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Sample records for cta polymeric inclusion

  1. Architecture of Amylose Supramolecules in Form of Inclusion Complexes by Phosphorylase-Catalyzed Enzymatic Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Kadokawa, Jun-ichi

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the architecture of amylose supramolecules in form of inclusion complexes with synthetic polymers by phosphorylase-catalyzed enzymatic polymerization. Amylose is known to be synthesized by enzymatic polymerization using α-d-glucose 1-phosphate as a monomer, by phosphorylase catalysis. When the phosphorylase-catalyzed enzymatic polymerization was conducted in the presence of various hydrophobic polymers, such as polyethers, polyesters, poly(ester-ether), and polycarbonates as a guest polymer, such inclusion supramolecules were formed by the hydrophobic interaction in the progress of polymerization. Because the representation of propagation in the polymerization is similar to the way that a vine of a plant grows, twining around a rod, this polymerization method for the formation of amylose-polymer inclusion complexes was proposed to be named “vine-twining polymerization”. To yield an inclusion complex from a strongly hydrophobic polyester, the parallel enzymatic polymerization system was extensively developed. The author found that amylose selectively included one side of the guest polymer from a mixture of two resemblant guest polymers, as well as a specific range in molecular weights of the guest polymers poly(tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF) in the vine-twining polymerization. Selective inclusion behavior of amylose toward stereoisomers of chiral polyesters, poly(lactide)s, also appeared in the vine-twining polymerization. PMID:24970172

  2. Introducing the CTA concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, B. S.; Actis, M.; Aghajani, T.; Agnetta, G.; Aguilar, J.; Aharonian, F.; Ajello, M.; Akhperjanian, A.; Alcubierre, M.; Aleksić, J.; Alfaro, R.; Aliu, E.; Allafort, A. J.; Allan, D.; Allekotte, I.; Amato, E.; Anderson, J.; Angüner, E. O.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Aravantinos, A.; Arlen, T.; Armstrong, T.; Arnaldi, H.; Arrabito, L.; Asano, K.; Ashton, T.; Asorey, H. G.; Awane, Y.; Baba, H.; Babic, A.; Baby, N.; Bähr, J.; Bais, A.; Baixeras, C.; Bajtlik, S.; Balbo, M.; Balis, D.; Balkowski, C.; Bamba, A.; Bandiera, R.; Barber, A.; Barbier, C.; Barceló, M.; Barnacka, A.; Barnstedt, J.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Basili, A.; Basso, S.; Bastieri, D.; Bauer, C.; Baushev, A.; Becerra, J.; Becherini, Y.; Bechtol, K. C.; Becker Tjus, J.; Beckmann, V.; Bednarek, W.; Behera, B.; Belluso, M.; Benbow, W.; Berdugo, J.; Berger, K.; Bernard, F.; Bernardino, T.; Bernlöhr, K.; Bhat, N.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Biland, A.; Billotta, S.; Bird, T.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Bitossi, M.; Blake, S.; Blanch Bigas, O.; Blasi, P.; Bobkov, A.; Boccone, V.; Boettcher, M.; Bogacz, L.; Bogart, J.; Bogdan, M.; Boisson, C.; Boix Gargallo, J.; Bolmont, J.; Bonanno, G.; Bonardi, A.; Bonev, T.; Bonifacio, P.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borgland, A.; Borkowski, J.; Bose, R.; Botner, O.; Bottani, A.; Bouchet, L.; Bourgeat, M.; Boutonnet, C.; Bouvier, A.; Brau-Nogué, S.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Briggs, M.; Bringmann, T.; Brook, P.; Brun, P.; Brunetti, L.; Buanes, T.; Buckley, J.; Buehler, R.; Bugaev, V.; Bulgarelli, A.; Bulik, T.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Byrum, K.; Cailles, M.; Cameron, R.; Camprecios, J.; Canestrari, R.; Cantu, S.; Capalbi, M.; Caraveo, P.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Carr, J.; Carton, P.-H.; Casanova, S.; Casiraghi, M.; Catalano, O.; Cavazzani, S.; Cazaux, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chabanne, E.; Chadwick, P.; Champion, C.; Chen, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiappetti, L.; Chikawa, M.; Chitnis, V. R.; Chollet, F.; Chudoba, J.; Cieślar, M.; Cillis, A.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colin, P.; Colome, J.; Colonges, S.; Compin, M.; Conconi, P.; Conforti, V.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Contreras, J. L.; Coppi, P.; Corona, P.; Corti, D.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Costantini, H.; Cotter, G.; Courty, B.; Couturier, S.; Covino, S.; Crimi, G.; Criswell, S. J.; Croston, J.; Cusumano, G.; Dafonseca, M.; Dale, O.; Daniel, M.; Darling, J.; Davids, I.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caprio, V.; De Frondat, F.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; de la Calle, I.; De La Vega, G. A.; de los Reyes Lopez, R.; De Lotto, B.; De Luca, A.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Naurois, M.; de Oliveira, Y.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; de Souza, V.; Decerprit, G.; Decock, G.; Deil, C.; Delagnes, E.; Deleglise, G.; Delgado, C.; Della Volpe, D.; Demange, P.; Depaola, G.; Dettlaff, A.; Di Paola, A.; Di Pierro, F.; Díaz, C.; Dick, J.; Dickherber, R.; Dickinson, H.; Diez-Blanco, V.; Digel, S.; Dimitrov, D.; Disset, G.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Doert, M.; Dohmke, M.; Domainko, W.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donat, A.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Dournaux, J.-L.; Drake, G.; Dravins, D.; Drury, L.; Dubois, F.; Dubois, R.; Dubus, G.; Dufour, C.; Dumas, D.; Dumm, J.; Durand, D.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Ebr, J.; Edy, E.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Einecke, S.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Elles, S.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Engelhaupt, D.; Enomoto, R.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Errando, M.; Etchegoyen, A.; Evans, P.; Falcone, A.; Fantinel, D.; Farakos, K.; Farnier, C.; Fasola, G.; Favill, B.; Fede, E.; Federici, S.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Ferenc, D.; Ferrando, P.; Fesquet, M.; Fiasson, A.; Fillin-Martino, E.; Fink, D.; Finley, C.; Finley, J. P.; Fiorini, M.; Firpo Curcoll, R.; Flores, H.; Florin, D.; Focke, W.; Föhr, C.; Fokitis, E.; Font, L.; Fontaine, G.; Fornasa, M.; Förster, A.; Fortson, L.; Fouque, N.; Franckowiak, A.; Fransson, C.; Fraser, G.; Frei, R.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Fresnillo, L.; Fruck, C.; Fujita, Y.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fukui, Y.; Funk, S.; Gäbele, W.; Gabici, S.; Gabriele, R.; Gadola, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gallant, Y.; Gámez-García, J.; García, B.; Garcia López, R.; Gardiol, D.; Garrido, D.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaug, M.; Gaweda, J.; Gebremedhin, L.; Geffroy, N.; Gerard, L.; Ghedina, A.; Ghigo, M.; Giannakaki, E.; Gianotti, F.; Giarrusso, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Gika, V.; Giommi, P.; Girard, N.; Giro, E.; Giuliani, A.; Glanzman, T.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Godinovic, N.; Golev, V.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gómez-Ortega, J.; Gonzalez, M. M.; González, A.; González, F.; González Muñoz, A.; Gothe, K. S.; Gougerot, M.; Graciani, R.; Grandi, P.; Grañena, F.; Granot, J.; Grasseau, G.; Gredig, R.; Green, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grégoire, T.; Grimm, O.; Grube, J.; Grudzinska, M.; Gruev, V.; Grünewald, S.; Grygorczuk, J.; Guarino, V.; Gunji, S.; Gyuk, G.; Hadasch, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a new observatory for very high-energy (VHE) gamma rays. CTA has ambitions science goals, for which it is necessary to achieve full-sky coverage, to improve the sensitivity by about an order of magnitude, to span about four decades of energy, from a few tens of GeV to above 100 TeV with enhanced angular and energy resolutions over existing VHE gamma-ray observatories. An international collaboration has formed with more than 1000 members from 27 countries in Europe, Asia, Africa and North and South America. In 2010 the CTA Consortium completed a Design Study and started a three-year Preparatory Phase which leads to production readiness of CTA in 2014. In this paper we introduce the science goals and the concept of CTA, and provide an overview of the project.

  3. Mirror development for CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, A.; Doro, M.; Brun, P.; Canestrari, R.; Chadwick, P.; Font, L.; Ghigo, M.; Lorenz, E.; Mariotti, M.; Michalowski, J.; Niemiec, J.; Pareschi, G.; Peyaud, B.; Seweryn, K.

    2009-08-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), currently in its early design phase, is a proposed new project for groundbased gamma-ray astronomy with at least 10 times higher sensitivity than current instruments. CTA is planned to consist of several tens of large Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) with a combined reflective surface of up to 10,000 m2. The challenge for the future CTA array is to develop lightweight and cost efficient mirrors with high production rates, good longterm durability and adequate optical properties. The technologies currently under investigation comprise different methods of carbon fibre/epoxy based substrates, sandwich concepts with cold-slumped surfaces made of thin float glass and different structural materials like aluminum honeycomb, glass foam or PU foam inside, and aluminum sandwich structures with either diamond milled surfaces or reflective foils. The current status of the mirror development for CTA will be summarized together with investigations on the improvement of the reflective surfaces and their protection against degradation.

  4. Characterization of inclusion complexes of organic ions with hydrophilic hosts by ion transfer voltammetry with solvent polymeric membranes.

    PubMed

    Olmos, José Manuel; Laborda, Eduardo; Ortuño, Joaquín Ángel; Molina, Ángela

    2017-03-01

    The quantitative characterization of inclusion complexes formed in aqueous phase between organic ions and hydrophilic hosts by ion-transfer voltammetry with solvent polymeric membrane ion sensors is studied, both in a theoretical and experimental way. Simple analytical solutions are presented for the determination of the binding constant of the complex from the variation with the host concentration of the electrochemical signal. These solutions are valid for any voltammetric technique and for solvent polymeric membrane ion sensors comprising one polarisable interface (1PI) and also, for the first time, two polarisable interfaces (2PIs). Suitable experimental conditions and data analysis procedures are discussed and applied to the study of the interactions of a common ionic liquid cation (1-octyl-3-metyl-imidazolium) and an ionisable drug (clomipramine) with two hydrophilic cyclodextrins: α-cyclodextrin and 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin. The experimental study is performed via square wave voltammetry with 2PIs and 1PI solvent polymeric membranes and in both cases the electrochemical experiments enable the detection of inclusion complexes and the determination of the corresponding binding constant.

  5. [Inclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luzader, Carolyn, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This special newsletter issue on inclusion of students with disabilities includes the following articles: "Inclusion: A Responsible Approach" (Harley A. Tomey, III); "Research Base Limited on Effects of Inclusion" (Thomas P. Lombardi); "Research Supports Inclusion for Physically Disabled--Vocational Ed Prevents Dropping…

  6. Inclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This theme journal issue focuses on current activities of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services which stress inclusion of students with disabilities in the mainstream. It begins with a message from the Assistant Secretary, Robert R. Davila which examines the full meaning of an "inclusive" education. Next, Barbara…

  7. Inclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This theme journal issue focuses on current activities of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services which stress inclusion of students with disabilities in the mainstream. It begins with a message from the Assistant Secretary, Robert R. Davila which examines the full meaning of an "inclusive" education. Next, Barbara…

  8. The CTA aims at the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Yaguna, Carlos E. E-mail: carlos.yaguna@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2016-02-01

    We show that the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) can realistically challenge the Inert Doublet Model, one of the simplest and best known models of dark matter. Specifically, the CTA may exclude its heavy regime up to dark matter masses of 800 GeV and probe a large fraction of the remaining viable parameter space at even higher masses. Two features of the Inert Doublet Model make it particularly suitable for CTA searches. First, the dark matter mass (in the heavy regime) must be larger than 500 GeV. Second, the dark matter annihilation cross section, σ v, is always larger than the thermal one, reaching values as high as 10{sup −25} cm{sup 3}s{sup −1}. This higher value of σv is the result of the unavoidable coannihilation effects that determine the relic density via thermal freeze-out in the early Universe. We find that with 100 hours of Galactic Center exposure, CTA's expected limit widely surpasses, even after the inclusion of systematic errors, current and projected bounds from Fermi-LAT and HESS on this model.

  9. Facile fabrication of narrowly-distributed polymeric micelles via host-guest inclusion complexation of hyperbranched polymers and cyclodextrin and its two-dimensional self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyi; Huang, Wei; Zhou, Yongfeng; Yan, Deyue

    2010-10-14

    A novel narrowly-distributed (ND) polymeric micelle obtained in combination with host-guest recognition and self-assembly is reported. First, the adamantyl-terminated hyperbranched poly[3-ethyl-3-(hydroxymethyl)oxetane] (HBPO-AD) was synthesized by esterification of hyperbranched poly[3-ethyl-3-(hydroxymethyl)oxetane] (HBPO) with 1-adamantanecarbonyl chloride. Then the ND polymeric core-shell micelles, with the hydrophobic HBPO-AD cores and hydrophilic beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD) shells, were prepared via host-guest inclusion complexation of HBPO-AD and β-CD. The resultant polymer micelles were well characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Interestingly, after annealing at a temperature above the glass transition temperature (T(g)) for a certain time, the polymeric micelles can further self-assemble and fuse into two-dimensional (2D) sheets. The TEM, SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterization validate that the sheets are formed through stacking and fusion of tightly packed nanoparticles. In addition, the formation mechanism of polymeric complex micelles and 2D sheets has also been discussed.

  10. RAFT microemulsion polymerization with surface-active chain transfer agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hedok, Ibrahim Adnan

    The work described in this dissertation focuses on enhancing the polymer nanoparticle synthesis using RAFT (reversible-addition fragmentation chain transfer) in microemulsion polymerization in order to achieve predetermined molecular weight with narrow molecular weight polydispersity. The hypothesis is that the use of an amphiphilic chain transfer agent (surface-active CTA) will confine the CTA to the surface of the particle and thermodynamically favor partitioning of the CTA between micelles and particles throughout the polymerization. Thus, the CTA diffusion from micelles to polymer particles would be minimized and the breadth of the CTA per particle distribution would remain low. We report the successful improved synthesis of poly(butyl acrylate), poly(ethyl acrylate), and poly(styrene) nanoparticles using the RAFT microemulsion polymerization with surface-active CTA. The polymerization kinetics, polymer characteristics and latex size experimental data are presented. The data analysis indicates that the CTA remains partitioned between the micelles and particles by the end of the polymerization, as expected. We also report the synthesis of well-defined core/shell poly(styrene)/poly(butyl acrylate) nanoparticle, having polydispersity index value of 1.1, using semi-continuous microemulsion polymerization with the surface-active CTA. The surface-active CTA restricts the polymerization growth to the surface of the particle, which facilitates the formation of a shell block co-polymers with each subsequent second monomer addition instead of discrete homopolymers. This synthesis method can be used to create a wide range of core/shell polymer nanoparticles with well-defined morphology, given the right feeding conditions.

  11. Synergies with CTA and VHE Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, W.

    2016-06-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a next-generation observatory for very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy. With one array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes each in the northern and southern hemispheres, CTA will provide full-sky coverage, enhance flux sensitivity by one order of magnitude compared to current instruments, cover gamma-ray energies from 20 GeV to 300 TeV, and provide angular resolution of a few arc-minutes across a multi-degree field of view. In the context of its Key Science Projects (KSPs), CTA will conduct a census of particle acceleration in the universe, with quarter-sky extragalactic, full-plane Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud surveys planned. Additional KSPs are focused on transients, acceleration up to PeV energies in our own galaxy, active galaxies, star-forming systems on a wide range of scales, and the Perseus cluster of galaxies. A major element of the programme is the search for dark matter, in particular the annihilation signature of WIMPs. Like for current-generation VHE instruments, CTA science will strongly rely upon multiwavelength observations of sources, with the X-ray domain playing a particularly crucial role. The presentation will briefly introduce CTA, summarize its science perspectives, and address the synergies with instruments in other wavebands.

  12. The Spanish contribution to the CTA Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio, J. A.; CTA Consortium

    2015-05-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project is an initiative to build the next generation ground- based Very High Energy gamma-ray instrument. It will serve as an open observatory to a wide astrophysics community and will provide a deep insight into the non-thermal high-energy universe. To achieve such goals, it will offer full-sky coverage (with Northern and Southern hemisphere sites), an improvement in sensitivity by about an order of magnitude, an enlarged span in energy (from a few tens of GeV to above 100 TeV), and enhanced angular and energy resolutions over existing VHE gamma-ray observatories. An international collaboration has formed with more than 1100 members from 28 countries all over the world. The Spanish High Energy Astrophysics community is deeply committed to CTA, with more than 70 scientists and technicians from 9 research groups currently involved in building prototypes for several CTA subsystems. This participation covers a wide list of items, both hardware- and software-related. The former includes telescope-level (camera electronics and mechanics and telescope undercarriage) and observatory- level (array optical calibration and atmospheric monitoring) elements. And the latter includes the design of the data pipelines and the scheduling for observational proposals. In this report, the status of the CTA project and the contribution of the Spanish community will be presented.

  13. Perspectives from CTA in relativistic astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Werner

    The Cherenkov telescope array (CTA) is a next-generation observatory for very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy. With one array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes each in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, CTA will provide full-sky coverage, enhance flux sensitivity by one order of magnitude compared to current instruments, cover gamma-ray energies from 20 GeV to 300 GeV, and provide a wide field of view with angular resolution of a few arc-minutes. Science themes to be addressed by the CTA observatory include (i) understanding the origin of relativistic cosmic particles, and the role these play in the evolution of star forming systems and galaxies, (ii) probing extreme environments such as neutron stars and black holes, but also the cosmic voids, and (iii) exploring frontiers in physics such as the nature of dark matter. With its superior performance, the prospects for CTA combine guaranteed science — the in-depth understanding of known objects and mechanisms — with anticipated detection of new classes of gamma-ray emitters and new phenomena, and a very significant potential for fundamentally new discoveries.

  14. Artificial intelligence for the CTA Observatory scheduler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomé, Josep; Colomer, Pau; Campreciós, Jordi; Coiffard, Thierry; de Oña, Emma; Pedaletti, Giovanna; Torres, Diego F.; Garcia-Piquer, Alvaro

    2014-08-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project will be the next generation ground-based very high energy gamma-ray instrument. The success of the precursor projects (i.e., HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) motivated the construction of this large infrastructure that is included in the roadmap of the ESFRI projects since 2008. CTA is planned to start the construction phase in 2015 and will consist of two arrays of Cherenkov telescopes operated as a proposal-driven open observatory. Two sites are foreseen at the southern and northern hemispheres. The CTA observatory will handle several observation modes and will have to operate tens of telescopes with a highly efficient and reliable control. Thus, the CTA planning tool is a key element in the control layer for the optimization of the observatory time. The main purpose of the scheduler for CTA is the allocation of multiple tasks to one single array or to multiple sub-arrays of telescopes, while maximizing the scientific return of the facility and minimizing the operational costs. The scheduler considers long- and short-term varying conditions to optimize the prioritization of tasks. A short-term scheduler provides the system with the capability to adapt, in almost real-time, the selected task to the varying execution constraints (i.e., Targets of Opportunity, health or status of the system components, environment conditions). The scheduling procedure ensures that long-term planning decisions are correctly transferred to the short-term prioritization process for a suitable selection of the next task to execute on the array. In this contribution we present the constraints to CTA task scheduling that helped classifying it as a Flexible Job-Shop Problem case and finding its optimal solution based on Artificial Intelligence techniques. We describe the scheduler prototype that uses a Guarded Discrete Stochastic Neural Network (GDSN), for an easy representation of the possible long- and short-term planning solutions, and Constraint

  15. Effect of inclusion size on failure mechanism and mechanical properties of polymeric composites containing micro and nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jeong-Min

    The effect of particle size on the mechanical properties of polymeric composites was investigated experimentally and numerically. It was found from experiments that particle sizes at micro scale have little influence on the Young's modulus of the composite and that Young's modulus increases as the size of particles decreases at nano scale. It was also observed that tensile strength of the composite is significantly dependent on particle size. At 1 vol.% loading, the tensile strength increased as the particle size decreased. However, the trend for the composite with alumina nanoparticles of 3% volume fraction was found to be opposite. TEM and SEM micrographs showed higher likelihood of poor dispersions in the composite with 3 vol.% nanoparticles than that with 1 vol.%. Finite element analyses showed that total strain energy release rate for particle/matrix debonding growth decreases as particle size decreases and that sliding fracture mode becomes dominant as the debonding grows. It was found that interfacial fracture toughness does not depend on particle size in micron scale but increases substantially when the sliding fracture mode prevails. It was analyzed with molecular dynamics simulations that the Young's modulus enhancement by decrease of nanoparticle size may be attributed to stiff polymer layers around nanoparticles. It was also found that the stiff polymer layers around nanoparticle are more effective on improving the elastic modulus with smaller nanoparticles and stronger polymer-nanoparticle interactions.

  16. Multiband VLBI Observations of CTA102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rantakyro, F. T.; Baath, L. B.; Dallacasa, D.; Jones, D. L.; Wehrle, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    The source CTA102, known to exhibit low frequency variability, has been observed at six epochs (three at lambda 32 cm, two at lambda 18 cm, and one at lambda l.3 cm) with intercontinental VLBI arrays. On the basis of the changes observed in the structure, we believe that the flux density variations at these wavelengths are due to intrinsic processes and not due to interstellar scintillation. This source exhibits behaviour suggestive of being expanding with a very high apparent transverse velocity.

  17. Multiband VLBI Observations of CTA102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rantakyro, F. T.; Baath, L. B.; Dallacasa, D.; Jones, D. L.; Wehrle, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    The source CTA102, known to exhibit low frequency variability, has been observed at six epochs (three at lambda 32 cm, two at lambda 18 cm, and one at lambda l.3 cm) with intercontinental VLBI arrays. On the basis of the changes observed in the structure, we believe that the flux density variations at these wavelengths are due to intrinsic processes and not due to interstellar scintillation. This source exhibits behaviour suggestive of being expanding with a very high apparent transverse velocity.

  18. Enhanced oral bioavailability and anticancer efficacy of fisetin by encapsulating as inclusion complex with HPβCD in polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kadari, Amrita; Gudem, Sagarika; Kulhari, Hitesh; Bhandi, Murali Mohan; Borkar, Roshan M; Kolapalli, Venkata Ramana Murthy; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2017-11-01

    Fisetin (FST), a potent anticancer phytoconstituent, exhibits poor aqueous solubility and hence poor bioavailability. The aim of the present study is to improve the oral bioavailability of FST by encapsulating into PLGA NPs (poly-lactide-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles) as a complex of HPβCD (hydroxyl propyl beta cyclodextrin) and to assess its anti-cancer activity against breast cancer cells. FST-HPβCD inclusion complex (FHIC) was prepared and the supramolecular complex formation was characterized by FTIR, DSC, PXRD and (1)H NMR. FHIC encapsulated PLGA nanoparticles (FHIC-PNP) were prepared and were studied for in vitro anticancer activity, cellular uptake, apoptosis and reactive oxygen species generation in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Comparative bioavailability of FST was determined after oral administration in C57BL6 mice as pure FST and FHIC-PNP. The results revealed that FHIC-PNP not only enhanced the anti-cancer activity and apoptosis of FST against MCF-7 cells but also improved its oral bioavailability, as demonstrated by increased peak plasma concentration and total drug absorbed.

  19. A fast optical outburst of the quasar CTA102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorstad, Svetlana; Larionov, Valeri; Mokrushina, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The quasar CTA102 is being in an active state at gamma-ray and optical wavelengths since 2015, with prominent gamma-ray and optical outbursts observed in the beginning of 2016 (see www.bu.edu/blazars/VLBA_GLAST/cta102.html).

  20. Intracranial aneurysm growth quantification in CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzian, Azadeh; Manniesing, Rashindra; Metz, Coert T.; Klein, Stefan; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; van der Lugt, Aad; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2012-02-01

    Next to aneurysm size, aneurysm growth over time is an important indicator for aneurysm rupture risk. Manual assessment of aneurysm growth is a cumbersome procedure, prone to inter-observer and intra-observer variability. In clinical practice, mainly qualitative assessment and/or diameter measurement are routinely performed. In this paper a semi-automated method for quantifying aneurysm volume growth over time in CTA data is presented. The method treats a series of longitudinal images as a 4D dataset. Using a 4D groupwise non-rigid registration method, deformations with respect to the baseline scan are determined. Combined with 3D aneurysm segmentation in the baseline scan, volume change is assessed using the deformation field at the aneurysm wall. For ten patients, the results of the method are compared with reports from expert clinicians, showing that the quantitative results of the method are in line with the assessment in the radiology reports. The method is also compared to an alternative method in which the volume is segmented in each 3D scan individually, showing that the 4D groupwise registration method agrees better with manual assessment.

  1. All Sky Camera for the CTA Atmospheric Calibration work package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandat, Dusan; Pech, Miroslav; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Schovanek, Petr; Palatka, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Travnicek, Petr; Janecek, Petr; Ebr, Jan; Doro, Michele; Gaug, Markus

    2015-03-01

    The All Sky Camera (ASC) is a passive non-invasive imaging system for rapid night sky atmosphere monitoring. By design, the operation of the ASC will not affect the measurement procedure of the CTA observatory, for which we discuss its application in this report. The data collected should enable improved productivity and increased measurement time for the CTA observatory. The goal of ASC is to identify cloud position, atmosphere attenuation and time evolution of the sky condition, working within the CTA Central Calibration Facilities (CCF) group. Clouds and atmosphere monitoring may allow near-future prediction of the night-sky quality, helping scheduling. Also, in the case of partly cloudy night sky the cameras will identify the uncovered regions of the sky during the operation time, and define potential observable sources that can be measured. By doing so, a higher productivity of the CTA observatory measurements may be possible.

  2. Management of Coronary Artery Calcium and Coronary CTA Findings.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dustin M; Divakaran, Sanjay; Villines, Todd C; Nasir, Khurram; Shah, Nishant R; Slim, Ahmad M; Blankstein, Ron; Cheezum, Michael K

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC) testing and coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) have significant data supporting their ability to identify coronary artery disease (CAD) and classify patient risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Evidence regarding CAC use for screening has established an excellent prognosis in patients with no detectable CAC, and the ability to risk re-classify the majority of asymptomatic patients considered intermediate risk by traditional risk scores. While data regarding the ideal management of CAC findings are limited, evidence supports statin consideration in patients with CAC > 0 and individualized aspirin therapy accounting for CAD risk factors, CAC severity, and factors which increase a patient's risk of bleeding. In patients with stable or acute symptoms undergoing coronary CTA, a normal CTA predicts excellent prognosis, allowing reassurance and disposition without further testing. When CTA identifies nonobstructive CAD (<50 % stenosis), observational data support consideration of statin use/intensification in patients with extensive plaque (at least four coronary segments involved) and patients with high-risk plaque features. In patients with both nonobstructive and obstructive CAD, multiple studies have now demonstrated an ability of CTA to guide management and improve CAD risk factor control. Still, significant under-treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and high-risk image findings remain, among concerns that CTA may increase invasive angiography and revascularization. To fully realize the impact of atherosclerosis imaging for ASCVD prevention, patient engagement in lifestyle changes and the modification of ASCVD risk factors remain the foundation of care. This review provides an overview of available data and recommendations in the management of CAC and CTA findings.

  3. CTA simulations with CORSIKA/sim lowbar telarray

    SciTech Connect

    Bernloehr, K.

    2008-12-24

    While current atmospheric Cherenkov installations consist of only a few telescopes each, future installations will be far more complex. Monte Carlo simulations have become an essential tool for the design and optimisation of such installations. The CORSIKA air-shower simulation code and the sim lowbar telarray code for simulation of arrays of Cherenkov telescopes have been used to simulate several candidate configurations of the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) in detail. Together with other detailed and simplified simulations the resulting data provide the basis for the ongoing optimisation of CTA over a wide energy range. In this paper, the simulation methods are outlined and preliminary results on a number of configurations are presented. It is demonstrated that the initial goals of the CTA project can be achieved with available technology, at least in the medium and high energy range (about 100 GeV to 100 TeV)

  4. Automatic aortic root segmentation in CTA whole-body dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinpei; Kitslaar, Pieter H.; Scholte, Arthur J. H. A.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Reiber, Johan H. C.

    2016-03-01

    Trans-catheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an evolving technique for patients with serious aortic stenosis disease. Typically, in this application a CTA data set is obtained of the patient's arterial system from the subclavian artery to the femoral arteries, to evaluate the quality of the vascular access route and analyze the aortic root to determine if and which prosthesis should be used. In this paper, we concentrate on the automated segmentation of the aortic root. The purpose of this study was to automatically segment the aortic root in computed tomography angiography (CTA) datasets to support TAVR procedures. The method in this study includes 4 major steps. First, the patient's cardiac CTA image was resampled to reduce the computation time. Next, the cardiac CTA image was segmented using an atlas-based approach. The most similar atlas was selected from a total of 8 atlases based on its image similarity to the input CTA image. Third, the aortic root segmentation from the previous step was transferred to the patient's whole-body CTA image by affine registration and refined in the fourth step using a deformable subdivision surface model fitting procedure based on image intensity. The pipeline was applied to 20 patients. The ground truth was created by an analyst who semi-automatically corrected the contours of the automatic method, where necessary. The average Dice similarity index between the segmentations of the automatic method and the ground truth was found to be 0.965±0.024. In conclusion, the current results are very promising.

  5. The ASTRI/CTA mini-array software system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosti, Gino; Schwarz, Joseph; Antonelli, Lucio Angelo; Trifoglio, Massimo; Catalano, Osvaldo; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Leto, Giuseppe; Gianotti, Fulvio; Canestrari, Rodolfo; Giro, Enrico; Fiorini, Mauro; La Palombara, Nicola; Pareschi, Giovanni; Stringhetti, Luca; Vercellone, Stefano; Conforti, Vito; Tanci, Claudio; Bruno, Pietro; Grillo, Alessandro; Testa, Vincenzo; di Paola, Andrea; Gallozzi, Stefano

    2014-07-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is a Flagship Project financed by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research, and led by INAF, the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics. The main goals of the ASTRI project are the realization of an end-to-end prototype of a Small Size Telescope (SST) for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) in a dual- mirror configuration (SST-2M) and, subsequently, of a mini-array comprising seven SST-2M telescopes. The mini-array will be placed at the final CTA Southern Site, which will be part of the CTA seed array, around which the whole CTA observatory will be developed. The Mini-Array Software System (MASS) will provide a comprehensive set of tools to prepare an observing proposal, to perform the observations specified therein (monitoring and controlling all the hardware components of each telescope), to analyze the acquired data online and to store/retrieve all the data products to/from the archive. Here we present the main features of the MASS and its first version, to be tested on the ASTRI SST-2M prototype that will be installed at the INAF observing station located at Serra La Nave on Mount Etna in Sicily.

  6. Application of the DIRAC framework to CTA: first evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrabito, L.; Barbier, C.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Khélifi, B.; Komin, N.; Lamanna, G.; Lavalley, C.; Le Flour, T.; Lenain, Jp; Lorca, A.; Renaud, M.; Sterzel, M.; Szepieniec, T.; Vasileiadis, G.; Vuerli, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) - an array of several tens of Cherenkov telescopes - is the next generation of ground-based instrument in the field of very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. The CTA observatory is expected to produce a main data stream for permanent storage of the order of 1-to-5 GB/s for about 1000 hours of observation per year, thus producing a total data volume of the order of several PB per year. The CPU time needed to calibrate and process one hour of data taking will be of the order of some thousands CPU hours with current technology. The high data rate of CTA, together with the large computing power requirements for Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, need dedicated computing resources. Massive MC simulations are needed to study the physics of cosmic-ray atmospheric showers as well as telescope response and performance for different detectors and layout configurations. Given these large storage and computing requirements, the Grid approach is well suited, and a vast number of MC simulations are already running on the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI). In order to optimize resource usage and to handle all production and future analysis activities in a coherent way, a high-level framework with advanced functionalities is desirable. For this purpose we have preliminarly evaluated the DIRAC framework for distributed computing and tested it for the CTA workload and data management systems. In this paper we present a possible implementation of a Distributed Computing Infrastructure (DCI) Computing Model for CTA as well as the benchmark test results of DIRAC.

  7. Polymeric microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Walt, David R.; Mandal, Tarun K.; Fleming, Michael S.

    2004-04-13

    The invention features core-shell microsphere compositions, hollow polymeric microspheres, and methods for making the microspheres. The microspheres are characterized as having a polymeric shell with consistent shell thickness.

  8. Comparison of image quality and arterial enhancement with a dedicated coronary CTA protocol versus a triple rule-out coronary CTA protocol.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Ethan J; Levin, David C; Zhang, Shaoxiong; Takakuwa, Kevin M

    2009-09-01

    To compare the image quality of dedicated coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) to that of triple rule-out (TRO) CTA designed to evaluate the coronary arteries, thoracic aorta, and pulmonary arteries. Consecutive cCTA examinations performed by a single radiologist over 1 year were reviewed. Biphasic injection protocols were employed: 70 mL of optiray-350 followed by 40 mL of saline injected at 5.5 mL/second for dedicated cCTA; 70 mL of optiray-350 followed by 25 mL of the contrast diluted with 25 mL of saline injected at 5.0 mL/second for TRO-CTA. Two independent cardiovascular radiologists reviewed the coronary vessels in each case and rated diagnostic image quality on a 5 point scale (1, suboptimal; 3, adequate; 5, excellent). Vascular enhancement was measured in the coronary arteries, aorta, and pulmonary arteries. There was excellent interobserver agreement between the cardiovascular radiologists (kappa = 0.91). Coronary image quality score were similar among 260 dedicated cCTA studies and 168 TRO-CTA studies (mean: 3.8-3.9. P > .18). At least one coronary segment demonstrated suboptimal image quality in 8% of examinations, including 18 dedicated cCTA studies and 16 TRO studies (P = .94). Enhancement was greater in the distal thoracic aorta of TRO patients (336 vs. 311 Hounsfield units; P = .01); no other significant differences in enhancement were identified in the aorta and coronary arteries of dedicated cCTA and TRO studies. Vascular enhancement was adequate for diagnostic evaluation of the pulmonary arteries in all TRO studies. A TRO-CTA protocol using 95 mL of contrast can provide comparable coronary image quality and coronary vascular enhancement as compared to dedicated cCTA with 70 mL of contrast.

  9. Advanced analysis and event reconstruction for the CTA Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becherini, Y.; Khélifi, B.; Pita, S.; Punch, M.; CTA Consortium

    2012-12-01

    The planned Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a future observatory for very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy composed of one site per hemisphere [1]. It aims at 10 times better sensitivity, a better angular resolution and wider energy coverage than current installations such as H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. In order to achieve this level of performance, both the design of the telescopes and the analysis algorithms are being studied and optimized within the CTA Monte-Carlo working group. Here, we present ongoing work on the data analysis for both the event reconstruction (energy, direction) and gamma/hadron separation, carried out within the HAP (H.E.S.S. Analysis Package) software framework of the H.E.S.S. collaboration, for this initial study. The event reconstruction uses both Hillas-parameter-based algorithms and an improved version of the 3D-Model algorithm [2]. For the gamma/hadron discrimination, original and robust discriminant variables are used and treated with Boosted Decision Trees (BDTs) in the TMVA [3] (Toolkit for Multivariate Data Analysis) framework. With this advanced analysis, known as Paris-MVA [4], the sensitivity is improved by a factor of ~ 2 in the core range of CTA relative to the standard analyses. Here we present the algorithms used for the reconstruction and discrimination, together with the resulting performance characteristics, with good confidence, since the method has been successfully applied for H.E.S.S.

  10. Catalytic living ring-opening metathesis polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkar, Amit A.; Kilbinger, Andreas F. M.

    2015-09-01

    In living ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP), a transition-metal-carbene complex polymerizes ring-strained olefins with very good control of the molecular weight of the resulting polymers. Because one molecule of the initiator is required for each polymer chain, however, this type of polymerization is expensive for widespread use. We have now designed a chain-transfer agent (CTA) capable of reducing the required amount of metal complex while still maintaining full control over the living polymerization process. This new method introduces a degenerative transfer process to ROMP. We demonstrate that substituted cyclohexene rings are good CTAs, and thereby preserve the ‘living’ character of the polymerization using catalytic quantities of the metal complex. The resulting polymers show characteristics of a living polymerization, namely narrow molecular-weight distribution, controlled molecular weights and block copolymer formation. This new technique provides access to well-defined polymers for industrial, biomedical and academic use at a fraction of the current costs and significantly reduced levels of residual ruthenium catalyst.

  11. Radical polymerization by a supramolecular catalyst: cyclodextrin with a RAFT reagent

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Kohei; Takashima, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Supramolecular catalysts have received a great deal of attention because they improve the selectivity and efficiency of reactions. Catalysts with host molecules exhibit specific reaction properties and recognize substrates via host–guest interactions. Here, we examined radical polymerization reactions with a chain transfer agent (CTA) that has α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) as a host molecule (α-CD-CTA). Prior to the polymerization of N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMA), we investigated the complex formation of α-CD with DMA. Single X-ray analysis demonstrated that α-CD includes DMA inside its cavity. When DMA was polymerized in the presence of α-CD-CTA using 2,2'-azobis[2-(2-imidazolin-2-yl)propane dihydrochloride (VA-044) as an initiator in an aqueous solution, poly(DMA) was obtained in good yield and with narrow molecular weight distribution. In contrast, the polymerization of DMA without α-CD-CTA produced more widely distributed polymers. In the presence of 1,6-hexanediol (C6 diol) which works as a competitive molecule by being included in the α-CD cavity, the reaction yield was lower than that without C6 diol. PMID:28144318

  12. Persistent expression of methamphetamine-induced CTA in periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Harrod, Steven B; Lacy, Ryan T; Ballina, Lauren E

    2010-10-01

    It is well documented that the transition from periadolescence to adulthood produces profound changes in motivated behavior, and furthermore, attenuates the aversive experience of abused drugs. Little is known, however, about adolescent memory for the conditioned aversive effects of abused drugs following retention intervals that span this developmental transition. The present experiment investigated methamphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in periadolescent rats to determine if the magnitude of conditioning was altered following retention intervals that extend to adulthood. Rats consumed saccharin (0.1%, w/v) and were immediately injected with saline or methamphetamine (3.0mg/kg) either once (PND 40) or three times (PND 38-40), and memory was assessed one or 50 days later on post natal days 41 or 90, respectively. Rats exhibited robust methamphetamine-induced CTA one and 50 days after conditioning, and the strength of responding did not change as a function of retention interval, regardless if animals were trained with one or three saccharin-methamphetamine pairings. These findings indicate that the expression of memory for the aversive effects of methamphetamine was resistant to degradation throughout the developmental period of periadolescence to adulthood. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Inclusive Classroom: How Inclusive Is Inclusion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Claudette M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the position that inclusion is limited; inclusion does not go far enough. The inclusive classroom has been assessed to be of benefit both to the teacher and student. There are, however, limits set on inclusion. In most classrooms only children with learning disability are included omitting those with severe disabilities,…

  14. 17 CFR Appendix C to Part 4 - Form CTA-PR

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Form CTA-PR C Appendix C to Part 4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS Pt. 4, App. C Appendix C to Part 4—Form CTA-PR ER24FE12.052...

  15. 17 CFR Appendix C to Part 4 - Form CTA-PR

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Form CTA-PR C Appendix C to Part 4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS Pt. 4, App. C Appendix C to Part 4—Form CTA-PR ER24FE12.052...

  16. 17 CFR Appendix C to Part 4 - Form CTA-PR

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Form CTA-PR C Appendix C to Part 4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COMMODITY POOL OPERATORS AND COMMODITY TRADING ADVISORS Pt. 4, App. C Appendix C to Part 4—Form CTA-PR ER24FE12.052...

  17. Design and Use of Collaborative Network Learning Scenarios: The DoCTA Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasson, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    In the Norwegian DoCTA and DoCTA NSS projects, we aimed to bring a theoretical perspective to the design of ICT-mediated learning environments that support the sociocultural aspects of human interaction and to evaluate their use. By taking a sociocultural perspective on learning activity focussing on the interpersonal social interaction in…

  18. Tools of the trade for CTA: MDCT scanners and contrast medium injection protocols.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Richard L; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2006-12-01

    The introduction of multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) scanners in 1998 ushered in new advances in CT angiography (CTA). The subsequent expansion of MDCT scanner capabilities, coupled with advances in understanding of contrast medium (CM) dynamics, has further improved the clinical availability and consistency of CTA. We will review recent advances in CT scanner technology and discuss early CM dynamics. Specifically, we describe an approach tailored to the available scanner technology and to patient size aimed at providing consistently robust CTA studies across all vascular territories. A rational method to design combined CTA scan/injection protocols to facilitate this goal will be described. Our current experience with a simplified protocol for CTA with 64-MDCT will also be explained.

  19. Extragalactic photon-ALP conversion at CTA energies

    DOE PAGES

    Kartavtsev, A.; Raffelt, G.; Vogel, H.

    2017-01-12

    Magnetic fields in extragalactic space between galaxy clusters may induce conversions between photons and axion-like particles (ALPs), thereby shielding the photons from absorption on the extragalactic background light. For TeV gamma rays, the oscillation length (losc) of the photon-ALP system becomes inevitably of the same order as the coherence length of the magnetic field l and the length over which the field changes significantly (transition length lt) due to refraction on background photons. We derive exact statistical evolution equations for the mean and variance of the photon and ALP transfer functions in the non-adiabatic regime (losc ~ l >> lt).more » We also make analytical predictions for the transfer functions in the quasi-adiabatic regime (losc CTA), and may also be applied to models with non-zero ALP masses.« less

  20. Extragalactic photon-ALP conversion at CTA energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavtsev, A.; Raffelt, G.; Vogel, H.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields in extragalactic space between galaxy clusters may induce conversions between photons and axion-like particles (ALPs), thereby shielding the photons from absorption on the extragalactic background light. For TeV gamma rays, the oscillation length (losc) of the photon-ALP system becomes inevitably of the same order as the coherence length of the magnetic field l and the length over which the field changes significantly (transition length lt) due to refraction on background photons. We derive exact statistical evolution equations for the mean and variance of the photon and ALP transfer functions in the non-adiabatic regime (losc ~ l gg lt). We also make analytical predictions for the transfer functions in the quasi-adiabatic regime (losc ll l, lt). Our results are important in light of the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), and may also be applied to models with non-zero ALP masses.

  1. A proposal of Texture Features for interactive CTA Segmentation by Active Learning.

    PubMed

    Maiora, J; Papakostas, G A; Kaburlasos, V G; Grana, M

    2014-01-01

    Our objective is to create an interactive image segmentation system of the abdominal area for quick volumetric segmentation of the aorta requiring minimal intervention of the human operator. The aforementioned goal is to be achieved by an Active Learning image segmentation system over enhanced image texture features, obtained from the standard Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and the Local Binary Patterns (LBP). The process iterates the following steps: first, image segmentation is produced by a Random Forest (RF) classifier trained on a set of image texture features for labeled voxels. The human operator is presented with the most uncertain unlabeled voxels to select some of them for inclusion in the training set, retraining the RF classifier. The approach will be applied to the segmentation of the thrombus in Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) data of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) patients. A priori knowledge on the expected shape of the target structures is used to filter out undesired detections. On going preliminary experiments on datasets containing diverse number of CT slices (between 216 and 560), each one consisting a real human contrast-enhanced sample of the abdominal area, are underway. The segmentation results obtained with simple image features were promising and highlight the capacity of the used texture features to describe the local variation of the AAA thrombus and thus to provide useful information to the classifier.

  2. Polymeric nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bolhassani, Azam; Javanzad, Shabnam; Saleh, Tayebeh; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Sadat, Seyed Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Nanocarriers with various compositions and biological properties have been extensively applied for in vitro/in vivo drug and gene delivery. The family of nanocarriers includes polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based carriers (liposomes/micelles), dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, and gold nanoparticles (nanoshells/nanocages). Among different delivery systems, polymeric carriers have several properties such as: easy to synthesize, inexpensive, biocompatible, biodegradable, non-immunogenic, non-toxic, and water soluble. In addition, cationic polymers seem to produce more stable complexes led to a more protection during cellular trafficking than cationic lipids. Nanoparticles often show significant adjuvant effects in vaccine delivery since they may be easily taken up by antigen presenting cells (APCs). Natural polymers such as polysaccharides and synthetic polymers have demonstrated great potential to form vaccine nanoparticles. The development of new adjuvants or delivery systems for DNA and protein immunization is an expanding research field. This review describes polymeric carriers especially PLGA, chitosan, and PEI as vaccine delivery systems. PMID:24128651

  3. 3D/3D registration of coronary CTA and biplane XA reconstructions for improved image guidance.

    PubMed

    Dibildox, Gerardo; Baka, Nora; Punt, Mark; Aben, Jean-Paul; Schultz, Carl; Niessen, Wiro; van Walsum, Theo

    2014-09-01

    The authors aim to improve image guidance during percutaneous coronary interventions of chronic total occlusions (CTO) by providing information obtained from computed tomography angiography (CTA) to the cardiac interventionist. To this end, the authors investigate a method to register a 3D CTA model to biplane reconstructions. The authors developed a method for registering preoperative coronary CTA with intraoperative biplane x-ray angiography (XA) images via 3D models of the coronary arteries. The models are extracted from the CTA and biplane XA images, and are temporally aligned based on CTA reconstruction phase and XA ECG signals. Rigid spatial alignment is achieved with a robust probabilistic point set registration approach using Gaussian mixture models (GMMs). This approach is extended by including orientation in the Gaussian mixtures and by weighting bifurcation points. The method is evaluated on retrospectively acquired coronary CTA datasets of 23 CTO patients for which biplane XA images are available. The Gaussian mixture model approach achieved a median registration accuracy of 1.7 mm. The extended GMM approach including orientation was not significantly different (P>0.1) but did improve robustness with regards to the initialization of the 3D models. The authors demonstrated that the GMM approach can effectively be applied to register CTA to biplane XA images for the purpose of improving image guidance in percutaneous coronary interventions.

  4. 3D/3D registration of coronary CTA and biplane XA reconstructions for improved image guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Dibildox, Gerardo Baka, Nora; Walsum, Theo van; Punt, Mark; Aben, Jean-Paul; Schultz, Carl; Niessen, Wiro

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The authors aim to improve image guidance during percutaneous coronary interventions of chronic total occlusions (CTO) by providing information obtained from computed tomography angiography (CTA) to the cardiac interventionist. To this end, the authors investigate a method to register a 3D CTA model to biplane reconstructions. Methods: The authors developed a method for registering preoperative coronary CTA with intraoperative biplane x-ray angiography (XA) images via 3D models of the coronary arteries. The models are extracted from the CTA and biplane XA images, and are temporally aligned based on CTA reconstruction phase and XA ECG signals. Rigid spatial alignment is achieved with a robust probabilistic point set registration approach using Gaussian mixture models (GMMs). This approach is extended by including orientation in the Gaussian mixtures and by weighting bifurcation points. The method is evaluated on retrospectively acquired coronary CTA datasets of 23 CTO patients for which biplane XA images are available. Results: The Gaussian mixture model approach achieved a median registration accuracy of 1.7 mm. The extended GMM approach including orientation was not significantly different (P > 0.1) but did improve robustness with regards to the initialization of the 3D models. Conclusions: The authors demonstrated that the GMM approach can effectively be applied to register CTA to biplane XA images for the purpose of improving image guidance in percutaneous coronary interventions.

  5. CTA1: Purified and display onto gram-positive enhancer matrix (GEM) particles as mucosal adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanpeng; Yu, Xiaoming; Hou, Liting; Chen, Jin; Li, Pengcheng; Qiao, Xuwen; Zheng, Qisheng; Hou, Jibo

    2017-09-01

    The A1 subunit of cholera toxin (CTA1) retains the adjuvant function of CT, without its toxic side effects, making the molecule a promising mucosal adjuvant. However, the methods required to obtain a pure product are both complicated and expensive, constricting its potential commercial applicability. Here, we fused the peptidoglycan binding domain (PA) to the C-terminus of CTA1, which enabled the fusion protein to be expressed by Bacillus subtilis, and secreted into the culture medium. CTA1 was then purified and displayed on GEM particles using a one step process, which resulted in the formation of CTA1-GEM complexes. Next, the CTA1-GEM complexes were used as an adjuvant to enhance the immune responses of mice to the influenza subunit vaccine. It was observed that the CTA1-GEM complexes enhanced specific systemic (IgG) and mucosal (IgA) immune responses against antigen, and induced cellular immune responses as well. The data presented here suggests that CTA1-GEM complexes can serve as a viable mucosal adjuvant. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Adsorption of the harmful hormone ethinyl estradiol inside hydrophobic cavities of CTA(+) intercalated montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Burgos, A E; Ribeiro-Santos, Tatiana A; Lago, Rochel M

    Hydrophobic cavities produced by cetyltrimethylammonium cation (CTA(+)) exchanged and trapped in the interlayer space of montmorillonite were used to remove the harmful hormone contaminant ethinyl estradiol (EE2) from water. X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry, elemental analysis (carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen), Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and contact angle analyses showed that the intercalation of 9, 16 and 34 wt% CTA(+) in the montmorillonite resulted in the d001 expansion from 1.37 to 1.58, 2.09 and 2.18 nm, respectively. EE2 adsorption experiments showed that the original clay montmorillonite does not remove EE2 from water whereas the intercalated composites showed high efficiency with adsorption capacities of 4.3, 8.8 and 7.3 mg g(-1) for M9CTA(+), M16CTA(+) and M34CTA(+), respectively. Moreover, experiments with montmorillonite simply impregnated with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide showed that the intercalation of CTA(+) to form the hydrophobic cavity is very important for the adsorption properties. Simple solvent extraction can be used to remove the adsorbed EE2 without significant loss of CTA(+), which allows the recovery and reuse of the adsorbent for at least five times.

  7. Kunststoffe (Polymere)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weißbach, Wolfgang

    Polymere bestehen aus Riesen- oder Makromolekülen, die durch chemische Reaktionen aus einfachen, niedermolekularen Verbindungen entstehen, den Monomeren. Ausgangsstoffe sind überwiegend Kohlenwasserstoffe (KW), die größte Gruppe der C-Verbindungen. Sie müssen reaktionsfähige Stellen besitzen, das sind OH-Gruppen oder Dopppelbindungen.

  8. Reversible Addition Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) Polymerization of 4-Vinylbenzaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guorong; Cheng, Chong; Wooley, Karen L.

    2008-01-01

    The direct reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of 4-vinylbenzaldehyde (VBA) was established as a new synthetic method for the preparation of well-defined poly(vinylbenzaldehyde) (PVBA), a polymer having reactive aldehyde side chain substiuents. RAFT polymerization of VBA was investigated using S-1-dodecyl-S’-(α,α’-dimethyl-α”-acetic acid)trithiocarbonate (DDMAT) as chain transfer agent (CTA) and 2,2′-azobis(isobutyronitrile) (AIBN) as initiator in 1,4-dioxane or 2-butanone at 70-75 °C for 7.5-22.5 h. With 45-76% of monomer conversion, the resulting PVBA had well controlled number-average molecular weight (Mn) and low polydispersity (PDI < 1.17). The living characteristic of the RAFT polymerization process was confirmed by the linearity between the Mn values of PVBA and monomer conversions. Well-defined PVBA was further used as a macromolecular chain transfer agent (macro-CTA) in RAFT polymerization of styrene (St), and a block copolymer PVBA-b-PSt with relatively low polydispersity (PDI = 1.20) was successfully synthesized. PMID:19066633

  9. The next generation Cherenkov Telescope Array observatory: CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercellone, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a large collaborative effort aimed at the design and operation of an observatory dedicated to the very high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics in the energy range 30 GeV-100 TeV, which will improve by about one order of magnitude the sensitivity with respect to the current major arrays (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS). In order to achieve such improved performance, for both the northern and southern CTA sites, four units of 23 m diameter Large Size Telescopes (LSTs) will be deployed close to the centre of the array with telescopes separated by about 100 m. A larger number (about 25 units) of 12 m Medium Size Telescopes (MSTs, separated by about 150 m), will cover a larger area. The southern site will also include up to 24 Schwarzschild-Couder dual-mirror medium-size Telescopes (SCTs) with the primary mirror diameter of 9.5 m. Above a few TeV, the Cherenkov light intensity is such that showers can be detected even well outside the light pool by telescopes significantly smaller than the MSTs. To achieve the required sensitivity at high energies, a huge area on the ground needs to be covered by Small Size Telescopes (SSTs) with a field of view of about 10° and an angular resolution of about 0.2°, making the dual-mirror configuration very effective. The SST sub-array will be composed of 50-70 telescopes with a mirror area of about 5-10 m2 and about 300 m spacing, distributed across an area of about 10 km2. In this presentation we will focus on the innovative solution for the optical design of the medium and small size telescopes based on a dual-mirror configuration. This layout will allow us to reduce the dimension and the weight of the camera at the focal plane of the telescope, to adopt Silicon-based photo-multipliers as light detectors thanks to the reduced plate-scale, and to have an optimal imaging resolution on a wide field of view.

  10. CTA ``L'' train outdoor noise propagation in Wrigley-ville

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDuffee, Matthew

    2003-10-01

    It is well known to those who reside in Chicago that the elevated mass transit trains, known as the L, are the largest culprit of outdoor noise pollution in most neighborhoods throughout the city. Many potential residents and buyers will make their choice of where to live in the city simply based upon the building's relationship to the L. For those who live directly next to the tracks vibration becomes a major issue. The study focused on the environmental noise impact of the CTA red line train traveling through Chicago's north side in the Wrigley-ville neighborhood. Approximately 1.5 miles of elevated track stretch between the Addison station (near Wrigley field) and the bridge that crosses Montrose Avenue. Eight locations were chosen throughout an area covering 17 city blocks surrounding the red line tracks to perform field measurements. The field measurements, taken in Leq, were correlated against a computer model designed using Cadna/A outdoor noise propagation software. The models polygons (representing buildings) were created using ESRI Arc View mapping software to view digitized aerial photographs of the north side of Chicago. The models predictions correlated to within plus or minus 1 dB on 6 out of 8 field measurements.

