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Sample records for ctsl run cc-15

  1. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Analysis of Black Thunder coal and liquefaction products from HRI Bench Unit Run CC-15

    SciTech Connect

    Pugmire, R.J.; Solum, M.S.

    1994-02-01

    This study was designed to apply {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry to the analysis of direct coal liquefaction process-stream materials. {sup 13}C-NMR was shown to have a high potential for application to direct coal liquefaction-derived samples in Phase II of this program. In this Phase III project, {sup 13}C-NMR was applied to a set of samples derived from the HRI Inc. bench-scale liquefaction Run CC-15. The samples include the feed coal, net products and intermediate streams from three operating periods of the run. High-resolution {sup 13}C-NMR data were obtained for the liquid samples and solid-state CP/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR data were obtained for the coal and filter-cake samples. The {sup 1}C-NMR technique is used to derive a set of twelve carbon structural parameters for each sample (CONSOL Table A). Average molecular structural descriptors can then be derived from these parameters (CONSOL Table B).

  2. HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process materials: chemical analysis and biological testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.

    1985-12-01

    This report presents data from the chemical analysis and biological testing of coal liquefaction materials obtained from the Hydrocarbon Research, Incorporated (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. Materials from both an experimental run and a 25-day demonstration run were analyzed. Chemical methods of analysis included adsorption column chromatography, high-resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biological activity was evaluated using the standard microbial mutagenicity assay and an initiation/promotion assay for mouse-skin tumorigenicity. Where applicable, the results obtained from the analyses of the CTSL materials have been compared to those obtained from the integrated and nonintegrated two-stage coal liquefaction processes. 18 refs., 26 figs., 22 tabs.

  3. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) process bench studies with bituminous coal. Final report, [October 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-03-01

    Reported herein are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using bituminous coal concluded at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE contract during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with the application of coal cleaning methods and solids separation methods to the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) Process. Additionally a predispersed catalyst was evaluated in a thermal/catalytic configuration, and an alternative nickel molybdenum catalyst was evaluated for the CTSL process. Three coals were evaluated in this program: Bituminous Illinois No. 6 Burning Star and Sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The tests involving the Illinois coal are reported herein, and the tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico coals are described in Topical Report No. 1. On the laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects are reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests, such as tests on rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids, and cleaned coals, are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL process are described in the CTSL Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

  4. Preliminary chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the HRI catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process. [Aliphatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Later, D.W.; Wilson, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    Coal-derived materials from experimental runs of Hydrocarbon Research Incorporated's (HRI) catalytic two-stage liquefaction (CTSL) process were chemically characterized and screened for microbial mutagenicity. This process differs from two-stage coal liquefaction processes in that catalyst is used in both stages. Samples from both the first and second stages were class-fractionated by alumina adsorption chromatography. The fractions were analyzed by capillary column gas chromatography; gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; direct probe, low voltage mass spectrometry; and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Mutagenicity assays were performed with the crude and class fractions in Salmonella typhimurium, TA98. Preliminary results of chemical analyses indicate that >80% CTSL materials from both process stages were aliphatic hydrocarbon and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. Furthermore, the gross and specific chemical composition of process materials from the first stage were very similar to those of the second stage. In general, the unfractionated materials were only slightly active in the TA98 mutagenicity assay. Like other coal liquefaction materials investigated in this laboratory, the nitrogen-containing polycyclic aromatic compound (N-PAC) class fractions were responsible for the bulk of the mutagenic activity of the crudes. Finally, it was shown that this activity correlated with the presence of amino-PAH. 20 figures, 9 tables.

  5. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies and PDU scale-up with sub-bituminous coal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.T.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-03-01

    Reported are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using sub-bituminous coal conducted at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-88PC88818 during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with testing of the baseline Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process with comparisons with other two stage process configurations, catalyst evaluations and unit operations such as solid separation, pretreatments, on-line hydrotreating, and an examination of new concepts. In the overall program, three coals were evaluated, bituminous Illinois No. 6, Burning Star and sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The runs (experiments) concern process variables, variable reactor volumes, catalysts (both supported, dispersed and rejuvenated), coal cleaned by agglomeration, hot slurry treatments, reactor sequence, on-line hydrotreating, dispersed catalyst with pretreatment reactors and CO{sub 2}/coal effects. The tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico Coals are reported herein, and the tests involving the Illinois coal are described in Topical Report No. 2. On a laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects were conducted and reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer such as: rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids and cleaned coals. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL{trademark} process are described in the CTSL{trademark} Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

  6. [Level of expression of gene CTSL and its correlation with natural killer T-Cells in mexican pediatric patients with recent-onset type 1 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Díaz, Rita Angélica; Medina-Santillán, Roberto; Castro-Magdonel, Blanca Elena; Bekker-Méndez, Carolina; Gómez-Zamudio, Jaime; Nishimura-Meguro, Elisa; Garrido-Magaña, Eulalia; Lizárraga-Paulin, Lorena; Aguilar-Herrera, Blanca E; Valladares-Salgado, Adán; Cruz, Miguel; Mondragón-González, Rafael; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; Wacher, Niels H

    2016-10-01

    To compare the level of expression of the gene CTSL and its correlation with NKT cells in patients with recent-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D), their siblings, and healthy controls. Analytical cross-sectional design. Patients with T1D < 3 months evolution, their siblings, and healthy controls were included. Percentages and absolute numbers of NKT cells were measured with expression of the CTSL gene. 124 subjects: with T1D (n = 48), siblings (n = 44) and controls (n = 32) were included. HbA1c was greater and C-peptide lower in T1D than the other groups and sibling age was higher (p < 0.001). There were no differences in NKT cells between T1D (0.176 ± 0.202) and controls (0.118 ± 0.133), but the percentage was higher in siblings (0.246 ± 0.188; p = 0.002). Lower level of expression of the CTSL gene associated with both absolute number (r: 0.4607; 95% CI: -0.08425 to -0.7935; p = 0.043) and percentage of NKT cells (r: 0.4540; 95% CI: -0.0927 to -0.7903; p = 0.045) in the T1D group. Patients with T1D have lower percentage and absolute number of NKT cells compared to their siblings. NKT cells absolute numbers are correlated with the expression of CTSL in T1D patients.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships and gene expression pattern of three different cathepsin L (Ctsl) isoforms in zebrafish: Ctsla is the putative yolk processing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tingaud-Sequeira, Angèle; Cerdà, Joan

    2007-01-15

    Certain cysteine proteases, such as cathepsin L (Ctsl), have been involved in yolk processing mechanisms in oocytes and embryos of lower vertebrates. In zebrafish (Danio rerio), three different ctsl genes, ctsla, ctslb and ctslc, have been found in the genome, but their pattern of expression, as well as information on which the encoded enzymes are potentially involved in yolk absorption during embryogenesis, is unknown. Here, phylogenetic and gene structure analysis revealed that zebrafish ctsla and ctslb genes are similar, showing a highly conserved structure in comparison with human ctsl, while ctslc presents different exon organization together with an earlier evolution. Thus, ctslc appears to be evolved from a common ancestral ctsl-like gene, possibly through an early duplication event, whereas ctsla and ctslb may be originated from a second duplication mechanism. Zebrafish ctsla, ctslb and ctslc also showed different patterns of mRNA expression during embryogenesis and in adult tissues. While Ctsla transcripts were accumulated in embryos throughout development and in the adult ovary, those encoding Ctslb were detected only in embryos around the time of hatching as previously reported, and those for Ctslc appeared only in larvae and in some adult tissues, but not in the ovary. In zebrafish and killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) embryos, Ctsla mRNA was first detected in blastomers, and later in development it was localized in cells of the yolk syncytial layer, an embryonic structure involved in yolk absorption. These data therefore suggested that Ctsla is most likely the putative protease involved in yolk processing in fish embryos, while Ctslc seems not to be required during early embryogenesis in zebrafish.

  8. Close-coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies. Final report, [October 1, 1988--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Popper, G.A.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-06-01

    This is the final report of a four year and ten month contract starting on October 1, 1988 to July 31, 1993 with the US Department of Energy to study and improve Close-Coupled Catalytic Two-Stage Direct Liquefaction of coal by producing high yields of distillate with improved quality at lower capital and production costs in comparison to existing technologies. Laboratory, Bench and PDU scale studies on sub-bituminous and bituminous coals are summarized and referenced in this volume. Details are presented in the three topical reports of this contract; CTSL Process Bench Studies and PDU Scale-Up with Sub-Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-1, CTSL Process Bench Studies with Bituminous Coal-DE-88818-TOP-2, and CTSL Process Laboratory Scale Studies, Modelling and Technical Assessment-DE-88818-TOP-3. Results are summarized on experiments and studies covering several process configurations, cleaned coals, solid separation methods, additives and catalysts both dispersed and supported. Laboratory microautoclave scale experiments, economic analysis and modelling studies are also included along with the PDU-Scale-Up of the CTSL processing of sub-bituminous Black Thunder Mine Wyoming coal. During this DOE/HRI effort, high distillate yields were maintained at higher throughput rates while quality was markedly improved using on-line hydrotreating and cleaned coals. Solid separations options of filtration and delayed coking were evaluated on a Bench-Scale with filtration successfully scaled to a PDU demonstration. Directions for future direct coal liquefaction related work are outlined herein based on the results from this and previous programs.

  9. Characterization of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Brazil (2008-2011): countrywide spread of OXA-23-producing clones (CC15 and CC79).

    PubMed

    Chagas, Thiago Pavoni Gomes; Carvalho, Karyne Rangel; de Oliveira Santos, Ivson Cassiano; Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula D'Alincourt; Asensi, Marise Dutra

    2014-08-01

    The study investigated the genetic relationship of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolated from inpatients during 2008-2011 from 11 Brazilian states. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile was determined by disc diffusion method and Etest. Polymerase chain reaction was applied for carbapenemase genes, and ISAba1. Isolates were subjected to pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for molecular typing. Most of the isolates showed high resistance rates to antibiotics tested. The blaOXA-51-like gene was found in all isolates, and 146 (94.2%) isolates were positive for blaOXA-23-like. In the most OXA-23-producing isolates, the blaOXA-23-like gene was accompanied by ISAba1. A total of 146 OXA-23-producing isolates were clustered into 28 genotypes by PFGE. Molecular analysis by MLST identified 13 sequence types (STs). The most prevalent PFGE profiles were designated as ST15 (CC15), ST1 (CC1), and ST79 (CC79). This study showed the widespread of clonal complexes of A. baumannii harboring the blaOXA-23-like gene in different Brazilian states.

  10. Running Away

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Running Away KidsHealth > For Kids > Running Away A A ... life on the streets. continue The Reality of Running Away When you think about running away, you ...

  11. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1994-03-01

    This is the Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Major topics reported are: Fifty-eight process samples from HRI CTSL Bench Unit Run CC-15 (227-75) were analyzed to provide information on process performance. Run CC-15 was operated for 14 periods (days) from October 21 through November 3, 1992 in the thermal/catalytic configuration with Black Thunder Mine (Wyodak and Anderson seams) coal and Shell S-317 Ni/Mo supported extrudate catalyst. The run was made to test performance with and without a dispersed hydrous iron hydroxide catalyst precursor impregnated in the coal. Results are compared with those of previous HRI CTSL bench unit Run CC-1, which was operated in the catalytic/catalytic configuration, also with Shell S-317 catalyst. Several HRI Run CC-15 product distillate fractions prepared by the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) for petroleum inspection tests were further characterized by CONSOL. These characterization data are presented. MicroAutoclave tests and chemical analyses were performed to evaluate the solvent quality of two potential solvents for Alberta Research Council ARC. Eight product samples from catalytic dehydrogenation experiments were characterized for the University of Pittsburgh. A description is presented of the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) method for determination of resid concentration/resid conversion, which was adapted for use in-house from HRI`s standard method. A brief summary of the status of the Participants Program is given.

  12. Running Away

    MedlinePlus

    ... away or know someone who has. If Your Friend Wants to Run Away If your friend is thinking about running away, warn him or ... will be to survive on the streets. Your friend is probably scared and confused. Try to be ...

  13. Running Shoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    This guide explains the purpose of running shoes and provides tips for purchasing them. A brief explanation of the difference between training shoes and racing shoes is followed by a list of characteristics of running shoes that should be considered when buying them. These characteristics include heel fit, heel elevation and width, the inner and…

  14. Changes in running economy following downhill running.

    PubMed

    Chen, Trevor C; Nosaka, Kazunori; Tu, Jui-Hung

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we examined the time course of changes in running economy following a 30-min downhill (-15%) run at 70% peak aerobic power (VO2peak). Ten young men performed level running at 65, 75, and 85% VO2peak (5 min for each intensity) before, immediately after, and 1 - 5 days after the downhill run, at which times oxygen consumption (VO2), minute ventilation, the respiratory exchange ratio (RER), heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and blood lactate concentration were measured. Stride length, stride frequency, and range of motion of the ankle, knee, and hip joints during the level runs were analysed using high-speed (120-Hz) video images. Downhill running induced reductions (7 - 21%, P < 0.05) in maximal isometric strength of the knee extensors, three- to six-fold increases in plasma creatine kinase activity and myoglobin concentration, and muscle soreness for 4 days after the downhill run. Oxygen consumption increased (4 - 7%, P < 0.05) immediately to 3 days after downhill running. There were also increases (P < 0.05) in heart rate, minute ventilation, RER, RPE, blood lactate concentration, and stride frequency, as well as reductions in stride length and range of motion of the ankle and knee. The results suggest that changes in running form and compromised muscle function due to muscle damage contribute to the reduction in running economy for 3 days after downhill running.

  15. Dr. Sheehan on Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, George A.

    This book is both a personal and technical account of the experience of running by a heart specialist who began a running program at the age of 45. In its seventeen chapters, there is information presented on the spiritual, psychological, and physiological results of running; treatment of athletic injuries resulting from running; effects of diet…

  16. Dr. Sheehan on Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, George A.

    This book is both a personal and technical account of the experience of running by a heart specialist who began a running program at the age of 45. In its seventeen chapters, there is information presented on the spiritual, psychological, and physiological results of running; treatment of athletic injuries resulting from running; effects of diet…

  17. On Running and Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Denzel; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Frederic Leer's article "Running as an Adjunct to Psychotherapy" (January 1980 issue of this journal) is criticized by three authors. They focus on the psychological and social effects of running and its usefulness as a treatment for depressed adults. (LAB)

  18. Biomechanics of Distance Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Peter R., Ed.

    Contributions from researchers in the field of running mechanics are included in the 13 chapters of this book. The following topics are covered: (1) "The Mechanics of Distance Running: A Historical Perspective" (Peter Cavanagh); (2) "Stride Length in Distance Running: Velocity, Body Dimensions, and Added Mass Effects" (Peter Cavanagh, Rodger…

  19. Biomechanics of Distance Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Peter R., Ed.

    Contributions from researchers in the field of running mechanics are included in the 13 chapters of this book. The following topics are covered: (1) "The Mechanics of Distance Running: A Historical Perspective" (Peter Cavanagh); (2) "Stride Length in Distance Running: Velocity, Body Dimensions, and Added Mass Effects" (Peter Cavanagh, Rodger…

  20. Well liner running shoe

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.F.

    1994-01-11

    Wellbore liners are set with a running shoe comprising a cylindrical body, end cap, check valve and receiver member in assembly. The receiver member includes threads for receiving the coupling sleeve of a running tool, and retaining wickers for engagement with a cement plug or dart to retain the same permanently engaged with and blocking the flow of fluid through the running shoe. A running tool for use with the shoe includes a coupling sleeve which is retained on a support mandrel by a collar which is secured to the mandrel with a shear pin so that pressuring up the workstring, in the event of a stuck coupling sleeve, will permit retrieval of the main part of the running tool and the workstring. The interior parts of the running shoe are made of aluminum or plastic for easy drill-out to extend the wellbore beyond the end of the liner. 3 figs.

  1. Triathlon: running injuries.

    PubMed

    Spiker, Andrea M; Dixit, Sameer; Cosgarea, Andrew J

    2012-12-01

    The running portion of the triathlon represents the final leg of the competition and, by some reports, the most important part in determining a triathlete's overall success. Although most triathletes spend most of their training time on cycling, running injuries are the most common injuries encountered. Common causes of running injuries include overuse, lack of rest, and activities that aggravate biomechanical predisposers of specific injuries. We discuss the running-associated injuries in the hip, knee, lower leg, ankle, and foot of the triathlete, and the causes, presentation, evaluation, and treatment of each.

  2. Overcoming the "Run" Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Patricia E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that it is not simply experiencing anxiety that affects mathematics performance but also how one responds to and regulates that anxiety (Lyons and Beilock 2011). Most people have faced mathematics problems that have triggered their "run response." The issue is not whether one wants to run, but rather…

  3. Run Anyone?... Everyone!

    PubMed Central

    McInnis, W. P.

    1974-01-01

    Fitness and health have become bywords in the past decade, signifying increased emphasis on these factors as necessary for good psychological and physical health. Reasons are given why we should run and how to do it. There is a discussion of the technique of running, and equipment. Brief mention is made of complications. An attempt is made to interest the individual in the benefits of running as a sport as well as the best method for the average person to achieve fitness and health. PMID:20469054

  4. SPHERES Maintenance Run

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-30

    iss048e017435 (6/30/2016) --- Commander Jeff Williams monitors bowling ball-sized internal satellites known as SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) during a maintenance run in the Japanese Kibo Laboratory Module.

  5. 84. AERIAL VIEW OF SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE, SPOUT RUN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    84. AERIAL VIEW OF SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE, SPOUT RUN BRIDGE WESTBOUND AND SPOUT RUN PARKWAY CULVERT LOOKING SOUTH. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  6. 87. AERIAL VIEW OF SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE, SPOUT RUN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    87. AERIAL VIEW OF SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE, SPOUT RUN BRIDGE WESTBOUND AND SPOUT RUN PARKWAY CULVERT LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  7. 86. AERIAL VIEW OF SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE, SPOUT RUN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    86. AERIAL VIEW OF SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE, SPOUT RUN BRIDGE WESTBOUND AND SPOUT RUN PARKWAY CULVERT LOOKING SOUTH. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  8. Prevention of running injuries.

    PubMed

    Fields, Karl B; Sykes, Jeannie C; Walker, Katherine M; Jackson, Jonathan C

    2010-01-01

    Evidence for preventive strategies to lessen running injuries is needed as these occur in 40%-50% of runners on an annual basis. Many factors influence running injuries, but strong evidence for prevention only exists for training modification primarily by reducing weekly mileage. Two anatomical factors - cavus feet and leg length inequality - demonstrate a link to injury. Weak evidence suggests that orthotics may lessen risk of stress fracture, but no clear evidence proves they will reduce the risk of those athletes with leg length inequality or cavus feet. This article reviews other potential injury variables, including strength, biomechanics, stretching, warm-up, nutrition, psychological factors, and shoes. Additional research is needed to determine whether interventions to address any of these will help prevent running injury.

  9. The Art of Running

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jill Harris

    2007-01-01

    Every year, the Parent-Teacher Association of Ferndale Elementary School in Atlanta, Georgia sponsors a fun road race for the students, teachers, families, and community. This annual event has inspired the author to develop the Running and Art project to show off her students' art and squeeze in a little art history, too. In this article, the…

  10. The Art of Running

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jill Harris

    2007-01-01

    Every year, the Parent-Teacher Association of Ferndale Elementary School in Atlanta, Georgia sponsors a fun road race for the students, teachers, families, and community. This annual event has inspired the author to develop the Running and Art project to show off her students' art and squeeze in a little art history, too. In this article, the…

  11. Running Wheel for Earthworms

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W. Jeffrey; Johnson, Brandon A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the construction and use of a running wheel responsive to the movement of the earthworm. The wheel employs readily available, inexpensive components and is easily constructed. Movement of the wheel can be monitored visually or via standard behavioral laboratory computer interfaces. Examples of data are presented, and possibilities for use in the teaching classroom are discussed. PMID:27385934

  12. Who Runs Our Universities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, David

    2012-01-01

    Inside the academy there is a cultural perspective that it should run itself, in the sense that "business as usual" should be done with no one's hands obviously on the levers. This theory reaches its high point in the "self-government" of Oxford and Cambridge colleges. In this article, the author explores the question,…

  13. Who Runs Our Universities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, David

    2012-01-01

    Inside the academy there is a cultural perspective that it should run itself, in the sense that "business as usual" should be done with no one's hands obviously on the levers. This theory reaches its high point in the "self-government" of Oxford and Cambridge colleges. In this article, the author explores the question,…

  14. Does Addiction Run in Families?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Addiction Run in Families? Does Addiction Run in Families? Listen PDF: EasyToRead_WhatIsAddiction_Final_012017.pdf Addiction ... Español English Español "Heart disease runs in some families. Addiction runs in ours." ©istock.com/ Antonio_Diaz ...

  15. WRF nature run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalakes, J.; Hacker, J.; Loft, R.; McCracken, M. O.; Snavely, A.; Wright, N. J.; Spelce, T.; Gorda, B.; Walkup, R.

    2008-07-01

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is a model of the atmosphere for mesoscale research and operational numerical weather prediction (NWP). A petascale problem for WRF is a nature run that provides very high-resolution 'truth' against which more coarse simulations or perturbation runs may be com-pared for purposes of studying predictability, stochastic parameterization, and fundamental dynamics. We carried out a nature run involving an idealized high resolution rotating fluid on the hemisphere, at a size and resolution never before attempted, and used it to investigate scales that span the k-3 to k-5/3 kinetic energy spectral transition, via simulations. We used up to 15,360 processors of the New York Blue IBM BG/L machine at Stony Brook Uni-versity and Brookhaven National Laboratory. The grid we employed has 4486 by 4486 horizontal grid points and 101 vertical levels (2 billion cells) at 5km resolution; this is 32 times larger than the previously largest 63 million cell 2.5km resolution WRF CONUS benchmark [10]). To solve a problem of this size, we worked through issues of parallel I/O and scalability and employed more processors than have ever been used in a WRF run. We achieved a sustained 3.4 Tflop/s on the New York Blue sys-tem, inputting and then generating an enormous amount of data to produce a scientifically meaningful result. More than 200 GB of data was input to initialize the run, which then generated output datasets of 40 GB each simulated hour. The cost of output was considered a key component of our investigation. Then we ran the same problem on more than 12K processors of the XT4 system at NERSC and achieved 8.8 Tflop/s. Our primary result however is not just scalability and a high Tflop/s number, but capture of atmosphere features never before represented by simulation, and taking an important step towards understanding weather predict-ability at high resolution.

  16. Run II luminosity progress

    SciTech Connect

    Gollwitzer, K.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron Collider Run II program continues at the energy and luminosity frontier of high energy particle physics. To the collider experiments CDF and D0, over 3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity has been delivered to each. Upgrades and improvements in the Antiproton Source of the production and collection of antiprotons have led to increased number of particles stored in the Recycler. Electron cooling and associated improvements have help make a brighter antiproton beam at collisions. Tevatron improvements to handle the increased number of particles and the beam lifetimes have resulted in an increase in luminosity.

  17. 198. SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE AND SPOUT RUN WESTBOUND BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    198. SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE AND SPOUT RUN WESTBOUND BRIDGE FROM POTOMAC RIVER LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  18. PDU Run 10

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    PDU Run 10, a 46-day H-Coal syncrude mode operation using Wyodak coal, successfully met all targeted objectives, and was the longest PDU operation to date in this program. Targeted coal conversion of 90 W % was exceeded with a C/sub 4/-975/sup 0/F distillate yield of 43 to 48 W %. Amocat 1A catalyst was qualified for Pilot Plant operation based on improved operation and superior performance. PDU 10 achieved improved yields and lower hydrogen consumption compared to PDU 6, a similar operation. High hydroclone efficiency and high solids content in the vacuum still were maintained throughout the run. Steady operations at lower oil/solids ratios were demonstrated. Microautoclave testing was introduced as an operational aid. Four additional studies were successfully completed during PDU 10. These included a catalyst tracer study in conjunction with Sandia Laboratories; tests on letdown valve trims for Battelle; a fluid dynamics study with Amoco; and special high-pressure liquid sampling.

  19. Barefoot running: biomechanics and implications for running injuries.

    PubMed

    Altman, Allison R; Davis, Irene S

    2012-01-01

    Despite the technological developments in modern running footwear, up to 79% of runners today get injured in a given year. As we evolved barefoot, examining this mode of running is insightful. Barefoot running encourages a forefoot strike pattern that is associated with a reduction in impact loading and stride length. Studies have shown a reduction in injuries to shod forefoot strikers as compared with rearfoot strikers. In addition to a forefoot strike pattern, barefoot running also affords the runner increased sensory feedback from the foot-ground contact, as well as increased energy storage in the arch. Minimal footwear is being used to mimic barefoot running, but it is not clear whether it truly does. The purpose of this article is to review current and past research on shod and barefoot/minimal footwear running and their implications for running injuries. Clearly more research is needed, and areas for future study are suggested.

  20. Why Does My Nose Run?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Puberty Train Your Temper Why Does My Nose Run? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Does My Nose Run? Print A A A en ... smell, you must be upside down! But why does your nose run? Read on to find out ...

  1. The Running Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Henning, P. Troy

    2014-01-01

    Context: Pelvic stress fractures, osteitis pubis, and snapping hip syndrome account for a portion of the overuse injuries that can occur in the running athlete. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed searches were performed for each entity using the following keywords: snapping hip syndrome, coxa sultans, pelvic stress fracture, and osteitis pubis from 2008 to 2013. Topic reviews, case reports, case series, and randomized trials were included for review. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Collectively, 188 articles were identified. Of these, 58 were included in this review. Conclusion: Based on the available evidence, the majority of these overuse injuries can be managed non-operatively. Primary treatment should include removal from offending activity, normalizing regional muscle strength/length imbalances and nutritional deficiencies, and mitigating training errors through proper education of the athlete and training staff. Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy: C PMID:24587861

  2. Pediatric running injuries.

    PubMed

    Seto, Craig K; Statuta, Siobhan M; Solari, Ian L

    2010-07-01

    As more children have become involved in athletic activities and running, there has been a significant increase in overuse injuries. The young athlete with open growth plates is vulnerable to unique overuse injuries involving the apophyses, articular cartilage, and growth plate. The physician caring for these young athletes needs to be aware of these conditions to diagnose and treat them appropriately. Physicians should also be aware of the risk of overtraining and overuse injury in athletes participating in year-round sports and competition. Current guidelines for overuse injury prevention in young athletes are primarily based on consensus and expert opinion. Further research is needed to provide evidence-based guidelines for overuse injury prevention in young athletes and runners. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. SAVAGE RUN WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCallum, M.E.; Kluender, Steven E.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral evaluation and related surveys were conducted in the Savage Run Wilderness in Wyoming and results of these studies indicate probable mineral-resource potential in four areas. Gold and (or) silver mineralization in veins associated with faults was found in two areas; all known occurrences inside the wilderness are very small in size. Slightly anomalous values of platinum, palladium, and nickel were recorded from rock-chip and stream- sediment samples from the southeast portion of the wilderness where layered mafic rocks predominate, and a probable resource potential exists for platinum, palladium, and nickel. An area of sheared rocks in the northeastern corner of the wilderness has a probable resource potential for copper. The nature of the geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of organic fuels.

  4. CFE-2 Experiment Run

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-11

    View of Flight Engineer (FE) Mike Hopkins initiating a CFE-2 (Capillary Flow Experiment - 2) Interior Corner Flow - 5 (ICF-5) test run. Liquids behave differently in space than they do on Earth, so containers that can process, hold or transport them must be designed carefully to work in microgravity. The Capillary Flow Experiment-2 furthers research on wetting, which is a liquid's ability to spread across a surface, and its impact over large length scales in strange container shapes in microgravity environments. This work will improve our capabilities to quickly and accurately predict how related processes occur, and allow us to design better systems to process liquids aboard spacecraft (i.e., liquid fuel tanks, thermals fluids, and water processing for life support). Image was released by astronaut on Twitter.

  5. CFE-2 Experiment Run

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-21

    View of Flight Engineer (FE) Koichi Wakata posing for a photo during a CFE-2 (Capillary Flow Experiment - 2) Interior Corner Flow - 8 (ICF-8) test run. Liquids behave differently in space than they do on Earth, so containers that can process, hold or transport them must be designed carefully to work in microgravity. The Capillary Flow Experiment-2 furthers research on wetting, which is a liquid's ability to spread across a surface, and its impact over large length scales in strange container shapes in microgravity environments. This work will improve capabilities to quickly and accurately predict how related processes occur, and allow us to design better systems to process liquids aboard spacecraft (i.e., liquid fuel tanks, thermals fluids, and water processing for life support). Image was released by astronaut on Twitter.

  6. Running WASP at Argonne

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    The WASP model was initially implemented at Argonne for the International Training course on Electric System Planning being conducted at Argonne. This implementation was done with special consideration to course participants who are unfamiliar with WASP and with the computer system they use during the course. Cataloged Procedures were developed for this purpose. The procedures simplify using WASP and enable participants to quickly start using WASP with a minimum of training. Within the procedures, features were added that enhance WASP. These features include a formatted printout of WASP input data and a historical log of all runs and inut data used. For the RENAME step, an alternate method is presented, with special comment concerning the WASP3 release.

  7. Backward running or absence of running from Creutz ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Giedt, Joel; Weinberg, Evan

    2011-10-01

    We extract the running coupling based on Creutz ratios in SU(2) lattice gauge theory with two Dirac fermions in the adjoint representation. Depending on how the extrapolation to zero fermion mass is performed, either backward running or an absence of running is observed at strong bare coupling. This behavior is consistent with other findings which indicate that this theory has an infrared fixed point.

  8. The QCD running coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.

    2016-05-09

    Here, we review present knowledge onmore » $$\\alpha_{s}$$, the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) running coupling. The dependence of $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$ on momentum transfer $Q$ encodes the underlying dynamics of hadron physics --from color confinement in the infrared domain to asymptotic freedom at short distances. We will survey our present theoretical and empirical knowledge of $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$, including constraints at high $Q^2$ predicted by perturbative QCD, and constraints at small $Q^2$ based on models of nonperturbative dynamics. In the first, introductory, part of this review, we explain the phenomenological meaning of the coupling, the reason for its running, and the challenges facing a complete understanding of its analytic behavior in the infrared domain. In the second, more technical, part of the review, we discuss $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$ in the high momentum transfer domain of QCD. We review how $$\\alpha_s$$ is defined, including its renormalization scheme dependence, the definition of its renormalization scale, the utility of effective charges, as well as `` Commensurate Scale Relations" which connect the various definitions of the QCD coupling without renormalization scale ambiguity. We also report recent important experimental measurements and advanced theoretical analyses which have led to precise QCD predictions at high energy. As an example of an important optimization procedure, we discuss the ``Principle of Maximum Conformality" which enhances QCD's predictive power by removing the dependence of the predictions for physical observables on the choice of the gauge and renormalization scheme. In last part of the review, we discuss $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$ in the low momentum transfer domain, where there has been no consensus on how to define $$\\alpha_s(Q^2)$$ or its analytic behavior. We will discuss the various approaches used for low energy calculations. Among them, we will discuss the light-front holographic approach to QCD in the strongly coupled

  9. The QCD running coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.

    2016-05-09

    Here, we review present knowledge on $\\alpha_{s}$, the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) running coupling. The dependence of $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$ on momentum transfer $Q$ encodes the underlying dynamics of hadron physics --from color confinement in the infrared domain to asymptotic freedom at short distances. We will survey our present theoretical and empirical knowledge of $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$, including constraints at high $Q^2$ predicted by perturbative QCD, and constraints at small $Q^2$ based on models of nonperturbative dynamics. In the first, introductory, part of this review, we explain the phenomenological meaning of the coupling, the reason for its running, and the challenges facing a complete understanding of its analytic behavior in the infrared domain. In the second, more technical, part of the review, we discuss $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$ in the high momentum transfer domain of QCD. We review how $\\alpha_s$ is defined, including its renormalization scheme dependence, the definition of its renormalization scale, the utility of effective charges, as well as `` Commensurate Scale Relations" which connect the various definitions of the QCD coupling without renormalization scale ambiguity. We also report recent important experimental measurements and advanced theoretical analyses which have led to precise QCD predictions at high energy. As an example of an important optimization procedure, we discuss the ``Principle of Maximum Conformality" which enhances QCD's predictive power by removing the dependence of the predictions for physical observables on the choice of the gauge and renormalization scheme. In last part of the review, we discuss $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$ in the low momentum transfer domain, where there has been no consensus on how to define $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$ or its analytic behavior. We will discuss the various approaches used for low energy calculations. Among them, we will discuss the light-front holographic approach to QCD in the strongly coupled regime and its prediction

  10. The QCD running coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.

    2016-05-09

    Here, we review present knowledge on $\\alpha_{s}$, the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) running coupling. The dependence of $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$ on momentum transfer $Q$ encodes the underlying dynamics of hadron physics --from color confinement in the infrared domain to asymptotic freedom at short distances. We will survey our present theoretical and empirical knowledge of $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$, including constraints at high $Q^2$ predicted by perturbative QCD, and constraints at small $Q^2$ based on models of nonperturbative dynamics. In the first, introductory, part of this review, we explain the phenomenological meaning of the coupling, the reason for its running, and the challenges facing a complete understanding of its analytic behavior in the infrared domain. In the second, more technical, part of the review, we discuss $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$ in the high momentum transfer domain of QCD. We review how $\\alpha_s$ is defined, including its renormalization scheme dependence, the definition of its renormalization scale, the utility of effective charges, as well as `` Commensurate Scale Relations" which connect the various definitions of the QCD coupling without renormalization scale ambiguity. We also report recent important experimental measurements and advanced theoretical analyses which have led to precise QCD predictions at high energy. As an example of an important optimization procedure, we discuss the ``Principle of Maximum Conformality" which enhances QCD's predictive power by removing the dependence of the predictions for physical observables on the choice of the gauge and renormalization scheme. In last part of the review, we discuss $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$ in the low momentum transfer domain, where there has been no consensus on how to define $\\alpha_s(Q^2)$ or its analytic behavior. We will discuss the various approaches used for low energy calculations. Among them, we will discuss the light-front holographic approach to QCD in the strongly coupled regime and its prediction

  11. Voluntary Wheel Running in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Voluntary wheel running in the mouse is used to assess physical performance and endurance and to model exercise training as a way to enhance health. Wheel running is a voluntary activity in contrast to other experimental exercise models in mice, which rely on aversive stimuli to force active movement. The basic protocol consists of allowing mice to run freely on the open surface of a slanted plastic saucer-shaped wheel placed inside a standard mouse cage. Rotations are electronically transmitted to a USB hub so that frequency and rate of running can be captured to a software program for data storage and analysis for variable time periods. Mice are individually housed so that accurate recordings can be made for each animal. Factors such as mouse strain, gender, age, and individual motivation, which affect running activity, must be considered in the design of experiments using voluntary wheel running. PMID:26629772

  12. Biodiversity conservation in running waters

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, J.D. ); Flecker, A.S. )

    1993-01-01

    In the concerns about biodiversity conservation, fresh waters have received less attention than tropical forests and oceans. However, running waters harbor a diverse panoply of species, habitats, and ecosystems, including some of the most threatened and many having great value to human society. An overview of the biological diversity of running waters and the state of imperilment is presented. Six major factors that threaten destruction of running water species and ecosystems are discussed: habitat loss and degradation; species invasions; overharvesting; secondary extinctions; chemical and organic pollution; global climate change. General measures for recovery and restoration of running waters conclude the article.

  13. A Running Start: Resource Guide for Youth Running Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Seth; Becker, Andrew; Armstrong, Tess

    2016-01-01

    The lack of physical activity is an epidemic problem among American youth today. In order to combat this, many schools are incorporating youth running programs as a part of their comprehensive school physical activity programs. These youth running programs are being implemented before or after school, at school during recess at the elementary…

  14. A Running Start: Resource Guide for Youth Running Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Seth; Becker, Andrew; Armstrong, Tess

    2016-01-01

    The lack of physical activity is an epidemic problem among American youth today. In order to combat this, many schools are incorporating youth running programs as a part of their comprehensive school physical activity programs. These youth running programs are being implemented before or after school, at school during recess at the elementary…

  15. The QCD running coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deur, Alexandre; Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.

    2016-09-01

    We review the present theoretical and empirical knowledge for αs, the fundamental coupling underlying the interactions of quarks and gluons in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The dependence of αs(Q2) on momentum transfer Q encodes the underlying dynamics of hadron physics-from color confinement in the infrared domain to asymptotic freedom at short distances. We review constraints on αs(Q2) at high Q2, as predicted by perturbative QCD, and its analytic behavior at small Q2, based on models of nonperturbative dynamics. In the introductory part of this review, we explain the phenomenological meaning of the coupling, the reason for its running, and the challenges facing a complete understanding of its analytic behavior in the infrared domain. In the second, more technical, part of the review, we discuss the behavior of αs(Q2) in the high momentum transfer domain of QCD. We review how αs is defined, including its renormalization scheme dependence, the definition of its renormalization scale, the utility of effective charges, as well as "Commensurate Scale Relations" which connect the various definitions of the QCD coupling without renormalization-scale ambiguity. We also report recent significant measurements and advanced theoretical analyses which have led to precise QCD predictions at high energy. As an example of an important optimization procedure, we discuss the "Principle of Maximum Conformality", which enhances QCD's predictive power by removing the dependence of the predictions for physical observables on the choice of theoretical conventions such as the renormalization scheme. In the last part of the review, we discuss the challenge of understanding the analytic behavior αs(Q2) in the low momentum transfer domain. We survey various theoretical models for the nonperturbative strongly coupled regime, such as the light-front holographic approach to QCD. This new framework predicts the form of the quark-confinement potential underlying hadron spectroscopy and

  16. Coordinating the 2009 RHIC Run

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab - Mei Bai

    2016-07-12

    Physicists working at the Brookhaven National Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are exploring the puzzle of proton spin as they begin taking data during the 2009 RHIC run. For the first time, RHIC is running at a record energy of 500 giga-elect

  17. Coordinating the 2009 RHIC Run

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab - Mei Bai

    2009-04-13

    Physicists working at the Brookhaven National Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are exploring the puzzle of proton spin as they begin taking data during the 2009 RHIC run. For the first time, RHIC is running at a record energy of 500 giga-elect

  18. Oxygen cost of running barefoot vs. running shod.

    PubMed

    Hanson, N J; Berg, K; Deka, P; Meendering, J R; Ryan, C

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oxygen cost of running barefoot vs. running shod on the treadmill as well as overground. 10 healthy recreational runners, 5 male and 5 female, whose mean age was 23.8±3.39 volunteered to participate in the study. Subjects participated in 4 experimental conditions: 1) barefoot on treadmill, 2) shod on treadmill, 3) barefoot overground, and 4) shod overground. For each condition, subjects ran for 6 min at 70% vVO (2)max pace while VO (2), heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed. A 2 × 2 (shoe condition x surface) repeated measures ANOVA revealed that running with shoes showed significantly higher VO (2) values on both the treadmill and the overground track (p<0.05). HR and RPE were significantly higher in the shod condition as well (p<0.02 and p<0.01, respectively). For the overground and treadmill conditions, recorded VO (2) while running shod was 5.7% and 2.0% higher than running barefoot. It was concluded that at 70% of vVO (2)max pace, barefoot running is more economical than running shod, both overground and on a treadmill.

  19. Wheel running in the wild.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Johanna H; Robbers, Yuri

    2014-07-07

    The importance of exercise for health and neurogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Wheel running is often used in the laboratory for triggering enhanced activity levels, despite the common objection that this behaviour is an artefact of captivity and merely signifies neurosis or stereotypy. If wheel running is indeed caused by captive housing, wild mice are not expected to use a running wheel in nature. This however, to our knowledge, has never been tested. Here, we show that when running wheels are placed in nature, they are frequently used by wild mice, also when no extrinsic reward is provided. Bout lengths of running wheel behaviour in the wild match those for captive mice. This finding falsifies one criterion for stereotypic behaviour, and suggests that running wheel activity is an elective behaviour. In a time when lifestyle in general and lack of exercise in particular are a major cause of disease in the modern world, research into physical activity is of utmost importance. Our findings may help alleviate the main concern regarding the use of running wheels in research on exercise.

  20. Effects of marathon running on running economy and kinematics.

    PubMed

    Kyröläinen, H; Pullinen, T; Candau, R; Avela, J; Huttunen, P; Komi, P V

    2000-07-01

    The present study was designed to investigate interactions between running economy and mechanics before, during, and after an individually run marathon. Seven experienced triathletes performed a 5-min submaximal running test on a treadmill at an individual constant marathon speed. Heart rate was monitored and the expired respiratory gas was analyzed. Blood samples were drawn to analyze serum creatine kinase activity (S-CK), skeletal troponin I (sTnI), and blood lactate (B-La). A video analysis was performed (200 frames x s(-1)) to investigate running mechanics. A kinematic arm was used to determine the external work of each subject. The results of the present study demonstrate that after the marathon, a standardized 5-min submaximal running test resulted in an increase in oxygen consumption, ventilation, and heart rate (P < 0.05), with a simultaneous decrease in the oxygen difference (%) between inspired and expired air, and respiratory exchange ratio (P < 0.05). B-La did not change during the marathon, while sTnI and S-CK values increased (P < 0.05), peaking 2 h and 2 days after the marathon, respectively. With regard to the running kinematics, a minor increase in stride frequency and a similar decrease in stride length were observed (P < 0.01). These results demonstrate clearly that weakened running economy cannot be explained by changes in running mechanics. Therefore, it is suggested that the increased physiological loading is due to several mechanisms: increased utilization of fat as an energy substrate, increased demands of body temperature regulation, and possible muscle damage.

  1. Run-to-Run Control Strategy for Diabetes Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    quite serious ( diabetic coma), and the long- term implications of varying glucose levels ( nephropathy , retinopathy, and other tissue damage ) have...Trial Re- search Group, \\The e ect of intensive treatment of diabetes on the development and progression of long{term complications in insulin{dependent...1 RUN-TO-RUN CONTROL STRATEGY FOR DIABETES MANAGEMENT F.J. Doyle III1, B. Srinivasan2, and D. Bonvin2 1Department of Chemical Engineering, University

  2. APS runControl library

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, C.; Borland, M.

    1995-10-25

    This document serves as a User`s Manual and Reference for the runControl library. This library is designed to be used by closed- loop EPICS control applications which are generally run in the background on the controls workstations. It permits an application to `register` itself with an EPICS record, thereby preventing additional instances of the same application from being run. In addition, the executing application may in turn be suspended or aborted via an MEDM control screen or other standard channel access client.

  3. Piketty in the long run.

    PubMed

    Cowell, Frank A

    2014-12-01

    I examine the idea of 'the long run' in Piketty (2014) and related works. In contrast to simplistic interpretations of long-run models of income- and wealth-distribution Piketty (2014) draws on a rich economic analysis that models the intra- and inter-generational processes that underly the development of the wealth distribution. These processes inevitably involve both market and non-market mechanisms. To understand this approach, and to isolate the impact of different social and economic factors on inequality in the long run, we use the concept of an equilibrium distribution. However the long-run analysis of policy should not presume that there is an inherent tendency for the wealth distribution to approach equilibrium. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2014.

