coronary Angiography

  16. Measurement of radiation dose in cerebral CT perfusion study.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Masaaki; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Fukutomi, Yukimi; Oomoto, Kenji; Murase, Kenya; Miki, Hitoshi; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate radiation dose in cerebral perfusion studies with a multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scanner on various voltage and current settings by using a human head phantom. Following the CT perfusion study protocol, continuous cine scans (1 sec/rotation x60 sec) consisting of four 5-mm-thick contiguous slices were performed three times at variable tube voltages of 80 kV, 100 kV, 120 kV, and 140 kV with the same tube current setting of 200 mA and on variable current settings of 50 mA, 100 mA, 150 mA, and 200 mA with the same tube voltage of 80 kV. Radiation doses were measured using a total of 41 theroluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed in the human head phantom. Thirty-six TLDs were inside and three were on the surface of the slice of the X-ray beam center, and two were placed on the surface 3 cm caudal assuming the lens position. Average radiation doses of surface, inside, and lens increased in proportion to the increases of tube voltage and tube current. The lowest inside dose was 87.6+/-15.3 mGy, and the lowest surface dose was 162.5+/-6.7 mGy at settings of 80 kV and 50 mA. The highest inside dose was 1,591.5+/-179.7 mGy, and the highest surface dose was 2,264.6+/-123.7 mGy at 140 kV-200 mA. At 80 kV-50 mA, the average radiation dose of lens was the lowest at 5.5+/-0.0 mGy. At 140 kV-200 mA the radiation dose of lens was the highest at 127.2+/-0.6 mGy. In cerebral CT perfusion study, radiation dose can vary considerably. Awareness of the patient's radiation dose is recommended.

  17. Correlation between CT Perfusion Parameters and Microvessel Density and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xifu; Bai, Renju; Li, Yajun; Zhao, Jinkun

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the correlation between computed tomography (CT) perfusion parameters and markers of angiogenesis in adrenal adenomas and non-adenomas to determine if perfusion CT can be used to distinguish between them. Thirty-four patients with pathologically-confirmed adrenal tumors (17 adenomas, 17 non-adenomas) received CT perfusion imaging before surgery. CT perfusion parameters (blood flow [BF], blood volume [BV], mean transit time [MTT], and permeability surface area product [PS]) were calculated. Tumor tissue sections were examined with immunohistochemical methods for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and microvessel density (MVD). The mean age of the 34 patients was 43 years. The median BV was significantly higher in adenomas than in non-adenomas [12.3 ml/100 g, inter-quartile range (IQR): 10.4 to 16.5 ml/100 g vs. 8.8 ml/100 g, IQR: 3.3 to 9.4 ml/100 g, p = 0.001]. Differences in BF, MTT, and PS parameter values between adenomas and non-adenomas were not significant (p>0.05). The mean MVD was significantly higher in adenomas compared to non-adenomas (98.5±28.5 vs. 53.5±27.0, p<0.0001). Adenomas also expressed significantly higher median VEGF than non-adenomas (65%, IQR: 50 to 79% vs. 45%, IQR: 35 to 67%, p = 0.02). A moderately strong correlation between BF and VEGF (r = 0.53, p = 0.03) and between BV and MVD among adenomas (r = 0.57, p = 0.02) exist. Morphology, MVD, and VEGF expression in adenomas differ significantly from non-adenomas. Of the CT perfusion parameters examined, both BF and BV correlate with MVD, but only BF correlates with VEGF, and only in adenomas. The significant difference in BV suggests that BV may be used to differentiate adenomas from non-adenomas. However, the small difference in BV shows that it may only be possible to use BV to identify adenomas vs. non-adenomas at extreme BV values. PMID:24260316

  18. Dose reduction in dynamic CT stress myocardial perfusion imaging: comparison of 80-kV/370-mAs and 100-kV/300-mAs protocols.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Makiko; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Ito, Tatsuro; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Kurobe, Yusuke; Nagata, Motonori; Ishida, Masaki; Sakuma, Hajime

    2014-03-01

    To determine the effect of reduced 80-kV tube voltage with increased 370-mAs tube current on radiation dose, image quality and estimated myocardial blood flow (MBF) of dynamic CT stress myocardial perfusion imaging (CTP) in patients with a normal body mass index (BMI) compared with a 100-kV and 300-mAs protocol. Thirty patients with a normal BMI (<25 kg/m(2)) with known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent adenosine-stress dual-source dynamic CTP. Patients were randomised to 80-kV/370-mAs (n = 15) or 100-kV/300-mAs (n = 15) imaging. Maximal enhancement and noise of the left ventricular (LV) cavity, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and MBF of the two groups were compared. Imaging with 80-kV/370-mAs instead of 100-kV/300-mAs was associated with 40% lower radiation dose (mean dose-length product, 359 ± 66 vs 628 ± 112 mGy[Symbol: see text]cm; P < 0.001 ) with no significant difference in CNR (34.5 ± 13.4 vs 33.5 ± 10.4; P = 0.81) or MBF in non-ischaemic myocardium (0.95 ± 0.20 vs 0.99 ± 0.25 ml/min/g; P = 0.66). Studies obtained using 80-kV/370-mAs were associated with 30.9% higher maximal enhancement (804 ± 204 vs 614 ± 115 HU; P < 0.005), and 31.2% greater noise (22.7 ± 3.5 vs 17.4 ± 2.6; P < 0.001). Dynamic CTP using 80-kV/370-mA instead of 100-kV/300-mAs allowed 40% dose reduction without compromising image quality or MBF. Tube voltage of 80-kV should be considered for individuals with a normal BMI. • CT stress perfusion imaging (CTP) is increasingly used to assess myocardial function. • Dynamic CTP is feasible at 80-kV in patients with normal BMI. • An 80-kV/370-mAs protocol allows 40% dose reduction compared with 100-kV/300-mAs. • Contrast-to-noise ratio and myocardial blood flow of the two protocols were comparable.

  19. Recent developments and future prospects of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Maseeh Uz; Hashmi, Ibrahim; Fatima, Nosheen

    2010-10-01

    Myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging is the most commonly performed functional imaging for assessment of coronary artery disease. High diagnostic accuracy and incremental prognostic value are the major benefits while suboptimal spatial resolution and significant radiation exposure are the main limitations. Its ability to detect hemodynamic significance of lesions seen on multidetector CT angiogram (MDCTA) has paved the path for a successful marriage between anatomical and functional imaging modalities in the form of hybrid SPECT/MDCTA system. In recent years, there have been enormous efforts by industry and academia to develop new SPECT imaging systems with better sensitivity, resolution, compact design and new reconstruction algorithms with ability to improve image quality and resolution. Furthermore, expected arrival of Tc-99m-labeled deoxyglucose in next few years would further strengthen the role of SPECT in imaging hibernating myocardium. In view of these developments, it seems that SPECT would enjoy its pivotal role in spite of major threat to be replaced by fluorine-18-labeled positron emission tomography perfusion and glucose metabolism imaging agents.

  20. Radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination using versatile optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salasiah, M.; Nordin, A. J.; Fathinul Fikri, A. S.; Hishar, H.; Tamchek, N.; Taiman, K.; Ahmad Bazli, A. K.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Mizanur, R.; Noor, Noramaliza M.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) provides a precise method in order to diagnose obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), compared to single photon emission tomography (SPECT). PET is suitable for obese and patients who underwent pharmacologic stress procedures. It has the ability to evaluate multivessel coronary artery disease by recording changes in left ventricular function from rest to peak stress and quantifying myocardial perfusion (in mL/min/g of tissue). However, the radiation dose to the radiosensitive organs has become crucial issues in the Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography(PET/CT) scanning procedure. The objective of this study was to estimate radiation dose to radiosensitive organs of patients who underwent PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination at Centre for Diagnostic Nuclear Imaging, Universiti Putra Malaysia in one month period using versatile optical fibres (Ge-B-doped Flat Fibre) and LiF (TLD-100 chips). All stress and rest paired myocardial perfusion PET/CT scans will be performed with the use of Rubidium-82 (82Rb). The optic fibres were loaded into plastic capsules and attached to patient's eyes, thyroid and breasts prior to the infusion of 82Rb, to accommodate the ten cases for the rest and stress PET scans. The results were compared with established thermoluminescence material, TLD-100 chips. The result shows that radiation dose given by TLD-100 and Germanium-Boron-doped Flat Fiber (Ge-B-doped Flat Fiber) for these five organs were comparable to each other where the p>0.05. For CT scans,thyroid received the highest dose compared to other organs. Meanwhile, for PET scans, breasts received the highest dose.

  1. SU-E-I-36: A KWIC and Dirty Look at Dose Savings and Perfusion Metrics in Simulated CT Neuro Perfusion Exams

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J; Martin, T; Young, S; McNitt-Gray, M; Wang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: CT neuro perfusion scans are one of the highest dose exams. Methods to reduce dose include decreasing the number of projections acquired per gantry rotation, however conventional reconstruction of such scans leads to sampling artifacts. In this study we investigated a projection view-sharing reconstruction algorithm used in dynamic MRI – “K-space Weighted Image Contrast” (KWIC) – applied to simulated perfusion exams and evaluated dose savings and impacts on perfusion metrics. Methods: A FORBILD head phantom containing simulated time-varying objects was developed and a set of parallel-beam CT projection data was created. The simulated scans were 60 seconds long, 1152 projections per turn, with a rotation time of one second. No noise was simulated. 5mm, 10mm, and 50mm objects were modeled in the brain. A baseline, “full dose” simulation used all projections and reduced dose cases were simulated by downsampling the number of projections per turn from 1152 to 576 (50% dose), 288 (25% dose), and 144 (12.5% dose). KWIC was further evaluated at 72 projections per rotation (6.25%). One image per second was reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP) and KWIC. KWIC reconstructions utilized view cores of 36, 72, 144, and 288 views and 16, 8, 4, and 2 subapertures respectively. From the reconstructed images, time-to-peak (TTP), cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the FWHM of the perfusion curve were calculated and compared against reference values from the full-dose FBP data. Results: TTP, CBF, and the FWHM were unaffected by dose reduction (to 12.5%) and reconstruction method, however image quality was improved when using KWIC. Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that KWIC preserves image quality and perfusion metrics when under-sampling projections and that the unique contrast weighting of KWIC could provided substantial dose-savings for perfusion CT scans. Evaluation of KWIC in clinical CT data will be performed in the near future. R01 EB014922, NCI

  2. The Cadaveric Perfusion and Angiography as a Teaching Tool: Imaging the Intracranial Vasculature in Cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Turkoglu, Erhan; Seckin, Hakan; Gurer, Bora; Ahmed, Azam; Uluc, Kutluay; Pulfer, Kari; Arat, Anıl; Niemann, David; Baskaya, Mustafa K.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Study Aim To enhance the visualization of the intracranial vasculature of cadavers under gross examination with a combination of imaging modalities. Material and Methods A total of 20 cadaver heads were used to test two different perfusion techniques. First, fixed cadaver heads were perfused with water; second, fresh cadavers were perfused with saline and 10% formalin. Subsequently, brains were removed and fixed. The compounds used were silicone rubber, silicone rubber mixed with powdered barium sulfate, and silicone rubber mixed with tantalum dioxide prepared by the first perfusion technique and gelatin mixed with liquid barium prepared with the second technique. Conventional X-ray imaging, computed tomography (CT), dynamic computed tomography (dCT), and postprocessing three-dimensional (3D) images were used to evaluate all the heads. Results Gelatinized barium was better visualized when compared with tantalum dioxide in conventional X-ray images. The blood vessels injected with either tantalum dioxide or gelatinized barium demonstrated a higher enhancement than the surrounding soft tissues with CT or dCT. The quality of the 3D reconstruction of the intracranial vasculature was significantly better in the CT images obtained from the gelatinized barium group. Conclusions Radiologic examinations of the heads injected with gelatinized barium facilitates the 3D understanding of cerebrovascular anatomy as an important tool for neuroanatomy training. PMID:25452903

  3. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Mimicking Acute Onset Stroke Diagnosed by CT Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Rajiv; Kurz, Kathinka D.; Kurz, Martin W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Metabolic syndromes such as Wernicke's encephalopathy may present with a sudden neurological deficit, thus mimicking acute onset stroke. Due to current emphasis on rapid admission and treatment of acute stroke patients, there is a significant risk that these stroke mimics may end up being treated with thrombolysis. Rigorous clinical and radiological skills are necessary to correctly identify such metabolic stroke mimics, in order to avoid doing any harm to these patients due to the unnecessary use of thrombolysis. Patient. A 51-year-old Caucasian male was admitted to our hospital with suspicion of an acute stroke due to sudden onset dysarthria and unilateral facial nerve paresis. Clinical examination revealed confusion and dysconjugate gaze. Computed tomography (CT) including a CT perfusion (CTP) scan revealed bilateral thalamic hyperperfusion. The use of both clinical and radiological findings led to correctly diagnosing Wernicke's encephalopathy. Conclusion. The application of CTP as a standard diagnostic tool in acute stroke patients can improve the detection of stroke mimics caused by metabolic syndromes as shown in our case report. PMID:24716022

  4. Defining acute ischemic stroke tissue pathophysiology with whole brain CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    Bivard, A; Levi, C; Krishnamurthy, V; Hislop-Jambrich, J; Salazar, P; Jackson, B; Davis, S; Parsons, M

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to identify and validate whole brain perfusion computed tomography (CTP) thresholds for ischemic core and salvageable penumbra in acute stroke patients and develop a probability based model to increase the accuracy of tissue pathophysiology measurements. One hundred and eighty-three patients underwent multimodal stroke CT using a 320-slice scanner within 6hours of acute stroke onset, followed by 24hour MRI that included diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic susceptibility weighted perfusion imaging (PWI). Coregistered acute CTP and 24hour DWI was used to identify the optimum single perfusion parameter thresholds to define penumbra (in patients without reperfusion), and ischemic core (in patients with reperfusion), using a pixel based receiver operator curve analysis. Then, these results were used to develop a sigma curve fitted probability based model incorporating multiple perfusion parameter thresholds. For single perfusion thresholds, a time to peak (TTP) of +5seconds best defined the penumbra (area under the curve, AUC 0.79 CI 0.74-0.83) while a cerebral blood flow (CBF) of < 50% best defined the acute ischemic core (AUC 0.73, CI 0.69-0.77). The probability model was more accurate at detecting the ischemic core (AUC 0.80 SD 0.75-0.83) and penumbra (0.85 SD 0.83-0.87) and was significantly closer in volume to the corresponding reference DWI (P=0.031). Whole brain CTP can accurately identify penumbra and ischemic core using similar thresholds to previously validated 16 or 64 slice CTP. Additionally, a novel probability based model was closer to defining the ischemic core and penumbra than single thresholds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Automatic delineation of functional lung volumes with (68)Ga-ventilation/perfusion PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Siva, Shankar; Callahan, Jason; Claudic, Yannis; Bourhis, David; Steinfort, Daniel P; Hicks, Rodney J; Hofman, Michael S

    2017-10-10

    Functional volumes computed from (68)Ga-ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) PET/CT, which we have shown to correlate with pulmonary function test parameters (PFTs), have potential diagnostic utility in a variety of clinical applications, including radiotherapy planning. An automatic segmentation method would facilitate delineation of such volumes. The aim of this study was to develop an automated threshold-based approach to delineate functional volumes that best correlates with manual delineation. Thirty lung cancer patients undergoing both V/Q PET/CT and PFTs were analyzed. Images were acquired following inhalation of Galligas and, subsequently, intravenous administration of (68)Ga-macroaggreted-albumin (MAA). Using visually defined manual contours as the reference standard, various cutoff values, expressed as a percentage of the maximal pixel value, were applied. The average volume difference and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were calculated, measuring the similarity of the automatic segmentation and the reference standard. Pearson's correlation was also calculated to compare automated volumes with manual volumes, and automated volumes optimized to PFT indices. For ventilation volumes, mean volume difference was lowest (- 0.4%) using a 15%max threshold with Pearson's coefficient of 0.71. Applying this cutoff, median DSC was 0.93 (0.87-0.95). Nevertheless, limits of agreement in volume differences were large (- 31.0 and 30.2%) with differences ranging from - 40.4 to + 33.0%. For perfusion volumes, mean volume difference was lowest and Pearson's coefficient was highest using a 15%max threshold (3.3% and 0.81, respectively). Applying this cutoff, median DSC was 0.93 (0.88-0.93). Nevertheless, limits of agreement were again large (- 21.1 and 27.8%) with volume differences ranging from - 18.6 to + 35.5%. Using the 15%max threshold, moderate correlation was demonstrated with FEV1/FVC (r = 0.48 and r = 0.46 for ventilation and perfusion images

  6. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C

    2013-05-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  8. Quantitative myocardial perfusion measurement using CT perfusion: a validation study in a porcine model of reperfused acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    So, Aaron; Hsieh, Jiang; Li, Jian-Ying; Hadway, Jennifer; Kong, Hua-Fu; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2012-06-01

    We validated a CT perfusion technique with beam hardening (BH) correction for quantitative measurement of myocardial blood flow (MBF). Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was created in four pigs by occluding the distal LAD for 1 h followed by reperfusion. MBF was measured from dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) scanning of the heart, with correction of cardiac motion and BH, before ischemic insult and on day 7, 10 and 14 post. On day 14 post, radiolabeled microspheres were injected to measure MBF and the results were compared with those measured by CT perfusion. Excised hearts were stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) to determine the relationship between MBF measured by CT Perfusion and myocardial viability. MBF measured by CT perfusion was strongly correlated with that by microspheres over a wide range of MBF values (R = 0.81, from 25 to 225 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1)). While MBF in the LAD territory decreased significantly from 98.4 ± 2.5 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1) at baseline to 32.2 ± 9.1 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1), P < 0.05 at day 7 and to 49.4 ± 9.3 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1), P < 0.05 at day 14, the decrease in remote myocardium (LCx territory) from baseline (103.9 ± 1.9 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1)) was minimal throughout the study (90.6 ± 5.1 ml min(-1) 100 g(-1) on day 14 post, P > 0.05). TTC staining confirmed incomplete infarction in the LAD territory and no infarction in the LCx territory. Microvascular obstruction in infarcted tissue resulted in no-reflow and hence persistently low MBF in the reperfused LAD territory which contained a mixture of viable and non-viable tissue. CT perfusion measurement of MBF was accurate and correlated well with histology and microspheres measurements.

  9. Diagnostic Value of Dual-Source Computerized Tomography Combined with Perfusion Imaging for Peripheral Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xijin; Wang, Shanshan; Jiang, Xingyue; Zhang, Lin; Xu, Wenjian

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary embolism has become the third most common cardiovascular disease, which can seriously harm human health. Objectives To investigate the diagnostic value of dual-source computerized tomography (CT) and perfusion imaging for peripheral pulmonary embolism. Patients and Methods Thirty-two patients with suspected pulmonary embolism underwent dual-source CT exams. To compare the ability of pulmonary embolism detection software (PED) with CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in determining the presence, numbers, and locations of pulmonary emboli, the subsequent images were reviewed by two radiologists using both imaging modalities. Also, the diagnostic consistency between PED and CTPA images and dual-energy pulmonary perfusion imaging (DEPI) for segmental pulmonary embolism was compared. Results CTPA images revealed 50 (7.81%) segmental and 56 (4.38%) sub-segmental pulmonary embolisms, while the PED images showed 68 (10.63%) segmental and 94 (7.34%) sub-segmental pulmonary embolisms. Thus, the detection rate on PED images for peripheral pulmonary embolism was significantly higher than that of the CTPA images (P < 0.05). There was good consistency for diagnosing segmental pulmonary embolism between PED and CTPA and DEPI (kappa = 0.85). The sensitivity and specificity of DEPI images for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism were 91.7% and 97.5%, respectively. Conclusion PED software of dual-source CT combined with perfusion imaging can significantly improve the detection rate of peripheral pulmonary embolism. PMID:27703656

  10. Findings of non-pathologic perfusion defects by CT arterial portography and non-pathologic enhancement of CT hepatic arteriography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Wu, Pei-Hong; Lin, Hao-Gao; Li, Jin-Qing; Mo, Yun-Xian; Zheng, Lie; Lu, Li-Xia; Ruan, Chao-Mei; Chen, Lin

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To recognize the characteristic findings of non-pathologic perfusion defects with CT arterial portography (CTAP) and nonpathologic enhancement found in CT hepatic arteriography (CTHA). METHONDS: The manifestations of nonpathologic perfusion defects with CTAP and non-pathologic enhancement found in CTHA were analyzed in 50 patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma. RESULTS: The false-positive rate of perfusion defects detected in CTAP was 15.1%. The shapes of perfusion defects were peripheral wedge, small, round, and patchy. The occurrence rate of non-pathologic enhancement found in CTHA was 22.0%. The shapes of non-pathologic enhancement were small, round, irregular, and wedge. CONCLUSION: There was high frequency of non-pathologic perfusion defects detected with CTAP and non-pathologic enhancement found in CTHA. The simultaneous use of both procedures may help decrease the false-positive rate, and increase the veracity of diagnosis for hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:11819358

  11. Spatial correspondence of 4D CT ventilation and SPECT pulmonary perfusion defects in patients with malignant airway stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; McCurdy, Matthew; Gomez, Daniel R.; Block, Alec M.; Bergsma, Derek; Joy, Sarah; Guerrero, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    To determine the spatial overlap agreement between four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) ventilation and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion hypo-functioning pulmonary defect regions in a patient population with malignant airway stenosis. Treatment planning 4D CT images were obtained retrospectively for ten lung cancer patients with radiographically demonstrated airway obstruction due to gross tumor volume. Each patient also received a SPECT perfusion study within one week of the planning 4D CT, and prior to the initiation of treatment. Deformable image registration was used to map corresponding lung tissue elements between the extreme component phase images, from which quantitative three-dimensional (3D) images representing the local pulmonary specific ventilation were constructed. Semi-automated segmentation of the percentile perfusion distribution was performed to identify regional defects distal to the known obstructing lesion. Semi-automated segmentation was similarly performed by multiple observers to delineate corresponding defect regions depicted on 4D CT ventilation. Normalized Dice similarity coefficient (NDSC) indices were determined for each observer between SPECT perfusion and 4D CT ventilation defect regions to assess spatial overlap agreement. Tidal volumes determined from 4D CT ventilation were evaluated versus measurements obtained from lung parenchyma segmentation. Linear regression resulted in a linear fit with slope = 1.01 (R2 = 0.99). Respective values for the average DSC, NDSC1 mm and NDSC2 mm for all cases and multiple observers were 0.78, 0.88 and 0.99, indicating that, on average, spatial overlap agreement between ventilation and perfusion defect regions was comparable to the threshold for agreement within 1-2 mm uncertainty. Corresponding coefficients of variation for all metrics were similarly in the range: 0.10%-19%. This study is the first to quantitatively assess 3D spatial overlap agreement between

  12. Evolution of pulmonary perfusion defects demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Howarth, N R; Beziat, C; Berthezène, Y

    1999-01-01

    Pulmonary perfusion defects can be demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging. We present the case of a patient with a pulmonary artery sarcoma who presented with a post-operative pulmonary embolus and was followed in the post-operative period with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR perfusion imaging. This technique allows rapid imaging of the first passage of contrast material through the lung after bolus injection in a peripheral vein. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe the use of this MR technique in showing the evolution of peripheral pulmonary perfusion defects associated with pulmonary emboli.

  13. Perfusion analysis using a wide coverage flat-panel volume CT: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Klotz, E.; Schmidt, B.; Flohr, T.

    2007-03-01

    We developed a Flat-panel detector based Volume CT (VCT) prototype scanner with large z-coverage. In that prototype scanner a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector was mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions) which provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at isocenter. The large volume covered in one rotation can be used for visualization of complete organs of small animals, e.g. rabbits. By implementing a mode with continuous scanning, we are able to reconstruct the complete volume at any point in time during the propagation of a contrast bolus. Multiple volumetric reconstructions over time elucidate the first pass dynamics of a bolus of contrast resulting in 4-D angiography and potentially allowing whole organ perfusion analysis. We studied to which extent pixel based permeability and blood volume calculation with a modified Patlak approach was possible. Experimental validation was performed by imaging evolution of contrast bolus in New Zealand rabbits. Despite the short circulation time of a rabbit, the temporal resolution was sufficient to visually resolve various phases of the first pass of the contrast bolus. Perfusion imaging required substantial spatial smoothing but allowed a qualitative discrimination of different types of parenchyma in brain and liver. If a true quantitative analysis is possible, requires further studies.

  14. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  15. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  16. Early Time Points Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Kenneth K.; Reese, Timothy G.; Nelissen, Koen; Wu, Ona; Chan, Suk-Tak; Benner, Thomas; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Foley, Mary; Vanduffel, Wim; Chesler, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the feasibility of making relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) maps from MR images acquired with short TR by measuring the initial arrival amount of Gd-DTPA evaluated within a time window before any contrast agent has a chance to leave the tissue. We named this rCBF measurement technique utilizing the early data points of the Gd-DTPA bolus the “early time points” method (ET), based on the hypothesis that early time point signals were proportional to rCBF. Simulation data were used successfully to examine the ideal behavior of ET while monkey’s MRI results offered encouraging support to the utility of ET for rCBF calculation. A better brain coverage for ET could be obtained by applying the Simultaneous Echo Refocusing (SER) EPI technique. A recipe to run ET was presented, with attention paid to the noise problem around the time of arrival (TOA) of the contrast agent. PMID:20851196

  17. Omental infarct: CT imaging features.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Gervais, D A; Lee, P; Westra, S; Hahn, P F; Novelline, R A; Mueller, P R

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) features of acute omental infarction and to study the evolutionary changes on follow-up CT imaging. Fifteen cases of omental infarction were evaluated for their initial CT imaging features. The imaging features evaluated included size of the fatty lesion, location, peripheral rim, and relation to colon. CT findings were correlated with etiology, clinical presentation, and leukocytosis. Follow-up CT images were available in eight patients and the imaging features were studied. Eight omental infarcts were of unknown etiology and seven were secondary to abdominal surgery. In 53% of patients (eight of 15), the location of the omental infarct was in the right lower, mid, or upper quadrants. These eight right-side infarcts occurred in six patients with primary omental infarcts. In 13 of 14 patients who underwent CT within 15 days of onset of omental infarct, the margin of the lesion was ill defined. Primary omental (n = 8) infarcts were seen in younger patients (p = 0.02) and were larger on CT (p = 0.02) compared with secondary omental infarcts. CT findings evolved from an ill-defined, heterogeneous fat-density lesion to a well-defined, heterogeneous fat-density lesion with a peripheral hyperdense rim in all six secondary omental infarctions for which acute stage and follow-up CT images were available for interpretation. There is a significant difference in the age distribution and CT findings in terms of size of the omental infarction between primary and secondary etiologies. On follow-up CT, secondary omental infarcts progressively shrank and developed a well-defined, hyperdense rim around a fatty core.

  18. Perfusion-based assessment of disease activity in untreated and treated patients with aortitis and chronic periaortitis: correlation with CT morphological, clinical and serological data.

    PubMed

    Bier, Georg; Henes, Jörg; Eulenbruch, Carolin; Xenitidis, Theodoros; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Horger, Marius

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the role of perfusion-based assessment of inflammatory activity in patients with treated and untreated aortitis and chronic periaortitis as compared with clinical and serological markers. 35 patients (20 females; median age 66 years) with (peri) aortitis were retrospectively evaluated. All patients had clinical symptoms prompting at the time of imaging. All patients first underwent whole-body contrast-enhanced CT and subsequently segmental volume perfusion CT for assessment of the degree of vascularization of (peri) aortitis as a surrogate marker for inflammatory activity. Blood flow, blood volume, volume transfer constant (k-trans), time to peak and mean transit time were determined. The thickness of the increased connective tissue formation was measured. Perfusion data were correlated with clinical symptoms and acute-phase inflammatory parameters such as C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and leukocyte number. 21 of 35 patients were untreated and 14 of 35 had previous/ongoing immunosuppression. The interobserver agreement was good (κ = 0.78) for all perfusion parameters. Average values of perfusion parameters were higher in untreated patients but remained abnormally elevated in treated patients as well. Perfusion data and ESR and CRP correlated well both in aortitis (p < 0.05) and in periaortitis (p < 0.05). In periaortitis, perfusion parameters agreed well with ESR and CRP values (p < 0.05) only in untreated patients. Perfusion CT parameters in untreated aortitis and chronic periaortitis correlate well with serological markers with respect to disease activity assessment. However, in treated periaortitis, correlations were weak, suggesting an increased role for (perfusion-based) imaging. Volume perfusion CT may be used for diagnosis of aortitis/periaortitis.

  19. Angiogenesis in tissue-engineered nerves evaluated objectively using MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-kui; Wang, Ya-xian; Xue, Cheng-bin; Li, Zhen-mei-yu; Huang, Jing; Zhao, Ya-hong; Yang, Yu-min; Gu, Xiao-song

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in regenerative medicine generally, as well as in the specific field of nerve regeneration. However, no convenient and objective method for evaluating the angiogenesis of tissue-engineered nerves has been reported. In this study, tissue-engineered nerves were constructed in vitro using Schwann cells differentiated from rat skin-derived precursors as supporting cells and chitosan nerve conduits combined with silk fibroin fibers as scaffolds to bridge 10-mm sciatic nerve defects in rats. Four weeks after surgery, three-dimensional blood vessel reconstructions were made through MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning, and parameter analysis of the tissue-engineered nerves was performed. New blood vessels grew into the tissue-engineered nerves from three main directions: the proximal end, the distal end, and the middle. The parameter analysis of the three-dimensional blood vessel images yielded several parameters, including the number, diameter, connection, and spatial distribution of blood vessels. The new blood vessels were mainly capillaries and microvessels, with diameters ranging from 9 to 301 μm. The blood vessels with diameters from 27 to 155 μm accounted for 82.84% of the new vessels. The microvessels in the tissue-engineered nerves implanted in vivo were relatively well-identified using the MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning method, which allows the evaluation and comparison of differences and changes of angiogenesis in tissue-engineered nerves implanted in vivo. PMID:26981108

  20. Automatic alignment of myocardial perfusion PET and 64-slice coronary CT angiography on hybrid PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Ryo; Dey, Damini; Alexánderson, Erick; Meave, Aloha; Jiménez, Moisés; Romero, Edgar; Jácome, Rodrigo; Peña, Marco; Berman, Daniel S.; Slomka, Piotr J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hybrid PET/CT allows acquisition of cardiac PET and coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in one session. However, PET and CCTA, are acquired with differing breathing protocols and require software registration. We aimed to validate automatic correction for breathing misalignment between PET and CCTA acquired on hybrid scanner. Methods Single-session hybrid PET/CT studies of rest/stress 13N-ammonia PET and CCTA in 32 consecutive patients were considered. Automated registration of PET left ventricular (LV) surfaces with CCTA volumes was evaluated by comparison to expert manual alignment by 2 observers. Results The average initial misalignment between the position of LV on PET and CCTA was 27.2±11.8mm, 13.3±11.5mm, and 14.3±9.1mm in x, y, and z axes on rest, and 26.3±10.2mm, 11.1±9.5mm, and 11.7±7.1mm in x, y, and z axes on stress. The automated PET-CCTA co-registration had 95% agreement as judged visually. Compared to expert manual alignment, the translation errors of the algorithm were 5.3±2.8mm (rest) and 6.0±3.5mm (stress). 3D visualization of combined coronary vessel anatomy and hypoperfusion from PET could be made without further manual adjustments. Conclusion Software co-registration of CCTA and PET myocardial perfusion imaging on hybrid PET/CT scanners is necessary, but can be performed automatically, facilitating integrated 3D display on PET/CT. PMID:22419224

  1. CT-based attenuation correction in (82)Rb-myocardial perfusion PET-CT: incidence of misalignment and effect on regional tracer distribution.

    PubMed

    Lautamäki, Riikka; Brown, Tracy L Y; Merrill, Jennifer; Bengel, Frank M

    2008-02-01

    Misalignment of low-dose-CT used for attenuation correction (AC) may cause artifacts in cardiac-PET-CT. The aim was to evaluate incidence and severity of misalignment and its quantitative effects on regional myocardial (82)Rb-distribution. Rest/dipyridamole (82)Rb-perfusion-PET-CT studies of 92 consecutive patients were analyzed for misalignment. Two different scanning protocols were employed: the first 57 patients had separate CTs for rest and stress PET. The following 35 patients had one CT at rest, used for AC of rest and stress PET. Misalignment was visually scored on a five-point scale (0 = no, 1 = minimal, 2 = mild, 3 = moderate, and 4 = severe). In five representative patients with normal perfusion and low probability of disease, 95 polarmaps were created by shifting CT vs PET prior to reconstruction of attenuation-corrected data sets using dedicated software (three dimensions of space; magnitude of shifts, 5, 10, 14 mm). PET/CT -misalignment was detected in 60% of rest and 67% of stress studies. Alignment for rest was better than that for stress (0.7 +/- 0.7 vs 1.0 +/- 0.9, P = 0.03). Comparison of the two protocols revealed no effect on the alignment of the stress study (1.0 +/- 0.9 vs 1.0 +/- 0.9, P = 0.9). Quantitatively, the largest individual effect of any artificial misalignment was a 25% reduction of relative (82)Rb uptake. With a shift of 1 cm, the largest effect in an individual was a 19% decrease. Anterior wall was most frequently influenced by misalignment, but changes of uptake also occurred in all other segments. Misalignment between CT and PET in cardiac-PET-CT influences regional tracer distribution in multiple segments. Repeated CT imaging after dipyridamole does not improve alignment. These results emphasize the need for strategies to improve coregistration in clinical imaging protocols.