  11. Measured Head CT/CTA Skin Dose and Intensive Care Unit Patient Cumulative Exposure.

    PubMed

    Nawfel, R D; Young, G S

    2017-03-01

    Estimates of cumulative CT/CTA radiation dose based on volumetric CT dose index have raised concern that neurological intensive care unit patient exposures may reach thresholds for deterministic skin injury. Because the accuracy of volumetric CT dose index for this purpose in unknown, we set out to directly measure head CT and CTA peak skin dose, assess the relationship of volumetric CT dose index to measured peak skin dose, and determine whether multiple CT/CTA exposures in typical patients in the neurological intensive care unit produce cumulative doses approaching or exceeding single-dose deterministic thresholds for skin injury. In a prospective study from 2011-2013, nanoDot optical stimulated luminescence dosimeters were used to measure head CT/CTA peak skin dose in 52 patients (28 female, 24 male; mean age, 63 years) divided equally between 2 CT scanners. Volumetric CT dose index and dose-length product were recorded for each examination. Peak skin dose was also measured on an acrylic skull phantom in each scanner. A 2-tailed, unpaired t test was used to compare mean patient skin doses between the 2 scanners. The measured peak skin doses were then used to calculate cumulative peak skin dose in 4 typical patients in intensive care units who received multiple CT/CTA scans. Head CT/CTA peak skin dose agreed between scanners in patients and phantoms: (scanner 1 CT/CTA: patients, 39.2 ± 3.7 mGy and 98.9 ± 5.3 mGy, respectively, versus phantom, 40.0 mGy and 105.4 mGy, respectively; scanner 2 CT/CTA: patients, 42.9 ± 9.4 mGy and 98.8 ± 7.4 mGy, respectively, versus phantom, 37.6 mGy and 95.2 mGy, respectively). Volumetric CT dose index overestimated peak skin dose by a factor of 1.4-1.9 depending on examination and CT scanner. Cumulative doses in 4 patients in the intensive care unit estimated from measured CT/CTA peak skin dose ranged from 1.9-4.5 Gy. Directly measured radiation skin doses from head CT/CTA patient examinations are substantially lower than

  12. The High-Level Interface Definitions in the ASTRI/CTA Mini Array Software System (MASS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conforti, V.; Tosti, G.; Schwarz, J.; Bruno, P.; Cefal‘A, M.; Paola, A. D.; Gianotti, F.; Grillo, A.; Russo, F.; Tanci, C.; Testa, V.; Antonelli, L. A.; Canestrari, R.; Catalano, O.; Fiorini, M.; Gallozzi, S.; Giro, E.; Palombara, N. L.; Leto, G.; Maccarone, M. C.; Pareschi, G.; Stringhetti, L.; Trifoglio, M.; Vercellone, S.; Astri Collaboration; Cta Consortium

    2015-09-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is a Flagship Project funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research, and led by INAF, the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics. Within this framework, INAF is currently developing an end-to-end prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, of a Small Size Dual-Mirror Telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA. A second goal of the project is the realization of the ASTRI/CTA mini-array, which will be composed of seven SST-2M telescopes placed at the CTA Southern Site. The ASTRI Mini Array Software System (MASS) is designed to support the ASTRI/CTA mini-array operations. MASS is being built on top of the ALMA Common Software (ACS) framework, which provides support for the implementation of distributed data acquisition and control systems, and functionality for log and alarm management, message driven communication and hardware devices management. The first version of the MASS system, which will comply with the CTA requirements and guidelines, will be tested on the ASTRI SST-2M prototype. In this contribution we present the interface definitions of the MASS high level components in charge of the ASTRI SST-2M observation scheduling, telescope control and monitoring, and data taking. Particular emphasis is given to their potential reuse for the ASTRI/CTA mini-array.

  13. Predictive Value of CTA Spot Sign on Hematoma Expansion in Intracerebral Hemorrhage Patients.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wen-Jie; Reis, Cesar; Reis, Haley; Zhang, John; Yang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Hematoma expansion (HE) occurs in approximately one-third of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and leads to high rates of mortality and morbidity. Currently, contrast extravasation within hematoma, termed the spot sign on computed tomography angiography (CTA), has been identified as a strong independent predictor of early hematoma expansion. Past studies indicate that the spot sign is a dynamic entity and is indicative of active hemorrhage. Furthermore, to enhance the spot sign's accuracy of predicting HE, spot parameters observed on CTA or dynamic CTA were used for its quantification. In addition, spot signs detected on multiphase CTA and dynamic CTA are shown to have higher sensitivity and specificity when compared with simple standardized spot sign detection in recent studies. Based on the spot sign, novel methods such as leakage sign and rate of contrast extravasation were explored to redefine HE prediction in combination with clinical characteristics and spot sign on CTA to assist clinical judgment. The spot sign is an accepted independent predictor of active hemorrhage and is used in both secondary intracerebral hemorrhage and the process of surgical assessment for hemorrhagic risk in patients with ischemic stroke. Spot sign predicts patients at high risk for hematoma expansion.

  14. Predictive Value of CTA Spot Sign on Hematoma Expansion in Intracerebral Hemorrhage Patients

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wen-Jie; Reis, Cesar; Reis, Haley

    2017-01-01

    Hematoma expansion (HE) occurs in approximately one-third of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and leads to high rates of mortality and morbidity. Currently, contrast extravasation within hematoma, termed the spot sign on computed tomography angiography (CTA), has been identified as a strong independent predictor of early hematoma expansion. Past studies indicate that the spot sign is a dynamic entity and is indicative of active hemorrhage. Furthermore, to enhance the spot sign's accuracy of predicting HE, spot parameters observed on CTA or dynamic CTA were used for its quantification. In addition, spot signs detected on multiphase CTA and dynamic CTA are shown to have higher sensitivity and specificity when compared with simple standardized spot sign detection in recent studies. Based on the spot sign, novel methods such as leakage sign and rate of contrast extravasation were explored to redefine HE prediction in combination with clinical characteristics and spot sign on CTA to assist clinical judgment. The spot sign is an accepted independent predictor of active hemorrhage and is used in both secondary intracerebral hemorrhage and the process of surgical assessment for hemorrhagic risk in patients with ischemic stroke. Spot sign predicts patients at high risk for hematoma expansion. PMID:28852647

  15. Fast automatic algorithm for bifurcation detection in vascular CTA scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozio, Matthias; Gorbunova, Vladlena; Godenschwager, Christian; Beck, Thomas; Bernhardt, Dominik

    2012-02-01

    Endovascular imaging aims at identifying vessels and their branches. Automatic vessel segmentation and bifurcation detection eases both clinical research and routine work. In this article a state of the art bifurcation detection algorithm is developed and applied on vascular computed tomography angiography (CTA) scans to mark the common iliac artery and its branches, the internal and external iliacs. In contrast to other methods our algorithm does not rely on a complete segmentation of a vessel in the 3D volume, but evaluates the cross-sections of the vessel slice by slice. Candidates for vessels are obtained by thresholding, following by 2D connected component labeling and prefiltering by size and position. The remaining candidates are connected in a squared distanced weighted graph. With Dijkstra algorithm the graph is traversed to get candidates for the arteries. We use another set of features considering length and shape of the paths to determine the best candidate and detect the bifurcation. The method was tested on 119 datasets acquired with different CT scanners and varying protocols. Both easy to evaluate datasets with high resolution and no apparent clinical diseases and difficult ones with low resolution, major calcifications, stents or poor contrast between the vessel and surrounding tissue were included. The presented results are promising, in 75.7% of the cases the bifurcation was labeled correctly, and in 82.7% the common artery and one of its branches were assigned correctly. The computation time was on average 0.49 s +/- 0.28 s, close to human interaction time, which makes the algorithm applicable for time-critical applications.

  16. Novae as Tevatrons: prospects for CTA and IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, B. D.; Caprioli, D.; Vurm, I.; Beloborodov, A. M.; Bartos, I.; Vlasov, A.

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of novae as sources of ˜0.1-1 GeV gamma-rays highlights the key role of shocks and relativistic particle acceleration in these transient systems. Although there is evidence for a spectral cut-off above energies ˜1-100 GeV at particular epochs in some novae, the maximum particle energy achieved in these accelerators has remained an open question. The high densities of the nova ejecta (˜10 orders of magnitude larger than in supernova remnants) render the gas far upstream of the shock neutral and shielded from ionizing radiation. The amplification of the magnetic field needed for diffusive shock acceleration requires ionized gas, thus confining the acceleration process to a narrow photoionized layer immediately ahead of the shock. Based on the growth rate of the hybrid non-resonant cosmic ray current-driven instability (considering also ion-neutral damping), we quantify the maximum particle energy, Emax, across the range of shock velocities and upstream densities of interest. We find values of Emax ˜ 10 GeV-10 TeV, which are broadly consistent with the inferred spectral cut-offs, but which could also in principle lead to emission extending to ≳ 100 GeV accessible to atmosphere Cherenkov telescopes, such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Detecting TeV neutrinos with IceCube is more challenging, although the prospects are improved for a nearby event (≲ kpc) or if the shock power during the earliest, densest phases of the outburst is higher than implied by the GeV light curves, due to downscattering of the gamma-rays within the ejecta.

  17. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  18. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  19. Biokompatible Polymere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Suk-Woo; Wintermantel, Erich; Maier, Gerhard

    Der klinische Einsatz von synthetischen Polymeren begann in den 60-er Jahren in Form von Einwegartikeln, wie beispielsweise Spritzen und Kathetern, vor allem aufgrund der Tatsache, dass Infektionen infolge nicht ausreichender Sterilität der wiederverwendbaren Artikel aus Glas und metallischen Werkstoffen durch den Einsatz von sterilen Einwegartikeln signifikant reduziert werden konnten [1]. Die Einführung der medizinischen Einwegartikel aus Polymeren erfolgte somit nicht nur aus ökonomischen, sondern auch aus hygienischen Gründen. Wegen der steigenden Anzahl synthetischer Polymere und dem zunehmenden Bedarf an ärztlicher Versorgung reicht die Anwendung von Polymeren in der Medizin von preisgünstigen Einwegartikeln, die nur kurzzeitig intrakorporal eingesetzt werden, bis hin zu Implantaten, welche über eine längere Zeit grossen Beanspruchungen im menschlichen Körper ausgesetzt sind. Die steigende Verbreitung von klinisch eingesetzten Polymeren ist auf ihre einfache und preisgünstige Verarbeitbarkeit in eine Vielzahl von Formen und Geometrien sowie auf ihr breites Eigenschaftsspektrum zurückzuführen. Polymere werden daher in fast allen medizinischen Bereichen eingesetzt.

  20. Organic-inorganic hybrid mesoporous polymers fabricated by using (CTA)2S2O8 as self-decomposed soft templates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianyou; Du, Binyang; Fan, Zhiqiang

    2012-10-23

    Organic-inorganic hybrid mesoporous polymers were successfully synthesized by using a template-directed free radical polymerization technique in aqueous solution at 0-5 °C with oxidative complexes as self-decomposed soft templates. The oxidative complexes ((CTA)(2)S(2)O(8)), which were formed between anionic oxidant (S(2)O(8)(2-)) and cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) at 0-5 °C, can be automatically decomposed due to the reduction of S(2)O(8)(2-). No additional treatment was needed to remove the templates. The reactive functional monomer, 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TMSPMA), was used as main monomer. Styrene was used as the comonomer. With simultaneous free radical copolymerization of TMSPMA and styrene, condensation of methoxysilyl groups, and the self-decomposition of (CTA)(2)S(2)O(8), organic-inorganic hybrid mesoporous polymers were successfully obtained. The mesoporous structures and morphologies of the resultant hybrid mesoporous polymers were found to be strongly dependent on the feed amounts of TMSPMA and styrene. In the absence of styrene, the hybrid polymer PTMSPMA exhibited mesh-like bicontinuous structures with mesopores and high surface area (335 m(2)/g). With the incorporation of styrene, mesoporous nanoparticles were obtained. The surface areas of the mesoporous nanoparticles decreased with the increase of styrene contents. The adsorption capabilities of such mesoporous polymers for organic dye (Congo red) and protein (bovine serum albumin) were also studied.

  1. THE DISCOVERY OF HOST GALAXY H I ABSORPTION IN CTA 21

    SciTech Connect

    Salter, C. J.; Minchin, R.; Ghosh, T.; Saikia, D. J.; Chandola, Y.

    2010-06-01

    We report the discovery of H I 21 cm absorption toward the well-studied Gigahertz peaked spectrum source CTA 21 (4C 16.09) using the Arecibo telescope on 2009 September 20 and 21. Recently, the frequency band between 700 and 800 MHz was temporarily opened up to radio astronomy when US TV stations were mandated to switch from analog to digital transmissions, with new frequency allocations. The redshifted H I frequency for CTA 21 falls within this band. CTA 21 has a complex radio structure on a range of scales. The innermost prominent components are separated by {approx}12 mas while weak diffuse emission extends for up to {approx}300 mas. The H I absorption profile that we find has two main components, one narrow and the other wider and blueshifted. The total H I column density is 7.9 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2}, assuming a covering factor of unity and a spin temperature of 100 K. This H I absorption confirms the recently determined optical redshift of this faint galaxy of z {approx} 0.907. We discuss this new detection in light of H I absorption studies toward compact radio sources, and also the possibility that CTA 21 may be exhibiting multiple cycles of nuclear activity. This new detection in CTA 21 is consistent with a strong trend for detection of H I absorption in radio galaxies with evidence of episodic nuclear/jet activity.

  2. The Discovery of Host Galaxy H I Absorption in CTA 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, C. J.; Saikia, D. J.; Minchin, R.; Ghosh, T.; Chandola, Y.

    2010-06-01

    We report the discovery of H I 21 cm absorption toward the well-studied Gigahertz peaked spectrum source CTA 21 (4C 16.09) using the Arecibo telescope on 2009 September 20 and 21. Recently, the frequency band between 700 and 800 MHz was temporarily opened up to radio astronomy when US TV stations were mandated to switch from analog to digital transmissions, with new frequency allocations. The redshifted H I frequency for CTA 21 falls within this band. CTA 21 has a complex radio structure on a range of scales. The innermost prominent components are separated by ~12 mas while weak diffuse emission extends for up to ~300 mas. The H I absorption profile that we find has two main components, one narrow and the other wider and blueshifted. The total H I column density is 7.9 × 1020 cm-2, assuming a covering factor of unity and a spin temperature of 100 K. This H I absorption confirms the recently determined optical redshift of this faint galaxy of z ~ 0.907. We discuss this new detection in light of H I absorption studies toward compact radio sources, and also the possibility that CTA 21 may be exhibiting multiple cycles of nuclear activity. This new detection in CTA 21 is consistent with a strong trend for detection of H I absorption in radio galaxies with evidence of episodic nuclear/jet activity.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of noise reduction and vesselness filters for liver vessel segmentation on abdominal CTA images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Moelker, Adriaan; Niessen, Wiro; van Walsum, Theo

    2015-05-01

    Liver vessel segmentation in CTA images is a challenging task, especially in the case of noisy images. This paper investigates whether pre-filtering improves liver vessel segmentation in 3D CTA images. We introduce a quantitative evaluation of several well-known filters based on a proposed liver vessel segmentation method on CTA images. We compare the effect of different diffusion techniques i.e. Regularized Perona-Malik, Hybrid Diffusion with Continuous Switch and Vessel Enhancing Diffusion as well as the vesselness approaches proposed by Sato, Frangi and Erdt. Liver vessel segmentation of the pre-processed images is performed using a histogram-based region grown with local maxima as seed points. Quantitative measurements (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) are determined based on manual landmarks inside and outside the vessels, followed by T-tests for statistic comparisons on 51 clinical CTA images. The evaluation demonstrates that all the filters make liver vessel segmentation have a significantly higher accuracy than without using a filter (p  <  0.05) Hybrid Diffusion with Continuous Switch achieves the best performance. Compared to the diffusion filters, vesselness filters have a greater sensitivity but less specificity. In addition, the proposed liver vessel segmentation method with pre-filtering is shown to perform robustly on a clinical dataset having a low contrast-to-noise of up to 3 (dB). The results indicate that the pre-filtering step significantly improves liver vessel segmentation on 3D CTA images.

  4. Evaluating the control software for CTA in a medium size telescope prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, I.; Behera, B.; Birsin, E.; Koeppel, H.; Melkumyan, D.; Schmidt, T.; Schwanke, U.; Wegner, P.; Wiesand, S.; Winde, M.; Consortium, CTA

    2012-12-01

    CTA (Cherenkov Telescope Array) is one of the largest ground-based astronomy projects being pursued and will be the largest facility for ground-based γ-ray observations ever built. CTA will consist of two arrays (one in the Northern hemisphere and one in the Southern hemisphere) composed of telescopes of several sizes. A prototype for the Medium Size Telescope (MST) of a diameter of 12 m will be installed in Berlin by the end of 2012. This MST prototype will be composed of the mechanical structure, drive system and mirror facets mounted with powered actuators to enable active control. Five Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) cameras and a weather station will allow the measurement of the performance of the instrument. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Common Software (ACS) distributed control framework is currently being considered by the CTA consortium to serve as the array control middleware. In order to evaluate the ACS software, it has been decided to implement an ACS-based readout and control system for the MST prototype. The design of the control software is following the concepts and tools under evaluation within the CTA consortium, like the use of a Unified Modeling Language (UML) based code generation framework for ACS component modeling, and the use of OPen Connectivity-Unified Architecture (OPC UA) for hardware access. In this contribution, the progress in the implementation of the control system for this CTA prototype telescope is described.

  5. CTA in acute stroke: short intensive training intervention is highly effective in improving radiologists' performance.

    PubMed

    Cora, E A; Ford, G A; Flynn, D; Gonsalves, P; White, P

    2017-10-01

    To determine whether focussed radiology training in reporting stroke computed tomography angiography (CTA) improved diagnostic performance of general radiology specialty trainees staffing regional on call rotas. A validated case archive (VCA) consisting of 50 hyperacute stroke CTA cases was developed for a full day course on CTA interpretation. Training days were organised ensuring all local trainees had a chance to attend. The rate of major and minor amendments by neuroradiology consultants were reviewed in 252 on-call radiology trainee reports. Before training, radiology trainees had a total discrepancy (reporting error) rate of 37%: 12% major, 25% minor. Following CTA training, the total discrepancy rate was not significantly reduced (34%) but there was a substantial reduction in major discrepancies to 4% (p=0.037; odds ratio=3.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08 to 10.12). An intensive training course based on a hyperacute stroke VCA significantly reduced major discrepancies in stroke CTA interpretation for radiology trainees. The ability of radiology trainees to recognise large vessel occlusions and other significant findings improved. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of noise reduction and vesselness filters for liver vessel segmentation on abdominal CTA images.

    PubMed

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Moelker, Adriaan; Niessen, Wiro; van Walsum, Theo

    2015-05-21

    Liver vessel segmentation in CTA images is a challenging task, especially in the case of noisy images. This paper investigates whether pre-filtering improves liver vessel segmentation in 3D CTA images. We introduce a quantitative evaluation of several well-known filters based on a proposed liver vessel segmentation method on CTA images. We compare the effect of different diffusion techniques i.e. Regularized Perona-Malik, Hybrid Diffusion with Continuous Switch and Vessel Enhancing Diffusion as well as the vesselness approaches proposed by Sato, Frangi and Erdt. Liver vessel segmentation of the pre-processed images is performed using a histogram-based region grown with local maxima as seed points. Quantitative measurements (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) are determined based on manual landmarks inside and outside the vessels, followed by T-tests for statistic comparisons on 51 clinical CTA images. The evaluation demonstrates that all the filters make liver vessel segmentation have a significantly higher accuracy than without using a filter (p  <  0.05); Hybrid Diffusion with Continuous Switch achieves the best performance. Compared to the diffusion filters, vesselness filters have a greater sensitivity but less specificity. In addition, the proposed liver vessel segmentation method with pre-filtering is shown to perform robustly on a clinical dataset having a low contrast-to-noise of up to 3 (dB). The results indicate that the pre-filtering step significantly improves liver vessel segmentation on 3D CTA images.

  7. Dose reduction potential of iterative reconstruction algorithms in neck CTA-a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Ellmann, Stephan; Kammerer, Ferdinand; Allmendinger, Thomas; Brand, Michael; Janka, Rolf; Hammon, Matthias; Lell, Michael M; Uder, Michael; Kramer, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the degree of radiation dose reduction in neck CT angiography (CTA) achievable with Sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) algorithms. 10 consecutive patients scheduled for neck CTA were included in this study. CTA images of the external carotid arteries either were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) at full radiation dose level or underwent simulated dose reduction by proprietary reconstruction software. The dose-reduced images were reconstructed using either SAFIRE 3 or SAFIRE 5 and compared with full-dose FBP images in terms of vessel definition. 5 observers performed a total of 3000 pairwise comparisons. SAFIRE allowed substantial radiation dose reductions in neck CTA while maintaining vessel definition. The possible levels of radiation dose reduction ranged from approximately 34 to approximately 90% and depended on the SAFIRE algorithm strength and the size of the vessel of interest. In general, larger vessels permitted higher degrees of radiation dose reduction, especially with higher SAFIRE strength levels. With small vessels, the superiority of SAFIRE 5 over SAFIRE 3 was lost. Neck CTA can be performed with substantially less radiation dose when SAFIRE is applied. The exact degree of radiation dose reduction should be adapted to the clinical question, in particular to the smallest vessel needing excellent definition.

  8. Cadmium (II) and lead (II) transport in a polymer inclusion membrane using tributyl phosphate as mobile carrier and CuFeO(2) as a polarized photo electrode.

    PubMed

    Arous, Omar; Amara, Mourad; Trari, Mohamed; Bouguelia, Aissa; Kerdjoudj, Hacène

    2010-08-15

    In this work, a development of polymeric inclusion membranes for the cations separation is reported. The membrane was made up of cellulose triacetate (CTA) with a tributyl phosphate (TBP) incorporated into the polymer as metal ions carrier. The transport of lead (II) and cadmium (II) ions in two membrane systems polymer inclusion membrane (PIM), PIM coupled with photo-chemical electrode using TBP as carrier and 2-nitro phenyl octyl ether (NPOE) or tris ethylhexyl phosphate (TEHP) as plasticizer have been investigated. The membranes: polymer+plasticizer+carrier were synthesized and characterized by FTIR, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Transports of lead and cadmium have been studied using these systems and the results were compared to commercial cation exchange membrane (CRA). The obtained results showed that for Pb(2+) ion, the concentrations of the strip phase increases using synthesized membranes. The conduction band of the delafossite CuFeO(2) (-1.25 V(SCE)) yields a thermodynamically M(2+) (=Pb(2+), Cd(2+)) photo electrodeposition and speeds up the diffusion process. In all the cases, the potential of the electrode M/M(2+) in the feed compartment increases until a maximum value, reached at approximately 100 min above which it undergoes a diminution. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catching the radio flare in CTA 102 (Fromm+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, C. M.; Ros, E.; Perucho, M.; Savolainen, T.; Mimica, P.; Kadler, M.; Lobanov, A. P.; Lister, M. L.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Zensus, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    The CTA 102 was observed with all ten antennas of the VLBA, where CTA 102 was the main target within the experiment BR122. In the BS157 and the BW086 experiment other observations CTA 102 was used as a D-term calibrator (see below for experiment codes) -------------------------- code Date (yyyy-mm-dd) -------------------------- BS157A 2005-05-19 BS157C 2005-09-01 BR122A 2006-04-14 BR122B 2006-06-08 BW086B 2006-10-02 BW086C 2006-12-04 BW086D 2007-01-26 BW086E 2007-04-26 -------------------------- (3 data files).

  10. Late Protein Synthesis-Dependent Phases in CTA Long-Term Memory: BDNF Requirement.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Moreno, Araceli; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F; Escobar, Martha L

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that long-term memory (LTM) persistence requires a late protein synthesis-dependent phase, even many hours after memory acquisition. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an essential protein synthesis product that has emerged as one of the most potent molecular mediators for long-term synaptic plasticity. Studies in the rat hippocampus have been shown that BDNF is capable to rescue the late-phase of long-term potentiation as well as the hippocampus-related LTM when protein synthesis was inhibited. Our previous studies on the insular cortex (IC), a region of the temporal cortex implicated in the acquisition and storage of conditioned taste aversion (CTA), have demonstrated that intracortical delivery of BDNF reverses the deficit in CTA memory caused by the inhibition of IC protein synthesis due to anisomycin administration during early acquisition. In this work, we first analyze whether CTA memory storage is protein synthesis-dependent in different time windows. We observed that CTA memory become sensible to protein synthesis inhibition 5 and 7 h after acquisition. Then, we explore the effect of BDNF delivery (2 μg/2 μl per side) in the IC during those late protein synthesis-dependent phases. Our results show that BDNF reverses the CTA memory deficit produced by protein synthesis inhibition in both phases. These findings support the notion that recurrent rounds of consolidation-like events take place in the neocortex for maintenance of CTA memory trace and that BDNF is an essential component of these processes.

  11. Late Protein Synthesis-Dependent Phases in CTA Long-Term Memory: BDNF Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Moreno, Araceli; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F.; Escobar, Martha L.

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that long-term memory (LTM) persistence requires a late protein synthesis-dependent phase, even many hours after memory acquisition. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an essential protein synthesis product that has emerged as one of the most potent molecular mediators for long-term synaptic plasticity. Studies in the rat hippocampus have been shown that BDNF is capable to rescue the late-phase of long-term potentiation as well as the hippocampus-related LTM when protein synthesis was inhibited. Our previous studies on the insular cortex (IC), a region of the temporal cortex implicated in the acquisition and storage of conditioned taste aversion (CTA), have demonstrated that intracortical delivery of BDNF reverses the deficit in CTA memory caused by the inhibition of IC protein synthesis due to anisomycin administration during early acquisition. In this work, we first analyze whether CTA memory storage is protein synthesis-dependent in different time windows. We observed that CTA memory become sensible to protein synthesis inhibition 5 and 7 h after acquisition. Then, we explore the effect of BDNF delivery (2 μg/2 μl per side) in the IC during those late protein synthesis-dependent phases. Our results show that BDNF reverses the CTA memory deficit produced by protein synthesis inhibition in both phases. These findings support the notion that recurrent rounds of consolidation-like events take place in the neocortex for maintenance of CTA memory trace and that BDNF is an essential component of these processes. PMID:21960964

  12. Model generation of coronary artery bifurcations from CTA and single plane angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenes, Ruben; Diez, Jose L.; Duchateau, Nicolas; Pashaei, Ali; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To generate accurate and realistic models of coronary artery bifurcations before and after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), using information from two image modalities. Because bifurcations are regions where atherosclerotic plaque appears frequently and intervention is more challenging, generation of such realistic models could be of high value to predict the risk of restenosis or thrombosis after stent implantation, and to study geometrical and hemodynamical changes. Methods: Two image modalities have been employed to generate the bifurcation models: computer tomography angiography (CTA) to obtain the 3D trajectory of vessels, and 2D conventional coronary angiography (CCA) to obtain radius information of the vessel lumen, due to its better contrast and image resolution. In addition, CCA can be acquired right before and after the intervention in the operation room; therefore, the combination of CTA and CCA allows the generation of realistic preprocedure and postprocedure models of coronary bifurcations. The method proposed is semiautomatic, based on landmarks manually placed on both image modalities. Results: A comparative study of the models obtained with the proposed method with models manually obtained using only CTA, shows more reliable results when both modalities are used together. The authors show that using preprocedure CTA and postprocedure CCA, realistic postprocedure models can be obtained. Analysis carried out of the Murray's law in all patient bifurcations shows the geometric improvement of PCI in our models, better than using manual models from CTA alone. An experiment using a cardiac phantom also shows the feasibility of the proposed method. Conclusions: The authors have shown that fusion of CTA and CCA is feasible for realistic generation of coronary bifurcation models before and after PCI. The method proposed is efficient, and relies on minimal user interaction, and therefore is of high value to study geometric and hemodynamic

  13. Prediction of aortic enhancement on coronary CTA images using a test bolus of diluted contrast material.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Takanori; Funama, Yoshinori; Imada, Naoyuki; Sato, Tomoyasu; Yamagami, Takuji; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Awai, Kazuo

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare test bolus techniques using undiluted or diluted contrast material for their ability to predict aortic enhancement on coronary computed tomographic angiography (c-CTA) images. We divided 200 consecutive patients who underwent c-CTA on a 64-MDCT scanner into two groups. In group A (n = 100), we used a test bolus of undiluted contrast material and in group B (n = 100), the contrast material was diluted. The injection volume was body weight × 0.2 (contrast material 100%) in group A and body weight × 0.7 (contrast material 30%, saline 70%) in group B. We then compared the CT number in the ascending aorta on c-CTA images obtained with undiluted and diluted contrast media to the CT number on c-CTA images. The mean CT number in the ascending aorta was significantly higher in group B than group A (217.1 vs. 157.4 HU, P < .001). There was a significant difference in the correlation between the CT number of the ascending aorta on c-CTA images and on images acquired with the test bolus using undiluted or diluted test bolus (P < .001). In group B, the correlation had a strong positive linear relationship (r = 0.72, P < .001), whereas in group A the positive linear relationship was weak (r = 0.36). The test bolus with diluted contrast material was useful for predicting aortic enhancement before c-CTA scanning. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A patient-specific visualization tool for comprehensive analysis of coronary CTA and perfusion MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirisli, H. A.; Gupta, V.; Kirschbaum, S.; Neefjes, L.; van Geuns, R. J.; Mollet, N.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Reiber, J. H. C.; van Walsum, T.; Niessen, W. J.

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion imaging (CMR) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) are widely used to assess heart disease. CMR is used to measure the global and regional myocardial function and to evaluate the presence of ischemia; CTA is used for diagnosing coronary artery disease, such as coronary stenoses. Nowadays, the hemodynamic significance of coronary artery stenoses is determined subjectively by combining information on myocardial function with assumptions on coronary artery territories. As the anatomy of coronary arteries varies greatly between individuals, we developed a patient-specific tool for relating CTA and perfusion CMR data. The anatomical and functional information extracted from CTA and CMR data are combined into a single frame of reference. Our graphical user interface provides various options for visualization. In addition to the standard perfusion Bull's Eye Plot (BEP), it is possible to overlay a 2D projection of the coronary tree on the BEP, to add a 3D coronary tree model and to add a 3D heart model. The perfusion BEP, the 3D-models and the CTA data are also interactively linked. Using the CMR and CTA data of 14 patients, our tool directly established a spatial correspondence between diseased coronary artery segments and myocardial regions with abnormal perfusion. The location of coronary stenoses and perfusion abnormalities were visualized jointly in 3D, thereby facilitating the study of the relationship between the anatomic causes of a blocked artery and the physiological effects on the myocardial perfusion. This tool is expected to improve diagnosis and therapy planning of early-stage coronary artery disease.

  15. Sensitivity of CTA to dark matter signals from the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Mathias; Siegal-Gaskins, Jennifer M.; Scott, Pat

    2014-06-01

    The Galactic Center is one of the most promising targets for indirect detection of dark matter with gamma rays. We investigate the sensitivity of the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) to dark matter annihilation and decay in the Galactic Center. As the inner density profile of the Milky Way's dark matter halo is uncertain, we study the impact of the slope of the Galactic density profile, inwards of the Sun, on the prospects for detecting a dark matter signal with CTA. Adopting the Ring Method to define the signal and background regions in an ON-OFF analysis approach, we find that the sensitivity achieved by CTA to annihilation signals is strongly dependent on the inner profile slope, whereas the dependence is more mild in the case of dark matter decay. Surprisingly, we find that the optimal choice of signal and background regions is virtually independent of the assumed density profile. For the fiducial case of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile, we find that CTA will be able to probe annihilation cross-sections well below the canonical thermal relic value for dark matter masses from a few tens of GeV up to ~ 5 TeV for annihilation to τ+τ-, and will achieve only a slightly weaker sensitivity for annihilation to bbar b or μ+μ-. CTA will improve significantly on current sensitivity to annihilation signals for dark matter masses above ~ 100 GeV, covering parameter space that is complementary to that probed by searches with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The interpretation of apparent excesses in the measured cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra as signals of dark matter decay will also be testable with CTA observations of the Galactic Center. We demonstrate that both for annihilation and for decay, including spectral information for hard channels (such as μ+μ- and τ+τ-) leads to enhanced sensitivity for dark matter masses above mDM ~ 200 GeV.

  16. The ASTRI SST-2M prototype and mini-array for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareschi, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    In the framework of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) Observatory, the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics (INAF) has recently inaugurated in Sicily (Italy), at the Serra La Nave astronomical site (on the slopes of Mount Etna), a dual-mirror prototype (ASTRI SST-2M) of the CTA small size class of telescopes. It is planned to install up to 70 small size telescopes in the southern CTA site, in order to allow the study of the gamma rays from a few TeV up to hundreds of TeV. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype has been developed following an end-to-end approach. According to this philosophy, the telescope includes structure, primary and secondary mirrors, camera, software and hardware for control/acquisition and data handling. The camera, almost completed, has been designed to cover a field of view of 9.6 degrees. After the full implementation of the prototype, a remarkable improvement in terms of technology advancement and performance will come from the operation of the ASTRI mini-array, led within the CTA collaboration by INAF in synergy with the Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil) and the North-West University (South Africa). The ASTRI mini-array will be composed of at least 9 ASTRI SST-2M units and it is proposed to be installed at the CTA southern site as part of its pre-production phase. Apart from the assessment of a number of technological aspects related to CTA, the ASTRI mini-array will extend and improve the flux sensitivity compared with the current experiments (HESS, MAGIC and VERITAS) in the 5 - 300 TeV energy range.

  17. Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Lukischa

    2008-01-01

    The placement and education of students with disabilities in the general education classroom has generated a challenge and varied opinions for educators, families, and service providers. It is likely that with recent litigation and legislation which supports inclusion and increasing pressure from advocates of inclusion, the trend towards including…

  18. Area postrema ablations in cats: Evidence for separate neural routes for motion- and xylazine-induced CTA and emesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Meryl Lee; Fox, Robert A.; Brizzee, Kenneth R.; Crampton, G.; Daunton, Nancy G.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies on the role of the area postrema (AP) in vomiting induced in the cat by motion and drugs have shown that the AP is not essential for motion-induced vomiting, but is necessary for vomiting to apomorphine and xylazine. To confirm these findings and to determine the role of the AP in the formation of Conditioned Taste Aversion (CTA), the AP was ablated bilaterally in 10 adult female cats. With one exception, the ablated cats continued to vomit to the same motion that elicited emesis before the ablation. Doses of xylazine and apomorphine that elicit emesis in intact cats, failed to induce emesis in the ablated cats. Histological examination indicated that 8 cats had complete lesions and 2 had partial lesions. Investigations of effects of AP ablations on CTA revealed that cats with complete lesions did not form CTA to flavored milk paired with xylazine-induced CTA. Seven of the eigth completely lesioned cats developed motion-induced CTA, even though emesis was not consistently elicited by motion. These results suggest that there are multiple routes for inducing CTA and the emetic reflex, that CTA can form without eliciting emesis, and that CTA may be a sensitive measure of sub-emetic motion sickness.

  19. Inclusive health.

    PubMed

    Maclachlan, Malcolm; Khasnabis, Chapal; Mannan, Hasheem

    2012-01-01

    We propose the concept of Inclusive Health to encapsulate the Health for All ethos; to build on the rights-based approach to health; to promote the idea of inclusion as a verb, where a more proactive approach to addressing distinctive and different barriers to inclusion is needed; and to recognise that new initiatives in human resources for health can offer exciting and innovative ways of healthcare delivery. While Inclusive Education has become a widely recognised and accepted concept, Health for All is still contested, and new thinking is required to develop its agenda in line with contemporary developments. Inclusive Health refers both to who gets health care and to who provides it; and its ethos resonates strongly with Jefferson's assertion that 'there is nothing more unequal, than the equal treatment of unequal people'. We situate the timeliness of the Inclusive Health concept with reference to recent developments in the recognition of the rights of people with disability, in the new guidelines for community-based rehabilitation and in the World Report on Disability. These developments offer a more inclusive approach to health and, more broadly, its inter-connected aspects of wellbeing. A concept which more proactively integrates United Nations conventions that recognise the importance of difference - disability, ethnicity, gender, children - could be of benefit for global healthcare policy and practice. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Evaluation of novel PMTs of worldwide best parameters for the CTA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, R.; Müller, D.; Hose, J.; Menzel, U.; Nakajima, D.; Takahashi, M.; Teshima, M.; Toyama, T.; Yamamoto, T.

    2017-02-01

    Photomultiplier Tubes (PMT) are the most widespread detectors for measuring fast and faint light signals. About six years ago, we started an improvement program for the PMT candidates for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project in cooperation with the companies Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. (Japan) and Electron Tubes Enterprises Ltd. (England). CTA is the next major Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes array for ground-based high energy gamma-ray astrophysics. A total of ∼ 100 telescopes of sizes of 23 m, 12 m and 4 m in diameter will be built in northern and southern hemispheres. For CTA we need PMTs with the highest quantum efficiency and photoelectron collection efficiency, short pulse width of a few ns, low transit time spread and very low afterpulsing. The manufacturers were able to produce 1.5‧ PMTs of enhanced peak quantum efficiency of ∼ 40 % . These collect up to 95-98% of photoelectrons onto the first dynode for the wavelengths ≥ 400 nm . A pulse width of ≤ 3 ns has been achieved at the selected operational gain of 40k. The afterpulsing for a threshold of ≥ 4 photoelectrons is dramatically reduced, down to the level of 0.02%. We will report on the measurements of 1.5‧ PMTs from Hamamatsu and Electron Tubes Enterprises as candidate PMTs for the CTA project. The novel 1.5‧ PMTs have the worldwide best parameters.

  1. Multi-frequency radio observations of CTA 102 during enhanced activity state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righini, Simona; Giroletti, Marcello; D'Ammando, Filippo; Raiteri, Claudia; Villata, Massimo; Bach, Uwe

    2016-12-01

    We report on multi-frequency radio observations of CTA 102 (2230+114), obtained following the reports of intense gamma-ray emission by AGILE and Fermi (ATel #9863, #9869) and the record optical blazar state ever detected (ATel #9868).

  2. Enhanced gamma-ray emission from the FSRQ CTA 102 detected by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minervini, G.; Bulgarelli, A.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Piano, G.; Tavani, M.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Donnarumma, I.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Vercellone, S.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Paoletti, Antonelli A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2017-05-01

    AGILE is detecting since last week increased gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a source positionally consistent with the FSRQ blazar CTA 102 [at Galactic coordinates (l,b)= (77.4 , -38) +/- 0.6 deg (stat.

  3. [Value of whole body CTA in the management of brain-dead patients].

    PubMed

    Fregeville, A; De Bazelaire, C; Zagdanski, Am; Albiter, M; Desgrandchamps, F; De Kerviler, E

    2010-01-01

    To assess the value of whole body CTA, as a complement to head CTA, in the management of brain-dead patients as potential organ donors. Materials and Methods. A total of 27 consecutive brain-dead patients admitted in a center authorized in the harvesting of organs between October 2006 and January 2008 were included. The imaging protocol used was the protocol recommended by the French Society of Neuroradiology, with additional arterial phase helical acquisition of the chest, abdomen and pelvis, and parenchymal phase helical acquisition of the abdomen and pelvis. The imaging findings were then correlated to the surgical reports after organ harvesting. CTA readily demonstrates tissue lesions, a contraindication to harvesting (14 cases, including one false positive), and anatomical variants of the vascular system (7 arterial variants and 3 venous variants) and liver (8 patients). CTA, the gold standard paraclinical examination for brain death assessment, allows, in a single examination, the identification of contraindications to organ harvesting that may modify the surgical approach and even avoid unnecessary mobilisation of the transplant team. It may also provide valuable preoperative evaluation by detecting anatomical variants of the liver and kidneys.

  4. Quantification of stenosis in coronary artery via CTA using fuzzy distance transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Saha, Punam K.; Hu, Guangshu; Liang, Guoyuan; Yang, Yan; Geng, Jinzhao

    2009-02-01

    tomographic angiography (CTA) being noninvasive, economical and informative, has become a common modality for monitoring disease status and treatment effects. Here, we present a new method for detecting and quantifying coronary arterial stenosis via CTA using fuzzy distance transform (FDT) approach. FDT computes local depth at each image point in the presence of partial voluming. Coronary arterial stenoses are detected and their severities are quantified by analyzing FDT values along the medial axis of an artery obtained by skeletonization. Also, we have developed a new skeletal pruning algorithm toward improving quality of medial axes and therefore, enhancing the accuracy of stenosis detection and quantification. The method is completed using the following steps - (1) fuzzy segmentation of coronary artery via CTA, (2) FDT computation of coronary arteries, (3) medial axis computation, (4) estimation of local diameter along arteries and (5) stenosis detection and quantification of arterial blockage. Performance of the method has been quantitatively evaluated on a realistic coronary artery phantom dataset with randomly simulated stenoses and the results are compared with a classical binary algorithm. The method has also been applied on a clinical CTA dataset from thirteen patients with 59 stenoses and the results are compared with an expert's quantitative assessment of stenoses. Results of the phantom experiment indicate that the new method is significantly more accurate as compared to the conventional binary method. Also, the results of the clinical study indicate that the computerized method is highly in agreement with the expert's assessments.

  5. Swift XRT and UVOT flares accompany brightest ever gamma-ray flare of CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Roopesh; Carpenter, Bryce; D'Ammand, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, observed the highest-ever level of gamma-ray activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 4C +11.69, PKS 2230+11, 3FGL J2232.5+1143).

  6. Intra-night optical activity of the blazar CTA 102 during its maximum state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Velimir; Bachev, Rumen

    2016-11-01

    CTA 102 is known to experience violent outbursts in the optical, the latest of which happened just recently (ATel #9756, ATel #9732). Following these reports we observed this object for four nights (17.11.2016 - 20.11.2016) in a search for intra-night variability.

  7. Improvement of determination technique for extracting centerline in coronary artery with calcification on CTA.

    PubMed

    Ikai, Akihiro; Lee, Yongbum; Tsai, Du-Yih; Yamamoto, Isao; Matsumoto, Kazunori; Kimura, Motomasa

    2009-09-20

    The present study proposes a method for improving an existing technique used for extracting the centerlines of coronary arteries with calcifications on CTA. Through the use of the improved centerline extraction method, CPR images could be depicted accurately. In the proposed method, two dynamic range compression algorithms using two ITC for blood vessel regions and calcification regions were employed. Two dynamic range compressed CTA images obtained from the two ITC were then subtracted. After that, automatic tracing to determine the centerline for creating CPR images was performed using 3D image processing equipment. The usefulness of our proposed method was confirmed by using simulated CTA of the coronary artery with calcification. We also applied the proposed method to CTA images of 39 branches in 18 cases, and to 48 segments. Our experimental results showed that automatic tracing software pre-installed in the workstation could accurately determine the centerline of the coronary artery without being affected by the existence of calcification. Furthermore, an experienced radiological technologist evaluated the CPR images obtained by the proposed method. The results showed that most created CPR images could be used as diagnostic images after a minor revision performed manually.

  8. New λ6 cm and λ11 cm observations of the supernova remnant CTA 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. H.; Reich, W.; Wang, C.; Han, J. L.; Reich, P.

    2011-11-01

    Aims: We attempt to study spatial variations in the spectrum and rotation measures (RMs) of the large-diameter, high-latitude supernova remnant (SNR) CTA 1. Methods: We conducted new λ6 cm and λ11 cm observations of CTA 1 using the Urumqi 25-m and Effelsberg 100-m telescopes. Data at other wavelengths were included to investigate the spectrum and polarisation properties. Results: We obtained new total intensity and polarisation maps at λ6 cm and λ11 cm with angular resolutions of 9'.5and 4'.4, respectively. We derived a spectral index of α = -0.63 ± 0.05 (Sν ∝ να) based on the integrated flux densities at 408 MHz, 1420 MHz, 2639 MHz, and 4800 MHz. The spectral index map calculated from data at the four frequencies shows a clear steepening of the spectrum from the strong shell emission towards the north-western breakout region with weak diffuse emission. The decrease of the spectral index is up to about Δα = 0.3. The RM map derived from polarisation data at λ6 cm and λ11 cm shows a sharp transition between positive RMs in the north-eastern and negative RMs in the south-western part of the SNR. We note a corresponding RM pattern of extragalactic sources and propose the existence of a large-diameter Faraday screen in front of CTA 1, which covers the north-eastern part of the SNR. The RM of the Faraday screen is estimated to be about +45 rad m-2. A RM structure function of CTA 1 indicates a very regular magnetic field within the Faraday screen, which is stronger than about 2.7 μG for a distance of 500 pc. Conclusions: CTA 1 is a large-diameter shell-type SNR located out of the Galactic plane, which makes it an ideal object to study its properties without suffering confusion. The previous detection of the rare breakout phenomenon in CTA 1 is confirmed. We identify a Faraday screen partly covering CTA 1 with a regular magnetic field in the opposite direction to the interstellar magnetic field. The detection of Faraday screens in the Galactic plane is

  9. Relation between quantitative coronary CTA and myocardial ischemia by adenosine stress myocardial CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    van Rosendael, Alexander R; Kroft, Lucia J; Broersen, Alexander; Dijkstra, Jouke; van den Hoogen, Inge J; van Zwet, Erik W; Bax, Jeroen J; de Graaf, Michiel A; Scholte, Arthur J

    2016-02-09

    Coronary-computed tomography angiography (CTA) has limited accuracy to predict myocardial ischemia. Besides luminal area stenosis, other coronary plaque morphology and composition parameters may help to assess ischemia. With the integration of coronary CTA and adenosine stress CT myocardial perfusion (CTP), reliable information regarding coronary anatomy and function can be derived in one procedure. This analysis aimed to investigate the association between coronary stenosis severity, plaque composition and morphology and the presence of ischemia measured with adenosine stress myocardial CTP. 84 patients (age, 62 ± 10 years; 48% men) who underwent sequential coronary CTA and adenosine stress myocardial CT perfusion were analyzed. Automated quantification was performed in all coronary lesions (quantitative CTA). Downstream myocardial ischemia was assessed by visual analysis of the rest and stress CTP images and defined as a summed difference score of ≥1. One or more coronary plaques were present in 146 coronary arteries of which 31 (21%) were ischemia-related. Of the lesions with a stenosis percentage <50%, 50%-70%, and >70%, respectively, 9% (6/67), 18% (9/51), and 57% (16/28) demonstrated downstream ischemia. Furthermore, mean plaque burden, plaque volume, lesion length, maximal plaque thickness, and dense calcium volume were significantly higher in ischemia-related lesions, but only stenosis severity (%) (OR 1.06; 95% CI 1.02-1.10; P = .006) and lesion length (mm) (OR 1.26; 95% CI 1.02-1.55; P = .029) were independent correlates. Increasing stenosis percentage by quantitative CTA is positively correlated to myocardial ischemia measured with adenosine stress myocardial CTP. However, stenosis percentage remains a moderate determinant. Lumen area stenosis and lesion length were independently associated with ischemia, adjusted for coronary plaque volume, mean plaque burden, maximal lesion thickness, and dense calcium volume.

  10. Morphology-based three-dimensional segmentation of coronary artery tree from CTA scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banh, Diem Phuc T.; Kyprianou, Iacovos S.; Paquerault, Sophie; Myers, Kyle J.

    2007-03-01

    We developed an algorithm based on a rule-based threshold framework to segment the coronary arteries from angiographic computed tomography (CTA) data. Computerized segmentation of the coronary arteries is a challenging procedure due to the presence of diverse anatomical structures surrounding the heart on cardiac CTA data. The proposed algorithm incorporates various levels of image processing and organ information including region, connectivity and morphology operations. It consists of three successive stages. The first stage involves the extraction of the three-dimensional scaffold of the heart envelope. This stage is semiautomatic requiring a reader to review the CTA scans and manually select points along the heart envelope in slices. These points are further processed using a surface spline-fitting technique to automatically generate the heart envelope. The second stage consists of segmenting the left heart chambers and coronary arteries using grayscale threshold, size and connectivity criteria. This is followed by applying morphology operations to further detach the left and right coronary arteries from the aorta. In the final stage, the 3D vessel tree is reconstructed and labeled using an Isolated Connected Threshold technique. The algorithm was developed and tested on a patient coronary artery CTA that was graciously shared by the Department of Radiology of the Massachusetts General Hospital. The test showed that our method constantly segmented the vessels above 79% of the maximum gray-level and automatically extracted 55 of the 58 coronary segments that can be seen on the CTA scan by a reader. These results are an encouraging step toward our objective of generating high resolution models of the male and female heart that will be subsequently used as phantoms for medical imaging system optimization studies.

  11. Carprofen-imprinted monolith prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization in room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Ban, Lu; Han, Xu; Wang, Xian-Hua; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    To obtain fast separation, ionic liquids were used as porogens first in combination with reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization to prepare a new type of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) monolith. The imprinted monolithic column was synthesized using a mixture of carprofen (template), 4-vinylpyridine, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, [BMIM]BF4, and chain transfer agent (CTA). Some polymerization factors, such as template-monomer molar ratio, the degree of crosslinking, the composition of the porogen, and the content of CTA, on the column efficiency and imprinting effect of the resulting MIP monolith were systematically investigated. Affinity screening of structurally similar compounds with the template can be achieved in 200 s on the MIP monolith due to high column efficiency (up to 12,070 plates/m) and good column permeability. Recognition mechanism of the imprinted monolith was also investigated.

  12. Spot sign on 90 second delayed CTA improves sensitivity for hematoma expansion and mortality: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ciura, Viesha A.; Brouwers, H. Bart; Pizzolato, Raffaella; Ortiz, Claudia J.; Rosand, Jonathan; Goldstein, Joshua; Greenberg, Steven M.; Pomerantz, Stuart R; Gonzalez, R. Gilberto; Romero, Javier M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The CTA spot sign is a validated biomarker for poor outcome and hematoma expansion in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The spot sign has proven to be a dynamic entity, with multimodal imaging proving to be of additional value. We investigated whether the addition of a 90 second delayed CTA acquisition would capture additional ICH patients with the spot sign and increase the sensitivity of the spot sign. Methods We prospectively enrolled consecutive ICH patients undergoing first pass and 90 second delayed CTA over 18 months at a single academic center. Uni- and multivariate logistic regression were performed to assess clinical and neuroimaging covariates for relationship with hematoma expansion and mortality. Results Sensitivity of the spot sign for hematoma expansion on first pass CTA was 55%, which increased to 64% if the spot sign was present on either CTA acquisition. In multivariate analysis the spot sign presence was associated with significant hematoma expansion: odds ratio (OR) 17.7 (95% CI 3.7-84.2, p=0.0004), 8.3 (95% CI 2.0-33.4, p=0.004), and 12.0 (95% CI 2.9-50.5, p=0.0008) if present on first pass, delayed, or either CTA acquisition respectively. Spot sign presence on either acquisitions was also significant for mortality. Conclusions We demonstrate improved sensitivity for predicting hematoma expansion and poor outcome by adding a 90 second delayed CTA, which may enhance selection of patients that may benefit from hemostatic therapy. PMID:25300974

  13. Polymerization of perfluorobutadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J.; Toy, M. S.

    1970-01-01

    Diisopropyl peroxydicarbonate dissolved in liquid perfluorobutadiene is conducted in a sealed vessel at the autogenous pressure of polymerization. Reaction temperature, ratio of catalyst to monomer, and amount of agitation determine degree of polymerization and product yield.

  14. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  15. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  16. Constant Resistance Is Not Constant Termperature Anemometry - A Lesson From the PWM-CTA Simulation and Its Impact on All CTA Frequency Responce Evaluations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Scott; Foss, John

    1998-11-01

    The transient response of a hot-wire sensor has been simulated numerically ala Perry(Perry, A., (1982), Hotwire Anemometry, Oxford Press.). The recently developed Pulse-Width-Modulated Constant Temperature Anemometer (PWM-CTA(J.F.Foss,D.G. Bohl, and T.J. Hicks (1996) ``The Pulse Width Modulated-Constant Temperature Anemometer,'' Meas. Sci. and Tech., vol. 7, pp. 1388-1395.)) was the power source for the sensor. The simplicity of this electrical circuit has permitted the simulation to reveal a distinctive feature of the sensor's response. A typical sensor was "calibrated" in the model for 3t_0) = 25m/sec. The indicated velocity did not equal the established Q(t>t_o) value albeit the proper overheat resistance was achieved in one time step. The discrepancy is a result of transient effects in the temperature distribution: T(z) and the non-linear coupling between the velocity and the heat transfer. This effect will be present in all CTA operations. The ``effective frequency response'' will be discussed.

  17. Toward the construction of a medium size prototype Schwarzschild-Couder telescope for CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousselle, J.; Byrum, K.; Cameron, R.; Connaughton, V.; Errando, M.; Griffiths, S.; Guarino, V.; Humensky, T. B.; Jenke, P.; Kaaret, P.; Kieda, D.; Limon, M.; Mognet, I.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; Okumura, A.; Peck, A.; Petrashyk, A.; Ribeiro, D.; Stevenson, B.; Vassiliev, V.; Yu, P.

    2015-09-01

    The construction of a prototype Schwarzschild-Couder telescope (pSCT) started in early June 2015 at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in Southern Arizona, as a candidate medium-sized telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Compared to current Davies-Cotton telescopes, this novel instrument with an aplanatic two-mirror optical system will offer a wider field-of-view and improved angular resolution. In addition, the reduced plate scale of the camera allows the use of highly-integrated photon detectors such as silicon photo multipliers. As part of CTA, this design has the potential to greatly improve the performance of the next generation ground-based observatory for very high-energy (E>60 GeV) gamma-ray astronomy. In this contribution we present the design and performance of both optical and alignment systems of the pSCT.

  18. Invited review-Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the thoracic cardiovascular system in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Drees, Randi; François, Christopher J; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the thoracic cardiovascular system is offering new diagnostic opportunities in companion animal patients with the increasing availability of multidetector-row computed tomographic (MDCT) units in veterinary facilities. Optimal investigation of the systemic, pulmonary, and coronary circulation provides unique challenges due to the constant movement of the heart, the small size of several of the structures of interest, and the dependence of angiographic quality on various contrast bolus design and patient factors. Technical and practical aspects of thoracic cardiovascular CTA are reviewed in light of the currently available veterinary literature and future opportunities given utilizing MDCT in companion animal patients with suspected thoracic cardiovascular disease. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  19. COMPTEL gamma-ray observations of the quasars CTA 102 and 3C 454.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blom, J. J.; Bloemen, H.; Bennett, K.; Collmar, W.; Hermsen, W.; Mcconnell, M.; Schoenfelder, V.; Stacy, J. G.; Steinle, H.; Strong, A.

    1994-01-01

    The blazar-type active galactic nuclei CTA 102 (QSO 2230+114) and 3C 454.3 (QSO 2251+158), located about 7 deg apart, were observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory at four epochs in 1992. Both were detected by Energy Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). The combined Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) observations in the 10-30 MeV energy range clearly indicate a source of MeV emission, which is likely due to a contribution from both quasars. These observations strongly suggest that the power-law spectra measured by EGRET above approximately 50 MeV flatten at lower MeV energies. A comparison with observations at other wavelengths shows that the power spectra of CTA 102 and 3C 454.3 peak at MeV energies. This behavior appears to be a common feature of gamma-ray active galactic nuclei (AGN).

  20. STS-52 CANEX-2 Canadian Target Assembly (CTA) held by RMS over OV-102's PLB

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-11-01

    STS052-71-057 (22 Oct-1 Nov 1992) --- This 70mm frame, photographed with a handheld Hasselblad camera aimed through Columbia's aft flight deck windows, captures the operation of the Space Vision System (SVS) experiment above the cargo bay. Target dots have been placed on the Canadian Target Assembly (CTA), a small satellite, in the grasp of the Canadian-built remote manipulator system (RMS) arm. SVS utilized a Shuttle TV camera to monitor the dots strategically arranged on the satellite, to be tracked. As the satellite moved via the arm, the SVS computer measured the changing position of the dots and provided real-time television display of the location and orientation of the CTA. This type of displayed information is expected to help an operator guide the RMS or the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) of the future when berthing or deploying satellites. Also visible in the frame is the U.S. Microgravity Payload (USMP-01).