  4. Observations of running penumbral waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Stein, A.

    1972-01-01

    Quiet sunspots with well-developed penumbrae show running intensity waves with period running around 300 sec. The waves appear connected with umbral flashes of exactly half the period. Waves are concentric, regular, with velocity constant around 10 km/sec. They are probably sound waves and show intensity fluctuation in H alpha centerline or wing of 10 to 20%. The energy is tiny compared to the heat deficit of the umbra.

  5. The practical biomechanics of running.

    PubMed

    Adelaar, R S

    1986-01-01

    The foot and ankle is a complex structure made of many small bones with capsular and ligamentous constraints. The physiology, kinematics, and muscle interaction of the walking, jogging, and running cycles will be discussed and the current biomechanical literature reviewed. To analyze the pathologic state, one must be aware of the normal stresses and functions of the running cycle. This knowledge establishes a rational basis for the interpretation of problems in providing medical and orthotic treatment.

  6. Running of the running and entropy perturbations during inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Longden, Chris

    2016-07-01

    In single field slow-roll inflation, one expects that the spectral index ns-1 is first order in slow-roll parameters. Similarly, its running αs=d ns/d log k and the running of the running βs=d αs/d log k are second and third order and therefore expected to be progressively smaller, and usually negative. Hence, such models of inflation are in considerable tension with a recent analysis hinting that βs may actually be positive, and larger than αs. Motivated by this, in this work we ask the question of what kinds of inflationary models may be useful in achieving such a hierarchy of runnings, particularly focusing on two-field models of inflation in which the late-time transfer of power from isocurvature to curvature modes allows for a much more diverse range of phenomenology. We calculate the runnings due to this effect and briefly apply our results to assess the feasibility of finding |βs|≳|αs| in some specific models.

  7. Effects of running velocity on running kinetics and kinematics.

    PubMed

    Brughelli, Matt; Cronin, John; Chaouachi, Anis

    2011-04-01

    Sixteen semiprofessional Australian football players performed running bouts at incremental velocities of 40, 60, 80, and 100% of their maximum velocity on a Woodway nonmotorized force treadmill. As running velocity increased from 40 to 60%, peak vertical and peak horizontal forces increased by 14.3% (effect size [ES] = 1.0) and 34.4% (ES = 4.2), respectively. The changes in peak vertical and peak horizontal forces from 60 to 80% were 1.0% (ES = 0.05) and 21.0% (ES = 2.9), respectively. Finally, the changes in peak vertical and peak horizontal forces from 80% to maximum were 2.0% (ES = 0.1) and 24.3% (ES = 3.4). In addition, both stride frequency and stride length significantly increased with each incremental velocity (p < 0.05). Conversely, contact times and the vertical displacement of the center of mass significantly decreased with increased running velocity (p < 0.05). A significant positive correlation was found between horizontal force and maximum running velocity (r = 0.47). For the kinematic variables, only stride length was found to have a significant positive correlation with maximum running velocity (r = 0.66). It would seem that increasing maximal sprint velocity may be more dependent on horizontal force production as opposed to vertical force production.

  8. RHIC Au beam in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    Au beam at the RHIC ramp in run 2014 is reviewed together with the run 2011 and run 2012. Observed bunch length and longitudinal emittance are compared with the IBS simulations. The IBS growth rate of the longitudinal emittance in run 2014 is similar to run 2011, and both are larger than run 2012. This is explained by the large transverse emittance at high intensity observed in run 2012, but not in run 2014. The big improvement of the AGS ramping in run 2014 might be related to this change. The importance of the injector intensity improvement in run 2014 is emphasized, which gives rise to the initial luminosity improvement of 50% in run 2014, compared with the previous Au-Au run 2011. In addition, a modified IBS model, which is calibrated using the RHIC Au runs from 9.8 GeV/n to 100 GeV/n, is presented and used in the study.

  9. CDF Run 2 muon system

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Ginsburg

    2004-02-05

    The CDF muon detection system for Run 2 of the Fermilab Tevatron is described. Muon stubs are detected for |{eta}| < 1.5, and are matched to tracks in the central drift chamber at trigger level 1 for |{eta}| < 1.25. Detectors in the |{eta}| < 1 central region, built for previous runs, have been enhanced to survive the higher rate environment and closer bunch spacing (3.5 {micro}sec to 396 nsec) of Run 2. Azimuthal gaps in the central region have been filled in. New detectors have been added to extend the coverage from |{eta}| < 1 to |{eta}| < 1.5, consisting of four layers of drift chambers covered with matching scintillators for triggering. The Level 1 Extremely Fast Tracker supplies matching tracks with measured p{sub T} for the muon trigger. The system has been in operation for over 18 months. Operating experience and reconstructed data are presented.

  10. [Stress fracture after changing to barefoot running].

    PubMed

    Christensen, Mikkel

    2014-12-15

    Barefoot running is increasing in popularity but little is known about the implications in respect to injuries. It has been proposed that barefoot running is associated with a decrease in running injuries as it represents a more natural way of running. A 50-year-old runner with a weekly running distance of 50 km presented suffering from a stress fracture of the second metatarsal after six weeks of intensive barefoot running.

  11. Running and Breathing in Mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramble, Dennis M.; Carrier, David R.

    1983-01-01

    Mechanical constraints appear to require that locomotion and breathing be synchronized in running mammals. Phase locking of limb and respiratory frequency has now been recorded during treadmill running in jackrabbits and during locomotion on solid ground in dogs, horses, and humans. Quadrupedal species normally synchronize the locomotor and respiratory cycles at a constant ratio of 1:1 (strides per breath) in both the trot and gallop. Human runners differ from quadrupeds in that while running they employ several phase-locked patterns (4:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 5:2, and 3:2), although a 2:1 coupling ratio appears to be favored. Even though the evolution of bipedal gait has reduced the mechanical constraints on respiration in man, thereby permitting greater flexibility in breathing pattern, it has seemingly not eliminated the need for the synchronization of respiration and body motion during sustained running. Flying birds have independently achieved phase-locked locomotor and respiratory cycles. This hints that strict locomotor-respiratory coupling may be a vital factor in the sustained aerobic exercise of endothermic vertebrates, especially those in which the stresses of locomotion tend to deform the thoracic complex.

  12. Teaching Bank Runs through Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, David T.

    2009-01-01

    The author advocates the use of films to supplement textbook treatments of bank runs and panics in money and banking or general banking classes. Modern students, particularly those in developed countries, tend to be unfamiliar with potential fragilities of financial systems such as a lack of deposit insurance or other safety net mechanisms. Films…

  13. Is Technology Running the Campus?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Discusses survey results from 269 colleges, including 96 two- year, 85 four-year, and 88 universities about their use of technology in running and operating their facilities. Results show that colleges get high marks for thinking about automating various facility functions, but low marks on implementation. Technology use in security, building…

  14. Running free: embracing a healthy lifestyle through distance running.

    PubMed

    Shipway, Richard; Holloway, Immy

    2010-11-01

    Sport and leisure activity contribute to both health and quality of life. There is a dearth of qualitative studies on the lived experiences of active people, so the aim of this paper is to develop a deeper understanding of the experiences of one particular group of active leisure participants, distance runners, and to highlight the associated health and well-being benefits that result from participating in this increasingly popular form of active leisure. In doing so, this paper will briefly explore the potential opportunities and implications for sport and leisure policy and provision, and highlight examples of how distance running could positively contribute towards government objectives linked to tackling obesity levels, healthy living and physical well-being. It is suggested that similar benefits also exist across other forms of physical activity, exercise and sport. Qualitative methods of enquiry were adopted to understand the nature of the social world of long distance runners through interviews and observations, which were thematically analyzed. One of the key themes emerging from the data was the desire to embrace a healthy lifestyle, which then led to the emergence of four main sub-themes. The first was linked to the importance of seeking self-esteem and confirmation through running; second, an investigation of a selection of negative aspects associated with exercise addiction; third, the need to exercise among sport and leisure participants; and finally, an understanding of the concept of the 'running body'. Cautionary notes also identified negative aspects associated with exercise and physical activity. The findings highlight the potential role that distance running can play as an easily accessible and enjoyable leisure activity, one that can help facilitate increased participation in exercise and physical activity as an integral part of an active and healthy lifestyle.

  15. Preventing Running Injuries through Barefoot Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Priscilla M.; Smith, Darla R.

    2008-01-01

    Running has become a very popular lifetime physical activity even though there are numerous reports of running injuries. Although common theories have pointed to impact forces and overpronation as the main contributors to chronic running injuries, the increased use of cushioning and orthotics has done little to decrease running injuries. A new…

  16. Physiologic Responses to Treadmill and Water Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Phillip A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents results of a study of the physiological responses of uninjured runners to running on a treadmill and in water. Water running may lessen an injured athlete's rate of deconditioning, but indications are that the metabolic cost of water running is not significantly greater than that of treadmill running. (SM)

  17. Physiologic Responses to Treadmill and Water Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Phillip A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents results of a study of the physiological responses of uninjured runners to running on a treadmill and in water. Water running may lessen an injured athlete's rate of deconditioning, but indications are that the metabolic cost of water running is not significantly greater than that of treadmill running. (SM)

  18. Preventing Running Injuries through Barefoot Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Priscilla M.; Smith, Darla R.

    2008-01-01

    Running has become a very popular lifetime physical activity even though there are numerous reports of running injuries. Although common theories have pointed to impact forces and overpronation as the main contributors to chronic running injuries, the increased use of cushioning and orthotics has done little to decrease running injuries. A new…

  19. Selective running tool for wells

    SciTech Connect

    Semar, J.E.

    1988-05-24

    A downhole running tool for positioning and locking tool support mandrels within landing nipples of thin production tubing string of a well is described comprising: (a) housing means adapted for connection to a tool string and forming an internal receptacle; (b) an elongated core member being disposed within the internal receptacle and being telescopically movable to collapsed and extended positions defined by spaced stops formed by the housing means, a portion of the elongated core member extending from the housing for connection with a tool support mandrel; and (c) releasable retainer means normally retaining the elongated core member at a substantially fixed set position within the internal receptacle and being released responsive to engagement with the landing nipple during upward movement of the downhole running tool to thus permit collapsing telescoping movement of the elongated core to a mandrel locating position within the internal receptacle.

  20. Running: Improving Form to Reduce Injuries.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    Running is often perceived as a good option for "getting into shape," with little thought given to the form, or mechanics, of running. However, as many as 79% of all runners will sustain a running-related injury during any given year. If you are a runner-casual or serious-you should be aware that poor running mechanics may contribute to these injuries. A study published in the August 2015 issue of JOSPT reviewed the existing research to determine whether running mechanics could be improved, which could be important in treating running-related injuries and helping injured runners return to pain-free running.

  1. The Hickory Run deer exclosure

    Treesearch

    Ted J. Grisez

    1959-01-01

    The damage that deer can do to both planted and natural tree seedlings is vividly demonstrated by a l/l0-acre fenced exclosure at Hickory Run State Park in Carbon County, Pennsylvania. Here, by comparing the growth of trees that have been browsed by deer with the growth of trees that have been protected from deer by the fence, one can see the injurious effects of...

  2. Running Jobs in the Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNab, A.; Stagni, F.; Ubeda Garcia, M.

    2014-06-01

    We present a model for the operation of computing nodes at a site using Virtual Machines (VMs), in which VMs are created and contextualized for experiments by the site itself. For the experiment, these VMs appear to be produced spontaneously "in the vacuum" rather having to ask the site to create each one. This model takes advantage of the existing pilot job frameworks adopted by many experiments. In the Vacuum model, the contextualization process starts a job agent within the VM and real jobs are fetched from the central task queue as normal. An implementation of the Vacuum scheme, Vac, is presented in which a VM factory runs on each physical worker node to create and contextualize its set of VMs. With this system, each node's VM factory can decide which experiments' VMs to run, based on site-wide target shares and on a peer-to-peer protocol in which the site's VM factories query each other to discover which VM types they are running. A property of this system is that there is no gate keeper service, head node, or batch system accepting and then directing jobs to particular worker nodes, avoiding several central points of failure. Finally, we describe tests of the Vac system using jobs from the central LHCb task queue, using the same contextualization procedure for VMs developed by LHCb for Clouds.

  3. GASIFICATION TEST RUN TC06

    SciTech Connect

    Southern Company Services, Inc.

    2003-08-01

    This report discusses test campaign TC06 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC06. Test run TC06 was started on July 4, 2001, and completed on September 24, 2001, with an interruption in service between July 25, 2001, and August 19, 2001, due to a filter element failure in the PCD caused by abnormal operating conditions while tuning the main air compressor. The reactor temperature was varied between 1,725 and 1,825 F at pressures from 190 to 230 psig. In TC06, 1,214 hours of solid circulation and 1,025 hours of coal feed were attained with 797 hours of coal feed after the filter element failure. Both reactor and PCD operations were stable during the test run with a stable baseline pressure drop. Due to its length and stability, the TC06 test run provided valuable data necessary to analyze long-term reactor operations and to identify necessary modifications to improve equipment and process performance as well as progressing the goal of many thousands of hours of filter element exposure.

  4. Barefoot running: does it prevent injuries?

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kelly; Curry, Emily J; Matzkin, Elizabeth G

    2013-11-01

    Endurance running has evolved over the course of millions of years and it is now one of the most popular sports today. However, the risk of stress injury in distance runners is high because of the repetitive ground impact forces exerted. These injuries are not only detrimental to the runner, but also place a burden on the medical community. Preventative measures are essential to decrease the risk of injury within the sport. Common running injuries include patellofemoral pain syndrome, tibial stress fractures, plantar fasciitis, and Achilles tendonitis. Barefoot running, as opposed to shod running (with shoes), has recently received significant attention in both the media and the market place for the potential to promote the healing process, increase performance, and decrease injury rates. However, there is controversy over the use of barefoot running to decrease the overall risk of injury secondary to individual differences in lower extremity alignment, gait patterns, and running biomechanics. While barefoot running may benefit certain types of individuals, differences in running stance and individual biomechanics may actually increase injury risk when transitioning to barefoot running. The purpose of this article is to review the currently available clinical evidence on barefoot running and its effectiveness for preventing injury in the runner. Based on a review of current literature, barefoot running is not a substantiated preventative running measure to reduce injury rates in runners. However, barefoot running utility should be assessed on an athlete-specific basis to determine whether barefoot running will be beneficial.

  5. 40 CFR 258.26 - Run-on/run-off control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... least the water volume resulting from a 24-hour, 25-year storm. (b) Run-off from the active portion of... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Run-on/run-off control systems. 258.26... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.26 Run-on/run-off control systems. (a...

  6. 40 CFR 258.26 - Run-on/run-off control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... least the water volume resulting from a 24-hour, 25-year storm. (b) Run-off from the active portion of... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Run-on/run-off control systems. 258.26... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.26 Run-on/run-off control systems. (a...

  7. 40 CFR 258.26 - Run-on/run-off control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... least the water volume resulting from a 24-hour, 25-year storm. (b) Run-off from the active portion of... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Run-on/run-off control systems. 258.26... FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Operating Criteria § 258.26 Run-on/run-off control systems. (a...

  8. Fatigue associated with prolonged graded running.

    PubMed

    Giandolini, Marlene; Vernillo, Gianluca; Samozino, Pierre; Horvais, Nicolas; Edwards, W Brent; Morin, Jean-Benoît; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2016-10-01

    Scientific experiments on running mainly consider level running. However, the magnitude and etiology of fatigue depend on the exercise under consideration, particularly the predominant type of contraction, which differs between level, uphill, and downhill running. The purpose of this review is to comprehensively summarize the neurophysiological and biomechanical changes due to fatigue in graded running. When comparing prolonged hilly running (i.e., a combination of uphill and downhill running) to level running, it is found that (1) the general shape of the neuromuscular fatigue-exercise duration curve as well as the etiology of fatigue in knee extensor and plantar flexor muscles are similar and (2) the biomechanical consequences are also relatively comparable, suggesting that duration rather than elevation changes affects neuromuscular function and running patterns. However, 'pure' uphill or downhill running has several fatigue-related intrinsic features compared with the level running. Downhill running induces severe lower limb tissue damage, indirectly evidenced by massive increases in plasma creatine kinase/myoglobin concentration or inflammatory markers. In addition, low-frequency fatigue (i.e., excitation-contraction coupling failure) is systematically observed after downhill running, although it has also been found in high-intensity uphill running for different reasons. Indeed, low-frequency fatigue in downhill running is attributed to mechanical stress at the interface sarcoplasmic reticulum/T-tubule, while the inorganic phosphate accumulation probably plays a central role in intense uphill running. Other fatigue-related specificities of graded running such as strategies to minimize the deleterious effects of downhill running on muscle function, the difference of energy cost versus heat storage or muscle activity changes in downhill, level, and uphill running are also discussed.

  9. Variable Joint Elasticities in Running

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Stephan; Grimmer, Sten; Lipfert, Susanne W.; Seyfarth, Andre

    In this paper we investigate how spring-like leg behavior in human running is represented at joint level. We assume linear torsion springs in the joints and between the knee and the ankle joint. Using experimental data of the leg dynamics we compute how the spring parameters (stiffness and rest angles) change during gait cycle. We found that during contact the joints reveal elasticity with strongly changing parameters and compare the changes of different parameters for different spring arrangements. The results may help to design and improve biologically inspired spring mechanisms with adjustable parameters.

  10. A Crack Runs Through It

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D image taken by the microscopic imager on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a close-up of the center of the rock abrasion tool hole, ground into 'Bounce' on the rover's 66th sol on Mars. Features smaller than one-tenth of a millimeter (.004 inches) are visible. The observed area is a little over 3 centimeters (1.2 inches). The canyon-like crack that runs across the bottom half of the image is really only about 2 millimeters (about 0.08 inches) deep. Scientists are currently using a variety of instruments to study the chemical content of the rock.

  11. Effective leg stiffness in running.

    PubMed

    Blum, Yvonne; Lipfert, Susanne W; Seyfarth, Andre

    2009-10-16

    Leg stiffness is a common parameter used to characterize leg function during bouncing gaits, like running and hopping. In the literature, different methods to approximate leg stiffness based on kinetic and kinematic parameters are described. A challenging point in estimating leg stiffness is the definition of leg compression during contact. In this paper four methods (methods A-D) based on ground reaction forces (GRF) and one method (method E) relying on temporal parameters are described. Leg stiffness calculated by these five methods is compared with running patterns, predicted by the spring mass model. The best and simplest approximation of leg stiffness is method E. It requires only easily accessible parameters (contact time, flight time, resting leg length, body mass and the leg's touch down angle). Method D is of similar quality but additionally requires the time-dependent progression of the GRF. The other three methods show clear differences from the model predictions by over- or underestimating leg stiffness, especially at slow speeds. Leg stiffness is derived from a conceptual model of legged locomotion and does not exist without this model. Therefore, it is important to prove which experimental method is suited best for approximating the stiffness in a specific task. This will help to interpret the predictions of the conceptual model in comparison with experimental data.

  12. HVM capabilities of CPE run-to-run overlay control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramany, Lokesh; Chung, Woong Jae; Gutjahr, Karsten; Garcia-Medina, Miguel; Sparka, Christian; Yap, Lipkong; Demirer, Onur; Karur-Shanmugam, Ramkumar; Riggs, Brent; Ramanathan, Vidya; Robinson, John C.; Pierson, Bill

    2015-03-01

    With the introduction of N2x and N1x process nodes, leading-edge factories are facing challenging demands of shrinking design margins. Previously un-corrected high-order signatures, and un-compensated temporal changes of high-order signatures, carry an important potential for improvement of on-product overlay (OPO). Until recently, static corrections per exposure (CPE), applied separately from the main APC correction, have been the industry's standard for critical layers [1], [2]. This static correction is setup once per device and layer and then updated periodically or when a machine change point generates a new overlay signature. This is a non-ideal setup for two reasons. First, any drift or sudden shift in tool signature between two CPE update periods can cause worse OPO and a higher rework rate, or, even worse, lead to yield loss at end of line. Second, these corrections are made from full map measurements that can be in excess of 1,000 measurements per wafer [3]. Advanced overlay control algorithms utilizing Run-to-Run (R2R) CPE can be used to reduce the overlay signatures on product in High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) environments. In this paper, we demonstrate the results of a R2R CPE control scheme in HVM. The authors show an improvement up to 20% OPO Mean+3Sigma values on several critical immersion layers at the 28nm and 14 nm technology nodes, and a reduction of out-of-spec residual points per wafer (validated on full map). These results are attained by closely tracking process tool signature changes by means of APC, and with an affordable metrology load which is significantly smaller than full wafer measurements.

  13. Ventilatory Threshold, Running Economy and Distance Running Performance of Trained Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Scott K.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    In an attempt to identify physiological factors that account for success in distance running, researchers evaluated relationships among ventilatory threshold, running economy, and distance running performance. Subjects were trained male runners with similar maximal aerobic power. (Authors/PP)

  14. Running Parallel Discrete Event Simulators on Sierra

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P. D.; Jefferson, D. R.

    2015-12-03

    In this proposal we consider porting the ROSS/Charm++ simulator and the discrete event models that run under its control so that they run on the Sierra architecture and make efficient use of the Volta GPUs.

  15. Is Running Bad for Your Knees?

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162903.html Is Running Bad for Your Knees? Study suggests it may ... THURSDAY, Jan. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Everybody believes running can leave you sore and swollen, right? Well, ...

  16. Running as an Adjunct to Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leer, Frederic

    1980-01-01

    Physical benefits of running have been highly publicized. Explores the equally valuable psychological benefits to be derived from running and examines how mastering a physical skill can be generalized to mastery in other areas of life. (Author)

  17. Running Patterns of Highly Skilled Distance Runners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunetts, Michael J.; Dillman, Charles J.

    The biomechanical elements inherent in the running styles of Olympic-level athletes were examined in order to obtain a range of parameter values for specific running velocities. Forty-eight athletes participated in middle and long distance running events that were filmed and later analyzed to determine the relationship between the physical…

  18. Running Patterns of Highly Skilled Distance Runners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunetts, Michael J.; Dillman, Charles J.

    The biomechanical elements inherent in the running styles of Olympic-level athletes were examined in order to obtain a range of parameter values for specific running velocities. Forty-eight athletes participated in middle and long distance running events that were filmed and later analyzed to determine the relationship between the physical…

  19. An Epidemiologic Perspective. Does Running Cause Osteoarthritis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    A review of literature on exercise and arthritis considers relevant epidemiologic and experimental studies of animals and humans, focusing on the relationship between running and osteoarthritis. No conclusive evidence exists that running causes osteoarthritis; research trends suggest that running may slow the functional aspects of musculoskeletal…

  20. An Epidemiologic Perspective. Does Running Cause Osteoarthritis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    A review of literature on exercise and arthritis considers relevant epidemiologic and experimental studies of animals and humans, focusing on the relationship between running and osteoarthritis. No conclusive evidence exists that running causes osteoarthritis; research trends suggest that running may slow the functional aspects of musculoskeletal…

  1. Head injury from a bungee run.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj; Convery, Fiona; Watt, Michael; Fulton, Ailsa; McKinstry, Steven; Flannery, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    An adaptation of bungee jumping, 'bungee running', involves participants attempting to run as far as they can whilst connected to an elastic rope which is anchored to a fixed point. Usually considered a safe recreational activity, we report a potentially life-threatening head injury following a bungee running accident.

  2. Adding run history to CLIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Sharon M.; Eick, Christoph F.

    1991-01-01

    To debug a C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) program, certain 'historical' information about a run is needed. It would be convenient for system builders to have the capability to request such information. We will discuss how historical Rete networks can be used for answering questions that help a system builder detect the cause of an error in a CLIPS program. Moreover, the cost of maintaining a historical Rete network is compared with that for a classical Rete network. We will demonstrate that the cost for assertions is only slightly higher for a historical Rete network. The cost for handling retraction could be significantly higher; however, we will show that by using special data structures that rely on hashing, it is also possible to implement retractions efficiently.

  3. Future Intent to Run and Running Performance of Students Exposed to a Traditional versus an Autonomy Supportive Motivational Running Program

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Andrea; Hannon, James C.; Shultz, Barry; Podlog, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Background. The study's primary purpose was to investigate whether an autonomy supportive motivational climate in a running program would increase future running intent among high school students. A secondary purpose was to examine whether the program would increase individual performance in the Cooper 12-minute run. Methods. Students participated in a 4-month running intervention program which included four timed runs, one per month, and a future intent questionnaire prior to the start of the timed runs and following the last run. Results. Factorial repeated measures ANOVA revealed significance regarding future intent (P = .026) at both schools. Factorial repeated measures ANOVA indicated differences between the runs at both schools (P < .001). Paired samples t-tests were conducted to look at significance with paired runs. Results revealed significance in two of the six pairs at the treatment school, notably between the first and last timed runs (P = .004). Only one pair was found to be significant (P < .001) with the control school. Conclusion. At both schools, the overall number of laps increased as well as future intent to run scores. The results do not support evidence of a greater effect from the autonomy supportive environment over a traditional environment. PMID:24236280

  4. Dynamic gearing in running dogs.

    PubMed

    Carrier, D R; Gregersen, C S; Silverton, N A

    1998-12-01

    Dynamic gearing is a mechanism that has been suggested to enhance the performance of skeletal muscles by maintaining them at the shortening velocities that maximize their power or efficiency. We investigated this hypothesis in three domestic dogs during trotting and galloping. We used ground force recordings and kinematic analysis to calculate the changes in gear ratio that occur during the production of the external work of locomotion. We also monitored length changes of the vastus lateralis muscle, an extensor muscle of the knee, using sonomicrometry in four additional dogs to determine the nature and rate of active shortening of this muscle. During both trotting and galloping, the gear ratios of the extensor muscles of the elbow, wrist and ankle joints were relatively constant early in limb support, but decreased rapidly during the second half of support. The gear ratio at the hip exerted an extensor moment initially, but decreased throughout limb support and became negative midway through support. This pattern of decreasing gear ratio during the second half of support indicates that dynamic gearing does not maximize muscle power or efficiency at the elbow, wrist, hip and ankle joints. In contrast, the extensor muscles of the shoulder and knee joints exhibited an increase in gear ratio during limb support. In two dogs, the vastus lateralis muscle shortened at a relatively constant rate of 3.7-4 lengths s-1 during intermediate-speed galloping. This pattern of increasing gear ratio and constant velocity of muscle shortening at the knee joint is consistent with the hypothesis of dynamic gearing. Given the amount of work done at the knee and shoulder joints of running dogs, dynamic gearing may contribute to the economy of constant-speed running and may be important to integrated limb function.

  5. Tissue vibration in prolonged running.

    PubMed

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Stirling, Lisa M; Federolf, Peter; Nigg, Benno M

    2011-01-04

    The impact force in heel-toe running initiates vibrations of soft-tissue compartments of the leg that are heavily dampened by muscle activity. This study investigated if the damping and frequency of these soft-tissue vibrations are affected by fatigue, which was categorized by the time into an exhaustive exercise. The hypotheses were tested that (H1) the vibration intensity of the triceps surae increases with increasing fatigue and (H2) the vibration frequency of the triceps surae decreases with increasing fatigue. Tissue vibrations of the triceps surae were measured with tri-axial accelerometers in 10 subjects during a run towards exhaustion. The frequency content was quantified with power spectra and wavelet analysis. Maxima of local vibration intensities were compared between the non-fatigued and fatigued states of all subjects. In axial (i.e. parallel to the tibia) and medio-lateral direction, most local maxima increased with fatigue (supporting the first hypothesis). In anterior-posterior direction no systematic changes were found. Vibration frequency was minimally affected by fatigue and frequency changes did not occur systematically, which requires the rejection of the second hypothesis. Relative to heel-strike, the maximum vibration intensity occurred significantly later in the fatigued condition in all three directions. With fatigue, the soft tissue of the triceps surae oscillated for an extended duration at increased vibration magnitudes, possibly due to the effects of fatigue on type II muscle fibers. Thus, the protective mechanism of muscle tuning seems to be reduced in a fatigued muscle and the risk of potential harm to the tissue may increase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomechanics and analysis of running gait.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Sheila A; Bhat, Krishna P

    2005-08-01

    Physical activity, including running, is important to general health by way of prevention of chronic illnesses and their precursors. To keep runners healthy, it is paramount that one has sound knowledge of the biomechanics of running and assessment of running gait. More so, improving performance in competitive runners is based in sound training and rehabilitation practices that are rooted firmly in biomechanical principles. This article summarized the biomechanics of running and the means with which one can evaluate running gait. The gait assessment techniques for collecting and analyzing kinetic and kinematic data can provide insights into injury prevention and treatment and performance enhancement.

  7. Random Test Run Length and Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, James H.; Groce, Alex; Weston, Melissa; Xu, Ru-Gang

    2008-01-01

    A poorly understood but important factor in many applications of random testing is the selection of a maximum length for test runs. Given a limited time for testing, it is seldom clear whether executing a small number of long runs or a large number of short runs maximizes utility. It is generally expected that longer runs are more likely to expose failures -- which is certainly true with respect to runs shorter than the shortest failing trace. However, longer runs produce longer failing traces, requiring more effort from humans in debugging or more resources for automated minimization. In testing with feedback, increasing ranges for parameters may also cause the probability of failure to decrease in longer runs. We show that the choice of test length dramatically impacts the effectiveness of random testing, and that the patterns observed in simple models and predicted by analysis are useful in understanding effects observed.

  8. Random Test Run Length and Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, James H.; Groce, Alex; Weston, Melissa; Xu, Ru-Gang

    2008-01-01

    A poorly understood but important factor in many applications of random testing is the selection of a maximum length for test runs. Given a limited time for testing, it is seldom clear whether executing a small number of long runs or a large number of short runs maximizes utility. It is generally expected that longer runs are more likely to expose failures -- which is certainly true with respect to runs shorter than the shortest failing trace. However, longer runs produce longer failing traces, requiring more effort from humans in debugging or more resources for automated minimization. In testing with feedback, increasing ranges for parameters may also cause the probability of failure to decrease in longer runs. We show that the choice of test length dramatically impacts the effectiveness of random testing, and that the patterns observed in simple models and predicted by analysis are useful in understanding effects observed.

  9. A Star on the Run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    Usually stars that are born together tend to move together but sometimes stars can go rogue and run away from their original birthplace. A pair of astronomers have now discovered the first runaway red supergiant (RSG) ever identified in another galaxy. With a radial velocity discrepancy of 300 km/s, its also the fastest runaway massive star known. Discrepant Speeds: When massive stars form in giant molecular clouds, they create what are known as OB associations: groups of hot, massive, short-lived stars that have similar velocities because theyre moving through space together. But sometimes stars that appear to be part of an OB association dont have the same velocity as the rest of the group. These stars are called runaways.What causes an OB star to run away is still debated, but we know that a fairly significant fraction of OB stars are runaways. In spite of this, surprisingly few runaways have been found that are evolved massive stars i.e., the post-main-sequence state of OB stars. This is presumably because these evolved stars have had more time to move away from their birthplace, and its more difficult to identify a runaway without the context of its original group. An Evolved Runaway: Difference between observed velocity and expected velocity, plotted as a function of expected velocity. The black points are foreground stars. The red points are expected RSGs, clustered around a velocity difference of zero. The green pentagon is the runaway RSG J004330.06+405258.4. [Evans Massey 2015]Despite this challenge, a recent survey of RSGs in the galaxy M31 has led to the detection of a massive star on the run! Kate Evans (Lowell Observatory and California Institute of Technology) and Philip Massey (Lowell Observatory and Northern Arizona University) discovered that RSG J004330.06+405258.4 is moving through the Andromeda Galaxy with a radial velocity thats off by about 300 km/s from the radial velocity expected for its location.Evans and Massey discovered this rogue star

  10. What we can learn about running from barefoot running: an evolutionary medical perspective.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Daniel E

    2012-04-01

    Barefoot running, which was how people ran for millions of years, provides an opportunity to study how natural selection adapted the human body to run. Because humans evolved to run barefoot, a barefoot running style that minimizes impact peaks and provides increased proprioception and foot strength, is hypothesized to help avoid injury, regardless of whether one is wearing shoes.

  11. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum from Running Sprints

    PubMed Central

    Turban, Joseph W.

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) is a fairly rare condition, caused by increased intrathoracic pressure, leading to free air in the mediastinal structures. Underlying lung conditions are associated with increased incidence of SPM, including asthma, interstitial lung disease, pneumonia, bullous lung, and radiation therapy for lung cancer. It is often preceded by Valsalva maneuvers, vomiting, coughing, asthma exacerbation, sneezing, childbirth, or intense physical activity. A case of SPM is presented in a 15-year-old male, who complained of throat pain and dyspnea while running sprints at football practice. Workup revealed SPM, and he was subsequently admitted and treated conservatively. His symptoms resolved in 2 days and he was discharged and suffered no further recurrences. In contrast to secondary pneumomediastinum, SPM is usually a benign condition although life-threatening conditions can rarely arise. Differentiating between these two conditions has important prognostic indications. There is a paucity of prospectively collected data regarding SPM, and considerable variation in recommendations concerning the extent of workup. PMID:20862351

  12. High impact running improves learning.

    PubMed

    Winter, Bernward; Breitenstein, Caterina; Mooren, Frank C; Voelker, Klaus; Fobker, Manfred; Lechtermann, Anja; Krueger, Karsten; Fromme, Albert; Korsukewitz, Catharina; Floel, Agnes; Knecht, Stefan

    2007-05-01

    Regular physical exercise improves cognitive functions and lowers the risk for age-related cognitive decline. Since little is known about the nature and the timing of the underlying mechanisms, we probed whether exercise also has immediate beneficial effects on cognition. Learning performance was assessed directly after high impact anaerobic sprints, low impact aerobic running, or a period of rest in 27 healthy subjects in a randomized cross-over design. Dependent variables comprised learning speed as well as immediate (1 week) and long-term (>8 months) overall success in acquiring a novel vocabulary. Peripheral levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and catecholamines (dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine) were assessed prior to and after the interventions as well as after learning. We found that vocabulary learning was 20 percent faster after intense physical exercise as compared to the other two conditions. This condition also elicited the strongest increases in BDNF and catecholamine levels. More sustained BDNF levels during learning after intense exercise were related to better short-term learning success, whereas absolute dopamine and epinephrine levels were related to better intermediate (dopamine) and long-term (epinephrine) retentions of the novel vocabulary. Thus, BDNF and two of the catecholamines seem to be mediators by which physical exercise improves learning.

  13. The MICE Run Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick; Mice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a demonstration experiment to prove the feasibility of cooling a beam of muons for use in a Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. The MICE cooling channel is a section of a modified Study II cooling channel which will provide a 10% reduction in beam emittance. In order to ensure a reliable measurement, MICE will measure the beam emittance before and after the cooling channel at the level of 1%, or a relative measurement of 0.001. This renders MICE a precision experiment which requires strict controls and monitoring of all experimental parameters in order to control systematic errors. The MICE Controls and Monitoring system is based on EPICS and integrates with the DAQ, Data monitoring systems, and a configuration database. The new MICE Run Control has been developed to ensure proper sequencing of equipment and use of system resources to protect data quality. A description of this system, its implementation, and performance during recent muon beam data collection will be discussed.

  14. Take the monkey and run

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Kimberley A.; Hambright, M. Karen; Hewes, Kelly; Schilder, Brian M.; Ross, Corinna N.; Tardif, Suzette D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a small, New World primate that is used extensively in biomedical and behavioral research. This short-lived primate, with its small body size, ease of handling, and docile temperament, has emerged as a valuable model for aging and neurodegenerative research. A growing body of research has indicated exercise, aerobic exercise especially, imparts beneficial effects to normal aging. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these positive effects of exercise, and the degree to which exercise has neurotherapeutic effects, is an important research focus. Thus, developing techniques to engage marmosets in aerobic exercise would have great advantages. New method Here we describe the marmoset exercise ball (MEB) paradigm: a safe (for both experimenter and subjects), novel and effective means to engage marmosets in aerobic exercise. We trained young adult male marmosets to run on treadmills for 30 min a day, 3 days a week. Results Our training procedures allowed us to engage male marmosets in this aerobic exercise within 4 weeks, and subjects maintained this frequency of exercise for 3 months. Comparison with existing methods To our knowledge, this is the first described method to engage marmosets in aerobic exercise. A major advantage of this exercise paradigm is that while it was technically forced exercise, it did not appear to induce stress in the marmosets. Conclusions These techniques should be useful to researchers wishing to address physiological responses of exercise in a marmoset model. PMID:25835199

  15. Impact Accelerations of Barefoot and Shod Running.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M; Seegmiller, J; McGowan, C P

    2016-05-01

    During the ground contact phase of running, the body's mass is rapidly decelerated resulting in forces that propagate through the musculoskeletal system. The repetitive attenuation of these impact forces is thought to contribute to overuse injuries. Modern running shoes are designed to reduce impact forces, with the goal to minimize running related overuse injuries. Additionally, the fore/mid foot strike pattern that is adopted by most individuals when running barefoot may reduce impact force transmission. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of the barefoot running form (fore/mid foot strike & decreased stride length) and running shoes on running kinetics and impact accelerations. 10 healthy, physically active, heel strike runners ran in 3 conditions: shod, barefoot and barefoot while heel striking, during which 3-dimensional motion analysis, ground reaction force and accelerometer data were collected. Shod running was associated with increased ground reaction force and impact peak magnitudes, but decreased impact accelerations, suggesting that the midsole of running shoes helps to attenuate impact forces. Barefoot running exhibited a similar decrease in impact accelerations, as well as decreased impact peak magnitude, which appears to be due to a decrease in stride length and/or a more plantarflexed position at ground contact. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Endurance running and the evolution of Homo.

    PubMed

    Bramble, Dennis M; Lieberman, Daniel E

    2004-11-18

    Striding bipedalism is a key derived behaviour of hominids that possibly originated soon after the divergence of the chimpanzee and human lineages. Although bipedal gaits include walking and running, running is generally considered to have played no major role in human evolution because humans, like apes, are poor sprinters compared to most quadrupeds. Here we assess how well humans perform at sustained long-distance running, and review the physiological and anatomical bases of endurance running capabilities in humans and other mammals. Judged by several criteria, humans perform remarkably well at endurance running, thanks to a diverse array of features, many of which leave traces in the skeleton. The fossil evidence of these features suggests that endurance running is a derived capability of the genus Homo, originating about 2 million years ago, and may have been instrumental in the evolution of the human body form.

  17. [Facts and fiction about running shoes].

    PubMed

    Schelde, Jacob

    2012-11-26

    Running as a means of exercise is becoming increasingly popular, but the rate of injury is very high among runners. To prevent running-related injuries much attention has been given the running shoe and its construction, particular its shock-absorbing capabilities and motion control features. It is recommended that running shoes should be purchased based on the runner's medial arch height and degree of pronation, and that the shoes should be changed frequently as their shock-absorbing capabilities decrease with usage. Randomized controlled trials and other studies in the scientific literature do not support these recommendations.

  18. Renal function abnormalities after marathon run and 16-kilometre long-distance run.

    PubMed

    Mydlík, Miroslav; Derzsiová, Katarína; Bohus, Branislav

    2012-01-01

    Renal functions were investigated in 29 marathon runners and in 20 runners in connection with 16-kilometre long-distance run. Body weight in runners decreased after marathon run in average of 1.3 +/- 0.5 kg and after 16-kilometre long-distance run in average of 1.4 +/- 0.4 kg. Blood pressure decreased after both runs. Total proteinuria and albuminuria significantly increased after both runs. The significant non-glomerular erythrocyturia was found in 9 runners after marathon run and in 3 runners after 16-km long-distance run. Total catalytic activity of serum creatine kinase, and its isoenzyme MB significantly increased after both runs. Increase of isoenzyme MB creatine kinase after runs was lower than 6% of total catalytic activity of creatine kinase. These increases were caused by rhabdomyolysis and were connected with myoglobinuria. Serum myoglobin significantly increased after marathon run and after 16-km run. Serum urea, creatinine, phosphorus and osmolality significantly increased after both runs. Calculated GFR significantly decreased after both runs. FE(Na), FE(Ca), FE(P), FE(OSM) and FE(H2O) significantly decreased after both runs. FE significantly increased after marathon run, but after 16-km run non-significantly decreased. Renal function abnormalities were caused by dehydration, microtraumas in extrarenal urinary tract, protein catabolism, decreased urinary excretion of osmotically active substances, rhabdomyolysis, activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and other factors. Renal function abnormalities in runners were already not present 2-6 days after marathon run and after 16-kilometre long-distance run and investigated parameters were in normal range or they did not significantly differ from the initial values.

  19. Distinct stages of adult hippocampal neurogenesis are regulated by running and the running environment.

    PubMed

    Bednarczyk, Matthew R; Hacker, Lindsay C; Fortin-Nunez, Stéphanie; Aumont, Anne; Bergeron, Raynald; Fernandes, Karl J L

    2011-12-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis continues into adulthood in mammalian vertebrates, and in experimental rodent models it is powerfully stimulated by exposure to a voluntary running wheel. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure to a running wheel environment, in the absence of running, is sufficient to regulate specific aspects of hippocampal neurogenesis. Adult mice were provided with standard housing, housing enriched with a running wheel or housing enriched with a locked wheel (i.e., an environment comparable to that of running animals, without the possibility of engaging in running). We found that mice in the running wheel and locked wheel groups exhibited equivalent increases in proliferation within the neurogenic niche of the dentate gyrus; this included comparable increases in the proliferation of radial glia-like stem cells and the number of proliferating neuroblasts. However, only running animals displayed increased numbers of postmitotic neuroblasts and mature neurons. These results demonstrate that the running wheel environment itself is sufficient for promoting proliferation of early lineage hippocampal precursors, while running per se enables newly generated neuroblasts to survive and mature into functional hippocampal neurons. Thus, both running-independent and running-dependent stimuli are integral to running wheel-induced hippocampal neurogenesis.