  2. An efficient polyenergetic SART (pSART) reconstruction algorithm for quantitative myocardial CT perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuan Samei, Ehsan

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In quantitative myocardial CT perfusion imaging, beam hardening effect due to dense bone and high concentration iodinated contrast agent can result in visible artifacts and inaccurate CT numbers. In this paper, an efficient polyenergetic Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (pSART) was presented to eliminate the beam hardening artifacts and to improve the CT quantitative imaging ability. Methods: Our algorithm made threea priori assumptions: (1) the human body is composed of several base materials (e.g., fat, breast, soft tissue, bone, and iodine); (2) images can be coarsely segmented to two types of regions, i.e., nonbone regions and noniodine regions; and (3) each voxel can be decomposed into a mixture of two most suitable base materials according to its attenuation value and its corresponding region type information. Based on the above assumptions, energy-independent accumulated effective lengths of all base materials can be fast computed in the forward ray-tracing process and be used repeatedly to obtain accurate polyenergetic projections, with which a SART-based equation can correctly update each voxel in the backward projecting process to iteratively reconstruct artifact-free images. This approach effectively reduces the influence of polyenergetic x-ray sources and it further enables monoenergetic images to be reconstructed at any arbitrarily preselected target energies. A series of simulation tests were performed on a size-variable cylindrical phantom and a realistic anthropomorphic thorax phantom. In addition, a phantom experiment was also performed on a clinical CT scanner to further quantitatively validate the proposed algorithm. Results: The simulations with the cylindrical phantom and the anthropomorphic thorax phantom showed that the proposed algorithm completely eliminated beam hardening artifacts and enabled quantitative imaging across different materials, phantom sizes, and spectra, as the absolute relative errors were reduced

  3. An efficient polyenergetic SART (pSART) reconstruction algorithm for quantitative myocardial CT perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuan Samei, Ehsan

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In quantitative myocardial CT perfusion imaging, beam hardening effect due to dense bone and high concentration iodinated contrast agent can result in visible artifacts and inaccurate CT numbers. In this paper, an efficient polyenergetic Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (pSART) was presented to eliminate the beam hardening artifacts and to improve the CT quantitative imaging ability. Methods: Our algorithm made threea priori assumptions: (1) the human body is composed of several base materials (e.g., fat, breast, soft tissue, bone, and iodine); (2) images can be coarsely segmented to two types of regions, i.e., nonbone regions and noniodine regions; and (3) each voxel can be decomposed into a mixture of two most suitable base materials according to its attenuation value and its corresponding region type information. Based on the above assumptions, energy-independent accumulated effective lengths of all base materials can be fast computed in the forward ray-tracing process and be used repeatedly to obtain accurate polyenergetic projections, with which a SART-based equation can correctly update each voxel in the backward projecting process to iteratively reconstruct artifact-free images. This approach effectively reduces the influence of polyenergetic x-ray sources and it further enables monoenergetic images to be reconstructed at any arbitrarily preselected target energies. A series of simulation tests were performed on a size-variable cylindrical phantom and a realistic anthropomorphic thorax phantom. In addition, a phantom experiment was also performed on a clinical CT scanner to further quantitatively validate the proposed algorithm. Results: The simulations with the cylindrical phantom and the anthropomorphic thorax phantom showed that the proposed algorithm completely eliminated beam hardening artifacts and enabled quantitative imaging across different materials, phantom sizes, and spectra, as the absolute relative errors were reduced

  4. [Myocardial perfusion imaging by digital subtraction angiography].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, H; Ishikawa, K; Ogai, T; Katori, R

    1986-03-01

    Several methods of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were compared to determine which could better visualize regional myocardial perfusion using coronary angiography in seven patients with myocardial infarction, two with angina pectoris and five with normal coronary arteries. Satisfactory DSA was judged to be achieved if the shape of the heart on the mask film was identical to that on the live film and if both films were exactly superimposed. To obtain an identical mask film in the shape of each live film, both films were selected from the following three phases of the cardiac cycle; at the R wave of the electrocardiogram, 100 msec before the R wave, and 200 msec before the R wave. The last two were superior for obtaining mask and live films which were similar in shape, because the cardiac motion in these phases was relatively small. Using these mask and live films, DSA was performed either with the continuous image mode (CI mode) or the time interval difference mode (TID mode). The overall perfusion of contrast medium through the artery to the vein was adequately visualized using the CI mode. Passage of contrast medium through the artery, capillary and vein was visualized at each phase using TID mode. Subtracted images were displayed and photographed, and the density of the contrast medium was adequate to display contour lines as in a relief map. Using this DSA, it was found that regional perfusion of the contrast medium was not always uniform in normal subjects, depending on the typography of the coronary artery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Recent Advances in Cardiac Computed Tomography: Dual Energy, Spectral and Molecular CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Danad, Ibrahim; Fayad, Zahi A.; Willemink, Martin J.; Min, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) evolved into a powerful diagnostic tool and it is impossible to imagine current clinical practice without CT imaging. Due to its widespread availability, ease of clinical application, superb sensitivity for detection of CAD, and non-invasive nature, CT has become a valuable tool within the armamentarium of the cardiologist. In the last few years, numerous technological advances in CT have occurred—including dual energy CT (DECT), spectral CT and CT-based molecular imaging. By harnessing the advances in technology, cardiac CT has advanced beyond the mere evaluation of coronary stenosis to an imaging modality tool that permits accurate plaque characterization, assessment of myocardial perfusion and even probing of molecular processes that are involved in coronary atherosclerosis. Novel innovations in CT contrast agents and pre-clinical spectral CT devices have paved the way for CT-based molecular imaging. PMID:26068288

  6. Accuracy of perfusion-CT in predicting malignant middle cerebral artery brain infarction.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, R; Kloska, S P; Fischer, T; Nam, E; Ritter, M A; Seidensticker, P; Heindel, W; Nabavi, D G; Ringelstein, E B

    2008-06-01

    We performed a prospective study on patients with middle cerebral artery(MCA) ischemic stroke to evaluate the accuracy of perfusion-CT imaging(PCT) to predict the development of malignant brain infarction (MBI). 106 patients(women 37 %, mean age 65 years)underwent native cranial computed tomography (CCT), CT angiography(CTA) and PCT after a median of 2 h after stroke onset. We assessed the patency of the MCA and the area of tissue ischemia (AIT)according to cerebral blood flow(CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and time-to-peak (TTP)maps. Optimum sensitivity, specificity,positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were calculated for the end-point MBI (= midline shift > 5 mm or decompressive surgery) by means of receiver operating characteristics(ROC). 20 patients (19 %)developed a MBI. In these patients,a larger AIT was found in all perfusion maps as compared to the remaining patients (p < 0.001). All perfusion maps had a very high NPV (95.4-98.4 %), a high sensitivity (85-95 %) and specificity (71.6-77.9 %) and only a moderate PPV (44-47.4 %). Best prediction was found for CBF maps with AIT of > 27.9 % of the hemisphere. PCT allows the discrimination of patients without a relevant risk for MBI from those having a 50 % risk of MBI development. Due to the high sensitivity and specificity, PCT is a reliable tool in detecting MBI. Because of PCT's better availability, it is the method of choice at present for an early risk stratification of acute stroke patients.

  7. CT perfusion during delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage: distinction between reversible ischemia and ischemia progressing to infarction.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Charlotte H P; Vos, Pieter C; van der Schaaf, Irene C; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Dankbaar, Jan Willem

    2015-09-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) can be reversible or progress to cerebral infarction. In patients with a deterioration clinically diagnosed as DCI, we investigated whether CT perfusion (CTP) can distinguish between reversible ischemia and ischemia progressing to cerebral infarction. From a prospectively collected series of aSAH patients, we included those with DCI, CTP on the day of clinical deterioration, and follow-up imaging. In qualitative CTP analyses (visual assessment), we calculated positive and negative predictive value (PPV and NPV) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) of a perfusion deficit for infarction on follow-up imaging. In quantitative analyses, we compared perfusion values of the least perfused brain tissue between patients with and without infarction by using receiver-operator characteristic curves and calculated a threshold value with PPV and NPV for the perfusion parameter with the highest area under the curve. In qualitative analyses of 33 included patients, 15 of 17 patients (88%) with and 6 of 16 patients (38%) without infarction on follow-up imaging had a perfusion deficit during clinical deterioration (p = 0.002). Presence of a perfusion deficit had a PPV of 71% (95%CI: 48-89%) and NPV of 83% (95%CI: 52-98%) for infarction on follow-up. Quantitative analyses showed that an absolute minimal cerebral blood flow (CBF) threshold of 17.7 mL/100 g/min had a PPV of 63% (95%CI: 41-81%) and a NPV of 78% (95%CI: 40-97%) for infarction. CTP may differ between patients with DCI who develop infarction and those who do not. For this purpose, qualitative evaluation may perform marginally better than quantitative evaluation.

  8. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound and computerized tomography perfusion imaging of a liver fibrosis-early cirrhosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanghui; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Yaqin; Liao, Jian; Tong, Qiongjuan; Gao, Feng; Hu, Yuequn; Wang, Wei

    2016-09-01

    To assess liver fibrosis stages in a liver fibrosis-early cirrhosis model in dogs, the clinical efficiency of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging were compared. Hepatic vein arriving time (HVAT), hepatic artery arriving time, and hepatic artery to vein transit time (HA-VTT) were measured on CEUS. Total liver perfusion (TLP), portal vein perfusion (PVP), hepatic artery perfusion, and hepatic perfusion index (HPI) were measured on CT perfusion imaging. Histologic examination of liver specimens of the animals was performed to assess the fibrosis stage. For assessment of liver fibrosis, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of CEUS indexes HVAT and HA-VTT were 0.865 and 0.930, respectively; the perfusion CT indexes TLP, PVP, and HPI were 0.797, 0.800, and 0.220, respectively; the serological index hyaluronic acid was 0.793. While for assessment of early cirrhosis, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of CEUS indexes HVAT and HA-VTT were 0.915 and 0.948, respectively; the perfusion CT indexes TLP, PVP, and HPI were 0.737, 0.765, and 0.218, respectively; the serological index hyaluronic acid was 0.627. This study showed that both CEUS and CT perfusion imaging have the potential to be complementary imaging tools in the evaluation of liver fibrosis. While CEUS is the better choice and the index HA-VTT can be considered as non-invasive semi-quantitative indexes for diagnosing liver fibrosis and early cirrhosis. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Whole-tumor perfusion CT in patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma treated with conventional and antiangiogenetic chemotherapy: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Fraioli, Francesco; Anzidei, Michele; Zaccagna, Fulvio; Mennini, Maria Luisa; Serra, Goffredo; Gori, Bruno; Longo, Flavia; Catalano, Carlo; Passariello, Roberto

    2011-05-01

    To determine whether wide-volume perfusion computed tomography (CT) performed with a new generation scanner can allow evaluation of the effects of chemotherapy combined with antiangiogenetic treatment on the whole tumor mass in patients with locally advanced lung adenocarcinoma and to determine if changes in CT numbers correlate with the response to therapy as assessed by conventional response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST). Forty-five patients with unresectable lung adenocarcinoma underwent perfusion CT before and 40 and 90 days after chemotherapy and antiangiogenetic treatment. RECIST measurements and calculations of blood flow, blood volume, time to peak, and permeability were performed by two independent blinded radiologists. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to assess the correlation between baseline CT numbers. Baseline and follow-up perfusion parameters of the neoplastic lesions were tested overall for statistically significant differences by using the repeated-measures analysis of variance and then were also compared on the basis of the therapy response assessed according to the RECIST criteria. Pearson correlation coefficient showed a significant correlation between baseline values of blood flow and blood volume (ρ = 0.48; P = .001), time to peak and permeability (ρ = 0.31; P = .04), time to peak and blood flow (ρ = -0.66; P < .001), and time to peak and blood volume (ρ = -0.39; P = .007). Blood flow, blood volume, and permeability values were higher in responding patients than in the other patients, with a significant difference at second follow-up for blood flow (P = .0001), blood volume (P = .02), and permeability (P = .0001); time to peak was higher in nonresponding patients (P = .012). Perfusion CT imaging may allow evaluation of lung cancer angiogenesis demonstrating alterations in vascularity following treatment. RSNA, 2011

  10. Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging in the Study of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a brief review of various uses of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in the investigation of brain/language relationships. The reviewed studies illustrate how perfusion imaging can reveal areas of brain where dysfunction due to low blood flow is associated with specific language deficits, and where restoration of blood flow…

  11. Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging in the Study of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a brief review of various uses of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in the investigation of brain/language relationships. The reviewed studies illustrate how perfusion imaging can reveal areas of brain where dysfunction due to low blood flow is associated with specific language deficits, and where restoration of blood flow…

  12. Optimisation of reconstruction for the registration of CT liver perfusion sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romain, B.; Letort, V.; Lucidarme, O.; d'Alché-Buc, F.; Rouet, L.

    2012-02-01

    Objective. CT abdominal perfusion is frequently used to evaluate tumor evolution when patients are undergoing antiangiogenic therapy. Parameters depending on longer-term dynamics of the diffusion of the contrast medium (e. g. permeability) could help assessing the treatment efficacy. To this end, dynamic image sequences are obtained while patients breath freely. Prior to any analysis, one needs to compensate the respiratory motion. The goal of our study is to optimize the CT reconstruction parameters (filter of reconstruction, thickness of image volumes) for our registration method. We also aim at proposing relevant criteria allowing to quantify the registration quality. Methods. Registration is computed in 4 steps: z-global rigid registration, local refinements with multiresolution blockmatching, regularization and warping. Two new criteria are defined to evaluate the quality of registration: one for spatial evaluation and the other for temporal evaluation. Results. The two measures decrease after registration (58% and 10% average decrease for the best reconstruction parameters for the spatial and temporal criteria respectively) which is consistent with visual inspection of the images. They are therefore used to determine the best combination of reconstruction parameters.

  13. Comparison of Perfusion CT Software to Predict the Final Infarct Volume After Thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Austein, Friederike; Riedel, Christian; Kerby, Tina; Meyne, Johannes; Binder, Andreas; Lindner, Thomas; Huhndorf, Monika; Wodarg, Fritz; Jansen, Olav

    2016-09-01

    Computed tomographic perfusion represents an interesting physiological imaging modality to select patients for reperfusion therapy in acute ischemic stroke. The purpose of our study was to determine the accuracy of different commercial perfusion CT software packages (Philips (A), Siemens (B), and RAPID (C)) to predict the final infarct volume (FIV) after mechanical thrombectomy. Single-institutional computed tomographic perfusion data from 147 mechanically recanalized acute ischemic stroke patients were postprocessed. Ischemic core and FIV were compared about thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (TICI) score and time interval to reperfusion. FIV was measured at follow-up imaging between days 1 and 8 after stroke. In 118 successfully recanalized patients (TICI 2b/3), a moderately to strongly positive correlation was observed between ischemic core and FIV. The highest accuracy and best correlation are shown in early and fully recanalized patients (Pearson r for A=0.42, B=0.64, and C=0.83; P<0.001). Bland-Altman plots and boxplots demonstrate smaller ranges in package C than in A and B. Significant differences were found between the packages about over- and underestimation of the ischemic core. Package A, compared with B and C, estimated more than twice as many patients with a malignant stroke profile (P<0.001). Package C best predicted hypoperfusion volume in nonsuccessfully recanalized patients. Our study demonstrates best accuracy and approximation between the results of a fully automated software (RAPID) and FIV, especially in early and fully recanalized patients. Furthermore, this software package overestimated the FIV to a significantly lower degree and estimated a malignant mismatch profile less often than other software. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Arterial Wall Perfusion Measured with Photon Counting Spectral X-ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Steven M.; Korinek, Mark J.; Vercnocke, Andrew J.; Anderson, Jill L.; Halaweish, Ahmed; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2016-01-01

    Early atherosclerosis changes perfusion of the arterial wall due to localized proliferation of the vasa vasorum. When contrast agent passes through the artery, some enters the vasa vasorum and increases radiopacity of the arterial wall. Technical challenges to detecting changes in vasa vasorum density include the thin arterial wall, partial volume averaging at the arterial lumen/wall interface and calcification within the wall. We used a photon-counting spectral CT scanner to study carotid arteries of anesthetized pigs and micro-CT of these arteries to quantify vasa vasorum density. The left carotid artery wall was injected with autologous blood to stimulate vasa vasorum angiogenesis. The scans were performed at 25–120 keV; the tube-current-time product was 550 mAs. A 60 mL bolus of iodine contrast agent was injected into the femoral vein at 5mL/s. Two seconds post injection, an axial scan was acquired at every 3 s over 60 s (i.e., 20 time points). Each time point acquired 28 contiguous transaxial slices with reconstructed voxels 0.16 × 0.16 × 1 mm3. Regions-of-interest in the outer 2/3 of the arterial wall and in the middle 2/3 of the lumen were drawn and their enhancements plotted versus time. Lumenal CT values peaked several seconds after injection and then returned towards baseline. Arterial wall CT values peaked concurrent to the lumen. The peak arterial wall enhancement in the left carotid arterial wall correlated with increased vasa vasorum density observed in micro-CT images of the isolated arteries. PMID:27807391

  15. Arterial wall perfusion measured with photon counting spectral x-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Steven M.; Korinek, Mark J.; Vercnocke, Andrew J.; Anderson, Jill L.; Halaweish, Ahmed; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2016-10-01

    Early atherosclerosis changes perfusion of the arterial wall due to localized proliferation of the vasa vasorum. When contrast agent passes through the artery, some enters the vasa vasorum and increases radiopacity of the arterial wall. Technical challenges to detecting changes in vasa vasorum density include the thin arterial wall, partial volume averaging at the arterial lumen/wall interface and calcification within the wall. We used a photon-counting spectral CT scanner to study carotid arteries of anesthetized pigs and micro-CT of these arteries to quantify vasa vasorum density. The left carotid artery wall was injected with autologous blood to stimulate vasa vasorum angiogenesis. The scans were performed at 25-120 keV; the tube-current-time product was 550 mAs. A 60 mL bolus of iodine contrast agent was injected into the femoral vein at 5mL/s. Two seconds post injection, an axial scan was acquired at every 3 s over 60 s (i.e., 20 time points). Each time point acquired 28 contiguous transaxial slices with reconstructed voxels 0.16 x 0.16 x 1 mm3. Regions-of-interest in the outer 2/3 of the arterial wall and in the middle 2/3 of the lumen were drawn and their enhancements plotted versus time. Lumenal CT values peaked several seconds after injection and then returned towards baseline. Arterial wall CT values peaked concurrent to the lumen. The peak arterial wall enhancement in the left carotid arterial wall correlated with increased vasa vasorum density observed in micro-CT images of the isolated arteries.

  16. Arterial Wall Perfusion Measured with Photon Counting Spectral X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Steven M; Korinek, Mark J; Vercnocke, Andrew J; Anderson, Jill L; Halaweish, Ahmed; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H; Ritman, Erik L

    2016-08-28

    Early atherosclerosis changes perfusion of the arterial wall due to localized proliferation of the vasa vasorum. When contrast agent passes through the artery, some enters the vasa vasorum and increases radiopacity of the arterial wall. Technical challenges to detecting changes in vasa vasorum density include the thin arterial wall, partial volume averaging at the arterial lumen/wall interface and calcification within the wall. We used a photon-counting spectral CT scanner to study carotid arteries of anesthetized pigs and micro-CT of these arteries to quantify vasa vasorum density. The left carotid artery wall was injected with autologous blood to stimulate vasa vasorum angiogenesis. The scans were performed at 25-120 keV; the tube-current-time product was 550 mAs. A 60 mL bolus of iodine contrast agent was injected into the femoral vein at 5mL/s. Two seconds post injection, an axial scan was acquired at every 3 s over 60 s (i.e., 20 time points). Each time point acquired 28 contiguous transaxial slices with reconstructed voxels 0.16 × 0.16 × 1 mm(3). Regions-of-interest in the outer 2/3 of the arterial wall and in the middle 2/3 of the lumen were drawn and their enhancements plotted versus time. Lumenal CT values peaked several seconds after injection and then returned towards baseline. Arterial wall CT values peaked concurrent to the lumen. The peak arterial wall enhancement in the left carotid arterial wall correlated with increased vasa vasorum density observed in micro-CT images of the isolated arteries.

  17. Perfusion CT in acute stroke: effectiveness of automatically-generated colour maps.

    PubMed

    Ukmar, Maja; Degrassi, Ferruccio; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberta Antea; Neri, Francesca; Mucelli, Fabio Pozzi; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of perfusion CT (pCT) in the definition of the infarcted core and the penumbra, comparing the data obtained from the evaluation of parametric maps [cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF) and mean transit time (MTT)] with software-generated colour maps. A retrospective analysis was performed to identify patients with suspected acute ischaemic strokes and who had undergone unenhanced CT and pCT carried out within 4.5 h from the onset of the symptoms. A qualitative evaluation of the CBV, CBF and MTT maps was performed, followed by an analysis of the colour maps automatically generated by the software. 26 patients were identified, but a direct CT follow-up was performed only on 19 patients after 24-48 h. In the qualitative analysis, 14 patients showed perfusion abnormalities. Specifically, 29 perfusion deficit areas were detected, of which 15 areas suggested the penumbra and the remaining 14 areas suggested the infarct. As for automatically software-generated maps, 12 patients showed perfusion abnormalities. 25 perfusion deficit areas were identified, 15 areas of which suggested the penumbra and the other 10 areas the infarct. The McNemar's test showed no statistically significant difference between the two methods of evaluation in highlighting infarcted areas proved later at CT follow-up. We demonstrated how pCT provides good diagnostic accuracy in the identification of acute ischaemic lesions. The limits of identification of the lesions mainly lie at the pons level and in the basal ganglia area. Qualitative analysis has proven to be more efficient in identification of perfusion lesions in comparison with software-generated maps. However, software-generated maps have proven to be very useful in the emergency setting. Advances in knowledge: The use of CT perfusion is requested in increasingly more patients in order to optimize the treatment, thanks also to the technological evolution of CT, which now allows a whole

  18. Reproducibility and variability of very low dose hepatic perfusion CT in metastatic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Topcuoğlu, Osman Melih; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa Nasuh

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to determine the intra- and interobserver agreement on the software analysis of very low dose hepatic perfusion CT (pCT). METHODS A total of 53 pCT examinations were obtained from 21 patients (16 men, 5 women; mean age, 60.4 years) with proven liver metastasis from various primary cancers. The pCT examinations were analyzed by two readers independently and perfusion parameters were noted for whole liver, whole metastasis, metastasis wall, and normal-looking liver (liver tissue without metastasis) in regions of interest (ROIs). Readers repeated the analysis after an interval of one month. Intra- and interobserver agreements were assessed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Bland-Altman statistics. RESULTS The mean ICCs of all ROIs between readers were 0.91, 0.93, 0.86, 0.45, 0.53, and 0.66 for blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), permeability, arterial liver perfusion (ALP), portal venous perfusion (PVP) and hepatic perfusion index (HPI), respectively. The mean ICCs of all ROIs between readings were 0.86, 0.91, 0.81, 0.53, 0.56, and 0.71 for BF, BV, permeability, ALP, PVP, and HPI, respectively. There was greater agreement on the parameters measured for the whole metastasis than on the parameters measured for the metastasis wall. The effective dose of all perfusion CT studies was 2.9 mSv. CONCLUSION There is greater intra- and interobserver agreement for BF and BV than for permeability, ALP, PVP, and HPI at very low dose hepatic pCT. Permeability, ALP, PVP, and HPI parameters cannot be used in clinical practice for hepatic pCT with an effective dose of 2.9 mSv. PMID:27759566

  19. Isoattenuating insulinomas at biphasic contrast-enhanced CT: frequency, clinicopathologic features and perfusion characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Xue, Hua-Dan; Sun, Hao; Wang, Xuan; He, Yong-Lan; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Zhao, Yu-Pei

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to determine the frequency of isoattenuating insulinomas, to investigate their clinicopathological features and to assess their regional pancreatic perfusion characteristics. Institutional review board approval was obtained, and patient informed consent was waived. From July 2010 to June 2014, 170 patients (66 male, 104 female) with endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia underwent biphasic contrast-enhanced CT before surgery, and 129 of those patients also received preoperative whole-pancreas CT perfusion. A total of 181 tumours were proved histopathologically after surgery. Enhancement pattern and regional pancreatic perfusion characteristics were analyzed. Clinical features, tumour size and pathological grading were investigated. The frequency of isoattenuating tumours was 24.9 %. Tumour size and WHO grading was not significantly different between isoattenuating and hyperattenuating tumours. Tumour-free regions had identical blood flow (BF) regardless of their location (p = 0.35). Isoattenuating tumour-harbouring regions had lower BF compared with hyperattenuating tumour-harbouring regions; both showed higher BF compared with tumour-free neighbourhood regions (all p < 0.01). For patients with isoattenuating tumours, the overall hospital stay was longer (p < 0.01). A substantial subset of insulinomas were isoattenuating on biphasic CT. CT perfusion showed higher BF in tumour-harbouring regions compared to tumour-free regions, providing a clue for tumour regionalization. • About a quarter of all insulinomas were isoattenuating on biphasic contrast-enhanced CT. • CT perfusion finds tumour-harbouring regions have higher blood-flow compared to tumour-free regions. • CT perfusion provides important information for tumour regionalization, for isoattenuating tumours.

  20. New Trends in Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Guang-Uei; Wang, Yuh-Feng; Su, Hung-Yi; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Ko, Chi-Lun; Yen, Ruoh-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been widely used clinically as one of the major functional imaging modalities for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) for decades. Ample evidence has supported the use of MPI as a useful and important tool in the diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment planning for CAD. Although popular in the United States, MPI has become the most frequently used imaging modality among all nuclear medicine tests in Taiwan. However, it should be acknowledged that MPI SPECT does have its limitations. These include false-positive results due to certain artifacts, false-negative due to balanced ischemia, complexity and adverse reaction arising from current pharmacological stressors, time consuming nature of the imaging procedure, no blood flow quantitation and relatively high radiation exposure. The purpose of this article was to review the recent trends in nuclear cardiology, including the utilization of positron emission tomography (PET) for MPI, new stressor, new SPECT camera with higher resolution and higher sensitivity, dynamic SPECT protocol for blood flow quantitation, new software of phase analysis for evaluation of LV dyssynchrony, and measures utilized for reducing radiation exposure of MPI. PMID:27122946

  1. Acute Pyelonephritis Focusing on Perfusion Defects on Contrast Enhansed Computerized Tomography(CT) Scans and Its Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sung-Kyu; Seo, Jung-Kun; Kim, Seung-Jung; Park, Seung-Ho; Park, Chong-Hoon; Lee, Ho-Yung; Han, Dae-Suk; Kim, Ki-Whang

    1997-01-01

    Objectives Many cases of acute pyelonephritis show renal perfusion defects on contrast enhanced computerized tomography (CT) imaging studies. The purpose of this study is to show the frequency of renal perfusion defects in uncomplicated acute pyelonephritis and to compare the clinical responses of patients who had perfusion defects or not. Methods We studied patients who had symptoms and signs of acute pyelonephritis through CT examinations with contrast enhancement. We identified 21 cases who had perfusion defects among 35 patients who had undergone CT imaging studies and compared the clinical data in the two groups of patients who had perfusion defects on CT (group 1) and who had not (group 2). Results Nearly all patients had typical symptoms and signs of acute pyelonephritis such as high fever and chill, flank pain and costovertebral angle tenderness. Combined clinical problems were septic shock (one case, 4.8%) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) (one case, 4.8%) in group 1. Laboratory findings were not different between the two groups. All patients were treated with antibiotics and had successful recoveries. The duration of recovery of pyuria in group 1 (5.2±9.6 days) was not longer than that in group 2(3.1±2.9 days) (p>0.05). The length of defeverscence in group 1 (7.0±4.6 days) was longer than in group 2 (3.5±2.7 days) (p<0.05). There were no differences between group 1 and group 2 in the rate of predisposing factors. Thirteen of 21 cases (61.9%) in group 1 and five of 14 cases (35.7%) in group 2 had positive urine culture results which are relatively low probably due to the administration of antibiotics prior to our emergency room visit. Perfusion defects on CT were very frequent findings (60.0% of the clinical acute pyelonephritis patients). We classified CT findings of group 1 as focal unilateral (2 cases, 9.5%), multifocal unilateral (14 cases, 66.7%) and multifocal bilateral (5 cases, 23.8%), and there were no differences between the

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Ventilation and Perfusion in the Lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, Gordon Kim (Inventor); Hopkins, Susan Roberta (Inventor); Buxton, Richard Bruce (Inventor); Pereira De Sa, Rui Carlos (Inventor); Theilmann, Rebecca Jean (Inventor); Cronin, Matthew Vincent (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Methods, devices, and systems are disclosed for implementing a fully quantitative non-injectable contrast proton MRI technique to measure spatial ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) matching and spatial distribution of ventilation and perfusion. In one aspect, a method using MRI to characterize ventilation and perfusion in a lung includes acquiring an MR image of the lung having MR data in a voxel and obtaining a breathing frequency parameter, determining a water density value, a specific ventilation value, and a perfusion value in at least one voxel of the MR image based on the MR data and using the water density value to determine an air content value, and determining a ventilation-perfusion ratio value that is the product of the specific ventilation value, the air content value, the inverse of the perfusion value, and the breathing frequency.

  3. [A comparison of ventilation/perfusion single photon emission CT and CT pulmonary angiography for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Meng, Jing-jing; Zhang, Li-jun; Wang, Qian; Fang, Wei; Dai, Hao-jie; Yan, Jue; Wang, Tie; Yao, Zhi-ming; He, Jia; Li, Mei; Mi, Hong-zhi; Jiao, Jian; Zheng, Yu-min

    2013-03-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) single photon emission CT (SPECT) as compared to computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) for pulmonary embolism (PE). In this prospective multicenter study, 111 patients in whom acute or sub-acute PE was clinically confirmed or suspected were enrolled. The patients underwent one-day method V/Q lung scan (including SPECT and planar imaging) within 3 days before and after completion of CTPA. The European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) guidelines for ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy (2009) reference was used as the evaluation criteria of V/Q SPECT imaging. The refined modified prospective investigation of pulmonary embolism diagnosis (RM-PIOPED) criteria was used for evaluation of planar imaging. According to the direct and indirect signs of PE, the imaging of CTPA was evaluated. All patients were followed for at least 6 months. A diagnosis was finally made by consensus of respiratory physicians, radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians based on the clinical data, laboratory tests, imaging features and follow-up results. The difference among diagnostic methods was evaluated for significance using chi-square test. The receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn according to the results of the 3 diagnostic tests. The area under ROC curve (AUC) was calculated and compared. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Among the 111 patients, PE was confirmed in 80, and excluded in 31. The diagnostic sensitivity/specificity/accuracy of V/Q SPECT, planar imaging, and CTPA were 85.9%/93.5%/88.1%, 75.7%/92.9%/81.4%, and 85.5%/90.0%/86.8%, respectively. By ROC curve analysis, the AUC values of V/Q SPECT, planar imaging and CTPA were 0.898, 0.838, and 0.877, respectively; with 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.831 to 0.966, 0.759 to 0.917, and 0.801 to 0.954, respectively. The area of the fitted smooth ROC curve was statistically significant (P < 0.05) as compared with the

  4. Effect of venous injection site on accuracy of fast computed tomography (CT) estimation of myocardial perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.R.; Rumberger, J.A.; Lerman, L.O.; Behrenbeck, T.; Sheedy, P.F.; Ritman, E.L. )

    1990-02-26

    Measurement of myocardial perfusion with fast CT, using venous injections of contrast, underestimates high flow rates. Accounting for intramyocardial blood volume improves the accuracy of such measurements but the additional influence of different contrast injection sites is unknown. To examine this, eight closed chest anesthetized dogs (18-24 kg) underwent fast CT studies of regional myocardial perfusion which were compared to microspheres (M). Dilute iohexol (0.5 mL/kg) was injected over 2.5 seconds, via, in turn, the pulmonary artery (PA), proximal inferior vena cava (IVC) and femoral vein (FV) during CT scans performed at rest and after vasodilation with adenosine (M flow range: 52-399 mL/100 g/minute). Correlations made with M were not significantly different for PA vs IVC (n = 24), PA vs FV (n = 22) and IVC vs FV (n = 44). To determine the relative influence of injection site on accuracy of measurements above normal flow rates (> 150mL/100g/minute), CT flow (mL/100g/minute; mean {+-}SD) was compared to M. Thus, at normal flow, some CT overestimation of myocardial perfusion occurred with PA injections but FV or IVC injections provided for accurate measurements. At higher flow rates only PA and IVC injections enabled accurate CT measurements of perfusion. This may be related to differing transit kinetics of the input bolus of contrast.

  5. Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Scoring of CT perfusion in early stroke visualization and assessment.

    PubMed

    Aviv, R I; Mandelcorn, J; Chakraborty, S; Gladstone, D; Malham, S; Tomlinson, G; Fox, A J; Symons, S

    2007-01-01

    Qualitative CT perfusion (CTP) assessment by using the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) allows rapid calculation of infarct extent for middle cerebral artery infarcts. Published thresholds exist for noncontrast CT (NCCT) ASPECTS, which may distinguish outcome/complication risk, but early ischemic signs are difficult to detect. We hypothesized that different ASPECTS thresholds exist for CTP parameters versus NCCT and that these may be superior at predicting clinical and radiologic outcome in the acute setting. Thirty-six baseline acute stroke NCCT and CTP studies within 3 hours of symptoms were blindly reviewed by 3 neuroradiologists, and ASPECTS were assigned. Treatment response was defined as major neurologic improvement when a > or =8-point National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale improvement at 24 hours occurred. Follow-up NCCT ASPECTS and 90-day modified Rankin score (mRS) were radiologic and clinical reference standards. Receiver operating characteristic curves derived optimal thresholds for outcome. Cerebral blood volume and NCCT ASPECTS had similar radiologic correlations (0.6 and 0.5, respectively) and best predicted infarct size in the absence of major neurologic improvement. A NCCT ASPECT threshold of 7 and a cerebral blood volume threshold of 8 discriminated patients with poor follow-up scans (P < .0002 and P = .0001) and mRS < or =2 (P = .001 and P < .001). Only cerebral blood volume predicted major neurologic improvement (P = .02). Interobserver agreement was substantial (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.69). Cerebral blood volume ASPECTS sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for clinical outcome were 60%, 100%, 100%, and 45%, respectively. No patients with cerebral blood volume ASPECTS <8 achieved good clinical outcome. Cerebral blood volume ASPECTS is equivalent to NCCT for predicting radiologic outcome but may have an additional benefit in predicting patients with major neurologic

  6. Development of a realistic, dynamic digital brain phantom for CT perfusion validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divel, Sarah E.; Segars, W. Paul; Christensen, Soren; Wintermark, Max; Lansberg, Maarten G.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-03-01

    Physicians rely on CT Perfusion (CTP) images and quantitative image data, including cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and bolus arrival delay, to diagnose and treat stroke patients. However, the quantification of these metrics may vary depending on the computational method used. Therefore, we have developed a dynamic and realistic digital brain phantom upon which CTP scans can be simulated based on a set of ground truth scenarios. Building upon the previously developed 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom containing a highly detailed brain model, this work consisted of expanding the intricate vasculature by semi-automatically segmenting existing MRA data and fitting nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces to the new vessels. Using time attenuation curves input by the user as reference, the contrast enhancement in the vessels changes dynamically. At each time point, the iodine concentration in the arteries and veins is calculated from the curves and the material composition of the blood changes to reflect the expected values. CatSim, a CT system simulator, generates simulated data sets of this dynamic digital phantom which can be further analyzed to validate CTP studies and post-processing methods. The development of this dynamic and realistic digital phantom provides a valuable resource with which current uncertainties and controversies surrounding the quantitative computations generated from CTP data can be examined and resolved.

  7. Diagnostic and Prognostic Impact of pc-ASPECTS Applied to Perfusion CT in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study.