  1. Cross-linked cationic diblock copolymer worms are superflocculants for micrometer-sized silica particles† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Macro-CTAs and the worm cross-linking chemistry; suggested mechanism for the break-up of linear worms; UV-visible spectroscopy data and assigned 1H NMR spectrum for the PEO113 macro-CTA; THF and aqueous GPC data for PEO113 and PQDMA120 macro-CTAs; kinetic data for the aqueous solution polymerization of QDMA monomer; assigned 1H NMR for PQDMA125 macro-CTA; additional TEM images and further laser diffraction traces; DLS particle size distributions; tabulated data for linear and cross-linked cationic worms diluted at pH 9 using either water or methanol; full experimental section. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc03732a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Yin; Verstraete, Pierre; Smets, Johan

    2016-01-01

    A series of linear cationic diblock copolymer nanoparticles are prepared by polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) via reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) aqueous dispersion polymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA) using a binary mixture of non-ionic and cationic macromolecular RAFT agents, namely poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO113, M n = 4400 g mol–1; M w/M n = 1.08) and poly([2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride) (PQDMA125, M n = 31 800 g mol–1, M w/M n = 1.19). A detailed phase diagram was constructed to determine the maximum amount of PQDMA125 stabilizer block that could be incorporated while still allowing access to a pure worm copolymer morphology. Aqueous electrophoresis studies indicated that zeta potentials of +35 mV could be achieved for such cationic worms over a wide pH range. Core cross-linked worms were prepared via statistical copolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GlyMA) with HPMA using a slightly modified PISA formulation, followed by reacting the epoxy groups of the GlyMA residues located within the worm cores with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES), and concomitant hydrolysis/condensation of the pendent silanol groups with the secondary alcohol on the HPMA residues. TEM and DLS studies confirmed that such core cross-linked cationic worms remained colloidally stable when challenged with either excess methanol or a cationic surfactant. These cross-linked cationic worms are shown to be much more effective bridging flocculants for 1.0 μm silica particles at pH 9 than the corresponding linear cationic worms (and also various commercial high molecular weight water-soluble polymers.). Laser diffraction studies indicated silica aggregates of around 25–28 μm diameter when using the former worms but only 3–5 μm diameter when employing the latter worms. Moreover, SEM studies confirmed that the cross-linked worms remained intact after their adsorption onto the silica particles, whereas the

  2. Clinicopathologic investigation of a family with expanded SCA8 CTA/CTG repeats.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Kawakami, H; Wate, R; Matsumoto, S; Imai, T; Hirano, A; Kusaka, H

    2006-10-24

    We investigated a family manifesting progressive ataxia, with expanded SCA8 CTA/CTG repeats. Neuropathologically, degeneration of Purkinje, inferior olivary, and nigral neurons and periaqueductal gliosis were evident. The sites of Purkinje cell loss were occupied by fibrillary accumulations. The remaining Purkinje cells showed somatic sprouts, and intracytoplasmic 1C2-positive granular structures were recognizable. This characteristic distribution of neurodegeneration and Purkinje cell cytopathology were distinct from those of other hereditary spinocerebellar ataxias previously reported.

  3. DAMPE detection of variable GeV gamma-ray emission from blazar CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zun-Lei; Caragiulo, Micaela; Chang, Jin; Duan, Kai-Kai; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Gargano, Fabio; Lei, Shi-Jun; Li, Xiang; Liang, Yun-Feng; Mazziotta, M. Nicola; Shen, Zhao-Qiang; Su, Meng; Tykhonov, Andrii; Yuan, Qiang; Zimmer, Stephan; Dampe Collaboration; Li, Bin; Zhao, Hai-Bin; Cneost Group

    2016-12-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE), has detected variable gamma-ray emission from a source positionally coincident with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 4C +11.69) with redshift of z=1.037 (Schmidt 1965, ApJ, 141, 1295) and coordinates (J2000.0, from VLBI) of R.A.: 338.151704 deg, Dec.: 11.730807 deg (Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  4. CTA Spot Sign Predicts Hematoma Expansion in Patients with Delayed Presentation After Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Guido J.; McNamara, Kristen A.; Ayres, Alison M.; Oleinik, Alexandra; Schwab, Kristin; Romero, Javier M.; Viswanathan, Anand; Greenberg, Steven M.; Rosand, Jonathan; Goldstein, Joshua N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hematoma expansion after acute intracerebral hemorrhage occurs most frequently in patients presenting within 3 h of symptom onset. However, the majority of patients present outside this window or with an unknown onset time. We investigated the prevalence of hematoma expansion in these patients and assessed the accuracy of the CT angiography (CTA) spot sign for identifying risk of hematoma expansion. Methods We analyzed 391 consecutive patients undergoing CTA and a followup CT. CTA spot sign readings were performed by two experienced readers and hematoma expansion was assessed by means of semi-automated software. Results Hematoma expansion occurred in 18 % of patients. When stratified by time from symptom onset to initial CT, hematoma expansion rates were: 39 % within 3 h; 11 % between 3 and 6 h, 11 % beyond 6 h (but with known onset), and 20 % in patients with unknown symptom onset. Of patients who developed hematoma expansion, only 38 % presented within 3 h. The accuracy of the spot sign in predicting hematoma expansion was 0.67 for patients presenting within 3 h, 0.83 between 3 and 6 h, 0.88 after 6 h, and 0.76 for patients presenting with an unknown onset time. Conclusions A substantial number of patients destined to suffer from hematoma expansion present either late or with an unknown symptom onset time. The CTA spot sign accurately identifies patients destined to expand regardless of time from symptom onset, and may therefore open a path to offer clinical trials and novel therapies to the many patients who do not present acutely. PMID:22878870

  5. Hypothenar hammer syndrome in a computer programmer: CTA diagnosis and surgical and endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gawad, Ehab A; Bonatti, Hugo; Housseini, Ahmed M; Maged, Ismaeel M; Morgan, Raymond F; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2009-01-01

    Finger ischemia due to embolic occlusion of digital arteries resulting from trauma to the palmar ulnar artery has been termed hypothenar hammer syndrome (HHS). In HHS, arterial thrombosis and/or aneurysm formation with embolization to the digital arteries causes symptoms of ischemia. We describe a patient in whom the initial diagnosis was made on multidetector computed tomographic angiography (CTA), as well as his endovascular and surgical management.

  6. SIMULTANEOUS MULTIWAVELENGTH AND OPTICAL MICROVARIABILITY OBSERVATIONS OF CTA 102 (PKS J2232+1143)

    SciTech Connect

    Osterman Meyer, Angela; Miller, H. Richard; Marshall, Kevin; Ryle, Wesley T.; Aller, Hugh; Aller, Margo; Balonek, Tom

    2009-12-15

    We present analysis of both the short-term optical and long-term multiwavelength variability of CTA 102. In 2004, this object was observed in an intense optical flaring state. Extensive R-band microvariability observations were carried out during this high state. In 2005, we obtained several weeks of contemporaneous radio, optical, and X-ray observations of CTA 102. These observations recorded distinct flaring activity in all three wavebands. Subsequent analysis revealed that this object may appear redder when in a brighter optical state, and that the X-ray, optical, and radio activity do not appear to be correlated. The shape of the observed spectral energy distributions suggests that both synchrotron-related and external inverse Compton processes may contribute to the X-ray emission. Our results are also compared to other results on this object and archival microvariability observations. It appears that more rapid, dramatic microvariability events occur when CTA 102 is in an elevated optical flux state.

  7. The radio sources CTA 21 and OF+247: The hot spots of radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukh, V. S.; Tyul'bashev, S. A.; Chernikov, P. A.

    2013-06-01

    The physical conditions in the radio sources CTA 21 and OF+247 are studied assuming that the low-frequency spectral turnovers are due to synchrotron self-absorption. The physical parameters of the radio sources are estimated using a technique based on a nonuniform synchrotron source model. It is shown that the magnetic-field distributions in the dominant compact components of these radio sources are strongly inhomogeneous. The magnetic fields at the center of the sources are B ˜ 10-1 G, and the fields are two to three orders of magnitude weaker at the periphery. The magnetic field averaged over the compact component is B ˜ 10-3 G, and the density of relativistic electrons is n e ˜ 10-3 cm-3. Assuming that there is equipartition of the energies of the magnetic field and relativistic particles, averaged over the source, < E H > = < E e > ˜ 10-7-10-6 erg cm-3. The energy density of the magnetic field exceeds that of the relativistic electrons at the centers of the radio sources. The derived parameters of CTA 21 and OF+247 are close to those of the hot spots in the radio galaxy Cygnus A. On this basis, it is suggested that CTA 21 and OF+247 are radio galaxies at an early stage of their evolution, when the hot spots (dominant compact radio components) have appeared, and the radio lobes (weak extended components) are still being formed.

  8. Fully automatic cardiac segmentation from 3D CTA data: a multi-atlas based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirisli, Hortense A.; Schaap, Michiel; Klein, Stefan; Neefjes, Lisan A.; Weustink, Annick C.; Van Walsum, Theo; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2010-03-01

    Computed tomography angiography (CTA), a non-invasive imaging technique, is becoming increasingly popular for cardiac examination, mainly due to its superior spatial resolution compared to MRI. This imaging modality is currently widely used for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) but it is not commonly used for the diagnosis of ventricular and atrial function. In this paper, we present a fully automatic method for segmenting the whole heart (i.e. the outer surface of the myocardium) and cardiac chambers from CTA datasets. Cardiac chamber segmentation is particularly valuable for the extraction of ventricular and atrial functional information, such as stroke volume and ejection fraction. With our approach, we aim to improve the diagnosis of CAD by providing functional information extracted from the same CTA data, thus not requiring additional scanning. In addition, the whole heart segmentation method we propose can be used for visualization of the coronary arteries and for obtaining a region of interest for subsequent segmentation of the coronaries, ventricles and atria. Our approach is based on multi-atlas segmentation, and performed within a non-rigid registration framework. A leave-one-out quantitative validation was carried out on 8 images. The method showed a high accuracy, which is reflected in both a mean segmentation error of 1.05+/-1.30 mm and an average Dice coefficient of 0.93. The robustness of the method is demonstrated by successfully applying the method to 243 additional datasets, without any significant failure.

  9. Molecular environment, reverberation, and radiation from the pulsar wind nebula in CTA 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, Jonatan; Torres, Diego F.; Pedaletti, Giovanna

    2016-07-01

    We estimate the molecular mass around CTA 1 using data from Planck and the Harvard CO survey. We observe that the molecular mass in the vicinity of the complex is not enough to explain the TeV emission observed by VERITAS, even under favorable assumptions for the cosmic ray acceleration properties of the supernova remnant. This supports the idea that the TeV emission comes from the pulsar wind nebula (PWN). Here, we model the spectrum of the PWN at possible different stages of its evolution, including both the dynamics of the PWN and the supernova remnant and their interaction via the reverse shock. We have included in the model the energy lost via radiation by particles and the particles escape when computing the pressure produced by the gas. This leads to an evolving energy partition, since for the same instantaneous sharing of the injection of energy provided by the rotational power, the field and the particles are affected differently by radiation and losses. We present the model, and study in detail how the spectrum of a canonical isolated PWN is affected during compression and re-expansion and how this may impact on the CTA 1 case. By exploring the phase-space of parameters that lead to radii in agreement with those observed, we then analyse different situations that might represent the current stage of the CTA 1 PWN, and discuss caveats and requirements of each one.

  10. [Social and anthropology considerations on the composite tissues allotransplantations (CTA). Excerpts from reading and analysis of a surgeon].

    PubMed

    Cariou, J-L

    2007-10-01

    The author is neither anthropologist nor invested in social activities. He has learned some reviews of anthropology and some social and philosophical books since seven years. He describe not a general review but an analysis of these lectures according to the composite tissues allotransplantations (CTA). The discussion concerns anthropology and symbols, philosophical and social aspects. There is a natural umbilicus between the anthropological science and the surgical art according to CTA.

  11. Individually addressable thermo- and redox-responsive block copolymers by combining anionic polymerization and RAFT protocols.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bernhard V K J; Elbert, Johannes; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Gallei, Markus

    2014-04-01

    A novel diblock copolymer consisting of poly(vinylferrocene) (PVFc) and poly(N,N-diethylacrylamide) (PDEA) is synthesized via a combination of anionic and RAFT polymerization. The use of a novel route to hydroxyl-end-functionalized metallopolymers in anionic polymerization and subsequent esterification with a RAFT agent leads to a PVFc macro-CTA (M¯n = 3800 g mol(-1) ; Đ = 1.17). RAFT polymerization with DEA affords block copolymers as evidenced by (1) H NMR spectroscopy as well as size exclusion chromatography (6400 ≤ M¯n≤ 33700 g mol(-1) ; 1.31 ≤ Đ 1.28). Self-assembly of the amphiphilic block copolymers in aqueous solution leads to micelles as shown via TEM. Importantly, the distinct thermo-responsive and redox-responsive character of the blocks is probed via dynamic light scattering and found to be individually and repeatedly addressable.

  12. Absence of Protoheme IX Farnesyltransferase CtaB Causes Virulence Attenuation but Enhances Pigment Production and Persister Survival in MRSA.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Han, Jian; Zhang, Jia; Chen, Jiazhen; Wu, Nan; Zhang, Wenhong; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The membrane protein CtaB in S. aureus is a protoheme IX farnesyltransferase involved in the synthesis of the heme containing terminal oxidases of bacterial respiratory chain. In this study, to assess the role of CtaB in S. aureus virulence, pigment production, and persister formation, we constructed a ctaB mutant in the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain USA500. We found that deletion of ctaB attenuated growth and virulence in mice but enhanced pigment production and formation of quinolone tolerant persister cells in stationary phase. RNA-seq analysis showed that deletion of ctaB caused decreased transcription of several virulence genes including RNAIII which is consistent with its virulence attenuation. In addition, transcription of 20 ribosomal genes and 24 genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis was significantly down-regulated in the ctaB knockout mutant compared with the parent strain. These findings suggest the importance of heme biosynthesis in virulence and persister formation of S. aureus.

  13. Absence of Protoheme IX Farnesyltransferase CtaB Causes Virulence Attenuation but Enhances Pigment Production and Persister Survival in MRSA

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Han, Jian; Zhang, Jia; Chen, Jiazhen; Wu, Nan; Zhang, Wenhong; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The membrane protein CtaB in S. aureus is a protoheme IX farnesyltransferase involved in the synthesis of the heme containing terminal oxidases of bacterial respiratory chain. In this study, to assess the role of CtaB in S. aureus virulence, pigment production, and persister formation, we constructed a ctaB mutant in the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain USA500. We found that deletion of ctaB attenuated growth and virulence in mice but enhanced pigment production and formation of quinolone tolerant persister cells in stationary phase. RNA-seq analysis showed that deletion of ctaB caused decreased transcription of several virulence genes including RNAIII which is consistent with its virulence attenuation. In addition, transcription of 20 ribosomal genes and 24 genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis was significantly down-regulated in the ctaB knockout mutant compared with the parent strain. These findings suggest the importance of heme biosynthesis in virulence and persister formation of S. aureus. PMID:27822202

  14. Neonatal infections in Saudi Arabia: association with C-reactive protein, CRP -286 (C>T>A) gene polymorphism and IgG antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP) is a nonspecific, acute-phase protein that rises in response to infectious and non-infectious inflammatory processes. Infections are the single largest cause of neonatal deaths globally. The primary aim of this study is to examine the association between CRP gene polymorphism and serum levels of CRP in correlation with early onset sepsis (EOS) infection in newborns living in Taif city, Saudi Arabia. The second aim is to examine the relationship between specific IgG/IgG subclasses and early onset sepsis (EOS) infection among these newborns. Methods Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the most common organisms related to sepsis infection in the newborn at King Abdel Aziz Specialist Hospital (KAASH). This study was conducted in Taif city, at KAASH’s neonatal intensive care unit between March and August 2012. Neonates were consecutively enrolled onto the study having met our inclusion criteria (as per our research protocol). The CRP concentration level was analysed using NycoCard® CRP Single Test. CRP -286 (C>T>A) A polymorphisms were analyzed using Pyrosequencing technology for CRP genotyping. IgG subclasses were analysed in the study population using ELISA. Result Logistic regression analyses showed that the AA and AC genotypes were negatively associated amongst EOS neonates compared to suspected neonates. The frequency of CC and CT were significantly associated with the EOS neonates compared to the suspected group. The levels of specific IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3 antibodies were significantly lower amongst EOS compared to the suspected group. Conclusions Taken together, the CRP-286 (C>T>A) A genotype polymorphism and specific IgG antibodies isotype levels can contribute to a reduced risk of EOS. Furthermore, CRP has a potential use in detecting EOS in neonates, which may mean earlier detection and management of EOS and subsequently better clinical outcome. PMID:23941472

  15. Carbonic inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Kerkhof, Alfons; Thiéry, Régis

    2001-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of the phase relations in carbonic fluid inclusions with pure, binary and ternary mixtures of the system CO 2-CH 4-N 2, compositions, which are frequently found in geological materials. Phase transitions involving liquid, gas and solid phases in the temperature range between -192°C and 31°C are discussed and presented in phase diagrams ( PT, TX and VX projections). These diagrams can be applied for the interpretation of microthermometry data in order to determine fluid composition and molar volume (or density).

  16. Multiphase contrast-saline mixture injection with dual-flow in 64-row MDCT coronary CTA.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lizhen; Du, Xiangying; Li, Pengyu; Liu, Yaou; Li, Kuncheng

    2009-03-01

    To explore the feasibility of multiphase contrast-saline mixture with dual-flow injection technique for visualization of right ventricular (RV) cavity and interventricular septum (IVS) in 64-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography. Twenty-four patients underwent coronary CT angiography (CTA) imaging with 64-row MDCT. In twelve patients (group A), 60 ml contrast medium (CM) bolus was followed by 40 ml saline, and in the other twelve patients (group B), 50 ml CM bolus was followed by 50 ml contrast-saline mixture at 60:40 ratio. The CM, saline and contrast-saline mixture flow rate were all 5.0 ml/s. Two experienced radiologists measured the CT values of ascending aorta, descending aorta, pulmonary artery and RV, rated the uniformity of RV cavity, the visualization of coronary arteries and IVS independently. By Kappa test, agreement between the two radiologists was 0.93 and 0.86 concerning the CT value measurements and the grades of the three indexes, respectively. By t-test, the mean CT values of ascending aorta and descending aorta of the two groups had no statistical difference (t=1.459, P>0.05; t=1.619, P>0.05); while the mean CT values of pulmonary artery and RV cavity had statistical differences (t=8.316, P<0.05; t=10.372, P<0.05). By two-related rank sum test, according to the visualization of coronary arteries and the uniformity of RV cavity, there were no statistical differences (U=66.00, P>0.05; U=54.00, P>0.05); while according to the visualization of IVS, group B was better than group A (U=8.00, P<0.05). In coronary CTA, a contrast-saline mixture after CM bolus can provide clear visualization of RV and IVS and LV without impairing coronary CTA image.

  17. Automated registration of coronary arterial trees from multiple phases in coronary CT angiography (cCTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Chughtai, Aamer; Agarwal, Prachi; Kuriakose, Jean; Patel, Smita; Wei, Jun; Kazerooni, Ella

    2013-03-01

    We are developing an automated registration method for coronary arterial trees from multiple-phase cCTA to build a best-quality tree to facilitate detection of stenotic plaques. Cubic B-spline with fast localized optimization (CBSO) is designed to register the initially segmented left and right coronary arterial trees (LCA or RCA) separately in adjacent phase pairs where displacements are small. First, the corresponding trees in phase 1 and 2 are registered. The phase 3 tree is then registered to the combined tree. Similarly the trees in phases 4, 5, and 6 are registered. An affine transform with quadratic terms and nonlinear simplex optimization (AQSO) is designed to register the trees between phases with large displacements, namely, registering the combined tree from phases 1, 2, and 3 to that from phases 4, 5, and 6. Finally, CBSO is again applied to the AQSO registered volumes for final refinement. The costs determined by the distances between the vessel centerlines, bifurcation points and voxels of the trees are minimized to guide both CBSO and AQSO registration. The registration performance was evaluated on 22 LCA and 22 RCA trees on 22 CTA scans with 6 phases from 22 patients. The average distance between the centerlines of the registered trees was used as a registration quality index. The average distances for LCA and RCA registration for 6 phases and 22 patients were 1.49 and 1.43 pixels, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using automated method for registration of coronary arterial trees from multiple cCTA phases.

  18. Making Polymeric Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Hyson, Michael T.; Chung, Sang-Kun; Colvin, Michael S.; Chang, Manchium

    1989-01-01

    Combination of advanced techniques yields uniform particles for biomedical applications. Process combines ink-jet and irradiation/freeze-polymerization techniques to make polymeric microspheres of uniform size in diameters from 100 to 400 micrometer. Microspheres used in chromatography, cell sorting, cell labeling, and manufacture of pharmaceutical materials.

  19. Making Polymeric Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Hyson, Michael T.; Chung, Sang-Kun; Colvin, Michael S.; Chang, Manchium

    1989-01-01

    Combination of advanced techniques yields uniform particles for biomedical applications. Process combines ink-jet and irradiation/freeze-polymerization techniques to make polymeric microspheres of uniform size in diameters from 100 to 400 micrometer. Microspheres used in chromatography, cell sorting, cell labeling, and manufacture of pharmaceutical materials.

  20. Step-Growth Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stille, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Following a comparison of chain-growth and step-growth polymerization, focuses on the latter process by describing requirements for high molecular weight, step-growth polymerization kinetics, synthesis and molecular weight distribution of some linear step-growth polymers, and three-dimensional network step-growth polymers. (JN)

  1. Very high energy observations of the Galactic Centre: recent results and perspectives with CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrier, Regis

    2016-07-01

    The central 300 pc of our Galaxy are a major laboratory for high energy astrophysics. They harbor the closest supermassive black hole (SMBH) and are the site of a sustained star formation activity. The energy released by the supernovae on the ambient medium must be very strong. Similarly, albeit extremely faint nowadays, the SMBH must have experienced episodes of intense activity in the past which can influence significantly the central regions and beyond, e.g. powering the Fermi bubbles. I review observational results at very high energies from the central region and discuss their implications and the questions they leave open. I discuss the perspectives CTA offers for Galactic Centre astrophysics.

  2. AGILE detection of renewed and intense gamma-ray flaring from the FSRQ CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Verrecchia, F.; Tavani, M.; Vercellone, S.; Pittori, C.; Lucarelli, F.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Minervini, G.; Piano, G.; Ursi, A.; Donnarumma, I.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Paoletti, F.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-12-01

    AGILE is detecting renewed and intense gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from the flat-spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 4C +11.69, PKS 2230+11, 5BZQ J2232+1143 and as the gamma-ray source as 3EG J2232+1147, 3FGL J2232.5+114), recently reported in flaring activity by AGILE on December 14 (ATel #9863), December 9 (Atel #9840), November 24 and 11, 2016 (ATel #9788, #9743), by Fermi-LAT on December 16 (ATel #9869), in optical/NIR/radio (ATel #9884, #9868, #9821, #9808 and #9801).

  3. AGILE detection of intense gamma-ray emission from the FSRQ CTA102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Tavani, M.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.; Lucarelli, F.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Minervini, G.; Piano, G.; Ursi, A.; Donnarumma, I.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Vercellone, S.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Paoletti, F.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-12-01

    AGILE is detecting enhanced gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a position consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 4C +11.69, PKS 2230+11, 5BZQ J2232+1143 and as gamma-ray source as 3EG J2232+1147, 3FGL J2232.5+114), recently reported in flaring activity by AGILE on December 9 (Atel #9841), November 24 and 11, 2016 (ATel #9788, #9743), and in optical/NIR extraordinary outburst (ATel #9821, #9808 and #9801).

  4. Búsqueda de Sitios para CTA: Análisis de Datos Satelitales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, A. E.; Medina, M. C.; Romero, G. E.

    The CTA Consortium has decided to implement a systematic search for sites for the Observatory. This search will be made in two different steps. The first one consists of a general determination of the possible sites on the basis of some very basic selection criteria, such as geographic latitude, altitude and extension of the flat area needed. For those sites passing these criteria, a more intensive characterization should be made, using available satellite data, together with existing ground or air-based measurements. In this work we compare the behavior of different sites analyzing the aerosol content and the total precipitable water vapor, measured by MODIS instrument. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  5. Coronary CT angiography (cCTA): automated registration of coronary arterial trees from multiple phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Chughtai, Aamer; Agarwal, Prachi; Kuriakose, Jean; Kazerooni, Ella; Wei, Jun; Patel, Smita

    2014-08-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) is a commonly used imaging modality for the evaluation of coronary artery disease. cCTA is generally reconstructed in multiple cardiac phases because different coronary arteries may be better visualized in some phases than in others due to the periodic cardiac motion. We are developing an automated registration method for coronary arterial trees from multiple-phase cCTA that has potential application in building a ‘best-quality’ tree to facilitate image analysis and detection of stenotic plaques. Given the segmented left or right coronary arterial (LCA or RCA) trees from the multiple phases as input, the adjacent phase pairs, where displacements are relatively small, are registered by a specifically designed method based on a cubic B-spline with fast localized optimization (CBSO). For the phase pairs with large displacements, a global registration using an affine transform with quadratic terms and nonlinear simplex optimization (AQSO) is followed by a local registration using CBSO to refine the AQSO registered volumes. 26 LCA and 26 RCA trees with six cCTA phases from 26 patients were used for registration evaluation. The average distances for the tree pairs between the adjacent phases with small displacements before and after CBSO registration were 0.96  ±  0.79 and 0.76  ±  0.61 mm respectively for LCA, and 0.93  ±  0.97 and 0.64  ±  0.43 mm, respectively for RCA. The average distance differences before and after registration were statistically significant (p < 0.001) for both LCA and RCA trees. The average distances for the distant phases with large displacements before registration, after AQSO registration, and finally after the CBSO registration were 2.85  ±  1.46, 1.62  ±  0.76, and 0.97  ±  0.43 mm, respectively for LCA, and 4.03  ±  2.36, 2.18  ±  1.11, and 0.97  ±  0.44 mm, respectively for RCA. The average distance differences between every two

  6. Fermi LAT Detection of a Rapid, Powerful Gamma-ray Flare of the FSRQ CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Bryce; Ojha, Roopesh

    2015-12-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 3FGL J2232.5+1143, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23) with radio coordinates R.A.: 338.1517038 deg, Dec: 11.7308067 deg (J2000, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880) at redshift z=1.037 (Schmidt 1965, ApJ, 141, 1295).

  7. Fermi-LAT detection of strong flaring activity from the FSRQ CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, J.; Carpenter, Bryce; Cutini, Sara

    2016-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has observed increasing gamma-ray activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 3FGL J2232.5+1143, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS, 218, 23) with radio coordinates R.A.: 338.1517038 deg, Dec: 11.7308067 deg (J2000, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880) at redshift z=1.037 (Schmidt 1965, ApJ, 141, 1295).

  8. Coronary CT angiography (cCTA): automated registration of coronary arterial trees from multiple phases.

    PubMed

    Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Chughtai, Aamer; Agarwal, Prachi; Kuriakose, Jean; Kazerooni, Ella; Wei, Jun; Patel, Smita

    2014-08-21

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) is a commonly used imaging modality for the evaluation of coronary artery disease. cCTA is generally reconstructed in multiple cardiac phases because different coronary arteries may be better visualized in some phases than in others due to the periodic cardiac motion. We are developing an automated registration method for coronary arterial trees from multiple-phase cCTA that has potential application in building a 'best-quality' tree to facilitate image analysis and detection of stenotic plaques. Given the segmented left or right coronary arterial (LCA or RCA) trees from the multiple phases as input, the adjacent phase pairs, where displacements are relatively small, are registered by a specifically designed method based on a cubic B-spline with fast localized optimization (CBSO). For the phase pairs with large displacements, a global registration using an affine transform with quadratic terms and nonlinear simplex optimization (AQSO) is followed by a local registration using CBSO to refine the AQSO registered volumes. 26 LCA and 26 RCA trees with six cCTA phases from 26 patients were used for registration evaluation. The average distances for the tree pairs between the adjacent phases with small displacements before and after CBSO registration were 0.96  ±  0.79 and 0.76  ±  0.61 mm respectively for LCA, and 0.93  ±  0.97 and 0.64  ±  0.43 mm, respectively for RCA. The average distance differences before and after registration were statistically significant (p < 0.001) for both LCA and RCA trees. The average distances for the distant phases with large displacements before registration, after AQSO registration, and finally after the CBSO registration were 2.85  ±  1.46, 1.62  ±  0.76, and 0.97  ±  0.43 mm, respectively for LCA, and 4.03  ±  2.36, 2.18  ±  1.11, and 0.97  ±  0.44 mm, respectively for RCA. The average distance differences

  9. Fermi LAT detection of a continuing increase of gamma-ray activity of CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orienti, M.; D'Ammando, F.

    2012-09-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed gamma-ray flaring activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 2FGL J2232.4+1143, Nolan et al. 2012, ApJS, 199, 31) with radio coordinates R.A.: 338.1517038 deg, Dec: 11.7308067 deg (J2000, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880) at redshift z=1.037 (Schmidt 1965, ApJ, 141, 1295).

  10. Polymeric Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C-S.

    1999-11-02

    Synthesis of polymeric carbon dioxide has long been of interest to many chemists and materials scientists. Very recently we discovered the polymeric phase of carbon dioxide (called CO{sub 2}-V) at high pressures and temperatures. Our optical and x-ray results indicate that CO{sub 2}-V is optically non-linear, generating the second harmonic of Nd: YLF laser at 527 nm and is also likely superhard similar to cubic-boron nitride or diamond. CO{sub 2}-V is made of CO{sub 4} tetrahedra, analogous to SiO{sub 2} polymorphs, and is quenchable at ambient temperature at pressures above 1 GPa. In this paper, we describe the pressure-induced polymerization of carbon dioxide together with the stability, structure, and mechanical and optical properties of polymeric CO{sub 2}-V. We also present some implications of polymeric CO{sub 2} for high-pressure chemistry and new materials synthesis.

  11. A novel non-toxic combined CTA1-DD and ISCOMS adjuvant vector for effective mucosal immunization against influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Dubravka Grdic; Helgeby, Anja; Schön, Karin; Nygren, Caroline; El-Bakkouri, Karim; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier; Lövgren, Karin Bengtsson; Nyström, Ida; Lycke, Nils Y

    2011-05-23

    Here we demonstrate that by using non-toxic fractions of saponin combined with CTA1-DD we can achieve a safe and above all highly efficacious mucosal adjuvant vector. We optimized the construction, tested the requirements for function and evaluated proof-of-concept in an influenza A virus challenge model. We demonstrated that the CTA1-3M2e-DD/ISCOMS vector provided 100% protection against mortality and greatly reduced morbidity in the mouse model. The immunogenicity of the vector was superior to other vaccine formulations using the ISCOM or CTA1-DD adjuvants alone. The versatility of the vector was best exemplified by the many options to insert, incorporate or admix vaccine antigens with the vector. Furthermore, the CTA1-3M2e-DD/ISCOMS could be kept 1 year at 4°C or as a freeze-dried powder without affecting immunogenicity or adjuvanticity of the vector. Strong serum IgG and mucosal IgA responses were elicited and CD4 T cell responses were greatly enhanced after intranasal administration of the combined vector. Together these findings hold promise for the combined vector as a mucosal vaccine against influenza virus infections including pandemic influenza. The CTA1-DD/ISCOMS technology represents a breakthrough in mucosal vaccine vector design which successfully combines immunomodulation and targeting in a safe and stable particulate formation.

  12. Intra-night variability of the blazar CTA 102 during its 2012 and 2016 giant outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachev, R.; Popov, V.; Strigachev, A.; Semkov, E.; Ibryamov, S.; Spassov, B.; Latev, G.; Muñoz Dimitrova, R. V.; Boeva, S.

    2017-10-01

    We obtained and analysed more than 100 h of multicolour optical time series of the blazar CTA 102 during its 2012 and 2016 outbursts. The object reached almost 11th mag at the end of 2016, which is perhaps the brightest blazar state ever observed! During both outbursts, CTA 102 showed significant and rapid variability on intra-night time-scales, reaching up to 0.2 mag for 30 min on some occasions. The 'rms-flux' relation, built for all data sets, shows a large scatter and no apparent saturation on the magnitude scale. The ensemble structure function of the light curves can be fitted well with a straight line of a slope of ∼0.4. The time lags between the different optical bands appear to be consistent with zero, taking into account our time resolution. We discuss different variability scenarios and favour the changing Doppler factor of the emitting blobs as the most plausible one to account for the observed intra-night variability.

  13. On the location of the supermassive black hole in CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, Christian M.; Perucho, Manel; Ros, Eduardo; Savolainen, Tuomas; Zensus, J. Anton

    2015-04-01

    Context. Relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei are one of the most powerful phenomena in the Universe. They form in the surroundings of the supermassive black holes as a by-product of accretion onto the central black hole in active galaxies. The flow in the jets propagates at velocities close to the speed of light. The distance between the first part of the jet that is visible in radio images (core) and the black hole is still a matter of debate. Aims: Only very-long-baseline interferometry observations resolve the innermost compact regions of the radio jet. These observations can access the jet base, and by combining data at different wavelenghts, address the physical parameters of the outflow from its emission. Methods: We have performed an accurate analysis of the frequency-dependent shift of the VLBI core location for a multi-wavelength set of images of the blazar CTA 102 including data from 6 cm down to 3 mm. Results: The measure of the position of the central black hole, with mass ~108.93M⊙, in the blazar CTA 102 reveals a distance of ~8 × 104 gravitational radii to the 86 GHz core, in agreement with similar measures obtained for other blazars and distant radio galaxies, and in contrast with recent results for the case of nearby radio galaxies, which show distances between the black hole and the radio core that can be two orders of magnitude smaller.

  14. Instrumentation for comparing night sky quality and atmospheric conditions of CTA site candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruck, C.; Gaug, M.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Mandát, D.; Schweizer, T.; Häfner, D.; Bulik, T.; Cieslar, M.; Costantini, H.; Dominik, M.; Ebr, J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Lorentz, E.; Pareschi, G.; Pech, M.; Puerto-Giménez, I.; Teshima, M.

    2015-04-01

    Many atmospheric and climatic criteria have to be taken into account for the selection of a suitable site for the next generation of imaging air-shower Cherenkov telescopes, the ``Cherenkov Telescope Array'' CTA. Such data are not available with sufficient precision, thus a comparison of the proposed sites and final decision based on a comprehensive characterization is impossible. Identical cross-calibrated instruments have been developed which allow for precise comparison between sites, the cross-validation of existing data, and the ground-validation of satellite data. The site characterization work package of the CTA consortium opted to construct and deploy 9 copies of an autonomous multi-purpose weather sensor, incorporating an infrared cloud sensor, a newly developed sensor for measuring the light of the night sky, and an All-Sky-Camera, the whole referred to as Autonomous Tool for Measuring Observatory Site COnditions PrEcisely (ATMOSCOPE). We present here the hardware that was combined into the ATMOSCOPE and characterize its performance.

  15. Biodegradable Multiblock Poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide] via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer Polymerization and Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kui; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopečková, Pavla; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2011-04-26

    A new bifunctional chain transfer agent (CTA) containing alkyne end groups was designed, synthesized and used for direct synthesis of clickable telechelic polymers. Good control of reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) was achieved by using the new CTA, as indicated by a linear increase of number average molecular weight (Mn) with conversion and low polydispersity (PDI) (<1.1). In particular, enzymatically degradable multiblock HPMA polymers were readily prepared by subsequent reaction with αω, -diazido oligopeptide (GFLG) sequence via Cu(I) catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition. Upon exposure of high molecular weight fractions of multiblock polyHPMA to papain or cathepsin B, the polymer was degraded into segments of molecular weight and narrow polydispersity similar to those of the initial telechelic polyHPMA.

  16. Improved Livingness and Control over Branching in RAFT Polymerization of Acrylates: Could Microflow Synthesis Make the Difference?

    PubMed

    Derboven, Pieter; Van Steenberge, Paul H M; Vandenbergh, Joke; Reyniers, Marie-Francoise; Junkers, Thomas; D'hooge, Dagmar R; Marin, Guy B

    2015-12-01

    The superior capabilities of structured microreactors over batch reactors are demonstrated for reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) solution polymerization of n-butyl acrylate with the aid of simulations, explicitly accounting for the chain length distribution of all macrospecies types. Since perfect isothermicity can be established in a microreactor, less side products due to backbiting and β-scission are formed compared to the batch operation in which ineffective heat removal leads to an undesirable temperature spike. For a given RAFT chain transfer agent (CTA), additional microstructural control results under microflow conditions by optimizing the reaction temperature, lowering the dilution degree, or decreasing the initial molar ratio of monomer to RAFT CTA.

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery planning based on time-resolved CTA for arteriovenous malformation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Turner, Ryan C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Josiah, Darnell; Gonzalez, Javier; Schmidt, Matthew; Tarabishy, Abdul Rahman; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-08-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery has long been recognized as the optimal form of management for high-grade arteriovenous malformations not amenable to surgical resection. Radiosurgical plans have generally relied upon the integration of stereotactic magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), standard contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or computed tomography angiography (CTA) with biplane digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Current options are disadvantageous in that catheter-based biplane DSA is an invasive test associated with a small risk of complications and perhaps more importantly, the two-dimensional nature of DSA is an inherent limitation in creating radiosurgical contours. The necessity of multiple scans to create DSA contours for radiosurgical planning puts patients at increased risk. Furthermore, the inability to import two-dimensional plans into some radiosurgery programs, such as Cyberknife TPS, limits treatment options for patients. Defining the nidus itself is sometimes difficult in any of the traditional modalities as all draining veins and feeding arteries are included in the images. This sometimes necessitates targeting a larger volume, than strictly necessary, with stereotactic radiosurgery for treatment of the AVM. In this case report, we show the ability to use a less-invasive and three-dimensional form of angiography based on time-lapsed CTA (4D-CTA) rather than traditional DSA for radiosurgical planning. 4D-CTA may allow generation of a series of images, which can show the flow of contrast through the AVM. A review of these series may allow the surgeon to pick and use a volume set that best outlines the nidus with least interference from feeding arteries or draining veins. In addition, 4D-CTA scans can be uploaded into radiosurgery programs and allow three-dimensional targeting. This is the first reported case demonstrating the use of a 4D CTA and an MRI to delineate the AVM nidus for Gamma Knife radiosurgery, with complete

  18. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  19. Influence of the geomagnetic field on the IACT detection technique for possible sites of CTA observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szanecki, M.; Bernlöhr, K.; Sobczyńska, D.; Niedźwiecki, A.; Sitarek, J.; Bednarek, W.

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the influence of the geomagnetic field (GF) on the Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescope technique for two northern (Tenerife and San Pedro Martir) and three southern (Salta, Leoncito and Namibia (the H.E.S.S.-site)) site candidates for Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatories. We use the CORSIKA and sim_telarray programs for Monte Carlo simulations of gamma ray showers, hadronic background and the telescope response. We focus here on gamma ray measurements in the low energy, sub-100 GeV, range. Therefore, we only consider the performance of arrays of several large telescopes. Neglecting the GF effect, we find (in agreement with previous studies) that such arrays have lower energy thresholds, and larger collection areas below 30 GeV, when located at higher altitudes. We point out, however, that in the considered ranges of altitudes and magnetic field intensities, 1800-3600 m a.s.l. and 0-40 μT, respectively, the GF effect has a similar magnitude to this altitude effect. We provide the trigger-level performance parameters of the observatory affected by the GF effect, in particular the collection areas, detection rates and the energy thresholds for all five locations, which information may be useful in the selection of sites for CTA. We also find simple scaling of these parameters with the magnetic field strength, which can be used to assess the magnitude of the GF effect for other sites; in this work we use them to estimate the performance parameters for five sites: South Africa-Beaufort West, USA-Yavapai Ranch, Namibia-Calapanzi, Chile-La Silla and India-Hanle. We roughly investigate the impact of the geophysical conditions on gamma/hadron separation procedures involving image shape and direction cuts. We note that the change of altitude has an opposite effect at the trigger and analysis levels, i.e. gains in triggering efficiency at higher altitudes are partially balanced by losses in the separation efficiency. In turn, a stronger GF spoils both the

  20. Catching the radio flare in CTA 102. II. VLBI kinematic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, C. M.; Ros, E.; Perucho, M.; Savolainen, T.; Mimica, P.; Kadler, M.; Lobanov, A. P.; Lister, M. L.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Zensus, J. A.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations can resolve the radio structure of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and provide estimates of the structural and kinematic characteristics on parsec-scales in their jets. The changes in the kinematics of the observed jet features can be used to study the physical conditions in the innermost regions of these sources. We performed multifrequency multiepoch Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the blazar CTA 102 during its 2006 radio flare, the strongest ever reported for this source. These observations provide an excellent opportunity to investigate the evolution of the physical properties of blazars, especially during these flaring events Aims: We want to study the kinematic changes in the source during the strong radio outburst in April 2006 and test the assumption of a shock-shock interaction. This assumption is based on the analysis and modeling of the single-dish observations of CTA 102 (Paper I). Methods: In this paper we study the kinematics of CTA 102 at several frequencies using VLBI observations. From the modeled jet features we derived estimates for the evolution of the physical parameters, such as the particle density and the magnetic field. Furthermore, we combined our observations during the 2006 flare with long-term VLBA monitoring of the source at 15 GHz and 43 GHz. Results: We cross-identified seven features throughout our entire multifrequency observations and find evidence of two possible recollimation shocks around 0.1 mas (deprojected 18 pc at a viewing angle ϑ = 2.6°) and 6.0 mas (deprojected 1 kpc) from the core. The 43 GHz observations reveal a feature ejected at epoch tej = 2005.9 ± 0.2, which could be connected to the 2006 April radio flare. Furthermore, this feature might be associated with the traveling component involved in the possible shock-shock interaction, which gives rise to the observed double peak structure in the single-dish light curves reported in Paper I

  1. Inclusion and Museums: Developing Inclusive Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Hannah

    2009-01-01

    Recent policy on inclusion has had an impact on the development of museum galleries and related educational provision. Museums are used as learning organisations and, as such, need to consider how to create an inclusive environment. However, inclusive provision for people with learning difficulties in museums tends to be isolated and small scale,…

  2. Comparison of biofouling mechanisms between cellulose triacetate (CTA) and thin-film composite (TFC) polyamide forward osmosis membranes in osmotic membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhua; Zhao, Yanxiao; Yuan, Bo; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Xiufen; Ren, Yueping

    2016-02-01

    There are two types of popular forward osmosis (FO) membrane materials applied for researches on FO process, cellulose triacetate (CTA) and thin film composite (TFC) polyamide. However, performance and fouling mechanisms of commercial TFC FO membrane in osmotic membrane bioreactors (OMBRs) are still unknown. In current study, its biofouling behaviors in OMBRs were investigated and further compared to the CTA FO membrane. The results indicated that β-D-glucopyranose polysaccharides and microorganisms accounted for approximately 77% of total biovolume on the CTA FO membrane while β-D-glucopyranose polysaccharides (biovolume ratio of 81.1%) were the only dominant biofoulants on the TFC FO membrane. The analyses on the biofouling structure implied that a tighter biofouling layer with a larger biovolume was formed on the CTA FO membrane. The differences in biofouling behaviors including biofoulants composition and biofouling structure between CTA and TFC FO membranes were attributed to different membrane surface properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fear memory formation can affect a different memory: fear conditioning affects the extinction, but not retrieval, of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) memory

    PubMed Central

    Joels, Gil; Lamprecht, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    The formation of fear memory to a specific stimulus leads to subsequent fearful response to that stimulus. However, it is not apparent whether the formation of fear memory can affect other memories. We study whether specific fearful experience leading to fear memory affects different memories formation and extinction. We revealed that cued fear conditioning, but not unpaired or naïve training, inhibited the extinction of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) memory that was formed after fear conditioning training in rats. Fear conditioning had no effect on retrieval of CTA memory but specifically impaired its extinction. Extinguished fear memory, after fear extinction training, had no effect on future CTA memory extinction. Fear conditioning had no effect on CTA memory extinction if CTA memory was formed before fear conditioning. Conditioned taste aversion had no effect on fear conditioning memory extinction. We conclude that active cued fear conditioning memory can affect specifically the extinction, but not the formation, of future different memory. PMID:25324744

  4. AGILE detects renewed gamma-ray emission from the FSRQ CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Pittori, C.; Minervini, G.; Piano, G.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Tavani, M.; Donnarumma, I.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Vercellone, S.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-11-01

    AGILE is detecting an increasing gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a source with galactic coordinates (l,b)= (77.2 , -38.3) +/- 0.5 deg (stat 95% c.l.) +/- 0.1 deg (syst), (RA, Dec) = (337.81, 11.82) (J2000), consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102. Integrating from 2016-11-22 06:44:00 UT to 2016-11-24 06:44:00 UT, a preliminary maximum likelihood analysis yields a detection with a significance of 9 sigma, and a flux F(E > 100 MeV)=(5.2 +/- 1.0) x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1.

  5. AGILE detection of enhanced gamma-ray emission from the FSRQ CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minervini, G.; Piano, G.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Bulgarelli, A.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Tavani, M.; Donnarumma, I.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Vercellone, S.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-11-01

    AGILE is detecting increased gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a source with galactic coordinates (l,b)= (77.4 , -38.4) +/- 0.6 deg (stat 95% c.l.) +/- 0.1 deg (syst), (RA, Dec) = (338.0, 11.8) (J2000), consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102. Integrating from 2016-11-08 10:30:00 UT to 2016-11-10 10:30:00 UT, a preliminary maximum likelihood analysis yields a detection with a significance of 6 sigma, and a flux F(E > 100 MeV)=(3.8 +/- 1.1) x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1.

  6. Swift observation of strong X-ray and UV activity of CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, S.; Verrecchia, F.

    2016-12-01

    The flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also historically known as 4C +11.69, PKS 2230+11, OY 150, DA 582, H 2230+114 and a well known gamma-ray source in the MeV/GeV bands, 3EG J2232+1147, 3FGL J2232.5+1143) has been subject into a prolonged outburst activity at optical and gamma-ray energy bands since the end of Oct. 2016 (see, for example, preliminary optical results in ATel#9676, ATel#9732, ATel#9756, ATel#9776, ATel#9801, ATel#9808, ATel#9821, preliminary gamma-ray results by AGILE in ATel#9743, ATel#9788, ATel#9840, and by the public Fermi LAT uncalibrated flux data).

  7. COMPTEL observations of the blazars 3C 454.3 and CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Collmar, W.; Schönfelder, V.; Bloemen, H.; Hermsen, W.; McConnell, M.; Bennett, K.; Williams, O. R.

    2001-10-01

    We have analyzed the two blazars of 3C 454.3 and CTA 102 using all available COMPTEL data from 1991 to 1999. In the 10-30 MeV band, emission from the general direction of the sources is found at the 4σ-level, being consistent with contributions from both sources. Below 10 MeV only 3C 454.3 is significantly detected, with the strongest evidence (5.6 σ) in the 3-10 MeV band. Significant flux variability is not observed for both sources, while a low emission is seen most of the years in the 3-10 MeV light curve for 3C 454.3. Its time-averaged MeV spectrum suggests a power maximum between 3 to 10 MeV. .

  8. The CTA sensitivity to Lorentz-violating effects on the gamma-ray horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbairn, M.; Nilsson, A.; Ellis, J.; Hinton, J.; White, R.

    2014-06-01

    The arrival of TeV-energy photons from distant galaxies is expected to be affected by their QED interaction with intergalactic radiation fields through electron-positron pair production. In theories where high-energy photons violate Lorentz symmetry, the kinematics of the process γ+γ→e++e- is altered and the cross section suppressed. Consequently, one would expect more of the highest-energy photons to arrive if QED is modified by Lorentz violation than if it is not. We estimate the sensitivity of Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) to changes in the gamma-ray horizon of the Universe due to Lorentz violation, and find that it should be competitive with other leading constraints.

  9. Catching the radio flare in CTA 102. III. Core-shift and spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, C. M.; Ros, E.; Perucho, M.; Savolainen, T.; Mimica, P.; Kadler, M.; Lobanov, A. P.; Zensus, J. A.

    2013-09-01

    Context. The temporal and spatial spectral evolution of the jets of active galactic nuclei (AGN) can be studied with multi-frequency, multi-epoch very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI) observations. The combination of both morphological (kinematical) and spectral parameters can be used to derive source-intrinsic physical properties, such as the magnetic field and the nonthermal particle density. Such a study is of special interest during the high states of activity in AGNs, since VLBI observations can provide estimates of the location of the flaring site. Furthermore, we can trace the temporal variations in the source-intrinsic parameters during the flare, which may reflect the interaction between the underlying plasma and a traveling shock wave. The source CTA 102 exhibited such a radio flare around 2006. Aims: In the first two papers of this series (Papers I and II), we analyzed the single-dish light curves and the VLBI kinematics of the blazar CTA 102 and suggested a shock-shock interaction between a traveling and a standing shock wave as a possible scenario to explain the observed evolution of the component associated to the 2006 flare. In this paper we investigate the core shift and spectral evolution to test our hypothesis of a shock-shock interaction. Methods: We used eight multi-frequency Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations to analyze the temporal and spatial evolution of the spectral parameters during the flare. We observed CTA 102 between May 2005 and April 2007 using the VLBA at six different frequencies spanning from 2 GHz up to 86 GHz. After the calibrated VLBA images were corrected for opacity, we performed a detailed spectral analysis. We developed methods for aligning the images and extracting the uncertainties in the spectral parameters. From the derived values we estimated the magnetic field and the density of the relativistic particles and combined those values with the kinematical changes provided from the long-term VLBA monitoring

  10. Comparative requirements for exploratory clinical trials -- eIND, eCTA and microdosing.

    PubMed

    Muller, Patrick Y

    2011-06-19

    Exploratory clinical trials provide a strategy for rapid human entry of investigational drugs. Such clinical studies are typically conducted during early clinical development in phase I as first-in-human studies, have no therapeutic intent, are not intended to examine clinical tolerability and involve a small number of human subjects at limited dose/exposure. Early decision data derived from such clinical studies may include PK, PD and/or biomarker-based translational medicine endpoints as well as PK/PD modeling approaches. This review critically discusses the various exploratory clinical trial strategies, their advantages and disadvantages as well as the regulatory safety requirements. In this respect, strategies for exploratory Investigational New Drugs (eIND), exploratory Clinical Trial Applications (eCTA) and microdosing are highlighted and compared in view of the new ICH M3(R2) guideline including options for biotechnology-derived pharmaceuticals such as monoclonal antibodies.

  11. The CTA sensitivity to Lorentz-violating effects on the gamma-ray horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbairn, M.; Ellis, J.; Nilsson, A.; Hinton, J.; White, R. E-mail: atf10ani@student.lu.se E-mail: jah85@leicester.ac.uk

    2014-06-01

    The arrival of TeV-energy photons from distant galaxies is expected to be affected by their QED interaction with intergalactic radiation fields through electron-positron pair production. In theories where high-energy photons violate Lorentz symmetry, the kinematics of the process γ+γ→e{sup +}+e{sup −} is altered and the cross section suppressed. Consequently, one would expect more of the highest-energy photons to arrive if QED is modified by Lorentz violation than if it is not. We estimate the sensitivity of Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) to changes in the gamma-ray horizon of the Universe due to Lorentz violation, and find that it should be competitive with other leading constraints.

  12. Observation of high-energy gamma rays from the quasi-stellar object CTA 102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    The quasar CTA 102 (QSO 2230 + 114) was observed four times in 1991-1992 by the EGRET high-energy gamma-ray telescope on the Compton GRO satellite. In the 1992 January 23-February 6 observation, emission was detected at the level (2.4 +/- 0.5) x 10 exp 7 photons/sq cm s (E is greater than 100 MeV). The other observations produced upper limits or detections with lower significance which are consistent with the same flux. The photon spectrum can be represented by a power law with a number index of 2.6 +/- 0.2, the softest so far observed by EGRET. The emitted gamma-ray luminosity, if isotropic, is 5 x 10 exp 47 ergs/s (H(0) = 75 km/s Mpc , q(0) = 0.5), although there are good reasons to believe that the gamma emission is strongly beamed.

  13. Observation of high-energy gamma rays from the quasi-stellar object CTA 102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    The quasar CTA 102 (QSO 2230 + 114) was observed four times in 1991-1992 by the EGRET high-energy gamma-ray telescope on the Compton GRO satellite. In the 1992 January 23-February 6 observation, emission was detected at the level (2.4 +/- 0.5) x 10 exp 7 photons/sq cm s (E is greater than 100 MeV). The other observations produced upper limits or detections with lower significance which are consistent with the same flux. The photon spectrum can be represented by a power law with a number index of 2.6 +/- 0.2, the softest so far observed by EGRET. The emitted gamma-ray luminosity, if isotropic, is 5 x 10 exp 47 ergs/s (H(0) = 75 km/s Mpc , q(0) = 0.5), although there are good reasons to believe that the gamma emission is strongly beamed.

  14. X-RAY PULSATIONS FROM THE RADIO-QUIET GAMMA-RAY PULSAR IN CTA 1

    SciTech Connect

    Caraveo, P. A.; De Luca, A.; Marelli, M.; Bignami, G. F.; Ray, P. S.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Kanbach, G.

    2010-12-10

    Prompted by the Fermi-LAT discovery of a radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar inside the CTA 1 supernova remnant, we obtained a 130 ks XMM-Newton observation to assess the timing behavior of this pulsar. Exploiting both the unprecedented photon harvest and the contemporary Fermi-LAT timing measurements, a 4.7{sigma} single-peak pulsation is detected, making PSR J0007+7303 the second example, after Geminga, of a radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar also seen to pulsate in X-rays. Phase-resolved spectroscopy shows that the off-pulse portion of the light curve is dominated by a power-law, non-thermal spectrum, while the X-ray peak emission appears to be mainly of thermal origin, probably from a polar cap heated by magnetospheric return currents, pointing to a hot spot varying throughout the pulsar rotation.

  15. CtaM Is Required for Menaquinol Oxidase aa3 Function in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Schurig-Briccio, Lici A.; Gerdes, Svetlana Y.; Gennis, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections, bacteremia, osteomyelitis, and endocarditis in the developed world. The ability of S. aureus to cause substantial disease in distinct host environments is supported by a flexible metabolism that allows this pathogen to overcome challenges unique to each host organ. One feature of staphylococcal metabolic flexibility is a branched aerobic respiratory chain composed of multiple terminal oxidases. Whereas previous biochemical and spectroscopic studies reported the presence of three different respiratory oxygen reductases (o type, bd type, and aa3 type), the genome contains genes encoding only two respiratory oxygen reductases, cydAB and qoxABCD. Previous investigation showed that cydAB and qoxABCD are required to colonize specific host organs, the murine heart and liver, respectively. This work seeks to clarify the relationship between the genetic studies showing the unique roles of the cydAB and qoxABCD in virulence and the respiratory reductases reported in the literature. We establish that QoxABCD is an aa3-type menaquinol oxidase but that this enzyme is promiscuous in that it can assemble as a bo3-type menaquinol oxidase. However, the bo3 form of QoxABCD restricts the carbon sources that can support the growth of S. aureus. In addition, QoxABCD function is supported by a previously uncharacterized protein, which we have named CtaM, that is conserved in aerobically respiring Firmicutes. In total, these studies establish the heme A biosynthesis pathway in S. aureus, determine that QoxABCD is a type aa3 menaquinol oxidase, and reveal CtaM as a new protein required for type aa3 menaquinol oxidase function in multiple bacterial genera. PMID:27406563

  16. CTA with fluoroscopy image fusion guidance in endovascular complex aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Sailer, A M; de Haan, M W; Peppelenbosch, A G; Jacobs, M J; Wildberger, J E; Schurink, G W H

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of intraoperative guidance by means of live fluoroscopy image fusion with computed tomography angiography (CTA) on iodinated contrast material volume, procedure time, and fluoroscopy time in endovascular thoraco-abdominal aortic repair. CTA with fluoroscopy image fusion road-mapping was prospectively evaluated in patients with complex aortic aneurysms who underwent fenestrated and/or branched endovascular repair (FEVAR/BEVAR). Total iodinated contrast material volume, overall procedure time, and fluoroscopy time were compared between the fusion group (n = 31) and case controls (n = 31). Reasons for potential fusion image inaccuracy were analyzed. Fusion imaging was feasible in all patients. Fusion image road-mapping was used for navigation and positioning of the devices and catheter guidance during access to target vessels. Iodinated contrast material volume and procedure time were significantly lower in the fusion group than in case controls (159 mL [95% CI 132-186 mL] vs. 199 mL [95% CI 170-229 mL], p = .037 and 5.2 hours [95% CI 4.5-5.9 hours] vs. 6.3 hours (95% CI 5.4-7.2 hours), p = .022). No significant differences in fluoroscopy time were observed (p = .38). Respiration-related vessel displacement, vessel elongation, and displacement by stiff devices as well as patient movement were identified as reasons for fusion image inaccuracy. Image fusion guidance provides added value in complex endovascular interventions. The technology significantly reduces iodinated contrast material dose and procedure time. Copyright © 2014 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Automatic selection of best quality vessels from multiple-phase coronary CT angiography (cCTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jordan; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Zhou, Chuan; Wei, Jun; Chughtai, Aamer; Kuriakose, Jean; Agarwal, Prachi; Kazerooni, Ella

    2015-03-01

    We are developing an automated method to select the best-quality vessels from coronary arterial trees in multiplephase cCTA and build a best-quality tree to facilitate the detection of stenotic plaques. Using our previously developed vessel registration method, the vessels from different phases were automatically registered. Branching points on the centerline are projected onto the registered trees. The centerlines are split into branches based on the projected branching points. Each tree branch is then straightened. The registered trees and centerline branches are used to determine the correspondence of branches between phases so that each branch can be compared to its corresponding branches in the other phases. A vessel quality measure (VQM) is calculated as the average radial gradients at the vessel wall over the entire vessel branch. The quality of the corresponding branches from all phases is automatically compared using the VQM. An observer preference study was conducted with two radiologists to visually compare the quality of the vessels. For each branch, the pair that was automatically determined to be the best and worst quality by the VQM was used for the radiologists' visual assessment. Each radiologist, blinded to the VQM, evaluated pairs of corresponding branches and provided their preference. The performance of the automatic selection using VQM was evaluated as the percentage of the total number of vessel pairs for which the automatic selection agreed with the radiologist's selection of the higher quality branch in the pair. The agreement between the first radiologist and the automated selection was 80% and that between the second radiologist and the automated selection was 82%. In comparison, the agreement between the two radiologists was 90%. This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of using an automated method to select the best-quality vessels from multiple cCTA phases.