  20. The Effect of Training in Minimalist Running Shoes on Running Economy.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Sarah T; Standifird, Tyler; Rivera, Jessica; Johnson, A Wayne; Mitchell, Ulrike; Hunter, Iain

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of minimalist running shoes on oxygen uptake during running before and after a 10-week transition from traditional to minimalist running shoes. Twenty-five recreational runners (no previous experience in minimalist running shoes) participated in submaximal VO2 testing at a self-selected pace while wearing traditional and minimalist running shoes. Ten of the 25 runners gradually transitioned to minimalist running shoes over 10 weeks (experimental group), while the other 15 maintained their typical training regimen (control group). All participants repeated submaximal VO2 testing at the end of 10 weeks. Testing included a 3 minute warm-up, 3 minutes of running in the first pair of shoes, and 3 minutes of running in the second pair of shoes. Shoe order was randomized. Average oxygen uptake was calculated during the last minute of running in each condition. The average change from pre- to post-training for the control group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 3.1 ± 15.2% and 2.8 ± 16.2%, respectively. The average change from pre- to post-training for the experimental group during testing in traditional and minimalist shoes was an improvement of 8.4 ± 7.2% and 10.4 ± 6.9%, respectively. Data were analyzed using a 2-way repeated measures ANOVA. There were no significant interaction effects, but the overall improvement in running economy across time (6.15%) was significant (p = 0.015). Running in minimalist running shoes improves running economy in experienced, traditionally shod runners, but not significantly more than when running in traditional running shoes. Improvement in running economy in both groups, regardless of shoe type, may have been due to compliance with training over the 10-week study period and/or familiarity with testing procedures. Key pointsRunning in minimalist footwear did not result in a change in running economy compared to running in traditional footwear

  1. Biomechanics of Distance Running: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Richard C.; Gregor, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    Training for distance running over a long period produces meaningful changes in the running mechanics of experienced runners, as revealed in this longitudinal study of the biomechanical components of stride length, stride rate, stride time, and support and nonsupport time. (MB)

  2. EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

    2008-09-20

    EnergyPlus is a new generation building performance simulation program offering many new modeling capabilities and more accurate performance calculations integrating building components in sub-hourly time steps. However, EnergyPlus runs much slower than the current generation simulation programs. This has become a major barrier to its widespread adoption by the industry. This paper analyzed EnergyPlus run time from comprehensive perspectives to identify key issues and challenges of speeding up EnergyPlus: studying the historical trends of EnergyPlus run time based on the advancement of computers and code improvements to EnergyPlus, comparing EnergyPlus with DOE-2 to understand and quantify the run time differences, identifying key simulation settings and model features that have significant impacts on run time, and performing code profiling to identify which EnergyPlus subroutines consume the most amount of run time. This paper provides recommendations to improve EnergyPlus run time from the modeler?s perspective and adequate computing platforms. Suggestions of software code and architecture changes to improve EnergyPlus run time based on the code profiling results are also discussed.

  3. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  4. Biomechanics of Distance Running: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Richard C.; Gregor, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    Training for distance running over a long period produces meaningful changes in the running mechanics of experienced runners, as revealed in this longitudinal study of the biomechanical components of stride length, stride rate, stride time, and support and nonsupport time. (MB)

  5. Running biomechanics: shorter heels, better economy.

    PubMed

    Scholz, M N; Bobbert, M F; van Soest, A J; Clark, J R; van Heerden, J

    2008-10-01

    Better running economy (i.e. a lower rate of energy consumption at a given speed) is correlated with superior distance running performance. There is substantial variation in running economy, even among elite runners. This variation might be due to variation in the storage and reutilization of elastic energy in tendons. Using a simple musculoskeletal model, it was predicted that the amount of energy stored in a tendon during a given movement depends more critically on moment arm than on mechanical properties of the tendon, with the amount of stored energy increasing as the moment arm gets smaller. Assuming a link between elastic energy reutilization and overall metabolic cost of running, a smaller moment arm should therefore be associated with superior running economy. This prediction was confirmed experimentally in a group of 15 highly trained runners. The moment arm of the Achilles tendon was determined from standardized photographs of the ankle, using the position of anatomical landmarks. Running economy was measured as the rate of metabolic energy consumption during level treadmill running at a speed of 16 km h(-1). A strong correlation was found between the moment arm of the Achilles tendon and running economy. Smaller muscle moment arms correlated with lower rates of metabolic energy consumption (r(2)=0.75, P<0.001).

  6. Teaching Bank Runs with Classroom Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkenborg, Dieter; Kaplan, Todd; Miller, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Once relegated to cinema or history lectures, bank runs have become a modern phenomenon that captures the interest of students. In this article, the authors explain a simple classroom experiment based on the Diamond-Dybvig model (1983) to demonstrate how a bank run--a seemingly irrational event--can occur rationally. They then present possible…

  7. The Second Student-Run Homeless Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seider, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    From 1983-2011, the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter (HSHS) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was the only student-run homeless shelter in the United States. However, college students at Villanova, Temple, Drexel, the University of Pennsylvania, and Swarthmore drew upon the HSHS model to open their own student-run homeless shelter in Philadelphia,…

  8. Run II data analysis on the grid

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Mandrichenko, Igor Terekhov and Frank Wurthwein

    2002-12-02

    In this document, we begin the technical design for the distributed RunII computing for CDF and D0. The present paper defines the three components of the data handling area of Run II computing, namely the Data Handling System, the Storage System and the Application. We outline their functionality and interaction between them. We identify necessary and desirable elements of the interfaces.

  9. Impact of Running Away on Girls' Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrane, Lisa E.; Chen, Xiaojin

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of running away on pregnancy in the subsequent year among U.S. adolescents. We also investigated interactions between running away and sexual assault, romance, and school disengagement. Pregnancy among females between 11 and 17 years (n = 6100) was examined utilizing the Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add…

  10. An analysis of running skyline load path.

    Treesearch

    Ward W. Carson; Charles N. Mann

    1971-01-01

    This paper is intended for those who wish to prepare an algorithm to determine the load path of a running skyline. The mathematics of a simplified approach to this running skyline design problem are presented. The approach employs assumptions which reduce the complexity of the problem to the point where it can be solved on desk-top computers of limited capacities. The...

  11. Separating Fact from Fiction: Increasing Running Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murgia, Carla

    2008-01-01

    From a biomechanical point of view, this article explores the common belief that one must increase stride length and frequency in order to increase running speed. The limb length, explosive power, and anaerobic capacity of the athlete, as well as the type of running (sprinting vs. long distance) must be considered before making such a…

  12. The Second Student-Run Homeless Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seider, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    From 1983-2011, the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter (HSHS) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was the only student-run homeless shelter in the United States. However, college students at Villanova, Temple, Drexel, the University of Pennsylvania, and Swarthmore drew upon the HSHS model to open their own student-run homeless shelter in Philadelphia,…

  13. Impact of Running Away on Girls' Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrane, Lisa E.; Chen, Xiaojin

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of running away on pregnancy in the subsequent year among U.S. adolescents. We also investigated interactions between running away and sexual assault, romance, and school disengagement. Pregnancy among females between 11 and 17 years (n = 6100) was examined utilizing the Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add…

  14. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  15. The Meaning of Running Away for Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peled, Einat; Cohavi, Ayelet

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this qualitative research was to understand how runaway girls perceive the processes involved in leaving home and the meaning they attribute to it. Method: Findings are based on in-depth interviews with 10 Israeli girls aged 13-17 with a history of running away from home. Results: The meaning of running away as it emerged…

  16. Separating Fact from Fiction: Increasing Running Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murgia, Carla

    2008-01-01

    From a biomechanical point of view, this article explores the common belief that one must increase stride length and frequency in order to increase running speed. The limb length, explosive power, and anaerobic capacity of the athlete, as well as the type of running (sprinting vs. long distance) must be considered before making such a…

  17. Teaching Bank Runs with Classroom Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkenborg, Dieter; Kaplan, Todd; Miller, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Once relegated to cinema or history lectures, bank runs have become a modern phenomenon that captures the interest of students. In this article, the authors explain a simple classroom experiment based on the Diamond-Dybvig model (1983) to demonstrate how a bank run--a seemingly irrational event--can occur rationally. They then present possible…

  18. 40 CFR 92.126 - Test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test run. 92.126 Section 92.126 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.126 Test run. (a) The following steps...

  19. Orthopaedic Perspective on Barefoot and Minimalist Running.

    PubMed

    Roth, Jonathan; Neumann, Julie; Tao, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a movement toward barefoot and minimalist running. Advocates assert that a lack of cushion and support promotes a forefoot or midfoot strike rather than a rearfoot strike, decreasing the impact transient and stress on the hip and knee. Although the change in gait is theorized to decrease injury risk, this concept has not yet been fully elucidated. However, research has shown diminished symptoms of chronic exertional compartment syndrome and anterior knee pain after a transition to minimalist running. Skeptics are concerned that, because of the effects of the natural environment and the lack of a standardized transition program, barefoot running could lead to additional, unforeseen injuries. Studies have shown that, with the transition to minimalist running, there is increased stress on the foot and ankle and risk of repetitive stress injuries. Nonetheless, despite the large gap of evidence-based knowledge on minimalist running, the potential benefits warrant further research and consideration.

  20. The CDF Run IIa Silicon Detector and Its Upgrade RunIIb

    SciTech Connect

    Cigdem Issever

    2003-12-19

    The CDF RunIIa silicon detector made the transition from commissioning to data taking. CDF's online and offline tracking algorithms, the performance of Layer 00 and the RunIIb silicon upgrade project are covered in this article.

  1. 40 CFR 258.26 - Run-on/run-off control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... storm; (2) A run-off control system from the active portion of the landfill to collect and control at least the water volume resulting from a 24-hour, 25-year storm. (b) Run-off from the active portion...

  2. 40 CFR 258.26 - Run-on/run-off control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... storm; (2) A run-off control system from the active portion of the landfill to collect and control at least the water volume resulting from a 24-hour, 25-year storm. (b) Run-off from the active portion...

  3. Comparing Running Specific and Traditional Prostheses During Running: Assessing Performance and Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0518 TITLE: Comparing Running-Specific and Traditional Prostheses during Running: Assessing Performance and Risk...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Comparing Running-Specific and Traditional Prostheses During Running: Assessing Performance and Risk 5a. CONTRACT...bbaum@regis.edu 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Regis

  4. A Runs-Test Algorithm: Contingent Reinforcement and Response Run Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hachiga, Yosuke; Sakagami, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Four rats' choices between two levers were differentially reinforced using a runs-test algorithm. On each trial, a runs-test score was calculated based on the last 20 choices. In Experiment 1, the onset of stimulus lights cued when the runs score was smaller than criterion. Following cuing, the correct choice was occasionally reinforced with food,…

  5. Fatigue-induced changes in decline running.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, J; Verbitsky, O; Isakov, E

    2001-03-01

    Study the relation between muscle fatigue during eccentric muscle contractions and kinematics of the legs in downhill running. Decline running on a treadmill was used to acquire data on shock accelerations, muscle activity and kinematics, for comparison with level running. In downhill running, local muscle fatigue is the cause of morphological muscle damage which leads to reduced attenuation of shock accelerations. Fourteen subjects ran on a treadmill above level-running anaerobic threshold speed for 30 min, in level and -4 degrees decline running. The following were monitored: metabolic fatigue by means of respiratory parameters; muscle fatigue of the quadriceps by means of elevation in myoelectric activity; and kinematic parameters including knee and ankle angles and hip vertical excursion by means of computerized videography. Data on shock transmission reported in previous studies were also used. Quadriceps fatigue develops in parallel to an increasing vertical excursion of the hip in the stance phase of running, enabled by larger dorsi flexion of the ankle rather than by increased flexion of the knee. The decrease in shock attenuation can be attributed to quadriceps muscle fatigue in parallel to increased vertical excursion of the hips.

  6. Energetics of running: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Kram, R; Taylor, C R

    1990-07-19

    The amount of energy used to run a mile is nearly the same whether it is run at top speed or at a leisurely pace (although it is used more rapidly at the higher speed). This puzzling independence of energy cost and speed is found generally among running animals, although, on a per gram basis, cost is much higher for smaller animals. Running involves little work against the environment; work is done by muscles and tendons to lift and accelerate the body and limbs. Some of the work is recovered from muscle-tendon springs without metabolic cost and work rate does not parallel metabolic rate with either speed or size. Regardless of the amount of work muscles do, they must be activated and develop force to support the weight of the body. Load-carrying experiments have shown that the cost of supporting an extra newton of load is the same as the weight-specific cost of running. Size differences in cost are proportional to stride frequency at equivalent speeds, suggesting that the time available for developing force is important in determining cost. We report a simple inverse relationship between the rate of energy used for running and the time the foot applies force to the ground during each stride. These results support the hypothesis that it is primarily the cost of supporting the animal's weight and the time course of generating this force that determines the cost of running.

  7. Running Economy from a Muscle Energetics Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Jared R; MacIntosh, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    The economy of running has traditionally been quantified from the mass-specific oxygen uptake; however, because fuel substrate usage varies with exercise intensity, it is more accurate to express running economy in units of metabolic energy. Fundamentally, the understanding of the major factors that influence the energy cost of running (Erun) can be obtained with this approach. Erun is determined by the energy needed for skeletal muscle contraction. Here, we approach the study of Erun from that perspective. The amount of energy needed for skeletal muscle contraction is dependent on the force, duration, shortening, shortening velocity, and length of the muscle. These factors therefore dictate the energy cost of running. It is understood that some determinants of the energy cost of running are not trainable: environmental factors, surface characteristics, and certain anthropometric features. Other factors affecting Erun are altered by training: other anthropometric features, muscle and tendon properties, and running mechanics. Here, the key features that dictate the energy cost during distance running are reviewed in the context of skeletal muscle energetics.

  8. Running Economy from a Muscle Energetics Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Jared R.; MacIntosh, Brian R.

    2017-01-01

    The economy of running has traditionally been quantified from the mass-specific oxygen uptake; however, because fuel substrate usage varies with exercise intensity, it is more accurate to express running economy in units of metabolic energy. Fundamentally, the understanding of the major factors that influence the energy cost of running (Erun) can be obtained with this approach. Erun is determined by the energy needed for skeletal muscle contraction. Here, we approach the study of Erun from that perspective. The amount of energy needed for skeletal muscle contraction is dependent on the force, duration, shortening, shortening velocity, and length of the muscle. These factors therefore dictate the energy cost of running. It is understood that some determinants of the energy cost of running are not trainable: environmental factors, surface characteristics, and certain anthropometric features. Other factors affecting Erun are altered by training: other anthropometric features, muscle and tendon properties, and running mechanics. Here, the key features that dictate the energy cost during distance running are reviewed in the context of skeletal muscle energetics. PMID:28690549

  9. Mental Fatigue Impairs Intermittent Running Performance.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mitchell R; Marcora, Samuele M; Coutts, Aaron J

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of mental fatigue on intermittent running performance. Ten male intermittent team sports players performed two identical self-paced, intermittent running protocols. The two trials were separated by 7 d and preceded, in a randomized-counterbalanced order, by 90 min of either emotionally neutral documentaries (control) or the AX-continuous performance test (AX-CPT; mental fatigue). Subjective ratings of fatigue and vigor were measured before and after these treatments, and motivation was recorded before the intermittent running protocol. Velocity, heart rate, oxygen consumption, blood glucose and lactate concentrations, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured throughout the 45-min intermittent running protocol. Session RPE was recorded 30 min after the intermittent running protocol. Subjective ratings of fatigue were higher after the AX-CPT (P = 0.005). This mental fatigue significantly reduced velocity at low intensities (1.28 ± 0.18 m·s vs 1.31 ± 0.17 m·s; P = 0.037), whereas high-intensity running and peak velocities were not significantly affected. Running velocity at all intensities significantly declined over time in both conditions (P < 0.001). Oxygen consumption was significantly lower in the mental fatigue condition (P = 0.007). Other physiological variables, vigor and motivation, were not significantly affected. Ratings of perceived exertion during the intermittent running protocol were not significantly different between conditions despite lower overall velocity in the mental fatigue condition. Session RPE was significantly higher in the mental fatigue condition (P = 0.013). Mental fatigue impairs intermittent running performance. This negative effect of mental fatigue seems to be mediated by higher perception of effort.

  10. Analysis Of Rearfoot Motion In Running Shoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Les

    1986-12-01

    In order to produce better shoes that cushion athletes from the high impact forces of running and still provide stability to the foot it is essential to have a method of quickly and reliably evaluating the performance of prototype shoes. The analysis of rear-foot motion requires the use of film or video recordings of test subjects running on a treadmill. Specific points on the subject are tracked to give a measure of inversion or eversion of the heel. This paper describes the testing procedure and its application to running shoe design. A comparison of film and video systems is also discussed.

  11. Smarter running can keep buildings fit.

    PubMed

    England, Simon

    2011-09-01

    Simon England, director at Accenture Health UK, outlines the benefits of an "assessment-based" approach to creating "smarter" healthcare buildings with reduced running costs and a lower carbon footprint.

  12. Gravitational baryogenesis in running vacuum models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikonomou, V. K.; Pan, Supriya; Nunes, Rafael C.

    2017-08-01

    We study the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism for generating baryon asymmetry in the context of running vacuum models. Regardless of whether these models can produce a viable cosmological evolution, we demonstrate that they produce a nonzero baryon-to-entropy ratio even if the universe is filled with conformal matter. This is a sound difference between the running vacuum gravitational baryogenesis and the Einstein-Hilbert one, since in the latter case, the predicted baryon-to-entropy ratio is zero. We consider two well known and most used running vacuum models and show that the resulting baryon-to-entropy ratio is compatible with the observational data. Moreover, we also show that the mechanism of gravitational baryogenesis may constrain the running vacuum models.

  13. [Experiences with running therapy in essential hypertension].

    PubMed

    Winterfeld, H J; Siewert, H; Strangfeld, D

    1995-03-21

    The authors report about a long-term study (three months) on blood pressure and heart rate at rest and during exercise (50 W) in hypertensive patients (WHO stadium I and I, n = 24) running twice a week. The control group were 15 healthy people who were running as well. In addition, the peripheral microcirculation (musculus tibialis anterior) was recorded by the Xenon-133 muscle clearance method and the cardiac output by means of radiocardiography (Indium 113m) as parameter of central hemodynamics. A positive influence of running on hypertension and hemodynamics, resulting in a significant decrease of systolic and diastolic blood pressure and a significant improvement of the peripheral microcirculation was registered. The measured values of blood pressure, heart rate and cardiac output show that there was no cardial risk caused by running at a velocity of 2 to 2.5 m/s.

  14. Social network structures and bank runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shouwei; Li, Jiaheng

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the impact of social network structures of depositors on bank runs. The analyzed network structures include random networks, small-world networks and scale-free networks. Simulation results show that the probability of bank run occurrence in random networks is larger than that in small-world networks, but the probability of bank run occurrence in scale-free networks drops from the highest to the lowest among the three types of network structures with the increase of the proportion of impatient depositors. The average degree of depositor networks has a significant impact on bank runs, but this impact is related to the proportion of impatient depositors and the confidence levels of depositors in banks.

  15. Run 16, eIPM Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; Dawson, C.; Jao, S.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.

    2016-08-05

    Three problems with the eIPMs were corrected during the 2015 summer shutdown. These involved ac coupling and 'negative profiles', detector 'dead zone' created by biasing, and gain control on ramp. With respect to Run 16, problems dealt with included gain depletion on horizontal MCP and rf pickup on profile signals; it was found that the MCP was severely damaged over part of the aperture. Various corrective measures were applied. Some results of these measured obtained during Run 16 are shown. At the end of Run 16 there was a three-­day beam run to study polarized proton beams in the AGS. Attempts to minimize beam injection errors which increase emittance by using the eIPMs to measure the contribution of injection mismatch to the AGS output beam emittance are recounted. .

  16. The calculation of take-off run

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, Walter S

    1934-01-01

    A comparatively simple method of calculating length of take-off run is developed from the assumption of a linear variation in net accelerating force with air speed and it is shown that the error involved is negligible.

  17. Flood-plain delineation for Horsepen Run, Sugarland Run, Nichols Run, Pond Branch, Clarks Branch, and Mine Run Branch basins, Fairfax County, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soule, Pat LeRoy

    1978-01-01

    Water-surface profiles of the 25-, 50-, and 100-year recurrence interval discharges have been computed for all streams and reaches of channels in Fairfax County, Virginia, having a drainage area greater than 1 square mile except for Dogue Creek, Little Hunting Creek, and that portion of Cameron Run above Lake Barcroft. Maps have a 2-foot contour interval and a horizontal scale of 1 inch equals 100 feet were used for base on which flood boundaries were delineated for 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods to be expected in each basin under ultimate development conditions. This report is one of a series and presents a discussion of techniques employed in computing discharges and profiles as well as the flood profiles and maps on which flood boundaries have been delineated for the Horsepen Run, Sugarland Run, Nichols Run, and Pond Branch basins in Fairfax County. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. The meaning of running away for girls.

    PubMed

    Peled, Einat; Cohavi, Ayelet

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this qualitative research was to understand how runaway girls perceive the processes involved in leaving home and the meaning they attribute to it. Findings are based on in-depth interviews with 10 Israeli girls aged 13-17 with a history of running away from home. The meaning of running away as it emerged from the girls' descriptions of their lives prior to leaving home was that of survival - both psychological and physical. The girls' stories centered on their evolving experiences of alienation, loneliness and detachment, and the failure of significant relationships at home and outside of home to provide them with the support they needed. These experiences laid the ground for the "final moments" before leaving, when a feeling of "no alternative," a hope for a better future, and various particular triggers led the girls to the decision to leave home. Participants' insights about the dynamics leading to running-away center on the meaning of family relationships, particularly those with the mother, as constituting the girl's psychological home. The girls seemed to perceive running away as an inevitability, rather than a choice, and even portrayed the running away as "living suicide." Yet, their stories clearly demonstrate their ability to cope and the possession of strengths and skills that enabled them to survive in extremely difficult home situations. The findings of this research highlight the importance of improving services for reaching out and supporting girls who are on the verge of running away from home. Such services should be tailored to the needs of girls who experience extreme but often silenced distress at home, and should facilitate alternative solutions to the girls' plight other than running away. An understanding of the dynamics leading to running away from the girls' perspective has the potential to improve the efficacy of services provided by contributing to the creation of a caring, empowering, understanding and trustful professional

  19. Minimum-time running: a numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Maroński, Ryszard; Rogowski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with the minimum-time running problem. The time of covering a given distance is minimized. The Hill-Keller model of running employed is based on Newton's second law and the equation of power balance. The problem is formulated in optimal control. The unknown function is the runner's velocity that varies with the distance. The problem is solved applying the direct Chebyshev's pseudospectral method.

  20. CDF forward shielding for Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Krivosheev, O.E.; Mokhov, N.V.

    1998-03-16

    Detailed calculations of the accelerator related background in the CDF forward muon spectrometer have been performed with the MARS13 code and a newly developed C++ code for particle tracking in accelerator lattices. Calculated space distributions of background hits are in a good agreement with data taken in Run I. Several shielding configurations in the CDF hall and Tevatron tunnel have been studied. The optimal one provides a 30-fold shielding efficiency compatible with CDF Run II requirements.

  1. The Ssart of Run II at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Marco Rescigno

    2002-10-29

    After a hiatus of almost 6 years and an extensive upgrade, Tevatron, the world largest proton-antiproton collider, has resumed the operation for the so called RUN II. In this paper we give a brief overview of the many new features of the Tevatron complex and of the upgraded CDF experiment, and show the presently achieved detector performances as well as highlights of the RUN II physics program in the beauty and electroweak sector.

  2. RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2008-10-06

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

  3. RHIC polarized proton performance in run-8.

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Barton, D.; et al.

    2008-06-23

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Helical spin rotators at these two interaction regions were used to control the spin orientation of both beams at the collision points. Physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8.

  4. Calcaneal loading during walking and running

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giddings, V. L.; Beaupre, G. S.; Whalen, R. T.; Carter, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study of the foot uses experimentally measured kinematic and kinetic data with a numerical model to evaluate in vivo calcaneal stresses during walking and running. METHODS: External ground reaction forces (GRF) and kinematic data were measured during walking and running using cineradiography and force plate measurements. A contact-coupled finite element model of the foot was developed to assess the forces acting on the calcaneus during gait. RESULTS: We found that the calculated force-time profiles of the joint contact, ligament, and Achilles tendon forces varied with the time-history curve of the moment about the ankle joint. The model predicted peak talocalcaneal and calcaneocuboid joint loads of 5.4 and 4.2 body weights (BW) during walking and 11.1 and 7.9 BW during running. The maximum predicted Achilles tendon forces were 3.9 and 7.7 BW for walking and running. CONCLUSIONS: Large magnitude forces and calcaneal stresses are generated late in the stance phase, with maximum loads occurring at approximately 70% of the stance phase during walking and at approximately 60% of the stance phase during running, for the gait velocities analyzed. The trajectories of the principal stresses, during both walking and running, corresponded to each other and qualitatively to the calcaneal trabecular architecture.

  5. Negative running can prevent eternal inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, William H.; Freese, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Current data from the Planck satellite and the BICEP2 telescope favor, at around the 2 σ level, negative running of the spectral index of curvature perturbations from inflation. We show that for negative running α < 0, the curvature perturbation amplitude has a maximum on scales larger than our current horizon size. A condition for the absence of eternal inflation is that the curvature perturbation amplitude always remain below unity on superhorizon scales. For current bounds on nS from Planck, this corresponds to an upper bound of the running α < -9 × 10-5, so that even tiny running of the scalar spectral index is sufficient to prevent eternal inflation from occurring, as long as the running remains negative on scales outside the horizon. In single-field inflation models, negative running is associated with a finite duration of inflation: we show that eternal inflation may not occur even in cases where inflation lasts as long as 104 e-folds.

  6. Metadata aided run selection at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, R. M.; Gallas, E. J.; C-L Tseng, J.; Viegas, F.; Vinek, E.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    Management of the large volume of data collected by any large scale scientific experiment requires the collection of coherent metadata quantities, which can be used by reconstruction or analysis programs and/or user interfaces, to pinpoint collections of data needed for specific purposes. In the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, we have collected metadata from systems storing non-event-wise data (Conditions) into a relational database. The Conditions metadata (COMA) database tables not only contain conditions known at the time of event recording, but also allow for the addition of conditions data collected as a result of later analysis of the data (such as improved measurements of beam conditions or assessments of data quality). A new web based interface called "runBrowser" makes these Conditions Metadata available as a Run based selection service. runBrowser, based on PHP and JavaScript, uses jQuery to present selection criteria and report results. It not only facilitates data selection by conditions attributes, but also gives the user information at each stage about the relationship between the conditions chosen and the remaining conditions criteria available. When a set of COMA selections are complete, runBrowser produces a human readable report as well as an XML file in a standardized ATLAS format. This XML can be saved for later use or refinement in a future runBrowser session, shared with physics/detector groups, or used as input to ELSSI (event level Metadata browser) or other ATLAS run or event processing services.

  7. Calcaneal loading during walking and running

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giddings, V. L.; Beaupre, G. S.; Whalen, R. T.; Carter, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study of the foot uses experimentally measured kinematic and kinetic data with a numerical model to evaluate in vivo calcaneal stresses during walking and running. METHODS: External ground reaction forces (GRF) and kinematic data were measured during walking and running using cineradiography and force plate measurements. A contact-coupled finite element model of the foot was developed to assess the forces acting on the calcaneus during gait. RESULTS: We found that the calculated force-time profiles of the joint contact, ligament, and Achilles tendon forces varied with the time-history curve of the moment about the ankle joint. The model predicted peak talocalcaneal and calcaneocuboid joint loads of 5.4 and 4.2 body weights (BW) during walking and 11.1 and 7.9 BW during running. The maximum predicted Achilles tendon forces were 3.9 and 7.7 BW for walking and running. CONCLUSIONS: Large magnitude forces and calcaneal stresses are generated late in the stance phase, with maximum loads occurring at approximately 70% of the stance phase during walking and at approximately 60% of the stance phase during running, for the gait velocities analyzed. The trajectories of the principal stresses, during both walking and running, corresponded to each other and qualitatively to the calcaneal trabecular architecture.

  8. Running With an Elastic Lower Limb Exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Michael S; Kota, Sridhar; Young, Aaron; Ferris, Daniel P

    2016-06-01

    Although there have been many lower limb robotic exoskeletons that have been tested for human walking, few devices have been tested for assisting running. It is possible that a pseudo-passive elastic exoskeleton could benefit human running without the addition of electrical motors due to the spring-like behavior of the human leg. We developed an elastic lower limb exoskeleton that added stiffness in parallel with the entire lower limb. Six healthy, young subjects ran on a treadmill at 2.3 m/s with and without the exoskeleton. Although the exoskeleton was designed to provide ~50% of normal leg stiffness during running, it only provided 24% of leg stiffness during testing. The difference in added leg stiffness was primarily due to soft tissue compression and harness compliance decreasing exoskeleton displacement during stance. As a result, the exoskeleton only supported about 7% of the peak vertical ground reaction force. There was a significant increase in metabolic cost when running with the exoskeleton compared with running without the exoskeleton (ANOVA, P < .01). We conclude that 2 major roadblocks to designing successful lower limb robotic exoskeletons for human running are human-machine interface compliance and the extra lower limb inertia from the exoskeleton.

  9. Negative running can prevent eternal inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, William H.; Freese, Katherine E-mail: ktfreese@umich.edu

    2015-01-01

    Current data from the Planck satellite and the BICEP2 telescope favor, at around the 2 σ level, negative running of the spectral index of curvature perturbations from inflation. We show that for negative running α < 0, the curvature perturbation amplitude has a maximum on scales larger than our current horizon size. A condition for the absence of eternal inflation is that the curvature perturbation amplitude always remain below unity on superhorizon scales. For current bounds on n{sub S} from Planck, this corresponds to an upper bound of the running α < −9 × 10{sup −5}, so that even tiny running of the scalar spectral index is sufficient to prevent eternal inflation from occurring, as long as the running remains negative on scales outside the horizon. In single-field inflation models, negative running is associated with a finite duration of inflation: we show that eternal inflation may not occur even in cases where inflation lasts as long as 10{sup 4} e-folds.

  10. Sex differences in running mechanics and patellofemoral joint kinetics following an exhaustive run.

    PubMed

    Willson, John D; Loss, Justin R; Willy, Richard W; Meardon, Stacey A

    2015-11-26

    Patellofemoral joint pain (PFP) is a common running-related injury that is more prevalent in females and thought to be associated with altered running mechanics. Changes in running mechanics have been observed following an exhaustive run but have not been analyzed relative to the sex bias for PFP. The purpose of this study was to test if females demonstrate unique changes in running mechanics associated with PFP following an exhaustive run. For this study, 18 females and 17 males ran to volitional exhaustion. Peak PFJ contact force and stress, PFJ contact force and stress loading rates, hip adduction excursion, and hip and knee joint frontal plane angular impulse were analyzed between females and males using separate 2 factor ANOVAs (2 (male/female)×2 (before/after exhaustion)). We observed similar changes in running mechanics among males and females over the course of the exhaustive run. Specifically, greater peak PFJ contact force loading rate (5%, P=.01), PFJ stress loading rate (5%, P<.01), hip adduction excursion (1.3°, P<.01), hip abduction angular impulse (4%, P<.01), knee abduction angular impulse (5%, P=.03), average vertical ground reaction force loading rate (10%, P<.01) and step length (2.1cm, P=.001) were observed during exhausted running. These small changes in suspected PFP pathomechanical factors may increase a runner׳s propensity for PFP. However, unique changes in female running mechanics due to exhaustion do not appear to contribute to the sex bias for PFP.

  11. Running kinematics and shock absorption do not change after brief exhaustive running.

    PubMed

    Abt, John P; Sell, Timothy C; Chu, Yungchien; Lovalekar, Mita; Burdett, Ray G; Lephart, Scott M

    2011-06-01

    Because of the nature of running, the forces encountered require a proper coordination of joint action of the lower extremity to dissipate the ground reaction forces and accelerations through the kinetic chain. Running-related muscle fatigue may reduce the shock absorbing capacity of the lower extremity and alter running kinematics. The purpose of this study was to determine if a bout of exhaustive running at a physiologically determined high intensity, changes running kinematics, impact accelerations, and alters shock attenuating capabilities. It was hypothesized that as a result of fatigue induced by an exhaustive run, running kinematics, impact accelerations at the head and shank, acceleration reduction, and shock attenuation would change. A within-subject, repeated-measures design was used for this study. Twelve healthy, competitive male and female distance runners participated. Subjects performed 2 testing sessions consisting of a VO2max treadmill protocol to determine the heart rate at ventilatory threshold and a fatigue-inducing running bout at the identified ventilatory threshold heart rate. Kinematic data included knee flexion, pronation, time to maximum knee flexion, and time to maximum pronation. Acceleration data included shank acceleration, head acceleration, and shock attenuation. No significant differences resulted for the kinematic or acceleration variables. Although the results of this study do not support the original hypotheses, the influence of running fatigue on kinematics and accelerations remains inconclusive. Future research is necessary to examine fatigue-induced changes in running kinematics and accelerations and to determine the threshold at which point the changes may occur.

  12. Running with a load increases leg stiffness.

    PubMed

    Silder, Amy; Besier, Thor; Delp, Scott L

    2015-04-13

    Spring-mass models have been used to characterize running mechanics and leg stiffness in a variety of conditions, yet it remains unknown how running while carrying a load affects running mechanics and leg stiffness. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that running with a load increases leg stiffness. Twenty-seven subjects ran at a constant speed on a force-measuring treadmill while carrying no load, and while wearing weight vests loaded with 10%, 20%, and 30% of body weight. We measured lower extremity motion and created a scaled musculoskeletal model of each subject, which we used to estimate lower extremity joint angles and leg length. We estimated dimensionless leg stiffness as the ratio of the peak vertical ground reaction force (normalized to body weight) and the change in stance phase leg length (normalized to leg length at initial foot contact). Leg length was calculated as the distance from the center of the pelvis to the center-of-pressure under the foot. We found that dimensionless leg stiffness increased when running with load (p=0.001); this resulted from an increase in the peak vertical ground reaction force (p<0.001) and a smaller change in stance phase leg length (p=0.025). When running with load, subjects had longer ground contact times (p<0.020), greater hip (p<0.001) and knee flexion (p=0.048) at the time of initial foot contact, and greater peak stance phase hip, knee, and ankle flexion (p<0.05). Our results reveal that subjects run in a more crouched posture and with higher leg stiffness to accommodate an added load. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Whole beetroot consumption acutely improves running performance.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Margaret; Eliot, Katie; Heuertz, Rita M; Weiss, Edward

    2012-04-01

    Nitrate ingestion improves exercise performance; however, it has also been linked to adverse health effects, except when consumed in the form of vegetables. The purpose of this study was to determine, in a double-blind crossover study, whether whole beetroot consumption, as a means for increasing nitrate intake, improves endurance exercise performance. Eleven recreationally fit men and women were studied in a double-blind placebo controlled crossover trial performed in 2010. Participants underwent two 5-km treadmill time trials in random sequence, once 75 minutes after consuming baked beetroot (200 g with ≥500 mg nitrate) and once 75 minutes after consuming cranberry relish as a eucaloric placebo. Based on paired t tests, mean running velocity during the 5-km run tended to be faster after beetroot consumption (12.3±2.7 vs 11.9±2.6 km/hour; P=0.06). During the last 1.1 miles (1.8 km) of the 5-km run, running velocity was 5% faster (12.7±3.0 vs 12.1±2.8 km/hour; P=0.02) in the beetroot trial, with no differences in velocity (P≥0.25) in the earlier portions of the 5-km run. No differences in exercise heart rate were observed between trials; however, at 1.8 km into the 5-km run, rating of perceived exertion was lower with beetroot (13.0±2.1 vs 13.7±1.9; P=0.04). Consumption of nitrate-rich, whole beetroot improves running performance in healthy adults. Because whole vegetables have been shown to have health benefits, whereas nitrates from other sources may have detrimental health effects, it would be prudent for individuals seeking performance benefits to obtain nitrates from whole vegetables, such as beetroot.

  14. Running Speed Can Be Predicted from Foot Contact Time during Outdoor over Ground Running

    PubMed Central

    van Oeveren, Ben; Francke, Agnieta; Zijlstra, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The number of validation studies of commercially available foot pods that provide estimates of running speed is limited and these studies have been conducted under laboratory conditions. Moreover, internal data handling and algorithms used to derive speed from these pods are proprietary and thereby unclear. The present study investigates the use of foot contact time (CT) for running speed estimations, which potentially can be used in addition to the global positioning system (GPS) in situations where GPS performance is limited. CT was measured with tri axial inertial sensors attached to the feet of 14 runners, during natural over ground outdoor running, under optimized conditions for GPS. The individual relationships between running speed and CT were established during short runs at different speeds on two days. These relations were subsequently used to predict instantaneous speed during a straight line 4 km run with a single turning point halfway. Stopwatch derived speed, measured for each of 32 consecutive 125m intervals during the 4 km runs, was used as reference. Individual speed-CT relations were strong (r2 >0.96 for all trials) and consistent between days. During the 4km runs, median error (ranges) in predicted speed from CT 2.5% (5.2) was higher (P<0.05) than for GPS 1.6% (0.8). However, around the turning point and during the first and last 125m interval, error for GPS-speed increased to 5.0% (4.5) and became greater (P<0.05) than the error predicted from CT: 2.7% (4.4). Small speed fluctuations during 4km runs were adequately monitored with both methods: CT and GPS respectively explained 85% and 73% of the total speed variance during 4km runs. In conclusion, running speed estimates bases on speed-CT relations, have acceptable accuracy and could serve to backup or substitute for GPS during tarmac running on flat terrain whenever GPS performance is limited. PMID:27648946

  15. Compare 100 GeV/n Au Run 2010 with Run 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-01-01

    With the very successful commissioning of the vertical stochastic cooling in 100 GeV/n Au Run 2010, the IBS (intra-beam scattering) is no longer the dominant factor in terms of the integrated luminosity. A new luminosity model is needed, where the beam intensity lifetime is more important and the burn-off needs to be accounted for. Toward this goal, a brief review of the Run 2010, compared with Run 2007, is presented.

  16. Exercise economy in skiing and running.

    PubMed

    Losnegard, Thomas; Schäfer, Daniela; Hallén, Jostein

    2014-01-01

    Substantial inter-individual variations in exercise economy exist even in highly trained endurance athletes. The variation is believed to be determined partly by intrinsic factors. Therefore, in the present study, we compared exercise economy in V2-skating, double poling, and uphill running. Ten highly trained male cross-country skiers (23 ± 3 years, 180 ± 6 cm, 75 ± 8 kg, VO2peak running: 76.3 ± 5.6 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) participated in the study. Exercise economy and VO2peak during treadmill running, ski skating (V2 technique) and double poling were compared based on correlation analysis. There was a very large correlation in exercise economy between V2-skating and double poling (r = 0.81) and large correlations between V2-skating and running (r = 0.53) and double poling and running (r = 0.58). There were trivial to moderate correlations between exercise economy and the intrinsic factors VO2peak (r = 0.00-0.23), cycle rate (r = 0.03-0.46), body mass (r = -0.09-0.46) and body height (r = 0.11-0.36). In conclusion, the inter-individual variation in exercise economy could be explained only moderately by differences in VO2peak, body mass and body height. Apparently other intrinsic factors contribute to the variation in exercise economy between highly trained subjects.

  17. The Run-2 ATLAS Trigger System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Martínez, A.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The ATLAS trigger successfully collected collision data during the first run of the LHC between 2009-2013 at different centre-of-mass energies between 900 GeV and 8TeV. The trigger system consists of a hardware Level-1 and a software-based high level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of a few hundred Hz. In Run-2, the LHC will operate at centre-of-mass energies of 13 and 14 TeV and higher luminosity, resulting in up to five times higher rates of processes of interest. A brief review of the ATLAS trigger system upgrades that were implemented between Run-1 and Run-2, allowing to cope with the increased trigger rates while maintaining or even improving the efficiency to select physics processes of interest, will be given. This includes changes to the Level-1 calorimeter and muon trigger systems, the introduction of a new Level-1 topological trigger module and the merging of the previously two-level HLT system into a single event processing farm. A few examples will be shown, such as the impressive performance improvements in the HLT trigger algorithms used to identify leptons, hadrons and global event quantities like missing transverse energy. Finally, the status of the commissioning of the trigger system and its performance during the 2015 run will be presented.

  18. Exercise economy in skiing and running

    PubMed Central

    Losnegard, Thomas; Schäfer, Daniela; Hallén, Jostein

    2014-01-01

    Substantial inter-individual variations in exercise economy exist even in highly trained endurance athletes. The variation is believed to be determined partly by intrinsic factors. Therefore, in the present study, we compared exercise economy in V2-skating, double poling, and uphill running. Ten highly trained male cross-country skiers (23 ± 3 years, 180 ± 6 cm, 75 ± 8 kg, VO2peak running: 76.3 ± 5.6 mL·kg−1·min−1) participated in the study. Exercise economy and VO2peak during treadmill running, ski skating (V2 technique) and double poling were compared based on correlation analysis. There was a very large correlation in exercise economy between V2-skating and double poling (r = 0.81) and large correlations between V2-skating and running (r = 0.53) and double poling and running (r = 0.58). There were trivial to moderate correlations between exercise economy and the intrinsic factors VO2peak (r = 0.00–0.23), cycle rate (r = 0.03–0.46), body mass (r = −0.09–0.46) and body height (r = 0.11–0.36). In conclusion, the inter-individual variation in exercise economy could be explained only moderately by differences in VO2peak, body mass and body height. Apparently other intrinsic factors contribute to the variation in exercise economy between highly trained subjects. PMID:24478718

  19. Tibiocalcaneal kinematics of barefoot versus shod running.

    PubMed

    Stacoff, A; Nigg, B M; Reinschmidt, C; van den Bogert, A J; Lundberg, A

    2000-11-01

    Barefoot running kinematics has been described to vary considerably from shod running. However, previous investigations were typically based on externally mounted shoe and/or skin markers, which have been shown to overestimate skeletal movements. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare calcaneal and tibial movements of barefoot versus shod running using skeletal markers. Intracortical bone pins with reflective marker triads were inserted under standard local anesthetic into the calcaneus and tibia of five healthy male subjects. The subjects ran barefoot, with a normal shoe, with three shoe soles and two orthotic modifications. The three-dimensional tibiocalcaneal rotations were determined using a joint coordinate system approach. Test variables were defined for eversion and tibial rotation. The results showed that the differences in bone movements between barefoot and shod running were small and unsystematic (mean effects being less than 2 degrees ) compared with the differences between the subjects (up to 10 degrees ). However, differences may occur during midstance when extreme shoe modifications (i.e. posterior orthosis) are used. It is concluded that calcaneal and tibial movement patterns do not differ substantially between barefoot and shod running, and that the effects of these interventions are subject specific. The result of this in vivo study contrasts with previous investigations using skin and shoe mounted markers and suggests that these discrepancies may be the result of the overestimation with externally mounted markers.

  20. Is running associated with degenerative joint disease

    SciTech Connect

    Panush, R.S.; Schmidt, C.; Caldwell, J.R.; Edwards, N.L.; Longley, S.; Yonker, R.; Webster, E.; Nauman, J.; Stork, J.; Pettersson, H.

    1986-03-07

    Little information is available regarding the long-term effects, if any, of running on the musculoskeletal system. The authors compared the prevalence of degenerative joint disease among 17 male runners with 18 male nonrunners. Running subjects (53% marathoners) ran a mean of 44.8 km (28 miles)/wk for 12 years. Pain and swelling of hips, knees, ankles and feet and other musculoskeletal complaints among runners were comparable with those among nonrunners. Radiologic examinations (for osteophytes, cartilage thickness, and grade of degeneration) also were without notable differences among groups. They did not find an increased prevalence of osteoarthritis among the runners. Our observations suggest that long-duration, high-mileage running need to be associated with premature degenerative joint disease in the lower extremities.

  1. Holographic Ricci dark energy as running vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Paxy; Mathew, Titus K.

    2016-04-01

    Holographic Ricci dark energy (DE) that has been proposed ago has faced problems of future singularity. In the present work, we consider the Ricci DE with an additive constant in its density as running vacuum energy. We have analytically solved the Friedmann equations and also the role played by the general conservation law followed by the cosmic components together. We have shown that the running vacuum energy status of the Ricci DE helps to remove the possible future singularity in the model. The additive constant in the density of the running vacuum played an important role, such that, without that, the model predicts either eternal deceleration or eternal acceleration. But along with the additive constant, equivalent to a cosmological constant, the model predicts a late time acceleration in the expansion of the universe, and in the far future of the evolution it tends to de Sitter universe.

