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Sample records for ct virtual bronchoscopy

  1. Virtual hybrid bronchoscopy using PET/CT data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Seemann, Marcus D.

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the possibilities, advantages and limitations of virtual bronchoscopy using data sets from positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT). Eight consecutive patients with lung cancer underwent PET/CT. PET was performed with F-18-labelled 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D: -glucose ((18)F-FDG). The tracheobronchial system was segmented with a volume-growing algorithm, using the CT data sets, and visualized with a shaded-surface rendering method. The primary tumours and the lymph node metastases were segmented for virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the CT data set and for virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy using the PET/CT data set. Virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the low-dose or diagnostic CT facilitates the detection of anatomical/morphological structure changes of the tracheobronchial system. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy was superior to virtual CT-bronchoscopy in the detection of lymph node metastases (P=0.001), because it uses the CT information and the molecular/metabolic information from PET. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy with a transparent colour-coded shaded-surface rendering model is expected to improve the diagnostic accuracy of identification and characterization of malignancies, assessment of tumour staging, differentiation of viable tumour tissue from atelectases and scars, verification of infections, evaluation of therapeutic response and detection of an early stage of recurrence that is not detectable or is misjudged in comparison with virtual CT-bronchoscopy.

  2. Integrated bronchoscopic video tracking and 3D CT registration for virtual bronchoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, William E.; Helferty, James P.; Padfield, Dirk R.

    2003-05-01

    Lung cancer assessment involves an initial evaluation of 3D CT image data followed by interventional bronchoscopy. The physician, with only a mental image inferred from the 3D CT data, must guide the bronchoscope through the bronchial tree to sites of interest. Unfortunately, this procedure depends heavily on the physician's ability to mentally reconstruct the 3D position of the bronchoscope within the airways. In order to assist physicians in performing biopsies of interest, we have developed a method that integrates live bronchoscopic video tracking and 3D CT registration. The proposed method is integrated into a system we have been devising for virtual-bronchoscopic analysis and guidance for lung-cancer assessment. Previously, the system relied on a method that only used registration of the live bronchoscopic video to corresponding virtual endoluminal views derived from the 3D CT data. This procedure only performs the registration at manually selected sites; it does not draw upon the motion information inherent in the bronchoscopic video. Further, the registration procedure is slow. The proposed method has the following advantages: (1) it tracks the 3D motion of the bronchoscope using the bronchoscopic video; (2) it uses the tracked 3D trajectory of the bronchoscope to assist in locating sites in the 3D CT "virtual world" to perform the registration. In addition, the method incorporates techniques to: (1) detect and exclude corrupted video frames (to help make the video tracking more robust); (2) accelerate the computation of the many 3D virtual endoluminal renderings (thus, speeding up the registration process). We have tested the integrated tracking-registration method on a human airway-tree phantom and on real human data.

  3. Experiments in virtual-endoscopic guidance of bronchoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helferty, James P.; Sherbondy, Anthony J.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Turlington, Janice Z.; Hoffman, Eric A.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Higgins, William E.

    2001-05-01

    Transbronchial needle biopsy is a common procedure for early detection of lung cancer. In practice, accurate results are difficult to obtain, since the bronchoscopy procedure requires a blind puncture into a region hidden behind the airway walls. This paper presents an image-guided endoscopy system for procedure preplanning and for guidance during bronchoscopy. Before the bronchoscopy, a 3D CT scan is analyzed to define guidance paths through the major airways to suspect biopsy sites. During subsequent bronchoscopy, the paths give the physician step-by-step guidance to each suspect site location. At a suspect site, a virtual CT image is registered to the bronchoscopic video. Then, the predefined biopsy site, from the prior CT analysis, is rendered onto the registered video. This gives the physician a reference for performing the needle biopsy. This paper focuses on our recent experiments with this system. These experiments involve a rubber phantom model of the human airway tree and in vivo animal tests. The experiments demonstrate the promise of our approach.

  4. Bronchoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    Fiberoptic bronchoscopy; Lung cancer - bronchoscopy; Pneumonia - bronchoscopy; Chronic lung disease - bronchoscopy ... to see the inside of the airways and lungs. The scope can be flexible or rigid. A ...

  5. Interactive CT-Video Registration for the Continuous Guidance of Bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Scott A.; Khare, Rahul; Bascom, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Bronchoscopy is a major step in lung cancer staging. To perform bronchoscopy, the physician uses a procedure plan, derived from a patient’s 3D computed-tomography (CT) chest scan, to navigate the bronchoscope through the lung airways. Unfortunately, physicians vary greatly in their ability to perform bronchoscopy. As a result, image-guided bronchoscopy systems, drawing upon the concept of CT-based virtual bronchoscopy (VB), have been proposed. These systems attempt to register the bronchoscope’s live position within the chest to a CT-based virtual chest space. Recent methods, which register the bronchoscopic video to CT-based endoluminal airway renderings, show promise but do not enable continuous real-time guidance. We present a CT-video registration method inspired by computer-vision innovations in the fields of image alignment and image-based rendering. In particular, motivated by the Lucas–Kanade algorithm, we propose an inverse-compositional framework built around a gradient-based optimization procedure. We next propose an implementation of the framework suitable for image-guided bronchoscopy. Laboratory tests, involving both single frames and continuous video sequences, demonstrate the robustness and accuracy of the method. Benchmark timing tests indicate that the method can run continuously at 300 frames/s, well beyond the real-time bronchoscopic video rate of 30 frames/s. This compares extremely favorably to the ≥1 s/frame speeds of other methods and indicates the method’s potential for real-time continuous registration. A human phantom study confirms the method’s efficacy for real-time guidance in a controlled setting, and, hence, points the way toward the first interactive CT-video registration approach for image-guided bronchoscopy. Along this line, we demonstrate the method’s efficacy in a complete guidance system by presenting a clinical study involving lung cancer patients. PMID:23508260

  6. Tracheal and central bronchial aerodynamics using virtual bronchoscopy and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cebral, Juan R; Summers, Ronald M

    2004-08-01

    Virtual bronchoscopy reconstructions of the airway noninvasively provide useful morphologic information of structural abnormalities such as stenoses and masses. In this paper, we show how virtual bronchoscopy can be used to perform aerodynamic calculations in anatomically realistic models. Pressure and flow patterns in a human airway were computed noninvasively. These showed decreased pressure and increased shear stress in the region of a stenosis.

  7. Comparison of CT and fiberoptic bronchoscopy in the evaluation of bronchial disease.

    PubMed

    Naidich, D P; Lee, J J; Garay, S M; McCauley, D I; Aranda, C P; Boyd, A D

    1987-01-01

    CT was compared to fiberoptic bronchoscopy in a large series of patients to study the value of CT for visualizing bronchial disease. CT scans were available for review in 64 cases in which focal airway disease was identified with fiberoptic bronchoscopy and in 38 patients in whom the airways appeared normal at bronchoscopy. CT was positive in 59 of 64 cases in which lesions were detected endoscopically. If the results are analyzed according to the extent of involvement of individual bronchi, CT successfully identified 88 (90%) of 98 lesions. CT correctly excluded disease in 35 (92%) of 38 cases that were subsequently verified to be normal by fiberoptic bronchoscopy. In no case was the diagnosis of malignancy missed by CT. While extremely accurate in detecting focal lesions, CT was inaccurate in predicting whether a given abnormality was endobronchial, submucosal, or extrinsic (peribronchial). In three cases CT failed to detect submucosal extension into the left mainstream bronchus, which has important implications concerning the value of CT in staging bronchial malignancy. It is concluded that CT is helpful when bronchoscopy is contraindicated or refused. CT may also be used in selected cases when there is low clinical suspicion of endobronchial disease and as a complementary procedure to fiberoptic bronchoscopy for outlining the exact location of major mediastinal and hilar vessels, lymph nodes, and tumor in relation to adjacent airways. PMID:3491497

  8. What is Bronchoscopy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scientists are studying new methods of bronchoscopy, including virtual bronchoscopy. This is a type of computed tomography ( ... around you and take pictures of your lungs. Virtual bronchoscopy still isn’t widely used. Rate This ...

  9. Role of virtual bronchoscopy in the evaluation of bronchial lesions: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Saad Rezk Abudlwahed

    2013-01-01

    Bronchoscopy is an important diagnostic method for the tracheobronchial, thoracic, and mediastinal lesions. It is limited by the physical progression of the bronchoscope. This represents a problem when assessing difficult airways, such as a lumen narrowed from any cause. Bronchoscopy can be performed with flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB), which remains the best modality for the evaluation of endoluminal and mucosal lesions of the respiratory tract. However, FOB has important limitations. It cannot view structures outside the bronchial wall, such as the mediastinal lymph nodes and vascular structures. Additionally, FOB frequently provides little information about the extent of the extraluminal diseases or airway patency distal to high-grade bronchial stenosis. In view of these limitations, some authors have suggested that virtual bronchoscopy (VB) may replace FOB. VB is a novel computed tomography-based imaging technique. It allows a noninvasive intraluminal evaluation of the tracheobronchial tree. In addition to its direct roles in patient care, VB has great potential in education, bronchoscopy training, and procedure planning. VB can be performed when FOB is contraindicated or considered risky, as in cases with airway narrowing. Also, it can be done as a preliminary evaluation before FOB. VB is not effective for the detection of subtle mucosal abnormalities, such as erythema or early sessile lesions. The aim of this pectoral essay is to present overview of VB and the author's experience of using of VB, based on computed tomography data, in diagnosis of different tracheobronchial lesions. PMID:23332136

  10. Automated display of the anatomical name of bronchial branches in a virtual bronchoscopy system and its application as a training tool for medical students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kensaku; Suenaga, Yasuhito; Toriwaki, Jun-ichiro; Hasegawa, Jun-ichi; Anno, Hirofumi; Katada, Kazuhiro; Natori, Hiroshi

    1999-05-01

    This paper proposes a method for automated labeling of the bronchial branches in the virtual bronchoscopy system and its application as a training tool. Virtual Bronchoscopy System (VBS) is a new observation method of 3-D medical images. This system is useful for a variety of purposes such as diagnosis, planning of surgery, informed consent, education and training. By the proposed method the VBS can automatically labels bronchial branches which are extracted from 3-D chest X-ray CT images by the knowledge based processing in the VBS. The knowledge base of the bronchial branch name is constructed. Automated labeling is performed by comparing the tree structure of the extracted bronchus with the knowledge base. The bronchial branch name is displayed in the navigation inside the bronchus. We extended the VBS to a teaching tool by using this function. The system generates questions about bronchial branch name. When the user navigate inside the bronchus by using the VBS, the system presents a question on the virtual endoscopic view and the user answers a question. The proposed method was implemented in our VBS. We confirmed that the method can assign anatomical names to about 90% of bronchial branches extracted from 3-D X-ray CT image automatically. In an extended module for educational use of the VBS, the system could generate questions about branch names and could display them on the virtual endoscopic view automatically.

  11. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the colon using a hand-held squeeze bulb. Sometimes an electronic pump is used to deliver ... When you enter the CT scanner room, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ...

  12. Virtual bronchoscopic approach for combining 3D CT and endoscopic video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherbondy, Anthony J.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Austin, Allen L.; Helferty, James P.; Wan, Shu-Yen; Turlington, Janice Z.; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Chao; Hoffman, Eric A.; McLennan, Geoffrey; Higgins, William E.

    2000-04-01

    To improve the care of lung-cancer patients, we are devising a diagnostic paradigm that ties together three-dimensional (3D) high-resolution computed-tomographic (CT) imaging and bronchoscopy. The system expands upon the new concept of virtual endoscopy that has seen recent application to the chest, colon, and other anatomical regions. Our approach applies computer-graphics and image-processing tools to the analysis of 3D CT chest images and complementary bronchoscopic video. It assumes a two-stage assessment of a lung-cancer patient. During Stage 1 (CT assessment), the physician interacts with a number of visual and quantitative tools to evaluate the patient's 'virtual anatomy' (3D CT scan). Automatic analysis gives navigation paths through major airways and to pre-selected suspect sites. These paths provide useful guidance during Stage-1 CT assessment. While interacting with these paths and other software tools, the user builds a multimedia Case Study, capturing telling snapshot views, movies, and quantitative data. The Case Study contains a report on the CT scan and also provides planning information for subsequent bronchoscopic evaluation. During Stage 2 (bronchoscopy), the physician uses (1) the original CT data, (2) software graphical tools, (3) the Case Study, and (4) a standard bronchoscopy suite to have an augmented vision for bronchoscopic assessment and treatment. To use the two data sources (CT and bronchoscopic video) simultaneously, they must be registered. We perform this registration using both manual interaction and an automated matching approach based on mutual information. We demonstrate our overall progress to date using human CT cases and CT-video from a bronchoscopy- training device.

  13. A novel research platform for electromagnetic navigated bronchoscopy using cone beam CT imaging and an animal model.

    PubMed

    Leira, Håkon Olav; Amundsen, Tore; Tangen, Geir Arne; Bø, Lars Eirik; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Langø, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic guided bronchoscopy is a new field of research, essential for the development of advanced investigation of the airways and lung tissue. Consecutive problem-based solutions and refinements are urgent requisites to achieve improvements. For that purpose, our intention is to build a complete research platform for electromagnetic guided bronchoscopy. The experimental interventional electromagnetic field tracking system in conjunction with a C-arm cone beam CT unit is presented in this paper. The animal model and the navigation platform performed well and the aims were achieved; the 3D localization of foreign bodies and their navigated and tracked removal, assessment of tracking accuracy that showed a high level of precision, and assessment of image quality. The platform may prove to be a suitable platform for further research and development and a full-fledged electromagnetic guided bronchoscopy navigation system. The inclusion of the C-arm cone beam CT unit in the experimental setup adds a number of new possibilities for diagnostic procedures and accuracy measurements. Among other future challenges that need to be solved are the interaction between the C-arm and the electromagnetic navigation field, as we demonstrate in this feasibility study.

  14. Role of virtual and flexible bronchoscopy in the management of a case of unnoticed foreign body aspiration presented as nonresolving pneumonia in an adult female.

    PubMed

    Kshatriya, Ravish Manmohan; Khara, Nimit V; Paliwal, Rajiv P; Patel, Sateesh N

    2016-01-01

    It is not so common to aspirate foreign body in normal adults without any predisposing factors as compared to children and those with the altered neurological state. Endobronchial foreign bodies are one of the causes of obstructive pneumonia and difficult to diagnose as signs and symptoms are often nonspecific. However, once they are diagnosed, they can generally be removed, leading to rapid and drastic resolution of symptoms. Bronchoscopy is the gold standard in the identification and localization of an airway foreign body and also for better management of the ailment. However with the help of virtual bronchoscopy one can decide the location of the foreign body before any invasive intervention and being noninvasive it can be performed in follow-up easily to check the patency of airways. It is not possible to detect the exact size of foreign body with the virtual bronchoscopy. In this article, we report a case of unnoticed foreign body aspiration in a 49-year-old female patient who was initially treated for pneumonia. However, due to nonresolution of opacity contrast enhanced computed tomography thorax with virtual and flexible bronchoscopy were performed, which revealed a foreign body in the right lower lobe bronchus that was removed with biopsy forceps in piecemeal. In her follow-up visit, she underwent virtual broncoscopy that revealed clear airways. Thus, detailed history and high index of suspicion is required for nonresolving pneumonias that may occur due to unnoticed foreign body/ies in an adult. PMID:27578936

  15. Role of virtual and flexible bronchoscopy in the management of a case of unnoticed foreign body aspiration presented as nonresolving pneumonia in an adult female

    PubMed Central

    Kshatriya, Ravish Manmohan; Khara, Nimit V; Paliwal, Rajiv P; Patel, Sateesh N

    2016-01-01

    It is not so common to aspirate foreign body in normal adults without any predisposing factors as compared to children and those with the altered neurological state. Endobronchial foreign bodies are one of the causes of obstructive pneumonia and difficult to diagnose as signs and symptoms are often nonspecific. However, once they are diagnosed, they can generally be removed, leading to rapid and drastic resolution of symptoms. Bronchoscopy is the gold standard in the identification and localization of an airway foreign body and also for better management of the ailment. However with the help of virtual bronchoscopy one can decide the location of the foreign body before any invasive intervention and being noninvasive it can be performed in follow-up easily to check the patency of airways. It is not possible to detect the exact size of foreign body with the virtual bronchoscopy. In this article, we report a case of unnoticed foreign body aspiration in a 49-year-old female patient who was initially treated for pneumonia. However, due to nonresolution of opacity contrast enhanced computed tomography thorax with virtual and flexible bronchoscopy were performed, which revealed a foreign body in the right lower lobe bronchus that was removed with biopsy forceps in piecemeal. In her follow-up visit, she underwent virtual broncoscopy that revealed clear airways. Thus, detailed history and high index of suspicion is required for nonresolving pneumonias that may occur due to unnoticed foreign body/ies in an adult. PMID:27578936

  16. SU-C-BRA-07: Virtual Bronchoscopy-Guided IMRT Planning for Mapping and Avoiding Radiation Injury to the Airway Tree in Lung SAbR

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, A; Modiri, A; Bland, R; Yan, Y; Ahn, C; Timmerman, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Post-treatment radiation injury to central and peripheral airways is a potentially important, yet under-investigated determinant of toxicity in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SAbR). We integrate virtual bronchoscopy technology into the radiotherapy planning process to spatially map and quantify the radiosensitivity of bronchial segments, and propose novel IMRT planning that limits airway dose through non-isotropic intermediate- and low-dose spillage. Methods: Pre- and ∼8.5 months post-SAbR diagnostic-quality CT scans were retrospectively collected from six NSCLC patients (50–60Gy in 3–5 fractions). From each scan, ∼5 branching levels of the bronchial tree were segmented using LungPoint, a virtual bronchoscopic navigation system. The pre-SAbR CT and the segmented bronchial tree were imported into the Eclipse treatment planning system and deformably registered to the planning CT. The five-fraction equivalent dose from the clinically-delivered plan was calculated for each segment using the Universal Survival Curve model. The pre- and post-SAbR CTs were used to evaluate radiation-induced segmental collapse. Two of six patients exhibited significant segmental collapse with associated atelectasis and fibrosis, and were re-planned using IMRT. Results: Multivariate stepwise logistic regression over six patients (81 segments) showed that D0.01cc (minimum point dose within the 0.01cc receiving highest dose) was a significant independent factor associated with collapse (odds-ratio=1.17, p=0.010). The D0.01cc threshold for collapse was 57Gy, above which, collapse rate was 45%. In the two patients exhibiting segmental collapse, 22 out of 32 segments showed D0.01cc >57Gy. IMRT re-planning reduced D0.01cc below 57Gy in 15 of the 22 segments (68%) while simultaneously achieving the original clinical plan objectives for PTV coverage and OAR-sparing. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the administration of lung SAbR can Result in significant injury to

  17. Bronchoscopy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... into the lungs. During a bronchoscopy procedure, a scope will be inserted through the nostril until it ... the airways of the lung (tracheobronchial tree). The scope also allows the doctor to collect lung secretions ...

  18. Laser bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, D R; Harrell, J H

    2001-11-01

    Because the lung cancer epidemic shows no signs of abating, little doubt exists that the need for interventional bronchoscopists will persist for many years to come. The Nd:YAG laser and the rigid bronchoscope remain crucial weapons in the fight against lung cancer. With more than 4000 published interventions pertaining to it, this combination is ideal for treating central airways obstruction. The safety and efficacy of laser bronchoscopy has been well established, and the reported incidence of complications is impressively low. If complications were to arise, a skilled bronchoscopist can manage them easily by using the beneficial attributes of the rigid bronchoscope. Many complications can be avoided by implementing the established safety procedures and techniques. A solid understanding of laser physics and tissue interactions is a necessity to anyone performing laser surgery. The team approach, relying on communication among the bronchoscopist, anesthesiologist, laser technician, and nurses, leads to a safer and more successful procedure. It is important to remember, however, that this is typically a palliative procedure, and therefore the focus should be on alleviating symptoms and improving quality of life. Unfortunately, because not every patient is a candidate for laser bronchoscopy, there are specific characteristics of endobronchial lesions that make them more or less amenable to resection. Each year a promising new technology is being developed, such as argon plasma coagulation, cryotherapy, and endobronchial electrosurgery. Although it is unclear what role these technologies will have, prospective controlled studies must be done to help clarify this question. The future may lay in combining these various technologies along with Nd:YAG laser bronchoscopy to maximize the therapeutic, palliative, and possibly even curative effect. As the experience of the medical community with Nd:YAG laser bronchoscopy continues to grow and as more health-care professionals

  19. Diagnostic bronchoscopy--current and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Leong, Steven; Shaipanich, Tawimas; Lam, Stephen; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2013-10-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Standard bronchoscopy has limited ability to accurately localise and biopsy pulmonary lesions that cannot be directly visualised. The field of advanced diagnostic bronchoscopy is rapidly evolving due to advances in electronics and miniaturisation. Bronchoscopes with smaller outer working diameters, coupled with miniature radial and convex ultrasound probes, allow accurate central and peripheral pulmonary lesion localisation and biopsy while at the same time avoiding vascular structures. Increases in computational processing power allow three-dimensional reconstruction of computed tomographic raw data to enable virtual bronchoscopy (VB), providing the bronchoscopist with a preview of the bronchoscopy prior to the procedure. Navigational bronchoscopy enables targeting of peripheral pulmonary lesions (PPLs) via a "roadmap", similar to in-car global positioning systems. Analysis of lesions on a cellular level is now possible with techniques such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal microscopy (CM). All these tools will hopefully allow earlier and safer lung cancer diagnosis and in turn better patient outcomes. This article describes these new bronchoscopic techniques and reviews the relevant literature.

  20. Virtual anthropology and forensic identification using multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Dedouit, F; Savall, F; Mokrane, F-Z; Rousseau, H; Crubézy, E; Rougé, D; Telmon, N

    2014-04-01

    Virtual anthropology is made possible by modern cross-sectional imaging. Multislice CT (MSCT) can be used for comparative bone and dental identification, reconstructive identification and lesion identification. Comparative identification, the comparison of ante- and post-mortem imaging data, can be performed on both teeth and bones. Reconstructive identification, a considerable challenge for the radiologist, identifies the deceased by determining sex, geographical origin, stature and age at death. Lesion identification combines virtual autopsy and virtual anthropology. MSCT can be useful in palaeopathology, seeking arthropathy, infection, oral pathology, trauma, tumours, haematological disorders, stress indicators or occupational stress in bones and teeth. We examine some of the possibilities offered by this new radiological subspeciality that adds a new dimension to the work of the forensic radiologist. A multidisciplinary approach is crucial and involves communication and data exchange between radiologists, forensic pathologists, anthropologists and radiographers.

  1. Virtual anthropology and forensic identification using multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Savall, F; Mokrane, F-Z; Rousseau, H; Crubézy, E; Rougé, D; Telmon, N

    2014-01-01

    Virtual anthropology is made possible by modern cross-sectional imaging. Multislice CT (MSCT) can be used for comparative bone and dental identification, reconstructive identification and lesion identification. Comparative identification, the comparison of ante- and post-mortem imaging data, can be performed on both teeth and bones. Reconstructive identification, a considerable challenge for the radiologist, identifies the deceased by determining sex, geographical origin, stature and age at death. Lesion identification combines virtual autopsy and virtual anthropology. MSCT can be useful in palaeopathology, seeking arthropathy, infection, oral pathology, trauma, tumours, haematological disorders, stress indicators or occupational stress in bones and teeth. We examine some of the possibilities offered by this new radiological subspeciality that adds a new dimension to the work of the forensic radiologist. A multidisciplinary approach is crucial and involves communication and data exchange between radiologists, forensic pathologists, anthropologists and radiographers. PMID:24234584

  2. Anaesthesia for bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Meenu; Kulshrestha, Mayank; Biyani, Alok

    2015-01-01

    Bronchoscopy as an investigation or therapeutic procedure demands anaesthesiologist to act accordingly. The present review will take the reader from rigid to fibreoptic flexible bronchoscopy. These procedures are now done as day care procedures in the operation theatre or in critical care units. Advantages and limitations of both rigid and flexible bronchoscopy are analysed. Recently, conscious sedation has come up as the commonly used anaesthetic technique for simple bronchoscopic procedures. However, general anaesthesia still remains a standard technique for more complex procedures. New advances in the field of anaesthesiology such as use of short acting opioids, use of newer drugs such as dexmedetomidine, supraglottic airways and mechanical jet ventilators have facilitated and eased the conduct of the procedure. PMID:26556915

  3. Immersive virtual reality for visualization of abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiufeng; Xu, Zhoubing; Li, Bo; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin; Landman, Bennett A.; Bodenheimer, Robert E.

    2013-03-01

    Immersive virtual environments use a stereoscopic head-mounted display and data glove to create high fidelity virtual experiences in which users can interact with three-dimensional models and perceive relationships at their true scale. This stands in stark contrast to traditional PACS-based infrastructure in which images are viewed as stacks of two dimensional slices, or, at best, disembodied renderings. Although there has substantial innovation in immersive virtual environments for entertainment and consumer media, these technologies have not been widely applied in clinical applications. Here, we consider potential applications of immersive virtual environments for ventral hernia patients with abdominal computed tomography imaging data. Nearly a half million ventral hernias occur in the United States each year, and hernia repair is the most commonly performed general surgery operation worldwide. A significant problem in these conditions is communicating the urgency, degree of severity, and impact of a hernia (and potential repair) on patient quality of life. Hernias are defined by ruptures in the abdominal wall (i.e., the absence of healthy tissues) rather than a growth (e.g., cancer); therefore, understanding a hernia necessitates understanding the entire abdomen. Our environment allows surgeons and patients to view body scans at scale and interact with these virtual models using a data glove. This visualization and interaction allows users to perceive the relationship between physical structures and medical imaging data. The system provides close integration of PACS-based CT data with immersive virtual environments and creates opportunities to study and optimize interfaces for patient communication, operative planning, and medical education.

  4. Bronchoscopy of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Emslander, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cancer site in men and women with a high incidence and mortality rate. Most patients are diagnosed when the disease has already spread. An early, detection and immediate and accurate histological or cytological diagnosis are essential for a hopeful outcome. In most patients, bronchoscopy is the method of choice in establishing a suspected lung neoplasm. With the rigid and flexible method, two complementary techniques are available. The methods bear a very low mortality rate if sufficient monitoring and resuscitative instrumentation is available. Rigid bronchoscopy offers the possibility of obtaining large biopsy specimens from the tumorous tissue and provides an effective tool in the control of major haemorrhage. However, it cannot be used for the inspection of further peripherally located parts of the bronchial system and needs general anaesthesia. In contrast, the flexible method can be quickly and readily performed at practically any location using portable equipment. Bronchi can be inspected up to the 8th order and with bronchial washing, forceps biopsy, brush biopsy and fluorescence bronchoscopy techniques with a high diagnostic yield are available. This holds true, especially if these sampling techniques are used as complementary methods. PMID:18493335

  5. Hands-Free System for Bronchoscopy Planning and Guidance.

    PubMed

    Khare, Rahul; Bascom, Rebecca; Higgins, William E

    2015-12-01

    Bronchoscopy is a commonly used minimally invasive procedure for lung-cancer staging. In standard practice, however, physicians differ greatly in their levels of performance. To address this concern, image-guided intervention (IGI) systems have been devised to improve procedure success. Current IGI bronchoscopy systems based on virtual bronchoscopic navigation (VBN), however, require involvement from the attending technician. This lessens physician control and hinders the overall acceptance of such systems. We propose a hands-free VBN system for planning and guiding bronchoscopy. The system introduces two major contributions. First, it incorporates a new procedure-planning method that automatically computes airway navigation plans conforming to the physician's bronchoscopy training and manual dexterity. Second, it incorporates a guidance strategy for bronchoscope navigation that enables user-friendly system control via a foot switch, coupled with a novel position-verification mechanism. Phantom studies verified that the system enables smooth operation under physician control, while also enabling faster navigation than an existing technician-assisted VBN system. In a clinical human study, we noted a 97% bronchoscopy navigation success rate, in line with existing VBN systems, and a mean guidance time per diagnostic site = 52 s. This represents a guidance time often nearly 3 min faster per diagnostic site than guidance times reported for other technician-assisted VBN systems. Finally, an ergonomic study further asserts the system's acceptability to the physician and long-term potential.

  6. Bronchoscopy guidance system based on bronchoscope-motion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, Duane C.; Higgins, William E.

    2012-02-01

    Bronchoscopy-guidance systems assist physicians during bronchoscope navigation. However, these systems require an attending technician and fail to continuously track the bronchoscope. We propose a real-time technicianfree bronchoscopy-guidance system that employs continuous tracking. For guidance, our system presents directions on virtual views that are generated from the bronchoscope's tracked location. The system achieves bronchoscope tracking using a strategy that is based on a recently proposed method for sensor-based bronchoscope-motion tracking.1 Furthermore, a graphical indicator notifies the physician when he/she has maneuvered the bronchoscope to an incorrect branch. Our proposed system uses the sensor data to generate virtual views through multiple candidate routes and employs image matching in a Bayesian framework to determine the most probable bronchoscope pose. Tests based on laboratory phantoms validate the potential of the system.

  7. Bronchoscopy Simulation: A Brief Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davoudi, Mohsen; Colt, Henri G.

    2009-01-01

    More than 500,000 flexible bronchoscopies are performed annually by chest physicians in the United States (Ernst et al., Chest 123:1693-1717, 2003). Indications include diagnosis of lung cancer and airway tumors, benign strictures, pulmonary infections, and treatment of central airway obstruction, emphysema, and intraepithelial lesions such as…

  8. Multimodal system for the planning and guidance of bronchoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, William E.; Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Zang, Xiaonan; Byrnes, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Many technical innovations in multimodal radiologic imaging and bronchoscopy have emerged recently in the effort against lung cancer. Modern X-ray computed-tomography (CT) scanners provide three-dimensional (3D) high-resolution chest images, positron emission tomography (PET) scanners give complementary molecular imaging data, and new integrated PET/CT scanners combine the strengths of both modalities. State-of-the-art bronchoscopes permit minimally invasive tissue sampling, with vivid endobronchial video enabling navigation deep into the airway-tree periphery, while complementary endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) reveals local views of anatomical structures outside the airways. In addition, image-guided intervention (IGI) systems have proven their utility for CT-based planning and guidance of bronchoscopy. Unfortunately, no IGI system exists that integrates all sources effectively through the complete lung-cancer staging work flow. This paper presents a prototype of a computer-based multimodal IGI system that strives to fill this need. The system combines a wide range of automatic and semi-automatic image-processing tools for multimodal data fusion and procedure planning. It also provides a flexible graphical user interface for follow-on guidance of bronchoscopy/EBUS. Human-study results demonstrate the system's potential.

  9. Bronchoscopy as a supplement to computed tomography in patients with haemoptysis may be unnecessary

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Klaus; Gottlieb, Magnus; Colella, Sara; Saghir, Zaigham; Larsen, Klaus R.; Clementsen, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Haemoptysis is a common symptom and can be an early sign of lung cancer. Careful investigation of patients with haemoptysis may lead to early diagnosis. The strategy for investigation of these patients, however, is still being debated. Objectives We studied whether the combination of computed tomography (CT) and bronchoscopy had a higher sensitivity for malignant and non-malignant causes of haemoptysis than CT alone. Methods The study was a retrospective, non-randomised, two-centre study and included patients who were referred from primary care for the investigation of haemoptysis. Results A total of 326 patients were included in the study (mean age 60.5 [SD 15.3] years, 63.3% male). The most common aetiologies of haemoptysis were cryptogenic (52.5%), pneumonia (16.3%), emphysema (8.0%), bronchiectasis (5.8%) and lung cancer (4.0%). In patients diagnosed with lung cancer, bronchoscopy, CT and the combination of bronchoscopy and CT had a sensitivity of 0.61, 0.92 (p<0.05) and 0.97 (p=0.58), respectively. In patients with non-malignant causes of haemoptysis, most aetiologies were diagnosed by CT and comprised mainly pneumonia, emphysema and bronchiectasis. Bronchoscopy did not reveal these conditions and the sensitivity to these conditions was not increased by combining CT and bronchoscopy. Conclusions CT can stand alone as a diagnostic workup for patients with haemoptysis referred to an outpatient clinic. Bronchoscopy does not identify any malignant aetiologies not already diagnosed by CT. Combining the two test modalities does not result in a significant increase in sensitivity for malignant or non-malignant causes of haemoptysis. PMID:27343164

  10. [CT and MR virtual colonscopy: indications, limits and comparison with conventional colonscopy].

    PubMed

    Bertini, L; Campagnano, S; Lanciotti, S; Fiorello, S; Fabiani, B; Graziani, M G; Gualdi, G F

    2006-01-01

    Virtual endoscopy is a new method for studying the colon; it consists in acquisition of CT and MR images and to elaborate them with a workstation, to create endoluminal vision as like as traditional colonscopy, permitting the complete exploration of colonic lumen, also with stenotic tumors. The analysis of the differences between CT and MR colography shows like these two techniques present both advantages and disadvantages, such as the impossibility to perform MR in patients with pace-maker or in claustrophobic patients and the impossibility to perform CT with iodated agents in patients with renal failure or with a story of adverse reactions. The increased use of these techniques is due to the high sensitivity of last-generation CT and MR machine, to the increased spatial resolution, to specific softwares for digital cleaning of colon, to the introduction of high-end workstations and to the possibility of computed assisted diagnosis (CAD). So, it is desiderable that the increasing spread of multidetector CT devices and the future technical innovations, should have the effect to increase culture and experience in various diagnostic centers about CT-colography, making possible the spreading of virtual endoscopy as a screening tool.

  11. A virtual source model for Kilo-voltage cone beam CT: Source characteristics and model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Spezi, E.; Volken, W.; Frei, D.; Fix, M. K.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to study the source characteristics of a clinical kilo-voltage cone beam CT unit and to develop and validate a virtual source model that could be used for treatment planning purposes. Methods: We used a previously commissioned full Monte Carlo model and new bespoke software to study the source characteristics of a clinical kilo-voltage cone beam CT (CBCT) unit. We identified the main particle sources, their spatial, energy and angular distribution for all the image acquisition presets currently used in our clinical practice. This includes a combination of two energies (100 and 120 kVp), two filters (neutral and bowtie), and eight different x-ray beam apertures. We subsequently built a virtual source model which we validated against full Monte Carlo calculations. Results: We found that the radiation output of the clinical kilo-voltage cone beam CT unit investigated in this study could be reproduced with a virtual model comprising of two sources (target and filtration cone) or three sources (target, filtration cone and bowtie filter) when additional filtration was used. With this model, we accounted for more than 97% of the photons exiting the unit. Each source in our model was characterised by a origin distribution in both X and Y directions, a fluence map, a single energy spectrum for unfiltered beams and a two dimensional energy spectrum for bowtie filtered beams. The percentage dose difference between full Monte Carlo and virtual source model based dose distributions was well within the statistical uncertainty associated with the calculations ( {+-} 2%, one standard deviation) in all cases studied. Conclusions: The virtual source that we developed is accurate in calculating the dose delivered from a commercial kilo-voltage cone beam CT unit operating with routine clinical image acquisition settings. Our data have also shown that target, filtration cone, and bowtie filter sources needed to be all included in the model

  12. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F; Long, Daniel J; Bolch, Wesley E; Liu, Bob; Xu, X George

    2015-07-21

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose--a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the 'software as a service (SaaS)' delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose's functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT-two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations.

  13. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F.; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Liu, Bob; Xu, X. George

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose—a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the ‘software as a service (SaaS)’ delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose’s functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT—two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations.

  14. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F; Long, Daniel J; Bolch, Wesley E; Liu, Bob; Xu, X George

    2015-07-21

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose--a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the 'software as a service (SaaS)' delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose's functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT-two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations. PMID:26134511

  15. Automatic Segmentation and Online virtualCT in Head-and-Neck Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Peroni, Marta; Ciardo, Delia; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Riboldi, Marco; Comi, Stefania; Alterio, Daniela; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop and validate an efficient and automatic strategy to generate online virtual computed tomography (CT) scans for adaptive radiation therapy (ART) in head-and-neck (HN) cancer treatment. Method: We retrospectively analyzed 20 patients, treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), for an HN malignancy. Different anatomical structures were considered: mandible, parotid glands, and nodal gross tumor volume (nGTV). We generated 28 virtualCT scans by means of nonrigid registration of simulation computed tomography (CTsim) and cone beam CT images (CBCTs), acquired for patient setup. We validated our approach by considering the real replanning CT (CTrepl) as ground truth. We computed the Dice coefficient (DSC), center of mass (COM) distance, and root mean square error (RMSE) between correspondent points located on the automatically segmented structures on CBCT and virtualCT. Results: Residual deformation between CTrepl and CBCT was below one voxel. Median DSC was around 0.8 for mandible and parotid glands, but only 0.55 for nGTV, because of the fairly homogeneous surrounding soft tissues and of its small volume. Median COM distance and RMSE were comparable with image resolution. No significant correlation between RMSE and initial or final deformation was found. Conclusion: The analysis provides evidence that deformable image registration may contribute significantly in reducing the need of full CT-based replanning in HN radiation therapy by supporting swift and objective decision-making in clinical practice. Further work is needed to strengthen algorithm potential in nGTV localization.

  16. [Electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy for the assessment of peripheral lung nodules].

    PubMed

    Gex, Grégoire; Montet, Xavier; Rochat, Thierry; Gasche-Soccal, Paola M

    2010-11-24

    Among recent technological progress, electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy (ENB), based on the principle of "GPS", allows the bronchoscopist to reach parenchymal lesions situated beyond the field of regular bronchoscopy. Compared to CT-scan guided transthoracic needle aspiration, the yield is lower (65%). However, the rate of complication (pneumothorax, hemorrhage) is significantly lower and the patient is not irradiated. Moreover, the yield remains stable also for cases associated to a lower yield of the transthoracic approach (small and/or deep and/or benign lesion). Beyond the diagnosis of peripheral lung nodules, ENB (alone or in combination with endobronchial ultrasound) is also an efficient and safe tool for disease staging by simultaneous (during the same procedure) sampling of associated hypermetabolic lymph nodes.

  17. On proton CT reconstruction using MVCT-converted virtual proton projections

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dongxu; Mackie, T. Rockwell; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To describe a novel methodology of converting megavoltage x-ray projections into virtual proton projections that are otherwise missing due to the proton range limit. These converted virtual proton projections can be used in the reconstruction of proton computed tomography (pCT). Methods: Relations exist between proton projections and multispectral megavoltage x-ray projections for human tissue. Based on these relations, these tissues can be categorized into: (a) adipose tissue; (b) nonadipose soft tissues; and (c) bone. These three tissue categories can be visibly identified on a regular megavoltage x-ray computed tomography (MVCT) image. With an MVCT image and its projection data available, the x-ray projections through heterogeneous anatomy can be converted to the corresponding proton projections using predetermined calibration curves for individual materials, aided by a coarse segmentation on the x-ray CT image. To show the feasibility of this approach, mathematical simulations were carried out. The converted proton projections, plotted on a proton sinogram, were compared to the simulated ground truth. Proton stopping power images were reconstructed using either the virtual proton projections only or a blend of physically available proton projections and virtual proton projections that make up for those missing due to the range limit. These images were compared to a reference image reconstructed from theoretically calculated proton projections. Results: The converted virtual projections had an uncertainty of {+-}0.8% compared to the calculated ground truth. Proton stopping power images reconstructed using a blend of converted virtual projections (48%) and physically available projections (52%) had an uncertainty of {+-}0.86% compared with that reconstructed from theoretically calculated projections. Reconstruction solely from converted virtual proton projections had an uncertainty of {+-}1.1% compared with that reconstructed from theoretical projections

  18. TU-F-18A-09: CT Number Stability Across Patient Sizes Using Virtual-Monoenergetic Dual-Energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Michalak, G; Grimes, J; Fletcher, J; McCollough, C; Halaweish, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Virtual-monoenergetic imaging uses dual-energy CT data to synthesize images corresponding to a single photon energy, thereby reducing beam-hardening artifacts. This work evaluated the ability of a commercial virtual-monoenergetic algorithm to achieve stable CT numbers across patient sizes. Methods: Test objects containing a range of iodine and calcium hydroxyapatite concentrations were placed inside 8 torso-shaped water phantoms, ranging in lateral width from 15 to 50 cm, and scanned on a dual-source CT system (Siemens Somatom Force). Single-energy scans were acquired from 70-150 kV in 10 kV increments; dual-energy scans were acquired using 4 energy pairs (low energy: 70, 80, 90, and 100 kV; high energy: 150 kV + 0.6 mm Sn). CTDIvol was matched for all single- and dual-energy scans for a given phantom size. All scans used 128×0.6 mm collimation and were reconstructed with 1-mm thickness at 0.8-mm increment and a medium smooth body kernel. Monoenergetic images were generated using commercial software (syngo Via Dual Energy, VA30). Iodine contrast was calculated as the difference in mean iodine and water CT numbers from respective regions-of-interest in 10 consecutive images. Results: CT numbers remained stable as phantom width varied from 15 to 50 cm for all dual-energy data sets (except for at 50 cm using 70/150Sn due to photon starvation effects). Relative to the 15 cm phantom, iodine contrast was within 5.2% of the 70 keV value for phantom sizes up to 45 cm. At 90/150Sn, photon starvation did not occur at 50 cm, and iodine contrast in the 50-cm phantom was within 1.4% of the 15-cm phantom. Conclusion: Monoenergetic imaging, as implemented in the evaluated commercial system, eliminated the variation in CT numbers due to patient size, and may provide more accurate data for quantitative tasks, including radiation therapy treatment planning. Siemens Healthcare.

  19. Value of Virtual Colonoscopy with 64 Row CT in Evaluation of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Łasecki, Mateusz; Nienartowicz, Ewa; Pelak, Joanna; Słonina, Joanna; Olchowy, Cyprian; Ścieżka, Marek; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Virtual colonoscopy (VC) enables three-dimensional view of walls and internal lumen of the colon as a result of reconstruction of multislice CT images. The role of VC in diagnosis of the colon abnormalities systematically increases, and in many medical centers all over the world is carried out as a screening test of patients with high risk of colorectal cancer. Material/Methods We analyzed results of virtual colonoscopy of 360 patients with clinical suspicion of colorectal cancer. Sensitivity and specificity of CT colonoscopy for detection of colon cancers and polyps were assessed. Results Results of our research have shown high diagnostic efficiency of CT colonoscopy in detection of focal lesions in large intestine of 10 mm or more diameter. Sensitivity was 85.7%, specificity 89.2%. Conclusions Virtual colonoscopy is noninvasive and well tolerated by patients imaging method, which permits for early detection of the large intestine lesions with specificity and sensitivity similar to classical colonoscopy in screening exams in patients suspected for colorectal cancer. Good preparation of the patients for the examination is very important for proper diagnosis and interpretation of this imaginge procedure. PMID:25302086

  20. CT virtual endoscopy and 3D stereoscopic visualisation in the evaluation of coronary stenting.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z; Lawrence-Brown

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this case report is to present the additional value provided by CT virtual endoscopy and 3D stereoscopic visualisation when compared with 2D visualisations in the assessment of coronary stenting. A 64-year old patient was treated with left coronary stenting 8 years ago and recently followed up with multidetector row CT angiography. An in-stent restenosis of the left coronary artery was suspected based on 2D axial and multiplanar reformatted images. 3D virtual endoscopy was generated to demonstrate the smooth intraluminal surface of coronary artery wall, and there was no evidence of restenosis or intraluminal irregularity. Virtual fly-through of the coronary artery was produced to examine the entire length of the coronary artery with the aim of demonstrating the intraluminal changes following placement of the coronary stent. In addition, stereoscopic views were generated to show the relationship between coronary artery branches and the coronary stent. In comparison with traditional 2D visualisations, virtual endoscopy was useful for assessment of the intraluminal appearance of the coronary artery wall following coronary stent implantation, while stereoscopic visualisation improved observers' understanding of the complex cardiac structures. Thus, both methods could be used as a complementary tool in cardiac imaging.

  1. Virtual Non-Contrast CT Using Dual-Energy Spectral CT: Feasibility of Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inyoung; Yi, Jeong Geun; Park, Jeong Hee; Kim, Sung Mok; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of coronary artery calcium scoring based on three virtual noncontrast-enhanced (VNC) images derived from single-source spectral dual-energy CT (DECT) as compared with true noncontrast-enhanced (TNC) images. Materials and Methods This prospective study was conducted with the approval of our Institutional Review Board. Ninety-seven patients underwent noncontrast CT followed by contrast-enhanced chest CT using single-source spectral DECT. Iodine eliminated VNC images were reconstructed using two kinds of 2-material decomposition algorithms (material density iodine-water pair [MDW], material density iodine-calcium pair [MDC]) and a material suppressed algorithm (material suppressed iodine [MSI]). Two readers independently quantified calcium on VNC and TNC images. The Spearman correlation coefficient test and Bland-Altman method were used for statistical analyses. Results Coronary artery calcium scores from all three VNC images showed excellent correlation with those from the TNC images (Spearman's correlation coefficient [ρ] = 0.94, 0.88, and 0.89 for MDW, MDC, and MSI, respectively; p < 0.001 for all pairs). Measured coronary calcium volumes from VNC images also correlated well with those from TNC images (ρ = 0.92, 0.87, and 0.91 for MDW, MDC, and MSI, respectively; p < 0.001 for all pairs). Among the three VNC images, coronary calcium from MDW correlated best with that from TNC. The coronary artery calcium scores and volumes were significantly lower from the VNC images than from the TNC images (p < 0.001 for all pairs). Conclusion The use of VNC images from contrast-enhanced CT using dual-energy material decomposition/suppression is feasible for coronary calcium scoring. The absolute value from VNC tends to be smaller than that from TNC. PMID:27134521

  2. Accelerated idioventricular rhythm during flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Borgeat, A.; Chiolero, R.; Mosimann, B.; Freeman, J.

    1987-03-01

    We report the case of a patient who developed severe hypoxemia and an unusual arrhythmia, accelerated idioventricular rhythm, during flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Coronary artery disease was subsequently suspected despite an unremarkable history and physical examination, and confirmed by a thallium 201 imaging. The appearance of accelerated idioventricular rhythm during fiberoptic bronchoscopy should raise the possibility of underlying coronary artery disease.

  3. Virtual monochromatic spectral imaging with fast kilovoltage switching: reduction of metal artifacts at CT.

    PubMed

    Pessis, Eric; Campagna, Raphaël; Sverzut, Jean-Michel; Bach, Fabienne; Rodallec, Mathieu; Guerini, Henri; Feydy, Antoine; Drapé, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    With arthroplasty being increasingly used to relieve joint pain, imaging of patients with metal implants can represent a significant part of the clinical work load in the radiologist's daily practice. Computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the postoperative evaluation of patients who are suspected of having metal prosthesis-related problems such as aseptic loosening, bone resorption or osteolysis, infection, dislocation, metal hardware failure, or periprosthetic bone fracture. Despite advances in detector technology and computer software, artifacts from metal implants can seriously degrade the quality of CT images, sometimes to the point of making them diagnostically unusable. Several factors may help reduce the number and severity of artifacts at multidetector CT, including decreasing the detector collimation and pitch, increasing the kilovolt peak and tube charge, and using appropriate reconstruction algorithms and section thickness. More recently, dual-energy CT has been proposed as a means of reducing beam-hardening artifacts. The use of dual-energy CT scanners allows the synthesis of virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images. Monochromatic images depict how the imaged object would look if the x-ray source produced x-ray photons at only a single energy level. For this reason, VMS imaging is expected to provide improved image quality by reducing beam-hardening artifacts.

  4. Pictorial review of colonic polyp and mass distortion and recognition with the CT virtual dissection technique.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Kevin N; Fidler, Jeff L; Fletcher, Joel G; Maccarty, Robert; Johnson, C Daniel

    2010-09-01

    Virtual dissection is a three-dimensional (3D) display technique for CT colonography that could potentially reduce interpretation times. With virtual dissection, the 3D model of the colon is "sliced" open along a centerline trace, rendering a 360° view of the endoluminal mucosa as a rectangular image. However, one must be familiar with several pitfalls and limitations to avoid errors in interpretation. One of the main limitations is the anatomic distortion that results. Polyp shape and colonic folds can be distorted and colonic or polyp mobility can lead to mischaracterization of polyps. Distorted folds, which frequently occur at flexures, can mimic polyps. Annular constricting masses can lead to skip areas, where the abnormality is not displayed. Various entities including diverticula and stool can mimic polyps at virtual dissection. Finally, technical errors such as an inadequate centerline trace can render a polyp occult. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the spectrum of appearances of polyps at virtual dissection, with an emphasis on more difficult to detect polyps. In addition, 10 interactive virtual dissection quiz cases are presented along with corresponding two-dimensional and 3D endoluminal fly-through views.

  5. Anesthesia for adult rigid bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Dincq, A S; Gourdin, M; Collard, E; Ocak, S; D'Odémont, J P; Dahlqvist, C; Lacrosse, D; Putz, L

    2014-01-01

    Rigid bronchoscopy under general anesthesia enables performing diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures in the tracheobronchial tree. This technique is characterized by specific technical problems, insofar as the anesthesiologist and the operators share the same space, namely the airway. Several potential complications (hemorrhage inside the airway, threat to ventilation ...) may arise. These challenges render the ability to use the variable available techniques essential, as well as knowledge of the complications they could entail, and the ability to rapidly solve them. General anesthesia is usually total intravenous anesthesia, using short acting agents. Ventilation can be spontaneous, but more often insured using high-frequency jet ventilation. The hospital infrastructure and staff must have the expertise to perform this particular procedure, in order to limit the complication rate. PMID:25508517

  6. Anesthesia for adult rigid bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Dincq, A S; Gourdin, M; Collard, E; Ocak, S; D'Odémont, J P; Dahlqvist, C; Lacrosse, D; Putz, L

    2014-01-01

    Rigid bronchoscopy under general anesthesia enables performing diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures in the tracheobronchial tree. This technique is characterized by specific technical problems, insofar as the anesthesiologist and the operators share the same space, namely the airway. Several potential complications (hemorrhage inside the airway, threat to ventilation ...) may arise. These challenges render the ability to use the variable available techniques essential, as well as knowledge of the complications they could entail, and the ability to rapidly solve them. General anesthesia is usually total intravenous anesthesia, using short acting agents. Ventilation can be spontaneous, but more often insured using high-frequency jet ventilation. The hospital infrastructure and staff must have the expertise to perform this particular procedure, in order to limit the complication rate. PMID:25470890

  7. Participation in research bronchoscopy: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Martinsen, Einar Marius Hjellestad; Leiten, Elise Orvedal; Bakke, Per Sigvald; Eagan, Tomas Mikal Lind; Grønseth, Rune

    2016-01-01

    Bronchoscopy is the preferred method for collecting biological samples from the lower airways of subjects in clinical research. However, ensuring participation in clinical research can be challenging when the research includes an invasive procedure. For this report we reviewed the literature to look for information on participation in research bronchoscopy studies to better design our own study, the Bergen COPD Microbiome study (MicroCOPD). We performed a systematic literature search on participation in research bronchoscopy studies in February 2014 using the search engines of PubMed and EMBASE. The literature search resulted in seven relevant papers. Motivation was an end point in six of the seven papers, but reasons for declining participation and recruitment strategies also seemed important. Human subjects participate in research bronchoscopy studies for personal benefit and altruistic reasons. Inconvenience associated with research, in addition to fear of procedures, is considered a barrier. Radio, especially news stations, generated the most inquiries for a clinical study involving bronchoscopy. There is a lack of information on participation in research bronchoscopy studies in the literature. A bronchoscopy study has been initiated at Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway, to examine the role of the microbiome in COPD, and participation will be explored as a substudy. PMID:26847517

  8. Initial staging of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. What is the place of bronchoscopy and upper GI endoscopy?