  18. Template-based CTA X-ray angio rigid registration of coronary arteries in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoy, Timur; Demirci, Stefanie; Degertekin, Muzaffer; Navab, Nassir; Unal, Gozde

    2013-03-01

    This study performs 3D to 2D rigid registration of segmented pre-operative CTA coronary arteries with a single segmented intra-operative X-ray Angio frame in both frequency and spatial domains for real-time Angiography interventions by C-arm fluoroscopy. Most of the work on rigid registration in literature required a close initial- ization of poses and/or positions because of the abundance of local minima and high complexity that searching algorithms face. This study avoids such setbacks by transforming the projections into translation-invariant Fourier domain for estimating the 3D pose. First, template DRRs as candidate poses of 3D vessels of segmented CTA are produced by rotating the camera (image intensifier) around the DICOM angle values with a wide range as in C-arm setup. We have compared the 3D poses of template DRRs with the real X-ray after equalizing the scales (due to disparities in focal length distances) in 3 domains, namely Fourier magnitude, Fourier phase and Fourier polar. The best pose candidate was chosen by one of the highest similarity measures returned by the methods in these domains. It has been noted in literature that these methods are robust against noise and occlusion which was also validated by our results. Translation of the volume was then recovered by distance-map based BFGS optimization well suited to convex structure of our objective function without local minima due to distance maps. Final results were evaluated in 2D projection space rather than with actual values in 3D due to lack of ground truth, ill-posedness of the problem which we intend to address in future.

  19. DISCOVERY OF TeV GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM CTA 1 BY VERITAS

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bouvier, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Benbow, W.; Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Dwarkadas, V. V.; Falcone, A. E-mail: smcarthur@ulysses.uchicago.edu; and others

    2013-02-10

    We report the discovery of TeV gamma-ray emission coincident with the shell-type radio supernova remnant (SNR) CTA 1 using the VERITAS gamma-ray observatory. The source, VER J0006+729, was detected as a 6.5 standard deviation excess over background and shows an extended morphology, approximated by a two-dimensional Gaussian of semimajor (semiminor) axis 0. Degree-Sign 30 (0. Degree-Sign 24) and a centroid 5' from the Fermi gamma-ray pulsar PSR J0007+7303 and its X-ray pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The photon spectrum is well described by a power-law dN/dE = N {sub 0}(E/3 TeV){sup -{Gamma}}, with a differential spectral index of {Gamma} = 2.2 {+-} 0.2{sub stat} {+-} 0.3{sub sys}, and normalization N {sub 0} = (9.1 {+-} 1.3{sub stat} {+-} 1.7{sub sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} TeV{sup -1}. The integral flux, F {sub {gamma}} = 4.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} above 1 TeV, corresponds to 0.2% of the pulsar spin-down power at 1.4 kpc. The energetics, colocation with the SNR, and the relatively small extent of the TeV emission strongly argue for the PWN origin of the TeV photons. We consider the origin of the TeV emission in CTA 1.

  20. Sequence and structural relationships of leucocins A-, B- and C-TA33a from Leuconostoc mesenteroides TA33a.

    PubMed

    Papathanasopoulos, M A; Dykes, G A; Revol-Junelles, A M; Delfour, A; von Holy, A; Hastings, J W

    1998-05-01

    Amino acid sequences of two of the three bacteriocins from Leuconostoc mesenteroides TA33a were determined and their sequence-structure relationships investigated. Leucocin B-TA33a consists of 31 amino acid residues, with a molecular mass of 3466 Da. Leucocin B-TA33a does not belong to the pediocin family of bacteriocins, but shares 62% homology with mesenterocin 52B. A partial sequence of 36 amino acids of leucocin C-TA33a (4598 Da) was determined. Leucocin C-TA33a belongs to the class II bacteriocins having the consensus YGNGV motif. The third bacteriocin, leucocin A-TA33a, is identical to leucocin A-UAL 187. Circular dichroism spectra of the leucocins in aqueous solution and micellar SDS indicated that they undergo a structural transition when in a membrane-mimicking environment. Theoretical predictions from circular dichroism data suggest that leucocins A-, B- and C-TA33a adopt a beta-structure (48%) in membrane-mimicking environments. Sequence alignments and secondary structure predictions for the N-terminus of leucocins A- and C-TA33a predicted that Cys-9 and Cys-14 are connected by a disulfide bridge and form two beta-strands.

  1. Two Particle Azimuthal Correlations in C+Ta Collisions at 4.2A GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Simic, Lj.; Jotanovic, O.

    2007-04-23

    In this report we present study of two particle azimuthal correlations for protons and negative pions in 4.2A GeV C+Ta collisions. Obtained results are compared with the analysis of azimuthal distribution of particles with respect to the reaction plane.

  2. Photo-responsive polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Dong, Ruijiao; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2014-09-07

    Photo-responsive polymeric micelles have received increasing attention in both academic and industrial fields due to their efficient photo-sensitive nature and unique nanostructure. In view of the photo-reaction mechanism, photo-responsive polymeric micelles can be divided into five major types: (1) photoisomerization polymeric micelles, (2) photo-induced rearrangement polymeric micelles, (3) photocleavage polymeric micelles, (4) photo-induced crosslinkable polymeric micelles, and (5) photo-induced energy conversion polymeric micelles. This review highlights the recent advances of photo-responsive polymeric micelles, including the design, synthesis and applications in various biomedical fields. Especially, the influence of different photo-reaction mechanisms on the morphology, structure and properties of the polymeric micelles is emphasized. Finally, the possible future directions and perspectives in this emerging area are briefly discussed.

  3. The ASTRI/CTA mini-array of Small Size Telescopes as a precursor of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareschi, Giovanni; Agnetta, Gaetano; Antolini, Elisa; Antonelli, Lucio Angelo; Bastieri, Denis; Bellassai, Giancarlo; Belluso, Massimiliano; Bigongiari, Ciro; Billotta, Sergio; Biondo , Benedetto; Boettcher, Markus; Bonanno, Giovanni; Bonnoli, Giacomo; Bruno , Pietro; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Canestrari, Rodolfo; Capalbi, Milvia; Capobianco, G.; Caraveo, Patrizia; Carosi, Alòessandro; Cascone, Enrico; Catalano, Osvaldo; Cereda, Michele; Conconi, Paolo; Conforti, Vito; Cusumano, Giancarlo; De Caprio, Vincenzo; De Luca, Andrea; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete; Di Paola, Andrea; Di Pierro, Federico; Fantinel, Daniela; Fiorini, Mauro; Fugazza, Dino; Gardiol, Daniele; Gargano, Carmelo; Garozzo , Salvatore; Gianotti , Fulvio; Giarrusso , Salvatore; Giro, Enrico; Grillo, Aledssandro; Impiombato, Domenico; Incorvaia , Salvatore; La Barbera , Antonino; La Palombara , Nicola; La Parola , Valentina; La Rosa, Giovanni; Lessio, Luigi; Leto, Giuseppe; Lombardi , Saverio; Lucarelli, Fabrizio; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Malaspina, Giuseppe; Marano, Davide; Martinetti , Eugenio; Melioli, C.; Millul, Rachele; Mineo , Teresa; Morello, Carlo; Morlino, Giovanni; Nemmen, R.; Perri, Luca; Rodeghiero, Gabriele; Romano, Patrizia; Romeo, Giuseppe; Russo, Francesco; Sacco, Bruno; Sartore, Nicola; Schwarz, Joseph; Alberto, Segreto; Selvestrel, Danilo; Sironi, Giorgia; Stamerra, Antonio; Strazzeri, Elisabetta; Stringhetti, Luca; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Tanci, Claudio; Testa, Vincenzo; Timpanaro , Maria Cristina; Toso, Giorgio; Tosti, Gino; Trifoglio, Massimo; Vallania, Piero; Vercellone, Stefano; Volpicelli, Antonio; Zitelli, Valentina

    2014-08-01

    ASTRI ("Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana") is a flagship project of the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research. Within this framework, INAF is currently developing a wide-field-of-view (9.6 degrees in diameter) end-to-end prototype of the small-size telescope (SST) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA, sensitive in the energy band from a few TeV up to hundreds TeV. The ASTRI telescope is based on a dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder (ASTRI SST-2M) optical design, with a compact (F# = 0.5) optical configuration named ASTRI SST-2M telescope. This allows us to adopt an innovative modular focal plane camera based on silicon photo-multipliers, with a logical pixel size of 6.2mm x 6.2mm. Moreover, planned, and already being developed, an SST mini-array based on 7 identical telescopes represents an evolution of the ASTRI SST-2M telescope. The ASTRI/CTA mini-array will be part of the CTA array, representing a precursor that will be included into the final array. With the mini-array, in addition to a technical assessment studies in the perpective of the full CTA implementation, it will be possible to perform an early scientific program. In particular we wish to start investigating the poorly known energy range between a few and 100 TeV, thus exploring e.g. the cut-off regime of cosmic accelerators. Apart from INAF, other international institutes will directly participate in the mini-array implementation, as the North-West University in South Africa and the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil. An interest about it has been expressed also by other international groups. In this talk we will report on the development status of the ASTRI prototype and ASTRI/CTA mini-array.

  4. Inclusive Education in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu-Tien, Wu

    2007-01-01

    As an echo of the worldwide movement of inclusive education and because of the conviction of inclusive ideas, special education in Taiwan is moving toward a goal of inclusion, though not necessarily full inclusion. While its terminology is as yet undesignated, principles and strategies are significantly reflected in the Special Education Act and…

  5. Limits to Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that a theoretical identification of the limit to inclusion is needed in the conceptual identification of inclusion. On the one hand, inclusion is formulated as a vision that is, in principle, limitless. On the other hand, there seems to be an agreement that inclusion has a limit in the pedagogical practice. However,…

  6. Limits to Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that a theoretical identification of the limit to inclusion is needed in the conceptual identification of inclusion. On the one hand, inclusion is formulated as a vision that is, in principle, limitless. On the other hand, there seems to be an agreement that inclusion has a limit in the pedagogical practice. However,…

  7. Biodegradable Polymeric Nanoparticles as the Delivery Carrier for Drug.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Li, Dan; Shi, Ci; Ma, Xueling; Rong, Guangu; Kang, Hong; Wang, Xiaohua; Sun, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Drug research and development has entered into the new epoch of innovation formulation, and the drug delivery system has been in the forefront of pharmaceutical innovation. Nanotechnology is widely used in fiber and textiles, electronics, space, agriculture, forensic science and medical therapeutics. It increasingly plays a significant role in drug delivery system. Compared with traditional delivery system, the nanoparticle drug delivery system has lots of merits, such as the high drug loading ability, the excellent biocompatibility, low toxicity, controlled and targeted drug release. We undertook a structured research of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles used as delivery carrier for drug using a focused review question and inclusion/exclusion criteria. We have searched the bibliographic databases for peerreviewed research literature. The outstanding characteristics of the screened papers were described respectively, and a systematic content analysis methodology was used to analysis the findings. Seventy-three papers were included in the review, the majority defined leadership and governance approaches that had impacted upon the polymeric nanoparticles as the delivery carrier for drug in therapeutic applications and developments. Seven papers outlined the superiority characteristics of polymeric nanoparticles that applied in the field of vaccine. Forty-seven papers overviewed the application prospects of polymeric nanoparticles used as drug delivery carrier for cancer. These included current advances in research and clinical applications of polymeric nanoparticles. The review identified the drug delivery carrier of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles, and we described the synthesis methods, applications and challenges of polymeric nanoparticles. The findings of this review identified that the biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles were used as delivery carrier for drug currently. It also indicates that the biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles play an

  8. 4D-CTA improves diagnostic certainty and accuracy in the detection of proximal intracranial anterior circulation occlusion in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wagemans, Bart A. J. M.; van Zwam, Wim H.; Nelemans, Patricia J.; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Postma, Alida A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In acute ischemic stroke, imaging of the cranio-cervical vessels is essential for intra-arterial treatment selection. Fast, reliable and easy accessible imaging is necessary 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Radiologists in training and non-expert readers often perform initial reviewing. In this pilot study, the potential benefit of adding 4Dimensional-CT Angiography (4D-CTA) to the patient selection protocol for intra-arterial therapy is investigated. Materials and methods Twenty-five datasets of prospectively recruited patients, eligible for intra-arterial treatment, were enrolled. Four radiologists-in-training consecutively reviewed CTA, CT-Perfusion and 4D-CTA (post-processed from CTP datasets) and scored: occlusion-presence and diagnostic certainty (scale 1–10). Time-to-diagnosis was registered. Results Arterial occlusion was present in 8 patients. Accuracy improved from 88–92% after CTA and CTP assessment to 96–100% after 4D-CTA assessment (P-values >0,05). Mean diagnostic certainty improved from 7,2–8,6 to 8,8–9,3 (P-values all < 0,05). Mean time to diagnosis increased from 3, 5, 5 and 4 minutes after CTA to 9, 14, 12, and 10 minutes after 4D-CTA. Conclusion 4D-CTA as an additive to regular CTA and CT-Perfusion in patients with acute ischemic stroke eligible for intra-arterial treatment shows a tendency to increase diagnostic accuracy and improves diagnostic certainty, when reviewed by radiologist in training, while only mildly prolonging time to diagnosis. PMID:28234928

  9. Variable Effect during Polymerization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment performing the polymerization of 3-methylthiophene(P-3MT) onto the conditions for the selective electrode to determine the catechol by using cyclic voltammetry was performed. The P-3MT formed under optimized conditions improved electrochemical reversibility, selectivity and reproducibility for the detection of the catechol.

  10. Flame retardant polymeric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, M.; Atlas, S.M.; Pearce, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    The flame retardation of polyolefins is the focus of this volume. Methods for reduction of smoke and experimental evaluation of flammability parameters for polymeric materials are discussed. The flammability evaluation methods for textiles and the use of mass spectrometry for analysis of polymers and their degradation products are also presented.

  11. Polymerized and functionalized triglycerides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant oils are useful sustainable raw materials for the development of new chemical products. As part of our research emphasis in sustainability and green polymer chemistry, we have explored a new method for polymerizing epoxidized triglycerides with the use of fluorosulfonic acid. Depending on the ...

  12. Variable Effect during Polymerization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment performing the polymerization of 3-methylthiophene(P-3MT) onto the conditions for the selective electrode to determine the catechol by using cyclic voltammetry was performed. The P-3MT formed under optimized conditions improved electrochemical reversibility, selectivity and reproducibility for the detection of the catechol.

  13. Protein specific polymeric immunomicrospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Small, round, bio-compatible microspheres capable of covalently bonding proteins and having a uniform diameter below about 3500 A are prepared by substantially instantaneously initiating polymerization of an aqueous emulsion containing no more than 35% total monomer including an acrylic monomer substituted with a covalently bondable group such as hydroxyl, amino or carboxyl and a minor amount of a cross-linking agent.

  14. Novel use of 4D-CTA in imaging of intranidal aneurysms in an acutely ruptured arteriovenous malformation: is this the way forward?

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Arun; Radon, Mark; Biswas, Shubhabrata; Das, Kumar; Puthuran, Mani; Nahser, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Ruptured arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a frequent cause of intracranial hemorrhage. The presence of associated aneurysms, especially intranidal aneurysms, is considered to increase the risk of re-hemorrhage. We present two cases where an intranidal aneurysm was demonstrated on four-dimensional CT angiography (time-resolved CT angiography) (4D-CTA). These features were confirmed by digital subtraction angiography (catheter arterial angiogram). This is the first report of an intranidal aneurysm demonstrated by 4D-CTA. 4D-CTA can offer a comprehensive evaluation of the angioarchitecture and flow dynamics of an AVM for appropriate classification and management. PMID:26153283

  15. Supramolecular Inclusion in Cyclodextrins: A Pictorial Spectroscopic Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haldar, Basudeb; Mallick, Arabinda; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2008-01-01

    A spectroscopic experiment is presented that reveals that the hydrophobically end-modified water-soluble polymeric fluorophore, pyrene end-capped poly(ethylene oxide) (PYPY), interacts differently with [alpha], [beta], and [gamma]-cyclodextrins (CD) to form supramolecular inclusion complexes. The emission spectrum of PYPY in aqueous solution shows…

  16. Supramolecular Inclusion in Cyclodextrins: A Pictorial Spectroscopic Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haldar, Basudeb; Mallick, Arabinda; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2008-01-01

    A spectroscopic experiment is presented that reveals that the hydrophobically end-modified water-soluble polymeric fluorophore, pyrene end-capped poly(ethylene oxide) (PYPY), interacts differently with [alpha], [beta], and [gamma]-cyclodextrins (CD) to form supramolecular inclusion complexes. The emission spectrum of PYPY in aqueous solution shows…

  17. Demystifying Inclusion: Implications for Sustainable Inclusive Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pather, Sulochini

    2006-01-01

    This paper argues that in the pursuit of influencing inclusive education development, definitions of inclusion have been promulgated that remain a distant concept in the minds of the most significant partners in this process, i.e. teachers and schools. This is despite best efforts to share ideas for sustainable change based on such definitions.…

  18. Registration of 3D+t coronary CTA and monoplane 2D+t X-ray angiography.

    PubMed

    Metz, Coert T; Schaap, Michiel; Klein, Stefan; Baka, Nora; Neefjes, Lisan A; Schultz, Carl J; Niessen, Wiro J; van Walsum, Theo

    2013-05-01

    A method for registering preoperative 3D+t coronary CTA with intraoperative monoplane 2D+t X-ray angiography images is proposed to improve image guidance during minimally invasive coronary interventions. The method uses a patient-specific dynamic coronary model, which is derived from the CTA scan by centerline extraction and motion estimation. The dynamic coronary model is registered with the 2D+t X-ray sequence, considering multiple X-ray time points concurrently, while taking breathing induced motion into account. Evaluation was performed on 26 datasets of 17 patients by comparing projected model centerlines with manually annotated centerlines in the X-ray images. The proposed 3D+t/2D+t registration method performed better than a 3D/2D registration method with respect to the accuracy and especially the robustness of the registration. Registration with a median error of 1.47 mm was achieved.

  19. Dark matter signals from Draco and Willman 1: prospects for MAGIC II and CTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bringmann, Torsten; Doro, Michele; Fornasa, Mattia E-mail: michele.doro@pd.infn.it

    2009-01-15

    The next generation of ground-based Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes will play an important role in indirect dark matter searches. In this article, we consider two particularly promising candidate sources for dark matter annihilation signals, the nearby dwarf galaxies Draco and Willman 1, and study the prospects of detecting such a signal for the soon-operating MAGIC II telescope system as well as for the planned installation of CTA, taking special care of describing the experimental features that affect the detectional prospects. For the first time in such studies, we fully take into account the effect of internal bremsstrahlung, which has recently been shown to considerably enhance, in some cases, the gamma-ray flux in the high energies domain where Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes operate, thus leading to significantly harder annihilation spectra than traditionally considered. While the detection of the spectral features introduced by internal bremsstrahlung would constitute a smoking gun signature for dark matter annihilation, we find that for most models the overall flux still remains at a level that will be challenging to detect, unless one adopts somewhat favorable descriptions of the smooth dark matter distribution in the dwarfs.

  20. Carotid stenosis evaluation by 64-slice CTA: comparison of NASCET, ECST and CC grading methods.

    PubMed

    Kılıçkap, Gülsüm; Ergun, Elif; Başbay, Elif; Koşar, Pınar; Kosar, Uğur

    2012-06-01

    Purpose is to evaluate the intraobserver and interobserver variability of the North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET), European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST) and Common Carotid (CC) methods, which are used to measure the degree of ICA stenosis, using 64-slice CT angiography and to compare the measurements made by these three methods. 88 cases (111 carotid arteries) were included in the study. Carotid CTA was performed by a 64 slice scanner (Toshiba, Aqullion 64).Two radiologists measured the degree of carotid stenosis by using NASCET, ECST and CC methods. Intraobserver and interobserver variability of each method was determined by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland-Altman plots and kappa and linear weighted kappa statistics. The relation between the measurements was assessed by correlation coefficient (with linear and quadratic methods). Correlation coefficients showed that there is linear correlation between the measurements made by the three methods. The degree of stenosis measured with the NASCET method had the lowest value, while the corresponding values measured with the ECST and CC methods were close to each other. ICC and Bland-Altman plots showed high intra and inter observer agreement for NASCET, ECST and CC methods whereas kappa statistics showed moderate to substantial agreement. CC method had slightly higher agreement when compared with the other two methods. Intra and interobserver agreement is high for NASCET, ECST and CC methods however CC method has a slightly higher reproducibility. There is linear correlation between the measurements made by the three methods.

  1. Multi-Wavelength Analysis of the Quasar CTA102 during a Dramatic Outburst in 2016 December

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Williamson, Karen E.; Larionov, Valeri M.; Smith, Paul S.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Lahteenmaki, Anne

    2017-08-01

    Abstract: The quasar CTA102 underwent a dramatic outburst from gamma-ray toradio wavelengths in late 2016. The gamma-ray emission at 0.1-200 GeV roseup to (12.1+-0.7)x10^{-6} phot/s/cm^2, with a significant flattening of the spectral index. The blazar reached an optical brightness level never observed previously, < 11 mag in R band, and an increase of the radio flux density at millimeter wavelengths with flattening of the radio spectrum was observed as well.We present analysis of multi-wavelength data during the event obtained at gamma-rays with the Fermi Large Area telescope, at X-rays provided by the NuStar X-ray telescope and Swift XRT and UVOT, in optical bands measured at different telescopes around the world along with polarimetric observations, and at mm-waves obtained at Metsahovi Radio Observatory and SubMillimeter Array, along with imaging of theparsec-scale jet of the quasar with the VLBA at 43 GHz. This research is funded in part by NASA through Fermi Guest Investigator grant NNX14AQ58G and by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-1615796.

  2. Detection Of HI Absorption In The Host Galaxy Of Quasar, CTA 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Christopher J.; Chandola, Y.; Ghosh, T.; Minchin, R.; Saikia, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    On June 12, 2009, a largely unexplored region of frequency space was (temporarily) opened up to radio astronomers when US TV stations were mandated to switch from analog transmissions to new frequency allocations for digital transmission. This freed up the spectral region between 700-800 MHz for a limited period (i.e. until new radio services allocated to this band begin operating), and Arecibo Observatory has produced a suitable receiver to allow astronomers to exploit this opportunity. We have begun a search within this band for highly redshifted HI and OH absorption against the continuum emission from 29 Compact-Steep-Spectrum/GHz-Peaked-Spectrum (CSS/GPS) radio sources of appropriate redshift. Such absorption would arise within the host galaxies. The first source observed, the quasar CTA 21 (4C16.09), shows strong HI absorption of optical depth 0.035. The detected line has a deep core absorption, with a strong wing extending to the blue. The recently determined optical redshift for this galaxy (z 0.907; Labiano et al, 2007) is confirmed.

  3. Segmentation of thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysms from CTA with nonparametric statistical grey level appearance modeling.

    PubMed

    Olabarriaga, Silvia D; Rouet, Jean-Michel; Fradkin, Maxim; Breeuwer, Marcel; Niessen, Wiro J

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a new method for deformable model-based segmentation of lumen and thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysms from computed tomography (CT) angiography (CTA) scans. First the lumen is segmented based on two positions indicated by the user, and subsequently the resulting surface is used to initialize the automated thrombus segmentation method. For the lumen, the image-derived deformation term is based on a simple grey level model (two thresholds). For the more complex problem of thrombus segmentation, a grey level modeling approach with a nonparametric pattern classification technique is used, namely k-nearest neighbors. The intensity profile sampled along the surface normal is used as classification feature. Manual segmentations are used for training the classifier: samples are collected inside, outside, and at the given boundary positions. The deformation is steered by the most likely class corresponding to the intensity profile at each vertex on the surface. A parameter optimization study is conducted, followed by experiments to assess the overall segmentation quality and the robustness of results against variation in user input. Results obtained in a study of 17 patients show that the agreement with respect to manual segmentations is comparable to previous values reported in the literature, with considerable less user interaction.

  4. The Cognition and Neuroergonomics (CaN) Collaborative Technology Alliance (CTA): Scientific Vision, Approach, and Translational Paths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Kelvin S. Oie, Kaleb McDowell, Jason Metcalfe, W. David Hairston, Scott Kerick, Tim Lee, and...and engineers bring both research skills and a Soldier-centric focus to keep programs oriented toward solving complex Army technology problems. In... programs . The Advanced Decision Architectures CTA, which designed, tested, and transitioned new computer science innovations to facilitate better

  5. Effect of Yeast CTA1 Gene Expression on Response of Tobacco Plants to Tobacco Mosaic Virus Infection1

    PubMed Central

    Talarczyk, Andrzej; Krzymowska, Magdalena; Borucki, Wojciech; Hennig, Jacek

    2002-01-01

    The response of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Xanthi-nc) plants with elevated catalase activity was studied after infection by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). These plants contain the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) peroxisomal catalase gene CTA1 under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. The transgenic lines exhibited 2- to 4-fold higher total in vitro catalase activity than untransformed control plants under normal growth conditions. Cellular localization of the CTA1 protein was established using immunocytochemical analysis. Gold particles were detected mainly inside peroxisomes, whereas no significant labeling was detected in other cellular compartments or in the intercellular space. The physiological state of the transgenic plants was evaluated in respect to growth rate, general appearance, carbohydrate content, and dry weight. No significant differences were recorded in comparison with non-transgenic tobacco plants. The 3,3′-diaminobenzidine-stain method was applied to visualize hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the TMV infected tissue. Presence of H2O2 could be detected around necrotic lesions caused by TMV infection in non-transgenic plants but to a much lesser extent in the CTA1 transgenic plants. In addition, the size of necrotic lesions was significantly bigger in the infected leaves of the transgenic plants. Changes in the distribution of H2O2 and in lesion formation were not reflected by changes in salicylic acid production. In contrast to the local response, the systemic response in upper noninoculated leaves of both CTA1 transgenic and control plants was similar. This suggests that increased cellular catalase activity influences local but not systemic response to TMV infection. PMID:12114558

  6. Design concepts for the Cherenkov Telescope Array CTA: an advanced facility for ground-based high-energy gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Actis, M.; Agnetta, G.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A.; Aleksić, J.; Aliu, E.; Allan, D.; Allekotte, I.; Antico, F.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Aravantinos, A.; Arlen, T.; Arnaldi, H.; Artmann, S.; Asano, K.; Asorey, H.; Bähr, J.; Bais, A.; Baixeras, C.; Bajtlik, S.; Balis, D.; Bamba, A.; Barbier, C.; Barceló, M.; Barnacka, A.; Barnstedt, J.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Basso, S.; Bastieri, D.; Bauer, C.; Becerra, J.; Becherini, Y.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, J.; Beckmann, V.; Bednarek, W.; Behera, B.; Beilicke, M.; Belluso, M.; Benallou, M.; Benbow, W.; Berdugo, J.; Berger, K.; Bernardino, T.; Bernlöhr, K.; Biland, A.; Billotta, S.; Bird, T.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Blake, S.; Blanch, O.; Bobkov, A. A.; Bogacz, L.; Bogdan, M.; Boisson, C.; Boix, J.; Bolmont, J.; Bonanno, G.; Bonardi, A.; Bonev, T.; Borkowski, J.; Botner, O.; Bottani, A.; Bourgeat, M.; Boutonnet, C.; Bouvier, A.; Brau-Nogué, S.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Briggs, M. S.; Brun, P.; Brunetti, L.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Bühler, R.; Bulik, T.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Byrum, K.; Cailles, M.; Cameron, R.; Canestrari, R.; Cantu, S.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Carr, J.; Carton, P. H.; Casiraghi, M.; Castarede, H.; Catalano, O.; Cavazzani, S.; Cazaux, S.; Cerruti, B.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chiang, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cieślar, M.; Ciesielska, M.; Cillis, A.; Clerc, C.; Colin, P.; Colomé, J.; Compin, M.; Conconi, P.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Contreras, J. L.; Coppi, P.; Corlier, M.; Corona, P.; Corpace, O.; Corti, D.; Cortina, J.; Costantini, H.; Cotter, G.; Courty, B.; Couturier, S.; Covino, S.; Croston, J.; Cusumano, G.; Daniel, M. K.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Cea Del Pozo, E.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; de Jager, O.; de La Calle Pérez, I.; de La Vega, G.; de Lotto, B.; de Naurois, M.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; de Souza, V.; Decerprit, B.; Deil, C.; Delagnes, E.; Deleglise, G.; Delgado, C.; Dettlaff, T.; di Paolo, A.; di Pierro, F.; Díaz, C.; Dick, J.; Dickinson, H.; Digel, S. W.; Dimitrov, D.; Disset, G.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Doert, M.; Domainko, W.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Dournaux, J.-L.; Dravins, D.; Drury, L.; Dubois, F.; Dubois, R.; Dubus, G.; Dufour, C.; Durand, D.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edy, E.; Egberts, K.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Elles, S.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Enomoto, R.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Errando, M.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcone, A. D.; Farakos, K.; Farnier, C.; Federici, S.; Feinstein, F.; Ferenc, D.; Fillin-Martino, E.; Fink, D.; Finley, C.; Finley, J. P.; Firpo, R.; Florin, D.; Föhr, C.; Fokitis, E.; Font, Ll.; Fontaine, G.; Fontana, A.; Förster, A.; Fortson, L.; Fouque, N.; Fransson, C.; Fraser, G. W.; Fresnillo, L.; Fruck, C.; Fujita, Y.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Gäbele, W.; Gabici, S.; Gadola, A.; Galante, N.; Gallant, Y.; García, B.; García López, R. J.; Garrido, D.; Garrido, L.; Gascón, D.; Gasq, C.; Gaug, M.; Gaweda, J.; Geffroy, N.; Ghag, C.; Ghedina, A.; Ghigo, M.; Gianakaki, E.; Giarrusso, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giro, E.; Giubilato, P.; Glanzman, T.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Gochna, M.; Golev, V.; Gómez Berisso, M.; González, A.; González, F.; Grañena, F.; Graciani, R.; Granot, J.; Gredig, R.; Green, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grimm, O.; Grube, J.; Grudzińska, M.; Grygorczuk, J.; Guarino, V.; Guglielmi, L.; Guilloux, F.; Gunji, S.; Gyuk, G.; Hadasch, D.; Haefner, D.; Hagiwara, R.; Hahn, J.; Hallgren, A.; Hara, S.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Hassan, T.; Haubold, T.; Hauser, M.; Hayashida, M.; Heller, R.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Herrero, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, D.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Horns, D.; Hrupec, D.; Huan, H.; Huber, B.; Huet, J.-M.; Hughes, G.; Hultquist, K.; Humensky, T. B.; Huppert, J.-F.; Ibarra, A.; Illa, J. M.; Ingjald, J.; Inoue, Y.; Inoue, S.; Ioka, K.; Jablonski, C.; Jacholkowska, A.; Janiak, M.; Jean, P.; Jensen, H.; Jogler, T.; Jung, I.; Kaaret, P.; Kabuki, S.; Kakuwa, J.; Kalkuhl, C.; Kankanyan, R.; Kapala, M.; Karastergiou, A.; Karczewski, M.; Karkar, S.; Karlsson, N.; Kasperek, J.; Katagiri, H.; Katarzyński, K.; Kawanaka, N.; Kȩdziora, B.; Kendziorra, E.; Khélifi, B.; Kieda, D.; Kifune, T.; Kihm, T.; Klepser, S.; Kluźniak, W.; Knapp, J.; Knappy, A. R.; Kneiske, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Köck, F.; Kodani, K.; Kohri, K.; Kokkotas, K.; Komin, N.; Konopelko, A.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Kostka, P.; Kotuła, J.; Kowal, G.; Kozioł, J.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Kretzschmann, A.; Kubo, H.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, N.; La Parola, V.; La Rosa, G.; López, A.; Lamanna, G.; Laporte, P.; Lavalley, C.; Le Flour, T.; Le Padellec, A.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lessio, L.; Lieunard, B.; Lindfors, E.; Liolios, A.; Lohse, T.; Lombardi, S.; Lopatin, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lubiński, P.; Luz, O.; Lyard, E.; Maccarone, M. C.; Maccarone, T.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; Maltezos, S.; Małkiewicz, P.; Mañá, C.; Manalaysay, A.; Maneva, G.; Mangano, A.; Manigot, P.; Marín, J.; Mariotti, M.; Markoff, S.; Martínez, G.; Martínez, M.; Mastichiadis, A.; Matsumoto, H.; Mattiazzo, S.; Mazin, D.; McComb, T. J. L.; McCubbin, N.; McHardy, I.; Medina, C.; Melkumyan, D.; Mendes, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meucci, M.; Michałowski, J.; Micolon, P.; Mineo, T.; Mirabal, N.; Mirabel, F.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Mizuno, T.; Moal, B.; Moderski, R.; Molinari, E.; Monteiro, I.; Moralejo, A.; Morello, C.; Mori, K.; Motta, G.; Mottez, F.; Moulin, E.; Mukherjee, R.; Munar, P.; Muraishi, H.; Murase, K.; Murphy, A. Stj.; Nagataki, S.; Naito, T.; Nakamori, T.; Nakayama, K.; Naumann, C.; Naumann, D.; Nayman, P.; Nedbal, D.; Niedźwiecki, A.; Niemiec, J.; Nikolaidis, A.; Nishijima, K.; Nolan, S. J.; Nowak, N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Ochoa, I.; Ohira, Y.; Ohishi, M.; Ohka, H.; Okumura, A.; Olivetto, C.; Ong, R. A.; Orito, R.; Orr, M.; Osborne, J. P.; Ostrowski, M.; Otero, L.; Otte, A. N.; Ovcharov, E.; Oya, I.; Oziȩbło, A.; Paiano, S.; Pallota, J.; Panazol, J. L.; Paneque, D.; Panter, M.; Paoletti, R.; Papyan, G.; Paredes, J. M.; Pareschi, G.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pepato, A.; Persic, M.; Petrucci, P. O.; Peyaud, B.; Piechocki, W.; Pita, S.; Pivato, G.; Płatos, Ł.; Platzer, R.; Pogosyan, L.; Pohl, M.; Pojmański, G.; Ponz, J. D.; Potter, W.; Prandini, E.; Preece, R.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quel, E.; Quirrenbach, A.; Rajda, P.; Rando, R.; Rataj, M.; Raue, M.; Reimann, C.; Reimann, O.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Renner, S.; Reymond, J.-M.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Ribordy, M.; Rico, J.; Rieger, F.; Ringegni, P.; Ripken, J.; Ristori, P.; Rivoire, S.; Rob, L.; Rodriguez, S.; Roeser, U.; Romano, P.; Romero, G. E.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rovero, A. C.; Roy, F.; Royer, S.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Ruppel, J.; Russo, F.; Ryde, F.; Sacco, B.; Saggion, A.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, K.; Saito, T.; Sakaki, N.; Salazar, E.; Salini, A.; Sánchez, F.; Sánchez Conde, M. Á.; Santangelo, A.; Santos, E. M.; Sanuy, A.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Sarkar, S.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Scarcioffolo, M.; Schanz, T.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schmidt, T.; Schmoll, J.; Schroedter, M.; Schultz, C.; Schultze, J.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schweizer, T.; Seiradakis, J.; Selmane, S.; Seweryn, K.; Shayduk, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Shibata, T.; Sikora, M.; Silk, J.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Skole, C.; Smith, N.; Sobczyńska, D.; Sofo Haro, M.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spiga, D.; Spyrou, S.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Starling, R. L. C.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steiner, S.; Stergioulas, N.; Sternberger, R.; Stinzing, F.; Stodulski, M.; Straumann, U.; Suárez, A.; Suchenek, M.; Sugawara, R.; Sulanke, K. H.; Sun, S.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutcliffe, P.; Szanecki, M.; Szepieniec, T.; Szostek, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Talbot, R. G.; Tam, P. H.; Tanaka, M.; Tanimori, T.; Tavani, M.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tchernin, C.; Tejedor, L. A.; Telezhinsky, I.; Temnikov, P.; Tenzer, C.; Terada, Y.; Terrier, R.; Teshima, M.; Testa, V.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tluczykont, M.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tokanai, F.; Tokarz, M.; Toma, K.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Totani, T.; Toussenel, F.; Vallania, P.; Vallejo, G.; van der Walt, J.; van Eldik, C.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vankov, H.; Vasileiadis, G.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vegas, I.; Venter, L.; Vercellone, S.; Veyssiere, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Videla, M.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Vlahakis, N.; Vlahos, L.; Vogler, P.; Vollhardt, A.; Volpe, F.; von Gunten, H. P.; Vorobiov, S.; Wagner, S.; Wagner, R. M.; Wagner, B.; Wakely, S. P.; Walter, P.; Walter, R.; Warwick, R.; Wawer, P.; Wawrzaszek, R.; Webb, N.; Wegner, P.; Weinstein, A.; Weitzel, Q.; Welsing, R.; Wetteskind, H.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Williams, D. A.; Winde, M.; Wischnewski, R.; Wiśniewski, Ł.; Wolczko, A.; Wood, M.; Xiong, Q.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamaoka, K.; Yamazaki, R.; Yanagita, S.; Yoffo, B.; Yonetani, M.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshikoshi, T.; Zabalza, V.; Zagdański, A.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A.; Zech, A.; Ziȩtara, K.; Ziółkowski, P.; Zitelli, V.; Zychowski, P.

    2011-12-01

    Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has had a major breakthrough with the impressive results obtained using systems of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has a huge potential in astrophysics, particle physics and cosmology. CTA is an international initiative to build the next generation instrument, with a factor of 5-10 improvement in sensitivity in the 100 GeV-10 TeV range and the extension to energies well below 100 GeV and above 100 TeV. CTA will consist of two arrays (one in the north, one in the south) for full sky coverage and will be operated as open observatory. The design of CTA is based on currently available technology. This document reports on the status and presents the major design concepts of CTA.

  7. Design Concepts for the Cherenkov Telescope Array CTA: An Advanced Facility for Ground-Based High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Actis, M

    2012-04-17

    Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has had a major breakthrough with the impressive results obtained using systems of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has a huge potential in astrophysics, particle physics and cosmology. CTA is an international initiative to build the next generation instrument, with a factor of 5-10 improvement in sensitivity in the 100 GeV-10 TeV range and the extension to energies well below 100 GeV and above 100 TeV. CTA will consist of two arrays (one in the north, one in the south) for full sky coverage and will be operated as open observatory. The design of CTA is based on currently available technology. This document reports on the status and presents the major design concepts of CTA.

  8. Development of the ACS+OPC UA based control system for a CTA medium size telescope prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Bagmeet; Oya, Igor; Birsin, Emrah; Köppel, Hendryk; Melkumyan, David; Schlenstedt, Stefan; Schmidt, Torsten; Schwanke, Ullrich; Wegner, Peter; Wiesand, Stephan; Winde, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the next generation Very High Energy (VHE, defined as > 50GeV to several 100TeV) telescope facility, currently in the design and prototyping phase, and expected to come on-line around 2016. The array would have both a Northern and Southern hemisphere site, together delivering nearly complete sky coverage. The CTA array is planned to have ~100 telescopes of several different sizes to fulfill the sensitivity and energy coverage needs. Each telescope has a number of subsystems with varied hardware and control mechanisms; a drive system that gets commands and inputs via OPC UA (OPC Unified Architecture), mirror alignment systems based on XBee/ZigBee protocol and/or CAN bus, weather monitor accessed via serial/Ethernet ports, CCD cameras for calibration, Cherenkov camera, and the data read out electronics, etc. Integrating the control and data-acquisitions of such a distributed heterogeneous system calls for a framework that can handle such a multi-platform, multi-protocol scenario. The CORBA based ALMA Common software satisfies these needs very well and is currently being evaluated as the base software for developing the control system for CTA. A prototype for a Medium Size Telescope (MST, ~12m) is being developed and will be deployed in Berlin, by end of 2012. We present the development being carried out to integrate and control the various hardware subsystems of this MST prototype using ACS.

  9. Fully automatic multi-atlas segmentation of CTA for partial volume correction in cardiac SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingyi; Mohy-Ud-Din, Hassan; Boutagy, Nabil E; Jiang, Mingyan; Ren, Silin; Stendahl, John C; Sinusas, Albert J; Liu, Chi

    2017-05-21

    Anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) has been shown to improve image quality and quantitative accuracy in cardiac SPECT/CT. However, this method requires manual segmentation of various organs from contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography (CTA) data. In order to achieve fully automatic CTA segmentation for clinical translation, we investigated the most common multi-atlas segmentation methods. We also modified the multi-atlas segmentation method by introducing a novel label fusion algorithm for multiple organ segmentation to eliminate overlap and gap voxels. To evaluate our proposed automatic segmentation, eight canine (99m)Tc-labeled red blood cell SPECT/CT datasets that incorporated PVC were analyzed, using the leave-one-out approach. The Dice similarity coefficient of each organ was computed. Compared to the conventional label fusion method, our proposed label fusion method effectively eliminated gaps and overlaps and improved the CTA segmentation accuracy. The anatomical-based PVC of cardiac SPECT images with automatic multi-atlas segmentation provided consistent image quality and quantitative estimation of intramyocardial blood volume, as compared to those derived using manual segmentation. In conclusion, our proposed automatic multi-atlas segmentation method of CTAs is feasible, practical, and facilitates anatomical-based PVC of cardiac SPECT/CT images.

  10. On the sensitivity of CTA to gamma-ray boxes from multi-TeV dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, Alejandro; Lamperstorfer, Anna S.; López-Gehler, Sergio; Pato, Miguel; Bertone, Gianfranco

    2015-09-01

    Collider, direct and indirect searches for dark matter have typically little or no sensitivity to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with masses above a few TeV. This rather unexplored regime can however be probed through the search for distinctive gamma-ray spectral features produced by the annihilation of WIMPs at very high energies. Here we present a dedicated search for gamma-ray boxes—sharp spectral features that cannot be mimicked by astrophysical sources—with the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Using realistic projections for the instrument performance and detailed background modelling, a profile likelihood analysis is implemented to derive the expected upper limits and sensitivity reach after 100 h of observations towards a 2°×2° region around the Galactic centre. Our results show that CTA will be able to probe gamma-ray boxes down to annihilation cross sections of 10-27-10-26 cm3/s up to tens of TeV. We also identify a number of concrete particle physics models providing thermal dark matter candidates that can be used as target benchmarks in future search campaigns. This constitutes a golden opportunity for CTA to either discover or rule out multi-TeV thermal dark matter in a corner of parameter space where all other experimental efforts are basically insensitive.

  11. Fully automatic multi-atlas segmentation of CTA for partial volume correction in cardiac SPECT/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingyi; Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Boutagy, Nabil E.; Jiang, Mingyan; Ren, Silin; Stendahl, John C.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2017-05-01

    Anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) has been shown to improve image quality and quantitative accuracy in cardiac SPECT/CT. However, this method requires manual segmentation of various organs from contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography (CTA) data. In order to achieve fully automatic CTA segmentation for clinical translation, we investigated the most common multi-atlas segmentation methods. We also modified the multi-atlas segmentation method by introducing a novel label fusion algorithm for multiple organ segmentation to eliminate overlap and gap voxels. To evaluate our proposed automatic segmentation, eight canine 99mTc-labeled red blood cell SPECT/CT datasets that incorporated PVC were analyzed, using the leave-one-out approach. The Dice similarity coefficient of each organ was computed. Compared to the conventional label fusion method, our proposed label fusion method effectively eliminated gaps and overlaps and improved the CTA segmentation accuracy. The anatomical-based PVC of cardiac SPECT images with automatic multi-atlas segmentation provided consistent image quality and quantitative estimation of intramyocardial blood volume, as compared to those derived using manual segmentation. In conclusion, our proposed automatic multi-atlas segmentation method of CTAs is feasible, practical, and facilitates anatomical-based PVC of cardiac SPECT/CT images.

  12. On the sensitivity of CTA to gamma-ray boxes from multi-TeV dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, Alejandro; Lamperstorfer, Anna S.; López-Gehler, Sergio; Pato, Miguel; Bertone, Gianfranco E-mail: anna.lamperstorfer@tum.de E-mail: migpato@gmail.com

    2015-09-01

    Collider, direct and indirect searches for dark matter have typically little or no sensitivity to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with masses above a few TeV. This rather unexplored regime can however be probed through the search for distinctive gamma-ray spectral features produced by the annihilation of WIMPs at very high energies. Here we present a dedicated search for gamma-ray boxes—sharp spectral features that cannot be mimicked by astrophysical sources—with the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Using realistic projections for the instrument performance and detailed background modelling, a profile likelihood analysis is implemented to derive the expected upper limits and sensitivity reach after 100 h of observations towards a 2°×2° region around the Galactic centre. Our results show that CTA will be able to probe gamma-ray boxes down to annihilation cross sections of 10{sup −27}−10{sup −26} cm{sup 3}/s up to tens of TeV. We also identify a number of concrete particle physics models providing thermal dark matter candidates that can be used as target benchmarks in future search campaigns. This constitutes a golden opportunity for CTA to either discover or rule out multi-TeV thermal dark matter in a corner of parameter space where all other experimental efforts are basically insensitive.

  13. Polymeric ion conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, J.; Mizuhashi, M.; Kamimori, T.

    1990-12-31

    There are several requirements for (polymeric) ion conductors in electrochromic window applications: (1) they have high ionic conductivity (desirably, > 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} Scm{sup {minus}1}); (2) they have high chemical and electrochemical stabilities with respect to the wide usable potential window and thermal and UV stabilities; (3) they are transparent in a specific wavelength region, which is, however, dependent of applications; and (4) they have enough adhesiveness to the substrates and have acceptable mechanical properties. Many kinds of polymeric ionic conductors have since been reported and some of them were applied to electrochromic uses. In this chapter, electrochemical and physicochemical properties of these materials are reviewed. However, certain aspects such as crystallographic studies and conduction models in detail have been omitted, which are still controversial.

  14. Organometallic polymerization catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Waymouth, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    Well-defined transition metal catalysts have resulted in exciting new opportunities in polymer synthesis. The stereochemistry of vinyl polymers can be rationally controlled with choice of the appropriate catalysts. Studies with optically active catalyst precursors have revealed considerable information on the absolute stereochemistry of olefin polymerization and have led to the synthesis of novel chiral polyolefins. The development of homogeneous olefin metathesis catalysts has also led to a variety of well-defined new polymer structures with controlled molecular weight and molecular weight distribution. Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms and stereochemistry of homogeneous transition metal catalyzed polymerization will be discussed. The ability to control polymer structure through catalyst design presents exciting opportunities in the synthesis of {open_quotes}tailor-made{close_quotes} macromolecules.

  15. A comparison of coronary CTA and stress testing using high-efficiency SPECT MPI for the evaluation of chest pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Duvall, W Lane; Savino, John A; Levine, Elliot J; Baber, Usman; Lin, Jonathan T; Einstein, Andrew J; Hermann, Luke K; Henzlova, Milena J

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies have compared CTA to stress testing and MPI using older Na-I SPECT cameras and traditional rest-stress protocols, but are limited by often using optimized CTA protocols but suboptimal MPI methodology. We compared CTA to stress testing with modern SPECT MPI using high-efficiency CZT cameras and stress-first protocols in an ED population. In a retrospective, non-randomized study, all patients who underwent CTA or stress testing (ETT or Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT MPI) as part of their ED assessment in 2010-2011 driven by ED attending preference and equipment availability were evaluated for their disposition from the ED (admission vs discharge, length of time to disposition), subsequent visits to the ED and diagnostic testing (within 3 months), and radiation exposure. CTA was performed using a 64-slice scanner (GE Lightspeed VCT) and MPI was performed using a CZT SPECT camera (GE Discovery 530c). Data were obtained from prospectively acquired electronic medical records and effective doses were calculated from published conversion factors. A propensity-matched analysis was also used to compare outcomes in the two groups. A total of 1,458 patients underwent testing in the ED with 192 CTAs and 1,266 stress tests (327 ETTs and 939 MPIs). The CTA patients were a lower-risk cohort based on age, risk factors, and known heart disease. A statistically similar proportion of patients was discharged directly from the ED in the stress testing group (82% vs 73%, P = .27), but their time to disposition was longer (11.0 ± 5 vs 20.5 ± 7 hours, P < .0001). There was no significant difference in cardiac return visits to the ED (5.7% CTA vs 4.3% stress testing, P = .50), but more patients had follow-up studies in the CTA cohort compared to stress testing (14% vs 7%, P = .001). The mean effective dose of 12.6 ± 8.6 mSv for the CTA group was higher (P < .0001) than 5.0 ± 4.1 mSv for the stress testing group (ETT and MPI). A propensity score-matched cohort showed similar

  16. Polymeric Microcapsule Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-24

    support, microencapsulation and entrapment within a membrane/film or gel. The ideal enzyme immobilization method would (1) Employ mild chemical...yields hollow polymeric microcapsules of uniform diameter and length. These microcapsules are arranged in a high density array in which the...individual capsules protrude from a surface like the bristles of a brush. We have developed procedures for filling these microcapsules with high

  17. Frontal Polymerization in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pojman, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Frontal polymerization systems, with their inherent large thermal and compositional gradients, are greatly affected by buoyancy-driven convection. Sounding rocket experiments allowed the preparation of benchmark materials and demonstrated that methods to suppress the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in ground-based research did not significantly affect the molecular weight of the polymer. Experiments under weightlessness show clearly that bubbles produced during the reaction interact very differently than under 1 g.

  18. Precision synthesis of functional materials via RAFT polymerization and click-type chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Joel Diez

    2011-12-01

    The need to tailor polymeric architectures with specific physico-chemical properties via the simplest, cleanest, and most efficient synthetic route possible has become the ultimate goal in polymer synthesis. Recent progress in macromolecular science, such as the discoveries of controlled/"living" free radical polymerization (CRP) methods, has brought about synthetic capabilities to prepare (co)polymers with advanced topologies, predetermined molecular weights, narrow molecular weight distributions, and precisely located functional groups. In addition, the establishment of click chemistry has redefined the selected few highly efficient chemical reactions that become highly useful in post-polymerization modification strategies. Hence, the ability to make well-defined topologies afforded by controlled polymerization techniques and the facile incorporation of functionalities along the chain via click-type reactions have yielded complex architectures, allowing the investigation of physical phenomena which otherwise could not be studied with systems prepared via conventional methods. The overarching theme of the research work described in this dissertation is the fusion of the excellent attributes of reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization method, which is one of the CRP techniques, and click-type chemical reactions in the precision of synthesis of advanced functional materials. Chapter IV is divided into three sections. In Section I, the direct RAFT homopolymerization of 2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl isocyanate (AOI) and subsequent post-polymerization modifications are described. The polymerization conditions were optimized in terms of the choice of RAFT chain transfer agent (CTA), polymerization temperature and the reaction medium. Direct RAFT polymerization of AOI requires a neutral CTA, and relatively low reaction temperature to yield AOI homopolymers with low polydispersities. Efficient side-chain functionalization of PAOI homopolymers was

  19. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  20. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  1. Developments in polymerization lamps.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Planas, Amparo; Martín, Juan; Abalos, Camilo; Llamas, Rafael

    2008-02-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of composite resins and the consequent stress generated at the composite-tooth interface continue to pose a serious clinical challenge. The development of high-intensity halogen lamps and the advent of curing units providing higher energy performance, such as laser lamps, plasma arc units, and, most recently, light-emitting diode (LED) curing units, have revolutionized polymerization lamp use and brought major changes in light-application techniques. A comprehensive review of the literature yielded the following conclusions: (1) the most reliable curing unit for any type of composite resin is the high-density halogen lamp, fitted with a programming device to enable both pulse-delay and soft-start techniques; (2) if any other type of curing unit is used, information must be available on the compatibility of the unit with the composite materials to be used; (3) polymerization lamp manufacturers need to focus on the ongoing development of LED technology; (4) further research is required to identify the most reliable light-application techniques.

  2. Inclusion in Middle Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Brandalyn; Ashley, Mandi; Salter, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to provide school districts within Tennessee with more research about how weekly hours of inclusion impact student achievement. Specifically, researchers examined which models of inclusion were in use in two school districts in Tennessee, administrators' and teachers' perceptions of inclusion, and whether or…

  3. Towards Inclusive Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafoor, K. Abdul

    2010-01-01

    Social inclusion is the process that will enable every person in society to participate in normal activities of societies they live in, including education, employment, public services and social recreational activities. For the development of an inclusive society, preparation of younger generation also needs to be inclusive. Our schools must…

  4. Inclusion in Middle Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Brandalyn; Ashley, Mandi; Salter, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to provide school districts within Tennessee with more research about how weekly hours of inclusion impact student achievement. Specifically, researchers examined which models of inclusion were in use in two school districts in Tennessee, administrators' and teachers' perceptions of inclusion, and whether or…

  5. Inclusive Education in Bangladesh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahsan, Mohammad Tariq; Burnip, Lindsay

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on inclusive education in Bangladesh for children with special needs. Bangladesh is not behind other developed countries in enacting laws and declarations in favour of inclusive education, but a lack of resources is the main barrier in implementing inclusive education. Special education and integrated education models exist in…

  6. Creating an Inclusive School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villa, Richard A., Ed.; Thousand, Jacqueline S., Ed.

    This collection of readings in support of inclusive education for students with disabilities offers rationales for inclusion, personal accounts of individuals involved, and strategies for facilitating change. Stressed throughout is the idea that inclusion is an attitude or belief system, not an action or set of actions. The readings identify…

  7. Footstep towards Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbas, Faiza; Zafar, Aneeka; Naz, Tayyaba

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive education is a rising trend in the world. The first step towards inclusive education is providing the awareness to the general education teachers. This study focused to investigate the general education teachers of primary and secondary level awareness about the special education and inclusive education. This study is descriptive method…

  8. Creating an Inclusive School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villa, Richard A., Ed.; Thousand, Jacqueline S., Ed.