    PubMed

    Pallesen, Lars-Peder; Gerber, Johannes; Dzialowski, Imanuel; van der Hoeven, Erik J R J; Michel, Patrik; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Ozdoba, Christoph; Kappelle, L Jaap; Wiedemann, Baerbel; Khomenko, Andrei; Algra, Ale; Hill, Michael D; von Kummer, Ruediger; Demchuk, Andrew M; Schonewille, Wouter J; Puetz, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The posterior circulation Acute Stroke Prognosis Early CT Score (pc-APECTS) applied to CT angiography source images (CTA-SI) predicts the functional outcome of patients in the Basilar Artery International Cooperation Study (BASICS). We assessed the diagnostic and prognostic impact of pc-ASPECTS applied to perfusion CT (CTP) in the BASICS registry population. We applied pc-ASPECTS to CTA-SI and cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT) parameter maps of BASICS patients with CTA and CTP studies performed. Hypoattenuation on CTA-SI, relative reduction in CBV or CBF, or relative increase in MTT were rated as abnormal. CTA and CTP were available in 27/592 BASICS patients (4.6%). The proportion of patients with any perfusion abnormality was highest for MTT (93%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 76%-99%), compared with 78% (58%-91%) for CTA-SI and CBF, and 46% (27%-67%) for CBV (P < .001). All 3 patients with a CBV pc-ASPECTS < 8 compared to 6/23 patients with a CBV pc-ASPECTS ≥ 8 had died at 1 month (RR 3.8; 95% CI, 1.9-7.6). CTP was performed in a minority of the BASICS registry population. Perfusion disturbances in the posterior circulation were most pronounced on MTT parameter maps. CBV pc-ASPECTS < 8 may indicate patients with high case fatality. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  8. Repeated Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography and Perfusion-Computed Tomography Imaging in Rectal Cancer: Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake Corresponds With Tumor Perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Marco H.M.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Oellers, Michel C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze both the intratumoral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake and perfusion within rectal tumors before and after hypofractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Rectal cancer patients, referred for preoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT), underwent FDG-positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) and perfusion-CT (pCT) imaging before the start of hypofractionated RT and at the day of the last RT fraction. The pCT-images were analyzed using the extended Kety model, quantifying tumor perfusion with the pharmacokinetic parameters K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, and v{sub p}. The mean and maximum FDG uptake based on the standardized uptake value (SUV) and transfer constant (K{sup trans}) within the tumor were correlated. Also, the tumor was subdivided into eight subregions and for each subregion the mean and maximum SUVs and K{sup trans} values were assessed and correlated. Furthermore, the mean FDG uptake in voxels presenting with the lowest 25% of perfusion was compared with the FDG uptake in the voxels with the 25% highest perfusion. Results: The mean and maximum K{sup trans} values were positively correlated with the corresponding SUVs ({rho} = 0.596, p = 0.001 and {rho} = 0.779, p < 0.001). Also, positive correlations were found for K{sup trans} values and SUVs within the subregions (mean, {rho} = 0.413, p < 0.001; and max, {rho} = 0.540, p < 0.001). The mean FDG uptake in the 25% highest-perfused tumor regions was significantly higher compared with the 25% lowest-perfused regions (10.6% {+-} 5.1%, p = 0.017). During hypofractionated radiotherapy, stable mean (p = 0.379) and maximum (p = 0.280) FDG uptake levels were found, whereas the mean (p = 0.040) and maximum (p = 0.003) K{sup trans} values were found to significantly increase. Conclusion: Highly perfused rectal tumors presented with higher FDG-uptake levels compared with relatively low perfused tumors. Also, intratumor regions with a high FDG

  9. Does perfusion CT play a role in the evaluation of percutaneous microwave-ablated lung tumours?

    PubMed

    Parvizi, N; Chung, D; Little, M W; Gleeson, F V; Anderson, E M

    2016-11-01

    To assess the clinical utility of perfusion computed tomography (pCT) parameters in microwave ablation (MWA) of lung tumours. Patients were included who had primary or metastatic lung tumours and underwent pCT studies immediately pre- and post-MWA. Perfusion maps of the tumours were constructed using CT perfusion software (GE, Milwaukee, WI, USA). Regions of interest were drawn on sequential axial sections to extract the pCT parameters, blood volume (BV), average blood flow (BF), and mean transit time (MTT) from the entire tumour volume. Direct visualisation of perfusion maps were performed by two experienced readers blinded to outcome. Data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney test. Thirty-one patients with 34 lung tumours had follow-up data at 12 months. The median tumour diameter was 19 mm (10-52 mm). Seven patients developed local tumour progression (LTP) at 12 months. There was no statistical difference between patients with LTP and complete treatment based on quantitative pCT parameters. Using radiologist visualisation of perfusion maps, there was moderate agreement between the two readers (kappa coefficient 0.53) with a combined 96% sensitivity, 62% specificity, 91% positive predictive value, and 80% negative predictive value. Quantitative pCT parameters do not help differentiate between LTP and complete treatment, but subjective analysis of perfusion maps may be a useful assessment tool for identifying treatment adequacy potentially enabling identification of areas requiring further treatment at the time of the procedure. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Different CT perfusion algorithms in the detection of delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Charlotte H P; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Vos, Pieter C; Bennink, Edwin; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Velthuis, Birgitta K; van der Schaaf, Irene C

    2015-05-01

    Tracer delay-sensitive perfusion algorithms in CT perfusion (CTP) result in an overestimation of the extent of ischemia in thromboembolic stroke. In diagnosing delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), delayed arrival of contrast due to vasospasm may also overestimate the extent of ischemia. We investigated the diagnostic accuracy of tracer delay-sensitive and tracer delay-insensitive algorithms for detecting DCI. From a prospectively collected series of aSAH patients admitted between 2007-2011, we included patients with any clinical deterioration other than rebleeding within 21 days after SAH who underwent NCCT/CTP/CTA imaging. Causes of clinical deterioration were categorized into DCI and no DCI. CTP maps were calculated with tracer delay-sensitive and tracer delay-insensitive algorithms and were visually assessed for the presence of perfusion deficits by two independent observers with different levels of experience. The diagnostic value of both algorithms was calculated for both observers. Seventy-one patients were included. For the experienced observer, the positive predictive values (PPVs) were 0.67 for the delay-sensitive and 0.66 for the delay-insensitive algorithm, and the negative predictive values (NPVs) were 0.73 and 0.74. For the less experienced observer, PPVs were 0.60 for both algorithms, and NPVs were 0.66 for the delay-sensitive and 0.63 for the delay-insensitive algorithm. Test characteristics are comparable for tracer delay-sensitive and tracer delay-insensitive algorithms for the visual assessment of CTP in diagnosing DCI. This indicates that both algorithms can be used for this purpose.

  11. Robust Low-dose CT Perfusion Deconvolution via Tensor Total-Variation Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaoting; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2016-01-01

    Acute brain diseases such as acute strokes and transit ischemic attacks are the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide, responsible for 9% of total death every year. ‘Time is brain’ is a widely accepted concept in acute cerebrovascular disease treatment. Efficient and accurate computational framework for hemodynamic parameters estimation can save critical time for thrombolytic therapy. Meanwhile the high level of accumulated radiation dosage due to continuous image acquisition in CT perfusion (CTP) raised concerns on patient safety and public health. However, low-radiation leads to increased noise and artifacts which require more sophisticated and time-consuming algorithms for robust estimation. In this paper, we focus on developing a robust and efficient framework to accurately estimate the perfusion parameters at low radiation dosage. Specifically, we present a tensor total-variation (TTV) technique which fuses the spatial correlation of the vascular structure and the temporal continuation of the blood signal flow. An efficient algorithm is proposed to find the solution with fast convergence and reduced computational complexity. Extensive evaluations are carried out in terms of sensitivity to noise levels, estimation accuracy, contrast preservation, and performed on digital perfusion phantom estimation, as well as in-vivo clinical subjects. Our framework reduces the necessary radiation dose to only 8% of the original level and outperforms the state-of-art algorithms with peak signal-to-noise ratio improved by 32%. It reduces the oscillation in the residue functions, corrects over-estimation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and under-estimation of mean transit time (MTT), and maintains the distinction between the deficit and normal regions. PMID:25706579

  12. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  13. Abdominal Perfusion Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M. Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis. PMID:25610249

  14. Relation between quantitative coronary CTA and myocardial ischemia by adenosine stress myocardial CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    van Rosendael, Alexander R; Kroft, Lucia J; Broersen, Alexander; Dijkstra, Jouke; van den Hoogen, Inge J; van Zwet, Erik W; Bax, Jeroen J; de Graaf, Michiel A; Scholte, Arthur J

    2016-02-09

    Coronary-computed tomography angiography (CTA) has limited accuracy to predict myocardial ischemia. Besides luminal area stenosis, other coronary plaque morphology and composition parameters may help to assess ischemia. With the integration of coronary CTA and adenosine stress CT myocardial perfusion (CTP), reliable information regarding coronary anatomy and function can be derived in one procedure. This analysis aimed to investigate the association between coronary stenosis severity, plaque composition and morphology and the presence of ischemia measured with adenosine stress myocardial CTP. 84 patients (age, 62 ± 10 years; 48% men) who underwent sequential coronary CTA and adenosine stress myocardial CT perfusion were analyzed. Automated quantification was performed in all coronary lesions (quantitative CTA). Downstream myocardial ischemia was assessed by visual analysis of the rest and stress CTP images and defined as a summed difference score of ≥1. One or more coronary plaques were present in 146 coronary arteries of which 31 (21%) were ischemia-related. Of the lesions with a stenosis percentage <50%, 50%-70%, and >70%, respectively, 9% (6/67), 18% (9/51), and 57% (16/28) demonstrated downstream ischemia. Furthermore, mean plaque burden, plaque volume, lesion length, maximal plaque thickness, and dense calcium volume were significantly higher in ischemia-related lesions, but only stenosis severity (%) (OR 1.06; 95% CI 1.02-1.10; P = .006) and lesion length (mm) (OR 1.26; 95% CI 1.02-1.55; P = .029) were independent correlates. Increasing stenosis percentage by quantitative CTA is positively correlated to myocardial ischemia measured with adenosine stress myocardial CTP. However, stenosis percentage remains a moderate determinant. Lumen area stenosis and lesion length were independently associated with ischemia, adjusted for coronary plaque volume, mean plaque burden, maximal lesion thickness, and dense calcium volume.

  15. Brain perfusion imaging using a Reconstruction-of-Difference (RoD) approach for cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mow, M.; Zbijewski, W.; Sisniega, A.; Xu, J.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Koliatsos, V.; Aygun, N.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: To improve the timely detection and treatment of intracranial hemorrhage or ischemic stroke, recent efforts include the development of cone-beam CT (CBCT) systems for perfusion imaging and new approaches to estimate perfusion parameters despite slow rotation speeds compared to multi-detector CT (MDCT) systems. This work describes development of a brain perfusion CBCT method using a reconstruction of difference (RoD) approach to enable perfusion imaging on a newly developed CBCT head scanner prototype. Methods: A new reconstruction approach using RoD with a penalized-likelihood framework was developed to image the temporal dynamics of vascular enhancement. A digital perfusion simulation was developed to give a realistic representation of brain anatomy, artifacts, noise, scanner characteristics, and hemo-dynamic properties. This simulation includes a digital brain phantom, time-attenuation curves and noise parameters, a novel forward projection method for improved computational efficiency, and perfusion parameter calculation. Results: Our results show the feasibility of estimating perfusion parameters from a set of images reconstructed from slow scans, sparse data sets, and arc length scans as short as 60 degrees. The RoD framework significantly reduces noise and time-varying artifacts from inconsistent projections. Proper regularization and the use of overlapping reconstructed arcs can potentially further decrease bias and increase temporal resolution, respectively. Conclusions: A digital brain perfusion simulation with RoD imaging approach has been developed and supports the feasibility of using a CBCT head scanner for perfusion imaging. Future work will include testing with data acquired using a 3D-printed perfusion phantom currently and translation to preclinical and clinical studies.

  16. First in vivo magnetic particle imaging of lung perfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinyi Yedda; Jeffris, Kenneth; Yu, Elaine; Zheng, Bo; Goodwill, Patrick; Nahid, Payam; Conolly, Steven

    2017-02-20

    Pulmonary embolism (PE), along with the closely related condition of deep vein thrombosis, affect an estimated 600,000 patients in the US per year. Untreated, PE carries a mortality rate of 30%. Because many patients experience mild or non-specific symptoms, imaging studies are necessary for definitive diagnosis of PE. Iodinated CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is recommended for most patients, while nuclear medicine-based ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scans are reserved for patients in whom the use of iodine is contraindicated. Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging tracer imaging modality with high image contrast (no tissue background signal) and sensitivity (200 nM Fe) to superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) tracer. Importantly, unlike CT or nuclear medicine, MPI uses no ionizing radiation. Further, MPI is not derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); MPI directly images SPIO tracers via their strong electronic magnetization, enabling deep imaging of anatomy including within the lungs, which is very challenging with MRI. Here, the first high-contrast in vivo MPI lung perfusion images of rats are shown using a novel lung perfusion agent, MAA-SPIOs.

  17. First in vivo magnetic particle imaging of lung perfusion in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinyi Y.; Jeffris, Kenneth E.; Yu, Elaine Y.; Zheng, Bo; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Nahid, Payam; Conolly, Steven M.

    2017-05-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE), along with the closely related condition of deep vein thrombosis, affect an estimated 600 000 patients in the US per year. Untreated, PE carries a mortality rate of 30%. Because many patients experience mild or non-specific symptoms, imaging studies are necessary for definitive diagnosis of PE. Iodinated CT pulmonary angiography is recommended for most patients, while nuclear medicine-based ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scans are reserved for patients in whom the use of iodine is contraindicated. Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging tracer imaging modality with high image contrast (no tissue background signal) and sensitivity to superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) tracer. Importantly, unlike CT or nuclear medicine, MPI uses no ionizing radiation. Further, MPI is not derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); MPI directly images SPIO tracers via their strong electronic magnetization, enabling deep imaging of anatomy including within the lungs, which is very challenging with MRI. Here, the first high-contrast in vivo MPI lung perfusion images of rats are shown using a novel lung perfusion agent, MAA-SPIOs.

  18. Integrated assessment of coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion using a retractable SPECT camera combined with 64-slice CT: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Christian; Schoepf, U Joseph; Gordon, Leonie; Chiaramida, Salvatore; Serguson, Jill; Costello, Philip

    2009-04-01

    We evaluated a prototype SPECT system integrated with multidetector row CT (MDCT) for obtaining complementary information on coronary anatomy and hemodynamic lesion significance. Twenty-five consecutive patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent routine SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). All patients also underwent repeat MPI with a mobile SPECT unit which could be attached to a 64-slice MDCT system. Coronary CT angiography (cCTA) was performed without repositioning the patient. Investigational MPI was compared with routine MPI for detection of myocardial perfusion defects (PD). Two observers diagnosed presence or absence of CAD based on MPI alone, cCTA alone, and based on combined MPI and cCTA with fused image display. In 22/24 patients investigative MPI corresponded with routine MPI (r = 0.80). Stenosis >or= 50% at cCTA was detected in 6/24 patients. Six out of 24 patients had PD at regular MPI. Three of these six patients had no significant stenosis at cCTA. Three out of 19 patients with normal MPI studies had significant stenosis at cCTA. Our initial experience indicates that the integration of SPECT MPI with cCTA is technically feasible and enables the comprehensive evaluation of coronary artery anatomy and myocardial perfusion with a single instrumental setup.

  19. Regadenoson-stress myocardial CT perfusion and single-photon emission CT: rationale, design, and acquisition methods of a prospective, multicenter, multivendor comparison.

    PubMed

    Cury, Ricardo C; Kitt, Therese M; Feaheny, Kathleen; Akin, Jamie; George, Richard T

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacologic stress myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) has been reported to be a viable imaging modality for detection of myocardial ischemia compared with single-photon emission CT (SPECT) in several single-center studies. However, regadenoson-stress CTP has not previously been compared with SPECT in a multicenter, multivendor study. The rationale and design of a phase 2, randomized, cross-over study of regadenoson-stress myocardial perfusion imaging by CTP compared with SPECT are described herein. The study will be conducted at approximately 25 sites by using 6 different CT scanner models, including 64-, 128-, 256-, and 320-slice systems. Subjects with known/suspected coronary artery disease will be randomly assigned to 1 of 2 imaging procedure sequences; rest and regadenoson-stress SPECT on day 1, then regadenoson-stress CTP and rest CTP/coronary CT angiography (same acquisition) on day 2; or regadenoson-stress CTP and rest CTP/CT angiography on day 1, then rest and regadenoson-stress SPECT on day 2. The prespecified primary analysis examines the agreement rate between CTP and SPECT for detecting or excluding ischemia (≥2 or 0-1 reversible defects, respectively), as assessed by 3 independent blinded readers for each modality. Non-inferiority will be indicated if the lower boundary of the 95% CI for the agreement rate is within 0.15 of 0.78 (the observed agreement rate in the regadenoson pivotal trials). The protocol described herein will support the first evaluation of regadenoson-stress CTP by using multiple scanner types compared with SPECT.

  20. (13)N-Ammonia PET/CT Detection of Myocardial Perfusion Abnormalities in Beagle Dogs After Local Heart Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianbo; Yan, Rui; Wu, Zhifang; Li, Jianguo; Yan, Min; Hao, Xinzhong; Liu, Jianzhong; Li, Sijin

    2017-04-01

    Our objective was to determine the potential value of (13)N-ammonia PET/CT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) for early detection of myocardial perfusion changes induced by radiation damage. Methods: Thirty-six Beagle dogs were randomly divided into a control group (n = 18) or an irradiation group (n = 18). The latter underwent local irradiation to the left ventricular anterior cardiac wall with a single dose of 20 Gy, whereas the former received sham irradiation. All dogs underwent (13)N-ammonia PET/CT MPI 1 wk before irradiation and at 3, 6, and 12 mo after sham or local irradiation. One week after undergoing (13)N-ammonia PET/CT MPI, the irradiation group underwent coronary angiography. Six randomly selected dogs from each group were sacrificed and used to detect pathologic cardiac injury at 3, 6, and 12 mo after irradiation. Results: Compared with the control group and baseline, the irradiation group showed significantly increased perfusion in the irradiated area of the heart at 3 mo after irradiation, perfusion reduction at 6 mo after irradiation, and a perfusion defect at 12 mo after irradiation. There was no significant difference in the left ventricular ejection fraction between the control and irradiation groups at baseline or at 3 mo after irradiation. The irradiation group showed a reduction of left ventricular ejection fraction compared with the control group at 6 mo (50.0% ± 8.1% vs. 59.3% ± 4.1%, P = 0.016) and 12 mo (47.2% ± 6.7% vs. 57.4% ± 3.3%, P = 0.002) after irradiation. No coronary stenosis was observed in the irradiation group. Regional wall motion abnormalities appeared in the irradiated area at 6 mo after irradiation, and its extent was enlarged at 12 mo after irradiation. Pathologic changes were observed; radiation-induced myocardial tissue damage and microvascular fibrosis in the irradiated area progressively increased over time. Conclusion:(13)N-ammonia PET/CT MPI can dynamically detect myocardial perfusion changes together with

  1. New insights on COPD imaging via CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sverzellati, N; Molinari, F; Pirronti, T; Bonomo, L; Spagnolo, P; Zompatori, M

    2007-01-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to quantify morphological features and investigate structure/function relationship in COPD. This approach allows a phenotypical definition of COPD patients, and might improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis and suggest new therapeutical options. In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has also become potentially suitable for the assessment of ventilation, perfusion and respiratory mechanics. This review focuses on the established clinical applications of CT, and novel CT and MRI techniques, which may prove valuable in evaluating the structural and functional damage in COPD. PMID:18229568

  2. Heterogeneity of pulmonary perfusion as a mechanistic image-based phenotype in emphysema susceptible smokers

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Sara K.; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that endothelial dysfunction and pathology of pulmonary vascular responses may serve as a precursor to smoking-associated emphysema. Although it is known that emphysematous destruction leads to vasculature changes, less is known about early regional vascular dysfunction which may contribute to and precede emphysematous changes. We sought to test the hypothesis, via multidetector row CT (MDCT) perfusion imaging, that smokers showing early signs of emphysema susceptibility have a greater heterogeneity in regional perfusion parameters than emphysema-free smokers and persons who had never smoked (NS). Assuming that all smokers have a consistent inflammatory response, increased perfusion heterogeneity in emphysema-susceptible smokers would be consistent with the notion that these subjects may have the inability to block hypoxic vasoconstriction in patchy, small regions of inflammation. Dynamic ECG-gated MDCT perfusion scans with a central bolus injection of contrast were acquired in 17 NS, 12 smokers with normal CT imaging studies (SNI), and 12 smokers with subtle CT findings of centrilobular emphysema (SCE). All subjects had normal spirometry. Quantitative image analysis determined regional perfusion parameters, pulmonary blood flow (PBF), and mean transit time (MTT). Mean and coefficient of variation were calculated, and statistical differences were assessed with one-way ANOVA. MDCT-based MTT and PBF measurements demonstrate globally increased heterogeneity in SCE subjects compared with NS and SNI subjects but demonstrate similarity between NS and SNI subjects. These findings demonstrate a functional lung-imaging measure that provides a more mechanistically oriented phenotype that differentiates smokers with and without evidence of emphysema susceptibility. PMID:20368443

  3. A dual micro-CT system for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Johnston, S.; Johnson, B.; Lin, M.; Hedlund, L. W.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2008-03-01

    Micro-CT is a non-invasive imaging modality usually used to assess morphology in small animals. In our previous work, we have demonstrated that functional micro-CT imaging is also possible. This paper describes a dual micro-CT system with two fixed x-ray/detectors developed to address such challenging tasks as cardiac or perfusion studies in small animals. A two-tube/detector system ensures simultaneous acquisition of two projections, thus reducing scanning time and the number of contrast injections in perfusion studies by a factor of two. The system is integrated with software developed in-house for cardio-respiratory monitoring and gating. The sampling geometry was optimized for 88 microns in such a way that the geometric blur of the focal spot matches the Nyquist sample at the detector. A geometric calibration procedure allows one to combine projection data from the two chains into a single reconstructed volume. Image quality was measured in terms of spatial resolution, uniformity, noise, and linearity. The modulation transfer function (MTF) at 10% is 3.4 lp/mm for single detector reconstructions and 2.3 lp/mm for dual tube/detector reconstructions. We attribute this loss in spatial resolution to the compounding of slight errors in the separate single chain calibrations. The dual micro-CT system is currently used in studies for morphological and functional imaging of both rats and mice.

  4. Impact of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt implantation on liver perfusion measured by volume perfusion CT.

    PubMed

    Preibsch, Heike; Spira, Daniel; Thaiss, Wolfgang M; Syha, Roland; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Ketelsen, Dominik; Lauer, Ulrich M; Horger, Marius

    2017-10-01

    Background Implantation of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) induces changes of liver perfusion. Purpose To determine the changes in arterial, portal venous, and total perfusion of the liver parenchyma induced by TIPS using the technique of volume perfusion computed tomography (VPCT) and compare results with invasively measured hepatic intravascular pressure values. Material and Methods VPCT quantification of liver perfusion was performed in 23 patients (mean age, 62.5 ± 8.8 years) with portal hypertension in the pre-TIPS and post-TIPS setting, respectively. A commercially available software package was used for post-processing, enabling separate calculation of the dual (arterial [ALP] and portal venous [PVP]) blood supply and additionally of the hepatic perfusion index (HPI) (HPI = ALP/(ALP + PVP)*100%). Invasive pressure measurements were performed during the intervention, before and after TIPS placement. Liver function tests performed before and after the procedure were compared. Results Mean decrease of pressure gradient through TIPS was 13.3 mmHg. Mean normal values for ALP, PVP, and total perfusion (ALP + PVP) before TIPS were 15.9, 37.7, and 53.5 mL/100 mL/min, respectively, mean HPI was 35.4%. After TIPS, ALP increased to a mean value of 37.7 mL/100 mL/min, PVP decreased (15.7 mL/100 mL/min, P < 0.05), whereas total perfusion remained unchanged (53.4 mL/100 mL/min, P = 0.97). HPI increased (71.9%; P < 0.05). No correlation between invasive pressure measurement and VPCT parameters was observed. After TIPS, liver function tests were found to worsen with a significant increase of bilirubin ( P < 0.05). Conclusion Following TIPS placement, ALP and HPI increased in all patients, whereas PVP markedly decreased. Interestingly, the magnitude of decrease in portosystemic pressure gradients was not found to correlate with VPCT parameters.

  5. CT Mapping of the Distribution of Saline During Radiofrequency Ablation with Perfusion Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillams, A.R. Lees, W.R.

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. During radiofrequency (RF) ablation, adjunctive saline increases the size of the ablation zone and therefore electrodes that simultaneously deliver current and saline have been developed, but the addition of saline also results in an irregular ablation zone. Our aim was to study the distribution of saline during RF ablation. Methods. Four patients were treated: 3 with liver metastases and 1 with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Two different perfusion electrodes were used: a high-perfusion-rate, straight electrode (Berchtold, Germany) and a low-perfusion-rate, expandable electrode (RITA Medical Systems, USA). The saline perfusate was doped with non-ionic contrast medium to render it visible on CT and the electrical conductivity was measured. CT scans were obtained of each electrode position prior to ablation and repeated after ablation. Contrast-enhanced CT was performed 18-24 hr later to demonstrate the ablation zone. All treatments were carried out according to the manufacturer's recommended protocol. Results. The addition of a small quantity of non-ionic contrast did not alter the electrical conductivity of the saline. Contrast-doped saline extravasated beyond the tumor in all 3 patients with metastases but was limited in the patient with HCC. In some areas where saline had extravasated there was reduced enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT consistent with tissue ablation. One patient treated with the high-perfusion-rate system sustained a jejunal perforation requiring surgery. Conclusion. Saline can extravasate beyond the tumor and with the high-perfusion-rate system this resulted in an undesirable extension of the ablation zone and a complication.

  6. Yield of CT perfusion for the evaluation of transient ischaemic attack.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Jonathan T; Mlynash, Michael; Zaharchuk, Greg; Ogdie, Alyshia A; Straka, Matus; Lansberg, Maarten G; Schwartz, Neil E; Singh, Paul; Kemp, Stephanie; Bammer, Roland; Albers, Gregory W; Olivot, Jean-Marc

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging are able to identify ischaemic 'footprints' in transient ischaemic attack. Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) may be useful for patient triage and subsequent management. To date, less than 100 cases have been reported, and none have compared computed tomography perfusion to perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI). We sought to define the yield of computed tomography perfusion for the evaluation of transient ischaemic attack. Consecutive patients with a discharge diagnosis of possible or definite transient ischaemic event who underwent computed tomography perfusion were included in this study. The presence of an ischaemic lesion was assessed on noncontrast computed tomography, automatically deconvolved CTPTMax (Time till the residue function reaches its maximum), and when available on diffusion-weighted imaging and PWITMax maps. Thirty-four patients were included and 17 underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Median delay between onset and computed tomography perfusion was 4·4 h (Interquartile range [IQR]: 1·9-9·6), and between computed tomography perfusion and magnetic resonance imaging was 11 h (Interquartile range: 3·8-22). Noncontrast computed tomography was negative in all cases, while CTPTMax identified an ischaemic lesion in 12/34 patients (35%). In the subgroup of patients with multimodal magnetic resonance imaging, an ischaemic lesion was found in six (35%) patients using CTPTMax versus nine (53%) on magnetic resonance imaging (five diffusion-weighted imaging, nine perfusion-weighted imaging). The additional yield of CTPTMax over computed tomography angiography was significant in the evaluation of transient ischaemic attack (12 vs. 3, McNemar, P = 0·004). CTPTMax found an ischaemic lesion in one-third of acute transient ischaemic attack patients. Computed tomography perfusion may be an acceptable substitute when magnetic resonance imaging is unavailable or contraindicated, and

  7. Parametric perfusion imaging based on low-cost ultrasound platform.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaolin; Zhong, Hui; Wan, Mingxi; Hu, Xiaowen; Lv, Dan; Shen, Liang; Zhang, Xiaomei

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to implement parametric perfusion imaging to quantify blood perfusion based on modified low-cost ultrasound platform. A novel ultrasound contrast-specific imaging method called pulse-inversion harmonic sum-squared-differences (PIHSSD) was proposed for improving the sensitivity for detecting contrast agents and the accuracy of parametric perfusion imaging, which combined pulse-inversion harmonic (PIH) with pulse-inversion sum-squared-differences (PISSD) threshold-based decision. PIHSSD method just involved simple operations including addition and multiplication and was easy to realize. The sequences of contrast images without logarithmic compression were used to acquire time intensity curves (TICs) from numerous equal-sized regions-of-interest (ROI) covering the entire image plane. Parametric perfusion images were obtained based on the parameters extracted from the TICs, including peak value (PV), area under curve (AUC), mean transit time (MTT), peak value time (PVT), peak width (PW) and climbing rate (CR). Flow phantom was used for validation and the results suggested that PIHSSD method provided 9.6 to 20.3 dB higher contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) than PIH method. The results of the experiments of rabbit kidney also showed that the CTR of PIHSSD images was higher than that of PIH images, and the parametric perfusion images based on PIHSSD method provided more accurate quantification of blood perfusion compared with those based on PIH and PISSD methods. It demonstrated that the parametric perfusion imaging achieved good performance though implemented on low-cost ultrasound platform. (E-mail: mxwan@mail.xjtu.edu.cn).

  8. CT perfusion and delayed cerebral ischemia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Charlotte H P; van der Schaaf, Irene C; Wensink, Emerens; Greving, Jacoba P; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2014-02-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is at presentation a diagnosis per exclusionem, and can only be confirmed with follow-up imaging. For treatment of DCI a diagnostic tool is needed. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the value of CT perfusion (CTP) in the prediction and diagnosis of DCI. We searched PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases to identify studies on the relationship between CTP and DCI. Eleven studies totaling 570 patients were included. On admission, cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), and time-to-peak (TTP) did not differ between patients who did and did not develop DCI. In the DCI time-window (4 to 14 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)), DCI was associated with a decreased CBF (pooled mean difference -11.9 mL/100 g per minute (95% confidence interval (CI): -15.2 to -8.6)) and an increased MTT (pooled mean difference 1.5 seconds (0.9-2.2)). Cerebral blood volume did not differ and TTP was rarely reported. Perfusion thresholds reported in studies were comparable, although the corresponding test characteristics were moderate and differed between studies. We conclude that CTP can be used in the diagnosis but not in the prediction of DCI. A need exists to standardize the method for measuring perfusion with CTP after SAH, and optimize and validate perfusion thresholds.

  9. Acute pulmonary embolism detection with ventilation/perfusion SPECT combined with full dose CT: What is the best option?

    PubMed

    Milà, M; Bechini, J; Vázquez, A; Vallejos, V; Tenesa, M; Espinal, A; Fraile, M; Monreal, M

    To compare diagnostic accuracy of Ventilation/Perfusion (V/P) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) combined with simultaneous full-dose CT with a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner versus planar ventilation/perfusion (V/P) SPECT and CT angiography (CTA) in patients suspected with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Between 2009 and 2011, consecutive patients suspected of acute PE were referred for V/P SPECT/CT (reviewed board approved study). A contrast agent was administered to patients who had no contraindications. Non-contrast V/P SPECT/CT was performed on the remaining patients. All patients were followed-up for at least 3 months. A total of 314 patients were available during the study period, with the diagnosis of PE confirmed in 70 (22.29%) of them. The overall population sensitivity and specificity was 90.91% and 92.44%, respectively for V/P SPECT, 80% and 99.15%, respectively, for CTA, and 95.52% and 97.08% for V/P SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT performed better than V/P SPECT (AUC differences=0.0419, P=0.0043, 95% CI; 0.0131-0.0706) and CTA (AUC differences=0.0681, P=0.0208, 95% CI; 0.0103-0.1259)). Comparing imaging modalities when contrast agent could be administered, sensitivity and specificity increased and V/P SPECT/CT was significantly better than CTA (AUC differences=0.0681, P=0.0208, 95% CI; 0.0103-0.1259) and V/P SPECT (AUC differences=0.0659, P=0.0052, 95% CI; 0.0197-0.1121). In case of non-contrast enhancement, there was non-significant increase of specificity. Secondary findings on CT impacted patient management in 14.65% of cases. Our study shows that combined V/P SPECT/CT scanning has a higher diagnostic accuracy for detecting acute PE than V/P SPECT and CTA alone. When feasible, V/P SPECT/CT with contrast enhancement is the best option. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  10. Using Flat-Panel Perfusion Imaging to Measure Cerebral Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Jung; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Feng-Chi; Hung, Sheng-Che; Chen, Ko-Kung; Yu, Deuerling-Zheng; Wu, Chun-Hsien Frank; Liou, Jy-Kang Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Flat-detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) imaging has demonstrated efficacy in qualitatively accessing the penumbra in acute stroke equivalent to that of magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP). The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of quantifying oligemia in the brain in patients with carotid stenosis. Ten patients with unilateral carotid stenosis of >70% were included. All MRPs and FD-CTPs were performed before stenting. Region-of-interests (ROIs) including middle cerebral artery territory at basal ganglia level on both stenotic and contralateral sides were used for quantitative analysis. Relative time to peak (rTTP) was defined as TTP of the stenotic side divided by TTP of the contralateral side, and so as relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), relative mean transit time (rMTT), and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Absolute and relative TTP, CBV, MTT, CBF between two modalities were compared. For absolute quantitative analysis, the correlation of TTP was highest (r = 0.56), followed by CBV (r = 0.47), MTT (r = 0.47), and CBF (r = 0.43); for relative quantitative analysis, rCBF was the highest (r = 0.79), followed by rTTP (r = 0.75) and rCBV (r = 0.50). We confirmed that relative quantitative assessment of FD-CTP is feasible in chronic ischemic disease. Absolute quantitative measurements between MRP and FD-CTP only expressed moderate correlations. Optimization of acquisitions and algorithms is warranted to achieve better quantification. PMID:27196456

  11. Evaluation of a proper cutoff value on quantitative dual-energy perfusion CT for the assessment of acute pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Kunihiro, Yoshie; Okada, Munemasa; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2017-01-01

    Background The cutoff value for assessing the severity of acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) using relative volumetric evaluations of dual-energy perfusion computed tomography (DEpCT) is unclear. Purpose To determine the proper cutoff value for determining the severity of PTE using DEpCT volumetry. Material and Methods A total of 185 patients with venous thromboembolism were included in this study, of whom 61 were diagnosed with acute PTE. DEpCT images were three-dimensionally reconstructed at the following attenuation ranges: 1-2 HU (V2), 1-10 HU (V10), and 1-120 HU (V120). The ratios of low perfusion areas associated with each threshold range per V120 were also calculated, and the relative ratios were expressed as %V2 to %V10. These values were compared with factors indicating the severity of PTE, including the pulmonary arterial pressure, heart rate, CT angiographic obstruction index (CTOI), and right/left ventricular diameter ratio (RV/LV). Results The area under the curve (AUC) of %V2 was highest (0.783) among these values (95% confidence interval, 0.710-0.856) based on the presence of IPCs. The %V2 showed moderate correlations with CTOI (r = 0.36, P = 0.005) and RV/LV (r = 0.36, P = 0.004) in the patients with acute PTE. Conclusion Volumetric evaluations of DEpCT images using the lowest attenuation threshold range (1-2 HU) exhibit the best correlation with factors suggesting the severity of acute PTE.