    PubMed

    Page, Cyril; Lucas-Gourdet, Emily; Biet-Hornstein, Aurélie; Strunski, Vladimir

    2015-03-01

    To determine the place of bronchoscopy and upper GI endoscopy in the initial staging of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). A 10-year retrospective study was conducted on a series of 838 patients. As part of initial staging of the tumor, all patients were examined by neck and chest CT scan, 487 patients were examined by bronchoscopy and 588 patients were examined by upper GI endoscopy. Esophageal cancer was detected in 4.25 % of cases and lung cancer in 6.35 % of cases. Chest CT scan was statistically superior to bronchoscopy to detect second lung cancers (p < 0.05). On multivariate analysis, oral cancers (p = 0.009) and multiple (synchronous) HNSCC (p = 0.009) were associated with the presence of a second lung cancer. Systematic bronchoscopy (performed by a pulmonologist) might not to be indicated for initial staging of HNSCC, particularly in the presence of normal chest CT scan. In case of abnormal Chest CT scan, patients should be referred to a pulmonologist. However, as oral cancers and multiple (synchronous) HNSCCs were statistically associated with the presence of a second lung cancer in this study, bronchoscopy might be indicated in these cases in order to detect rare small proximal bronchic lesions which might be invisible on chest CT scan in these patients at risk. More, systematic upper GI endoscopy (performed by a gastroenterologist) for initial staging of HNSCC might also not to be indicated in a majority of cases. PMID:24682611

  9. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source dual-energy CT: Radiation dose and image quality

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lifeng; Christner, Jodie A.; Leng Shuai; Wang Jia; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the image quality of virtual monochromatic images synthesized from dual-source dual-energy computed tomography (CT) in comparison with conventional polychromatic single-energy CT for the same radiation dose. Methods: In dual-energy CT, besides the material-specific information, one may also synthesize monochromatic images at different energies, which can be used for routine diagnosis similar to conventional polychromatic single-energy images. In this work, the authors assessed whether virtual monochromatic images generated from dual-source CT scanners had an image quality similar to that of polychromatic single-energy images for the same radiation dose. First, the authors provided a theoretical analysis of the optimal monochromatic energy for either the minimum noise level or the highest iodine contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for a given patient size and dose partitioning between the low- and high-energy scans. Second, the authors performed an experimental study on a dual-source CT scanner to evaluate the noise and iodine CNR in monochromatic images. A thoracic phantom with three sizes of attenuating rings was used to represent four adult sizes. For each phantom size, three dose partitionings between the low-energy (80 kV) and the high-energy (140 kV) scans were used in the dual-energy scan. Monochromatic images at eight energies (40 to 110 keV) were generated for each scan. Phantoms were also scanned at each of the four polychromatic single energy (80, 100, 120, and 140 kV) with the same radiation dose. Results: The optimal virtual monochromatic energy depends on several factors: phantom size, partitioning of the radiation dose between low- and high-energy scans, and the image quality metrics to be optimized. With the increase of phantom size, the optimal monochromatic energy increased. With the increased percentage of radiation dose on the low energy scan, the optimal monochromatic energy decreased. When maximizing the iodine CNR in

  10. Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy in Greek children

    PubMed Central

    Kirvassilis, F; Gidaris, D; Ventouri, M; Zampouri, A; Mylona, M; Keramidiotis, A; Kontakiotis, Th; Tsanakas, I

    2011-01-01

    Background and aim: Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FFB) is one of the most important procedures in paediatric pulmonology. To the best of our knowledge there is no review - audit summarising the experience with FFB in children in Greece. We therefore analysed retrospectively all FFBs performed by the paediatric pulmonology team in our hospital in order to analyse indications for bronchoscopy in our population, explore diagnostic yield for each indication and highlight potential complications. Material - Methods: Three hundred and sixteen (316) diagnostic FFBs performed in 305 children during a six years period were retrospectively analysed. Results: Seventy five (75) % of bronchoscopies had a meaningful outcome. Diagnostic yield for individual indications ranged from 41% to 91%. Stridor was the most rewarding indication (91%). Fever was the most common side effect (7%). The rest of complications were in small numbers and easily reversible. Conclusions: Bronchoscopy is a safe procedure and in our diverse population the overall diagnostic yield was 75%. PMID:24391411

  11. Complications of bronchoscopy: A concise synopsis

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, David L; Richard, Kathleen M; Papadimos, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Flexible and rigid bronchoscopes are used in diagnosis, therapeutics, and palliation. While their use is widespread, effective, and generally safe; there are numerous potential complications that can occur. Mechanical complications of bronchoscopy are primarily related to airway manipulations or bleeding. Systemic complications arise from the procedure itself, medication administration (primarily sedation), or patient comorbidities. Attributable mortality rates remain low at < 0.1% for fiberoptic and rigid bronchoscopy. Here we review the complications (classified as mechanical or systemic) of both rigid and flexible bronchoscopy in hope of making practitioners who are operators of these tools, and those who consult others for interventions, aware of potential problems, and pitfalls in order to enhance patient safety and comfort. PMID:26557489

  12. Navigation systems based on registration of endoscopic and CT-derived virtual images for bronchofiberoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Turcza, Paweł; Duplaga, Mariusz

    2004-01-01

    Bronchofiberoscopy is an essential diagnostic procedure in patients with lung cancer. Sampling methods employed during endoscopy of the respiratory tract are performed with the aim of diagnosis confirmation and staging. Transbronchial needle aspiration may be used for evaluation of lymph nodes neighbouring with trachea and bronchi. Many efforts have been undertaken to increase the sensitivity of this procedure including the application of endobronchial ultrasonography. In recent years several research groups have proposed models of navigating systems to provide computer assistance during bronchoscopic interventions. Although they have used different techniques, their objective was the same - enabling tracking location and movement of bronchofiberoscope tip with reference to previously-acquired computed tomography (CT) images. Since a fiber-optic bronchoscope is a rather long and flexible device, determination of its tip location is not an easy task. The adoption of optical tracking methods used in neurosurgery or laparoscopic surgery to endoscopy of the tracheobronchial tree is usually not possible. Another obstacle is related to the fact that bronchofiberoscopes usually have only one operational channel. This feature considerably limits the feasibility of navigation systems based on the use of small electromagnetic sensing devices or USG probes. The sources of positioning errors in such systems are respiratory movements and the lack of external referential coordinate system associated with the tracheobronchial tree.A promising option for development of a bronchoscopic guidance system is the application of image registration algorithms. Such an approach encompasses registration of endoscopic images to views derived from advanced imaging methods, e.g. CT. In the first step, reconstruction of a three-dimensional, endoluminal views is performed. Next, the position of the virtual camera in a CT-derived virtual model is determined using a complex multi-level image

  13. Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Flexible Bronchoscopy in Patients with Unexpected Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hae Jung; Eom, Jung Seop; Lee, Geewon; Mok, Jeong Ha; Kim, Mi Hyun; Lee, Kwangha; Kim, Ki Uk; Lee, Min Ki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent guidelines recommend the use by healthcare personnel of a fit-tested N95 particulate respirator or higher-grade respiratory precaution in a patient undergoing bronchoscopy when pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is suspected. However, PTB may be unexpectedly diagnosed in this setting and therefore not evaluated, resulting in the unexpected exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) of healthcare workers in the bronchoscopy suite. Here, we examined the incidence of unexpected exposure to MTB during flexible bronchoscopy and determined the exposure-related factors. Methods Between 2011 and 2013, a retrospective study was conducted to evaluate unexpected diagnoses of PTB in the bronchoscopy suite. During the study period, 1650 consecutive patients for whom previous CT scans were available and who underwent bronchoscopy for respiratory disease other than PTB were included. The results of bronchial washing, bronchoalveolar lavage, and post-bronchoscopic sputum were reviewed. Results PTB was unexpectedly diagnosed in 76 patients (4.6%). The presence of anthracofibrosis [odds ratio (OR), 3.878; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.291–11.650; P = 0.016), bronchiectasis (OR, 1.974; 95% CI, 1.095–3.557; P = 0.024), or atelectasis (OR, 1.740; 95% CI, 1.010–2.903; P = 0.046) as seen on chest CT scan was independently associated with unexpected PTB. Patients with both anthracofibrosis and atelectasis were at much higher risk of unexpected PTB (OR, 4.606; 95% CI, 1.383–15.342; P = 0.013). Conclusions The risk of MTB exposure by healthcare personnel in the bronchoscopy suite due to patients with undiagnosed PTB has been underestimated. Therefore, in geographic regions with an intermediate PTB prevalence, such as South Korea (97/100,000 persons per year), higher-grade respiratory precaution, such as a fit-tested N95 particulate respirator, should be considered to prevent occupational exposure to MTB during routine bronchoscopy, especially in patients with CT

  14. Deep transfer learning of virtual endoluminal views for the detection of polyps in CT colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näppi, Janne J.; Hironaka, Toru; Regge, Daniele; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-01

    Proper training of deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs) requires large annotated image databases that are currently not available in CT colonography (CTC). In this study, we employed a deep transfer learning (DETALE) scheme to circumvent this problem in automated polyp detection for CTC. In our method, a DCNN that had been pre-trained with millions of non-medical images was adapted to identify polyps using virtual endoluminal images of the polyp candidates prompted by a computer-aided detection (CADe) system. For evaluation, 154 CTC cases with and without fecal tagging were divided randomly into a development set and an external validation set including 107 polyps >=6 mm in size. A CADe system was trained to detect polyp candidates using the development set, and the virtual endoluminal images of the polyp candidates were labeled manually into true-positive and several false-positive (FP) categories for transfer learning of the DCNN. Next, the trained CADe system was used to detect polyp candidates from the external validation set, and the DCNN reviewed their images to determine the final detections. The detection sensitivity of the standalone CADe system was 93% at 6.4 FPs per patient on average, whereas the DCNN reduced the number of FPs to 2.0 per patient without reducing detection sensitivity. Most of the remaining FP detections were caused by untagged stool. In fecal-tagged CTC cases, the detection sensitivity was 94% at only 0.78 FPs per patient on average. These preliminary results indicate that DETALE can yield substantial improvement in the accuracy of automated polyp detection in CTC.

  15. 3D image fusion and guidance for computer-assisted bronchoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, W. E.; Rai, L.; Merritt, S. A.; Lu, K.; Linger, N. T.; Yu, K. C.

    2005-11-01

    The standard procedure for diagnosing lung cancer involves two stages. First, the physician evaluates a high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) computed-tomography (CT) chest image to produce a procedure plan. Next, the physician performs bronchoscopy on the patient, which involves navigating the the bronchoscope through the airways to planned biopsy sites. Unfortunately, the physician has no link between the 3D CT image data and the live video stream provided during bronchoscopy. In addition, these data sources differ greatly in what they physically give, and no true 3D planning tools exist for planning and guiding procedures. This makes it difficult for the physician to translate a CT-based procedure plan to the video domain of the bronchoscope. Thus, the physician must essentially perform biopsy blindly, and the skill levels between different physicians differ greatly. We describe a system that enables direct 3D CT-based procedure planning and provides direct 3D guidance during bronchoscopy. 3D CT-based information on biopsy sites is provided interactively as the physician moves the bronchoscope. Moreover, graphical information through a live fusion of the 3D CT data and bronchoscopic video is provided during the procedure. This information is coupled with a series of computer-graphics tools to give the physician a greatly augmented reality of the patient's interior anatomy during a procedure. Through a series of controlled tests and studies with human lung-cancer patients, we have found that the system not only reduces the variation in skill level between different physicians, but also increases biopsy success rate.

  16. Effect of bronchoscopy on localization of gallium-67 citrate

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, B.A.; Cooper, K.R.; Fratkin, M.J.

    1983-03-01

    Bronchoscopy, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and 67Ga lung scans are frequently performed for diagnosis or follow-up of patients with sarcoidosis, interstitial pneumonitis, lymphoma, infections, and bronchogenic carcinoma. Because many patients undergo all 3 of these procedures, it is important to determine what effects bronchoscopy and/or BAL may have on gallium imaging. Because 67Ga accumulates in neutrophils at the site of an inflammatory lesion as well as in those circulating in the vascular compartment, it seems reasonable to postulate that bronchoscopy could cause migration of labeled neutrophils into the lung, resulting in false positive gallium scans. To test this hypothesis, we studied 5 patients with varying chronologic relationships of 67Ga injection, gallium scanning, and bronchoscopy with BAL. In all patients, the repeat 67Ga lung scans remained normal or showed no change after bronchoscopy and BAL. We conclude that bronchoscopy with or without BAL does not cause increased 67Ga uptake by the lung.

  17. [Application of Interventional Bronchoscopy in Pulmonary Peripheral Lesions].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Huang, Linian

    2016-08-20

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. A low cure rate of lung cancer is not only attributed to intrinsic aggressive biological behavior, but also little attention to lung cancer screening. With lung screening methods continuous progress, peripheral pulmonary lesions detection rate gradually increased. Currently, a transbronchial approach using a bronchoscope or computed tompgraphy (CT) guided transthoracic needle aspiration/biopsy have been the most generally accepted methods for diagnosing peripheral pulmonary lesions. However, conventional bronchoscopy has a poor diagnostic yield and CT-guided approach has high rates of pneumothorax for such peripheral pulmonary lesions. Therefore, clinicians will be challenged with the task of providing the means to provide a safe and minimally invasive method of obtaining accurate tissue diagnostics for the pulmonary peripheral lesions. New bronchoscopic interventional diagnosis technologies have recommended in clinical gradually. They can effectively improve the peripheral pulmonary lesions diagnosis rate, shorten the time of diagnosis, and make the patients get timely and effective treatment. In this paper, we reviewed briefly available technologies to aid clinicians in attempts at minimally invasive techniques. PMID:27561808

  18. Transconvolution and the virtual positron emission tomograph-A new method for cross calibration in quantitative PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Prenosil, George A.; Weitzel, Thilo; Hentschel, Michael; Klaeser, Bernd; Krause, Thomas

    2013-06-15

    with a Gaussian distribution were introduced. Furthermore, simulation of a virtual PET system provided a standard imaging system with clearly defined properties to which the real PET systems were to be matched. A Hann window served as the modulation transfer function for the virtual PET. The Hann's apodization properties suppressed high spatial frequencies above a certain critical frequency, thereby fulfilling the above-mentioned boundary conditions. The determined point spread functions were subsequently used by the novel Transconvolution algorithm to match different PET/CT systems onto the virtual PET system. Finally, the theoretically elaborated Transconvolution method was validated transforming phantom images acquired on two different PET systems to nearly identical data sets, as they would be imaged by the virtual PET system. Results: The proposed Transconvolution method matched different PET/CT-systems for an improved and reproducible determination of a normalized activity concentration. The highest difference in measured activity concentration between the two different PET systems of 18.2% was found in spheres of 2 ml volume. Transconvolution reduced this difference down to 1.6%. In addition to reestablishing comparability the new method with its parameterization of point spread functions allowed a full characterization of imaging properties of the examined tomographs. Conclusions: By matching different tomographs to a virtual standardized imaging system, Transconvolution opens a new comprehensive method for cross calibration in quantitative PET imaging. The use of a virtual PET system restores comparability between data sets from different PET systems by exerting a common, reproducible, and defined partial volume effect.

  19. Technical Note: Relation between dual-energy subtraction of CT images for electron density calibration and virtual monochromatic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Masatoshi

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: For accurate tissue inhomogeneity correction in radiotherapy treatment planning, the author previously proposed a simple conversion of the energy-subtracted computed tomography (CT) number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide ρ{sub e} range. The purpose of the present study was to reveal the relation between the ΔHU image for ρ{sub e} calibration and a virtually monochromatic CT image by performing numerical analyses based on the basis material decomposition in dual-energy CT. Methods: The author determined the weighting factor, α{sub 0}, of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion through numerical analyses of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report-46 human body tissues using their attenuation coefficients and given ρ{sub e} values. Another weighting factor, α(E), for synthesizing a virtual monochromatic CT image from high- and low-kV CT images, was also calculated in the energy range of 0.03 < E < 5 MeV, assuming that cortical bone and water were the basis materials. The mass attenuation coefficients for these materials were obtained using the XCOM photon cross sections database. The effective x-ray energies used to calculate the attenuation were chosen to imitate a dual-source CT scanner operated at 80–140 and 100–140 kV/Sn. Results: The determined α{sub 0} values were 0.455 for 80–140 kV/Sn and 0.743 for 100–140 kV/Sn. These values coincided almost perfectly with the respective maximal points of the calculated α(E) curves located at approximately 1 MeV, in which the photon-matter interaction in human body tissues is exclusively the incoherent (Compton) scattering. Conclusions: The ΔHU image could be regarded substantially as a CT image acquired with monoenergetic 1-MeV photons, which provides a linear relationship between CT numbers and electron densities.

  20. Therapeutic Bronchoscopy for Malignant Central Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Armin; Grosu, Horiana B.; Lei, Xiudong; Diaz-Mendoza, Javier; Slade, Mark; Gildea, Thomas R.; Machuzak, Michael S.; Jimenez, Carlos A.; Toth, Jennifer; Kovitz, Kevin L.; Ray, Cynthia; Greenhill, Sara; Casal, Roberto F.; Almeida, Francisco A.; Wahidi, Momen M.; Eapen, George A.; Feller-Kopman, David; Morice, Rodolfo C.; Benzaquen, Sadia; Tremblay, Alain; Simoff, Michael; Kovitz, Kevin; Greenhill, Sara; Gildea, Thomas R.; Machuzak, Michael; Almeida, Francisco A.; Cicenia, Joseph; Wahidi, Momen; Mahmood, Kamran; MacEachern, Paul; Tremblay, Alain; Simoff, Michael; Diaz-Mendoza, Javier; Ray, Cynthia; Feller-Kopman, David; Yarmus, Lonny; Estrada-Y-Martin, Rosa; Casal, Roberto F.; Toth, Jennifer; Karunakara, Raj; Slade, Mark; Ernst, Armin; Rafeq, Samaan; Ost, David; Eapen, George A.; Jimenez, Carlos A.; Morice, Rodolfo C.; Benzaquen, Sadia; Puchalski, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is significant variation between physicians in terms of how they perform therapeutic bronchoscopy, but there are few data on whether these differences impact effectiveness. METHODS: This was a multicenter registry study of patients undergoing therapeutic bronchoscopy for malignant central airway obstruction. The primary outcome was technical success, defined as reopening the airway lumen to > 50% of normal. Secondary outcomes were dyspnea as measured by the Borg score and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) as measured by the SF-6D. RESULTS: Fifteen centers performed 1,115 procedures on 947 patients. Technical success was achieved in 93% of procedures. Center success rates ranged from 90% to 98% (P = .02). Endobronchial obstruction and stent placement were associated with success, whereas American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) score > 3, renal failure, primary lung cancer, left mainstem disease, and tracheoesophageal fistula were associated with failure. Clinically significant improvements in dyspnea occurred in 90 of 187 patients measured (48%). Greater baseline dyspnea was associated with greater improvements in dyspnea, whereas smoking, having multiple cancers, and lobar obstruction were associated with smaller improvements. Clinically significant improvements in HRQOL occurred in 76 of 183 patients measured (42%). Greater baseline dyspnea was associated with greater improvements in HRQOL, and lobar obstruction was associated with smaller improvements. CONCLUSIONS: Technical success rates were high overall, with the highest success rates associated with stent placement and endobronchial obstruction. Therapeutic bronchoscopy should not be withheld from patients based solely on an assessment of risk, since patients with the most dyspnea and lowest functional status benefitted the most. PMID:25358019

  1. Radiofrequency Ablation Assisted by Real-Time Virtual Sonography and CT for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Undetectable by Conventional Sonography

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Motoki Sato, Morio; Sahara, Shinya; Takasaka, Isao; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Tanihata, Hirohiko; Kimura, Masashi; Takeuchi, Nozomu

    2009-01-15

    Real-time virtual sonography (RVS) is a diagnostic imaging support system, which provides the same cross-sectional multiplanar reconstruction images as ultrasound images on the same monitor screen in real time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiofrequency ablation (RFA) assisted by RVS and CT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) undetectable with conventional sonography. Subjects were 20 patients with 20 HCC nodules not detected by conventional sonography but detectable by CT or MRI. All patients had hepatitis C-induced liver cirrhosis; there were 13 males and 7 females aged 55-81 years (mean, 69.3 years). RFA was performed in the CT room, and the tumor was punctured with the assistance of RVS. CT was performed immediately after puncture, and ablation was performed after confirming that the needle had been inserted into the tumor precisely. The mean number of punctures and success rates of the first puncture were evaluated. Treatment effects were evaluated with dynamic CT every 3 months after RFA. RFA was technically feasible and local tumor control was achieved in all patients. The mean number of punctures was 1.1, and the success rate of the first puncture was 90.0%. This method enabled safe ablation without complications. The mean follow-up period was 13.5 month (range, 9-18 months). No local recurrence was observed at the follow-up points. In conclusion, RFA assisted by RVS and CT is a safe and efficacious method of treatment for HCC undetectable by conventional sonography.

  2. THE ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE INDUCED BY BRONCHOSCOPY WITH LAVAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bronchoscopy has been used to evaluate the inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. The procedure may affect acute inflammation in the lower respiratory tract. We reviewed consecutive bronchoscopies done in normal healthy non-smokers between April, 1998 and April, 2004. The...

  3. Percutaneous transthoracic localization of pulmonary nodules under C-arm cone-beam CT virtual navigation guidance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Ho; Park, Chang Min; Lee, Sang Min; McAdams, H. Page; Kim, Young Tae; Goo, Jin Mo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to describe our initial experience with percutaneous transthoracic localization (PTL) of pulmonary nodules using a C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) virtual navigation guidance system. METHODS From February 2013 to March 2014, 79 consecutive patients (mean age, 61±10 years) with 81 solid or ground-glass nodules (mean size, 12.36±7.21 mm; range, 4.8–25 mm) underwent PTLs prior to video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) excision under CBCT virtual navigation guidance using lipiodol (mean volume, 0.18±0.04 mL). Their procedural details, radiation dose, and complication rates were described. RESULTS All 81 target nodules were successfully localized within 10 mm (mean distance, 2.54±3.24 mm) from the lipiodol markings. Mean number of CT acquisitions was 3.2±0.7, total procedure time was 14.6±5.14 min, and estimated radiation exposure during the localization was 5.21±2.51 mSv. Postprocedural complications occurred in 14 cases (17.3%); complications were minimal pneumothorax (n=10, 12.3%), parenchymal hemorrhage (n=3, 3.7%), and a small amount of hemoptysis (n=1, 1.2%). All target nodules were completely resected; pathologic diagnosis included invasive adenocarcinoma (n=53), adenocarcinoma-in-situ (n=10), atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (n=4), metastasis (n=7), and benign lesions (n=7). CONCLUSION PTL procedures can be performed safely and accurately under the guidance of a CBCT virtual navigation system. PMID:27015318

  4. Evaluation of a CT-based technique to measure the transfer accuracy of a virtually planned osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Dobbe, J G G; Kievit, A J; Schafroth, M U; Blankevoort, L; Streekstra, G J

    2014-08-01

    Accurate transfer of a preoperatively planned osteotomy plane to the bone is of significance for corrective surgery, tumor resection, implant positioning and evaluation of new osteotomy techniques. Methods for comparing a preoperatively planned osteotomy plane with a surgical cut exist but the accuracy of these techniques are either limited or unknown. This paper proposes and evaluates a CT-based technique that enables comparing virtual with actual osteotomy planes. The methodological accuracy and reproducibility of the technique is evaluated using CT-derived volume data of a cadaver limb, which serves to plan TKA osteotomies in 3-D space and to simulate perfect osteotomies not hampered by surgical errors. The methodological variability of the technique is further investigated with repeated CT scans after actual osteotomy surgery of the same cadaver specimen. Plane displacement (derr) and angulation errors in the sagittal and coronal plane (βerr, γerr) are measured with high accuracy and reproducibility (derr=-0.11±0.06mm; βerr=0.08±0.04°, γerr=-0.03±0.03°). The proposed method for evaluating an osteotomy plane position and orientation has a high intrinsic accuracy and reproducibility. The method can be of great value for measuring the transfer accuracy of new techniques for positioning and orienting a surgical cut in 3-D space.

  5. Advanced bronchoscopy for the diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions.

    PubMed

    Asano, Fumihiro

    2016-07-01

    Bronchoscopy to examine peripheral pulmonary lesions is performed using a bronchoscope with an outer diameter of 5-6mm under fluoroscopy, but the diagnostic yield can be insufficient. Problems with transbronchial biopsy include a limited range of bronchoscope insertion, difficulty in guiding a bronchoscope and biopsy instruments to lesions, and insufficient confirmation of the arrival of biopsy instruments at the target lesion; as such, new techniques have been used to overcome these individual problems. Radial-endobronchial ultrasound is used to identify peripheral pulmonary lesions and sampling sites. In a meta-analysis, the diagnostic yield, that of lesions smaller than 2cm, and complication rate were 73, 56.3, and 1.0%, respectively. Virtual bronchoscopic navigation is a method to guide a bronchoscope to peripheral lesions under direct vision using virtual bronchoscopic images of the bronchial route, and the diagnostic yield, that of 2-cm or smaller lesions, and complication rate were 73.8, 67.4, and 1.0%, respectively. Electromagnetic navigation utilizes electromagnetism; the diagnostic yield was 64.9-71%, and the pneumothorax complication rate was 4% for this modality. Ultrathin bronchoscopes can be advanced to the peripheral bronchus under direct vision in contrast to normal-size bronchoscopes, and the diagnostic yield and pneumothorax complication rates were reported to be 63 and 1.5%, respectively. The overall diagnostic yield of these new techniques on meta-analysis was 70%, a higher yield than that obtained with conventional transbronchial biopsy. Each technique has advantages and disadvantages, and the investigation of appropriate combinations corresponding to individual cases is necessary. PMID:27424820

  6. Interventional bronchoscopy in the management of thoracic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hardavella, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Educational Aims To highlight the various methods of interventional bronchoscopy. To inform about the indications for palliation and curative bronchoscopy in lung cancer. Interventional bronchoscopy is a rapidly expanding field in respiratory medicine offering minimally invasive therapeutic and palliative procedures for all types of lung neoplasms. This field has progressed over the last couple of decades with the application of new technology. The HERMES European curriculum recommendations include interventional bronchoscopy skills in the modules of thoracic tumours and bronchoscopy [1]. However, interventional bronchoscopy is not available in all training centres and consequently, not all trainees will obtain experience unless they rotate to centres specifically offering such training. In this review, we give an overview of interventional bronchoscopic procedures used for the treatment and palliation of thoracic malignancy. These can be applied either with flexible or rigid bronchoscopy or a combination of both depending on the anatomical location of the tumour, the complexity of the case, bleeding risk, the operator’s expertise and preference as well as local availability. Specialised anaesthetic support and appropriately trained endoscopy staff are essential, allowing a multimodality approach to meet the high complexity of these cases. PMID:26632425

  7. Ultrathin bronchoscopy in the diagnosis of peripheral cavitary lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sonali; Ghatol, Abhijeet; Eberlein, Michael; Yung, Rex C

    2013-04-01

    Ultrathin (UT) bronchoscopy has emerged as a useful tool to diagnose peripheral solid lung lesions of a malignant nature. This technology is superior to standard bronchoscopic techniques, which have low yield in identifying small lesions, especially as they extend further out along the bronchial tree. UT bronchoscopy can prevent the need to pursue more invasive open lung strategies to diagnose suspicious lesions. In this report, we present 3 distinct clinical scenarios where UT bronchoscopy was successful in diagnosing benign peripheral cavitary lesions after standard techniques failed. The use of UT bronchoscopy in each case was instrumental in allowing rapid initiation of appropriate therapy without need for more invasive surgical biopsies in the setting of a benign condition. PMID:23609255

  8. [Flexible bronchoscopy in children: Indications and general considerations].

    PubMed

    Pérez Ruiz, E; Barrio Gómez De Agüero, M I

    2004-04-01

    There is considerable interhospital variability in the practice of flexible bronchoscopy in children. The present report aims to provide some recommendations that are supported by the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pulmonologists. We review the indications, contraindications, equipment, setting and personnel involved in flexible bronchoscopy, as well as the pre-procedure preparation of the patient, medications, post-procedure monitoring, complications, care and maintenance of instruments, and informed consent. These recommendations may be adopted, modified or rejected according to clinical needs and constraints.

  9. Hemodynamic Changes Caused by Flow Diverters in Rabbit Aneurysm Models: Comparison of Virtual and Realistic FD Deployments Based on Micro-CT Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinyu; Deng, Benqiang; Fang, Yibin; Yu, Ying; Cheng, Jiyong; Wang, Shengzhang; Wang, Kuizhong; Liu, Jian-Min; Huang, Qinghai

    2013-01-01

    Adjusting hemodynamics via flow diverter (FD) implantation is emerging as a novel method of treating cerebral aneurysms. However, most previous FD-related hemodynamic studies were based on virtual FD deployment, which may produce different hemodynamic outcomes than realistic (in vivo) FD deployment. We compared hemodynamics between virtual FD and realistic FD deployments in rabbit aneurysm models using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. FDs were implanted for aneurysms in 14 rabbits. Vascular models based on rabbit-specific angiograms were reconstructed for CFD studies. Real FD configurations were reconstructed based on micro-CT scans after sacrifice, while virtual FD configurations were constructed with SolidWorks software. Hemodynamic parameters before and after FD deployment were analyzed. According to the metal coverage (MC) of implanted FDs calculated based on micro-CT reconstruction, 14 rabbits were divided into two groups (A, MC >35%; B, MC <35%). Normalized mean wall shear stress (WSS), relative residence time (RRT), inflow velocity, and inflow volume in Group A were significantly different (P<0.05) from virtual FD deployment, but pressure was not (P>0.05). The normalized mean WSS in Group A after realistic FD implantation was significantly lower than that of Group B. All parameters in Group B exhibited no significant difference between realistic and virtual FDs. This study confirmed MC-correlated differences in hemodynamic parameters between realistic and virtual FD deployment.

  10. Development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations: interdependence of CT image artifact mitigation and tissue assignment.

    PubMed

    Miksys, N; Xu, C; Beaulieu, L; Thomson, R M

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates and compares CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR) methods and tissue assignment schemes (TAS) for the development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. Four MAR techniques are investigated to mitigate seed artifacts from post-implant CT images of a homogeneous phantom and eight prostate patients: a raw sinogram approach using the original CT scanner data and three methods (simple threshold replacement (STR), 3D median filter, and virtual sinogram) requiring only the reconstructed CT image. Virtual patient models are developed using six TAS ranging from the AAPM-ESTRO-ABG TG-186 basic approach of assigning uniform density tissues (resulting in a model not dependent on MAR) to more complex models assigning prostate, calcification, and mixtures of prostate and calcification using CT-derived densities. The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is employed to calculate dose distributions. All four MAR methods eliminate bright seed spot artifacts, and the image-based methods provide comparable mitigation of artifacts compared with the raw sinogram approach. However, each MAR technique has limitations: STR is unable to mitigate low CT number artifacts, the median filter blurs the image which challenges the preservation of tissue heterogeneities, and both sinogram approaches introduce new streaks. Large local dose differences are generally due to differences in voxel tissue-type rather than mass density. The largest differences in target dose metrics (D90, V100, V150), over 50% lower compared to the other models, are when uncorrected CT images are used with TAS that consider calcifications. Metrics found using models which include calcifications are generally a few percent lower than prostate-only models. Generally, metrics from any MAR method and any TAS which considers calcifications agree within 6%. Overall, the studied MAR methods and TAS show promise for further retrospective MC dose

  11. Development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations: interdependence of CT image artifact mitigation and tissue assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miksys, N.; Xu, C.; Beaulieu, L.; Thomson, R. M.

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates and compares CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR) methods and tissue assignment schemes (TAS) for the development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. Four MAR techniques are investigated to mitigate seed artifacts from post-implant CT images of a homogeneous phantom and eight prostate patients: a raw sinogram approach using the original CT scanner data and three methods (simple threshold replacement (STR), 3D median filter, and virtual sinogram) requiring only the reconstructed CT image. Virtual patient models are developed using six TAS ranging from the AAPM-ESTRO-ABG TG-186 basic approach of assigning uniform density tissues (resulting in a model not dependent on MAR) to more complex models assigning prostate, calcification, and mixtures of prostate and calcification using CT-derived densities. The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is employed to calculate dose distributions. All four MAR methods eliminate bright seed spot artifacts, and the image-based methods provide comparable mitigation of artifacts compared with the raw sinogram approach. However, each MAR technique has limitations: STR is unable to mitigate low CT number artifacts, the median filter blurs the image which challenges the preservation of tissue heterogeneities, and both sinogram approaches introduce new streaks. Large local dose differences are generally due to differences in voxel tissue-type rather than mass density. The largest differences in target dose metrics (D90, V100, V150), over 50% lower compared to the other models, are when uncorrected CT images are used with TAS that consider calcifications. Metrics found using models which include calcifications are generally a few percent lower than prostate-only models. Generally, metrics from any MAR method and any TAS which considers calcifications agree within 6%. Overall, the studied MAR methods and TAS show promise for further retrospective MC dose

  12. Development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations: interdependence of CT image artifact mitigation and tissue assignment.

    PubMed

    Miksys, N; Xu, C; Beaulieu, L; Thomson, R M

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates and compares CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR) methods and tissue assignment schemes (TAS) for the development of virtual patient models for permanent implant brachytherapy Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. Four MAR techniques are investigated to mitigate seed artifacts from post-implant CT images of a homogeneous phantom and eight prostate patients: a raw sinogram approach using the original CT scanner data and three methods (simple threshold replacement (STR), 3D median filter, and virtual sinogram) requiring only the reconstructed CT image. Virtual patient models are developed using six TAS ranging from the AAPM-ESTRO-ABG TG-186 basic approach of assigning uniform density tissues (resulting in a model not dependent on MAR) to more complex models assigning prostate, calcification, and mixtures of prostate and calcification using CT-derived densities. The EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose is employed to calculate dose distributions. All four MAR methods eliminate bright seed spot artifacts, and the image-based methods provide comparable mitigation of artifacts compared with the raw sinogram approach. However, each MAR technique has limitations: STR is unable to mitigate low CT number artifacts, the median filter blurs the image which challenges the preservation of tissue heterogeneities, and both sinogram approaches introduce new streaks. Large local dose differences are generally due to differences in voxel tissue-type rather than mass density. The largest differences in target dose metrics (D90, V100, V150), over 50% lower compared to the other models, are when uncorrected CT images are used with TAS that consider calcifications. Metrics found using models which include calcifications are generally a few percent lower than prostate-only models. Generally, metrics from any MAR method and any TAS which considers calcifications agree within 6%. Overall, the studied MAR methods and TAS show promise for further retrospective MC dose

  13. SU-D-BRA-06: Dual-Energy Chest CT: The Effects of Virtual Monochromatic Reconstructions On Texture Analysis Features

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, J; Duran, C; Stingo, F; Wei, W; Rao, A; Zhang, L; Court, L; Erasmus, J; Godoy, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of virtual monochromatic reconstructions on several commonly used texture analysis features in DECT of the chest. Further, to assess the effect of monochromatic energy levels on the ability of these textural features to identify tissue types. Methods: 20 consecutive patients underwent chest CTs for evaluation of lung nodules using Siemens Somatom Definition Flash DECT. Virtual monochromatic images were constructed at 10keV intervals from 40–190keV. For each patient, an ROI delineated the lesion under investigation, and cylindrical ROI’s were placed within 5 different healthy tissues (blood, fat, muscle, lung, and liver). Several histogram- and Grey Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM)-based texture features were then evaluated in each ROI at each energy level. As a means of validation, these feature values were then used in a random forest classifier to attempt to identify the tissue types present within each ROI. Their predictive accuracy at each energy level was recorded. Results: All textural features changed considerably with virtual monochromatic energy, particularly below 70keV. Most features exhibited a global minimum or maximum around 80keV, and while feature values changed with energy above this, patient ranking was generally unaffected. As expected, blood demonstrated the lowest inter-patient variability, for all features, while lung lesions (encompassing many different pathologies) exhibited the highest. The accuracy of these features in identifying tissues (76% accuracy) was highest at 80keV, but no clear relationship between energy and classification accuracy was found. Two common misclassifications (blood vs liver and muscle vs fat) accounted for the majority (24 of the 28) errors observed. Conclusion: All textural features were highly dependent on virtual monochromatic energy level, especially below 80keV, and were more stable above this energy. However, in a random forest model, these commonly used features were

  14. [Bronchoscopy: new diagnostic and therapeutic technology, new indications].

    PubMed

    Burgers, J A; Baas, P; van Zandwijk, N

    2004-06-26

    Over the last few years developments have been concentrated on the diagnostic and therapeutic properties of bronchoscopy. Autofluorescence and fluorescence bronchoscopy significantly enhance the detection rate of premalignant and early neoplastic endobronchial lesions. Unfortunately, this technique is hampered by a low specificity. Endobronchial ultrasound examination is the first tool that has enabled the bronchoscopist to get an impression of the tracheal wall beyond its epithelial surface including the mediastinal and the hilar structures. Currently, the complexity of the procedure prevents its widespread application. Intervention bronchoscopy involves mechanical and laser removal of processes that may impede the central airways. Electrocauterization and laser dissection are regularly used to remove intrabronchial tumour depositions. Airway stenting is indicated if there are stenoses caused by compression from abnormalities located externally to the airways.

  15. [Value of flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy under local anesthesia in infants].

    PubMed

    Bodart, E; De Lange, M; Vliers, A

    1993-06-01

    From October 1991 through April 1992, 16 infants aged 5 to 25 months (mean age 14.3 months) underwent bronchoscopy with a flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope, under local anesthesia. The technique is described in detail. Reasons for bronchoscopy included recurrent or persistent pneumonia (n = 4), persistent atelectasia (n = 4), lymphadenopathy and/or airway compression (n = 2), suspected foreign body (n = 2), bronchoalveolar lavage to investigate diffuse interstitial lung disease (n = 2), and severe recurrent wheezing (n = 2). The procedure established the accurate diagnosis in 14 cases. Adverse events (32%) were minor (transient hypoxia, n = 3; moderate fever, n = 1; and laryngospasm, n = 1) and resolved completely. Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy under local anesthesia is a simple procedure which is safe in patients under 30 months of age when performed by a experienced operator in an adequate facility. This method is useful for the diagnosis and/or treatment of a broad spectrum of conditions. PMID:8352497

  16. Three-Dimensional Visualization and Imaging of the Entry Tear and Intimal Flap of Aortic Dissection Using CT Virtual Intravascular Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Ma, Xiangxing; Wang, Qing; Yu, Dexin

    2016-01-01

    Aims Conventional computed tomography (CT) approaches provides limited visualization of the entire endoluminal changes of aortic dissection (AD), which is essential for its treatment. As an important supplement, three-dimensional CT virtual intravascular endoscopy (VIE) can show relevant details. This study aims to determine the value of VIE in displaying the entry tear and intimal flap of AD. Methods and Results Among 127 consecutive symptomatic patients with suspected AD who underwent CT angiography (CTA), 84 subjects were confirmed to have AD and were included in the study. Conventional CT and VIE images were observed and evaluated. From the 92 entry tears revealed via conventional CT, 88 (95.7%) tears appeared on VIE with round (n = 26), slit-shaped (n = 9), or irregular (n = 53) shapes, whereas the intimal flaps were sheetlike (n = 34), tubular (n = 34), wavelike (n = 13), or irregular (n = 7) in shape. The VIE also showed the spatial relationship between the torn flap and adjacent structures. Among 58 entry tears with multiple-line type flap shown on conventional CT, 41 (70.7%) appeared with an irregular shape on VIE, whereas among 30 tears with single-line type flap, 17 (56.7%) appeared as round or slit-shaped on VIE. These results demonstrated a significant difference (P < 0.05). The poor display of tears on VIE was related to the low CT attenuation values in lumen or in neighboring artifacts (P < 0.01). Conclusion CT VIE presents the complete configurations and details of the intimal tears and flaps of AD better than conventional CT approaches. Accordingly, it should be recommended as a necessary assessment tool for endovascular therapy and as part of strategy planning in pre-surgical patients. PMID:27760170

  17. Optimal procedure planning and guidance system for peripheral bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Jason D; Graham, Michael W; Bascom, Rebecca; Cornish, Duane C; Khare, Rahul; Higgins, William E

    2014-03-01

    With the development of multidetector computed-tomography (MDCT) scanners and ultrathin bronchoscopes, the use of bronchoscopy for diagnosing peripheral lung-cancer nodules is becoming a viable option. The work flow for assessing lung cancer consists of two phases: 1) 3-D MDCT analysis and 2) live bronchoscopy. Unfortunately, the yield rates for peripheral bronchoscopy have been reported to be as low as 14%, and bronchoscopy performance varies considerably between physicians. Recently, proposed image-guided systems have shown promise for assisting with peripheral bronchoscopy. Yet, MDCT-based route planning to target sites has relied on tedious error-prone techniques. In addition, route planning tends not to incorporate known anatomical, device, and procedural constraints that impact a feasible route. Finally, existing systems do not effectively integrate MDCT-derived route information into the live guidance process. We propose a system that incorporates an automatic optimal route-planning method, which integrates known route constraints. Furthermore, our system offers a natural translation of the MDCT-based route plan into the live guidance strategy via MDCT/video data fusion. An image-based study demonstrates the route-planning method's functionality. Next, we present a prospective lung-cancer patient study in which our system achieved a successful navigation rate of 91% to target sites. Furthermore, when compared to a competing commercial system, our system enabled bronchoscopy over two airways deeper into the airway-tree periphery with a sample time that was nearly 2 min shorter on average. Finally, our system's ability to almost perfectly predict the depth of a bronchoscope's navigable route in advance represents a substantial benefit of optimal route planning.

  18. Oxygen supplementation is required in healthy volunteers during bronchoscopy with lavage

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hypoxemia can complicate bronchoscopy. Common causes of hypoxemia during bronchoscopy include preexisting lung disease, upper airway obstruction, pneumothorax and bleeding secondary to either transbronchial lung biopsy or another interventional bronchoscopic procedure, hypoventil...

  19. The use of a new 3D splint and double CT scan procedure to obtain an accurate anatomic virtual augmented model of the skull.

    PubMed

    Swennen, G R J; Barth, E-L; Eulzer, C; Schutyser, F

    2007-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) virtual planning of orthognathic surgery requires detailed visualization of the interocclusal relationship. The purpose of this study was to introduce the modification of the double computed tomography (CT) scan procedure using a newly designed 3D splint in order to obtain a detailed anatomic 3D virtual augmented model of the skull. A total of 10 dry adult human cadaver skulls were used to evaluate the accuracy of the automatic rigid registration method for fusion of both CT datasets (Maxilim, version 1.3.0). The overall mean registration error was 0.1355+/-0.0323 mm (range 0.0760-0.1782 mm). Analysis of variance showed a registration method error of 0.0564 mm (P < 0.001; 95% confidence interval = 0.0491-0.0622). The combination of the newly designed 3D splint with the double CT scan procedure allowed accurate registration and the set-up of an accurate anatomic 3D virtual augmented model of the skull with detailed dental surface.

  20. Cavitary pulmonary infection with Mycobacterium avium observed by bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Uruga, Hironori; Suzuki, Aika; Hanada, Shigeo; Takaya, Hisashi; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Morokawa, Nasa; Fujii, Takeshi; Kurosaki, Atsuko; Kishi, Kazuma

    2012-10-01

    A 58-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of fever and loss of appetite. He had undergone surgery for esophageal cancer. A chest radiography 12 years after the surgery revealed cavitary lesions in the right upper lobe of the lung. The patient was then diagnosed as having Mycobacterium avium infection. The cavitary lesions worsened 2 years after clarithromycin monotherapy. Bronchoscopy was performed to observe the interior of the cavity. Gray debris adhering to the cavitary wall decreased after intensive treatment with Streptomycin, rifabutin, levofloxacin, and ethambutol. This is a rare case in which treatment efficacy of M. avium infection was directly observed by serial bronchoscopy. PMID:23207537

  1. Technician-free system for image-guided bronchoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Rahul; Bascom, Rebecca; Higgins, William E.

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that guidance systems improve accuracy and reduce skill variation among physicians during bronchoscopy. However, most of these systems suffer from one or more of the following limitations: 1) an attending technician must carefully keep the system position synchronized with the bronchoscope position during the procedure; 2) extra bronchoscope tracking hardware may be required; 3) guidance cannot take place in real time; 4) the guidance system is unable to detect and correct faulty bronchoscope maneuvers; and 5) a resynchronization procedure must be followed after adverse events such as patient cough or dynamic airway collapse. Here, we propose an image-based system for technician-free bronchoscopy guidance that relies on two features. First, our system precomputes a guidance plan that suggests natural bronchoscope maneuvers at every bifurcation leading toward a region of interest (ROI). Second, our system enables bronchoscope position verification that relies on a global-registration algorithm to establish the global bronchoscope position and, thus, provide the physician with updated navigational information during bronchoscopy. The system can handle general navigation to an ROI, as well as adverse events, and is directly controlled by the physician by a foot pedal. Guided bronchoscopy results using airway-tree phantoms and human cases demonstrate the efficacy of the system.

  2. Virtual bite registration using intraoral digital scanning, CT and CBCT: In vitro evaluation of a new method and its implication for orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Johanna; Richards, Robert Geoff; Thor, Andreas; Kamer, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer-assisted planning requires detailed visualisation of the craniomaxillofacial region and interocclusal relationship. The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a method to create a 3D model of the craniomaxillofacial region and to adopt intraoral digital scanning to place the lower jaw into a centric relation (CR) without the need of additional plaster casts and model surgery. A standard plastic skull modified by metallic dental wires and brackets was subjected to computed tomography (CT), cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), and intraoral digital scanning. We evaluated two different virtual bite registrations, a digital scan of the buccal dental surfaces and scanning of the wax bites to position the lower jaw into a CR, and assessed the accuracy of the integration of intraoral scanning to the CT/CBCT scans. The mean registration error of corresponding mesh points for the CT and intraoral scanned images was 0.15 ± 0.12 mm, while this error was 0.18 ± 0.13 mm for the CBCT and intraoral scanned images. The mean accuracy of the two virtual bite registrations ranged from 0.41 to 0.49 mm (buccal scan technique) and from 0.65 to 1.3 mm (virtualised wax bite technique). A method for virtual bite registration was developed. It has the potential to eliminate plaster casts and model surgery and may facilitate 3D computer-assisted planning of orthognathic surgery cases.

  3. Virtual bite registration using intraoral digital scanning, CT and CBCT: In vitro evaluation of a new method and its implication for orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Johanna; Richards, Robert Geoff; Thor, Andreas; Kamer, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer-assisted planning requires detailed visualisation of the craniomaxillofacial region and interocclusal relationship. The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a method to create a 3D model of the craniomaxillofacial region and to adopt intraoral digital scanning to place the lower jaw into a centric relation (CR) without the need of additional plaster casts and model surgery. A standard plastic skull modified by metallic dental wires and brackets was subjected to computed tomography (CT), cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), and intraoral digital scanning. We evaluated two different virtual bite registrations, a digital scan of the buccal dental surfaces and scanning of the wax bites to position the lower jaw into a CR, and assessed the accuracy of the integration of intraoral scanning to the CT/CBCT scans. The mean registration error of corresponding mesh points for the CT and intraoral scanned images was 0.15 ± 0.12 mm, while this error was 0.18 ± 0.13 mm for the CBCT and intraoral scanned images. The mean accuracy of the two virtual bite registrations ranged from 0.41 to 0.49 mm (buccal scan technique) and from 0.65 to 1.3 mm (virtualised wax bite technique). A method for virtual bite registration was developed. It has the potential to eliminate plaster casts and model surgery and may facilitate 3D computer-assisted planning of orthognathic surgery cases. PMID:27423538

  4. Creation of individual ideally shaped stents using multi-slice CT: in vitro results from the semi-automatic virtual stent (SAVS) designer.

    PubMed

    Hyodoh, Hideki; Katagiri, Yoshimi; Sakai, Toyohiko; Hyodoh, Kazusa; Akiba, Hidenari; Hareyama, Masato

    2005-08-01

    To plan stent-grafting for thoracic aortic aneurysm with complicated morphology, we created a virtual stent-grafting program [Semi Automatic Virtual Stent (SAVS) designer] using three-dimensional CT data. The usefulness of the SAVS designer was evaluated by measurement of transformed anatomical and straight stents. Curved model images (source, multi-planer reconstruction and volume rendering) were created, and a hollow virtual stent was produced by the SAVS designer. A straight Nitinol stent was transformed to match the curved configuration of the virtual stent. The accuracy of the anatomical stent was evaluated by experimental strain phantom studies in comparison with the straight stent. Mean separation length was 0 mm in the anatomical stent [22 mm outer diameter (OD)] and 5 mm in the straight stent (22 mm OD). The straight stent strain voltage was four times that of the anatomical stent at the stent end. The anatomical stent is useful because it fits the curved structure of the aorta and reduces the strain force compared to the straight stent. The SAVS designer can help to design and produce the anatomical stent.

  5. Pseudo-outbreak of Actinomyces graevenitzii associated with bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Peaper, David R; Havill, Nancy L; Aniskiewicz, Michael; Callan, Deborah; Pop, Olivia; Towle, Dana; Boyce, John M

    2015-01-01

    Outbreaks and pseudo-outbreaks of infection related to bronchoscopy typically involve Gram-negative bacteria, Mycobacterium species or Legionella species. We report an unusual bronchoscopy-related pseudo-outbreak due to Actinomyces graevenitzii. Extensive epidemiological and microbiological investigation failed to identify a common source. Strain typing revealed that the cluster was comprised of heterogeneous strains of A. graevenitzii. A change in laboratory procedures for Actinomyces cultures was coincident with the emergence of the pseudo-outbreak, and we determined that A. graevenitzii isolates more readily adopted a white, dry, molar tooth appearance on anaerobic colistin nalidixic acid (CNA) agar which likely facilitated its detection and identification in bronchoscopic specimens. This unusual pseudo-outbreak was related to frequent requests of bronchoscopists for Actinomyces cultures combined with a change in microbiology laboratory practices.

  6. Giant endobronchial hamartoma resected by fiberoptic bronchoscopy electrosurgical snaring

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Less than 1% of lung neoplasms are represented by benign tumors. Among these, hamartomas are the most common with an incidence between 0.025% and 0.32%. In relation to the localization, hamartomas are divided into intraparenchymal and endobronchial. Clinical manifestation of an endobronchial hamartoma (EH) results from tracheobronchial obstruction or bleeding. Usually, EH localizes in large diameter bronchus. Endoscopic removal is usually recommended. Bronchotomy or parenchimal resection through thoracotomy should be reserved only for cases where the hamatoma cannot be approached through endoscopy, or when irreversible lung functional impairment occurred after prolonged airflow obstruction. Generally, when endoscopic approach is used, this is through rigid bronchoscopy, laser photocoagulation or mechanical resection. Here we present a giant EH occasionally diagnosed and treated by fiberoptic bronchoscopy electrosurgical snaring. PMID:21838930

  7. Electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy and robotic-assisted thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Christie, Sara

    2014-06-01

    With the use of electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy and robotics, lung lesions can be diagnosed and resected during one surgical procedure. Global positioning system technology allows surgeons to identify and mark a thoracic tumor, and then robotics technology allows them to perform minimally invasive resection and cancer staging procedures. Nurses on the perioperative robotics team must consider the logistics of providing safe and competent care when performing combined procedures during one surgical encounter. Instrumentation, OR organization and room setup, and patient positioning are important factors to consider to complete the procedure systematically and efficiently. This revolutionary concept of combining navigational bronchoscopy with robotics requires a team of dedicated nurses to facilitate the sequence of events essential for providing optimal patient outcomes in highly advanced surgical procedures.

  8. A distal airway foreign body removed with electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Karpman, Craig; Midthun, David E; Mullon, John J

    2014-04-01

    Distal airway foreign bodies can be challenging to remove with a flexible bronchoscope because of angulation or deep impaction. Thoracic surgery may be required if bronchoscopy is not successful. The use of electromagnetic navigation for pulmonary nodule localization and characterization is well established; however, its use to localize and remove distal foreign bodies has not been described. We report the initial case of electromagnetic navigation-assisted foreign body removal.

  9. Use of cryoprobe for removal of a large tracheobronchial foreign body during flexible bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Dhooria, Sahajal; Behera, Digambar; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body (FB) inhalation in the tracheobronchial tree is an infrequently encountered event in adults. The diagnosis is suspected in the presence of a clinical history of aspiration and the presence of respiratory symptoms. Management involves confirmation by flexible bronchoscopy, which may be both diagnostic as well as therapeutic. However, in certain situations including those with large FB, FB embedded in granulation tissue or FB with very smooth margins, rigid bronchoscopy may be superior to flexible bronchoscopy in the retrieval of the FB. An alternative to rigid bronchoscopy in such situations may be the use of a cryoprobe. Herein, we describe a patient with a large tracheobronchial FB causing a complete collapse of the left lung and hypoxemia. The FB was successfully extracted using a cryoprobe during flexible bronchoscopy, obviating the need for rigid bronchoscopy. PMID:27625452

  10. Use of cryoprobe for removal of a large tracheobronchial foreign body during flexible bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Dhooria, Sahajal; Behera, Digambar; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body (FB) inhalation in the tracheobronchial tree is an infrequently encountered event in adults. The diagnosis is suspected in the presence of a clinical history of aspiration and the presence of respiratory symptoms. Management involves confirmation by flexible bronchoscopy, which may be both diagnostic as well as therapeutic. However, in certain situations including those with large FB, FB embedded in granulation tissue or FB with very smooth margins, rigid bronchoscopy may be superior to flexible bronchoscopy in the retrieval of the FB. An alternative to rigid bronchoscopy in such situations may be the use of a cryoprobe. Herein, we describe a patient with a large tracheobronchial FB causing a complete collapse of the left lung and hypoxemia. The FB was successfully extracted using a cryoprobe during flexible bronchoscopy, obviating the need for rigid bronchoscopy.

  11. Use of cryoprobe for removal of a large tracheobronchial foreign body during flexible bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Dhooria, Sahajal; Behera, Digambar; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body (FB) inhalation in the tracheobronchial tree is an infrequently encountered event in adults. The diagnosis is suspected in the presence of a clinical history of aspiration and the presence of respiratory symptoms. Management involves confirmation by flexible bronchoscopy, which may be both diagnostic as well as therapeutic. However, in certain situations including those with large FB, FB embedded in granulation tissue or FB with very smooth margins, rigid bronchoscopy may be superior to flexible bronchoscopy in the retrieval of the FB. An alternative to rigid bronchoscopy in such situations may be the use of a cryoprobe. Herein, we describe a patient with a large tracheobronchial FB causing a complete collapse of the left lung and hypoxemia. The FB was successfully extracted using a cryoprobe during flexible bronchoscopy, obviating the need for rigid bronchoscopy. PMID:27625452

  12. Use of cryoprobe for removal of a large tracheobronchial foreign body during flexible bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Dhooria, Sahajal; Behera, Digambar; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body (FB) inhalation in the tracheobronchial tree is an infrequently encountered event in adults. The diagnosis is suspected in the presence of a clinical history of aspiration and the presence of respiratory symptoms. Management involves confirmation by flexible bronchoscopy, which may be both diagnostic as well as therapeutic. However, in certain situations including those with large FB, FB embedded in granulation tissue or FB with very smooth margins, rigid bronchoscopy may be superior to flexible bronchoscopy in the retrieval of the FB. An alternative to rigid bronchoscopy in such situations may be the use of a cryoprobe. Herein, we describe a patient with a large tracheobronchial FB causing a complete collapse of the left lung and hypoxemia. The FB was successfully extracted using a cryoprobe during flexible bronchoscopy, obviating the need for rigid bronchoscopy.

  13. A cone-beam CT based technique to augment the 3D virtual skull model with a detailed dental surface.

    PubMed

    Swennen, G R J; Mommaerts, M Y; Abeloos, J; De Clercq, C; Lamoral, P; Neyt, N; Casselman, J; Schutyser, F

    2009-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is used for maxillofacial imaging. 3D virtual planning of orthognathic and facial orthomorphic surgery requires detailed visualisation of the interocclusal relationship. This study aimed to introduce and evaluate the use of a double CBCT scan procedure with a modified wax bite wafer to augment the 3D virtual skull model with a detailed dental surface. The impressions of the dental arches and the wax bite wafer were scanned for ten patient separately using a high resolution standardized CBCT scanning protocol. Surface-based rigid registration using ICP (iterative closest points) was used to fit the virtual models on the wax bite wafer. Automatic rigid point-based registration of the wax bite wafer on the patient scan was performed to implement the digital virtual dental arches into the patient's skull model. Probability error histograms showed errors of < or =0.22 mm (25% percentile), < or =0.44 mm (50% percentile) and < or =1.09 mm (90% percentile) for ICP surface matching. The mean registration error for automatic point-based rigid registration was 0.18+/-0.10 mm (range 0.13-0.26 mm). The results show the potential for a double CBCT scan procedure with a modified wax bite wafer to set-up a 3D virtual augmented model of the skull with detailed dental surface.

  14. Role of electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy in pulmonary nodule management

    PubMed Central

    Dahagam, Chanukya; Breen, David P.; Sarkar, Saiyad

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pulmonary nodules and lung cancer is rising. Some of this increase in incidence is due to improved pick up by newer imaging modalities. However, the goal is to diagnose these lesion, many of which are located in the periphery, by safe and relatively non-invasive methods. This has led to the emergence of numerous techniques such as electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy (ENB). Current evidence supports a role for these techniques in the diagnostic pathway. However, numerous factor influence the diagnostic accuracy. Thus despite significant advances, more research needs to be undertaken to further improve the currently available diagnostic technologies. PMID:27606080

  15. Role of electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy in pulmonary nodule management.

    PubMed

    Goud, Aditya; Dahagam, Chanukya; Breen, David P; Sarkar, Saiyad

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of pulmonary nodules and lung cancer is rising. Some of this increase in incidence is due to improved pick up by newer imaging modalities. However, the goal is to diagnose these lesion, many of which are located in the periphery, by safe and relatively non-invasive methods. This has led to the emergence of numerous techniques such as electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy (ENB). Current evidence supports a role for these techniques in the diagnostic pathway. However, numerous factor influence the diagnostic accuracy. Thus despite significant advances, more research needs to be undertaken to further improve the currently available diagnostic technologies. PMID:27606080

  16. [Flexible bronchoscopy techniques: bronchoalveolar lavage, bronchial biopsy and transbronchial biopsy].

    PubMed

    Escribano Montaner, A; Moreno Galdó, A

    2005-04-01

    This article completes previous recommendations of the Techniques Group of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pulmonologists on the practice of flexible bronchoscopy in children. We review the most frequently performed diagnostic and therapeutic procedures applied through the flexible bronchoscope: bronchoalveolar lavage, bronchial biopsy and transbronchial biopsy. Recommendations are also provided on the practice of nonbronchoscopic bronchoalveolar lavage. We review the indications and contraindications of these techniques, the equipment required, and the preparation and monitoring of the patient before, during and after the procedure. The complications of these techniques are also discussed. These recommendations may be adopted, modified or rejected according to clinical needs and constraints.

  17. Role of electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy in pulmonary nodule management

    PubMed Central

    Dahagam, Chanukya; Breen, David P.; Sarkar, Saiyad

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pulmonary nodules and lung cancer is rising. Some of this increase in incidence is due to improved pick up by newer imaging modalities. However, the goal is to diagnose these lesion, many of which are located in the periphery, by safe and relatively non-invasive methods. This has led to the emergence of numerous techniques such as electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy (ENB). Current evidence supports a role for these techniques in the diagnostic pathway. However, numerous factor influence the diagnostic accuracy. Thus despite significant advances, more research needs to be undertaken to further improve the currently available diagnostic technologies.

  18. A Virtual Learning Environment for Part-Time MASW Students: An Evaluation of the WebCT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Charles C.; Tsui, Ming-sum; Chan, Mandy Y. C.; Hong, Joe H.

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the perception of a cohort of social workers studying for a part-time master's program in social work in using the popular Web-based learning platform--World Wide Web Course Tools (WebCT) as a complimentary method of teaching and learning. It was noted that social work profession began incorporating computer technology…

  19. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source and dual-energy CT for visualization of acute ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Hidetake; Muraishi, Hiroshi; Matsuzawa, Hiroki; Inoue, Toshiyuki; Nakajima, Yasuo; Satoh, Hitoshi; Abe, Shinji

    2015-07-01

    We have recently developed a phantom that simulates acute ischemic stroke. We attempted to visualize an acute-stage cerebral infarction by using dual-energy Computed tomography (DECT) to obtain virtual monochromatic images of this phantom. Virtual monochromatic images were created by using DECT voltages from 40 to 100 keV in steps of 10 keV and from 60 to 80 keV in steps of 1 keV, under three conditions of the tube voltage with thin (Sn) filters. Calculation of the CNR values allowed us to evaluate the visualization of acute-stage cerebral infarction. The CNR value of a virtual monochromatic image was the highest at 68 keV under 80 kV / Sn 140 kV, at 72 keV under 100 kV / Sn 140 kV, and at 67 keV under 140 kV / 80 kV. The CNR values of virtual monochromatic images at voltages between 65 and 75 keV were significantly higher than those obtained for all other created images. Therefore, the optimal conditions for visualizing acute ischemic stroke were achievable.