  2. Jefferson Lab Data Acquisition Run Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Vardan Gyurjyan; Carl Timmer; David Abbott; William Heyes; Edward Jastrzembski; David Lawrence; Elliott Wolin

    2004-10-01

    A general overview of the Jefferson Lab data acquisition run control system is presented. This run control system is designed to operate the configuration, control, and monitoring of all Jefferson Lab experiments. It controls data-taking activities by coordinating the operation of DAQ sub-systems, online software components and third-party software such as external slow control systems. The main, unique feature which sets this system apart from conventional systems is its incorporation of intelligent agent concepts. Intelligent agents are autonomous programs which interact with each other through certain protocols on a peer-to-peer level. In this case, the protocols and standards used come from the domain-independent Foundation for Intelligent Physical Agents (FIPA), and the implementation used is the Java Agent Development Framework (JADE). A lightweight, XML/RDF-based language was developed to standardize the description of the run control system for configuration purposes.

  3. Predicting running speed from a simple questionnaire.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, M J

    1985-01-01

    Of 221 competitors in a University half marathon in 1983, 98 replied to a questionnaire before the race which asked for details of training, age, height, weight and resting pulse rate. Finishing times of all competitors were recorded. In a multiple regression analysis significant predictors of running speed were: amount of training, expressed as distance run per week and number of weeks training for the event, the Body Mass Index (weight/height) and resting pulse rate. We conclude that for assessing running speed amongst competitors with similar amounts of training, the Body Mass Index and the resting pulse rate are useful substitutes for more elaborate and expensive measures. Images p142-a PMID:4075062

  4. Predicting application run times using historical information.

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.; Smith, W.; Taylor, V.

    1999-06-25

    The authors present a technique for deriving predictions for the run times of parallel applications from the run times of similar applications that have executed in the past. The novel aspect of the work is the use of search techniques to determine those application characteristics that yield the best definition of similarity for the purpose of making predictions. They use four workloads recorded from parallel computers at Argonne National Laboratory, the Cornell Theory Center, and the San Diego Supercomputer Center to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach.They show that on these workloads the techniques achieve predictions that are between 14 and 60% better than those achieved by other researchers; the approach achieves mean prediction errors that are between 41 and 65% of mean application run times.

  5. The effect of footwear on running performance and running economy in distance runners.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Joel T; Bellenger, Clint R; Thewlis, Dominic; Tsiros, Margarita D; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2015-03-01

    The effect of footwear on running economy has been investigated in numerous studies. However, no systematic review and meta-analysis has synthesised the available literature and the effect of footwear on running performance is not known. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of footwear on running performance and running economy in distance runners, by reviewing controlled trials that compare different footwear conditions or compare footwear with barefoot. The Web of Science, Scopus, MEDLINE, CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), EMBASE, AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine), CINAHL and SPORTDiscus databases were searched from inception up until April 2014. Included articles reported on controlled trials that examined the effects of footwear or footwear characteristics (including shoe mass, cushioning, motion control, longitudinal bending stiffness, midsole viscoelasticity, drop height and comfort) on running performance or running economy and were published in a peer-reviewed journal. Of the 1,044 records retrieved, 19 studies were included in the systematic review and 14 studies were included in the meta-analysis. No studies were identified that reported effects on running performance. Individual studies reported significant, but trivial, beneficial effects on running economy for comfortable and stiff-soled shoes [standardised mean difference (SMD) <0.12; P < 0.05), a significant small beneficial effect on running economy for cushioned shoes (SMD = 0.37; P < 0.05) and a significant moderate beneficial effect on running economy for training in minimalist shoes (SMD = 0.79; P < 0.05). Meta-analysis found significant small beneficial effects on running economy for light shoes and barefoot compared with heavy shoes (SMD < 0.34; P < 0.01) and for minimalist shoes compared with conventional shoes (SMD = 0.29; P < 0.01). A significant positive association between shoe mass and metabolic cost of running

  6. Rocker shoe, minimalist shoe, and standard running shoe: a comparison of running economy.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, Sobhan; Bredeweg, Steef; Dekker, Rienk; Kluitenberg, Bas; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Hijmans, Juha; Postema, Klaas

    2014-05-01

    Running with rocker shoes is believed to prevent lower limb injuries. However, it is not clear how running in these shoes affects the energy expenditure. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to assess the effects of rocker shoes on running economy in comparison with standard and minimalist running shoes. Cross-over design. Eighteen endurance female runners (age=23.6 ± 3 years), who were inexperienced in running with rocker shoes and with minimalist/barefoot running, participated in this study. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, heart rate and rate of perceived exertion were measured while participants completed a 6-min sub-maximal treadmill running test for each footwear condition. The data of the last 2 min of each shoe condition were averaged for analysis. A linear mixed model was used to compare differences among three footwear conditions. Oxygen consumption during running with rocker shoes was on average 4.5% higher than with the standard shoes (p<0.001) and 5.6% higher than with the minimalist shoe (p<0.001). No significant differences were found in heart rate and rate of perceived exertion across three shoe conditions. Female runners, who are not experienced in running with the rocker shoes and minimalist shoes, show more energy expenditure during running with the rocker shoes compared with the standard and minimalist shoes. As the studied shoes were of different masses, part of the effect of increased energy expenditure with the rocker shoe is likely to be due to its larger mass as compared with standard running shoes and minimalist shoes. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Footwear Decreases Gait Asymmetry during Running

    PubMed Central

    Hoerzer, Stefan; Federolf, Peter A.; Maurer, Christian; Baltich, Jennifer; Nigg, Benno M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on elderly people has suggested that footwear may improve neuromuscular control of motion. If footwear does in fact improve neuromuscular control, then such an influence might already be present in young, healthy adults. A feature that is often used to assess neuromuscular control of motion is the level of gait asymmetry. The objectives of the study were (a) to develop a comprehensive asymmetry index (CAI) that is capable of detecting gait asymmetry changes caused by external boundary conditions such as footwear, and (b) to use the CAI to investigate whether footwear influences gait asymmetry during running in a healthy, young cohort. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected for both legs of 15 subjects performing five barefoot and five shod over-ground running trials. Thirty continuous gait variables including ground reaction forces and variables of the hip, knee, and ankle joints were computed for each leg. For each individual, the differences between the variables for the right and left leg were calculated. Using this data, a principal component analysis was conducted to obtain the CAI. This study had two main outcomes. First, a sensitivity analysis suggested that the CAI had an improved sensitivity for detecting changes in gait asymmetry caused by external boundary conditions. The CAI may, therefore, have important clinical applications such as monitoring the progress of neuromuscular diseases (e.g. stroke or cerebral palsy). Second, the mean CAI for shod running (131.2 ± 48.5; mean ± standard deviation) was significantly lower (p = 0.041) than the CAI for barefoot running (155.7 ± 39.5). This finding suggests that in healthy, young adults gait asymmetry is reduced when running in shoes compared to running barefoot, which may be a result of improved neuromuscular control caused by changes in the afferent sensory feedback. PMID:26488484

  8. Footwear Decreases Gait Asymmetry during Running.

    PubMed

    Hoerzer, Stefan; Federolf, Peter A; Maurer, Christian; Baltich, Jennifer; Nigg, Benno M

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on elderly people has suggested that footwear may improve neuromuscular control of motion. If footwear does in fact improve neuromuscular control, then such an influence might already be present in young, healthy adults. A feature that is often used to assess neuromuscular control of motion is the level of gait asymmetry. The objectives of the study were (a) to develop a comprehensive asymmetry index (CAI) that is capable of detecting gait asymmetry changes caused by external boundary conditions such as footwear, and (b) to use the CAI to investigate whether footwear influences gait asymmetry during running in a healthy, young cohort. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected for both legs of 15 subjects performing five barefoot and five shod over-ground running trials. Thirty continuous gait variables including ground reaction forces and variables of the hip, knee, and ankle joints were computed for each leg. For each individual, the differences between the variables for the right and left leg were calculated. Using this data, a principal component analysis was conducted to obtain the CAI. This study had two main outcomes. First, a sensitivity analysis suggested that the CAI had an improved sensitivity for detecting changes in gait asymmetry caused by external boundary conditions. The CAI may, therefore, have important clinical applications such as monitoring the progress of neuromuscular diseases (e.g. stroke or cerebral palsy). Second, the mean CAI for shod running (131.2 ± 48.5; mean ± standard deviation) was significantly lower (p = 0.041) than the CAI for barefoot running (155.7 ± 39.5). This finding suggests that in healthy, young adults gait asymmetry is reduced when running in shoes compared to running barefoot, which may be a result of improved neuromuscular control caused by changes in the afferent sensory feedback.

  9. 2. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR CANTILEVERED HOG RUN; BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR CANTILEVERED HOG RUN; BUILDING 168 (1960 HOG KILL) IS BENEATH HOG RUN - Rath Packing Company, Cantilevered Hog Run, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  10. CDF - Run II Status and Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Manfred Paulini

    2003-03-17

    After a five year upgrade period, the CDF detector located at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider is back in operation taking high quality data with all subsystems functional. We report on the status of the CDF experiment in Run II and discuss the start-up of the Tevatron accelerator. First physics results from CDF are presented. We also discuss the prospects for B physics in RunII, in particular the measurements of B{sub S}{sup 0} flavour oscillations and CP violation in B decays.

  11. Abort Gap Cleaning for LHC Run 2

    SciTech Connect

    Uythoven, Jan; Boccardi, Andrea; Bravin, Enrico; Goddard, Brennan; Hemelsoet, Georges-Henry; Höfle, Wolfgang; Jacquet, Delphine; Kain, Verena; Mazzoni, Stefano; Meddahi, Malika; Valuch, Daniel; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2014-07-01

    To minimize the beam losses at the moment of an LHC beam dump the 3 μs long abort gap should contain as few particles as possible. Its population can be minimised by abort gap cleaning using the LHC transverse damper system. The LHC Run 1 experience is briefly recalled; changes foreseen for the LHC Run 2 are presented. They include improvements in the observation of the abort gap population and the mechanism to decide if cleaning is required, changes to the hardware of the transverse dampers to reduce the detrimental effect on the luminosity lifetime and proposed changes to the applied cleaning algorithms.

  12. Effects of a minimalist shoe on running economy and 5-km running performance.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Joel T; Thewlis, Dominic; Tsiros, Margarita D; Brown, Nicholas A T; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if minimalist shoes improve time trial performance of trained distance runners and if changes in running economy, shoe mass, stride length, stride rate and footfall pattern were related to any difference in performance. Twenty-six trained runners performed three 6-min sub-maximal treadmill runs at 11, 13 and 15 km·h(-1) in minimalist and conventional shoes while running economy, stride length, stride rate and footfall pattern were assessed. They then performed a 5-km time trial. In the minimalist shoe, runners completed the trial in less time (effect size 0.20 ± 0.12), were more economical during sub-maximal running (effect size 0.33 ± 0.14) and decreased stride length (effect size 0.22 ± 0.10) and increased stride rate (effect size 0.22 ± 0.11). All but one runner ran with a rearfoot footfall in the minimalist shoe. Improvements in time trial performance were associated with improvements in running economy at 15 km·h(-1) (r = 0.58), with 79% of the improved economy accounted for by reduced shoe mass (P < 0.05). The results suggest that running in minimalist shoes improves running economy and 5-km running performance.

  13. Oxygen delivery does not limit peak running speed during incremental downhill running to exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Liefeldt, G; Noakes, T D; Dennis, S C

    1992-01-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO2), ventilation (VI), respiratory exchange ratio (R), stride frequency and blood lactate concentrations were measured continuously in nine trained athletes during two continuous incremental treadmill runs to exhaustion on gradients of either 0 degree or -3 degrees. Compared to the run at 0 degree gradient, the athletes reached significantly higher maximal treadmill velocities but significantly lower VO2, VI, R and peak blood lactate concentrations (P less than 0.001) during downhill running. These lower VO2 and blood lactate concentrations at exhaustion indicated that factors other than oxygen delivery limited maximal performance during the downhill run. In contrast, stride frequencies were similar at each treadmill velocity; the higher maximal speed during the downhill run was achieved with a significantly longer stride length (P less than 0.001); maximal stride frequency was the same between tests. Equivalent maximal stride frequencies suggested that factors determining the rate of lower limb stride recovery may have limited maximal running speed during downhill running and, possibly, also during horizontal running.

  14. Use case approach to integrating and implementing lithography run-to-run control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlikar, Dorit; Abramovich, Irit K.; Kish, Miri; Crow, David; Joubert, Etienne; Carlson, Alan

    2004-04-01

    The benefits of using a run-to-run control system for overlay and CD control have been well documented. However, before any these benefits can be achieved, one must first integrate the run-to-run control system into the existing automation and manufacturing execution system (MES) environment. Integration details that are overlooked during the planning stages often times create unnecessary challenges down the road that can delay reaching advantageous control results. INFICON has developed a novel methodology of documenting process and integration requirements. This method, termed Use Case Review, congregates the appropriate resources from the supplier and the customer to review and customize a predetermined set of documents that describe the run-to-run controller. Each use case contains a flow diagram and a detailed sequence of transactions documenting the actors (Automation PC, Process Equipment, MES, etc.) and variables (Lot ID, Process Level ID, Recipe ID, etc.) involved. The combined set of use cases covers all aspects of integrating a lithography run-to-run controller. During the implementation of NVS ARGUS, TOWER Semiconductor Ltd. benefited from use case review and customization.

  15. Change in running kinematics after cycling are related to alterations in running economy in triathletes.

    PubMed

    Bonacci, Jason; Green, Daniel; Saunders, Philo U; Blanch, Peter; Franettovich, Melinda; Chapman, Andrew R; Vicenzino, Bill

    2010-07-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that cycling may influence neuromuscular control during subsequent running but the relationship between altered neuromuscular control and run performance in triathletes is not well understood. The aim of this study was to determine if a 45 min high-intensity cycle influences lower limb movement and muscle recruitment during running and whether changes in limb movement or muscle recruitment are associated with changes in running economy (RE) after cycling. RE, muscle activity (surface electromyography) and limb movement (sagittal plane kinematics) were compared between a control run (no preceding cycle) and a run performed after a 45 min high-intensity cycle in 15 moderately trained triathletes. Muscle recruitment and kinematics during running after cycling were altered in 7 of 15 (46%) triathletes. Changes in kinematics at the knee and ankle were significantly associated with the change in VO(2) after cycling (p<0.05). The change in ankle angle at foot contact alone explained 67.1% of the variance in VO(2). These findings suggest that cycling does influence limb movement and muscle recruitment in some triathletes and that changes in kinematics, especially at the ankle, are closely related to alterations in running economy after cycling.

  16. Run Run Run.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilt, Fred

    This guidebook is written for coaches of runners competing in both crosscountry and track. The techniques of training athletes in this sport are described with emphasis placed on why certain methods are successful as well as how they are accomplished. The methods of training runners of different ages and varying experience are discussed. Articles…

  17. Run-to-run CD error analysis and control monitoring of effective dose and focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masafumi; Fujisawa, Tadahito; Izuha, Kyoko; Inoue, Soichi

    2003-05-01

    We have developed in-line dose and focus monitoring techniques for the detailed analysis of critical dimension error and accurate process control. From exposed wafers, effective does and focus are measured with specificed monitor marks built on a reticle. The contributions of effective dose and focus to critical dimension error on device chips were clarified in a fabrication proces of 110 nm isolated pattern with a KrF scanner. The critical dimensions error was described as a function of effective dose and focus, which include various process fluctuations. We could determine whether current exposure settings such as dose input and focus input were adequate or not. Based on the experimental data, we estimated the benefit of simultaneous Run-to-Run control of dose and focus. The estimation clarifies that it realizes total critical dimension control including Run-to-Run and intra-Run.

  18. A running controller for a powered transfemoral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Huff, Amanda M; Lawson, Brian E; Goldfarb, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a running controller for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis. The running controller was implemented on a powered prosthesis prototype and evaluated by a transfemoral amputee subject running on a treadmill at a speed of 2.25 m/s (5.0 mph). The ability of the prosthesis and controller to provide the salient features of a running gait was assessed by comparing the kinematics of running provided by the powered prosthesis to the averaged kinematics of five healthy subjects running at the same speed. This comparison indicates that the powered prosthesis and running controller are able to provide essential features of a healthy running gait.

  19. Comparison of Running Economy Values While Wearing No Shoes, Minimal Shoes, and Normal Running Shoes.

    PubMed

    Cochrum, Robbie G; Connors, Ryan T; Coons, John M; Fuller, Dana K; Morgan, Don W; Caputo, Jennifer L

    2017-03-01

    Cochrum, RG, Connors, RT, Coons, JM, Fuller, DK, Morgan, DW, and Caputo, JL. Comparison of running economy values while wearing no shoes, minimal shoes, and normal running shoes. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 595-601, 2017-The purpose of this study was to quantify differences in running economy (RE) at 50 and 70% of each subject's velocity at V[Combining Dot Above]O2max (vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max) across barefoot and 2 mass, stack height, and heel-to-toe-drop controlled footwear conditions (minimal shoes and normal running shoes) in 9 recreational distance runners (mean age 26.8 ± 6.8 years). Over 3 days, subjects ran in one of the footwear conditions while RE (oxygen consumption) and step frequency were measured at each speed with a 5-minute rest between each trial. A 2-way repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance (p ≤ 0.05) and Bonferroni-adjusted follow-up analyses revealed that RE was not significantly different across footwear conditions at either speed. However, those running barefoot exhibited a higher step frequency than when running in minimal (50%, p = 0.007; and 70%, p < 0.001) and standard footwear conditions (70% only, p < 0.001). Higher step frequencies were also exhibited by those running in minimal versus standard footwear (70% only, p = 0.007). Thus, RE is not affected by footwear or running barefoot in those with experience running in minimal-type footwear. Significant adjustments in step frequency when alternative footwear was introduced may help explain why RE was statistically maintained during each footwear and speed condition across but not between subjects. Therefore, determination of footwear for the enhancement of RE should be based on individual physical characteristics and preferences rather than a global recommendation of an economical running shoe.

  20. Brook Trout Back in Aaron Run

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Following a series of acid mine drainage (AMD) projects funded largely by EPA’s Clean Water Act Section 319 non-point source program, the pH level in Aaron Run is meeting Maryland’s water quality standard – and the brook trout are back.

  1. Utah CTE: Running in New Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Kristine; Fischio, Shannon; Thomas, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Although the authors admit that they do not have any fool-proof formulas to offer for using Web site, blog, Facebook, Twitter, or YouTube in order to more successfully share one's career and technical education (CTE) story, they share a story of their own journey and hope that it may help people to run faster and more effectively in these new…

  2. Running-Away: A Definitional Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, William L.

    The broader question regarding the issue of runaways as a social problem requires incidence figures to estimate the extent of this problem. This paper examines how differing definitions used to describe running away can produce varying estimates of incidence. Due to these variations, levels of incidence range from a low of .0011% to a high of…

  3. An Orthopedic Perspective. Does Running Cause Osteoarthritis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascale, Mark; Grana, William A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the development of osteoarthritis and whether running and other impact loading sports promote it. Although these sports do not cause arthritis in normal weight bearing limbs, they can accelerate it in damaged joints. It is important to identify people with preeexisting joint disease so they can choose nonimpact-loading aerobic exercise.…

  4. The D0 run II trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard; /Michigan State U.

    2004-11-01

    The D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron was upgraded for Run II. This upgrade included improvements to the trigger system in order to be able to handle the increased Tevatron luminosity and higher bunch crossing rates compared to Run I. The D0 Run II trigger is a highly exible system to select events to be written to tape from an initial interaction rate of about 2.5 MHz. This is done in a three-tier pipelined, buffered system. The first tier (level 1) processes fast detector pick-off signals in a hardware/firmware based system to reduce the event rate to about 1. 5kHz. The second tier (level 2) uses information from level 1 and forms simple Physics objects to reduce the rate to about 850 Hz. The third tier (level 3) uses full detector readout and event reconstruction on a filter farm to reduce the rate to 20-30 Hz. The D0 trigger menu contains a wide variety of triggers. While the emphasis is on triggering on generic lepton and jet final states, there are also trigger terms for specific final state signatures. In this document we describe the D0 trigger system as it was implemented and is currently operating in Run II.

  5. Endosew: new device for laparoscopic running sutures.

    PubMed

    Brehmer, Bernhard; Moll, Clemens; Makris, Antonios; Kirschner-Hermanns, Ruth; Knüchel, Ruth; Jakse, Gerhard

    2008-02-01

    In 2002, the first completely laparoscopic cystectomy and orthotopic ileal neobladder procedure was reported to take more than 10 hours, with the most time-consuming portion being suturing. Therefore, to improve the quality and reduce the time to place running sutures, we developed a new sewing device for laparoscopic use. We compared running sutures made by hand with those made by machine in the ilea of six pigs. The tightness of the closures was examined and the suturing time recorded. Two animals each were sacrificed after 3, 6, and 9 days, and then the explanted ilea were examined at both the macroscopic and microscopic levels. No animal died during the course of the experiment and no leaks were found postoperatively. Moreover, no significant differences were seen on macroscopic or microscopic examination in the quality of the two sets of sutures. The time taken to place 1 cm of running suture, including initial preparation, was 7.2 and 3 minutes for hand and machine suturing, respectively. The hand sutures were always initially tight, whereas those placed by machine required adjustment to stop leaks on four occasions. Using the Endosew device reduces the time needed to place running sutures by 2.4-fold. The quality of the hand- and machine-made sutures was nearly identical at both the macroscopic and microscopic level. Thus, the functionality of this new sewing device is more than satisfactory, and the amount of time saved by using it far outweighs the need for occasional adjustments to stop suture leakage.

  6. Jet physics at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Safonov, A.; /UC, Davis

    2004-12-01

    The latest results on jet physics at CDF are presented and discussed. Particular attention is paid to studies of the inclusive jet cross section using 177 pb{sup -1} of Run II data. Also discussed is a study of gluon and quark jet fragmentation.

  7. The running athlete: Roentgenograms and remedies

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, H.; Torg, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have put together an atlas of radiographs of almost every conceivable running injury to the foot, ankle, leg, knee, femur, groin, and spine. Text material is limited to legends which describe the figures, and the remedies listed are brief. The text indicates conservative versus surgical treatment and, in some instances, recommends a surgical procedure.

  8. An Orthopedic Perspective. Does Running Cause Osteoarthritis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascale, Mark; Grana, William A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the development of osteoarthritis and whether running and other impact loading sports promote it. Although these sports do not cause arthritis in normal weight bearing limbs, they can accelerate it in damaged joints. It is important to identify people with preeexisting joint disease so they can choose nonimpact-loading aerobic exercise.…

  9. South Africa/Time Running Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Todd, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Based on the book, "South Africa: Time Running Out," a report of the Study Commission on U.S. Policy Toward Southern Africa, this 10-20 day unit of study is designed to help high school students learn about the history, geography, and present situation in South Africa and its relationship to the United States. The first of four sections…

  10. Validity of Self-Reported Running Distance.

    PubMed

    Dideriksen, Mette; Soegaard, Cristina; Nielsen, Rasmus O

    2016-06-01

    It is unclear whether there is a difference between subjective evaluation and objective global positioning systems (GPS) measurement of running distance. The purpose of this study was to investigate if such difference exists. A total of 100 participants (51% men; median age, 41.5; body mass, 78.1 kg ±13.8 SD) completed a run of free choice, then subjectively reported the distance in kilometer (km). This information was subsequently compared with the distance derived from a nondifferential GPS watch using paired t-tests and Bland-Altman's 95% limits of agreement. No significant difference was found between the mean paired differences between subjective evaluations and GPS measurements (1.86%, 95% confidence interval = -1.53%; 5.25%, p = 0.96). The Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement revealed considerable variation (lower limit = -28% and upper limit = 40%). Such variation exceeds the clinical error range of 10%. In conclusion, the mean running distance (km) is similar between self-reporting and GPS measurements. However, researchers should consider using GPS measurements in favor of subjective reporting of running distance because of considerable variation on an individual level.

  11. Necessary adiabatic run times in quantum optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Lucas T.; van Dam, Wim

    2017-03-01

    Quantum annealing is guaranteed to find the ground state of optimization problems provided it operates in the adiabatic limit. Recent work [S. Muthukrishnan et al., Phys. Rev. X 6, 031010 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevX.6.031010] has found that for some barrier tunneling problems, quantum annealing can be run much faster than is adiabatically required. Specifically, an n -qubit optimization problem was presented for which a nonadiabatic, or diabatic, annealing algorithm requires only a constant run time, while an adiabatic annealing algorithm requires a run-time polynomial in n . Here we show that this nonadiabatic speedup is the direct result of a specific symmetry in the studied problem. In the more general case, no such nonadiabatic speedup occurs and we show why the special case achieves this speedup compared to the general case. We also prove that the adiabatic annealing algorithm has a necessary and sufficient run time that is quadratically better than the standard quantum adiabatic condition suggests. We conclude with an observation about the required precision in timing for the diabatic algorithm.

  12. Healthy Living Initiative: Running/Walking Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stylianou, Michalis; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; Kloeppel, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    This study was grounded in the public health literature and the call for schools to serve as physical activity intervention sites. Its purpose was twofold: (a) to examine the daily distance covered by students in a before-school running/walking club throughout 1 school year and (b) to gain insights on the teachers perspectives of the club.…

  13. Individualism, innovation, and long-run growth

    PubMed Central

    Gorodnichenko, Yuriy; Roland, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Countries having a more individualist culture have enjoyed higher long-run growth than countries with a more collectivist culture. Individualist culture attaches social status rewards to personal achievements and thus, provides not only monetary incentives for innovation but also social status rewards, leading to higher rates of innovation and economic growth. PMID:22198759

  14. Gravitational correction to running of gauge couplings.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sean P; Wilczek, Frank

    2006-06-16

    We calculate the contribution of graviton exchange to the running of gauge couplings at lowest non-trivial order in perturbation theory. Including this contribution in a theory that features coupling constant unification does not upset this unification, but rather shifts the unification scale. When extrapolated formally, the gravitational correction renders all gauge couplings asymptotically free.

  15. Biomechanics of running with rocker shoes.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, Sobhan; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Dekker, Rienk; Postema, Klaas; Kluitenberg, Bas; Bredeweg, Steef W; Hijmans, Juha M

    2017-01-01

    Load reduction is an important consideration in conservative management of tendon overuse injuries such as Achilles tendinopathy. Previous research has shown that the use of rocker shoes can reduce the positive ankle power and plantar flexion moment which might help in unloading the Achilles tendon. Despite this promising implication of rocker shoes, the effects on hip and knee biomechanics remain unclear. Moreover, the effect of wearing rocker shoes on different running strike types is unexplored. The aim of this study was to investigate biomechanics of the ankle, knee and hip joints and the role of strike type on these outcomes. Randomized cross-over study. In this study, 16 female endurance runners underwent three-dimensional gait analysis wearing rocker shoes and standard shoes. We examined work, moments, and angles of the ankle, knee and hip during the stance phase of running. In comparison with standard shoes, running with rocker shoes significantly (p<0.001) reduced the positive (16%), and negative (32%) work at the ankle joint. Plantar flexion moment peak and impulse were also reduced by 11% and 12%, respectively. Reduction in these variables was almost two times larger for midfoot strikers than for rearfoot strikers. At the knee joint running with rocker shoes significantly increased the positive work (14%), extension moment peak (6%), and extension moment impulse (12%). These findings indicate that although running with rocker shoes might lower mechanical load on the Achilles tendon, it could increase the risk of overuse injuries of the knee joint. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Running and its influence on smoking habits].

    PubMed

    Ortega Sánchez-Pinilla, Ricardo; Aguilar-Blanco, Eva María

    2006-05-31

    To investigate whether running influences smoking habits. Study of cases and controls, with 1:1 pairing. Retrospective longitudinal observational study. Primary care. City of Toledo, Spain. 48 healthy volunteer runners of 47+/-7.8 years of age. 48 healthy subjects, paired by gender and year of birth, chosen at random from the medical list assigned to the medical researcher. Smoking habits and alcohol consumption in grams per week using a questionnaire, weight, height, blood pressure, and heart rate at rest. The odds ratio (OR) was obtained on the proportion of subjects who smoked or smoked at some time, those who continued smoking and the probabilities of giving up tobacco in each group. The OR of the proportion of subjects who smoked or had smoked between the groups of runners (54.2%) and controls (70.9%) was 0.486 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.205-1.149; chi(2)=2.8; P=.093). The OR for continuing the habit between groups of runners (8.4%) and controls (41.7%) was 0.127 (95% CI, 0.035-0.456; chi(2)=14.0; P=.0002). In the group of runners, 45.8% had stopped smoking, as well as 31.2% of the controls (OR=7.85; 95% CI, 1.89-32.52; chi(2)=11.8; P=.0007); 50% of the runners who smoked had given it up since starting to run and 76.9% of these had given it up just at the time of starting to run. There is a negative association between running and tobacco. If a smoker decides to run regularly he/she has high probabilities of giving up smoking and continue to do so.

  17. Marathon run: cardiovascular adaptation and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Predel, Hans-Georg

    2014-11-21

    The first marathon run as an athletic event took place in the context of the Olympic Games in 1896 in Athens, Greece. Today, participation in a 'marathon run' has become a global phenomenon attracting young professional athletes as well as millions of mainly middle-aged amateur athletes worldwide each year. One of the main motives for these amateur marathon runners is the expectation that endurance exercise (EE) delivers profound beneficial health effects. However, with respect to the cardiovascular system, a controversial debate has emerged whether the marathon run itself is healthy or potentially harmful to the cardiovascular system, especially in middle-aged non-elite male amateur runners. In this cohort, exercise-induced increases in cardiac biomarkers-troponin and brain natriuretic peptide-and acute functional cardiac alterations have been observed and interpreted as potential cardiac damage. Furthermore, in the cohort of 40- to 65-year-old males engaged in intensive EE, a significant risk for the development of atrial fibrillation has been identified. Fortunately, recent studies demonstrated a normalization of the cardiac biomarkers and the functional alterations within a short time frame. Therefore, these alterations may be perceived as physiological myocardial reactions to the strenuous exercise and the term 'cardiac fatigue' has been coined. This interpretation is supported by a recent analysis of 10.9 million marathon runners demonstrating that there was no significantly increased overall risk of cardiac arrest during long-distance running races. In conclusion, intensive and long-lasting EE, e.g. running a full-distance Marathon, results in high cardiovascular strain whose clinical relevance especially for middle-aged and older athletes is unclear and remains a matter of controversy. Furthermore, there is a need for evidence-based recommendations with respect to medical screening and training strategies especially in male amateur runners over the age of

  18. The Relationships between Age and Running Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Devita, Paul; Fellin, Rebecca E; Seay, Joseph F; Ip, Edward; Stavro, Nicole; Messier, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Running has high injury rates, especially among older runners. Most aging literature compares young with old runners without accounting for the progression of biomechanics throughout the lifespan. We used age as a continuous variable to investigate the continuum of age-related gait adaptations in running along with determining the chronology and rate of these adaptations. This study aimed to identify the relations among age and selected running biomechanics throughout the range of 18-60 yr. Experienced (n = 110) healthy runners (male, 54%) provided informed consent and ran at their training pace while motion and force data were captured. Kinematics, ground reaction forces (GRF), and lower limb joint torques and powers were correlated with age using Pearson product-moment correlations and linear regression. Running velocity was inversely related to age (r = -0.27, P = 0.005) because of decreased stride length (r = -0.25, P = 0.008) but not rate. Peak vertical GRF (r = -0.23, P = 0.016) and peak horizontal propulsive GRF decreased with age (r = -0.38, P < 0.0001). Peak ankle torque (r = -0.32, P = 0.0007) and peak negative (r = 0.34, P = 0.0003) and positive (r = -0.37, P < 0.0001) ankle power decreased with age. Age-based regression equations and per-year reductions in all variables significantly related to age are reported. Data support previous work showing lower GRF, stride length, and velocity in old runners. Results are novel in showing the rate of decline in running biomechanics on a per-year basis and that mechanical reductions at the ankle but not at the hip or knee were correlated with age, confirming a previous observation of biomechanical plasticity with age showing reduced ankle but not hip function in gait.

  19. The influence of a new sole geometry while running

    PubMed Central

    Knoepfli-Lenzin, Claudia; Waech, Jennifer Carole; Gülay, Turgut; Schellenberg, Florian; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Running shoe construction influences the forces experienced by the human body while running. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether the new sole architecture of the On running shoe reduces ground reaction forces compared with running barefoot or with a conventional running shoe and whether it changes the physiological parameters of running in shoes. Thirty-seven trained male participants were studied while running at submaximal speeds wearing their conventional running shoe, wearing the On running shoe and while barefoot. Additional biomechanical and physiological values were investigated to determine whether the On running shoe induced any changes in these parameters compared with conventional running shoes. The On exhibited similar ground reaction forces as conventional shoes, and these were different from the forces experienced while running barefoot, showing that the On was more similar to typical shoed running. No difference was observed in running economy between the On and a conventional shoe model. However, a slightly lower heart rate (HR) (≈1.3%) and blood lactate concentration (≈5.5%) were observed during submaximal running with the On running shoe compared with a conventional running shoe, as well as a greater lateral deviation of the centre of pressure mid-stance. The ramifications of the reduced HR and blood lactate concentration for competitive performance are unknown. PMID:24977468

  20. The influence of a new sole geometry while running.

    PubMed

    Knoepfli-Lenzin, Claudia; Waech, Jennifer Carole; Gülay, Turgut; Schellenberg, Florian; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Running shoe construction influences the forces experienced by the human body while running. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether the new sole architecture of the On running shoe reduces ground reaction forces compared with running barefoot or with a conventional running shoe and whether it changes the physiological parameters of running in shoes. Thirty-seven trained male participants were studied while running at submaximal speeds wearing their conventional running shoe, wearing the On running shoe and while barefoot. Additional biomechanical and physiological values were investigated to determine whether the On running shoe induced any changes in these parameters compared with conventional running shoes. The On exhibited similar ground reaction forces as conventional shoes, and these were different from the forces experienced while running barefoot, showing that the On was more similar to typical shoed running. No difference was observed in running economy between the On and a conventional shoe model. However, a slightly lower heart rate (HR) (≈1.3%) and blood lactate concentration (≈5.5%) were observed during submaximal running with the On running shoe compared with a conventional running shoe, as well as a greater lateral deviation of the centre of pressure mid-stance. The ramifications of the reduced HR and blood lactate concentration for competitive performance are unknown.

  1. Kinematic and kinetic analyses of novice running in dress shoes and running shoes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yongku; Kim, Young-Kwan; Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Kong, Sejin; Lee, Ki-Kwang

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate how novice runners adjust their lower extremities in heel-toe running while they wear dress shoes and running shoes. Ten novice male runners repeatedly ran across a force plate at 4 m/s in each type of shoes. Joint kinematics and kinetics, vertical ground reaction force, and utilized coefficient of friction during the stance phase were quantified. The results obtained showed no differences in impact peaks, stance time, stride length and joint kinematics. However, dorsiflexion moment was significantly greater with dress shoes (407 Nm) compared to that with running shoes (304 Nm; p<0.05). Compared to the runners in running shoes (0.23), the runners in dress shoes (0.20) achieved a significantly lower utilized coefficient of friction ( p<0.05). When running in dress shoes, novice runners tended to use better a dorsiflexion moment than when running in running shoes. This adaptation appears to minimize the chances of slipping at the moment of heel strike.

  2. A novel running mechanic's class changes kinematics but not running economy.

    PubMed

    Craighead, Daniel H; Lehecka, Nick; King, Deborah L

    2014-11-01

    A novel method of running technique instruction, Midstance to Midstance Running (MMR), was studied to determine how MMR affected kinematics and running economy (RE) of recreational runners. An experimental pre-post randomized groups design was used. Participants (n = 18) were recreational runners who ran at least 3 days a week and 5 km per run. All testing was performed on a treadmill at 2.8 m·s. The intervention group (n = 9) completed 8 weeks of instruction in MMR; the control group (n = 9) continued running without instruction. The MMR group showed significant decreases in stride length (SL) (p = 0.02) and maximum knee flexion velocity in stance (p = 0.01), and a significant increase in stride rate (SR) (p = 0.02) after 8 weeks. No significant changes were found in heart rate, rating of perceived exertion, or RE. Midstance to Midstance Running was effective in changing SR and SL, but was not effective in changing other kinematic variables such as foot contact position and maximum knee flexion during swing. Midstance to Midstance Running did not affect RE. Evidence suggests that MMR may be an appropriate instructional method for recreational runners trying to decrease SL and increase SR.

  3. Physiological assessment of isolated running does not directly replicate running capacity after triathlon-specific cycling.

    PubMed

    Etxebarria, Naroa; Hunt, Julie; Ingham, Steve; Ferguson, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Triathlon running is affected by prior cycling and power output during triathlon cycling is variable in nature. We compared constant and triathlon-specific variable power cycling and their effect on subsequent submaximal running physiology. Nine well-trained male triathletes (age 24.6 ± 4.6 years, [Formula: see text] 4.5 ± 0.4 L · min(-1); mean ± SD) performed a submaximal incremental run test, under three conditions: no prior exercise and after a 1 h cycling trial at 65% of maximal aerobic power with either a constant or a variable power profile. The variable power protocol involved multiple 10-90 s intermittent efforts at 40-140% maximal aerobic power. During cycling, pulmonary ventilation (22%, ± 14%; mean; ± 90% confidence limits), blood lactate (179%, ± 48%) and rating of perceived exertion (7.3%, ± 10.2%) were all substantially higher during variable than during constant power cycling. At the start of the run, blood lactate was 64%, ± 61% higher after variable compared to constant power cycling, which decreased running velocity at 4 mM lactate threshold by 0.6, ± 0.9 km · h(-1). Physiological responses to incremental running are negatively affected by prior cycling and, to a greater extent, by variable compared to even-paced cycling. Testing and training of triathletes should account foe higher physiological cost of triathlon-specific cycling and its effect on subsequent running.

  4. Effects of treadmill running and fatigue on impact acceleration in distance running.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, José Antonio; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana Belloch, Salvador; Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    The effects of treadmill running on impact acceleration were examined together with the interaction between running surface and runner's fatigue state. Twenty recreational runners (11 men and 9 women) ran overground and on a treadmill (at 4.0 m/s) before and after a fatigue protocol consisting of a 30-minute run at 85% of individual maximal aerobic speed. Impact accelerations were analysed using two lightweight capacitive uniaxial accelerometers. A two-way repeated-measure analysis of variance showed that, in the pre-fatigue condition, the treadmill running decreased head and tibial peak impact accelerations and impact rates (the rate of change of acceleration), but no significant difference was observed between the two surfaces in shock attenuation. There was no significant difference in acceleration parameters between the two surfaces in the post-fatigue condition. There was a significant interaction between surface (treadmill and overground) and fatigue state (pre-fatigue and post-fatigue). In particular, fatigue when running overground decreased impact acceleration severity, but it had no such effect when running on the treadmill. The effects of treadmill running and the interaction need to be taken into account when interpreting the results of studies that use a treadmill in their experimental protocols, and when prescribing physical exercise.

  5. Muscular strategy shift in human running: dependence of running speed on hip and ankle muscle performance.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Tim W; Schache, Anthony G; Pandy, Marcus G

    2012-06-01

    Humans run faster by increasing a combination of stride length and stride frequency. In slow and medium-paced running, stride length is increased by exerting larger support forces during ground contact, whereas in fast running and sprinting, stride frequency is increased by swinging the legs more rapidly through the air. Many studies have investigated the mechanics of human running, yet little is known about how the individual leg muscles accelerate the joints and centre of mass during this task. The aim of this study was to describe and explain the synergistic actions of the individual leg muscles over a wide range of running speeds, from slow running to maximal sprinting. Experimental gait data from nine subjects were combined with a detailed computer model of the musculoskeletal system to determine the forces developed by the leg muscles at different running speeds. For speeds up to 7 m s(-1), the ankle plantarflexors, soleus and gastrocnemius, contributed most significantly to vertical support forces and hence increases in stride length. At speeds greater than 7 m s(-1), these muscles shortened at relatively high velocities and had less time to generate the forces needed for support. Thus, above 7 m s(-1), the strategy used to increase running speed shifted to the goal of increasing stride frequency. The hip muscles, primarily the iliopsoas, gluteus maximus and hamstrings, achieved this goal by accelerating the hip and knee joints more vigorously during swing. These findings provide insight into the strategies used by the leg muscles to maximise running performance and have implications for the design of athletic training programs.

  6. The Relationship between Running Velocity and the Energy Cost of Turning during Running

    PubMed Central

    Hatamoto, Yoichi; Yamada, Yosuke; Sagayama, Hiroyuki; Higaki, Yasuki; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Ball game players frequently perform changes of direction (CODs) while running; however, there has been little research on the physiological impact of CODs. In particular, the effect of running velocity on the physiological and energy demands of CODs while running has not been clearly determined. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between running velocity and the energy cost of a 180°COD and to quantify the energy cost of a 180°COD. Nine male university students (aged 18–22 years) participated in the study. Five shuttle trials were performed in which the subjects were required to run at different velocities (3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 km/h). Each trial consisted of four stages with different turn frequencies (13, 18, 24 and 30 per minute), and each stage lasted 3 minutes. Oxygen consumption was measured during the trial. The energy cost of a COD significantly increased with running velocity (except between 7 and 8 km/h, p = 0.110). The relationship between running velocity and the energy cost of a 180°COD is best represented by a quadratic function (y = −0.012+0.066x +0.008x2, [r = 0.994, p = 0.001]), but is also well represented by a linear (y = −0.228+0.152x, [r = 0.991, p<0.001]). These data suggest that even low running velocities have relatively high physiological demands if the COD frequency increases, and that running velocities affect the physiological demands of CODs. These results also showed that the energy expenditure of COD can be evaluated using only two data points. These results may be useful for estimating the energy expenditure of players during a match and designing shuttle exercise training programs. PMID:24497913

  7. The relationship between running velocity and the energy cost of turning during running.

    PubMed

    Hatamoto, Yoichi; Yamada, Yosuke; Sagayama, Hiroyuki; Higaki, Yasuki; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Ball game players frequently perform changes of direction (CODs) while running; however, there has been little research on the physiological impact of CODs. In particular, the effect of running velocity on the physiological and energy demands of CODs while running has not been clearly determined. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between running velocity and the energy cost of a 180°COD and to quantify the energy cost of a 180°COD. Nine male university students (aged 18-22 years) participated in the study. Five shuttle trials were performed in which the subjects were required to run at different velocities (3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 km/h). Each trial consisted of four stages with different turn frequencies (13, 18, 24 and 30 per minute), and each stage lasted 3 minutes. Oxygen consumption was measured during the trial. The energy cost of a COD significantly increased with running velocity (except between 7 and 8 km/h, p = 0.110). The relationship between running velocity and the energy cost of a 180°COD is best represented by a quadratic function (y = -0.012+0.066x +0.008x(2), [r = 0.994, p = 0.001]), but is also well represented by a linear (y = -0.228+0.152x, [r = 0.991, p<0.001]). These data suggest that even low running velocities have relatively high physiological demands if the COD frequency increases, and that running velocities affect the physiological demands of CODs. These results also showed that the energy expenditure of COD can be evaluated using only two data points. These results may be useful for estimating the energy expenditure of players during a match and designing shuttle exercise training programs.