  12. Interobserver agreement of ASPECT score distribution for noncontrast CT, CT angiography, and CT perfusion in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, Olga; John, Verity; Yeung, Robert; Dowlatshahi, Dar; Howard, Peter; Zhang, Liying; Swartz, Rick; Aviv, Richard I

    2013-01-01

    The Alberta Stroke program early CT score (ASPECTS) is a semiquantative scale for estimating extent and distribution of early ischemic changes within the MCA territory in the acute stroke setting. Good interobserver agreement of total ASPECTS is demonstrated for noncontrast CT (NCCT) and other imaging modalities. Our purpose is to assess interobserver agreement for individual ASPECTS regions for different imaging modalities. One hundred and eighty-one consecutive patients presenting with acute stroke symptoms within 4.5 hours of onset were included. Four readers assigned total and individual ASPECTS for NCCT, CT angiography source images (CTA-SI), and CTP maps of cerebral blood volume (CTP-CBV). Interobserver agreement was assessed by measuring internal consistency and concordance of total and individual ASPECTS using Cronbach's α and intraclass correlation coefficient, respectively. Total ASPECTS demonstrated very good concordance and internal consistency for all 3 modalities. Intraclass correlation coefficient and Cronbach's α were 0.834 and 0.859 for NCCT, 0.876 and 0.894 for CTA, and 0.903 and 0.911 for CTP-CBV, respectively. Performance for individual ASPECTS regions was inferior to total ASPECTS, but incremental improvement in interobserver reliability was demonstrated for NCCT, CTA-SI, and CTP-CBV, respectively. Highest concordance was shown for caudate, lentiform, and M1-M3, whereas performance for internal capsule and M4-M6 was poorer. CTP-CBV demonstrates the highest interobserver agreement for individual ASPECTS regions.

  13. Histogram Analysis of CT Perfusion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma for Predicting Response to Transarterial Radioembolization: Value of Tumor Heterogeneity Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Reiner, Caecilia S. Gordic, Sonja; Puippe, Gilbert; Morsbach, Fabian; Wurnig, Moritz; Schaefer, Niklaus; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), whether assessment of tumor heterogeneity by histogram analysis of computed tomography (CT) perfusion helps predicting response to transarterial radioembolization (TARE).Materials and MethodsSixteen patients (15 male; mean age 65 years; age range 47–80 years) with HCC underwent CT liver perfusion for treatment planning prior to TARE with Yttrium-90 microspheres. Arterial perfusion (AP) derived from CT perfusion was measured in the entire tumor volume, and heterogeneity was analyzed voxel-wise by histogram analysis. Response to TARE was evaluated on follow-up imaging (median follow-up, 129 days) based on modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST). Results of histogram analysis and mean AP values of the tumor were compared between responders and non-responders. Receiver operating characteristics were calculated to determine the parameters’ ability to discriminate responders from non-responders.ResultsAccording to mRECIST, 8 patients (50 %) were responders and 8 (50 %) non-responders. Comparing responders and non-responders, the 50th and 75th percentile of AP derived from histogram analysis was significantly different [AP 43.8/54.3 vs. 27.6/34.3 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}); p < 0.05], while the mean AP of HCCs (43.5 vs. 27.9 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}; p > 0.05) was not. Further heterogeneity parameters from histogram analysis (skewness, coefficient of variation, and 25th percentile) did not differ between responders and non-responders (p > 0.05). If the cut-off for the 75th percentile was set to an AP of 37.5 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}, therapy response could be predicted with a sensitivity of 88 % (7/8) and specificity of 75 % (6/8).ConclusionVoxel-wise histogram analysis of pretreatment CT perfusion indicating tumor heterogeneity of HCC improves the pretreatment prediction of response to TARE.

  14. MULTIMODALITY IMAGING: BEYOND PET/CT AND SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Simon R.

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality imaging with PET/CT and SPECT/CT has become commonplace in clinical practice and in preclinical and basic medical research. Do other combinations of imaging modalities have a similar potential to impact medical science and clinical medicine? The combination of PET or SPECT with MRI is an area of active research at the present time, while other, perhaps less obvious combinations, including CT/MR and PET/optical also are being studied. In addition to the integration of the instrumentation, there are parallel developments in synthesizing imaging agents that can be viewed by multiple imaging modalities. Is the fusion of PET and SPECT with CT the ultimate answer in multimodality imaging, or is it just the first example of a more general trend towards harnessing the complementary nature of the different modalities on integrated imaging platforms? PMID:19646559

  15. Assessment of differential pulmonary blood flow using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging: comparison with radionuclide perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Francesco; Fink, Christian; Risse, Frank; Tuengerthal, Siegfried; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2006-08-01

    We sought to assess the agreement between lung perfusion ratios calculated from pulmonary perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and those calculated from radionuclide (RN) perfusion scintigraphy. A retrospective analysis of MR and RN perfusion scans was conducted in 23 patients (mean age, 60 +/- 14 years) with different lung diseases (lung cancer = 15, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease = 4, cystic fibrosis = 2, and mesothelioma = 2). Pulmonary perfusion was assessed by a time-resolved contrast-enhanced 3D gradient-echo pulse sequence using parallel imaging and view sharing (TR = 1.9 milliseconds; TE = 0.8 milliseconds; parallel imaging acceleration factor = 2; partition thickness = 4 mm; matrix = 256 x 96; in-plane spatial resolution = 1.87 x 3.75 mm; scan time for each 3D dataset = 1.5 seconds), using gadolinium-based contrast agents (injection flow rate = 5 mL/s, dose = 0.1 mmol/kg of body weight). The peak concentration (PC) of the contrast agent bolus, the pulmonary blood flow (PBF), and blood volume (PBV) were computed from the signal-time curves of the lung. Left-to-right ratios of pulmonary perfusion were calculated from the MR parameters and RN counts. The agreement between these ratios was assessed for side prevalence (sign test) and quantitatively (Deming-regression). MR and RN ratios agreed on side prevalence in 21 patients (91%) with PC, in 20 (87%) with PBF, and in 17 (74%) with PBV. The MR estimations of left-to-right perfusion ratios correlated significantly with those of RN perfusion scans (P < 0.01). The correlation was higher using PC (r = 0.67) and PBF (r = 0.66) than using PBV (r = 0.50). The MR ratios computed from PBF showed the highest accuracy, followed by those from PC and PBV. Independently from the MR parameter used, in some patients the quantitative difference between the MR and RN ratios was not negligible. Pulmonary perfusion MRI can be used to assess the differential blood flow of the lung. Further studies in a larger group

  16. Intra-Arterial MR Perfusion Imaging of Meningiomas: Comparison to Digital Subtraction Angiography and Intravenous MR Perfusion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lum, Mark A; Martin, Alastair J; Alexander, Matthew D; McCoy, David B; Cooke, Daniel L; Lillaney, Prasheel; Moftakhar, Parham; Amans, Matthew R; Settecase, Fabio; Nicholson, Andrew; Dowd, Christopher F; Halbach, Van V; Higashida, Randall T; McDermott, Michael W; Saloner, David; Hetts, Steven W

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of IA MR perfusion to characterize meningioma blood supply. Studies were performed in a suite comprised of an x-ray angiography unit and 1.5T MR scanner that permitted intraprocedural patient movement between the imaging modalities. Patients underwent intra-arterial (IA) and intravenous (IV) T2* dynamic susceptibility MR perfusion immediately prior to meningioma embolization. Regional tumor arterial supply was characterized by digital subtraction angiography and classified as external carotid artery (ECA) dural, internal carotid artery (ICA) dural, or pial. MR perfusion data regions of interest (ROIs) were analyzed in regions with different vascular supply to extract peak height, full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF), relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and mean transit time (MTT). Linear mixed modeling was used to identify perfusion curve parameter differences for each ROI for IA and IV MR imaging techniques. IA vs. IV perfusion parameters were also directly compared for each ROI using linear mixed modeling. 18 ROIs were analyzed in 12 patients. Arterial supply was identified as ECA dural (n = 11), ICA dural (n = 4), or pial (n = 3). FWHM, rCBV, and rCBF showed statistically significant differences between ROIs for IA MR perfusion. Peak Height and FWHM showed statistically significant differences between ROIs for IV MR perfusion. RCBV and MTT were significantly lower for IA perfusion in the Dural ECA compared to IV perfusion. Relative CBF in IA MR was found to be significantly higher in the Dural ICA region and MTT significantly lower compared to IV perfusion.

  17. Intra-Arterial MR Perfusion Imaging of Meningiomas: Comparison to Digital Subtraction Angiography and Intravenous MR Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alastair J.; Alexander, Matthew D.; McCoy, David B.; Cooke, Daniel L.; Lillaney, Prasheel; Moftakhar, Parham; Amans, Matthew R.; Settecase, Fabio; Nicholson, Andrew; Dowd, Christopher F.; Halbach, Van V.; Higashida, Randall T.; McDermott, Michael W.; Saloner, David; Hetts, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose To evaluate the ability of IA MR perfusion to characterize meningioma blood supply. Methods Studies were performed in a suite comprised of an x-ray angiography unit and 1.5T MR scanner that permitted intraprocedural patient movement between the imaging modalities. Patients underwent intra-arterial (IA) and intravenous (IV) T2* dynamic susceptibility MR perfusion immediately prior to meningioma embolization. Regional tumor arterial supply was characterized by digital subtraction angiography and classified as external carotid artery (ECA) dural, internal carotid artery (ICA) dural, or pial. MR perfusion data regions of interest (ROIs) were analyzed in regions with different vascular supply to extract peak height, full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF), relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and mean transit time (MTT). Linear mixed modeling was used to identify perfusion curve parameter differences for each ROI for IA and IV MR imaging techniques. IA vs. IV perfusion parameters were also directly compared for each ROI using linear mixed modeling. Results 18 ROIs were analyzed in 12 patients. Arterial supply was identified as ECA dural (n = 11), ICA dural (n = 4), or pial (n = 3). FWHM, rCBV, and rCBF showed statistically significant differences between ROIs for IA MR perfusion. Peak Height and FWHM showed statistically significant differences between ROIs for IV MR perfusion. RCBV and MTT were significantly lower for IA perfusion in the Dural ECA compared to IV perfusion. Relative CBF in IA MR was found to be significantly higher in the Dural ICA region and MTT significantly lower compared to IV perfusion. PMID:27802268

  18. Magnetic resonance cardiac perfusion imaging-a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Hunold, Peter; Schlosser, Thomas; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2006-08-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) with its clinical appearance of stable or unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death in developed countries. In view of increasing costs and the rising number of CAD patients, there has been a major interest in reliable non-invasive imaging techniques to identify CAD in an early (i.e. asymptomatic) stage. Since myocardial perfusion deficits appear very early in the "ischemic cascade", a major breakthrough would be the non-invasive quantification of myocardial perfusion before functional impairment might be detected. Therefore, there is growing interest in other, target-organ-specific parameters, such as relative and absolute myocardial perfusion imaging. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been proven to offer attractive concepts in this respect. However, some important difficulties have not been resolved so far, which still causes uncertainty and prevents the broad application of MR perfusion imaging in a clinical setting. This review explores recent technical developments in MR hardware, software and contrast agents, as well as their impact on the current and future clinical status of MR imaging of first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging.

  19. TU-E-201-02: Eye Lens Dosimetry From CT Perfusion Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.

    2015-06-15

    awareness can lead to avoidance or even prevention. Learning Objectives: To understand recent changes in eye lens dose limits and thresholds for tissue reactions To understand different approaches to dose estimation for eye lens To learn about challenges in eye lens opacities among staff in interventional fluoroscopy Di Zhang, Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA, USA Eye lens radiation dose from brain perfusion CT exams CT perfusion imaging requires repeatedly exposing one location of the head to monitor the uptake and washout of iodinated contrast. The accumulated radiation dose to the eye lens can be high, leading to concerns about potential radiation injury from these scans. CTDIvol assumes continuous z coverage and can overestimate eye lens dose in CT perfusion scans where the table do not increment. The radiation dose to the eye lens from clinical CT brain perfusion studies can be estimated using Monte Carlo simulation methods on voxelized patient models. MDCT scanners from four major manufacturers were simulated and the eye lens doses were estimated using the AAPM posted clinical protocols. They were also compared to CTDIvol values to evaluate the overestimation from CTDIvol. The efficacy of eye lens dose reduction techniques such as tilting the gantry and moving the scan location away from the eyelens were also investigated. Eye lens dose ranged from 81 mGy to 279 mGy, depending on the scanner and protocol used. It is between 59% and 63% of the CTDIvol values reported by the scanners. The eye lens dose is significantly reduced when the eye lenses were not directly irradiated. CTDIvol should not be interpreted as patient dose; this study has shown it to overestimate dose to the eye lens. These results may be used to provide more accurate estimates of actual dose to ensure that protocols are operated safely below thresholds. Tilting the gantry or moving the scanning region further away from the eyes are effective for reducing lens dose in clinical practice

  20. Quality control within the multicentre perfusion CT study of primary colorectal cancer (PROSPeCT): results of an iodine density phantom study.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Maria; Goh, Vicky; Beggs, Shaun; Bridges, Andrew; Clewer, Philip; Davis, Anne; Foy, Trevelyan; Fuller, Karen; George, Jennifer; Higginson, Antony; Honey, Ian; Iball, Gareth; Mutch, Steve; Neil, Shellagh; Rivett, Cat; Slater, Andrew; Sutton, David; Weir, Nick; Wayte, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    To assess the cross-centre consistency of iodine enhancement, contrast-to-noise ratio and radiation dose in a multicentre perfusion CT trial of colorectal cancer. A cylindrical water phantom containing different iodine inserts was examined on seven CT models in 13 hospitals. The relationship between CT number (Hounsfield units, HU) and iodine concentration (milligrams per millilitre) was established and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) calculated. Radiation doses (CTDIvol, DLP) were compared across all sites. There was a linear relationship between CT number and iodine density. Iodine enhancement varied by a factor of at most 1.10, and image noise by at most 1.5 across the study sites. At an iodine concentration of 1 mg ml(-1) and 100 kV, CNRs ranged from 3.6 to 4.8 in the 220-mm phantom and from 1.4 to 1.9 in the 300-mm phantom. Doses varied by a factor of at most 2.4, but remained within study dose constraints. Iterative reconstruction algorithms did not alter iodine enhancement but resulted in reduced image noise by a factor of at most 2.2, allowing a potential dose decrease of at most 80% compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Quality control of CT performance across centres indicates that CNR values remain relatively consistent across all sites, giving acceptable image quality within the agreed dose constraints. Quality control is essential in a multicentre setting to enable CT quantification. CNRs in a body-sized phantom had the recommended value of at least 1.5. CTDIs and DLPs varied by factors of 1.8 and 2.4 respectively.

  1. Combination of CT scanning and fluoroscopy imaging on a flat-panel CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Suess, Ch.; Schmidt, B.; Stierstorfer, K.; Popescu, S.; Brady, T.; Flohr, T.

    2006-03-01

    We developed and evaluated a prototype flat-panel detector based Volume CT (fpVCT) scanner. The fpVCT scanner consists of a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions). It provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at the isocenter. In addition to the standard tomographic scanning, fpVCT allows two new scan modes: (1) fluoroscopic imaging from any arbitrary rotation angle, and (2) continuous, time-resolved tomographic scanning of a dynamically changing viewing volume. Fluoroscopic imaging is feasible by modifying the standard CT gantry so that the imaging chain can be oriented along any user-selected rotation angle. Scanning with a stationary gantry, after it has been oriented, is equivalent to a conventional fluoroscopic examination. This scan mode enables combined use of high-resolution tomography and real-time fluoroscopy with a clinically usable field of view in the z direction. The second scan mode allows continuous observation of a timeevolving process such as perfusion. The gantry can be continuously rotated for up to 80 sec, with the rotation time ranging from 3 to 20 sec, to gather projection images of a dynamic process. The projection data, that provides a temporal log of the viewing volume, is then converted into multiple image stacks that capture the temporal evolution of a dynamic process. Studies using phantoms, ex vivo specimens, and live animals have confirmed that these new scanning modes are clinically usable and offer a unique view of the anatomy and physiology that heretofore has not been feasible using static CT scanning. At the current level of image quality and temporal resolution, several clinical applications such a dynamic angiography, tumor enhancement pattern and vascularity studies, organ perfusion, and interventional applications are in reach.

  2. Single-energy computed tomography-based pulmonary perfusion imaging: Proof-of-principle in a canine model

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kent, Michael S.; Wisner, Erik R.; Johnson, Lynelle R.; Stern, Joshua A.; Qi, Lihong; Fujita, Yukio; Boone, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) that selectively avoids irradiating highly functional lung regions may reduce pulmonary toxicity, which is substantial in lung cancer RT. Single-energy computed tomography (CT) pulmonary perfusion imaging has several advantages (e.g., higher resolution) over other modalities and has great potential for widespread clinical implementation, particularly in RT. The purpose of this study was to establish proof-of-principle for single-energy CT perfusion imaging. Methods: Single-energy CT perfusion imaging is based on the following: (1) acquisition of end-inspiratory breath-hold CT scans before and after intravenous injection of iodinated contrast agents, (2) deformable image registration (DIR) for spatial mapping of those two CT image data sets, and (3) subtraction of the precontrast image data set from the postcontrast image data set, yielding a map of regional Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement, a surrogate for regional perfusion. In a protocol approved by the institutional animal care and use committee, the authors acquired CT scans in the prone position for a total of 14 anesthetized canines (seven canines with normal lungs and seven canines with diseased lungs). The elastix algorithm was used for DIR. The accuracy of DIR was evaluated based on the target registration error (TRE) of 50 anatomic pulmonary landmarks per subject for 10 randomly selected subjects as well as on singularities (i.e., regions where the displacement vector field is not bijective). Prior to perfusion computation, HUs of the precontrast end-inspiratory image were corrected for variation in the lung inflation level between the precontrast and postcontrast end-inspiratory CT scans, using a model built from two additional precontrast CT scans at end-expiration and midinspiration. The authors also assessed spatial heterogeneity and gravitationally directed gradients of regional perfusion for normal lung subjects and diseased lung subjects using a two-sample two-tailed t

  3. Single-energy computed tomography-based pulmonary perfusion imaging: Proof-of-principle in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kent, Michael S; Wisner, Erik R; Johnson, Lynelle R; Stern, Joshua A; Qi, Lihong; Fujita, Yukio; Boone, John M

    2016-07-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) that selectively avoids irradiating highly functional lung regions may reduce pulmonary toxicity, which is substantial in lung cancer RT. Single-energy computed tomography (CT) pulmonary perfusion imaging has several advantages (e.g., higher resolution) over other modalities and has great potential for widespread clinical implementation, particularly in RT. The purpose of this study was to establish proof-of-principle for single-energy CT perfusion imaging. Single-energy CT perfusion imaging is based on the following: (1) acquisition of end-inspiratory breath-hold CT scans before and after intravenous injection of iodinated contrast agents, (2) deformable image registration (DIR) for spatial mapping of those two CT image data sets, and (3) subtraction of the precontrast image data set from the postcontrast image data set, yielding a map of regional Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement, a surrogate for regional perfusion. In a protocol approved by the institutional animal care and use committee, the authors acquired CT scans in the prone position for a total of 14 anesthetized canines (seven canines with normal lungs and seven canines with diseased lungs). The elastix algorithm was used for DIR. The accuracy of DIR was evaluated based on the target registration error (TRE) of 50 anatomic pulmonary landmarks per subject for 10 randomly selected subjects as well as on singularities (i.e., regions where the displacement vector field is not bijective). Prior to perfusion computation, HUs of the precontrast end-inspiratory image were corrected for variation in the lung inflation level between the precontrast and postcontrast end-inspiratory CT scans, using a model built from two additional precontrast CT scans at end-expiration and midinspiration. The authors also assessed spatial heterogeneity and gravitationally directed gradients of regional perfusion for normal lung subjects and diseased lung subjects using a two-sample two-tailed t-test. The mean TRE

  4. Clinical application of dual-source CT in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer: correlation with perfusion scintigraphy and pulmonary function tests.

    PubMed

    Fraioli, F; Serra, G; Liberali, S; Fiorelli, A; Liparulo, V; Zaccagna, F; Ciccariello, G; Catalano, C; Passariello, R

    2011-09-01

    This study was done to assess the diagnostic potential of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) in the functional evaluation of lung cancer patients undergoing surgical resection. The CT data were compared with pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy and pulmonary function tests (PFTs). All patients were evaluated with DSCT, scintigraphy and PFTs. The DSCT scan protocol was as follows: two tubes (80 and 140 kV; Care Dose protocol); 70 cc of contrast material (5 cc/s); 5- to 6-s scan time; 0.6 mm collimation. After the automatic calculation of lung perfusion with DSCT and quantification of air volumes and emphysema with dedicated software applications, the perfusional CT studies were compared with scintigraphy using a visual score for perfusion defects; CT air volumes and emphysema were compared with PFTs. The values of accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values of DSCT compared with perfusion scintigraphy as the reference standard were: 0.88, 0.84, 0.90, 0.93 and 0.88, respectively. The McNemar test did not identify significant differences either between the two imaging techniques (p=0.07) or between CT and PFTs (p=0.09). DSCT is a robust and promising technique that provides important and accurate information on lung function.

  5. Reliability, Reproducibility and Prognostic Accuracy of the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score on CT Perfusion and Non-Contrast CT in Hyperacute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Jillian; Churilov, Leonid; Chen, Ziyuan; Koome, Miriam; Rane, Neil; Campbell, Bruce C V

    2017-08-16

    Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) assesses early ischemic change on non-contrast CT (NCCT). We hypothesised that assessing ASPECTS regions on CT Perfusion (CTP) rather than NCCT would improve inter-rater agreement and prognostic accuracy, particularly in patients presenting early after stroke onset. Ischemic stroke patients treated with intravenous alteplase from 2009 to 2014 at our institution were included in this study. Inter-rater agreement and prognostic accuracy of ASPECTS across modalities were analysed by the time between stroke onset and initial NCCT, dichotomized 1st quartile versus quartiles 2-4, referred to as epochs. ASPECTS was assessed by 2 independent raters, blinded to stroke onset time, with agreement determined by weighted kappa (κw). Prognostic accuracy for favourable outcome (modified Rankin Scale 0-2) was assessed using the receiver-operating characteristic analysis. A total of 227 participants were included. There was significant time-by-CT modality interaction for ASPECTS, p < 0.0001. The inter-rater agreement of ASPECTS on NCCT significantly increased as onset to CT time increased (κw epoch 1 = 0.76 vs. κw epoch 2-4 = 0.89, p = 0.04), whereas agreement using CTP parameters was stable across epochs. Inter-rater agreement for CTP-ASPECTS was significantly higher than NCCT in early epoch: Tmax κw = 0.96, p = 0.002; cerebral blood volume (CBV) κw = 0.95, p = 0.003; cerebral blood flow (CBF) κw = 0.94, p = 0.006, with no differences in the later epochs. Prognostic accuracy of ASPECTS on NCCT in epoch 1 were (area under the ROC curves [AUC] = 0.52, 95% CI 0.48-0.56), CBV (AUC = 0.55, 95% CI 0.42-0.69, CBF (AUC = 0.58, 95% CI 0.46-0.71) and Tmax (AUC = 0.62, 95% CI 0.49-0.75), p = 0.46 between modalities. CTP can improve reliability when assessing the extent of ischemic changes, particularly in patients imaged early after stroke onset. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Association of CT perfusion parameters with hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Jain, A R; Jain, M; Kanthala, A R; Damania, D; Stead, L G; Wang, H Z; Jahromi, B S

    2013-10-01

    Prediction of hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke could help determine treatment and prognostication. With increasing numbers of patients with acute ischemic stroke undergoing multimodal CT imaging, we examined whether CT perfusion could predict hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke. Patients with acute ischemic stroke who underwent CTP scanning within 12 hours of symptom onset were examined. Patients with and without hemorrhagic transformation were defined as cases and controls, respectively, and were matched as to IV rtPA administration and presentation NIHSS score (± 2). Relative mean transit time, relative CBF, and relative CBV values were calculated from CTP maps and normalized to the contralateral side. Receiver operating characteristic analysis curves were created, and threshold values for significant CTP parameters were obtained to predict hemorrhagic transformation. Of 83 patients with acute ischemic stroke, 16 developed hemorrhagic transformation (19.28%). By matching, 38 controls were found for only 14 patients with hemorrhagic transformation. Among the matched patients with hemorrhagic transformation, 13 developed hemorrhagic infarction (6 hemorrhagic infarction 1 and 7 hemorrhagic infarction 2) and 1 developed parenchymal hematoma 2. There was no significant difference between cases and controls with respect to age, sex, time to presentation from symptom onset, and comorbidities. Cases had significantly lower median rCBV (8% lower) compared with controls (11% higher) (P = .009; odds ratio, 1.14 for a 0.1-U decrease in rCBV). There was no difference in median total volume of ischemia, rMTT, and rCBF among cases and controls. The area under the receiver operating characteristic was computed to be 0.83 (standard error, 0.08), with a cutoff point for rCBV of 1.09. Of the examined CTP parameters, only lower rCBV was found to be significantly associated with a relatively higher chance of hemorrhagic transformation.

  7. Comparing perfusion CT evaluation algorithms for predicting outcome after endovascular treatment in anterior circulation ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Khaw, A V; Angermaier, A; Kirsch, M; Kessler, C; Hosten, N; Langner, S

    2015-05-01

    To analyse perfusion CT (PCT) evaluation algorithms for their predictive value for outcome after endovascular therapy (ET) in acute ischaemic stroke. Twenty-six patients were prospectively enrolled to undergo endovascular therapy for moderate to severe [National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of ≥5] anterior circulation stroke ≤6 h of onset. PCT datasets were evaluated according to three algorithms: visual mismatch estimate (VME), Alberta Stroke Programme Early CT Score (ASPECTS) perfusion, and quantitative perfusion ratios (QPRs: RCBF, RCBV) of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and volume (CBV). Results were correlated with outcome measures [NIHSS score at discharge, NIHSS score change until discharge (ΔNIHSSA/D), mRS at 90 days (mRS90d)] and compared with a matched control group. Recanalization was achieved in 73%, median NIHSS score decreased from 14 to 5 at discharge. The treatment and control group did not differ by VME and ASPECTS perfusion, nor did VME correlate with any of the three outcome measures. ASPECTS perfusion was not predictive of any outcome measure in the ET group. RCBF and RCBV were associated with ΔNIHSSA/D in controls and, inversely, the ET group, but not with mRS90d. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of RCBF (and RCBV) showed a positive predictive and negative predictive value of 87% (78%) and 74% (73%), respectively, for discriminating major neurological improvement (ΔNIHSSA/D <7 versus ≥7). Implementation of QPRs for CBF and CBV are superior to clinically used VME and ASPECTS perfusion evaluation methods for predicting early outcome after ET for anterior circulation stroke. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Automatic Valve Plane Localization in Myocardial Perfusion SPECT/CT by Machine Learning: Anatomic and Clinical Validation.

    PubMed

    Betancur, Julian; Rubeaux, Mathieu; Fuchs, Tobias A; Otaki, Yuka; Arnson, Yoav; Slipczuk, Leandro; Benz, Dominik C; Germano, Guido; Dey, Damini; Lin, Chih-Jen; Berman, Daniel S; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Slomka, Piotr J

    2017-06-01

    Precise definition of the mitral valve plane (VP) during segmentation of the left ventricle for SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) quantification often requires manual adjustment, which affects the quantification of perfusion. We developed a machine learning approach using support vector machines (SVM) for automatic VP placement. Methods: A total of 392 consecutive patients undergoing (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin stress (5 min; mean ± SD, 350 ± 54 MBq) and rest (5 min; 1,024 ± 153 MBq) fast SPECT MPI attenuation corrected (AC) by CT and same-day coronary CT angiography were studied; included in the 392 patients were 48 patients who underwent invasive coronary angiography and had no known coronary artery disease. The left ventricle was segmented with standard clinical software (quantitative perfusion SPECT) by 2 experts, adjusting the VP if needed. Two-class SVM models were computed from the expert placements with 10-fold cross validation to separate the patients used for training and those used for validation. SVM probability estimates were used to compute the best VP position. Automatic VP localizations on AC and non-AC images were compared with expert placement on coronary CT angiography. Stress and rest total perfusion deficits and detection of per-vessel obstructive stenosis by invasive coronary angiography were also compared. Results: Bland-Altman 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for VP localization by SVM and experts for AC stress images (bias, 1; 95% CI, -5 to 7 mm) and AC rest images (bias, 1; 95% CI, -7 to 10 mm) were narrower than interexpert 95% CIs for AC stress images (bias, 0; 95% CI, -8 to 8 mm) and AC rest images (bias, 0; 95% CI, -10 to 10 mm) (P < 0.01). Bland-Altman 95% CIs for VP localization by SVM and experts for non-AC stress images (bias, 1; 95% CI, -4 to 6 mm) and non-AC rest images (bias, 2; 95% CI, -7 to 10 mm) were similar to interexpert 95% CIs for non-AC stress images (bias, 0; 95% CI, -6 to 5 mm) and non-AC rest images (bias, -1; 95% CI

  9. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in neuro-oncology

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, James; Thompson, Gerard; Mills, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have seen the development of techniques that allow quantitative imaging of a number of anatomical and physiological descriptors. These techniques have been increasingly applied to cancer imaging where they can provide some insight into tumour microvascular structure and physiology. This review details technical approaches and application of quantitative MRI, focusing particularly on perfusion imaging and its role in neuro-oncology. PMID:18980870

  10. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in neuro-oncology.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alan; O'Connor, James; Thompson, Gerard; Mills, Samantha

    2008-10-13

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have seen the development of techniques that allow quantitative imaging of a number of anatomical and physiological descriptors. These techniques have been increasingly applied to cancer imaging where they can provide some insight into tumour microvascular structure and physiology. This review details technical approaches and application of quantitative MRI, focusing particularly on perfusion imaging and its role in neuro-oncology.

  11. ASPECTS (Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score) Assessment of the Perfusion-Diffusion Mismatch.

    PubMed

    Lassalle, Louis; Turc, Guillaume; Tisserand, Marie; Charron, Sylvain; Roca, Pauline; Lion, Stephanie; Legrand, Laurence; Edjlali, Myriam; Naggara, Olivier; Meder, Jean-François; Mas, Jean-Louis; Baron, Jean-Claude; Oppenheim, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Rapid and reliable assessment of the perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI)/diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) mismatch is required to promote its wider application in both acute stroke clinical routine and trials. We tested whether an evaluation based on the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) reliably identifies the PWI/DWI mismatch. A total of 232 consecutive patients with acute middle cerebral artery stroke who underwent pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (PWI and DWI) were retrospectively evaluated. PWI-ASPECTS and DWI-ASPECTS were determined blind from manually segmented PWI and DWI volumes. Mismatch-ASPECTS was defined as the difference between PWI-ASPECTS and DWI-ASPECTS (a high score indicates a large mismatch). We determined the mismatch-ASPECTS cutoff that best identified the volumetric mismatch, defined as VolumeTmax>6s/VolumeDWI≥1.8, a volume difference≥15 mL, and a VolumeDWI<70 mL. Inter-reader agreement was almost perfect for PWI-ASPECTS (κ=0.95 [95% confidence interval, 0.90-1]), and DWI-ASPECTS (κ=0.96 [95% confidence interval, 0.91-1]). There were strong negative correlations between volumetric and ASPECTS-based assessments of DWI lesions (ρ=-0.84, P<0.01) and PWI lesions (ρ=-0.90, P<0.01). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that a mismatch-ASPECTS ≥2 best identified a volumetric mismatch, with a sensitivity of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-0.98) and a specificity of 0.82 (95% confidence interval, 0.74-0.89). The mismatch-ASPECTS method can detect a true mismatch in patients with acute middle cerebral artery stroke. It could be used for rapid screening of patients with eligible mismatch, in centers not equipped with ultrafast postprocessing software. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Perfusion-CT of Developmental Venous Anomalies: Typical and Atypical Hemodynamic Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Hannes; Soares, Bruno P.; Saloner, David; Dillon, William P.; Wintermark, Max

    2009-01-01

    Summary This article reports perfusion-CT patterns that can be observed in patients with DVAs. In atypical DVAs, an abnormal venous congestion pattern with increased CBV, CBF and MTT can be observed in the vicinity of a DVA, and needs to be recognized and differentiated from other entities such as cerebral neoplasms or stroke. This pattern might help to stratify risks of associated complications such as hemorrhage. PMID:19959233

  13. Increased blood-brain barrier permeability on perfusion CT might predict malignant middle cerebral artery infarction.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Hesna; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Kasam, Mallikarjunarao; Harun, Nusrat; Sitton, Clark W; Grotta, James C; Savitz, Sean I

    2010-11-01

    Perfusion CT has been used to assess the extent of blood-brain barrier breakdown. The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive value of blood-brain barrier permeability measured using perfusion CT for development of malignant middle cerebral artery infarction requiring hemicraniectomy (HC). We retrospectively identified patients from our stroke registry who had middle cerebral artery infarction and were evaluated with admission perfusion CT. Blood-brain barrier permeability and cerebral blood volume maps were generated and infarct volumes calculated. Clinical and radiographic characteristics were compared between those who underwent HC versus those who did not undergo HC. One hundred twenty-two patients (12 HC, 110 no HC) were identified. Twelve patients who underwent HC had developed edema, midline shift, or infarct expansion. Infarct permeability area, infarct cerebral blood volume area, and infarct volumes were significantly different (P < 0.018, P < 0.0211, P < 0.0001, P < 0.0014) between HC and no HC groups. Age (P = 0.03) and admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (P = 0.0029) were found to be independent predictors for HC. Using logistic regression modeling, there was an association between increased infarct permeability area and HC. The OR for HC based on a 5-, 10-, 15-, or 20-cm² increase in infarct permeability area were 1.179, 1.390, 1.638, or 1.932, respectively (95% CI, 1.035 to 1.343, 1.071 to 1.804, 1.108 to 2.423, 1.146 to 3.255, respectively). Increased infarct permeability area is associated with an increased likelihood for undergoing HC. Because early HC for malignant middle cerebral artery infarction has been associated with better outcomes, the infarct permeability area on admission perfusion CT might be a useful tool to predict malignant middle cerebral artery infarction and need for HC.