  20. Integration of interventional bronchoscopy in the management of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Guibert, Nicolas; Mazieres, Julien; Marquette, Charles-Hugo; Rouviere, Damien; Didier, Alain; Hermant, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    Tracheal or bronchial proximal stenoses occur as complications in 20-30% of lung cancers, resulting in a dramatic alteration in quality of life and poor prognosis. Bronchoscopic management of these obstructions is based on what are known as "thermal" techniques for intraluminal stenosis and/or placement of tracheal or bronchial prostheses for extrinsic compressions, leading to rapid symptom palliation in the vast majority of patients. This invasive treatment should only be used in cases of symptomatic obstructions and in the presence of viable bronchial tree and downstream parenchyma. This review aims to clarify 1) the available methods for assessing the characteristics of stenoses before treatment, 2) the various techniques available including their preferred indications, outcomes and complications, and 3) the integration of interventional bronchoscopy in the multidisciplinary management of proximal bronchial cancers and its synergistic effects with the other specific treatments (surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy).

  1. Disinfecting endoscopes: how not to transmit Mycobacterium tuberculosis by bronchoscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Leers, W D

    1980-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis was cultured from the bronchial washings of two patients who underwent bronchoscopy consecutively with the same bronchoscope. Active pulmonary tuberculosis was later confirmed in the first patient, whereas the second patient had clinical and serologic evidence of infection with respiratory syncytial virus. The bronchoscope had been cleaned with an iodophor disinfectant, which had not destroyed the tubercle bacilli. The agent recommended for chemical disinfection of fibreoptic bronchoscopes is 2% glutaraldehyde solution; the instrument should be immersed in it for 10 to 30 minutes. Five hours' exposure to ethylene oxide is recommended for sterilization of instruments. These procedures must be preceded by adequate mechanical cleaning. Then transmission of pathogenic organisms during endoscopy, which can result in nosocomial disease, misdiagnosis or inappropriate treatment, will be avoided. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:6790150

  2. CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Pu Jiantao; Gu Suicheng; Liu Shusen; Zhu Shaocheng; Wilson, David; Siegfried, Jill M.; Gur, David

    2012-05-15

    As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work.

  3. [DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC BRONCHOSCOPY IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING CARDIAC SURGERY IN INTRA- AND POSTOPERATIVE PERIODS].

    PubMed

    Titova, I V; Khrustaleva, M V; Pshenichnyy, T A; Aksel'rod, B A; Eremenko, A A; Bogomolova, N S; Kuznetsova, S M

    2016-01-01

    The article presents research conducted to evaluate the use of diagnostic and therapeutic fiberoptic bronchoscopy in the treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and tracheobronchitis in patients in cardiac ICU. The paper presents the results of the study and comparison of invasive techniques for sampling from the respiratory tract for bacteriological analysis. We studied the bacterial profile of ICU, original content of the respiratory tract of cardiac patients in the intraoperative period and possible ways for prevention of VAP and tracheobronchitis in the postoperative period using bronchoscopy. In addition data on the effect of bronchoscopy on the respiratory and cardiovascular systems in cardiac surgical patients undergoing mechanical ventilation presented. PMID:27468503

  4. Comparison of flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy and scalene lymph node biopsy in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Stjernberg, N; Thunell, M; Lundgren, R

    1983-09-01

    The diagnostic accuracy achieved by taking bronchial mucosal and lung biopsies through flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopes was compared with scalene lymph node biopsy in 55 patients with sarcoidosis. The diagnostic yield with flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy was 62 per cent in the whole material and increased to 76 per cent in patients with stage II sarcoidosis. Scalene lymph node biopsy was positive in 80 per cent. Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy is a useful method for obtaining biopsy material in sarcoidosis, especially in stage II sarcoidosis. We consider flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy and scalene lymph node biopsy the methods of choice in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. PMID:6628338

  5. 3-D reconstruction and virtual ductoscopy of high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast with casting type calcifications using refraction-based X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami; Maksimenko, Anton; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Eiko; Yamasaki, Katsuhito; Mori, Kensaku; Arai, Yoshinori; Endo, Tokiko

    2008-01-01

    Stereomicroscopic observations of thick sections, or three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions from serial sections, have provided insights into histopathology. However, they generally require time-consuming and laborious procedures. Recently, we have developed a new algorithm for refraction-based X-ray computed tomography (CT). The aim of this study is to apply this emerging technology to visualize the 3-D structure of a high-grade ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS) of the breast. The high-resolution two-dimensional images of the refraction-based CT were validated by comparing them with the sequential histological sections. Without adding any contrast medium, the new CT showed strong contrast and was able to depict the non-calcified fine structures such as duct walls and intraductal carcinoma itself, both of which were barely visible in a conventional absorption-based CT. 3-D reconstruction and virtual endoscopy revealed that the high-grade DCIS was located within the dichotomatous branches of the ducts. Multiple calcifications occurred in the necrotic core of the continuous DCIS, resulting in linear and branching (casting type) calcifications, a hallmark of high-grade DCIS on mammograms. In conclusion, refraction-based X-ray CT approaches the low-power light microscopic view of the histological sections. It provides high quality slice data for 3-D reconstruction and virtual ductosocpy.

  6. Rigid bronchoscopy and silicone stents in the management of central airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yarmus, Lonny

    2015-01-01

    The field of interventional pulmonology has grown significantly over the past several decades now including the diagnosis and therapeutic treatment of complex airway disease. Rigid bronchoscopy is an invaluable tool in the diagnosis and management of several malignant and non-malignant causes of central airway obstruction (CAO) and has become integral after the inception of airway stenting. The management of CAO can be a complicated endeavor with significant risks making the understanding of basic rigid bronchoscopy techniques, ablative technologies, anesthetic care and stenting of utmost importance in the care of these complex patients. This review article will focus on the history of rigid bronchoscopy, the technical aspects of performing a rigid bronchoscopy as well as the use of silicone stents their indications, complications and placement techniques. PMID:26807283

  7. Summary of the British Thoracic Society guidelines for advanced diagnostic and therapeutic flexible bronchoscopy in adults.

    PubMed

    Du Rand, I A; Barber, P V; Goldring, J; Lewis, R A; Mandal, S; Munavvar, M; Rintoul, R C; Shah, P L; Singh, S; Slade, M G; Woolley, A

    2011-11-01

    This new guideline covers the rapidly advancing field of interventional bronchoscopy using flexible bronchoscopy. It includes the use of more complex diagnostic procedures such as endobronchial ultrasound, interventions for the relief of central airway obstruction due to malignancy and the recent development of endobronchial therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. The guideline aims to help all those who undertake flexible bronchoscopy to understand more about this important area. It also aims to inform respiratory physicians and other specialists dealing with lung cancer of the procedures possible in the management and palliation of central airway obstruction. The guideline covers transbronchial needle aspiration and endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration, electrocautery/diathermy, argon plasma coagulation and thermal laser, cryotherapy, cryoextraction, photodynamic therapy, brachytherapy, tracheobronchial stenting, electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy, endobronchial valves for emphysema and bronchial thermoplasty for asthma.

  8. Lung squamous cell carcinoma metastasizing to the nasopharynx following bronchoscopy intervention therapies: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic carcinoma to the nasopharynx is extremely rare, and few cases have been reported in the literature. In the present report, we describe the case of a patient with a mass in the nasopharynx found by bronchoscopy. Our patient was a 61-year-old man receiving multiple bronchoscopy intervention therapies for advanced lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), which was histopathologically confirmed. The SCC metastasized to the nasopharynx following the bronchoscopy intervention therapies. The lesion was considered metastatic from lung cancer on the basis of clinical and histological clues. The exact mechanism of lung cancer metastasis to the nasopharynx in this case remains unclear because either implantation or hematogenous and lymphatic spread is possible. A thorough head and neck examination should be undertaken during bronchoscopic evaluation, especially in patients receiving bronchoscopy intervention therapies. The early detection of a silent nasopharyngeal metastasis is important to choosing from among the multiple treatment options available. PMID:24673971

  9. SU-E-J-167: Improvement of Time-Ordered Four Dimensional Cone-Beam CT; Image Mosaicing with Real and Virtual Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M; Kida, S; Masutani, Y; Shiraki, T; Yamamoto, K; Shiraishi, K; Nakagawa, K; Haga, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In the previous study, we developed time-ordered fourdimensional (4D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) technique to visualize nonperiodic organ motion, such as peristaltic motion of gastrointestinal organs and adjacent area, using half-scan reconstruction method. One important obstacle was that truncation of projection was caused by asymmetric location of flat-panel detector (FPD) in order to cover whole abdomen or pelvis in one rotation. In this study, we propose image mosaicing to extend projection data to make possible to reconstruct full field-of-view (FOV) image using half-scan reconstruction. Methods: The projections of prostate cancer patients were acquired using the X-ray Volume Imaging system (XVI, version 4.5) on Synergy linear accelerator system (Elekta, UK). The XVI system has three options of FOV, S, M and L, and M FOV was chosen for pelvic CBCT acquisition, with a FPD panel 11.5 cm offset. The method to produce extended projections consists of three main steps: First, normal three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction which contains whole pelvis was implemented using real projections. Second, virtual projections were produced by reprojection process of the reconstructed 3D image. Third, real and virtual projections in each angle were combined into one extended mosaic projection. Then, 4D CBCT images were reconstructed using our inhouse reconstruction software based on Feldkamp, Davis and Kress algorithm. The angular range of each reconstruction phase in the 4D reconstruction was 180 degrees, and the range moved as time progressed. Results: Projection data were successfully extended without discontinuous boundary between real and virtual projections. Using mosaic projections, 4D CBCT image sets were reconstructed without artifacts caused by the truncation, and thus, whole pelvis was clearly visible. Conclusion: The present method provides extended projections which contain whole pelvis. The presented reconstruction method also enables time-ordered 4D CBCT

  10. Propylthiouracil-Induced Vasculitis With Alveolar Hemorrhage Confirmed by Clinical, Laboratory, Computed Tomography, and Bronchoscopy Findings: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Yang, Xiaoqing; Sun, Shihai; Guo, Weina; Li, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Zhongliang; Han, Jie; Li, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Propylthiouracil (PTU) is commonly used to treat hyperthyroidism and can induce antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. Although this is a rare side effect, ANCA-associated vasculitis can progress to severe disease if its diagnosis and treatment are delayed, leading to a poor prognosis. Case Presentation A 43-year-old woman with Graves’ disease developed pulmonary vasculitis and diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) associated with ANCA against myeloperoxidase and proteinase-3 that was confirmed by computed tomography (CT) and bronchoscopy and treated with PTU. The symptoms and signs of alveolar hemorrhage were rapidly resolved after PTU withdrawal and treatment with corticosteroids. After 6 months of follow-up, the patient maintained complete ANCA-negative clinical remission status, as confirmed by normal CT and bronchoscopy findings. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of bronchoscopic comparison of PTU-induced DAH before and after steroid treatment. Conclusions Patients treated with PTU should be closely monitored and followed up, even if the drug has been used for several years. When patients develop progressive dyspnea with alveolar opacities on chest imaging that cannot be explained otherwise, alveolar hemorrhage should be an important differential diagnosis while investigating the case. Early diagnosis and prompt discontinuation of the PTU treatment are essential for improving patient outcomes. PMID:27257510

  11. Value of flexible bronchoscopy in the pre-operative work-up of solitary pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Carsten; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Bittner, Roland C; Mairinger, Thomas; Rüssmann, Holger; Bauer, Torsten T; Kaiser, Dirk; Loddenkemper, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The diagnostic value of flexible bronchoscopy in the pre-operative work-up of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN) is still under debate among pneumologists, radiologists and thoracic surgeons. In a prospective observational manner, flexible bronchoscopy was routinely performed in 225 patients with SPN of unknown origin. Of the 225 patients, 80.5% had lung cancer, 7.6% had metastasis of an extrapulmonary primary tumour and 12% had benign aetiology. Unsuspected endobronchial involvement was found in 4.4% of all 225 patients (or in 5.5% of patients with lung cancer). In addition, flexible bronchoscopy clarified the underlying aetiology in 41% of the cases. The bronchoscopic biopsy results from the SPN were positive in 84 (46.5%) patients with lung cancer. Surgery was cancelled due to the results of flexible bronchoscopy in four cases (involvement of the right main bronchus (impaired pulmonary function did not allow pneumonectomy) n=1, small cell lung cancer n=1, bacterial pneumonia n=2), and the surgical strategy had to be modified to bilobectomy in one patient. Flexible bronchoscopy changed the planned surgical approach in five cases substantially. These results suggest that routine flexible bronchoscopy should be included in the regular pre-operative work-up of patients with SPN. PMID:22496316

  12. SU-E-J-114: Towards Integrated CT and Ultrasound Guided Radiation Therapy Using A Robotic Arm with Virtual Springs

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, K; Zhang, Y; Sen, H; Lediju Bell, M; Goldstein, S; Kazanzides, P; Iordachita, I; Wong, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Currently there is an urgent need in Radiation Therapy for noninvasive and nonionizing soft tissue target guidance such as localization before treatment and continuous monitoring during treatment. Ultrasound is a portable, low cost option that can be easily integrated with the LINAC room. We are developing a cooperatively controlled robot arm that has high intrafraction reproducibility with repositioning of the ultrasound probe. In this study, we introduce virtual springs (VS) to assist with interfraction probe repositioning and we compare the soft tissue deformation introduced by VS to the deformation that would exist without them. Methods: Three metal markers were surgically implanted in the kidney of one dog. The dog was anesthetized and immobilized supine in an alpha cradle. The reference ultrasound probe position and force to ideally visualize the kidney was defined by an experienced ultrasonographer using the Clarity ultrasound system and robot sensor. For each interfraction study, the dog was removed from the cradle and re-setup based on CBCT with bony anatomy alignment to mimic regular patient setup. The ultrasound probe was automatically returned to the reference position using the robot. To accommodate the soft tissue anatomy changes between each setup the operator used the VS feature to adjust the probe and obtain an ultrasound image that matched the reference image. CBCT images were acquired and each interfraction marker location was compared with the first interfraction Result. Results: Analysis of the marker positions revealed that the kidney was displaced by 18.8 ± 6.4 mm without VS and 19.9 ± 10.5 mm with VS. No statistically significant differences were found between two procedures. Conclusion: The VS feature is necessary to obtain matching ultrasound images, and they do not introduce further changes to the tissue deformation. Future work will focus on automatic VS based on ultrasound feedback. Supported in part by: NCI R01 CA161613

  13. Efficacy and safety of electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy with or without radial endobronchial ultrasound for peripheral lung lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ozgul, Guler; Cetinkaya, Erdogan; Ozgul, Mehmet Akif; Abul, Yasin; Gencoglu, Atayla; Kamiloglu, Emine; Gul, Sule; Dincer, H. Erhan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy (ENB) is a promising new technology to increase the diagnostic yield of peripheral lung and mediastinal lesions. Conventional flexible bronchoscopy has a limited yield in peripheral pulmonary lesions, even in experienced hands. Radial endobronchial ultrasound (r-EBUS) with its real-time imaging capability can help to diagnose peripheral pulmonary lesions. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the diagnostic yield and safety of ENB with or without r-EBUS for peripheral lung lesions. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in a tertiary medical center, and 56 consecutive patients who were thought to be the best candidates for bronchoscopic biopsies at a multidisciplinary meeting were enrolled. ENB was performed under conscious sedation by using an electromagnetic tracking system with multiplanar reconstruction of previously acquired computed tomography (CT) data. Sampling was performed by biopsy forceps, endobronchial brush, and bronchoalveolar lavage. Results: Fifty-six patients (50 men and 6 women; mean age, 60 ± 9 years) were studied. While an electromagnetic navigation system was used in all patients, r-EBUS was used in 26 of 56 patients. The median diameter of the lesions was 30 mm (interquartile range: 23-44 mm). Mean distance of the lesions from the pleura was 14.9 ± 14.6 mm. Mean procedure time was 20 ± 11.5 min. Mean registration error was 5.8 ± 1.5 mm. Mean navigation error was 1.2 ± 0.5 mm. The diagnostic yield of the procedure was 71.4% for peripheral lesions (non-small cell lung cancer = 23, small cell lung cancer = 3, benign diseases = 14). Pneumothorax occurred in only 1 patient (1.7%). Conclusion: ENB with or without r-EBUS is a safe, efficient, and easily applied method for sampling of peripheral lung lesions, with high diagnostic yield independent of lesion size and location. PMID:27386477

  14. Electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy-guided fine needle aspiration for the diagnosis of lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Odronic, Shelley I; Gildea, Thomas R; Chute, Deborah J

    2014-12-01

    Many peripheral lung lesions are beyond the reach of conventional bronchoscopes, and require percutaneous CT-guided or open surgical biopsy, which carry increased risks to the patient. Electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy (ENB) is a relatively new technique, which uses an image guided localization system to direct steerable bronchoscopic tools to predetermined points within the bronchial tree. This technology allows improved access to peripheral lesions in particular. We investigated the sensitivity and specificity of ENB-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) in the diagnosis of lung lesions. All ENB-guided FNAs performed at one institution were included in the study. The superDimension i-Logic System™ was used in all cases. Pathologic reports of the ENB-guided FNAs, as well as all other pulmonary sampling performed simultaneously with the FNA and within 1 year of the ENB-guided FNA were reviewed. Patients with a positive ENB-guided FNA or malignancy within the same lobe within the follow-up period were considered positive for malignancy. Patients with an atypical diagnosis but no definitive malignancy were considered negative for malignancy for statistical purposes. Ninety-one patients underwent 95 ENB-guided FNAs over a 3-year period. Thirty-five patients (38%) were positive for malignancy. ENB-guided FNA had a sensitivity of 63% for the detection of malignancy. The sensitivity for the detection of malignancy using all ENB-guided sampling methods, including FNA, bronchoscopic biopsy, and bronchial brushing was 83%. Pathologists and cytotechnologists should be aware of ENB-guided FNA as an emerging technology with a relatively high sensitivity for the diagnosis of peripheral lung lesions.

  15. Perceptions of Research Bronchoscopy in Malawian Adults with Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lora, Wezzie; Khoo, Saye H.; Sloan, Derek J.; Mwandumba, Henry C.; Desmond, Nicola; Davies, Geraint R.

    2016-01-01

    Bronchoscopy is an established research tool in Malawi, enabling collection of pulmonary samples for immunological, pharmacological, and microbiological studies. It is, however, an invasive clinical procedure that offers no direct benefit to volunteering participants when used in a research capacity alone, and thus informed consent is essential. This study aimed to explore TB patients’ understanding of research bronchoscopy, what would motivate them to participate in research bronchoscopy, and their concerns, in order to inform consenting processes for future clinical studies. We used a qualitative research design. Two focus group discussions were conducted with community members and TB patients to understand their perceptions of bronchoscopy. Transcripts were coded by multiple co-authors and thematic content analysis was used to analyse main findings. We found that Malawian patients with pulmonary TB were willing to participate in a study using research bronchoscopy for health assessment and access to improved healthcare. We identified information of value to potential participants when consenting to that may lessen some of the anxieties expressed by participants. Patient and public involvement is essential to improve informed consent and institutional trust. PMID:27792765

  16. [Neonatal bronchoscopy: a retrospective analysis of 67 cases and a review of their indications].

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Santos, J A; Pereira-da-Silva, L; Clington, A; Serelha, M

    2004-01-01

    The availability of newer, more sophisticated and versatile bronchoscopes has expanded the spectrum and scope of the indications for bronchoscopy in the newborn infant both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The aim of this study was to carry out a retrospective analysis of the bronchoscopies performed on newborn infants, and to review the indications of this procedure in this age group. Sixty-three patients were submitted to 67 bronchoscopies in a period of 13 years, allowing the diagnosis of 45 anomalies and malformations of the tracheo-bronchial tree, and the performance of 24 bronchoalveolar lavages. In six cases, endoscopic removal of secretions helped to resolve resistant atelectasia, while in another case, with esophageal atresia, intra-operative definition of the fistula tract was possible through catheterisation of the fistula with the bronchoscope. The flexible bronchoscope was preferred for diagnosis by direct visualisation, and the rigid bronchoscope for some diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Stridor, unexplained cyanosis, hemoptysis, persistent or recurrent pulmonary images, difficulties in the intubation or extubation, and persistent disturbances in ventilation are among the main indications for bronchoscopy in the newborn infant. Bronchoscopy also allows the performance of subsidiary techniques, such as bronchoalveolar lavage, biopsy and laser therapy. PMID:16197839

  17. Development of a standardized nomenclature for bronchoscopy of the respiratory system of harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena).

    PubMed

    Harper, C M; Borkowski, R; Hoffman, A M; Warner, A

    2001-06-01

    Respiratory disease is common in captive and wild cetaceans. Bronchoscopy may permit early diagnosis of respiratory disease in dolphins and porpoises. Refinement of cetacean bronchoscopy requires development of a nomenclature system to facilitate description of the anatomic site at which lesions occur. A standard bronchoscopic nomenclature also permits serial evaluations of lesions and enhances communication between veterinarians. In this project, we adapted the bronchoscopic nomenclature devised by Amis and McKiernan for the dog and horse to the harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena). Silastic and air-dried models of the bronchial tree of the harbor porpoise were made to illustrate the anatomy and devise the nomenclature. Bronchial anatomy was consistent among the four porpoise lungs studied. The Amis and McKiernan nomenclature was readily adaptable to the harbor porpoise lung with minor modifications and may be useful for cetacean bronchoscopy.

  18. Rigid Bronchoscopy in Airway Foreign Bodies: Value of the Clinical and Radiological Signs

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Kunjan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Foreign body in airway is a common emergency in ENT practice. As we know, Rigid Bronchoscopy is the method of choice for removing it, although at times it leads to specialists performing unnecessary bronchoscopy, exposing patients to hazards of general anesthesia. Objective  The objective of my study is to calculate sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, odds ratio from the clinical and radiological signs, comparing with the gold standard, the rigid bronchoscope procedure. Method  This is a prospective analytical study designed at University Teaching Hospital and conducted over a period of 18 months, from March 2011 to August 2012. Data collection was broadly classified into three different categories: (1) Symptomatology, such as presence or absence of choking, cyanosis, and difficulty in breathing; (2) Clinical signs, such as the presence or absence of air entry, crackles, and rhonchi 3. Chest X-ray findings were suggestive of a foreign body. Results  There were a total of 40 rigid bronchoscopies performed under general anesthesia for the diagnosis and therapeutic reasons. Among 40 patients who underwent rigid bronchoscopy, 32 (80%) were found to have varieties of foreign bodies in their airway while 8 patients (20%) had negative bronchoscopy. The history of choking is the only clinical symptoms which came out to be statistically Significant (p = 0.043) with odds ratio of 5. Conclusion  Rigid bronchoscopy is the gold standard technique for diagnosis and procedure of choice to remove FB from airway. Regardless, it still presents a small chance of negative result, especially when there is no history of aspiration. PMID:27413398

  19. Extraction of a Large Central Airway Foreign Body Using Flexible Bronchoscopy Combined with an Endobronchial Blocker

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Adult foreign body (FB) aspiration is an uncommon but potentially fatal event. Options for extraction include flexible bronchoscopy (FLXB), rigid bronchoscopy (RB), and surgical extraction. We report the case of a large, smooth aspirated rock causing airway obstruction in an elderly male. RB is generally the preferred approach for extraction of a large complex FB; however, due to its size, the FB had to be removed using FLXB combined with an endobronchial blocker. In this report, we describe the anesthetic and surgical considerations and the novel technique used to extract the FB. PMID:27274879

  20. Status Asthmaticus: use of acetylcysteine during bronchoscopy and lavage to remove mucous plugs.

    PubMed

    Millman, M; Goodman, A H; Goldstein, I M; Millman, F M; Van Campen, S S

    1983-02-01

    Three patients suffering from severe, chronic, bronchial asthma underwent bronchoscopy and lavage, using in the irrigant fluid acetylcysteine, isoetharine and Solu-Medrol. All patients had a large amount of thick mucus in the tracheobronchial tree which was removed during the lavage. Following the lavage, all three patients were easily treated with conventional allergic measures and were able to lead normal lives, which they could not do before. A discussion of the precautions to be taken by the medical-surgical team in charge of a patient undergoing bronchoscopy and lavage is made. These conclusions were based on the results of two previous reports by the authors in addition to the present communication.

  1. Full Airway Drainage by Fiber Bronchoscopy Through Artificial Airway in the Treatment of Occult Traumatic Atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Hong; Zhang, Yun; Liang, Zhong Yan; Zhang, Shao Yang; Yu, Wen Qiao; Huang, Fang-Fang

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of full airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway in the treatment of traumatic atelectasis with occult manifestations. From May 2006 to May 2011, 40 cases of occult traumatic atelectasis were enrolled into our prospective study. Group A (n = 18) received drainage by nasal bronchoscope; group B underwent airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway (n = 22). The effects of treatment were evaluated by the incidence of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), lung abscess, and the average length of hospital stay. Compared with nasal fiber-optic treatment, airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway reduced the incidence of ARDS (p = 0.013) and lung abscess (p = 0.062) and shortened the mean length of stay (p = 0.018). Making the decision to create an artificial airway timely and carry out lung lavage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway played a significant role in the treatment of occult traumatic atelectasis. PMID:27011511

  2. Full Airway Drainage by Fiber Bronchoscopy Through Artificial Airway in the Treatment of Occult Traumatic Atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Hong; Zhang, Yun; Liang, Zhong Yan; Zhang, Shao Yang; Yu, Wen Qiao; Huang, Fang-Fang

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of full airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway in the treatment of traumatic atelectasis with occult manifestations. From May 2006 to May 2011, 40 cases of occult traumatic atelectasis were enrolled into our prospective study. Group A (n = 18) received drainage by nasal bronchoscope; group B underwent airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway (n = 22). The effects of treatment were evaluated by the incidence of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), lung abscess, and the average length of hospital stay. Compared with nasal fiber-optic treatment, airway drainage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway reduced the incidence of ARDS (p = 0.013) and lung abscess (p = 0.062) and shortened the mean length of stay (p = 0.018). Making the decision to create an artificial airway timely and carry out lung lavage by fiber bronchoscopy through artificial airway played a significant role in the treatment of occult traumatic atelectasis.

  3. Distributed practice. The more the merrier? A randomised bronchoscopy simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Bjerrum, Anne Sofie; Eika, Berit; Charles, Peder; Hilberg, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The distribution of practice affects the acquisition of skills. Distributed practice has shown to be more effective for skills acquisition than massed training. However, it remains unknown as to which is the most effective distributed practice schedule for learning bronchoscopy skills through simulation training. This study compares two distributed practice schedules: One-day distributed practice and weekly distributed practice. Method Twenty physicians in training were randomly assigned to one-day distributed or weekly distributed bronchoscopy simulation practice. Performance was assessed with a pre-test, a post-test after each practice session, and a 4-week retention test using previously validated simulator measures. Data were analysed with repeated measures ANOVA. Results No interaction was found between group and test (F(4,72) <1.68, p>0.16), except for the measure ‘percent-segments-entered’, and no main effect of group was found for any of the measures (F(1,72)< 0.87, p>0.36), which indicates that there was no difference between the learning curves of the one-day distributed practice schedule and the weekly distributed practice schedule. Discussion We found no difference in effectiveness of bronchoscopy skills acquisition between the one-day distributed practice and the weekly distributed practice. This finding suggests that the choice of bronchoscopy training practice may be guided by what best suits the clinical practice. PMID:27172423

  4. Prospective study of percutaneous tracheostomy: Role of bronchoscopy and surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Laisaar, Tanel; Jakobson, Eero; Sarana, Bruno; Sarapuu, Silver; Vahtramäe, Jüri; Raag, Mait

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Percutaneous tracheostomy is a common procedure but varies considerably in approach. The aim of our study was to evaluate the need for intraoperative bronchoscopy and to compare various surgical techniques. Methods: During 1 year all percutaneous tracheostomies in three intensive care units were prospectively documented according to a unified protocol. In one unit, bronchoscopy was used routinely and in others only during the study. Results: A total of 111 subjects (77 males) with median age 64 (range, 18–86) years and body mass index 25.4 (range, 15.9–50.7) were included. In unit A, tracheal wall was directly exposed; in unit B, limited dissection to enable tracheal palpation was made. In both units, bronchoscopy was used to check the location of an already inserted guiding needle; needle position required correction in 8% and 12% of cases, respectively. In unit C, in tracheostomies without pretracheal tissue dissection, bronchoscopy was used to guide needle insertion; needle position required correction in 66% of cases. Median duration of operations performed by thoracic surgeons and residents was 10 (range, 3–37) min and by intensive care doctors and residents was 16.5 (range, 3–63) min (p < 0.001). Time from the beginning of preparations for tracheostomy until the end of the whole procedure was median 32 min for bedside tracheostomies and 64 min for operations in the operating theatre (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Limited pretracheal tissue dissection enabled proper guiding needle insertion and bronchoscopy was rarely needed. Percutaneous tracheostomies performed by thoracic surgeons took less time, and duration of the whole procedure was remarkably shorter when performed at bedside. PMID:27708779

  5. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    MedlinePlus

    ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography (Virtual colonoscopy) ... time and for your attention! Spotlight Recently posted: Video: Ultrasound-guided Breast Biopsy Video: Breast MRI Video: ...

  6. Applying microCT and 3D visualization to Jurassic silicified conifer seed cones: A virtual advantage over thin-sectioning1

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Carole T.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: As an alternative to conventional thin-sectioning, which destroys fossil material, high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (also called microtomography or microCT) integrated with scientific visualization, three-dimensional (3D) image segmentation, size analysis, and computer animation is explored as a nondestructive method of imaging the internal anatomy of 150-million-year-old conifer seed cones from the Late Jurassic Morrison Formation, USA, and of recent and other fossil cones. • Methods: MicroCT was carried out on cones using a General Electric phoenix v|tome|x s 240D, and resulting projections were processed with visualization software to produce image stacks of serial single sections for two-dimensional (2D) visualization, 3D segmented reconstructions with targeted structures in color, and computer animations. • Results: If preserved in differing densities, microCT produced images of internal fossil tissues that showed important characters such as seed phyllotaxy or number of seeds per cone scale. Color segmentation of deeply embedded seeds highlighted the arrangement of seeds in spirals. MicroCT of recent cones was even more effective. • Conclusions: This is the first paper on microCT integrated with 3D segmentation and computer animation applied to silicified seed cones, which resulted in excellent 2D serial sections and segmented 3D reconstructions, revealing features requisite to cone identification and understanding of strobilus construction. PMID:25202495

  7. Three-dimensional CT imaging and virtual endoscopy for the placement of self-expandable stents in oesophageal and tracheobronchial neoplastic stenoses.

    PubMed

    Di Simone, M P; Mattioli, S; D'Ovidio, F; Bassi, F

    2003-01-01

    We examined the value of multislice computed tomography (CT) with three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the images as a pre-treatment examination in order to plan endoluminal stenting in 14 patients with large tumours involving the oesophagus and/or the tracheobronchial tree. The measurement of the stenosis obtained during 3D reconstruction of the CT images corresponded to that obtained by endoscopy and to the prosthesis chosen in all cases, with the exception of one patient undergoing double stenting due to inadequate gaseous distension of the oesophageal lumen. 3D CT may add information with respect to axial imaging, and be helpful to better plan and perform stenting of the oesophagus and airways without burdening the preoperative work-up.

  8. Postmortem virtual volumetry of the heart and lung in situ using CT data for investigating terminal cardiopulmonary pathophysiology in forensic autopsy.

    PubMed

    Sogawa, Nozomi; Michiue, Tomomi; Kawamoto, Osamu; Oritani, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Takaki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2014-07-01

    Postmortem CT (PM-CT) is useful to investigate the viscera in situ before opening the body cavity at autopsy. The present study investigated heart and lung volumes in situ with regard to the cause of death as possible indexes of terminal cardiopulmonary dysfunction by means of PM-CT data analysis of forensic autopsy cases within 3 days postmortem (n=70). Estimated heart volume was larger in sudden cardiac death (SCD; n=10) and fatal methamphetamine abuse (n=5) than in other groups, including mechanical asphyxiation (n=12), drowning (n=11), acute alcohol/sedative-hypnotic intoxication (n=8), fire fatality (n=12), hyperthermia (heatstroke; n=6) and fatal hypothermia (cold exposure; n=6). Estimated combined lung volume was larger in drowning, smaller in fire fatality due to carbon monoxide intoxication and SCD, and intermediate in other groups. Volume ratio of the lung to heart was higher in drowning, lower in SCD, and intermediate or varied in other groups; high and low ratios can indicate predominant/antecedent pulmonary and cardiac dysfunctions, respectively. These findings provide quantitative data that are not available at conventional autopsy or by routine two-dimensional CT morphology to assess three-dimensional gross heart and lung morphologies for interpreting terminal cardiopulmonary pathophysiology, detecting significant difference between SCD and other causes of death, especially mechanical asphyxiation and drowning.

  9. Web-based versus traditional lecture: are they equally effective as a flexible bronchoscopy teaching method?

    PubMed

    Mata, Caio Augusto Sterse; Ota, Luiz Hirotoshi; Suzuki, Iunis; Telles, Adriana; Miotto, Andre; Leão, Luiz Eduardo Vilaça

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the traditional live lecture to a web-based approach in the teaching of bronchoscopy and evaluates the positive and negative aspects of both methods. We developed a web-based bronchoscopy curriculum, which integrates texts, images and animations. It was applied to first-year interns, who were later administered a multiple-choice test. Another group of eight first-year interns received the traditional teaching method and the same test. The two groups were compared using the Student's t-test. The mean scores (± SD) of students who used the website were 14.63 ± 1.41 (range 13-17). The test scores of the other group had the same range, with a mean score of 14.75 ± 1. The Student's t-test showed no difference between the test results. The common positive point noted was the presence of multimedia content. The web group cited as positive the ability to review the pages, and the other one the role of the teacher. Web-based bronchoscopy education showed results similar to the traditional live lecture in effectiveness. PMID:22108938

  10. Dexmedetomidine-fentanyl versus propofol-fentanyl in flexible bronchoscopy: A randomized study

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, FENG; FU, HONGGUANG; YANG, PENGJU; SUN, KAI; WU, SHUBIAO; LV, MIAOMIAO; DONG, ZHENZHEN; DONG, TIELI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a combination of dexmedetomidine and fentanyl on peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and hemodynamic stability in patients undergoing flexible bronchoscopy. One hundred patients undergoing elective flexible bronchoscopy were randomized into either a propofol-fentanyl group (PF group; n=50) or a dexmedetomidine-fentanyl group (DF group; n=50). SpO2 values, heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), patients' cough scores and discomfort scores as determined by patients and bronchoscopists, levels of sedation, number of times that additional lidocaine was required, elapsed time until recovery, and adverse events were recorded. The mean SpO2 values in the DF group were significantly higher than those in the PF group (P<0.01), and HR, SBP and DBP were significantly lower in the DF group than in the PF group (P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of cough scores or discomfort scores, sedation levels, or number of times that additional lidocaine was required (P>0.05). Elapsed time until recovery in the DF group was significantly longer than in the PF group (P=0.002). The incidence of hypoxemia was significantly lower in the DF group than in the PF group (P=0.027), but the incidence of bradycardia was significantly higher in the DF group than in the PF group (P=0.037). Dexmedetomidine-fentanyl was superior to propofol-fentanyl in providing satisfactory SpO2. Furthermore, dexmedetomidine-fentanyl attenuated hemodynamic responses during bronchoscopy and maintained hemodynamic stability in the early stage of the procedure. PMID:27347086

  11. Topical Nasal Anesthesia in Flexible Bronchoscopy – A Cross-Over Comparison between Two Devices

    PubMed Central

    Fuehner, Thomas; Fuge, Jan; Jungen, Meike; Buck, Anna; Suhling, Hendrik; Welte, Tobias; Gottlieb, Jens; Greer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Topical airway anesthesia is known to improve tolerance and patient satisfaction during flexible bronchoscopy (FB). Lidocaine is commonly used, delivered as an atomized spray. The current study assesses safety and patient satisfaction for nasal anesthesia of a new atomization device during outpatient bronchoscopy in lung transplant recipients. Methods Using a prospective, non-blinded, cross-over design, patients enrolled between 01-10-2014 and 24-11-2014 received 2% lidocaine using the standard reusable nasal atomizer (CRNA). Those enrolled between 25-11-2014 and 30-01-2015, received a disposable intranasal mucosal atomization device (DIMAD). After each procedure, the treating physician, their assistant and the patient independently rated side-effects and satisfaction, basing their responses on visual analogue scales (VAS). At their next scheduled bronchoscopy during the study period, patients then received the alternative atomizer. Written consent was obtained prior to the first bronchoscopy, and the study approved by the institutional ethics committee. Results Of the 252 patients enrolled between 01-10-2014 and 30-01-2015, 80 (32%) received both atomizers. Physicians reported better efficacy (p = 0.001) and fewer side effects (p< = 0.001) for DIMAD in patients exposed to both procedures. Among patients with one visit, physicians and their assistants reported improved efficacy (p = 0.018, p = 0.002) and fewer side effects (p< = 0.001, p = 0.029) for the disposable atomizer, whereas patients reported no difference in efficacy or side effects (p = 0.72 and p = 0.20). No severe adverse events were noted. The cost of the reusable device was 4.08€ per procedure, compared to 3.70€ for the disposable device. Discussion Topical nasal anesthesia via a disposable intranasal mucosal atomization device (DIMAD) offers comparable safety and patient comfort, compared to conventional reusable nasal atomizers (CRNA) in lung transplant recipients. Procedural costs

  12. Bronchoscopy: Diagnostic and Therapeutic for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Thomas L; Berkheim, David B

    2016-07-01

    The bronchoscope has gone through much advancement from its origin as a thin metal tube. It has become a highly sophisticated tool for clinicians. Both rigid and the flexible bronchoscopes are invaluable in the diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Treatment of this disease process hinges on accurate diagnosis and lymph node staging. Technologies, such as endobronchial ultrasound, navigational bronchoscopy, and autofluorescence, have improved efficacy of endobronchial diagnosis and sample collection. If a patient is not a candidate for surgery and has a complication from a centrally located mass, the bronchoscope has been used to deliver palliative therapies. PMID:27261910

  13. Design of a swept-source, anatomical OCT system for pediatric bronchoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesundara, Kushal C.; Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2013-03-01

    We describe the design and performance of a long coherence length, swept-source anatomical OCT (aOCT) system for pediatric airway imaging. A fiber-optic catheter is designed to be accommodated by a small-bore bronchoscope, and is scanned distally in a helical scan pattern to provide aOCT during bronchoscopy. We discuss particular challenges associated with the need for large imaging range, low SNR roll-off, and small catheter diameter. We present 3-D visualizations of airway phantoms and discuss optimization of the airway surface geometry obtained by aOCT. Accurate reconstruction of airway geometry will enable predictive modeling of patients suffering from airway obstruction.

  14. Demographic and Clinical Findings in Children Undergoing Bronchoscopy for Foreign Body Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Mojgan; Manesh, Mohammad Reza Hashemi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Foreign body aspiration (FBA) is a significant cause of airway distress, mortality, and morbidity in children. Diagnosis of FBA can be challenging and is sometimes delayed for weeks or even months. If not diagnosed and treated promptly, FBA can result in serious consequences. Methods: For this retrospective study, we investigated the medical records of 89 children who underwent bronchoscopy for suspected FBA and recorded relevant demographic, clinical, and treatment data. Results: Of the 89 patients identified for this study, 51 had a definitive diagnosis of FBA. Among these patients, choking, chronic cough and wheezing, cyanosis, and dyspnea were the most frequent symptoms of FBA. The foreign bodies were located in the left bronchus (45.1%), the right bronchus (35.3%), the trachea (15.7%), and in both the right and left bronchi (3.9%). Seeds were the most prevalent foreign body, found in 39.2% of the patients. Conclusion: Lack of complete medical history in patients with suspected FBA is one of the main causes of delayed FBA diagnosis. Bronchoscopy is considered the definitive diagnostic method for FBA and should be conducted in all patients with suspected FBA because of the low risk of complications and reduced probability that FBA diagnosis and treatment will be delayed. PMID:27303219

  15. Cytological analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid acquired by bronchoscopy in healthy ferrets: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bercier, Marjorie; Langlois, Isabelle; Dunn, Marilyn; Hélie, Pierre; Burns, Patrick; Gara-Boivin, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the normal cytological evaluation of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in healthy adult ferrets (N = 12). These ferrets underwent bronchoscopy and BAL using sterile saline [1.5 mL/kg body weight (BW)]. Percentage of fluid recovered, total leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count, and cell count of the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) were determined. The mean percentage of lavage volume recovered from the right lung and left lung were 67.8 ± 14.9% and 69.7 ± 20.0%, respectively. Gender (P = 0.12) and weight (P = 0.17) did not significantly affect the mean percentage of recovered volume. The mean percentage of recovered volume (P = 0.47) and the mean leukocyte count (P = 0.17) from the right and left lung were not significantly different. Macrophages were the main leukocyte component of the lavages, followed by neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. The mean proportion of ELF in BAL fluid was 9.3 ± 3.7% v/v. Bronchoscopy is clinically useful for collecting good quality BAL samples for cytological analysis in ferrets. The leucocyte differential was established, which may help veterinarians to make better clinical decisions when treating respiratory disease. Further studies are required with a larger group in order to establish the healthy reference intervals for BAL values in ferrets. PMID:26733735

  16. CT -- Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special x-ray ... Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  17. Measuring learning gain during a one-day introductory bronchoscopy course

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Mohsen; Murgu, Septimiu; Zamanian Rohani, Nazanin

    2010-01-01

    Background Rigorous assessment of medical knowledge and technical skill inspires learning, reinforces confidence, and reassures the public. Identifying curricular effectiveness using objective measures of learning is therefore crucial for competency-oriented program development in a learner-centric educational environment. The aim of this study was to determine whether various measures of learning, including class-averagenormalized gain, can be used to assess the effectiveness of a one-day introductory bronchoscopy course curriculum. Methods We conducted a quasi-experimental one-group pre-test/post-test study at the University of California, Irvine. The group comprised 24 first-year pulmonary and critical care trainees from eight training institutions in southern California. Class-average normalized gain, single-student normalized gain, absolute gain, and relative gain were used as objective measures of cognitive knowledge and bronchoscopy technical skill learning. A class-average normalized gain of 30% was used to determine curricular effectiveness. Perceived educational value using Likert-scale surveys and post-course questionnaires was determined during and 3 months after course participation. Results Mean test scores of cognitive knowledge improved significantly from 48 to 66% (p = 0.043). Absolute gain for the class was 18%, relative gain was 37%, classaverage normalized gain 〈g〉 was 34%, and the average of thesingle-student normalized gains g(ave) was 29%. Mean test scores of technical skill improved significantly from 43 to 77% (p = 0.017). Absolute gain was 34%, relative gain was 78%, classaverage normalized gain 〈g〉 was 60%, and the average of thesingle-student normalized gains g(ave) was 59%. Statistically significant improvements in absolute gain were noted in all five elements of technical skill (p < 0.05). Likert-scale surveys, questionnaires, and surveys demonstrated strong perceived educational value. Conclusion The effectiveness

  18. Respiratory bronchoscopy of subadult American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and tracheal wash evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lafortune, Maud; Göbel, Thomas; Jacobson, Elliot; Heard, Darryl; Brown, Dan; Alleman, Rick; Vliet, Kent; Harr, Kendal E; Hernandez, Jorge

    2005-03-01

    Twelve healthy approximately 3-yr-old captive-born 4.5-9 kg American alligators (Alligator mississipiensis) each had bronchoscopy and tracheal washes performed four times during a 10-mo period to evaluate seasonal respiratory microbiology and cytology. Cytologic evaluation of most samples showed a small amount of mucus and low numbers of ciliated columnar epithelium, cubodial epithelium, and keratinized squamous cells. No bacteria or parasites were observed, and there was no seasonal variation in the cytology. No significant bacterial or fungal growth was identified in any season. Hematology performed in the spring and fall evaluations showed seasonal variation in the red blood cell count, hemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, eosinophil count, and thrombocyte count. The lower respiratory tract (at the tracheal level) of healthy subadult alligators appears to be sterile, and cytology is similar to that described in domestic mammals. PMID:17315452

  19. Removal of Endobronchially Placed Vascular Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Using Flexible Bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kremens, Karol

    2016-04-01

    Self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) are commonly placed in malignant airway obstruction and sometimes in benign obstruction. Complications from SEMS placement are common, especially after 30 days from deployment. SEMS removal can be complicated and often involves significant resources. We report a case of a 78-year-old man with small cell carcinoma who underwent placement of a Luminexx endovascular stent in his right main stem bronchus, complicated by stent migration after initiation of chemotherapy. Stent removal was performed by flexible bronchoscopy, utilizing forceps inserted via a working channel, as well as a goose neck snare operated parallel to the bronchoscope. The patient was discharged the same day with no complications. PMID:27197344

  20. Detection of drug-resistance genes using single bronchoscopy biopsy specimens.

    PubMed

    Trussardi-Regnier, Aurelie; Millot, Jean-Marc; Gorisse, Marie-Claude; Delvincourt, Chantal; Prevost, Alain

    2007-09-01

    Expression of three major resistance genes MDR1, MRP1 and LRP was investigated in small cell lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and metastasis. Single biopsies of bronchoscopy from 73 patients were performed to investigate expression of these three resistance genes by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Relations between gene expression and patient age, smoking status, histology, and chemotherapy were evaluated. A more frequent expression of MDR1 (77 versus 66%), MRP1 (91 versus 72%) and LRP (77 versus 63%) genes was detected in the malignant biopsies than in the non-malignant, respectively. In the metastasis biopsies, expression of these genes was markedly increased. No significant difference was observed between specimens before and after chemotherapy. Biopsies from progressing cancer showed higher MDR1, MRP1 and LRP gene expression. In conclusion, these data reveal a major role of MRP1 in intrinsic resistance and the high gene expression of MDR1 and MRP1 in relapsed diseases.

  1. The utility of fiberoptic bronchoscopy in the evaluation of the solitary pulmonary nodule.

    PubMed

    Torrington, K G; Kern, J D

    1993-10-01

    To determine the value of routine, preoperative, fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FB) for diagnosing and treating patients (pts) with solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs), we retrospectively reviewed the records of all pts with SPNs undergoing FB at Walter Reed Army Medical Center between January 1986 and December 1989. We defined SPNs radiographically as < or = 6 cm peripheral pulmonary lesions completely surrounded by pulmonary parenchyma. Of 191 charts reviewed, 91 (72 bronchogenic carcinomas [BC], 7 carcinoid tumors, 12 benign) constitute the study population. Fifty-four charts were eliminated because preoperative, clinical-radiologic staging revealed advanced (greater than stage I) BC or extrathoracic malignancy metastatic to the lung (44), the clinicians suspected benign disease and elected medical followup (3), the pt had medically inoperable disease (3), or the pt refused surgery (4). Forty-six charts were incomplete or unavailable. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed one unsuspected vocal cord carcinoma and no occult synchronous BCs. Five pts had submucosal or endobronchial tumors and biopsy specimens showed BC in four of five tumors from which specimens were taken. Four of 66 (6 percent) cytologic evaluations of bronchial brushings or washings diagnosed BC. In pts shown at surgery to have BC, 9 of 30 transbronchial lung biopsy (TBBx) specimens showed BC. Diagnostic yield of TBBx specimens was not improved in the pts who underwent biopsies under fluoroscopic guidance. The 16 FB specimens positive for BC concurred 100 percent with the surgical specimens. The FB findings did not obviate the need for surgery nor alter the surgical stage of BC. A preoperative diagnosis of malignancy did not affect operative time or operative procedure, because many pts required frozen-section biopsy of mediastinal lymph nodes prior to lung resection. At our institution, routine, preoperative FB did not measurably benefit pts with SPNs. PMID:8404158

  2. Fiber optic bronchoscopy-assisted percutaneous tracheostomy: a decade of experience at a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Carlos M.; Cornejo, Rodrigo; Tobar, Eduardo; Gálvez, Ricardo; Luengo, Cecilia; Estuardo, Nivia; Neira, Rodolfo; Navarro, José Luis; Abarca, Osvaldo; Ruiz, Mauricio; Berasaín, María Angélica; Neira, Wilson; Arellano, Daniel; Llanos, Osvaldo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous tracheostomy by means of single-step dilation with fiber optic bronchoscopy assistance in critical care patients under mechanical ventilation. Methods Between the years 2004 and 2014, 512 patients with indication of tracheostomy according to clinical criteria, were prospectively and consecutively included in our study. One-third of them were high-risk patients. Demographic variables, APACHE II score, and days on mechanical ventilation prior to percutaneous tracheostomy were recorded. The efficacy of the procedure was evaluated according to an execution success rate and based on the necessity of switching to an open surgical technique. Safety was evaluated according to post-operative and operative complication rates. Results The mean age of the group was 64 ± 18 years (203 women and 309 males). The mean APACHE II score was 21 ± 3. Patients remained an average of 11 ± 3 days on mechanical ventilation before percutaneous tracheostomy was performed. All procedures were successfully completed without the need to switch to an open surgical technique. Eighteen patients (3.5%) presented procedure complications. Five patients experienced transient desaturation, 4 presented low blood pressure related to sedation, and 9 presented minor bleeding, but none required a transfusion. No serious complications or deaths associated with the procedure were recorded. Eleven patients (2.1%) presented post-operative complications. Seven presented minor and transitory bleeding of the percutaneous tracheostomy stoma, 2 suffered displacement of the tracheostomy cannula, and 2 developed a superficial infection of the stoma. Conclusion Percutaneous tracheostomy using the single-step dilation technique with fiber optic bronchoscopy assistance seems to be effective and safe in critically ill patients under mechanical ventilation when performed by experienced intensive care specialists using a standardized procedure. PMID:26340151

  3. Bronchoscopy-Derived Correlates of Lung Injury following Inhalational Injuries: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Samuel W.; Zhou, Haibo; Ortiz-Pujols, Shiara M.; Maile, Robert; Herbst, Margaret; Joyner Jr, Benny L.; Zhang, Hongtao; Kesic, Matthew; Jaspers, Ilona; Short, Kathleen A.; Meyer, Anthony A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major factor determining morbidity following burns and inhalational injury. In experimental models, factors potentially contributing to ALI risk include inhalation of toxins directly causing cell damage; inflammation; and infection. However, few studies have been done in humans. Methods We carried out a prospective observational study of patients admitted to the NC Jaycees Burn Center who were intubated and on mechanical ventilation for burns and suspected inhalational injury. Subjects were enrolled over an 8-month period and followed till discharge or death. Serial bronchial washings from clinically-indicated bronchoscopies were collected and analyzed for markers of cell injury and inflammation. These markers were compared with clinical markers of ALI. Results Forty-three consecutive patients were studied, with a spectrum of burn and inhalation injury severity. Visible soot at initial bronchoscopy and gram negative bacteria in the lower respiratory tract were associated with ALI in univariate analyses. Subsequent multivariate analysis also controlled for % body surface area burns, infection, and inhalation severity. Elevated IL-10 and reduced IL-12p70 in bronchial washings were statistically significantly associated with ALI. Conclusions Independently of several factors including initial inhalational injury severity, infection, and extent of surface burns, high early levels of IL-10 and low levels of IL-12p70 in the central airways are associated with ALI in patients intubated after acute burn/inhalation injury. Lower airway secretions can be collected serially in critically ill burn/inhalation injury patients and may yield important clues to specific pathophysiologic pathways. PMID:23691180

  4. Relationship Between Lung Cancer and Mycobacterium Avium Complex Isolated Using Bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Atsuhisa; Hebisawa, Akira; Kusaka, Kei; Hirose, Takashi; Suzuki, Junko; Yamane, Akira; Nagai, Hideaki; Fukami, Takeshi; Ohta, Ken; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC)-positive respiratory specimen cultures and MAC lung disease (MACLD) is increasing worldwide. This retrospective study aimed to assess the association between MAC culture-positive bronchoscopy specimens and lung cancer. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 1382 untreated lung cancer patients between 2003 and 2011 were collected using our hospital database. Of them, records for 1258 that had undergone bronchoscopy together with sampling for mycobacterial culture were reviewed. Patient characteristics were compared between those with MAC-positive/other nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM)-negative bronchial washings and those with MAC-negative/other NTM-negative bronchial washings. Patients with MAC-positive lung cancer were cross-sectionally divided into MACLD and non-MACLD groups, and their features were assessed. Follow-up data for patients with lung cancer but without MACLD were reviewed for subsequent development of MACLD. Results: Of the 1258 patients with lung cancer, 25 (2.0%) had MAC-positive/other NTM-negative bronchial washings. The proportion of women (52% vs 30%; P = 0.0274) and patient age (72 years vs 69 years; P = 0.0380) were significantly higher in the MAC-positive/other NTM-negative lung cancer group (n = 25) than in the MAC-negative/other NTM-negative lung cancer group (n = 1223). There were 10 patients with lung cancer and MACLD and 15 without MACLD; significant differences in patient characteristics were not found between the two groups, and none of the 15 patients without MACLD subsequently developed MACLD. Conclusion: MAC culture-positive bronchial washing is positively associated with lung cancer. Female sex and advanced age, but not lung cancer characteristics, were found to be associated with MAC infection in patients with lung cancer. PMID:27335625

  5. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  6. Impact of Endobronchial Ultrasound Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration on Diagnostic Yield of Bronchoscopy in Patients with Mediastinal Lymph Node Enlargement.

    PubMed

    Osinka, K; Zielińska-Krawczyk, M; Korczyński, P; Górnicka, B; Krenke, R

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) had an enormous impact on the current advancement in diagnostic bronchoscopy. The aims of the present study were: (1) to evaluate the added value of EBUS-TBNA to routine diagnostic bronchoscopy performed in patients with mediastinal lymph node enlargement and (2) to identify factors that affect the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA. We retrospectively analyzed 712 EBUS-TBNA procedures out of the 4081 bronchoscopies performed in the years 2009-2014. The number of EBUS-TBNA procedures increased from 61 (8.8 % of all bronchoscopies) in 2009 to 160 (21.4 %) in 2014. In 625 (87.8 %) patients adequate cytological material was obtained. Based on cytological examination of EBUS-TBNA aspirates, specific diagnosis was made in 367 (51.5 %) patients. The forceps biopsy of endobronchial lesions provided specific diagnosis in only 204 (28.6 %) patients. The percentage of patients with EBUS-TBNA based diagnosis increased steadily from 34.4 % in 2009 to 65.0 % in 2014 (p < 0.0001). The median lymph node diameter in patients with positive EBUS-TBNA findings was 20 (IQR 15-30) mm and was significantly larger than that in patients with negative EBUS-TBNA results (15 (IQR 10-20) mm, p = 0.0001). The highest diagnostic yield (78.5 %) was found in patients with lymph node dimension between 31 mm and 40 mm. We conclude that EBUS-TBNA is a valuable diagnostic method in an unselected group of patients with mediastinal lymph node enlargement. The percentage of positive EBUS-TBNA diagnoses is related to lymph node dimensions. The overall efficacy of EBUS-TBNA improves with increasing years of experience. PMID:26987324

  7. [Development and design of a new sonography rigid bronchoscopy and corollary vacuum-assisted biopsy device system].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Xiangdong; Tan, Xiaojiang; Zhang, Ruixiang; Dong, Fuwen

    2014-02-01

    The present study was to develop and design a new sonography rigid bronchoscopy and corollary vacuum-assisted biopsy device system with less injury and complication. The system combined ultrasonic-probe with ultrasound catheter, a new medical ultrasound technique, and rigid bronchoscopy (RB) which is improved with an auxiliary vacuum-assisted biopsy device. The principle of the device is vacuum suction and rotary knife. The reduced outer diameter of the RB led to less pain and lower complications for the patient. With the help of ultrasonic-probe (30 MHz), lesions and blood vessels can be identified clearly and unintentional puncture and damage to blood vessels can be avoided. Plenty of lesions can be obtained quickly through the vacuum-assisted biopsy device without getting puncture needle in and out repeatedly. The novel endobronchial sonography rigid bronchoscopy and matched vacuum-assisted biopsy device has many remarkable advantages. It can enlarge the applied range of the RB from endobronchial to mediastinal lesions, avoiding unintentional puncture of vessels. Obtaining multiple samples with a higher accuracy rate than that by other sampling techniques, minimizing operation time, alleviating pain and decreasing the complication rate, the system makes up the technical deficiency for the diagnosis and treatment of the mediastinal lesions, to a certain degree.