  8. Muscle injury after low-intensity downhill running reduces running economy.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Cory W; Green, Michael S; Doyle, J Andrew; Rupp, Jeffrey C; Ingalls, Christopher P; Corona, Benjamin T

    2014-05-01

    Contraction-induced muscle injury may reduce running economy (RE) by altering motor unit recruitment, lowering contraction economy, and disturbing running mechanics, any of which may have a deleterious effect on endurance performance. The purpose of this study was to determine if RE is reduced 2 days after performing injurious, low-intensity exercise in 11 healthy active men (27.5 ± 5.7 years; 50.05 ± 1.67 VO2peak). Running economy was determined at treadmill speeds eliciting 65 and 75% of the individual's peak rate of oxygen uptake (VO2peak) 1 day before and 2 days after injury induction. Lower extremity muscle injury was induced with a 30-minute downhill treadmill run (6 × 5 minutes runs, 2 minutes rest, -12% grade, and 12.9 km·h(-1)) that elicited 55% VO2peak. Maximal quadriceps isometric torque was reduced immediately and 2 days after the downhill run by 18 and 10%, and a moderate degree of muscle soreness was present. Two days after the injury, steady-state VO2 and metabolic work (VO2 L·km(-1)) were significantly greater (4-6%) during the 65% VO2peak run. Additionally, postinjury VCO2, VE and rating of perceived exertion were greater at 65% but not at 75% VO2peak, whereas whole blood-lactate concentrations did not change pre-injury to postinjury at either intensity. In conclusion, low-intensity downhill running reduces RE at 65% but not 75% VO2peak. The results of this study and other studies indicate the magnitude to which RE is altered after downhill running is dependent on the severity of the injury and intensity of the RE test.

  9. An overview of hip injuries in running.

    PubMed

    Paluska, Scott A

    2005-01-01

    Running has steadily gained in worldwide popularity and is the primary exercise modality for many individuals of all ages. Its low cost, versatility, convenience and related health benefits appeal to men and women of broad cultural, ethnic and economic backgrounds. With more children and adults participating in recreational and competitive running, the incidence of injuries has steadily increased. Most running-related injuries affecting the lower extremities are due to preventable training errors, and some may necessitate medical evaluation or a significant reduction in training. Hip injuries in runners are due to interactions of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that adversely affect the complex regional anatomy. Acute or chronic hip pain presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge because the vague, nonspecific symptoms and signs may originate from local, regional or distant foci. Muscle strains and tendonitis are the most common aetiologies of hip pain and typically result from sudden acceleration/deceleration manoeuvres, direction changes or eccentric contractions. Apophysitis and avulsion fractures may affect younger runners and produce localised pain at muscle attachment sites. Iliotibial band syndrome is a common cause of lateral hip and knee symptoms characterised by sharp or burning pain that is exacerbated by activity. Bursitis, due to repetitive activity or acute trauma, may affect the trochanteric, ischial or iliopectineal bursae. Hip osteoarthritis may also produce persistent pain that worsens with running. Stress fractures are potentially serious conditions that affect women more frequently than men. Snapping hip syndrome is a benign condition that results from tight connective tissues' passing repeatedly over the greater trochanter, anterior hip capsule, lesser trochanter, femoral head or iliopectineal eminence. Acetabular labral tears, sports hernias and nerve entrapment syndromes are also potential causes of persistent hip pain in runners

  10. 28 CFR 544.34 - Inmate running events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inmate running events. 544.34 Section 544... EDUCATION Inmate Recreation Programs § 544.34 Inmate running events. Running events will ordinarily not... available for all inmate running events....

  11. 28 CFR 544.34 - Inmate running events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inmate running events. 544.34 Section 544... EDUCATION Inmate Recreation Programs § 544.34 Inmate running events. Running events will ordinarily not... available for all inmate running events....

  12. 47 CFR 76.804 - Disposition of home run wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disposition of home run wiring. 76.804 Section... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.804 Disposition of home run wiring. (a) Building-by-building disposition of home run wiring. (1) Where an MVPD owns the home run wiring in an MDU...

  13. 47 CFR 76.804 - Disposition of home run wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disposition of home run wiring. 76.804 Section... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.804 Disposition of home run wiring. (a) Building-by-building disposition of home run wiring. (1) Where an MVPD owns the home run wiring in an MDU...

  14. 28 CFR 544.34 - Inmate running events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inmate running events. 544.34 Section 544... EDUCATION Inmate Recreation Programs § 544.34 Inmate running events. Running events will ordinarily not... available for all inmate running events. ...

  15. 28 CFR 544.34 - Inmate running events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inmate running events. 544.34 Section 544... EDUCATION Inmate Recreation Programs § 544.34 Inmate running events. Running events will ordinarily not... available for all inmate running events. ...

  16. 47 CFR 76.804 - Disposition of home run wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disposition of home run wiring. 76.804 Section... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.804 Disposition of home run wiring. (a) Building-by-building disposition of home run wiring. (1) Where an MVPD owns the home run wiring in an MDU...

  17. 28 CFR 544.34 - Inmate running events.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inmate running events. 544.34 Section 544... EDUCATION Inmate Recreation Programs § 544.34 Inmate running events. Running events will ordinarily not... available for all inmate running events. ...

  18. Impact of running away on girls' pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thrane, Lisa E; Chen, Xiaojin

    2012-04-01

    This study assessed the impact of running away on pregnancy in the subsequent year among U.S. adolescents. We also investigated interactions between running away and sexual assault, romance, and school disengagement. Pregnancy among females between 11 and 17 years (n = 6100) was examined utilizing the Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) data from Waves 1 and 2. The odds of pregnancy in the next year were 1.67 times greater for runaways net of other factors. A history of sexual assault and romantic involvement increased the likelihood of pregnancy. The relationship between pregnancy and runaway behavior in the general population is understudied. Our findings suggest that runaway youth have a multiplicity of needs that require a complex array of medical, social, emotional, and academic resources to promote positive sexual health outcomes. Copyright © 2011 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Running enhances spatial pattern separation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Creer, David J.; Romberg, Carola; Saksida, Lisa M.; van Praag, Henriette; Bussey, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that regular exercise improves brain health and promotes synaptic plasticity and hippocampal neurogenesis. Exercise improves learning, but specific mechanisms of information processing influenced by physical activity are unknown. Here, we report that voluntary running enhanced the ability of adult (3 months old) male C57BL/6 mice to discriminate between the locations of two adjacent identical stimuli. Improved spatial pattern separation in adult runners was tightly correlated with increased neurogenesis. In contrast, very aged (22 months old) mice had impaired spatial discrimination and low basal cell genesis that was refractory to running. These findings suggest that the addition of newly born neurons may bolster dentate gyrus-mediated encoding of fine spatial distinctions. PMID:20133882

  20. The CDF Run IIb Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    M. Aoki; N. Bacchetta; S. Behari et al.

    2004-02-25

    Fermilab plans to deliver 5-15 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity to the CDF and D0 experiments. The current inner silicon detectors at CDF (SVXIIa and L00) will not tolerate the radiation dose associated with high luminosity running and will need to be replaced. A new readout chip (SVX4) has been designed in radiation-hard 0.25 {micro}m CMOS technology. Single sided sensors are arranged in a compact structure, called a stave, with integrated readout and cooling systems. This paper describes the general design of the Run IIb system, testing results of prototype electrical components (staves), and prototype silicon sensor performance before and after irradiation.

  1. Somatosensory perception of running shoe mass.

    PubMed

    Slade, Stephen J; Greenya, Joel G; Kliethermes, Christopher L; Senchina, David S

    2014-01-01

    Running shoes are often marketed based on mass. A total of 50 young adult males participated across two separate experiments to determine how well they could perceive the relative masses of five different running shoes using hands versus feet. For the foot portion, subjects were blindly fitted with the shoes and asked to rank their masses individually using visual analogue scales (VAS) and verbal rankings. For the hand portion, two different methods were used, one presenting all shoes simultaneously and the other presenting the shoes individually. Verbal accuracy and VAS scores correlated across subjects for the hand and foot, but accuracy in mass perception by the feet was 30% compared to 92% or 63% by the hand (depending on the method). These results indicate the foot perceives mass poorly compared to the hand, and that consumers' perception of shoe mass may come more from handling shoes versus wearing them.

  2. Software detection method based on running state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, XiaoLin; Chen, Quanbao; Shan, Chun; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Yiman

    2017-08-01

    It is extremely important for the study of software behavior modeling for software security research. This article determines whether the security of software operation by analyzing the credibility of software behavior, monitoring software running status. This paper focuses on a modeling algorithm, namely the GK-tail algorithm, which based on software behavior modeling method. At the same time, this paper improves the GK-tail algorithm, which focuses on data constraints and the interaction between software components. Restrictions on extending finite automaton can be obtained by using a combination of Daikon and ESC/JAVA tools. Restrictions can improve the accuracy of the generated model. So the generated behavior model can capture more accurate information. Finally, the paper designs and implements the software running state generator. It is feasible through the software state diagram to determine the feasibility of software security proved by the experiment.

  3. Run-08 pC polarization analysis - October 16, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmawardane,V.; Bazilevsky,A.; Bunce, G.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Makdisi, Y.; Nakagawa, I.; Morozov, B.; Okada, H.; Sivertz, M.; Zelenski, A.; Alekseev, I.; Svirida, D.

    2009-03-01

    In this note we will discuss the analysis of RHIC run 08 pC data that were collected during February 14 - March 10, 2008. An analysis method that is similar to Run 05 and Run 06 was adopted for Run 08 analysis (except few minor changes, which are described below). A detailed analysis note and a NIM article that describe the pC analysis procedure (for run 05 and run 06) can be found elsewhere. In brief, the analysis consists of calibrating the detectors, determining energy corrections ('dead layers'), determining good runs and extracting the polarization from data.

  4. Comparing Computer Run Time of Building Simulation Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip; Selkowitz, Stephen; Wetter, Michael

    2008-07-23

    This paper presents an approach to comparing computer run time of building simulation programs. The computing run time of a simulation program depends on several key factors, including the calculation algorithm and modeling capabilities of the program, the run period, the simulation time step, the complexity of the energy models, the run control settings, and the software and hardware configurations of the computer that is used to make the simulation runs. To demonstrate the approach, simulation runs are performed for several representative DOE-2.1E and EnergyPlus energy models. The computer run time of these energy models are then compared and analyzed.

  5. The anatomy and biomechanics of running.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Terry L; Jewison, David J

    2012-04-01

    To understand the normal series of biomechanical events of running, a comparative assessment to walking is helpful. Closed kinetic chain through the lower extremities, control of the lumbopelvic mechanism, and overall symmetry of movement has been described well enough that deviations from normal movement can now be associated with specific overuse injuries experienced by runners. This information in combination with a history of the runner's errors in their training program will lead to a more comprehensive treatment and prevention plan for related injuries.

  6. Forecasting Long-Run Electricity Prices

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Gregory; Borison, Adam

    2006-08-15

    Estimation of long-run electricity prices is extremely important but it is also very difficult because of the many uncertainties that will determine future prices, and because of the lack of sufficient historical and forwards data. The difficulty is compounded when forecasters ignore part of the available information or unnecessarily limit their thinking about the future. The authors present a practical approach that addresses these problems. (author)

  7. 1987 DOE review: First collider run operation

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, S.; Crawford, J.; Dugan, G.; Edwards, H.; Finley, D.A.; Fowler, W.B.; Harrison, M.; Holmes, S.; Makara, J.N.; Malamud, E.

    1987-05-01

    This review covers the operations of the first run of the 1.8 TeV superconducting super collider. The papers enclosed cover: PBAR source status, fixed target operation, Tevatron cryogenic reliability and capacity upgrade, Tevatron Energy upgrade progress and plans, status of the D0 low beta insertion, 1.8 K and 4.7 K refrigeration for low-..beta.. quadrupoles, progress and plans for the LINAC and booster, near term and long term and long term performance improvements.

  8. Dry run for first of two EVAs

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-03

    ISS036-E-014713 (3 July 2013) --- NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (left) and European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, both Expedition 36 flight engineers, don their Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuits for a ?dry run? in the International Space Station?s Quest airlock in preparation for the first of two sessions of extravehicular (EVA) scheduled for July 9 and July 16. NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, flight engineer, uses a computer in the background.

  9. Thomas runs in the Kristall module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-24

    STS091-375-011 (2-12 June 1998) --- Andrew S.W. Thomas makes a treadmill run onboard the Kristall module before joining the STS-91 crew for a journey home that will complete 141 days in space for the NASA astronaut. Thomas is the final of seven NASA astronauts assigned to indvidual long-duration stays aboard Russia's Mir space station as cosmonaut guest researchers. Photo Credit: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Russian Aviation and Space Agency.

  10. Dry run for first of two EVAs

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-03

    ISS036-E-014724 (3 July 2013) --- NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (left) and European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, both Expedition 36 flight engineers, attired in their Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuits, participate in a ?dry run? in the International Space Station?s Quest airlock in preparation for the first of two sessions of extravehicular (EVA) scheduled for July 9 and July 16. NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, flight engineer, assists Cassidy and Parmitano.

  11. Dry run for first of two EVAs

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-03

    ISS036-E-014714 (3 July 2013) --- NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (left background) and European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, both Expedition 36 flight engineers, don their Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuits for a ?dry run? in the International Space Station?s Quest airlock in preparation for the first of two sessions of extravehicular (EVA) scheduled for July 9 and July 16. NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, flight engineer, assists Cassidy and Parmitano.

  12. Dry run for first of two EVAs

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-03

    View of NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy (left) and European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano (right), Expedition 36 flight engineers, preparing for a dry run in the International Space Stations Quest airlock in preparation for the first of two sessions of extravehicular (EVA) scheduled for July 9 and July 16. Both have donned their EMUs. Astronaut Karen Nyberg, Expetition 36 flight engineer, is visible in the center.

  13. Running with a powered knee and ankle prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Amanda H; Lawson, Brian E; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a running control architecture for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis that enables a transfemoral amputee to run with a biomechanically appropriate running gait and to intentionally transition between a walking and running gait. The control architecture consists firstly of a coordination level controller, which provides gait biomechanics representative of healthy running, and secondly of a gait selection controller that enables the user to intentionally transition between a running and walking gait. The running control architecture was implemented on a transfemoral prosthesis with powered knee and ankle joints, and the efficacy of the controller was assessed in a series of running trials with a transfemoral amputee subject. Specifically, treadmill trials were conducted to assess the extent to which the coordination controller provided a biomechanically appropriate running gait. Separate trials were conducted to assess the ability of the user to consistently and reliably transition between walking and running gaits.

  14. RUNNING TECHNIQUE IS AN IMPORTANT COMPONENT OF RUNNING ECONOMY AND PERFORMANCE.

    PubMed

    Folland, Jonathan P; Allen, Sam J; Black, Matthew I; Handsaker, Joseph C; Forrester, Stephanie E

    2017-03-03

    Despite an intuitive relationship between technique and both running economy (RE) and performance, and the diverse techniques employed by runners to achieve forward locomotion, the objective importance of overall technique and the key components therein remain to be elucidated.

  15. Run-to-Run Optimization Control Within Exact Inverse Framework for Scan Tracking.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Ivan L; Reinhall, Per G; Berg, Martin C; Chizeck, Howard J; Seibel, Eric J

    2017-09-01

    A run-to-run optimization controller uses a reduced set of measurement parameters, in comparison to more general feedback controllers, to converge to the best control point for a repetitive process. A new run-to-run optimization controller is presented for the scanning fiber device used for image acquisition and display. This controller utilizes very sparse measurements to estimate a system energy measure and updates the input parameterizations iteratively within a feedforward with exact-inversion framework. Analysis, simulation, and experimental investigations on the scanning fiber device demonstrate improved scan accuracy over previous methods and automatic controller adaptation to changing operating temperature. A specific application example and quantitative error analyses are provided of a scanning fiber endoscope that maintains high image quality continuously across a 20 °C temperature rise without interruption of the 56 Hz video.

  16. The mechanics of running in children

    PubMed Central

    Schepens, B; Willems, P A; Cavagna, G A

    1998-01-01

    The effect of age and body size on the bouncing mechanism of running was studied in children aged 2-16 years.The natural frequency of the bouncing system (fs) and the external work required to move the centre of mass of the body were measured using a force platform.At all ages, during running below ≈11 km h−1, the freely chosen step frequency (f) is about equal to fs (symmetric rebound), independent of speed, although it decreases with age from 4 Hz at 2 years to 2.5 Hz above 12 years.The decrease of step frequency with age is associated with a decrease in the mass-specific vertical stiffness of the bouncing system (k/m) due to an increase of the body mass (m) with a constant stiffness (k). Above 12 years, k/m and f remain approximately constant due to a parallel increase in both k and m with age.Above the critical speed of ≈11 km h−1, independent of age, the rebound becomes asymmetric, i.e. f < fs.The maximum running speed (V¯f,max) increases with age while the step frequency at remains constant (≈4 Hz), independent of age.At a given speed, the higher step frequency in preteens results in a mass-specific power against gravity less than that in adults. The external power required to move the centre of mass of the body is correspondingly reduced. PMID:9596810

  17. The Run-Up of Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, S.; Bravo, F. J.; Fuentes, M.; Matias, M.; Medina, M.

    2016-12-01

    Large earthquakes in subduction zones are liable to produce tsunamis that can cause destruction and fatalities. The Run-up is a geophysical parameter that quantifies damage and if critical facilities or population are exposed to. Here we use the coupling for certain subduction regions measured by different techniques (Potency and GPS observations) to define areas where large earthquakes can occur. Taking the slab 1.0 from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), we can define the geometry of the area including its tsunamigenic potential. By using stochastic earthquakes sources for each area with its maximum tsunamigenic potential, we calculate the numerical and analytical run-up for each case. Then, we perform a statistical analysis and calculate the envelope for both methods. Furthermore, we build an index of risk using: the closest slope to the shore in a piecewise linear approach (last slopecriteria) and the outputsfrom tsunami modeling. Results show that there are areas prone to produce higher run-up than others based on the size of the earthquake, geometrical constraints of the source, tectonic setting and the coast last slope. Based on these results, there are zones that have low risk index which can define escape routes or secure coastal areas for tsunami early warning, urban and planning purposes when detailed data is available.

  18. Running vacuum cosmological models: linear scalar perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perico, E. L. D.; Tamayo, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    In cosmology, phenomenologically motivated expressions for running vacuum are commonly parameterized as linear functions typically denoted by Λ(H2) or Λ(R). Such models assume an equation of state for the vacuum given by bar PΛ = - bar rhoΛ, relating its background pressure bar PΛ with its mean energy density bar rhoΛ ≡ Λ/8πG. This equation of state suggests that the vacuum dynamics is due to an interaction with the matter content of the universe. Most of the approaches studying the observational impact of these models only consider the interaction between the vacuum and the transient dominant matter component of the universe. We extend such models by assuming that the running vacuum is the sum of independent contributions, namely bar rhoΛ = Σibar rhoΛi. Each Λ i vacuum component is associated and interacting with one of the i matter components in both the background and perturbation levels. We derive the evolution equations for the linear scalar vacuum and matter perturbations in those two scenarios, and identify the running vacuum imprints on the cosmic microwave background anisotropies as well as on the matter power spectrum. In the Λ(H2) scenario the vacuum is coupled with every matter component, whereas the Λ(R) description only leads to a coupling between vacuum and non-relativistic matter, producing different effects on the matter power spectrum.

  19. Creatine supplementation and multiple sprint running performance.

    PubMed

    Glaister, Mark; Lockey, Richard A; Abraham, Corinne S; Staerck, Allan; Goodwin, Jon E; McInnes, Gillian

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of short-term creatine monohydrate supplementation on multiple sprint running performance. Using a double-blind research design, 42 physically active men completed a series of 3 indoor multiple sprint running trials (15 x 30 m repeated at 35-second intervals). After the first 2 trials (familiarization and baseline), subjects were matched for fatigue score before being randomly assigned to 5 days of either creatine (4 x d(-1) x 5 g creatine monohydrate + 1 g maltodextrin) or placebo (4 x d(-1) x 6 g maltodextrin) supplementation. Sprint times were recorded via twin-beam photocells, and earlobe blood samples were drawn to evaluate posttest lactate concentrations. Relative to placebo, creatine supplementation resulted in a 0.7 kg increase in body mass (95% likely range: 0.02 to 1.3 kg) and a 0.4% reduction in body fat (95% likely range: -0.2 to 0.9%). There were no significant (p > 0.05) between-group differences in multiple sprint measures of fastest time, mean time, fatigue, or posttest blood lactate concentration. Despite widespread use as an ergogenic aid in sport, the results of this study suggest that creatine monohydrate supplementation conveys no benefit to multiple sprint running performance.

  20. The mechanics of running in children.

    PubMed

    Schepens, B; Willems, P A; Cavagna, G A

    1998-06-15

    1. The effect of age and body size on the bouncing mechanism of running was studied in children aged 2-16 years. 2. The natural frequency of the bouncing system (fs) and the external work required to move the centre of mass of the body were measured using a force platform. 3. At all ages, during running below approximately 11 km h-1, the freely chosen step frequency (f) is about equal to fs (symmetric rebound), independent of speed, although it decreases with age from 4 Hz at 2 years to 2.5 Hz above 12 years. 4. The decrease of step frequency with age is associated with a decrease in the mass-specific vertical stiffness of the bouncing system (k/m) due to an increase of the body mass (m) with a constant stiffness (k). Above 12 years, k/m and f remain approximately constant due to a parallel increase in both k and m with age. 5. Above the critical speed of approximately 11 km h-1, independent of age, the rebound becomes asymmetric, i.e. f < fs. 6. The maximum running speed (Vf, max) increases with age while the step frequency at remains constant (approximately 4 Hz), independent of age. 7. At a given speed, the higher step frequency in preteens results in a mass-specific power against gravity less than that in adults. The external power required to move the centre of mass of the body is correspondingly reduced.

  1. Constructing predictive models of human running.

    PubMed

    Maus, Horst-Moritz; Revzen, Shai; Guckenheimer, John; Ludwig, Christian; Reger, Johann; Seyfarth, Andre

    2015-02-06

    Running is an essential mode of human locomotion, during which ballistic aerial phases alternate with phases when a single foot contacts the ground. The spring-loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP) provides a starting point for modelling running, and generates ground reaction forces that resemble those of the centre of mass (CoM) of a human runner. Here, we show that while SLIP reproduces within-step kinematics of the CoM in three dimensions, it fails to reproduce stability and predict future motions. We construct SLIP control models using data-driven Floquet analysis, and show how these models may be used to obtain predictive models of human running with six additional states comprising the position and velocity of the swing-leg ankle. Our methods are general, and may be applied to any rhythmic physical system. We provide an approach for identifying an event-driven linear controller that approximates an observed stabilization strategy, and for producing a reduced-state model which closely recovers the observed dynamics. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Constructing predictive models of human running

    PubMed Central

    Maus, Horst-Moritz; Revzen, Shai; Guckenheimer, John; Ludwig, Christian; Reger, Johann; Seyfarth, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Running is an essential mode of human locomotion, during which ballistic aerial phases alternate with phases when a single foot contacts the ground. The spring-loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP) provides a starting point for modelling running, and generates ground reaction forces that resemble those of the centre of mass (CoM) of a human runner. Here, we show that while SLIP reproduces within-step kinematics of the CoM in three dimensions, it fails to reproduce stability and predict future motions. We construct SLIP control models using data-driven Floquet analysis, and show how these models may be used to obtain predictive models of human running with six additional states comprising the position and velocity of the swing-leg ankle. Our methods are general, and may be applied to any rhythmic physical system. We provide an approach for identifying an event-driven linear controller that approximates an observed stabilization strategy, and for producing a reduced-state model which closely recovers the observed dynamics. PMID:25505131

  3. Long decoding runs for Galileo's convolutional codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahmeyer, C. R.; Cheung, K.-M.

    1988-01-01

    Decoding results are described for long decoding runs of Galileo's convolutional codes. A 1 k-bit/sec hardware Viterbi decoder is used for the (15, 1/4) convolutional code, and a software Viterbi decoder is used for the (7, 1/2) convolutional code. The output data of these long runs are stored in data files using a data compression format which can reduce file size by a factor of 100 to 1 typically. These data files can be used to replicate the long, time-consuming runs exactly and are useful to anyone who wants to analyze the burst statistics of the Viterbi decoders. The 1 k-bit/sec hardware Viterbi decoder was developed in order to demonstrate the correctness of certain algorithmic concepts for decoding Galileo's experimental (15, 1/4) code, and for the long-constraint-length codes in general. The hardware decoder can be used both to search for good codes and to measure accurately the performance of known codes.

  4. Tracking at CDF: algorithms and experience from Run I and Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, F.D.; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    The authors describe the tracking algorithms used during Run I and Run II by CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, covering the time from about 1992 through the present, and discuss the performance of the algorithms at high luminosity. By tracing the evolution of the detectors and algorithms, they reveal some of the successful strategies used by CDF to address the problems of tracking at high luminosities.

  5. Prophylactic ankle taping: influence on treadmill-running kinematics and running economy.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Sally; Braun, William A

    2014-02-01

    Prophylactic ankle taping (PAT) is commonly used in sport. Prophylactic ankle taping may restrict ankle motion, which would affect the kinetic chain and alter gait. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of PAT on lower extremity (LE) kinematics and running economy during treadmill running. Twelve recreational runners (9 women, 3 men; M ± SD age = 31.33 ± 8.04 years, height = 1.67 ± 0.81 m, mass = 61.84 ± 9.38 kg) completed two 20-minute running sessions (PAT and no tape: control [CON]) at a self-selected pace. Before each run, reflective markers were placed along the right side of the body. Sagittal plane kinematic data (60 Hz) were captured 4 times, and expired gases were measured for 2-minute after each video capture during both trials. Stride frequency, stride length, LE kinematic variables at initial contact and end contact (EC) were calculated. Cardiorespiratory variables and heart rate were also measured. Running economy was normalized to oxygen uptake per unit body mass per kilometer (milliliter per kilogram per kilometer) as running speeds varied. At EC, the PAT hip angle significantly decreased (p = 0.01) by 3.82°, whereas CON decreased by 0.85°. The range of motion tended to decrease over the 20-minute run (p = 0.08). Heart rate significantly increased over time (6.7%) but was not different between conditions. Prophylactic ankle taping did not significantly affect the physiological measures associated with the metabolic cost of treadmill running or the other kinematic variables. These findings suggest that the hip angle continued to decrease during the PAT condition at push-off in recreational runners without impacting the metabolic cost of transport.

  6. Peak treadmill running velocity during the VO2 max test predicts running performance.

    PubMed

    Noakes, T D; Myburgh, K H; Schall, R

    1990-01-01

    Twenty specialist marathon runners and 23 specialist ultra-marathon runners underwent maximal exercise testing to determine the relative value of maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), peak treadmill running velocity, running velocity at the lactate turnpoint, VO2 at 16 km h-1, % VO2max at 16 km h-1, and running time in other races, for predicting performance in races of 10-90 km. Race time at 10 or 21.1 km was the best predictor of performance at 42.2 km in specialist marathon runners and at 42.2 and 90 km in specialist ultra-marathon runners (r = 0.91-0.97). Peak treadmill running velocity was the best laboratory-measured predictor of performance (r = -0.88(-)-0.94) at all distances in ultra-marathon specialists and at all distances except 42.2 km in marathon specialists. Other predictive variables were running velocity at the lactate turnpoint (r = -0.80(-)-0.92); % VO2max at 16 km h-1 (r = 0.76-0.90) and VO2max (r = 0.55(-)-0.86). Peak blood lactate concentrations (r = 0.68-0.71) and VO2 at 16 km h-1 (r = 0.10-0.61) were less good predictors. These data indicate: (i) that in groups of trained long distance runners, the physiological factors that determine success in races of 10-90 km are the same; thus there may not be variables that predict success uniquely in either 10 km, marathon or ultra-marathon runners, and (ii) that peak treadmill running velocity is at least as good a predictor of running performance as is the lactate turnpoint. Factors that determine the peak treadmill running velocity are not known but are not likely to be related to maximum rates of muscle oxygen utilization.

  7. Warm-up with a weighted vest improves running performance via leg stiffness and running economy.

    PubMed

    Barnes, K R; Hopkins, W G; McGuigan, M R; Kilding, A E

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effects of "strides" with a weighted-vest during a warm-up on endurance performance and its potential neuromuscular and metabolic mediators. A bout of resistance exercise can enhance subsequent high-intensity performance, but little is known about such priming exercise for endurance performance. A crossover with 5-7 days between an experimental and control trial was performed by 11 well-trained distance runners. Each trial was preceded by a warm-up consisting of a 10-min self-paced jog, a 5-min submaximal run to determine running economy, and six 10-s strides with or without a weighted-vest (20% of body mass). After a 10-min recovery period, runners performed a series of jumps to determine leg stiffness and other neuromuscular characteristics, another 5-min submaximal run, and an incremental treadmill test to determine peak running speed. Clinical and non-clinical forms of magnitude-based inference were used to assess outcomes. Correlations and linear regression were used to assess relationships between performance and underlying measures. The weighted-vest condition resulted in a very-large enhancement of peak running speed (2.9%; 90% confidence limits ±0.8%), a moderate increase in leg stiffness (20.4%; ±4.2%) and a large improvement in running economy (6.0%; ±1.6%); there were also small-moderate clear reductions in cardiorespiratory measures. Relationships between change scores showed that changes in leg stiffness could explain all the improvements in performance and economy. Strides with a weighted-vest have a priming effect on leg stiffness and running economy. It is postulated the associated major effect on peak treadmill running speed will translate into enhancement of competitive endurance performance. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of CAISO-run Plexos output with LLNL-run Plexos output

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A; Meyers, C; Smith, S

    2011-12-20

    In this report we compare the output of the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) 33% RPS Plexos model when run on various computing systems. Specifically, we compare the output resulting from running the model on CAISO's computers (Windows) and LLNL's computers (both Windows and Linux). We conclude that the differences between the three results are negligible in the context of the entire system and likely attributed to minor differences in Plexos version numbers as well as the MIP solver used in each case.

  9. Midsole thickness affects running patterns in habitual rearfoot strikers during a sustained run.

    PubMed

    TenBroek, Trampas M; Rodrigues, Pedro A; Frederick, Edward C; Hamill, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) investigate how kinematic patterns are adjusted while running in footwear with THIN, MEDIUM, and THICK midsole thicknesses and (2) determine if these patterns are adjusted over time during a sustained run in footwear of different thicknesses. Ten male heel-toe runners performed treadmill runs in specially constructed footwear (THIN, MEDIUM, and THICK midsoles) on separate days. Standard lower extremity kinematics and acceleration at the tibia and head were captured. Time epochs were created using data from every 5 minutes of the run. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used (P < .05) to determine differences across footwear and time. At touchdown, kinematics were similar for the THIN and MEDIUM conditions distal to the knee, whereas only the THIN condition was isolated above the knee. No runners displayed midfoot or forefoot strike patterns in any condition. Peak accelerations were slightly increased with THIN and MEDIUM footwear as was eversion, as well as tibial and thigh internal rotation. It appears that participants may have been anticipating, very early in their run, a suitable kinematic pattern based on both the length of the run and the footwear condition.

  10. Can parallel use of different running shoes decrease running-related injury risk?

    PubMed

    Malisoux, L; Ramesh, J; Mann, R; Seil, R; Urhausen, A; Theisen, D

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if runners who use concomitantly different pairs of running shoes are at a lower risk of running-related injury (RRI). Recreational runners (n = 264) participated in this 22-week prospective follow-up and reported all information about their running session characteristics, other sport participation and injuries on a dedicated Internet platform. A RRI was defined as a physical pain or complaint located at the lower limbs or lower back region, sustained during or as a result of running practice and impeding planned running activity for at least 1 day. One-third of the participants (n = 87) experienced at least one RRI during the observation period. The adjusted Cox regression analysis revealed that the parallel use of more than one pair of running shoes was a protective factor [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.614; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.389-0.969], while previous injury was a risk factor (HR = 1.722; 95%CI = 1.114-2.661). Additionally, increased mean session distance (km; HR = 0.795; 95%CI = 0.725-0.872) and increased weekly volume of other sports (h/week; HR = 0.848; 95%CI = 0.732-0.982) were associated with lower RRI risk. Multiple shoe use and participation in other sports are strategies potentially leading to a variation of the load applied to the musculoskeletal system. They could be advised to recreational runners to prevent RRI.

  11. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger in Run I and Upgrades for Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Dai

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken data at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV during Run I (2009-2013). The LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of about 20 fb-1 in 2012, which required dedicated strategies to ensure the highest possible physics output while effectively reducing the event rate. The Muon High Level Trigger has successfully adapted to the changing environment from low instantaneous luminosity (1032 cm-2 s-1) in 2010 to the peak high instantaneous luminosity (1034 cm-2 s-1). The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving muons in the final state. We will present the excellent performance achieved during Run I. In preparation for the next data taking period (Run II) several hardware and software upgrades to the ATLAS Muon Trigger have been performed to deal with the increased trigger rate expected at higher centre-of-mass energy and increased instantaneous luminosity. We will highlight the development of novel algorithms that have been developed to maintain a highly efficient event selection while reducing the processing time by a factor of three. In addition, the two stages of the high level trigger that was deployed in Run I will be merged for Run II. We will discuss novel approaches that are being developed to further improve the trigger algorithms for Run II and beyond.

  12. Aging and factors related to running economy.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Timothy J; Manley, Michelle J; Aziz, Jason; Padham, Jamie L; MacKenzie, Allison M

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship that age has on factors affecting running economy (RE) in competitive distance runners. Fifty-one male and female subelite distance runners (Young [Y]: 18-39 years [n = 18]; Master [M]: 40-59 years [n = 22]; and Older [O]: 60-older [n = 11]) were measured for RE, step rate, lactate threshold (LT), VO2max, muscle strength and endurance, flexibility, power, and body composition. An RE test was conducted at 4 different velocities (161, 188, 215, and 241 m·min(-1)), with subjects running for 5 minutes at each velocity. The steady-state VO2max during the last minute of each stage was recorded and plotted vs. speed, and a regression equation was formulated. A 1 × 3 analysis of variance revealed no differences in the slopes of the RE regression lines among age groups (y = 0.1827x - 0.2974; R2 = 0.9511 [Y]; y = 0.1988x - 1.0416; R2 = 0.9697 [M]; y = 0.1727x + 3.0252; R2 = 0.9618 [O]). The VO2max was significantly lower in the O group compared to in the Y and M groups (Y = 64.1 ± 3.2; M = 56.8 ± 2.7; O = 44.4 ± 1.7 mlO2·kg(-1)·min(-1)). The maximal heart rate and velocity @ LT were significantly different among all age groups (Y = 197 ± 4; M = 183 ± 2; O = 170 ± 6 b·min(-1) and Y = 289.7 ± 27.0; M = 251.5 ± 32.9; O = 212.3 ± 24.6 m·min(-1), respectively). The VO2max @ LT was significantly lower in the O group compared to in the Y and M groups (Y = 50.3 ± 2.0; M = 48.8 ± 2.9; O = 34.9 ± 3.2 mlO2·kg(-1)·min(-1)). The O group was significantly lower than in the Y and M groups in flexibility, power, and upper body strength. Multiple regression analyses showed that strength and power were significantly related to running velocity. The results from this cross-sectional analysis suggest that age-related declines in running performance are associated with declines in maximal and submaximal cardiorespiratory variables and declines in strength and power, not because of declines in running economy.

  13. Changes in timing of muscle contractions and running economy with altered stride pattern during running.

    PubMed

    Connick, Mark J; Li, Francois-Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Large alterations to the preferred running stride decrease running economy, and shorter strides increase leg muscle activity. However, the effect of altered strides on the timing of leg muscle activation is not known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of moderate alterations to the running stride on running economy and the timing of biceps femoris (BF), vastus lateralis (VL) and gastrocnemius (GAST) muscle contractions. The preferred stride pattern for eleven trained male runners was measured prior to a separate visit where participants ran for bouts of 5 min whilst synchronising foot contacts to a metronome signal which was tuned to (1) the preferred stride, and (2) frequencies which related to ± 8% and ± 4% of the preferred stride length. Running economy was measured at each stride pattern along with electromyography and three-dimensional kinematics to estimate onset and offset of muscle contractions for each muscle. Running economy was greatest at the preferred stride length. However, a quadratic fit to the data was optimised at a stride which was 2.9% shorter than preferred. Onset and offset of BF and VL muscle contractions occurred earlier with shorter than preferred strides. We detected no changes to the timing of muscle contractions with longer than preferred strides and no changes to GAST muscle contractions. The results suggest that runners optimise running economy with a stride length that is close to, but shorter than, the preferred stride, and that timing of BF and VL muscle contractions change with shorter than preferred strides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effects of Backwards Running Training on Forward Running Economy in Trained Males.

    PubMed

    Ordway, Jason D; Laubach, Lloyd L; Vanderburgh, Paul M; Jackson, Kurt J

    2016-03-01

    Backwards running (BR) results in greater cardiopulmonary response and muscle activity compared with forward running (FR). BR has traditionally been used in rehabilitation for disorders such as stroke and lower leg extremity injuries, as well as in short bursts during various athletic events. The aim of this study was to measure the effects of sustained backwards running training on forward running economy in trained male athletes. Eight highly trained, male runners (26.13 ± 6.11 years, 174.7 ± 6.4 cm, 68.4 ± 9.24 kg, 8.61 ± 3.21% body fat, 71.40 ± 7.31 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) trained with BR while harnessed on a treadmill at 161 m·min(-1) for 5 weeks following a 5-week BR run-in period at a lower speed (134 m·min(-1)). Subjects were tested at baseline, postfamiliarized, and post-BR training for body composition, a ramped VO2max test, and an economy test designed for trained male runners. Subjects improved forward running economy by 2.54% (1.19 ± 1.26 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), p = 0.032) at 215 m·min(-1). VO2max, body mass, lean mass, fat mass, and % body fat did not change (p > 0.05). Five weeks of BR training improved FR economy in healthy, trained male runners without altering VO2max or body composition. The improvements observed in this study could be a beneficial form of training to an already economical population to improve running economy.

  15. Body borne loads impact walk-to-run and running biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Brown, T N; O'Donovan, M; Hasselquist, L; Corner, B D; Schiffman, J M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a biomechanics-based assessment of body borne load during the walk-to-run transition and steady-state running because historical research has limited load carriage assessment to prolonged walking. Fifteen male military personnel had trunk and lower limb biomechanics examined during these locomotor tasks with three different load configurations (light, ∼6 kg, medium, ∼20 kg, and heavy, ∼40 kg). Subject-based means of the dependent variables were submitted to repeated measures ANOVA to test the effects of load configuration. During the walk-to-run transition, the hip decreased (P=0.001) and knee increased (P=0.004) their contribution to joint power with the addition of load. Additionally, greater peak trunk (P=0.001), hip (P=0.001), and knee flexion (P<0.001) moments and trunk flexion (P<0.001) angle, and reduced hip (P=0.001) and knee flexion (P=0.001) posture were evident during the loaded walk-to-run transition. Body borne load had no significant effect (P>0.05) on distribution of lower limb joint power during steady-state running, but increased peak trunk (P<0.001), hip (P=0.001), and knee (P=0.001) flexion moments, and trunk flexion (P<0.001) posture were evident. During the walk-to-run transition the load carrier may move joint power production distally down the kinetic chain and adopt biomechanical profiles to maintain performance of the task. The load carrier, however, may not adopt lower limb kinematic adaptations necessary to shift joint power distribution during steady-state running, despite exhibiting potentially detrimental larger lower limb joint loads. As such, further study appears needed to determine how load carriage impairs maximal locomotor performance.

  16. Is There an Economical Running Technique? A Review of Modifiable Biomechanical Factors Affecting Running Economy.

    PubMed

    Moore, Isabel S

    2016-06-01

    Running economy (RE) has a strong relationship with running performance, and modifiable running biomechanics are a determining factor of RE. The purposes of this review were to (1) examine the intrinsic and extrinsic modifiable biomechanical factors affecting RE; (2) assess training-induced changes in RE and running biomechanics; (3) evaluate whether an economical running technique can be recommended and; (4) discuss potential areas for future research. Based on current evidence, the intrinsic factors that appeared beneficial for RE were using a preferred stride length range, which allows for stride length deviations up to 3 % shorter than preferred stride length; lower vertical oscillation; greater leg stiffness; low lower limb moment of inertia; less leg extension at toe-off; larger stride angles; alignment of the ground reaction force and leg axis during propulsion; maintaining arm swing; low thigh antagonist-agonist muscular coactivation; and low activation of lower limb muscles during propulsion. Extrinsic factors associated with a better RE were a firm, compliant shoe-surface interaction and being barefoot or wearing lightweight shoes. Several other modifiable biomechanical factors presented inconsistent relationships with RE. Running biomechanics during ground contact appeared to play an important role, specifically those during propulsion. Therefore, this phase has the strongest direct links with RE. Recurring methodological problems exist within the literature, such as cross-comparisons, assessing variables in isolation, and acute to short-term interventions. Therefore, recommending a general economical running technique should be approached with caution. Future work should focus on interdisciplinary longitudinal investigations combining RE, kinematics, kinetics, and neuromuscular and anatomical aspects, as well as applying a synergistic approach to understanding the role of kinetics.

  17. Altered Running Economy Directly Translates to Altered Distance-Running Performance.

    PubMed

    Hoogkamer, Wouter; Kipp, Shalaya; Spiering, Barry A; Kram, Rodger

    2016-11-01

    Our goal was to quantify if small (1%-3%) changes in running economy quantitatively affect distance-running performance. Based on the linear relationship between metabolic rate and running velocity and on earlier observations that added shoe mass increases metabolic rate by ~1% per 100 g per shoe, we hypothesized that adding 100 and 300 g per shoe would slow 3000-m time-trial performance by 1% and 3%, respectively. Eighteen male sub-20-min 5-km runners completed treadmill testing, and three 3000-m time trials wearing control shoes and identical shoes with 100 and 300 g of discreetly added mass. We measured rates of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production and calculated metabolic rates for the treadmill tests, and we recorded overall running time for the time trials. Adding mass to the shoes significantly increased metabolic rate at 3.5 m·s by 1.11% per 100 g per shoe (95% confidence interval = 0.88%-1.35%). While wearing the control shoes, participants ran the 3000-m time trial in 626.1 ± 55.6 s. Times averaged 0.65% ± 1.36% and 2.37% ± 2.09% slower for the +100-g and +300-g shoes, respectively (P < 0.001). On the basis of a linear fit of all the data, 3000-m time increased 0.78% per added 100 g per shoe (95% confidence interval = 0.52%-1.04%). Adding shoe mass predictably degrades running economy and slows 3000-m time-trial performance proportionally. Our data demonstrate that laboratory-based running economy measurements can accurately predict changes in distance-running race performance due to shoe modifications.