  14. Imaging of drug effects in perfused liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammann, Marc; Mahlke, Christine; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2002-06-01

    Various medications affect the systemic circulation and organ oxygenation causing dilatation or constriction of blood vessels. Imminent liver failure can be generated by reduced perfusion of different origins. In this case hepatic vasodilatation would be a therapeutical approach for improving patient's condition. Our examinations have been performed in perfused rat liver using spectrometric methods. Two defined areas of the liver were measured punctually. We compared the influence of Tetramethylpyrazine and Glyceroltrinitrate on hemoglobin oxygenation (HbO2) and concentration (Hb-conc.) in rat liver after application of Norepinephrine, which caused a mid decrease in hemoglobin oxygenation of 47,9 %. Both increased the HbO2, but differed from each other in manner of time and extent. Tetramethylpyrazine indicated a longer effect than Glyceroltrinitrate. Furthermore, HbO2 and Hb-conc. showed a conversed relation. From the shape of the absorption spectra it is possible to derive the oxygenation of hemoglobin.

  15. Impact of metoclopramide on image quality in myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Yaghoobi, Nahid; Mardanshahi, Alireza; Rastgou, Fereydoon; Malek, Hadi; Firouzabady, Seyed-Hassan; Rajabi, Ahmad Bitarafan; Amouzadeh, Hedieh; Vaseghi, Samaneh

    2012-10-01

    The effectiveness of metoclopramide in reducing gastrointestinal-induced artifacts in myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is a subject of debate. We examined the significance of this pharmacological intervention in the quality of images obtained from MPI studies. A total of 211 suspected or known cases with coronary artery disease routinely referred to our nuclear medicine department for MPI were randomly assigned to group A and group B. Group A (N=125) comprised patients who received 10 mg of metoclopramide orally after the injection of the radiotracer [technetium-99m-labeled methoxyisobutyl isonitril (99mTc-MIBI)] 1 h before image acquisition, and group B (N=86) comprised patients who did not receive any pharmacological intervention and were considered the control group. All the scans in each group were assessed in the rest phase of a routine 2-day protocol. The single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) images were visually evaluated in terms of extracardiac activities and their effects on image quality by three nuclear medicine physicians, who were blinded to the details of the protocol. Of the 125 patients who had received metoclopramide, 16 (13%) had nonacceptable, 72 (57.6%) had acceptable (interpretable), and 37 (29.6%) had good image quality. The image quality in group B was nonacceptable in 10 (11.23%), acceptable in 48 (50.23%), and good in 28 (33.56%) patients. The overall interobserver agreement was good (κ: 0.6-0.9, P<0.05) among the three readers. There was no statistically significant difference in terms of MPI-SPECT image quality between patients who received metoclopramide and those in the control group. Metoclopramide, therefore, did not exert a remarkable effect on the quality of our MPI scans.

  16. Arterial Perfusion Imaging-Defined Subvolume of Intrahepatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hesheng; Farjam, Reza; Feng, Mary; Hussain, Hero; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether an increase in a subvolume of intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during radiation therapy (RT) predicts tumor progression post RT. Methods and Materials Twenty patients with unresectable intrahepatic cancers undergoing RT were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) were performed prior to RT (pre-RT), after delivering ~60% of the planned dose (mid-RT) and one month after completion of RT to quantify hepatic arterial perfusion. The arterial perfusions of the tumors at pre-RT were clustered into low-normal and elevated perfusion by a fuzzy clustering-based method, and the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion were extracted from the hepatic arterial perfusion images. The percentage changes in the tumor subvolumes and means of arterial perfusion over the tumors from pre-RT to mid-RT were evaluated for predicting tumor progression post-RT. Results Of the 24 tumors, 6 tumors in 5 patients progressed 5–21 months after RT completion. Neither tumor volumes nor means of tumor arterial perfusion at pre-RT were predictive of treatment outcome. The mean arterial perfusion over the tumors increased significantly at mid-RT in progressive tumors comparing to the responsive ones (p=0.006). From pre-RT to mid-RT, the responsive tumors had a decrease in the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion (median: −14%, range: −75% – 65%), while the progressing tumors had an increase of the subvolumes (median: 57%, range: −7% – 165%) (p=0.003). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of the percentage change in the subvolume for predicting tumor progression post-RT had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.90. Conclusion The increase in the subvolume of the intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during RT has the potential to be a predictor for tumor progression post-RT. The tumor subvolume could be a radiation boost candidate

  17. How influential is the duration of contrast material bolus injection in perfusion CT? evaluation in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Sonja M; Meyer, Henning; Boehnert, Markus; Hoppel, Bernice; Paul, Narinder Singh; Rogalla, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the effect of the duration of contrast material bolus injection on perfusion values in a swine model by using the maximum slope method. This study was approved by the institutional animal care committee. Twenty pigs (weight range, 63-77 kg) underwent dynamic volume computed tomography (CT) of the kidneys during suspended respiration. Before the CT examination, a miniature cuff-shaped ultrasonographic flow probe encircling the right renal artery was surgically implanted in each pig to obtain true perfusion values. Two sequential perfusion CT series were performed in 30 seconds, each comprising 30 volumes with identical parameters (100 kV, 200 mAs, 0.5 sec rotation time). The duration of contrast material bolus (0.5 mL/kg of body weight) was 3.8 seconds in the first series (short bolus series) and 11.5 seconds in the second series (long bolus series), and the injection flow rate was adapted accordingly. In each pig, cortical kidney volume was determined by using the volume with the highest cortical enhancement. CT perfusion values were calculated for both series by using the maximum slope method and were statistically compared and correlated with the true perfusion values from the flow probe by using linear regression analysis. Mean true perfusion and CT perfusion values (in minutes(-1)) for the short bolus series were 1.95 and 2.03, respectively (P = .22), and for the long bolus series, they were 2.02 and 1.92, respectively (P = .12). CT perfusion showed very good correlation with true perfusion in both the short (slope, 1.01; 95% confidence interval: 0.91, 1.11) and long (slope, 0.92; 95% confidence interval: 0.78, 1.04) series. On the basis of the regression analysis, CT perfusion values in the short bolus series were overestimated by 1% and those in the long bolus series were underestimated by 8%. Duration of contrast material bolus injection does not influence CT perfusion values substantially. The longer, clinically preferred intravenous injection

  18. Blood pressure reduction does not reduce perihematoma oxygenation: a CT perfusion study.

    PubMed

    Kate, Mahesh P; Hansen, Mikkel B; Mouridsen, Kim; Østergaard, Leif; Choi, Victor; Gould, Bronwen E; McCourt, Rebecca; Hill, Michael D; Demchuk, Andrew M; Coutts, Shelagh B; Dowlatshahi, Dariush; Emery, Derek J; Buck, Brian H; Butcher, Kenneth S

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) reduction after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is controversial, because of concerns that this may cause critical reductions in perihematoma perfusion and thereby precipitate tissue damage. We tested the hypothesis that BP reduction reduces perihematoma tissue oxygenation.Acute ICH patients were randomized to a systolic BP target of <150 or <180 mm Hg. Patients underwent CT perfusion (CTP) imaging 2 hours after randomization. Maps of cerebral blood flow (CBF), maximum oxygen extraction fraction (OEF(max)), and the resulting maximum cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2(max)) permitted by local hemodynamics, were calculated from raw CTP data.Sixty-five patients (median (interquartile range) age 70 (20)) were imaged at a median (interquartile range) time from onset to CTP of 9.8 (13.6) hours. Mean OEF(max) was elevated in the perihematoma region (0.44±0.12) relative to contralateral tissue (0.36±0.11; P<0.001). Perihematoma CMRO2(max) (3.40±1.67 mL/100 g per minute) was slightly lower relative to contralateral tissue (3.63±1.66 mL/100 g per minute; P=0.025). Despite a significant difference in systolic BP between the aggressive (140.5±18.7 mm Hg) and conservative (163.0±10.6 mm Hg; P<0.001) treatment groups, perihematoma CBF was unaffected (37.2±11.9 versus 35.8±9.6 mL/100 g per minute; P=0.307). Similarly, aggressive BP treatment did not affect perihematoma OEF(max) (0.43±0.12 versus 0.45±0.11; P=0.232) or CMRO2(max) (3.16±1.66 versus 3.68±1.85 mL/100 g per minute; P=0.857). Blood pressure reduction does not affect perihematoma oxygen delivery. These data support the safety of early aggressive BP treatment in ICH.

  19. Influence of tissue movements on laser Doppler perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Daniel M.; Larsson, Marcus; Stroemberg, Tomas; Wardell, Karin

    2002-05-01

    The microvascular perfusion can be measured using laser Doppler blood flowmetry (LDF), a technique sensitive to the concentration of moving blood cells and their velocity. However, movements of the tissue itself can cause artifacts in the perfusion readings. In a clinical situation, these movement induced artifacts may arise from patient movements or from movements of internal organs e.g. the intestines or the beating heart. Therefore, we have studied how a well-controlled tissue movement affects the LDF signals during different flow conditions and for different surface structures. Tissue perfusion was recorded non-touch in one point using a laser Doppler perfusion imager. During the measurements the object was placed on a shaker that generated the movement (both horizontal and vertical). Measurements were carried out both on DELRIN (polyacetal plastic) and the fingertip, for a wide range of velocities (0-3 cm/s). The influence of the microvascular perfusion was evaluated by occluding the brachial artery as well as blood emptying the finger and by using a flow model. The LDF signals were correlated to the movement. In vivo measurements showed that velocities above 0.8 cm/s gave a significant contribution to the perfusion signal. Corresponding velocities for the DELRIN piece were higher (1.4 - 2.6 cm/s), and dependent on the surface structures and reflecting properties. By reducing the amount of specular reflection the movement influence was substantially lowered.

  20. Perfusion-weighted MR imaging in persistent hemiplegic migraine.

    PubMed

    Mourand, Isabelle; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas; Carra-Dallière, Clarisse; Le Bars, Emmanuelle; Roubertie, Agathe; Bonafé, Alain; Thouvenot, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Hemiplegic migraine is a rare type of migraine that has an aura characterized by the presence of motor weakness, which may occasionally last up to several days, and then resolve without sequela. Pathogenesis of migraine remains unclear and, recently, perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) has provided a non-invasive method to study hemodynamic changes during acute attacks. Two female patients were admitted in our hospital suffering from prolonged hemiparesis. In both cases, they underwent MRI examination using a 1.5 T magnet including axial diffusion-weighted and perfusion sequences. From each perfusion MRI acquisition two regions of interest were delineated on each hemisphere and, the index of flow, cerebral blood volume, mean transit time, and time to peak were recorded and asymmetry indices from each perfusion parameter were calculated. Perfusion alterations were detected during the attacks. In one case, we observed, after 3 h of left hemiparesia, hypoperfusion of the right hemisphere. In the other case, who presented a familial hemiplegic migraine attack, on the third day of a persistent aura consisting of right hemiplegia and aphasia, PWI revealed hyperperfusion of the left hemisphere. Asymmetry indices for temporal parameters (mean transit time and time to peak) were the most sensitive. These findings resolved spontaneously after the attacks without any permanent sequel or signs of cerebral ischemia on follow-up MRI. PWI should be indicated for patients with migraine attacks accompanied by auras to assess the sequential changes in cerebral perfusion and to better understand its pathogenesis.

  1. TIPS bilateral noise reduction in 4D CT perfusion scans produces high-quality cerebral blood flow maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendrik, Adriënne M.; Vonken, Evert-jan; van Ginneken, Bram; de Jong, Hugo W.; Riordan, Alan; van Seeters, Tom; Smit, Ewoud J.; Viergever, Max A.; Prokop, Mathias

    2011-07-01

    Cerebral computed tomography perfusion (CTP) scans are acquired to detect areas of abnormal perfusion in patients with cerebrovascular diseases. These 4D CTP scans consist of multiple sequential 3D CT scans over time. Therefore, to reduce radiation exposure to the patient, the amount of x-ray radiation that can be used per sequential scan is limited, which results in a high level of noise. To detect areas of abnormal perfusion, perfusion parameters are derived from the CTP data, such as the cerebral blood flow (CBF). Algorithms to determine perfusion parameters, especially singular value decomposition, are very sensitive to noise. Therefore, noise reduction is an important preprocessing step for CTP analysis. In this paper, we propose a time-intensity profile similarity (TIPS) bilateral filter to reduce noise in 4D CTP scans, while preserving the time-intensity profiles (fourth dimension) that are essential for determining the perfusion parameters. The proposed TIPS bilateral filter is compared to standard Gaussian filtering, and 4D and 3D (applied separately to each sequential scan) bilateral filtering on both phantom and patient data. Results on the phantom data show that the TIPS bilateral filter is best able to approach the ground truth (noise-free phantom), compared to the other filtering methods (lowest root mean square error). An observer study is performed using CBF maps derived from fifteen CTP scans of acute stroke patients filtered with standard Gaussian, 3D, 4D and TIPS bilateral filtering. These CBF maps were blindly presented to two observers that indicated which map they preferred for (1) gray/white matter differentiation, (2) detectability of infarcted area and (3) overall image quality. Based on these results, the TIPS bilateral filter ranked best and its CBF maps were scored to have the best overall image quality in 100% of the cases by both observers. Furthermore, quantitative CBF and cerebral blood volume values in both the phantom and the

  2. TIPS bilateral noise reduction in 4D CT perfusion scans produces high-quality cerebral blood flow maps.

    PubMed

    Mendrik, Adriënne M; Vonken, Evert-jan; van Ginneken, Bram; de Jong, Hugo W; Riordan, Alan; van Seeters, Tom; Smit, Ewoud J; Viergever, Max A; Prokop, Mathias

    2011-07-07

    Cerebral computed tomography perfusion (CTP) scans are acquired to detect areas of abnormal perfusion in patients with cerebrovascular diseases. These 4D CTP scans consist of multiple sequential 3D CT scans over time. Therefore, to reduce radiation exposure to the patient, the amount of x-ray radiation that can be used per sequential scan is limited, which results in a high level of noise. To detect areas of abnormal perfusion, perfusion parameters are derived from the CTP data, such as the cerebral blood flow (CBF). Algorithms to determine perfusion parameters, especially singular value decomposition, are very sensitive to noise. Therefore, noise reduction is an important preprocessing step for CTP analysis. In this paper, we propose a time-intensity profile similarity (TIPS) bilateral filter to reduce noise in 4D CTP scans, while preserving the time-intensity profiles (fourth dimension) that are essential for determining the perfusion parameters. The proposed TIPS bilateral filter is compared to standard Gaussian filtering, and 4D and 3D (applied separately to each sequential scan) bilateral filtering on both phantom and patient data. Results on the phantom data show that the TIPS bilateral filter is best able to approach the ground truth (noise-free phantom), compared to the other filtering methods (lowest root mean square error). An observer study is performed using CBF maps derived from fifteen CTP scans of acute stroke patients filtered with standard Gaussian, 3D, 4D and TIPS bilateral filtering. These CBF maps were blindly presented to two observers that indicated which map they preferred for (1) gray/white matter differentiation, (2) detectability of infarcted area and (3) overall image quality. Based on these results, the TIPS bilateral filter ranked best and its CBF maps were scored to have the best overall image quality in 100% of the cases by both observers. Furthermore, quantitative CBF and cerebral blood volume values in both the phantom and the

  3. Perfusion CT of head and neck cancer: effect of arterial input selection.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Ahmed M; Razek, Ahmed A Abdel; Elsorogy, Lamiaa G; Soliman, Nermin Y; Kerl, J Matthias; Mack, Martin G; Vogl, Thomas J

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of arterial input selection on perfusion CT parameters of head and neck tumors. Perfusion calculations were done for 50 cases using deconvolution-based software. Peak enhancement values of the ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) and external carotid artery (ECA) were recorded. Blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and permeability surface area product were calculated using ipsilateral ECA, ipsilateral ICA, and contralateral ICA as input arteries. Values were compared using Wilcoxon's matched pair test and Pearson's correlation coefficients (r). A highly significant correlation was observed between peak enhancement values of the ICA and ECA (r = 0.97; p < 0.0001). A high correlation was observed between perfusion calculations obtained using ipsilateral ICA and ECA (BF, r = 0.98; BV, r = 0.92; MTT, r = 0.91; and permeability surface area product, r = 0.89), ipsilateral and contralateral ICA (BF, r = 0.97; BV, r = 0.95; MTT, r = 0.93; and permeability surface area product, r = 0.89), as well as left and right ICA (BF, r = 0.97; BV, r = 0.95; MTT, r = 0.94; and permeability surface area product, r = 0.88). All correlations were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). No significant differences were observed between perfusion calculations obtained using ipsilateral ICA versus ECA, ipsilateral versus contralateral ICA, or left versus right ICA (p > 0.05). Arterial input selection has no significant effect on perfusion CT calculation of head and neck cancer. For standardization and simplification of postprocessing, we recommend the use of the ICA instead of the ECA as the arterial input because of its better visualization, perpendicular course, and larger caliber, all of which decrease partial volume effects.

  4. Spatio-temporal TGV denoising for ASL perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Spann, Stefan M; Kazimierski, Kamil S; Aigner, Christoph S; Kraiger, Markus; Bredies, Kristian; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2017-08-15

    In arterial spin labeling (ASL) a perfusion weighted image is achieved by subtracting a label image from a control image. This perfusion weighted image has an intrinsically low signal to noise ratio and numerous measurements are required to achieve reliable image quality, especially at higher spatial resolutions. To overcome this limitation various denoising approaches have been published using the perfusion weighted image as input for denoising. In this study we propose a new spatio-temporal filtering approach based on total generalized variation (TGV) regularization which exploits the inherent information of control and label pairs simultaneously. In this way, the temporal and spatial similarities of all images are used to jointly denoise the control and label images. To assess the effect of denoising, virtual ground truth data were produced at different SNR levels. Furthermore, high-resolution in-vivo pulsed ASL data sets were acquired and processed. The results show improved image quality, quantitative accuracy and robustness against outliers compared to seven state of the art denoising approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Computed tomography perfusion imaging in spectacular shrinking deficit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivien H; John, Sayona; Mohammad, Yousef; Prabhakaran, Shyam

    2012-02-01

    Spectacular shrinking deficit (SSD) is characterized by abrupt onset of a major hemispheric stroke syndrome, followed by dramatic and rapid improvement. We retrospectively identified patients with SSD diagnosed at our institution between December 1, 2007, and June 30, 2009. We reviewed computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging to determine perfusion defect as a measure of initial ischemic penumbra, and magnetic resonance imaging diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to determine the final infarct core. Among the 472 consecutive ischemic stroke patients, 126 (27%) presented with major hemispheric ischemic stroke syndrome, defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (NIHSS) ≥8 in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or internal carotid artery (ICA). Out of these patients, we identified 8 SSD patients with available CTP data. In these 8 patients, the mean time to dramatic recovery was 3.4 hours (range, 0.75-7 hours), and the mean time from onset to CTP was 12.7 hours (range, 3-30 hours). All 8 patients had perfusion abnormalities in portions of the MCA territory (partial MCA territory in 5 patients and complete MCA territory in 3 patients). The mean time from onset to MRI DWI was 15.5 hours (range, 7.9-34 hours). Restricted diffusion was present in all patients in the corresponding MCA distribution. Vascular imaging revealed MCA occlusion in 2 patients. Cervical vascular imaging revealed carotid occlusion in 2 patients and high-grade carotid stenosis in 2 patients. The stroke mechanisms were cardioembolism in 2 patients, large artery in 4 patients, and unknown in 2 patients. Four patients had repeat CTP imaging available that demonstrated eventual resolution of the perfusion defect. SSD is associated with a "shrinking" clinical syndrome and a "shrinking" perfusion pattern on CTP that lags behind clinical recovery. CTP imaging corroborates that a larger territory is at risk in SSD and contributes to better understanding of SSD.

  6. Correction of Motion Artifacts From Shuttle Mode Computed Tomography Acquisitions for Body Perfusion Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Payel; Chandler, Adam G; Altinmakas, Emre; Rong, John; Ng, Chaan S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of shuttle-mode computed tomography (CT) technology for body perfusion applications by quantitatively assessing and correcting motion artifacts. Noncontrast shuttle-mode CT scans (10 phases, 2 nonoverlapping bed locations) were acquired from 4 patients on a GE 750HD CT scanner. Shuttling effects were quantified using Euclidean distances (between-phase and between-bed locations) of corresponding fiducial points on the shuttle and reference phase scans (prior to shuttle mode). Motion correction with nonrigid registration was evaluated using sum-of-squares differences and distances between centers of segmented volumes of interest on shuttle and references images. Fiducial point analysis showed an average shuttling motion of 0.85 ± 1.05 mm (between-bed) and 1.18 ± 1.46 mm (between-phase), respectively. The volume-of-interest analysis of the nonrigid registration results showed improved sum-of-squares differences from 2950 to 597, between-bed distance from 1.64 to 1.20 mm, and between-phase distance from 2.64 to 1.33 mm, respectively, averaged over all cases. Shuttling effects introduced during shuttle-mode CT acquisitions can be computationally corrected for body perfusion applications.

  7. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study.

    PubMed

    Honda, Mitsuru; Ichibayashi, Ryo; Yokomuro, Hiroki; Yoshihara, Katsunori; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Haga, Daisuke; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Kudoh, Chiaki; Kishi, Taichi

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1-3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3-4, GCS5-6, and GCS7-8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients.

  8. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study

    PubMed Central

    HONDA, Mitsuru; ICHIBAYASHI, Ryo; YOKOMURO, Hiroki; YOSHIHARA, Katsunori; MASUDA, Hiroyuki; HAGA, Daisuke; SEIKI, Yoshikatsu; KUDOH, Chiaki; KISHI, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1–3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3–4, GCS5–6, and GCS7–8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  9. Comparison Between Perfusion Computed Tomography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kierkels, Roel G.J.; Backes, Walter H.; Janssen, Marco H.M.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Oellers, Michel C.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To compare pretreatment scans with perfusion computed tomography (pCT) vs. dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients diagnosed with rectal cancer were included in this prospective study. All patients underwent both pCT and DCE-MRI. Imaging was performed on a dedicated 40-slice CT-positron emission tomography system and a 3-T MRI system. Dynamic contrast enhancement was measured in tumor tissue and the external iliac artery. Tumor perfusion was quantified in terms of pharmacokinetic parameters: transfer constant K{sup trans}, fractional extravascular-extracellular space v{sub e}, and fractional plasma volume v{sub p}. Pharmacokinetic parameter values and their heterogeneity (by 80% quantile value) were compared between pCT and DCE-MRI. Results: Tumor K{sup trans} values correlated significantly for the voxel-by-voxel-derived median (Kendall's tau correlation, tau = 0.81, p < 0.001) and 80% quantile (tau = 0.54, p = 0.04), as well as for the averaged uptake (tau = 0.58, p = 0.03). However, no significant correlations were found for v{sub e} and v{sub p} derived from the voxel-by-voxel-derived median and 80% quantile and derived from the averaged uptake curves. Conclusions: This study demonstrated for the first time that pCT provides K{sup trans} values comparable to those of DCE-MRI. However, no correlation was found for the v{sub e} and v{sub p} parameters between CT and MRI. Computed tomography can serve as an alternative modality to MRI for the in vivo evaluation of tumor angiogenesis in terms of the transfer constant K{sup trans}.

  10. Correlation analysis of dual-energy CT iodine maps with quantitative pulmonary perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hansmann, Jan; Apfaltrer, Paul; Zoellner, Frank G; Henzler, Thomas; Meyer, Mathias; Weisser, Gerald; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Attenberger, Ulrike I

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To correlate dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) pulmonary angiography derived iodine maps with parameter maps of quantitative pulmonary perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: Eighteen patients with pulmonary perfusion defects detected on DECT derived iodine maps were included in this prospective study and additionally underwent time-resolved contrast-enhanced pulmonary MRI [dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI]. DCE-MRI data were quantitatively analyzed using a pixel-by-pixel deconvolution analysis calculating regional pulmonary blood flow (PBF), pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in visually normal lung parenchyma and perfusion defects. Perfusion parameters were correlated to mean attenuation values of normal lung and perfusion defects on DECT iodine maps. Two readers rated the concordance of perfusion defects in a visual analysis using a 5-point Likert-scale (1 = no correlation, 5 = excellent correlation). RESULTS: In visually normal pulmonary tissue mean DECT and MRI values were: 22.6 ± 8.3 Hounsfield units (HU); PBF: 58.8 ± 36.0 mL/100 mL per minute; PBV: 16.6 ± 8.5 mL; MTT: 17.1 ± 10.3 s. In areas with restricted perfusion mean DECT and MRI values were: 4.0 ± 3.9 HU; PBF: 10.3 ± 5.5 mL/100 mL per minute, PBV: 5 ± 4 mL, MTT: 21.6 ± 14.0 s. The differences between visually normal parenchyma and areas of restricted perfusion were statistically significant for PBF, PBV and DECT (P < 0.0001). No linear correlation was found between MRI perfusion parameters and attenuation values of DECT iodine maps (PBF: r = 0.35, P = 0.15; PBV: r = 0.34, P = 0.16; MTT: r = 0.41, P = 0.08). Visual analysis revealed a moderate correlation between perfusion defects on DECT iodine maps and the parameter maps of DCE-MRI (mean score 3.6, κ 0.45). CONCLUSION: There is a moderate visual but not statistically significant correlation between DECT iodine maps and perfusion parameter maps of DCE-MRI. PMID:23805370

  11. Correlation analysis of dual-energy CT iodine maps with quantitative pulmonary perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Hansmann, Jan; Apfaltrer, Paul; Zoellner, Frank G; Henzler, Thomas; Meyer, Mathias; Weisser, Gerald; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Attenberger, Ulrike I

    2013-05-28

    To correlate dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) pulmonary angiography derived iodine maps with parameter maps of quantitative pulmonary perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Eighteen patients with pulmonary perfusion defects detected on DECT derived iodine maps were included in this prospective study and additionally underwent time-resolved contrast-enhanced pulmonary MRI [dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI]. DCE-MRI data were quantitatively analyzed using a pixel-by-pixel deconvolution analysis calculating regional pulmonary blood flow (PBF), pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in visually normal lung parenchyma and perfusion defects. Perfusion parameters were correlated to mean attenuation values of normal lung and perfusion defects on DECT iodine maps. Two readers rated the concordance of perfusion defects in a visual analysis using a 5-point Likert-scale (1 = no correlation, 5 = excellent correlation). In visually normal pulmonary tissue mean DECT and MRI values were: 22.6 ± 8.3 Hounsfield units (HU); PBF: 58.8 ± 36.0 mL/100 mL per minute; PBV: 16.6 ± 8.5 mL; MTT: 17.1 ± 10.3 s. In areas with restricted perfusion mean DECT and MRI values were: 4.0 ± 3.9 HU; PBF: 10.3 ± 5.5 mL/100 mL per minute, PBV: 5 ± 4 mL, MTT: 21.6 ± 14.0 s. The differences between visually normal parenchyma and areas of restricted perfusion were statistically significant for PBF, PBV and DECT (P < 0.0001). No linear correlation was found between MRI perfusion parameters and attenuation values of DECT iodine maps (PBF: r = 0.35, P = 0.15; PBV: r = 0.34, P = 0.16; MTT: r = 0.41, P = 0.08). Visual analysis revealed a moderate correlation between perfusion defects on DECT iodine maps and the parameter maps of DCE-MRI (mean score 3.6, κ 0.45). There is a moderate visual but not statistically significant correlation between DECT iodine maps and perfusion parameter maps of DCE-MRI.

  12. [Diagnostic imaging--CT, dynamic CT, and others].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Hajime

    2011-10-01

    Technical advances have raised computed tomography(CT) as a strong diagnostic tool of clinical imaging. Emphysematous changes can be quantitatively analyzed as low attenuation area which correlated with diffusion capacity, quality of life, and nutritional states, but not so much with forced expiratory volume in one second. With co-analyzing airway wall thickness, those are possibly useful to understand phenotypes. Dynamics of airway during breathing can be visualized by dynamic CT such as electron-beam CT. Dynamic airway narrowing is a representative feature in emphysematous lung.

  13. Analysis of myocardial perfusion from vasodilator stress computed tomography: does improvement in image quality by iterative reconstruction lead to improved diagnostic accuracy?

    PubMed

    Bhave, Nicole M; Mor-Avi, Victor; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Freed, Benjamin H; Vannier, Michael; Dill, Karin; Lang, Roberto M; Patel, Amit R

    2014-01-01

    Iterative reconstruction (IR) in cardiac CT has been shown to improve confidence of interpretation of noninvasive coronary CT angiography (CTA). We hypothesized that IR would also improve the quality of vasodilator stress coronary CT images acquired with low tube voltage to assess myocardial perfusion and the accuracy of the detection of perfusion abnormalities by using quantitative 3-dimensional (3D) analysis. We studied 39 consecutive patients referred for coronary CTA (256-slice scanner; Philips), who underwent additional imaging (100 kV, prospective gating) with regadenoson (0.4 mg; Astellas). Stress images were reconstructed with different algorithms: filtered back projection (FBP) and IR (iDose; Philips). Image quality was quantified by signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the blood pool and the myocardium. Then, FBP and separately IR images were analyzed with custom 3D analysis software to quantitatively detect perfusion defects. Accuracy of detection was compared with perfusion abnormalities predicted by coronary stenosis >50% on coronary CTA. Five patients with image artifacts were excluded. In the remaining 34 patients, both signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios increased with IR, indicating improvement in image quality compared with FBP. For 3D perfusion analysis, 10 patients with normal coronary arteries were used as a reference to correct for x-ray attenuation variations in normal myocardium. In the remaining 24 patients, reduced noise levels in the IR images compared with FBP resulted in tighter attenuation distribution and improved detection of perfusion abnormalities. IR significantly improves image quality on regadenoson stress CT images acquired with low tube voltage, leading to improved 3D quantitative evaluation of myocardial perfusion. Copyright © 2014 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. High quality high spatial resolution functional classification in low dose dynamic CT perfusion using singular value decomposition (SVD) and k-means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisana, Francesco; Henzler, Thomas; Schönberg, Stefan; Klotz, Ernst; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic CT perfusion acquisitions are intrinsically high-dose examinations, due to repeated scanning. To keep radiation dose under control, relatively noisy images are acquired. Noise is then further enhanced during the extraction of functional parameters from the post-processing of the time attenuation curves of the voxels (TACs) and normally some smoothing filter needs to be employed to better visualize any perfusion abnormality, but sacrificing spatial resolution. In this study we propose a new method to detect perfusion abnormalities keeping both high spatial resolution and high CNR. To do this we first perform the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the original noisy spatial temporal data matrix to extract basis functions of the TACs. Then we iteratively cluster the voxels based on a smoothed version of the three most significant singular vectors. Finally, we create high spatial resolution 3D volumes where to each voxel is assigned a distance from the centroid of each cluster, showing how functionally similar each voxel is compared to the others. The method was tested on three noisy clinical datasets: one brain perfusion case with an occlusion in the left internal carotid, one healthy brain perfusion case, and one liver case with an enhancing lesion. Our method successfully detected all perfusion abnormalities with higher spatial precision when compared to the functional maps obtained with a commercially available software. We conclude this method might be employed to have a rapid qualitative indication of functional abnormalities in low dose dynamic CT perfusion datasets. The method seems to be very robust with respect to both spatial and temporal noise and does not require any special a priori assumption. While being more robust respect to noise and with higher spatial resolution and CNR when compared to the functional maps, our method is not quantitative and a potential usage in clinical routine could be as a second reader to assist in the maps

  15. Automated CT Perfusion Ischemic Core Volume and Noncontrast CT ASPECTS (Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score): Correlation and Clinical Outcome Prediction in Large Vessel Stroke.

    PubMed

    Haussen, Diogo C; Dehkharghani, Seena; Rangaraju, Srikant; Rebello, Leticia C; Bouslama, Mehdi; Grossberg, Jonathan A; Anderson, Aaron; Belagaje, Samir; Frankel, Michael; Nogueira, Raul G

    2016-09-01

    The semiquantitative noncontrast CT Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) and RAPID automated computed tomography (CT) perfusion (CTP) ischemic core volumetric measurements have been used to quantify infarct extent. We aim to determine the correlation between ASPECTS and CTP ischemic core, evaluate the variability of core volumes within ASPECTS strata, and assess the strength of their association with clinical outcomes. Review of a prospective, single-center database of consecutive thrombectomies of middle cerebral or intracranial internal carotid artery occlusions with pretreatment CTP between September 2010 and September 2015. CTP was processed with RAPID software to identify ischemic core (relative cerebral blood flow<30% of normal tissue). Three hundred and thirty-two patients fulfilled inclusion criteria. Median age was 66 years (55-75), median ASPECTS was 8 (7-9), whereas median CTP ischemic core was 11 cc (2-27). Median time from last normal to groin puncture was 5.8 hours (3.9-8.8), and 90-day modified Rankin scale score 0 to 2 was observed in 54%. The correlation between CTP ischemic core and ASPECTS was fair (R=-0.36; P<0.01). Twenty-six patients (8%) had ASPECTS <6 and CTP core ≤50 cc (37% had modified Rankin scale score 0-2, whereas 29% were deceased at 90 days). Conversely, 27 patients (8%) had CTP core >50 cc and ASPECTS ≥6 (29% had modified Rankin scale 0-2, whereas 21% were deceased at 90 days). Moderate correlations between ASPECTS and final infarct volume (R=-0.42; P<0.01) and between CTP ischemic core and final infarct volume (R=0.50; P<0.01) were observed; coefficients were not significantly influenced by the time from stroke onset to presentation. Multivariable regression indicated ASPECTS ≥6 (odds ratio 4.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.47-11.46; P=0.01) and CTP core ≤50 cc (odds ratio 3.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-12.15; P=0.02) independently and comparably predictive of good outcome. There is wide variability of CTP

  16. Correlation Between Dual-energy and Perfusion CT in Patients with Focal Liver Lesions Using Third-generation Dual-source CT Scanner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Zheng, Yongchang; Wang, Xuan; Xue, Huadan; Wang, Shitian; Liang, Jixiang; Jin, Zhengyu

    2017-02-20

    Objective To compare measurements of dual-energy CT iodine map parameters and liver perfusion CT parameters in patients with focal liver lesions using a third-generation dual-source CT scanner. Methods Between November 2015 and August 2016,33 patients with non-cystic focal lesions of liver were enrolled in this study. CT examinations were performed with a third-generation dual-source CT. The study CT protocol included a perfusion CT and dual-energy arterial and portal venous scans,with a time interval of 15 minutes. Iodine attenuation was measured at five region of interests including areas of high,medium,and low density within the lesion,as well as right and left liver parenchyma from the iodine map,while arterial liver perfusion (ALP),portal venous liver perfusion (PVP),and hepatic perfusion index (HPI) at the same location were measured from perfusion CT. The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the relationship between iodine attenuation and perfusion parameters. Results The iodine attenuation at arterial phase showed significant intra-individual correlation with ALP (r=0.812,95% CI=0.728-0.885,P<0.001)and PVP (r=-0.209,95% CI=-0.323--0.073,P=0.007),but not significantly correlated with HPI (r=0.058,95% CI=0.046-0.498,P=0.461). The iodine attenuation at portal venous phase showed significant correlation with PVP (r=0.214,95% CI=0.072-0.361,P=0.005) but not with HPI(r=0.036,95% CI=-0.002-0.242,P=0.649). The mean effective dose of arterial phase and portal venous phase of dual-energy CT together [(3.53±1.17)mSv] was significantly lower than that of the perfusion CT [(14.53±0.45)mSv](t=25.212,P<0.001). Conclusion Iodine attenuation from arterial phase of dual energy CT demonstrates significant correlation with ALP and PVP,and iodine attenuation from portal venous phase demonstrates significant correlation with PVP.