    This collection of readings in support of inclusive education for students with disabilities offers rationales for inclusion, personal accounts of individuals involved, and strategies for facilitating change. Stressed throughout is the idea that inclusion is an attitude or belief system, not an action or set of actions. The readings identify…

  9. Inclusive Education in Bangladesh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahsan, Mohammad Tariq; Burnip, Lindsay

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on inclusive education in Bangladesh for children with special needs. Bangladesh is not behind other developed countries in enacting laws and declarations in favour of inclusive education, but a lack of resources is the main barrier in implementing inclusive education. Special education and integrated education models exist in…

  10. Supporting Inclusive Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Gianna

    2006-01-01

    Written to support all teaching and learning staff in developing good inclusive practice, this book provides knowledge and understanding about a range of inclusion issues, such as what an inclusive school might look like and practical guidance on supporting the development of such a school. It also explores issues surrounding: (1) Ethnicity; (2)…

  11. Facile Synthesis of Worm-like Micelles by Visible Light Mediated Dispersion Polymerization Using Photoredox Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Jonathan; Xu, Jiangtao; Boyer, Cyrille

    2016-06-08

    Presented herein is a protocol for the facile synthesis of worm-like micelles by visible light mediated dispersion polymerization. This approach begins with the synthesis of a hydrophilic poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (POEGMA) homopolymer using reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Under mild visible light irradiation (λ = 460 nm, 0.7 mW/cm(2)), this macro-chain transfer agent (macro-CTA) in the presence of a ruthenium based photoredox catalyst, Ru(bpy)3Cl2 can be chain extended with a second monomer to form a well-defined block copolymer in a process known as Photoinduced Electron Transfer RAFT (PET-RAFT). When PET-RAFT is used to chain extend POEGMA with benzyl methacrylate (BzMA) in ethanol (EtOH), polymeric nanoparticles with different morphologies are formed in situ according to a polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) mechanism. Self-assembly into nanoparticles presenting POEGMA chains at the corona and poly(benzyl methacrylate) (PBzMA) chains in the core occurs in situ due to the growing insolubility of the PBzMA block in ethanol. Interestingly, the formation of highly pure worm-like micelles can be readily monitored by observing the onset of a highly viscous gel in situ due to nanoparticle entanglements occurring during the polymerization. This process thereby allows for a more reproducible synthesis of worm-like micelles simply by monitoring the solution viscosity during the course of the polymerization. In addition, the light stimulus can be intermittently applied in an ON/OFF manner demonstrating temporal control over the nanoparticle morphology.

  12. Automated attenuation-based tube voltage selection for body CTA: Performance evaluation of 192-slice dual-source CT.

    PubMed

    Winklehner, Anna; Gordic, Sonja; Lauk, Eliane; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Leschka, Sebastian; Alkadhi, Hatem; Husarik, Daniela B

    2015-08-01

    To assess radiation dose and image quality in body CT-angiography (CTA) with automated attenuation-based tube voltage selection (ATVS) on a 192-slice dual-source CT (DSCT). Forty patients (69.5 ± 9.6 years) who had undergone body CTA with ATVS (ref.kVp 100, ref.mAs 90) using a 2x192-slice CT in single-source mode were retrospectively included. All patients had undergone prior CTA with a 2x128-slice CT and ATVS with identical imaging and contrast media protocols, serving for comparison. Images were reconstructed with iterative reconstruction at similar strength levels. Radiation dose was determined. Image quality was assessed semi-quantitatively (1:excellent, 5:non-diagnostic), aortic attenuation, noise and CNR were determined. As compared to 128-slice DSCT, 192-slice DSCT selected tube voltages were lower in 30 patients (75 %), higher in 3 (7.5 %), and similar in 7 patients (17.5 %). CTDIvol was lower with 192-slice DSCT (4.7 ± 1.9 mGy vs. 5.8 ± 2.1 mGy; p < 0.001). Subjective image quality, mean aortic attenuation (342 ± 67HU vs. 268 ± 67HU) and CNR (9.8 ± 2.5 vs. 8.2 ± 2.9) were higher with 192-slice DSCT (all p < 0.01), all datasets being diagnostic. Our study suggests that ATVS of 192-slice DSCT for body CTA is associated with an improved image quality and further radiation dose reduction of 19 % compared to 128-slice DSCT. • 192-slice DSCT allows imaging from 70 kVp to 150 kVp at 10 kVp increments. • 192-slice DSCT allows for radiation-dose reduction in body-CTA with ATVS. • Subjective and objective image quality increase compared to 128-slice DSCT.

  13. Introduction of Living Polymerization. Living and/or Controlled Polymerization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    separated into kinetic and synthetic. The intention of this paper is not to review existing and proclaimed living systems but to discuss the essence of a...o1 OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH S4 CONTRACT N00014-94-1-0101 I R&T Code 31321075 Technical Report No. 10 INTRODUCTION TO LIVING POLYMERIZATION. LIVING ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Introduction to Living Polymerization. Living and/or Controlled Polymerization N00014-94-1-0101 6. AUTHOR(S

  14. The TeV emission of Ap Librae: a hadronic interpretation and prospects for CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, M.; Vasilopoulos, G.; Giannios, D.

    2017-01-01

    Ap Librae is one out of a handful of low-frequency peaked blazars to be detected at TeV γ-rays and the only one with an identified X-ray jet. Combined observations of Fermi-LAT at high energies (HE) and of H.E.S.S. at very high energies (VHE) revealed a striking spectral property of Ap Librae; the presence of a broad high-energy component that extends more than nine orders of magnitude in energy and is, therefore, hard to be explained by the usual single-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. We show that the superposition of different emission components related to photohadronic interactions can explain the γ-ray emission of Ap Librae without invoking external radiation fields. We present two indicative model fits to the spectral energy distribution of Ap Librae where the VHE emission is assumed to originate from a compact, sub-pc scale region of the jet. A robust prediction of our model is VHE flux variability on time-scales similar to those observed at X-rays and HE γ-rays, which can be further used to distinguish between a sub-pc or kpc scale origin of the TeV emission. We thus calculate the expected variability signatures at X-rays, HE and VHE γ-rays and show that quasi-simultaneous flares are expected, with larger amplitude flares appearing at γ-rays. We assess the detectability of VHE variability from Ap Librae with CTA, next generation of IACT. We show that ˜h time-scale variability at Eγ > 0.1 TeV could be detectable at high significance with shorter exposure times than current Cherenkov telescopes.

  15. Fully automated segmentation of carotid and vertebral arteries from contrast enhanced CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisenaire, Olivier; Virmani, Sunny; Olszewski, Mark E.; Ardon, Roberto

    2008-03-01

    We propose a method for segmenting and labeling the main head and neck vessels (common, internal, external carotid, vertebral) from a contrast enhanced computed tomography angiography (CTA) volume. First, an initial centerline of each vessel is extracted. Next, the vessels are segmented using 3D active objects initialized using the first step. Finally, the true centerline is identified by smoothly deforming it away from the segmented mask edges using a spline-snake. We focus particularly on the novel initial centerline extraction technique. It uses a locally adaptive front propagation algorithm that attempts to find the optimal path connecting the ends of the vessel, typically from the lowest image of the scan to the Circle of Willis in the brain. It uses a patient adapted anatomical model of the different vessels both to initialize and constrain this fast marching, thus eliminating the need for manual selection of seed points. The method is evaluated using data from multiple regions (USA, India, China, Israel) including a variety of scanners (10, 16, 40, 64-slice; Brilliance CT, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, OH, USA), contrast agent dose, and image resolution. It is fully successful in over 90% of patients and only misses a single vessel in most remaining cases. We also demonstrate its robustness to metal and dental artifacts and anatomical variability. Total processing time is approximately two minutes with no user interaction, which dramatically improves the workflow over existing clinical software. It also reduces patient dose exposure by obviating the need to acquire an unenhanced scan for bone suppression as this can be done by applying the segmentation masks.

  16. An innovative telescope control system architecture for SST-GATE telescopes at the CTA Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasola, Gilles; Mignot, Shan; Laporte, Philippe; Abchiche, Abdel; Buchholtz, Gilles; Jégouzo, Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    SST-GATE (Small Size Telescope - GAmma-ray Telescope Elements) is a 4-metre telescope designed as a prototype for the Small Size Telescopes (SST) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a major facility for the very high energy gamma-ray astronomy of the next three decades. In this 100-telescope array there will be 70 SSTs, involving a design with an industrial view aiming at long-term service, low maintenance effort and reduced costs. More than a prototype, SST-GATE is also a fully functional telescope that shall be usable by scientists and students at the Observatoire de Meudon for 30 years. The Telescope Control System (TCS) is designed to work either as an element of a large array driven by an array controller or in a stand-alone mode with a remote workstation. Hence it is built to be autonomous with versatile interfacing; as an example, pointing and tracking —the main functions of the telescope— are managed onboard, including astronomical transformations, geometrical transformations (e.g. telescope bending model) and drive control. The core hardware is a CompactRIO (cRIO) featuring a real-time operating system and an FPGA. In this paper, we present an overview of the current status of the TCS. We especially focus on three items: the pointing computation implemented in the FPGA of the cRIO —using CORDIC algorithms— since it enables an optimisation of the hardware resources; data flow management based on OPCUA with its specific implementation on the cRIO; and the use of an EtherCAT field-bus for its ability to provide real-time data exchanges with the sensors and actuators distributed throughout the telescope.

  17. COMPTEL Observations of the Neighboring Blazars 3C 454.3 and CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Collmar, W.; Schönfelder, V.; Hermsen, W.; Bloemen, H.; McConnell, M.; Bennett, K.; Williams, O. R.

    The detection of MeV emission from the Gamma-Ray blazars 3C 454.3 and CTA 102 were reported by Blom et al. (1995) using data of the first 18 months of the COMPTEL mission (0.75-30 MeV). We have analyzed/reanalyzed these 2 blazars, which are located only 7 degrees apart on the sky, using all available COMPTEL data from 1991 to 1999. In the 10-30 MeV band, emission from the sources is found at the 3.9σ-level, being consistent with contributions from both sources. Below 10 MeV only 3C 454.3 is significantly detected. The strongest evidence (5.6σ) is found in the 3-10 MeV band. A reanalysis of the data of the first 18 months with improved methods provided skymaps and spectra similar to those obtained by Blom et al. (1995). Significant flux variability is not observed for both sources. In fact, the light curves indicate a low (near the COMPTEL threshold) but rather stable MeV emission of 3C 454.3 in the 3-10 MeV band during the years. The time-averaged COMPTEL spectra are not well determined due to the insignificant detections below 3 MeV. However, the combined quasi-simultaneous OSSE/COMPTEL/ EGRET energy spectra show strong breaks at MeV energies for both sources. Two maxima, located at similar energy regions for both sources, are obvious in multi-wavelength spectra.

  18. Hafnocene-Based Olefin Polymerizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diesner, T.; Troll, C.; Rieger, B.

    Zirconocenes have been used for a long time in the field of olefin polymerization using MAO as cocatalyst. The equivalent hafnocenes were seldom used due to a lack of productivity while using MAO activation. In the last few years borane and borate activation has come into the focus of research for olefin polymerization. A variety of different hafnocenes were used to investigate the polymerization mechanism and the different cocatalysts.

  19. Controlled release of ethylene via polymeric films for food packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, Roberto; Bazzano, Marco; Capozzi, Luigi Carlo; Ferri, Ada; Sangermano, Marco

    2015-12-01

    In modern fruit supply chain a common method to trigger ripening is to keep fruits inside special chambers and initiate the ripening process through administration of ethylene. Ethylene is usually administered through cylinders with inadequate control of its final concentration in the chamber. The aim of this study is the development of a new technology to accurately regulate ethylene concentration in the atmosphere where fruits are preserved: a polymeric film, containing an inclusion complex of α-cyclodextrin with ethylene, was developed. The complex was prepared by molecular encapsulation which allows the entrapment of ethylene into the cavity of α-cyclodextrin. After encapsulation, ethylene can be gradually released from the inclusion complex and its release rate can be regulated by temperature and humidity. The inclusion complex was dispersed into a thin polymeric film produced by UV-curing. This method was used because is solvent-free and involves low operating temperature; both conditions are necessary to prevent rapid release of ethylene from the film. The polymeric films were characterized with respect to thermal behaviour, crystalline structure and kinetics of ethylene release, showing that can effectively control the release of ethylene within confined volume.

  20. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, R.R.; Baumann, R.

    1999-03-30

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  1. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Baumann, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  2. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Baumann, Robert

    2003-08-26

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  3. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Bauman, Robert

    2006-11-14

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  4. Bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S. (Inventor); Curley, Michael J. (Inventor); Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor); Sarkisov, Jr., Sergey S. (Inventor); Fields, Aisha B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator, in one embodiment using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a photosensitive body, transmitting light over fiber optic cables, and controlling the shape and pulse duration of the light pulse to control movement of the actuator. Multiple light beams are utilized to generate different ranges of motion for the actuator from a single photomechanical body and alternative designs use multiple light beams and multiple photomechanical bodies to provide controlled movement. Actuator movement using one or more ranges of motion is utilized to control motion to position an actuating element in three dimensional space.

  5. RAFT Aqueous Dispersion Polymerization of N-(2-(Methacryloyloxy)ethyl)pyrrolidone: A Convenient Low Viscosity Route to High Molecular Weight Water-Soluble Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    RAFT solution polymerization of N-(2-(methacryoyloxy)ethyl)pyrrolidone (NMEP) in ethanol at 70 °C was conducted to produce a series of PNMEP homopolymers with mean degrees of polymerization (DP) varying from 31 to 467. Turbidimetry was used to assess their inverse temperature solubility behavior in dilute aqueous solution, with an LCST of approximately 55 °C being observed in the high molecular weight limit. Then a poly(glycerol monomethacylate) (PGMA) macro-CTA with a mean DP of 63 was chain-extended with NMEP using a RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization formulation at 70 °C. The target PNMEP DP was systematically varied from 100 up to 6000 to generate a series of PGMA63–PNMEPx diblock copolymers. High conversions (≥92%) could be achieved when targeting up to x = 5000. GPC analysis confirmed high blocking efficiencies and a linear evolution in Mn with increasing PNMEP DP. A gradual increase in Mw/Mn was also observed when targeting higher DPs. However, this problem could be minimized (Mw/Mn < 1.50) by utilizing a higher purity grade of NMEP (98% vs 96%). This suggests that the broader molecular weight distributions observed at higher DPs are simply the result of a dimethacrylate impurity causing light branching, rather than an intrinsic side reaction such as chain transfer to polymer. Kinetic studies confirmed that the RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization of NMEP was approximately four times faster than the RAFT solution polymerization of NMEP in ethanol when targeting the same DP in each case. This is perhaps surprising because both 1H NMR and SAXS studies indicate that the core-forming PNMEP chains remain relatively solvated at 70 °C in the latter formulation. Moreover, dissolution of the initial PGMA63–PNMEPx particles occurs on cooling from 70 to 20 °C as the PNMEP block passes through its LCST. Hence this RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization formulation offers an efficient route to a high molecular weight water-soluble polymer in a rather

  6. RAFT Aqueous Dispersion Polymerization of N-(2-(Methacryloyloxy)ethyl)pyrrolidone: A Convenient Low Viscosity Route to High Molecular Weight Water-Soluble Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Victoria J; Derry, Matthew J; Fielding, Lee A; Musa, Osama M; Armes, Steven P

    2016-06-28

    RAFT solution polymerization of N-(2-(methacryoyloxy)ethyl)pyrrolidone (NMEP) in ethanol at 70 °C was conducted to produce a series of PNMEP homopolymers with mean degrees of polymerization (DP) varying from 31 to 467. Turbidimetry was used to assess their inverse temperature solubility behavior in dilute aqueous solution, with an LCST of approximately 55 °C being observed in the high molecular weight limit. Then a poly(glycerol monomethacylate) (PGMA) macro-CTA with a mean DP of 63 was chain-extended with NMEP using a RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization formulation at 70 °C. The target PNMEP DP was systematically varied from 100 up to 6000 to generate a series of PGMA63-PNMEP x diblock copolymers. High conversions (≥92%) could be achieved when targeting up to x = 5000. GPC analysis confirmed high blocking efficiencies and a linear evolution in Mn with increasing PNMEP DP. A gradual increase in Mw/Mn was also observed when targeting higher DPs. However, this problem could be minimized (Mw/Mn < 1.50) by utilizing a higher purity grade of NMEP (98% vs 96%). This suggests that the broader molecular weight distributions observed at higher DPs are simply the result of a dimethacrylate impurity causing light branching, rather than an intrinsic side reaction such as chain transfer to polymer. Kinetic studies confirmed that the RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization of NMEP was approximately four times faster than the RAFT solution polymerization of NMEP in ethanol when targeting the same DP in each case. This is perhaps surprising because both (1)H NMR and SAXS studies indicate that the core-forming PNMEP chains remain relatively solvated at 70 °C in the latter formulation. Moreover, dissolution of the initial PGMA63-PNMEP x particles occurs on cooling from 70 to 20 °C as the PNMEP block passes through its LCST. Hence this RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization formulation offers an efficient route to a high molecular weight water-soluble polymer in a rather

  7. Sustainable polymerizations in recoverable microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenzhen; Yan, Feng; Qiu, Lihua; Lu, Jianmei; Zhou, Yinxia; Chen, Jiaxin; Tang, Yishan; Texter, John

    2010-03-16

    Free radical and atom-transfer radical polymerizations were conducted in monomer/ionic liquid microemulsions. After the polymerization and isolation of the resultant polymers, the mixture of the catalyst and ionic liquids (surfactant and continuous phase) can be recovered and reused, thereby dramatically improving the environmental sustainability of such chemical processing. The addition of monomer to recovered ionic liquid mixtures regenerates transparent, stable microemulsions that are ready for the next polymerization cycle upon addition of initiator. The method combines the advantages of IL recycling and microemulsion polymerization and minimizes environmental disposable effects from surfactants and heavy metal ions.

  8. Polymerization Evaluation by Spectrophotometric Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunach, Jaume

    1985-01-01

    Discusses polymerization evaluation by spectrophotometric measurements by considering: (1) association degrees and molar absorptivities; (2) association degrees and equilibrium constants; and (3) absorbance and equilibrium constants. (JN)

  9. Inclusion chemistry in periodic mesoporous hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, K.; Bein, T.

    1998-10-01

    This review provides an overview of different aspects of inclusion chemistry in ordered mesoporous host materials such as MCM-41 or MCM-48 (Mobil codes). A rich field of inclusion chemistry has been explored in this context, including sorption, ion exchange, inhibition followed by reduction, grafting of reactive metal alkoxides, halides, etc., grafting of silane coupling agents (sometimes followed by subsequent reactions), grafting of reactive metal complexes, and polymerization in the channels. Finally, co-condensation of reactive species during the mesopore synthesis is a method to incorporate functionality into the walls of the channel system. Important applications of these modified and functionalized systems are heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis involving bulky grated catalysts and/or the conversion of large substrates. Other potential applications include ion exchange and separations, removal of heavy metals, chromatography, stabilization of quantum wires, stabilization of dyes, and polymer composites.

  10. A calcified polymeric valve for valve-in-valve applications.

    PubMed

    Falahatpisheh, Ahmad; Morisawa, Daisuke; Toosky, Taraz T; Kheradvar, Arash

    2017-01-04

    The prevalence of aortic valve stenosis (AS) is increasing in the aging society. More recently, novel treatments and devices for AS, especially transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) have significantly changed the therapeutic approach to this disease. Research and development related to TAVR require testing these devices in the calcified heart valves that closely mimic a native calcific valve. However, no animal model of AS has yet been available. Alternatively, animals with normal aortic valve that are currently used for TAVR experiments do not closely replicate the aortic valve pathology required for proper testing of these devices. To solve this limitation, for the first time, we developed a novel polymeric valve whose leaflets possess calcium hydroxyapatite inclusions immersed in them. This study reports the characteristics and feasibility of these valves. Two types of the polymeric valve, i.e., moderate and severe calcified AS models were developed and tested by deploying a transcatheter valve in those and measuring the related hemodynamics. The valves were tested in a heart flow simulator, and were studied using echocardiography. Our results showed high echogenicity of the polymeric valve, that was correlated to the severity of the calcification. Aortic valve area of the polymeric valves was measured, and the severity of stenosis was defined according to the clinical guidelines. Accordingly, we showed that these novel polymeric valves closely mimic AS, and can be a desired cost-saving solution for testing the performance of the transcatheter aortic valve systems in vitro.

  11. Organometallic Polymeric Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    For aerospace applications, the use of polymers can result in tremendous weight savings over metals. Suitable polymeric materials for some applications like EMI shielding, spacecraft grounding, and charge dissipation must combine high electrical conductivity with long-term environmental stability, good processability, and good mechanical properties. Recently, other investigators have reported hybrid films made from an electrically conductive polymer combined with insulating polymers. In all of these instances, the films were prepared by infiltrating an insulating polymer with a precursor for a conductive polymer (either polypyrrole or polythiophene), and oxidatively polymerizing the precursor in situ. The resulting composite films have good electrical conductivity, while overcoming the brittleness inherent in most conductive polymers. The highest conductivities reported (approximately 4/Scm) were achieved with polythiophene in a polystyrene host polymer. The best films using a polyamide as base polymer were four orders of magnitude less conductive than the polystyrene films. The authors suggested that this was because polyimides were unable to swell sufficiently for infiltration of monomer as in the polystyrene. It was not clear, however, if the different conductivities obtained were merely the result of differing oxidation conditions. Oxidation time, temperature and oxidant concentration varied widely among the studies.

  12. Gratings in polymeric waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishakov, G.; Sokolov, V.; Kocabas, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2007-04-01

    Laser-induced formation of polymer Bragg grating filters for Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) applications is discussed. Acrylate monomers halogenated with both fluorine and chlorine, which possess absorption losses less than 0.25 dB/cm and wide choice of refractive indices (from 1.3 to 1.5) in the 1.5 μm telecom wavelength region were used. The monomers are highly intermixable thus permitting to adjust the refractive index of the composition within +/-0.0001. Moreover they are photocurable under UV exposure and exhibit high contrast in polymerization. These properties make halogenated acrylates very promising for fabricating polymeric waveguides and photonic circuits. Single-mode polymer waveguides were fabricated on silicon wafers using resistless contact lithography. Submicron index gratings have been written in polymer waveguides using holographic exposure with He-Cd laser beam (325 nm) through a phase mask. Both uniform and apodized gratings have been fabricated. The gratings are stable and are not erased by uniform UV exposure. The waveguide gratings possess narrowband reflection spectra in the 1.5 μm wavelength region of 0.4 nm width, nearly rectangular shape of the stopband and reflectivity R > 99%. The fabricated Bragg grating filters can be used for multiplexing/demultiplexing optical signals in high-speed DWDM optical fiber networks.

  13. Reproducibility of aortic pulsatility measurements from ECG-gated abdominal CTA in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, Armando; Fletcher, Joel G.; Wentz, Robert J.; Shields, Raymond C.; Vrtiska, Terri J.; Siddiki, Hassan; Nielson, Theresa

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: ECG-gated abdominal CT angiography with reconstruction of multiple, temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets has been proposed for measuring aortic pulsatility. The purpose of this work is to develop algorithms to segment the aorta from surrounding structures from CTA datasets across cardiac phases, calculate registered centerlines and measurements of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with AAA, and to assess the reproducibility of these measurements. Methods: ECG-gated CTA was performed with a temporal resolution of 165 ms, reconstructed to 1 mm slices ranging at 14 cardiac phase points. Data sets were obtained from 17 patients on which two such scans were performed 6 to 12 months apart. Automated segmentation, centerline generation, and registration of centerlines between phases was performed, followed by calculation of cross-sectional areas and regional and local pulsatility. Results: Pulsatility calculations for the supraceliac region were very reproducible between earlier and later scans of the same patient, with average differences less than 1% for pulsatility values ranging from 2% to 13%. Local radial pulsatilities were also reproducible to within ~1%. Aneurysm volume changes between scans can also be quantified. Conclusion: Automated segmentation, centerline generation, and registration of temporally resolved CTA datasets permit measurements of regional changes in cross-sectional area over the course of the cardiac cycle (i.e., regional aortic pulsatility). These measurements are reproducible between scans 6-12 months apart, with differences in aortic areas reflecting both aneurysm remodeling and changes in blood pressure. Regional pulsatilities ranged from 2 to 13% but were reproducible at the 1% level.

  14. Risks to the Superior Gluteal Neurovascular Bundle During Iliosacral and Transsacral Screw Fixation: A Computed Tomogram Arteriography (CTA) Study.

    PubMed

    Collinge, Cory; Maslow, Jed

    2017-07-31

    Iliosacral (IS) and transsacral (TS) screws are popular techniques to repair complicated injuries to the pelvis. The anatomy of the superior gluteal neurovasculature (SG NV bundle) is well described as running along the posterior ilium, providing innervation and perfusion to important abductor muscles. The method of pelvis fixation least likely to injure the SG NV bundle is unknown. Twenty uninjured patients with a contrasted computed tomogram of the pelvis and lower extremities (CTA) were evaluated. Starting points for an S1 IS screw, and S1 and S2 TS screws were estimated on the "ghost" lateral CTA image for those pelvi with safe corridors (>9mm diameter). The distance from the projected screw to the SG artery was measured. A distance of <3.65mm (half of a 7.3mm screw's diameter) was considered likely for NV bundle injury. Of forty pelvi CTA's (single sides), 10 pelvi (25%) were determined to be inappropriate for a S1 TS screw. The average distances from the screw starting point and the artery were 25.3mm (±9.2) for S1 IS, 12.4mm (±9.0) for S1 TS, and 23.5mm (±10.7) for S2 TS screws, respectively. Ten S1 TS screws (25%) and no S1 IS or S2 TS screws were projected to have caused injury to the SG NV bundle (P<0.001). Inserting S1 IS and S2 TS screws put the SG NV anatomy at significantly less risk than S1 TS screws. This information may aid in choosing the "best" fixation option for patients with pelvic ring trauma requiring surgery. Therapeutic level III.

  15. Increased image quality and reduced radiation dose and contrast media volume: a holistic approach to intracranial CTA.

    PubMed

    Saade, C; Al-Fout, G; Mayat, A; Brennan, P C; Hui, F; Maroun, G; Kikano, R N; Naffaa, L

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the dose-length product (DLP) during intracranial computed tomography angiography (CTA) using a patient-specific contrast formula. Intracranial CTA was performed on 120 patients using 64-channel CT. Patients were subjected in equal numbers to one of two acquisitions/contrast medium protocols. Protocol A, consisted of 80 ml contrast medium and protocol B, involved a novel contrast medium formula. In each protocol, contrast medium and saline were injected at a flow rate of 4.5 ml/s. The DLP and contrast volume (CV) were measured between each protocol and the data obtained were compared using two-tailed independent t-test. Mean arterial vessel attenuation was up to 56% (p<0.01) higher using protocol B compared with A. In the venous system, the mean vessel attenuation was significantly lower in protocol B than A with a maximum reduction of 93% (p<0.001). The mean CV was significantly lower in protocol B (53±10 ml) compared to A (80±1 ml, p<0.001). The scan time was equal in each protocol (B, 4.22±1.2 seconds; A, 4.01±1.3 seconds). A significant reduction in mean DLP was demonstrated in protocol B (3.99±0.22 mSv) compared to A (4.74±0.22 mSv; p=0.02). A significant reduction in CV and DLP during intracranial CTA can be achieved when employing a patient-specific contrast medium formula. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Probing for Pulsars: An XMM Study of the Composite SNRS G327.1-1.1 and CTA1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The subject grant is for analysis of XMM data from the supernova remnant CTA1. Our investigation centered on the study of the compact source Rx 50007.0+7302 that, based on our previous observations, appears to be a neutron star powering a wind nebula in the remnant interior. This compact source has also been suggested as the counterpart of the EGRET source 2EG J0008+7307. The analysis of the data from the compact source is complete. We find that the spectrum of the source is well described by a power law with the addition of a soft thermal component that may correspond to emission from hot polar cap regions or to cooling emission from a light element atmosphere over the entire star. There is evidence of extended emission on small spatial scales which may correspond to structure in the underlying synchrotron nebula. Extrapolation of the nonthermal emission component to gamma-ray energies yields a flux that is consistent with that of 2EG J0008+7307, thus strengthening the proposition that there is a gamma-ray emitting pulsar at the center of CTA 1. Our timing studies with the EPIC pn data revealed no evidence for pulsations, however; we set an upper limit of 61% on the pulsed fraction from this source. The results from this study were presented in a poster at the recent IAU Symposium in Sydney, Australia. A paper summarizing these results, entitled "Xray Observations of the Compact Source in CTA 1" (Slane et al.) has been submitted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal.

  17. The investigation of electrokinetic behaviour of micro-particles produced by CTA+ ions and Na-montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürses, Ahmet; Güneş, Kübra; Mindivan, Ferda; Korucu, Mehtap Ejder; Açıkyıldız, Metin; Doğar, Çetin

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the interactions between clay platelets and CTA+ ions in aqueous dispersions of Na-montmorillonite (Na-MMT) were examined in detail by using electro kinetic parameters such as electrical conductivity and zeta potential and by considering XRD patterns and d-spacing values of the organoclay samples as a function of both surfactant concentration (CTAB, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) and clay amount. The amounts adsorbed and zeta potentials of the particles increased with an increase in the initial concentration of CTAB in parallel with the electrical conductivity values. The adsorption mechanisms which predominate at certain ranges of CTAB concentration were proposed and schematized by considering the d-spacing values calculated and the zeta potential values of particles. For the different solid/liquid ratios, the initial concentrations of CTAB, in which appeared significant increases in the d-spacing values were found as 200, 280 and 300 mg/L, respectively. The d-spacing values which correspond to these concentrations are, respectively 1.82, 1.82 and 1.68 nm. It is remarkable that at first three solid/liquid ratios, a "stress region" to be related with hydrophobic binding appeared. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy (ΔGo), isosteric enthalpy (ΔHoads)q, and isosteric entropy (ΔSoads)q were also calculated by using experimental data. These parameters indicate that adsorption of CTAB onto Na-montmorillonite is spontaneous and exothermic in the temperature range studied. The ((ΔSoads)q, (ΔHoads)q and (ΔGo)) values calculated are highly negative. This reveals that the adsorption of CTA+ ions at the interlayer region of clay carried out with more order stacking of CTA+ ions.

  18. Fusion of CTA and XA data using 3D centerline registration for plaque visualization during coronary intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaila, Gaurav; Kitslaar, Pieter; Tu, Shengxian; Penicka, Martin; Dijkstra, Jouke; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn

    2016-03-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) results in the buildup of plaque below the intima layer inside the vessel wall of the coronary arteries causing narrowing of the vessel and obstructing blood flow. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is usually done to enlarge the vessel lumen and regain back normal flow of blood to the heart. During PCI, X-ray imaging is done to assist guide wire movement through the vessels to the area of stenosis. While X-ray imaging allows for good lumen visualization, information on plaque type is unavailable. Also due to the projection nature of the X-ray imaging, additional drawbacks such as foreshortening and overlap of vessels limit the efficacy of the cardiac intervention. Reconstruction of 3D vessel geometry from biplane X-ray acquisitions helps to overcome some of these projection drawbacks. However, the plaque type information remains an issue. In contrast, imaging using computed tomography angiography (CTA) can provide us with information on both lumen and plaque type and allows us to generate a complete 3D coronary vessel tree unaffected by the foreshortening and overlap problems of the X-ray imaging. In this paper, we combine x-ray biplane images with CT angiography to visualize three plaque types (dense calcium, fibrous fatty and necrotic core) on x-ray images. 3D registration using three different registration methods is done between coronary centerlines available from x-ray images and from the CTA volume along with 3D plaque information available from CTA. We compare the different registration methods and evaluate their performance based on 3D root mean squared errors. Two methods are used to project this 3D information onto 2D plane of the x-ray biplane images. Validation of our approach is performed using artificial biplane x-ray datasets.

  19. CTA collateral score predicts infarct volume and clinical outcome after endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke: a retrospective chart review.

    PubMed

    Elijovich, Lucas; Goyal, Nitin; Mainali, Shraddha; Hoit, Dan; Arthur, Adam S; Whitehead, Matthew; Choudhri, Asim F

    2016-06-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) due to emergent large-vessel occlusion (ELVO) has a poor prognosis. To examine the hypothesis that a better collateral score on pretreatment CT angiography (CTA) would correlate with a smaller final infarct volume and a more favorable clinical outcome after endovascular therapy (EVT). A retrospective chart review of the University of Tennessee AIS database from February 2011 to February 2013 was conducted. All patients with CTA-proven LVO treated with EVT were included. Recanalization after EVT was defined by Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) score ≥2. Favorable outcome was assessed as a modified Rankin Score ≤3. Fifty patients with ELVO were studied. The mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 17 (2-27) and 38 of the patients (76%) received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. The recanalization rate for EVT was 86.6%. Good clinical outcome was achieved in 32% of patients. Univariate predictors of good outcome included good collateral scores (CS) on presenting CTA (p=0.043) and successful recanalization (p=0.02). Multivariate analysis confirmed both good CS (p=0.024) and successful recanalization (p=0.009) as predictors of favorable outcome. Applying results of the multivariate analysis to our cohort we were able to determine the likelihood of good clinical outcome as well as predictors of smaller final infarct volume after successful recanalization. Good CS predict smaller infarct volumes and better clinical outcome in patients recanalized with EVT. These data support the use of this technique in selecting patients for EVT. Poor CS should be considered as an exclusion criterion for EVT as patients with poor CS have poor clinical outcomes despite recanalization. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. RAFT polymerization of 4-vinylphenylboronic acid as the basis for micellar sugar sensors.

    PubMed

    Maji, Samarendra; Vancoillie, Gertjan; Voorhaar, Lenny; Zhang, Qilu; Hoogenboom, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Well-defined homo and mPEGylated block (co)polymers of the commercially available unprotected 4-vinylphenylboronic acid (4-VBA) monomer are reported based on reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The polymerization kinetics are studied in detail for homo and block (co)polymerizations with different chain transfer agents (CTAs) to optimize the preparation of well-defined polymer structures, eventually leading to comparatively low dispersities (Đ ≤ 1.25). Subsequently, block (co)polymers with methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) mPEG-b-P(4-VBA) are prepared using a mPEG-functionalized CTA. The formed block copolymer mPEG114 -b-P(4-VBA)30 is demonstrated to be pH and glucose responsive as its micellization behavior is dictated by pH as well as the presence of glucose. The glucose-responsive pH window of mPEG114 -b-P(4-VBA)30 is found to be pH 9-10 based on the DLS and TEM measurement. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Coating of plasma polymerized film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morita, S.; Ishibashi, S.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma polymerized thin film coating and the use of other coatings is suggested for passivation film, thin film used for conducting light, and solid body lubrication film of dielectrics of ultra insulators for electrical conduction, electron accessories, etc. The special features of flow discharge development and the polymerized film growth mechanism are discussed.

  2. Amplification of actin polymerization forces

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments. PMID:27002174

  3. Amplification of actin polymerization forces.

    PubMed

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-03-28

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments.

  4. Platelet interaction with polymerizing fibrin.

    PubMed

    Niewiarowski, S; Regoeczi, E; Stewart, G J; Senyl, A F; Mustard, J F

    1972-03-01

    Interaction of washed pig, rabbit, or human platelets with fibrinogen was studied during its transition to fibrin using photometric, isotopic, and electron microscopic techniques. Untreated fibrinogen and fully polymerized fibrin had no detectable effect on platelets. Fibrinogen, incubated with low concentrations of reptilase or thrombin, formed intermediate products which readily became associated with platelets and caused their aggregation. Neutralization of the thrombin did not prevent this interaction. In the absence of fibrinogen, reptilase did not affect platelets. The interaction of polymerizing fibrin with platelets was accompanied by small losses of platelet constituents (serotonin, adenine nucleotides, platelet factor 4, and lactic dehydrogenase). This loss did not appear to be the result of the platelet release reaction. Inhibitors of the release reaction or of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation did not prevent the interaction of platelets with polymerizing fibrin. Apyrase or prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1)) reduced the extent of platelet aggregation by polymerizing fibrin, but the amount of protein associated with platelets was slightly increased. The interaction of polymerizing fibrin with platelets was completely inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) or ethylene glycol bis (beta-aminoethyl ether) N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA).Fibers formed in solutions of polymerizing fibrin were larger in the presence than in the absence of washed platelets, suggesting that platelets affect fibrin polymerization. The adherence of platelets to polymerizing fibrin may be responsible for the establishment of links between platelets and fibrin in hemostatic plugs and thrombi.

  5. AGILE detection of a new episode of enhanced gamma-ray emission from the FSRQ CTA102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrecchia, F.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Pittori, C.; Lucarelli, F.; Minervini, G.; Piano, G.; Bulgarelli, A.; Tavani, M.; Donnarumma, I.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Vercellone, S.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Paoletti, F.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-12-01

    AGILE is detecting a new episode of increased gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a position consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 4C +11.69, PKS 2230+11, 5BZQ J2232+1143 and as gamma-ray source as 3EG J2232+1147, 3FGL J2232.5+114), recently reported in flaring activity by AGILE on November 24 and 11, 2016 (ATel #9788, #9743), and in optical/NIR extraordinary outburst (ATel #9821, #9808 and #9801).

  6. Identification of stability and control derivatives for AS 355 L2 helicopter with Quad-M/CTA methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Sérgio Servilha; Menegaldo, Luciano Luporini

    2012-11-01

    This work presents results obtained from a study of case for H-55 Helicopter System Identification which was carried out by an implementation of Quad-M Methodology purposed for Jategaonkar. The implementation performed was based on Cruz et al whose works were developed in Centro Técnico Aeroespacial (CTA). A comparison between Stability and Control Derivatives tables from these results and those from literature is performed for some important flight conditions. This comparison allows us to conclude about the reliability of the method, to present preliminary SCD tables for the studied aircraft and point to possible future works.

  7. Yet another strong GeV gamma-ray outburst of blazar CTA 102 observed by the Fermi LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed new and strong gamma-ray activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 4C +11.69, PKS 2230+11, 3FGL J2232.5+1143) with VLBI coordinates (J2000.0), R.A.: 338.151704 deg, Dec.: 11.730807 deg (Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  8. Fermi LAT observation of renewed and strong GeV gamma-ray activity from blazar CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed a new phase of strong gamma-ray activity from a source positionally consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 4C +11.69, PKS 2230+11, 3FGL J2232.5+1143) with VLBI coordinates, (J2000.0), R.A.: 338.151704 deg, Dec.: 11.730807 deg (Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  9. {delta}{sup 0} resonance production in peripheral 4.2A GeV C+Ta collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Simic, Lj.; Milosavljevic, M. Vranjes; Mendas, I.; Popovic, D. S.; Krpic, D.

    2009-07-15

    The production of {delta}{sup 0}(1232){yields}p{pi}{sup -} resonance is studied in peripheral C+Ta collisions at 4.2A GeV using the 2-m propane bubble chamber exposed at JINR Dubna Synchrophasotron. Using an invariant mass distribution of p{pi}{sup -} pairs and additional kinematical constrains, the mass, width, and kinematical characteristics of {delta}{sup 0} resonance are determined. The ratio of the number of pions originated from {delta}{sup 0} resonance decay to the number of all pions (resonant and nonresonant) is estimated. The analogous ratio for protons is also determined.

  10. Biomimetic PEGylation of carbon nanotubes through surface-initiated RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yingge; Zeng, Guanjian; Xu, Dazhuang; Liu, Meiying; Wang, Ke; Li, Zhen; Fu, Lihua; Zhang, Qingsong; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a type of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials that possess excellent physicochemical properties and have been potentially utilized for a variety of applications. Surface modification of CNTs with polymers is a general route to expand and improve the performance of CNTs and has attracted great research interest over the past few decades. Although many methods have been developed previously, most of these methods still showed some disadvantages, such as low efficiency, complex experimental procedure and harsh reaction conditions etc. In this work, we reported a practical and novel way to fabricate CNTs based polymer composites via the combination of mussel inspired chemistry and reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. First, the amino group was introduced onto the surface of CNTs via self-polymerization of dopamine. Then, chain transfer agent can be immobilized on the amino groups functionalized CNTs to obtain CNT-PDA-CTA, which can be utilized for surface-initiated RAFT polymerization. A water soluble and biocompatible monomer poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) was adopted to fabricate pPEGMA functionalized CNTs through RAFT polymerization. The successful preparation of CNTs based polymer composites (CNT-pPEGMA) was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in details. The CNT-pPEGMA showed good dispersibility and desirable biocompatibility, making them highly potential for biomedical applications. More importantly, a large number of CNTs based polymer composites could also be fabricated through the same strategy when different monomers were used due to the good monomer adaptability of RAFT polymerization. Therefore, this strategy should be a general method for preparation of various multifunctional CNTs based polymer composites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  11. Inclusive Services Innovation Configuration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdheide, Lynn R.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher preparation to deliver inclusive services to students with disabilities is increasingly important because of changes in law and policy emphasizing student access to, and achievement in, the general education curriculum. This innovation configuration identifies the components of inclusive services that should be incorporated in teacher…

  12. School Inclusion Programmes (SIPS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drossinou-Korea, Maria; Matousi, Dimitra; Panopoulos, Nikolaos; Paraskevopoulou, Aikaterini

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to understand the school inclusion programmes (SIPs) for students with special educational needs (SEN). The methodology was conducted in the field of special education (SE) and focuses on three case studies of students who was supported by SIPs. The Targeted, Individual, Structured, Inclusion Programme for students…

  13. What is "Inclusion"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neary, Tom; Halvorsen, Ann

    This paper presents principles for inclusion of students with disabilities in regular education classrooms, organized around the following aspects: inclusion versus mainstreaming, service delivery, planning and curriculum development, best practices, and training. Among the principles discussed are: students are members of age-appropriate general…

  14. Inclusive Mathematics Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollerton, Mike

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the theme of inclusion. Inclusion is one of the themes within the recent Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) publication: "Engaging mathematics for all learners" and the author had the good fortune to participate in this project. This involved working with five schools which, frivolously, all had a…

  15. The Inclusion Facilitator's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Cheryl M.; Schuh, Mary C.; Nisbet, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Inclusion facilitators are educators who do more than teach children with disabilities--they advocate for change in schools and communities, sparking a passion for inclusion in teachers, administrators, and families and giving them the practical guidance they need to make it work. This is an essential new role in today's schools, and this guide…

  16. Index for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Allister

    2005-01-01

    Index for Inclusion is a programme to assist in developing learning and participation in schools. It was written by Tony Booth and Mel Ainscow from the Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education, UK. Central Normal School was pleased to have the opportunity to trial this programme.

  17. School Inclusion Programmes (SIPS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drossinou-Korea, Maria; Matousi, Dimitra; Panopoulos, Nikolaos; Paraskevopoulou, Aikaterini

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to understand the school inclusion programmes (SIPs) for students with special educational needs (SEN). The methodology was conducted in the field of special education (SE) and focuses on three case studies of students who was supported by SIPs. The Targeted, Individual, Structured, Inclusion Programme for students…

  18. Understanding Inclusion in Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamas, Christoforos

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a framework for understanding inclusion in Cyprus. The evidence base is the result of a six-month qualitative research study in five Cypriot mainstream primary schools. Despite the rhetoric in favour of inclusion, it seems that the Cypriot educational system is still highly segregating in its philosophy and does not fully…

  19. Handbook for Successful Inclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochhar, Carol A.; West, Lynda L.

    This manual is intended to help regular and special educators and related professionals to better serve special learners in inclusive settings through identifying practical strategies for the classroom and school, and techniques for overcoming barriers to inclusion. The manual is written in a question-and-answer format. The first chapter addresses…

  20. Learning Styles and Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Gavin

    2005-01-01

    This book is about learning styles and inclusion, but essentially it is about learning, and how to make learning more effective for all learners. To recognise the needs of learners as well as those of teachers, and at the same time appreciate that the inclusive education environment, irrespective of its merits, will present barriers for learners,…

  1. What Counts as Inclusion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, E.; Nel, N.

    2012-01-01

    In the years since the publication in South Africa of White Paper Six: Special needs education (Department of Education (DoE) 2001) various schools in the state and independent sectors have begun to implement inclusive policies and practices. With reference to the Guidelines for full-service/inclusive schools issued in 2009, and by discussing a…

  2. What Counts as Inclusion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, E.; Nel, N.

    2012-01-01

    In the years since the publication in South Africa of White Paper Six: Special needs education (Department of Education (DoE) 2001) various schools in the state and independent sectors have begun to implement inclusive policies and practices. With reference to the Guidelines for full-service/inclusive schools issued in 2009, and by discussing a…

  3. Conclusions on Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, John

    2004-01-01

    An inclusion classroom is defined as one that is tasked with mainstreaming special education students into a population of general education students. In this brief article, the author, a high school mathematics teacher, shares his personal experiences in teaching in an inclusion classroom. A primary focus is his relationship with the special…

  4. Understanding Inclusion in Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamas, Christoforos

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a framework for understanding inclusion in Cyprus. The evidence base is the result of a six-month qualitative research study in five Cypriot mainstream primary schools. Despite the rhetoric in favour of inclusion, it seems that the Cypriot educational system is still highly segregating in its philosophy and does not fully…

  5. The Inclusion Facilitator's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Cheryl M.; Schuh, Mary C.; Nisbet, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Inclusion facilitators are educators who do more than teach children with disabilities--they advocate for change in schools and communities, sparking a passion for inclusion in teachers, administrators, and families and giving them the practical guidance they need to make it work. This is an essential new role in today's schools, and this guide…

  6. Jet inclusive cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons.

  7. Adapted Aquatics and Inclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Martin E.; Conatser, Phillip

    2002-01-01

    Presents strategies and techniques to help instructors and directors promote successful inclusive aquatics programs for students with disabilities, discussing the importance of considering issues related to: teaching style, collaborative planning, goal determination, appropriate inclusive placement, personnel preparation, curriculum adaptation,…

  8. FOST 2 Upgrade with Hollow-Fiber CTA FO Module and Generation of Osmotic Agent for Microorganism Growth Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parodi, Jurek; Mangado, Jaione Romero; Stefanson, Ofir; Flynn, Michael; Shaw, Hali; Beeler, David

    2016-01-01

    FOST 2 is an integrated membrane system that incorporates a forward osmosis subsystem and a reverse osmosis subsystem working in series. It has been designed as a post treatment system to process the effluent from the Membrane Aerated Biological Reactor developed at NASA Johnson Space Center and Texas Tech University. Its function is to remove dissolved solids residual such as ammonia and suspended solids, as well as to provide a physical barrier to microbial and viral contamination. A tubular CTA membrane module from HTI and a flat-sheet lipid-base membrane module from Porifera were integrated and tested on FOST 2 in the past, using both a bioreactor's effluent and greywater as the feed solution. This paper documents the performance of FOST 2 after its upgrade with a hollow-fiber CTA membrane module from Toyobo, treating real black-water to generate the osmotic agent solution necessary to conduct growth studies of genetically engineered microorganism for the Synthetic Biological Membrane project.

  9. COMPTEL observations of the γ-ray blazars 3C 454.3 and CTA 102 during the CGRO mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Collmar, W.; Schönfelder, V.

    2005-12-01

    We have investigated the MeV behaviour of the γ-ray blazars 3C 454.3 and CTA 102 by analyzing all COMPTEL observations of this sky region during the complete CGRO mission. Both sources are detected by COMPTEL at the upper COMPTEL energies, although their flux estimates may be uncertain by possible minor contributions of nearby unidentified EGRET γ-ray sources. While CTA 102 was only detected at energies above 10 MeV during the early mission, 3C 454.3 is most significantly detected in the COMPTEL 3-10 MeV band in the sum of all data. Time-resolved analyses indicate a weak (near COMPTEL threshold) but likely steady 3-10 MeV emission over years, being independent of the observed time variability at energies above 100 MeV as observed by EGRET. This energy-dependent variability behaviour suggests different emission mechanisms at work in the two bands. Putting the COMPTEL fluxes in multifrequency perspective (radio to γ-rays) reveals for both sources the typical two-hump blazar spectrum, with a low-energy maximum around the IR and a high-energy maximum at MeV energies. The latter one dominates the energy output across the whole electro-magnetic spectrum. The results of our analyses are discussed in the framework of current blazar modeling.

  10. Probing for Pulsars in XMM Study of the Composite SNRS G327.1-1.1 and CTA 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotsky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Slane, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    The subject grant is for analysis of XMM data from the supernova remnant CTA1. Our investigation centered on the study of the compact source RX 50007.0+7302 that, based on our previous observations, appears to be a neutron star powering a wind nebula in the remnant interior. This compact source has also been suggested as the counterpart of the EGRET source 2EG J0008+7307. The analysis of the data from the compact source is complete. We find that the spectrum of the source is well described by a power law with the addition of a soft thermal component that may correspond to emission from hot polar cap regions or to cooling emission from a light element atmosphere over the entire star. There is evidence of extended emission on small spatial scales which may correspond to structure in the underlying synchrotron nebula. Extrapolation of the nonthermal emission component to gamma-ray energies yields a flux that is consistent with that of 2EG J0008+7307, thus strengthening the proposition that there is a gamma-ray emitting pulsar at the center of CTA 1. Our timing studies with the EPIC pn data revealed no evidence for pulsations, however; we set an upper limit of 61% on the pulsed fraction from this source. The results from this study were presented.

  11. H.E.S.S. and CTA, present and perspectives in ground-based gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sol, H.

    2016-12-01

    Very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy emerged as a new branch of astronomy about ten years ago with the major discoveries achieved by the High Energy Stereocopic System (H.E.S.S.) operating in Namibia, quickly followed by the Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov Telescopes (MAGIC) in the Canary Islands and the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) in the USA. These experiments succeeded to start exploring the cosmos at TeV energies, with the present detection of 178 sources in this range, mostly pulsar wind nebulae, supernova remnants, binary systems, blazars, and a variety of other types of sources. Based on these promizing results, the scientific community soon defined a next generation global project with significantly improved performance, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), in order to implement an open observatory at extreme energies, allowing a deep analysis of the sky in the highest part of the electromagnetic spectrum, from 20 GeV to 300 TeV. The CTA preparation phase is now completed. Production of the first telescopes should start in 2017 for deployment in 2018, in the perspective of an array fully operational at the horizon 2022.

  12. Cloning, purification, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic analysis of the periplasmic sensing domain of Pseudomonas fluorescens chemotactic transducer of amino acids type A (CtaA).

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Abu Iftiaf Md Salah; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2016-09-05

    Chemotaxis towards nutrients plays a crucial role in root colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens. The P. fluorescens chemotactic transducer of amino acids type A (CtaA) mediates movement towards amino acids present in root exudates. In this study, the periplasmic sensory domain of CtaA has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapor diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as a precipitating agent. A complete data set was collected to 1.9 Å resolution using cryocooling conditions and synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to space group I222 or I212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.2, b = 76.0, c = 113.3 Å. This is an important step towards elucidation of the structural basis of how CtaA recognizes its signal molecules and transduces the signal across the membrane.

  13. Novel hybrid polymeric materials for barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlacky, Erin Christine

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites, described as the inclusion of nanometer-sized layered silicates into polymeric materials, have been widely researched due to significant enhancements in material properties with the incorporation of small levels of filler (1--5 wt.%) compared to conventional micro- and macro-composites (20--30 wt.%). One of the most promising applications for polymer-clay nanocomposites is in the field of barrier coatings. The development of UV-curable polymer-clay nanocomposite barrier coatings was explored by employing a novel in situ preparation technique. Unsaturated polyesters were synthesized in the presence of organomodified clays by in situ intercalative polymerization to create highly dispersed clays in a precursor resin. The resulting clay-containing polyesters were crosslinked via UV-irradiation using donor-acceptor chemistry to create polymer-clay nanocomposites which exhibited significantly enhanced barrier properties compared to alternative clay dispersion techniques. The impact of the quaternary alkylammonium organic modifiers, used to increase compatibility between the inorganic clay and organic polymer, was studied to explore influence of the organic modifier structure on the nanocomposite material properties. By incorporating just the organic modifiers, no layered silicates, into the polyester resins, reductions in film mechanical and thermal properties were observed, a strong indicator of film plasticization. An alternative in situ preparation method was explored to further increase the dispersion of organomodified clay within the precursor polyester resins. In stark contrast to traditional in situ polymerization methods, a novel "reverse" in situ preparation method was developed, where unmodified montmorillonite clay was added during polyesterification to a reaction mixture containing the alkylammonium organic modifier. The resulting nanocomposite films exhibited reduced water vapor permeability and increased mechanical properties

  14. Production of monodisperse, polymeric microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Rhim, Won-Kyu (Inventor); Hyson, Michael T. (Inventor); Chang, Manchium (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Very small, individual polymeric microspheres with very precise size and a wide variation in monomer type and properties are produced by deploying a precisely formed liquid monomer droplet, suitably an acrylic compound such as hydroxyethyl methacrylate into a containerless environment. The droplet which assumes a spheroid shape is subjected to polymerizing radiation such as ultraviolet or gamma radiation as it travels through the environment. Polymeric microspheres having precise diameters varying no more than plus or minus 5 percent from an average size are recovered. Many types of fillers including magnetic fillers may be dispersed in the liquid droplet.

  15. Melting line of polymeric nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakub, L. N.

    2013-05-01

    We made an attempt to predict location of the melting line of polymeric nitrogen using two equations for Helmholtz free energy: proposed earlier for cubic gauche-structure and developed recently for liquid polymerized nitrogen. The P-T relation, orthobaric densities and latent heat of melting were determined using a standard double tangent construction. The estimated melting temperature decreases with increasing pressure, alike the temperature of molecular-nonmolecular transition in solid. We discuss the possibility of a triple point (solid-molecular fluid-polymeric fluid) at ˜80 GPa and observed maximum of melting temperature of nitrogen.

  16. Organometallic Polymeric Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngs, Wiley J.

    1997-01-01

    For aerospace applications, the use of polymers can result in tremendous weight savings over metals. Suitable polymeric materials for some applications like EMI shielding, spacecraft grounding, and charge dissipation must combine high electrical conductivity with long-term environmental stability, good processability, and good mechanical properties. Recently, other investigators have reported hybrid films made from an electrically conductive polymer combined with insulating polymers. In all of these instances, the films were prepared by infiltrating an insulating polymer with a precursor for a conductive polymer (either polypyrrole or polythiophene), and oxidatively polymerizing the precursor in situ. The resulting composite films have good electrical conductivity, while overcoming the brittleness inherent in most conductive polymers. Many aerospace applications require a combination of properties. Thus, hybrid films made from polyimides or other engineering resins are of primary interest, but only if conductivities on the same order as those obtained with a polystyrene base could be obtained. Hence, a series of experiments was performed to optimize the conductivity of polyimide-based composite films. The polyimide base chosen for this study was Kapton. 3-MethylThiophene (3MT) was used for the conductive phase. Three processing variables were identified for producing these composite films, namely time, temperature, and oxidant concentration for the in situ oxidation. Statistically designed experiments were used to examine the effects of these variables and synergistic/interactive effects among variables on the electrical conductivity and mechanical strength of the films. Multiple linear regression analysis of the tensile data revealed that temperature and time have the greatest effect on maximum stress. The response surface of maximum stress vs. temperature and time (for oxidant concentration at 1.2 M) is shown. Conductivity of the composite films was measured for

  17. High temperature structural, polymeric foams from high internal emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Hoisington, M.A.; Duke, J.R.; Apen, P.G.