  8. The bovine lung in biomedical research: visually guided bronchoscopy, intrabronchial inoculation and in vivo sampling techniques.

    PubMed

    Prohl, Annette; Ostermann, Carola; Lohr, Markus; Reinhold, Petra

    2014-01-01

    There is an ongoing search for alternative animal models in research of respiratory medicine. Depending on the goal of the research, large animals as models of pulmonary disease often resemble the situation of the human lung much better than mice do. Working with large animals also offers the opportunity to sample the same animal repeatedly over a certain course of time, which allows long-term studies without sacrificing the animals. The aim was to establish in vivo sampling methods for the use in a bovine model of a respiratory Chlamydia psittaci infection. Sampling should be performed at various time points in each animal during the study, and the samples should be suitable to study the host response, as well as the pathogen under experimental conditions. Bronchoscopy is a valuable diagnostic tool in human and veterinary medicine. It is a safe and minimally invasive procedure. This article describes the intrabronchial inoculation of calves as well as sampling methods for the lower respiratory tract. Videoendoscopic, intrabronchial inoculation leads to very consistent clinical and pathological findings in all inoculated animals and is, therefore, well-suited for use in models of infectious lung disease. The sampling methods described are bronchoalveolar lavage, bronchial brushing and transbronchial lung biopsy. All of these are valuable diagnostic tools in human medicine and could be adapted for experimental purposes to calves aged 6-8 weeks. The samples obtained were suitable for both pathogen detection and characterization of the severity of lung inflammation in the host.

  9. Comparison of intravenous and topical lidocaine as a suppressant of coughing after bronchoscopy during general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, C J; Ahlburg, P; Holdgård, H O; Olsen, K H; Thomsen, A

    1991-04-01

    Twenty-four consecutive patients scheduled for fiberbronchoscopy were randomized to receive double-blind either intravenous (1.5 mg/kg) or laryngotracheal (3 mg/kg) lidocaine to evaluate the influence on post-bronchoscopic laryngospasm, pain in the throat and coughing. Plasma lidocaine concentrations were analyzed 5, 15, 30 and 60 min after administration. None of the patients demonstrated laryngospasm or pain in the throat during the first hour after bronchoscopy. Patients receiving topical lidocaine coughed significantly more than patients receiving intravenous lidocaine, with a median number of coughs of 20 compared to 4, during the first hour (P less than 0.01). The plasma lidocaine concentrations were significantly higher after intravenous than after topical administration (P less than 0.001). After intravenous administration the plasma lidocaine concentrations exceeded the accepted level for potential toxicity in five out of 11 patients, but none of the patients developed toxic symptoms and no side-effects were observed. PMID:2038931

  10. Metallic stent and flexible bronchoscopy without fluoroscopy for acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Lin, S-M; Lin, T-Y; Chou, C-L; Chen, H-C; Liu, C-Y; Wang, C-H; Lin, H-C; Yu, C-T; Lee, K-Y; Kuo, H-P

    2008-05-01

    Stent implantation has been reported to facilitate liberation from mechanical ventilation in patients with respiratory failure due to central airway disease. The present retrospective cohort study sought to evaluate the risk and benefit of stent implantation via bronchoscopy without fluoroscopic guidance in mechanically ventilated patients. From July 2001 to September 2006, 26 patients with acute respiratory failure were recruited. A bronchoscope was inserted through a mouth guard into the space between the tracheal wall and the endotracheal tube. A guide wire was inserted via the flexible bronchoscope to the lesion site. The bronchoscope was reintroduced through the endotracheal tube. Under bronchoscopic visualisation, the delivery catheter was advanced over the guide wire to deploy the stent. These procedures were successfully performed in 26 patients, with 22 stents placed in the trachea and seven in the main bronchus. Of the 26 patients, 14 (53.8%) became ventilator independent during their stay in the intensive care unit. Severe pneumonia was the most common cause, in seven (58.3%) out of 12 patients, for continued ventilator dependence after stenting. Granulation tissue formation was found in seven patients during the follow-up period. It is concluded that metallic stents can be safely implanted without fluoroscopic guidance in patients with respiratory failure, to facilitate ventilator independence.

  11. Automated virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Gordon W.; Hemler, Paul F.; Vining, David J.

    1997-05-01

    Virtual colonscopy (VC) is a minimally invasive alternative to conventional fiberoptic endoscopy for colorectal cancer screening. The VC technique involves bowel cleansing, gas distension of the colon, spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning of a patient's abdomen and pelvis, and visual analysis of multiplanar 2D and 3D images created from the spiral CT data. Despite the ability of interactive computer graphics to assist a physician in visualizing 3D models of the colon, a correct diagnosis hinges upon a physician's ability to properly identify small and sometimes subtle polyps or masses within hundreds of multiplanar and 3D images. Human visual analysis is time-consuming, tedious, and often prone to error of interpretation.We have addressed the problem of visual analysis by creating a software system that automatically highlights potential lesions in the 2D and 3D images in order to expedite a physician's interpretation of the colon data.

  12. Hybrid DynaCT-guided electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopic biopsy†.

    PubMed

    Ng, Calvin S H; Yu, Simon C H; Lau, Rainbow W H; Yim, Anthony P C

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy-guided biopsy of small pulmonary nodules can be challenging. Navigational error of the system and movement of the biopsy tool during its deployment adversely affect biopsy success. Furthermore, conventional methods to confirm navigational success such as fluoroscopy and radial endobronchial ultrasound become less useful for the biopsy of small lesions. A hybrid operating theatre can provide unparalleled real-time imaging through DynaCT scan to guide and confirm successful navigation and biopsy of difficult-to-reach or small lesions. We describe our technique for DynaCT image-guided electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopic biopsy of a small pulmonary nodule in the hybrid operating theatre. The advantages, disadvantages and special considerations in adopting this approach are discussed.

  13. Virtual Laboratories and Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hut, Piet

    2008-05-01

    Since we cannot put stars in a laboratory, astrophysicists had to wait till the invention of computers before becoming laboratory scientists. For half a century now, we have been conducting experiments in our virtual laboratories. However, we ourselves have remained behind the keyboard, with the screen of the monitor separating us from the world we are simulating. Recently, 3D on-line technology, developed first for games but now deployed in virtual worlds like Second Life, is beginning to make it possible for astrophysicists to enter their virtual labs themselves, in virtual form as avatars. This has several advantages, from new possibilities to explore the results of the simulations to a shared presence in a virtual lab with remote collaborators on different continents. I will report my experiences with the use of Qwaq Forums, a virtual world developed by a new company (see http://www.qwaq.com).

  14. Safety and feasibility of prolonged bronchoscopy involving diagnosis of lung cancer, systematic nodal staging, and fiducial marker placement in a high-risk population

    PubMed Central

    Kular, Harman; Mudambi, Lakshmi; Lazarus, Donald R.; Cornwell, Lorraine; Zhu, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Background Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is considered the standard treatment for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer. Bronchoscopy has shown to be effective in obtaining diagnosis of peripheral lung tumors, staging the mediastinum (with endobronchial ultrasound- EBUS-), and placing fiducial markers (FMs). However, the combination of these 3 procedures in a single bronchoscopy has not been studied. The aim of this study is to describe safety and feasibility of performing diagnosis, systematic nodal staging, and placement of FMs in a single bronchoscopic procedure. Methods Retrospective review of patients who underwent bronchoscopy with diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer, EBUS for nodal staging, and FM placement in a single procedure at Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center between January 2011 and July 2015. Results Twenty-one patients met our criteria, one having 2 synchronous tumors. 95% of patients had an ASA score of at least 3. Twenty-two tumors were diagnosed with a size of 2.72±1.06 cm. Distance from pleura was 1.33±1.42 cm. Median duration of bronchoscopy was 96 minutes (range, 75 to 136 minutes). Guided-bronchoscopy provided diagnosis of lung cancer in all cases. Fluoroscopy and RP-EBUS were utilized in 21 patients, “hybrid” scope in 14, and electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy in 3. A total of 100 lymph nodes (LN) were sampled with EBUS-TBNA, with 95% of the patients having at least 4 LN sampled. A total of 71 FM were placed for 22 tumors. All markers were retained and allowed for successful SBRT. There were no pneumothoraces and no major complications. Conclusions Although it results in lengthy procedures, a single bronchoscopy obtaining diagnosis of peripheral lung nodules, systematic nodal staging, and FM placement can be safely performed in high-risk patients. Our “all-in-one” strategy could potentially expedite treatment, decrease complications, and reduce costs. Further prospective studies are needed to

  15. Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehler, Ted

    2006-12-01

    Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds Coastline Community College has under development several virtual lab simulations and activities that range from biology, to language labs, to virtual discussion environments. Imagine a virtual world that students enter online, by logging onto their computer from home or anywhere they have web access. Upon entering this world they select a personalized identity represented by a digitized character (avatar) that can freely move about, interact with the environment, and communicate with other characters. In these virtual worlds, buildings, gathering places, conference rooms, labs, science rooms, and a variety of other “real world” elements are evident. When characters move about and encounter other people (players) they may freely communicate. They can examine things, manipulate objects, read signs, watch video clips, hear sounds, and jump to other locations. Goals of critical thinking, social interaction, peer collaboration, group support, and enhanced learning can be achieved in surprising new ways with this innovative approach to peer-to-peer communication in a virtual discussion world. In this presentation, short demos will be given of several online learning environments including a virtual biology lab, a marine science module, a Spanish lab, and a virtual discussion world. Coastline College has been a leader in the development of distance learning and media-based education for nearly 30 years and currently offers courses through PDA, Internet, DVD, CD-ROM, TV, and Videoconferencing technologies. Its distance learning program serves over 20,000 students every year. sponsor Jerry Meisner

  16. Virtually Possible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Diane Lewis began building her popular virtual education program in a storage closet. The drab room, just big enough to squeeze in a tiny table, was her office at the headquarters of Seminole County (Florida) Public Schools. She had a computer and a small staff of temporary workers. Lewis, who managed to open two successful virtual schools for…

  17. Human in vivo fluorescence microimaging of the alveolar ducts and sacs during bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Thiberville, L; Salaün, M; Lachkar, S; Dominique, S; Moreno-Swirc, S; Vever-Bizet, C; Bourg-Heckly, G

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess fibred confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM) as a tool for imaging the alveolar respiratory system in vivo during bronchoscopy. A 488-nm excitation wavelength FCFM device was used in 41 healthy subjects including 17 active smokers. After topical anaesthesia, the 1.4-mm miniprobe was introduced into the bronchoscope working channel and advanced distally to the alveoli. Morphometric and cellular analyses were performed on selected frames harbouring a minimal compression effect. In vivo acinar microimaging was obtained from each lung segment except for the apical and posterior segments of both upper lobes. Reproducible patterns, corresponding to the elastic framework of the axial and peripheral interstitial systems, were recorded from 192 separate acini. The mean+/-sd thickness of the acinar elastic fibres was 10+/-2.7 microm. Alveolar mouth diameters (mean+/-sd 278+/-53 microm) were normally distributed but appeared smaller in the right upper lobe and right medial basal segment. Lobular microvessels (median diameter 90 microm) were equally distributed throughout the lungs. Alveolar macrophages were not detectable in nonsmokers, whereas a specific tobacco-tar-induced fluorescence was observed in smoking subjects, providing fine details of the alveolar walls and macrophages. A strong correlation was found between the number of cigarettes smoked per day and the amount of large and mobile macrophages observed in vivo, as well as with the intensity of the macrophage alveolitis. Fibred confocal fluorescence microscopy enables accurate exploration of the peripheral lung in vivo in both smokers and nonsmokers. PMID:19213792

  18. Kinomic Profiling of Electromagnetic Navigational Bronchoscopy Specimens: A New Approach for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joshua C.; Minnich, Douglas J.; Dobelbower, M. Christian; Denton, Alexander J.; Dussaq, Alex M.; Gilbert, Ashley N.; Rohrbach, Timothy D.; Arafat, Waleed; Welaya, Karim; Bonner, James A.; Willey, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Researchers are currently seeking relevant lung cancer biomarkers in order to make informed decisions regarding therapeutic selection for patients in so-called “precision medicine.” However, there are challenges to obtaining adequate lung cancer tissue for molecular analyses. Furthermore, current molecular testing of tumors at the genomic or transcriptomic level are very indirect measures of biological response to a drug, particularly for small molecule inhibitors that target kinases. Kinase activity profiling is therefore theorized to be more reflective of in vivo biology than many current molecular analysis techniques. As a result, this study seeks to prove the feasibility of combining a novel minimally invasive biopsy technique that expands the number of lesions amenable for biopsy with subsequent ex vivo kinase activity analysis. Methods Eight patients with lung lesions of varying location and size were biopsied using the novel electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy (ENB) technique. Basal kinase activity (kinomic) profiles and ex vivo interrogation of samples in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors erlotinib, crizotinib, and lapatinib were performed by PamStation 12 microarray analysis. Results Kinomic profiling qualitatively identified patient specific kinase activity profiles as well as patient and drug specific changes in kinase activity profiles following exposure to inhibitor. Thus, the study has verified the feasibility of ENB as a method for obtaining tissue in adequate quantities for kinomic analysis and has demonstrated the possible use of this tissue acquisition and analysis technique as a method for future study of lung cancer biomarkers. Conclusions We demonstrate the feasibility of using ENB-derived biopsies to perform kinase activity assessment in lung cancer patients. PMID:25549342

  19. Preoperative flexible bronchoscopy in patients with persistent ground-glass nodule.

    PubMed

    Jhun, Byung Woo; Um, Sang-Won; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Lee, Kyung Soo; Han, Joungho; Kim, Jhingook

    2015-01-01

    There are no accurate data on the diagnostic value of preoperative flexible bronchoscopy (FB) for persistent ground-glass nodule (GGN) of the lung. We evaluated the value of preoperative FB in patients with suspected GGN-type lung cancer. We retrospectively searched a database for subjects who had 'ground-glass opacity', 'non-solid nodule', 'part-solid nodule', or 'sub-solid nodule' on chest computed tomography reports between February 2004 and March 2012. Patients who had infiltrative ground-glass opacity lesions, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, or pleural effusion, focal ground-glass opacity lesions >3 cm, and were lost to follow-up were excluded. We assessed the diagnostic value of preoperative FB in patients with persistent GGNs who underwent surgical resection. In total, 296 GGNs were evaluated by FB in 264 patients with persistent GGNs who underwent preoperative FB and surgical resection. The median size of the GGNs was 18 mm; 135 (46%) were pure GGN and 161 (54%) were part-solid GGN. No visible tumor or unsuspected endobronchial metastasis was identified by preoperative FB. Only 3 (1%, 3/208) GGNs were identified preoperatively as malignant by bronchial washing cytology; all were part-solid GGNs. No other etiology was identified by FB. Of the GGNs, 271 (91%) were subsequently confirmed as malignant and 25 (9%) were confirmed as benign at surgical resection. Consequently, the overall diagnostic sensitivity and negative predictive value of preoperative FB on a per-nodule basis was 1% (3/271) and 8% (25/293), respectively. The preoperative FB did not change the surgical strategy. Preoperative FB did not add much to the evaluation of persistent GGNs of the lung. Routine preoperative FB may have limited value in surgical candidates with small persistent pure GGNs.

  20. Virtual cancer image data warehouse.

    PubMed

    Oyama, H; Wakao, F; Mishina, T; Lu, Y; Honjo, A

    1997-01-01

    We previously developed a system with which we have created more than 100 virtual cancer images from CT or MR data of individual patients with cancer (Cancer Edutainment Virtual Reality Theater: CEVRT). These images can be used to help explain procedures, findings, etc. to the patient, to obtain informed consent, to simulate surgery, and to estimate cancer invasion to surrounding organs. We recently developed a web-based object-oriented database both to access these cancer images and to register medical images at international research sites via the Internet. In this report, we introduce an international medical VR data warehouse created using an object-oriented database.

  1. Virtual Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammrs, Stephan R.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Satellite (VirtualSat) is a computer program that creates an environment that facilitates the development, verification, and validation of flight software for a single spacecraft or for multiple spacecraft flying in formation. In this environment, enhanced functionality and autonomy of navigation, guidance, and control systems of a spacecraft are provided by a virtual satellite that is, a computational model that simulates the dynamic behavior of the spacecraft. Within this environment, it is possible to execute any associated software, the development of which could benefit from knowledge of, and possible interaction (typically, exchange of data) with, the virtual satellite. Examples of associated software include programs for simulating spacecraft power and thermal- management systems. This environment is independent of the flight hardware that will eventually host the flight software, making it possible to develop the software simultaneously with, or even before, the hardware is delivered. Optionally, by use of interfaces included in VirtualSat, hardware can be used instead of simulated. The flight software, coded in the C or C++ programming language, is compilable and loadable into VirtualSat without any special modifications. Thus, VirtualSat can serve as a relatively inexpensive software test-bed for development test, integration, and post-launch maintenance of spacecraft flight software.

  2. Virtual seminars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, H. Roice

    1997-06-01

    A virtual seminar (SM) is an economic and effective instructional tool for teaching students who are at a distance from their instructor. Like conventional class room teaching, a virtual seminar requires an instructor, a student, and a method of communication. Teleconferencing, video conferencing, intranets and the Internet give learners in a Virtual Seminar the ability to interact immediately with their mentors and receive real and relevant answers. This paper shows how industry and academia can benefit from using methods developed and experience gained in presenting the first virtual seminars to academic and petroleum industry participants in mid-1996. The information explosion in industry means that business or technical information is worthless until it is assimilated into a corporate knowledge management system. A search for specific information often turns into a filtering exercise or an attempt to find patterns and classify retrieved material. In the setting of an interactive corporate information system, virtual seminars meet the need for a productive new relationship between creative people and the flux of corporate knowledge. Experience shows that it is more efficient to circulate timesensitive and confidential information electronically through a virtual seminar. Automating the classification of information and removing that task from the usual work load creates an electronic corporate memory and enhances the value of the knowledge to both users and a corporation. Catalogued benchmarks, best-practice standards, and Knowledge Maps (SM) of experience serve as key aids to communicating knowledge through virtual seminars and converting that knowledge into a profit-making asset.

  3. Virtual Worlds for Virtual Organizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoten, Diana; Lutters, Wayne

    The members and resources of a virtual organization are dispersed across time and space, yet they function as a coherent entity through the use of technologies, networks, and alliances. As virtual organizations proliferate and become increasingly important in society, many may exploit the technical architecture s of virtual worlds, which are the confluence of computer-mediated communication, telepresence, and virtual reality originally created for gaming. A brief socio-technical history describes their early origins and the waves of progress followed by stasis that brought us to the current period of renewed enthusiasm. Examination of contemporary examples demonstrates how three genres of virtual worlds have enabled new arenas for virtual organizing: developer-defined closed worlds, user-modifiable quasi-open worlds, and user-generated open worlds. Among expected future trends are an increase in collaboration born virtually rather than imported from existing organizations, a tension between high-fidelity recreations of the physical world and hyper-stylized imaginations of fantasy worlds, and the growth of specialized worlds optimized for particular sectors, companies, or cultures.

  4. Virtual memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Virtual memory was conceived as a way to automate overlaying of program segments. Modern computers have very large main memories, but need automatic solutions to the relocation and protection problems. Virtual memory serves this need as well and is thus useful in computers of all sizes. The history of the idea is traced, showing how it has become a widespread, little noticed feature of computers today.

  5. Virtual reality and virtual bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Catherine; Korba, Larry W.; Shaw, Christopher D.; Green, Mark

    1994-04-01

    There are many ways to produce the sense of `presence' or telepresence in the user of virtual reality. For example attempting to increase the realism of the visual environment is a commonly accepted strategy. In contrast, this paper explores a way for the user to feel present in an unrealistic virtual body. It investigates an unusual approach, proprioceptive illusions. Proprioceptive or body illusions are used to generate and explore the experience of virtuality and presence outside of the normal body limits. These projects are realized in art installations.

  6. Virtual Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paor, D. G.

    2009-12-01

    Virtual Field Trips have been around almost as long as the Worldwide Web itself yet virtual explorers do not generally return to their desktops with folders full of virtual hand specimens. Collection of real specimens on fields trips for later analysis in the lab (or at least in the pub) has been an important part of classical field geoscience education and research for generations but concern for the landscape and for preservation of key outcrops from wanton destruction has lead to many restrictions. One of the author’s favorite outcrops was recently vandalized presumably by a geologist who felt the need to bash some of the world’s most spectacular buckle folds with a rock sledge. It is not surprising, therefore, that geologists sometimes leave fragile localities out of field trip itineraries. Once analyzed, most specimens repose in drawers or bins, never to be seen again. Some end up in teaching collections but recent pedagogical research shows that undergraduate students have difficulty relating specimens both to their collection location and ultimate provenance in the lithosphere. Virtual specimens can be created using 3D modeling software and imported into virtual globes such as Google Earth (GE) where, they may be linked to virtual field trip stops or restored to their source localities on the paleo-globe. Sensitive localities may be protected by placemark approximation. The GE application program interface (API) has a distinct advantage over the stand-alone GE application when it comes to viewing and manipulating virtual specimens. When instances of the virtual globe are embedded in web pages using the GE plug-in, Collada models of specimens can be manipulated with javascript controls residing in the enclosing HTML, permitting specimens to be magnified, rotated in 3D, and sliced. Associated analytical data may be linked into javascript and localities for comparison at various points on the globe referenced by ‘fetching’ KML. Virtual specimens open up

  7. Automated Rotational Percussion Bed and Bronchoscopy Improves Respiratory Mechanics and Oxygenation in ARDS Patients Supported with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nirmal S; Wille, Keith M; Bellot, S Christopher; Diaz-Guzman, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been used to provide "lung rest" through the use of low tidal volume (6 ml/kg) and ultralow tidal volume (<6 ml/kg) ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Low and ultralow tidal volume ventilation can result in low dynamic respiratory compliance and potentially increased retention of airway secretions. We present our experience using automated rotational percussion beds (ARPBs) and bronchoscopy in four ARDS patients to manage increased pulmonary secretions. These beds performed automated side-to-side tilt maneuver and intermittent chest wall percussion. Their use resulted in substantial reduction in peak and plateau pressures in two patients on volume control ventilation, while the driving pressures (inspiratory pressure) to attain the desired tidal volumes in patients on pressure control ventilation also decreased. In addition, mean partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PaO2)/fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) ratio (109 pre-ARPB vs. 157 post-ARPB), positive end-expiratory pressure (10 cm H2O vs. 8 cm H2O), and FiO2 (0.88 vs. 0.52) improved after initiation of ARPB. The improvements in the respiratory mechanics and oxygenation helped us to initiate early ECMO weaning. Based on our experience, the use of chest physiotherapy, frequent body repositioning, and bronchoscopy may be helpful in the management of pulmonary secretions in patients supported with ECMO. PMID:26771392

  8. Intravenous Dexmedetomidine Provides Superior Patient Comfort and Tolerance Compared to Intravenous Midazolam in Patients Undergoing Flexible Bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Goneppanavar, Umesh; Magazine, Rahul; Periyadka Janardhana, Bhavya; Krishna Achar, Shreepathi

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine, an α2 agonist, has demonstrated its effectiveness as a sedative during awake intubation, but its utility in fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) is not clear. We evaluated the effects of midazolam and dexmedetomidine on patient's response to FOB. The patients received either midazolam, 0.02 mg/kg (group M, n = 27), or dexmedetomidine, 1 µg/kg (group D, n = 27). A composite score of five different parameters and a numerical rating scale (NRS) for pain intensity and distress were used to assess patient response during FOB. Patients rated the quality of sedation and level of discomfort 24 h after the procedure. Ease of bronchoscopy, rescue medication requirement, and haemodynamic variables were noted. Ideal or acceptable composite score was observed in 15 and 26 patients, respectively, in group M (14.48 ± 3.65) and group D (9.41 ± 3.13), p < 0.001. NRS showed that 11 patients in group M had severe pain and discomfort as compared to one patient with severe pain and two with severe discomfort in group D during the procedure, p < 0.001. Rescue midazolam requirement was significantly higher in group M (p = 0.023). We conclude that during FOB, under topical airway anaesthesia, IV dexmedetomidine (1 µg/kg) provides superior patient comfort and tolerance as compared to IV midazolam (0.02 mg/kg). PMID:26543645

  9. Virtual sound for virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, M.M. ||; Papp, A.L. III |

    1993-02-01

    The computational limitations of real-time interactive computing do not meet our requirements for producing realistic images for virtual reality in a convincing manner. Regardless of the real-time restrictions on virtual reality interfaces, the representations can be no better than the graphics. Computer graphics is still limited in its ability to generate complex objects such as landscapes and humans. Nevertheless, useful and convincing visualizations are made through a variety of techniques. The central theme of this article is that a similar situation is true with sound for virtual reality. It is beyond our abilityto create interactive soundscapes that create a faithful reproduction of real world sounds, however, by choosing one`s application carefully and using sound to enhance a display rather than only mimic real-world scenes, a very effective use of sound can be made.

  10. Virtual sound for virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, M.M. Cancer Center, Houston, TX . Dept. of Biomathematics Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA California Univ., Davis, CA ); Papp, A.L. III Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1993-02-01

    The computational limitations of real-time interactive computing do not meet our requirements for producing realistic images for virtual reality in a convincing manner. Regardless of the real-time restrictions on virtual reality interfaces, the representations can be no better than the graphics. Computer graphics is still limited in its ability to generate complex objects such as landscapes and humans. Nevertheless, useful and convincing visualizations are made through a variety of techniques. The central theme of this article is that a similar situation is true with sound for virtual reality. It is beyond our abilityto create interactive soundscapes that create a faithful reproduction of real world sounds, however, by choosing one's application carefully and using sound to enhance a display rather than only mimic real-world scenes, a very effective use of sound can be made.

  11. Virtual colonoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... test that looks for cancer, polyps , or other disease in the large intestine (colon). The medical name of this test is CT ... a swollen and inflamed intestine) due to Crohn disease , ulcerative ... problems in the colon. Problems that need a biopsy were seen on ...

  12. Virtualize Me!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2009-01-01

    John Abdelmalak, director of technology for the School District of the Chathams, was pretty sure it was time to jump on the virtualization bandwagon last year when he invited Dell to conduct a readiness assessment of his district's servers. When he saw just how little of their capacity was being used, he lost all doubt. Abdelmalak is one of many…

  13. Virtually There.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanier, Jaron

    2001-01-01

    Describes tele-immersion, a new medium for human interaction enabled by digital technologies. It combines the display and interaction techniques of virtual reality with new vision technologies that transcend the traditional limitations of a camera. Tele-immersion stations observe people as moving sculptures without favoring a single point of view.…

  14. Virtual Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Ruth

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the potential of computers in teaching laboratories to spare the lives of animals; however, it is felt that in areas of physiology education, virtual labs are not as desirable a learning experience for advanced students as live animal labs. (Author/AIM)

  15. Virtual Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Gregory B.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the current state of the art in virtual reality (VR), its historical background, and future possibilities. Highlights include applications in medicine, art and entertainment, science, business, and telerobotics; and VR for information science, including graphical display of bibliographic data, libraries and books, and cyberspace.…

  16. Construction of a multimodal CT-video chest model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, Patrick D.; Higgins, William E.

    2014-03-01

    Bronchoscopy enables a number of minimally invasive chest procedures for diseases such as lung cancer and asthma. For example, using the bronchoscope's continuous video stream as a guide, a physician can navigate through the lung airways to examine general airway health, collect tissue samples, or administer a disease treatment. In addition, physicians can now use new image-guided intervention (IGI) systems, which draw upon both three-dimensional (3D) multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) chest scans and bronchoscopic video, to assist with bronchoscope navigation. Unfortunately, little use is made of the acquired video stream, a potentially invaluable source of information. In addition, little effort has been made to link the bronchoscopic video stream to the detailed anatomical information given by a patient's 3D MDCT chest scan. We propose a method for constructing a multimodal CT-video model of the chest. After automatically computing a patient's 3D MDCT-based airway-tree model, the method next parses the available video data to generate a positional linkage between a sparse set of key video frames and airway path locations. Next, a fusion/mapping of the video's color mucosal information and MDCT-based endoluminal surfaces is performed. This results in the final multimodal CT-video chest model. The data structure constituting the model provides a history of those airway locations visited during bronchoscopy. It also provides for quick visual access to relevant sections of the airway wall by condensing large portions of endoscopic video into representative frames containing important structural and textural information. When examined with a set of interactive visualization tools, the resulting fused data structure provides a rich multimodal data source. We demonstrate the potential of the multimodal model with both phantom and human data.

  17. Usefulness of intraoperative bronchoscopy during surgical repair of a congenital cardiac anomaly with possible airway obstruction: three cases report.

    PubMed

    Oh, JongEun; Kim, Jung-Won; Shin, Won-Jung; Gwak, Mijeung; Park, Pyung Hwan

    2016-02-01

    Compression of the airway is relatively common in pediatric patients, although it is often an unrecognized complication of congenital cardiac and aortic arch anomalies. Aortopexy has been established as a surgical treatment for tracheobronchial obstruction associated with vascular anomaly, aortic arch anomaly, esophageal atresia, and tracheoesophageal fistula. The tissue-to-tissue arch repair technique could result in severe airway complication such as compression of the left main bronchus which was not a problem before the correction. We report three cases of corrective open heart surgery monitored by intraoperative bronchoscopy performed during prebypass, and performed immediately before weaning from bypass, to evaluate tracheobronchial obstruction caused by congenital, complex cardiac anomalies in the operating room. PMID:26885306

  18. Usefulness of intraoperative bronchoscopy during surgical repair of a congenital cardiac anomaly with possible airway obstruction: three cases report

    PubMed Central

    Oh, JongEun; Kim, Jung-won; Shin, Won-Jung; Park, Pyung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Compression of the airway is relatively common in pediatric patients, although it is often an unrecognized complication of congenital cardiac and aortic arch anomalies. Aortopexy has been established as a surgical treatment for tracheobronchial obstruction associated with vascular anomaly, aortic arch anomaly, esophageal atresia, and tracheoesophageal fistula. The tissue-to-tissue arch repair technique could result in severe airway complication such as compression of the left main bronchus which was not a problem before the correction. We report three cases of corrective open heart surgery monitored by intraoperative bronchoscopy performed during prebypass, and performed immediately before weaning from bypass, to evaluate tracheobronchial obstruction caused by congenital, complex cardiac anomalies in the operating room. PMID:26885306

  19. Predictors of low prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among Egyptian health care workers at intensive care and bronchoscopy units

    PubMed Central

    Hefzy, Enas Mamdouh; Wegdan, Ahmed Ashraf; Elhefny, Radwa Ahmed; Nasser, Samar Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Latent tuberculosis infections (LTBI) contain a significant reservoir for future epidemics. Screening of health care workers (HCWs) in a high-risk tuberculosis (TB) environment is an important strategy in TB control. The study aimed to assess the prevalence of LTBI among high risk Egyptian HCWs and to assess infection associated risk factors. Methods: Fifty-two HCWs who work at intensive care unit (ICU), bronchoscopy unit, and chest diseases department were tested for LTBI using both tuberculin skin test (TST) and Quantiferon TB Gold in-tube test (QFT). Risk factors for infection, knowledge of HCWs towards different aspects of TB infection and agreement between TST and QFT were also evaluated. Results: Prevalence of LTBI in this study was 13.5% by QFT and TST. It was 13.6% by TST alone and 10.3% by QFT alone. There was good concordance between both tests (Kappa=0.713). There was a statistically significant association between prevalence of LTBI and age of staff ≥30 yr (p=0.002), period of working experience (p=0.006) and working at the Bronchoscopy Unit (p=0.001). The total knowledge of HCWs towards different aspects of TB infection was generally good. Conclusion: Although the participants in the current study were among high risk HCWs, the prevalence of LTBI was low. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination, young age, short employment duration, good knowledge and a good infection control were the predictors of low risk of contracting TB at our hospitals. The risk of TB infection in resource-limited countries can be reduced with simple continuous educational and administrative infection control programmes. PMID:27777875

  20. Test of 3D CT reconstructions by EM + TV algorithm from undersampled data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evseev, Ivan; Ahmann, Francielle; da Silva, Hamilton P.; Schelin, Hugo R.; Yevseyeva, Olga; Klock, Márgio C. L.

    2013-05-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in medical imaging for diagnosis and therapy. However, CT imaging is connected with ionization radiation exposure of patients. Therefore, the dose reduction is an essential issue in CT. In 2011, the Expectation Maximization and Total Variation Based Model for CT Reconstruction (EM+TV) was proposed. This method can reconstruct a better image using less CT projections in comparison with the usual filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Thus, it could significantly reduce the overall dose of radiation in CT. This work reports the results of an independent numerical simulation for cone beam CT geometry with alternative virtual phantoms. As in the original report, the 3D CT images of 128×128×128 virtual phantoms were reconstructed. It was not possible to implement phantoms with lager dimensions because of the slowness of code execution even by the CORE i7 CPU.

  1. Test of 3D CT reconstructions by EM + TV algorithm from undersampled data

    SciTech Connect

    Evseev, Ivan; Ahmann, Francielle; Silva, Hamilton P. da

    2013-05-06

    Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in medical imaging for diagnosis and therapy. However, CT imaging is connected with ionization radiation exposure of patients. Therefore, the dose reduction is an essential issue in CT. In 2011, the Expectation Maximization and Total Variation Based Model for CT Reconstruction (EM+TV) was proposed. This method can reconstruct a better image using less CT projections in comparison with the usual filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Thus, it could significantly reduce the overall dose of radiation in CT. This work reports the results of an independent numerical simulation for cone beam CT geometry with alternative virtual phantoms. As in the original report, the 3D CT images of 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 virtual phantoms were reconstructed. It was not possible to implement phantoms with lager dimensions because of the slowness of code execution even by the CORE i7 CPU.

  2. Virtual anthropology.

    PubMed

    Weber, Gerhard W

    2015-02-01

    Comparative morphology, dealing with the diversity of form and shape, and functional morphology, the study of the relationship between the structure and the function of an organism's parts, are both important subdisciplines in biological research. Virtual anthropology (VA) contributes to comparative morphology by taking advantage of technological innovations, and it also offers new opportunities for functional analyses. It exploits digital technologies and pools experts from different domains such as anthropology, primatology, medicine, paleontology, mathematics, statistics, computer science, and engineering. VA as a technical term was coined in the late 1990s from the perspective of anthropologists with the intent of being mostly applied to biological questions concerning recent and fossil hominoids. More generally, however, there are advanced methods to study shape and size or to manipulate data digitally suitable for application to all kinds of primates, mammals, other vertebrates, and invertebrates or to issues regarding plants, tools, or other objects. In this sense, we could also call the field "virtual morphology." The approach yields permanently available virtual copies of specimens and data that comprehensively quantify geometry, including previously neglected anatomical regions. It applies advanced statistical methods, supports the reconstruction of specimens based on reproducible manipulations, and promotes the acquisition of larger samples by data sharing via electronic archives. Finally, it can help identify new, hidden traits, which is particularly important in paleoanthropology, where the scarcity of material demands extracting information from fragmentary remains. This contribution presents a current view of the six main work steps of VA: digitize, expose, compare, reconstruct, materialize, and share. The VA machinery has also been successfully used in biomechanical studies which simulate the stress and strains appearing in structures. Although

  3. Virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Chen, Bean T.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Newton, George J.

    1988-08-30

    A virtual impactor having improved efficiency and low wall losses in which a core of clean air is inserted into the aerosol flow while aerosol flow is maintained adjacent inner wall surfaces of the focusing portion of the impactor. The flow rate of the core and the length of the throat of the impactor's collection probe, as well as the dimensional relationships of other components of the impactor adjacent the separation region of the impactor, are selected to optimize separation efficiency.

  4. Virtual anthropology.

    PubMed

    Weber, Gerhard W

    2015-02-01

    Comparative morphology, dealing with the diversity of form and shape, and functional morphology, the study of the relationship between the structure and the function of an organism's parts, are both important subdisciplines in biological research. Virtual anthropology (VA) contributes to comparative morphology by taking advantage of technological innovations, and it also offers new opportunities for functional analyses. It exploits digital technologies and pools experts from different domains such as anthropology, primatology, medicine, paleontology, mathematics, statistics, computer science, and engineering. VA as a technical term was coined in the late 1990s from the perspective of anthropologists with the intent of being mostly applied to biological questions concerning recent and fossil hominoids. More generally, however, there are advanced methods to study shape and size or to manipulate data digitally suitable for application to all kinds of primates, mammals, other vertebrates, and invertebrates or to issues regarding plants, tools, or other objects. In this sense, we could also call the field "virtual morphology." The approach yields permanently available virtual copies of specimens and data that comprehensively quantify geometry, including previously neglected anatomical regions. It applies advanced statistical methods, supports the reconstruction of specimens based on reproducible manipulations, and promotes the acquisition of larger samples by data sharing via electronic archives. Finally, it can help identify new, hidden traits, which is particularly important in paleoanthropology, where the scarcity of material demands extracting information from fragmentary remains. This contribution presents a current view of the six main work steps of VA: digitize, expose, compare, reconstruct, materialize, and share. The VA machinery has also been successfully used in biomechanical studies which simulate the stress and strains appearing in structures. Although

  5. Virtual endoscopy: quicker and easier disease evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vining, David J.; Hemler, Paul F.; Stelts, David R.; Ahn, David K.; Ge, Yaorong; Hunt, Gordon W.; Siege, Christopher; McCorquodale, Danny; Honea, David M.

    1997-05-01

    The advent of spiral computed tomography (CT) has created the potential to image continuous anatomical volumes during a single breath-hold. The ability to reconstruct overlapping spiral CT images has improved through-plane resolution and contributed to improved diagnostic accuracy. When spiral CT is used to image organ systems such as the colon or airways, it is common to generate up to 500 CT images. We have developed a virtual endoscopy (VE) software system that couples computer-assisted diagnosis capabilities with volume visualization techniques to aid in the analysis of these large datasets. Despite its potential to assist in disease diagnosis, VE faces several important technical and nontechnical challenges that must be addressed before it becomes a clinical reality.

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen ... and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  7. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  8. Virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Chen, B.T.; Cheng, Y.S.; Newton, G.J.

    1988-08-30

    A virtual impactor is described having improved efficiency and low wall losses in which a core of clean air is inserted into the aerosol flow while aerosol flow is maintained adjacent to the inner wall surfaces of the focusing portion of the impactor. The flow rate of the core and the length of the throat of the impactor's collection probe, as well as the dimensional relationships of other components of the impactor adjacent the separation region of the impactor, are selected to optimize separation efficiency. 4 figs.

  9. Virtual palpation of skeletal landmarks with multimodal display interfaces.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Fulvia; Ansaloni, Mauro; Testi, Debora; Viceconti, Marco

    2007-09-01

    The 3D location of skeletal landmarks on CT datasets is an important procedure, used in many research and clinical contexts. The standard procedure involves the segmentation of the CT images, the creation of a 3D surface bone model, and the location of the landmarks on this surface. However, the segmentation is time-consuming and requires skilled operators and sophisticated software. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the efficacy of a multimodal display interface to direct volumetric interactive visualization in performing a virtual palpation task. An expert operator used the CT dataset of a patient's thigh region to locate 14 femoral skeletal landmarks. This operation was repeatedly performed using different CT data representation; the accuracy and repeatability were compared to those achievable with the conventional procedure based on the segmented 3D surface. When a multimodal display interface (formed by an orthogonal slice, RXCT and interactive isosurface views) was used to perform the virtual palpation directly on the CT data, the average coordinates of the landmarks did not differ significantly from those located on the 3D surface, and the measurement repeatability was actually better with the multimodal display of the volumetric data than with the 3D surface. Thus, we can conclude that skeletal virtual palpation can be performed directly on the CT dataset, as far as the virtual palpation is performed with a multimodal display interface.

  10. Virtual screening of virtual libraries.

    PubMed

    Green, Darren V S

    2003-01-01

    Virtual screening of virtual libraries (VSVL) is a rapidly changing area of research. Great efforts are being made to produce better algorithms, selection methods and infrastructure. Yet, the number of successful examples in the literature is not impressive, although the quality of work certainly is high. Why is this? One reason is that these methods tend to be applied at the lead generation stage and therefore there is a large lead-time before successful examples appear in the literature. However, any computational chemist would confirm that these methods are successful and there exists a glut of start-up companies specialising in virtual screening. Moreover, the scientific community would not be focussing so much attention on this area if it were not yielding results. Even so, the paucity of literature data is certainly a hindrance to the development of better methods. The VSVL process is unique within the discovery process, in that it is the only method that can screen the > 10(30) genuinely novel molecules out there. Already, some VSVL methods are evaluating 10(13) compounds, a capacity that high throughput screening can only dream of. There is a huge potential advantage for the company that develops efficient and effective methods, for lead generation, lead hopping and optimization of both potency and ADME properties. To do this, it requires more than the software, it requires confidence to exploit the methodology, to commit synthesis on the basis of it, and to build this approach into the medicinal chemistry strategy. It is a fact that these tools remain quite daunting for the majority of scientists working at the bench. The routine use of these methods is not simply a matter of education and training. Integration of these methods into accessible and robust end user software, without dilution of the science, must be a priority. We have reached a coincidence, where several technologies have the required level of maturity predictive computational chemistry

  11. Virtual Reality and the Virtual Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheim, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Explains virtual reality, including proper and improper uses of the term, and suggests ways that libraries might be affected by it. Highlights include elements of virtual reality systems; possible virtual reality applications, including architecture, the chemical industry, transport planning, armed forces, and entertainment; and the virtual…

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  13. A bronchoscopic navigation system using bronchoscope center calibration for accurate registration of electromagnetic tracker and CT volume without markers

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xiongbiao

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Various bronchoscopic navigation systems are developed for diagnosis, staging, and treatment of lung and bronchus cancers. To construct electromagnetically navigated bronchoscopy systems, registration of preoperative images and an electromagnetic tracker must be performed. This paper proposes a new marker-free registration method, which uses the centerlines of the bronchial tree and the center of a bronchoscope tip where an electromagnetic sensor is attached, to align preoperative images and electromagnetic tracker systems. Methods: The chest computed tomography (CT) volume (preoperative images) was segmented to extract the bronchial centerlines. An electromagnetic sensor was fixed at the bronchoscope tip surface. A model was designed and printed using a 3D printer to calibrate the relationship between the fixed sensor and the bronchoscope tip center. For each sensor measurement that includes sensor position and orientation information, its corresponding bronchoscope tip center position was calculated. By minimizing the distance between each bronchoscope tip center position and the bronchial centerlines, the spatial alignment of the electromagnetic tracker system and the CT volume was determined. After obtaining the spatial alignment, an electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy system was established to real-timely track or locate a bronchoscope inside the bronchial tree during bronchoscopic examinations. Results: The electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy system was validated on a dynamic bronchial phantom that can simulate respiratory motion with a breath rate range of 0–10 min{sup −1}. The fiducial and target registration errors of this navigation system were evaluated. The average fiducial registration error was reduced from 8.7 to 6.6 mm. The average target registration error, which indicates all tracked or navigated bronchoscope position accuracy, was much reduced from 6.8 to 4.5 mm compared to previous registration methods. Conclusions: An

  14. CT-assisted agile manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, James H.; Yancey, Robert N.

    1996-11-01

    The next century will witness at least two great revolutions in the way goods are produced. First, workers will use the medium of virtual reality in all aspects of marketing, research, development, prototyping, manufacturing, sales and service. Second, market forces will drive manufacturing towards small-lot production and just-in-time delivery. Already, we can discern the merging of these megatrends into what some are calling agile manufacturing. Under this new paradigm, parts and processes will be designed and engineered within the mind of a computer, tooled and manufactured by the offspring of today's rapid prototyping equipment, and evaluated for performance and reliability by advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques and sophisticated computational models. Computed tomography (CT) is the premier example of an NDE method suitable for future agile manufacturing activities. It is the only modality that provides convenient access to the full suite of engineering data that users will need to avail themselves of computer- aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, and computer- aided engineering capabilities, as well as newly emerging reverse engineering, rapid prototyping and solid freeform fabrication technologies. As such, CT is assured a central, utilitarian role in future industrial operations. An overview of this exciting future for industrial CT is presented.

  15. Virtual Worlds, Real Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Eric M.

    2009-01-01

    Many children between the ages of four and twelve log in to Web-based virtual play spaces each day, and these virtual worlds are quickly becoming an important aspect of their out-of-school lives. Consequently, educators' challenge is to see how they can leverage virtual spaces, such as the virtual play spaces, for learning and literacy. Over the…

  16. Rethinking Virtual School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schomburg, Gary; Rippeth, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Virtual schooling has been touted as one of the best ways to meet the needs of at-risk students, but what happens when a district's virtual education program is unsuccessful? That was the problem in Eastern Local School District, a small rural district in Beaver, Ohio. The district contracted virtual school services and used the virtual school for…

  17. Spiral CT pneumocolon: applications, status and limitations.

    PubMed

    Harvey, C J; Renfrew, I; Taylor, S; Gillams, A R; Lees, W R

    2001-01-01

    CT pneumocolon is a promising new technique in the diagnosis and management of colon pathology. CT pneumocolon can detect (sensitivity >95%) and stage (accuracy 79%) colorectal cancer and is very accurate in the differentiation of malignant from benign colonic pathologies. It has excellent detection rates for polyps >10 mm in diameter. Several studies using 3D virtual colonoscopy have already proven its high sensitivity and specificity in polyp detection making this technique robust as a screening tool. The combined results for virtual colonoscopy, from all centres, show a sensitivity of >85% in the detection of polyps 10 mm or greater in size, 70-80% for 5-9 mm polyps and an overall specificity of 90%. CT pneumocolon is a safe, non-invasive and cost-effective method for detecting colonic carcinomas and adenomas and correctly identifying which patients need further colonoscopy. The technique is quick, well tolerated and non-operator dependent. It can also image the proximal colon when distal stenoses prevent endoscopic and barium examination. CT pneumocolon is able to identify the features and complications of inflammatory bowel disease. Further research is warranted to fully assess its impact in terms of a screening tool, acceptability, availability and cost benefit.

  18. Virtual courseware for geoscience education: Virtual Earthquake and Virtual Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Gary A.

    1999-05-01

    Virtual courseware developed for introductory-level, on-line geology labs is an interactive teaching/learning model that has an enormous pedagogical potential for making Web sites places where students learn by doing. Virtual Earthquake and Virtual Dating are modest examples of the `virtual courseware' paradigm. Virtual Earthquake helps students explore the techniques of how an earthquake's epicenter is located and how its Richter magnitude is determined. Virtual Dating models the theory and techniques of the radiometric age determination of rocks and minerals. Virtual courseware applications offer several advantages over traditional floppy disk or CD ROM-based courseware, the most significant being the ease of dissemination. The author's experience with bringing these two virtual applications on-line suggests that there is a need for interactive geology labs on-line and that the approach will be received with enthusiasm by the educational community. The widespread implementation and adoption of virtual courseware can bring meaningful educational content and interactivity for the geosciences that goes beyond multimedia on the World-Wide-Web.

  19. Material Separation Using Dual-Energy CT: Current and Emerging Applications.

    PubMed

    Patino, Manuel; Prochowski, Andrea; Agrawal, Mukta D; Simeone, Frank J; Gupta, Rajiv; Hahn, Peter F; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) offers the opportunity to generate material-specific images on the basis of the atomic number Z and the unique mass attenuation coefficient of a particular material at different x-ray energies. Material-specific images provide qualitative and quantitative information about tissue composition and contrast media distribution. The most significant contribution of DE CT-based material characterization comes from the capability to assess iodine distribution through the creation of an image that exclusively shows iodine. These iodine-specific images increase tissue contrast and amplify subtle differences in attenuation between normal and abnormal tissues, improving lesion detection and characterization in the abdomen. In addition, DE CT enables computational removal of iodine influence from a CT image, generating virtual noncontrast images. Several additional materials, including calcium, fat, and uric acid, can be separated, permitting imaging assessment of metabolic imbalances, elemental deficiencies, and abnormal deposition of materials within tissues. The ability to obtain material-specific images from a single, contrast-enhanced CT acquisition can complement the anatomic knowledge with functional information, and may be used to reduce the radiation dose by decreasing the number of phases in a multiphasic CT examination. DE CT also enables generation of energy-specific and virtual monochromatic images. Clinical applications of DE CT leverage both material-specific images and virtual monochromatic images to expand the current role of CT and overcome several limitations of single-energy CT. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  20. Material Separation Using Dual-Energy CT: Current and Emerging Applications.

    PubMed

    Patino, Manuel; Prochowski, Andrea; Agrawal, Mukta D; Simeone, Frank J; Gupta, Rajiv; Hahn, Peter F; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) offers the opportunity to generate material-specific images on the basis of the atomic number Z and the unique mass attenuation coefficient of a particular material at different x-ray energies. Material-specific images provide qualitative and quantitative information about tissue composition and contrast media distribution. The most significant contribution of DE CT-based material characterization comes from the capability to assess iodine distribution through the creation of an image that exclusively shows iodine. These iodine-specific images increase tissue contrast and amplify subtle differences in attenuation between normal and abnormal tissues, improving lesion detection and characterization in the abdomen. In addition, DE CT enables computational removal of iodine influence from a CT image, generating virtual noncontrast images. Several additional materials, including calcium, fat, and uric acid, can be separated, permitting imaging assessment of metabolic imbalances, elemental deficiencies, and abnormal deposition of materials within tissues. The ability to obtain material-specific images from a single, contrast-enhanced CT acquisition can complement the anatomic knowledge with functional information, and may be used to reduce the radiation dose by decreasing the number of phases in a multiphasic CT examination. DE CT also enables generation of energy-specific and virtual monochromatic images. Clinical applications of DE CT leverage both material-specific images and virtual monochromatic images to expand the current role of CT and overcome several limitations of single-energy CT. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27399237

  1. Virtual button interface

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jake S.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch.

  2. Virtual button interface

    DOEpatents

    Jones, J.S.

    1999-01-12

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment are disclosed. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch. 4 figs.

  3. Virtual goods recommendations in virtual worlds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Liao, Hsiu-Yu; Chen, Jyun-Hung; Liu, Duen-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Virtual worlds (VWs) are computer-simulated environments which allow users to create their own virtual character as an avatar. With the rapidly growing user volume in VWs, platform providers launch virtual goods in haste and stampede users to increase sales revenue. However, the rapidity of development incurs virtual unrelated items which will be difficult to remarket. It not only wastes virtual global companies' intelligence resources, but also makes it difficult for users to find suitable virtual goods fit for their virtual home in daily virtual life. In the VWs, users decorate their houses, visit others' homes, create families, host parties, and so forth. Users establish their social life circles through these activities. This research proposes a novel virtual goods recommendation method based on these social interactions. The contact strength and contact influence result from interactions with social neighbors and influence users' buying intention. Our research highlights the importance of social interactions in virtual goods recommendation. The experiment's data were retrieved from an online VW platform, and the results show that the proposed method, considering social interactions and social life circle, has better performance than existing recommendation methods. PMID:25834837

  4. Virtual goods recommendations in virtual worlds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Liao, Hsiu-Yu; Chen, Jyun-Hung; Liu, Duen-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Virtual worlds (VWs) are computer-simulated environments which allow users to create their own virtual character as an avatar. With the rapidly growing user volume in VWs, platform providers launch virtual goods in haste and stampede users to increase sales revenue. However, the rapidity of development incurs virtual unrelated items which will be difficult to remarket. It not only wastes virtual global companies' intelligence resources, but also makes it difficult for users to find suitable virtual goods fit for their virtual home in daily virtual life. In the VWs, users decorate their houses, visit others' homes, create families, host parties, and so forth. Users establish their social life circles through these activities. This research proposes a novel virtual goods recommendation method based on these social interactions. The contact strength and contact influence result from interactions with social neighbors and influence users' buying intention. Our research highlights the importance of social interactions in virtual goods recommendation. The experiment's data were retrieved from an online VW platform, and the results show that the proposed method, considering social interactions and social life circle, has better performance than existing recommendation methods.

  5. Virtual Goods Recommendations in Virtual Worlds

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Liao, Hsiu-Yu; Chen, Jyun-Hung; Liu, Duen-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Virtual worlds (VWs) are computer-simulated environments which allow users to create their own virtual character as an avatar. With the rapidly growing user volume in VWs, platform providers launch virtual goods in haste and stampede users to increase sales revenue. However, the rapidity of development incurs virtual unrelated items which will be difficult to remarket. It not only wastes virtual global companies' intelligence resources, but also makes it difficult for users to find suitable virtual goods fit for their virtual home in daily virtual life. In the VWs, users decorate their houses, visit others' homes, create families, host parties, and so forth. Users establish their social life circles through these activities. This research proposes a novel virtual goods recommendation method based on these social interactions. The contact strength and contact influence result from interactions with social neighbors and influence users' buying intention. Our research highlights the importance of social interactions in virtual goods recommendation. The experiment's data were retrieved from an online VW platform, and the results show that the proposed method, considering social interactions and social life circle, has better performance than existing recommendation methods. PMID:25834837

  6. Virtual PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Clague, D S; Vandersall, J A; Hon, G; Williams, P L

    2006-02-23

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) stands among the keystone technologies for analysis of biological sequence data. PCR is used to amplify DNA, to generate many copies from as little as a single template. This is essential, for example, in processing forensic DNA samples, pathogen detection in clinical or biothreat surveillance applications, and medical genotyping for diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is used in virtually every laboratory doing molecular, cellular, genetic, ecologic, forensic, or medical research. Despite its ubiquity, we lack the precise predictive capability that would enable detailed optimization of PCR reaction dynamics. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop Virtual PCR (VPCR) software, a computational method to model the kinetic, thermodynamic, and biological processes of PCR reactions. Given a successful completion, these tools will allow us to predict both the sequences and concentrations of all species that are amplified during PCR. The ability to answer the following questions will allow us both to optimize the PCR process and interpret the PCR results: What products are amplified when sequence mixtures are present, containing multiple, closely related targets and multiplexed primers, which may hybridize with sequence mismatches? What are the effects of time, temperature, and DNA concentrations on the concentrations of products? A better understanding of these issues will improve the design and interpretation of PCR reactions. The status of the VPCR project after 1.5 years of funding is consistent with the goals of the overall project which was scoped for 3 years of funding. At half way through the projected timeline of the project we have an early beta version of the VPCR code. We have begun investigating means to improve the robustness of the code, performed preliminary experiments to test the code and begun drafting manuscripts for publication. Although an experimental protocol for testing the code was developed, the preliminary

  7. New approaches to virtual environment surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Twombly, A.; Lee, A. W.; Cheng, R.; Senger, S.

    1999-01-01

    This research focused on two main problems: 1) low cost, high fidelity stereoscopic imaging of complex tissues and organs; and 2) virtual cutting of tissue. A further objective was to develop these images and virtual tissue cutting methods for use in a telemedicine project that would connect remote sites using the Next Generation Internet. For goal one we used a CT scan of a human heart, a desktop PC with an OpenGL graphics accelerator card, and LCD stereoscopic glasses. Use of multiresolution meshes ranging from approximately 1,000,000 to 20,000 polygons speeded interactive rendering rates enormously while retaining general topography of the dataset. For goal two, we used a CT scan of an infant skull with premature closure of the right coronal suture, a Silicon Graphics Onyx workstation, a Fakespace Immersive WorkBench and CrystalEyes LCD glasses. The high fidelity mesh of the skull was reduced from one million to 50,000 polygons. The cut path was automatically calculated as the shortest distance along the mesh between a small number of hand selected vertices. The region outlined by the cut path was then separated from the skull and translated/rotated to assume a new position. The results indicate that widespread high fidelity imaging in virtual environment is possible using ordinary PC capabilities if appropriate mesh reduction methods are employed. The software cutting tool is applicable to heart and other organs for surgery planning, for training surgeons in a virtual environment, and for telemedicine purposes.