  17. Value of attenuation correction in stress-only myocardial perfusion imaging using CZT-SPECT.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, J D; Mouden, M; Ottervanger, J P; van Dalen, J A; Knollema, S; Slump, C H; Jager, P L

    2017-04-01

    Attenuation correction (AC) improves the diagnostic outcome of stress-only myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using conventional SPECT. Our aim was to determine the value of AC using a cadmium zinc telluride-based (CZT)-SPECT camera. We retrospectively included 107 consecutive patients who underwent stress-optional rest MPI CZT-SPECT/CT. Next, we created three types of images for each patient; (1) only displaying reconstructed data without the CT-based AC (NC), (2) only displaying AC, and (3) with both NC and AC (NC + AC). Next, two experienced physicians visually interpreted these 321 randomized images as normal, equivocal, or abnormal. Image outcome was compared with all hard events over a mean follow-up time of 47.7 ± 9.8 months. The percentage of images interpreted as normal increased from 45% using the NC images to 72% using AC and to 67% using NC + AC images (P < .001). Hard event hazard ratios for images interpreted as normal were not different between using NC and AC (1.01, P = .99), or NC and NC + AC images (0.97, P = .97). AC lowers the need for additional rest imaging in stress-first MPI using CZT-SPECT, while long-term patient outcome remained identical. Use of AC reduces the need for additional rest imaging, decreasing the mean effective dose by up to 1.2 mSv.

  18. Burn imaging with a whole field laser Doppler perfusion imager based on a CMOS imaging array.

    PubMed

    van Herpt, Heleen; Draijer, Matthijs; Hondebrink, Erwin; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne; Beerthuizen, Gerard; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2010-05-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) has been proven to be a useful tool in predicting the burn wound outcome in an early stage. A major disadvantage of scanning beam LDPI devices is their slow scanning speed, leading to patient discomfort and imaging artifacts. We have developed the Twente Optical Perfusion Camera (TOPCam), a whole field laser Doppler perfusion imager based on a CMOS imaging array, which is two orders of magnitude faster than scanning beam LDPI systems. In this paper the first clinical results of the TOPCam in the setting of a burn centre are presented. The paper shows perfusion images of burns of various degrees. While our system encounters problems caused by blisters, tissue necrosis, surface reflection and curvature in a manner similar to scanning beam imagers, it poses a clear advantage in terms of procedure time. Image quality in terms of dynamic range and resolution appears to be sufficient for burn diagnosis. Hence, we made important steps in overcoming the limitations of LDPI in burn diagnosis imposed by the measurement speed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Perfusion-metabolism coupling in recurrent gliomas: a prospective validation study with 13N-ammonia and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Khangembam, Bangkim Chandra; Karunanithi, Sellam; Sharma, Punit; Kc, Sudhir Suman; Kumar, Rajeev; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the validity of "perfusion-metabolism coupling" hypothesis in recurrent glioma with 13N-ammonia (13N-NH3) PET/CT and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT. Fifty-six consecutive patients (age, 38.8 ± 12.1 years; 62.5% males) with histologically proven and previously treated glioma presenting with clinical suspicion of recurrence were prospectively enrolled and evaluated with 13N-NH3 PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT. PET/CT images were evaluated both qualitatively and semiquantitatively. Tumor to white matter uptake ratio (T/W) and tumor to gray matter uptake ratio (T/G) were calculated and analyzed for both the modalities. A combination of clinico-radiological follow-up, repeated imaging, and biopsy (when available) were considered as the reference standard. Based on the reference standard, 27/56 patients had recurrence. 13N-NH3 PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT were concordant in 55/56 patients. Overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of 13N-NH3PET/CT were 77.8, 86.2, 84.0, 80.7, and 82.1%, respectively, and for 18F-FDG PET/CT were 77.8, 89.7, 87.5, 81.2, and 83.9%, respectively. There was excellent agreement between results of 13N-NH3 PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT (ĸ = 0.964; P < 0.001). The performances of 13N-NH3 PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT were not significantly different between high-grade and low-grade glioma (P = 1.000). A strong positive correlation was noted between the uptake ratios derived on the two modalities (ρ = 0.866, P < 0.001 for T/W; ρ = 0.918, P < 0.001 for T/G). A combination of 13N-NH3 PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT demonstrates that perfusion and metabolism are coupled in recurrent gliomas. These tracers target two different but interrelated aspects of the same pathologic process and can be used as surrogates for each other.

  20. Clinical relevance and practical implications of trials of perfusion and angiographic imaging in patients with acute ischaemic stroke: a multicentre cohort imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, Joanna M; Muir, Keith W; Macleod, Mary-Joan; Weir, Christopher; McVerry, Ferghal; Carpenter, Trevor; Shuler, Kirsten; Thomas, Ralph; Acheampong, Paul; Dani, Krishna; Murray, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Background In randomised trials testing treatments for acute ischaemic stroke, imaging markers of tissue reperfusion and arterial recanalisation may provide early response indicators. Objective To determine the predictive value of structural, perfusion and angiographic imaging for early and late clinical outcomes and assess practicalities in three comprehensive stroke centres. Methods We recruited patients with potentially disabling stroke in three stroke centres, performed magnetic resonance (MR) or CT, including perfusion and angiography imaging, within 6 h, at 72 h and 1 month after stroke. We assessed the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score serially and functional outcome at 3 months, tested associations between clinical variables and structural imaging, several perfusion parameters and angiography. Results Among 83 patients, median age 71 (maximum 89), median NIHSS 7 (range 1–30), 38 (46%) received alteplase, 41 (49%) had died or were dependent at 3 months. Most baseline imaging was CT (76%); follow-up was MR (79%) despite both being available acutely. At presentation, perfusion lesion size varied considerably between parameters (p<0.0001); 40 (48%) had arterial occlusion. Arterial occlusion and baseline perfusion lesion extent were both associated with baseline NIHSS (p<0.0001). Recanalisation by 72 h was associated with 1 month NIHSS (p=0.0007) and 3 month functional outcome (p=0.048), whereas tissue reperfusion, using even the best perfusion parameter, was not (p=0.11, p=0.08, respectively). Conclusion Early recanalisation on angiography appeared to predict clinical outcome more directly than did tissue reperfusion. Acute assessment with CT and follow-up with MR was practical and feasible, did not preclude image analysis, and would enhance trial recruitment and generalisability of results. PMID:23644501

  1. Perfusion CT Changes in Liver Metastases from Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors During Everolimus Treatment.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; Cingarlini, Sara; Ortolani, Silvia; Crosara, Stefano; DE Robertis, Riccardo; Vallerio, Paola; Grego, Elisabetta; Ciaravino, Valentina; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Landoni, Luca; Scarpa, Aldo; Bassi, Claudio; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate modifications of perfusional parameters assessed by perfusion computed tomography (P-CT) of liver metastases (LM) from pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) during everolimus treatment. All patients with LMs from G1-2 PanNETs undergoing everolimus treatment between January 2013 and January 2015 were prospectively evaluated with P-CT at baseline, and after 2 and 4 months of therapy. Size, perfusion, blood volume (BV), peak enhancement intensity (PEI) and time to peak for each lesion were calculated. A total of 33 LMs in nine patients with G1-2 PanNETs were prospectively evaluated: 23/33 (69.7%) were responders, 10/33 (30.3%) were non-responders. Among perfusional parameters, only numerical peak enhancement intensity values significantly differed between the two groups at baseline (p=0.043). BV increase was the most significant perfusional modification identifying responding lesions, even at an early stage of treatment, with a high positive predictive value (89.47%). P-CT seems to be useful for prediction of response to everolimus of LMs from PanNETs. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  2. Effectiveness of CT Computed Tomography Perfusion in Diagnostics of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Mete, Ahmet; Ünverdi, Zeyni

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Stroke is the third most common death reason after the cardiovascular disorders and cancer. Cerebral ischemia is a pathology that stems from a decrease in cerebral perfusion. Computed Tomography Perfusion (CTP) is an additional method to the conventional Computed Tomography (CT) that could be performed by using developed softwares, in a short period of time and with a low risk of complications. CTP not only allows early detection of cerebral ischemia but also gives valuable information on the ischemic penumbra which are very important in early diagnosis and treatment. Acute Ischemic Stroke (AIS) can be cured by trombolytic treapy within 3–6 hours after symptom onset. Since rapid screening and accurate diagnosis increase the success of the treatment, the role of neuroradiology in acute ischemia diagnostics and treatment has become more important. Our aim was to define CT skills in early diagnosis of AIS, to define its contribution to patient’s diagnosis and treatment and to define its importance regarding patient’s prognosis. Material/Methods We included 42 patients that presented to the emergency service and neurology outpatient clinic with the symptoms of acute cerebral incidence. Results In our study, we found that Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) is 90.91% sensitive and 100% specific in examining ischemia. Conclusions Tissue hemodynamic data, especially sensitivity and specificity rates, which cannot be acquired by conventional CT and MRI methods, can be acquired by the CTP method. PMID:26740827

  3. Parametric imaging of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    A new image processing strategy is detailed for the simultaneous measurement of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology parameters from a sequence of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) images. A technique for locally mapping tumor perfusion parameters using skeletonized neovascular data is also introduced. Simulated images were used to test the neovascular skeletonization technique and variance (error) of relevant parametric estimates. Preliminary DCE-US image datasets were collected in 6 female patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and using a Philips iU22 ultrasound system equipped with a L9-3 MHz transducer and Definity contrast agent. Simulation data demonstrates that neovascular morphology parametric estimation is reproducible albeit measurement error can occur at a lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Experimental results indicate the feasibility of our approach to performing both tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology measurements from DCE-US images. Future work will expand on our initial clinical findings and also extent our image processing strategy to 3-dimensional space to allow whole tumor characterization.

  4. Diagnosis of Paracardiac Castleman Disease by Dynamic Gadolinium-Enhanced First Pass Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Crean, Andrew; Paul, Narinder; Merchant, Naeem; Singer, Lianne; Provost, Yves

    2008-01-01

    Summary Castleman disease is an uncommon disorder affecting the lymphatic system and is characterised by atypical lymphocyte proliferation. The usual clinical presentation is of a solitary mass lesion, frequently within the thorax. A number of different imaging findings have been reported on CT and MRI. We present a case of paracardiac Castleman disease where the diagnosis was suggested by dramatic enhancement of the tumour mass during a dynamic MR perfusion sequence. To our knowledge this is the first report of the use of a first pass bolus tracking technique in the diagnosis of Castleman disease. PMID:24179362

  5. Multi-material decomposition of spectral CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Paulo R. S.; Bhotika, Rahul; Maddah, Mahnaz; Thomsen, Brian; Dutta, Sandeep; Licato, Paul E.; Joshi, Mukta C.

    2010-04-01

    Spectral Computed Tomography (Spectral CT), and in particular fast kVp switching dual-energy computed tomography, is an imaging modality that extends the capabilities of conventional computed tomography (CT). Spectral CT enables the estimation of the full linear attenuation curve of the imaged subject at each voxel in the CT volume, instead of a scalar image in Hounsfield units. Because the space of linear attenuation curves in the energy ranges of medical applications can be accurately described through a two-dimensional manifold, this decomposition procedure would be, in principle, limited to two materials. This paper describes an algorithm that overcomes this limitation, allowing for the estimation of N-tuples of material-decomposed images. The algorithm works by assuming that the mixing of substances and tissue types in the human body has the physicochemical properties of an ideal solution, which yields a model for the density of the imaged material mix. Under this model the mass attenuation curve of each voxel in the image can be estimated, immediately resulting in a material-decomposed image triplet. Decomposition into an arbitrary number of pre-selected materials can be achieved by automatically selecting adequate triplets from an application-specific material library. The decomposition is expressed in terms of the volume fractions of each constituent material in the mix; this provides for a straightforward, physically meaningful interpretation of the data. One important application of this technique is in the digital removal of contrast agent from a dual-energy exam, producing a virtual nonenhanced image, as well as in the quantification of the concentration of contrast observed in a targeted region, thus providing an accurate measure of tissue perfusion.

  6. Iterative image reconstruction in spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Daniel; Michel, Eric; Kim, Hye S.; Kim, Jae G.; Han, Byung H.; Cho, Min H.; Lee, Soo Y.

    2012-03-01

    Scan time of spectral-CTs is much longer than conventional CTs due to limited number of x-ray photons detectable by photon-counting detectors. However, the spectral pixel information in spectral-CT has much richer information on physiological and pathological status of the tissues than the CT-number in conventional CT, which makes the spectral- CT one of the promising future imaging modalities. One simple way to reduce the scan time in spectral-CT imaging is to reduce the number of views in the acquisition of projection data. But, this may result in poorer SNR and strong streak artifacts which can severely compromise the image quality. In this work, spectral-CT projection data were obtained from a lab-built spectral-CT consisting of a single CdTe photon counting detector, a micro-focus x-ray tube and scan mechanics. For the image reconstruction, we used two iterative image reconstruction methods, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) and the total variation minimization based on conjugate gradient method (CG-TV), along with the filtered back-projection (FBP) to compare the image quality. From the imaging of the iodine containing phantoms, we have observed that SIRT and CG-TV are superior to the FBP method in terms of SNR and streak artifacts.

  7. Assessment of intratumor hypoxia by integrated 18F-FDG PET / perfusion CT in a liver tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Stewart, Errol; Desjardins, Lise; Hadway, Jennifer; Morrison, Laura; Crukley, Cathie

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Hypoxia in solid tumors occurs when metabolic demands in tumor cells surpass the delivery of oxygenated blood. We hypothesize that the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) metabolism and tumor blood flow mismatch would correlate with tumor hypoxia. Methods Liver perfusion computed tomography (CT) and 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) imaging were performed in twelve rabbit livers implanted with VX2 carcinoma. Under CT guidance, a fiber optic probe was inserted into the tumor to measure the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). Tumor blood flow (BF) and standardized uptake value (SUV) were measured to calculate flow-metabolism ratio (FMR). Tumor hypoxia was further identified using pimonidazole immunohistochemical staining. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the correlation between the imaging parameters and pO2 and pimonidazole staining. Results Weak correlations were found between blood volume (BV) and pO2 level (r = 0.425, P = 0.004), SUV and pO2 (r = -0.394, P = 0.007), FMR and pimonidazole staining score (r = -0.388, P = 0.031). However, there was stronger correlation between tumor FMR and pO2 level (r = 0.557, P < 0.001). Conclusions FMR correlated with tumor oxygenation and pimonidazole staining suggesting it may be a potential hypoxic imaging marker in liver tumor. PMID:28264009

  8. CT & CBCT imaging: assessment of the orbits.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, David C

    2012-11-01

    The orbits can be visualized easily on routine or customized protocols for computed tomography (CT) or cone beam CT (CBCT) scans. Detailed orbital investigations are best performed with 3-dimensional imaging methods. CT scans are preferred for visualizing the osseous orbital anatomy and fissures while magnetic resonance imaging is preferred for evaluating tumors and inflammation. CBCT provides high-resolution anatomic data of the sinonasal spaces, airway, soft tissue surfaces, and bones but does not provide much detail within the soft tissues. This article discusses CBCT imaging of the orbits, osseous anatomy of the orbits, and CBCT investigation of selected orbital pathosis.

  9. Perfusion imaging with non-contrast ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, Jaime E.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Byram, Brett C.

    2016-04-01

    A Doppler ultrasound clutter filter that enables estimation of low velocity blood flow could considerably improve ultrasound as a tool for clinical diagnosis and monitoring, including for the evaluation of vascular diseases and tumor perfusion. Conventional Doppler ultrasound is currently used for visualizing and estimating blood flow. However, conventional Doppler is limited by frame rate and tissue clutter caused by involuntary movement of the patient or sonographer. Spectral broadening of the clutter due to tissue motion limits ultrasound's ability to detect blood flow less than about 5mm/s at an 8MHz center frequency. We propose a clutter filtering technique that may increase the sensitivity of Doppler measurements to at least as low as 0.41mm/s. The proposed filter uses an adaptive demodulation scheme that decreases the bandwidth of the clutter. To test the performance of the adaptive demodulation method at removing sonographer hand motion, six volunteer subjects acquired data from a basic quality assurance phantom. Additionally, to test initial in vivo feasibility, an arterial occlusion reactive hyperemia study was performed to assess the efficiency of the proposed filter at preserving signals from blood velocities 2mm/s or greater. The hand motion study resulted in initial average bandwidths of 577Hz (28.5mm/s), which were decreased to 7.28Hz (0.36mm/s) at -60 dB at 3cm using our approach. The in vivo power Doppler study resulted in 15.2dB and 0.15dB dynamic ranges between the lowest and highest blood flow time points for the proposed filter and conventional 50Hz high pass filter, respectively.

  10. [Gatrointestinal imaging with multidetector CT and MRI].

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Filomenamila; Fonio, Paolo; Scardapane, Arnaldo; Giganti, Melchiore; Rubini, Giuseppe; Ferrante, Annunziata; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio

    2012-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important diagnostic tools for evaluating gastrointestinal disorders. A rigorous examination protocol is needed to achieve the best results. This paper describes the technical issues of CT and MRI for the study of gastrointestinal tracts (esophagus, stomach, small and large bowel).

  11. Hepatic perfusion in a tumor model using DCE-CT: an accuracy and precision study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Errol E.; Chen, Xiaogang; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2008-08-01

    In the current study we investigate the accuracy and precision of hepatic perfusion measurements based on the Johnson and Wilson model with the adiabatic approximation. VX2 carcinoma cells were implanted into the livers of New Zealand white rabbits. Simultaneous dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and radiolabeled microsphere studies were performed under steady-state normo-, hyper- and hypo-capnia. The hepatic arterial blood flows (HABF) obtained using both techniques were compared with ANOVA. The precision was assessed by the coefficient of variation (CV). Under normo-capnia the microsphere HABF were 51.9 ± 4.2, 40.7 ± 4.9 and 99.7 ± 6.0 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 while DCE-CT HABF were 50.0 ± 5.7, 37.1 ± 4.5 and 99.8 ± 6.8 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 in normal tissue, tumor core and rim, respectively. There were no significant differences between HABF measurements obtained with both techniques (P > 0.05). Furthermore, a strong correlation was observed between HABF values from both techniques: slope of 0.92 ± 0.05, intercept of 4.62 ± 2.69 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 and R2 = 0.81 ± 0.05 (P < 0.05). The Bland-Altman plot comparing DCE-CT and microsphere HABF measurements gives a mean difference of -0.13 ml min-1 (100 g)-1, which is not significantly different from zero. DCE-CT HABF is precise, with CV of 5.7, 24.9 and 1.4% in the normal tissue, tumor core and rim, respectively. Non-invasive measurement of HABF with DCE-CT is accurate and precise. DCE-CT can be an important extension of CT to assess hepatic function besides morphology in liver diseases.

  12. Pulmonary hypertension leads to a loss of gravity dependent redistribution of regional lung perfusion: a SPECT/CT study.

    PubMed

    Lau, Edmund Mt; Bailey, Dale L; Bailey, Elizabeth A; Torzillo, Paul J; Roach, Paul J; Schembri, Geoffrey P; Corte, Tamera J; Celermajer, David S

    2014-01-01

    Pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is characterised by progressive pulmonary vascular obliteration and loss of vascular reserves. In health, regional lung perfusion redistributes under the influence of gravity due to the presence of recruitable vessels. We investigated a combined single photon emission computed tomography/CT (SPECT/CT) method for assessing the pulmonary circulation by quantifying the gravity dependent redistribution of lung perfusion. Characterisation of patients versus healthy controls. 15 patients with pre-capillary PHT and 11 healthy controls. University hospital clinic. Regional lung perfusion was measured using SPECT/CT in two different postures (supine vs upright). A perfusion redistribution index (PRI) was used to quantify the cranial-caudal shift in regional lung perfusion resulting from gravitational (postural) change. PRI was compared between cases and controls, and correlated with markers of disease severity in cases. Patients with pre-capillary PHT had notably reduced PRI compared to controls (0.02±0.06 vs. 0.28±0.15 normalised perfusion/cm, p<0.0001). PRI was significantly associated with prognostic parameters such as 6 min walk distance (r=0.60, p=0.018), functional class (p=0.008), and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (r=0.58, p=0.022). The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that PRI differentiated patients with pre-capillary PHT from controls with AUC=0.94 (p<0.001). With SPECT/CT, gravity dependent redistribution of lung perfusion can be quantified using the PRI derived from supine and upright perfusion analysis. The potential utility of PRI for the non-invasive detection of PHT and assessment of disease severity warrants further study.

  13. 99mTc-HMPAO perfusion SPECT/CT in the diagnosis of brain death.

    PubMed

    Derlin, Thorsten; Weiberg, Desiree

    2016-01-01

    This report describes a case of brain death (BD) evaluated by 99mTc-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). A 16-year-old boy with a history of rapid unexpected brain herniation due to pilocytic astrocytoma underwent 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT/CT for evaluation of brain death in the context of organ donation. Flow images demonstrated lack of blood flow to the brain, and delayed images showed absence of demonstrable radionuclide activity within the brain. SPECT/CT confirmed absence of tracer accumulation, and was deemed helpful for evaluation of the brain stem. 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT/CT is a valuable tool enabling imaging-based confirmation of BD.

  14. MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion imaging: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Hatabu, H

    1997-10-01

    Recent advances in MR pulmonary angiography and MR perfusion imaging are reviewed, focusing on two principal areas of technical development: (1) the availability of MR scanners equipped with enhanced gradient systems; and (2) new trends in MR angiography using gadolinium contrast agents or labeling of blood with an inversion recovery radiofrequency pulse in place of the more traditional methods using naturally flowing spins as the source of intravascular signal. These recent developments in MR have significant potential for clinical imaging of the pulmonary vasculature, particularly for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, and are now opening windows to functional MR imaging of the lung.

  15. Use of intravenous dipyridamole in thallium 201 myocardial perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, F.P.; Blend, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Thallium 201 myocardial perfusion imaging is a standard method of evaluating regional myocardial blood flow. Myocardial perfusion is best evaluated at rest and during exercise, however, alternative methods have been sought to increase coronary blood flow in patients incapable of performing adequate exercise. A promising new method is the use of intravenous dipyridamole for pharmacologic stress imaging. It has distinct advantages over traditional treadmill exercise testing. The primary advantage of combining intravenous dipyridamole and thallium 201 is for testing patients in whom exercise is impractical or contraindicated. Examples include patients taking beta blockers and those who have had myocardial infarction or have severe peripheral vascular disease. To date, this agent has been available only to clinical investigators in approved protocols. With continued success, it should be approved for general use in the near future. 33 references.

  16. Myocardial perfusion imaging for detection of silent myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, G.A.

    1988-04-21

    Despite the widespread use of the exercise stress test in diagnosing asymptomatic myocardial ischemia, exercise radionuclide imaging remains useful for detecting silent ischemia in numerous patient populations, including those who are totally asymptomatic, those who have chronic stable angina, those who have recovered from an episode of unstable angina or an uncomplicated myocardial infarction, and those who have undergone angioplasty or received thrombolytic therapy. Studies show that thallium scintigraphy is more sensitive than exercise electrocardiography in detecting ischemia, i.e., in part, because perfusion defects occur more frequently than ST depression and before angina in the ischemic cascade. Thallium-201 scintigraphy can be performed to differentiate a true- from a false-positive exercise electrocardiographic test in patients with exercise-induced ST depression and no angina. The development of technetium-labeled isonitriles may improve the accuracy of myocardial perfusion imaging. 11 references.

  17. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Avsenik, Jernej; Bisdas, Sotirios; Popovic, Katarina Surlan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with pathologies such as acute stroke, tumors, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Conclusions. Blood-brain barrier permeability can be evaluated in vivo by perfusion computed tomography - an efficient diagnostic method that involves the sequential acquisition of tomographic images during the intravenous administration of iodinated contrast material. The major clinical applications of perfusion computed tomography are in acute stroke and in brain tumor imaging. PMID:26029020

  18. Ultrasound imaging of breast tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Umphrey, Heidi; Lockhart, Mark; Robbin, Michelle; Forero-Torres, Andres

    2015-09-01

    A novel image processing strategy is detailed for simultaneous measurement of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology parameters from a sequence of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) images. After normalization and tumor segmentation, a global time-intensity curve describing contrast agent flow was analyzed to derive surrogate measures of tumor perfusion (i.e., peak intensity, time-to-peak intensity, area under the curve, wash-in rate, wash-out rate). A maximum intensity image was generated from these same segmented image sequences, and each vascular component was skeletonized via a thinning algorithm. This skeletonized data set and collection of vessel segments were then investigated to extract parameters related to the neovascular network and physical architecture (i.e., vessel-to-tissue ratio, number of bifurcations, vessel count, average vessel length and tortuosity). An efficient computation of local perfusion parameters was also introduced and operated by averaging time-intensity curve data over each individual neovascular segment. Each skeletonized neovascular segment was then color-coded by these local measures to produce a parametric map detailing spatial properties of tumor perfusion. Longitudinal DCE-US image data sets were collected in six patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer using a Philips iU22 ultrasound system equipped with a L9-3 transducer and Definity contrast agent. Patients were imaged using US before and after contrast agent dosing at baseline and again at weeks 6, 12, 18 and 24 after treatment started. Preliminary clinical results suggested that breast tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be associated with temporal and spatial changes in DCE-US-derived parametric measures of tumor perfusion. Moreover, changes in neovascular morphology parametric measures may also help identify any breast tumor response (or lack thereof) to systemic treatment. Breast cancer management from early detection to therapeutic

  19. Perfusion Imaging with a Freely Diffusible Hyperpolarized Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Aaron K.; Vinogradov, Elena; Wang, Xiaoen; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Alsop, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents that can diffuse freely into or within tissue have numerous attractive features for perfusion imaging. Here we present preliminary data illustrating the suitability of hyperpolarized 13C labeled 2-methylpropan-2-ol (also known as dimethylethanol, tertiary butyl alcohol and tert-butanol) as a freely diffusible contrast agent for magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. Dynamic 13C images acquired in rat brain with a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence following administration of hyperpolarized 2-methylpropan-2-ol show that this agent can be imaged with 2–4s temporal resolution, 2mm slice thickness, and 700 micron in-plane resolution while retaining adequate signal-to-noise ratio. 13C relaxation measurements on 2-methylpropan-2-ol in blood at 9.4T yield T1=46±4s and T2=0.55±0.03s. In the rat brain at 4.7T, analysis of the temporal dynamics of the bSSFP image intensity in tissue and venous blood indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol has a T2 of roughly 2–4s and a T1 of 43±24s. In addition, the images indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is freely diffusible in brain and hence has a long residence time in tissue; this in turn makes it possible to image the agent continuously for tens of seconds. These characteristics show that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is a promising agent for robust and quantitative perfusion imaging in the brain and body. PMID:21432901

  20. CT Perfusion with Acetazolamide Challenge in C6 Gliomas and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiao-Yuan; Qiang, Jin-Wei; Zhang, Jia-wen; Wang, Yong-gang; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was performed to investigate the correlation between CT perfusion with acetazolamide challenge and angiogenesis in C6 gliomas. Methods Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were evaluated. The rats were divided randomly to four groups: eight rats with orthotopically implanted C6 gliomas at 10-days old (Group A), eight rats with gliomas at 14-days old (Group B), eight rats with gliomas at 18-days old (Group C), eight rats with orthotopically injected normal saline served as controls. CT perfusion was performed before and after administration of acetazolamide. Changes in perfusion parameters due to acetazolamide administration were calculated and analyzed. Results Elevated carbon dioxide partial pressure and decreased pH were found in all 32 rats post acetazolamide challenge (P<0.01). Cerebral blood flowpre-challenge was increased in group C (95.0±2.5 ml/100g/min), as compared to group B (80.1±11.3 ml/100g/min) and group A (63.1±2.1 ml/100g/min). Cerebral blood flow percentage changes were detected with a reduction in group C (54.2±4.8%) as compared to controls (111.3±22.2%). Cerebral blood volume pre-challenge was increased in group C (50.8±1.7ml/100g), as compared to group B (45.7±1.9 ml/100g) and group A (38.2±0.8 ml/100g). Cerebral blood volume percentage changes were decreased in group C (23.5±4.6%) as compared to controls (113.5±30.4%). Angiogenesis ratio = [(CD105-MVD) / (FVIII-MVD)] ×100%. Positive correlations were observed between CD105-microvessel density, angiogenesis ratio, vascular endothelial growth factor, proliferation marker and cerebral blood flowpre-challenge, cerebral blood volume pre-challenge. Negative correlations were observed between CD105-microvessel density and cerebral blood flow percentage changes (P<0.01, correlation coefficient r=-0.788), cerebral blood volume percentage changes (P<0.01, r=-0.703). Negative correlations were observed between angiogenesis ratio, vascular endothelial growth factor

  1. Fat poor angiomyolipoma differentiation from renal cell carcinoma at 320-slice dynamic volume CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Kang, Qinqin; Xu, Bing; Shi, Zhang; Guo, Hairuo; Wei, Qiang; Lu, Yayun; Wu, Xinhuai

    2017-08-21

    To compare various CT perfusion features of fat poor angiomyolipoma (AML) with those of size-matched renal cell carcinoma (RCC). One hundred and seventy-four patients [16 with fat poor AML (mean diameter, 3.1 cm; range, 1.5-5.5 cm) and 158 with RCC (mean diameter, 3.2 cm; range, 2.4-5.4 cm)] who had undergone 320-slice dynamic volume CT perfusion were evaluated. Equivalent blood volume (BV Equiv), permeability surface-area product (PS), and blood flow (BF) of tumor were measured and analyzed. Fat poor AML was compared with each subtype of RCC (132 clear cell, 9 papillary, and 17 chromophobe). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed for the comparison of fat poor AML and RCC. ROC curve analysis was not performed for the papillary RCC subtype because of the small number of masses of this subtype. BV Equiv and BF were significantly lower in fat poor AML than in clear cell RCC (P < 0.05 for both). Fat poor AML had higher BV Equiv, PS, and BF than papillary RCC (P < 0.05 for all). PS and BF in fat poor AML significantly exceeded those in chromophobe RCC (P < 0.05 for both). For differentiating fat poor AML from clear cell RCC, area under the ROC curve (AUC) of BV Equiv and BF were 0.82 and 0.69. Using the optimal threshold value, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were 0.82, 0.81, 0.35, 0.97 for BV Equiv and 0.71, 0.75, 0.24, 0.96 for BF, respectively. For differentiating fat poor AML from chromophobe RCC, AUC of PS and BF were 0.77 and 0.79, respectively. The optimal sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 0.77, 0.75, 0.75, 0.76 for PS and 0.71, 0.81, 0.72, 0.80 for BF, respectively. Fat poor AML and subtypes of RCCs demonstrate different perfusion features at 320-slice dynamic volume CT, allowing their differentiations with BV Equiv, PS, and BF being valuable perfusion parameters.

  2. Liver echinococcus - CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This upper abdominal CT scan shows multiple cysts in the liver, caused by dog tapeworm (echinococcus). Note the large circular cyst (seen on the left side of the screen) and multiple smaller cysts throughout ...

  3. Impact of pharmacological stress agent on patient motion during rubidium-82 myocardial perfusion PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Memmott, Matthew J; Tonge, Christine M; Saint, Kimberley J; Arumugam, Parthiban

    2017-01-04

    Patient motion has been demonstrated to have a significant impact on the quality and accuracy of rubidium-82 myocardial perfusion PET/CT. This study aimed to investigate the effect on patient motion of two pharmacological stressing agents, adenosine and regadenoson. Dynamic data were retrospectively analyzed in 90 patients undergoing adenosine (n = 30), incremental adenosine (n = 30), or regadenoson (n = 30) rubidium-82 myocardial perfusion PET/CT. Severity of motion was scored qualitatively using a four-point (0-3) scale and quantitatively using frame-to-frame pixel shifts. The type of motion, returning or non-returning, and the frame in which it occurred were also recorded. There were significant differences in both the qualitative and quantitative scores comparing regadenoson to adenosine (P = .025 and P < .001) and incremental adenosine (P = .014, P = .015), respectively. The difference in scores between adenosine and incremental adenosine was not significant. Where motion was present, significantly more adenosine patients were classed as non-returning (P = .018). The median frames for motion occurring were 12 for regadenoson and 14 for both adenosine cohorts. The choice of stressing protocol impacts significantly on patient motion. Patients stressed with regadenoson have significantly lower motion scores than those stressed with adenosine, using local protocols. This motion is more likely to be associated with a drift of the heart away from a baseline position, coinciding with the termination of infusion.

  4. Acute cerebral perfusion CT abnormalities associated with posttraumatic amnesia in mild head injury.

    PubMed

    Metting, Zwany; Rödiger, Lars A; de Jong, Bauke M; Stewart, Roy E; Kremer, Berry P; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2010-12-01

    Posttraumatic amnesia (PTA) is a common symptom following traumatic brain injury. Although this transient memory deficit implies specific impairment of higher brain function, the actual pathophysiology of PTA is not well understood. The aim of this study was to assess regional cerebral hemodynamics with perfusion computed tomography (CT) in patients during PTA following mild head injury compared to patients with resolved PTA. A total of 74 patients with mild head injury without structural abnormalities on a non-contrast CT scan were included and compared to 25 healthy controls. Two patient groups were defined: (1) a PTA group that was scanned during the episode of PTA (n = 34), and (2) a post-PTA group scanned after resolution of PTA (n = 40). The PTA group had significantly reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the frontal grey matter (41.78 [SD 7.4] versus 44.44 [SD 6.2] mL • 100 g⁻¹ • min⁻¹, p = 0.023), and caudate nucleus (44.59 [SD 6.2] versus 47.85 [SD 7.7] mL • 100 g⁻¹ • min⁻¹, p = 0.021), compared to the post-PTA group. Thus in patients with mild head injury, PTA is associated with cerebral perfusion abnormalities in specific cortical and subcortical regions.