    1996-02-01

    In 1982, a high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) polymerization process to manufacture microcellular, polymeric foam systems was patented by Unilever. This patent discloses a polymerization process that occurs in a water-in-oil emulsion in which the water represents at least 76% of the emulsion by volume. The oil phase consists of vinyl monomers such as styrene and acrylates that are crosslinked by divinyl monomers during polymerization. After polymerization and drying to remove the water phase, the result is a crosslinked polymer foam with an open cell microstructure that is homogeneous throughout in terms of morphology, density, and mechanical properties. Since 1982, numerous patents have examined various HIPE polymerized foam processing techniques and applications that include absorbents for body fluids, cleaning materials, and ion exchange systems. All the published HIPE polymerized foams have concentrated on materials for low temperature applications. Copolymerization of styrene with maleic anhydride and N-substituted maleimides to produce heat resistant thermoplastics has been studied extensively. These investigations have shown that styrene will free radically copolymerize with N-substituted maleimides to create an alternating thermoplastic copolymer with a Tg of approximately 200{degrees}C. However, there are many difficulties in attempting the maleimide styrene copolymerization in a HIPE such as lower polymerization temperatures, maleimide solubility difficulties in both styrene and water, and difficulty obtaining a stable HIPE with a styrene/maleimide oil phase. This work describes the preparation of copolymer foams from N-ethylmaleimide and Bis(3-ethyl-5-methyl-4-maleimide-phenyl)methane with styrene based monomers and crosslinking agents.

  18. Oligomeric and polymeric aggregates formed by proteins containing expanded polyglutamine

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, S.; Hoffner, G.; Verbeke, P.; Djian, P.; Green, H.

    2003-01-01

    Neurological diseases resulting from proteins containing expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) are characteristically associated with insoluble neuronal inclusions, usually intranuclear, and neuronal death. We describe here oligomeric and polymeric aggregates formed in cells by expanded polyQ. These aggregates are not dissociated by concentrated formic acid, an extremely effective solvent for otherwise insoluble proteins. Perinuclear inclusions formed in cultured cells by expanded polyQ can be completely dissolved in concentrated formic acid, but a soluble protein oligomer containing the expanded polyQ and released by the formic acid is not dissociated to monomer. In Huntington's disease, a formic acid-resistant oligomer is present in cerebral cortex, but not in cerebellum. Cortical nuclei contain a polymeric aggregate of expanded polyQ that is insoluble in formic acid, does not enter polyacrylamide gels, but is retained on filters. This finding shows that the process of polymerization is more advanced in the cerebral cortex than in cultured cells. The resistance of oligomer and polymer to formic acid suggests the participation of covalent bonds in their stabilization. PMID:12591956

  19. Kinetics of silica polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Weres, O.; Yee, A.; Tsao, L.

    1980-05-01

    The polymerization of silicic acid in geothermal brine-like aqueous solutions to produce amorphous silica in colloidal form has been studied experimentally and theoretically. A large amount of high quality experimental data has been generated over the temperature rang 23 to 100{sup 0}C. Wide ranges of dissolved silica concentration, pH, and sodium chloride concentration were covered. The catalytic effects of fluoride and the reaction inhibiting effects of aluminum and boron were studied also. Two basic processes have been separately studied: the formation of new colloidal particles by the homogeneous nucleation process and the deposition of dissolved silica on pre-existing colloidal particles. A rigorous theory of the formation of colloidal particles of amorphous silica by homogeneous nucleation was developed. This theory employs the Lothe-Pound formalism, and is embodied in the computer code SILNUC which quantitatively models the homogeneous nucleation and growth of colloidal silica particles in more than enough detail for practical application. The theory and code were extensively used in planning the experimental work and analyzing the data produced. The code is now complete and running in its final form. It is capable of reproducing most of the experimental results to within experimental error. It is also capable of extrapolation to experimentally inaccessible conditions, i.e., high temperatures, rapidly varying temperature and pH, etc.

  20. Direct polymerization of proteins.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Cem; Swartz, James R

    2014-06-20

    We report the synthesis of active polymers of superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) in one step using Click chemistry. Up to six copies of the non-natural amino acids (nnAAs) p-azido-l-phenylalanine (pAzF) or p-propargyloxy-l-phenylalanine (pPaF) were site-specifically inserted into sfGFP by cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS). sfGFP containing two or three copies of these nnAAs were coupled by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition to synthesize linear or branched protein polymers, respectively. The protein polymers retained ≥63% of their specific activity (i.e., fluorescence) after coupling. Polymerization of a concentrated solution of triply substituted sfGFP resulted in fluorescent macromolecular particles. Our method can be generalized to synthesize polymers of a protein or copolymers of any two or more proteins, and the conjugation sites can be determined exactly by standard genetic manipulation. Polymers of proteins and small molecules can also be created with this technology to make a new class of scaffolds or biomaterials.

  1. Polymerization of anionic wormlike micelles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; González, Yamaira I; Xu, Hangxun; Kaler, Eric W; Liu, Shiyong

    2006-01-31

    Polymerizable anionic wormlike micelles are obtained upon mixing the hydrotropic salt p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) with the reactive anionic surfactant sodium 4-(8-methacryloyloxyoctyl)oxybenzene sulfonate (MOBS). Polymerization captures the cross-sectional radius of the micelles (approximately 2 nm), induces micellar growth, and leads to the formation of a stable single-phase dispersion of wormlike micellar polymers. The unpolymerized and polymerized micelles were characterized using static and dynamic laser light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering, 1H NMR, and stopped-flow light scattering. Stopped-flow light scattering was also used to measure the average lifetime of the unpolymerized wormlike micelles. A comparison of the average lifetime of unpolymerized wormlike micelles with the surfactant monomer propagation rate was used to elucidate the mechanism of polymerization. There is a significant correlation between the ratio of the average lifetime to the monomer propagation rate and the average aggregation number of the polymerized wormlike micelles.

  2. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  3. Polymerized supramolecular assemblies and biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, David F.

    2001-03-01

    The creation of durable, biomembrane-mimetic coatings for inorganic and polymeric surfaces that are biocompatible, i.e. resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption, remains an important goal that is expected to impact numerous fields. It has already been shown that the physical stability of lipid bilayer vesicles can be dramatically enhanced by cross-linking polymerization of reactive lipids, such as phosphatidylcholines. Bilayers of these same lipids on clean silicon dioxide surfaces can be formed by fusion of small bilayer vesicles with the surface. Radical initiated polymerization of these supported bilayers yields a stable poly(lipid) film that is not perturbed upon exposure to surfactant. Moreover, the cross-linked bilayer film can be removed from water into air with retention of the poly(lipid) bilayer structure. These polymerized bilayer films could be repeatedly transferred from water to air to water with no obvious change in their biocompatibility. The supported bilayer films were equally resistant to non-specific protein adsorption before and after polymerization. This indicates that biocompatible nature of the phosphorylcholine head group of the lipids was not compromised by polymerization of the lipids. The ability to maintain surface biocompatibility of membranes while substantially increasing their stability would appear to extend the technological uses of supramolecular assemblies of lipids.

  4. Carotid CTA: radiation exposure and image quality with the use of attenuation-based, automated kilovolt selection.

    PubMed

    Eller, A; Wuest, W; Kramer, M; May, M; Schmid, A; Uder, M; Lell, M M

    2014-02-01

    CTA is considered the imaging modality of choice in evaluating the supraaortic vessels in many institutions, but radiation exposure remains a matter of concern. The objective of the study was to evaluate a fully automated, attenuation-based kilovolt selection algorithm in carotid CTA in respect to radiation dose and image quality compared with a standard 120-kV protocol. Ninety-eight patients were included: 53 examinations (patient age, 66 ± 12 years) were performed by use of automated adaption of tube potential (80-140 kV) on the basis of the attenuation profile of the scout scan (study group), and 45 examinations (patient age, 67 ± 11 years) were performed by use of a standard 120-kV protocol (control group). CT dose index volume and dose-length product were recorded from the examination protocol. Image quality was assessed by ROI measurements and calculations of SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio. Subjective image quality was evaluated by 2 observers with the use of a 4-point scale (3, excellent; 0, not diagnostic). Subjective image quality was rated as "excellent" or "good" in all examinations (study group, 2.8; control group, 2.8). The algorithm automatically selected 100 kV in 47% and 80 kV in 34%; 120 kV was retained in 19%. An elevation to 140 kV did not occur. Compared with the control group, overall CT dose index volume reduction was 33.7%; overall dose-length product reduction was 31.5%. In the low-kilovolt scans, image noise and mean attenuation of ROIs inside the carotid arteries were significantly higher than in 120-kV scans, resulting in a constant or increased (80-kV group) contrast-to-noise ratio. The attenuation-based, kilovolt selection algorithm enables a dose reduction of >30% in carotid artery CTA while maintaining contrast-to-noise ratio and subjective image quality at adequate levels.

  5. Fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles on pre- and postoperative CT arthrography (CTA): is the Goutallier grading system reliable?

    PubMed

    Lee, Eugene; Choi, Jung-Ah; Oh, Joo Han; Ahn, Soyeon; Hong, Sung Hwan; Chai, Jee Won; Kang, Heung Sik

    2013-09-01

    To retrospectively evaluate fatty degeneration (FD) of rotator cuff muscles on CTA using Goutallier's grading system and quantitative measurements with comparison between pre- and postoperative states. IRB approval was obtained for this study. Two radiologists independently reviewed pre- and postoperative CTAs of 43 patients (24 males and 19 females, mean age, 58.1 years) with 46 shoulders confirmed as full-thickness tears with random distribution. FD of supraspinatus, infraspinatus/teres minor, and subscapularis was assessed using Goutallier's system and by quantitative measurements of Hounsfield units (HUs) on sagittal images. Changes in FD grades and HUs were compared between pre- and postoperative CTAs and analyzed with respect to preoperative tear size and postoperative cuff integrity. The correlations between qualitative grades and quantitative measurements and their inter-observer reliabilities were also assessed. There was statistically significant correlation between FD grades and HU measurements of all muscles on pre- and postoperative CTA (p < 0.05). Inter-observer reliability of fatty degeneration grades were excellent to substantial on both pre- and postoperative CTA in supraspinatus (0.8685 and 0.8535) and subscapularis muscles (0.7777 and 0.7972), but fair in infraspinatus/teres minor muscles (0.5791 and 0.5740); however, quantitative Hounsfield units measurements showed excellent reliability for all muscles (ICC: 0.7950 and 0.9346 for SST, 0.7922 and 0.8492 for SSC, and 0.9254 and 0.9052 for IST/TM). No muscle showed improvement of fatty degeneration after surgical repair on qualitative and quantitative assessments; there was no difference in changes of fatty degeneration after surgical repair according to preoperative tear size and post-operative cuff integrity (p > 0.05). The average dose-length product (DLP, mGy · cm) was 365.2 mGy · cm (range, 323.8-417.2 mGy · cm) and estimated average effective dose was 5.1 mSv. Goutallier

  6. Polymeric materials in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skurat, Vladimir

    Paper of short review type. It is the continuation of and addition to previous review papers "V. E. Skurat. Polymers in Space. In: Encyclopedia of aerospace engineering, vol. 4, Wiley and sons, 2010; Ibid., 2012 (on line)". Following topics are considered: (1) Destruction of polymers by solar radiation with various wavelengths in different spectral regions (visible-UV, vacuum UV (VUV), deep UV, soft and hard X-rays) are discussed. In difference with common polymer photochemistry induced by UV radiation, directions of various routs of polymer phototransformations and their relative yields are greatly dependent on wavelength of light (photon energy) during illuminations in VUV, deep UV and X-ray regions. During last twenty years, intensive spacecraft investigations of solar spectrum show great periodic and spontaneous variations of radiation intensities in short-wavelengths regions - up to one - two decimal orders of magnitude for X-rays. As a result, during solar flares the absorbed dose on the polymer surfaces from X-rays can be compared with absorbed dose from VUV radiation. (2) Some new approaches to predictions of reaction efficiencies of fast orbital atomic oxygen in their interaction with polymeric materials are considered. (3) Some aspects of photocatalitic destruction of polymers in vacuum conditions by full-spectrum solar radiation are discussed. This process can take place in enamels containing semiconducting particles (TiO2, ZnO) as pigments. (4) Contamination of spacecraft surfaces from intrinsic outer atmosphere play important role not only from the point of view of deterioration of optical and thermophysical properties. Layers of SiO2 contaminations with nanometer thicknesses can greatly diminish mass losses from perfluorinated polymers under VUV irradiation.

  7. Polymeric materials for neovascularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVolder, Ross John

    Revascularization therapies have emerged as a promising strategy to treat various acute and chronic wounds, cardiovascular diseases, and tissue defects. It is common to either administer proangiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), or transplant cells that endogenously express multiple proangiogenic factors. Additionally, these strategies utilize a wide variety of polymeric systems, including hydrogels and biodegradable plastics, to deliver proangiogenic factors in a sophisticated manner to maintain a sustained proangiogenic environment. Despite some impressive results in rebuilding vascular networks, it is still a challenging task to engineer mature and functional neovessels in target tissues, because of the increasing complexities involved with neovascularization applications. To resolve these challenges, this work aims to design a wide variety of proangiogenic biomaterial systems with tunable properties used for neovascularization therapies. This thesis describes the design of several biomaterial systems used for the delivery of proangiogenic factors in neovascularization therapies, including: an electrospun/electrosprayed biodegradable plastic patch used for directional blood vessel growth (Chapter 2), an alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel system that biochemically stimulates cellular endogenous proangiogenic factor expression (Chapter 3), an enzyme-catalyzed alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel system for VEGF delivery (Chapter 4), an enzyme-activated alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel system with systematically controllable electrical and mechanical properties (Chapter 5), and an alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel that enables the decoupled control of electrical conductivity and mechanical rigidity and is use to electrically stimulate cellular endogenous proangiogenic factor expression (Chapter 6). Overall, the biomaterial systems developed in this thesis will be broadly useful for improving the quality of a wide array of molecular and cellular based

  8. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope Discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova Remnant CTA 1

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Atwood, W. B.; ...

    2008-11-21

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10-13 s s-1 . Its characteristic age of 104 years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated withmore » star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.« less

  9. The Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova-Remnant CTA 1

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M.G.; Bastieri, Denis; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bogaert, G.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.

    2009-05-15

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10{sup -13} s s{sup -1}. Its characteristic age of 10{sup 4} years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  10. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope Discovers the Pulsar in the Young Galactic Supernova Remnant CTA 1

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogaert, G.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carlson, P.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Davis, D. S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Edmonds, Y.; Farnier, C.; Focke, W. B.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Hartman, R. C.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kanai, Y.; Kanbach, G.; Katagiri, H.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Kishishita, T.; Kiziltan, B.; Knodlseder, J.; Kocian, M. L.; Komin, N.; Kuehn, F.; Kuss, M.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Lonjou, V.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Marelli, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mineo, T.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piano, G.; Pieri, L.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Parkinson, P. M. S.; Schalk, T. L.; Sellerholm, A.; Sgro, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J. -L.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Wang, P.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yasuda, H.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2008-11-21

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves (supernova remnants, SNRs) are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 ms, a period derivative of 3.614 x 10-13 s s-1 . Its characteristic age of 104 years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. It is conjectured that most unidentified Galactic gamma ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  11. Two-particle azimuthal correlations in 4.2A GeV C+Ta collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Simic, Lj.; Mendas, I.; Jotanovic, O.; Milosevic, J.

    2007-10-15

    Two particle azimuthal correlations are studied in 4.2A GeV C+Ta collisions observed with the 2-m propane bubble chamber exposed at JINR Dubna Synchrophasotron. The correlations are analyzed both for protons and negative pions, and their dependence on the collision centrality, rapidity and rapidity difference is investigated. It is found that protons show a weak back-to-back correlations, while a side-by-side correlations are observed for negative pions. Restricting both protons to the target or projectile fragmentation region, the side-by-side correlations are observed for protons also. Using the two particle correlation function, the flow analysis is performed and intensity of directed flow is determined without event-by event estimation of the reaction plane.

  12. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope discovers the pulsar in the young galactic supernova remnant CTA 1.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Carlson, P; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; Davis, D S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dormody, M; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Farnier, C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hartman, R C; Hays, E; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Kanai, Y; Kanbach, G; Katagiri, H; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Kishishita, T; Kiziltan, B; Knödlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Lonjou, V; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Mineo, T; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piano, G; Pieri, L; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schalk, T L; Sellerholm, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Starck, J-L; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Van Etten, A; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Wang, P; Watters, K; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yasuda, H; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2008-11-21

    Energetic young pulsars and expanding blast waves [supernova remnants (SNRs)] are the most visible remains after massive stars, ending their lives, explode in core-collapse supernovae. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has unveiled a radio quiet pulsar located near the center of the compact synchrotron nebula inside the supernova remnant CTA 1. The pulsar, discovered through its gamma-ray pulsations, has a period of 316.86 milliseconds and a period derivative of 3.614 x 10(-13) seconds per second. Its characteristic age of 10(4) years is comparable to that estimated for the SNR. We speculate that most unidentified Galactic gamma-ray sources associated with star-forming regions and SNRs are such young pulsars.

  13. Exceptional outburst of the blazar CTA 102 in 2012: the GASP-WEBT campaign and its extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V. M.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Jorstad, S. G.; Marscher, A. P.; Agudo, I.; Smith, P. S.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; ˙arévalo, M. J.; Arkharov, A. A.; Bachev, R.; Blinov, D. A.; Borisov, G.; Borman, G. A.; Bozhilov, V.; Bueno, A.; Carnerero, M. I.; Carosati, D.; Casadio, C.; Chen, W. P.; Clemens, D. P.; Di Paola, A.; Ehgamberdiev, Sh. A.; Gómez, J. L.; González-Morales, P. A.; Griñón-Marín, A.; Grishina, T. S.; Hagen-Thorn, V. A.; Ibryamov, S.; Itoh, R.; Joshi, M.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Koptelova, E.; Lázaro, C.; Larionova, E. G.; Larionova, L. V.; Manilla-Robles, A.; Metodieva, Y.; Milanova, Yu. V.; Mirzaqulov, D. O.; Molina, S. N.; Morozova, D. A.; Nazarov, S. V.; Ovcharov, E.; Peneva, S.; Ros, J. A.; Sadun, A. C.; Savchenko, S. S.; Semkov, E.; Sergeev, S. G.; Strigachev, A.; Troitskaya, Yu. V.; Troitsky, I. S.

    2016-09-01

    After several years of quiescence, the blazar CTA 102 underwent an exceptional outburst in 2012 September-October. The flare was tracked from γ-ray to near-infrared (NIR) frequencies, including Fermi and Swift data as well as photometric and polarimetric data from several observatories. An intensive Glast-Agile support programme of the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (GASP-WEBT) collaboration campaign in optical and NIR bands, with an addition of previously unpublished archival data and extension through fall 2015, allows comparison of this outburst with the previous activity period of this blazar in 2004-2005. We find remarkable similarity between the optical and γ-ray behaviour of CTA 102 during the outburst, with a time lag between the two light curves of ≈1 h, indicative of cospatiality of the optical and γ-ray emission regions. The relation between the γ-ray and optical fluxes is consistent with the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) mechanism, with a quadratic dependence of the SSC γ-ray flux on the synchrotron optical flux evident in the post-outburst stage. However, the γ-ray/optical relationship is linear during the outburst; we attribute this to changes in the Doppler factor. A strong harder-when-brighter spectral dependence is seen both the in γ-ray and optical non-thermal emission. This hardening can be explained by convexity of the UV-NIR spectrum that moves to higher frequencies owing to an increased Doppler shift as the viewing angle decreases during the outburst stage. The overall pattern of Stokes parameter variations agrees with a model of a radiating blob or shock wave that moves along a helical path down the jet.

  14. Quantification of the uncertainty in coronary CTA plaque measurements using dynamic cardiac phantom and 3D-printed plaque models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Taylor; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Rubin, Geoffrey; Segars, Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the accuracy of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) stenosis measurements using newly developed physical coronary plaque models attached to a base dynamic cardiac phantom (Shelley Medical DHP-01). Coronary plaque models (5 mm diameter, 50% stenosis, and 32 mm long) were designed and 3D-printed with tissue equivalent materials (calcified plaque with iodine enhanced lumen). Realistic cardiac motion was achieved by fitting known cardiac motion vectors to left ventricle volume-time curves to create synchronized heart motion profiles executed by the base cardiac phantom. Realistic coronary CTA acquisition was accomplished by synthesizing corresponding ECG waveforms for gating and reconstruction purposes. All scans were acquired using a retrospective gating technique on a dual-source CT system (Siemens SOMATOM FLASH) with 75ms temporal resolution. Multi-planar reformatted images were reconstructed along vessel centerlines and the enhanced lumens were manually segmented by 5 independent operators. On average, the stenosis measurement accuracy was 0.9% positive bias for the motion free condition (0 bpm). The measurement accuracy monotonically decreased to 18.5% negative bias at 90 bpm. Contrast-tonoise (CNR), vessel circularity, and segmentation conformity also decreased monotonically with increasing heart rate. These results demonstrate successful implementation of the base cardiac phantom with 3D-printed coronary plaque models, adjustable motion profiles, and coordinated ECG waveforms. They further show the utility of the model to ascertain metrics of coronary CT accuracy and image quality under a variety of plaque, motion, and acquisition conditions.

  15. Deep optical observations of the γ-ray pulsar PSR J0007+7303 in the CTA 1 supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, R. P.; de Luca, A.; Rea, N.; Shearer, A.; Collins, S.; Torres, D. F.; Hadasch, D.; Caliandro, A.

    2013-04-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope discovered the time signature of a radio-silent pulsar coincident with RX J0007.0+7302, a plerion-like X-ray source at the centre of the CTA 1 supernova remnant. The inferred timing parameters of the γ-ray pulsar PSR J0007+7303 (P = 315.8 ms; dot{P} ˜ 3.6× 10^{-13} s s-1) point to a Vela-like neutron star, with an age comparable to that of CTA 1. The PSR J0007+7303 low distance (˜1.4 kpc), interstellar absorption (AV ˜ 1.6), and relatively high energy loss rate (dot{E} ˜ 4.5× 10^{35} erg s-1), make it a suitable candidate for an optical follow-up. Here, we present deep optical observations of PSR J0007+7303. The pulsar is not detected in the Gran Telescopio Canarias images down to a limit of r' ˜ 27.6 (3σ), the deepest ever obtained for this pulsar, while William Herschel Telescope images yield a limit of V ˜ 26.9. Our r'-band limit corresponds to an optical emission efficiency η _opt equiv L_opt/dot{E} lesssim 9.4 × 10^{-8}. This limit is more constraining than those derived for other Vela-like pulsars, but is still above the measured optical efficiency of the Vela pulsar. We compared the optical upper limits with the extrapolation of the XMM-Newton X-ray spectrum and found that the optical emission is compatible with the extrapolation of the X-ray power-law component, at variance with what is observed, e.g. in the Vela pulsar.

  16. Evaluation of a multi-atlas based method for segmentation of cardiac CTA data: a large-scale, multicenter, and multivendor study

    SciTech Connect

    Kirisli, H. A.; Schaap, M.; Klein, S.; Papadopoulou, S. L.; Bonardi, M.; Chen, C. H.; Weustink, A. C.; Mollet, N. R.; Vonken, E. J.; Geest, R. J. van der; Walsum, T. van; Niessen, W. J.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is increasingly used for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, CTA is not commonly used for the assessment of ventricular and atrial function, although functional information extracted from CTA data is expected to improve the diagnostic value of the examination. In clinical practice, the extraction of ventricular and atrial functional information, such as stroke volume and ejection fraction, requires accurate delineation of cardiac chambers. In this paper, we investigated the accuracy and robustness of cardiac chamber delineation using a multiatlas based segmentation method on multicenter and multivendor CTA data. Methods: A fully automatic multiatlas based method for segmenting the whole heart (i.e., the outer surface of the pericardium) and cardiac chambers from CTA data is presented and evaluated. In the segmentation approach, eight atlas images are registered to a new patient's CTA scan. The eight corresponding manually labeled images are then propagated and combined using a per voxel majority voting procedure, to obtain a cardiac segmentation. Results: The method was evaluated on a multicenter/multivendor database, consisting of (1) a set of 1380 Siemens scans from 795 patients and (2) a set of 60 multivendor scans (Siemens, Philips, and GE) from different patients, acquired in six different institutions worldwide. A leave-one-out 3D quantitative validation was carried out on the eight atlas images; we obtained a mean surface-to-surface error of 0.94{+-}1.12 mm and an average Dice coefficient of 0.93 was achieved. A 2D quantitative evaluation was performed on the 60 multivendor data sets. Here, we observed a mean surface-to-surface error of 1.26{+-}1.25 mm and an average Dice coefficient of 0.91 was achieved. In addition to this quantitative evaluation, a large-scale 2D and 3D qualitative evaluation was performed on 1380 and 140 images, respectively. Experts evaluated that 49% of the 1380 images

  17. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, John E.; Herzog, Timothy A.

    1998-01-01

    A metallocene catalyst system for the polymerization of .alpha.-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula ##STR1## wherein: R.sup.1, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyls as a substituent, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R.sup.8).sub.3 where R.sup.8 is selected from the group consisting of C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R.sup.1 and R.sup.3 ; R.sup.5 is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E.sup.1, E.sup.2 are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Si(R.sup.9).sub.2 --Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Ge(R.sup.9).sub.2, Sn(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2 --C(R.sup.9).sub.2, where R.sup.9 is C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C.sub.S or C.sub.1 -symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from .alpha.-olefin monomers.

  18. Polymeric bicontinuous microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Kasiraman

    Rheology of complex fluids has been a topic of considerable interest recently. Bicontinuous microemulsions (BmuE), made by mixing appropriate amounts of oil, water and a surfactant, form a unique class of complex fluids. They possess a characteristic nanostructure consisting of undulating surfaces with vanishingly small interfacial curvature. BmuEs can also be generated in polymers by mixing appropriate amounts of two homopolymers and their corresponding diblock copolymer. The main objective of the present research is to study effects of shear on a model polymeric BmuE. Scattering is used as a predominant tool with in situ flow devices, along with optical microscopy and rheology. The model BmuE consists of a ternary blend of poly(ethyl ethylene) (PEE), poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) and a PEE-PDMS diblock copolymer. Steady shear experiments reveal four regimes as a function of shear rate. At low shear rates (regime I), Newtonian behavior is observed; there is onset of shear thinning at higher rates (regime II). In regime III, the stress is independent of shear rate, whereas it increases with shear rate once again in regime IV. Morphological characterization was carried out for each of these four regimes using scattering and microscopy, the key result being the evidence for flow-induced phase separation in regime III. Transient rheological measurements were conducted for startup and step changes in shear rate, and the BmuE exhibits features similar to worm-like micellar colloidal systems. Time-resolved light scattering and microscopy also reveal interesting characteristics. Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy indicates similarities with neat block copolymers near the order-disorder transition. The equilibrium rheological behavior is intriguing and detailed comparisons are made with Landau-Ginzburg theoretical models. Other areas of research as a part of this thesis include study of structural dynamics of BmuEs with dynamic light scattering, and the rheological

  19. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, J.E.; Herzog, T.A.

    1998-01-13

    A metallocene catalyst system is described for the polymerization of {alpha}-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula shown wherein: R{sup 1}, R{sup 2}, and R{sup 3} are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyls as a substituent, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R{sup 8}){sub 3} where R{sup 8} is selected from the group consisting of C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; R{sup 4} and R{sup 6} are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R{sup 1} and R{sup 3}; R{sup 5} is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E{sup 1}, E{sup 2} are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Ge(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Sn(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, where R{sup 9} is C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C{sub S} or C{sub 1}-symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from {alpha}-olefin monomers.

  20. Comparative evaluation of actinide ion uptake by polymer inclusion membranes containing TODGA as the carrier extractant.

    PubMed

    Mahanty, B N; Raut, D R; Mohapatra, P K; Das, D K; Behere, P G; Afzal, Md

    2014-06-30

    Polymer inclusion membranes (PIM) containing TODGA (N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyl diglycolamide) were evaluated for the separation of actinide ions such as Am(3+), Pu(4+), UO2(2+) and Th(4+) from acidic feeds. The PIMs were prepared using cellulose triacetate (CTA) as the polymer matrix and 2-nitrophenyloctyl ether (NPOE) as the plasticizer along with the diglycolamide carrier extractants and were characterized by conventional techniques such as XRD, thermal analysis and AFM. The PIM composition was optimized by a series of studies which involved variation in the CTA, NPOE and carrier concentration which suggested 58% TODGA, 30% NPOE and 12% CTA to be optimum. The uptake studies were carried out using feed solutions containing varying concentrations of nitric acid and showed the trend: Am(3+)>Pu(4+)>Th(4+)>UO2(2+). Transport studies were carried out in a two-compartment cell where nitric acid concentration the feed was varied (1-3M) while the receiver compartment contained alpha-hydroxy-iso-butyric acid (AHIBA). The actinide ion transport efficiencies with TODGA containing PIMs followed the same trend as seen in the uptake studies. The AFM patterns of the PIMs changed when loaded with Eu(3+) carrier (used as a surrogate for Am(3+)) while the regenerated membranes have displayed comparable morphologies. Diffusion coefficient values were experimentally obtained from the transport studies and were found to be 8.89×10(-8) cm(2)/s for Am(3+) transport. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanically controlled radical polymerization initiated by ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Hemakesh; Kleiman, Maya; Esser-Kahn, Aaron Palmer

    2017-02-01

    In polymer chemistry, mechanical energy degrades polymeric chains. In contrast, in nature, mechanical energy is often used to create new polymers. This mechanically stimulated growth is a key component of the robustness of biological materials. A synthetic system in which mechanical force initiates polymerization will provide similar robustness in polymeric materials. Here we show a polymerization of acrylate monomers initiated and controlled by mechanical energy provided by ultrasonic agitation. The activator for an atom-transfer radical polymerization is generated using piezochemical reduction of a Cu(II) precursor complex, which thus converts a mechanical activation of piezoelectric particles to the synthesis of a new material. This polymerization reaction has some characteristics of controlled radical polymerization, such as narrow molecular-weight distribution and linear dependence of the polymeric chain length on the time of mechanical activation. This new method of controlled radical polymerization complements the existing methods to synthesize commercially useful well-defined polymers.

  2. Mechanically controlled radical polymerization initiated by ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Hemakesh; Kleiman, Maya; Esser-Kahn, Aaron Palmer

    2016-10-01

    In polymer chemistry, mechanical energy degrades polymeric chains. In contrast, in nature, mechanical energy is often used to create new polymers. This mechanically stimulated growth is a key component of the robustness of biological materials. A synthetic system in which mechanical force initiates polymerization will provide similar robustness in polymeric materials. Here we show a polymerization of acrylate monomers initiated and controlled by mechanical energy provided by ultrasonic agitation. The activator for an atom-transfer radical polymerization is generated using piezochemical reduction of a Cu(II) precursor complex, which thus converts a mechanical activation of piezoelectric particles to the synthesis of a new material. This polymerization reaction has some characteristics of controlled radical polymerization, such as narrow molecular-weight distribution and linear dependence of the polymeric chain length on the time of mechanical activation. This new method of controlled radical polymerization complements the existing methods to synthesize commercially useful well-defined polymers.

  3. Inclusion Body Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are a group of rare disorders that share many similarities. These include dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), necrotizing myopathy (NM), and sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM). Inclusion body myositis is the most common idiopathic inflammatory myopathy after age 50 and it presents with chronic proximal leg and distal arm asymmetric mucle weakness. Despite similarities with PM, it is likely that IBM is primarily a degenerative disorder rather than an inflammatory muscle disease. Inclusion body myositis is associated with a modest degree of creatine kinase (CK) elevation and an abnormal electromyogram demonstrating an irritative myopathy with some chronicity. The muscle histopathology demonstrates inflammatory exudates surrounding and invading nonnecrotic muscle fibers often times accompanied by rimmed vacuoles. In this chapter, we review sporadic IBM. We also examine past, essentially negative, clinical trials in IBM and review ongoing clinical trials. For further details on DM, PM, and NM, the reader is referred to the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies chapter. PMID:23117948

  4. Dose of reduced z-axis length of computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the chest for pulmonary embolism using 64-detector rows and adaptive iterative reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Martillotti, Jared; Silva, Naomi; Chhabra, Jyoti; Molstrom, Christian; Coughlin, Ryan; O'Loughlin, Michael; Coughlin, Bret

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the dose of CT angiography (CTA) for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) performed using a reduced z-axis to conventional CTA for PE, both using adaptive iterative reconstruction technique on a 64-detector row device. The institutional review board approved a waiver of informed consent. A study was performed to consecutive patients having CTA for PE in the emergency department (ED). The patients underwent a reduced z-axis CTA from the top of the aortic arch to the bottom of the heart using the appropriate CT parameters and standard IV contrast injections. All patients had scans performed with 40 % ASIR and had a breast shield placed to limit breast dose. Per ED ordering criteria, the reduced z-axis protocol was appropriate for patients under 50 years old with no significant comorbidity. The control group consisted of patients from the same time period under 50 years of age who received a full z-axis scan. Technical parameters were the same for both groups other than scan length. Dose-length product (DLP) and volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) were the parameters used to evaluate differences in radiation dose to patients. The average effective dose of the full z-axis group was significantly higher (10.9 mSv (SD 4.7, range = 2.8-22)) compared to the reduced z-axis group (5.5 mSv (SD 3.0, range = 1.6-13, p < 0.001). The average effective dose for the reduced z-axis group was 49 % less than that of the full z-axis group. Reducing the z-axis of a CTA for PE significantly reduces effective radiation dose.

  5. Effects of automatic tube potential selection on radiation dose index, image quality, and lesion detectability in pediatric abdominopelvic CT and CTA: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Brinkley, Michael F; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan C; Samei, Ehsan; Frush, Daniel J; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Wilson, Joshua M; Christianson, Olav I; Frush, Donald P

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effect of automatic tube potential selection (ATPS) on radiation dose, image quality, and lesion detectability in paediatric abdominopelvic CT and CT angiography (CTA). A paediatric modular phantom with contrast inserts was examined with routine pitch (1.4) and high pitch (3.0) using a standard abdominopelvic protocol with fixed 120 kVp, and ATPS with variable kVp in non-contrast, contrast-enhanced, and CTA mode. The volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and lesion detectability index (d') were compared between the standard protocol and ATPS examinations. CTDIvol was reduced in all routine pitch ATPS examinations, with dose reductions of 27-52 % in CTA mode (P < 0.0001), 15-33 % in contrast-enhanced mode (P = 0.0003) and 8-14 % in non-contrast mode (P = 0.03). Iodine and soft tissue insert CNR and d' were improved or maintained in all ATPS examinations. kVp and dose were reduced in 25 % of high pitch ATPS examinations and in none of the full phantom examinations obtained after a single full phantom localizer. ATPS reduces radiation dose while maintaining image quality and lesion detectability in routine pitch paediatric abdominopelvic CT and CTA, but technical factors such as pitch and imaging range must be considered to optimize ATPS benefits. ATPS automatically individualizes CT scan technique for each patient. ATPS lowers radiation dose in routine pitch pediatric abdominopelvic CT and CTA. There is no loss of image quality or lesion detectability with ATPS. Pitch and scan range impact the effectiveness of ATPS dose reduction.

  6. Linguistic Diversity and Social Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piller, Ingrid; Takahashi, Kimie

    2011-01-01

    This introduction provides the framework for the special issue by describing the social inclusion agenda of neoliberal market democracies. While the social inclusion agenda has been widely adopted, social inclusion policies are often blind to the ways in which language proficiency and language ideologies mediate social inclusion in linguistically…

  7. Novel inclusion in laser crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xiaoshan; Wang Siting; Jin Zhongru; Shen Yafang; Chen Jiaguang

    1986-12-01

    In growing alexandrite crystals, a novel inclusion has been found. The inclusions are quantitatively analyzed by an electronic probe and the mechanism for forming inclusions is suggested. In our Bridgman MgF/sub 2/ crystals, the inclusions in <001> direction have also been observed.

  8. Linguistic Diversity and Social Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piller, Ingrid; Takahashi, Kimie

    2011-01-01

    This introduction provides the framework for the special issue by describing the social inclusion agenda of neoliberal market democracies. While the social inclusion agenda has been widely adopted, social inclusion policies are often blind to the ways in which language proficiency and language ideologies mediate social inclusion in linguistically…

  9. On-demand photoinitiated polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Boydston, Andrew J; Grubbs, Robert H; Daeffler, Chris; Momcilovic, Nebojsa

    2015-01-13

    Compositions and methods for adjustable lenses are provided. In some embodiments, the lenses contain a lens matrix material, a masking compound, and a prepolymer. The lens matrix material provides structure to the lens. The masking compound is capable of blocking polymerization or crosslinking of the prepolymer, until photoisomerization of the compound is triggered, and the compound is converted from a first isomer to a second isomer having a different absorption profile. The prepolymer is a composition that can undergo a polymerization or crosslinking reaction upon photoinitiation to alter one or more of the properties of the lenses.

  10. On-demand photoinitiated polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Boydston, Andrew J; Grubbs, Robert H; Daeffler, Chris; Momcilovic, Nebojsa

    2013-12-10

    Compositions and methods for adjustable lenses are provided. In some embodiments, the lenses contain a lens matrix material, a masking compound, and a prepolymer. The lens matrix material provides structure to the lens. The masking compound is capable of blocking polymerization or crosslinking of the prepolymer, until photoisomerization of the compound is triggered, and the compound is converted from a first isomer to a second isomer having a different absorption profile. The prepolymer is a composition that can undergo a polymerization or crosslinking reaction upon photoinitiation to alter one or more of the properties of the lenses.

  11. Relationships in Inclusive Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Graça Duarte; Sardinha, Susana; Reis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Climate in the classroom is one of the determining factors in the development of practices in Inclusive Education. Many factors contribute to the climate in the classroom. However, there are predominance on affective-relational factors, with impact on action, norms and values, social interactions and learning processes. In this paper, the authors…

  12. Collaborative Support for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanahuja-Gavaldà, Josep M.; Olmos-Rueda, Patricia; Morón-Velasco, Mar

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, in Catalonia, students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are increasingly in regular schools although their presence, participation, learning and success are unequal. Barriers towards inclusion often depend on how to organise supporting at regular schools and the teachers' collaboration during this process. In this paper, the support…

  13. Inclusion on the Bookshelf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Camille

    2009-01-01

    Three decades have passed since federal law mandated inclusion--ending, officially at least, a system that segregated students with disabilities from the rest of the student population. The publishing world has yet to catch up. In children's books, characters with disabilities often inhabit their own separate world, where disability is the only…

  14. Education for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preece, Julia

    2006-01-01

    Poverty can be both a consequence of, and contributory factor to, educational exclusion. This paper argues that poverty and exclusion are multidimensional. They require a multisectoral and multilevel approach in education if the most vulnerable sectors of society are to benefit from initiatives to turn exclusion into inclusion. This paper also…

  15. Bacterial inclusion body purification.

    PubMed

    Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Peternel, Spela; Cano-Garrido, Olivia; Villaverde, Antonio; García-Fruitós, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Purification of bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) is gaining importance due to the raising of novel applications for this type of submicron particulate protein clusters, with potential uses in the biomedical field among others. Here, we present two optimized methods to purify IBs adapting classical procedures to the material nature as well as the requirements of its final application.

  16. Nanotubular Toughening Inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Working, Dennis C. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Conventional toughening agents are typically rubbery materials or small molecular weight molecules, which mostly sacrifice the intrinsic properties of a matrix such as modulus, strength, and thermal stability as side effects. On the other hand, high modulus inclusions tend to reinforce elastic modulus very efficiently, but not the strength very well. For example, mechanical reinforcement with inorganic inclusions often degrades the composite toughness, encountering a frequent catastrophic brittle failure triggered by minute chips and cracks. Thus, toughening generally conflicts with mechanical reinforcement. Carbon nanotubes have been used as efficient reinforcing agents in various applications due to their combination of extraordinary mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. Moreover, nanotubes can elongate more than 20% without yielding or breaking, and absorb significant amounts of energy during deformation, which enables them to also be an efficient toughening agent, as well as excellent reinforcing inclusion. Accordingly, an improved toughening method is provided by incorporating nanotubular inclusions into a host matrix, such as thermoset and thermoplastic polymers or ceramics without detrimental effects on the matrix's intrinsic physical properties.

  17. Inclusion's Confusion in Alberta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilham, Chris; Williamson, W. John

    2014-01-01

    This hermeneutic paper interprets a recent series of reforms to inclusive education policy undertaken by the ministry of education in the province of Alberta, Canada. A 2007 Alberta Education review of the 16,000 student files in the province that school boards had claimed met the criteria for severe disability codification status -- the level of…

  18. Nanotubular Toughening Inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Working, Dennis C. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Conventional toughening agents are typically rubbery materials or small molecular weight molecules, which mostly sacrifice the intrinsic properties of a matrix such as modulus, strength, and thermal stability as side effects. On the other hand, high modulus inclusions tend to reinforce elastic modulus very efficiently, but not the strength very well. For example, mechanical reinforcement with inorganic inclusions often degrades the composite toughness, encountering a frequent catastrophic brittle failure triggered by minute chips and cracks. Thus, toughening generally conflicts with mechanical reinforcement. Carbon nanotubes have been used as efficient reinforcing agents in various applications due to their combination of extraordinary mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. Moreover, nanotubes can elongate more than 20% without yielding or breaking, and absorb significant amounts of energy during deformation, which enables them to also be an efficient toughening agent, as well as excellent reinforcing inclusion. Accordingly, an improved toughening method is provided by incorporating nanotubular inclusions into a host matrix, such as thermoset and thermoplastic polymers or ceramics without detrimental effects on the intrinsic physical properties of the matrix.

  19. Positive Inclusion Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensign, Arselia, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This guide focuses on the use of low-end technology to make education more inclusive for children and adolescents with disabilities. The definition of "assistive technology" is discussed, and low-end technology is defined as simple modification/adaptation of toys and games, design and construction of simple switching devices, and the…

  20. Relationships in Inclusive Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Graça Duarte; Sardinha, Susana; Reis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Climate in the classroom is one of the determining factors in the development of practices in Inclusive Education. Many factors contribute to the climate in the classroom. However, there are predominance on affective-relational factors, with impact on action, norms and values, social interactions and learning processes. In this paper, the authors…

  1. Inclusion on the Bookshelf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Camille

    2009-01-01

    Three decades have passed since federal law mandated inclusion--ending, officially at least, a system that segregated students with disabilities from the rest of the student population. The publishing world has yet to catch up. In children's books, characters with disabilities often inhabit their own separate world, where disability is the only…

  2. In Search of Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, John; O'Connor, Una

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a context within which other contributions to this issue might be read. It examines the position of special educational needs (SEN) within the evolving continuum of education in Northern Ireland, specifically within the context of educational inclusion. It describes recent changes in educational policy and legislation which…

  3. Against Being Inclusive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The term "inclusive excellence," made popular by the Association of American Colleges and Universities and adopted by many schools across the country is in some ways unfortunate, in that the concept of "including," arguably, assumes the priority and ongoing dominance of a given reality into which one may (or may not) be granted…

  4. Optimization of inclusive fitness.

    PubMed

    Grafen, Alan

    2006-02-07

    The first fully explicit argument is given that broadly supports a widespread belief among whole-organism biologists that natural selection tends to lead to organisms acting as if maximizing their inclusive fitness. The use of optimization programs permits a clear statement of what this belief should be understood to mean, in contradistinction to the common mathematical presumption that it should be formalized as some kind of Lyapunov or even potential function. The argument reveals new details and uncovers latent assumptions. A very general genetic architecture is allowed, and there is arbitrary uncertainty. However, frequency dependence of fitnesses is not permitted. The logic of inclusive fitness immediately draws together various kinds of intra-genomic conflict, and the concept of 'p-family' is introduced. Inclusive fitness is thus incorporated into the formal Darwinism project, which aims to link the mathematics of motion (difference and differential equations) used to describe gene frequency trajectories with the mathematics of optimization used to describe purpose and design. Important questions remain to be answered in the fundamental theory of inclusive fitness.

  5. Peer Tutoring for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Viviene A.; Lynnes, Michelle D.

    2008-01-01

    Peer tutoring is a pedagogical technique that has promise to improve outcomes for students with a disability within existing resource constraints. Published empirically-based papers on peer-tutoring were descriptively analysed. Synthesis of these studies revealed that peer tutoring is effective in inclusive physical education contexts. Evidence…

  6. Against Being Inclusive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The term "inclusive excellence," made popular by the Association of American Colleges and Universities and adopted by many schools across the country is in some ways unfortunate, in that the concept of "including," arguably, assumes the priority and ongoing dominance of a given reality into which one may (or may not) be granted…

  7. Inclusion Strategies that Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, Alice M.

    2004-01-01

    Many school systems are moving toward an inclusion model for teaching special learners in which all students are included in general classrooms. The basic premise is that all students should first be placed in the general classroom. Students receive as many necessary supplementary aids and services as possible in the general classroom, and then,…

  8. Collaborative Support for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanahuja-Gavaldà, Josep M.; Olmos-Rueda, Patricia; Morón-Velasco, Mar

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, in Catalonia, students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are increasingly in regular schools although their presence, participation, learning and success are unequal. Barriers towards inclusion often depend on how to organise supporting at regular schools and the teachers' collaboration during this process. In this paper, the support…

  9. Moving Toward Inclusive Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, N.; Sears, S.; Wilcoxen, A.; Cabello, B.; Spagna, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a change model that was developed and implemented over 3 years in 2 southern California school districts to promote inclusive practices. A study documented the change process and the impact of related district and site activities through interviews with general and special educators, administrators, and…

  10. Evaluation of polymer inclusion membranes containing crown ethers for selective cesium separation from nuclear waste solution.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, P K; Lakshmi, D S; Bhattacharyya, A; Manchanda, V K

    2009-09-30

    Transport behaviour of (137)Cs from nitric acid feed was investigated using cellulose triacetate plasticized polymer inclusion membrane (PIM) containing several crown ether carriers viz. di-benzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6), di-benzo-21-crown-7 (DB21C7) and di-tert-butylbenzo-18-crown-6 (DTBB18C6). The PIM was prepared from cellulose triacetate (CTA) with various crown ethers and plasticizers. DTBB18C6 and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) were found to give higher transport rate for (137)Cs as compared to other carriers and plasticizers. Effect of crown ether concentration, nitric acid concentration, plasticizer and CTA concentration on the transport rate of Cs was also studied. The Cs selectivity with respect to various fission products obtained from an irradiated natural uranium target was found to be heavily dependent on the nature of the plasticizer. The present work shows that by choosing a proper plasticizer, one can get either good transport efficiency or selectivity. Though TBP plasticized membranes showed good transport efficiency, it displayed poor selectivities. On the other hand, an entirely opposite separation behaviour was observed with 2-nitrophenyloctylether (NPOE) plasticized membranes suggesting the possible application of the later membranes for the removal of bulk (137)Cs from the nuclear waste. The stability of the membrane was tested by carrying out transport runs for nearly 25 days.

  11. Preliminary experience with MRA in evaluating the degree of carotid stenosis and plaque morphology using high-resolution sequences after gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist) administration: comparison with CTA and DSA.

    PubMed

    Anzidei, M; Napoli, A; Geiger, D; Cavallo Marincola, B; Zini, C; Zaccagna, F; Di Paolo, P; Catalano, C; Passariello, R

    2010-06-01

    The authors performed a preliminary study with blood-pool contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in evaluating the degree of carotid artery stenosis and plaque morphology, comparing the diagnostic performance of first-pass (FP) and steady-state (SS) acquisitions with 64-slice computed tomography angiography (CTA) and using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the reference standard. Twenty patients with >or=50% carotid artery stenosis at Doppler sonography underwent blood-pool contrast-enhanced MRA, CTA and DSA. Two independent radiologists evaluated MRA and CTA examinations to assess the degree of stenosis and characterise plaque morphology. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for FP, SS and CTA. The McNemar and Wilcoxon tests were used to determine significant differences (p<0.05) between the diagnostic performance of the three modalities. Forty carotid bifurcations were studied. For stenosis grading, accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 90%, 89%, 90%, 89% and 90%, respectively, at FP; 95%, 95%, 95%, 95% and 95%, respectively, at SS; and 97.5%, 95%, 100%, 100% and 95%, respectively, at CTA. SS and CTA were superior to FP for evaluating the degree of stenosis (p<0.05). For evaluating plaque morphology, accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were 87.5%, 89%, 86%, 85% and 90%, respectively, at FP; 97.5%, 100%, 95%, 95% and 100%, respectively, at SS; and 100%, 100%, 100%, 100% and 100%, respectively, at CTA. There were no significant differences between FP, SS and CTA for plaque assessment (p>0.05). Blood-pool contrast-enhanced MRA with SS sequences allow improved diagnostic evaluation of the degree of carotid stenosis and plaque morphology compared with FP and is substantially equal to CTA and DSA.

  12. Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycely O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers. acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors, in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors. weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 1000 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium; applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  13. Novel polymeric materials from triglycerides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Triglycerides are good platforms for new polymeric products that can substitute for petroleum-based materials. As part of our research emphasis in sustainability and green polymer chemistry, we have explored a number of reactions in efforts to produce a wide range of value-added products. In this ...

  14. The absorption of polymeric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řídký, R.; Popovič, M.; Rolc, S.; Drdlová, M.; Krátký, J.

    2016-06-01

    An absorption capacity of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates is important for wide range of practical applications. Nowadays there are many variants of numerical models suitable for this kind of analysis. The main difficulty is in selection of the most realistic numerical model and a correct setup of many unknown material constants. Cooperation between theoretical simulations and real testing is next crucial point in the investigation process. Standard open source material database offer material properties valid for strain rates less than 250 s-1. There are experiments suitable for analysis of material properties with strain rates close to 2000 s-1. The high strain-rate characteristics of a specific porous blast energy absorbing material measured by modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus is presented in this study. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. One of the possible solution leads to complex and frequency depended Young modulus of testing bars material. This testing technique was applied to materials composed of porous glass/ceramic filler and polymeric binder, with density of 125 - 300 kg/m3 and particle size in range of 50 µm - 2 mm. The achieved material model was verified in practical application of sandwich structure includes polymeric composites under a blast test.

  15. Ballistic Resistance of Polymeric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Chad

    2005-03-01

    Ballistic-resistant body armor has been credited with saving more than 2,500 lives, but new materials are constantly being developed, and there currently exists no method for evaluating armor over time to ensure the continued effectiveness of the protection. We report on progress towards development of a standard test method for reliability of the active polymeric materials that comprise them.

  16. Buckling of polymerized monomolecular films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdieu, L.; Daillant, J.; Chatenay, D.; Braslau, A.; Colson, D.

    1994-03-01

    The buckling of a two-dimensional polymer network at the air-water interface has been evidenced by grazing incidence x-ray scattering. A comprehensive description of the inhomogeneous octadecyltrichlorosilane polymerized film was obtained by atomic force microscopy and x-ray scattering measurements. The buckling occurs with a characteristic wavelength ~=10 μm.

  17. The Viscosity of Polymeric Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, J. E.; Martin, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    To illustrate the behavior of polymeric fluids and in what respects they differ from Newtonian liquids, an experiment was developed to account for the shear-rate dependence of non-Newtonian fluids. Background information, procedures, and results are provided for the experiment. Useful in transport processes, fluid mechanics, or physical chemistry…

  18. Low vibration polymeric composite engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimond, David P.; Muench, Rolf K.

    1994-12-01

    An internal combustion engine is constructed with metallic parts in its regions which are subjected to high stress (temperature, pressure) during combustion and polymeric materials in its regions which are subjected to relatively lower stresses. The integrated construction helps realize increased power densities and reductions on engine noise without compromising engine performance. V-configuration Diesel engines particularly benefit from this construction.

  19. The Viscosity of Polymeric Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, J. E.; Martin, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    To illustrate the behavior of polymeric fluids and in what respects they differ from Newtonian liquids, an experiment was developed to account for the shear-rate dependence of non-Newtonian fluids. Background information, procedures, and results are provided for the experiment. Useful in transport processes, fluid mechanics, or physical chemistry…

  20. The Role of Inclusion Binding Contributions for β-Cyclodextrin Polymers Cross-Linked with Divinyl Sulfone?--A Comment on Morales-Sanfrutos et al. Entitled "Divinyl Sulfone Cross-Linked Cyclodextrin-Based Polymeric Materials: Synthesis and Applications as Sorbents and Encapsulating Agents", Molecules, 2015, 20, 3565-3581.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Lee D; Mohamed, Mohamed H; McMartin, Dena W

    2016-01-14

    This commentary reports on a recent scientific study reported in this journal (cf. Molecules 2015, 20(3), 3565-3581). Some key scientific issues that require further explanation and clarification in the former article are as follows: (i) the relationship between the inclusion site accessibility and the level of cross-linking employed are brought into question for the case of α-CD and β-CD cross-linked adsorbent materials; (ii) the binding affinity of the CD/guest complexes were not related to the isotherm parameters for the CD-polymer/guest systems; (iii) the limited molecular level structural characterization of the cross-linked polymer materials; and (iv) the interpretation of the adsorption isotherm results by the authors.

  1. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, T.J.; Ijadi-Maghsooodi, S; Yi Pang.

    1993-10-19

    A polymeric material is described which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl[sub 5] or W(CO)[sub 6].

  2. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina; Pang, Yi

    1992-05-19

    A polymeric material which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl.sub.5 or W(CO).sub.6 /hv.

  3. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina; Pang, Yi

    1993-10-19

    A polymeric material which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl.sub.5 or W(CO).sub.6 /hv.

  4. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, T.J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Pang, Y.

    1992-05-19

    A polymeric material which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl[sub 5] or W(CO)[sub 6]/hv.

  5. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2017-06-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  6. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  7. Inclusive Flavour Tagging Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Derkach, Denis; Rogozhnikov, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Identifying the flavour of neutral B mesons production is one of the most important components needed in the study of time-dependent CP violation. The harsh environment of the Large Hadron Collider makes it particularly hard to succeed in this task. We present an inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm as an upgrade of the algorithms currently used by the LHCb experiment. Specifically, a probabilistic model which efficiently combines information from reconstructed vertices and tracks using machine learning is proposed. The algorithm does not use information about underlying physics process. It reduces the dependence on the performance of lower level identification capacities and thus increases the overall performance. The proposed inclusive flavour-tagging algorithm is applicable to tag the flavour of B mesons in any proton-proton experiment.

  8. Microvillous inclusion disease.

    PubMed

    Kucinskiene, Rūta; Janciauskas, Dainius; Puzas, Antanas; Adamonis, Kestutis

    2004-01-01

    Congenital defects in the intestinal mucosa can provoke diarrhea in the neonatal period. This kind of diarrhea is difficult to treat and the outcome is bad if intestinal transplantation is not done. We describe the case of newborn female with severe protracted secretory diarrhea, which started after first oral intake of breast milk. The newborn presented with severe dehydration and persistent metabolic acidosis though potential treatment was not stopped. Endoscopy with the biopsies from the distal part of duodenum mucosa was done on the third week of life. Histological examination revealed the pathological mucosa with the total microvillous atrophy, surface epithelium thinning and histochemical PAS (Periodic acid-Schiff reaction) positivity of enterocytes apical region. These changes are typical for rare microvillous inclusion disease. When the diagnosis of microvillous inclusion disease is made, the only treatment is total parenteral nutrition and intestinal transplantation.