  8. SafAIRway: an airway training for pulmonologists performing a flexible bronchoscopy with nonanesthesiologist administered propofol sedation

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Melanie; Grande, Bastian; Kolbe, Michaela; Kriech, Sarah; Nöthiger, Christoph B.; Kohler, Malcolm; Spahn, Donat R.; Franzen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonanesthesiologist administered propofol (NAAP) sedation for flexible bronchoscopy is controversial, because there is no established airway management (AM) training for pulmonologists. The aim was to investigate the performance and acceptance of a proposed AM algorithm and training for pulmonologists performing NAAP sedation. The algorithm includes using 3 maneuvers including bag mask ventilation (BMV), laryngeal tube (LT), and needle cricothyrotomy (NCT). During training (consisting of 2 sessions with a break of 9 weeks in between), these maneuvers were demonstrated and exercised, followed by 4 consecutive attempts to succeed with each of these devices. The primary outcome was the improvement of completion time needed for a competent airway. Secondary outcomes were the trainees’ overall reactions to the training and algorithm, and the perceptions of psychological safety (PS). The 23 staff members of the Department of Pulmonology performed a total of 552 attempts at AM procedures (4 attempts at each of the 3 maneuvers in 2 sessions), and returned a total of 42 questionnaires (4 questionnaires were not returned). Median completion times of LT and NCT improved significantly between Sessions 1 and 2 (P = 0.005 and P = 0.04, respectively), whereas BMV was only marginally improved (P = 0.05). Trainees perceived training to be useful and expressed satisfaction with this training and the algorithm. The perception of PS increased after training. An AM algorithm and training for pulmonologists leads to improved technical AM skills, and is considered useful by trainees and raised their perception of PS during training. It thus represents a promising program. PMID:27281093

  9. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  10. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-04

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  11. CT appearance of splenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  12. {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT Simulation for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Effect in Patients Already Staged by PET-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Gerard G.; McAleese, Jonathan; Carson, Kathryn J.; Stewart, David P.; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Eakin, Ruth L.; Zatari, Ashraf; Lynch, Tom; Jarritt, Peter H.; Young, V.A. Linda D.C.R.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET), in addition to computed tomography (CT), has an effect in target volume definition for radical radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In previously PET-CT staged patients with NSCLC, we assessed the effect of using an additional planning PET-CT scan for gross tumor volume (GTV) definition. Methods and Materials: A total of 28 patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were enrolled. All patients had undergone staging PET-CT to ensure suitability for radical RT. Of the 28 patients, 14 received induction chemotherapy. In place of a RT planning CT scan, patients underwent scanning on a PET-CT scanner. In a virtual planning study, four oncologists independently delineated the GTV on the CT scan alone and then on the PET-CT scan. Intraobserver and interobserver variability were assessed using the concordance index (CI), and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: PET-CT improved the CI between observers when defining the GTV using the PET-CT images compared with using CT alone for matched cases (median CI, 0.57 for CT and 0.64 for PET-CT, p = .032). The median of the mean percentage of volume change from GTV{sub CT} to GTV{sub FUSED} was -5.21% for the induction chemotherapy group and 18.88% for the RT-alone group. Using the Mann-Whitney U test, this was significantly different (p = .001). Conclusion: PET-CT RT planning scan, in addition to a staging PET-CT scan, reduces interobserver variability in GTV definition for NSCLC. The GTV size with PET-CT compared with CT in the RT-alone group increased and was reduced in the induction chemotherapy group.

  13. Feasibility of CT-Guided Percutaneous Needle Biopsy in Early Diagnosis of BOOP

    SciTech Connect

    Poulou, Loukia S. Tsangaridou, Iris; Filippoussis, Petros; Sidiropoulou, Nektaria; Apostolopoulou, Sofia; Thanos, Loukas

    2008-09-15

    Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is a nonneoplastic, noninfectious lung disease with a diverse spectrum of imaging abnormalities and nonspecific symptoms diagnosed by open lung biopsy, transbroncial biopsy, and/or video-assisted thoracoscopy. The objective of this study was to retrospectively assess the role of percutaneous computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsy in early diagnosis of the disorder. Fourteen BOOP cases diagnosed by CT-guided biopsy were analyzed in terms of imaging abnormalities and complication rate. All had previously undergone a nondiagnostic procedure (bronchoscopy, transbronchial biopsy, bronchoalveolar lavage) to exclude infection or lung cancer. The most common imaging abnormalities in descending order were bilateral consolidations (5/14), unilateral tumor-like lesions (5/14), unilateral consolidations (3/14), and diffuse reticular pattern (1/14). Coexistent abnormalities (pleural effusions, nodules, ground-glass opacities) were observed in five patients. The complication rate was 4 of 14 (28.6%), including 2 cases of subclinical pneumothorax and 1 case of minor hemoptysis and local lung injury. None required intervention. We conclude that transthoracic CT-guided biopsy may be used in the diagnosis of BOOP in selected patients with mild complications. For the focal consolidation nodule/mass imaging pattern, CT-guided biopsy may prove to be a reasonable alternative to more invasive procedures.

  14. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  15. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  16. Virtual Worlds? "Outlook Good"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelton, AJ

    2008-01-01

    Many people believed that virtual worlds would end up like the eight-track audiotape: a memory of something no longer used (or useful). Yet today there are hundreds of higher education institutions represented in three-dimensional (3D) virtual worlds such as Active Worlds and Second Life. The movement toward the virtual realm as a viable teaching…

  17. Virtual Reality: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franchi, Jorge

    1994-01-01

    Highlights of this overview of virtual reality include optics; interface devices; virtual worlds; potential applications, including medicine and archaeology; problems, including costs; current research and development; future possibilities; and a listing of vendors and suppliers of virtual reality products. (Contains 11 references.) (LRW)

  18. Lack of efficacy of pre bronchoscopy inhaled salbutamol on symptoms and lung functions in patients with pre-existing airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Anant; Momin, Indrajit; Poulose, Rosemary; Mohan, Charu; Madan, Karan; Hadda, Vijay; Guleria, Randeep; Pandey, RM

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) may exaggerate symptoms and lung functions in patients with pre-existing airway obstruction. Interventions which can alleviate or minimize this procedure-related bronchospasm, especially in this high-risk group are, therefore, required. Methods: A double-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of 400 μg of inhaled salbutamol on patients with spirometric evidence of airflow obstruction planned for FOB. Patient's dyspnea, procedure tolerability, and change in spirometry were assessed before and after the procedure. Results: A total of 50 patients were enrolled (78% males), with a mean (standard deviation) age of 49.8 (6.2) years. There was a significant fall in % predicted FEV1 within each group compared to their respective pre-bronchoscopy values. However, no significant difference in the % predicted or absolute FEV1 level was observed between the two groups. Similarly, although both groups experienced increased dyspnea immediately following FOB, this difference was not significant between the two groups either on the Borg or visual analog scale scales. Pre-FOB anxiety levels and the tolerability of the procedure as assessed by the bronchoscopist were similar in both groups. Conclusion: FOB in patients with pre-existing airway obstruction aggravates cough and dyspnea, with a concomitant decline in FEV1 and FVC. The administration of pre-FOB inhaled salbutamol does not have any significant beneficial effect on procedure-related outcomes. PMID:27578926

  19. Oncologic applications of dual-energy CT in the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Mukta D; Pinho, Daniella F; Kulkarni, Naveen M; Hahn, Peter F; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2014-01-01

    Dual-energy computed tomographic (DECT) technology offers enhanced capabilities that may benefit oncologic imaging in the abdomen. By using two different energies, dual-energy CT allows material decomposition on the basis of energy-dependent attenuation profiles of specific materials. Although image acquisition with dual-energy CT is similar to that with single-energy CT, comprehensive postprocessing is able to generate not only images that are similar to single-energy CT (SECT) images, but a variety of other images, such as virtual unenhanced (VUE), virtual monochromatic (VMC), and material-specific iodine images. An increase in the conspicuity of iodine on low-energy VMC images and material-specific iodine images may aid detection and characterization of tumors. Use of VMC images of a desired energy level (40-140 keV) improves lesion-to-background contrast and the quality of vascular imaging for preoperative planning. Material-specific iodine images enable differentiation of hypoattenuating tumors from hypo- or hyperattenuating cysts and facilitate detection of isoattenuating tumors, such as pancreatic masses and peritoneal disease, thereby defining tumor targets for imaging-guided therapy. Moreover, quantitative iodine mapping may serve as a surrogate biomarker for monitoring effects of the treatment. Dual-energy CT is an innovative imaging technique that enhances the capabilities of CT in evaluating oncology patients. PMID:24819783

  20. Phantom based evaluation of CT to CBCT image registration for proton therapy dose recalculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Guillaume; Dedes, George; Zöllner, Christoph; Handrack, Josefine; Janssens, Guillaume; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan; Reiner, Michael; Paganelli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Kamp, Florian; Söhn, Matthias; Wilkens, Jan J.; Baroni, Guido; Belka, Claus; Parodi, Katia

    2015-01-01

    The ability to perform dose recalculation on the anatomy of the day is important in the context of adaptive proton therapy. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of deformable image registration (DIR) and cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging to generate the daily stopping power distribution of the patient. We investigated the deformation of the planning CT scan (pCT) onto daily CBCT images to generate a virtual CT (vCT) using a deformable phantom designed for the head and neck (H & N) region. The phantom was imaged at a planning CT scanner in planning configuration, yielding a pCT and in deformed, treatment day configuration, yielding a reference CT (refCT). The treatment day configuration was additionally scanned at a CBCT scanner. A Morphons DIR algorithm was used to generate a vCT. The accuracy of the vCT was evaluated by comparison to the refCT in terms of corresponding features as identified by an adaptive scale invariant feature transform (aSIFT) algorithm. Additionally, the vCT CT numbers were compared to those of the refCT using both profiles and regions of interest and the volumes and overlap (DICE coefficients) of various phantom structures were compared. The water equivalent thickness (WET) of the vCT, refCT and pCT were also compared to evaluate proton range differences. Proton dose distributions from the same initial fluence were calculated on the refCT, vCT and pCT and compared in terms of proton range. The method was tested on a clinical dataset using a replanning CT scan acquired close in time to a CBCT scan as reference using the WET evaluation. Results from the aSIFT investigation suggest a deformation accuracy of 2-3 mm. The use of the Morphon algorithm did not distort CT number intensity in uniform regions and WET differences between vCT and refCT were of the order of 2% of the proton range. This result was confirmed by proton dose calculations. The patient results were consistent with phantom observations. In conclusion, our phantom

  1. Future generation CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Walter, Deborah; De Man, Bruno; Iatrou, Maria; Edic, Peter M

    2004-02-01

    X-ray CT technology has been available for more than 30 years, yet continued technological advances have kept CT imaging at the forefront of medical imaging innovation. Consequently, the number of clinical CT applications has increased steadily. Other imaging modalities might be superior to CT imaging for some specific applications, but no other single modality is more often used in chest imaging today. Future technological developments in the area of high-resolution detectors, high-capacity x-ray tubes, advanced reconstruction algorithms, and improved visualization techniques will continue to expand the imaging capability. Future CT imaging technology will combine improved imaging capability with advanced and specific computer-assisted tools, which will expand the usefulness of CT imaging in many areas.

  2. Dual energy CT: preliminary observations and potential clinical applications in the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Graser, Anno; Johnson, Thorsten R C; Chandarana, Hersh; Macari, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Dual energy CT (DECT) is a new technique that allows differentiation of materials and tissues based on CT density values derived from two synchronous CT acquisitions at different tube potentials. With the introduction of a new dual source CT system, this technique can now be used routinely in abdominal imaging. Potential clinical applications include evaluation of renal masses, liver lesions, urinary calculi, small bowel, pancreas, and adrenal glands. In CT angiography of abdominal aortic aneurysms, dual energy CT techniques can be used to remove bones from the datasets, and virtual unenhanced images allow differentiation of contrast agent from calcifying thrombus in patients with endovascular stents. This review describes potential applications, practical guidelines, and limitations of dual energy CT in the abdomen.

  3. PET/CT artifacts.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, Todd M; Mehta, Ajeet S; Mehta, Amar S; Laymon, Charles M; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W

    2011-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in positron emission tomography/computed tomographic (PET/CT) imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for AC. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT.

  4. Esophageal carcinoma: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Quint, L.E.; Glazer, G.M.; Orringer, M.B.; Gross, B.H.

    1985-04-01

    Preoperative CT scans of 33 patients with esophageal cancer were reviewed to assess staging accuracy and define the role of CT in patients being considered for transhiatal blunt esophagectomy. Surgical and pathological verification was obtained in all cases. Only 13 tumors were staged correctly according to the TNM classification. In addition, CT was not useful in assessing resectability because of its low accuracy in evaluating aortic invasion and the fact that few patients had tracheobronchial or aortic invasion or hepatic metastases at presentation.

  5. Virtual annotation: Verbal communication in virtual reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlinden, Jouke C.; Bolter, Jay David; Vandermast, Charles

    A system that was developed to explore communication in virtual reality and which offers a simple and powerful method to embed verbal communication in simulations and visualizers by means of voice annotation is described. The prototype demonstrates that the addition of verbal communication opens up a range of new uses for virtual environments. A similar voice annotation facility is easily added to existing visualizers and simulations, and it enables reading, writing and communicating.

  6. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  7. Analysis of patient CT dose data using virtualdose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Richard

    X-ray computer tomography has many benefits to medical and research applications. Recently, over the last decade CT has had a large increase in usage in hospitals and medical diagnosis. In pediatric care, from 2000 to 2006, abdominal CT scans increased by 49 % and chest CT by 425 % in the emergency room (Broder 2007). Enormous amounts of effort have been performed across multiple academic and government groups to determine an accurate measure of organ dose to patients who undergo a CT scan due to the inherent risks with ionizing radiation. Considering these intrinsic risks, CT dose estimating software becomes a necessary tool that health care providers and radiologist must use to determine many metrics to base the risks versus rewards of having an x-ray CT scan. This thesis models the resultant organ dose as body mass increases for patients with all other related scan parameters fixed. In addition to this,this thesis compares a modern dose estimating software, VirtualDose CT to two other programs, CT-Expo and ImPACT CT. The comparison shows how the software's theoretical basis and the phantom they use to represent the human body affect the range of results in organ dose. CT-Expo and ImPACT CT dose estimating software uses a different model for anatomical representation of the organs in the human body and the results show how that approach dramatically changes the outcome. The results categorizes four datasets as compared to the three software types where the appropriate phantom was available. Modeling was done to simulate chest abdominal pelvis scans and whole body scans. Organ dose difference versus body mass index shows as body mass index (BMI) ranges from 23.5 kg/m 2 to 45 kg/m2 the amount of organ dose also trends a percent change from -4.58 to -176.19 %. Comparing organ dose difference with increasing x-ray tube potential from 120 kVp to 140 kVp the percent change in organ dose increases from 55 % to 65 % across all phantoms. In comparing VirtualDose to CT

  8. MITRE's virtual model shop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingfield, Michael A.

    1995-04-01

    The exploration of visual data and the use of visual information during the design process can be greatly enhanced by working within the virtual environment where the user is closely coupled to the data by means of immersive technologies and natural user interfaces. Current technology enables us to construct a virtual environment utilizing 3D graphics projection, object generated stereo sound, tactile feedback, and voice command input. Advances in software architectures and user interfaces enable us to focus on enhancing the design process within the virtual environment. These explorations at MITRE have evolved into an application which focuses on the ability to create, manipulate, and explore photo and audio realistic 3D models of work spaces, office complexes, and entire communities in real-time. This application, the Virtual Interactive Planning System, is a component of the MITRE virtual model shop, a suite of applications which permits the user to design and manipulate computer graphics models within the virtual environment.

  9. Agreements in Virtual Organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankowska, Malgorzata

    This chapter is an attempt to explain the important impact that contract theory delivers with respect to the concept of virtual organization. The author believes that not enough research has been conducted in order to transfer theoretical foundations for networking to the phenomena of virtual organizations and open autonomic computing environment to ensure the controllability and management of them. The main research problem of this chapter is to explain the significance of agreements for virtual organizations governance. The first part of this chapter comprises explanations of differences among virtual machines and virtual organizations for further descriptions of the significance of the first ones to the development of the second. Next, the virtual organization development tendencies are presented and problems of IT governance in highly distributed organizational environment are discussed. The last part of this chapter covers analysis of contracts and agreements management for governance in open computing environments.

  10. CT of Gastric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guniganti, Preethi; Bradenham, Courtney H; Raptis, Constantine; Menias, Christine O; Mellnick, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms among adult patients seeking care in the emergency department, and, with the increased use of computed tomography (CT) to image patients with these complaints, radiologists will more frequently encounter a variety of emergent gastric pathologic conditions on CT studies. Familiarity with the CT appearance of emergent gastric conditions is important, as the clinical presentation is often nonspecific and the radiologist may be the first to recognize gastric disease as the cause of a patient's symptoms. Although endoscopy and barium fluoroscopy remain important tools for evaluating patients with suspected gastric disease in the outpatient setting, compared with CT these modalities enable less comprehensive evaluation of patients with nonspecific complaints and are less readily available in the acute setting. Endoscopy is also more invasive than CT and has greater potential risks. Although the mucosal detail of CT is relatively poor compared with barium fluoroscopy or endoscopy, CT can be used with the appropriate imaging protocols to identify inflammatory conditions of the stomach ranging from gastritis to peptic ulcer disease. In addition, CT can readily demonstrate the various complications of gastric disease, including perforation, obstruction, and hemorrhage, which may direct further clinical, endoscopic, or surgical management. We will review the normal anatomy of the stomach and discuss emergent gastric disease with a focus on the usual clinical presentation, typical imaging appearance, and differentiating features, as well as potential imaging pitfalls.

  11. Possible application of CT morphometry of the calcaneus and talus in forensic anthropological identification.

    PubMed

    Inamori-Kawamoto, Osamu; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Mustafa, Asmaa Mohammed Hishmat; Sogawa, Nozomi; Kanou, Tetsuya; Oritani, Shigeki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) data provide information for volumetric and radiographic density analysis. The present study investigated the application of virtual CT volumetry of the tarsal bones to estimation of the sex, stature, and body weight using postmortem CT (PMCT) data of forensic autopsy cases. Three-dimensional (3D) images of the bilateral foot bones of intact Japanese subjects after adolescence (age ≥ 15 years, n = 179, 100 males and 79 females) were reconstructed on an automated CT image analyzer system. Measured parameters were mass volume, mean CT value (HU), and total CT value of the talus and calcaneus. Mean CT values of these bones showed age-dependent decreases in elderly subjects over 60 years of age for both sexes, with significant sex-related differences especially in the elderly. The mass volumes and total CT values of the talus and calcaneus showed significant sex-related differences, and also moderate correlations with body height and weight for bilateral bones in all cases (r = 0.58-0.78, p < 0.0001); however, the correlations of these parameters of the female talus with body weight were insufficient (r = 0.41-0.61, p < 0.0001). These observations indicate the applicability of virtual CT morphometry of the talus and calcaneus using an automated analyzer to estimate the sex and stature in forensic identification; however, greater variations should be considered in body weight estimations of females. PMID:26362306

  12. Possible application of CT morphometry of the calcaneus and talus in forensic anthropological identification.

    PubMed

    Inamori-Kawamoto, Osamu; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Mustafa, Asmaa Mohammed Hishmat; Sogawa, Nozomi; Kanou, Tetsuya; Oritani, Shigeki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) data provide information for volumetric and radiographic density analysis. The present study investigated the application of virtual CT volumetry of the tarsal bones to estimation of the sex, stature, and body weight using postmortem CT (PMCT) data of forensic autopsy cases. Three-dimensional (3D) images of the bilateral foot bones of intact Japanese subjects after adolescence (age ≥ 15 years, n = 179, 100 males and 79 females) were reconstructed on an automated CT image analyzer system. Measured parameters were mass volume, mean CT value (HU), and total CT value of the talus and calcaneus. Mean CT values of these bones showed age-dependent decreases in elderly subjects over 60 years of age for both sexes, with significant sex-related differences especially in the elderly. The mass volumes and total CT values of the talus and calcaneus showed significant sex-related differences, and also moderate correlations with body height and weight for bilateral bones in all cases (r = 0.58-0.78, p < 0.0001); however, the correlations of these parameters of the female talus with body weight were insufficient (r = 0.41-0.61, p < 0.0001). These observations indicate the applicability of virtual CT morphometry of the talus and calcaneus using an automated analyzer to estimate the sex and stature in forensic identification; however, greater variations should be considered in body weight estimations of females.

  13. Coronary artery calcium quantification from contrast enhanced CT using gemstone spectral imaging and material decomposition.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Tobias A; Stehli, Julia; Dougoud, Svetlana; Sah, Bert-Ram; Bull, Sacha; Clerc, Olivier F; Possner, Mathias; Buechel, Ronny R; Gaemperli, Oliver; Kaufmann, Philipp A

    2014-10-01

    To explore the feasibility of coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement from low-dose contrast enhanced coronary CT angiography (CCTA) as this may obviate the need for an unenhanced CT scan. 52 patients underwent unenhanced cardiac CT and prospectively ECG triggered contrast enhanced CCTA (Discovery HD 750, GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA). The latter was acquired in single-source dual-energy mode [gemstone spectral imaging (GSI)]. Virtual unenhanced images were generated from GSI CCTA by monochromatic image reconstruction of 70 keV allowing selective iodine material suppression. CAC scores from virtual unenhanced CT were compared to standard unenhanced CT including a linear regression model. After iodine subtraction from the contrast enhanced CCTA the attenuation in the ascending aorta decreased significantly from 359 ± 61 to 54 ± 8 HU (P < 0.001), the latter comparing well to the value of 64 ± 55 HU found in the standard unenhanced CT (P = ns) confirming successful iodine subtraction. After introducing linear regression formula the mean values for Agatston, Volume and Mass scores of virtual unenhanced CT were 187 ± 321, 72 ± 114 mm(3), and 27 ± 46 mg/cm(3), comparing well to the values from standard unenhanced CT (187 ± 309, 72 ± 110 mm(3), and 27 ± 45 mg/cm(3)) yielding an excellent correlation (r = 0.96, r = 0.96, r = 0.92; P < 0.001). Mean estimated radiation dose revealed 0.83 ± 0.02 mSv from the unenhanced CT and 1.70 ± 0.53 mSv from the contrast enhanced CCTA. Single-source dual-energy scanning with GSI allows CAC quantification from low dose contrast enhanced CCTA by virtual iodine contrast subtraction.

  14. SNOMED CT in pathology.

    PubMed

    García-Rojo, Marcial; Daniel, Christel; Laurinavicius, Arvydas

    2012-01-01

    Pathology information systems have been using SNOMED II for many years, and in most cases, they are in a migration process to SNOMED CT. COST Action IC0604 (EURO-TELEPATH) has considered terminology normalization one of its strategic objectives. This paper reviews the use of SNOMED CT in healthcare, with a special focus in pathology. Nowadays, SNOMED CT is mainly used for concept search and coding of clinical data. Some ontological errors found in SNOMED CT are described. The Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) initiative has fostered the use of SNOMED CT, also in Pathology, as recommended in the Supplement Anatomic Pathology Structured Reports of the IHE Anatomic Pathology Technical Framework. Rule governing concept post-coordination is also described. Some recent initiatives are trying to define a SNOMED CT subset for Pathology. The Spanish Society of Pathology has defined a subset for specimens and procedures in Pathology. Regarding diagnosis coding, the morphological abnormality sub-hierarchy of SNOMED CT need to be significantly extended and improved to become useful for pathologists. A consensus is needed to encode pathology reports with the adequate hierarchies and concepts. This will make the implementation of pathology structured reports more feasible.

  15. A Virtual Good Idea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolch, Matt

    2009-01-01

    School districts across the country have always had to do more with less. Funding goes only so far, leaving administrators and IT staff to find innovative ways to save money while maintaining a high level of academic quality. Creating virtual servers accomplishes both tasks, district technology personnel say. Virtual environments not only allow…

  16. 10 Myths of Virtualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    Half of servers in higher ed are virtualized. But that number's not high enough for Link Alander, interim vice chancellor and CIO at the Lone Star College System (Texas). He aspires to see 100 percent of the system's infrastructure requirements delivered as IT services from its own virtualized data centers or other cloud-based operators. Back in…

  17. Virtual Worlds for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Steve

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an online experience that has not only created a fantasy world for the general public but has enabled some tech-savvy educators to create virtual educational opportunities. Second Life, or SL, is a 3-D Internet-based virtual world created by Linden Lab and populated by nearly 1,000,000 active users worldwide since 2003.…

  18. Virtual Peace Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firer, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on the convictions that peace education is the basis for any sustainable non-violent relations between parties in a conflict, and that virtual peace education is almost the only feasible way to practise peace education in an open violent conflict as is the current Israeli/Palestinians one. Moreover, virtual peace education…

  19. Digging the Virtual Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polymeropoulou, Panagiota

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we will investigate the way that the technological progress and the Informatics contributed greatly to the field of Archaeology. There will be analyzed the terms of virtual archaeology and virtual reality in archaeology and there will be an extended reference to the applications and the computer graphics that archaeologists could use…

  20. Virtual School Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Debra S.; Peterson, Gary W.; Hale, Rebecca R.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of virtual schools opens doors to opportunity for delivery of student services via the Internet. Through the use of structured interviews with four practicing Florida virtual school counselors, and a follow-up survey, the authors examined the experiences and reflections of school counselors who are employed full time in a statewide…

  1. Virtual Schools. Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2009-01-01

    The majority of school districts in the U.S. are providing some form of online learning for their students. In the past, virtual schools primarily targeted advanced students who didn't have access to certain courses in their regular schools. Recently, however, many virtual schools have shifted their focus to credit recovery as a way to provide…

  2. Rethinking the Virtual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burbules, Nicholas C.

    2004-01-01

    The author builds theoretically off an alternative conception of the virtual, through a series of steps. First, he explores four processes of engagement through which immersion happens (interest, involvement, imagination and interaction); these will prove especially important for understanding the educational potential of virtuality. Second, he…

  3. Virtual Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follows, Scott B.

    1999-01-01

    Illustrates the possibilities and educational benefits of virtual learning environments (VLEs), based on experiences with "Thirst for Knowledge," a VLE that simulates the workplace of a major company. While working in this virtual office world, students walk through the building, attend meetings, read reports, receive e-mail, answer the telephone,…

  4. Intelligent virtual teacher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, Ondřej; Kostolányová, Kateřina

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the Virtual Teacher that uses a set of rules to automatically adapt the way of teaching. These rules compose of two parts: conditions on various students' properties or learning situation; conclusions that specify different adaptation parameters. The rules can be used for general adaptation of each subject or they can be specific to some subject. The rule based system of Virtual Teacher is dedicated to be used in pedagogical experiments in adaptive e-learning and is therefore designed for users without education in computer science. The Virtual Teacher was used in dissertation theses of two students, who executed two pedagogical experiments. This paper also describes the phase of simulating and modeling of the theoretically prepared adaptive process in the modeling tool, which has all the required parameters and has been created especially for the occasion. The experiments are being conducted on groups of virtual students and by using a virtual study material.

  5. Virtual Worlds, Virtual Literacy: An Educational Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoerger, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Virtual worlds enable students to learn through seeing, knowing, and doing within visually rich and mentally engaging spaces. Rather than reading about events, students become part of the events through the adoption of a pre-set persona. Along with visual feedback that guides the players' activities and the development of visual skills, visual…

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic ... Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic ... X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses About ...

  8. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - pelvis; Computed axial tomography scan - pelvis; Computed tomography scan - pelvis; CT scan - pelvis ... creates detailed pictures of the body, including the pelvis and areas near the pelvis. The test may ...

  9. Pediatric CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  10. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... on film. Three-dimensional (3D) models of the leg can be created by adding the slices together. ...

  11. CT Angiography (CTA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CT Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ...

  12. Virtual Machine Logbook - Enabling virtualization for ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yushu; Calafiura, Paolo; Poffet, Julien; Cavalli, Andrea; Leggett, Charles; Frédéric, Bapst

    2010-04-01

    ATLAS software has been developed mostly on CERN linux cluster lxplus or on similar facilities at the experiment Tier 1 centers. The fast rise of virtualization technology has the potential to change this model, turning every laptop or desktop into an ATLAS analysis platform. In the context of the CernVM project we are developing a suite of tools and CernVM plug-in extensions to promote the use of virtualization for ATLAS analysis and software development. The Virtual Machine Logbook (VML), in particular, is an application to organize work of physicists on multiple projects, logging their progress, and speeding up "context switches" from one project to another. An important feature of VML is the ability to share with a single "click" the status of a given project with other colleagues. VML builds upon the save and restore capabilities of mainstream virtualization software like VMware, and provides a technology-independent client interface to them. A lot of emphasis in the design and implementation has gone into optimizing the save and restore process to makepractical to store many VML entries on a typical laptop disk or to share a VML entry over the network. At the same time, taking advantage of CernVM's plugin capabilities, we are extending the CernVM platform to help increase the usability of ATLAS software. For example, we added the ability to start the ATLAS event display on any computer running CernVM simply by clicking a button in a web browser. We want to integrate seamlessly VML with CernVM unique file system design to distribute efficiently ATLAS software on every physicist computer. The CernVM File System (CVMFS) download files on-demand via HTTP, and cache it locally for future use. This reduces by one order of magnitude the download sizes, making practical for a developer to work with multiple software releases on a virtual machine.

  13. [Development of a software for 3D virtual phantom design].

    PubMed

    Zou, Lian; Xie, Zhao; Wu, Qi

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we present a 3D virtual phantom design software, which was developed based on object-oriented programming methodology and dedicated to medical physics research. This software was named Magical Phan tom (MPhantom), which is composed of 3D visual builder module and virtual CT scanner. The users can conveniently construct any complex 3D phantom, and then export the phantom as DICOM 3.0 CT images. MPhantom is a user-friendly and powerful software for 3D phantom configuration, and has passed the real scene's application test. MPhantom will accelerate the Monte Carlo simulation for dose calculation in radiation therapy and X ray imaging reconstruction algorithm research. PMID:24804488

  14. Virtual Human Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, RD

    2001-06-12

    This paper describes the development of a comprehensive human modeling environment, the Virtual Human, which will be used initially to model the human respiratory system for purposes of predicting pulmonary disease or injury using lung sounds. The details of the computational environment, including the development of a Virtual Human Thorax, a database for storing models, model parameters, and experimental data, and a Virtual Human web interface are outlined. Preliminary progress in developing this environment will be presented. A separate paper at the conference describes the modeling of sound generation using computational fluid dynamics and the modeling of sound propagation in the human respiratory system.

  15. Virtual slit scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fiolka, Reto; Stemmer, Andreas; Belyaev, Yury

    2007-12-01

    We present a novel slit scanning confocal microscope with a CCD camera image sensor and a virtual slit aperture for descanning that can be adjusted during post-processing. A very efficient data structure and mathematical criteria for aligning the virtual aperture guarantee the ease of use. We further introduce a method to reduce the anisotropic lateral resolution of slit scanning microscopes. System performance is evaluated against a spinning disk confocal microscope on identical specimens. The virtual slit scanning microscope works as the spinning disk type and outperforms on thick specimens. PMID:17891411

  16. Working Group Reports and Presentations: Virtual Worlds and Virtual Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LAmoreaux, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    Scientists and engineers are continually developing innovative methods to capitalize on recent developments in computational power. Virtual worlds and virtual exploration present a new toolset for project design, implementation, and resolution. Replication of the physical world in the virtual domain provides stimulating displays to augment current data analysis techniques and to encourage public participation. In addition, the virtual domain provides stakeholders with a low cost, low risk design and test environment. The following document defines a virtual world and virtual exploration, categorizes the chief motivations for virtual exploration, elaborates upon specific objectives, identifies roadblocks and enablers for realizing the benefits, and highlights the more immediate areas of implementation (i.e. the action items). While the document attempts a comprehensive evaluation of virtual worlds and virtual exploration, the innovative nature of the opportunities presented precludes completeness. The authors strongly encourage readers to derive additional means of utilizing the virtual exploration toolset.

  17. The Virtual Reference Librarian's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipow, Anne Grodzins

    This book is a practical guide to librarians and their administrators who are thinking about or in the early stages of providing virtual reference service. Part 1, "The Decision to Go Virtual," provides a context for thinking about virtual reference, including the benefits and problems, getting in the virtual frame of mind, and shopping for…

  18. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-13

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  19. Nuevo Observatorio Virtual Argentino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissera, P. B.

    We summarized the main events in the creation of the Nuevo Observatorio Virtual Argentino (NOVA) and its objectives. We also discuss the present advances and the goals for the near future. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  20. Virtual Organizations: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nami, Mohammad Reza

    The need to remain competitive in the open market forces companies to concentrate on their core competencies while searching for alliances when additional skills or resources are needed to fulfill business opportunities. The changing business situation of companies and customer needs have motivated researchers to introduce Virtual Organization (VO) idea. A Virtual Organization is always a form of partnership and managing partners and handling partnerships are crucial. Virtual organizations are defined as a temporary collection of enterprises that cooperate and share resources, knowledge, and competencies to better respond to business opportunities. This paper presents base concepts of virtual organizations including properties, management concepts, operational concepts, and main issues in collaboration such as security and authentication.

  1. ISIS Workshops Using Virtualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K. J.; Becker, T. L.

    2015-06-01

    ISIS workshops are now using virtualization technology to improve the user experience and create a stable, consistent and useful ISIS installation for educational purposes as well as future processing needs.

  2. Going Virtual, Getting Real.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Randall J.

    1999-01-01

    Presents an account of how one company went completely virtual--no office at all--and reaped the eventual rewards. Describes implementation processes, communication challenges, and customer reactions. (JOW)

  3. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  4. Multispectral MRI-based virtual cystoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lihong; Zhu, Hongbin; Wang, Su; Wei, Xinzhou; Liang, Zhengrong

    2010-08-01

    Bladder cancer is the fifth cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Virtual cystoscopy (VC) can be a screening means for early detection of the cancer using non-invasive imaging and computer graphics technologies. Previous researches have mainly focused on spiral CT (computed tomography), which invasively introduces air into bladder lumen for a contrast against bladder wall via a small catheter. However, the tissue contrast around bladder wall is still limited in CT-based VC. In addition, CT-based technique carries additional radiation. We have investigated a procedure to achieve the screening task by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). It utilizes the unique features of MRI: (1) the urine has distinct T1 and T2 relaxation times as compared to its surrounding tissues, and (2) MRI has the potential to obtain good tissue contrast around bladder wall. The procedure is fully non-invasive and easy in implementation. In this paper, we proposed a MRI-based VC system for computer aided detection (CAD) of bladder tumors. The proposed VC system is an integration of partial volume-based segmentation containing texture information and fast marching-based CAD employing geometrical features for detecting of bladder tumors. The accuracy and efficiency of the integrated VC system are evaluated by testing the diagnoses against a database of patients.

  5. Virtual Reality Lab Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Hrishikesh; Palmer, Timothy A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality Lab Assistant (VRLA) demonstration model is aligned for engineering and material science experiments to be performed by undergraduate and graduate students in the course as a pre-lab simulation experience. This will help students to get a preview of how to use the lab equipment and run experiments without using the lab hardware/software equipment. The quality of the time available for laboratory experiments can be significantly improved through the use of virtual reality technology.

  6. NASA New Virtual Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Virtual Airport Tower is located at the Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. The Virtual Airport Tower's two-story structure is a full-scale, highly sophisticated simulation facility that will emulate Level 5 air traffic control towers and the busiest airports. It provides the platform to conduct in-depth human factors studies with quantifiable results using actual air traffic controllers, airline dispatchers and airport managers.

  7. The Virtual Observatory: I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisch, R. J.

    2014-11-01

    The concept of the Virtual Observatory arose more-or-less simultaneously in the United States and Europe circa 2000. Ten pages of Astronomy and Astrophysics in the New Millennium: Panel Reports (National Academy Press, Washington, 2001), that is, the detailed recommendations of the Panel on Theory, Computation, and Data Exploration of the 2000 Decadal Survey in Astronomy, are dedicated to describing the motivation for, scientific value of, and major components required in implementing the National Virtual Observatory. European initiatives included the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory at the European Southern Observatory, the AstroGrid project in the United Kingdom, and the Euro-VO (sponsored by the European Union). Organizational/conceptual meetings were held in the US at the California Institute of Technology (Virtual Observatories of the Future, June 13-16, 2000) and at ESO Headquarters in Garching, Germany (Mining the Sky, July 31-August 4, 2000; Toward an International Virtual Observatory, June 10-14, 2002). The nascent US, UK, and European VO projects formed the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) at the June 2002 meeting in Garching, with yours truly as the first chair. The IVOA has grown to a membership of twenty-one national projects and programs on six continents, and has developed a broad suite of data access protocols and standards that have been widely implemented. Astronomers can now discover, access, and compare data from hundreds of telescopes and facilities, hosted at hundreds of organizations worldwide, stored in thousands of databases, all with a single query.

  8. VIRTUAL FRAME BUFFER INTERFACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    Large image processing systems use multiple frame buffers with differing architectures and vendor supplied user interfaces. This variety of architectures and interfaces creates software development, maintenance, and portability problems for application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program makes all frame buffers appear as a generic frame buffer with a specified set of characteristics, allowing programmers to write code which will run unmodified on all supported hardware. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface converts generic commands to actual device commands. The virtual frame buffer consists of a definition of capabilities and FORTRAN subroutines that are called by application programs. The virtual frame buffer routines may be treated as subroutines, logical functions, or integer functions by the application program. Routines are included that allocate and manage hardware resources such as frame buffers, monitors, video switches, trackballs, tablets and joysticks; access image memory planes; and perform alphanumeric font or text generation. The subroutines for the various "real" frame buffers are in separate VAX/VMS shared libraries allowing modification, correction or enhancement of the virtual interface without affecting application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program was developed in FORTRAN 77 for a DEC VAX 11/780 or a DEC VAX 11/750 under VMS 4.X. It supports ADAGE IK3000, DEANZA IP8500, Low Resolution RAMTEK 9460, and High Resolution RAMTEK 9460 Frame Buffers. It has a central memory requirement of approximately 150K. This program was developed in 1985.

  9. Investigating CT to CBCT image registration for head and neck proton therapy as a tool for daily dose recalculation

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Nijhuis, Reinoud; Thieke, Christian; Reiner, Michael; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus; Dedes, George; Handrack, Josefine; Parodi, Katia; Janssens, Guillaume; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan; Kamp, Florian; Wilkens, Jan J.; Paganelli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) of head and neck (H and N) cancer patients may be improved by plan adaptation. The decision to adapt the treatment plan based on a dose recalculation on the current anatomy requires a diagnostic quality computed tomography (CT) scan of the patient. As gantry-mounted cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners are currently being offered by vendors, they may offer daily or weekly updates of patient anatomy. CBCT image quality may not be sufficient for accurate proton dose calculation and it is likely necessary to perform CBCT CT number correction. In this work, the authors investigated deformable image registration (DIR) of the planning CT (pCT) to the CBCT to generate a virtual CT (vCT) to be used for proton dose recalculation. Methods: Datasets of six H and N cancer patients undergoing photon intensity modulated radiation therapy were used in this study to validate the vCT approach. Each dataset contained a CBCT acquired within 3 days of a replanning CT (rpCT), in addition to a pCT. The pCT and rpCT were delineated by a physician. A Morphons algorithm was employed in this work to perform DIR of the pCT to CBCT following a rigid registration of the two images. The contours from the pCT were deformed using the vector field resulting from DIR to yield a contoured vCT. The DIR accuracy was evaluated with a scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm comparing automatically identified matching features between vCT and CBCT. The rpCT was used as reference for evaluation of the vCT. The vCT and rpCT CT numbers were converted to stopping power ratio and the water equivalent thickness (WET) was calculated. IMPT dose distributions from treatment plans optimized on the pCT were recalculated with a Monte Carlo algorithm on the rpCT and vCT for comparison in terms of gamma index, dose volume histogram (DVH) statistics as well as proton range. The DIR generated contours on the vCT were compared to physician-drawn contours on the rpCT

  10. Dual-energy CT revisited with multidetector CT: review of principles and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay; Aktaş, Aykut

    2011-09-01

    Although dual-energy CT (DECT) was first conceived in the 1970s, it was not widely used for CT indications. Recently, the simultaneous acquisition of volumetric dual-energy data has been introduced using multidetector CT (MDCT) with two X-ray tubes and rapid kVp switching (gemstone spectral imaging). Two major advantages of DECT are material decomposition by acquiring two image series with different kVp and the elimination of misregistration artifacts. Hounsfield unit measurements by DECT are not absolute and can change depending on the kVp used for an acquisition. Typically, a combination of 80/140 kVp is used for DECT, but for some applications, 100/140 kVp is preferred. In this study, we summarized the clinical applications of DECT and included images that were acquired using the dual-source CT and rapid kVp switching. In general, unenhanced images can be avoided by using DECT for body and neurological applications; iodine can be removed from the image, and a virtual, non-contrast (water) image can be obtained. Neuroradiological applications allow for the removal of bone and calcium from the carotid and brain CT angiography. Thorax applications include perfusion imaging in patients with pulmonary thromboemboli and other chest diseases, xenon ventilation-perfusion imaging and solitary nodule characterization. Cardiac applications include dual-energy cardiac perfusion, viability and cardiac iron detection. The removal of calcific plaques from arteries, bone removal and aortic stent graft evaluation may be achieved in the vascular system. Abdominal applications include the detection and characterization of liver and pancreas masses, the diagnosis of steatosis and iron overload, DECT colonoscopy and CT cholangiography. Urinary system applications are urinary calculi characterization (uric acid vs. non-uric acid), renal cyst characterization and mass characterization. Musculoskeletal applications permit the differentiation of gout from pseudogout and a reduction of

  11. Virtual data in CMS production

    SciTech Connect

    Arbree, A. et al.

    2004-08-26

    Initial applications of the GriPhyN Chimera Virtual Data System have been performed within the context of CMS Production of Monte Carlo Simulated Data. The GriPhyN Chimera system consists of four primary components: (1) a Virtual Data Language, which is used to describe virtual data products, (2) a Virtual Data Catalog, which is used to store virtual data entries, (3) an Abstract Planner, which resolves all dependencies of a particular virtual data product and forms a location and existence independent plan, (4) a Concrete Planner, which maps an abstract, logical plan onto concrete, physical grid resources accounting for staging in/out files and publishing results to a replica location service. A CMS Workflow Planner, MCRunJob, is used to generate virtual data products using the Virtual Data Language. Subsequently, a prototype workflow manager, known as WorkRunner, is used to schedule the instantiation of virtual data products across a grid.

  12. Contrast-enhanced CT imaging in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    von Stillfried, Saskia; Apitzsch, Jonas C; Ehling, Josef; Penzkofer, Tobias; Mahnken, Andreas H; Knüchel, Ruth; Floege, Jürgen; Boor, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Renal microvascular rarefaction characterizes chronic kidney disease (CKD). In murine models of CKD, micro-CT imaging reflected capillary rarefaction using quantification of renal relative blood volume (rBV). In addition, micro-CT imaging revealed morphological alterations of the intrarenal vasculature including reduced vascular branching and lumen diameter. Here, we retrospectively quantified rBV in contrast-enhanced CT angiography in patients and found that, compared to non-CKD patients, those with CKD and renal fibrosis had significantly reduced rBV in the renal cortex. rBV values closely mirrored capillary rarefaction in the corresponding nephrectomy specimens. In patients with follow-up CT angiography, reduction of renal function was paralleled by a decline in rBV. Using virtual autopsy, i.e., postmortem CT angiography, morphometry of intrarenal arteries in 3D-rendered CT images revealed significantly reduced arterial diameter and branching in CKD compared to non-CKD cases. In conclusion, in CKD patients, contrast-enhanced CT imaging with quantification of rBV correlates with functional renal vasculature, whereas virtual autopsy allows morphometric analyses of macrovascular changes. Importantly, the observed vascular alterations in CKD patients mirror those in animals with progressive CKD, suggesting a high relevance of animal models for studying vascular alterations in CKD and renal fibrosis. PMID:27582011

  13. Varieties of virtualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.

    1991-01-01

    Natural environments have a content, i.e., the objects in them; a geometry, i.e., a pattern of rules for positioning and displacing the objects; and a dynamics, i.e., a system of rules describing the effects of forces acting on the objects. Human interaction with most common natural environments has been optimized by centuries of evolution. Virtual environments created through the human-computer interface similarly have a content, geometry, and dynamics, but the arbitrary character of the computer simulation creating them does not insure that human interaction with these virtual environments will be natural. The interaction, indeed, could be supernatural but it also could be impossible. An important determinant of the comprehensibility of a virtual environment is the correspondence between the environmental frames of reference and those associated with the control of environmental objects. The effects of rotation and displacement of control frames of reference with respect to corresponding environmental references differ depending upon whether perceptual judgement or manual tracking performance is measured. The perceptual effects of frame of reference displacement may be analyzed in terms of distortions in the process of virtualizing the synthetic environment space. The effects of frame of reference displacement and rotation have been studied by asking subjects to estimate exocentric direction in a virtual space.

  14. Pyogenic myositis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Butler, G.J.; Maguire, J.H.; Nagel, J.S.

    1988-11-01

    Computed tomography and gallium scintigraphy uncovered clinically occult muscle infection in eight patients. The CT findings included enlargement of the muscle, effacement of the intramuscular fat planes, fluid density, rim enhancement, and involvement of the underlying bone. Computed tomography suggested the diagnosis in seven of eight cases. Gallium scintigraphy was positive in all seven cases in which it was performed.

  15. Method for extracting the aorta from 3D CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taeprasartsit, Pinyo; Higgins, William E.

    2007-03-01

    Bronchoscopic biopsy of the central-chest lymph nodes is vital in the staging of lung cancer. Three-dimensional multi-detector CT (MDCT) images provide vivid anatomical detail for planning bronchoscopy. Unfortunately, many lymph nodes are situated close to the aorta, and an inadvertent needle biopsy could puncture the aorta, causing serious harm. As an eventual aid for more complete planning of lymph-node biopsy, it is important to define the aorta. This paper proposes a method for extracting the aorta from a 3D MDCT chest image. The method has two main phases: (1) Off-line Model Construction, which provides a set of training cases for fitting new images, and (2) On-Line Aorta Construction, which is used for new incoming 3D MDCT images. Off-Line Model Construction is done once using several representative human MDCT images and consists of the following steps: construct a likelihood image, select control points of the medial axis of the aortic arch, and recompute the control points to obtain a constant-interval medial-axis model. On-Line Aorta Construction consists of the following operations: construct a likelihood image, perform global fitting of the precomputed models to the current case's likelihood image to find the best fitting model, perform local fitting to adjust the medial axis to local data variations, and employ a region recovery method to arrive at the complete constructed 3D aorta. The region recovery method consists of two steps: model-based and region-growing steps. This region growing method can recover regions outside the model coverage and non-circular tube structures. In our experiments, we used three models and achieved satisfactory results on twelve of thirteen test cases.

  16. High efficiency virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Loo, B.W.

    1980-03-27

    Environmental monitoring of atmospheric air is facilitated by a single stage virtual impactor for separating an inlet flow (Q/sub 0/) having particulate contaminants into a coarse particle flow (Q/sub 1/) and a fine particle flow (Q/sub 2/) to enable collection of such particles on different filters for separate analysis. An inlet particle acceleration nozzle and coarse particle collection probe member having a virtual impaction opening are aligned along a single axis and spaced apart to define a flow separation region at which the fine particle flow (Q/sub 2/) is drawn radially outward into a chamber while the coarse particle flow (Q/sub 1/) enters the virtual impaction opening.

  17. Quantitative assessment of anatomical change using a virtual proton depth radiograph for adaptive head and neck proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Yin, Lingshu; Zhang, Yawei; Kirk, Maura; Song, Gang; Ahn, Peter H; Lin, Alexander; Gee, James; Dolney, Derek; Solberg, Timothy D; Maughan, Richard; McDonough, James; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using water-equivalent thickness (WET) and virtual proton depth radiographs (PDRs) of intensity corrected cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to detect anatomical change and patient setup error to trigger adaptive head and neck proton therapy. The planning CT (pCT) and linear accelerator (linac) equipped CBCTs acquired weekly during treatment of a head and neck patient were used in this study. Deformable image registration (DIR) was used to register each CBCT with the pCT and map Hounsfield units (HUs) from the planning CT (pCT) onto the daily CBCT. The deformed pCT is referred as the corrected CBCT (cCBCT). Two dimensional virtual lateral PDRs were generated using a ray-tracing technique to project the cumulative WET from a virtual source through the cCBCT and the pCT onto a virtual plane. The PDRs were used to identify anatomic regions with large variations in the proton range between the cCBCT and pCT using a threshold of 3 mm relative difference of WET and 3 mm search radius criteria. The relationship between PDR differences and dose distribution is established. Due to weight change and tumor response during treatment, large variations in WETs were observed in the relative PDRs which corresponded spatially with an increase in the number of failing points within the GTV, especially in the pharynx area. Failing points were also evident near the posterior neck due to setup variations. Differences in PDRs correlated spatially to differences in the distal dose distribution in the beam's eye view. Virtual PDRs generated from volumetric data, such as pCTs or CBCTs, are potentially a useful quantitative tool in proton therapy. PDRs and WET analysis may be used to detect anatomical change from baseline during treatment and trigger further analysis in adaptive proton therapy. PMID:27074464

  18. Intraoperative virtual brain counseling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaowei; Grosky, William I.; Zamorano, Lucia J.; Muzik, Otto; Diaz, Fernando

    1997-06-01

    Our objective is to offer online real-tim e intelligent guidance to the neurosurgeon. Different from traditional image-guidance technologies that offer intra-operative visualization of medical images or atlas images, virtual brain counseling goes one step further. It can distinguish related brain structures and provide information about them intra-operatively. Virtual brain counseling is the foundation for surgical planing optimization and on-line surgical reference. It can provide a warning system that alerts the neurosurgeon if the chosen trajectory will pass through eloquent brain areas. In order to fulfill this objective, tracking techniques are involved for intra- operativity. Most importantly, a 3D virtual brian environment, different from traditional 3D digitized atlases, is an object-oriented model of the brain that stores information about different brain structures together with their elated information. An object-oriented hierarchical hyper-voxel space (HHVS) is introduced to integrate anatomical and functional structures. Spatial queries based on position of interest, line segment of interest, and volume of interest are introduced in this paper. The virtual brain environment is integrated with existing surgical pre-planning and intra-operative tracking systems to provide information for planning optimization and on-line surgical guidance. The neurosurgeon is alerted automatically if the planned treatment affects any critical structures. Architectures such as HHVS and algorithms, such as spatial querying, normalizing, and warping are presented in the paper. A prototype has shown that the virtual brain is intuitive in its hierarchical 3D appearance. It also showed that HHVS, as the key structure for virtual brain counseling, efficiently integrates multi-scale brain structures based on their spatial relationships.This is a promising development for optimization of treatment plans and online surgical intelligent guidance.

  19. Seventh-generation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, G. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new dual-drum CT system architecture has been recently introduced with the potential to achieve significantly higher temporal resolution than is currently possible in medical imaging CT. The concept relies only on known technologies; in particular rotation speeds several times higher than what is possible today could be achieved leveraging typical x-ray tube designs and capabilities. However, the architecture lends itself to the development of a new arrangement of x-ray sources in a toroidal vacuum envelope containing a rotating cathode ring and a (optionally rotating) shared anode ring to potentially obtain increased individual beam power as well as increase total exposure per rotation. The new x-ray source sub-system design builds on previously described concepts and could make the provision of multiple conventional high-power cathodes in a CT system practical by distributing the anode target between the cathodes. In particular, relying on known magnetic-levitation technologies, it is in principle possible to more than double the relative speed of the electron-beam with respect to the target, thus potentially leading to significant individual beam power increases as compared to today's state-of-the-art. In one embodiment, the proposed design can be naturally leveraged by the dual-drum CT concept previously described to alleviate the problem of arranging a number of conventional rotating anode-stem x-ray tubes and power conditioners on the limited space of a CT gantry. In another embodiment, a system with three cathodes is suggested leveraging the architecture previously proposed by Franke.

  20. Technical aspects of CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Maravilla, K R; Pastel, M S

    1978-01-01

    The advent of computed tomography (CT) has initiated a technological revolution which continues to the present time. A brief review of basic principles of CT scanning is presented, and the evolution of modern CT scanner systems is traced. Some early indications of future trends are also presented.

  1. Three-dimensional virtual bone bank system workflow for structural bone allograft selection: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Ritacco, Lucas Eduardo; Farfalli, German Luis; Milano, Federico Edgardo; Ayerza, Miguel Angel; Muscolo, Domingo Luis; Aponte-Tinao, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Structural bone allograft has been used in bone defect reconstruction during the last fifty years with acceptable results. However, allograft selection methods were based on 2-dimensional templates using X-rays. Thanks to preoperative planning platforms, three-dimensional (3D) CT-derived bone models were used to define size and shape comparison between host and donor. The purpose of this study was to describe the workflow of this virtual technique in order to explain how to choose the best allograft using a virtual bone bank system. We measured all bones in a 3D virtual environment determining the best match. The use of a virtual bone bank system has allowed optimizing the allograft selection in a bone bank, providing more information to the surgeons before surgery. In conclusion, 3D preoperative planning in a virtual environment for allograft selection is an important and helpful tool in order to achieve a good match between host and donor.

  2. A VIRTUAL OPERATING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Dennis E.; Scherrer, Deborah K.; Sventek, Joseph S.

    1980-05-01

    Significant progress toward disentangling computing environments from their under lying operating systern has been made. An approach is presented that achieves inter-system uniformity at all three levels of user interface - virtual machine, utilities, and command language. Under specifiable conditions, complete uniformity is achievable without disturbing the underlying operating system. The approach permits accurate computation of the cost to move both people and software to a new system. The cost of moving people is zero, and the cost of moving software is equal to the cost of implementing a virtual machine. Efficiency is achieved through optimization of the primitive functions.

  3. Virtual reality welder training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Steven A.; Reiners, Dirk; Prachyabrued, Mores; Borst, Christoph W.; Chambers, Terrence L.

    2010-01-01

    This document describes the Virtual Reality Simulated MIG Lab (sMIG), a system for Virtual Reality welder training. It is designed to reproduce the experience of metal inert gas (MIG) welding faithfully enough to be used as a teaching tool for beginning welding students. To make the experience as realistic as possible it employs physically accurate and tracked input devices, a real-time welding simulation, real-time sound generation and a 3D display for output. Thanks to being a fully digital system it can go beyond providing just a realistic welding experience by giving interactive and immediate feedback to the student to avoid learning wrong movements from day 1.

  4. Virtual reality for emergency training

    SciTech Connect

    Altinkemer, K.

    1995-12-31

    Virtual reality is a sequence of scenes generated by a computer as a response to the five different senses. These senses are sight, sound, taste, touch, smell. Other senses that can be used in virtual reality include balance, pheromonal, and immunological senses. Many application areas include: leisure and entertainment, medicine, architecture, engineering, manufacturing, and training. Virtual reality is especially important when it is used for emergency training and management of natural disasters including earthquakes, floods, tornados and other situations which are hard to emulate. Classical training methods for these extraordinary environments lack the realistic surroundings that virtual reality can provide. In order for virtual reality to be a successful training tool the design needs to include certain aspects; such as how real virtual reality should be and how much fixed cost is entailed in setting up the virtual reality trainer. There are also pricing questions regarding the price per training session on virtual reality trainer, and the appropriate training time length(s).

  5. An Investigation of the Incorporation of Virtual Microscopy in the Cytotechnology Educational Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukherjee, Maheswari S.