  18. Effects of multicycle-run training on triathlete performance.

    PubMed

    Hue, Olivier; Valluet, Alex; Blonc, Stephen; Hertogh, Claude

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of triathlon training using multiple, short cycle-run sequences (multicycle-run training) on cycle-run performance. Twelve competitive triathletes, randomized into two groups, underwent multicycle-run training or normal training for 6 weeks. During this period, baseline training remained the same for both groups, and only the high-intensity component differed. The differentiated exercises were performed at or above 100% maximal aerobic velocity. The improvements in overall cycle-run performance were similar (3.3 +/- 1.4 % and 6.1 +/- 1.7% rise in Performance in multicycle-run and normal training, respectively). However, the improvement in performance was significantly greater for the multicycle-run training (-11.2 +/- 6.8 s versus -1.2 +/- 7. 7 s for multicycle-run training and normal training, respectively) during both the cycle-run change and the first 333-m lap, which together are termed the cycle-run transition. We concluded that 6 weeks of multicycle-run training did not induce greater improvement in cycle-run performance than did normal training in competitive triathletes. However, it did induce significant improvement in the cycle-run transition. This finding indicates that multicycle-run training may help competitive triathletes to develop greater skill and better physiological adaptations during this critical transition period of the triathlon race.

  19. Run-09 pC polarimeter analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, I.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoyan, G.; Bazilevsky, A.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Lee, S.; Li, X.; Makdisi, Y.; Morozov, B.; Nakagawa, I.; Svirida, D.; Zelenski, A.

    2010-08-01

    Analysis of PC polarimeter data at {radical}s = 200 and 500 GeV from Run9 is presented. Final polarization results, fill-by-fill, for blue and yellow beams, as to be used by RHIC experiments (in collisions) are released and collected in http://www4.rcf.bnl.gov/cnipol/pubdocs/Run09Offline/. Global relative systematic uncertainties {delta}P/P (to be considered as correlated from fill to fill) are 4.7% for 100 GeV beams, and 8.3% (12.1%) for blue (yellow) 250 GeV beams. For a product of two beam polarizations P{sub B} {center_dot} P{sub Y} (used in double spin asymmetry measurements) the relative uncertainty {delta}(P{sub B} {center_dot} P{sub Y})/(P{sub B} {center_dot} P{sub Y}) 8.8% for 100 GeV beams and 18.5% for 250 GeV beams. For the average between two beam polarization (P{sub B} + P{sub Y})/2 (used in single spin asymmetry measurements, when data from two polarized beams are combined) the relative uncertainty is 4.4% for 100 GeV beams and 9.2% for 250 GeV beams. Larger uncertainties for 250 GeV beams relate to significant rate related systematic effects experienced in the first part of Run9 (due to thicker targets used and smaller trans. beam size at higher beam energy).

  20. Contribution of trunk muscularity on sprint run.

    PubMed

    Kubo, T; Hoshikawa, Y; Muramatsu, M; Iida, T; Komori, S; Shibukawa, K; Kanehisa, H

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate how the trunk muscularity is related to sprint running performance. In 23 youth soccer players, the cross-sectional images at the mid level of each of L1-L2, L2-L3, L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 were obtained using magnetic resonance imaging to determine the cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of rectus abdominis, oblique, psoas major, quadratus lumborum and erector spinae muscles. The times taken to sprint over 20 m were measured, and the mean velocity of running was calculated for each of the 2 distances (V (10 m) and V (20 m)) and for the distance from 10 m to 20 m (V (10-20 m)). The CSA values of the 5 slice levels for all muscles except for the quadratus lumborum and those of the 3 slice levels (L1-L2, L2-L3 and L3-L4) for the quadratus lumborum were averaged and expressed relative to the two-third power of body mass (CSA/BM (2/3)). The CSA/BM (2/3) values of the erector spinae and quadratus lumborum were selected as significant contributors to predict V (10 m) ( R(2)=0.450), V (20 m) ( R(2)=0.504) and V (10-20 m) ( R(2)=0.420). The current results indicate that the muscularity of the erector spinae and quadratus lumborum contributes to achieving a high performance in sprint running over distances of less than 20 m.

  1. Energetics (and kinematics) of short shuttle runs.

    PubMed

    Zamparo, Paola; Bolomini, Francesca; Nardello, Francesca; Beato, Marco

    2015-09-01

    The energy cost of shuttle running (C netSR), over distances of 10-20 m, was reported to increase with the shuttle speed and to decrease with the shuttle distance. The aims of this study were to assess C netSR over a shorter distance (5 m), at different speeds, and to estimate the energy cost based on a simple kinematic analysis (C netK). Ten subjects (six basketball players, BP; four non-basketball players, NBP) performed ten shuttle runs (SR) with 30 s of passive recovery in-between, over a distance of 5 + 5 m (with a 180° change of direction); these experiments were repeated at different speeds (range 2-3.5 m s(-1)). The values of average (v mean) and maximal (v max) speed during each run were determined by means of kinematic analysis and C netK was calculated as: 0.96[Formula: see text]. C netSR was calculated based on data of oxygen uptake, blood lactate concentration and distance covered. The relationships between C (J m(-1) kg(-1)) and v (m(.)s(-1)) are well described by C netK (all subjects) = 11.76v - 13.09, R (2) = 0.853; C netSR (BP) = 11.94v - 12.82, R (2) = 0.636; and C netSR (NBP) = 14.09v - 14.53, R (2) = 0.738. Hence C netSR ≈ C netK in BP, whereas C netSR > C netK in NBP (un-familiar with this specific motor task). The calculations proposed in this study allow to estimate C of short SR based on simple measures of v max and can be utilized to develop training protocols in basketball as well as in other team sports (characterized by repeated sprints over short distances).

  2. Repeatability of a running heat tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Mee, Jessica A; Doust, Jo; Maxwell, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    At present there is no standardised heat tolerance test (HTT) procedure adopting a running mode of exercise. Current HTTs may misdiagnose a runner's susceptibility to a hyperthermic state due to differences in exercise intensity. The current study aimed to establish the repeatability of a practical running test to evaluate individual's ability to tolerate exercise heat stress. Sixteen (8M, 8F) participants performed the running HTT (RHTT) (30 min, 9 km h(-1), 2% elevation) on two separate occasions in a hot environment (40 °C and 40% relative humidity). There were no differences in peak rectal temperature (RHTT1: 38.82 ± 0.47 °C, RHTT2: 38.86 ± 0.49 °C, Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.93, typical error of measure (TEM) = 0.13 °C), peak skin temperature (RHTT1: 38.12 ± 0.45, RHTT2: 38.11 ± 0.45 °C, ICC = 0.79, TEM = 0.30 °C), peak heart rate (RHTT1: 182 ± 15 beats min(-1), RHTT2: 183 ± 15 beats min(-1), ICC = 0.99, TEM = 2 beats min(-1)), nor sweat rate (1721 ± 675 g h(-1), 1716 ± 745 g h(-1), ICC = 0.95, TEM = 162 g h(-1)) between RHTT1 and RHTT2 (p>0.05). Results demonstrate good agreement, strong correlations and small differences between repeated trials, and the TEM values suggest low within-participant variability. The RHTT was effective in differentiating between individuals physiological responses; supporting a heat tolerance continuum. The findings suggest the RHTT is a repeatable measure of physiological strain in the heat and may be used to assess the effectiveness of acute and chronic heat alleviating procedures.

  3. Input data to run Landis-II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeJager, Nathan R.

    2017-01-01

    The data are input data files to run the forest simulation model Landis-II for Isle Royale National Park. Files include: a) Initial_Comm, which includes the location of each mapcode, b) Cohort_ages, which includes the ages for each tree species-cohort within each mapcode, c) Ecoregions, which consist of different regions of soils and climate, d) Ecoregion_codes, which define the ecoregions, and e) Species_Params, which link the potential establishment and growth rates for each species with each ecoregion.

  4. Software reliability: Repetitive run experimentation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, P. M.; Skrivan, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    A software experiment conducted with repetitive run sampling is reported. Independently generated input data was used to verify that interfailure times are very nearly exponentially distributed and to obtain good estimates of the failure rates of individual errors and demonstrate how widely they vary. This fact invalidates many of the popular software reliability models now in use. The log failure rate of interfailure time was nearly linear as a function of the number of errors corrected. A new model of software reliability is proposed that incorporates these observations.

  5. Schools should not be run as businesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Robert

    2011-04-01

    Schools, prisons, hospitals, governments and the like should not be run as businesses or following business principles. The reason is simple, most businesses fail in 3 to 5 years and 90% fail in 10 years. Business methodology more often than not leads to failure. Society should instead prefer and follow the methods of science, engineering and democracy. The scientific method is superior to markets. It has been known for 100 years that groups can produce better decisions than individuals. We should not have chairs, and deans and presidents. Rather, decisions should be taken by workers councils.

  6. Lower Three Runs Instream Flow Study

    SciTech Connect

    del Carmen, B.R.; Paller, M.H.

    1993-12-31

    An Instream Flow Study was conducted to identify the minimum discharge from PAR Pond that will support a balanced biological fish community in Lower Three Runs. Hydraulic and habitat models of the Physical Habitat simulation System (PHABSIM), the major component of the US Fish and Wildlife Service`s Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) were applied. Following calibration of the Water Surface Profile (WSP)Model for three study reaches, hydraulic data was input to the AVDEPTH habitat model to develop relationships between discharge and reaches, hydraulic data was input to the AVDEPTH habitat model to development relationship between discharge and available habitat.

  7. CDF Run II silicon tracking projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sill, Alan; CDF Collaboration

    2000-06-01

    Design features, functionality, and expected performance are reviewed for the silicon charged particle track detectors to be used by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) during the upcoming Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The original design has been supplemented by addiition of a new layer of silicon mounted on the beam pipe that improves the vertexing performance of the combined assembly. Progress has been made in many areas of design and construction of the silicon sensors, readout electronics, and associated systems. The resulting detector array should provide substantial improvements in coverage and performance over those of previous CDF silicon vertex detectors.

  8. AGU member running to fill congressional seat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Emily

    John F Mink, an AGU member (Hydrology) for 50 years, and husband of the late Representative Patsy T. Mink (D-Hawaii), will run in a special election on 30 November to fill the remainder of his wife's unexpired congressional term. Patsy Mink, who represented the 2nd Congressional District of Hawaii, passed away on 28 September after battling pneumonia.Her name will appear on the 5 November election ballot as a candidate for Hawaii's 2nd District in the 108th Congress. If she is elected posthumously, the state of Hawaii will hold a special election in January to select an official to serve the full two-year term.

  9. Effects of a structured midsole on spatio-temporal variables and running economy in overground running.

    PubMed

    Wunsch, Tobias; Kröll, Josef; Stöggl, Thomas; Schwameder, Hermann

    2017-04-01

    Research to enhance running performance has led to the design of a leaf spring-structured midsole shoe (LEAF). In treadmill running, it has been shown that LEAF led to an increased running economy and increased stride length (SL) through a horizontal foot shift during stance compared to a standard foam shoe (FOAM). The purpose of this study was to analyse whether (a) these findings can also be observed in overground running and (b) relations exist between spatio-temporal variables and running economy. Ten male long-distance heel-strike runners ran at their individual 2 mmol/l blood lactate speed with LEAF and FOAM in randomized order. Kinematic data were recorded with an inertial measurement unit synchronized with 2D video. Oxygen consumption was measured using an automated metabolic gas analysis system. Blood lactate was collected after each run. The strike pattern was unaffected by LEAF. SL was increased by 0.9 ± 1.1 cm (95% CI 0.2 to 1.5; p = .040; dz = 0.76), stride rate (SR) was reduced by -0.4 ± 0.3 strides/min (95% CI -0.6 to -0.1; p = .029; dz = 0.82) and oxygen consumption tended to be reduced by 1% (-0.4 ± 0.6 ml/min/kg; 95% CI -0.8 to 0.0; p = .082; dz = 0.62) when running with LEAF compared to FOAM. Changes in oxygen consumption in LEAF were correlated with SL (r = 0.71; p = .022) and SR (r = -0.68; p = .031). It can be concluded that LEAF has the potential to cause small changes in spatio-temporal variables during running. Runners increasing SL and decreasing SR in response to LEAF can achieve small improvements in running economy, which is beneficial in terms of performance.

  10. Effect of motion control running shoes compared with neutral shoes on tibial rotation during running.

    PubMed

    Rose, Alice; Birch, Ivan; Kuisma, Raija

    2011-09-01

    To determine whether a motion control running shoe reduces tibial rotation in the transverse plane during treadmill running. An experimental study measuring tibial rotation in volunteer participants using a repeated measures design. Human Movement Laboratory, School of Health Professions, University of Brighton. Twenty-four healthy participants were tested. The group comprised males and females with size 6, 7, 9 and 11 feet. The age range for participants was 19 to 31 years. The total range of proximal tibial rotation was measured using the Codamotion 3-D Movement Analysis System. A one-tailed paired t-test indicated a statistically significant decrease in the total range of proximal tibial rotation when a motion control shoe was worn (mean difference 1.38°, 95% confidence interval 0.03 to 2.73, P=0.04). There is a difference in tibial rotation in the transverse plane between a motion control running shoe and a neutral running shoe. The results from this study have implications for the use of supportive running shoes as a form of injury prevention. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dissociation between running economy and running performance in elite Kenyan distance runners.

    PubMed

    Mooses, Martin; Mooses, Kerli; Haile, Diresibachew Wondimu; Durussel, Jérôme; Kaasik, Priit; Pitsiladis, Yannis Paul

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between running economy (RE) and performance in a homogenous group of competitive Kenyan distance runners. Maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) (68.8 ± 3.8 ml∙kg(-1)∙min(-1)) was determined on a motorised treadmill in 32 Kenyan (25.3 ± 5.0 years; IAAF performance score: 993 ± 77 p) distance runners. Leg anthropometry was assessed and moment arm of the Achilles tendon determined. While Achilles moment arm was associated with better RE (r(2) = 0.30, P = 0.003) and upper leg length, total leg length and total leg length to body height ratio were correlated with running performance (r = 0.42, P = 0.025; r = 0.40, P = 0.030 and r = 0.38, P = 0.043, respectively), RE and maximal time on treadmill (t(max)) were not associated with running performance (r = -0.01, P = 0.965; r = 0.27; P = 0.189, respectively) in competitive Kenyan distance runners. The dissociation between RE and running performance in this homogenous group of runners would suggest that RE can be compensated by other factors to maintain high performance levels and is in line with the idea that RE is only one of many factors explaining elite running performance.

  12. Crossover assessment of cardiolocomotor synchronization during running.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Lucenildo Silva; D'Affonsêca Netto, Aluizio; Mello, Roger Gomes Tavares; Nadal, Jurandir

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed at testing the hypothesis that positive cardiolocomotor coordination (CLC) measure occurs by chance during a running task where the heart rate (HR) is approximated to the step frequency (StepF). The electrocardiogram and electromyogram from the right gastrocnemius lateralis muscle were continuously recorded from ten healthy young men running at a paced rhythm of 152 step/min, to monitor HR and StepF. CLC was evaluated by phase synchrograms and the index of conditional probability (iCP). Results were validated with surrogate data and a crossover approach, where the HR of one subject was related to the StepF of another one, and comparisons were made combining subjects two by two. Six subjects showed synchrogram structures and high iCP values (≥0.8), suggesting the occurrence of physiological entrainment, when the HR reached the SF range. In crossover analysis, phase synchrograms and iCP presented similar behavior of original data when the HR from one subject was close enough to the SF from another one. Significant iCP values in 46 of 90 comparisons (51%) were observed, including all cases crossing signals among the six positive cases. Synchrogram and iCP tools currently employed for measuring CLC are not appropriate because they indicate the occurrence of this phenomenon even among subjects who ran on different days and times of each other.

  13. Primordial gravitational waves in running vacuum cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, D. A.; Lima, J. A. S.; Alves, M. E. S.; de Araujo, J. C. N.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the cosmological production of gravitational waves in a nonsingular flat cosmology powered by a "running vacuum" energy density described by ρΛ ≡ ρΛ(H), a phenomenological expression potentially linked with the renormalization group approach in quantum field theory in curved spacetimes. The model can be interpreted as a particular case of the class recently discussed by Perico et al. (2013) [25] which is termed complete in the sense that the cosmic evolution occurs between two extreme de Sitter stages (early and late time de Sitter phases). The gravitational wave equation is derived and its time-dependent part numerically integrated since the primordial de Sitter stage. The generated spectrum of gravitons is also compared with the standard calculations where an abrupt transition, from the early de Sitter to the radiation phase, is usually assumed. It is found that the stochastic background of gravitons is very similar to the one predicted by the cosmic concordance model plus inflation except at higher frequencies (ν ≳ 100 kHz). This remarkable signature of a "running vacuum" cosmology combined with the proposed high frequency gravitational wave detectors and measurements of the CMB polarization (B-modes) may provide a new window to confront more conventional models of inflation.

  14. Can cycle power predict sprint running performance?

    PubMed

    van Ingen Schenau, G J; Jacobs, R; de Koning, J J

    1991-01-01

    A major criticism of present models of the energetics and mechanics of sprint running concerns the application of estimates of parameters which seem to be adapted from measurements of running during actual competitions. This study presents a model which does not perpetuate this solecism. Using data obtained during supra-maximal cycle ergometer tests of highly trained athletes, the kinetics of the anaerobic and aerobic pathways were modelled. Internal power wasted in the acceleration and deceleration of body limbs and the power necessary to overcome air friction was calculated from data in the literature. Assuming a mechanical efficiency as found during submaximal cycling, a power equation was constructed which also included the power necessary to accelerate the body at the start of movement. The differential equation thus obtained was solved through simulation. The model appeared to predict realistic times at 100 m (10.47 s), 200 m (19.63 s) and 400 m (42.99 s) distances. By comparison with other methods it is argued that power equations of locomotion should include the concept of mechanical efficiency.

  15. Running energetics in the pronghorn antelope.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, S L; Hokanson, J F; Wells, D J; Swain, S D; Hoppeler, H; Navarro, V

    1991-10-24

    The pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) has an alleged top speed of 100 km h-1, second only to the cheetah (Acionyx jubatus) among land vertebrates, a possible response to predation in the exposed habitat of the North American prairie. Unlike cheetahs, however, pronghorn antelope are distance runners rather than sprinters, and can run 11 km in 10 min, an average speed of 65 km h-1. We measured maximum oxygen uptake in pronghorn antelope to distinguish between two potential explanations for this ability: either they have evolved a uniquely high muscular efficiency (low cost of transport) or they can supply oxygen to the muscles at unusually high levels. Because the cost of transport (energy per unit distance covered per unit body mass) varies as a predictable function of body mass among terrestrial vertebrates, we can calculate the predicted cost to maintain speeds of 65 and 100 km h-1 in an average 32-kg animal. The resulting range of predicted values, 3.2-5.1 ml O2 kg-1 s-1, far surpasses the predicted maximum aerobic capacity of a 32-kg mammal (1.5 ml O2 kg-1 s-1). We conclude that their performance is achieved by an extraordinary capacity to consume and process enough oxygen to support a predicted running speed greater than 20 ms-1 (70 km h-1), attained without unique respiratory-system structures.

  16. GRETINA commissioning and engineering run resolution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarlow, Thomas; Beausang, Con; Ross, Tim; Hughes, Richard; Gell, Kristen; Good, Erin

    2012-10-01

    GRETINA, the first stage in the full Gamma Ray Energy Tracking Array (GRETA), consists of seven modules covering approximately 1 solid angle. Each module is made up of four large, highly-segmented germanium detectors capable of measuring the interaction points of individual gamma-rays. GRETINA has recently been assembled and commissioned in LBNL via a series of engineering and commissioning runs. Here we report on an analysis of data from the first engineering run (ER01) which was intended to probe the response of the data acquisition system to high multiplicity gamma-ray cascades. For this experiment the 122Sn(40Ar, 4n) reaction at a beam energy of 210 MeV was utilized to populate high spin states in 158Er. A variety of beam currents, targets and trigger conditions were utilized to test the acquisition. Here we report on the measured energy resolution, both with calibration and in-beam sources as well as a gamma-gamma coincidence analysis to confirm the known level scheme and the capability of the data acquisition system for high fold coincidence measurements. This work was partly supported by the US Department of Energy via grant numbers DE-FG52-09NA29454 and DE-FG02-05-ER41379.

  17. A runs-test algorithm: contingent reinforcement and response run structures.

    PubMed

    Hachiga, Yosuke; Sakagami, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Four rats' choices between two levers were differentially reinforced using a runs-test algorithm. On each trial, a runs-test score was calculated based on the last 20 choices. In Experiment 1, the onset of stimulus lights cued when the runs score was smaller than criterion. Following cuing, the correct choice was occasionally reinforced with food, and the incorrect choice resulted in a blackout. Results indicated that this contingency reduced sequential dependencies among successive choice responses. With one exception, subjects' choice rule was well described as biased coin flipping. In Experiment 2, cuing was removed and the reinforcement criterion was changed to a percentile score based on the last 20 reinforced responses. The results replicated those of Experiment 1 in successfully eliminating first-order dependencies in all subjects. For 2 subjects, choice allocation was approximately consistent with nonbiased coin flipping. These results suggest that sequential dependencies may be a function of reinforcement contingency.

  18. Walking and running in the red-legged running frog, Kassina maculata.

    PubMed

    Ahn, A N; Furrow, E; Biewener, A A

    2004-01-01

    Although most frog species are specialized for jumping or swimming, Kassina maculata (red-legged running frog) primarily uses a third type of locomotion during which the hindlimbs alternate. In the present study, we examined Kassina's distinct locomotory mode to determine whether these frogs walk or run and how their gait may change with speed. We used multiple methods to distinguish between terrestrial gaits: the existence or absence of an aerial phase, duty factor, relative footfall patterns and the mechanics of the animal's center of mass (COM). To measure kinematic and kinetic variables, we recorded digital video as the animals moved over a miniature force platform (N=12 individuals). With respect to footfall patterns, the frogs used a single gait and walked at all speeds examined. Duty factor always exceeded 0.59. Based on COM mechanics, however, the frogs used both walking and running gaits. At slower speeds, the fluctuations in the horizontal kinetic energy (E(k)) and gravitational potential energy (E(p)) of the COM were largely out of phase, indicating a vaulting or walking gait. In most of the trials, Kassina used a combined gait at intermediate speeds, unlike cursorial animals with distinct gait transitions. This combined gait, much like a mammalian gallop, exhibited the mechanics of both vaulting and bouncing gaits. At faster speeds, the E(k) and E(p) of Kassina's COM were more in phase, indicating the use of a bouncing or running gait. Depending on the definition used to distinguish between walking and running, Kassina either only used a walking gait at all speeds or used a walking gait at slower speeds but then switched to a running gait as speed increased.

  19. Joint kinematics and kinetics of overground accelerated running versus running on an accelerated treadmill

    PubMed Central

    Van Caekenberghe, Ine; Segers, Veerle; Aerts, Peter; Willems, Patrick; De Clercq, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Literature shows that running on an accelerated motorized treadmill is mechanically different from accelerated running overground. Overground, the subject has to enlarge the net anterior–posterior force impulse proportional to acceleration in order to overcome linear whole body inertia, whereas on a treadmill, this force impulse remains zero, regardless of belt acceleration. Therefore, it can be expected that changes in kinematics and joint kinetics of the human body also are proportional to acceleration overground, whereas no changes according to belt acceleration are expected on a treadmill. This study documents kinematics and joint kinetics of accelerated running overground and running on an accelerated motorized treadmill belt for 10 young healthy subjects. When accelerating overground, ground reaction forces are characterized by less braking and more propulsion, generating a more forward-oriented ground reaction force vector and a more forwardly inclined body compared with steady-state running. This change in body orientation as such is partly responsible for the changed force direction. Besides this, more pronounced hip and knee flexion at initial contact, a larger hip extension velocity, smaller knee flexion velocity and smaller initial plantarflexion velocity are associated with less braking. A larger knee extension and plantarflexion velocity result in larger propulsion. Altogether, during stance, joint moments are not significantly influenced by acceleration overground. Therefore, we suggest that the overall behaviour of the musculoskeletal system (in terms of kinematics and joint moments) during acceleration at a certain speed remains essentially identical to steady-state running at the same speed, yet acting in a different orientation. However, because acceleration implies extra mechanical work to increase the running speed, muscular effort done (in terms of power output) must be larger. This is confirmed by larger joint power generation at the level

  20. Adjustments with running speed reveal neuromuscular adaptations during landing associated with high mileage running training.

    PubMed

    Verheul, Jasper; Clansey, Adam C; Lake, Mark J

    2017-03-01

    It remains to be determined whether running training influences the amplitude of lower limb muscle activations before and during the first half of stance and whether such changes are associated with joint stiffness regulation and usage of stored energy from tendons. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate neuromuscular and movement adaptations before and during landing in response to running training across a range of speeds. Two groups of high mileage (HM; >45 km/wk, n = 13) and low mileage (LM; <15 km/wk, n = 13) runners ran at four speeds (2.5-5.5 m/s) while lower limb mechanics and electromyography of the thigh muscles were collected. There were few differences in prelanding activation levels, but HM runners displayed lower activations of the rectus femoris, vastus medialis, and semitendinosus muscles postlanding, and these differences increased with running speed. HM runners also demonstrated higher initial knee stiffness during the impact phase compared with LM runners, which was associated with an earlier peak knee flexion velocity, and both were relatively unchanged by running speed. In contrast, LM runners had higher knee stiffness during the slightly later weight acceptance phase and the disparity was amplified with increases in speed. It was concluded that initial knee joint stiffness might predominantly be governed by tendon stiffness rather than muscular activations before landing. Estimated elastic work about the ankle was found to be higher in the HM runners, which might play a role in reducing weight acceptance phase muscle activation levels and improve muscle activation efficiency with running training.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Although neuromuscular factors play a key role during running, the influence of high mileage training on neuromuscular function has been poorly studied, especially in relation to running speed. This study is the first to demonstrate changes in neuromuscular conditioning with high mileage training, mainly characterized by

  1. The psychological benefits of recreational running: a field study.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Attila; Abrahám, Júlia

    2013-01-01

    Running yields positive changes in affect, but the external validity of controlled studies has received little attention in the literature. In this inquiry, 50 recreational runners completed the Exercise-Induced Feeling Inventory (Gauvin & Rejeskí, 1993) before and after a bout of self-planned running on an urban running path. Positive changes were seen in all four measures of affect (p < .001). Multivariate regressions were performed to examine the contribution of four exercise characteristics (i.e., duration of the current run, weekly running time, weekly running distance, and running experience) to the observed changes in affect. The results have revealed that exercise characteristics accounted for only 14-30% of the variance in the recreational runners' affect, in both directions. It is concluded that psychological benefits of recreational running may be linked to placebo (conditioning and/or expectancy) effects.

  2. 6. Pedlar Gap Run Aqueduct, detail of north abutment showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Pedlar Gap Run Aqueduct, detail of north abutment showing evidence of trough framing, looking NE - North River Canal System, Pedlar Gap Run Aqueduct, West side of Buena Vista, Buena Vista, Roanoke City, VA

  3. 5. Pedlar Gap Run Aqueduct, detail of north abutment showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Pedlar Gap Run Aqueduct, detail of north abutment showing evidence of trough framing, looking N - North River Canal System, Pedlar Gap Run Aqueduct, West side of Buena Vista, Buena Vista, Roanoke City, VA

  4. 2. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF OVENS ALONG CATS RUN LOOKING NORTHEAST, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF OVENS ALONG CATS RUN LOOKING NORTHEAST, SHOWING OVEN NOS. 159 (RIGHT) THROUGH 163 (LEFT) - Griffin No. 1 Coke Works, Along Cats Run, Southeast of Masontown Bourough (Nicholson Township), Masontown, Fayette County, PA

  5. Running, heart disease, and the ironic death of Jim Fixx.

    PubMed

    Plymire, Darcy C

    2002-03-01

    Jim Fixx was one of millions ofAmericans who started running in the 1 960s, 1970s, and 1980s. Unlike other runners, however, Fixx wrote a best-selling book about running and, ironically, died of a heart attack at the age of 52 years while running. Fixx and the authors of other running books believed heart disease resulted from overcivilization and recommended running as a cure. Running was not merely a physical exercise, according to those authors, but also a way of life. Moreover, those running authors, who were often doctors themselves, advised their readers to listen to their bodies, instead of their doctors. Fixx's adherence to that philosophy offers an explanationfor his seemingly irrational behavior--running through chest pain and discomfort.

  6. 29 CFR 452.30 - Run-off elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Run-off elections. 452.30 Section 452.30 Labor Regulations... OF 1959 Frequency and Kinds of Elections § 452.30 Run-off elections. A run-off election must meet the... example, if the run-off is to be held at the same meeting as the original election, the original notice of...

  7. 29 CFR 452.30 - Run-off elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Run-off elections. 452.30 Section 452.30 Labor Regulations... OF 1959 Frequency and Kinds of Elections § 452.30 Run-off elections. A run-off election must meet the... example, if the run-off is to be held at the same meeting as the original election, the original notice of...

  8. 29 CFR 452.30 - Run-off elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Run-off elections. 452.30 Section 452.30 Labor Regulations... OF 1959 Frequency and Kinds of Elections § 452.30 Run-off elections. A run-off election must meet the... example, if the run-off is to be held at the same meeting as the original election, the original notice of...

  9. 29 CFR 452.30 - Run-off elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Run-off elections. 452.30 Section 452.30 Labor Regulations... OF 1959 Frequency and Kinds of Elections § 452.30 Run-off elections. A run-off election must meet the... example, if the run-off is to be held at the same meeting as the original election, the original notice of...

  10. 29 CFR 452.30 - Run-off elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Run-off elections. 452.30 Section 452.30 Labor Regulations... OF 1959 Frequency and Kinds of Elections § 452.30 Run-off elections. A run-off election must meet the... example, if the run-off is to be held at the same meeting as the original election, the original notice of...

  11. Is the WII fit free run activity a feasible mode of exercise for regular exercisers: a comparison with treadmill running.

    PubMed

    Roopchand-Martin, Sharmella; Nelson, Gail A

    2016-10-01

    This study compared the metabolic responses between treadmill running and the Free Run on the Nintendo Wii when maintaining a constant pace with an aim to see whether this would be a feasible option for exercise in persons who already exercise. Twenty eight university students, mean age 20.7±1.38 years, participated in a repeated measures study. Subjects completed 10 minutes running on the treadmill at a self selected pace followed by 10 minutes of Free Run on the Nintendo Wii Fit disc. A metronome regulated the running pace during the Free Run activity to match the running pace on the treadmill. Oxygen consumption, caloric expenditure and heart rate were measured with a Cardio Coach Metabolic Cart. Paired t-tests compared the percentage of age predicted maximal oxygen consumption (% VO2max), metabolic equivalents (METs), caloric expenditure and percentage of estimated maximal heart rate (% HRmax) between the two running situations. For all variables of interest the mean values for treadmill running was found to be significantly higher than those for the Wii Free Run (P<0.001). The mean %HRmax and METs categorized both activities as vigorous intensity, however, the Free Run was at the lower end of the ranges whilst treadmill running was at the upper. The mean %VO2max classified treadmill running as vigorous intensity and Wii Free Run as moderate. The Wii Free Run activity can be used as an additional form of exercise for persons who are already engaged in physical activity but should not be considered a replacement for treadmill running by those who run.

  12. 14 CFR 23.59 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 23.59... Takeoff distance and takeoff run. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff distance and, at the option of the applicant, the takeoff run, must be determined. (a) Takeoff distance is the greater of— (1...

  13. 14 CFR 23.59 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 23.59... Takeoff distance and takeoff run. For each commuter category airplane, the takeoff distance and, at the option of the applicant, the takeoff run, must be determined. (a) Takeoff distance is the greater of— (1...

  14. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs between...

  15. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs between...

  16. Predictors of Running Away from Family Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesmith, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Running away is a frequent but little studied phenomenon among adolescents in foster care. Repeated running from care often leads to premature discharge and homelessness for youth. This article uses cumulative risk theory in the context of normative adolescent development to investigate predictors of running away from foster care. Results indicate…

  17. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  18. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  19. 46 CFR 113.10-3 - Cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cable runs. 113.10-3 Section 113.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems § 113.10-3 Cable runs. Cable runs...

  20. Running, Heart Disease, and the Ironic Death of Jim Fixx.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plymire, Darcy C.

    2002-01-01

    Runner Jim Fixx wrote a book about running and died young of a heart attack while running. Fixx and other authors believed heart disease resulted from overcivilization and recommended running as a way of life and cure, advising readers to listen to their bodies instead of their doctors. Fixx's adherence to that philosophy explains his behavior…

  1. Using Integration and Autonomy to Teach an Elementary Running Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sluder, J. Brandon; Howard-Shaughnessy, Candice

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular fitness is an important aspect of overall fitness, health, and wellness, and running can be an excellent lifetime physical activity. One of the most simple and effective means of exercise, running raises heart rate in a short amount of time and can be done with little to no cost for equipment. There are many benefits to running,…

  2. Running, Heart Disease, and the Ironic Death of Jim Fixx.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plymire, Darcy C.

    2002-01-01

    Runner Jim Fixx wrote a book about running and died young of a heart attack while running. Fixx and other authors believed heart disease resulted from overcivilization and recommended running as a way of life and cure, advising readers to listen to their bodies instead of their doctors. Fixx's adherence to that philosophy explains his behavior…

  3. Using Integration and Autonomy to Teach an Elementary Running Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sluder, J. Brandon; Howard-Shaughnessy, Candice

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular fitness is an important aspect of overall fitness, health, and wellness, and running can be an excellent lifetime physical activity. One of the most simple and effective means of exercise, running raises heart rate in a short amount of time and can be done with little to no cost for equipment. There are many benefits to running,…

  4. Improvement in Running Economy after 6 Weeks of Plyometric Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Amanda M.; Owings, Matt; Schwane, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Investigated whether a 6-week regimen of plyometric training would improve running economy. Data were collected on 18 regular but not highly trained distance runners who participated in either regular running training or plyometric training. Results indicated that 6 weeks of plyometric training improved running economy at selected speeds in this…

  5. 40 CFR 600.507-12 - Running change data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Running change data requirements. 600... Passenger Automobiles)-Procedures for Determining Manufacturer's Average Fuel Economy § 600.507-12 Running... shall submit additional running change fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emissions data...

  6. 40 CFR 86.537-90 - Dynamometer test runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dynamometer test runs. 86.537-90... 1978 and Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.537-90 Dynamometer test runs. (a) The vehicle... (505 seconds) is run. (b) The following steps shall be taken for each test: (1) Place drive wheel...

  7. 40 CFR 86.537-90 - Dynamometer test runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dynamometer test runs. 86.537-90... 1978 and Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.537-90 Dynamometer test runs. (a) The vehicle... (505 seconds) is run. (b) The following steps shall be taken for each test: (1) Place drive wheel...

  8. 40 CFR 600.507-12 - Running change data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Running change data requirements. 600... Average Carbon-Related Exhaust Emissions § 600.507-12 Running change data requirements. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (d) of this section, the manufacturer shall submit additional running change...

  9. 14 CFR 25.113 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 25.113... and takeoff run. (a) Takeoff distance on a dry runway is the greater of— (1) The horizontal distance... include a clearway, the takeoff run is equal to the takeoff distance. If the takeoff distance includes a...

  10. 14 CFR 25.113 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 25.113... and takeoff run. (a) Takeoff distance on a dry runway is the greater of— (1) The horizontal distance... include a clearway, the takeoff run is equal to the takeoff distance. If the takeoff distance includes a...

  11. 14 CFR 25.113 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 25.113... and takeoff run. (a) Takeoff distance on a dry runway is the greater of— (1) The horizontal distance... include a clearway, the takeoff run is equal to the takeoff distance. If the takeoff distance includes a...

  12. 40 CFR 91.409 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine dynamometer test run. 91.409... Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Engine and dynamometer start-up. (1) Only adjustments in accordance with... manufacturer's option, the engine can be run with the throttle in a fixed position or by using the engine's...

  13. 40 CFR 91.409 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 91.409... Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Engine and dynamometer start-up. (1) Only adjustments in accordance with... manufacturer's option, the engine can be run with the throttle in a fixed position or by using the engine's...

  14. 40 CFR 91.409 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 91.409... Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Engine and dynamometer start-up. (1) Only adjustments in accordance with... manufacturer's option, the engine can be run with the throttle in a fixed position or by using the engine's...

  15. 40 CFR 86.1237-85 - Dynamometer runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dynamometer runs. 86.1237-85 Section... Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1237-85 Dynamometer runs. (a) The vehicle shall be either driven... the diurnal loss test and beginning of the hot soak preparation run shall not exceed 3 minutes, and...

  16. 49 CFR 238.319 - Running brake test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Running brake test. 238.319 Section 238.319... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.319 Running brake test. (a) As soon as conditions safely permit, a running brake test shall be performed on each passenger train after the train has received, or...

  17. 49 CFR 238.319 - Running brake test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Running brake test. 238.319 Section 238.319... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.319 Running brake test. (a) As soon as conditions safely permit, a running brake test shall be performed on each passenger train after the train has received, or...

  18. 49 CFR 238.319 - Running brake test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Running brake test. 238.319 Section 238.319... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.319 Running brake test. (a) As soon as conditions safely permit, a running brake test shall be performed on each passenger train after the train has received, or...

  19. 40 CFR 90.409 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 90.409... Test Procedures § 90.409 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Engine and dynamometer start-up. (1) Only... practice. (3) For Phase 1 engines, at the manufacturer's option, the engine can be run with the throttle in...

  20. 40 CFR 86.1237-85 - Dynamometer runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dynamometer runs. 86.1237-85 Section... Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1237-85 Dynamometer runs. (a) The vehicle shall be either driven... the diurnal loss test and beginning of the hot soak preparation run shall not exceed 3 minutes, and...

  1. 49 CFR 238.319 - Running brake test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Running brake test. 238.319 Section 238.319... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.319 Running brake test. (a) As soon as conditions safely permit, a running brake test shall be performed on each passenger train after the train has received, or...

  2. 49 CFR 238.319 - Running brake test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Running brake test. 238.319 Section 238.319... Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment § 238.319 Running brake test. (a) As soon as conditions safely permit, a running brake test shall be performed on each passenger train after the train has received, or...

  3. 40 CFR 1066.960 - Running loss test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Running loss test. 1066.960 Section 1066.960 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS... Procedures for Motor Vehicles § 1066.960 Running loss test. Test vehicles for running loss emissions as...

  4. Shock Transmission and Fatigue in Human Running.

    PubMed

    Verbitsky, Oleg; Mizrahi, Joseph; Voloshin, Arkady; Treiger, July; Isakov, Eli

    1998-08-01

    The goal of this research was to analyze the effects of fatigue on the shock waves generated by foot strike. Twenty-two subjects were instrumented with an externally attached, lightweight accelerometer placed over the tibial tuberosity. The subjects ran on a treadmill for 30 min at a speed near their anaerobic threshold. Fatigue was established when the end-tidal CO2 pressure decreased. The results indicated that approximately half of the subjects reached the fatigue state toward the end of the test. Whenever fatigue occurred, the peak acceleration was found to increase. It was thus concluded that there is a clear association between fatigue and increased heel strike-induced shock waves. These results have a significant implication for the etiology of running injuries, since shock wave attenuation has been previously reported to play an important role in preventing such injuries.

  5. Process-independent strong running coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binosi, Daniele; Mezrag, Cédric; Papavassiliou, Joannis; Roberts, Craig D.; Rodríguez-Quintero, Jose

    2017-09-01

    We unify two widely different approaches to understanding the infrared behavior of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), one essentially phenomenological, based on data, and the other computational, realized via quantum field equations in the continuum theory. Using the latter, we explain and calculate a process-independent running coupling for QCD, a new type of effective charge that is an analogue of the Gell-Mann-Low effective coupling in quantum electrodynamics. The result is almost identical to the process-dependent effective charge defined via the Bjorken sum rule, which provides one of the most basic constraints on our knowledge of nucleon spin structure. This reveals the Bjorken sum to be a near direct means by which to gain empirical insight into QCD's Gell-Mann-Low effective charge.

  6. Giving students the run of sprinting models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, André; Ellermeijer, Ton

    2009-11-01

    A biomechanical study of sprinting is an interesting task for students who have a background in mechanics and calculus. These students can work with real data and do practical investigations similar to the way sports scientists do research. Student research activities are viable when the students are familiar with tools to collect and work with data from sensors and video recordings and with modeling tools for comparing simulation and experimental results. This article describes a multipurpose system, named COACH, that offers a versatile integrated set of tools for learning, doing, and teaching mathematics and science in a computer-based inquiry approach. Automated tracking of reference points and correction of perspective distortion in videos, state-of-the-art algorithms for data smoothing and numerical differentiation, and graphical system dynamics based modeling are some of the built-in techniques that are suitable for motion analysis. Their implementation and their application in student activities involving models of running are discussed.

  7. DNA strand displacement system running logic programs.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Patón, Alfonso; Sainz de Murieta, Iñaki; Sosík, Petr

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a DNA-based computing model which is enzyme-free and autonomous, not requiring a human intervention during the computation. The model is able to perform iterated resolution steps with logical formulae in conjunctive normal form. The implementation is based on the technique of DNA strand displacement, with each clause encoded in a separate DNA molecule. Propositions are encoded assigning a strand to each proposition p, and its complementary strand to the proposition ¬p; clauses are encoded comprising different propositions in the same strand. The model allows to run logic programs composed of Horn clauses by cascading resolution steps. The potential of the model is demonstrated also by its theoretical capability of solving SAT. The resulting SAT algorithm has a linear time complexity in the number of resolution steps, whereas its spatial complexity is exponential in the number of variables of the formula. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. LHC Computing: The First Run and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, Ian

    2012-10-10

    Even in between the last two generations of high energy physics detectors there has been a tremendous amount of progress in the area of computing. The distributed computing systems used in the LHC are composed of large-scale facilities on 5 continents, executing over a million processing requests a day, and moving peta-bytes of data a month. In this presentation I will discuss the operational experience of the LHC experiments and the challenges faced in the first run. I will discuss how the techniques have evolved and I will cover future projects to improve the distributed computing infrastructure and services. I will close by speaking of some potential new technologies being explored.

  9. Pathogenic regulation of running water macroinvertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, K.W.; Wilzbach, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The research during the second year focused on a large scale laboratory and field experiment on factors regulating growth and mortality of populations of the stream shredder caddisfly {ital Pycnopsyche guttifer}. This species, which is an obligate shredder feeding on leaf litter in woodland streams during its autumn-winter growth period, was selected because of the extensive pool of background data that are available, the ease with which its terrestrial eggs can be collected, and its suitability for laboratory culture and field observations. The species is univoltine and it is widely distributed in the eastern US, but did not occur naturally in the specific stream, Piney Run, MD, into which a population was introduced. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Flood-plain delineation for Occoquan River, Wolf Run, Sandy Run, Elk Horn Run, Giles Run, Kanes Creek, Racoon Creek, and Thompson Creek, Fairfax County, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soule, Pat LeRoy

    1978-01-01

    Water-surface profiles of the 25-, 50-, and 100-year recurrence interval discharges have been computed for all streams and reaches of channels in Fairfax County, Virginia, having a drainage area greater than 1 square mile except for Dogue Creek, Little Hunting Creek, and that portion of Cameron Run above Lake Barcroft. Maps having a 2-foot contour interval and a horizontal scale of 1 inch equals 100 feet were used for base on which flood boundaries were delineated for 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods to be expected in each basin under ultimate development conditions. This report is one of a series and presents a discussion of techniques employed in computing discharges and profiles as well as the flood profiles and maps on which flood boundaries have been delineated for the Occoquan River and its tributaries within Fairfax County and those streams on Mason Neck within Fairfax County tributary to the Potomac River. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. Hit-and-run planetary collisions.