  9. Making Inclusion Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villa, Jennifer; Colker, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Inclusion is an oft-used buzzword in education. It is also a concept that the author highly values and wants to be a part of her teaching. She feels she would not be teaching to her potential if she was not able to reach all students. She truly wants a classroom in which all children have access. The author was a Sure Start teacher at a U.S.…

  10. Familial dementia caused by polymerization of mutant neuroserpin.

    PubMed

    Davis, R L; Shrimpton, A E; Holohan, P D; Bradshaw, C; Feiglin, D; Collins, G H; Sonderegger, P; Kinter, J; Becker, L M; Lacbawan, F; Krasnewich, D; Muenke, M; Lawrence, D A; Yerby, M S; Shaw, C M; Gooptu, B; Elliott, P R; Finch, J T; Carrell, R W; Lomas, D A

    1999-09-23

    Aberrant protein processing with tissue deposition is associated with many common neurodegenerative disorders; however, the complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors has made it difficult to decipher the sequence of events linking protein aggregation with clinical disease. Substantial progress has been made toward understanding the pathophysiology of prototypical conformational diseases and protein polymerization in the superfamily of serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins). Here we describe a new disease, familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies, characterized clinically as an autosomal dominantly inherited dementia, histologically by unique neuronal inclusion bodies and biochemically by polymers of the neuron-specific serpin, neuroserpin. We report the cosegregation of point mutations in the neuroserpin gene (PI12) with the disease in two families. The significance of one mutation, S49P, is evident from its homology to a previously described serpin mutations, whereas that of the other, S52R, is predicted by modelling of the serpin template. Our findings provide a molecular mechanism for a familial dementia and imply that inhibitors of protein polymerization may be effective therapies for this disorder and perhaps for other more common neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Inclusive Education in Italy: Description and Reflections on Full Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasiou, Dimitris; Kauffman, James M.; Di Nuovo, Santo

    2015-01-01

    Inclusion of students with disabilities when appropriate is an important goal of special education for students with special needs. Full inclusion, meaning no education for any child in a separate setting, is held to be desirable by some, and Italy is likely the nation with an education system most closely approximating full inclusion on the…

  12. Developing Inclusive Teachers from an Inclusive Curricular Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opertti, Renato; Brady, Jayne

    2011-01-01

    This article defines inclusive education in light of the Education for All agenda. It then describes key considerations for developing inclusive teachers from the perspective of an inclusive curriculum which seeks to address the needs of all learners. It concludes by outlining several key policy discussion areas which must be addressed if…

  13. Inclusive Education in Italy: Description and Reflections on Full Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasiou, Dimitris; Kauffman, James M.; Di Nuovo, Santo

    2015-01-01

    Inclusion of students with disabilities when appropriate is an important goal of special education for students with special needs. Full inclusion, meaning no education for any child in a separate setting, is held to be desirable by some, and Italy is likely the nation with an education system most closely approximating full inclusion on the…

  14. The Potential of Poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide] via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer Polymerization as Safe Nanocarrier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Guo, Chunhua; Li, Shuo; Luo, Kui; Hu, Jiani; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-06-01

    N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers have been presented as nanoscale drug/gene delivery systems and imaging probes, and the well-defined HPMA copolymers prepared via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization promote their to clinical trials, as the significant enhanced anticancer efficacy. The biosafety is another issue associated with the carriers. In this study, we prepared the linear and branched HPMA copolymers labeled with Cy5.5 via RAFT polymerization and click chemistry, and their potential biosafety was studied. The linear copolymer was prepared via RAFT polymerization mediated by the ends-functionalized peptide chain transfer agent (peptide2CTA), resulting in well-defined and block linear HPMA copolymer with molecular weight (MW) of 98 kDa. Additionally, the branched HPMA copolymer was also prepared via RAFT polymerization. Followed by Cy5.5 labeling, the two copolymers showed negative zeta potential and their accumulation into tumor was studied by in vivo optical fluorescence imaging in the nude mice with breast tumors. The biosafety studies on in vitro cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility studies, including hemolysis tests, plasma coagulation and thromboelastography assay were carried out well, demonstrating that the linear HPMA copolymer-Cy5.5 with MW around 100 kDa and biodegradable moiety in the main chain might be utilized as safe nanoscale carrier.

  15. Working through the Inclusion Maze.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Michelle

    1994-01-01

    Suggests that if inclusion programs are implemented correctly, students with special needs will begin to have more success stories, which will help educators find a pathway out of the dead ends of the inclusion maze. (RS)

  16. Polymerization in highly compressed nitrogen (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakub, L. N.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the thermodynamic properties of new polymeric phases of nitrogen at ultra-high pressures, as well as computer modeling of the structure and properties of polymeric nitrogen based on the potential models of interaction of atoms and molecules are reviewed. The location of the phase transition lines for the transitions between the molecular and polymeric crystals, molecular and polymeric fluids as well as the position of the melting line for the polymeric nitrogen in the phase diagram are discussed.

  17. Normalizing difference in inclusive teaching.

    PubMed

    Baglieri, Susan; Knopf, Janice H

    2004-01-01

    Inclusion practices and special education can be transformed by using a disability studies perspective, which constructs differences as natural, acceptable, and ordinary. Although inclusion is a moral imperative in promoting social justice, some inclusive practices continue to marginalize students with disabilities. A truly inclusive school reflects a democratic philosophy whereby all students are valued, educators normalize difference through differentiated instruction, and the school culture reflects an ethic of caring and community.

  18. The control system of the 12-m medium-size telescope prototype: a test-ground for the CTA array control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, I.; Anguner, E. A.; Behera, B.; Birsin, E.; Fuessling, M.; Lindemann, R.; Melkumyan, D.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schwanke, U.; Sternberger, R.; Wegner, P.; Wiesand, S.

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be the next generation ground-based very-high energy -ray observatory. CTA will consist of two arrays: one in the Northern hemisphere composed of about 20 telescopes, and the other one in the Southern hemisphere composed of about 100 telescopes, both arrays containing telescopes of different sizes and types and in addition numerous auxiliary devices. In order to provide a test-ground for the CTA array control, the steering software of the 12-m medium size telescope (MST) prototype deployed in Berlin has been implemented using the tools and design concepts under consideration to be used for the control of the CTA array. The prototype control system is implemented based on the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Common Software (ACS) control middleware, with components implemented in Java, C++ and Python. The interfacing to the hardware is standardized via the Object Linking and Embedding for Process Control Unified Architecture (OPC UA). In order to access the OPC UA servers from the ACS framework in a common way, a library has been developed that allows to tie the OPC UA server nodes, methods and events to the equivalents in ACS components. The front-end of the archive system is able to identify the deployed components and to perform the sampling of the monitoring points of each component following time and value change triggers according to the selected configurations. The back-end of the archive system of the prototype is composed by two different databases: MySQL and MongoDB. MySQL has been selected as storage of the system configurations, while MongoDB is used to have an efficient storage of device monitoring data, CCD images, logging and alarm information. In this contribution, the details and conclusions on the implementation of the control software of the MST prototype are presented.

  19. Inclusive Education in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yong-Wook

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the current implementation of inclusive education in South Korea and discuss its challenges. The history of special education is first described followed by an introduction to policies relevant to special and inclusive education. Next, a critical discussion of the state of inclusive education follows built…

  20. Inclusive Education in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yong-Wook

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the current implementation of inclusive education in South Korea and discuss its challenges. The history of special education is first described followed by an introduction to policies relevant to special and inclusive education. Next, a critical discussion of the state of inclusive education follows built…

  1. Inclusive Education under Collectivistic Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Futaba, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses how inclusive education under collective culture is possible. Inclusive education, which more-or-less involves changing the current schools, has been denied, doubted or distorted by both policy-makers and practitioners of general and special education in Japan. Main reason for the setback in inclusive education can be…

  2. Developing Inclusive Schools: A Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, Barbara

    This workbook provides practical information for developing and implementing inclusive school programs through understanding the educator role, using effective problem-solving strategies, and developing a support network to meet the challenges of inclusion. Ten chapters cover the following topics: (1) effective inclusion (an analysis of the trend…

  3. Inclusion bodies in Plesiomonas shigelloides.

    PubMed Central

    Pastian, M R; Bromel, M C

    1984-01-01

    Inclusion bodies were discovered in seven environmental isolates of Plesiomonas shigelloides and the P. shigelloides control (ATCC 14029). Differential staining indicated that the inclusion bodies may be composed of polyphosphates, and developmental stages of the bodies may occur. The inclusion bodies may be useful for rapid presumptive identification of this organism. Images PMID:6320723

  4. Inclusive Education under Collectivistic Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Futaba, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses how inclusive education under collective culture is possible. Inclusive education, which more-or-less involves changing the current schools, has been denied, doubted or distorted by both policy-makers and practitioners of general and special education in Japan. Main reason for the setback in inclusive education can be…

  5. Assistive Technology & Inclusion. Issue Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sax, Caren; And Others

    This paper uses a case study of the inclusion of a deaf-blind child with cognitive disabilities to explain principles of applying assistive technology in inclusive educational settings. The 12-year-old's progress from a special school four years previously to full inclusion is recounted with emphasis on use of such adaptive equipment as adapted…

  6. Developing Inclusive Schools: A Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, Barbara

    This workbook provides practical information for developing and implementing inclusive school programs through understanding the educator role, using effective problem-solving strategies, and developing a support network to meet the challenges of inclusion. Ten chapters cover the following topics: (1) effective inclusion (an analysis of the trend…

  7. Inclusion: A Guide for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stainback, Susan, Ed.; Stainback, William, Ed.

    This book discusses the inclusion of students with disabilities in general education classrooms and describes strategies that enhance the social success and educational achievement for all students. Section 1 provides an introduction to inclusion and contains the following chapters: "Rationale for Inclusive Schooling" (Anastasios Karagiannis and…

  8. ECG-gated Versus Non-ECG-gated High-pitch Dual-source CT for Whole Body CT Angiography (CTA).

    PubMed

    Beeres, Martin; Wichmann, Julian L; Frellesen, Claudia; Bucher, Andreas M; Albrecht, Moritz; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Lee, Clara; Vogl, Thomas J; Lehnert, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    To investigate motion artifacts, image quality, and practical differences in electrocardiographic (ECG)-gated versus non-ECG-gated high-pitch dual-source computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the whole aorta. Two groups, each including 40 patients, underwent either ECG-gated or non-ECG-gated high-pitch dual-source CTA of the whole aorta. The aortic annulus, aortic valve, coronary ostia, and the presence of motion artifacts of the thoracic aorta as well as vascular contrast down to the femoral arteries were independently assessed by two readers. Additional objective parameters including image noise and signal-to-noise ratio were analyzed. Subjective and objective scoring revealed no presence of motional artifacts regardless of whether the ECG-gated or the non-ECG-gated protocol was used (P > 0.1). Image acquisition parameters (examination length, examination duration, radiation dose) were comparable between the two groups without significant differences. The aortic annulus, aortic valve, and coronary ostia were reliably evaluable in all patients. Vascular contrast was rated excellent in both groups. High-pitch dual-source CTA of the whole aorta is a robust and dose-efficient examination strategy for the evaluation of aortic pathologies whether or not ECG gating is used. Copyright © 2015 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Image Fusion of Preprocedural CTA with Real-time Fluoroscopy to Guide Proper Hepatic Artery Catheterization During Transarterial Chemoembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bargellini, Irene Turini, Francesca; Bozzi, Elena; Lauretti, Dario; Cicorelli, Antonio; Lunardi, Alessandro; Cioni, Roberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2013-04-15

    To assess feasibility of proper hepatic artery catheterization using a 3D model obtained from preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA), fused with real-time fluoroscopy, during transarterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma. Twenty consecutive cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing transarterial chemoembolization were prospectively enrolled onto the study. The early arterial phase axial images of the preprocedural CTA were postprocessed on an independent workstation connected to the angiographic system (Innova 4100; GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI), obtaining a 3D volume rendering image (VR) that included abdominal aorta, splanchnic arteries, and first and second lumbar vertebrae. The VR image was manually registered to the real-time X-ray fluoroscopy, with the lumbar spine used as the reference. The VR image was then used as guidance to selectively catheterize the proper hepatic artery. The procedure was considered successful when performed with no need for intraarterial contrast injections or angiographic acquisitions. The procedure was successful in 19 (95 %) of 20 patients. In one patient, celiac trunk angiography was required for the presence of a significant ostial stenosis that was underestimated at computed tomography. Time for image reconstruction and registration was <10 min in all cases. The use of preprocedural CTA model with fluoroscopy enables confident and direct catheterization of the proper hepatic artery with no need for preliminary celiac trunk angiography, thus reducing radiation exposure and contrast media administration.

  10. Automated identification of best-quality coronary artery segments from multiple-phase coronary CT angiography (cCTA) for vessel analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chughtai, Aamer; Wei, Jun; Kazerooni, Ella A.

    2016-03-01

    We are developing an automated method to identify the best quality segment among the corresponding segments in multiple-phase cCTA. The coronary artery trees are automatically extracted from different cCTA phases using our multi-scale vessel segmentation and tracking method. An automated registration method is then used to align the multiple-phase artery trees. The corresponding coronary artery segments are identified in the registered vessel trees and are straightened by curved planar reformation (CPR). Four features are extracted from each segment in each phase as quality indicators in the original CT volume and the straightened CPR volume. Each quality indicator is used as a voting classifier to vote the corresponding segments. A newly designed weighted voting ensemble (WVE) classifier is finally used to determine the best-quality coronary segment. An observer preference study is conducted with three readers to visually rate the quality of the vessels in 1 to 6 rankings. Six and 10 cCTA cases are used as training and test set in this preliminary study. For the 10 test cases, the agreement between automatically identified best-quality (AI-BQ) segments and radiologist's top 2 rankings is 79.7%, and between AI-BQ and the other two readers are 74.8% and 83.7%, respectively. The results demonstrated that the performance of our automated method was comparable to those of experienced readers for identification of the best-quality coronary segments.

  11. 320-Row Detector Dynamic 4D-CTA for the Assessment of Brain and Spinal Cord Vascular Shunting Malformations. A Technical Note.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Federico; Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    Shunting vascular malformations of the brain and spinal cord are traditionally studied using digital subtraction angiography (DSA), the current gold standard imaging method routinely used because of its favourable combination in terms of spatial and temporal resolution. Because DSA is relatively expensive, time-consuming and carries a risk of silent embolic events and a small risk of transient or permanent neurologic deterioration, a non-invasive alternative angiographic method is of interest. New 320 row-detector CT scanners allow volumetric imaging of the whole brain with temporal resolution up to ≌ 3 Hz. Those characteristics make computed tomography angiography (CTA) an affordable imaging method to study the haemodynamics of the whole brain and can also be applied to the study of limited portions of the spinal cord. The aim of this paper is to make a brief summary of our experience in studying shunting vascular malformation of the brain and spinal cord using dynamic 4D-CTA, explaining the technical details of the studies performed at our institution, and the state-of-the-art major advantages and drawbacks of this new technique. We found that dynamic 4D-CTA is able to depict the main architectural characteristics of previously untreated vascular shunting malformations both in brain and spinal cord (i.e. their main arterial feeders and draining veins) allowing their correct diagnosis and exhaustive classification, limiting the use of DSA for therapeutic purposes.

  12. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 2 carbon atoms of mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins or diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing one or more olefins in the presence of the catalyst system comprising (A) an organo aluminum cocatalyst, and (B) a vanadium-containing catalyst component obtained by sequentially treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent with (i) a dihydrocarbyl magnesium compound, (ii) optionally an oxygen-containing compound which is an alcohol, ketone or aldehyde, (iii) a vanadium compound, and (iv) a Group IIIa metal halide. The process as above is described wherein the inert solid support material is an inorganic oxide or mixtures of inorganic oxides.

  13. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-04-14

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alphaolefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins or diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing one or more olefins in the presence of the catalyst system comprising (A) an organo aluminum cocatalyst, and (B) a vanadium-containing catalyst component obtained by treating an inert support material in an inert solvent with (i) a dihydrocarbyl magnesium compound or a complex or mixture of an organic dihydrocarbyl magnesium compound and an aluminum compound, (ii) optionally an oxygen-containing compound which is an alcohol, ketone or aldehyde, (iii) a Group IIIa metal halide, (iv) at least one vanadium compound, and as the last step a second treatment with a Group IIIa metal halide.

  14. Polymeric Nanofibers in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Rebecca L.; Kasper, F. Kurtis

    2011-01-01

    Polymeric nanofibers can be produced using methods such as electrospinning, phase separation, and self-assembly, and the fiber composition, diameter, alignment, degradation, and mechanical properties can be tailored to the intended application. Nanofibers possess unique advantages for tissue engineering. The small diameter closely matches that of extracellular matrix fibers, and the relatively large surface area is beneficial for cell attachment and bioactive factor loading. This review will update the reader on the aspects of nanofiber fabrication and characterization important to tissue engineering, including control of porous structure, cell infiltration, and fiber degradation. Bioactive factor loading will be discussed with specific relevance to tissue engineering. Finally, applications of polymeric nanofibers in the fields of bone, cartilage, ligament and tendon, cardiovascular, and neural tissue engineering will be reviewed. PMID:21699434

  15. Metal containing polymeric functional microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Molday, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Polymeric functional microspheres containing metal or metal compounds are formed by addition polymerization of a covalently bondable olefinic monomer such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate in the presence of finely divided metal or metal oxide particles, such as iron, gold, platinum or magnetite, which are embedded in the resulting microspheres. The microspheres can be covalently bonded to chemotherapeutic agents, antibodies, or other proteins providing a means for labeling or separating labeled cells. Labeled cells or microspheres can be concentrated at a specific body location such as in the vicinity of a malignant tumor by applying a magnetic field to the location and then introducing the magnetically attractable microspheres or cells into the circulatory system of the subject. Labeled cells can be separated from a cell mixture by applying a predetermined magnetic field to a tube in which the mixture is flowing. After collection of the labeled cells, the magnetic field is discontinued and the labeled sub-cell population recovered.

  16. Polymeric coatings for biomedical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, H.; Chang, B.-J.; Prucker, O.; Dahm, M.; Rühe, J.

    2004-10-01

    To improve the properties of materials in biomedical applications and to allow a better interaction of the medical device with the biological system surrounding it, frequently polymeric coatings are applied. However, the adhesion of the coating to the substrate usually poses a problem as the materials involved have either rather inert surfaces or strongly varying surface chemistries. We describe a new approach which allows to attach a wide variety of polymer films to organic substrates either of polymeric or biological origin. The technique is based on photochemical processes occurring in benzophenone group containing polymers, which lead to simultaneous crosslinking of the polymer in the coating and surface-attachment of the forming polymer network. The synthesis and characterization of monolayers and surface-attached polymer networks through this route are described and possible applications of this approach in the biomedical area are discussed.

  17. Polymeric nanofibers in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Rebecca L; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2011-10-01

    Polymeric nanofibers can be produced using methods such as electrospinning, phase separation, and self-assembly, and the fiber composition, diameter, alignment, degradation, and mechanical properties can be tailored to the intended application. Nanofibers possess unique advantages for tissue engineering. The small diameter closely matches that of extracellular matrix fibers, and the relatively large surface area is beneficial for cell attachment and bioactive factor loading. This review will update the reader on the aspects of nanofiber fabrication and characterization important to tissue engineering, including control of porous structure, cell infiltration, and fiber degradation. Bioactive factor loading will be discussed with specific relevance to tissue engineering. Finally, applications of polymeric nanofibers in the fields of bone, cartilage, ligament and tendon, cardiovascular, and neural tissue engineering will be reviewed.

  18. Polymeric anti-HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Danial, Maarten; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this review is to highlight the application of polymer therapeutics in an effort to curb the transmission and infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Following a description of the HIV life cycle, the use of approved antiretroviral drugs that inhibit critical steps in the HIV infection process is highlighted. After that, a comprehensive overview of the structure and inhibitory properties of polymeric anti-HIV therapeutic agents is presented. This overview will include inhibitors based on polysaccharides, synthetic polymers, dendritic polymers, polymer conjugates as well as polymeric DC-SIGN antagonists. The review will conclude with a section that discusses the applications of polymers and polymer conjugates as systemic and topical anti-HIV therapeutics.

  19. Singing and social inclusion

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Graham F.; Himonides, Evangelos; Saunders, Jo; Papageorgi, Ioulia; Sarazin, Marc

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of neurological, cognitive, and social psychological research to suggest the possibility of positive transfer effects from structured musical engagement. In particular, there is evidence to suggest that engagement in musical activities may impact on social inclusion (sense of self and of being socially integrated). Tackling social exclusion and promoting social inclusion are common concerns internationally, such as in the UK and the EC, and there are many diverse Government ministries and agencies globally that see the arts in general and music in particular as a key means by which social needs can be addressed. As part of a wider evaluation of a national, Government-sponsored music education initiative for Primary-aged children in England (“Sing Up”), opportunity was taken by the authors, at the request of the funders, to assess any possible relationship between (a) children's developing singing behavior and development and (b) their social inclusion (sense of self and of being socially integrated). Subsequently, it was possible to match data from n = 6087 participants, drawn from the final 3 years of data collection (2008–2011), in terms of each child's individually assessed singing ability (based on their singing behavior of two well-known songs to create a “normalized singing score”) and their written responses to a specially-designed questionnaire that included a set of statements related to children's sense of being socially included to which the children indicated their level of agreement on a seven-point Likert scale. Data analyses suggested that the higher the normalized singing development rating, the more positive the child's self-concept and sense of being socially included, irrespective of singer age, sex and ethnicity. PMID:25120514

  20. Singing and social inclusion.

    PubMed

    Welch, Graham F; Himonides, Evangelos; Saunders, Jo; Papageorgi, Ioulia; Sarazin, Marc

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of neurological, cognitive, and social psychological research to suggest the possibility of positive transfer effects from structured musical engagement. In particular, there is evidence to suggest that engagement in musical activities may impact on social inclusion (sense of self and of being socially integrated). Tackling social exclusion and promoting social inclusion are common concerns internationally, such as in the UK and the EC, and there are many diverse Government ministries and agencies globally that see the arts in general and music in particular as a key means by which social needs can be addressed. As part of a wider evaluation of a national, Government-sponsored music education initiative for Primary-aged children in England ("Sing Up"), opportunity was taken by the authors, at the request of the funders, to assess any possible relationship between (a) children's developing singing behavior and development and (b) their social inclusion (sense of self and of being socially integrated). Subsequently, it was possible to match data from n = 6087 participants, drawn from the final 3 years of data collection (2008-2011), in terms of each child's individually assessed singing ability (based on their singing behavior of two well-known songs to create a "normalized singing score") and their written responses to a specially-designed questionnaire that included a set of statements related to children's sense of being socially included to which the children indicated their level of agreement on a seven-point Likert scale. Data analyses suggested that the higher the normalized singing development rating, the more positive the child's self-concept and sense of being socially included, irrespective of singer age, sex and ethnicity.

  1. Radiation-hardened polymeric films

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Hughes, R.C.; Kepler, R.G.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1984-07-16

    The radiation-induced conductivity of polymeric dielectrics with low electronic mobility is reduced by doping with electron donor or electron acceptor compounds at a level of 10/sup 15/ to 10/sup 21/ molecules of dopant/cm/sup 3/. Polyesters, polyolefins, perfluoropolyolefins, vinyl polymers, vinylidene polymers, polycarbonates, polysulfones and polyimides can benefit from such a treatment. Usable dopants include 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone, tetracyanethylene, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, m-dinitrobenzene, 2-isopropylcarbazole, and triphenylamine.

  2. Macrokinetic characteristics of isobutylene polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Minsker, K.S.; Berlin, A.A.; Enikolopyan, N.S.; Prochukhan, Y.A.; Svinkov, A.G.

    1986-08-01

    This paper describes a method of obtaining oligo and polyisobutylene with a molecular mass of 112-50,000: the cationic polymerization of isobutylene carried out in the presence of AlCl/sub 3/, in an environment of hydrocarbons (butanes, etc.) or chlorinated hydrocarbons (ethyl chloride, methyl chloride, etc.) at a temperature of 173-353 K/sub 3/ and in mixer-reactors of complicated design with a volume of 1.5-30 m.

  3. Stability of Polymeric Crystalline Polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkovits, Daniel W.; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    In the search for polymeric materials with novel properties, such as high dielectric constant and low loss, an important attribute of a material is its crystal structure. Most polymers can crystallize into multiple polymorphs whose properties vary. Therefore, the question of which polymorphs are thermodynamically preferred under what conditions is of great importance. We generate polymorphs using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and tackle the question of stability using a combination of molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques. Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI).

  4. Radiation-hardened polymeric films

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., Charles; Hughes, Robert C.; Kepler, R. Glen; Kurtz, Steven R.

    1986-01-01

    The radiation-induced conductivity of polymeric dielectrics with low electronic mobility is reduced by doping with electron donor or electron acceptor compounds at a level of 10.sup.15 to 10.sup.21 molecules of dopant/cm.sup.3. Polyesters, polyolefins, perfluoropolyolefins, vinyl polymers, vinylidene polymers, polycarbonates, polysulfones and polyimides can benefit from such a treatment. Usable dopants include 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone, tetracyanethylene, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, m-dinitrobenzene, 2-isopropylcarbazole, and triphenylamine.

  5. Policies of Inclusion

    PubMed Central

    Fairchild, Amy L.

    2004-01-01

    The racial politics of immigration have punctuated national discussions about immigration at different periods in US history, particularly when concerns about losing an American way of life or American population have coincided with concerns about infectious diseases. Nevertheless, the main theme running through American immigration policy is one of inclusion. The United States has historically been a nation reliant on immigrant labor and, accordingly, the most consequential public policies regarding immigration have responded to disease and its economic burdens by seeking to control the behavior of immigrants within our borders rather than excluding immigrants at our borders. PMID:15053996

  6. Can We Build Inclusion?

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, Inge Mette; Grangaard, Sidse

    2016-01-01

    Inclusion of children with special needs in kindergartens and preschools may be approached from different angles. This paper raises the question of whether the physical framework of kindergartens makes any difference for daily life at the kindergarten at all, and whether it can support inclusion of some children with special needs. Hence the title - can we build inclusion? In the literature of Universal Design, accommodation and design features seldom reflect the less visible disabilities. The paper is based on a research project initiated to investigate how more or less space influences daily pedagogical practice in general. Twelve interviews were conducted with experienced teachers from twelve different kindergartens with different amounts of space, varying from a ratio of 2.1 m2 play area per child to 5.5 m2. The results indicated that, for a group of children with special needs in particular, the amount of space is crucial. This group consisted of children who were socially very extrovert, and who maybe were noisy, easily provoked, and quick to get involved in arguments with other children. Alternatively, children in the group were very restrained and withdrawn in social interaction. Based on the answers in the interviews, we found support for answering the question in the title in the affirmative; we can build inclusion! This is because the teachers' experience indicated that, if there was sufficient space per child, there were fewer conflicts and the children managed to stay in the same activity for a much longer period. Sufficient space made it possible to divide the children into smaller groups, and use any secluded space. Therefore, it was much easier for other children to include some children with special needs. Accordingly, we can say that, sufficient space per child and an adequate layout and furnishing of the kindergarten is an advantage for all children. This is a clear example of Universal Design in which architectural

  7. Polymeric nanocomposites: compounding and performance.

    PubMed

    Utracki, L A

    2008-04-01

    Polymeric nanocomposites (PNC) are binary mixtures of strongly interacting, inorganic platelets dispersed in a polymeric matrix. For full exfoliation, the thermodynamic miscibility is required. There are three basic methods of organically-modified clay dispersion that might result in PNC: (1) in polymer solution (followed by solvent removal), (2) in a monomer (followed by polymerization), and (3) in molten polymer (compounding). Most commercial PNC are produced by the second method, but it is the third one that has the greatest promise for the plastics industry. Similarly as during the manufacture of polymer blends, the layered silicates must be compatibilized by intercalation with organic salts and/or addition of functionalized macromolecules. Compounding affects the kinetics of dispersion process, but rarely the miscibility. Melt compounding is carried out either in a single-screw (SSE) or a twin-screw extruder (TSE). Furthermore, an extensional flow mixer (EFM) might be attached to an extruder. Two versions of EFM were evaluated: (1) designed for polymer homogenization and blending, and (2) designed for dispersing nano-particles. In this review, the dispersion of organoclay in polystyrene (PS), polyamide-6 (PA-6) or in polypropylene (PP) is discussed. The PNC based on PS or PA-6 contained two components (polymer and organoclay), whereas those based on PP in addition had a compatibilizer mixture of two maleated polypropylenes. Better dispersion was found compounding PNC's in a SSE + EFM than in TSE with or without EFM. The mechanical performance (tensile, flexural and impact) was examined.

  8. Non-equilibrium supramolecular polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Markvoort, Albert J; de Greef, Tom F A; Hermans, Thomas M

    2017-03-28

    Supramolecular polymerization has been traditionally focused on the thermodynamic equilibrium state, where one-dimensional assemblies reside at the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The pathway and rate to reach the equilibrium state are irrelevant, and the resulting assemblies remain unchanged over time. In the past decade, the focus has shifted to kinetically trapped (non-dissipative non-equilibrium) structures that heavily depend on the method of preparation (i.e., pathway complexity), and where the assembly rates are of key importance. Kinetic models have greatly improved our understanding of competing pathways, and shown how to steer supramolecular polymerization in the desired direction (i.e., pathway selection). The most recent innovation in the field relies on energy or mass input that is dissipated to keep the system away from the thermodynamic equilibrium (or from other non-dissipative states). This tutorial review aims to provide the reader with a set of tools to identify different types of self-assembled states that have been explored so far. In particular, we aim to clarify the often unclear use of the term "non-equilibrium self-assembly" by subdividing systems into dissipative, and non-dissipative non-equilibrium states. Examples are given for each of the states, with a focus on non-dissipative non-equilibrium states found in one-dimensional supramolecular polymerization.

  9. Fluid inclusions in stony meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, J. L.; Ashwal, L. D.; Bergman, S. C.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Henry, D. J.; Lee-Berman, R.; Roedder, E.; Belkin, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The fluid inclusions presently described for five stony meteorites brings to seven the number of such meteorites confirmed. Homogenization temperatures are reproducible in each inclusion, and range from 25 C to over 225 C, with some vapor plus liquid inclusions remaining at 225 C, the highest temperature in these microthermometric experiments. Upon cooling, the fluid in some inclusions appears to freeze, as indicated by deformation and immobilization of the vapor bubble at low temperatures. Melting temperatures are by contrast difficult to observe and are not reproducible. Microthermometric data for the fluid in diogenite ALPHA 77256 and inclusions in four chondrites suggest that the fluid is aqueous, with a high solute content.

  10. Three-dimensional Imaging of Crystalline Inclusions Embedded in Intact Maize Stalks

    PubMed Central

    Badger, John; Lal, Jyotsana; Harder, Ross; Inouye, Hideyo; Gleber, S. Charlotte; Vogt, Stefan; Robinson, Ian; Makowski, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Mineral inclusions in biomass are attracting increased scrutiny due to their potential impact on processing methods designed to provide renewable feedstocks for the production of chemicals and fuels. These inclusions are often sculpted by the plant into shapes required to support functional roles that include the storage of specific elements, strengthening of the plant structure, and providing a defense against pathogens and herbivores. In situ characterization of these inclusions faces substantial challenges since they are embedded in an opaque, complex polymeric matrix. Here we describe the use of Bragg coherent diffraction imaging (BCDI) to study mineral inclusions within intact maize stalks. Three-dimensional BCDI data sets were collected and used to reconstruct images of mineral inclusions at 50–100 nm resolution. Asymmetries in the intensity distributions around the Bragg peaks provided detailed information about the deformation fields within these crystal particles revealing lattice defects that result in distinct internal crystal domains. PMID:24091898

  11. Development and Suggestion of a Cardiac CTA Scoring System for the Prediction of Revascularization Success in Chronic Total Occlusions (CTO) of the Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Roller, F C; Harth, S; Rixe, J; Krombach, G A; Schneider, C

    2016-02-01

    Analyzing occluded segments with computed tomography angiography (CTA) prior to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) increased revascularization success in chronic total occlusions (CTO). The aim of our study was to develop a scoring system for the prediction of PCI success in CTO. 41 consecutive CTO patients (30 male; 63.1 years +/- 8.3 standard deviation) underwent CTA prior to PCI. All CTOs were categorized by two radiologists in consensus regarding the presence of special features and without knowledge of PCI outcome. All outcome criteria were evaluated. Afterwards one point was assigned for each unequally distributed outcome criteria per CTO and all points were added up to a single score. Severe calcifications (failure group 68.8 % vs. success group 28.0 %; p < 0.02) and intraluminal calcifications (68.8 %; 40.0 %), tortuosity (25.0 %; 0 %; p < 0.02), linear intrathrombus enhancement (37.5 %; 60.0 %) and distal vessel disease (68.8 %; 44.0 %) were unequally distributed. By adopting a threshold of 4 points or higher (maximum 5 points), the results were: sensitivity 31.3 %, specificity 100 %, negative predictive value (NPV) 69.4 % and positive predictive value (PPV) 100 %. The PCI complication rate was 9.8 % and the mean contrast media amount was 234.4 ml. With the suggested scoring system, based on five CTA criteria, PCI failure could be predicted with high PPV and specificity in our group of patients, but the NPV and sensitivity are low. However, 5 unsuccessful PCIs (13.2 %) could have been avoided and none would have been wrongly omitted. Regarding the complication rate during PCI and the high amounts of contrast media needed, a prediction system appears to be desirable and should be the object of large-scale trials. Single predictors of revascularization success in CTO have been identified. Success rates are improved by analyzing CTA data sets prior to revascularization approaches. Prediction of revascularization

  12. Gage inclusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    To make field measurements of the free-field radial stress, we typically drill holes in the host rock and couple the gages to the rock with a grout material. Usually there is a mismatch of the mechanical properties of gage, installation grout, and host rock. The mismatch may produce peak values that are different from the free-field values and distort the waveshapes. This is the gage inclusion problem. To investigate this effect and provide data for comparison with modeling calculations, we have fielded pairs of gages in which the gage package or the installation technique differed between the pairs. Experiments were conducted in four environments: wet tunnel bed tuff, a block of DSRM2 grout, Yuma soil, and partially saturated tuff. Data suggest that: (1) at stresses below one kilobar in wet tuff, specific gage types will show peak amplitudes of 65 to 70% of the peaks, and reduced impulses, shown by other gage types, (2) there are negligible inclusion effects at the two kilobar level in DSRM2 grout, (3) a gage package with a wave transit time longer than the risetime of the incident stress wave may overregister and distort the waveshape, and (4) geometry effects -- a hole versus a slot -- can generate different peak values. 5 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Inclusive fitness in agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Kiers, E. Toby; Denison, R. Ford

    2014-01-01

    Trade-offs between individual fitness and the collective performance of crop and below-ground symbiont communities are common in agriculture. Plant competitiveness for light and soil resources is key to individual fitness, but higher investments in stems and roots by a plant community to compete for those resources ultimately reduce crop yields. Similarly, rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi may increase their individual fitness by diverting resources to their own reproduction, even if they could have benefited collectively by providing their shared crop host with more nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively. Past selection for inclusive fitness (benefits to others, weighted by their relatedness) is unlikely to have favoured community performance over individual fitness. The limited evidence for kin recognition in plants and microbes changes this conclusion only slightly. We therefore argue that there is still ample opportunity for human-imposed selection to improve cooperation among crop plants and their symbionts so that they use limited resources more efficiently. This evolutionarily informed approach will require a better understanding of how interactions among crops, and interactions with their symbionts, affected their inclusive fitness in the past and what that implies for current interactions. PMID:24686938

  14. Ultrasound-Mediated Polymeric Micelle Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hesheng; Zhao, Yue; Tong, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of multi-functional nanocarriers and the design of new stimuli-responsive means are equally important for drug delivery. Ultrasound can be used as a remote, non-invasive and controllable trigger for the stimuli-responsive release of nanocarriers. Polymeric micelles are one kind of potential drug nanocarrier. By combining ultrasound and polymeric micelles, a new modality (i.e., ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery) has been developed and has recently received increasing attention. A major challenge remaining in developing ultrasound-responsive polymeric micelles is the improvement of the sensitivity or responsiveness of polymeric micelles to ultrasound. This chapter reviews the recent advance in this field. In order to understand the interaction mechanism between ultrasound stimulus and polymeric micelles, ultrasound effects, such as thermal effect, cavitation effect, ultrasound sonochemistry (including ultrasonic degradation, ultrasound-initiated polymerization, ultrasonic in-situ polymerization and ultrasound site-specific degradation), as well as basic micellar knowledge are introduced. Ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery has been classified into two main streams based on the different interaction mechanism between ultrasound and polymeric micelles; one is based on the ultrasound-induced physical disruption of the micelle and reversible release of payload. The other is based on micellar ultrasound mechanochemical disruption and irreversible release of payload.

  15. Feasibility of Quantification of Intracranial Aneurysm Pulsation with 4D CTA with Manual and Computer-Aided Post-Processing

    PubMed Central

    Illies, Till; Saering, Dennis; Kinoshita, Manabu; Fujinaka, Toshiyuki; Bester, Maxim; Fiehler, Jens; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The analysis of the pulsation of unruptured intracranial aneurysms might improve the assessment of their stability and risk of rupture. Pulsations can easily be concealed due to the small movements of the aneurysm wall, making post-processing highly demanding. We hypothesized that the quantification of aneurysm pulsation is technically feasible and can be improved by computer-aided post-processing. Materials and Methods Images of 14 cerebral aneurysms were acquired with an ECG-triggered 4D CTA. Aneurysms were post-processed manually and computer-aided on a 3D model. Volume curves and random noise-curves were compared with the arterial pulse wave and volume curves were compared between both post-processing modalities. Results The aneurysm volume curves showed higher similarity with the pulse wave than the random curves (Hausdorff-distances 0.12 vs 0.25, p<0.01). Both post-processing methods did not differ in intra- (r = 0.45 vs r = 0.54, p>0.05) and inter-observer (r = 0.45 vs r = 0.54, p>0.05) reliability. Time needed for segmentation was significantly reduced in the computer-aided group (3.9 ± 1.8 min vs 20.8 ± 7.8 min, p<0.01). Conclusion Our results show pulsatile changes in a subset of the studied aneurysms with the final prove of underlying volume changes remaining unsettled. Semi-automatic post-processing significantly reduces post-processing time but cannot yet replace manual segmentation. PMID:27880805

  16. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH POLARIMETRIC STUDY OF THE BLAZAR CTA 102 DURING A GAMMA-RAY FLARE IN 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Casadio, Carolina; Gómez, José L.; Agudo, Iván; Molina, Sol N.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Bala, Vishal; Joshi, Manasvita; Taylor, Brian; Williamson, Karen E.; Larionov, Valeri M.; Blinov, Dmitry A.; Grishina, Tatiana S.; Hagen-Thorn, Vladimir A.; Smith, Paul S.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Lähteenmäki, Anne; Arkharov, Arkady A.; Borman, George A.; Paola, Andrea Di; and others

    2015-11-01

    We perform a multi-wavelength polarimetric study of the quasar CTA 102 during an extraordinarily bright γ-ray outburst detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope in 2012 September–October when the source reached a flux of F{sub >100} {sub MeV} = 5.2 ± 0.4 × 10{sup −6} photons cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. At the same time, the source displayed an unprecedented optical and near-infrared (near-IR) outburst. We study the evolution of the parsec-scale jet with ultra-high angular resolution through a sequence of 80 total and polarized intensity Very Long Baseline Array images at 43 GHz, covering the observing period from 2007 June to 2014 June. We find that the γ-ray outburst is coincident with flares at all the other frequencies and is related to the passage of a new superluminal knot through the radio core. The powerful γ-ray emission is associated with a change in direction of the jet, which became oriented more closely to our line of sight (θ ∼ 1.°2) during the ejection of the knot and the γ-ray outburst. During the flare, the optical polarized emission displays intra-day variability and a clear clockwise rotation of electric vector position angles (EVPAs), which we associate with the path followed by the knot as it moves along helical magnetic field lines, although a random walk of the EVPA caused by a turbulent magnetic field cannot be ruled out. We locate the γ-ray outburst a short distance downstream of the radio core, parsecs from the black hole. This suggests that synchrotron self-Compton scattering of NIR to ultraviolet photons is the probable mechanism for the γ-ray production.

  17. Inclusive indoor play: an approach to developing inclusive design guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mullick, Abir

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the Inclusive Indoor Play study was to learn about indoor play and develop design guidelines to inform design of inclusive playthings. Children with and without disabilities, parents, teachers, therapists, daycare owners and designers. Focus group interviews; Children's drawings; and Indoor play simulation. The major findings suggest that: 1) play should encourage a child's creativity and develop imagination, 2) inclusive play concept must be employed to design playthings for children with wide age group, 3) inclusive designs improve usability, broaden market appeal, and increase user base, and 4) customizable playthings help children with and without disabilities personalize play situations. Three play principles provide new directions to designing inclusive playthings: 1) offer many play opportunities, 2) provide many modes of play, and 3) include many levels of play challenges. Inclusive Design Guidelines were developed from the findings of three studies: Focus group interviews, Children's drawings, and Play simulation. The guidelines served as useful tools for inclusive design and they were employed to design of six indoor playthings. The playthings were instrumental in promoting social inclusion and they met the criteria of the Inclusive Indoor Play project.

  18. Polymeric slot waveguide for photonics sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chovan, J.; Uherek, F.

    2016-12-01

    Polymeric slot waveguide for photonics sensing was designed, simulated and studied in this work. The polymeric slot waveguide was designed on commercial Ormocer polymer platform and operates at visible 632.8 nm wavelength. Designed polymeric slot waveguide detects the refractive index change of the ambient material by evanescent field label-free techniques. The motivation for the reported work was to design a low-cost polymeric slot waveguide for sensing arms of integrated Mach-Zehnder interferometer optical sensor with reduced temperature dependency. The minimal dimensions of advanced sensing slot waveguide structure were designed for researcher direct laser writing fabrication by nonlinear two-photon polymerization. The normalized effective refractive index changes of TE and TM fundamental modes in polymeric slot waveguide and slab waveguides were compared. The sensitivity of the normalized effective refractive index changes of TE and TM fundamental modes on refractive index changes of the ambient material was investigated by glucose-water solutions.

  19. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  20. Polymeric materials science and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on the use of polymers in enhanced oil recovery. Topics considered at the conference included polymer flow in porous media, hydrophobically associating polymers, mobility control,rheology, the direct determination of high molecular weights, size characterization of enhanced oil recovery polymers, MWD systems, light scattering, the use of size exclusion chromatography to study the degradation of water-soluble polymers for hydraulic fracturing fluids, polymer concentration in sandstone, electron microscopy, high salinity conditions, polymerization, and viscosity.

  1. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, D.B.; Shahinpoor, M.; Segalman, D.J.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1993-10-05

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles are described capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots. 11 figures.

  2. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, Douglas B.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Segalman, Daniel J.; Witkowski, Walter R.

    1993-01-01

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots.

  3. Ionene modified small polymeric beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Linear ionene polyquaternary cationic polymeric segments are bonded by means of the Menshutkin reaction (quaternization) to biocompatible, extremely small, porous particles containing halide or tertiary amine sites which are centers for attachment of the segments. The modified beads in the form of emulsions or suspensions offer a large, positively-charged surface area capable of irreversibly binding polyanions such as heparin, DNA, RNA or bile acids to remove them from solution or of reversibly binding monoanions such as penicillin, pesticides, sex attractants and the like for slow release from the suspension.

  4. Compositional Controls on Melt Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugger, C.; Hammer, J.

    2005-12-01

    The structure and rheology of silicate melts are strongly controlled by composition, namely the concentrations of network-forming and -modifying cations. Melt viscosity is implicated in kinetic theories of phase transformations as a proxy for component mobility, which partly controls rates of crystal and bubble nucleation and growth. To anticipate reaction kinetics in magmas and focus experimental work on key variables, compositional controls on melt structure are systematically investigated using NBO/T (Mysen, 1988), the ratio of non-bridging oxygens to tetrahedrally coordinated cations. Silicon, ferric iron, and aluminum are network-formers, whereas alkalis and divalent cations are network-modifiers unless needed to charge-balance trivalent cations in tetrahedral coordination. NBO/T calculations are performed over 4D composition space (alkalis, silica, divalent and trivalent cations), in which 3 components are varied independently, creating a cube. We assess the effects of individual components using slices through the cube contoured for NBO/T. Ratios are also calculated for naturally occurring liquids and MELTS-generated liquid lines of descent derived from basalts with similar silica contents but varying in alkalis. Naturally occurring melts are highly polymerized (NBO/T of 0-1) compared to silicate minerals (0-4). Calculations show that replacing network-modifiers with network-formers decreases NBO/T; conversely, replacing formers with modifiers increases the ratio. However, polymerization increases when alumina replaces silica or when alkalis replace divalent cations. Natural alkali-rich melts tend to have fewer divalent cations than alkali-poor melts at similar silica contents, thus they are more polymerized and have higher viscosities. Contrary to common perception, the lower viscosities of highly differentiated alkalic melts (e.g. trachytes, phonolites) compared to silica-rich rhyolites are attributed to lower silica rather than greater alkalis. In fact

  5. Marketing NASA Langley Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Diane M.

    1995-01-01

    A marketing tool was created to expand the knowledge of LaRC developed polymeric materials, in order to facilitate the technology transfer process and increase technology commercialization awareness among a non-technical audience. The created brochure features four materials, LaRC-CP, LaRC-RP46, LaRC-SI, and LaRC-IA, and highlights their competitive strengths in potential commercial applications. Excellent opportunities exist in the $40 million per year microelectronics market and the $6 billion adhesives market. It is hoped that the created brochure will generate inquiries regarding the use of the above materials in markets such as these.

  6. Template polymerization of nucleotide analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Recent work on the template-directed reactions of the natural D-nucleotides has made it clear that l-nucleotides and nucleotide-like derivatives of other sugars would strongly inhibit the formation of long oligonucleotides. Consequently, attention is focusing on molecules simpler than nucleotides that might have acted as monomers of an information transfer system. We have begun a general exploration of the template directed reactions of diverse peptide analogues. I will present work by Dr. Taifeng Wu on oxidative oligomerization of phosphorothioates and of Dr. Mary Tohidi on the cyclic polymerization of nucleoside and related cyclic pyrophosphates.

  7. (Meth)Acrylate Vinyl Ester Hybrid Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, TaiYeon; Cramer, Neil; Hoyle, Charles; Stansbury, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    In this study vinyl ester monomers were synthesized by an amine catalyzed Michael addition reaction between a multifunctional thiol and the acrylate double bond of vinyl acrylate. The copolymerization behavior of both methacrylate/vinyl ester and acrylate/vinyl ester systems was studied with near-infrared spectroscopy. In acrylate/vinyl ester systems, the acrylate groups polymerize faster than the vinyl ester groups resulting in an overall conversion of 80% for acrylate double bonds in the acrylate/vinyl ester system relative to only 50% in the bulk acrylate system. In the methacrylate/vinyl ester systems, the difference in reactivity is even more pronounced resulting in two distinguishable polymerization regimes, one dominated by methacrylate polymerization and a second dominated by vinyl ester polymerization. A faster polymerization rate and higher overall conversion of the methacrylate double bonds is thus achieved relative to polymerization of the pure methacrylate system. The methacrylate conversion in the methacrylate/vinyl ester system is near 100% compared to only ~60% in the pure methacrylate system. Utilizing hydrophilic vinyl ester and hydrophobic methacrylate monomers, polymerization-induced phase separation is observed. The phase separated domain size is on the order of ~1 μm under the polymerization conditions. The phase separated domains become larger and more distinct with slower polymerization and correspondingly increased time for diffusion. PMID:19855853

  8. UV-triggered dopamine polymerization: control of polymerization, surface coating, and photopatterning.

    PubMed

    Du, Xin; Li, Linxian; Li, Junsheng; Yang, Chengwu; Frenkel, Nataliya; Welle, Alexander; Heissler, Stefan; Nefedov, Alexei; Grunze, Michael; Levkin, Pavel A

    2014-12-17

    UV irradiation is demonstrated to initiate dopamine polymerization and deposition on different surfaces under both acidic and basic pH. The observed acceleration of the dopamine polymerization is explained by the UV-induced formation of reactive oxygen species that trigger dopamine polymerization. The UV-induced dopamine polymerization leads to a better control over polydopamine deposition and formation of functional polydopamine micropatterns. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Inclusion by Design: Engineering Inclusive Practices in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Charles; Lamar-Dukes, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    In order to help teachers understand the importance of intentional design for inclusive education, this article describes the design process an engineer might use when designing a new project. If teachers learn to think like engineers, it is possible for them to design inclusive education. This conceptual design can then be combined with…

  10. Inclusion in the East: Chinese Students' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malinen, Olli-Pekka; Savolainen, Hannu

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 523 Chinese university students was given a questionnaire on their attitudes towards the inclusion of children with disabilities into regular classrooms. Factor analysis, analysis of variance, t-test and correlations were used to assess the respondents' general attitude towards inclusion, the factor structure of the attitudes, the…

  11. Student Teachers' Attitudes and Beliefs about Inclusion and Inclusive Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beacham, Nigel; Rouse, Martyn

    2012-01-01

    The beliefs and attitudes of teachers are an important element in the development of inclusive education and its associated practices. Teacher education is seen as crucial in helping to develop positive attitudes and beliefs that are thought to promote inclusion, although attempts to reform teacher education in order to address issues of inclusion…

  12. Inclusive Education: Identifying Teachers' Perceived Stressors in Inclusive Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brackenreed, Darlene

    2008-01-01

    This research replicates the study conducted by Forlin (2001) in Churchlands, Western Australia. Forlin's Inclusive Education Teacher Stress and Coping Questionnaire was adapted from the original questionnaire to more accurately reflect the language and practice of inclusion in Ontario (Frost & Brackenreed, 2004). The purpose of this study was…

  13. Enacting Inclusion : A Framework for Interrogating Inclusive Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florian, Lani; Spratt, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on the development and use of an analytical framework for interrogating the practice of newly qualified mainstream teachers recently graduated from a one-year Professional Graduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) that was informed by a concept of inclusive pedagogy. Inclusive pedagogy is an approach to teaching and learning that…

  14. Possibilities for an Inclusive Society in Singapore: Becoming Inclusive within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Levan

    2009-01-01

    The envisioning of Singapore as an inclusive society has witnessed the most progressive systemic and policy developments concerning people with disabilities in recent years. The building of "heartware" in society (as in the will, values, and attitudes of its citizens) in order to realize the vision of an inclusive society, however,…

  15. Possibilities for an Inclusive Society in Singapore: Becoming Inclusive within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Levan

    2009-01-01

    The envisioning of Singapore as an inclusive society has witnessed the most progressive systemic and policy developments concerning people with disabilities in recent years. The building of "heartware" in society (as in the will, values, and attitudes of its citizens) in order to realize the vision of an inclusive society, however,…

  16. Incremental diagnostic quality gain of CTA over V/Q scan in the assessment of pulmonary embolism by means of a Wells score Bayesian model: results from the ACDC collaboration.

    PubMed

    Cochon, Laila; McIntyre, Kaitlin; Nicolás, José M; Baez, Amado Alejandro

    2017-08-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the diagnostic value of computed tomography angiography (CTA) and ventilation perfusion (V/Q) scan in the assessment of pulmonary embolism (PE) by means of a Bayesian statistical model. Wells criteria defined pretest probability. Sensitivity and specificity of CTA and V/Q scan for PE were derived from pooled meta-analysis data. Likelihood ratios calculated for CTA and V/Q were inserted in the nomogram. Absolute (ADG) and relative diagnostic gains (RDG) were analyzed comparing post- and pretest probability. Comparative gain difference was calculated for CTA ADG over V/Q scan integrating ANOVA p value set at 0.05. The sensitivity for CT was 86.0% (95% CI: 80.2%, 92.1%) and specificity of 93.7% (95% CI: 91.1%, 96.3%). The V/Q scan yielded a sensitivity of 96% (95% CI: 95%, 97%) and a specificity of 97% (95% CI: 96%, 98%). Bayes nomogram results for CTA were low risk and yielded a posttest probability of 71.1%, an ADG of 56.1%, and an RDG of 374%, moderate-risk posttest probability was 85.1%, an ADG of 56.1%, and an RDG of 193.4%, and high-risk posttest probability was 95.2%, an ADG of 36.2%, and an RDG of 61.35%. The comparative gain difference for low-risk population was 46.1%; in moderate-risk 41.6%; and in high-risk a 22.1% superiority. ANOVA analysis for LR+ and LR- showed no significant difference (p = 0.8745, p = 0.9841 respectively). This Bayesian model demonstrated a superiority of CTA when compared to V/Q scan for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Low-risk patients are recognized to have a superior overall comparative gain favoring CTA.

  17. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.; Etherton, B.P.; Kaus, M.J.

    1989-09-12

    This patent describes a polymerization process. It comprises polymerizing ethylene, alpha-olefins of 3 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene and the alpha-olefins in the presence of a catalyst system. The system comprising: an organo aluminum compound of the formula AIR'''/sub eta/X'''/sub 3-eta/ wherein R''' is hydrogen, hydrocarbyl, or substituted hydrocarbyl having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X''' is a halogen and eta is a number from 1 to 3, and a transition metal-containing catalyst component. The component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent with an organonmetallic compound represented by the formula R/sup 1/MgR/sup 2/ wherein R/sup 1/ and R/sup 2/, which may be the same of different,contain 1 to 20 carbon atoms and are selected from alkyl group, aryl group, cycloalkyl group, aralkyl group, alkadienyl group of group; an alcohol; an acyl halide; a titanium halide; Cl/sub 2/, and prereducing the transition metal-containing product with an aluminum alkyl, with the proviso that the first two ingredients can be added to the inert solid simultaneously, as the reaction product of the first two steps or treatment with step two immediately precedes treatment with step one.

  18. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins and diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (a) an organo aluminum compound of the formula ALR''/sub n/X''/sub 3-n/ wherein R is hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X is halogen and is a number from 1 to 3, and (b) a transition metal containing catalyst component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent. This is done sequentially with (A) an organometallic compounds of a Group IIa, IIb or IIIa metal wherein all the metal valencies are satisfied with a hydrocarbon group, (B) an oxygen containing compound selected from ketones, aldehydes, alcohols or mixtures thereof, (C) an acyl halide, (D) at least one transition metal compound of a Group IVb, Vb, VIb or VIII metal, and (E) a group IIIa metal hydrocarbyl dihalide.

  19. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins and diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (a) an organo aluminum compound of the formula AIR''/sub n/X''/sub 3-n/ wherein R'' is hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X is halogen and n is a number from 1 to 3, and (B) a transition metal containing catalyst component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent. This is done sequentially with, optionally (A) Cl/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/, an interhalogen or mixtures thereof, (B) an organometallic compound of a Group IIa, IIb or IIIa metal wherein all the metal valencies are satisfied with a hydrocarbon group, (C) an oxygen containing compound selected from ketones, aldehydes, alcohols or mixtures thereof, (D) an acyl halide, (E) at least one transition metal compound of a Group IVb, VB, VIb or VIII metal, and (F) Cl/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/, an interhalogen or mixtures thereof.

  20. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins and diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (a) an organo aluminum compounds of the formula AIR''/sub n/X''/sub 3-n/ wherein R'' is hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X is halogen and n is a number from 1 to 3, and (b) a transition metal containing catalyst component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent. This is done sequentially with (A) an organometallic compound of a Group IIa, IIb, or IIIa metal wherein all the metal valencies are satisfied with a hydrocarbon group, optionally (B) an oxygen containing compound selected from ketones, aldehydes, alcohols, siloxanes or mixtures thereof, (C) at least one transition metal compound of a Group IVb, Vb, VIb or VIII metal, and (D) a group IIIa metal hydrocarbyl dihalide.