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, cytotechnology (CT) students have been trained by using light microscopy (LM) and glass slides. However, this method of training has some drawbacks. Several other educational programs with similar issues have incorporated virtual microscopy (VM) in their curricula. In VM, the specimens on glass slides are converted into virtual…

  6. The Delivery of Business Courses via the African Virtual University: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graber, Mark; Bolt, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In this case study the delivery of business courses as a result of the partnership between the African Virtual University (AVU) and Curtin University in Western Australia is described. From 2004 to 2008, degree and diploma business courses were delivered using WebCT in the four AVU partner locations: Addis Ababa University (Ethiopia), Kigali…

  7. Dual-Energy Spectral CT: Various Clinical Vascular Applications.

    PubMed

    Machida, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Isao; Fukui, Rika; Shen, Yun; Ishikawa, Takuya; Tate, Etsuko; Ueno, Eiko

    2016-01-01

    Single-source dual-energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) with fast switching of tube voltage allows projection-based image reconstruction, substantial reduction of beam-hardening effects, reconstruction of accurate monochromatic images and material decomposition images (MDIs), and detailing of material composition by using x-ray spectral information. In vascular applications, DE CT is expected to overcome limitations of standard single-energy CT angiography, including patient exposure to nephrotoxic contrast medium and carcinogenic radiation, insufficient contrast vascular enhancement, interference from metallic and beam-hardening artifacts and severe vessel calcification, and limited tissue characterization and perfusion assessment. Acquisition of low-energy monochromatic images and iodine/water MDIs can reasonably reduce contrast agent dose and improve vessel enhancement. Acquisition of virtual noncontrast images, such as water/iodine MDIs, can reduce overall radiation exposure by replacing true noncontrast CT in each examination. Acquisition of monochromatic images by using metal artifact reduction software or acquisition of iodine/water MDIs can reduce metal artifacts with preserved or increased vessel contrast, and subtraction of monochromatic images between two energy levels can subtract coils composed of dense metallic materials. Acquisition of iodine/calcium (ie, hydroxyapatite) MDIs permits subtraction of vessel calcification and improves vessel lumen delineation. Sensitive detection of lipid-rich plaque can be achieved by using fat/water MDIs, the spectral Hounsfield unit curve (energy level vs CT attenuation), and a histogram of effective atomic numbers included in an image. Various MDIs are useful for accurate differentiation among materials with high attenuation values, including contrast medium, calcification, and fresh hematoma. Iodine/water MDIs are used to assess organ perfusion, such as in the lungs and myocardium. Understanding these DE CT

  8. Virtual Inquiry Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Danielle; Nilsen, Katy

    2011-01-01

    Children in classrooms and scientists in laboratories engage in similar activities: they observe, ask questions, and try to explain phenomena. Video conferencing technology can remove the wall between the classroom and the laboratory, bringing children and scientists together. Virtual experiences and field trips can provide many of the benefits of…

  9. Virtual Bridge Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    This design/problem-solving activity challenges students to design a replacement bridge for one that has been designated as either structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. The Aycock MS Technology/STEM Magnet Program Virtual Bridge Design Challenge is an authentic introduction to the engineering design process. It is a socially relevant…

  10. Definition of Virtual Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Bruce W.

    1979-01-01

    Presents an examination of graphical displays of solutions to time-dependent Schrodinger equation modeling a laser-excited three-level atom. It suggests that an energy level may be regarded as virtual when it is detuned from resonance by more than two Rabi frequencies. (Author/HM)

  11. War Games Go Virtual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Scott

    2006-01-01

    This article describes how researchers work with military to create the next generation of training technology. This article also describes the features of Flatworld, a virtual military training technology. Flatworld is one of many projects under development at the Institute for Creative Technologies, a research group that is supported primarily…

  12. Rethinking Virtual Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Virtual reference services seem a natural extension of libraries digital collections and the emphasis on access to the library anytime, anywhere. If patrons use the library from home, it makes sense to provide them with person-to-person online reference. The Library of Congress (LC), OCLC, and several large library systems have developed and…

  13. Virtual Jupiter - Real Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzhitskaya, Lanika; Speck, A.; Laffey, J.

    2010-01-01

    How many earthlings went to visit Jupiter? None. How many students visited virtual Jupiter to fulfill their introductory astronomy courses’ requirements? Within next six months over 100 students from University of Missouri will get a chance to explore the planet and its Galilean Moons using a 3D virtual environment created especially for them to learn Kepler's and Newton's laws, eclipses, parallax, and other concepts in astronomy. The virtual world of Jupiter system is a unique 3D environment that allows students to learn course material - physical laws and concepts in astronomy - while engaging them into exploration of the Jupiter's system, encouraging their imagination, curiosity, and motivation. The virtual learning environment let students to work individually or collaborate with their teammates. The 3D world is also a great opportunity for research in astronomy education to investigate impact of social interaction, gaming features, and use of manipulatives offered by a learning tool on students’ motivation and learning outcomes. Use of 3D environment is also a valuable source for exploration of how the learners’ spatial awareness can be enhanced by working in 3-dimensional environment.

  14. The Virtual Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenza, Joyce Kasman

    2006-01-01

    Today's school libraries must meet student needs as both a physical and virtual space. Existing both offline and online, they must offer around-the-clock access as well as instruction and guidance that support the face-to-face interactions of students with librarians and classroom teachers. Although students are often technologically proficient,…

  15. Virtual extracorporeal circulation process.

    PubMed

    Boschetti, F; Montevecchi, F M; Fumero, R

    1997-06-01

    Virtual instruments for an extracorporeal circulation (ECC) process were developed to simulate the reactions of a patient to different artificial perfusion conditions. The computer simulation of the patient takes into account the hydraulic, volume, thermal and biochemical phenomena and their interaction with the devices involved in ECC (cannulae dimensions, oxygenator and filter types, pulsatile or continuous pump and thermal exchangers). On the basis of the patient's initialisation data (height, weight, Ht) and perfusion variables (pump flow rate, water temperature, gas flow rate and composition) imposed by the operator, the virtual ECC monitors simulated arterial and venous pressure tracings in real time, along with arterial and venous flow rate tracings, urine production tracing and temperature levels. Oxyhemoglobin arterial and venous blood saturation together with other related variables (pO2, pCO2, pH, HCO3 are also monitored. A drug model which allows the simulation of the effect of vasodilator and diuretic drugs is also implemented. Alarms are provided in order to check which variables (pressure, saturation, pH, urine flow) are out of the expected ranges during the ECC simulation. Consequently the possibility of modifying the control parameters of the virtual devices of the ECC in run-time mode offers an interaction mode between the operator and the virtual environment. PMID:9259211

  16. The Virtual Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    Increasingly, college teachers and instructional designers are exploring use of the technology of virtual reality to enhance student learning in math, science, and the social sciences. It is found particularly useful for teaching psychomotor skills and may have potential to make scientific concepts and abstract subjects more accessible to…

  17. Virtual manufacturing in reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papstel, Jyri; Saks, Alo

    2000-10-01

    SMEs play an important role in manufacturing industry. But from time to time there is a shortage in resources to complete the particular order in time. Number of systems is introduced to produce digital information in order to support product and process development activities. Main problem is lack of opportunity for direct data transition within design system modules when needed temporary extension of design capacity (virtuality) or to implement integrated concurrent product development principles. The planning experience in the field is weakly used as well. The concept of virtual manufacturing is a supporting idea to solve this problem. At the same time a number of practical problems should be solved like information conformity, data transfer, unified technological concepts acceptation etc. In the present paper the proposed ways to solve the practical problems of virtual manufacturing are described. General objective is to introduce the knowledge-based CAPP system as missing module for Virtual Manufacturing in the selected product domain. Surface-centered planning concept based on STEP- based modeling principles, and knowledge-based process planning methodology will be used to gain the objectives. As a result the planning module supplied by design data with direct access, and supporting advising environment is expected. Mould producing SME would be as test basis.

  18. Virtual Libraries: Service Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Jan

    This paper discusses client service issues to be considered when transitioning to a virtual library situation. Themes related to the transitional nature of society in the knowledge era are presented, including: paradox and a contradictory nature; blurring of boundaries; networks, systems, and holistic thinking; process/not product, becoming/not…

  19. Virtual Beach Manager Toolset

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Virtual Beach Manager Toolset (VB) is a set of decision support software tools developed to help local beach managers make decisions as to when beaches should be closed due to predicted high levels of water borne pathogens. The tools are being developed under the umbrella of...

  20. Virtual First Impressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergren, Martha Dewey

    2005-01-01

    Frequently, a nurse's first and only contact with a graduate school, legislator, public health official, professional organization, or school nursing colleague is made through e-mail. The format, the content, and the appearance of the e-mail create a virtual first impression. Nurses can manage their image and the image of the profession by…

  1. Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Virginia A.

    1997-01-01

    Virtual field trips can provide experiences beyond the reach of average K-12 students. Describes multimedia products for school use: Africa Trail, Dinosaur Hunter, Louvre Museum, Magic School Bus Explores the Rainforest, and Up to the Himalayas: Kingdoms in the Clouds and provides book and Internet connections for additional learning, highlighting…

  2. Learning in Virtual Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bricken, William

    The essence of the computer revolution is yet to come, for computers are essentially generators of realities. Virtual reality (VR) is the next step in the evolutionary path; the user is placed inside the image and becomes a participant within the computational space. A VR computer generates a direct experience of the computational environment. The…

  3. Virtual Classes, Real Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Kate

    2010-01-01

    As Internet technology encroached on the public school classroom about a decade ago, Kim Ross, superintendent of the Houston (MN) School District saw an opportunity. The entrepreneurial spirit overtook Ross and his team, and out of that was born the Minnesota Virtual Academy and the Minnesota Center of Online Learning, or MCoOL--two virtual…

  4. Ethnography in a Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumar, Wesley; Madison, Nora

    2013-01-01

    This article situates the discussion of virtual ethnography within the larger political/economic changes of twenty-first century consumer capitalism and suggests that increasingly our entire social world is a virtual world and that there were very particular utopian and dystopian framings of virtual community growing out of that history. The…

  5. Virtual Reality in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantelidis, Veronica S.

    1993-01-01

    Considers the concept of virtual reality; reviews its history; describes general uses of virtual reality, including entertainment, medicine, and design applications; discusses classroom uses of virtual reality, including a software program called Virtus WalkThrough for use with a computer monitor; and suggests future possibilities. (34 references)…

  6. Team Development of Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sooyoung

    2004-01-01

    Advanced technologies, globalization, the competitiveness of business, flexible working practices, and other rapid changes in the nature of work have all led to the booming of "virtual teams." This paper will provide an overview of virtual teams, including a description of their emergence, a definition and typology of the term "virtual team," an…

  7. Leading Virtual Teams: Three Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, James R.; Jeris, Laurel

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated virtual team members' and leaders' perceptions of the role of the leader, and hindering and helping forces within virtual teams and their host organizations for developing leaders of such teams. It addresses the expressed need of virtual team leaders for the field of HRD to guide leadership development for this emerging…

  8. Constructing Meaning with Virtual Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iaonnou-Georgiou, Sophie

    2002-01-01

    Presents a constructivist rationale for introducing virtual reality in language learning and teaching and describes various virtual reality environments that are available. Ways of implementing constuctivist learning through virtual reality are suggested as well as basic guidelines for successful implementation in the classroom. (Author/VWL)

  9. Virtual Worlds in Computing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crellin, Jonathan; Duke-Williams, Emma; Chandler, Jane; Collinson, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on the use of a virtual world ("Second Life") in computing education, and identifies the precursors of current virtual world systems. The article reviews the potential for virtual worlds as tools in computing education. It describes two areas where "Second Life" has been used in computing education: as a development…

  10. Technology Counts 2012: Virtual Shift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Virtual education is moving into that intersection where rising popularity meets calls for greater accountability. How the virtual education movement responds to those calls will have a significant impact on how it evolves in K-12 over the next five to 10 years. This report tackles this shift in the virtual education landscape. It examines the…

  11. World Reaction to Virtual Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    DRaW Computing developed virtual reality software for the International Space Station. Open Worlds, as the software has been named, can be made to support Java scripting and virtual reality hardware devices. Open Worlds permits the use of VRML script nodes to add virtual reality capabilities to the user's applications.

  12. Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation is based on the concept of smart sensor technology for testing with intelligence needed to perform sell-diagnosis of health, and to participate in a hierarchy of health determination at sensor, process, and system levels. A virtual sensor test instrumentation consists of five elements: (1) a common sensor interface, (2) microprocessor, (3) wireless interface, (4) signal conditioning and ADC/DAC (analog-to-digital conversion/ digital-to-analog conversion), and (5) onboard EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) for metadata storage and executable software to create powerful, scalable, reconfigurable, and reliable embedded and distributed test instruments. In order to maximize the efficient data conversion through the smart sensor node, plug-and-play functionality is required to interface with traditional sensors to enhance their identity and capabilities for data processing and communications. Virtual sensor test instrumentation can be accessible wirelessly via a Network Capable Application Processor (NCAP) or a Smart Transducer Interlace Module (STIM) that may be managed under real-time rule engines for mission-critical applications. The transducer senses the physical quantity being measured and converts it into an electrical signal. The signal is fed to an A/D converter, and is ready for use by the processor to execute functional transformation based on the sensor characteristics stored in a Transducer Electronic Data Sheet (TEDS). Virtual sensor test instrumentation is built upon an open-system architecture with standardized protocol modules/stacks to interface with industry standards and commonly used software. One major benefit for deploying the virtual sensor test instrumentation is the ability, through a plug-and-play common interface, to convert raw sensor data in either analog or digital form, to an IEEE 1451 standard-based smart sensor, which has instructions to program sensors for a wide variety of

  13. Virtual System Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vallee, Geoffroy R; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Ong, Hong Hoe; Tikotekar, Anand A; Engelmann, Christian; Bland, Wesley B; Aderholdt, Ferrol; Scott, Stephen L

    2008-01-01

    Distributed and parallel systems are typically managed with "static" settings: the operating system (OS) and the runtime environment (RTE) are specified at a given time and cannot be changed to fit an application's needs. This means that every time application developers want to use their application on a new execution platform, the application has to be ported to this new environment, which may be expensive in terms of application modifications and developer time. However, the science resides in the applications and not in the OS or the RTE. Therefore, it should be beneficial to adapt the OS and the RTE to the application instead of adapting the applications to the OS and the RTE. This document presents the concept of Virtual System Environments (VSE), which enables application developers to specify and create a virtual environment that properly fits their application's needs. For that four challenges have to be addressed: (i) definition of the VSE itself by the application developers, (ii) deployment of the VSE, (iii) system administration for the platform, and (iv) protection of the platform from the running VSE. We therefore present an integrated tool for the definition and deployment of VSEs on top of traditional and virtual (i.e., using system-level virtualization) execution platforms. This tool provides the capability to choose the degree of delegation for system administration tasks and the degree of protection from the application (e.g., using virtual machines). To summarize, the VSE concept enables the customization of the OS/RTE used for the execution of application by users without compromising local system administration rules and execution platform protection constraints.

  14. Pulmonary airways tree segmentation from CT examinations using adaptive volume of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Kim, Won Pil; Zheng, Bin; Leader, Joseph K.; Pu, Jiantao; Tan, Jun; Gur, David

    2009-02-01

    Airways tree segmentation is an important step in quantitatively assessing the severity of and changes in several lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and cystic fibrosis. It can also be used in guiding bronchoscopy. The purpose of this study is to develop an automated scheme for segmenting the airways tree structure depicted on chest CT examinations. After lung volume segmentation, the scheme defines the first cylinder-like volume of interest (VOI) using a series of images depicting the trachea. The scheme then iteratively defines and adds subsequent VOIs using a region growing algorithm combined with adaptively determined thresholds in order to trace possible sections of airways located inside the combined VOI in question. The airway tree segmentation process is automatically terminated after the scheme assesses all defined VOIs in the iteratively assembled VOI list. In this preliminary study, ten CT examinations with 1.25mm section thickness and two different CT image reconstruction kernels ("bone" and "standard") were selected and used to test the proposed airways tree segmentation scheme. The experiment results showed that (1) adopting this approach affectively prevented the scheme from infiltrating into the parenchyma, (2) the proposed method reasonably accurately segmented the airways trees with lower false positive identification rate as compared with other previously reported schemes that are based on 2-D image segmentation and data analyses, and (3) the proposed adaptive, iterative threshold selection method for the region growing step in each identified VOI enables the scheme to segment the airways trees reliably to the 4th generation in this limited dataset with successful segmentation up to the 5th generation in a fraction of the airways tree branches.

  15. Virtual reality in the operating room of the future.

    PubMed

    Müller, W; Grosskopf, S; Hildebrand, A; Malkewitz, R; Ziegler, R

    1997-01-01

    In cooperation with the Max-Delbrück-Centrum/Robert-Rössle-Klinik (MDC/RRK) in Berlin, the Fraunhofer Institute for Computer Graphics is currently designing and developing a scenario for the operating room of the future. The goal of this project is to integrate new analysis, visualization and interaction tools in order to optimize and refine tumor diagnostics and therapy in combination with laser technology and remote stereoscopic video transfer. Hence, a human 3-D reference model is reconstructed using CT, MR, and anatomical cryosection images from the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project. Applying segmentation algorithms and surface-polygonization methods a 3-D representation is obtained. In addition, a "fly-through" the virtual patient is realized using 3-D input devices (data glove, tracking system, 6-DOF mouse). In this way, the surgeon can experience really new perspectives of the human anatomy. Moreover, using a virtual cutting plane any cut of the CT volume can be interactively placed and visualized in realtime. In conclusion, this project delivers visions for the application of effective visualization and VR systems. Commonly known as Virtual Prototyping and applied by the automotive industry long ago, this project shows, that the use of VR techniques can also prototype an operating room. After evaluating design and functionality of the virtual operating room, MDC plans to build real ORs in the near future. The use of VR techniques provides a more natural interface for the surgeon in the OR (e.g., controlling interactions by voice input). Besides preoperative planning future work will focus on supporting the surgeon in performing surgical interventions. An optimal synthesis of real and synthetic data, and the inclusion of visual, aural, and tactile senses in virtual environments can meet these requirements. This Augmented Reality could represent the environment for the surgeons of tomorrow. PMID:10173059

  16. Segmentation of multispectral bladder MR images with inhomogeneity correction for virtual cystoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lihong; Liang, Zhengrong; Wang, Su; Lu, Hongyu; Wei, Xinzhou; Wagshul, Mark; Zawin, Marlene; Posniak, Erica J.; Lee, Christopher S.

    2008-03-01

    Virtual cystoscopy (VC) is a developing noninvasive, safe, and low-cost technique for bladder cancer screening. Multispectral (T I- and T II-weighted) magnetic resonance (MR) images provide a better tissue contrast between bladder wall and bladder lumen comparing with computed tomography (CT) images. The intrinsic T I and T II contrast of the urine against the bladder wall eliminates the invasive air insufflation procedure which is often used in CT-based VC. We propose a new partial volume (PV) segmentation scheme with inhomogeneity correction to segment multispectral MR images for tumor screening by virtual cystoscopy. The proposed PV segmentation algorithm automatically estimates the bias field and segments tissue mixtures inside each voxel of MR images, thus preserving texture information. Experimental results indicate that the present scheme is promising towards mass screening by virtual cystoscopy means.

  17. [3D virtual endoscopy of heart].

    PubMed

    Du, Aan; Yang, Xin; Xue, Haihong; Yao, Liping; Sun, Kun

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we present a virtual endoscopy (VE) for diagnosis of heart diseases, which is proved efficient and affordable, easy to popularize for viewing the interior of the heart. The dual source CT (DSCT) data were used as primary data in our system. The 3D structure of virtual heart was reconstructed with 3D texture mapping technology based on graphics processing unit (GPU), and could be displayed dynamically in real time. When we displayed it in real time, we could not only observe the inside of the chambers of heart but also examine from the new angle of view by the 3D data which were already clipped according to doctor's desire. In the pattern of observation, we used both mutual interactive mode and auto mode. In the auto mode, we used Dijkstra Algorithm which treated the 3D Euler distance as weighting factor to find out the view path quickly, and, used view path to calculate the four chamber plane. PMID:23198444

  18. Virtual reality at work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Frederick P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The utility of virtual reality computer graphics in telepresence applications is not hard to grasp and promises to be great. When the virtual world is entirely synthetic, as opposed to real but remote, the utility is harder to establish. Vehicle simulators for aircraft, vessels, and motor vehicles are proving their worth every day. Entertainment applications such as Disney World's StarTours are technologically elegant, good fun, and economically viable. Nevertheless, some of us have no real desire to spend our lifework serving the entertainment craze of our sick culture; we want to see this exciting technology put to work in medicine and science. The topics covered include the following: testing a force display for scientific visualization -- molecular docking; and testing a head-mounted display for scientific and medical visualization.

  19. Curating Virtual Data Collections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris; Leon, Amanda; Ramapriyan, Hampapuram; Tsontos, Vardis; Shie, Chung-Lin; Liu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    NASAs Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) contains a rich set of datasets and related services throughout its many elements. As a result, locating all the EOSDIS data and related resources relevant to particular science theme can be daunting. This is largely because EOSDIS data's organizing principle is affected more by the way they are produced than around the expected end use. Virtual collections oriented around science themes can overcome this by presenting collections of data and related resources that are organized around the user's interest, not around the way the data were produced. Virtual collections consist of annotated web addresses (URLs) that point to data and related resource addresses, thus avoiding the need to copy all of the relevant data to a single place. These URL addresses can be consumed by a variety of clients, ranging from basic URL downloaders (wget, curl) and web browsers to sophisticated data analysis programs such as the Integrated Data Viewer.

  20. Virtual reality systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Virtual realities are a type of human-computer interface (HCI) and as such may be understood from a historical perspective. In the earliest era, the computer was a very simple, straightforward machine. Interaction was human manipulation of an inanimate object, little more than the provision of an explicit instruction set to be carried out without deviation. In short, control resided with the user. In the second era of HCI, some level of intelligence and control was imparted to the system to enable a dialogue with the user. Simple context sensitive help systems are early examples, while more sophisticated expert system designs typify this era. Control was shared more equally. In this, the third era of the HCI, the constructed system emulates a particular environment, constructed with rules and knowledge about 'reality'. Control is, in part, outside the realm of the human-computer dialogue. Virtual reality systems are discussed.

  1. Three-dimensional virtual reality surgical planning and simulation workbench for orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Xia, J; Samman, N; Yeung, R W; Shen, S G; Wang, D; Ip, H H; Tideman, H

    2000-01-01

    A new integrated computer system, the 3-dimensional (3D) virtual reality surgical planning and simulation workbench for orthognathic surgery (VRSP), is presented. Five major functions are implemented in this system: post-processing and reconstruction of computed tomographic (CT) data, transformation of 3D unique coordinate system geometry, generation of 3D color facial soft tissue models, virtual surgical planning and simulation, and presurgical prediction of soft tissue changes. The basic mensuration functions, such as linear and spatial measurements, are also included. The surgical planning and simulation are based on 3D CT reconstructions, whereas soft tissue prediction is based on an individualized, texture-mapped, color facial soft tissue model. The surgeon "enters" the virtual operatory with virtual reality equipment, "holds" a virtual scalpel, and "operates" on a virtual patient to accomplish actual surgical planning, simulation of the surgical procedure, and prediction of soft tissue changes before surgery. As a final result, a quantitative osteotomy-simulated bone model and predicted color facial model with photorealistic quality can be visualized from any arbitrary viewing point in a personal computer system. This system can be installed in any hospital for daily use.

  2. Virtual nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, J.F.

    1997-08-01

    The term virtual nuclear weapons proliferation and arsenals, as opposed to actual weapons and arsenals, has entered in recent years the American lexicon of nuclear strategy, arms control, and nonproliferation. While the term seems to have an intuitive appeal, largely due to its cyberspace imagery, its current use is still vague and loose. The author believes, however, that if the term is clearly delineated, it might offer a promising approach to conceptualizing certain current problems of proliferation. The first use is in a reference to an old problem that has resurfaced recently: the problem of growing availability of weapon-usable nuclear materials in civilian nuclear programs along with materials made `excess` to defense needs by current arms reduction and dismantlement. It is argued that the availability of these vast materials, either by declared nuclear-weapon states or by technologically advanced nonweapon states, makes it possible for those states to rapidly assemble and deploy nuclear weapons. The second use has quite a different set of connotations. It is derived conceptually from the imagery of computer-generated reality. In this use, one thinks of virtual proliferation and arsenals not in terms of the physical hardware required to make the bomb but rather in terms of the knowledge/experience required to design, assemble, and deploy the arsenal. Virtual weapons are a physics reality and cannot be ignored in a world where knowledge, experience, materials, and other requirements to make nuclear weapons are widespread, and where dramatic army reductions and, in some cases, disarmament are realities. These concepts are useful in defining a continuum of virtual capabilities, ranging from those at the low end that derive from general technology diffusion and the existence of nuclear energy programs to those at the high end that involve conscious decisions to develop or maintain militarily significant nuclear-weapon capabilities.

  3. A Virtual, Shoestring Vacation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    If there is a discrepancy between the scope of your imagination and the depth of your bank account, this may be the ideal summer to stretch your horizons by diving into a good book. You can take a virtual vacation to almost any place or time by reading. You will not need to fill your gas tank or empty your pocketbook. Reading has a small carbon…

  4. CT evaluation of intracholecystic bile

    SciTech Connect

    Rebner, M.; Ruggieri, P.M.; Gross, B.H.; Glazer, G.M.

    1985-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used to detect a variety of gallbladder abnormalities, but the accuracy of routine abdominal CT in evaluating intracholecystic bile has not been established. Forty-six patients were identified in whom abdominal CT and sonography were performed within 1 week of each other. Using sonographic results as the standard, sensitivity specificity, and accuracy of CT gallbladder evaluation were calculated; both initial CT interpretations and retrospective review of scans were used for this analysis. In the retrospective review, visual interpretation of gallbladder images and measurement of intracholecystic bile attenuation were analyzed. The most common cause of high-attenuation bile in the series was sludge, a cause not previously reported. It was concluded that intracholecystic bile is poorly evaluated on routine abdominal CT, particularly because of low sensitivity in disease detection.

  5. High efficiency virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Loo, Billy W.

    1981-01-01

    Environmental monitoring of atmospheric air is facilitated by a single stage virtual impactor (11) for separating an inlet flow (Q.sub.O) having particulate contaminants into a coarse particle flow (Q.sub.1) and a fine particle flow (Q.sub.2) to enable collection of such particles on different filters (19a, 19b) for separate analysis. An inlet particle acceleration nozzle (28) and coarse particle collection probe member (37) having a virtual impaction opening (41) are aligned along a single axis (13) and spaced apart to define a flow separation region (14) at which the fine particle flow (Q.sub.2) is drawn radially outward into a chamber (21) while the coarse particle flow (Q.sub.1) enters the virtual impaction opening (41). Symmetrical outlet means (47) for the chamber (21) provide flow symmetry at the separation region (14) to assure precise separation of particles about a cutpoint size and to minimize losses by wall impaction and gravitational settling. Impulse defocusing means (42) in the probe member (37) provides uniform coarse particle deposition on the filter (19a) to aid analysis. Particle losses of less than 1% for particles in the 0 to 20 micron range may be realized.

  6. The virtual microscope.

    PubMed

    Catalyürek, Umit; Beynon, Michael D; Chang, Chialin; Kurc, Tahsin; Sussman, Alan; Saltz, Joel

    2003-12-01

    We present the design and implementation of the Virtual Microscope, a software system employing a client/server architecture to provide a realistic emulation of a high power light microscope. The system provides a form of completely digital telepathology, allowing simultaneous access to archived digital slide images by multiple clients. The main problem the system targets is storing and processing the extremely large quantities of data required to represent a collection of slides. The Virtual Microscope client software runs on the end user's PC or workstation, while database software for storing, retrieving and processing the microscope image data runs on a parallel computer or on a set of workstations at one or more potentially remote sites. We have designed and implemented two versions of the data server software. One implementation is a customization of a database system framework that is optimized for a tightly coupled parallel machine with attached local disks. The second implementation is component-based, and has been designed to accommodate access to and processing of data in a distributed, heterogeneous environment. We also have developed caching client software, implemented in Java, to achieve good response time and portability across different computer platforms. The performance results presented show that the Virtual Microscope systems scales well, so that many clients can be adequately serviced by an appropriately configured data server.

  7. The virtual clinical campus.

    PubMed

    Friedman, C P

    1996-06-01

    The increased use of community sites for the clinical training of medical students creates many challenges for educators. Among them is the need to provide students in community settings with access to the same range of educational resources-the medical literature, student colleagues, feedback, and faculty-that are customarily available at academic medical centers. One way to make this access possible is to use information technology to create a "virtual clinical campus," which would allow students to enjoy the best of both worlds: the immersion in primary care offered by the community-based setting and the knowledge-rich resources of the academic medical center, including the all-important library. With a virtual campus in place, students would be able to access most library resources, interact with their peers, ensure that they were meeting the goals of their community rotations, and participate with their colleagues in didactic sessions without having to travel. The virtual campus is technologically feasible and economically within reach. It is possible that the movement of clinical training into the community will make it imperative for all medical students to own their own computers and for medical centers to provide the infrastructure that would enable community sites to have access to a range of educational resources.

  8. The virtual articulator.

    PubMed

    Bisler, A; Bockholt, U; Kordass, B; Suchan, M; Voss, G

    2002-01-01

    The virtual articulator (VA) is intended for use as a tool for the analysis fo the complex static and dynamic occlusal relations. Its chief application is in individual diagnosis and the simulation of the mechanical articulator. As entry data, the VA requires digital, 3-dimensional representations of the jaws and patient-specific data on jaw movement. It then simulates jaw movement and provides a dynamic visualization of the occlusal contacts. If no patient-specific data are available, the modus operandi of the mechanical articulator can be simulated. Virtual reality (VR) techniques applied in computer-aided diagnosis are revolutionizing medical routine in many disciplines. Particularly in the field of dental engineering, VR combined with CAD/CAM technology has great potential in implant planning and design in terms of greater precision and shorter treatment duration. The geometry of teeth can be digitized, the implant models can be designed with specialized CAD systems, and the final implants can be manufactured with a CNC machine. In this context, the virtual articulator completes the digital manufacturing process.

  9. Virtual microscopy in virtual tumor banking.

    PubMed

    Isabelle, M; Teodorovic, I; Oosterhuis, J W; Riegman, P H J; Passioukov, A; Lejeune, S; Therasse, P; Dinjens, W N M; Lam, K H; Oomen, M H A; Spatz, A; Ratcliffe, C; Knox, K; Mager, R; Kerr, D; Pezzella, F; Van Damme, B; Van de Vijver, M; Van Boven, H; Morente, M M; Alonso, S; Kerjaschki, D; Pammer, J; López-Guerrero, J A; Llombart-Bosch, A; Carbone, A; Gloghini, A; Van Veen, E B

    2006-01-01

    Many systems have already been designed and successfully used for sharing histology images over large distances, without transfer of the original glass slides. Rapid evolution was seen when digital images could be transferred over the Internet. Nowadays, sophisticated virtual microscope systems can be acquired, with the capability to quickly scan large batches of glass slides at high magnification and compress and store the large images on disc, which subsequently can be consulted through the Internet. The images are stored on an image server, which can give simple, easy to transfer pictures to the user specifying a certain magnification on any position in the scan. This offers new opportunities in histology review, overcoming the necessity of the dynamic telepathology systems to have compatible software systems and microscopes and in addition, an adequate connection of sufficient bandwidth. Consulting the images now only requires an Internet connection and a computer with a high quality monitor. A system of complete pathology review supporting biorepositories is described, based on the implementation of this technique in the European Human Frozen Tumor Tissue Bank (TuBaFrost).

  10. PET/CT imaging and radioimmunotherapy of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tagawa, Scott T.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Turkbey, Baris; Capala, Jacek; Choyke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in oncology is emerging as an important imaging tool. The most common radiotracer for PET/CT in oncology, 18F- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is not very useful in prostate cancer. However, in recent years other PET tracers have improved the accuracy of PET/CT imaging of prostate cancer. Among these, choline, labelled with 18F or 11C, 11C-acetate and 18F- fluoride have demonstrated promising results, and other new radiopharmaceuticals are currently under development and evaluation in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Large prospective clinical PET/CT trials are needed to establish the role of PET/CT in prostate cancer patients. Because there are only limited available therapeutic options for advanced metastatic prostate cancer, there is an urgent need for the development of more effective treatment modalities that could improve outcome. Prostate cancer represents an attractive target for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for several reasons, including pattern of metastatic spread (lymph nodes and bone marrow, sites with good access to circulating antibodies), and small volume disease (ideal for antigen access and antibody delivery). Furthermore, prostate cancer is also radiation sensitive. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed by virtually all prostate cancers, and represents an attractive target for RIT. Anti PSMA RIT demonstrates antitumor activity and is well tolerated. Clinical trials are underway to further improve upon treatment efficacy and patient selection. This review focuses on the recent advances of clinical PET/CT imaging and RIT of prostate

  11. CT findings of atrial myxoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, F.; Kohno, A.; Saitoh, R.; Shigeta, A.

    1984-04-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of six atrial myxomas was analyzed. Five of the myxomas were located in the left atrium and one was in the right atrium. The margin of the myxoma was at least slightly lobulated in five cases and the content was inhomogeneous in all. Calcification was demonstrated in three cases. The site of attachment of the myxoma was demonstrated by CT to be the arial septum in all cases. The CT finding correlated well with the operative findings. It is concluded that it is possible with CT to diagnose atrial myxoma by the location and nature of the intracardiac mass and to differentiate it from thrombus.

  12. Chronic osteomyelitis examined by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Helms, C.A.; Trafton, P.

    1985-01-01

    CT examination of 25 patients who had acute exacerbations of chronic osteomyelitis allowed for the correct identification of single or multiple sequestra in 14 surgical patients. Plain radiographs were equivocal for sequestra in seven of these patients, because the sequestra were too small or because diffuse bony sclerosis was present. CT also demonstrated a foreign body and five soft tissue abscesses not suspected on the basis of plain radiographs. CT studies, which helped guide the operative approach, were also useful in treating those patients whose plain radiographs were positive for sequestra. The authors review the potential role of CT in evaluating patients with chronic osteomyelitis.

  13. 3D multislice CT angiography in post-aortic stent grafting: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhonghua

    2006-01-01

    Helical CT angiography has been widely used in both pre- and post-aortic stent grafting and it has been confirmed to be the preferred modality when compared to conventional angiography. The recent development of multislice CT (MSCT) has further enhanced the applications of CT angiography for aortic stent grafting. One of the advantages of MSCT angiography over conventional angiography is that the 3D reconstructions, based on the volumetric CT data, provide additional information during follow-up of aortic stent grafting. While endovascular repair has been increasingly used in clinical practice, the use of 3D MSCT imaging in endovascular repair continues to play an important role. In this pictorial essay, we aimed to discuss the diagnostic performance of 3D MSCT angiography in post aortic stent grafting, including the most commonly used surface shaded display, curvilinear reformation, the maximum intensity projection, volume rendering and virtual endoscopy. The advantages and disadvantages of each 3D reconstruction are also explored.

  14. A virtual simulator designed for collision prevention in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hyunuk; Kum, Oyeon; Han, Youngyih Park, Hee Chul; Kim, Jin Sung; Choi, Doo Ho

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: In proton therapy, collisions between the patient and nozzle potentially occur because of the large nozzle structure and efforts to minimize the air gap. Thus, software was developed to predict such collisions between the nozzle and patient using treatment virtual simulation. Methods: Three-dimensional (3D) modeling of a gantry inner-floor, nozzle, and robotic-couch was performed using SolidWorks based on the manufacturer’s machine data. To obtain patient body information, a 3D-scanner was utilized right before CT scanning. Using the acquired images, a 3D-image of the patient’s body contour was reconstructed. The accuracy of the image was confirmed against the CT image of a humanoid phantom. The machine components and the virtual patient were combined on the treatment-room coordinate system, resulting in a virtual simulator. The simulator simulated the motion of its components such as rotation and translation of the gantry, nozzle, and couch in real scale. A collision, if any, was examined both in static and dynamic modes. The static mode assessed collisions only at fixed positions of the machine’s components, while the dynamic mode operated any time a component was in motion. A collision was identified if any voxels of two components, e.g., the nozzle and the patient or couch, overlapped when calculating volume locations. The event and collision point were visualized, and collision volumes were reported. Results: All components were successfully assembled, and the motions were accurately controlled. The 3D-shape of the phantom agreed with CT images within a deviation of 2 mm. Collision situations were simulated within minutes, and the results were displayed and reported. Conclusions: The developed software will be useful in improving patient safety and clinical efficiency of proton therapy.

  15. Surgery applications of virtual reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    Virtual reality is a computer-generated technology which allows information to be displayed in a simulated, bus lifelike, environment. In this simulated 'world', users can move and interact as if they were actually a part of that world. This new technology will be useful in many different fields, including the field of surgery. Virtual reality systems can be used to teach surgical anatomy, diagnose surgical problems, plan operations, simulate and perform surgical procedures (telesurgery), and predict the outcomes of surgery. The authors of this paper describe the basic components of a virtual reality surgical system. These components include: the virtual world, the virtual tools, the anatomical model, the software platform, the host computer, the interface, and the head-coupled display. In the chapter they also review the progress towards using virtual reality for surgical training, planning, telesurgery, and predicting outcomes. Finally, the authors present a training system being developed for the practice of new procedures in abdominal surgery.

  16. T1-weighted MRI as a substitute to CT for refocusing planning in MR-guided focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintermark, Max; Tustison, Nicholas J.; Elias, William J.; Patrie, James T.; Xin, Wenjun; Demartini, Nicholas; Eames, Matt; Sumer, Suna; Lau, Benison; Cupino, Alan; Snell, John; Hananel, Arik; Kassell, Neal; Aubry, Jean-Francois

    2014-07-01

    Precise focusing is essential for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) to minimize collateral damage to non-diseased tissues and to achieve temperatures capable of inducing coagulative necrosis at acceptable power deposition levels. CT is usually used for this refocusing but requires a separate study (CT) ahead of the TcMRgFUS procedure. The goal of this study was to determine whether MRI using an appropriate sequence would be a viable alternative to CT for planning ultrasound refocusing in TcMRgFUS. We tested three MRI pulse sequences (3D T1 weighted 3D volume interpolated breath hold examination (VIBE), proton density weighted 3D sampling perfection with applications optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolution and 3D true fast imaging with steady state precision T2-weighted imaging) on patients who have already had a CT scan performed. We made detailed measurements of the calvarial structure based on the MRI data and compared those so-called ‘virtual CT’ to detailed measurements of the calvarial structure based on the CT data, used as a reference standard. We then loaded both standard and virtual CT in a TcMRgFUS device and compared the calculated phase correction values, as well as the temperature elevation in a phantom. A series of Bland-Altman measurement agreement analyses showed T1 3D VIBE as the optimal MRI sequence, with respect to minimizing the measurement discrepancy between the MRI derived total skull thickness measurement and the CT derived total skull thickness measurement (mean measurement discrepancy: 0.025; 95% CL (-0.22-0.27) p = 0.825). The T1-weighted sequence was also optimal in estimating skull CT density and skull layer thickness. The mean difference between the phase shifts calculated with the standard CT and the virtual CT reconstructed from the T1 dataset was 0.08 ± 1.2 rad on patients and 0.1 ± 0.9 rad on phantom. Compared to the real CT, the MR-based correction showed a 1 °C drop on the maximum

  17. The virtual environment display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgreevy, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    Virtual environment technology is a display and control technology that can surround a person in an interactive computer generated or computer mediated virtual environment. It has evolved at NASA-Ames since 1984 to serve NASA's missions and goals. The exciting potential of this technology, sometimes called Virtual Reality, Artificial Reality, or Cyberspace, has been recognized recently by the popular media, industry, academia, and government organizations. Much research and development will be necessary to bring it to fruition.

  18. Virtual microscopy in pathology education.

    PubMed

    Dee, Fred R

    2009-08-01

    Technology for acquisition of virtual slides was developed in 1985; however, it was not until the late 1990s that desktop computers had enough processing speed to commercialize virtual microscopy and apply the technology to education. By 2000, the progressive decrease in use of traditional microscopy in medical student education had set the stage for the entry of virtual microscopy into medical schools. Since that time, it has been successfully implemented into many pathology courses in the United States and around the world, with surveys indicating that about 50% of pathology courses already have or expect to implement virtual microscopy. Over the last decade, in addition to an increasing ability to emulate traditional microscopy, virtual microscopy has allowed educators to take advantage of the accessibility, efficiency, and pedagogic versatility of the computer and the Internet. The cost of virtual microscopy in education is now quite reasonable after taking into account replacement cost for microscopes, maintenance of glass slides, and the fact that 1-dimensional microscope space can be converted to multiuse computer laboratories or research. Although the current technology for implementation of virtual microscopy in histopathology education is very good, it could be further improved upon by better low-power screen resolution and depth of field. Nevertheless, virtual microscopy is beginning to play an increasing role in continuing education, house staff education, and evaluation of competency in histopathology. As Z-axis viewing (focusing) becomes more efficient, virtual microscopy will also become integrated into education in cytology, hematology, microbiology, and urinalysis.

  19. Next Generation Virtual Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, P.; McGuinness, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Virtual Observatories (VO) are now being established in a variety of geoscience disciplines beyond their origins in Astronomy and Solar Physics. Implementations range from hydrology and environmental sciences to solid earth sciences. Among the goals of VOs are to provide search/ query, access and use of distributed, heterogeneous data resources. With many of these goals being met and usage increasing, new demands and requirements are arising. In particular there are two of immediate and pressing interest. The first is use of VOs by non-specialists, especially for information products that go beyond the usual data, or data products that are sought for scientific research. The second area is citation and attribution of artifacts that are being generated by VOs. In some sense VOs are re-publishing (re-packaging, or generating new synthetic) data and information products. At present only a few VOs address this need and it is clear that a comprehensive solution that includes publishers is required. Our work in VOs and related semantic data framework and integration areas has lead to a view of the next generation of virtual observatories which the two above-mentioned needs as well as others that are emerging. Both of the needs highlight a semantic gap, i.e. that the meaning and use for a user or users beyond the original design intention is very often difficult or impossible to bridge. For example, VOs created for experts with complex, arcane or jargon vocabularies are not accessible to the non-specialist and further, information products the non-specialist may use are not created or considered for creation. In the second case, use of a (possibly virtual) data or information product (e.g. an image or map) as an intellectual artifact that can be accessed as part of the scientific publication and review procedure also introduces terminology gaps, as well as services that VOs may need to provide. Our supposition is that formalized methods in semantics and semantic web

  20. "Virtual Feel" Capaciflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    2006-01-01

    The term "virtual feel" denotes a type of capaciflector (an advanced capacitive proximity sensor) and a methodology for designing and using a sensor of this type to guide a robot in manipulating a tool (e.g., a wrench socket) into alignment with a mating fastener (e.g., a bolt head) or other electrically conductive object. A capaciflector includes at least one sensing electrode, excited with an alternating voltage, that puts out a signal indicative of the capacitance between that electrode and a proximal object.

  1. Mobile Virtual Private Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkis, Göran; Grahn, Kaj; Mårtens, Mathias; Mattsson, Jonny

    Mobile Virtual Private Networking (VPN) solutions based on the Internet Security Protocol (IPSec), Transport Layer Security/Secure Socket Layer (SSL/TLS), Secure Shell (SSH), 3G/GPRS cellular networks, Mobile IP, and the presently experimental Host Identity Protocol (HIP) are described, compared and evaluated. Mobile VPN solutions based on HIP are recommended for future networking because of superior processing efficiency and network capacity demand features. Mobile VPN implementation issues associated with the IP protocol versions IPv4 and IPv6 are also evaluated. Mobile VPN implementation experiences are presented and discussed.

  2. Virtual holographic laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, M. L.; Alieva, T.; Rodrigo, J. A.; Martínez-Matos, O.; Moreno, A.; Aliev, T.

    2007-06-01

    In this work we present a Virtual Holographic Laboratory for educational purposes. This project is edited on DVD support and it has been designed to be interactive: schemes, pictures, videos in order to clarify the theoretical description of the phenomena improving the understanding of its fundamental concepts. We believe that this project is helpful for undergraduate and graduate students in physics and engineering to obtain the solid knowledge about holography and to prepare for practical lessons on holography or partially substitute the lasts in the case of absence of appropriated technical base at a specific university level.

  3. On virtual displacement and virtual work in Lagrangian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Subhankar; Shamanna, J.

    2006-03-01

    The confusion and ambiguity encountered by students in understanding virtual displacement and virtual work is discussed in this paper. A definition of virtual displacement is presented that allows one to express them explicitly for holonomic (velocity independent), non-holonomic (velocity dependent), scleronomous (time independent) and rheonomous (time dependent) constraints. It is observed that for holonomic, scleronomous constraints, the virtual displacements are the displacements allowed by the constraints. However, this is not so for a general class of constraints. For simple physical systems, it is shown that the work done by the constraint forces on virtual displacements is zero. This motivates Lagrange's extension of d'Alembert's principle to a system of particles in constrained motion. However, a similar zero work principle does not hold for the allowed displacements. It is also demonstrated that d'Alembert's principle of zero virtual work is necessary for the solvability of a constrained mechanical problem. We identify this special class of constraints, physically realized and solvable, as the ideal constraints. The concept of virtual displacement and the principle of zero virtual work by constraint forces are central to both Lagrange's method of undetermined multipliers and Lagrange's equations in generalized coordinates.

  4. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  5. Virtual anthropology meets biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Weber, Gerhard W; Bookstein, Fred L; Strait, David S

    2011-05-17

    A meeting in Vienna in October 2010 brought together researchers using Virtual Anthropology (VA) and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in order to explore the benefits and problems facing a collaboration between the two fields. FEA is used to test mechanical hypotheses in functional anatomy and VA complements and augments this process by virtue of its tools for acquiring data, for segmenting and preparing virtual specimens, and for generating reconstructions and artificial forms. This represents a critical methodological advance because geometry is one of the crucial inputs of FEA and is often the variable of interest in functional anatomy. However, we currently lack tools that quantitatively relate differences in geometry to differences in stress and strain, or that evaluate the impact on FEA of variation within and between biological samples. Thus, when comparing models of different geometry, we do not currently obtain sufficiently informative answers to questions such as "How different are these models, and in what manner are they different? Are they different in some anatomical regions but not others?" New methodologies must be developed in order to maximize the potential of FEA to address questions in comparative and evolutionary biology. In this paper we review these and other important issues that were raised during our Vienna meeting.

  6. Virtual Optical Comparator

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Greg

    2008-10-20

    The Virtual Optical Comparator, VOC, was conceived as a result of the limitations of conventional optical comparators and vision systems. Piece part designs for mechanisms have started to include precision features on the face of parts that must be viewed using a reflected image rather than a profile shadow. The VOC concept uses a computer generated overlay and a digital camera to measure features on a video screen. The advantage of this system is superior edge detection compared to traditional systems. No vinyl charts are procured or inspected. The part size and expensive fixtures are no longer a concern because of the range of the X-Y table of the Virtual Optical Comparator. Product redesigns require only changes to the CAD image overlays; new vinyl charts are not required. The inspection process is more ergonomic by allowing the operator to view the part sitting at a desk rather than standing over a 30 inch screen. The procurement cost for the VOC will be less than a traditional comparator with a much smaller footprint with less maintenance and energy requirements.

  7. Virtual reality via photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahrt, John D.; Papcun, George; Childers, Randy A.; Rubin, Naama

    1996-03-01

    We wish to walk into a photograph just as Alice walked into the looking glass. From a mathematical perspective, this problem is exceedingly ill-posed (e.g. Is that a large, distant object or a small, nearby object?). A human expert can supply a large amount of a priori information that can function as mathematical constraints. The constrained problem can then be attacked with photogrammetry to obtain a great deal of quantitative information which is otherwise only qualitatively apparent. The user determines whether the object to be analyzed contains two or three vanishing points, then selects an appropriate number of points from the photon to enable the code to compute the locations of the vanishing points. Using this information and the standard photogrammetric geometric algorithms, the location of the camera, relative to the structure, is determined. The user must also enter information regarding an absolute sense of scale. As the vectors from the camera to the various points chosen from the photograph are determined, the vector components (coordinates) are handed to a virtual reality software package. Once the objects are entered, the appropriate surfaces of the 3D object are `wallpapered' with the surface from the photograph. The user is then able to move through the virtual scene. A video will demonstrate our work.

  8. Curating Virtual Data Collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynnes, C.; Ramapriyan, H.; Leon, A.; Tsontos, V. M.; Liu, Z.; Shie, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) contains a rich set of datasets and related services throughout its many elements. As a result, locating all the EOSDIS data and related resources relevant to particular science theme can be daunting. This is largely because EOSDIS data's organizing principle is affected more by the way they are produced than around the expected end use.Virtual collections oriented around science themes can overcome this by presenting collections of data and related resources that are organized around the user's interest, not around the way the data were produced. Science themes can be: Specific applications (uses) of the data, e.g., landslide prediction Geophysical events (e.g., Hurricane Sandy) A specific science research problem Virtual collections consist of annotated web addresses (URLs) that point to data and related resource addresses, thus avoiding the need to copy all of the relevant data to a single place. These URL addresses can be consumed by a variety of clients, ranging from basic URL downloaders (wget, curl) and web browsers to sophisticated data analysis programs such as the Integrated Data Viewer. Eligible resources include anything accessible via URL: data files: data file URLs data subsets: OPeNDAP, webification or Web Coverage Service URLs data visualizations: Web Map Service data search results: OpenSearch Atom response custom analysis workflows: e.g., Giovanni analysis URL

  9. Virtual Astronomical Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, R.; Protopapas, P.; Lehner, M.

    2007-10-01

    The sheer magnitude of databases and data rates in new surveys makes it hard to develop pipelines to enable both the analysis of data and the federation of these databases for correlation and followup. There is thus a compelling need to facilitate the creation and management of dynamic workflow pipelines that enable correlating data between separate, parallel streams; changing the workflow in response to an event; using the NVO to obtain additional needed information from databases; and modifying the observing program of a primary survey to follow-up a transient or moving object. This paper describes such a Virtual Astronomical Pipeline (VAP) system which is running in the TAOS project. The software enables components in the pipeline to react to events encapsulated in XML messages, modifying and subsequently routing these messages to multiple other components. This architecture allows for the bootstrapping of components individually in the development process and for dynamic reconfiguration of the pipeline as a response to external and internal events. The software will be extended for future work in combining the results of surveys and followups into a global virtual pipeline.

  10. When Virtual Worlds Expand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainbridge, William Sims

    The future of a virtual world depends on whether it can grow in subjective size, cultural content, and numbers of human participants. In one form of growth, exemplified by Second Life, the scope of a world increases gradually as new sponsors pay for new territory and inhabitants create content. A very different form of growth is sudden expansion, as when World of Warcraft (WoW) added entire new continents in its Burning Crusade and Lich King expansions (Lummis and Kern 2006, 2008; Corneliussen and Rettberg 2008; Sims et al. 2008). Well-established gamelike worlds have often undergone many expansions. Both the pioneer science fiction game Anarchy Online, which was launched in 2001, and Star Wars Galaxies dating from 2003, have had three, and EVE Online also from 2003 has had nine, although smaller ones. This chapter reports research on WoW's 2008 Lich King expansion, using both quantitative and qualitative methods, in order to develop theoretical ideas of the implications of expansion for virtual worlds.

  11. The Russian Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dluzhnevskaya, O. B.; Malkov, O. Yu.; Kilpio, A. A.; Kilpio, E. Yu.; Kovaleva, D. A.; Sat, L. A.

    The Russian Virtual Observatory (RVO) will be an integral component of the International Virtual Observatory (IVO). The RVO has the main goal of integrating resources of astronomical data accumulated in Russian observatories and institutions (databases, archives, digitized glass libraries, bibliographic data, a remote access system to information and technical resources of telescopes etc.), and providing transparent access for scientific and educational purposes to the distributed information and data services that comprise its content. Another goal of the RVO is to provide Russian astronomers with on-line access to the rich volumes of data and metadata that have been, and will continue to be, produced by astronomical survey projects. Centre for Astronomical Data (CAD), among other Russian institutions, has had the greatest experience in collecting and distributing astronomical data for more than 20 years. Some hundreds of catalogs and journal tables are currently available from the CAD repository. More recently, mirrors of main astronomical data resources (VizieR, ADS, etc) are now maintained in CAD. Besides, CAD accumulates and makes available for the astronomical community information on principal Russian astronomical resources.

  12. Tours in Virtual Globes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treves, R.

    2009-12-01

    The most significant new feature to appear in Google Earth 5.0 in February was the tour feature, it can produce eye catching and appealing animations as was shown by the Apollo 11 Tour which shows a model of the lunar module descending to the surface of the moon. It allows users to record themselves navigating around Google Earth switching elements on and off. The use of the tour functionality goes beyond exciting animations, it has important applications as a way of; introducing users to a larger data set presented in a Virtual Globe, offering an alternative to PowerPoint as a platform to support presentations and as a quick way to produce powerful visualizations for education purposes. In this talk I will explore how best to use to tours to present a range of spatial data and examine how the Google Earth tour compares to similar functionality that is appearing in other Virtual Globes and other 3D environments such as Second Life.

  13. Virtual reality and psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Botella, Cristina; Quero, Soledad; Baños, Rosa M; Perpiñá, Conxa; García Palacios, Azucena; Riva, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a new technology consisting on a graphic environment in which the user, not only has the feeling of being physically present in a virtual world, but he/she can interact with it. The first VR workstations were designed for big companies in order to create environments that simulate certain situations to train professionals. However, at this moment a great expansion of this technology is taking place in several fields, including the area of health. Especially interesting for us is the use of VR as a therapeutic tool in the treatment of psychological disorders. Compared to the traditional treatments, VR has many advantages (e.g., it is a protected environment for the patient, he/she can re-experience many times the feared situation, etc.). There are already data on the effectiveness of this technology in the treatment of different psychological disorders; here anxiety disorders, eating disorders and sexual disorders are reviewed. Finally, this chapter ends with some words about the limitations of VR and future perspectives.

  14. The virtual group identification process: a virtual educational community case.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chia-Ping; Young, Mei-Lein

    2008-02-01

    Because the Internet provides an alternative forum for the social interaction of professional groups, understanding how these groups form as virtual communities (VCs) in cyberspace is crucial. In this study, we observe the social interactions of teachers belonging to the largest VC in Taiwan and analyze discourse on an important educational policy, using content analysis to ascertain how virtual group identity is established. Our primary findings show that among the seven identity categories characterizing professional virtual group identity, both alliance and kinship types of identities are the main forces behind the formation of a virtual group. In contrast, the affection, attachment, bonding, closeness, and nostalgia types of identities show minimal effect. Moreover, leadership of the virtual group plays a critical role in the group setting, and participants play a part in restoring a positive sense of self or in shaping the group identity as they encounter threats in this dynamic environment.

  15. The virtual group identification process: a virtual educational community case.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chia-Ping; Young, Mei-Lein

    2008-02-01

    Because the Internet provides an alternative forum for the social interaction of professional groups, understanding how these groups form as virtual communities (VCs) in cyberspace is crucial. In this study, we observe the social interactions of teachers belonging to the largest VC in Taiwan and analyze discourse on an important educational policy, using content analysis to ascertain how virtual group identity is established. Our primary findings show that among the seven identity categories characterizing professional virtual group identity, both alliance and kinship types of identities are the main forces behind the formation of a virtual group. In contrast, the affection, attachment, bonding, closeness, and nostalgia types of identities show minimal effect. Moreover, leadership of the virtual group plays a critical role in the group setting, and participants play a part in restoring a positive sense of self or in shaping the group identity as they encounter threats in this dynamic environment. PMID:18275318

  16. Dual-energy CT with single- and dual-source scanners: current applications in evaluating the genitourinary tract.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Ravi K; Platt, Joel F; Cohan, Richard H; Caoili, Elaine M; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M; Wasnik, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    Several promising clinical applications for dual-energy computed tomography (CT) in genitourinary imaging have been reported. Dual-energy CT not only provides excellent morphologic detail but also can supply material-specific and quantitative information that may be particularly useful in genitourinary imaging. Dual-energy CT has unique capabilities for characterizing renal lesions by quantifying iodine content and helping identify the mineral contents of renal stones, information that is important for patient care. Virtual unenhanced images reconstructed from dual-energy CT datasets can be useful for detecting calculi within the iodine-filled urinary collecting system, potentially reducing the need for an unenhanced scanning phase at CT urography. Although the underlying principles of dual-energy CT are the same regardless of scanner type, single-source dual-energy scanners with fast kilovoltage switching differ from dual-source dual-energy scanners both in image data acquisition and in processing methods; an understanding of these differences may help optimize dual-energy CT genitourinary protocols. Dual-energy CT performed with a dual-source scanner or with a single-source scanner with fast kilovoltage switching also has some important limitations. Further advances in scanning protocols and refinement of processing techniques to reduce image noise may lead to more widespread use of dual-energy CT.