    PubMed

    Asphaug, Erik; Agnor, Craig B; Williams, Quentin

    2006-01-12

    Terrestrial planet formation is believed to have concluded in our Solar System with about 10 million to 100 million years of giant impacts, where hundreds of Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos acquired random velocities through gravitational encounters and resonances with one another and with Jupiter. This led to planet-crossing orbits and collisions that produced the four terrestrial planets, the Moon and asteroids. But here we show that colliding planets do not simply merge, as is commonly assumed. In many cases, the smaller planet escapes from the collision highly deformed, spun up, depressurized from equilibrium, stripped of its outer layers, and sometimes pulled apart into a chain of diverse objects. Remnants of these 'hit-and-run' collisions are predicted to be common among remnant planet-forming populations, and thus to be relevant to asteroid formation and meteorite petrogenesis.

  12. Running cosmological constant with observational tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi; Zhang, Kaituo

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the running cosmological constant model with dark energy linearly proportional to the Hubble parameter, Λ = σH +Λ0, in which the ΛCDM limit is recovered by taking σ = 0. We derive the linear perturbation equations of gravity under the Friedmann-Lemaïtre-Robertson-Walker cosmology, and show the power spectra of the CMB temperature and matter density distribution. By using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we fit the model to the current observational data and find that σH0 /Λ0 ≲ 2.63 ×10-2 and 6.74 ×10-2 for Λ (t) coupled to matter and radiation-matter, respectively, along with constraints on other cosmological parameters.

  13. Effects of forefoot bending elasticity of running shoes on gait and running performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Tu, Kuan-Hua; Liu, Chiang; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of forefoot bending elasticity of running shoes on kinetics and kinematics during walking and running. Twelve healthy male participants wore normal and elastic shoes while walking at 1.5m/s, jogging at 2.5m/s, and running at 3.5m/s. The elastic shoes were designed by modifying the stiffness of flexible shoes with elastic bands added to the forefoot part of the shoe sole. A Kistler force platform and Vicon system were used to collect kinetic and kinematic data during push-off. Electromyography was used to record the muscle activity of the medial gastrocnemius and medial tibialis anterior. A paired dependent t-test was used to compare the various shoes and the level of significance was set at α=.05. The range of motion of the ankle joint and the maximal anterior-posterior propulsive force differed significantly between elastic and flexible shoes in walking and jogging. The contact time and medial gastrocnemius muscle activation in the push-off phase were significantly lower for the elastic shoes compared with the flexible shoes in walking and jogging. The elastic forefoot region of shoes can alter movement characteristics in walking and jogging. However, for running, the elasticity used in this study was not strong enough to exert a similar effect. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of replica running shoes upon external forces and muscle activity during running.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ana Paula Da Silva; Brandina, Kátia; Bianco, Roberto; Oliveira, Vitor Henrique De; Souza, Juliana Roque De; Mezencio, Bruno; Amadio, Alberto Carlos; Serrão, Júlio Cerca

    2012-05-01

    Twelve participants ran (9 km · h(-1)) to test two types of running shoes: replica and original shoes. Ground reaction force, plantar pressure and electromyographic activity were recorded. The shoes were tested randomly and on different days. Comparisons between the two experimental conditions were made by analysis of variance (ANOVA) test (P ≤ 0.05). The time to first peak, loading rate of the first peak and impulse of the first 75 ms of stance were significantly different between the shoes (P ≤ 0.05), revealing an increase of impact forces for the replica shoes. The peak plantar pressure values were significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) when wearing replica shoes. During running, the contact area was significantly smaller (P ≤ 0.05) for the replica shoe. The electromyographic activity of the analysed muscles did not show changes between the two shoes in running. These findings suggest that the use of replica running shoes can increase the external load applied to the human body, but may not change the muscle activity pattern during locomotion. This new mechanical situation may increase the risk of injuries in these movements.

  15. How Fast Can a Human Run? − Bipedal vs. Quadrupedal Running

    PubMed Central

    Kinugasa, Ryuta; Usami, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Usain Bolt holds the current world record in the 100-m run, with a running time of 9.58 s, and has been described as the best human sprinter in history. However, this raises questions concerning the maximum human running speed, such as “Can the world’s fastest men become faster still?” The correct answer is likely “Yes.” We plotted the historical world records for bipedal and quadrupedal 100-m sprint times according to competition year. These historical records were plotted using several curve-fitting procedures. We found that the projected speeds intersected in 2048, when for the first time, the winning quadrupedal 100-m sprint time could be lower, at 9.276 s, than the winning bipedal time of 9.383 s. Video analysis revealed that in quadrupedal running, humans employed a transverse gallop with a small angular excursion. These results suggest that in the future, the fastest human on the planet might be a quadrupedal runner at the 2048 Olympics. This may be achieved by shifting up to the rotary gallop and taking longer strides with wide sagittal trunk motion. PMID:27446911

  16. Modular Control of Treadmill vs Overground Running

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Dario; Kersting, Uwe Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Motorized treadmills have been widely used in locomotion studies, although a debate remains concerning the extrapolation of results obtained from treadmill experiments to overground locomotion. Slight differences between treadmill (TRD) and overground running (OVG) kinematics and muscle activity have previously been reported. However, little is known about differences in the modular control of muscle activation in these two conditions. Therefore, we aimed at investigating differences between motor modules extracted from TRD and OVG by factorization of multi-muscle electromyographic (EMG) signals. Twelve healthy men ran on a treadmill and overground at their preferred speed while we recorded tibial acceleration and surface EMG from 11 ipsilateral lower limb muscles. We extracted motor modules representing relative weightings of synergistic muscle activations by non-negative matrix factorization from 20 consecutive gait cycles. Four motor modules were sufficient to accurately reconstruct the EMG signals in both TRD and OVG (average reconstruction quality = 92±3%). Furthermore, a good reconstruction quality (80±7%) was obtained also when muscle weightings of one condition (either OVG or TRD) were used to reconstruct the EMG data from the other condition. The peak amplitudes of activation signals showed a similar timing (pattern) across conditions. The magnitude of peak activation for the module related to initial contact was significantly greater for OVG, whereas peak activation for modules related to leg swing and preparation to landing were greater for TRD. We conclude that TRD and OVG share similar muscle weightings throughout motion. In addition, modular control for TRD and OVG is achieved with minimal temporal adjustments, which were dependent on the phase of the running cycle. PMID:27064978

  17. Thermodynamical aspects of running vacuum models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A. S.; Basilakos, Spyros; Solà, Joan

    2016-04-01

    The thermal history of a large class of running vacuum models in which the effective cosmological term is described by a truncated power series of the Hubble rate, whose dominant term is Λ (H) ∝ H^{n+2}, is discussed in detail. Specifically, by assuming that the ultrarelativistic particles produced by the vacuum decay emerge into space-time in such a way that its energy density ρ _r ∝ T4, the temperature evolution law and the increasing entropy function are analytically calculated. For the whole class of vacuum models explored here we find that the primeval value of the comoving radiation entropy density (associated to effectively massless particles) starts from zero and evolves extremely fast until reaching a maximum near the end of the vacuum decay phase, where it saturates. The late-time conservation of the radiation entropy during the adiabatic FRW phase also guarantees that the whole class of running vacuum models predicts the same correct value of the present day entropy, S0 ˜ 10^{87}-10^{88} (in natural units), independently of the initial conditions. In addition, by assuming Gibbons-Hawking temperature as an initial condition, we find that the ratio between the late-time and primordial vacuum energy densities is in agreement with naive estimates from quantum field theory, namely, ρ _{Λ 0}/ρ _{Λ I} ˜ 10^{-123}. Such results are independent on the power n and suggests that the observed Universe may evolve smoothly between two extreme, unstable, non-singular de Sitter phases.

  18. A new ankle foot orthosis for running.

    PubMed

    Bishop, David; Moore, Allan; Chandrashekar, Naveen

    2009-09-01

    Traumatic knee injuries in automobile accidents and sports often lead to damage of the peroneal nerve. A lack of control of muscles innervated by the peroneal nerve due to this damage, results in the inability to dorsiflex and evert the foot and to extend the toes. This condition is commonly known as foot drop. Foot drop reduces the stability in the body while walking and running and may also cause injury due to lack of foot clearance during the swing phase of the gait. Traditionally, an ankle foot orthosis (AFO), comprised of a moulded sheet of plastic that conforms around the posterior calf and distally contains all or part of the calcaneous as well as the plantar foot, is used to treat foot drop. The intent of this orthosis is to dorsiflex the foot to provide clearance during the swing phase of walking and running. Traditional AFO results in increased pressures due to a decrease in dorsiflexion range of motion at the ankle and make the orthosis increasingly uncomfortable to wear. Several other existing designs of foot drop AFO suffer from similar inadequacies. To address these issues, a new AFO was developed. The device was successfully used by one person with foot drop without issues for more than one year. This new design conforms to the lower anterior shin and dorsum of the foot using dorsiassist Tamarack ankle joints to allow for greater plantar and dorsiflexion range of motion. While still limiting ankle inversion it does allow for more ankle eversion. This orthosis can be discretely worn inside shoes due to its smaller size, and can be worn for a longer period of time without discomfort.

  19. SALIVARY ANTIMICROBIAL PROTEIN RESPONSE TO PROLONGED RUNNING

    PubMed Central

    Kuennen, M.; Gourley, C.; Schneider, S.; Dokladny, K.; Moseley, P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Prolonged exercise may compromise immunity through a reduction of salivary antimicrobial proteins (AMPs). Salivary IgA (IgA) has been extensively studied, but little is known about the effect of acute, prolonged exercise on AMPs including lysozyme (Lys) and lactoferrin (Lac). Objective To determine the effect of a 50-km trail race on salivary cortisol (Cort), IgA, Lys, and Lac. Methods 14 subjects: (6 females, 8 males) completed a 50km ultramarathon. Saliva was collected pre, immediately after (post) and 1.5 hrs post race (+1.5). Results Lac concentration was higher at +1.5 hrs post race compared to post exercise (p < 0.05). Lys was unaffected by the race (p > 0.05). IgA concentration, secretion rate, and IgA/Osm were lower +1.5 hrs post compared to pre race (p < 0.05). Cort concentration was higher at post compared to +1.5 (p < 0.05), but was unaltered from pre race levels. Subjects finished in 7.81±1.2 hrs. Saliva flow rate did not differ between time points. Saliva Osm increased at post (p < 0.05) compared to pre race. Conclusions The intensity could have been too low to alter Lys and Lac secretion rates and thus, may not be as sensitive as IgA to changes in response to prolonged running. Results expand our understanding of the mucosal immune system and may have implications for predicting illness after prolonged running. PMID:24744458

  20. Runs of Homozygosity in European Populations

    PubMed Central

    McQuillan, Ruth; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Abdel-Rahman, Rehab; Franklin, Christopher S.; Pericic, Marijana; Barac-Lauc, Lovorka; Smolej-Narancic, Nina; Janicijevic, Branka; Polasek, Ozren; Tenesa, Albert; MacLeod, Andrew K.; Farrington, Susan M.; Rudan, Pavao; Hayward, Caroline; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Wild, Sarah H.; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Wilson, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Estimating individual genome-wide autozygosity is important both in the identification of recessive disease variants via homozygosity mapping and in the investigation of the effects of genome-wide homozygosity on traits of biomedical importance. Approaches have tended to involve either single-point estimates or rather complex multipoint methods of inferring individual autozygosity, all on the basis of limited marker data. Now, with the availability of high-density genome scans, a multipoint, observational method of estimating individual autozygosity is possible. Using data from a 300,000 SNP panel in 2618 individuals from two isolated and two more-cosmopolitan populations of European origin, we explore the potential of estimating individual autozygosity from data on runs of homozygosity (ROHs). Termed Froh, this is defined as the proportion of the autosomal genome in runs of homozygosity above a specified length. Mean Froh distinguishes clearly between subpopulations classified in terms of grandparental endogamy and population size. With the use of good pedigree data for one of the populations (Orkney), Froh was found to correlate strongly with the inbreeding coefficient estimated from pedigrees (r = 0.86). Using pedigrees to identify individuals with no shared maternal and paternal ancestors in five, and probably at least ten, generations, we show that ROHs measuring up to 4 Mb are common in demonstrably outbred individuals. Given the stochastic variation in ROH number, length, and location and the fact that ROHs are important whether ancient or recent in origin, approaches such as this will provide a more useful description of genomic autozygosity than has hitherto been possible. PMID:18760389

  1. Running injuries. A review of the epidemiological literature.

    PubMed

    van Mechelen, W

    1992-11-01

    Running is one of the most popular leisure sports activities. Next to its beneficial health effects, negative side effects in terms of sports injuries should also be recognised. Given the limitations of the studies it appears that for the average recreational runner, who is steadily training and who participates in a long distance run every now and then, the overall yearly incidence rate for running injuries varies between 37 and 56%. Depending on the specificity of the group of runners concerned (competitive athletes; average recreational joggers; boys and girls) and on different circumstances these rates vary. If incidence is calculated according to exposure of running time the incidence reported in the literature varies from 2.5 to 12.1 injuries per 1000 hours of running. Most running injuries are lower extremity injuries, with a predominance for the knee. About 50 to 75% of all running injuries appear to be overuse injuries due to the constant repetition of the same movement. Recurrence of running injuries is reported in 20 to 70% of the cases. From the epidemiological studies it can be concluded that running injuries lead to a reduction of training or training cessation in about 30 to 90% of all injuries, about 20 to 70% of all injuries lead to medical consultation or medical treatment and 0 to 5% result in absence from work. Aetiological factors associated with running injuries include previous injury, lack of running experience, running to compete and excessive weekly running distance. The association between running injuries and factors such as warm-up and stretching exercises, body height, malalignment, muscular imbalance, restricted range of motion, running frequency, level of performance, stability of running pattern, shoes and inshoe orthoses and running on 1 side of the road remains unclear or is backed by contradicting or scarce research findings. Significantly not associated with running injuries seem age, gender, body mass index, running hills

  2. Progress report of hydrology and sedimentation in Bixler Run, Corey Creek, and Elk Run watersheds, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culbertson, J.K.

    1957-01-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation in progress and presents some tentative findings from a study of hydrology and sedimentation of three small watersheds where soil conservation practices are being applied. The study was begun in April 1954, to determine precipitation, runoff, probable sources and yields of sediment, and channel changes in two small watersheds in Pennsylvania. This report covers the period April 1954, to September 30, 1955 with the exception of the aggradation-degradation range data which covers the period October 1954 to November 1956. The internal or time control method of calibration is being used for the Bixler Run watershed study, and an external control is being used in the Corey Creek study.Precipitation on Bixler Run watershed was 47.33 inches for the 1955 water year. Total runoff was 14.08 inches and the suspended sediment yield was 1,143.3 tons or 76 tons per square mile of drainage area. Precipitation on Corey Creek watershed for the same period totaled 35.81 inches. The total runoff was 8.37 inches and the suspended-sediment yield was 713.0 tons or 58.2 tons per square mile of drainage area. The precipitation on Elk Run, external control watershed for the Corey Creek study was 34.54 inches. The runoff was 10.10 inches and the suspended sediment yield was 709.9 tons or 69.5 tons per square mile.Results from the study of channel changes by means of sediment aggradation-degradation ranges showed fill in all three watersheds. Bixler Run showed an average channel fill of 1.3 square feet per stream cross section. Corey Creek and Elk Run watersheds showed average fills of 2.9 and 4.1 square feet per cross section respectively. Most of the sediments comprising this fill were in the particle size range of gravel and coarser material.The water in all three watersheds was low in dissolved solids during the period of investigation, varying from 72 to 127 ppm in Bixler Run, from 58 to 130 ppm in Corey Creek, and from 58 to 117 ppm

  3. Human-like Running Can Be Open-Loop Stable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mombaur, Katja

    This paper addresses the question if running motions of a human-like robot can be stable without feedback. Exploitation of self-stability is considered to be a crucial factor for biological running and might be the key for success to make bipedal and humanoid robots run in the future, We investigate a two-dimensional simulation model of running with 9 bodies (trunk, thighs, shanks, feet, and arms) powered by torques at all internal joints. Using efficient optimal control techniques and stability optimization, we were able to determine torque inputs and spring-damper parameters that lead to fully open-loop stable running motions.

  4. Development and Prevention of Running-Related Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ni, Guo-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Studies investigating the effect of running on risk for developing osteoarthritis at weight-bearing joints have reported with conflicting results. Generally, moderate-level running is not likely detrimental to joint health. However, many factors may be associated with the increased risk of developing osteoarthritis in runners. Factors often implicated in the development of osteoarthritis comprise those that increase joint vulnerability and those which increase joint loading. It is therefore suggested that running has different effects on different people. Efforts should be made to identify those with joint vulnerability and joint loading, and measures should be taken to have those factors and/or their running programs modified to run safely. Further investigations are needed to examine the effect of running on joint health under different conditions to confirm the association between exposure to risk factors and development of osteoarthritis, as well as to validate the effectiveness of measures for preventing running-related osteoarthritis.

  5. Advanced overlay: sampling and modeling for optimized run-to-run control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramany, Lokesh; Chung, WoongJae; Samudrala, Pavan; Gao, Haiyong; Aung, Nyan; Gomez, Juan Manuel; Gutjahr, Karsten; Park, DongSuk; Snow, Patrick; Garcia-Medina, Miguel; Yap, Lipkong; Demirer, Onur Nihat; Pierson, Bill; Robinson, John C.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years overlay (OVL) control schemes have become more complicated in order to meet the ever shrinking margins of advanced technology nodes. As a result, this brings up new challenges to be addressed for effective run-to- run OVL control. This work addresses two of these challenges by new advanced analysis techniques: (1) sampling optimization for run-to-run control and (2) bias-variance tradeoff in modeling. The first challenge in a high order OVL control strategy is to optimize the number of measurements and the locations on the wafer, so that the "sample plan" of measurements provides high quality information about the OVL signature on the wafer with acceptable metrology throughput. We solve this tradeoff between accuracy and throughput by using a smart sampling scheme which utilizes various design-based and data-based metrics to increase model accuracy and reduce model uncertainty while avoiding wafer to wafer and within wafer measurement noise caused by metrology, scanner or process. This sort of sampling scheme, combined with an advanced field by field extrapolated modeling algorithm helps to maximize model stability and minimize on product overlay (OPO). Second, the use of higher order overlay models means more degrees of freedom, which enables increased capability to correct for complicated overlay signatures, but also increases sensitivity to process or metrology induced noise. This is also known as the bias-variance trade-off. A high order model that minimizes the bias between the modeled and raw overlay signature on a single wafer will also have a higher variation from wafer to wafer or lot to lot, that is unless an advanced modeling approach is used. In this paper, we characterize the bias-variance trade off to find the optimal scheme. The sampling and modeling solutions proposed in this study are validated by advanced process control (APC) simulations to estimate run-to-run performance, lot-to-lot and wafer-to- wafer model term monitoring to

  6. Physiological responses during intermittent running exercise differ between outdoor and treadmill running.

    PubMed

    Panascì, Marco; Lepers, Romuald; La Torre, Antonio; Bonato, Matteo; Assadi, Hervè

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the physiological responses during 15 min of intermittent running consisting of 30 s of high-intensity running exercise at maximal aerobic velocity (MAV) interspersed with 30 s of passive recovery (30-30) performed outdoor versus on a motorized treadmill. Fifteen collegiate physically active males (age, 22 ± 1 years old; body mass, 66 ± 7 kg; stature, 176 ± 06 cm; weekly training volume, 5 ± 2 h·week(-1)), performed the Fitness Intermittent Test 45-15 to determine maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max) and MAV and then completed in random order 3 different training sessions consisting of a 30-s run/30-s rest on an outdoor athletic track (30-30 Track) at MAV; a 30-s run/30-s rest on a treadmill (30-30 Treadmill) at MAV; a 30-s run/30-s rest at MAV+15% (30-30 + 15% MAV Treadmill). Oxygen uptake (V̇O2), time above 90%V̇O2max (t90%V̇O2max), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured during each training session. We observed a statistical significant underestimation of V̇O2 (53.1 ± 5.4 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) vs 49.8 ± 6.7 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), -6.3%, P = 0.012), t90%V̇O2max (8.6% ± 11.5% vs 38.7% ± 32.5%, -77.8%, P = 0.008), RPE (11.4 ± 1.4 vs 16.5 ± 1.7, -31%, P < 0.0001) during the 30-30 Treadmill compared with the same training session performed on track. No statistical differences between 30-30 +15 % MAV Treadmill and 30-30 Track were observed. The present study demonstrates that a 15% increase in running velocity during a high-intensity intermittent treadmill training session is the optimal solution to reach the same physiological responses than an outdoor training session.

  7. Cumulative loads increase at the knee joint with slow-speed running compared to faster running: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jesper; Sørensen, Henrik; Nielsen, Rasmus Østergaard

    2015-04-01

    Biomechanical cross-sectional study. To investigate the hypothesis that the cumulative load at the knee during running increases as running speed decreases. The knee joint load per stride decreases as running speed decreases. However, by decreasing running speed, the number of strides per given distance is increased. Running a given distance at a slower speed may increase the cumulative load at the knee joint compared with running the same distance at a higher speed, hence increasing the risk of running-related injuries in the knee. Kinematic and ground reaction force data were collected from 16 recreational runners, during steady-state running with a rearfoot strike pattern at 3 different speeds (mean ± SD): 8.02 ± 0.17 km/h, 11.79 ± 0.21 km/h, and 15.78 ± 0.22 km/h. The cumulative load (cumulative impulse) over a 1000-m distance was calculated at the knee joint on the basis of a standard 3-D inverse-dynamics approach. Based on a 1000-m running distance, the cumulative load at the knee was significantly higher at a slow running speed than at a high running speed (relative difference, 80%). The mean load per stride at the knee increased significantly across all biomechanical parameters, except impulse, following an increase in running speed. Slow-speed running decreases knee joint loads per stride and increases the cumulative load at the knee joint for a given running distance compared to faster running. The primary reason for the increase in cumulative load at slower speeds is an increase in number of strides needed to cover the same distance.

  8. The Millennium Run Observatory: first light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overzier, R.; Lemson, G.; Angulo, R. E.; Bertin, E.; Blaizot, J.; Henriques, B. M. B.; Marleau, G.-D.; White, S. D. M.

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of galaxy evolution aim to capture our current understanding as well as to make predictions for testing by future experiments. Simulations and observations are often compared in an indirect fashion: physical quantities are estimated from the observational data and compared to models. However, many applications can benefit from a more direct approach, where the observing process is also simulated, so that the models are seen fully from the observer's perspective. To facilitate this, we have developed the Millennium Run Observatory (MRObs), a theoretical virtual observatory which uses virtual telescopes to `observe' semi-analytic galaxy formation simulations based on the suite of Millennium Run (MR) dark matter simulations. The MRObs produces data that can be processed and analysed using the standard observational software packages developed for real observations. At present, we produce images in 40 filters covering the rest-frame ultraviolet to infrared for two stellar population synthesis models, for three different models of absorption by the intergalactic medium, and in two cosmologies (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe year 1 and 7). Galaxy distributions for a large number of mock light cones can be `observed' using models of major ground- and space-based telescopes. The data include light cone catalogues linked to structural properties of galaxies, pre-observation model images, mock telescope images and Source Extractor products that can all be traced back to the higher level dark matter, semi-analytic galaxy and light cone catalogues available in the MR data base. Here, we describe our methods and announce a first public release of simulated observations that emulate a large number of extragalactic surveys [e.g. Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHT-LS), Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), GOODS/Early Release Science (ERS), Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS

  9. APEX: A Prime EXperiment at Jefferson Lab - Test Run Results and Full Run Plans; Update

    SciTech Connect

    Beacham, James

    2015-06-01

    APEX is an experiment at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in Virginia, USA, that searches for a new gauge boson (A') with sub-GeV mass and coupling to ordinary matter of g' ~ (10-6 - 10⁻²)e. Electrons impinge upon a fixed target of high-Z material. An A' is produced via a process analogous to photon bremsstrahlung, decaying to an e⁺+e⁻ pair. A test run was held in July of 2010, covering mA' = 175 to 250 MeV and couplings g'/e > 10⁻³. A full run is approved and will cover mA' ~ 65 to 525 MeV and g'/e > 2.3 x 10⁻⁴, and is expected to occur sometime in 2016 or 2017.

  10. APEX: A Prime EXperiment at Jefferson Lab. Test Run Results and Full Run Plans; Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beacham, James

    2015-06-01

    APEX is an experiment at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in Virginia, USA, that searches for a new gauge boson (A') with sub-GeV mass and coupling to ordinary matter of g' ˜ (10-6 - 10-2)e. Electrons impinge upon a fixed target of high-Z material. An A' is produced via a process analogous to photon bremsstrahlung, decaying to an e+e- pair. A test run was held in July of 2010, covering mA' = 175 to 250 MeV and couplings g'/e > 10-3. A full run is approved and will cover mA' ˜ 65 to 525 MeV and g'/e > 2.3 × 10-4, and is expected to occur sometime in 2016 or 2017.

  11. Are we running out of water?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nace, Raymond L.

    1967-01-01

    Water supplies are not running out, but time is getting short to stem waste of water and destructive exploitation of the environment before harm is done that may be irreparable. Most of the world's water is oceanic brine. Of the waters on the land, most is frozen in Antarctica and Greenland. Only a small part of continental water is available for use and management. The discharge of rivers to the sea is a close measure of the availability of liquid water, but ground-water reservoirs have important functions as inexpensive equalizers of water supply. Soil moisture is a major factor in the water economy, and its function usually is overlooked in assessments of water use and future water demand. Despite outcries of water shortage, the principal use of water in advanced countries is as a medium for waste disposal. In reality, despite regional maldistribution of water, United States supplies are adequate, given rational management. Also, contrary to common belief, water pollution is primarily a problem of economics, not of health. A paramount problem in most parts of the world is the shortage of water development and management facilities, not a shortage of water. The International Hydrological Decade is a program to awaken people everywhere to the crucial importance of water in man's future and to promote rational approach to water problems.

  12. FPGA Trigger System to Run Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Darius; /Texas A-M /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The Klystron Department is in need of a new trigger system to update the laboratory capabilities. The objective of the research is to develop the trigger system using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology with a user interface that will allow one to communicate with the FPGA via a Universal Serial Bus (USB). This trigger system will be used for the testing of klystrons. The key materials used consists of the Xilinx Integrated Software Environment (ISE) Foundation, a Programmable Read Only Memory (Prom) XCF04S, a Xilinx Spartan 3E 35S500E FPGA, Xilinx Platform Cable USB II, a Printed Circuit Board (PCB), a 100 MHz oscillator, and an oscilloscope. Key considerations include eight triggers, two of which have variable phase shifting capabilities. Once the project was completed the output signals were able to be manipulated via a Graphical User Interface by varying the delay and width of the signal. This was as planned; however, the ability to vary the phase was not completed. Future work could consist of being able to vary the phase. This project will give the operators in the Klystron Department more flexibility to run various tests.

  13. Oil prices and long-run risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ready, Robert Clayton

    I show that relative levels of aggregate consumption and personal oil consumption provide an excellent proxy for oil prices, and that high oil prices predict low future aggregate consumption growth. Motivated by these facts, I add an oil consumption good to the long-run risk model of Bansal and Yaron [2004] to study the asset pricing implications of observed changes in the dynamic interaction of consumption and oil prices. Empirically I observe that, compared to the first half of my 1987--2010 sample, oil consumption growth in the last 10 years is unresponsive to levels of oil prices, creating an decrease in the mean-reversion of oil prices, and an increase in the persistence of oil price shocks. The model implies that the change in the dynamics of oil consumption generates increased systematic risk from oil price shocks due to their increased persistence. However, persistent oil prices also act as a counterweight for shocks to expected consumption growth, with high expected growth creating high expectations of future oil prices which in turn slow down growth. The combined effect is to reduce overall consumption risk and lower the equity premium. The model also predicts that these changes affect the riskiness of of oil futures contracts, and combine to create a hump shaped term structure of oil futures, consistent with recent data.

  14. [Helminths in broiler geese fattened in runs].

    PubMed

    Busta, J

    1980-12-01

    The occurrence of helminths in broiler geese was studied in the rapid-fattening technological system in 1974-1978. The birds were kept on grassy run adjacent to water. Helminthological examination was performed in 1065 broilers and the following 16 helminth species were revealed: Notocotylus attenuatus (0.3%), Apatemon gracilis (1.5%), Cotyrulus cornutus (0.1%), Hypoderaeum conoideum (0.1%), Retinometra longicirrosa (3.2%), Drepanidotaenia lanceolata (3.1%), Sobolevicanthus fragilis (0.7%), Diorchis stefanskii (0.8%), Microsomacanthus microsoma (0.9%), Dilepis undula (0.1%), Capillaria caudinflata (0.2%), Capillaria obsignata (7.7%), Amidostomum anseris (3.7%), Trichostrongylus tenuis (0.2%), Ganguleterakis dispar (16.8%), and Heterakis gallinarum (0.4%). Seven of these species were found for the first time in geese in Czechoslovakia (A. gracilis, C. cornutus, H. conoideum, M. microsoma, D. undula, C. caudinflata, and H. gallinarum). The species Dilepis undula has not been recorded in this host species ever before. The extensity and intensity of the invasions, the frequency of monoinvasions and mixed invasions, and the relation of invasion extensity and intensity to the age of the broilers examined were evaluated during the study.

  15. Relationship between speed and time in running.

    PubMed

    Hill, D W; Vingren, J L; Nakamura, F Y; Kokobun, E

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of using different mathematical models to describe the relationship between treadmill running speed and time to exhaustion. All models generated a value for an aerobic parameter (critical speed; S (critical)). 35 university students performed 5-7 constant-speed 0%-slope treadmill tests at speeds that elicited exhaustion in ∼3 min to ∼10 min. Speed and time data were fitted using 3 models: (1) a 2-parameter hyperbolic model; (2) a 3-parameter hyperbolic model; and (3) a hybrid 3-parameter hyperbolic+exponential model. The 2-parameter model generated values for S (critical) (mean (± SD): 186 ± 33 m·min (-1)) and anaerobic distance capacity (ADC; 251 ± 122 m) with a high level of statistical certainty (i.e., with small SEEs). The 3-parameter models generated parameter estimates that were unrealistic in magnitude and/or associated with large SEEs and little statistical certainty. Therefore, it was concluded that, for the range of exercise durations used in the present study, the 2-parameter model is preferred because it provides a parsimonious description of the relationship between velocity and time to fatigue, and it produces parameters of known physiological significance, with excellent confidence.

  16. Forces predicted at the ankle during running.

    PubMed

    Burdett, R G

    1982-01-01

    A biomechanical model of the ankle joint was developed and was used to predict the forces at the ankle during the stance phase of running. Measurements from five cadavers were averaged to obtain insertion points and directions of pull of equivalent tendons with respect to the assumed center of the ankle joint. A minimum joint force solution was obtained by assuming that only two equivalent muscle groups could exert force at one time. Three subjects ran at 4.47 m/s across a force platform that recorded the external forces and moments acting on the foot. Cinematography was used to measure the foot and leg positions during stance. Peak resultant joint forces ranging from 9.0 to 13.3 times body weight and peak Achilles tendon forces ranging from 5.3 to 10.0 times body weight were predicted. Small variations in some cases resulted in large differences in predicted forces. The highest tendon forces predicted exceeded those reported to cause damage to cadaver tendons in other studies.

  17. The NLstart2run study: Incidence and risk factors of running-related injuries in novice runners.

    PubMed

    Kluitenberg, B; van Middelkoop, M; Smits, D W; Verhagen, E; Hartgens, F; Diercks, R; van der Worp, H

    2015-10-01

    Running is a popular form of physical activity, despite of the high incidence of running-related injuries (RRIs). Because of methodological issues, the etiology of RRIs remains unclear. Therefore, the purposes of the study were to assess the incidence of RRIs and to identify risk factors for RRIs in a large group of novice runners. In total, 1696 runners of a 6-week supervised "Start to Run" program were included in the NLstart2run study. All participants were aged between 18 and 65, completed a baseline questionnaire that covered potential risk factors, and completed at least one running diary. RRIs were registered during the program with a weekly running log. An RRI was defined as a musculo-skeletal complaint of the lower extremity or back attributed to running and hampering running ability for three consecutive training sessions. During the running program, 10.9% of the runners sustained an RRI. The multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that a higher age, higher BMI, previous musculo-skeletal complaints not attributed to sports and no previous running experience were related to RRI. These findings indicate that many novice runners participating in a short-term running program suffer from RRIs. Therefore, the identified risk factors should be considered for screening and prevention purposes.

  18. Running-specific, periodized strength training attenuates loss of stride length during intense endurance running.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Lanao, Jonathan; Rhea, Matthew R; Fleck, Steven J; Lucia, Alejandro

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a running-specific, periodized strength training program (performed over the specific period [8 weeks] of a 16-week macrocycle) on endurance-trained runners' capacity to maintain stride length during running bouts at competitive speeds. Eighteen well-trained middle-distance runners completed the study (personal bests for 1500 and 5000 m of 3 minutes 57 seconds +/- 12 seconds and 15 minutes 24 seconds +/- 36 seconds). They were randomly assigned to each of the following groups (6 per group): periodized strength group, performing a periodized strength training program over the 8-week specific (intervention) period (2 sessions per week); nonperiodized strength group, performing the same strength training exercises as the periodized group over the specific period but with no week-to-week variations; and a control group, performing no strength training at all during the specific period. The percentage of loss in the stride length (cm)/speed (m.s) (SLS) ratio was measured by comparing the mean SLS during the first and third (last) group of the total repetitions, respectively, included in each of the interval training sessions performed at race speeds during the competition period that followed the specific period. Significant differences (p < 0.05) were found in mean percentage of SLS loss between the 3 study groups, with the periodized strength group showing no significant SLS change (0.36 +/- 0.95%) and the 2 other groups showing a moderate or high SLS loss (-1.22 +/- 1.5% and -3.05 +/- 1.2% for the nonperiodized strength and control groups, respectively). In conclusion, periodized, running-specific strength training minimizes the loss of stride length that typically occurs in endurance runners during fatiguing running bouts.

  19. Hints from Run 1 and prospects from Run 2 at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Bernius, Catrin

    2016-06-21

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN has allowed the ATLAS experiment to collect a large amount of proton-proton collision data at 7 TeV and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energies throughout Run 1. This dataset was used to discover a Higgs boson with Standard Model-like properties at a mass of about 125 GeV. Furthermore, an impressive number of searches for deviations from the Standard Model expectations have been carried out. To date, no evidence for new physics beyond the SM has been found. However, a few hints in form of 2-3 σ deviations have been observed. After an 18-month shutdown, in which the ATLAS detector has undergone various upgrades, the LHC has again started to deliver collision data at an increased centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, providing a much improved sensitivity for various searches, in particular for high mass particles. Some representative hints at the LHC Run 1 are presented, a brief overview of ATLAS upgrades and prospects for SUSY searches with early Run 2 data are given.

  20. Hints from Run 1 and prospects from Run 2 at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernius, Catrin

    2016-06-01

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN has allowed the ATLAS experiment to collect a large amount of proton-proton collision data at 7 TeV and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energies throughout Run 1. This dataset was used to discover a Higgs boson with Standard Model-like properties at a mass of about 125 GeV. Furthermore, an impressive number of searches for deviations from the Standard Model expectations have been carried out. To date, no evidence for new physics beyond the SM has been found. However, a few hints in form of 2-3 σ deviations have been observed. After an 18-month shutdown, in which the ATLAS detector has undergone various upgrades, the LHC has again started to deliver collision data at an increased centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, providing a much improved sensitivity for various searches, in particular for high mass particles. Some representative hints at the LHC Run 1 are presented, a brief overview of ATLAS upgrades and prospects for SUSY searches with early Run 2 data are given.

  1. [Running and the association with anthropometric and training characteristics].

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Stiefel, Michael; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph; Zingg, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    Running can be performed as a sprint discipline on the track over a few meters up to 10 km to the marathon and ultramarathon running distances over hundreds to thousands of kilometers. Running performance is influenced by a variety of anthropometric and training factors. Morphological features such as skin fold thickness, body fat percentage, circumferences and length of limbs, body weight, body height and body mass index (BMI) seem to have an influence on the running performance. The training volume and running speed during training are also correlated with running performance. When all variables were investigated comparatively, body fat and running speed during training were usually the most important influencing factors. For longer running performances (over 6 hours or 100 km, respectively), the aspects of experience (number of successfully finished races) and personal best times were, however, far more important than training volume or morphological characteristics such as body fat. It was also shown that ultra runners prepare differently (lower running speed and higher running volume) as runners competing over shorter distances such as half-marathon and marathon.

  2. Predictors of Running-Related Injuries Among 930 Novice Runners

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard; Buist, Ida; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Sørensen, Henrik; Lind, Martin; Rasmussen, Sten

    2013-01-01

    Background: To identify persons at high risk of sustaining running-related injuries, an evidence-based understanding of the risk factors associated with injury is needed. Purpose: To identify demographic and behavioral risk factors associated with running-related injuries. Study Design: Observational prospective cohort study with a 1-year follow-up. Methods: Exposures including sex, age, body mass index (BMI), behavior (Type A Self-Rating Inventory [TASRI]), running experience, other sports activity, previous running-related injuries, and other injuries not related to running were assessed prior to or at baseline. The outcome of interest was a running-related injury, defined as any musculoskeletal complaint of the lower extremity or back caused by running that restricted the amount of running (volume, duration, pace, or frequency) for at least 1 week. All participants quantified their running volume by global positioning system (GPS) and used a neutral running shoe. Time to first injury for each exposure variable was analyzed using a generalized linear model, with cumulative kilometers of the training sessions as the time scale. Results: A total of 930 individuals were included in the study, of which 254 sustained a running-related injury during a total of 155.318 km of running. By calculating the cumulative injury risk differences (cIRDs) [95% confidence intervals] after 500 km of running, the TASRI Type B behavior (cIRD, 11.9% [−0.5%; 23.3%]; P = .04) was found to be a significant predictor of injury, while age between 45 and 65 years (cIRD, 14.7% [−2.1%; 31.5%]; P = .08) and previous injuries not related to running (cIRD, 11.1% [−0.2%; 22.4%]; P = .05) were considered clinically interesting, although not statistically significant. In addition, χ2 test results across 4 BMI groups also revealed a borderline significant relationship (P = .06). No significant or clinically relevant relationships were found for sex (P = .42), previous running-related injury

  3. [Physiological effects of ultra-marathon run].

    PubMed

    Akimov, E B; Son'kin, V D

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the performance of vegetative systems of the body, and gas exchange in the implementation of one athlete (master of skiing, 27 years, MaxVO2 = 67 ml/min/kg) during 6 hours ultra-marathon race in a closed stadium at an average speed of 2.7 m/s. Continuous monitoring of heart rate was carried out using the heart rate monitor Polar RS 800. During the first hour and then for 20-30 minutes each hour gas analysis was performed with Metamaxdevice (Germany), mounted on the test subject during all the time of the race. Before and after the passages of the measured interval distance blood lactate content was measured. These data demonstrate a number of features that accompany fatigue in the final stretches a distance: reduction of body economy, which is to increase heart rate and oxygen cost of work; activation of anaerobic-glycolitic energy production mechanism, the intensification of respiratory function. Along with this, the methods of correlation and regression analysis revealed changes (increase or decrease) the relationship between the functions depending on whether the body is in the initial stage of the physical load, sustainable high performance or in either a state of extreme fatigue. These results suggest the interference effects of the central and tissue mechanisms of fatigue in the organization of the oxygen transport function of the body. Apparently, in the case of ultra-marathon run, that is, long-term work of moderate power, the main limiting factor is not the energy of the body, and the autonomic software.

  4. The NUHM2 after LHC Run 1.

    PubMed

    Buchmueller, O; Cavanaugh, R; Citron, M; De Roeck, A; Dolan, M J; Ellis, J R; Flächer, H; Heinemeyer, S; Malik, S; Marrouche, J; Martínez Santos, D; Olive, K A; de Vries, K J; Weiglein, G

    We make a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the NUHM2, in which the soft supersymmetry (SUSY)-breaking contributions to the masses of the two Higgs multiplets, [Formula: see text], vary independently from the universal soft SUSY-breaking contributions [Formula: see text] to the masses of squarks and sleptons. Our analysis uses the MultiNest sampling algorithm with over [Formula: see text] points to sample the NUHM2 parameter space. It includes the ATLAS and CMS Higgs mass measurements as well as the ATLAS search for supersymmetric jets + [Formula: see text] signals using the full LHC Run 1 data, the measurements of [Formula: see text] by LHCb and CMS together with other B-physics observables, electroweak precision observables and the XENON100 and LUX searches for spin-independent dark-matter scattering. We find that the preferred regions of the NUHM2 parameter space have negative SUSY-breaking scalar masses squared at the GUT scale for squarks and sleptons, [Formula: see text], as well as [Formula: see text]. The tension present in the CMSSM and NUHM1 between the supersymmetric interpretation of [Formula: see text] and the absence to date of SUSY at the LHC is not significantly alleviated in the NUHM2. We find that the minimum [Formula: see text] with 21 degrees of freedom (dof) in the NUHM2, to be compared with [Formula: see text] in the CMSSM, and [Formula: see text] in the NUHM1. We find that the one-dimensional likelihood functions for sparticle masses and other observables are similar to those found previously in the CMSSM and NUHM1.

  5. The NUHM2 after LHC Run 1

    DOE PAGES

    Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; ...