  1. How Do Spherical Diblock Copolymer Nanoparticles Grow during RAFT Alcoholic Dispersion Polymerization?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMA) chain transfer agent (CTA) is used for the reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) alcoholic dispersion polymerization of benzyl methacrylate (BzMA) in ethanol at 70 °C. THF GPC analysis indicated a well-controlled polymerization with molecular weight increasing linearly with conversion. GPC traces also showed high blocking efficiency with no homopolymer contamination apparent and Mw/Mn values below 1.35 in all cases. 1H NMR studies confirmed greater than 98% BzMA conversion for a target PBzMA degree of polymerization (DP) of up to 600. The PBzMA block becomes insoluble as it grows, leading to the in situ formation of sterically stabilized diblock copolymer nanoparticles via polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA). Fixing the mean DP of the PDMA stabilizer block at 94 units and systematically varying the DP of the PBzMA block enabled a series of spherical nanoparticles of tunable diameter to be obtained. These nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, DLS, MALLS, and SAXS, with mean diameters ranging from 35 to 100 nm. The latter technique was particularly informative: data fits to a spherical micelle model enabled calculation of the core diameter, surface area occupied per copolymer chain, and the mean aggregation number (Nagg). The scaling exponent derived from a double-logarithmic plot of core diameter vs PBzMA DP suggests that the conformation of the PBzMA chains is intermediate between the collapsed and fully extended state. This is in good agreement with 1H NMR studies, which suggest that only 5−13% of the BzMA residues of the core-forming chains are solvated. The Nagg values calculated from SAXS and MALLS are in good agreement and scale approximately linearly with PBzMA DP. This suggests that spherical micelles grow in size not only as a result of the increase in copolymer molecular weight during the PISA synthesis but also by exchange of individual copolymer chains between micelles

  2. CT Angiography (CTA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ... the extent and severity of the effects of coronary artery disease and plan for a surgical operation, such as ...

  3. CT Angiography (CTA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplied by them in various body parts, including: brain neck heart chest abdomen (such as the kidneys and ... plaque) disease in the carotid artery of the neck, which may limit blood flow to the brain and cause a stroke. identify a small aneurysm ...

  4. Proton conducting, high modulus polymer electrolyte membranes by polymerization-induced microphase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopade, Sujay; Hillmyer, Marc; Lodge, Timothy

    Robust solid-state polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) are vital for designing next-generation lithium-ion batteries and high-temperature fuel cells. However, the performance of diblock polymer electrolytes is generally limited by poor mechanical stability and network defects in the conducting pathways. We present the in-situ preparation of robust cross-linked PEMs via polymerization-induced microphase separation, and incorporation of protic ionic liquid (IL) into one of the microphase separated domains. The facile design strategy involves a delicate balance between the controlled growth of polystyrene from a poly(ethylene oxide) macro-chain transfer agent (PEO-CTA) and simultaneous chemical cross-linking by divinylbenzene in the presence of IL. Small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the formation of a disordered structure with bicontinuous morphology and a characteristic domain size of order 20 nm. The long-range continuity of the PEO/protic IL conducting nanochannels and cross-linked polystyrene domains imparts high thermal and mechanical stability to the PEMs, with elastic modulus approaching 10 MPa and a high ionic conductivity of 15 mS/cm at 180 °C.

  5. Inclusion Body Myositis

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) are a heterogenous group of rare disorders that share many similarities. In addition to sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM), these include dematomyositis (DM), polymyositis (PM), and autoimmune necrotizing myopathy (NM). For discussion of later three disorders, the reader is referred to the IIM review in this issue. IBM is the most common IIM after age 50. It typically presents with chronic insidious proximal leg and/or distal arm asymmetric muscle weakness leading to recurrent falls and loss of dexterity. Creatine kinase (CK) is up to 15 times elevated in IBM and needle electromyograhy (EMG) mostly shows a chronic irritative myopathy. Muscle histopathology demonstrates endomysial inflammatory exudates surrounding and invading non-necrotic muscle fibers often times accompanied by rimmed vacuoles and protein deposits. Despite inflammatory muscle pathology suggesting similarity with PM, it likely that IBM is has a prominent degenerative component as supported by refractoriness to immunosuppressive therapy. We review the evolution of our knowledge in IBM with emphasis on recent developments in the field and discuss ongoing clinical trials. PMID:25037082

  6. Inclusion Body Myositis.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Steven A

    2016-12-01

    Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is an enigmatic progressive disease of skeletal muscle. This review provides a summary of the clinical and pathophysiologic aspects of IBM. The development of diagnostic blood testing for IBM followed from the discovery of a B-cell pathway in IBM muscle and circulating autoantibodies against NT5C1A, further establishing IBM's status as an autoimmune disease. The key role of cytotoxic T cells in IBM is further supported by the identification of a link between IBM and T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia. The testing of research diagnostic criteria in patients is improving its accuracy. Increases in estimated prevalences may be due to a combination of true increases and improved recognition of disease. IBM has high unmet medical need. Advances in the mechanistic understanding of IBM as an autoimmune disease will drive effective therapeutic approaches. The identification of a B-cell pathway has resulted in the first identification of an IBM autoantigen and emphasized its status as an autoimmune disease. The recognition that large granular lymphocyte CD8+ T-cell expansions are present in both blood and muscle provides additional biomarkers for IBM and suggests a mechanistic relationship to the neoplastic disease T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia.

  7. CTA Characteristics of the Circle of Willis and Intracranial Aneurysm in a Chinese Crowd with Family History of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhang-ning; Dong, Wen-tao; Cai, Xin-wang; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Li-tong; Gao, Feng; Kang, Xiao-kui; Li, Jia; Wang, Hai-ning; Gao, Nan-nan; Ning, Xian-jia; Tu, Jun; Li, Feng-tan; Zhang, Jing; Jiang, Ying-jian; Li, Nai-xin; Yang, Shu-yuan; Zhang, Jian-ning; Wang, Jing-hua; Yang, Xin-yu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The vascular morphology in crowd with family history of stroke remains unclear. The present study clarified the characteristics of the intracranial vascular CoW and prevalence of intracranial aneurysms in subjects with family history of stroke. Methods. A stratified cluster, random sampling method was used for subjects with family history of stroke among rural residents in Jixian, Tianjin, China. All the subjects underwent a physical examination, head computed tomography (CT) scan, and cephalic and cervical computed tomography angiography (CTA) scan. Anatomic variations in the Circle of Willis and cerebrovascular disease in this population were analyzed. Results. In the crowd with similar living environment, stable genetic background, and family history of stroke and without obvious nerve function impairment (1) hypoplasia or absence of A1 segment was significantly different in gender (male versus female: 9.8% versus 18.8%, p = 0.031), especially the right-side A1 (male versus female: 5.9% versus 16.4%, p = 0.004). (2) Hypoplasia or absence of bilateral posterior communicating arteries was more common in men than women (58.2% versus 45.3%, p = 0.032). Unilateral fetal posterior cerebral artery was observed more often in women than men (17.2% versus 8.5%, p = 0.028). (3) The percentage of subjects with incomplete CoW did not increase significantly with age. Compared to healthy Chinese people, the crowd had a higher percentage of incomplete CoW (p < 0.001). (4) No obvious correlation between risk factors and CoW was found. (5) The prevalence of aneurysm was 10.3% in the special crowd. Conclusions. The certain variations of CoW showed significant relation to gender, but not to age in people with family history of stroke. The incomplete circle may be a dangerous factor that is independent of common risk factors for stroke and tend to lead to cerebral ischemia in the crowd with family history of stroke. The prevalence of intracranial aneurysm is

  8. Reinforcement of polymeric latexes by in situ polymerization.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Andres F; Brostow, Witold; Lobland, Haley E Hagg; López, Betty L; Olea-Mejia, Oscar

    2009-11-01

    Two silicas with different particle sizes have been synthesized by the Stöber method. The particles have been functionalized with methacryloyl groups. In situ emulsion polymerization of butyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate in the presence of functionalized silica particles was performed. The ratio of butyl acrylate to methyl methacrylate was varied in order to optimize the composition for improvement of tribological and thermophysical properties. The silica particles morphology and functionalization have been determined respectively by scanning electronic microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The composites were characterized also by thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, microscratch testing and static light scattering. The latex reinforced with the smallest functionalized silica exhibits higher thermal stability than the non reinforced latex, along with lower penetration depth and higher residual depth in progressive load scratch testing. Thus, the resistance to penetration is increased while viscoelastic healing is hampered by silica particles.

  9. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy-a simple method for the characterization of polymer inclusion membranes containing aliquat 336.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Michelle; Duffy, Noel; Marco, Roland De; Potter, Ian

    2011-06-23

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been used to estimate the non-frequency dependent (static) dielectric constants of base polymers such as poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), cellulose triacetate (CTA) and polystyrene (PS). Polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs) containing different amounts of PVC or CTA, along with the room temperature ionic liquid Aliquat 336 and plasticizers such as trisbutoxyethyl phosphate (TBEP), dioctyl sebecate (DOS) and 2-nitrophenyloctyl ether (NPOE) have been investigated. In this study, the complex and abstract method of EIS has been applied in a simple and easy to use way, so as to make the method accessible to membrane scientists and engineers who may not possess the detailed knowledge of electrochemistry and interfacial science needed for a rigorous interpretation of EIS results. The EIS data reported herein are internally consistent with a percolation threshold in the dielectric constant at high concentrations of Aliquat 336, which illustrates the suitability of the EIS technique since membrane percolation with ion exchangers is a well-known phenomenon.

  10. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy—A Simple Method for the Characterization of Polymer Inclusion Membranes Containing Aliquat 336

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, Michelle; Duffy, Noel; De Marco, Roland; Potter, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been used to estimate the non-frequency dependent (static) dielectric constants of base polymers such as poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), cellulose triacetate (CTA) and polystyrene (PS). Polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs) containing different amounts of PVC or CTA, along with the room temperature ionic liquid Aliquat 336 and plasticizers such as trisbutoxyethyl phosphate (TBEP), dioctyl sebecate (DOS) and 2-nitrophenyloctyl ether (NPOE) have been investigated. In this study, the complex and abstract method of EIS has been applied in a simple and easy to use way, so as to make the method accessible to membrane scientists and engineers who may not possess the detailed knowledge of electrochemistry and interfacial science needed for a rigorous interpretation of EIS results. The EIS data reported herein are internally consistent with a percolation threshold in the dielectric constant at high concentrations of Aliquat 336, which illustrates the suitability of the EIS technique since membrane percolation with ion exchangers is a well-known phenomenon. PMID:24957616

  11. Stress test to STEMI: Utility of coronary CTA in the diagnosis and management of anomalous right coronary artery from the left coronary cusp.

    PubMed

    Das, Anshuman; Joseph, Ajay; Jolly, Neeraj; Kalra, Dinesh K

    2017-10-01

    A 42-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with chest pain. Acute coronary syndrome was ruled out. During dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE), she developed chest pain and inferior ST elevation. Emergent coronary angiography revealed no culprit lesions but did show an anomalous right coronary artery (RCA). Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) confirmed an anomalous RCA arising from the left coronary cusp with a slit-like ostium and interarterial course (ARCA-LCC-IA). Herein, we review the extant literature on ARCA-LCC-IA, its clinical presentation, the vital role of CTA and MRI in its diagnosis, as well as challenges and controversies surrounding management. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Building Inclusive Cities and Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freiler, Christa

    2008-01-01

    Canada prides itself on being an inclusive country. Immigrants from all over the world arrive in Canada's cities with their families because they feel welcome and safe. According to research, engagement towards social inclusion increased among Canadians during the last 30 last years. These changing values resulted in the creation of official…

  13. Early Childhood Inclusion in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diken, Ibrahim H.; Rakap, Salih; Diken, Ozlem; Tomris, Gozde; Celik, Secil

    2016-01-01

    Inclusion of young children with disabilities into regular preschool classrooms is a common practice that has been implemented for several decades in industrialized nations around the world, and many developing countries including Turkey have been developing and implementing laws, regulation, and services to support inclusion and teaching in…

  14. Social Inclusion and Metrolingual Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otsuji, Emi; Pennycook, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the implications of metrolingual language practices for how we understand social inclusion. A vision of social inclusion that includes bi- and multilingual capacities may comprise an appreciation of a diversity of languages other than English, and the skills and capabilities of multilingual language users, yet it is all…

  15. Stiffening solids with liquid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Style, Robert W.; Boltyanskiy, Rostislav; Allen, Benjamin; Jensen, Katharine E.; Foote, Henry P.; Wettlaufer, John S.; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    From bone and wood to concrete and carbon fibre, composites are ubiquitous natural and synthetic materials. Eshelby’s inclusion theory describes how macroscopic stress fields couple to isolated microscopic inclusions, allowing prediction of a composite’s bulk mechanical properties from a knowledge of its microstructure. It has been extended to describe a wide variety of phenomena from solid fracture to cell adhesion. Here, we show experimentally and theoretically that Eshelby’s theory breaks down for small liquid inclusions in a soft solid. In this limit, an isolated droplet’s deformation is strongly size-dependent, with the smallest droplets mimicking the behaviour of solid inclusions. Furthermore, in opposition to the predictions of conventional composite theory, we find that finite concentrations of small liquid inclusions enhance the stiffness of soft solids. A straightforward extension of Eshelby’s theory, accounting for the surface tension of the solid-liquid interface, explains our experimental observations. The counterintuitive stiffening of solids by fluid inclusions is expected whenever inclusion radii are smaller than an elastocapillary length, given by the ratio of the surface tension to Young’s modulus of the solid matrix. These results suggest that surface tension can be a simple and effective mechanism to cloak the far-field elastic signature of inclusions.

  16. Creative Educational Practices for Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piske, Fernanda Hellen Ribeiro; Stoltz, Tania; Machado, Jarci

    2014-01-01

    Inclusion of gifted students depends on several aspects to happen in the school context, and one of the most important aspects to include these children at school is creative educational practices. Teaching with art is a good possibility to make children feel motivated to attend school. In the school context, the inclusion of these children could…

  17. Inclusion in Malaysian Integrated Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukumaran, Sailajah; Loveridge, Judith; Green, Vanessa A.

    2015-01-01

    Inclusive education has been introduced through a number of policy developments in Malaysia over the last 10 years but there is little research investigating the extent and nature of inclusive education for preschoolers with special educational needs (SEN). This study surveyed both regular and special education teachers in Malaysian integrated…

  18. Friendship in Inclusive Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Helena; Reid, Greg; Bloom, Gordon A.

    2009-01-01

    Social interaction and development of friendships between children with and without a disability are often proposed as potential outcomes of inclusive education. Physical activity specialists assert that exercise and sport environments may be conducive to social and friendship outcomes. This study investigated friendship in inclusive physical…

  19. Promoting Inclusive Education in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djietror, Beauty B. K.; Okai, Edward; Kwapong, Olivia A. T. Frimpong

    2011-01-01

    Inclusive education is critical for nation building. The government of Ghana has put in measures for promoting inclusion from basic through to tertiary level of education. Some of these measures include expansion of school facilities, implementation of the Free Compulsory Universal Basic Education (FCUBE); the change of policy on girls who drop…

  20. In Support of Unfinished Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausstätter, Rune Sarromaa

    2014-01-01

    This article claims that the radical potential inherent in the origins of inclusive education has been altered into a tool for protecting the status quo. Drawing on ideas from the essay "The Unfinished" by Thomas Mathiesen (1971), I discuss inclusion as a potential alternative to mainstream education and argue that the potential power of…

  1. Early Childhood Inclusion in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giné, Climent; Balcells-Balcells, Anna; Cañadas, Margarita; Paniagua, Gema

    2016-01-01

    This article describes early childhood inclusion in educational settings in Spain. First, we address the legislative framework of preschool education in Spain and offer a brief analysis of some relevant issues, including the current situation of early childhood education and inclusion at this stage. Second, current policies and practices relating…

  2. Early Childhood Inclusion in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diken, Ibrahim H.; Rakap, Salih; Diken, Ozlem; Tomris, Gozde; Celik, Secil

    2016-01-01

    Inclusion of young children with disabilities into regular preschool classrooms is a common practice that has been implemented for several decades in industrialized nations around the world, and many developing countries including Turkey have been developing and implementing laws, regulation, and services to support inclusion and teaching in…

  3. Friendship in Inclusive Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Helena; Reid, Greg; Bloom, Gordon A.

    2009-01-01

    Social interaction and development of friendships between children with and without a disability are often proposed as potential outcomes of inclusive education. Physical activity specialists assert that exercise and sport environments may be conducive to social and friendship outcomes. This study investigated friendship in inclusive physical…

  4. Inclusion in Malaysian Integrated Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukumaran, Sailajah; Loveridge, Judith; Green, Vanessa A.

    2015-01-01

    Inclusive education has been introduced through a number of policy developments in Malaysia over the last 10 years but there is little research investigating the extent and nature of inclusive education for preschoolers with special educational needs (SEN). This study surveyed both regular and special education teachers in Malaysian integrated…

  5. Social Inclusion and Metrolingual Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otsuji, Emi; Pennycook, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the implications of metrolingual language practices for how we understand social inclusion. A vision of social inclusion that includes bi- and multilingual capacities may comprise an appreciation of a diversity of languages other than English, and the skills and capabilities of multilingual language users, yet it is all…

  6. Early Childhood Inclusion in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giné, Climent; Balcells-Balcells, Anna; Cañadas, Margarita; Paniagua, Gema

    2016-01-01

    This article describes early childhood inclusion in educational settings in Spain. First, we address the legislative framework of preschool education in Spain and offer a brief analysis of some relevant issues, including the current situation of early childhood education and inclusion at this stage. Second, current policies and practices relating…

  7. Fluid Inclusions in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saylor, J.; Zolensky, M. E.; Bodnar, R. J.; Le L.; Schwandt, C.

    2001-01-01

    Fluid inclusions are present in carbonaceous chondrites. Of the chondrites studied (CI1, CM1 and 2, CV3) fluid inclusions were found only in CM2s and CI1s, and by extrapolation are most likely to be found there in the future. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Escalation of polymerization in a thermal gradient.

    PubMed

    Mast, Christof B; Schink, Severin; Gerland, Ulrich; Braun, Dieter

    2013-05-14

    For the emergence of early life, the formation of biopolymers such as RNA is essential. However, the addition of nucleotide monomers to existing oligonucleotides requires millimolar concentrations. Even in such optimistic settings, no polymerization of RNA longer than about 20 bases could be demonstrated. How then could self-replicating ribozymes appear, for which recent experiments suggest a minimal length of 200 nt? Here, we demonstrate a mechanism to bridge this gap: the escalated polymerization of nucleotides by a spatially confined thermal gradient. The gradient accumulates monomers by thermophoresis and convection while retaining longer polymers exponentially better. Polymerization and accumulation become mutually self-enhancing and result in a hyperexponential escalation of polymer length. We describe this escalation theoretically under the conservative assumption of reversible polymerization. Taking into account the separately measured thermophoretic properties of RNA, we extrapolate the results for primordial RNA polymerization inside a temperature gradient in pores or fissures of rocks. With a dilute, nanomolar concentration of monomers the model predicts that a pore length of 5 cm and a temperature difference of 10 K suffice to polymerize 200-mers of RNA in micromolar concentrations. The probability to generate these long RNAs is raised by a factor of >10(600) compared with polymerization in a physical equilibrium. We experimentally validate the theory with the reversible polymerization of DNA blocks in a laser-driven thermal trap. The results confirm that a thermal gradient can significantly enlarge the available sequence space for the emergence of catalytically active polymers.

  9. Spring-loaded polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, M.

    1995-02-14

    Spring-loaded electrically controllable polymeric gel actuators are disclosed. The polymeric gels can be polyvinyl alcohol, polyacrylic acid, or polyacrylamide, and are contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as water plus acetone. The action of the gel is mechanically biased, allowing the expansive and contractile forces to be optimized for specific applications. 5 figs.

  10. VOLUMETRIC POLYMERIZATION SHRINKAGE OF CONTEMPORARY COMPOSITE RESINS

    PubMed Central

    Nagem, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire) to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (á=0.05) was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01) and Definite (1.89±0.01) shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06), Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03), and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02) presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation. PMID:19089177

  11. Polymeric Additives For Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Nir, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental studies of properties of several graphite/epoxy composites containing polymeric additives as flexibilizing or toughening agents. Emphasizes effects of brominated polymeric additives (BPA's) with or without carboxy-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber. Reviews effects of individual and combined additives on fracture toughnesses, environmental stabilities, hot/wet strengths, thermomechanical behaviors, and other mechanical properties of composites.

  12. Spring-loaded polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    1995-01-01

    Spring-loaded electrically controllable polymeric gel actuators are disclosed. The polymeric gels can be polyvinyl alcohol, polyacrylic acid, or polyacrylamide, and are contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as water plus acetone. The action of the gel is mechanically biased, allowing the expansive and contractile forces to be optimized for specific applications.

  13. Escalation of polymerization in a thermal gradient

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Christof B.; Schink, Severin; Gerland, Ulrich; Braun, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    For the emergence of early life, the formation of biopolymers such as RNA is essential. However, the addition of nucleotide monomers to existing oligonucleotides requires millimolar concentrations. Even in such optimistic settings, no polymerization of RNA longer than about 20 bases could be demonstrated. How then could self-replicating ribozymes appear, for which recent experiments suggest a minimal length of 200 nt? Here, we demonstrate a mechanism to bridge this gap: the escalated polymerization of nucleotides by a spatially confined thermal gradient. The gradient accumulates monomers by thermophoresis and convection while retaining longer polymers exponentially better. Polymerization and accumulation become mutually self-enhancing and result in a hyperexponential escalation of polymer length. We describe this escalation theoretically under the conservative assumption of reversible polymerization. Taking into account the separately measured thermophoretic properties of RNA, we extrapolate the results for primordial RNA polymerization inside a temperature gradient in pores or fissures of rocks. With a dilute, nanomolar concentration of monomers the model predicts that a pore length of 5 cm and a temperature difference of 10 K suffice to polymerize 200-mers of RNA in micromolar concentrations. The probability to generate these long RNAs is raised by a factor of >10600 compared with polymerization in a physical equilibrium. We experimentally validate the theory with the reversible polymerization of DNA blocks in a laser-driven thermal trap. The results confirm that a thermal gradient can significantly enlarge the available sequence space for the emergence of catalytically active polymers. PMID:23630280

  14. Properties of amylose-oleic acid inclusion complexes from corn starch grafted with poly(methyl acrylate)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn starch granules have been previously investigated as fillers in polymers. In this study, much smaller particles in the form of spherulites produced by steam jet-cooking high-amylose corn starch and oleic acid to form amylose inclusion complexes were graft polymerized with methyl acrylate, both ...

  15. Targeted polymeric nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Wilson, David R.; Zamboni, Camila G.; Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, advances in designing polymeric nanoparticles for targeted cancer gene therapy are reviewed. Characterization and evaluation of biomaterials, targeting ligands, and transcriptional elements are each discussed. Advances in biomaterials have driven improvements to nanoparticle stability and tissue targeting, conjugation of ligands to the surface of polymeric nanoparticles enable binding to specific cancer cells, and the design of transcriptional elements has enabled selective DNA expression specific to the cancer cells. Together, these features have improved the performance of polymeric nanoparticles as targeted non-viral gene delivery vectors to treat cancer. As polymeric nanoparticles can be designed to be biodegradable, non-toxic, and to have reduced immunogenicity and tumorigenicity compared to viral platforms, they have significant potential for clinical use. Results of polymeric gene therapy in clinical trials and future directions for the engineering of nanoparticle systems for targeted cancer gene therapy are also presented. PMID:26061296

  16. Pressure induced polymerization of Formates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschauner, Oliver

    2004-03-01

    The discovery of pressure induced polymerization of CO2 inspired us to search for C-O based chain structures forming at high pressure. We used salts of carboxylic acids as starting materials and exposed them to pressures between 10 and 30 GPa. Upon heating to temperatures above 1800 K we observed deprotonation and significant changes in the Raman shifts of C-O streching modes. Structure analysis based on powder diffraction patterns collected at sector 16 of the APS showed formation of extended C-O chain structures with the cations of the salts residing in the interchain spaces. These new high pressure polymers are interesting by their mechanical strength and provide basic molecular patterns of organic metallic conductors.

  17. Modeling liquid crystal polymeric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez Pinto, Vianney Karina

    The main focus of this work is the theoretical and numerical study of materials that combine liquid crystal and polymer. Liquid crystal elastomers are polymeric materials that exhibit both the ordered properties of the liquid crystals and the elastic properties of rubbers. Changing the order of the liquid crystal molecules within the polymer network can induce shape change. These materials are very valuable for applications such as actuators, sensors, artificial muscles, haptic displays, etc. In this work we apply finite element elastodynamics simulations to study the temperature induced shape deformation in nematic elastomers with complex director microstructure. In another topic, we propose a novel numerical method to model the director dynamics and microstructural evolution of three dimensional nematic and cholesteric liquid crystals. Numerical studies presented in this work are in agreement with experimental observations and provide insight into the design of application devices.

  18. Molecular and polymeric ceramic precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Sneddon, L.G.

    1991-08-01

    The development of new methods for the production of complex materials is one of the most important problems in modern solid state chemistry and materials science. This project is attempting to apply the synthetic principles which have evolved inorganic and organometallic chemistry to the production of technologically important non-oxide ceramics, such as boron nitride, boron carbide and metal borides. Our recent work has now resulted in the production of new polymer systems, including poly(B-vinylborazine), polyvinylpentaborane and polyborazylene, that have proven to be high yield precursors to boron-based ceramic materials. Current work is now directed toward the synthesis of new types of molecular and polymeric boron-containing species and on exploration of the solid state properties of the ceramics that have been produced in these studies.

  19. The Chemical Behavior of Fluids Released during Deep Subduction Based on Fluid Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frezzotti, M. L.; Ferrando, S.

    2014-12-01

    We present a review of current research on fluid inclusions in (HP-) UHP metamorphic rocks that, combined with existing experimental research and thermodynamic models, allow us to investigate the chemical and physical properties of fluids released during deep subduction, their solvent and element transport capacity, and the subsequent implications for the element recycling in the mantle wedge. An impressive number of fluid inclusion studies indicate three main populations of fluid inclusions in HP and UHP metamorphic rocks: i) aqueous and/or non-polar gaseous fluid inclusions (FI), ii) multiphase solid inclusions (MSI), and iii) melt inclusions (MI). Chemical data from preserved fluid inclusions in rocks match with and implement "model" fluids by experiments and thermodynamics, revealing a continuity behind the extreme variations of physico-chemical properties of subduction-zone fluids. From fore-arc to sub-arc depths, fluids released by progressive devolatilization reactions from slab lithologies change from relatively diluted chloride-bearing aqueous solutions (± N2), mainly influenced by halide ligands, to (alkali) aluminosilicate-rich aqueous fluids, in which polymerization probably governs the solubility and transport of major (e.g., Si and Al) and trace elements (including C). Fluid inclusion data implement the petrological models explaining deep volatile liberation in subduction zones, and their flux into the mantle wedge.

  20. Polymeric materials from renewable resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frollini, Elisabete; Rodrigues, Bruno V. M.; da Silva, Cristina G.; Castro, Daniele O.; Ramires, Elaine C.; de Oliveira, Fernando; Santos, Rachel P. O.

    2016-05-01

    The goals of our studies have been the use of renewable raw materials in the preparation of polymeric materials with diversified properties. In this context, lignosulfonate, which is produced in large scale around the world, but not widely used in the production of polymeric materials, was used to replace phenol and polyols in the preparation of phenolic- (Ligno-PH) and polyurethane-type (Ligno-PU) polymers, respectively. These polymers were used to prepare composites reinforced with sisal lignocellulosic fibers. The use of lignosulfonate in the formulation of both types of polymers was beneficial, because in general composites with improved properties, specially impact strength, were obtained. Composites were also prepared from the so called "biopolyethylene" (HDPE), curaua lignocellulosic fiber, and castor oil (CO). All composites HDBPE/CO/Fiber exhibited higher impact strength, when compared to those of the corresponding HDBPE/Fiber. These results, combined with others (eg SEM images of the fractured surfaces) indicated that, in addition to acting as a plasticizer, this oil may have acted as a compatibilizer of the hydrophilic fiber with the hydrophobic polymer. The set of results indicated that (i) mats with nano (diameter ≤ 100nm) and/or ultrafine (submicron scale) fibers were produced, (ii) hybrid fibers were produced (bio-based mats composites), (iii) cellulosic pulp (CP) and/or lignin (Lig) can be combined with PET matrices to control properties such as stiffness and hydrophilicity of the respective mats. Materials with diversified properties were prepared from high content of renewable raw materials, thus fulfilling the proposed targets.

  1. Polymeric materials from renewable resources

    SciTech Connect

    Frollini, Elisabete; Rodrigues, Bruno V. M.; Silva, Cristina G. da; Castro, Daniele O.; Ramires, Elaine C.; Oliveira, Fernando de; Santos, Rachel P. O.

    2016-05-18

    The goals of our studies have been the use of renewable raw materials in the preparation of polymeric materials with diversified properties. In this context, lignosulfonate, which is produced in large scale around the world, but not widely used in the production of polymeric materials, was used to replace phenol and polyols in the preparation of phenolic- (Ligno-PH) and polyurethane-type (Ligno-PU) polymers, respectively. These polymers were used to prepare composites reinforced with sisal lignocellulosic fibers. The use of lignosulfonate in the formulation of both types of polymers was beneficial, because in general composites with improved properties, specially impact strength, were obtained. Composites were also prepared from the so called “biopolyethylene” (HDPE), curaua lignocellulosic fiber, and castor oil (CO). All composites HDBPE/CO/Fiber exhibited higher impact strength, when compared to those of the corresponding HDBPE/Fiber. These results, combined with others (eg SEM images of the fractured surfaces) indicated that, in addition to acting as a plasticizer, this oil may have acted as a compatibilizer of the hydrophilic fiber with the hydrophobic polymer. The set of results indicated that (i) mats with nano (diameter ≤ 100nm) and/or ultrafine (submicron scale) fibers were produced, (ii) hybrid fibers were produced (bio-based mats composites), (iii) cellulosic pulp (CP) and/or lignin (Lig) can be combined with PET matrices to control properties such as stiffness and hydrophilicity of the respective mats. Materials with diversified properties were prepared from high content of renewable raw materials, thus fulfilling the proposed targets.

  2. The Italian ASTRI program: an end-to-end dual-mirror telescope prototype for the CTA Small System telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraveo, Patrizia; Pareschi, Giovanni; Catalano, Osvaldo; Vercellone, Stefano; Sacco, Bruno; Conconi, Paolo; Fiorini, Mauro; Canestrari, Rodolfo

    2012-07-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is a flagship project ofthe Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research related to the next generation IACT (Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope), within the framework of the CTA International Observatory. In this context, INAF (Italian National Institute of Astrophysics) is currently developing a scientific and technological breakthrough to allow the study of the uppermost end of the VHE domain (from a few TeV - hundreds of TeV). The ASTRI project timeframe is of about 3 years, and foresees the full development, installation and calibration of a Small Size class Telescope prototype compliant with the requirements of the High Energy array of CTA. The ASTRI prototype will adopt an aplanatic, wide field, double reflection optical layout in a Schwarzschild-Couder configuration. Moreover, the focal plane instrument will explore small pixelated detector sensors such as Silicon PMs. Among the number of technological challenges, this telescope will be the very first instrument implementing both the Schwarzschild-Couder optical configuration and the double reflection for air Cherenkov imaging. In this paper we describe the status of the project, and we present the results obtained so far among the different technological developments.

  3. Nontraditional Student Perceptions of Collegiate Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkowsky, Patricia; Mendez, Sylvia; Ogunbowo, Oluwafolakemi; Clayton, Grant; Hernandez, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    This study explored student responses to a Student Inclusiveness Survey (SIS), with specific attention to nontraditional student responses about collegiate inclusion. Specifically, the SIS constructs that related to inclusion, the Perceptions of Inclusiveness and Institutional Safeguarding of Inclusiveness, were analyzed descriptively, and…

  4. ESR studies of semicontinuous emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, W.; Westmoreland, D.G.

    1993-12-31

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is used in the detection and quantification of propagating radicals during a semicontinuous emulsion polymerization. The propagating radical concentration is crucial for the determination of kinetic parameters of the emulsion polymerization process. A flow reactor was built which involves a closed-loop flow system that circulates latex from the polymerization reactor through the ESR cavity for free-radical measurements and back to the reactor. With the continuous measurement of the radical concentrations during a polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA), {bar n} (average number of radicals per particle) and k{sub p} (propagating rate constant), are measured throughout the entire polymerization. For the polymerization of the MMA system studied, the authors observed a gradual increased in n and decrease in k{sub p} during the run, suggesting a diffusionally controlled process and that the polymerization is not occurring homogeneously throughout the polymer particles. In the glassy pMMA matrix, radicals can be {open_quotes}trapped{close_quotes} within a minimum volume and remain unterminated.

  5. Polymeric MST - high precision at low cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elderstig, Håkan; Larsson, Olle

    1997-09-01

    A low-cost production process for fabrication of polymeric microstructures from micromachined silicon is demonstrated in a splice for the splicing of optical fibers and an optical motherboard. Measurements on splices showed less than 0.5 dB insertion losses. The prototype polymeric motherboard concisted of an optical receiver module. The detector that was mounted on the polymeric optical motherboard detected about 70% of the transferred light. Measurements with modulated light indicates an optical bandwidth of 5 GHz at 2 V reverse current on the pin-diode.

  6. Method for forming polymerized microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Singh, Anup K.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Claudnic, Mark R.

    2013-03-12

    Methods for making a microfluidic device according to embodiments of the present invention include defining.about.cavity. Polymer precursor solution is positioned in the cavity, and exposed to light to begin the polymerization process and define a microchannel. In some embodiments, after the polymerization process is partially complete, a solvent rinse is performed, or fresh polymer precursor introduced into the microchannel. This may promote removal of unpolymerized material from the microchannel and enable smaller feature sizes. The polymer precursor solution may contain an iniferter. Polymerized features therefore may be capped with the iniferter, which is photoactive. The iniferter may aid later binding of a polyacrylamide gel to the microchannel surface.

  7. Method for forming polymerized microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory J [Livermore, CA; Hatch, Anson V [Tracy, CA; Wang, Ying-Chih [Pleasanton, CA; Singh, Anup K [Danville, CA; Renzi, Ronald F [Tracy, CA; Claudnic, Mark R [Livermore, CA

    2011-11-01

    Methods for making a micofluidic device according to embodiments of the present invention include defining a cavity. Polymer precursor solution is positioned in the cavity, and exposed to light to begin the polymerization process and define a microchannel. In some embodiments, after the polymerization process is partially complete, a solvent rinse is performed, or fresh polymer precursor introduced into the microchannel. This may promote removal of unpolymerized material from the microchannel and enable smaller feature sizes. The polymer precursor solution may contain an iniferter. Polymerized features therefore may be capped with the iniferter, which is photoactive. The iniferter may aid later binding of a polyacrylamide gel to the microchannel surface.

  8. Polymeric nanoparticles: the future of nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Banik, Brittany L; Fattahi, Pouria; Brown, Justin L

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the most studied organic strategies for nanomedicine. Intense interest lies in the potential of polymeric NPs to revolutionize modern medicine. To determine the ideal nanosystem for more effective and distinctly targeted delivery of therapeutic applications, particle size, morphology, material choice, and processing techniques are all research areas of interest. Utilizations of polymeric NPs include drug delivery techniques such as conjugation and entrapment of drugs, prodrugs, stimuli-responsive systems, imaging modalities, and theranostics. Cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular diseases are fields impacted by NP technologies that push scientific boundaries to the leading edge of transformative advances for nanomedicine. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Hydrocarbon polymeric binder for advanced solid propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potts, J. E. (Editor); Ashcraft, A. C., Jr.; Wise, E. W.

    1971-01-01

    Various experimental factors were examined to determine the source of difficulty in an isoprene polymerization in the 5-gallon reactor which gave a non-uniform product of low functionality. It was concluded that process improvements relating to initiator and monomer purity were desirable, but that the main difficulty was in the initiator feed system. A new pumping system was installed and an analog simulation of the reactor, feed system and initiator decomposition kinetics was devised which permits the selection of initial initiator concentrations and feed rates to use to give a nearly uniform initiator concentration throughout a polymerization run. An isoprene polymerization was run in which the process improvements were implemented.

  10. A convex hull inclusion test.

    PubMed

    Bailey, T; Cowles, J

    1987-02-01

    A new characterization of the interior of the convex hull of a finite point set is given. An inclusion test based on this characterization is, on average, almost linear in the number of points times the dimensionality.

  11. Inclusion-Body Myositis: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Make a Donation Matching Gifts Legacy Gifts Product Donations Partner Become an MDA Partner Meet our Partners How to Get Involved Donate Inclusion-Body Myositis (IBM) Share print email share facebook twitter ...

  12. Polymeric Coatings for Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Schuler, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Two polymeric coatings have been developed for the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission. ProSEDS is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta II unmanned expendable booster scheduled for launch in August 2000. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta 11 second stage and collects current from the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma to facilitate de-orbit of the spent stage. The conductive tether is attached to a 10-km non-conductive tether, the other end of which is attached to an endmass containing several scientific instruments. A bare metal tether would have the best conductivity but thermal concerns preclude this design. A conductive polymer developed by Triton Systems has been optimized for conductivity and thermo-optical properties. The current design for the ProSEDS conductive tether is seven strands of 28 AWG aluminum wire individually coated with 8.7 micrometers (0.35 mil) of an atomic oxygen-resistant conductive polymer composed of a mixture of 87% Clear Oxygen-Resistant polymer (COR) and 13% polyanaline (PANi), wrapped around a braided Kevlar (TM) 49 core. Extensive testing has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to qualify this material for flight on ProSEDS. Atomic oxygen exposure was performed, with solar absorptance and infrared emittance measured before and after exposure. Conductivity was measured before and after atomic oxygen exposure. High voltage tests, up to 1500 V, of the current collecting ability of the COR/PANi have been completed. Approximately 160 meters of the conductive tether closest to the Delta 11 second stage is insulated to prevent any electron reconnection to the tether from the plasma contactor. The insulation is composed of polyimide overcoated with TOR-BP, another polymeric coating developed by Triton for this mission. TOR-BP acts as both insulator

  13. Genetics Home Reference: inclusion body myopathy 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions inclusion body myopathy 2 inclusion body myopathy 2 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Inclusion body myopathy 2 is a condition that primarily affects skeletal muscles , ...

  14. Preparation of polysaccharide supramolecular films by vine-twining polymerization approach.

    PubMed

    Kadokawa, Jun-ichi; Nomura, Shintaro; Hatanaka, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Kazuya

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we investigated the preparation of polysaccharide supramolecular films through the formation of inclusion complexes by amylose in vine-twining polymerization using carboxymethyl cellulose-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) (CMC-g-PCL) as a new guest polymer. First, hydrogels were prepared by phosphorylase-catalyzed enzymatic polymerization in the presence of CMC-g-PCL according to the vine-twining polymerization manner. The XRD result of a powdered sample obtained by lyophilization of the resulting hydrogel indicated the presence of inclusion complexes of amylose with the PCL graft-chains between intermolecular (CMC-g-PCL)s, which acted as supramolecular cross-linking points for the hydrogelation. Then, the supramolecular films were obtained by adding water to the powdered samples, followed by drying. The mechanical properties of the selected films examined by tensile testing were superior to those of a CMC film. The effect of the supramolecular cross-linking structures on the mechanical properties of the films was evaluated further by several investigations.

  15. Properties of an indirect composite material polymerized with two different laboratory polymerizing systems.

    PubMed

    Satsukawa, Hidetada; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Tanoue, Naomi; Nemoto, Mika; Ogino, Tomohisa; Matsumura, Hideo

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the performance of two laboratory light polymerization systems used to polymerize an indirect composite (Sinfony). A two-step polymerization system (Visio-Alfa and Beta) and a halogen-metal halide unit (Twinkle MIII) were assessed. The composite was polymerized either with the Visio units or with the MIII unit for different exposure periods. Knoop hardness, water sorption, and solubility in water of the composite polymerized with the following modes were determined: Visio, 15 minutes; MIII, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 180 seconds. Extension of light exposure time to the MIII unit improved the hardness of the composite from 30.5 (30 s) to 40.7 (180 s), whereas hardness obtained with the Visio units resulted in 24.8 (15 minutes). Water sorption and solubility of the composite were greater when it was polymerized with the Visio units than with the MIII unit.

  16. Radiation effects on polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    It is important to study changes in properties of polymeres after irradiation with charged particles, with ultraviolet radiation, and with combinations of both. An apparatus for this purpose has been built at the NASA Langley Research Center. It consists of a chamber 9 inches in diameter and 9 inches high with a port for an electron gun, another port for a mass spectrometer, and a quartz window through which an ultraviolet lamp can be focused. The chamber, including the electron gun and the mass spectrometer, can be evacuated to a pressure of 10 to the 8th power torr. A sample placed in the chamber can be irradiated with electrons and ultraviolet radiation separately, sequentially, or simultaneously, while volatile products can be monitored during all irradiations with the mass spectrometer. The apparatus described above has been used to study three different polymer films: lexan; a polycarbonate; P1700, a polysulfone; and mylar, a polyethylene terephthalate. All three polymers had been studied extensively with both electrons and ultraviolet radiation separately, but not simultaneously. Also, volatile products had not been monitored during irradiation for the materials. A high electron dose rate of 530 Mrads/hr was used so that a sufficient concentration of volatile products would be formed to yield a reasonable mass spectrum.

  17. Polymeric conjugates for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Nate; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    The field of polymer therapeutics has evolved over the past decade and has resulted in the development of polymer-drug conjugates with a wide variety of architectures and chemical properties. Whereas traditional non-degradable polymeric carriers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and N-(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylamide) (HPMA) copolymers have been translated to use in the clinic, functionalized polymer-drug conjugates are increasingly being utilized to obtain biodegradable, stimuli-sensitive, and targeted systems in an attempt to further enhance localized drug delivery and ease of elimination. In addition, the study of conjugates bearing both therapeutic and diagnostic agents has resulted in multifunctional carriers with the potential to both “see and treat” patients. In this paper, the rational design of polymer-drug conjugates will be discussed followed by a review of different classes of conjugates currently under investigation. The design and chemistry used for the synthesis of various conjugates will be presented with additional comments on their potential applications and current developmental status. PMID:22707853

  18. Transglutaminase polymerization of peanut proteins.

    PubMed

    Clare, D A; Gharst, G; Sanders, T H

    2007-01-24

    Transglutaminase promotes protein cross-linking reactions through an acyl transferase mechanism involving protein-bound glutaminyl residues and primary amines including the epsilon-amino group of lysine residues in soy, myosin, gluten, oat globulin, casein, and whey. Herein, we present a first report of exogenous transglutaminase catalysis of several peanut protein fractions, including purified Ara h 1. In most cases, SDS-PAGE banding patterns revealed the formation of high molecular weight polymers while catalysis of Ara h 1 resulted in distinct dimer formation. Cross-linking effects were accomplished in the presence and absence of the reducing reagent, dithiothreitol. Ortho-phthaldialdehyde assays, used to quantify the degree of polymerization, indicated approximately 21% and approximately 30% coupling over a similar time interval, using either cold hexane extracted peanut protein fractions or lightly roasted flour dispersions, respectively. Rheological measurements established that transglutaminase-modified peanut extracts exhibited lowered viscosity readings compared to nontreated dispersions. Peanut protein polymers and glycoprotein conjugates, created by covalent linkage between protein substrates and monosaccharide amino sugars, exhibited similar IgE binding activity, compared to control solutions. These results suggested that potential allergic responses were not enhanced after enzymatic modification. Ultimately, these approaches may provide novel peanut-based food ingredients with unique functional characteristics for expanded applications within the world marketplace.

  19. Highly elastic conductive polymeric MEMS

    PubMed Central

    Ruhhammer, J; Zens, M; Goldschmidtboeing, F; Seifert, A; Woias, P

    2015-01-01

    Polymeric structures with integrated, functional microelectrical mechanical systems (MEMS) elements are increasingly important in various applications such as biomedical systems or wearable smart devices. These applications require highly flexible and elastic polymers with good conductivity, which can be embedded into a matrix that undergoes large deformations. Conductive polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a suitable candidate but is still challenging to fabricate. Conductivity is achieved by filling a nonconductive PDMS matrix with conductive particles. In this work, we present an approach that uses new mixing techniques to fabricate conductive PDMS with different fillers such as carbon black, silver particles, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Additionally, the electrical properties of all three composites are examined under continuous mechanical stress. Furthermore, we present a novel, low-cost, simple three-step molding process that transfers a micro patterned silicon master into a polystyrene (PS) polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) replica with improved release features. This PS/PTFE mold is used for subsequent structuring of conductive PDMS with high accuracy. The non sticking characteristics enable the fabrication of delicate structures using a very soft PDMS, which is usually hard to release from conventional molds. Moreover, the process can also be applied to polyurethanes and various other material combinations. PMID:27877753

  20. Highly elastic conductive polymeric MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhhammer, J.; Zens, M.; Goldschmidtboeing, F.; Seifert, A.; Woias, P.

    2015-02-01

    Polymeric structures with integrated, functional microelectrical mechanical systems (MEMS) elements are increasingly important in various applications such as biomedical systems or wearable smart devices. These applications require highly flexible and elastic polymers with good conductivity, which can be embedded into a matrix that undergoes large deformations. Conductive polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a suitable candidate but is still challenging to fabricate. Conductivity is achieved by filling a nonconductive PDMS matrix with conductive particles. In this work, we present an approach that uses new mixing techniques to fabricate conductive PDMS with different fillers such as carbon black, silver particles, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Additionally, the electrical properties of all three composites are examined under continuous mechanical stress. Furthermore, we present a novel, low-cost, simple three-step molding process that transfers a micro patterned silicon master into a polystyrene (PS) polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) replica with improved release features. This PS/PTFE mold is used for subsequent structuring of conductive PDMS with high accuracy. The non sticking characteristics enable the fabrication of delicate structures using a very soft PDMS, which is usually hard to release from conventional molds. Moreover, the process can also be applied to polyurethanes and various other material combinations.

  1. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Babcock, Walter C.; Friensen, Dwayne T.; Smith, Kelly L.; Johnson, Bruce M.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclsoed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers.

  2. Hydrogel polymerization in microgravity for contact lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, Oksana; Kostarev, Konstantin; Kondyurin, Alexey

    Contact lenses become widely used for vision correction. The modern contact lenses made of polymer materials have to satisfy a number of requirements: biocompatibility and non-toxicity, low elastic module, high oxygen permeability, good wettability, mechanical strength and stable shape. To following all these requirements, special polymer compositions and polymerization techniques are in development. One of the unique technology is based on polymerization process in microgravity. The synthesis of the polymer structures proceeds in low concentration solution and Earth gravity has a great influence on the polymerization kinetics and final properties of the gel. The microgravity conditions give a possibility to get a regular polymer network with specific macromolecular structure. The experiments on board of space station and theoretical models of the polymerization processes are considered for contact lenses application.

  3. Reverse-osmosis membranes by plasma polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Thin allyl amine polymer films were developed using plasma polymerization. Resulting dry composite membranes effectively reject sodium chloride during reverse osmosis. Films are 98% sodium chloride rejective, and 46% urea rejective.

  4. Polymerization as a Model Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Maurice

    1973-01-01

    Describes the features of the free radical, anionic, and cationic mechanisms of chain addition polymerization. Indicates that the nature of chain reactions can be best taught through the study of macromolecules. (CC)

  5. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry of Chiral Polymeric Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Werber, Liora; Preiss, Laura C; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2015-09-01

    Chiral polymeric nanoparticles are of prime importance, mainly due to their enantioselective potential, for many applications such as catalysis and chiral separation in chromatography. In this article we report on the preparation of chiral polymeric nanoparticles by miniemulsion polymerization. In addition, we describe the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to measure the chiral interactions and the energetics of the adsorption of enantiomers from aqueous solutions onto chiral polymeric nanoparticles. The characterization of chirality in nano-systems is a very challenging task; here, we demonstrate that ITC can be used to accurately determine the thermodynamic parameters associated with the chiral interactions of nanoparticles. The use of ITC to measure the energetics of chiral interactions and recognition at the surfaces of chiral nanoparticles can be applied to other nanoscale chiral systems and can provide further insight into the chiral discrimination processes of nanomaterials.

  6. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Babcock, W.C.; Friensen, D.T.; Smith, K.L.; Johnson, B.M.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-08-14

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclosed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers. 3 figs.

  7. Hydrocarbon polymeric binder for advanced solid propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potts, J. E. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    A series of DEAB initiated isoprene polymerizations were run in the 5-gallon stirred autoclave reactor. Polymerization run parameters such as initiator concentration and feed rate were correlated with the molecular weight to provide a basis for molecular weight control in future runs. Synthetic methods were developed for the preparation of n-1,3-alkadienes. By these methods, 1,3-nonadiene was polymerized using DEAB initiator to give an ester-telechelic polynonadiene. This was subsequently hydrogenated with copper chromite catalyst to give a hydroxyl terminated saturated liquid hydrocarbon prepolymer having greatly improved viscosity characteristics and a Tg 18 degrees lower than that of the hydrogenated polyisoprenes. The hydroxyl-telechelic saturated polymers prepared by the hydrogenolysis of ester-telechelic polyisoprene were reached with diisocyanates under conditions favoring linear chain extension gel permeation chromatography was used to monitor this condensation polymerization. Fractions having molecular weights above one million were produced.

  8. Polymerization as a Model Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Maurice

    1973-01-01

    Describes the features of the free radical, anionic, and cationic mechanisms of chain addition polymerization. Indicates that the nature of chain reactions can be best taught through the study of macromolecules. (CC)

  9. Polymerization of actin by positively charged liposomes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    By cosedimentation, spectrofluorimetry, and electron microscopy, we have established that actin is induced to polymerize at low salt concentrations by positively charged liposomes. This polymerization occurs only at the surface of the liposomes, and thus monomers not in direct contact with the liposome remain monomeric. The integrity of the liposome membrane is necessary to maintain actin in its polymerized state since disruption of the liposome depolymerizes actin. Actin polymerized at the surface of the liposome is organized into two filamentous structures: sheets of parallel filaments in register and a netlike organization. Spectrofluorimetric analysis with the probe N- pyrenyl-iodoacetamide shows that actin is in the F conformation, at least in the environment of the probe. However, actin assembly induced by the liposome is not accompanied by full ATP hydrolysis as observed in vitro upon addition of salts. PMID:3360852

  10. Polymeric lithography editor: Editing lithographic errors with nanoporous polymeric probes.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Pradeep Ramiah; Zhou, Chuanhong; Dasari, Mallika; Voss, Kay-Obbe; Trautmann, Christina; Kohli, Punit

    2017-06-01

    A new lithographic editing system with an ability to erase and rectify errors in microscale with real-time optical feedback is demonstrated. The erasing probe is a conically shaped hydrogel (tip size, ca. 500 nm) template-synthesized from track-etched conical glass wafers. The "nanosponge" hydrogel probe "erases" patterns by hydrating and absorbing molecules into a porous hydrogel matrix via diffusion analogous to a wet sponge. The presence of an interfacial liquid water layer between the hydrogel tip and the substrate during erasing enables frictionless, uninterrupted translation of the eraser on the substrate. The erasing capacity of the hydrogel is extremely high because of the large free volume of the hydrogel matrix. The fast frictionless translocation and interfacial hydration resulted in an extremely high erasing rate (~785 μm(2)/s), which is two to three orders of magnitude higher in comparison with the atomic force microscopy-based erasing (~0.1 μm(2)/s) experiments. The high precision and accuracy of the polymeric lithography editor (PLE) system stemmed from coupling piezoelectric actuators to an inverted optical microscope. Subsequently after erasing the patterns using agarose erasers, a polydimethylsiloxane probe fabricated from the same conical track-etched template was used to precisely redeposit molecules of interest at the erased spots. PLE also provides a continuous optical feedback throughout the entire molecular editing process-writing, erasing, and rewriting. To demonstrate its potential in device fabrication, we used PLE to electrochemically erase metallic copper thin film, forming an interdigitated array of microelectrodes for the fabrication of a functional microphotodetector device. High-throughput dot and line erasing, writing with the conical "wet nanosponge," and continuous optical feedback make PLE complementary to the existing catalog of nanolithographic/microlithographic and three-dimensional printing techniques. This new PLE

  11. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-02-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  12. Post polymerization cure shape memory polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S; Hearon, Michael Keith; Bearinger, Jane P

    2014-11-11

    This invention relates to chemical polymer compositions, methods of synthesis, and fabrication methods for devices regarding polymers capable of displaying shape memory behavior (SMPs) and which can first be polymerized to a linear or branched polymeric structure, having thermoplastic properties, subsequently processed into a device through processes typical of polymer melts, solutions, and dispersions and then crossed linked to a shape memory thermoset polymer retaining the processed shape.

  13. Post polymerization cure shape memory polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Hearon, II, Michael Keith; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2017-01-10

    This invention relates to chemical polymer compositions, methods of synthesis, and fabrication methods for devices regarding polymers capable of displaying shape memory behavior (SMPs) and which can first be polymerized to a linear or branched polymeric structure, having thermoplastic properties, subsequently processed into a device through processes typical of polymer melts, solutions, and dispersions and then crossed linked to a shape memory thermoset polymer retaining the processed shape.

  14. New Polybenzimidazole Architectures by Diels Alder Polymerization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-14

    REPORT New Polybenzimidazole Architectures By Diels Alder Polymerization. Final Report 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Due to their high...substituents to improve processability, are desirable. This project was a proof of principle study to determine if Diels - Alder polymerization of monomers...AND ADDRESSES U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Polybenzimidazole, Diels Alder

  15. Containerless polymeric microsphere production for biomedical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Hyson, M. T.; Chung, S. K.; Colvin, M.; Chang, M.

    1987-01-01

    A containerless method that produces highly uniform microspheres (greater than 50 microns in diameter) from many materials has been developed for biomedical applications. A piezoelectrically vibrated drop generator forms uniform (monodisperse) monomer droplets that are either electrostatistically levitated and polymerized using UV irradiation, or free-radical polymerized. Spheres of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate polymer have been produced with diameters of 155 microns + or - 1.57 percent.

  16. Biaxially oriented film on flexible polymeric substrate

    DOEpatents

    Finkikoglu, Alp T.; Matias, Vladimir

    2009-10-13

    A flexible polymer-based template having a biaxially oriented film grown on the surface of a polymeric substrate. The template having the biaxially oriented film can be used for further epitaxial growth of films of interest for applications such as photovoltaic cells, light emitting diodes, and the like. Methods of forming such a flexible template and providing the polymeric substrate with a biaxially oriented film deposited thereon are also described.

  17. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-09-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  18. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Coari, Kristin M; Martin, Rebecca C; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B

    2017-02-03

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  19. UV Polymerization of Hydrodynamically Shaped Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    parallel.17 One other example of non-round fibers was originally reported in 199518 and was produced by co -extrusion of polymers with different...ordinary as there is a minimum required exposure to initiate polymerization as shown with other polymers .25 It was desirable to maintain the same exposure...UV polymerization of hydrodynamically shaped fibers† Abel L. Thangawng, Peter B. Howell, Jr, Christopher M. Spillmann, Jawad Naciri and Frances S

  20. Nonperturbative Renormalization Group Approach to Polymerized Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essafi, Karim; Kownacki, Jean-Philippe; Mouhanna, Dominique

    2014-03-01

    Membranes or membrane-like materials play an important role in many fields ranging from biology to physics. These systems form a very rich domain in statistical physics. The interplay between geometry and thermal fluctuations lead to exciting phases such flat, tubular and disordered flat phases. Roughly speaking, membranes can be divided into two group: fluid membranes in which the molecules are free to diffuse and thus no shear modulus. On the other hand, in polymerized membranes the connectivity is fixed which leads to elastic forces. This difference between fluid and polymerized membranes leads to a difference in their critical behaviour. For instance, fluid membranes are always crumpled, whereas polymerized membranes exhibit a phase transition between a crumpled phase and a flat phase. In this talk, I will focus only on polymerized phantom, i.e. non-self-avoiding, membranes. The critical behaviour of both isotropic and anisotropic polymerized membranes are studied using a nonperturbative renormalization group approach (NPRG). This allows for the investigation of the phase transitions and the low temperature flat phase in any internal dimension D and embedding d. Interestingly, graphene behaves just as a polymerized membrane in its flat phase.