  5. CT substitutes derived from MR images reconstructed with parallel imaging.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Adam; Garpebring, Anders; Asklund, Thomas; Nyholm, Tufve

    2014-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) substitute images can be generated from ultrashort echo time (UTE) MRI sequences with radial k-space sampling. These CT substitutes can be used as ordinary CT images for PET attenuation correction and radiotherapy dose calculations. Parallel imaging allows faster acquisition of magnetic resonance (MR) images by exploiting differences in receiver coil element sensitivities. This study investigates whether non-Cartesian parallel imaging reconstruction can be used to improve CT substitutes generated from shorter examination times. The authors used gridding as well as two non-Cartesian parallel imaging reconstruction methods, SPIRiT and CG-SENSE, to reconstruct radial UTE and gradient echo (GE) data into images of the head for 23 patients. For each patient, images were reconstructed from the full dataset and from a number of subsampled datasets. The subsampled datasets simulated shorter acquisition times by containing fewer radial k-space spokes (1000, 2000, 3000, 5000, and 10,000 spokes) than the full dataset (30,000 spokes). For each combination of patient, reconstruction method, and number of spokes, the reconstructed UTE and GE images were used to generate a CT substitute. Each CT substitute image was compared to a real CT image of the same patient. The mean absolute deviation between the CT number in CT substitute and CT decreased when using SPIRiT as compared to gridding reconstruction. However, the reduction was small and the CT substitute algorithm was insensitive to moderate subsampling (≥ 5000 spokes) regardless of reconstruction method. For more severe subsampling (≤ 3000 spokes), corresponding to acquisition times less than a minute long, the CT substitute quality was deteriorated for all reconstruction methods but SPIRiT gave a reduction in the mean absolute deviation of down to 25 Hounsfield units compared to gridding. SPIRiT marginally improved the CT substitute quality for a given number of radial spokes as compared to

  6. CT image visualization: a conceptual introduction.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) postprocessing produces information-rich diagnostic images, transforming enormous amounts of x-ray attenuation data into clinical information that can assist in diagnosis and treatment. This article briefly reviews the history of the technological evolution of CT imaging equipment and provides a conceptual overview of scan data visualization processes. Trends in and examples of image postprocessing, segmentation, registration and fusion techniques, and computer-aided detection are described. Finally, the uses of these visualization algorithms in selected diagnostic imaging applications are discussed.

  7. Iofetamine hydrochloride I 123: a new radiopharmaceutical for cerebral perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Druckenbrod, R.W.; Williams, C.C.; Gelfand, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Iofetamine hydrochloride I-123 permits cerebral blood perfusion imaging with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). SPECT is more widely available than positron emission tomography, and complements anatomic visualization with X-ray computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging. Iofetamine is an amphetamine analog that is rapidly taken up by the lungs, then redistributed principally to the liver and brain. The precise mechanism of localization has not been determined, but is believed to result from nonspecific receptor binding. Brain uptake peaks at 30 minutes postinjection and remains relatively constant through 60 minutes. The drug is metabolized and excreted in the urine, with negligible activity remaining at 48 hours. When compared with CT in stroke patients, visualization may be performed sooner after symptom onset and a larger zone of involvement may be evident with iofetamine. Localization of seizure foci and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease may also be possible. As CT has revolutionized noninvasive imaging of brain anatomy, SPECT with iofetamine permits routine cerebral blood flow imaging. 36 references.

  8. Cerebral infarction on 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Hu, Shuang; Wang, Haitao; Kuang, Anren

    2013-11-01

    A 70-year-old man with lung cancer underwent whole-body MDP bone scintigraphy to evaluate bone metastases that showed marked tracer uptake in the right side of the head, suggestive of skull metastasis. SPECT/CT imaging was performed for further evaluation. The SPECT images demonstrated increased MDP activity in the region of the brain perfused by the right middle cerebral artery. On CT images, there was a large hypoattenuation area corresponding to elevated MDP accumulation. At the same day, magnetic resonance angiography of the brain revealed occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery.

  9. CT Image Presentations For Oral Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Rothman, Stephen L. G.; Schwarz, Melvyn S.; Tivattanasuk, Eva S.

    1988-06-01

    Reformatted CT images of the mandible and maxilla are described as a planning aid to the surgical implantation of dental fixtures. Precisely scaled and cross referenced axial, oblique, CT generated panorex, and 3-D images are generated to help indicate where and how critical anatomic structures are positioned. This information guides the oral surgeon to those sites where dental implants have optimal osteotic support and least risk to sensitive neural tissue. Oblique images are generated at 1-2 mm increments along the arch of the mandible (or maxilla). Each oblique is oriented perpendicular to the local arch curvature. The adjoining five CT generated panorex views match the patient's mandibular (or maxilla) arch, with each of the views separated by twice the distance between axial CT slices. All views are mutually cross-referenced to show fine detail of the underlying mandibular (or maxilla) structure. Several exams are illustrated and benefit to subsequent surgery is assessed.

  10. Towards personalized interventional SPECT-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Gardiazabal, José; Esposito, Marco; Matthies, Philipp; Okur, Asli; Vogel, Jakob; Kraft, Silvan; Frisch, Benjamin; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2014-01-01

    The development of modern robotics and compact imaging detectors allows the transfer of diagnostic imaging modalities to the operating room, supporting surgeons to perform faster and safer procedures. An intervention that currently suffers from a lack of interventional imaging is radioembolization, a treatment for hepatic carcinoma. Currently, this procedure requires moving the patient from an angiography suite for preliminary catheterization and injection to a whole-body SPECT/CT for leakage detection, necessitating a second catheterization back in the angiography suite for the actual radioembolization. We propose an imaging setup that simplifies this procedure using a robotic approach to directly acquire an interventional SPECT/CT in the angiography suite. Using C-arm CT and a co-calibrated gamma camera mounted on a robotic arm, a personalized trajectory of the gamma camera is generated from the C-arm CT, enabling an interventional SPECT reconstruction that is inherently co-registered to the C-arm CT. In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of this personalized interventional SPECT/CT imaging approach in a liver phantom study.

  11. Dynamic iterative beam hardening correction (DIBHC) in myocardial perfusion imaging using contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Stenner, Philip; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelrie, Marc

    2010-06-01

    In cardiac perfusion examinations with computed tomography (CT) large concentrations of iodine in the ventricle and in the descending aorta cause beam hardening artifacts that can lead to incorrect perfusion parameters. The aim of this study is to reduce these artifacts by performing an iterative correction and by accounting for the 3 materials soft tissue, bone, and iodine. Beam hardening corrections are either implemented as simple precorrections which cannot account for higher order beam hardening effects, or as iterative approaches that are based on segmenting the original image into material distribution images. Conventional segmentation algorithms fail to clearly distinguish between iodine and bone. Our new algorithm, DIBHC, calculates the time-dependent iodine distribution by analyzing the voxel changes of a cardiac perfusion examination (typically N approximately 15 electrocardiogram-correlated scans distributed over a total scan time up to T approximately 30 s). These voxel dynamics are due to changes in contrast agent. This prior information allows to precisely distinguish between bone and iodine and is key to DIBHC where each iteration consists of a multimaterial (soft tissue, bone, iodine) polychromatic forward projection, a raw data comparison and a filtered backprojection. Simulations with a semi-anthropomorphic dynamic phantom and clinical scans using a dual source CT scanner with 2 x 128 slices, a tube voltage of 100 kV, a tube current of 180 mAs, and a rotation time of 0.28 seconds have been carried out. The uncorrected images suffer from beam hardening artifacts that appear as dark bands connecting large concentrations of iodine in the ventricle, aorta, and bony structures. The CT-values of the affected tissue are usually underestimated by roughly 20 HU although deviations of up to 61 HU have been observed. For a quantitative evaluation circular regions of interest have been analyzed. After application of DIBHC the mean values obtained deviate by

  12. Endoscopic ICG perfusion imaging for flap transplants: technical development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepp, Herbert; Schachenmayr, Hilmar; Ehrhardt, André; Göbel, Werner; Zhorzel, Sven; Betz, Christian Stephan

    2010-02-01

    Objective: Following tumour surgery in the head and neck region, skin flap transplants are usually required to cover the resection area. The purpose of the development was to provide a simple and reliable means to assess whether the transplanted flap is sufficiently perfused. Methods: Fluorescence of intravenously injected Indocyanine green (ICG) was detected with a slightly modified 3-chip CCD camera. Appropriately coated optical filters allow for excitation of ICG with NIR light and detection of NIR ICGfluorescence with the blue channel of the camera. In addition, low intensities of white light can be transmitted to allow for simultaneous display of a remission image in the green and red channels of the camera. Further processing was performed with a LabVIEW program. Results: A satisfactory white light image (red, green and blue display (RGB)) could be calculated from the remission images recorded with the green and red channels of the camera via a look-up table. The look-up table was programmed to provide an optimized blue intensity value for each combination of red and green values. This was generated using a reference image. Implementation of image tracking and intensity measurements in regions of interest (ROIs) in the images is useful to reliably monitor perfusion kinetics of flap and adjacent normal tissue.

  13. Multimodality imaging approach for serial assessment of regional changes in lower extremity arteriogenesis and tissue perfusion in a porcine model of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Mitchel R; Yu, Da Yu; Maxfield, Mark W; Jaba, Irina M; Jozwik, Bartosz P; Zhuang, Zhen W; Lin, Ben A; Hawley, Christi L; Caracciolo, Christopher M; Pal, Prasanta; Tirziu, Daniela; Sampath, Smita; Sinusas, Albert J

    2014-01-01

    A standard quantitative imaging approach to evaluate peripheral arterial disease does not exist. Quantitative tools for evaluating arteriogenesis in vivo are not readily available, and the feasibility of monitoring serial regional changes in lower extremity perfusion has not been examined. Serial changes in lower extremity arteriogenesis and muscle perfusion were evaluated after femoral artery occlusion in a porcine model using single photon emission tomography (SPECT)/CT imaging with postmortem validation of in vivo findings using gamma counting, postmortem imaging, and histological analysis. Hybrid 201Tl SPECT/CT imaging was performed in pigs (n=8) at baseline, immediately postocclusion, and at 1 and 4 weeks postocclusion. CT imaging was used to identify muscle regions of interest in the ischemic and nonischemic hindlimbs for quantification of regional changes in CT-defined arteriogenesis and quantification of 201Tl perfusion. Four weeks postocclusion, postmortem tissue 201Tl activity was measured by gamma counting, and immunohistochemistry was performed to assess capillary density. Relative 201Tl retention (ischemic/nonischemic) was reduced immediately postocclusion in distal and proximal muscles and remained lower in calf and gluteus muscles 4 weeks later. Analysis of CT angiography revealed collateralization at 4 weeks within proximal muscles (P<0.05). SPECT perfusion correlated with tissue gamma counting at 4 weeks (P=0.01). Increased capillary density was seen within the ischemic calf at 4 weeks (P=0.004). 201Tl SPECT/CT imaging permits serial, regional quantification of arteriogenesis and resting tissue perfusion after limb ischemia. This approach may be effective for detection of disease and monitoring therapy in peripheral arterial disease.

  14. Characterizing anatomical variability in breast CT images

    PubMed Central

    Metheany, Kathrine G.; Abbey, Craig K.; Packard, Nathan; Boone, John M.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work [Burgess , Med. Phys. 28, 419–437 (2001)] has shown that anatomical noise in projection mammography results in a power spectrum well modeled over a range of frequencies by a power law, and the exponent (β) of this power law plays a critical role in determining the size at which a growing lesion reaches the threshold for detection. In this study, the authors evaluated the power-law model for breast computed tomography (bCT) images, which can be thought of as thin sections through a three-dimensional (3D) volume. Under the assumption of a 3D power law describing the distribution of attenuation coefficients in the breast parenchyma, the authors derived the relationship between the power-law exponents of bCT and projection images and found it to be βsection=βproj−1. They evaluated this relationship on clinical images by comparing bCT images from a set of 43 patients to Burgess’ findings in mammography. They were able to make a direct comparison for 6 of these patients who had both a bCT exam and a digitized film-screen mammogram. They also evaluated segmented bCT images to investigate the extent to which the bCT power-law exponent can be explained by a binary model of attenuation coefficients based on the different attenuation of glandular and adipose tissue. The power-law model was found to be a good fit for bCT data over frequencies from 0.07to0.45cyc∕mm, where anatomical variability dominates the spectrum. The average exponent for bCT images was 1.86. This value is close to the theoretical prediction using Burgess’ published data for projection mammography and for the limited set of mammography data available from the authors’ patient sample. Exponents from the segmented bCT images (average value: 2.06) were systematically slightly higher than bCT images, with substantial correlation between the two (r=0.84). PMID:18975714

  15. The stripe sign: correlation of radionuclide ventilation and perfusion with He-3 magnetic resonance lung imaging

    PubMed

    Teates; Brookeman; Daniel; Truwit; Parekh; Mugler; de Lange EE

    1999-10-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to correlate regional ventilation and perfusion images and perfusion SPECT with images made using a newly developed magnetic resonance ventilation (MRV) method. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The investigation included a single patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a healthy control participant. Ventilation and perfusion images using Xe-133 and Tc-99m MAA, including perfusion SPECT, were compared with single-breath MRV with hyperpolarized He-3. RESULTS: Ventilation and perfusion defects correspond to areas of poor ventilation on MRV. High-resolution MRV images show preservation of bronchi and acinus units in areas of the "stripe sign" on the V/Q study. CONCLUSIONS: MRV imaging confirms that the stripe sign seen on nuclear perfusion imaging correlates with subsegmental preserved lung. MRV imaging has the potential for high-resolution innovative studies of subsegmental lung function, using either He-3 or Xe-129 hyperpolarized gases.

  16. Dynamic myocardial perfusion in a porcine balloon-induced ischemia model using a prototype spectral detector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Fares, Anas; Levi, Jacob; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2015-03-01

    Myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging is an application that should greatly benefit from spectral CT through the significant reduction of beam hardening (BH) artifacts using mono-energetic (monoE) image reconstructions. We used a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner (Philips Healthcare) and developed advanced processing tools (registration, segmentation, and deconvolution-based flow estimation) for quantitative myocardial CTP in a porcine ischemia model with different degrees of coronary occlusion using a balloon catheter. The occlusion severity was adjusted with fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements. The SDCT scanner is a single source, dual-layer detector system, which allows simultaneous acquisitions of low and high energy projections, hence enabling accurate projection-based material decomposition and effective reduction of BH-artifacts. In addition, the SDCT scanner eliminates partial scan artifacts with fast (0.27s), full gantry rotation acquisitions. We acquired CTP data under different hemodynamic conditions and reconstructed conventional 120kVp images and projection-based monoenergetic (monoE) images for energies ranging from 55keV-to-120keV. We computed and compared myocardial blood flow (MBF) between different reconstructions. With balloon completely deflated (FFR=1), we compared the mean attenuation in a myocardial region of interest before iodine arrival and at peak iodine enhancement in the left ventricle (LV), and we found that monoE images at 70keV effectively minimized the difference in attenuation, due to BH, to less than 1 HU compared to 14 HU with conventional 120kVp images. Flow maps under baseline condition (FFR=1) were more uniform throughout the myocardial wall at 70keV, whereas with 120kVp data about 12% reduction in blood flow was noticed on BH-hypoattenuated areas compared to other myocardial regions. We compared MBF maps at different keVs under an ischemic condition (FFR < 0.7), and we found that flow

  17. [CT evaluation of extravascular perfusion of contrast medium and its potential to a new method of diagnosis: an experimental study using macro, micro-molecular contrast media].

    PubMed

    Sako, M; Sugimoto, K; Matsumoto, S; Hirota, S; Fujita, Y; Hasegawa, Y; Kuwata, Y; Tomita, M; Murakami, T; Kono, M

    1994-03-25

    To evaluate the dynamics of extravascular perfusion, dynamic CT with two different molecular sized contrast media was performed on VX2 tumor of rabbit. The first dynamic CT was performed with a bolus injection of iopamidol (IP:120 mgI/ml, 5 ml). After ascertaining that the tumor attenuation had returned to the pre-contrast level, the second dynamic CT was performed on the same slice with bolus injection of iodoethylated starch (IES:120 mgI/ml). The time-density (T-D) curves of the same tumor area on the images obtained by two contrast media were compared. The T-D curve with IP showed definitely higher level than that with IES. This occurrence can be explained that IP, 13 A in size, has higher permeability distributing not only in the intravascular space, but also into the extravascular space. On the other hand, IES, 200 A in size, will stay mostly in the intravascular space. From this, we consider that the attenuation difference between the two curves will be an indicator for the dynamics of extravascular perfusion, suggesting to become a new method for CT diagnosis.

  18. Assessment of Renal Function in Patients with Unilateral Ureteral Obstruction Using Whole-Organ Perfusion Imaging with 320-Detector Row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Juan; Feng, You-Zhen; Xian, Zhao-Hui; Yang, Wen-Cai; Mo, Xu-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructed nephropathy is a common complication of several disease processes. Accurate evaluation of the functional status of the obstructed kidney is important to achieve a good outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate renal cortical and medullary perfusion changes associated with unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) using whole-organ perfusion imaging with 320-detector row computed tomography (CT). Methodology/Principle Findings Sixty-four patients with UUO underwent whole-organ CT perfusion imaging. Patients were divided into 3 groups, mild, moderate, and severe, based on hydronephrosis severity. Twenty sex- and age-matched patients without renal disease, who referred to abdominal CT, were chosen as control subjects. Mean cortical and medullary perfusion parameters of obstructed and contralateral kidneys were compared, and mean perfusion ratios between obstructed and contralateral kidneys were calculated and compared. Mean cortical or medullary blood flow (BF) and blood volume (BV) of the obstructed kidneys in the moderate UUO and BF, BV, and clearance (CL) in the severe UUO were significantly lower than those of the contralateral kidneys (p < 0.05). The mean cortical or medullary BF of the obstructed kidney in the moderate UUO, and BF, BV, and CL in the severe UUO were significantly lower than those of the kidneys in control subjects (p < 0.05). Mean cortical or medullary BF of the non-obstructed kidneys in the severe UUO were statistically greater than that of normal kidneys in control subjects (p < 0.05). An inverse correlation was observed between cortical and medullary perfusion ratios and grades of hydronephosis (p < 0.01). Conclusions/Significance Perfusion measurements of the whole kidney can be obtained with 320-detector row CT, and estimated perfusion ratios have potential for quantitatively evaluating UUO renal injury grades. PMID:25874690

  19. Brain perfusion: computed tomography and magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Copen, William A; Lev, Michael H; Rapalino, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral perfusion imaging provides assessment of regional microvascular hemodynamics in the living brain, enabling in vivo measurement of a variety of different hemodynamic parameters. Perfusion imaging techniques that are used in the clinical setting usually rely upon X-ray computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This chapter reviews CT- and MRI-based perfusion imaging techniques, with attention to image acquisition, clinically relevant aspects of image postprocessing, and fundamental differences between CT- and MRI-based techniques. Correlations with cerebrovascular physiology and potential clinical applications of perfusion imaging are reviewed, focusing upon the two major classes of neurologic disease in which perfusion imaging is most often performed: primary perfusion disorders (including ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, and reperfusion syndrome), and brain tumors. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Imaging considerations for a technetium-99m myocardial perfusion agent

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.J.; Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.; Lister-James, J.; Campbell, S.; Holman, B.L.

    1986-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging with /sup 201/Tl chloride suffers from a number of physical, geometric, and dosimetric constraints that could be diminished if an agent labeled with /sup 99m/Tc were available. The cationic complex /sup 99m/Tc hexakis-(t-butylisonitrile)technetium(I) ((/sup 99m/Tc)TBI) has been shown to concentrate in the myocardial tissue of both animals and humans, with preliminary clinical studies demonstrating a number of technical attributes not possible with /sup 201/Tl. Technetium-99m-TBI is a promising myocardial imaging agent that may permit high quality planar, gated, and tomographic imaging of both myocardial ischemia and infarction with reduced imaging times and improved resolution.

  1. Diagnostic Performance of Coronary CT Angiography, Stress Dual-Energy CT Perfusion, and Stress Perfusion Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography for Coronary Artery Disease: Comparison with Combined Invasive Coronary Angiography and Stress Perfusion Cardiac MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyun Woo; Hwang, Hweung Kon; So, Young; Yi, Jeong Geun; Lee, Eun Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the diagnostic performance of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress dual-energy computed tomography perfusion (DE-CTP), stress perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and the combinations of CCTA with myocardial perfusion imaging (CCTA + DE-CTP and CCTA + SPECT) for identifying coronary artery stenosis that causes myocardial hypoperfusion. Combined invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and stress perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance (SP-CMR) imaging are used as the reference standard. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 25 patients with suspected coronary artery disease, who underwent CCTA, DE-CTP, SPECT, SP-CMR, and ICA. The reference standard was defined as ≥ 50% stenosis by ICA, with a corresponding myocardial hypoperfusion on SP-CMR. Results For per-vascular territory analysis, the sensitivities of CCTA, DE-CTP, SPECT, CCTA + DE-CTP, and CCTA + SPECT were 96, 96, 68, 93, and 68%, respectively, and specificities were 72, 75, 89, 85, and 94%, respectively. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) were 0.84 ± 0.05, 0.85 ± 0.05, 0.79 ± 0.06, 0.89 ± 0.04, and 0.81 ± 0.06, respectively. For per-patient analysis, the sensitivities of CCTA, DE-CTP, SPECT, CCTA + DE-CTP, and CCTA + SPECT were 100, 100, 89, 100, and 83%, respectively; the specificities were 14, 43, 57, 43, and 57%, respectively; and the AUCs were 0.57 ± 0.13, 0.71 ± 0.11, 0.73 ± 0.11, 0.71 ± 0.11, and 0.70 ± 0.11, respectively. Conclusion The combination of CCTA and DE-CTP enhances specificity without a loss of sensitivity for detecting hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis, as defined by combined ICA and SP-CMR. PMID:28458600

  2. Diagnostic Performance of Coronary CT Angiography, Stress Dual-Energy CT Perfusion, and Stress Perfusion Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography for Coronary Artery Disease: Comparison with Combined Invasive Coronary Angiography and Stress Perfusion Cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyun Woo; Ko, Sung Min; Hwang, Hweung Kon; So, Young; Yi, Jeong Geun; Lee, Eun Jeong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress dual-energy computed tomography perfusion (DE-CTP), stress perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and the combinations of CCTA with myocardial perfusion imaging (CCTA + DE-CTP and CCTA + SPECT) for identifying coronary artery stenosis that causes myocardial hypoperfusion. Combined invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and stress perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance (SP-CMR) imaging are used as the reference standard. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 25 patients with suspected coronary artery disease, who underwent CCTA, DE-CTP, SPECT, SP-CMR, and ICA. The reference standard was defined as ≥ 50% stenosis by ICA, with a corresponding myocardial hypoperfusion on SP-CMR. For per-vascular territory analysis, the sensitivities of CCTA, DE-CTP, SPECT, CCTA + DE-CTP, and CCTA + SPECT were 96, 96, 68, 93, and 68%, respectively, and specificities were 72, 75, 89, 85, and 94%, respectively. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) were 0.84 ± 0.05, 0.85 ± 0.05, 0.79 ± 0.06, 0.89 ± 0.04, and 0.81 ± 0.06, respectively. For per-patient analysis, the sensitivities of CCTA, DE-CTP, SPECT, CCTA + DE-CTP, and CCTA + SPECT were 100, 100, 89, 100, and 83%, respectively; the specificities were 14, 43, 57, 43, and 57%, respectively; and the AUCs were 0.57 ± 0.13, 0.71 ± 0.11, 0.73 ± 0.11, 0.71 ± 0.11, and 0.70 ± 0.11, respectively. The combination of CCTA and DE-CTP enhances specificity without a loss of sensitivity for detecting hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis, as defined by combined ICA and SP-CMR.

  3. Pulmonary CT image classification with evolutionary programming.

    PubMed

    Madsen, M T; Uppaluri, R; Hoffman, E A; McLennan, G

    1999-12-01

    It is often difficult to classify information in medical images from derived features. The purpose of this research was to investigate the use of evolutionary programming as a tool for selecting important features and generating algorithms to classify computed tomographic (CT) images of the lung. Training and test sets consisting of 11 features derived from multiple lung CT images were generated, along with an indicator of the target area from which features originated. The images included five parameters based on histogram analysis, 11 parameters based on run length and co-occurrence matrix measures, and the fractal dimension. Two classification experiments were performed. In the first, the classification task was to distinguish between the subtle but known differences between anterior and posterior portions of transverse lung CT sections. The second classification task was to distinguish normal lung CT images from emphysematous images. The performance of the evolutionary programming approach was compared with that of three statistical classifiers that used the same training and test sets. Evolutionary programming produced solutions that compared favorably with those of the statistical classifiers. In separating the anterior from the posterior lung sections, the evolutionary programming results were better than two of the three statistical approaches. The evolutionary programming approach correctly identified all the normal and abnormal lung images and accomplished this by using less features than the best statistical method. The results of this study demonstrate the utility of evolutionary programming as a tool for developing classification algorithms.

  4. Vascular flow and perfusion imaging with ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Matthew; Averkiou, Mike; Tiemann, Klaus; Lohmaier, Stefan; Powers, Jeff; Beach, Kirk

    2004-06-01

    Current techniques for imaging ultrasound (US) contrast agents (UCA) make no distinction between low-velocity microbubbles in the microcirculation and higher-velocity microbubbles in the larger vasculature. A combination of radiofrequency (RF) and Doppler filtering on a low mechanical index (MI) pulse inversion acquisition is presented that differentiates low-velocity microbubbles (on the order of mm/s) associated with perfusion, from the higher-velocity microbubbles (on the order of cm/s) in larger vessels. In vitro experiments demonstrate the ability to separate vascular flow using both harmonic and fundamental Doppler signals. Fundamental and harmonic Doppler signals from microbubbles using a low-MI pulse-inversion acquisition are compared with conventional color Doppler signals in vivo. Due to the lower transmit amplitude and enhanced backscatter from microbubbles, the in vivo signal to clutter ratios for both the fundamental (-11 dB) and harmonic (-4 dB) vascular flow signals were greater than with conventional power Doppler (-51 dB) without contrast agent. The processing investigated here, in parallel with conventional pulse-inversion processing, enables the simultaneous display of both perfusion and vascular flow. In vivo results demonstrating the feasibility and potential utility of the real-time display of both perfusion and vascular flow using US contrast agents are presented and discussed.

  5. Multislice Analysis of Blood Flow Values in CT Perfusion Studies of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malavasi, Silvia; Barone, Domenico; Gavelli, Giampaolo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. Tumour heterogeneity represents a key issue in CT perfusion (CTp), where all studies are usually based on global mean or median values of perfusion maps, often computed on whole tumour. We sought to determine whether, and to what extent, such global values can be representative of tumour heterogeneity, with respect to single slices, and could be used for therapy assessment. Materials and Methods. Twelve patients with one primary non-small cell lung cancer lesion were enrolled in this study, for a total amount of 26 CTp examinations and 118 slices. Mean and median blood flow (BF) values, calculated voxel-based, were computed on each slice and the whole tumour. To measure functional heterogeneity, entropy was calculated on BF values as well. Results. Most of the slices were not represented by the global BF values computed on the whole tumour. In addition, there are a number of lesions having equivalent global BF values, but they are composed of slices having very different heterogeneity distributions, that is, entropy values. Conclusions. Global mean/median BF values of the single slices separately should be considered for clinical assessment, only if interpreted through entropy computed on BF values. The numerical equivalence between global BF values of different lesions may correspond to different clinical status, thus inducing possible errors in choice of therapy when considering global values only. PMID:28164118

  6. Automated prediction of tissue outcome after acute ischemic stroke in computed tomography perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, Pieter C.; Bennink, Edwin; de Jong, Hugo; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Viergever, Max A.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem

    2015-03-01

    Assessment of the extent of cerebral damage on admission in patients with acute ischemic stroke could play an important role in treatment decision making. Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging can be used to determine the extent of damage. However, clinical application is hindered by differences among vendors and used methodology. As a result, threshold based methods and visual assessment of CTP images has not yet shown to be useful in treatment decision making and predicting clinical outcome. Preliminary results in MR studies have shown the benefit of using supervised classifiers for predicting tissue outcome, but this has not been demonstrated for CTP. We present a novel method for the automatic prediction of tissue outcome by combining multi-parametric CTP images into a tissue outcome probability map. A supervised classification scheme was developed to extract absolute and relative perfusion values from processed CTP images that are summarized by a trained classifier into a likelihood of infarction. Training was performed using follow-up CT scans of 20 acute stroke patients with complete recanalization of the vessel that was occluded on admission. Infarcted regions were annotated by expert neuroradiologists. Multiple classifiers were evaluated in a leave-one-patient-out strategy for their discriminating performance using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) statistics. Results showed that a RandomForest classifier performed optimally with an area under the ROC of 0.90 for discriminating infarct tissue. The obtained results are an improvement over existing thresholding methods and are in line with results found in literature where MR perfusion was used.

  7. Shortened Mean Transit Time in CT Perfusion With Singular Value Decomposition Analysis in Acute Cerebral Infarction: Quantitative Evaluation and Comparison With Various CT Perfusion Parameters.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Kazuhiro; Katada, Kazuhiro; Hayakawa, Motoharu; Toyama, Hiroshi

    We aimed to clarify the cause of shortened mean transit time (MTT) in acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease and examined its relationship with reperfusion. Twenty-three patients with acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease underwent whole-brain computed tomography perfusion (CTP). The maximum MTT (MTTmax), minimum MTT (MTTmin), ratio of maximum and minimum MTT (MTTmin/max), and minimum cerebral blood volume (CBV) (CBVmin) were measured by automatic region of interest analysis. Diffusion weighted image was performed to calculate infarction volume. We compared these CTP parameters between reperfusion and nonreperfusion groups and calculated correlation coefficients between the infarction core volume and CTP parameters. Significant differences were observed between reperfusion and nonreperfusion groups (MTTmin/max: P = 0.014; CBVmin ratio: P = 0.038). Regression analysis of CTP and high-intensity volume on diffusion weighted image showed negative correlation (CBVmin ratio: r = -0.41; MTTmin/max: r = -0.30; MTTmin ratio: r = -0.27). A region of shortened MTT indicated obstructed blood flow, which was attributed to the singular value decomposition method error.

  8. Proton and fluorine NMR imaging for the assessment of myocardial perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, B.S.D.

    1985-01-01

    A high field, small bore NMR spectrometer was converted to an imaging system for the detection of fluorine and protons in phantoms and small biological samples. The modified spectrometer system was used to image various phantoms for the assessment of imaging performance. After assessment of the imaging system performance, a water soluble fluorinated compound of relatively low toxicity was investigated for use as an imaging agent for the detection of myocardial perfusion. New Zealand white rabbits were used as the model. Hearts were rapidly extracted and hung via the aorta to a perfusion apparatus which was capable of prolonging heart function throughout the course of the experiment. Perfusion with a standard nutrient solution was followed either by perfusion with a solution to which the fluorinated compound had been added or by ligation of the left coronary artery with subsequent perfusion with the fluorinated compound in perfusate solution. The hearts were then sectioned and imaged. The ligation of the left coronary artery produced a region of impaired perfusion in the left ventricular wall and parts of the septum. The regions of reduced perfusion appeared in the F-19 NMR images as areas of reduced intensity. Proton images of the tissue sections were also obtained for comparison. It was found that infarcted regions may be best visualized by combining the fluorine and proton images. Infarct damage was verified by Gentian violet stain. Relaxation times of fluorine and protons were measured both in perfused tissue and in various concentration solutions.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, G.A. )

    1991-09-01

    Myocardial thallium-201 (Tl-201) imaging performed in conjunction with exercise stress has enhanced the accuracy of detecting coronary artery disease among patients with chest pain. Sensitivity and specificity of qualitative visual Tl-201 scintigraphy for detection of coronary artery disease average 84% and 87%, respectively. Quantitative analysis of planar Tl-201 scintigrams has yielded sensitivity and specificity in the 90% range. Single photon emission computed tomographic imaging is associated with even higher sensitivity but with specificity in the 82-85% range. Perfusion defects representing ischemia can now be distinguished from scar by demonstration of delayed Tl-201 redistribution or enhanced uptake after reinjection of a second dose of Tl-201. Stenoses of the left circumflex coronary artery are less easily detected than lesions of the right and left anterior descending coronary arteries. False-positive Tl-201 perfusion defects may occur as a result of attenuation artifacts, most often caused by overlying breast tissue or by a high left hemidiaphragm. Patient motion during acquisition of single photon emission computed tomographic images results in artifactual defects on reconstruction. Abnormal Tl-201 uptake has been noted in patients with (1) left bundle branch block and normal coronary arteries, (2) hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and (3) progressive systemic sclerosis.