  17. In-vitro study on the accuracy of a simple-design CT-guided stent for dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Young-June; Choi, Bo-Ram; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Lee, Sam-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Purpose An individual surgical stent fabricated from computed tomography (CT) data, called a CT-guided stent, would be useful for accurate installation of implants. The purpose of the present study was to introduce a newly developed CT-guided stent with a simple design and evaluate the accuracy of the stent placement. Materials and Methods A resin template was fabricated from a hog mandible and a specially designed plastic plate, with 4 metal balls inserted in it for radiographic recognition, was attached to the occlusal surface of the template. With the surgical stent applied, CT images were taken, and virtual implants were placed using software. The spatial positions of the virtually positioned implants were acquired and implant guiding holes were drilled into the surgical stent using a specially designed 5-axis drilling machine. The surgical stent was placed on the mandible and CT images were taken again. The discrepancy between the central axis of the drilled holes on the second CT images and the virtually installed implants on the first CT images was evaluated. Results The deviation of the entry point and angulation of the central axis in the reference plane were 0.47±0.27 mm, 0.57±0.23 mm, and 0.64±0.16°, 0.57±0.15°, respectively. However, for the two different angulations in each group, the 20° angulation showed a greater error in the deviation of the entry point than did the 10° angulation. Conclusion The CT-guided template proposed in this study was highly accurate. It could replace existing implant guide systems to reduce costs and effort. PMID:23071963

  18. Interpersonal distance in immersive virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Bailenson, Jeremy N; Blascovich, Jim; Beall, Andrew C; Loomis, Jack M

    2003-07-01

    Digital immersive virtual environment technology (IVET) enables behavioral scientists to conduct ecologically realistic experiments with near-perfect experimental control. The authors employed IVET to study the interpersonal distance maintained between participants and virtual humans. In Study 1, participants traversed a three-dimensional virtual room in which a virtual human stood. In Study 2, a virtual human approached participants. In both studies, participant gender, virtual human gender, virtual human gaze behavior, and whether virtual humans were allegedly controlled by humans (i.e., avatars) or computers (i.e., agents) were varied. Results indicated that participants maintained greater distance from virtual humans when approaching their fronts compared to their backs. In addition, participants gave more personal space to virtual agents who engaged them in mutual gaze. Moreover, when virtual humans invaded their personal space, participants moved farthest from virtual human agents. The advantages and disadvantages of IVET for the study of human behavior are discussed.

  19. Virtual Reality: The Promise of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanier, Jaron

    1992-01-01

    Defines virtual reality and describes the equipment or clothing necessary to achieve the illusion of being in a virtual world. Recent developments with this technology and current virtual reality applications are discussed, including experiential prototyping, telepresence, and educational applications. (MES)

  20. Virtual Realities and the Future of Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    Discusses issues surrounding virtual reality and "virtual books." Suggests that those who are exploring the territory of virtual realities are already helping to expand and enrich expectations and visions for integrating technology into reading and writing. (RS)

  1. Virtual cathode microwave devices: Basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thode, L. E.; Snell, C. M.

    Unlike a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential can cause electron reflection. The region associated with this electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and through the bunching of electrons trapped in a potential well between the real and virtual cathodes. These two mechanisms are competitive. There are three basic classes of virtual cathode devices: (1) reflex triode; (2) reditron and side-shoot vircator; and (3) reflex diode or vircator. The reflex diode is the highest power virtual-cathode device. For the reflex diode the energy exchange between the beam and electromagnetic wave occurs in both the axial and radial directions. In some designs the oscillating virtual-cathode frequency exceeds the reflexing-electron frequency while in other designs the reflexing-electron frequency exceeds the oscillating virtual-cathode frequency. For the flex diode, a periodic disruption in magnetic insulation can modulate the high-frequency microwave power. Overall, particle-in-cell simulation predictions and axial reflex diode experiments are in good agreement. Although frequency stability and phase locking of the reflex diode have been demonstrated, little progress has been made in efficiency enhancement.

  2. Developing Trust in Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germain, Marie-Line

    2011-01-01

    Rapid globalization, advances in technology, flatter organizational structures, synergistic cooperation among firms, and a shift to knowledge work environments have led to the increasing use of virtual teams in organizations. Selecting, training, and socializing employees in virtual teamwork has therefore become an important human resource…

  3. Webinars at Louisiana Virtual School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Allen

    2009-01-01

    Delivering meaningful professional development, engaging students in exciting yet practical curricula, and effectively communicating with faculty and staff members are challenges in any school setting. At the Louisiana Virtual School, a state-funded virtual school run by the Louisiana Department of Education, the 6,000 students, 115 instructors,…

  4. Virtual Learning Is Becoming Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancek, Richard L.

    Once a school district decides to offer students virtual classes, it has to recognize the costs associated with the implementation, the logistical needs, the staff that will be needed to assist students, and the maintenance of the technology. Adapting the philosophy of virtual education is only the beginning. The role of the traditional teacher…

  5. Learning Experience with Virtual Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Virtual worlds create a new opportunity to enrich the educational experience through media-rich immersive learning. Virtual worlds have gained notoriety in games such as World of Warcraft (WoW), which has become the most successful online game ever, and in "general purpose" worlds, such as Second Life (SL), whose participation levels (more than 10…

  6. Computer Based Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Kenneth F.; Hosticka, Alice; Schriver, Martha; Bedell, Jackie

    This paper discusses computer based virtual field trips that use technologies commonly found in public schools in the United States. The discussion focuses on the advantages of both using and creating these field trips for an instructional situation. A virtual field trip to Cumberland Island National Seashore, St. Marys, Georgia is used as a point…

  7. Virtual Enterprises and Vocational Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreber, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    Characteristics of virtual enterprises (client oriented, temporary working organizations that dissolve after solving specific problems, extensive technological applications) can be applied to vocational training. Virtual learning centers can provide web-based training intraorganizationally and interorganizationally via intranets and extranets. (SK)

  8. Virtual Learning: Possibilities and Realization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerimbayev, Nurassyl

    2016-01-01

    In the article it was important to consider two basic moments i.e., impact mode of using virtual environment at training process within one faculty of the University, directly at training quality and what outcomes can be reached therewith. The work significance consists of studying the virtual environment effect instead of traditional educational…

  9. The Power of Virtual Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Marcia L.; Zigmond, Naomi P.; Gregg, Madeleine; Gable, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Amid budget cuts in U.S. public schools, the spotlight is on how to make less effective teachers more effective--fast. The authors describe virtual coaching--in which a coach interacts electronically with a teacher as a lesson unfolds--as a promising way to help teachers with weak teaching skills. Virtual coaching uses online and mobile technology…

  10. Telemedicine, virtual reality, and surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormack, Percival D.; Charles, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Two types of synthetic experience are covered: virtual reality (VR) and surgery, and telemedicine. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: geometric models; physiological sensors; surgical applications; virtual cadaver; VR surgical simulation; telesurgery; VR Surgical Trainer; abdominal surgery pilot study; advanced abdominal simulator; examples of telemedicine; and telemedicine spacebridge.

  11. Virtual Ed. Faces Sharp Criticism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillen, Ian

    2011-01-01

    It's been a rough time for the image of K-12 virtual education. Studies in Colorado and Minnesota have suggested that full-time online students are struggling to match the achievement levels of their peers in brick-and-mortar schools. Articles in "The New York Times" questioned not only the academic results for students in virtual schools, but…

  12. Virtual Enterprise: Transforming Entrepreneurship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgese, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Entrepreneurship education is ripe for utilizing experiential learning methods. Experiential methods are best learned when there is constant immersion into the subject matter. One such transformative learning methodology is Virtual Enterprise (VE). Virtual Enterprise is a multi-faceted, experiential learning methodology disseminated by the City…

  13. The Geography of Virtual Questioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mon, Lorri; Bishop, Bradley Wade; McClure, Charles R.; McGilvray, Jessica; Most, Linda; Milas, Theodore Patrick; Snead, John T.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the geography of virtual questioning by using geographic information systems to study activity within the Florida Electronic Library "Ask a Librarian" collaborative chat service. Researchers mapped participating libraries throughout the state of Florida that served as virtual "entry portals" for users as they asked questions…

  14. Virtual cathode microwave devices -- Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Snell, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Unlike a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential can cause electron reflection. The region associated with this electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and through the bunching of electrons trapped in a potential well between the real and virtual cathodes. These two mechanisms are competitive. There are three basic classes of virtual cathode devices: (1) reflex triode; (2) reditron and side-shoot vircator; and (3) reflex diode or vircator. The reflex diode is the highest power virtual-cathode device. For the reflex diode the energy exchange between the beam and electromagnetic wave occurs in both the axial and radial directions. In some designs the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency exceeds the reflexing-electron frequency exceeds the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency. For the flex diode a periodic disruption in magnetic insulation can modulate the high- frequency microwave power. Overall, particle-in-cell simulation predictions and axial reflex diode experiments are in good agreement. Although frequency stability and phase locking of the reflex diode have been demonstrated, little progress has been made in efficiency enhancement. 58 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Adolescent Attitudes towards Virtual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pleau, Andrea R.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to examine adolescents' attitudes towards virtual schooling. Virtual schooling may be defined as any public or private organization that delivers instruction via the Internet. The rationale for this study is based on the increased number of adolescents opting to complete some or all of their secondary education through…

  16. Has your greenhouse gone virtual?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virtual Grower is a free decision-support software program available from USDA-ARS that allows growers to build a virtual greenhouse. It was initially designed to help greenhouse growers estimate heating costs and conduct simple simulations to figure out where heat savings could be achieved. Featu...

  17. When Rural Reality Goes Virtual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husain, Dilshad D.

    1998-01-01

    In rural towns where sparse population and few business are barriers, virtual reality may be the only way to bring work-based learning to students. A partnership between a small-town high school, the Ohio Supercomputer Center, and a high-tech business will enable students to explore the workplace using virtual reality. (JOW)

  18. Knowledge Navigation for Virtual Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Julian E.

    2004-01-01

    A virtual vehicle is a digital model of the knowledge surrounding a potentially real vehicle. Knowledge consists not only of the tangible information, such as CAD, but also what is known about the knowledge - its metadata. This paper is an overview of technologies relevant to building a virtual vehicle, and an assessment of how to bring those technologies together.

  19. The Virtual Intercultural Team Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rus, Calin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Virtual Intercultural Team Tool (VITT) and discusses its processes and benefits. VIIT is a virtual platform designed with the aim of assisting European project teams to improve intercultural communication and build on their cultural diversity for effective implementation of their projects. It is a process-focused tool,…

  20. Enhancing Spiritualism in Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dangwal, Kiran Lata; Singh, Shireesh Pal

    2012-01-01

    Spiritualism is one word which puts man on the highest plinth of life. Spirituality is the way we find meaning, hope, comfort and inner peace in life. Spirituality in the virtual World is generally known as Virtual Spirituality. A goldmine of wisdom from all kinds of religious and spiritual philosophies, traditions and practices can be found in…

  1. Virtual Schools. Trends and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadderman, Margaret

    This article looks at a rapidly growing form of distance education: virtual schools. Also known as cyber schools, these Internet-based programs enroll fewer than 50,000 students nationwide, but more and more companies are entering this market. Some examples of these virtual schools are the Willoway CyberSchool, which was founded by a former…

  2. CT Angiography after 20 Years

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Leipsic, Jonathon; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Fleischmann, Dominik; Napel, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Through a marriage of spiral computed tomography (CT) and graphical volumetric image processing, CT angiography was born 20 years ago. Fueled by a series of technical innovations in CT and image processing, over the next 5–15 years, CT angiography toppled conventional angiography, the undisputed diagnostic reference standard for vascular disease for the prior 70 years, as the preferred modality for the diagnosis and characterization of most cardiovascular abnormalities. This review recounts the evolution of CT angiography from its development and early challenges to a maturing modality that has provided unique insights into cardiovascular disease characterization and management. Selected clinical challenges, which include acute aortic syndromes, peripheral vascular disease, aortic stent-graft and transcatheter aortic valve assessment, and coronary artery disease, are presented as contrasting examples of how CT angiography is changing our approach to cardiovascular disease diagnosis and management. Finally, the recently introduced capabilities for multispectral imaging, tissue perfusion imaging, and radiation dose reduction through iterative reconstruction are explored with consideration toward the continued refinement and advancement of CT angiography. PMID:24848958

  3. The role of PET/CT scanning in radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Jarritt, P H; Carson, K J; Hounsell, A R; Visvikis, D

    2006-09-01

    The introduction of functional data into the radiotherapy treatment planning process is currently the focus of significant commercial, technical, scientific and clinical development. The potential of such data from positron emission tomography (PET) was recognized at an early stage and was integrated into the radiotherapy treatment planning process through the use of image fusion software. The combination of PET and CT in a single system (PET/CT) to form an inherently fused anatomical and functional dataset has provided an imaging modality which could be used as the prime tool in the delineation of tumour volumes and the preparation of patient treatment plans, especially when integrated with virtual simulation. PET imaging typically using 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) can provide data on metabolically active tumour volumes. These functional data have the potential to modify treatment volumes and to guide treatment delivery to cells with particular metabolic characteristics. This paper reviews the current status of the integration of PET and PET/CT data into the radiotherapy treatment process. Consideration is given to the requirements of PET/CT data acquisition with reference to patient positioning aids and the limitations imposed by the PET/CT system. It also reviews the approaches being taken to the definition of functional/tumour volumes and the mechanisms available to measure and include physiological motion into the imaging process. The use of PET data must be based upon a clear understanding of the interpretation and limitations of the functional signal. Protocols for the implementation of this development remain to be defined, and outcomes data based upon clinical trials are still awaited. PMID:16980683

  4. Marshall Engineers Use Virtual Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) can provide cost effective methods to design and evaluate components and systems for maintenance and refurbishment operations. Marshall Spce Flight Center (MSFC) is begirning to utilize VR for design analysis in the X-34 experimental reusable space vehicle. Analysts at MSFC's Computer Applications and Virtual Environments (CAVE) used Head Mounted Displays (HMD) (pictured), spatial trackers and gesture inputs as a means to animate or inhabit a properly sized virtual human model. These models are used in a VR scenario as a way to determine functionality of space and maintenance requirements for the virtual X-34. The primary functions of the virtual X-34 mockup is to support operations development and design analysis for engine removal, the engine compartment and the aft fuselage. This capability provides general visualization support to engineers and designers at MSFC and to the System Design Freeze Review at Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC).

  5. Virtual Environments in Scientific Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Cooper, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    Virtual environment technology is a new way of approaching the interface between computers and humans. Emphasizing display and user control that conforms to the user's natural ways of perceiving and thinking about space, virtual environment technologies enhance the ability to perceive and interact with computer generated graphic information. This enhancement potentially has a major effect on the field of scientific visualization. Current examples of this technology include the Virtual Windtunnel being developed at NASA Ames Research Center. Other major institutions such as the National Center for Supercomputing Applications and SRI International are also exploring this technology. This talk will be describe several implementations of virtual environments for use in scientific visualization. Examples include the visualization of unsteady fluid flows (the virtual windtunnel), the visualization of geodesics in curved spacetime, surface manipulation, and examples developed at various laboratories.

  6. Formal modeling of virtual machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cremers, A. B.; Hibbard, T. N.

    1978-01-01

    Systematic software design can be based on the development of a 'hierarchy of virtual machines', each representing a 'level of abstraction' of the design process. The reported investigation presents the concept of 'data space' as a formal model for virtual machines. The presented model of a data space combines the notions of data type and mathematical machine to express the close interaction between data and control structures which takes place in a virtual machine. One of the main objectives of the investigation is to show that control-independent data type implementation is only of limited usefulness as an isolated tool of program development, and that the representation of data is generally dictated by the control context of a virtual machine. As a second objective, a better understanding is to be developed of virtual machine state structures than was heretofore provided by the view of the state space as a Cartesian product.

  7. Virtual reality aided visualization of fluid flow simulations with application in medical education and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Tijana; Mandic, Vesna; Filipovic, Nenad

    2013-12-01

    Medical education, training and preoperative diagnostics can be drastically improved with advanced technologies, such as virtual reality. The method proposed in this paper enables medical doctors and students to visualize and manipulate three-dimensional models created from CT or MRI scans, and also to analyze the results of fluid flow simulations. Simulation of fluid flow using the finite element method is performed, in order to compute the shear stress on the artery walls. The simulation of motion through the artery is also enabled. The virtual reality system proposed here could shorten the length of training programs and make the education process more effective. PMID:24290920

  8. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  9. The virtual observatory registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Greene, G.; Le Sidaner, P.; Plante, R. L.

    2014-11-01

    In the Virtual Observatory (VO), the Registry provides the mechanism with which users and applications discover and select resources-typically, data and services-that are relevant for a particular scientific problem. Even though the VO adopted technologies in particular from the bibliographic community where available, building the Registry system involved a major standardisation effort, involving about a dozen interdependent standard texts. This paper discusses the server-side aspects of the standards and their application, as regards the functional components (registries), the resource records in both format and content, the exchange of resource records between registries (harvesting), as well as the creation and management of the identifiers used in the system based on the notion of authorities. Registry record authors, registry operators or even advanced users thus receive a big picture serving as a guideline through the body of relevant standard texts. To complete this picture, we also mention common usage patterns and open issues as appropriate.

  10. Virtual World Astrosociology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainbridge, William Sims

    2010-01-01

    This essay introduces the opportunity for theory development and even empirical research on some aspects of astrosociology through today's online virtual worlds. The examples covered present life on other planets or in space itself, in a manner that can be experienced by the user and where the user's reactions may simulate to some degree future human behavior in real extraterrestrial environments: Tabula Rasa, Anarchy Online, Entropia Universe, EVE Online, StarCraft and World of Warcraft. Ethnographic exploration of these computerized environments raises many questions about the social science both of space exploration and of direct contact with extraterrestrials. The views expressed in this essay do not necessarily represent the views of the National Science Foundation or the United States.

  11. Augmented Virtual Reality Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tully-Hanson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Real time motion tracking hardware has for the most part been cost prohibitive for research to regularly take place until recently. With the release of the Microsoft Kinect in November 2010, researchers now have access to a device that for a few hundred dollars is capable of providing redgreenblue (RGB), depth, and skeleton data. It is also capable of tracking multiple people in real time. For its original intended purposes, i.e. gaming, being used with the Xbox 360 and eventually Xbox One, it performs quite well. However, researchers soon found that although the sensor is versatile, it has limitations in real world applications. I was brought aboard this summer by William Little in the Augmented Virtual Reality (AVR) Lab at Kennedy Space Center to find solutions to these limitations.

  12. Are Virtual Classrooms Colorblind?

    PubMed

    Killion, Cheryl M; Gallagher-Lepak, Susan; Reilly, Janet

    2015-01-01

    E-learning, increasingly employed in nursing education, has been embraced as a means to enhance options for all students, particularly those with limited educational opportunities. Although a desire to increase access for underserved students is often cited, disparities in availability, usage, and quality of e-learning persist among diverse households and student populations when compared to the general population. In this article, these issues will be examined along with reflection on the extent to which culture has been integrated into on-line design and instruction. Historical and cultural aspects, circumscribing virtual classrooms, are discussed using African Americans as an exemplar. The imperative to harness the democratizing potential of this educational format is underscored. In this article, culture will be examined in light of the significant growth in on-line nursing education over the past several decades. PMID:26428346

  13. Virtual reality and anthropology.

    PubMed

    Recheis, W; Weber, G W; Schäfer, K; Knapp, R; Seidler, H; zur Nedden, D

    1999-08-01

    Since the discovery of the Tyrolean Iceman in 1991 advanced imaging and post processing techniques were successfully applied in anthropology. Specific techniques include spiral computed tomography and 3-dimensional reconstructions including stereolithographic and fused deposition modeling of volume data sets. The Iceman's skull was the first to be reproduced using stereolithography, before this method was successfully applied in preoperative planning. With the advent of high-end graphics workstations and biomedical image processing software packages, 3-dimensional reconstructions were established as a routine tool for analyzing volume data sets. These techniques opened totally new insights in the field of physical anthropology. Computed tomography became the ideal research tool to access the internal structures of various precious fossils without damaging or even touching them. Many of the most precious specimens from the species Autralopithecus (1.8-3.5 Myears), Homo heidelbergensis (200-600 kyears) or Homo neanderthalensis (40-100 kyears) were scanned during the last 5 years. Often the fossils are filled with a stone matrix or other materials. During the postprocessing routines highly advanced algorithms were used to remove virtually these incrustations. Thus it was possible to visualize the morphological structures that lie beneath the matrix. Some specimen were partially destroyed, so the missing parts were reconstructed on computer screen in order to get estimations of the brain volume and endocranial morphology, both major fields of interest in physical anthropology. Moreover the computerized form of the data allows new descriptions of morphologic structures by the means of 'geometric morphometrics'. Some of the results may change aspects and interpretations in human evolution. The introduction of new imaging and post processing techniques created a new field of research: Virtual Anthropology.

  14. Reducing CT dose in myocardial perfusion SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Emma; Dixon, Kat L

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the radiation dose arising from computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction to single photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging studies without adversely affecting its accuracy. Using the Perspex CTDI phantom with the Xi detector to measure dose, CT scans were acquired using the Siemens Symbia T over the full range of CT settings available. Using the default setting 'AECmean', the measured dose at the centre of the phantom was 1.68 mGy and the breast dose from the scout view was 0.30 mGy. The lowest dose was achieved using the dose modulation setting in which the doses were reduced to 1.21 mGy and undetectable (<0.01 mGy), respectively. To observe the effect of changing these settings, 30 patients received a stress scan with default CT settings and a rest scan utilizing single photon emission computed tomography-guided CT and the dose modulation CT settings. Results showed a mean effective dose reduction of 23.6%. The dose reduction was greatest for larger patients, with the largest dose reduction for one patient being 72%. There was no apparent difference in attenuation correction between the two sets of resultant images. These new lower-dose settings are now applied to all clinical myocardial perfusion imaging studies. PMID:26302461

  15. The Virtual Tablet: Virtual Reality as a Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chronister, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In the field of human-computer interaction, Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) have been rapidly growing areas of interest and concerted development effort thanks to both private and public research. At NASA, a number of groups have explored the possibilities afforded by AR and VR technology, among which is the IT Advanced Concepts Lab (ITACL). Within ITACL, the AVR (Augmented/Virtual Reality) Lab focuses on VR technology specifically for its use in command and control. Previous work in the AVR lab includes the Natural User Interface (NUI) project and the Virtual Control Panel (VCP) project, which created virtual three-dimensional interfaces that users could interact with while wearing a VR headset thanks to body- and hand-tracking technology. The Virtual Tablet (VT) project attempts to improve on these previous efforts by incorporating a physical surrogate which is mirrored in the virtual environment, mitigating issues with difficulty of visually determining the interface location and lack of tactile feedback discovered in the development of previous efforts. The physical surrogate takes the form of a handheld sheet of acrylic glass with several infrared-range reflective markers and a sensor package attached. Using the sensor package to track orientation and a motion-capture system to track the marker positions, a model of the surrogate is placed in the virtual environment at a position which corresponds with the real-world location relative to the user's VR Head Mounted Display (HMD). A set of control mechanisms is then projected onto the surface of the surrogate such that to the user, immersed in VR, the control interface appears to be attached to the object they are holding. The VT project was taken from an early stage where the sensor package, motion-capture system, and physical surrogate had been constructed or tested individually but not yet combined or incorporated into the virtual environment. My contribution was to combine the pieces of

  16. Endoscopic bronchial occlusion with silicone spigots under virtual bronchoscopic navigation

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shingo; Shiroyama, Takayuki; Nishida, Takuji; Nishihara, Takashi; Okamoto, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A 68‐year‐old woman with interstitial lung disease related to dermatomyositis and systemic scleroderma was admitted to our hospital with fever and dyspnoea. Although the fever was reduced after antibiotic therapy, a left pneumothorax suddenly occurred on day 27 after admission. A continuous air leak persisted despite chest drainage with three tubes and repeated pleurodesis. Chest computed tomography (CT) images showed a cavitary lesion with a pinhole in the left upper division, which was suspected to be the affected lesion with the air leak. Virtual bronchoscopic navigation images were constructed from CT data. Bronchial occlusion with Endobronchial Watanabe Spigots (EWSs) was performed on day 52. Two medium‐sized EWSs were inserted into the left B1 + 2a and B1 + 2b, and the air leak stopped immediately. No procedure‐related adverse events occurred. All three chest tubes were successfully removed by day 60. This case demonstrates that virtual bronchoscopic navigation can improve bronchial occlusion procedures using EWSs. PMID:27512560

  17. Endoscopic bronchial occlusion with silicone spigots under virtual bronchoscopic navigation.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Manabu; Sato, Shingo; Shiroyama, Takayuki; Nishida, Takuji; Nishihara, Takashi; Okamoto, Norio

    2016-07-01

    A 68-year-old woman with interstitial lung disease related to dermatomyositis and systemic scleroderma was admitted to our hospital with fever and dyspnoea. Although the fever was reduced after antibiotic therapy, a left pneumothorax suddenly occurred on day 27 after admission. A continuous air leak persisted despite chest drainage with three tubes and repeated pleurodesis. Chest computed tomography (CT) images showed a cavitary lesion with a pinhole in the left upper division, which was suspected to be the affected lesion with the air leak. Virtual bronchoscopic navigation images were constructed from CT data. Bronchial occlusion with Endobronchial Watanabe Spigots (EWSs) was performed on day 52. Two medium-sized EWSs were inserted into the left B1 + 2a and B1 + 2b, and the air leak stopped immediately. No procedure-related adverse events occurred. All three chest tubes were successfully removed by day 60. This case demonstrates that virtual bronchoscopic navigation can improve bronchial occlusion procedures using EWSs. PMID:27512560

  18. Multiple myeloma: evaluation by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiman, J.S.; McLeod, R.A.; Kyle, R.A.; Beabout, J.W.

    1985-02-01

    Although patients who have multiple myeloma usually have straightforward clinical symptoms and corroborative radiographs, in some instances, these patients will present atypically, with symptoms suggesting active disease but radiographs that are normal or nonspecific. The authors reviewed the records of 32 patients who had documented multiple myeloma and had undergone CT examinations, assessing the value of those examinations. Although CT is not indicated in all patients who have multiple myeloma, it is especially useful in patients who have bone pain and normal or nonspecific radiographs. CT provided confirmatory information in all cases in which lesions were seen on radiographs. CT also frequently demonstrated a greater extent of disease than could be appreciated on the radiographs.

  19. Children, CT Scan and Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bajoghli, Morteza; Bajoghli, Farshad; Tayari, Nazila; Rouzbahani, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Children are more sensitive to radiation than adults. Computerized tomography (CT) consists of 25 % of all medical imaging. It was estimated that more than 2% of all carcinomas in the USA are due to CT scans. There is an ongoing focus on the reduction of CT scan radiation dose. Awareness about risk-benefits of CT has increased. Reduction of radiological exam is an important issue because the accumulation effects of radiation can be hazardous. In addition, proper protocol should be followed for diagnostic procedures of ionization radiation and computerized tomography. Effective radiation dose should range from 0.8 to 10.5 millisievert. The same protocol should be followed in different hospitals as well. Basic principles of radiation protection should be monitored. As much as possible, both technician and radiologist must be present during computerized tomography for children, and MRI and ultrasound should be replaced if possible. PMID:21566776

  20. CT Demonstration of Caput Medusae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Edward C.; Vilensky, Joel A.

    2009-01-01

    Maximum intensity and volume rendered CT displays of caput medusae are provided to demonstrate both the anatomy and physiology of this portosystemic shunt associated with portal hypertension. (Contains 2 figures.)

  1. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross- ... CT, it is possible to obtain very detailed pictures of the heart and blood vessels in children, ...

  2. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This is an illustrated text on computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine with an emphasis on the role and value of multiplanar imaging for helping determine diagnoses. The book has adequate discussion of scanning techniques for the different regions, interpretations of various abnormalities, degenerative disk disease, and different diagnoses. There is a 50-page chapter on detailed sectional anatomy of the spine and useful chapters on the postoperative spine and the planning and performing of spinal surgery with CT multiplanar reconstruction. There are comprehensive chapters on spinal tumors and trauma. The final two chapters of the book are devoted to CT image processing using digital networks and CT applications of medical computer graphics.

  3. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  4. CT Perfusion of the Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... scanning combines special x-ray equipment with sophisticated computers to produce multiple images or pictures of the ... being studied can then be examined on a computer monitor, printed or transferred to a CD. CT ...

  5. Menagerie: designing a virtual experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Scott S.; Amkraut, Susan; Girard, Michael; Trayle, Mark

    1994-04-01

    This paper describes an ongoing effort to develop one of the first fully immersive virtual environment installations that is inhabited by virtual characters and presences specially designed to respond to and interact with its users. This experience allows a visitor to become visually and aurally immersed in a 3D computer generated environment that is inhabited by many virtual animals. As a user explores the virtual space, he/she encounters several species of computer generated animals, birds, and insects that move about independently, and interactively respond to the user's presence in various ways. The hardware configuration of this system includes a head-coupled, stereoscopic color viewer, and special DSP hardware that provides realistic, 3D localized sound cues linked to characters and events in the virtual space. Also, the virtual environment and characters surrounding the user are generated by a high performance, real-time computer graphics platform. The paper describes the computer programs that model the motion of the animals, the system configuration that supports the experience, and the design issues involved in developing a virtual environment system for public installation.

  6. Intelligent virtual interfaces for telerobotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinstein, Georges G.; Maybury, Mark T.; Mitchell, Richard B.

    1992-11-01

    One promise of telerobotics is the ability to interact in environments that are distant (e.g., deep sea or deep space), dangerous (e.g., nuclear, chemical, or biological environments), or inaccessible by humans for political or legal reasons. A key component to such interactions are sophisticated human-computer interfaces that can replicate sufficient information about a local environment to permit remote navigation and manipulation. This environment replication can, in part, be provided by technologies such as virtual reality. In addition, however, telerobotic interfaces may need to enhance human-machine interaction to assist users in task performance, for example, governing motion or manipulation controls to avoid obstacles or to restrict interaction with certain objects (e.g., avoiding contact with a live mine or a deep sea treasure). Thus, effective interactions within remote environments require intelligent virtual interfaces to telerobotic devices. In part to address this problem, MITRE is investigating virtual reality architectures that will enable enhanced interaction within virtual environments. Key components to intelligent virtual interfaces include spoken language processing, gesture recognition algorithms, and more generally, task recognition. In addition, these interfaces will eventually have to take into account properties of the user, the task, and discourse context to be more adaptive to the current situation at hand. While our work has not yet investigated the connection of virtual interfaces to external robotic devices, we have begun developing the key components for intelligent virtual interfaces for information and training systems.

  7. On the usage of health records for the design of virtual patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The process of creating and designing Virtual Patients for teaching students of medicine is an expensive and time-consuming task. In order to explore potential methods of mitigating these costs, our group began exploring the possibility of creating Virtual Patients based on electronic health records. This review assesses the usage of electronic health records in the creation of interactive Virtual Patients for teaching clinical decision-making. Methods The PubMed database was accessed programmatically to find papers relating to Virtual Patients. The returned citations were classified and the relevant full text articles were reviewed to find Virtual Patient systems that used electronic health records to create learning modalities. Results A total of n = 362 citations were found on PubMed and subsequently classified, of which n = 28 full-text articles were reviewed. Few articles used unformatted electronic health records other than patient CT or MRI scans. The use of patient data, extracted from electronic health records or otherwise, is widespread. The use of unformatted electronic health records in their raw form is less frequent. Patient data use is broad and spans several areas, such as teaching, training, 3D visualisation, and assessment. Conclusions Virtual Patients that are based on real patient data are widespread, yet the use of unformatted electronic health records, abundant in hospital information systems, is reported less often. The majority of teaching systems use reformatted patient data gathered from electronic health records, and do not use these electronic health records directly. Furthermore, many systems were found that used patient data in the form of CT or MRI scans. Much potential research exists regarding the use of unformatted electronic health records for the creation of Virtual Patients. PMID:24011027

  8. Virtual agents in a simulated virtual training environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achorn, Brett; Badler, Norman L.

    1993-01-01

    A drawback to live-action training simulations is the need to gather a large group of participants in order to train a few individuals. One solution to this difficulty is the use of computer-controlled agents in a virtual training environment. This allows a human participant to be replaced by a virtual, or simulated, agent when only limited responses are needed. Each agent possesses a specified set of behaviors and is capable of limited autonomous action in response to its environment or the direction of a human trainee. The paper describes these agents in the context of a simulated hostage rescue training session, involving two human rescuers assisted by three virtual (computer-controlled) agents and opposed by three other virtual agents.

  9. Virtual model surgery and wafer fabrication using 2-dimensional cephalograms, 3-dimensional virtual dental models, and stereolithographic technology.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Young; Hwang, Jong-Min; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2012-02-01

    Although several 3-dimensional virtual model surgery (3D-VMS) programs have been introduced to reduce time-consuming manual laboratory steps and potential errors, these programs still require 3D-computed tomography (3D-CT) data and involve complex computerized maneuvers. Because it is difficult to take 3D-CTs for all cases, a new VMS program using 2D lateral and posteroanterior cephalograms and 3D virtual dental models (2.5D-VMS program; 3Txer version 2.5, Orapix, Seoul, Korea) has recently been introduced. The purposes of this article were to present the methodology of the 2.5D-VMS program and to verify the accuracy of intermediate surgical wafers fabricated with the stereolithographic technique. Two cases successfully treated using the 2.5D-VMS program are presented. There was no significant difference in the position of upper dentition after surgical movement between 2.5D-VMS and 3D-VMS in 18 samples (less than 0.10 mm, P > .05, Wilcoxon-signed rank test). The 2.5D-VMS can be regarded as an effective alternative for 3D-VMS for cases in which 3D-CT data are not available.

  10. Information Virtulization in Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Virtual Environments provide a natural setting for a wide range of information visualization applications, particularly wlieit the information to be visualized is defined on a three-dimensional domain (Bryson, 1996). This chapter provides an overview of the issues that arise when designing and implementing an information visualization application in a virtual environment. Many design issues that arise, such as, e.g., issues of display, user tracking are common to any application of virtual environments. In this chapter we focus on those issues that are special to information visualization applications, as issues of wider concern are addressed elsewhere in this book.

  11. Operator Localization of Virtual Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Menges, Brian M.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Errors in the localization of nearby virtual objects presented via see-through, helmet mounted displays are examined as a function of viewing conditions and scene content. Monocular, biocular or stereoscopic presentation of the virtual objects, accommodation (required focus), subjects'age, and the position of physical surfaces are examined. Nearby physical surfaces are found to introduce localization errors that differ depending upon the other experimental factors. The apparent physical size and transparency of the virtual objects and physical surfaces respectively are also influenced by their relative position when superimposed. Design implications are discussed.

  12. SU-E-J-94: Geometric and Dosimetric Evaluation of Deformation Image Registration Algorithms Using Virtual Phantoms Generated From Patients with Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z; Greskovich, J; Xia, P; Bzdusek, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To generate virtual phantoms with clinically relevant deformation and use them to objectively evaluate geometric and dosimetric uncertainties of deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms. Methods: Ten lung cancer patients undergoing adaptive 3DCRT planning were selected. For each patient, a pair of planning CT (pCT) and replanning CT (rCT) were used as the basis for virtual phantom generation. Manually adjusted meshes were created for selected ROIs (e.g. PTV, lungs, spinal cord, esophagus, and heart) on pCT and rCT. The mesh vertices were input into a thin-plate spline algorithm to generate a reference displacement vector field (DVF). The reference DVF was used to deform pCT to generate a simulated replanning CT (srCT) that was closely matched to rCT. Three DIR algorithms (Demons, B-Spline, and intensity-based) were applied to these ten virtual phantoms. The images, ROIs, and doses were mapped from pCT to srCT using the DVFs computed by these three DIRs and compared to those mapped using the reference DVF. Results: The average Dice coefficients for selected ROIs were from 0.85 to 0.96 for Demons, from 0.86 to 0.97 for intensity-based, and from 0.76 to 0.95 for B-Spline. The average Hausdorff distances for selected ROIs were from 2.2 to 5.4 mm for Demons, from 2.3 to 6.8 mm for intensity-based, and from 2.4 to 11.4 mm for B-Spline. The average absolute dose errors for selected ROIs were from 0.2 to 0.6 Gy for Demons, from 0.1 to 0.5 Gy for intensity-based, and from 0.5 to 1.5 Gy for B-Spline. Conclusion: Virtual phantoms were modeled after patients with lung cancer and were clinically relevant for adaptive radiotherapy treatment replanning. Virtual phantoms with known DVFs serve as references and can provide a fair comparison when evaluating different DIRs. Demons and intensity-based DIRs were shown to have smaller geometric and dosimetric uncertainties than B-Spline. Z Shen: None; K Bzdusek: an employee of Philips Healthcare; J Greskovich: None; P Xia

  13. Clinical applications of 2D and 3D CT imaging of the airways--a review.

    PubMed

    Salvolini, L; Bichi Secchi, E; Costarelli, L; De Nicola, M

    2000-04-01

    Hardware and software evolution has broadened the possibilities of 2D and 3D reformatting of spiral CT and MR data set. In the study of the thorax, intrinsic benefits of volumetric CT scanning and better quality of reconstructed images offer us the possibility to apply additional rendering techniques to everyday clinical practice. Considering the large number and redundancy of possible post-processing imaging techniques that we can apply to raw CT sections data, it is necessary to precisely set a well-defined number of clinical applications of each of them, by careful evaluation of their benefits and possible pitfalls in each clinical setting. In diagnostic evaluation of pathological processes affecting the airways, a huge number of thin sections is necessary for detailed appraisal and has to be evaluated, and information must then be transferred to referring clinicians. By additional rendering it is possible to make image evaluation and data transfer easier, faster, and more effective. In the study of central airways, additional rendering can be of interest for precise evaluation of the length, morphology, and degree of stenoses. It may help in depicting exactly the locoregional extent of central tumours by better display of relations with bronchovascular interfaces and can increase CT/bronchoscopy sinergy. It may allow closer radiotherapy planning and better depiction of air collections, and, finally, it could ease panoramic evaluation of the results of dynamic or functional studies, that are made possible by increased speed of spiral scanning. When applied to the evaluation of peripheral airways, as a completion to conventional HRCT scans, High-Resolution Volumetric CT, by projection slabs applied to target areas of interest, can better depict the profusion and extension of affected bronchial segments in bronchiectasis, influence the choice of different approaches for tissue sampling by better evaluation of the relations of lung nodules with the airways, or help

  14. Game-Based Virtual Worlds as Decentralized Virtual Activity Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scacchi, Walt

    There is widespread interest in the development and use of decentralized systems and virtual world environments as possible new places for engaging in collaborative work activities. Similarly, there is widespread interest in stimulating new technological innovations that enable people to come together through social networking, file/media sharing, and networked multi-player computer game play. A decentralized virtual activity system (DVAS) is a networked computer supported work/play system whose elements and social activities can be both virtual and decentralized (Scacchi et al. 2008b). Massively multi-player online games (MMOGs) such as World of Warcraft and online virtual worlds such as Second Life are each popular examples of a DVAS. Furthermore, these systems are beginning to be used for research, deve-lopment, and education activities in different science, technology, and engineering domains (Bainbridge 2007, Bohannon et al. 2009; Rieber 2005; Scacchi and Adams 2007; Shaffer 2006), which are also of interest here. This chapter explores two case studies of DVASs developed at the University of California at Irvine that employ game-based virtual worlds to support collaborative work/play activities in different settings. The settings include those that model and simulate practical or imaginative physical worlds in different domains of science, technology, or engineering through alternative virtual worlds where players/workers engage in different kinds of quests or quest-like workflows (Jakobsson 2006).

  15. Ct2 Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    The patient is an 80-year-old man who presented with gross hematuria. His past medical history indicates he was a cigarette smoker with 50 pack/years. He was successfully treated for carcinoma of the lung 7 years ago. He received chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. He has mild COPD but has a good performance status. His laboratory studies do not indicate any abnormalities in terms of renal function. He does not have any significant cardiac disease. He has a medium build. He had prostate cancer and underwent a successful radical prostatectomy 10 years ago. His PSA is undetectable. He has some urinary incontinence and wears two pads/day. He underwent the appropriate investigations for gross hematuria. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was normal with the exception of a 4-cm posterior mass in the bladder. There was no hydronephrosis and no enlarged lymph nodes. He underwent a transurethral resection of a solitary bladder tumor performed by another urologist. The tumor was described as large and sessile. It was located on the posterior wall and was approximately 4 cm. The bimanual examination did not reveal a mass. The pathology report stated that the tumor was a high-grade urothelial carcinoma with invasion into the muscularis propria. There was no lymphovascular invasion. I performed a reTURBT, and at that procedure, I did not identify any obvious tumor but the prior resection site was evident. I resected the prior tumor site quite extensively both in depth and width. The pathology revealed only focal carcinoma in situ. There was ample muscle in the specimen and there was some fat as well. As stated, they were free of any cancer. The patient is receptive to any treatment approach.

  16. Ct2 Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    The patient is an 80-year-old man who presented with gross hematuria. His past medical history indicates he was a cigarette smoker with 50 pack/years. He was successfully treated for carcinoma of the lung 7 years ago. He received chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. He has mild COPD but has a good performance status. His laboratory studies do not indicate any abnormalities in terms of renal function. He does not have any significant cardiac disease. He has a medium build. He had prostate cancer and underwent a successful radical prostatectomy 10 years ago. His PSA is undetectable. He has some urinary incontinence and wears two pads/day. He underwent the appropriate investigations for gross hematuria. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was normal with the exception of a 4-cm posterior mass in the bladder. There was no hydronephrosis and no enlarged lymph nodes. He underwent a transurethral resection of a solitary bladder tumor performed by another urologist. The tumor was described as large and sessile. It was located on the posterior wall and was approximately 4 cm. The bimanual examination did not reveal a mass. The pathology report stated that the tumor was a high-grade urothelial carcinoma with invasion into the muscularis propria. There was no lymphovascular invasion. I performed a reTURBT, and at that procedure, I did not identify any obvious tumor but the prior resection site was evident. I resected the prior tumor site quite extensively both in depth and width. The pathology revealed only focal carcinoma in situ. There was ample muscle in the specimen and there was some fat as well. As stated, they were free of any cancer. The patient is receptive to any treatment approach. PMID:27457483

  17. Multiscan MRI-based virtual cystoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongqing; Li, Bin; Huang, Wei; Liang, Zach

    2000-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) based virtual cystoscopy (VC) has been studied as a potential tool for screening bladder cancer. It is accurate in localizing tumor of size larger than 1 cm and less expensive, as compared to fiberoptic cystoscopy. However, it is invasive and difficult to perform due to using Foley catheter for bladder insufflating with air. In a previous work, we investigated a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based VC scheme with urine as a natural contrast solution, in which a MRI acquisition protocol and an adaptive segmentation method were utilized. Both bladder lumen and wall were successfully delineated. To suppress motion artifact and insight pathological change on the bladder wall images, a multi-scan MRI scheme was presented in this study. One transverse and another coronal acquisitions of T1-weighted that cover the whole bladder were obtained twice, at one time the bladder is full of urine and at another time it is near the empty. Four bladder volumes extracted from those 4 datasets were registered first using a flexible three- dimensional (3D) registration algorithm. Then, associated 4 lumen surfaces were viewed simultaneously with the help of an interactive 3D visualization system. This MRI-based VC was tested on volunteers and demonstrated the feasibility to mass screening for bladder cancer.

  18. Colorectal cancer screening with virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yaorong; Vining, David J.; Ahn, David K.; Stelts, David R.

    1999-05-01

    Early detection and removal of colorectal polyps have been proven to reduce mortality from colorectal carcinoma (CRC), the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Unfortunately, traditional techniques for CRC examination (i.e., barium enema, sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy) are unsuitable for mass screening because of either low accuracy or poor public acceptance, costs, and risks. Virtual colonoscopy (VC) is a minimally invasive alternative that is based on tomographic scanning of the colon. After a patient's bowel is optimally cleansed and distended with gas, a fast tomographic scan, typically helical computed tomography (CT), of the abdomen is performed during a single breath-hold acquisition. Two-dimensional (2D) slices and three-dimensional (3D) rendered views of the colon lumen generated from the tomographic data are then examined for colorectal polyps. Recent clinical studies conducted at several institutions including ours have shown great potential for this technology to be an effective CRC screening tool. In this paper, we describe new methods to improve bowel preparation, colon lumen visualization, colon segmentation, and polyp detection. Our initial results show that VC with the new bowel preparation and imaging protocol is capable of achieving accuracy comparable to conventional colonoscopy and our new algorithms for image analysis contribute to increased accuracy and efficiency in VC examinations.

  19. A Review of Virtual Character's Emotion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen

    2008-11-01

    Emotional virtual characters are essential to digital entertainment, an emotion is related to virtual environment and a virtual character's inner variables, emotion model of virtual character is a hot topic in many fields, domain knowledge is very important for modeling emotion, and the current research of emotion expression in the world was also summarized, and some new research directions of emotion model are presented.

  20. CEDS Addresses: Virtual and Blended Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Common Education Data Standards (CEDS) common data vocabulary supports the collection and use of information about virtual and blended learning. The data element "Virtual Indicator", introduced in version 3 of CEDS, supports a range of virtual learning-related use cases. The Virtual Indicator element may be related to a Course…

  1. A demonstration of the virtual nursing college.

    PubMed

    Yensen, J A; Woolery, L K

    1995-01-01

    This demonstration will illustrate the operation of a virtual nursing college (VNC) through the Internet. The key concepts to be shown include: Distance and remote learning and teaching; Multi-site collaboration in teaching and clinical research using groupware; Multimedia courseware found in programmable virtual classrooms; Personal knowbots that manage information; Virtual clinics with virtual patients and simulated patients. PMID:8591569

  2. Getting "Real" in Virtual Talk about Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aukerman, Maren; Walsh, Heather Weisse

    2009-01-01

    For the middle school students in a Virtual Reading Group (VRG), it was easy to see their virtual discussion peers and their virtual teacher; all participants appeared simultaneously on a screen, with a separate box for each participating site. In this article, the authors offer an account of how the "realness" of virtual others was constructed by…

  3. Virtual Reality--Learning by Immersion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunning, Jeremy

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the use of virtual reality in educational software. Topics include CAVE (Computer-Assisted Virtual Environments); cost-effective virtual environment tools including QTVR (Quick Time Virtual Reality); interactive exercises; educational criteria for technology-based educational tools; and examples of screen displays. (LRW)

  4. Ray Tracing with Virtual Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinoff, Stuart

    1991-01-01

    Introduces the method of ray tracing to analyze the refraction or reflection of real or virtual images from multiple optical devices. Discusses ray-tracing techniques for locating images using convex and concave lenses or mirrors. (MDH)

  5. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  6. Virtually Out of This World!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Ames Research Center granted Reality Capture Technologies (RCT), Inc., a license to further develop NASA's Mars Map software platform. The company incorporated NASA#s innovation into software that uses the Virtual Plant Model (VPM)(TM) to structure, modify, and implement the construction sites of industrial facilities, as well as develop, validate, and train operators on procedures. The VPM orchestrates the exchange of information between engineering, production, and business transaction systems. This enables users to simulate, control, and optimize work processes while increasing the reliability of critical business decisions. Engineers can complete the construction process and test various aspects of it in virtual reality before building the actual structure. With virtual access to and simulation of the construction site, project personnel can manage, access control, and respond to changes on complex constructions more effectively. Engineers can also create operating procedures, training, and documentation. Virtual Plant Model(TM) is a trademark of Reality Capture Technologies, Inc.

  7. Virtual Machine Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasso, Christopher; Page, Dennis; O'Reilly, Taifun; Fteichert, Ralph; Lock, Patricia; Lin, Imin; Naviaux, Keith; Sisino, John

    2005-01-01

    Virtual Machine Language (VML) is a mission-independent, reusable software system for programming for spacecraft operations. Features of VML include a rich set of data types, named functions, parameters, IF and WHILE control structures, polymorphism, and on-the-fly creation of spacecraft commands from calculated values. Spacecraft functions can be abstracted into named blocks that reside in files aboard the spacecraft. These named blocks accept parameters and execute in a repeatable fashion. The sizes of uplink products are minimized by the ability to call blocks that implement most of the command steps. This block approach also enables some autonomous operations aboard the spacecraft, such as aerobraking, telemetry conditional monitoring, and anomaly response, without developing autonomous flight software. Operators on the ground write blocks and command sequences in a concise, high-level, human-readable programming language (also called VML ). A compiler translates the human-readable blocks and command sequences into binary files (the operations products). The flight portion of VML interprets the uplinked binary files. The ground subsystem of VML also includes an interactive sequence- execution tool hosted on workstations, which runs sequences at several thousand times real-time speed, affords debugging, and generates reports. This tool enables iterative development of blocks and sequences within times of the order of seconds.

  8. Virtual acoustic prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marty

    2003-10-01

    In this paper the re-creation of 3-D sound fields so the full psycho-acoustic impact of sound sources can be assessed before the manufacture of a product or environment is examined. Using head related transfer functions (HRTFs) coupled with a head tracked set of headphones the sound field at the left and right ears of a listener can be re-created for a set of sound sources. However, the HRTFs require that sources have a defined location and this is not the typical output from numerical codes which describe the sound field as a set of distributed modes. In this paper a method of creating a set of equivalent sources is described such that the standard set of HRTFs can be applied in real time. A structural-acoustic model of a cylinder driving an enclosed acoustic field will be used as an example. It will be shown that equivalent sources can be used to recreate all of the reverberation of the enclosed space. An efficient singular value decomposition technique allows the large number of sources required to be simulated in real time. An introduction to the requirements necessary for 3-D virtual prototyping using high frequency Statistical Energy Analysis models will be presented. [Work supported by AuSim and NASA.

  9. Virtual art revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzanka, S.

    2014-02-01

    Virtual reality art at the turn of the millenium saw an explosion of creative exploration around this nascent technoloy. Though VR art has much in common with media art in general, the affordances of the technology gave rise to unique experiences, discourses, and artistic investigations. Women artists were at the forefront of the medium, shaping its aesthetic and technical development, and VR fostered a range of artistic concerns and experimentation that was largely distinct from closely related forms such as digital games. Today, a new wave of consumer technologies including 3D TV's, gestural and motion tracking interfaces, and headmount displays as viable, low-cost gaming peripherals drives a resurgence in interest in VR for interactive art and entertainment. Designers, game developers, and artists working with these technologies are in many cases discovering them anew. This paper explores ways of reconnecting this current moment in VR with its past. Can the artistic investigations begun in previous waves of VR be continued? How do the similarities and differences in contexts, communities, technologies, and discourses affect the development of the medium?

  10. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Love, L.J.

    1999-09-01

    The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics. but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his/her students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

  11. Virtual environment tactile system

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, Ronald

    1996-01-01

    A method for providing a realistic sense of touch in virtual reality by means of programmable actuator assemblies is disclosed. Each tactile actuator assembly consists of a number of individual actuators whose movement is controlled by a computer and associated drive electronics. When an actuator is energized, the rare earth magnet and the associated contactor, incorporated within the actuator, are set in motion by the opposing electromagnetic field of a surrounding coil. The magnet pushes the contactor forward to contact the skin resulting in the sensation of touch. When the electromagnetic field is turned off, the rare earth magnet and the contactor return to their neutral positions due to the magnetic equilibrium caused by the interaction with the ferrous outer sleeve. The small size and flexible nature of the actuator assemblies permit incorporation into a glove, boot or body suit. The actuator has additional applications, such as, for example, as an accelerometer, an actuator for precisely controlled actuations or to simulate the sensation of braille letters.

  12. Virtual environment tactile system

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, R.

    1996-12-10

    A method for providing a realistic sense of touch in virtual reality by means of programmable actuator assemblies is disclosed. Each tactile actuator assembly consists of a number of individual actuators whose movement is controlled by a computer and associated drive electronics. When an actuator is energized, the rare earth magnet and the associated contactor, incorporated within the actuator, are set in motion by the opposing electromagnetic field of a surrounding coil. The magnet pushes the contactor forward to contact the skin resulting in the sensation of touch. When the electromagnetic field is turned off, the rare earth magnet and the contactor return to their neutral positions due to the magnetic equilibrium caused by the interaction with the ferrous outer sleeve. The small size and flexible nature of the actuator assemblies permit incorporation into a glove, boot or body suit. The actuator has additional applications, such as, for example, as an accelerometer, an actuator for precisely controlled actuations or to simulate the sensation of braille letters. 28 figs.

  13. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.; Love, L.J.

    1997-03-01

    The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory equipment to outside universities, industrial researchers, and elementary and secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division (RPSD) has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics, but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

  14. Virtual pinhole confocal microscope

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.S.; Rector, D.M.; Ranken, D.M.; Peterson, B.; Kesteron, J.

    1999-06-01

    Scanned confocal microscopes enhance imaging capabilities, providing improved contrast and image resolution in 3-D, but existing systems have significant technical shortcomings and are expensive. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel approach--virtual pinhole confocal microscopy--that uses state of the art illumination, detection, and data processing technologies to produce an imager with a number of advantages: reduced cost, faster imaging, improved efficiency and sensitivity, improved reliability and much greater flexibility. Work at Los Alamos demonstrated proof of principle; prototype hardware and software have been used to demonstrate technical feasibility of several implementation strategies. The system uses high performance illumination, patterned in time and space. The authors have built functional confocal imagers using video display technologies (LCD or DLP) and novel scanner based on a micro-lens array. They have developed a prototype system for high performance data acquisition and processing, designed to support realtime confocal imaging. They have developed algorithms to reconstruct confocal images from a time series of spatially sub-sampled images; software development remains an area of active development. These advances allow the collection of high quality confocal images (in fluorescence, reflectance and transmission modes) with equipment that can inexpensively retrofit to existing microscopes. Planned future extensions to these technologies will significantly enhance capabilities for microscopic imaging in a variety of applications, including confocal endoscopy, and confocal spectral imaging.

  15. [Virtual room of gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Osvaldo Mateo; Fittipaldi, Mónica Elsa; Henderson, Eduardo; Krabshuis, Justus Hendrik

    2010-12-01

    The amount of published information and its continuing growth can no longer be managed by an individual searcher. One of today's great challenges for the academic researcher and clinician is to find a relevant scientific article using bibliographic search strategies. We aimed to design and build a Virtual Room of Gastroenterology (VRG) generating real-time automated search strategies and producing bibliographic and full text search results. These results update and complement with the latest evidence the Clinical Guideline Program of the World Gastroenterology Organisation. The HTML driven interface provides a series of pre-formulated MeSH based search strategies for each Aula. For each topic between 10 and 20 specific terms, qualifiers and subheadings are identified. The functionality of the VRG is based on the PubMed's characteristic that allows a search strategy to be captured as a web address. The VRG is available in Spanish and English, and the access is free. There are 28 rooms currently available. All together these rooms provide an advanced bibliographic access using more than 900 pre-programmed MeSH driven strategies. In a further very recent development some of the topics of VRG now allow cascade based searches. These searches look at resource sensitive options and possible ethnic difference per topic. The VRG allows significant reductions in time required to design and carry out complex bibliographic searches in the areas of gastroenterology, hepatology and endoscopy. The system updates automatically in real-time thus ensuring the currency of the results. PMID:21381412

  16. [Virtual room of gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Osvaldo Mateo; Fittipaldi, Mónica Elsa; Henderson, Eduardo; Krabshuis, Justus Hendrik

    2010-12-01

    The amount of published information and its continuing growth can no longer be managed by an individual searcher. One of today's great challenges for the academic researcher and clinician is to find a relevant scientific article using bibliographic search strategies. We aimed to design and build a Virtual Room of Gastroenterology (VRG) generating real-time automated search strategies and producing bibliographic and full text search results. These results update and complement with the latest evidence the Clinical Guideline Program of the World Gastroenterology Organisation. The HTML driven interface provides a series of pre-formulated MeSH based search strategies for each Aula. For each topic between 10 and 20 specific terms, qualifiers and subheadings are identified. The functionality of the VRG is based on the PubMed's characteristic that allows a search strategy to be captured as a web address. The VRG is available in Spanish and English, and the access is free. There are 28 rooms currently available. All together these rooms provide an advanced bibliographic access using more than 900 pre-programmed MeSH driven strategies. In a further very recent development some of the topics of VRG now allow cascade based searches. These searches look at resource sensitive options and possible ethnic difference per topic. The VRG allows significant reductions in time required to design and carry out complex bibliographic searches in the areas of gastroenterology, hepatology and endoscopy. The system updates automatically in real-time thus ensuring the currency of the results.

  17. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  18. Virtual Reality Enhanced Instructional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nachimuthu, K.; Vijayakumari, G.

    2009-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a creation of virtual 3D world in which one can feel and sense the world as if it is real. It is allowing engineers to design machines and Educationists to design AV [audiovisual] equipment in real time but in 3-dimensional hologram as if the actual material is being made and worked upon. VR allows a least-cost (energy…

  19. [Chemical databases and virtual screening].

    PubMed

    Rognan, Didier; Bonnet, Pascal

    2014-12-01

    A prerequisite to any virtual screening is the definition of compound libraries to be screened. As we describe here, various sources are available. The selection of the proper library is usually project-dependent but at least as important as the screening method itself. This review details the main compound libraries that are available for virtual screening and guide the reader to the best possible selection according to its needs. PMID:25537046

  20. System Management Software for Virtual Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vallee, Geoffroy R; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Scott, Stephen L

    2007-01-01

    Recently there has been an increased interest in the use of system-level virtualization using mature solutions such as Xen, QEMU, or VMWare. These virtualization platforms are being used in distributed and parallel environments including high performance computing. The use of virtual machines within such environments introduces new challenges to system management. These include tedious tasks such as deploying para-virtualized host operating systems to support virtual machine execution or virtual overlay networks to connect these virtual machines. Additionally, there is the problem of machine definition and deployment, which is complicated by differentiation in the underlying virtualization technology. This paper discusses tools for the deployment and management of both host operating systems and virtual machines in clusters. We begin with an overview of system-level virtualization and move on to a description of tools that we have developed to aid with these environments. These tools extend prior work in the area of cluster installation, configuration and management.

  1. Generation of virtual models for planning orthognathic surgery using a modified multimodal image fusion technique.

    PubMed

    Uechi, J; Tsuji, Y; Konno, M; Hayashi, K; Shibata, T; Nakayama, E; Mizoguchi, I

    2015-04-01

    Streak artefacts caused by dental metals deteriorate the quality of computed tomography (CT) images. We developed and evaluated a method for generating three-dimensional virtual models to plan orthognathic surgery in patients with multiple dental materials, to avoid the adverse effects of metal artefacts in image fusion. The method basically consists of four procedures: (1) fabrication of a splint in the open-mouth position with fiducial markers, (2) reconstruction of a virtual skull model in the open-mouth position from CT scanning, (3) reconstruction of two virtual dental models in the open-mouth position and either the intercuspal position (ICP) or centric relation (CR) from surface scanning, and (4) three serial steps of image registration and subsequent repositioning of the mandible to the ICP or CR. This method allows for the registration of skull and dental models under artefact-free conditions. To validate the method, CT and dental cast data from 30 patients were used. The registration accuracy was 0.080 mm for the initial registration, 0.033 mm for the second registration, and 0.028 mm for the third registration. The present method can be used to determine the occlusal relationships and craniofacial morphology of patients with dental metals and can be applied to computer-assisted diagnosis and surgery.

  2. Economic impact of real-time teleradiology in thoracic CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Takada, Akihiro; Kasahara, Toshiyuki; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Hosoba, Minoru; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2003-07-01

    Conventional teleradiology is a useful tool, but sometimes we have found it to be an insufficient means of investigation because the radiological specialists cannot indicate the imaging protocol during the investigation. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of real-time teleradiology, which will improve the quality of medical management. Ten radiologists evaluated thoracic CT scans of 50 patients transmitted through teleradiology retrospectively. We evaluated whether or not the contrast enhancement study was performed effectively on the basis of the clinical data and after interpretation of the pre-contrast scans. The clinical data showed that 47.6% of the CT contrast enhancement examinations were not necessary. After interpretation of the pre-contrast CT scans, 66.6% of the contrast-enhanced scans were considered unnecessary. Real-time teleradiology will improve the quality of medical management providing the virtual presence of radiologists, and will save medical costs.

  3. Virtual patients in geriatric education.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zaldy S; Mulhausen, Paul L; Smith, Stephen R; Ruiz, Jorge G

    2010-01-01

    The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators have spurred the development of virtual patient programs to teach geriatrics at the medical undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels. As an instructional tool, the Virtual Patient must be placed in the correct educational context to help educators identify opportunities for its proper use in the curriculum. In this review, the experiences of three medical schools in the development and application of geriatric virtual patients are described as case studies. In each case study, the challenges encountered and solutions developed are presented. Areas of future research in the use of virtual patients in geriatrics education include the determination of the optimal combination of features, the settings of use of virtual patient programs, the underlying pedagogy, and the limitations in its application in clinical instruction. PMID:20509062

  4. What makes virtual agents believable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovych, Anton; Trescak, Tomas; Simoff, Simeon

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the concept of believability and make an attempt to isolate individual characteristics (features) that contribute to making virtual characters believable. As the result of this investigation we have produced a formalisation of believability and based on this formalisation built a computational framework focused on simulation of believable virtual agents that possess the identified features. In order to test whether the identified features are, in fact, responsible for agents being perceived as more believable, we have conducted a user study. In this study we tested user reactions towards the virtual characters that were created for a simulation of aboriginal inhabitants of a particular area of Sydney, Australia in 1770 A.D. The participants of our user study were exposed to short simulated scenes, in which virtual agents performed some behaviour in two different ways (while possessing a certain aspect of believability vs. not possessing it). The results of the study indicate that virtual agents that appear resource bounded, are aware of their environment, own interaction capabilities and their state in the world, agents that can adapt to changes in the environment and exist in correct social context are those that are being perceived as more believable. Further in the paper we discuss these and other believability features and provide a quantitative analysis of the level of contribution for each such feature to the overall perceived believability of a virtual agent.

  5. New horizons in cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    den Harder, A M; Willemink, M J; de Jong, P A; Schilham, A M R; Rajiah, P; Takx, R A P; Leiner, T

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, cardiovascular computed tomography angiography (CCTA) was associated with considerable radiation doses. The introduction of tube current modulation and automatic tube potential selection as well as high-pitch prospective ECG-triggering and iterative reconstruction offer the ability to decrease dose with approximately one order of magnitude, often to sub-millisievert dose levels. In parallel, advancements in computational technology have enabled the measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR) from CCTA data (FFRCT). This technique shows potential to replace invasively measured FFR to select patients in need of coronary intervention. Furthermore, developments in scanner hardware have led to the introduction of dual-energy and photon-counting CT, which offer the possibility of material decomposition imaging. Dual-energy CT reduces beam hardening, which enables CCTA in patients with a high calcium burden and more robust myocardial CT perfusion imaging. Future-generation CT systems will be capable of counting individual X-ray photons. Photon-counting CT is promising and may result in a substantial further radiation dose reduction, vastly increased spatial resolution, and the introduction of a whole new class of contrast agents. PMID:26932775

  6. MicroPET/CT Colonoscopy in long-lived Min mouse using NM404

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Matthew B.; Halberg, Richard B.; Schutten, Melissa M.; Weichert, Jamey P.

    2009-02-01

    Colon cancer is a leading cause of death in the US, even though many cases are preventable if tumors are detected early. One technique to promote screening is Computed Tomography Colonography (CTC). NM404 is a second generation phospholipid ether analogue which has demonstrated selective uptake and prolonged retention in 43/43 types of malignant tumors but not inflammatory sites or premalignant lesions. The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate (SWR x B6 )F1.Min mice as a preclinical model to test MicroPET/CT dual modality virtual colonoscopy. Each animal was given an IV injection of 124I-NM404 (100 uCi) 24, 48 and 96 hours prior to scanning on a dedicated microPET/CT system. Forty million counts were histogrammed in 3D and reconstructed using an OSEM 2D algorithm. Immediately after PET acquisition, a 93 m volumetric CT was acquired at 80 kVp, 800 uA and 350 ms exposures. Following CT, the mouse was sacrificed. The entire intestinal tract was excised, washed, insufflated, and scanned ex vivo A total of eight tissue samples from the small intestine were harvested: 5 were benign adenomas, 2 were malignant adenocarcinomas, and 1 was a Peyer's patch (lymph tissue) . The sites of these samples were positioned on CT and PET images based on morphological cues and the distance from the anus. Only 1/8 samples showed tracer uptake. several hot spots in the microPET image were not chosen for histology. (SWR x B6)F1.Min mice develop benign and malignant tumors, making this animal model a strong candidate for future dual modality microPET/CT virtual colonography studies.

  7. Virtual acoustic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1991-01-01

    A 3D auditory display can potentially enhance information transfer by combining directional and iconic information in a quite naturalistic representation of dynamic objects in the interface. Another aspect of auditory spatial clues is that, in conjunction with other modalities, it can act as a potentiator of information in the display. For example, visual and auditory cues together can reinforce the information content of the display and provide a greater sense of presence or realism in a manner not readily achievable by either modality alone. This phenomenon will be particularly useful in telepresence applications, such as advanced teleconferencing environments, shared electronic workspaces, and monitoring telerobotic activities in remote or hazardous situations. Thus, the combination of direct spatial cues with good principles of iconic design could provide an extremely powerful and information-rich display which is also quite easy to use. An alternative approach, recently developed at ARC, generates externalized, 3D sound cues over headphones in realtime using digital signal processing. Here, the synthesis technique involves the digital generation of stimuli using Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTF's) measured in the two ear-canals of individual subjects. Other similar approaches include an analog system developed by Loomis, et. al., (1990) and digital systems which make use of transforms derived from normative mannikins and simulations of room acoustics. Such an interface also requires the careful psychophysical evaluation of listener's ability to accurately localize the virtual or synthetic sound sources. From an applied standpoint, measurement of each potential listener's HRTF's may not be possible in practice. For experienced listeners, localization performance was only slightly degraded compared to a subject's inherent ability. Alternatively, even inexperienced listeners may be able to adapt to a particular set of HRTF's as long as they provide adequate

  8. Virtual intraluminal evaluation of aortico-left ventricular tunnel by multislice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jong-Hau; Wu, Ding-Kwo; Chen, Ying-Fu; Dai, Zen-Kong; Lee, Meng-Hsun; Wu, Jiunn-Ren

    2007-03-20

    The aortico-left ventricular tunnel (ALVT) is a rare abnormal channel that arises from the right coronary sinus through the right ventricular outflow tract to enter the left ventricle below the aortic valve. The unique ability of multislice computed tomography (CT), as applied in the virtual coloscopy, has not been well established in patients with cardiovascular diseases. We herein investigate the virtual intraluminal image in a patient with an ALVT. An 18-year-old male was admitted with a 6-month-long history of progressive exertional dyspnea. He was diagnosed to suffer from ALVT at 5 months of age and received prosthetic patch closure of the aortic opening of the tunnel with mild residual aortic regurgitation. On admission this time, physical examination revealed a grade 3/6 diastolic murmur over the right upper sternal border. A 16-row multislice CT angiography demonstrated an ALVT. In the 3D reconstructed images, the orifice and intraluminal structure of ALVT were clearly visualized at different levels, similar to a real intracardiac endoscopic images. The patient was then referred for aortic valve replacement due to heart failure caused by severe degenerative aortic insufficiency. Our case displayed successfully not only the entire location of ALVT but also demonstrated the virtual intraluminal imaging mimicking endoscopy. This technique provides the virtual visualization of the entire inner image of AVLT, which may not be possible with other imaging modalities.

  9. Malignant external otitis: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, H.D.; Wolfe, P.; May, M.

    1982-11-01

    Malignant external otitis is an aggressive infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that most often occurs in elderly diabetics. Malignant external otitis often spreads inferiorly from the external canal to involve the subtemporal area and progresses medially towards the petrous apex leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies. The computed tomographic (CT) findings in malignant external otitis include obliteration of the normal fat planes in the subtemporal area as well as patchy destruction of the bony cortex of the mastoid. The point of exit of the various cranial nerves can be identified on CT scans, and the extent of the inflammatory mass correlates well with the clinical findings. Four cases of malignant external otitis are presented. In each case CT provided a good demonstration of involvement of the soft tissues at the base of the skull.

  10. Renal applications of dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Ravi K; Platt, Joel F

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy CT is being increasingly used for abdominal imaging due to its incremental benefit of material characterization without significant increase in radiation dose. Knowledge of the different dual-energy CT acquisition techniques and image processing algorithms is essential to optimize imaging protocols and understand potential limitations while using dual-energy CT renal imaging such as urinary calculi characterization, assessment of renal masses and in CT urography. This review article provides an overview of the current dual-energy CT techniques and use of dual-energy CT in renal imaging.

  11. A rapid noninvasive characterization of CT x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Randazzo, Matt; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to generate spatially varying half value layers (HVLs) that can be used to construct virtual equivalent source models of computed tomography (CT) x-ray sources for use in Monte Carlo CT dose computations. Methods: To measure the spatially varying HVLs, the authors combined a cylindrical HVL measurement technique with the characterization of bowtie filter relative attenuation (COBRA) geometry. An apparatus given the name “HVL Jig” was fabricated to accurately position a real-time dosimeter off-isocenter while surrounded by concentric cylindrical aluminum filters (CAFs). In this geometry, each projection of the rotating x-ray tube is filtered by an identical amount of high-purity (type 1100 H-14) aluminum while the stationary radiation dose probe records an air kerma rate versus time waveform. The CAFs were progressively nested to acquire exposure data at increasing filtrations to calculate the HVL. Using this dose waveform and known setup geometry, each timestamp was related to its corresponding fan angle. Data were acquired using axial CT protocols (i.e., rotating tube and stationary patient table) at energies of 80, 100, and 120 kVp on a single CT scanner. These measurements were validated against the more laborious conventional step-and-shoot approach (stationary x-ray tube). Results: At each energy, HVL data points from the COBRA-cylinder technique were fit to a trendline and compared with the conventional approach. The average relative difference in HVL between the two techniques was 1.3%. There was a systematic overestimation in HVL due to scatter contamination. Conclusions: The described method is a novel, rapid, accurate, and noninvasive approach that allows one to acquire the spatially varying fluence and HVL data using a single experimental setup in a minimum of three scans. These measurements can be used to characterize the CT beam in terms of the angle-dependent fluence and energy spectra along the bowtie filter

  12. Development of a Radiation Dose Reporting Software for X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Aiping

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has experienced tremendous technological advances in recent years and has established itself as one of the most popular diagnostic imaging tools. While CT imaging clearly plays an invaluable role in modern medicine, its rapid adoption has resulted in a dramatic increase in the average medical radiation exposure to the worldwide and United States populations. Existing software tools for CT dose estimation and reporting are mostly based on patient phantoms that contain overly simplified anatomies insufficient in meeting the current and future needs. This dissertation describes the development of an easy-to-use software platform, “VirtualDose”, as a service to estimate and report the organ dose and effective dose values for patients undergoing the CT examinations. “VirtualDose” incorporates advanced models for the adult male and female, pregnant women, and children. To cover a large portion of the ignored obese patients that frequents the radiology clinics, a new set of obese male and female phantoms are also developed and applied to study the effects of the fat tissues on the CT radiation dose. Multi-detector CT scanners (MDCT) and clinical protocols, as well as the most recent effective dose algorithms from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 are adopted in “VirtualDose” to keep pace with the MDCT development and regulatory requirements. A new MDCT scanner model with both body and head bowtie filter is developed to cover both the head and body scanning modes. This model was validated through the clinical measurements. A comprehensive slice-by-slice database is established by deriving the data from a larger number of single axial scans simulated on the patient phantoms using different CT bowtie filters, beam thicknesses, and different tube voltages in the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) code. When compared to the existing CT dose software packages, organ dose data in this

  13. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  14. Wide coverage by volume CT: benefits for cardiac imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablayrolles, Jean-Louis; Cesmeli, Erdogan; Mintandjian, Laura; Adda, Olivier; Dessalles-Martin, Diane

    2005-04-01

    With the development of new technologies, computed tomography (CT) is becoming a strong candidate for non-invasive imaging based tool for cardiac disease assessment. One of the challenges of cardiac CT is that a typical scan involves a breath hold period consisting of several heartbeats, about 20 sec with scanners having a longitudinal coverage of 2 cm, and causing the image quality (IQ) to be negatively impacted since beat to beat variation is high likely to occur without any medication, e.g. beta blockers. Because of this and the preference for shorter breath hold durations, a CT scanner with a wide coverage without the compromise in the spatial and temporal resolution of great clinical value. In this study, we aimed at determining the optimum scan duration and the delay relative to beginning of breath hold, to achieve high IQ. We acquired EKG data from 91 consecutive patients (77 M, 14 F; Age: 57 +/- 14) undergoing cardiac CT exams with contrast, performed on LightSpeed 16 and LightSpeed Pro16. As an IQ metric, we adopted the standard deviation of "beat-to-beat variation" (stdBBV) within a virtual scan period. Two radiologists evaluated images by assigning a score of 1 (worst) to 4 best). We validated stdBBV with the radiologist scores, which resulted in a population distribution of 9.5, 9.5, 31, and 50% for the score groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Based on the scores, we defined a threshold for stdBBV and identified an optimum combination of virtual scan period and a delay. With the assumption that the relationship between the stdBBV and diagnosable scan IQ holds, our analysis suggested that the success rate can be improved to 100% with scan durations equal or less than 5 sec with a delay of 1 - 2 sec. We confirmed the suggested conclusion with LightSpeed VCT (GE Healthcare Technologies, Waukesha, WI), which has a wide longitudinal coverage, fine isotropic spatial resolution, and high temporal resolution, e.g. 40 mm coverage per rotation of 0.35 sec

  15. Virtual integral holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venolia, Dan S.; Williams, Lance

    1990-08-01

    components of a stereo display system with user point-of-view tracking for interactive 3D, and a digital realization of integral composite display which we term virtual integral holography. The primary drawbacks of holographic display - film processing turnaround time, and the difficulties of displaying scenes in full color -are obviated, and motion parallax cues provide easy 3D interpretation even for users who cannot see in stereo.

  16. Virtual Flow Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Calderer, Antoni; Yang, Xiaolei; Angelidis, Dionysios; Khosronejad, Ali; Le, Trung; Kang, Seokkoo; Gilmanov, Anvar; Ge, Liang; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-10-05

    Virtual Flow Simulator (VFS) is a state-of-the-art computational fluid mechanics (CFD) package that is capable of simulating multi-physics/multi-phase flows with the most advanced turbulence models (RANS, LES) over complex terrains. The flow solver is based on the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method to handle geometrically complex and moving domains. Different modules of the VFS package can provide different simulation capabilities for specific applications ranging from the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of solid and deformable bodies, the two-phase free surface flow solver based on the level set method for ocean waves, sediment transport models in rivers and the large-scale models of wind farms based on actuator lines and surfaces. All numerical features of VFS package have been validated with known analytical and experimental data as reported in the related journal articles. VFS package is suitable for a broad range of engineering applications within different industries. VFS has been used in different projects with applications in wind and hydrokinetic energy, offshore and near-shore ocean studies, cardiovascular and biological flows, and natural streams and river morphodynamics. Over the last decade, the development of VFS has been supported and assisted with the help of various United States companies and federal agencies that are listed in the sponsor lists. In this version, VFS-Wind contains all the necessary modeling tools for wind energy applications, including land-based and offshore wind farms. VFS is highly scalable to run on either desktop computers or high performance clusters (up to 16,000 CPUs). This released version comes with a detailed user’s manual and a set of case studies designed to facilitate the learning of the various aspects of the code in a comprehensive manner. The included documentation and support material has been elaborated in a collaboration effort with Sandia National Labs under the contract DE-EE0005482. The VFS

  17. Virtual Flow Simulator

    2015-10-05

    Virtual Flow Simulator (VFS) is a state-of-the-art computational fluid mechanics (CFD) package that is capable of simulating multi-physics/multi-phase flows with the most advanced turbulence models (RANS, LES) over complex terrains. The flow solver is based on the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method to handle geometrically complex and moving domains. Different modules of the VFS package can provide different simulation capabilities for specific applications ranging from the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of solid and deformable bodies, themore » two-phase free surface flow solver based on the level set method for ocean waves, sediment transport models in rivers and the large-scale models of wind farms based on actuator lines and surfaces. All numerical features of VFS package have been validated with known analytical and experimental data as reported in the related journal articles. VFS package is suitable for a broad range of engineering applications within different industries. VFS has been used in different projects with applications in wind and hydrokinetic energy, offshore and near-shore ocean studies, cardiovascular and biological flows, and natural streams and river morphodynamics. Over the last decade, the development of VFS has been supported and assisted with the help of various United States companies and federal agencies that are listed in the sponsor lists. In this version, VFS-Wind contains all the necessary modeling tools for wind energy applications, including land-based and offshore wind farms. VFS is highly scalable to run on either desktop computers or high performance clusters (up to 16,000 CPUs). This released version comes with a detailed user’s manual and a set of case studies designed to facilitate the learning of the various aspects of the code in a comprehensive manner. The included documentation and support material has been elaborated in a collaboration effort with Sandia National Labs under the contract DE-EE0005482

  18. Australia's marine virtual laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Roger; Gillibrand, Philip; Oke, Peter; Rosebrock, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    In all modelling studies of realistic scenarios, a researcher has to go through a number of steps to set up a model in order to produce a model simulation of value. The steps are generally the same, independent of the modelling system chosen. These steps include determining the time and space scales and processes of the required simulation; obtaining data for the initial set up and for input during the simulation time; obtaining observation data for validation or data assimilation; implementing scripts to run the simulation(s); and running utilities or custom-built software to extract results. These steps are time consuming and resource hungry, and have to be done every time irrespective of the simulation - the more complex the processes, the more effort is required to set up the simulation. The Australian Marine Virtual Laboratory (MARVL) is a new development in modelling frameworks for researchers in Australia. MARVL uses the TRIKE framework, a java-based control system developed by CSIRO that allows a non-specialist user configure and run a model, to automate many of the modelling preparation steps needed to bring the researcher faster to the stage of simulation and analysis. The tool is seen as enhancing the efficiency of researchers and marine managers, and is being considered as an educational aid in teaching. In MARVL we are developing a web-based open source application which provides a number of model choices and provides search and recovery of relevant observations, allowing researchers to: a) efficiently configure a range of different community ocean and wave models for any region, for any historical time period, with model specifications of their choice, through a user-friendly web application, b) access data sets to force a model and nest a model into, c) discover and assemble ocean observations from the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN, http://portal.aodn.org.au/webportal/) in a format that is suitable for model evaluation or data assimilation, and

  19. GIScience Operations with Virtual Globes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, S. T.; Cantrell, S. J.; Peterlin, A.

    2009-12-01

    GIScience operations with 3D and 4D user-defined information is demonstrated for virtual globes using a light client on Google Earth. Shown are interactive “point and click” operations on 3D/4D objects suspended in the virtual globe environment. Such interactive operations include extraction of information from, and modification of KML/COLLADA models of displayed virtual objects. A Transparent Interface is introduced for Google Earth which enhances utilization of the massive datasets available from public and private sources in the KML/COLLADA (KMZ) format. This Transparent Interface also supports just-in-time conversion of common formats such as netCDF into KML/COLLADA for virtual globe visualizations. Developed under the NASA SBIR Program, such GIScience tools and techniques for virtual globes are becoming available to NASA projects and data assets including Giovanni (GSFC), Cloudsat and AIRS (JPL), CALIPSO (LaRC), the Real Time Mission Manager or RTMM (MSFC) for field mission support, and NASA World Wind (ARC). Such techniques also apply to data and information in the underwater and subsurface environment where supported. A cross-comparison of satellite-borne radar with the ground-based NOAA/NWS NEXRAD system is featured to demonstrate the innovation.

  20. A Virtual Aluminum Reduction Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Zhou, Chenn Q.; Wu, Bing; Li, Jie

    2013-11-01

    The most important component in the aluminum industry is the aluminum reduction cell; it has received considerable interests and resources to conduct research to improve its productivity and energy efficiency. The current study focused on the integration of numerical simulation data and virtual reality technology to create a scientifically and practically realistic virtual aluminum reduction cell by presenting complex cell structures and physical-chemical phenomena. The multiphysical field simulation models were first built and solved in ANSYS software (ANSYS Inc., Canonsburg, PA, USA). Then, the methodology of combining the simulation results with virtual reality was introduced, and a virtual aluminum reduction cell was created. The demonstration showed that a computer-based world could be created in which people who are not analysis experts can see the detailed cell structure in a context that they can understand easily. With the application of the virtual aluminum reduction cell, even people who are familiar with aluminum reduction cell operations can gain insights that make it possible to understand the root causes of observed problems and plan design changes in much less time.

  1. Virtual scarce water in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Kuishuang; Hubacek, Klaus; Pfister, Stephan; Yu, Yang; Sun, Laixiang

    2014-07-15

    Water footprints and virtual water flows have been promoted as important indicators to characterize human-induced water consumption. However, environmental impacts associated with water consumption are largely neglected in these analyses. Incorporating water scarcity into water consumption allows better understanding of what is causing water scarcity and which regions are suffering from it. In this study, we incorporate water scarcity and ecosystem impacts into multiregional input-output analysis to assess virtual water flows and associated impacts among 30 provinces in China. China, in particular its water-scarce regions, are facing a serious water crisis driven by rapid economic growth. Our findings show that inter-regional flows of virtual water reveal additional insights when water scarcity is taken into account. Consumption in highly developed coastal provinces is largely relying on water resources in the water-scarce northern provinces, such as Xinjiang, Hebei, and Inner Mongolia, thus significantly contributing to the water scarcity in these regions. In addition, many highly developed but water scarce regions, such as Shanghai, Beijing, and Tianjin, are already large importers of net virtual water at the expense of water resource depletion in other water scarce provinces. Thus, increasingly importing water-intensive goods from other water-scarce regions may just shift the pressure to other regions, but the overall water problems may still remain. Using the water footprint as a policy tool to alleviate water shortage may only work when water scarcity is taken into account and virtual water flows from water-poor regions are identified.

  2. Virtual odors to transmit emotions in virtual agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Mata, Carlos; Aylett, Ruth

    2003-04-01

    In this paper we describe an emotional-behvioral architecture. The emotional engine sits at a higher layer than the behavior system, and can alter behavior patterns, the engine is designed to simulate Emotionally-Intelligent Agents in a Virtual Environment, where each agent senses its own emotions, and other creature emotions through a virtual smell sensor; senses obstacles and other moving creatures in the environment and reacts to them. The architecture consists of an emotion engine, behavior synthesis system, a motor layer and a library of sensors.

  3. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  4. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 3,2015 ... facts MDCT is a very fast type of computed tomography (CT) scan. MDCT creates pictures of the healthy ...

  5. Pocket atlas of normal CT anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, J.B.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a quick reference for interpreting CT scans of the extracranial organs. This collection of 41 CT scans covers all the major organs of the body: neck and larynx; chest; abdomen; male pelvis; and female pelvis.

  6. An Indirect Method to Measure Abutment Screw Preload: A Pilot Study Based on Micro-CT Scanning.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Carlos Eduardo E; Griggs, Jason Alan; Duan, Yuanyuan; Mushashe, Amanda M; Nolasco, Gisele Maria Correr; Borges, Ana Flávia Sanches; Rubo, José Henrique

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to measure the preload in different implant platform geometries based on micro-CT images. External hexagon (EH) implants and Morse Tapered (MT) implants (n=5) were used for the preload measurement. The abutment screws were scanned in micro-CT to obtain their virtual models, which were used to record their initial length. The abutments were screwed on the implant with a 20 Ncm torque and the set composed by implant, abutment screw and abutment were taken to the micro-CT scanner to obtain virtual slices of the specimens. These slices allowed the measurement of screw lengths after torque application and based on the screw elongation. Preload values were calculated using the Hooke's Law. The preloads of both groups were compared by independent t-test. Removal torque of each specimen was recorded. To evaluate the accuracy of the micro-CT technique, three rods with known lengths were scanned and the length of their virtual model was measured and compared with the original length. One rod was scanned four times to evaluate the measuring method variation. There was no difference between groups for preload (EH = 461.6 N and MT = 477.4 N), but the EH group showed higher removal torque values (13.8 ± 4.7 against 8.2 ± 3.6 N cm for MT group). The micro-CT technique showed a variability of 0.053% and repeatability showed an error of 0.23 to 0.28%. Within the limitations of this study, there was no difference between external hexagon and Morse taper for preload. The method using micro-CT may be considered for preload calculation.

  7. Virtual surgical telesimulations in otolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Navarro Newball, Andrés A; Hernández, Carlos J; Velez, Jorge A; Munera, Luis E; García, Gregorio B; Gamboa, Carlos A; Reyes, Antonio J

    2005-01-01

    Distance learning can be enhanced with the use of virtual reality; this paper describes the design and initial validation of a Web Environment for Surgery Skills Training on Otolaryngology (WESST-OT). WESST-OT was created aimed to help trainees to gain the skills required in order to perform the Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery procedure (FESS), since training centers and specialist in this knowledge are scarce in Colombia; also, it is part of a web based educational cycle which simulates the stages of a real procedure. WESST-OT is one from the WESST family of telesimulators which started to be developed from an architecture proposed at the Medicine Meets Virtual Reality conference 2002; also, it is a step towards the use of virtual reality technologies in Latin America. PMID:15718758

  8. Simulated maintenance a virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Lirvall, P.

    1995-10-01

    The article describes potential applications of personal computer-based virtual reality software. The applications are being investigated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited`s (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories for the Canadian deuterium-uranium (Candu) reactor. Objectives include: (1) reduction of outage duration and improved safety, (2) cost-effective and safe maintenance of equipment, (3) reduction of exposure times and identification of overexposure situations, (4) cost-effective training in a virtual control room simulator, (5) human factors evaluation of design interface, and (6) visualization of conceptual and detailed designs of critical nuclear field environments. A demonstration model of a typical reactor control room, the use of virtual reality in outage planning, and safety issues are outlined.

  9. Virtual Reality: You Are There

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Telepresence or "virtual reality," allows a person, with assistance from advanced technology devices, to figuratively project himself into another environment. This technology is marketed by several companies, among them Fakespace, Inc., a former Ames Research Center contractor. Fakespace developed a teleoperational motion platform for transmitting sounds and images from remote locations. The "Molly" matches the user's head motion and, when coupled with a stereo viewing device and appropriate software, creates the telepresence experience. Its companion piece is the BOOM-the user's viewing device that provides the sense of involvement in the virtual environment. Either system may be used alone. Because suits, gloves, headphones, etc. are not needed, a whole range of commercial applications is possible, including computer-aided design techniques and virtual reality visualizations. Customers include Sandia National Laboratories, Stanford Research Institute and Mattel Toys.

  10. Virtual Organizations: Trends and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nami, Mohammad Reza; Malekpour, Abbaas

    The Use of ICT in business has changed views about traditional business. With VO, organizations with out physical, geographical, or structural constraint can collaborate with together in order to fulfill customer requests in a networked environment. This idea improves resource utilization, reduces development process and costs, and saves time. Virtual Organization (VO) is always a form of partnership and managing partners and handling partnerships are crucial. Virtual organizations are defined as a temporary collection of enterprises that cooperate and share resources, knowledge, and competencies to better respond to business opportunities. This paper presents an overview of virtual organizations and main issues in collaboration such as security and management. It also presents a number of different model approaches according to their purpose and applications.

  11. Roughness Perception in Virtual Textures.

    PubMed

    Unger, B; Hollis, R; Klatzky, R

    2011-01-01

    Haptic devices allow the production of virtual textured surfaces for psychophysical experiments. Some studies have shown inconsistencies between virtual and real textures with respect to their psychophysical functions for roughness, leading to speculation that virtual textures differ in some way from real ones. We have determined the psychophysical function for roughness using textures rendered with a high-fidelity magnetic levitation haptic device. A constraint surface algorithm was used to simulate the motion of a spherical probe over trapezoidal gratings and randomly dithered cones. The shape of the psychophysical functions for roughness is consistent between subjects but varies with changes in texture and probe geometry. For dithered cones, inverted "U"-shaped functions were found nearly identical, in maxima and curvature, to those in the literature for real textures with similar geometry. PMID:26963163

  12. CT "halo sign" in pulmonary tuberculoma.

    PubMed

    Gaeta, M; Volta, S; Stroscio, S; Romeo, P; Pandolfo, I

    1992-01-01

    The CT halo sign has been described as the CT finding of a low-attenuation zone surrounding a pulmonary nodule. It is an early clue to the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. We describe a case of CT halo sign associated with a pulmonary tuberculoma. Therefore, we think that a diagnosis other than invasive pulmonary aspergillosis should be considered in the presence of the CT halo sign in immunocompetent patients.

  13. CT Scans - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... الأشعة المقطعية الحاسوبية - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) CT (Computerized Tomography) Scan CT ( ... 扫描 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) CT (Computerized Tomography) Scan CT ( ...

  14. Virtual planning in orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Stokbro, K; Aagaard, E; Torkov, P; Bell, R B; Thygesen, T

    2014-08-01

    Numerous publications regarding virtual surgical planning protocols have been published, most reporting only one or two case reports to emphasize the hands-on planning. None have systematically reviewed the data published from clinical trials. This systematic review analyzes the precision and accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) virtual surgical planning of orthognathic procedures compared with the actual surgical outcome following orthognathic surgery reported in clinical trials. A systematic search of the current literature was conducted to identify clinical trials with a sample size of more than five patients, comparing the virtual surgical plan with the actual surgical outcome. Search terms revealed a total of 428 titles, out of which only seven articles were included, with a combined sample size of 149 patients. Data were presented in three different ways: intra-class correlation coefficient, 3D surface area with a difference <2mm, and linear and angular differences in three dimensions. Success criteria were set at 2mm mean difference in six articles; 125 of the 133 patients included in these articles were regarded as having had a successful outcome. Due to differences in the presentation of data, meta-analysis was not possible. Virtual planning appears to be an accurate and reproducible method for orthognathic treatment planning. A more uniform presentation of the data is necessary to allow the performance of a meta-analysis. Currently, the software system most often used for 3D virtual planning in clinical trials is SimPlant (Materialise). More independent clinical trials are needed to further validate the precision of virtual planning.

  15. The transience of virtual fractals.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R P

    2012-01-01

    Artists have a long and fruitful tradition of exploiting electronic media to convert static images into dynamic images that evolve with time. Fractal patterns serve as an example: computers allow the observer to zoom in on virtual images and so experience the endless repetition of patterns in a matter that cannot be matched using static images. This year's featured cover artist, Susan Lowedermilk, instead plans to employ persistence of human vision to bring virtual fractals to life. This will be done by incorporating her prints of fractal patterns into zoetropes and phenakistoscopes.

  16. Stroke Rehabilitation Using Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Fu, Michael J; Knutson, Jayme S; Chae, John

    2015-11-01

    This review covers the rationale, mechanisms, and availability of commercially available virtual environment-based interventions for stroke rehabilitation. It describes interventions for motor, speech, cognitive, and sensory dysfunction. Also discussed are the important features and mechanisms that allow virtual environments to facilitate motor relearning. A common challenge is the inability to translate success in small trials to efficacy in larger populations. The heterogeneity of stroke pathophysiology has been blamed, and experts advocate for the study of multimodal approaches. Therefore, this article also introduces a framework to help define new therapy combinations that may be necessary to address stroke heterogeneity.

  17. Virtual worlds and team training.

    PubMed

    Dev, Parvati; Youngblood, Patricia; Heinrichs, W Leroy; Kusumoto, Laura

    2007-06-01

    An important component of all emergency medicine residency programs is managing trauma effectively as a member of an emergency medicine team, but practice on live patients is often impractical and mannequin-based simulators are expensive and require all trainees to be physically present at the same location. This article describes a project to develop and evaluate a computer-based simulator (the Virtual Emergency Department) for distance training in teamwork and leadership in trauma management. The virtual environment provides repeated practice opportunities with life-threatening trauma cases in a safe and reproducible setting. PMID:17574193

  18. Stroke Rehabilitation using Virtual Environments

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Michael J.; Knutson, Jayme; Chae, John

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis This review covers the rationale, mechanisms, and availability of commercially available virtual environment-based interventions for stroke rehabilitation. It describes interventions for motor, speech, cognitive, and sensory dysfunction. Also discussed are the important features and mechanisms that allow virtual environments to facilitate motor relearning. A common challenge facing the field is inability to translate success in small trials to efficacy in larger populations. The heterogeneity of stroke pathophysiology has been blamed and experts advocate for the study of multimodal approaches. Therefore, this article also introduces a framework to help define new therapy combinations that may be necessary to address stroke heterogeneity. PMID:26522910

  19. CT Innovators Reunion: Where Are They Now?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    Each year, "Campus Technology" ("CT") gazes across higher ed horizons to identify the most innovative IT programs at colleges and universities around the globe. The projects "CT" profiles are inspiring examples of technology making a difference on campus--at least at that moment. The question is, have they stood the test of time? "CT" followed up…

  20. Virtually Ostracized: Studying Ostracism in Immersive Virtual Environments

    PubMed Central

    Wesselmann, Eric D.; Law, Alvin Ty; Williams, Kipling D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Electronic-based communication (such as Immersive Virtual Environments; IVEs) may offer new ways of satisfying the need for social connection, but they also provide ways this need can be thwarted. Ostracism, being ignored and excluded, is a common social experience that threatens fundamental human needs (i.e., belonging, control, self-esteem, and meaningful existence). Previous ostracism research has made use of a variety of paradigms, including minimal electronic-based interactions (e.g., Cyberball) and communication (e.g., chatrooms and Short Message Services). These paradigms, however, lack the mundane realism that many IVEs now offer. Further, IVE paradigms designed to measure ostracism may allow researchers to test more nuanced hypotheses about the effects of ostracism. We created an IVE in which ostracism could be manipulated experimentally, emulating a previously validated minimal ostracism paradigm. We found that participants who were ostracized in this IVE experienced the same negative effects demonstrated in other ostracism paradigms, providing, to our knowledge, the first evidence of the negative effects of ostracism in virtual environments. Though further research directly exploring these effects in online virtual environments is needed, this research suggests that individuals encountering ostracism in other virtual environments (such as massively multiplayer online role playing games; MMORPGs) may experience negative effects similar to those of being ostracized in real life. This possibility may have serious implications for individuals who are marginalized in their real life and turn to IVEs to satisfy their need for social connection. PMID:22897472

  1. Affordable virtual environments: building a virtual beach for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Sherstyuk, Andrei; Aschwanden, Christoph; Saiki, Stanley

    2005-01-01

    Virtual Reality has been used for clinical application for about 10 years and has proved to be an effective tool for treating various disorders. In this paper, we want to share our experience in building a 3D, motion tracked, immersive VR system for pain treatment and biofeedback research. PMID:15718779

  2. Efficient Checkpointing of Virtual Machines using Virtual Machine Introspection

    SciTech Connect

    Aderholdt, Ferrol; Han, Fang; Scott, Stephen L; Naughton, III, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Cloud Computing environments rely heavily on system-level virtualization. This is due to the inherent benefits of virtualization including fault tolerance through checkpoint/restart (C/R) mechanisms. Because clouds are the abstraction of large data centers and large data centers have a higher potential for failure, it is imperative that a C/R mechanism for such an environment provide minimal latency as well as a small checkpoint file size. Recently, there has been much research into C/R with respect to virtual machines (VM) providing excellent solutions to reduce either checkpoint latency or checkpoint file size. However, these approaches do not provide both. This paper presents a method of checkpointing VMs by utilizing virtual machine introspection (VMI). Through the usage of VMI, we are able to determine which pages of memory within the guest are used or free and are better able to reduce the amount of pages written to disk during a checkpoint. We have validated this work by using various benchmarks to measure the latency along with the checkpoint size. With respect to checkpoint file size, our approach results in file sizes within 24% or less of the actual used memory within the guest. Additionally, the checkpoint latency of our approach is up to 52% faster than KVM s default method.

  3. Virtual Reference, Real Money: Modeling Costs in Virtual Reference Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eakin, Lori; Pomerantz, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Libraries nationwide are in yet another phase of belt tightening. Without an understanding of the economic factors that influence library operations, however, controlling costs and performing cost-benefit analyses on services is difficult. This paper describes a project to develop a cost model for collaborative virtual reference services. This…

  4. Why do commercial CT scanners still employ traditional, filtered back-projection for image reconstruction?

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaochuan; Sidky, Emil Y; Vannier, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Despite major advances in x-ray sources, detector arrays, gantry mechanical design and especially computer performance, one component of computed tomography (CT) scanners has remained virtually constant for the past 25 years—the reconstruction algorithm. Fundamental advances have been made in the solution of inverse problems, especially tomographic reconstruction, but these works have not been translated into clinical and related practice. The reasons are not obvious and seldom discussed. This review seeks to examine the reasons for this discrepancy and provides recommendations on how it can be resolved. We take the example of field of compressive sensing (CS), summarizing this new area of research from the eyes of practical medical physicists and explaining the disconnection between theoretical and application-oriented research. Using a few issues specific to CT, which engineers have addressed in very specific ways, we try to distill the mathematical problem underlying each of these issues with the hope of demonstrating that there are interesting mathematical problems of general importance that can result from in depth analysis of specific issues. We then sketch some unconventional CT-imaging designs that have the potential to impact on CT applications, if the link between applied mathematicians and engineers/physicists were stronger. Finally, we close with some observations on how the link could be strengthened. There is, we believe, an important opportunity to rapidly improve the performance of CT and related tomographic imaging techniques by addressing these issues. PMID:20376330

  5. Dual-Energy CT-based Display of Bone Marrow Edema in Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures: Impact on Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiologists with Varying Levels of Experience in Correlation to MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kaup, Moritz; Wichmann, Julian L; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Beeres, Martin; Kromen, Wolfgang; Albrecht, Moritz H; Lehnert, Thomas; Boettcher, Marie; Vogl, Thomas J; Bauer, Ralf W

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether a dual-energy (DE) computed tomographic (CT) virtual noncalcium technique can improve the detection rate of acute thoracolumbar vertebral compression fractures in patients with osteoporosis compared with that at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging depending on the level of experience of the reading radiologist. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. Forty-nine patients with osteoporosis who were suspected of having acute vertebral fracture underwent DE CT and MR imaging. Conventional linear-blended CT scans and corresponding virtual noncalcium reconstructions were obtained. Five radiologists with varying levels of experience evaluated gray-scale CT scans for the presence of fractures and their suspected age. Then, virtual noncalcium images were evaluated to detect bone marrow edema. Findings were compared with those from MR imaging (the standard of reference). Sensitivity and specificity analyses for diagnostic performance and matched pair analyses were performed on vertebral fracture and patient levels. Results Sixty-two fractures were classified as fresh and 52 as old at MR imaging. The diagnostic performance of all readers in the detection of fresh fractures improved with the addition of virtual noncalcium reconstructions compared with that with conventional CT alone. Although the diagnostic accuracy of the least experienced reader with virtual noncalcium CT (accuracy with CT alone, 61%; accuracy with virtual noncalcium technique, 83%) was within the range of that of the most experienced reader with CT alone, the latter improved his accuracy with the noncalcium technique (from 81% to 95%), coming close to that with MR imaging. The number of vertebrae rated as unclear decreased by 59%-90% or from 15-53 to 2-13 in absolute numbers across readers. The number of patients potentially referred to MR imaging decreased by 36%-87% (from 11

  6. Direct manipulation of virtual objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Long K.

    Interacting with a Virtual Environment (VE) generally requires the user to correctly perceive the relative position and orientation of virtual objects. For applications requiring interaction in personal space, the user may also need to accurately judge the position of the virtual object relative to that of a real object, for example, a virtual button and the user's real hand. This is difficult since VEs generally only provide a subset of the cues experienced in the real world. Complicating matters further, VEs presented by currently available visual displays may be inaccurate or distorted due to technological limitations. Fundamental physiological and psychological aspects of vision as they pertain to the task of object manipulation were thoroughly reviewed. Other sensory modalities -- proprioception, haptics, and audition -- and their cross-interactions with each other and with vision are briefly discussed. Visual display technologies, the primary component of any VE, were canvassed and compared. Current applications and research were gathered and categorized by different VE types and object interaction techniques. While object interaction research abounds in the literature, pockets of research gaps remain. Direct, dexterous, manual interaction with virtual objects in Mixed Reality (MR), where the real, seen hand accurately and effectively interacts with virtual objects, has not yet been fully quantified. An experimental test bed was designed to provide the highest accuracy attainable for salient visual cues in personal space. Optical alignment and user calibration were carefully performed. The test bed accommodated the full continuum of VE types and sensory modalities for comprehensive comparison studies. Experimental designs included two sets, each measuring depth perception and object interaction. The first set addressed the extreme end points of the Reality-Virtuality (R-V) continuum -- Immersive Virtual Environment (IVE) and Reality Environment (RE). This

  7. [Usefulness of virtual vessel images in ppi for treatment of complete obstruction of leg arteries].

    PubMed

    Kittaka, Daisuke; Sato, Hisaya; Nakai, Yuichi; Kato, Kyoichi; Nakazawa, Yasuo

    2014-10-01

    Following recent rapid advances in devices and treatment technology, indications for percutaneous peripheral intervention (PPI) have been expanded to include complex lesions (long-segment lesions, completely obstructed chronic lesions, etc.) and even lesions of the superficial femoral artery and arteries distal to the popliteal artery. However, when PPI is used for treatment of complete obstruction, treatment can take a long time or its outcome can be less satisfactory for reasons such as difficulty in assessing the vascular distribution/arrangement or the direction of calcification in the obstructed area or excessively long lesions. In the present study, we conducted three-dimensional image processing of CT data from leg arteries conventionally used for preoperative diagnosis. Using this processing technique, we created virtual images of the blood vessels of the completely obstructed area and mapped these virtual vessel images onto the fluoroscopic monitor image during catheter treatment. The usefulness of this technique for PPI was then evaluated. We succeeded in creating virtual vessel images of the completely obstructed parts of leg arteries with the use of preoperative CT images of leg arteries that we then mapped onto the fluoroscopic monitor images during treatment. We were successful in mapping virtual images onto the abdominal aorta in 96.8% of cases and in 95.7% with the common iliac artery. This technique is thus able to supply reliable information on vascular distribution/arrangement, suggesting that it can enable the surgeon to advance the treatment device precisely along the vessels, making it useful for treatment with PPI. The study additionally showed that differences in the angle of imaging affect the manual mapping of the CT images onto angiograms.

  8. Computer Vision Assisted Virtual Reality Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, W.

    1999-01-01

    A computer vision assisted semi-automatic virtual reality (VR) calibration technology has been developed that can accurately match a virtual environment of graphically simulated three-dimensional (3-D) models to the video images of the real task environment.

  9. Aerospace applications of virtual environment technology.

    PubMed

    Loftin, R B

    1996-11-01

    The uses of virtual environment technology in the space program are examined with emphasis on training for the Hubble Space Telescope Repair and Maintenance Mission in 1993. Project ScienceSpace at the Virtual Environment Technology Lab is discussed.

  10. Aerospace applications of virtual environment technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, R. B.

    1996-01-01

    The uses of virtual environment technology in the space program are examined with emphasis on training for the Hubble Space Telescope Repair and Maintenance Mission in 1993. Project ScienceSpace at the Virtual Environment Technology Lab is discussed.

  11. Virtual Learning Takes a Front Row Seat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Describes virtual learning opportunities for elementary and secondary school classrooms. Highlights include examples of various programs; content and curriculum development; designing effective formats; student perspectives; teacher perspectives; virtual learning models; characteristics of online students; integrating business models for online…

  12. Overview of multisource CT systems and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun; Lu, Yang; Zhuang, Tiange; Wang, Ge

    2010-09-01

    Multiple-source cone-beam scanning is a promising mode for dynamic volumetric CT/micro-CT. The first dynamic CT system is the Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (DSR) built in 1979. The pursuance for higher temporal resolution has largely driven the development of CT technology, and recently led to the emergence of Siemens dual-source CT scanner. Given the impact and limitation of dual-source cardiac CT, triple-source cone-beam CT seems a natural extension for future cardiac CT. Our work shows that trinity (triple-source architecture) is superior to duality (dual-source architecture) for helical cone-beam CT in terms of exact reconstruction. In particular, a triple-source helical scan allows a perfect mosaic of longitudinally truncated cone-beam data to satisfy the Orlov condition and yields better noise performance than the dual-source counterpart. In the (2N+1)-source helical CT case, the more sources, the higher temporal resolution. In the N-source saddle CT case, a triple-source scan offers the best temporal resolution for continuous dynamic exact reconstruction of a central volume. The recently developed multi-source cone-beam algorithms include an exact backprojection-filtration (BPF) approach and a "slow" exact filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm for (2N+1)-source helical CT, two fast quasi-exact FBP algorithms for triple-source helical CT, as well as a fast exact FBP algorithm for triple-source saddle CT. Some latest ideas will be also discussed, such as multi-source interior tomography and multi-beam field-emission x-ray CT.

  13. First virtual endocasts of adapiform primates.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Arianna R; Silcox, Mary T; Yapuncich, Gabriel S; Boyer, Doug M; Bloch, Jonathan I

    2016-10-01

    Well-preserved crania of notharctine adapiforms from the Eocene of North America provide the best direct evidence available for inferring neuroanatomy and encephalization in early euprimates (crown primates). Virtual endocasts of the notharctines Notharctus tenebrosus (n = 3) and Smilodectes gracilis (n = 4) from the middle Eocene Bridger formation of Wyoming, and the late Eocene European adapid adapiform Adapis parisiensis (n = 1), were reconstructed from high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) data. While the three species share many neuroanatomical similarities differentiating them from plesiadapiforms (stem primates) and extant euprimates, our sample of N. tenebrosus displays more variation than that of S. gracilis, possibly related to differences in the patterns of cranial sexual dimorphism or within-lineage evolution. Body masses predicted from associated teeth suggest that N. tenebrosus was larger and had a lower encephalization quotient (EQ) than S. gracilis, despite their close relationship and similar inferred ecologies. Meanwhile, body masses predicted from cranial length of the same specimens suggest that the two species were more similar, with overlapping body mass and EQ, although S. gracilis exhibits a range of EQs shifted upwards relative to that of N. tenebrosus. While associated data from other parts of the skeleton are mostly lacking for specimens included in this study, measurements for unassociated postcrania attributed to these species yield body mass and EQ estimates that are also more similar to each other than those based on teeth. Regardless of the body mass prediction method used, results suggest that the average EQ of adapiforms was similar to that of plesiadapiforms, only overlapped the lower quadrant for the range of extant strepsirrhines, and did not overlap with the range of extant haplorhines. However, structural changes evident in these endocasts suggest that early euprimates relied more on vision than olfaction

  14. First virtual endocasts of adapiform primates.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Arianna R; Silcox, Mary T; Yapuncich, Gabriel S; Boyer, Doug M; Bloch, Jonathan I

    2016-10-01

    Well-preserved crania of notharctine adapiforms from the Eocene of North America provide the best direct evidence available for inferring neuroanatomy and encephalization in early euprimates (crown primates). Virtual endocasts of the notharctines Notharctus tenebrosus (n = 3) and Smilodectes gracilis (n = 4) from the middle Eocene Bridger formation of Wyoming, and the late Eocene European adapid adapiform Adapis parisiensis (n = 1), were reconstructed from high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) data. While the three species share many neuroanatomical similarities differentiating them from plesiadapiforms (stem primates) and extant euprimates, our sample of N. tenebrosus displays more variation than that of S. gracilis, possibly related to differences in the patterns of cranial sexual dimorphism or within-lineage evolution. Body masses predicted from associated teeth suggest that N. tenebrosus was larger and had a lower encephalization quotient (EQ) than S. gracilis, despite their close relationship and similar inferred ecologies. Meanwhile, body masses predicted from cranial length of the same specimens suggest that the two species were more similar, with overlapping body mass and EQ, although S. gracilis exhibits a range of EQs shifted upwards relative to that of N. tenebrosus. While associated data from other parts of the skeleton are mostly lacking for specimens included in this study, measurements for unassociated postcrania attributed to these species yield body mass and EQ estimates that are also more similar to each other than those based on teeth. Regardless of the body mass prediction method used, results suggest that the average EQ of adapiforms was similar to that of plesiadapiforms, only overlapped the lower quadrant for the range of extant strepsirrhines, and did not overlap with the range of extant haplorhines. However, structural changes evident in these endocasts suggest that early euprimates relied more on vision than olfaction

  15. Material decomposition and virtual non-contrast imaging in photon counting computed tomography: an animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutjahr, R.; Polster, C.; Kappler, S.; Pietsch, H.; Jost, G.; Hahn, K.; Schöck, F.; Sedlmair, M.; Allmendinger, T.; Schmidt, B.; Krauss, B.; Flohr, T. G.

    2016-03-01

    The energy resolving capabilities of Photon Counting Detectors (PCD) in Computed Tomography (CT) facilitate energy-sensitive measurements. The provided image-information can be processed with Dual Energy and Multi Energy algorithms. A research PCD-CT firstly allows acquiring images with a close to clinical configuration of both the X-ray tube and the CT-detector. In this study, two algorithms (Material Decomposition and Virtual Non-Contrast-imaging (VNC)) are applied on a data set acquired from an anesthetized rabbit scanned using the PCD-CT system. Two contrast agents (CA) are applied: A gadolinium (Gd) based CA used to enhance contrasts for vascular imaging, and xenon (Xe) and air as a CA used to evaluate local ventilation of the animal's lung. Four different images are generated: a) A VNC image, suppressing any traces of the injected Gd imitating a native scan, b) a VNC image with a Gd-image as an overlay, where contrast enhancements in the vascular system are highlighted using colored labels, c) another VNC image with a Xe-image as an overlay, and d) a 3D rendered image of the animal's lung, filled with Xe, indicating local ventilation characteristics. All images are generated from two images based on energy bin information. It is shown that a modified version of a commercially available dual energy software framework is capable of providing images with diagnostic value obtained from the research PCD-CT system.

  16. Virtual reality and planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgreevy, Michael W.

    1992-01-01

    Exploring planetary environments is central to NASA's missions and goals. A new computing technology called Virtual Reality has much to offer in support of planetary exploration. This technology augments and extends human presence within computer-generated and remote spatial environments. Historically, NASA has been a leader in many of the fundamental concepts and technologies that comprise Virtual Reality. Indeed, Ames Research Center has a central role in the development of this rapidly emerging approach to using computers. This ground breaking work has inspired researchers in academia, industry, and the military. Further, NASA's leadership in this technology has spun off new businesses, has caught the attention of the international business community, and has generated several years of positive international media coverage. In the future, Virtual Reality technology will enable greatly improved human-machine interactions for more productive planetary surface exploration. Perhaps more importantly, Virtual Reality technology will democratize the experience of planetary exploration and thereby broaden understanding of, and support for, this historic enterprise.

  17. Virtual reality and stereoscopic telepresence

    SciTech Connect

    Mertens, E.P.

    1994-12-01

    Virtual reality technology is commonly thought to have few, if any, applications beyond the national research laboratories, the aerospace industry, and the entertainment world. A team at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is developing applications for virtual reality technology that make it a practical, viable, portable, and cost-effective business and training tool. The technology transfer is particularly applicable to the waste management industry and has become a tool that can serve the entire work force spectrum, from industrial sites to business offices. For three and a half years, a small team of WHC personnel has been developing an effective and practical method of bringing virtual reality technology to the job site. The applications are practical, the results are repeatable, and the equipment costs are within the range of present-day office machines. That combination can evolve into a competitive advantage for commercial business interests. The WHC team has contained system costs by using commercially available equipment and personal computers to create effective virtual reality work stations for less than $20,000.

  18. Embedding speech into virtual realities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohn, Christian-Arved; Krueger, Wolfgang

    1993-01-01

    In this work a speaker-independent speech recognition system is presented, which is suitable for implementation in Virtual Reality applications. The use of an artificial neural network in connection with a special compression of the acoustic input leads to a system, which is robust, fast, easy to use and needs no additional hardware, beside a common VR-equipment.

  19. Virtual HUD using an HMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Thomas W.; Page, H. J.

    2001-08-01

    As part of risk reduction activities for the development of next-generation fighter cockpits, Lockheed-Martin Aeronautics Company is using the USAF Variable-stability In- flight Simulation Test Aircraft F-16 and its programmable display system for the demonstration and evaluation of a Virtual Head-Up Display (HUD) concept. The Virtual HUD concept promises a significant improvement in next- generation fighter cockpits by eliminating the HUD yet projecting the Primary Flight Reference symbology, formerly displayed in the HUD, on the pilot's Helmet-Mounted Display. The Virtual HUD is presented in an aircraft-stabilized position where the HUD combining glass would normally be located in today's fighters. This change provides a cost and weight reduction, and clears invaluable instrument panel space for larger displays with less clutter and discontinuity in displayed information. The Virtual HUD flight trials also studied the use of voice recognition in flight. Voice was used to control all aspects of the test and in-cockpit sound measurements were taken to understand the impact of cockpit noise on recognition performance.

  20. Direct Manipulation in Virtual Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Virtual Reality interfaces offer several advantages for scientific visualization such as the ability to perceive three-dimensional data structures in a natural way. The focus of this chapter is direct manipulation, the ability for a user in virtual reality to control objects in the virtual environment in a direct and natural way, much as objects are manipulated in the real world. Direct manipulation provides many advantages for the exploration of complex, multi-dimensional data sets, by allowing the investigator the ability to intuitively explore the data environment. Because direct manipulation is essentially a control interface, it is better suited for the exploration and analysis of a data set than for the publishing or communication of features found in that data set. Thus direct manipulation is most relevant to the analysis of complex data that fills a volume of three-dimensional space, such as a fluid flow data set. Direct manipulation allows the intuitive exploration of that data, which facilitates the discovery of data features that would be difficult to find using more conventional visualization methods. Using a direct manipulation interface in virtual reality, an investigator can, for example, move a data probe about in space, watching the results and getting a sense of how the data varies within its spatial volume.