  10. Intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke patients with negative CT perfusion: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Ratnesh; Qahwash, Omar; Richards, Boyd; Fessler, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Background Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is a commonly used modality of neurophysiologic imaging to aid the selection of acute ischemic stroke patients for neuroendovascular intervention by identifying the presence of penumbra versus infarcted brain tissue. However many patients present with evidence of cerebral ischemia with normal CTP, and in that case, should intravenous thrombolytics be given? Purpose To demonstrate if tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA)-eligible stroke patients without perfusion defects demonstrated on CTP would benefit from administration of intravenous thrombolytics. Material and Methods We retrospectively identified patients presenting with acute ischemic symptoms who received intravenous tPA (IV-tPA) from January to June 2012 without a perfusion defect on CTP. Clinical and radiographic findings including the NIHSS at presentation, 24 h, and at discharge, symptomatic and asymptomatic hemorrhagic transformation, and the modified Rankin score at 30 days were collected. A reduction of NIHSS of greater than 4 points or resolution of symptoms was considered significant. Results Seventeen patients were identified with a mean NIHSS of 8.2 prior to administration of intravenous thrombolytics, 3.5 after 24 h, and 2.5 at discharge. Among them, 13 patients had significant improvement of NIHSS with a mean reduction of 6.15 points at 24 h. One patient initially improved but had delayed hemorrhagic transformation and died. Two patients had improvement in NIHSS but were not significant and two patients had increased in NIHSS at 24 h, although one eventually improved at discharge. There was no asymptomatic hemorrhagic transformation. Mean mRS at 3 months is 1.76. Conclusion The failure to identify a perfusion deficit by CTP should not be used as a contraindication for intravenous thrombolytics. Criteria for administration of intravenous thrombolytics should still be based on time from symptom onset as previously published by NINDS. PMID

  11. TU-CD-BRA-08: Single-Energy Computed Tomography-Based Pulmonary Perfusion Imaging: Proof-Of-Principle in a Canine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, T; Boone, J; Kent, M; Wisner, E; Fujita, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Pulmonary perfusion imaging has provided significant insights into pulmonary diseases, and can be useful in radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to prospectively establish proof-of-principle in a canine model for single-energy CT-based perfusion imaging, which has the potential for widespread clinical implementation. Methods: Single-energy CT perfusion imaging is based on: (1) acquisition of inspiratory breath-hold CT scans before and after intravenous injection of iodinated contrast medium, (2) deformable image registration (DIR) of the two CT image data sets, and (3) subtraction of the pre-contrast image from post-contrast image, yielding a map of Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement. These subtraction image data sets hypothetically represent perfused blood volume, a surrogate for perfusion. In an IACUC-approved clinical trial, we acquired pre- and post-contrast CT scans in the prone posture for six anesthetized, mechanically-ventilated dogs. The elastix algorithm was used for DIR. The registration accuracy was quantified using the target registration errors (TREs) for 50 pulmonary landmarks in each dog. The gradient of HU enhancement between gravity-dependent (ventral) and non-dependent (dorsal) regions was evaluated to quantify the known effect of gravity, i.e., greater perfusion in ventral regions. Results: The lung volume difference between the two scans was 4.3±3.5% on average (range 0.3%–10.1%). DIR demonstrated an average TRE of 0.7±1.0 mm. HU enhancement in lung parenchyma was 34±10 HU on average and varied considerably between individual dogs, indicating the need for improvement of the contrast injection protocol. HU enhancement in ventral (gravity-dependent) regions was found to be greater than in dorsal regions. A population average ventral-to-dorsal gradient of HU enhancement was strong (R{sup 2}=0.94) and statistically significant (p<0.01). Conclusion: This canine study demonstrated relatively accurate DIR and a strong ventral

  12. Contrast adaptive total p-norm variation minimization approach to CT reconstruction for artifact reduction in reduced-view brain perfusion CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Won; Kim, Jong-Hyo

    2011-03-01

    Perfusion CT (PCT) examinations are getting more frequently used for diagnosis of acute brain diseases such as hemorrhage and infarction, because the functional map images it produces such as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and mean transit time (MTT) may provide critical information in the emergency work-up of patient care. However, a typical PCT scans the same slices several tens of times after injection of contrast agent, which leads to much increased radiation dose and is inevitability of growing concern for radiation-induced cancer risk. Reducing the number of views in projection in combination of TV minimization reconstruction technique is being regarded as an option for radiation reduction. However, reconstruction artifacts due to insufficient number of X-ray projections become problematic especially when high contrast enhancement signals are present or patient's motion occurred. In this study, we present a novel reconstruction technique using contrast-adaptive TpV minimization that can reduce reconstruction artifacts effectively by using different p-norms in high contrast and low contrast objects. In the proposed method, high contrast components are first reconstructed using thresholded projection data and low p-norm total variation to reflect sparseness in both projection and reconstruction spaces. Next, projection data are modified to contain only low contrast objects by creating projection data of reconstructed high contrast components and subtracting them from original projection data. Then, the low contrast projection data are reconstructed by using relatively high p-norm TV minimization technique, and are combined with the reconstructed high contrast component images to produce final reconstructed images. The proposed algorithm was applied to numerical phantom and a clinical data set of brain PCT exam, and the resultant images were compared with those using filtered back projection (FBP) and conventional TV

  13. Effect of increasing the sampling interval to 2 seconds on the radiation dose and accuracy of CT perfusion of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Ahmed M; Razek, Ahmed A; Elhawary, Galal; Batouty, Nihal M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of increasing the sampling interval from 1 second (1 image per second) to 2 seconds (1 image every 2 seconds) on computed tomographic (CT) perfusion (CTP) of head and neck tumors. Twenty patients underwent CTP studies of head and neck tumors with images acquired in cine mode for 50 seconds using sampling interval of 1 second. Using deconvolution-based software, analysis of CTP was done with sampling interval of 1 second and then 2 seconds. Perfusion maps representing blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and permeability surface area product (PS) were obtained. Quantitative tumor CTP values were compared between the 2 sampling intervals. Two blinded radiologists compared the subjective quality of CTP maps using a 3-point scale between the 2 sampling intervals. Radiation dose parameters were recorded for the 2 sampling interval rates. No significant differences were observed between the means of the 4 perfusion parameters generated using both sampling intervals; all P >0.05. The 95% limits of agreement between the 2 sampling intervals were -65.9 to 48.1) mL/min per 100 g for blood flow, -3.6 to 3.1 mL/100 g for blood volume, -2.9 to 3.8 seconds for mean transit time, and -10.0 to 12.5 mL/min per 100 g for PS. There was no significant difference between the subjective quality scores of CTP maps obtained using the 2 sampling intervals; all P > 0.05. Radiation dose was halved when sampling interval increased from 1 to 2 seconds. Increasing the sampling interval rate to 1 image every 2 seconds does not compromise the image quality and has no significant effect on quantitative perfusion parameters of head and neck tumors. The radiation dose is halved.

  14. Automatic lumbar spine measurement in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yunxiang; Zheng, Dong; Liao, Shu; Peng, Zhigang; Yan, Ruyi; Liu, Junhua; Dong, Zhongxing; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Zhan, Yiqiang; Fei, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Accurate lumbar spine measurement in CT images provides an essential way for quantitative spinal diseases analysis such as spondylolisthesis and scoliosis. In today's clinical workflow, the measurements are manually performed by radiologists and surgeons, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Therefore, automatic and accurate lumbar spine measurement algorithm becomes highly desirable. In this study, we propose a method to automatically calculate five different lumbar spine measurements in CT images. There are three main stages of the proposed method: First, a learning based spine labeling method, which integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information, is used to detect lumbar and sacrum vertebrae in CT images. Then, a multiatlases based image segmentation method is used to segment each lumbar vertebra and the sacrum based on the detection result. Finally, measurements are derived from the segmentation result of each vertebra. Our method has been evaluated on 138 spinal CT scans to automatically calculate five widely used clinical spine measurements. Experimental results show that our method can achieve more than 90% success rates across all the measurements. Our method also significantly improves the measurement efficiency compared to manual measurements. Besides benefiting the routine clinical diagnosis of spinal diseases, our method also enables the large scale data analytics for scientific and clinical researches.

  15. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Evaluation of Model-Based Pulmonary Perfusion Analysis With Pyramid Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Image Analysis aims to develop model-based computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the Dynamic Pulmonary Imaging technique 18,5,17,6. We have proposed and evaluated a multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation model based on pyramid images for ventilation analysis. We have further extended the method for ventilation analysis to pulmonary perfusion. This paper focuses on the clinical evaluation of our method for

  16. Image quality assessment of a pre-clinical flat-panel volumetric micro-CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Louise Y.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Holdsworth, David W.

    2006-03-01

    Small animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. Current micro-CT systems are capable of achieving spatial resolution on the order of 10 μm, giving highly detailed anatomical information. However, the speed of data acquisition of these systems is relatively slow, when compared with clinical CT systems. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging has proven to be a powerful tool clinically in detecting and diagnosing cancer, stroke, pulmonary and ischemic heart diseases. In order to perform this technique in mice and rats, quantitative CT images must be acquired at a rate of at least 1 Hz. Recently, a research pre-clinical CT scanner (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare) has been designed specifically for dynamic perfusion imaging in small animals. Using an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector and a clinical slip-ring gantry, this system is capable of acquiring volumetric image data at a rate of 1 Hz, with in-plane resolution of 150 μm, while covering the entire thoracic region of a mouse or whole organs of a rat. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the principal imaging performance of the micro-CT system, in terms of spatial resolution, image uniformity, linearity, dose and voxel noise for the feasibility of imaging mice and rats. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.7 line pairs per mm and noise of 42 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 seconds at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy.

  17. Perfusion vector-a new method to quantify myocardial perfusion scintigraphy images: a simulation study with validation in patients.

    PubMed

    Minarik, David; Senneby, Martin; Wollmer, Per; Mansten, Alva; Sjöstrand, Karl; Edenbrandt, Lars; Trägårdh, Elin

    2015-12-01

    The interpretation of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) largely relies on visual assessment by the physician of the localization and extent of a perfusion defect. The aim of this study was to introduce the concept of the perfusion vector as a new objective quantitative method for further assisting the visual interpretation and to test the concept using simulated MPS images as well as patients. The perfusion vector is based on calculating the difference between the anatomical centroid and the perfusion center of gravity of the left ventricle. Simulated MPS images were obtained using the SIMIND Monte Carlo program together with XCAT phantom. Four different-sized anterior and four lateral defects were simulated, and perfusion vector components x-, y-, and z-axes were calculated. For the patient study, 40 normal and 80 abnormal studies were included. Perfusion vectors were compared between normal and abnormal (apical, inferior, anterior, and lateral ischemia or infarction) studies and also correlated to the defect size. For simulated anterior defects, the stress perfusion vector component on the y-axis (anterior-inferior direction) increased in proportion to the defect size. For the simulated lateral defects, the stress perfusion vector component on the x-axis (septal-lateral direction) decreased in proportion to the defect size. When comparing normal and abnormal patients, there was a statistically significant difference for the stress perfusion vector on the x-axis for apical and lateral defects; on the y-axis for apical, inferior, and lateral defects; and on the z-axis (basal-apical direction) for apical, anterior, and lateral defects. A significant difference was shown for the difference vector magnitude (stress/rest) between normal and ischemic patients (p = 0.001) but not for patients with infarction. The correlation between the defect size and stress vector magnitude was also found to be significant (p < 0.001). The concept of the perfusion vector

  18. Monitoring microcirculatory changes in the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap with laser Doppler perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Tindholdt, Tyge Tind; Saidian, Said; Pripp, Are Hugo; Tønseth, Kim Alexander

    2011-08-01

    Microcirculatory changes were monitored in 20 deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEAP) flaps during unilateral breast reconstruction until the seventh postoperative day using laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Measurements were recorded according to the zonal classification by Scheflan and Dinner. The cutaneous territory zone IV was discarded during insetting due to marginal circulation. The highest perfusion levels were found the first postoperative day for both zones I and III. Postoperative perfusion values were significantly higher for these zones compared with zone II. Immediately after revascularization, zone I was significantly better perfused than both II and III. However, the perfusion in zone III stabilized at the level of zone I in the postoperative phase. Evaluating microcirculatory changes in the DIEAP flap with laser Doppler perfusion imaging showed that zones I and III have higher perfusion levels than zone II in the postoperative phase.

  19. Myocardial Perfusion SPECT Imaging in Patients after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Valotassiou, Varvara; Tsougos, Ioannis; Demakopoulos, Nikolaos

    2010-05-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most prevalent form of cardiovascular disease affecting about 13 million Americans, while more than one million percutaneous transluminal intervention (PCI) procedures are performed annually in the USA. The relative high occurrence of restenosis, despite stent implementation, seems to be the primary limitation of PCI. Over the last decades, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), has proven an invaluable tool for the diagnosis of CAD and patients' risk stratification, providing useful information regarding the decision about revascularization and is well suited to assess patients after intervention. Information gained from post-intervention MPI is crucial to differentiate patients with angina from those with exo-cardiac chest pain syndromes, to assess peri-intervention myocardial damage, to predict-detect restenosis after PCI, to detect CAD progression in non-revascularized vessels, to evaluate the effects of intervention if required for occupational reasons and to evaluate patients' long-term prognosis. On the other hand, chest pain and exercise electrocardiography are largely unhelpful in identifying patients at risk after PCI.Although there are enough published data demonstrating the value of myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in patients after PCI, there is still debate on whether or not these tests should be performed routinely.

  20. TU-AB-204-01: Advances in C-Arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.

    2015-06-15

    This symposium highlights advanced cone-beam CT (CBCT) technologies in four areas of emerging application in diagnostic imaging and image-guided interventions. Each area includes research that extends the spatial, temporal, and/or contrast resolution characteristics of CBCT beyond conventional limits through advances in scanner technology, acquisition protocols, and 3D image reconstruction techniques. Dr. G. Chen (University of Wisconsin) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Brain Perfusion Imaging. Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and a fraction of people having an acute ischemic stroke are suitable candidates for endovascular therapy. Critical factors that affect both the likelihood of successful revascularization and good clinical outcome are: 1) the time between stroke onset and revascularization; and 2) the ability to distinguish patients who have a small volume of irreversibly injured brain (ischemic core) and a large volume of ischemic but salvageable brain (penumbra) from patients with a large ischemic core and little or no penumbra. Therefore, “time is brain” in the care of the stroke patients. C-arm CBCT systems widely available in angiography suites have the potential to generate non-contrast-enhanced CBCT images to exclude the presence of hemorrhage, time-resolved CBCT angiography to evaluate the site of occlusion and collaterals, and CBCT perfusion parametric images to assess the extent of the ischemic core and penumbra, thereby fulfilling the imaging requirements of a “one-stop-shop” in the angiography suite to reduce the time between onset and revascularization therapy. The challenges and opportunities to advance CBCT technology to fully enable the one-stop-shop C-arm CBCT platform for brain imaging will be discussed. Dr. R. Fahrig (Stanford University) will present on the topic: Advances in C-arm CBCT for Cardiac Interventions. With the goal of providing functional information during cardiac interventions

  1. CT Image Processing Using Public Digital Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Azzawi, Yu-Ming; Quinn, John F.; Glenn, William V.; Rothman, Stephen L.G.

    1984-01-01

    Nationwide commercial computer communication is now commonplace for those applications where digital dialogues are generally short and widely distributed, and where bandwidth does not exceed that of dial-up telephone lines. Image processing using such networks is prohibitive because of the large volume of data inherent to digital pictures. With a blend of increasing bandwidth and distributed processing, network image processing becomes possible. This paper examines characteristics of a digital image processing service for a nationwide network of CT scanner installations. Issues of image transmission, data compression, distributed processing, software maintenance, and interfacility communication are also discussed. Included are results that show the volume and type of processing experienced by a network of over 50 CT scanners for the last 32 months.

  2. ASPECTS is a predictor of favorable CT perfusion in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yaghi, Shadi; Bianchi, Nicholas; Amole, Adewumi; Hinduja, Archana

    2014-07-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is used by some stroke centers to stratify stroke patients who may potentially benefit from endovascular treatment. Our aim is to identify predictors of a favorable CTP in acute ischemic stroke patients evaluated within 8h from symptoms onset for possible endovascular treatment. We reviewed records of patients who had CTP studies between August 2010 and September 2012. We included all patients with anterior circulation strokes with evidence of large vessel disease. All patients had CT head and CT angiography head and neck as part of our protocol. Favorable CTP was defined as core infarct size less than one third the middle cerebral artery distribution and penumbra>20% of infarct size. The patients were divided into two groups based on favorable CTP or not. Baseline characteristics, time parameters, laboratory data and radiological data were compared between both groups. For statistical analysis, we used independent and Fisher's exact tests and a multivariate logistic regression model. During this period, 60 patients met the inclusion criteria. Patients with favorable CTP were likely to be ≥ 80 years (33% vs 9%, P = 0.026), have Alberta Stroke Program early CT score (ASPECTS) > 7 (81% v. 21%, P ≤ 0.001) and lower mean time from symptom onset to CTP (234 ± 91 vs 305 ± 122, P = 0.015). On regression analysis, ASPECTS was the only independent predictor of a favorable CTP (OR = 16.2, CI: 4.3-62.2, P < 0.001). ASPECT score may be used as a tool to predict a favorable CTP. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Fast parallel algorithm for CT image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Flores, Liubov A; Vidal, Vicent; Mayo, Patricia; Rodenas, Francisco; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2012-01-01

    In X-ray computed tomography (CT) the X rays are used to obtain the projection data needed to generate an image of the inside of an object. The image can be generated with different techniques. Iterative methods are more suitable for the reconstruction of images with high contrast and precision in noisy conditions and from a small number of projections. Their use may be important in portable scanners for their functionality in emergency situations. However, in practice, these methods are not widely used due to the high computational cost of their implementation. In this work we analyze iterative parallel image reconstruction with the Portable Extensive Toolkit for Scientific computation (PETSc).

  4. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a good'' surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  5. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a ``good`` surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  6. Quantification of lung perfusion blood volume (lung PBV) by dual-energy CT in pulmonary embolism before and after treatment: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Hiroki; Sueyoshi, Eijun; Hayashida, Takeshi; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the quantification of lung perfusion blood volume (PBV) by dual-energy computed tomography (CT) in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) before and after treatment. Twenty-five patients with PE underwent dual-energy CT angiography before and after treatment. In all 25 patients, pulmonary CT confirmed that there was no PE after treatment. This preliminary study demonstrated the possibility that quantification of lung PBV may reflect parenchymal arterial perfusion before and after treatment, including the compensatory increase of lung perfusion.

  7. Quantitative iodine-123 IMP imaging of brain perfusion in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.B.; Lake, R.R.; Graham, L.S.; King, M.A.; Kling, A.S.; Fitten, L.J.; O'Rear, J.; Bronca, G.A.; Gan, M.; Servrin, R. )

    1989-10-01

    Decreased perfusion in the frontal lobes of patients with chronic schizophrenia has been reported by multiple observes using a variety of techniques. Other observers have been unable to confirm this finding using similar techniques. In this study quantitative single photon emission computed tomography brain imaging was performed using p,5n ({sup 123}I)IMP in five normal subjects and ten chronically medicated patients with schizophrenia. The acquisition data were preprocessed with an image dependent Metz filter and reconstructed using a ramp filtered back projection technique. The uptake in each of 50 regions of interest in each subject was normalized to the uptake in the cerebellum. There were no significant confirmed differences in the comparable ratios of normal subjects and patients with schizophrenia even at the p = 0.15 level. Hypofrontality was not observed.

  8. ACR-SPR-STR Practice Parameter for the Performance of Cardiac Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Imaging.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Rathan M; Janowitz, Warren R; Johnson, Geoffrey B; Lodge, Martin A; Parisi, Marguerite T; Ferguson, Mark R; Hellinger, Jeffrey C; Gladish, Gregory W; Gupta, Narainder K

    2017-09-15

    This clinical practice parameter has been developed collaboratively by the American College of Radiology (ACR), the Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR), and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR). This document is intended to act as a guide for physicians performing and interpreting positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) of cardiac diseases in adults and children. The primary value of cardiac PET/CT imaging include evaluation of perfusion, function, viability, inflammation, anatomy, and risk stratification for cardiac-related events such as myocardial infarction and death. Optimum utility of cardiac PET/CT is achieved when images are interpreted in conjunction with clinical information and laboratory data. Measurement of myocardial blood flow, coronary flow reserve and detection of balanced ischemia are significant advantages of cardiac PET perfusion studies. Increasingly cardiac PET/CT is used in diagnosis and treatment response assessment for cardiac sarcoidosis.

  9. Hybrid imaging: integration of nuclear imaging and cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Di Carli, Marcelo F

    2009-05-01

    The integration of nuclear medicine cameras with multidetector CT scanners provides a unique opportunity to delineate cardiac and vascular anatomic abnormalities and their physiologic consequences in a single setting. By revealing the burden of anatomic coronary artery disease and its physiologic significance, hybrid imaging can provide unique information that may improve noninvasive diagnosis, risk assessment, and management of coronary artery disease. By integrating the detailed anatomic information from CT with the high sensitivity of radionuclide imaging to evaluate targeted molecular and cellular abnormalities, hybrid imaging may play a key role in shaping the future of molecular diagnostics and therapeutics. This article reviews potential clinical applications of hybrid imaging in cardiovascular disease.

  10. Automatic quantitative analysis of cardiac MR perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breeuwer, Marcel M.; Spreeuwers, Luuk J.; Quist, Marcel J.

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique for imaging cardiovascular diseases. The introduction of cardiovascular MRI into clinical practice is however hampered by the lack of efficient and accurate image analysis methods. This paper focuses on the evaluation of blood perfusion in the myocardium (the heart muscle) from MR images, using contrast-enhanced ECG-triggered MRI. We have developed an automatic quantitative analysis method, which works as follows. First, image registration is used to compensate for translation and rotation of the myocardium over time. Next, the boundaries of the myocardium are detected and for each position within the myocardium a time-intensity profile is constructed. The time interval during which the contrast agent passes for the first time through the left ventricle and the myocardium is detected and various parameters are measured from the time-intensity profiles in this interval. The measured parameters are visualized as color overlays on the original images. Analysis results are stored, so that they can later on be compared for different stress levels of the heart. The method is described in detail in this paper and preliminary validation results are presented.

  11. Parametric myocardial perfusion PET imaging using physiological clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Karakatsanis, Nikolaos A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tang, Jing; Rahmim, Arman

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel framework of robust kinetic parameter estimation applied to absolute ow quanti cation in dynamic PET imaging. Kinetic parameter estimation is formulated as a nonlinear least squares with spatial constraints problem (NLLS-SC) where the spatial constraints are computed from a physiologically driven clustering of dynamic images, and used to reduce noise contamination. An ideal clustering of dynamic images depends on the underlying physiology of functional regions, and in turn, physiological processes are quanti ed by kinetic parameter estimation. Physiologically driven clustering of dynamic images is performed using a clustering algorithm (e.g. K-means, Spectral Clustering etc) with Kinetic modeling in an iterative handshaking fashion. This gives a map of labels where each functionally homogenous cluster is represented by mean kinetics (cluster centroid). Parametric images are acquired by solving the NLLS-SC problem for each voxel which penalizes spatial variations from its mean kinetics. This substantially reduces noise in the estimation process for each voxel by utilizing kinetic information from physiologically similar voxels (cluster members). Resolution degradation is also substantially minimized as no spatial smoothing between heterogeneous functional regions is performed. The proposed framework is shown to improve the quantitative accuracy of Myocardial Perfusion (MP) PET imaging, and in turn, has the long-term potential to enhance capabilities of MP PET in the detection, staging and management of coronary artery disease.

  12. Patient position verification using CT images.

    PubMed

    Kress, J; Minohara, S; Endo, M; Debus, J; Kanai, T

    1999-06-01

    The use of ions in the radiotherapy of cancer patients requires an accurate patient positioning in order to exploit its potential benefits. Using CT images as the basis for the setup verification offers the advantage of a high in-plane resolution in combination with a geometrically accurate, volumetric information. Before each fraction a single CT slice is acquired at the isocenter level after the positioning procedure. This single slice is registered to the planning CT cube using automated image registration algorithms. Thus any erreonous translation or rotation can be detected and quantified. The registration process involves the interpolation of the volumetric data, the calculation of an energy function, and the minimization of this energy function. Several data interpolation functions as well as minimization algorithms were compared. CT studies with a head phantom were performed in which defined translations and rotations were simulated by moving a motor-driven treatment chair. Different slice thicknesses and anatomical sites were studied to investigate their potential influence on the registration accuracy. The accuracy of the registration was found to be a fraction of a voxel size for suitable combinations of algorithms (typically better than 0.16 mm/deg). A significant dependancy of the registration accuracy on the CT slice thickness and the anatomical site was found (the accuracy ranges from 0.05 mm/deg to 0.16 mm/deg depending on the site). The calculation time is dependant on the used algorithms and the magnitude of the setup error. For the standard combination of algorithms as proposed by the authors (Downhill Simplex minimization with Trilinear interpolation) the typical calculation time is about 20 s for a Sun UltraSPARC processor. Taking into account the mechanical accuracy of the setup device (motor-driven chair) the registration of CT images is thus a useful tool for detecting and quantifying any significant error in the patient position.

  13. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in high-risk smokers and smoking-related COPD: correlations with pulmonary function tests and quantitative computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yi; Guan, Yu; Fan, Li; Liu, Shi-Yuan; Yu, Hong; Zhao, Li-Ming; Li, Bing

    2014-09-01

    The study aimed to prospectively evaluate correlations between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR perfusion imaging, pulmonary function tests (PFT) and volume quantitative CT in smokers with or without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to determine the value of DCE-MR perfusion imaging and CT volumetric imaging on the assessment of smokers. According to the ATS/ERS guidelines, 51 male smokers were categorized into five groups: At risk for COPD (n = 8), mild COPD (n = 9), moderate COPD (n = 12), severe COPD (n = 10), and very severe COPD (n = 12). Maximum slope of increase (MSI), positive enhancement integral (PEI), etc. were obtained from MR perfusion data. The signal intensity ratio (RSI) of the PDs and normal lung was calculated (RSI = SIPD/SInormal). Total lung volume (TLV), total emphysema volume (TEV) and emphysema index (EI) were obtained from volumetric CT data. For "at risk for COPD," the positive rate of PDs on MR perfusion images was higher than that of abnormal changes on non-enhanced CT images (p < 0.05). Moderate-to-strong positive correlations were found between all the PFT parameters and SIPD, or RSI (r range 0.445∼0.683, p ≤ 0.001). TEV and EI were negatively correlated better with FEV1/FVC than other PFT parameters (r range -0.48 --0.63, p < 0.001). There were significant differences in RSI and SIPD between "at risk for COPD" and "very severe COPD," and between "mild COPD" and "very severe COPD". Thus, MR perfusion imaging may be a good approach to identify early evidence of COPD and may have potential to assist in classification of COPD.

  14. Multimodal tissue perfusion imaging using multi-spectral and thermographic imaging systems applied on clinical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Nelisse, Martin; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Noordmans, Herke Jan

    2013-03-01

    Clinical interventions can cause changes in tissue perfusion, oxygenation or temperature. Real-time imaging of these phenomena could be useful for surgical strategy or understanding of physiological regulation mechanisms. Two noncontact imaging techniques were applied for imaging of large tissue areas: LED based multispectral imaging (MSI, 17 different wavelengths 370 nm-880 nm) and thermal imaging (7.5 to 13.5 μm). Oxygenation concentration changes were calculated using different analyzing methods. The advantages of these methods are presented for stationary and dynamic applications. Concentration calculations of chromophores in tissue require right choices of wavelengths The effects of different wavelength choices for hemoglobin concentration calculations were studied in laboratory conditions and consequently applied in clinical studies. Corrections for interferences during the clinical registrations (ambient light fluctuations, tissue movements) were performed. The wavelength dependency of the algorithms were studied and wavelength sets with the best results will be presented. The multispectral and thermal imaging systems were applied during clinical intervention studies: reperfusion of tissue flap transplantation (ENT), effectiveness of local anesthetic block and during open brain surgery in patients with epileptic seizures. The LED multispectral imaging system successfully imaged the perfusion and oxygenation changes during clinical interventions. The thermal images show local heat distributions over tissue areas as a result of changes in tissue perfusion. Multispectral imaging and thermal imaging provide complementary information and are promising techniques for real-time diagnostics of physiological processes in medicine.

  15. Automated CT Perfusion for Ischemic Core Volume Prediction in Tandem Anterior Circulation Occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Haussen, Diogo C.; Dehkharghani, Seena; Grigoryan, Mikayel; Bowen, Meredith; Rebello, Leticia C.; Nogueira, Raul G.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim CT perfusion (CTP) predicts ischemic core volumes in acute ischemic stroke (AIS); however, assumptions made within the pharmacokinetic model may engender errors by the presence of tracer delay or dispersion. We aimed to evaluate the impact of hemodynamic disturbance due to extracranial anterior circulation occlusions upon the accuracy of ischemic core volume estimation with an automated perfusion analysis tool (RAPID) among AIS patients with large-vessel occlusions. Methods A prospectively collected, interventional database was retrospectively reviewed for all cases of endovascular treatment of AIS between September 2010 and March 2015 for patients with anterior circulation occlusions with baseline CTP and full reperfusion (mTICI3). Results Out of 685 treated patients, 114 fit the inclusion criteria. Comparison between tandem (n = 21) and nontandem groups (n = 93) revealed similar baseline ischemic core (20 ± 19 vs. 19 ± 25 cm3; p = 0.8), Tmax >6 s (175 ± 109 vs. 162 ± 118 cm3; p = 0.6), Tmax >10 s (90 ± 84 vs. 90 ± 91 cm3; p = 0.9), and final infarct volumes (45 ± 47 vs. 37 ± 45 cm3; p = 0.5). Baseline core volumes were found to correlate with final infarct volumes for the tandem (r = 0.49; p = 0.02) and nontandem (r = 0.44; p < 0.01) groups. The mean absolute difference between estimated core and final infarct volume was similar between patients with and those without (24 ± 41 vs. 17 ± 41 cm3; p = 0.5) tandem lesions. Conclusions The prediction of baseline ischemic core volumes through an optimized CTP analysis employing rigorous normalization, thresholding, and voxel-wise analysis is not significantly influenced by the presence of underlying extracranial carotid steno-occlusive disease in large-vessel AIS. PMID:27610125

  16. SU-F-R-51: Radiomics in CT Perfusion Maps of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nesteruk, M; Riesterer, O; Veit-Haibach, P; Huellner, M; Studer, G; Stieb, S; Glatz, S; Pruschy, M; Guckenberger, M; Tanadini-Lang, S; Bundschuh, R

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to test the predictive value of radiomics features of CT perfusion (CTP) for tumor control, based on a preselection of radiomics features in a robustness study. Methods: 11 patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) and 11 patients with lung cancer were included in the robustness study to preselect stable radiomics parameters. Data from 36 HNC patients treated with definitive radiochemotherapy (median follow-up 30 months) was used to build a predictive model based on these parameters. All patients underwent pre-treatment CTP. 315 texture parameters were computed for three perfusion maps: blood volume, blood flow and mean transit time. The variability of texture parameters was tested with respect to non-standardizable perfusion computation factors (noise level and artery contouring) using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). The parameter with the highest ICC in the correlated group of parameters (inter-parameter Spearman correlations) was tested for its predictive value. The final model to predict tumor control was built using multivariate Cox regression analysis with backward selection of the variables. For comparison, a predictive model based on tumor volume was created. Results: Ten parameters were found to be stable in both HNC and lung cancer regarding potentially non-standardizable factors after the correction for inter-parameter correlations. In the multivariate backward selection of the variables, blood flow entropy showed a highly significant impact on tumor control (p=0.03) with concordance index (CI) of 0.76. Blood flow entropy was significantly lower in the patient group with controlled tumors at 18 months (p<0.1). The new model showed a higher concordance index compared to the tumor volume model (CI=0.68). Conclusion: The preselection of variables in the robustness study allowed building a predictive radiomics-based model of tumor control in HNC despite a small patient cohort. This model was found to be superior

  17. Usefulness of myocardial perfusion imaging with exercise testing in children.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Brad; Goudie, Brett; Remmert, Jenna; Gidding, Samuel S

    2012-10-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) provides additional clinical information on children with cardiac disease but will not benefit children with chest pain and normal cardiac studies. This study reviewed all technetium-99 m ((99m)Tc) sestamibi stress MPI studies between 2004 and 2010 performed in association with graded exercise testing (86% with bicycle ergometer, 14% with treadmill). A positive test was defined as a perfusion defect or abnormal ventricular function response. Clinical records were reviewed, including follow-up assessment to determine accuracy of MPI interpretation. False-positive and false-negative rates were recorded. A total of 197 patients (mean age, 13.4 ± 3.6 years, 70% male) underwent 218 MPI studies. Group A had 42 patients (43 studies) with isolated chest pain and normal studies. Of the 43 studies, 39 had negative results, and 4 had false-positive results. Group B had 155 patients (175 studies) with known or suspected cardiac disease, and 39 tests (33 patients) had positive results. Whereas 32 studies were considered true-positive, 7 were false-positive. There was one false-negative test. According to the findings, (99m)Tc sestamibi MPI studies are clinically useful but not perfect tests in the setting of known or suspected cardiac disease based on clinical evaluation, electrocardiography (ECG), or echocardiography. Children who had isolated chest pain with a normal ECG and echocardiogram often have false-positive studies.

  18. Myocardial perfusion imaging determination using an appropriate use smartphone application.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ashish; Bal, Susan; Hahn, Harvey

    2015-02-01

    Inappropriate cardiac imaging has been a significant cost concern and cause of radiation burden to patients. To assess if a smartphone application (app) based on 2009 Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for Cardiac Radionuclide Imaging published by American College of Cardiology would be feasible at the point of order. We evaluated stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) (N = 403) (mean age = 62.23 years; 47.89% males) over a 4 month period using a smartphone app to determine whether the study ordered was Appropriate, Inappropriate, or Uncertain per 2009 AUC. We also monitored the time needed to use the app to determine the level of appropriateness of each stress MPI. The results of the stress MPI were noted. Of the 403 stress MPIs evaluated, 267 (66.25%) were noted to be Appropriate, 118 (29.28%) were Inappropriate, and 13 (3.23%) were Uncertain, per AUC; 5 (1.25%) remained unclassified. Average time needed to use the app to assess each stress MPI for appropriateness was noted to be 44 (±9) seconds. Non-teaching physicians ordered 70 (38.89%) inappropriate stress MPIs as compared to 20 (23.53%) ordered by physicians on resident teaching service, and 28 (23.33%) by cardiologists (P = .0045). Among inappropriately ordered stress MPIs, 87 (42.65%) were ordered in females as compared to 31 (17.13%) in males (P < .0001). 70 (26.22%) stress MPIs among appropriately ordered were abnormal (reversible ischemia or fixed perfusion defect) as compared to 15 (12.17%) among inappropriately ordered stress MPIs (P = .0032). A free and convenient smartphone app provides an easy-to-use tool to assist physicians in determining the level of appropriateness of stress MPI in a time- and cost-effective manner at the point of order. The smartphone app may have potential to promote the usage of the AUC and possibly aid reduction of healthcare cost and ionizing radiation burden.

  19. Continuous ASL (CASL) perfusion MRI with an array coil and parallel imaging at 3T.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze; Wang, Jiongjiong; Connick, Thomas J; Wetmore, Gabriel S; Detre, John A

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of using an array coil and parallel imaging in continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) perfusion MRI. An 8-channel receive-only array head coil was used in conjunction with a surrounding detunable volume transmit coil. The signal to noise ratio (SNR), temporal stability, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and perfusion image coverage were measured from steady state CASL scans using: a standard volume coil, array coil, and array coil with 2- and 3-fold accelerated parallel imaging. Compared to the standard volume coil, the array coil provided 3 times the average SNR increase and higher temporal stability for the perfusion weighted images, even with threefold acceleration. Although perfusion images of the array coil were affected by the inhomogeneous coil sensitivities, this effect was invisible in the quantitative CBF images, which showed highly reproducible perfusion values compared to the standard volume coil. The unfolding distortions of parallel imaging were suppressed in the perfusion images by pairwise subtraction, though they sharply degraded the raw EPI images. Moreover, parallel imaging provided the potential of acquiring more slices due to the shortened acquisition time and improved coverage in brain regions with high static field inhomogeneity. Such results highlight the potential utility of array coils and parallel imaging in ASL perfusion MRI. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Feasibility of stress only rubidium-82 PET myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Sean R; Kikut, Janusz; Pinckney, Richard G; Keating, Friederike K

    2013-12-01

    Stress only SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is a validated strategy to streamline cardiac diagnostic imaging. The potential use of Rb82 PET stress only MPI has not been investigated. Stress images from 200 Rb82 PET-MPI were reviewed by two blinded readers and categorized as not requiring additional rest images (normal) or requiring additional images (abnormal or equivocal). No additional images were deemed necessary for 95 (48%) and 99 (50%) by the two blinded readers. The stress only interpretation was compared to the previous read of the complete rest-stress study. The rate of detecting a normal result with stress only reading was 76%-79% with a negative predictive value of 94%-95%. Clinical predictors of a normal stress only PET-MPI included lower age, the absence of CAD, and female gender, but not body mass index. Blinded reads of 50 additional consecutive PET-MPI from patients with selected clinical predictors (age <65 years, no known CAD) were then performed. Of these, 40 (80%) were normal by previous rest-stress reading, and 34 (68%) were categorized as not requiring additional images after stress only reading. PET stress only imaging would have resulted in a mean reduction of radiation exposure of 2.4 mSv per study according to a published radiation estimate. Stress only Rb82 PET-MPI is a feasible strategy to reduce resource utilization and radiation exposure associated with MPI. This strategy would be most applicable to patients with a lower pretest likelihood.