    2014-12-17

    We make a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the NUHM2, in which the soft supersymmetry (SUSY)-breaking contributions to the masses of the two Higgs multiplets, m2Hu,d, vary independently from the universal soft SUSY-breaking contributions m20 to the masses of squarks and sleptons. Our analysis uses the MultiNest sampling algorithm with over 4 × 10⁸ points to sample the NUHM2 parameter space. It includes the ATLAS and CMS Higgs mass measurements as well as the ATLAS search for supersymmetric jets + /ET signals using the full LHC Run 1 data, the measurements of BR(Bs→μ⁺μ⁻) by LHCb and CMS togethermore » with other B-physics observables, electroweak precision observables and the XENON100 and LUX searches for spin-independent dark-matter scattering. We find that the preferred regions of the NUHM2 parameter space have negative SUSY-breaking scalar masses squared at the GUT scale for squarks and sleptons, m20 < 0, as well as m2Hu < m2Hd < 0. The tension present in the CMSSM and NUHM1 between the supersymmetric interpretation of (g – 2)μ and the absence to date of SUSY at the LHC is not significantly alleviated in the NUHM2. We find that the minimum χ2 = 32.5 with 21 degrees of freedom (dof) in the NUHM2, to be compared with χ2/dof = 35.0/23 in the CMSSM, and χ2/dof = 32.7/22 in the NUHM1. We find that the one-dimensional likelihood functions for sparticle masses and other observables are similar to those found previously in the CMSSM and NUHM1.« less

  6. Are There Long-Run Effects of the Minimum Wage?

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Isaac

    2015-04-01

    An empirical consensus suggests that there are small employment effects of minimum wage increases. This paper argues that these are short-run elasticities. Long-run elasticities, which may differ from short-run elasticities, are policy relevant. This paper develops a dynamic industry equilibrium model of labor demand. The model makes two points. First, long-run regressions have been misinterpreted because even if the short- and long-run employment elasticities differ, standard methods would not detect a difference using US variation. Second, the model offers a reconciliation of the small estimated short-run employment effects with the commonly found pass-through of minimum wage increases to product prices.

  7. Are There Long-Run Effects of the Minimum Wage?

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    An empirical consensus suggests that there are small employment effects of minimum wage increases. This paper argues that these are short-run elasticities. Long-run elasticities, which may differ from short-run elasticities, are policy relevant. This paper develops a dynamic industry equilibrium model of labor demand. The model makes two points. First, long-run regressions have been misinterpreted because even if the short- and long-run employment elasticities differ, standard methods would not detect a difference using US variation. Second, the model offers a reconciliation of the small estimated short-run employment effects with the commonly found pass-through of minimum wage increases to product prices. PMID:25937790

  8. Running-mass inflation model and primordial black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, Manuel; Erfani, Encieh E-mail: erfani@th.physik.uni-bonn.de

    2011-04-01

    We revisit the question whether the running-mass inflation model allows the formation of Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) that are sufficiently long-lived to serve as candidates for Dark Matter. We incorporate recent cosmological data, including the WMAP 7-year results. Moreover, we include ''the running of the running'' of the spectral index of the power spectrum, as well as the renormalization group ''running of the running'' of the inflaton mass term. Our analysis indicates that formation of sufficiently heavy, and hence long-lived, PBHs still remains possible in this scenario. As a by-product, we show that the additional term in the inflaton potential still does not allow significant negative running of the spectral index.

  9. Running as a Key Lifestyle Medicine for Longevity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duck-Chul; Brellenthin, Angelique G; Thompson, Paul D; Sui, Xuemei; Lee, I-Min; Lavie, Carl J

    Running is a popular and convenient leisure-time physical activity (PA) with a significant impact on longevity. In general, runners have a 25%-40% reduced risk of premature mortality and live approximately 3 years longer than non-runners. Recently, specific questions have emerged regarding the extent of the health benefits of running versus other types of PA, and perhaps more critically, whether there are diminishing returns on health and mortality outcomes with higher amounts of running. This review details the findings surrounding the impact of running on various health outcomes and premature mortality, highlights plausible underlying mechanisms linking running with chronic disease prevention and longevity, identifies the estimated additional life expectancy among runners and other active individuals, and discusses whether there is adequate evidence to suggest that longevity benefits are attenuated with higher doses of running. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of footwear designed to boost energy return on running economy in comparison to a conventional running shoe.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, J; Mcgrath, R; Brook, O; Taylor, P J; Dillon, S

    2016-01-01

    Running economy is a reflection of the amount of inspired oxygen required to maintain a given velocity and is considered a determining factor for running performance. Athletic footwear has been advocated as a mechanism by which running economy can be enhanced. New commercially available footwear has been developed in order to increase energy return, although their efficacy has not been investigated. This study aimed to examine the effects of energy return footwear on running economy in relation to conventional running shoes. Twelve male runners completed 6-min steady-state runs in conventional and energy return footwear. Overall, oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate, respiratory exchange ratio, shoe comfort and rating of perceived exertion were assessed. Moreover, participants subjectively indicated which shoe condition they preferred for running. Differences in shoe comfort and physiological parameters were examined using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, whilst shoe preferences were tested using a chi-square analysis. The results showed that VO2 and respiratory exchange ratio were significantly lower, and shoe comfort was significantly greater, in the energy return footwear. Given the relationship between running economy and running performance, these observations indicate that the energy return footwear may be associated with enhanced running performance in comparison to conventional shoes.

  11. The effect of three surface conditions, speed and running experience on vertical acceleration of the tibia during running.

    PubMed

    Boey, Hannelore; Aeles, Jeroen; Schütte, Kurt; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2017-06-01

    Research has focused on parameters that are associated with injury risk, e.g. vertical acceleration. These parameters can be influenced by running on different surfaces or at different running speeds, but the relationship between them is not completely clear. Understanding the relationship may result in training guidelines to reduce the injury risk. In this study, thirty-five participants with three different levels of running experience were recruited. Participants ran on three different surfaces (concrete, synthetic running track, and woodchip trail) at two different running speeds: a self-selected comfortable speed and a fixed speed of 3.06 m/s. Vertical acceleration of the lower leg was measured with an accelerometer. The vertical acceleration was significantly lower during running on the woodchip trail in comparison with the synthetic running track and the concrete, and significantly lower during running at lower speed in comparison with during running at higher speed on all surfaces. No significant differences in vertical acceleration were found between the three groups of runners at fixed speed. Higher self-selected speed due to higher performance level also did not result in higher vertical acceleration. These results may show that running on a woodchip trail and slowing down could reduce the injury risk at the tibia.

  12. Joint stiffness and running economy during imposed forefoot strike before and after a long run in rearfoot strike runners.

    PubMed

    Melcher, Daniel A; Paquette, Max R; Schilling, Brian K; Bloomer, Richard J

    2017-12-01

    Research has focused on the effects of acute strike pattern modifications on lower extremity joint stiffness and running economy (RE). Strike pattern modifications on running biomechanics have mostly been studied while runners complete short running bouts. This study examined the effects of an imposed forefoot strike (FFS) on RE and ankle and knee joint stiffness before and after a long run in habitual rearfoot strike (RFS) runners. Joint kinetics and RE were collected before and after a long run. Sagittal joint kinetics were computed from kinematic and ground reaction force data that were collected during over-ground running trials in 13 male runners. RE was measured during treadmill running. Knee flexion range of motion, knee extensor moment and ankle joint stiffness were lower while plantarflexor moment and knee joint stiffness were greater during imposed FFS compared with RFS. The long run did not influence the difference in ankle and knee joint stiffness between strike patterns. Runners were more economical during RFS than imposed FFS and RE was not influenced by the long run. These findings suggest that using a FFS pattern towards the end of a long run may not be mechanically or metabolically beneficial for well-trained male RFS runners.

  13. LINEAR OPTICS DURING THE RHIC 2001 - 2 RUN.

    SciTech Connect

    SATOGATA,T.; CARDONA,J.; PTITSYN,V.; TEPIKIAN,S.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2002-06-02

    The RHIC 2001-2 Au and polarized proton runs used several different low-beta optics configurations. Low-beta squeezes were routinely performed through the Au acceleration ramp to optimize injection and transition optics; the polarized proton run injected and accelerated with constant low-beta optics to optimize polarization preservation. This paper summarizes tools, methods and results for linear optics measurement and correction during these runs as well as future plans.

  14. New catalyst, improved presulfiding result in 4+ year hydrotreater run

    SciTech Connect

    Gorra, F. ); Scribano, G. ); Christensen, P.; Anderson, K.V.; Corsaro, O.G. )

    1993-08-23

    Prompted by decreasing catalyst activity and unit run lengths, an Italian refiner made several modifications to its coker gas oil desulfurization unit equipment, catalyst, and operations. Results of the project include improved catalyst activity at start-of-run, increased unit capacity of end-of-run, and improved plant economics. The paper describes the background of the problem, the process, operational history, catalyst testing, unit modifications, catalyst loading, catalyst service life, and economics.

  15. 29 CFR 1206.1 - Run-off elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Run-off elections. 1206.1 Section 1206.1 Labor Regulations... LABOR ACT § 1206.1 Run-off elections. (a) If in an election among any craft or class no organization or individual receives a majority of the legal votes cast, or in the event of a tie vote, a second or run-off...

  16. 29 CFR 1206.1 - Run-off elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Run-off elections. 1206.1 Section 1206.1 Labor Regulations... LABOR ACT § 1206.1 Run-off elections. (a) In an election among any craft or class where three or more... of the legal votes cast, or in the event of a tie vote, the Board shall authorize a run-off election...

  17. 29 CFR 1206.1 - Run-off elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Run-off elections. 1206.1 Section 1206.1 Labor Regulations... LABOR ACT § 1206.1 Run-off elections. (a) If in an election among any craft or class no organization or individual receives a majority of the legal votes cast, or in the event of a tie vote, a second or run-off...

  18. 29 CFR 1206.1 - Run-off elections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Run-off elections. 1206.1 Section 1206.1 Labor Regulations... LABOR ACT § 1206.1 Run-off elections. (a) In an election among any craft or class where three or more... of the legal votes cast, or in the event of a tie vote, the Board shall authorize a run-off election...

  19. Polarization simulations in the RHIC run 15 lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Meot, F.; Huang, H.; Luo, Y.; Ranjbar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; White, S.

    2015-05-03

    RHIC polarized proton Run 15 uses a new acceleration ramp optics, compared to RHIC Run 13 and earlier runs, in relation with electron-lens beam-beam compensation developments. The new optics induces different strengths in the depolarizing snake resonance sequence, from injection to top energy. As a consequence, polarization transport along the new ramp has been investigated, based on spin tracking simulations. Sample results are reported and discussed.

  20. An Evidence-Based Videotaped Running Biomechanics Analysis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Richard B

    2016-02-01

    Running biomechanics play an important role in the development of injuries. Performing a running biomechanics analysis on injured runners can help to develop treatment strategies. This article provides a framework for a systematic video-based running biomechanics analysis plan based on the current evidence on running injuries, using 2-dimensional (2D) video and readily available tools. Fourteen measurements are proposed in this analysis plan from lateral and posterior video. Identifying simple 2D surrogates for 3D biomechanic variables of interest allows for widespread translation of best practices, and have the best opportunity to impact the highly prevalent problem of the injured runner.

  1. Oxygen uptake in maximal effort constant rate and interval running.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Daniel; O'Brien, Brendan J; Clark, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated differences in average VO2 of maximal effort interval running to maximal effort constant rate running at lactate threshold matched for time. The average VO2 and distance covered of 10 recreational male runners (VO2max: 4158 ± 390 mL · min(-1)) were compared between a maximal effort constant-rate run at lactate threshold (CRLT), a maximal effort interval run (INT) consisting of 2 min at VO2max speed with 2 minutes at 50% of VO2 repeated 5 times, and a run at the average speed sustained during the interval run (CR submax). Data are presented as mean and 95% confidence intervals. The average VO2 for INT, 3451 (3269-3633) mL · min(-1), 83% VO2max, was not significantly different to CRLT, 3464 (3285-3643) mL · min(-1), 84% VO2max, but both were significantly higher than CR sub-max, 3464 (3285-3643) mL · min(-1), 76% VO2max. The distance covered was significantly greater in CLRT, 4431 (4202-3731) metres, compared to INT and CR sub-max, 4070 (3831-4309) metres. The novel finding was that a 20-minute maximal effort constant rate run uses similar amounts of oxygen as a 20-minute maximal effort interval run despite the greater distance covered in the maximal effort constant-rate run.

  2. The evolution of marathon running : capabilities in humans.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Daniel E; Bramble, Dennis M

    2007-01-01

    Humans have exceptional capabilities to run long distances in hot, arid conditions. These abilities, unique among primates and rare among mammals, derive from a suite of specialised features that permit running humans to store and release energy effectively in the lower limb, help keep the body's center of mass stable and overcome the thermoregulatory challenges of long distance running. Human endurance running performance capabilities compare favourably with those of other mammals and probably emerged sometime around 2 million years ago in order to help meat-eating hominids compete with other carnivores.

  3. Running, walking, and hyperventilation causing asthma in children.

    PubMed Central

    Kilham, H; Tooley, M; Silverman, M

    1979-01-01

    To examine further the relation between type of exercise, workload, ventilation, and exercise-induced asthma, we compared treadmill walking with treadmill running and treadmill running with isocapnic hyperventilation in separate studies in children and adolescents. Inspired air conditions were identical during each pair of tests. Walking and running with similar minute ventilation and oxygen consumption were followed by similar falls in peak expiratory flow rate as were running and hyperventilation with similar minute ventilation and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension. This study supports the concept that hyperventilation is a central mechanism in exercise-induced asthma. PMID:515978

  4. Spontaneous running activity in male rats - Effect of age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondon, C. E.; Dolkas, C. B.; Sims, C.; Reaven, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Variations in the intensity and the patterns of spontaneous running activity in wheel cages were studied in male rats aged 7 weeks to one year. Daily running records were obtained for periods of 12 mo, and 24-hour recordings were made for selected runners in order to study variations in running activity during the day. The data indicate that for rats running over two miles/day, the maximum running intensity can be divided into two groups: a group of high achievers running 8 miles/day; and a group of moderate achievers running 4.8 miles/day. For both groups spontaneous activity reached a maximum after 4-5 weeks. An hourly pattern of running activity during the day was identified in rats of increasing age who averaged 9.0, 4.5, 2.6, and 1.2 miles/day, respectively. Progressive losses were observed in both the speed and the duration of spontaneous running as the rats increased in age, with the intensity of exercise falling below 2 miles/day after 7-8 months of age.

  5. Does running cause osteoarthritis in the hip or knee?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Pamela; English, Michael; Willick, Stuart E

    2012-05-01

    Running is an excellent activity to promote general health and well-being. However, running injuries are common, and concern is sometimes raised that running might lead to osteoarthritis in weight-bearing joints. This article reviews the relevant in vitro and in vivo literature that looks at possible associations between running and the development of osteoarthritis. Also reviewed is the limited literature on running barefoot and with minimalist footwear. Low- and moderate-volume runners appear to have no more risk of developing osteoarthritis than nonrunners. The existing literature is inconclusive about a possible association between high-volume running and the development of osteoarthritis. The early literature on running barefoot and running with minimalist footwear has primarily focused on biomechanics but has not yet focused on any effect on cartilage health. Experienced and beginner runners should be encouraged to allow the body adequate time to adapt to changes in gait biomechanics caused by changing footwear, which can be done by slowly increasing running mileage in the new footwear. Clinicians can improve the health of runners by encouraging appropriate treatment of musculoskeletal injuries, encouraging maintenance of an optimal body mass index, and correcting gait abnormalities caused by deficits in flexibility, strength, or motor control along the kinetic chain.

  6. Running Therapy: Change Agent in Anxiety and Stress Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Michael L.

    1982-01-01

    Running can be used effectively to produce positive physiological and psychological changes, including cardiovascular and physical fitness, reduction of anxiety, and more effective management of stress. (CJ)

  7. Preventing running injuries. Practical approach for family doctors.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, C. A. M.; Taunton, J. E.; Lloyd-Smith, D. R.; McKenzie, D. C.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present a practical approach for preventing running injuries. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Much of the research on running injuries is in the form of expert opinion and comparison trials. Recent systematic reviews have summarized research in orthotics, stretching before running, and interventions to prevent soft tissue injuries. MAIN MESSAGE: The most common factors implicated in running injuries are errors in training methods, inappropriate training surfaces and running shoes, malalignment of the leg, and muscle weakness and inflexibility. Runners can reduce risk of injury by using established training programs that gradually increase distance or time of running and provide appropriate rest. Orthoses and heel lifts can correct malalignments of the leg. Running shoes appropriate for runners' foot types should be selected. Lower-extremity strength and flexibility programs should be added to training. Select appropriate surfaces for training and introduce changes gradually. CONCLUSION: Prevention addresses factors proven to cause running injuries. Unfortunately, injury is often the first sign of fault in running programs, so patients should be taught to recognize early symptoms of injury. PMID:14526862

  8. Magnitude of multiplanar breast kinematics differs depending upon run distance.

    PubMed

    Milligan, Alexandra; Mills, Chris; Corbett, Jo; Scurr, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Recommendations for breast support, dynamic breast pain assessment, and implications for sports performance have been made within breast biomechanics research; however, these studies have been based upon short exercise protocols (2-5 min). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of breast support on multiplanar breast kinematics over a 5-kilometre run. Ten female participants (34D or 32DD) conducted two 5-kilometre runs, in a low and high breast support. Relative multiplanar breast kinematics were averaged over five gait cycles at six intervals of a 5-kilometre run. Increases in multiplanar breast kinematics were reported from the start to the end of the run, with the greatest rate of increase in breast kinematics reported within the first two kilometres of running. The greatest relative increases in breast range of motion (34%), velocity (33%), and acceleration (41%) were reported in the superioinferior direction at the fifth kilometre (33 min of running) in the high breast support. Key findings suggest that the run distance, and therefore run duration, employed for both fundamental research and product validation protocols should be carefully considered and it is suggested that running protocols for assessing breast biomechanics should exceed 7 min.

  9. Vacuum straw tracker test beam run

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, Yau; /Chicago U.

    2005-08-01

    This memorandum of understanding requests beam time at Fermilab during the 2005 Meson Test Beam run to measure the detection inefficiency of vacuum straw tubes. One of the future kaon experiments at J-PARC has the goal to measure the branching ratio of the neutral kaon ''Golden Mode'' K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} with a few hundred event sensitivity. This future J-PARC experiment is a follow up of a current KEK experiment, E391a which has been taking data since February 2004. E391a is a collaboration of five countries (Japan, United States, Russia, Korea, and Taiwan) with ten institutions (KEK, Saga U, Yamagata U, Osaka U, U of Chicago, Pusan U, JINR, NDA, Kyoto U, National Taiwan U, and RCNP). The branching ratio of K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {nu} {nu} is small, about 3 x 10{sup -11}. To first order, all kaon decays with final states with charged particles need to be vetoed, and those include K{sub e3}, K{sub {mu}3}, and K{sub {+-}0} (about 80% of all neutral kaon decay). The standard and typical veto power comes from sheet scintillator and may not be adequate. Vacuum straw tubes provides additional, independent and orthogonal veto power, but the detection inefficiency has not been known or measured in a detail way. The inefficiency of the straw has three sources, the electronics, the straw wall/wire, and the gas. We like to perform beam test to measure all three sources. There is much experience in straw detector technology, and some in vacuum straw technology (CKM R&D effort). The possible use of straws in the future K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} {nu} {nu} experiment will allow absolute photon/electron energy calibration (via K{sub {+-}0} decays), possible measurement of photon inefficiencies (via K{sub 000} with {pi}{sup 0} Dalitz), and as mentioned, charged particle veto. The results of this proposed beam test will provide new knowledge on the absorption cross section and will direct us on design issues for future neutral kaon decay experiments. Regarding

  10. Terror birds on the run: a mechanical model to estimate its maximum running speed

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, R. Ernesto; Jones, Washington W

    2005-01-01

    ‘Terror bird’ is a common name for the family Phorusrhacidae. These large terrestrial birds were probably the dominant carnivores on the South American continent from the Middle Palaeocene to the Pliocene–Pleistocene limit. Here we use a mechanical model based on tibiotarsal strength to estimate maximum running speeds of three species of terror birds: Mesembriornis milneedwardsi, Patagornis marshi and a specimen of Phorusrhacinae gen. The model is proved on three living large terrestrial bird species. On the basis of the tibiotarsal strength we propose that Mesembriornis could have used its legs to break long bones and access their marrow. PMID:16096087

  11. Effects of footwear on treadmill running biomechanics in preadolescent children.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Karsten; Riebe, Dieko; Campe, Sebastian; Braumann, Klaus-Michael; Zech, Astrid

    2014-07-01

    While recent research debates the topic of natural running in adolescents and adults, little is known about the influence of footwear on running patterns in children. The purpose of this study was to compare shod and barefoot running gait biomechanics in preadolescent children. Kinematic and ground reaction force data of 36 normally developed children aged 6-9 years were collected during running on an instrumented treadmill. Running conditions were randomized for each child in order to compare barefoot running with two different shod conditions: a cushioned and a minimalistic running shoe. Primary outcome was the ankle angle at foot strike. Secondary outcomes were knee angle, maximum and impact ground reaction forces, presence of rear-foot strike, step width, step length and cadence. Ankle angle at foot strike differed with statistical significance (p < 0.001) between conditions. Running barefoot reduced the ankle angle at foot strike by 5.97° [95% CI, 4.19; 7.75] for 8 kmh(-1) and 6.18° [95% CI, 4.38; 7.97] for 10 kmh(-1) compared to the cushioned shoe condition. Compared to the minimalistic shoe condition, running barefoot reduced the angle by 1.94° [95% CI, 0.19°; 3.69°] for 8 kmh(-1) and 1.38° [95% CI, -3.14°; 0.39°] for 10 kmh(-1). Additionally, using footwear significantly increased maximum and impact ground reaction forces, step length, step width and rate of rear-foot strike. In conclusion, preadolescent running biomechanics are influenced by footwear, especially by cushioned running shoes. Health professionals and parents should keep this in mind when considering footwear for children.

  12. Biological maturity influences running performance in junior Australian football.

    PubMed

    Gastin, Paul B; Bennett, Gary; Cook, Jill

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of biological maturity on measures of running fitness and running performance in both training and competition in junior Australian football. Cross sectional observational. Fifty-two male junior players from five age groups (U11-U19) participated. Biological maturity was self-assessed based on Tanner's description of five pubertal stages (P1-P5) as well as objectively estimated from anthropometric measures and expressed as years to and from peak height velocity (Y-PHV). Running speed and aerobic fitness were measured using a 20m sprint and 20m multi-stage shuttle run respectively. Running movements during training and competition were analysed (n=197) using global positioning system technology, including total distance, peak speed, high-intensity running (HIR>14.4km/h) distance and number of sprints (>23km/h). Age groups included participants from a range of pubertal stages (U11: P1-2; U13: P2-4; U15: P2-5; U17: P4-5; U19: P5). Y-PHV was significantly correlated with 20m shuttle run (r=0.647), 20m sprint time (r=-0.773) and all distance and high intensity running variables (r=0.417-0.831). Incremental improvements across pubertal stages for speed, aerobic fitness and most GPS derived running variables were observed. Within age group comparisons between less and more mature players found significant differences for standing and sitting height, peak speed in training, and total distance, HIR and peak speed in matches. Functional running fitness and running performance in both training and competition environments improved with increasing biological maturity. More mature players in an age group, either chronologically, biologically or a combination of both, are at a performance advantage to those less mature. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Running shoes and running injuries: mythbusting and a proposal for two new paradigms: 'preferred movement path' and 'comfort filter'.

    PubMed

    Nigg, B M; Baltich, J; Hoerzer, S; Enders, H

    2015-10-01

    In the past 100 years, running shoes experienced dramatic changes. The question then arises whether or not running shoes (or sport shoes in general) influence the frequency of running injuries at all. This paper addresses five aspects related to running injuries and shoe selection, including (1) the changes in running injuries over the past 40 years, (2) the relationship between sport shoes, sport inserts and running injuries, (3) previously researched mechanisms of injury related to footwear and two new paradigms for injury prevention including (4) the 'preferred movement path' and (5) the 'comfort filter'. Specifically, the data regarding the relationship between impact characteristics and ankle pronation to the risk of developing a running-related injury is reviewed. Based on the lack of conclusive evidence for these two variables, which were once thought to be the prime predictors of running injuries, two new paradigms are suggested to elucidate the association between footwear and injury. These two paradigms, 'the preferred movement path' and 'the comfort filter', suggest that a runner intuitively selects a comfortable product using their own comfort filter that allows them to remain in the preferred movement path. This may automatically reduce the injury risk and may explain why there does not seem to be a secular trend in running injury rates.

  14. Safety evaluation of the ITP filter/stripper test runs and quiet time runs using simulant solution. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, M.K.

    1994-06-01

    The purpose is to provide the technical bases for the evaluation of Unreviewed Safety Question for the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Filter/Stripper Test Runs (Ref. 7) and Quiet Time Runs Program (described in Section 3.6). The Filter/Stripper Test Runs and Quiet Time Runs program involves a 12,000 gallon feed tank containing an agitator, a 4,000 gallon flush tank, a variable speed pump, associated piping and controls, and equipment within both the Filter and the Stripper Building.

  15. Leg kinematics and muscle activity during treadmill running in the cockroach, Blaberus discoidalis: I. Slow running.

    PubMed

    Watson, J T; Ritzmann, R E

    1998-01-01

    We have combined high-speed video motion analysis of leg movements with electromyogram (EMG) recordings from leg muscles in cockroaches running on a treadmill. The mesothoracic (T2) and metathoracic (T3) legs have different kinematics. While in each leg the coxa-femur (CF) joint moves in unison with the femurtibia (FT) joint, the relative joint excursions differ between T2 and T3 legs. In T3 legs, the two joints move through approximately the same excursion. In T2 legs, the FT joint moves through a narrower range of angles than the CF joint. In spite of these differences in motion, no differences between the T2 and T3 legs were seen in timing or qualitative patterns of depressor coxa and extensor tibia activity. The average firing frequencies of slow depressor coxa (Ds) and slow extensor tibia (SETi) motor neurons are directly proportional to the average angular velocity of their joints during stance. The average Ds and SETi firing frequency appears to be modulated on a cycle-by-cycle basis to control running speed and orientation. In contrast, while the frequency variations within Ds and SETi bursts were consistent across cycles, the variations within each burst did not parallel variations in the velocity of the relevant joints.

  16. The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter calibration during Run I: progress achieved and expectations for Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzi, Alessio; CMS Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The CMS ECAL is a high-resolution, hermetic, and homogeneous electromagnetic calorimeter made of 75,848 scintillating lead tungstate crystals. It relies on precision calibration in order to achieve and maintain its design performance. A set of inter-calibration procedures is carried out to normalize the differences in crystal light yield and photodetector response between channels. Different physics channels such as low mass di-photon resonances, electrons from W and Z decays and the azimuthal symmetry of low energy deposits from minimum bias events are used. A laser monitoring system is used to measure and correct for response changes, which arise mainly from the harsh radiation environment at the LHC. The challenges of the different calibration techniques are discussed along with the performance evolution during Run I. The impact on physics performance is illustrated through the successful quest for the Higgs boson via its electromagnetic decays, and the subsequent mass measurement of the newly discovered particle. Conclusions are drawn for the performance to be expected from 2015 onwards, following the start of the LHC Run II.

  17. X-1E Engine Ground Test Run

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    The Bell Aircraft Corporation X-1E during a ground engine test run on the NACA High-Speed Flight Station ramp near the Rogers Dry Lake. The rocket technician is keeping the concrete cool by hosing it with water during the test. This also helps in washing away any chemicals that might spill. The test crew worked close to the aircraft during ground tests. There were four versions of the Bell X-1 rocket-powered research aircraft that flew at the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station, Edwards, California. The bullet-shaped X-1 aircraft were built by Bell Aircraft Corporation, Buffalo, N.Y. for the U.S. Army Air Forces (after 1947, U.S. Air Force) and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The X-1 Program was originally designated the XS-1 for EXperimental Supersonic. The X-1's mission was to investigate the transonic speed range (speeds from just below to just above the speed of sound) and, if possible, to break the 'sound barrier.' Three different X-1s were built and designated: X-1-1, X-1-2 (later modified to become the X-1E), and X-1-3. The basic X-1 aircraft were flown by a large number of different pilots from 1946 to 1951. The X-1 Program not only proved that humans could go beyond the speed of sound, it reinforced the understanding that technological barriers could be overcome. The X-1s pioneered many structural and aerodynamic advances including extremely thin, yet extremely strong wing sections; supersonic fuselage configurations; control system requirements; powerplant compatibility; and cockpit environments. The X-1 aircraft were the first transonic-capable aircraft to use an all-moving stabilizer. The flights of the X-1s opened up a new era in aviation. The first X-1 was air-launched unpowered from a Boeing B-29 Superfortress on January 25, 1946. Powered flights began in December 1946. On October 14, 1947, the X-1-1, piloted by Air Force Captain Charles 'Chuck' Yeager, became the first aircraft to exceed the speed of sound, reaching about

  18. Dietary nitrate markedly improves voluntary running in mice.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Niklas; Schiffer, Tomas A; Hernández, Andrés; Lanner, Johanna T; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O; Westerblad, Håkan

    2017-01-01

    Nitrate supplementation is shown to increase submaximal force in human and mouse skeletal muscles. In this study, we test the hypothesis that the increased submaximal force induced by nitrate supplementation reduces the effort of submaximal voluntary running, resulting in increased running speed and distance. C57Bl/6N male mice were fed nitrate in the drinking water and housed with or without access to an in-cage running wheel. Nitrate supplementation in sedentary mice had no effect on endurance in a treadmill test, nor did it enhance mitochondrial function. However, after three weeks with in-cage running wheel, mice fed nitrate ran on average 20% faster and 30% further than controls (p<0.01). Compared to running controls, this resulted in ~13% improved endurance on a subsequent treadmill test (p<0.05) and increased mitochondrial oxidative capacity, as judged from a mean increase in citrate synthase activity of 14% (p<0.05). After six weeks with nitrate, the mice were running 58% longer distances per night. When nitrate supplementation was removed from the diet, the running distance and speed decreased to the control level, despite the improved endurance achieved during nitrate supplementation. In conclusion, low-frequency force improvement due to nitrate supplementation facilitates submaximal exercise such as voluntary running. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 14 CFR 25.113 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 25.113... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.113 Takeoff distance and takeoff run. (a) Takeoff distance on a dry runway is the greater of— (1) The horizontal distance...

  20. 14 CFR 25.113 - Takeoff distance and takeoff run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Takeoff distance and takeoff run. 25.113... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 25.113 Takeoff distance and takeoff run. (a) Takeoff distance on a dry runway is the greater of— (1) The horizontal distance...

  1. 40 CFR 89.407 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.407 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Measure and record the temperature of the air... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 89.407...

  2. 40 CFR 89.407 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.407 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Measure and record the temperature of the air... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 89.407...

  3. Physiological Parameters Related to Running Performance in College Runners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vytvytsky, Maria; And Others

    Submaximal and maximal physiological parameters were measured on a progressive treadmill test in 11 Columbia University trackmen trained for various events. All runners were also tested in the 220, 440, 880, one-mile, and two-mile running events. Oxygen uptake was significantly related only to time in the one-mile run. Heart rates (HRs) at each…

  4. Cross Country Running for Visually Impaired Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonka, John J.; Bina, Michael J.

    1978-01-01

    The article describes an interscholastic competitive cross country running program for adolescent boys and girls at the Wisconsin School for the Visually Handicapped, in which totally blind students are assigned sighted guides, while partially sighted students run alone, guided by colored flags positioned along the course to indicate turns.…

  5. 46 CFR 113.50-20 - Distribution of cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Distribution of cable runs. 113.50-20 Section 113.50-20... ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Public Address Systems § 113.50-20 Distribution of cable runs. (a) Each... each of these zones. (g) Feeders and branch circuit cables must be in passageways. They must not be in...

  6. 57. VIEW DOWN TENSION RUNS FROM CATWALK OVER WINDERS: View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. VIEW DOWN TENSION RUNS FROM CATWALK OVER WINDERS: View towards northwest looking down the tension runs for the cables. Photograph taken from atop the catwalk over the winding machinery. The California Street cable is on the left and the Hyde Street cable on the right. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  7. 46 CFR 113.50-20 - Distribution of cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Distribution of cable runs. 113.50-20 Section 113.50-20... ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Public Address Systems § 113.50-20 Distribution of cable runs. (a) Each... each of these zones. (g) Feeders and branch circuit cables must be in passageways. They must not be in...

  8. 46 CFR 113.50-20 - Distribution of cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Distribution of cable runs. 113.50-20 Section 113.50-20... ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Public Address Systems § 113.50-20 Distribution of cable runs. (a) Each... each of these zones. (g) Feeders and branch circuit cables must be in passageways. They must not be in...

  9. 46 CFR 113.50-20 - Distribution of cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Distribution of cable runs. 113.50-20 Section 113.50-20... ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Public Address Systems § 113.50-20 Distribution of cable runs. (a) Each... each of these zones. (g) Feeders and branch circuit cables must be in passageways. They must not be in...

  10. 46 CFR 113.50-20 - Distribution of cable runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Distribution of cable runs. 113.50-20 Section 113.50-20... ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Public Address Systems § 113.50-20 Distribution of cable runs. (a) Each... each of these zones. (g) Feeders and branch circuit cables must be in passageways. They must not be in...

  11. 40 CFR 86.884-12 - Test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test run. 86.884-12 Section 86.884-12... Engines; Smoke Exhaust Test Procedure § 86.884-12 Test run. (a) The temperature of the air supplied to the... taken for each test: (1) Start cooling system; (2) Warm up the engine by the procedure described in...

  12. 40 CFR 86.884-12 - Test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test run. 86.884-12 Section 86.884-12... Heavy-Duty Engines; Smoke Exhaust Test Procedure § 86.884-12 Test run. (a) The temperature of the air... steps shall be taken for each test: (1) Start cooling system; (2) Warm up the engine by the...

  13. How Does the Wind Affect Road-Running Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Villiers, Michael D.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simple mathematical model in which resultant speed is the sum or difference between wind speed and runner speed and a more complex model that assumes that only a proportion of the wind's speed affects one's running speed to describe the time difference between running with and without wind. (MDH)

  14. Comparison of plantar loads during running on different overground surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Hong, Youlian; Li, Jing-Xian; Zhou, Ji-He

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study is to compare plantar loads during running on different overground surfaces. Fifteen heel-to-toe runners participated in the study. Plantar load data were collected and analyzed using an insole sensor system during running on concrete, synthetic rubber, and grass surfaces at a running speed of 3.8 m/s. Compared with running on concrete surface, running on natural grass showed a lower magnitude of maximum plantar pressure at the total foot (451.8 kPa vs. 401.7 kPa, p = 0.016), lateral midfoot (175.3 kPa vs. 148.0 kPa, p = 0.004), central forefoot (366.3 kPa vs. 336.8 kPa, p = 0.003), and lateral forefoot (290.2 kPa vs. 257.9 kPa, p = 0.004). Moreover, running on natural grass showed a longer relative contact time compared with running on a concrete surface at the central forefoot (81.9% vs. 78.8%, p = 0.017) and lateral forefoot (75.2% vs. 73.1%, p = 0.007). No significant difference was observed in other multiple comparisons. Different surfaces affected the plantar loads while running. The differences may help us to understand potential injury mechanisms.

  15. Running of scalar spectral index in multi-field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk

    2015-05-01

    We compute the running of the scalar spectral index in general multi-field slow-roll inflation. By incorporating explicit momentum dependence at the moment of horizon crossing, we can find the running straightforwardly. At the same time, we can distinguish the contributions from the quasi de Sitter background and the super-horizon evolution of the field fluctuations.

  16. 40 CFR 86.1437 - Test run-manufacturer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test run-manufacturer. 86.1437 Section... Trucks; Certification Short Test Procedures § 86.1437 Test run—manufacturer. (a) This section describes the test run performed by the manufacturer for its data submittal pursuant to obtaining a...

  17. East side of long wing of building 149 (running eastwest) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East side of long wing of building 149 (running east-west) and east and south side of short, perpendicular wing (running north-south). Northeast corner of building 148 is at the extreme left edge of photograph. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Carpenter Shop Building, Southwest Corner of West I Avenue, & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. 40 CFR 86.1437 - Test run-manufacturer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test run-manufacturer. 86.1437 Section... Trucks; Certification Short Test Procedures § 86.1437 Test run—manufacturer. (a) This section describes the test run performed by the manufacturer for its data submittal pursuant to obtaining a...

  19. 40 CFR 86.1237-85 - Dynamometer runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... taken for the dynamometer run: (1) Place drive wheels of vehicle on the dynamometer. (2) Position the... Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1237-85 Dynamometer runs. (a) The vehicle shall be either driven or pushed onto the dynamometer; however, if driven, the period of engine operation between the end of...

  20. 40 CFR 86.1237-85 - Dynamometer runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... taken for the dynamometer run: (1) Place drive wheels of vehicle on the dynamometer. (2) Position the... Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1237-85 Dynamometer runs. (a) The vehicle shall be either driven or pushed onto the dynamometer; however, if driven, the period of engine operation between the end of...

  1. 5K Run: 7-Week Training Schedule for Beginners

    MedlinePlus

    ... Run/walk 2 miles (3.2 km) with Magic Mile* Sunday Rest or walk Week 4 On ... Run/walk 2 miles (3.2 km) with Magic Mile* Sunday Rest or walk Week 6 On ... Meyer & Meyer Sport; 2008. Used with permission. *The Magic Mile is a training tool designed to help ...

  2. 40 CFR 89.407 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine dynamometer test run. 89.407... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.407 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Measure and record the temperature of the air...

  3. 40 CFR 91.409 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 91.409... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.409 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Engine and dynamometer start-up. (1) Only adjustments in accordance with...

  4. 40 CFR 90.409 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 90.409... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.409 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Engine and dynamometer start-up. (1) Only...

  5. 40 CFR 90.409 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine dynamometer test run. 90.409... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.409 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Engine and dynamometer start-up. (1) Only...

  6. 40 CFR 89.407 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 89.407... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.407 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Measure and record the temperature of the air...

  7. 40 CFR 90.409 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 90.409... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.409 Engine dynamometer test run. (a) Engine and dynamometer start-up. (1) Only...

  8. 1. GENERAL SETTING; LOOKING WEST INTO RAILROAD CORRIDOR; HOG RUN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL SETTING; LOOKING WEST INTO RAILROAD CORRIDOR; HOG RUN AND BUILDING 149 ARE AT LEFT; BUILDING 92 IS PARTIALLY HIDDEN BEHIND PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE AT CENTER; BUILDING 181 IS AT RIGHT - Rath Packing Company, Cantilevered Hog Run, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  9. 3. LOOKING TOWARD EAST INSIDE HOG RUN; STEEL STRUCTURAL MEMBERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. LOOKING TOWARD EAST INSIDE HOG RUN; STEEL STRUCTURAL MEMBERS ABOVE WINDOWS SUPPORTED IMMENSE SCALDING TANK INSTALLED DURING 1960-61 RENOVATION OF RATH'S HOG OPERATIONS - Rath Packing Company, Cantilevered Hog Run, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  10. Editorial Involvement in Regional/Split Run Editions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuss, Carol

    This document is a preliminary study of the listings of a wide variety of regional/split-run editorial practices of major American periodicals. Publications chosen for the study were selected from the tenth edition of "Magazine Regional and Split-Run Advertising," published by the Magazine Advertising Bureau of the Magazine Publishers Association.…

  11. Running Records: Authentic Instruction in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The most effective way to understand what a child knows about the reading process is to take a running record. In "Running Records", Mary Shea demonstrates how teachers can use this powerful tool to design lessons that decrease reading difficulties, build on strengths, and stimulate motivation, ensuring that children develop self-sustaining…

  12. VO2 responses to running speeds above VO2max.

    PubMed

    Duffield, R; Bishop, D

    2008-06-01

    This study compared VO2, heart rate (HR) and electromyographic (iEMG) responses to speeds above the velocity associated with VO2max (v-VO2max). Eight male, middle-distance runners performed a graded exercise test to determine VO2max and v-VO2max and runs to fatigue at 100 % and 110 % v-VO2max. Breath-by-breath VO2 and HR were continuously recorded; lactate [La (-)] measured pre- and post-run and iEMG measures of rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis were recorded during the first and last 20 s of each run. Analysis indicated longer time to fatigue in the 100 % v-VO2max run with no differences between conditions for VO2 or HR amplitudes or post-run [La (-)] (p > 0.05). There were significantly faster tau values (p < 0.05) in the 110 % condition in VO2 and HR. No significant correlations were observed between VO2 or HR tau values and time to fatigue. RF iEMG was significantly larger in 110 % compared to 100 % run in the first 20 s (p < 0.05). While no association between treadmill performance and VO2 response was evident, faster running speeds resulted in faster VO2 and HR responses, with no difference in amplitude or % VO2max attained. This may potentially be as a result of an increased muscle fibre recruitment stimulus during the faster running velocity resulting in faster cardiodynamic responses.

  13. 40 CFR 600.507-08 - Running change data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Running change data requirements. 600... change data requirements. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (d) of this section, the manufacturer shall submit additional running change fuel economy data as specified in paragraph (b) of this section...

  14. 40 CFR 600.507-86 - Running change data requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Running change data requirements. 600... change data requirements. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (d) of this section, the manufacturer shall submit additional running change fuel economy data as specified in paragraph (b) of this section...

  15. 1. LOOKING DOWNSTREAM (NORTHEAST) ALONG WINTER'S RUN TOWARD THE MITCHELL'S ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. LOOKING DOWNSTREAM (NORTHEAST) ALONG WINTER'S RUN TOWARD THE MITCHELL'S MILL BRIDGE, SHOWING THE SETTING OF THE BRIDGE. CARRS MILL ROAD APPROACHES THE BRIDGE FROM THE SOUTH, ON THE RIGHT. - Mitchell's Mill Bridge, Spanning Winter's Run on Carrs Mill Road, west of Bel Air, Bel Air, Harford County, MD

  16. 16 CFR 803.10 - Running of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Running of time. 803.10 Section 803.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 TRANSMITTAL RULES § 803.10 Running of time....

  17. AGS vertical beta function measurements for Run 15

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, C.; Ahrens, L.; Huang, H.; Schoefer, V.

    2016-10-07

    One key parameter for running the AGS efficiently is by maintaining a low emittance. To measure emittance, one needs to measure the beta function throughout the cycle. This can be done by measuring the beta function at the ionization profile monitors (IPM) in the AGS. This tech note delves into the motivation, the measurement, and some strides that were made throughout Run15.

  18. Acceleration patterns in the lower and upper trunk during running.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Masahiro; Goto, Kenta; Fukusaki, Chiho; Sasaki, Ken; Hihara, Eiji; Mizushina, Takahiro; Ishii, Naokata

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to relate 3D acceleration patterns of the lower and upper trunk during running to running gait cycle, assess the validity of stride duration estimated from acceleration patterns, investigate speed-dependent changes in acceleration, and examine the test-retest reliability of these parameters. Thirteen healthy young men performed two running trials each on a treadmill and on land at three speeds (slow, preferred, and fast). The 3D accelerations were measured at the L3 spinous process (lower trunk) and the ensiform process (upper trunk) and synchronised with digital video data. The amplitude and root mean square of acceleration and stride duration were calculated and then analysed by three-way analysis of variance to test effects of running conditions, device location, and running speed. Bland-Altman analysis was used to evaluate the test-retest reliability. Marked changes in acceleration were observed in relation to foot strike during running. Stride durations calculated from the vertical accelerations were nearly equal to those estimated from video data. There were significant speed effects on all parameters, and the low test-retest reliability was confirmed in the anterior-posterior acceleration during treadmill running and the anterior-posterior acceleration at slow speed during treadmill and overground running.

  19. 40 CFR 86.1438 - Test run-EPA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test run-EPA. 86.1438 Section 86.1438 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF... Short Test Procedures § 86.1438 Test run—EPA. (a) This section describes the test run performed by...

  20. 9. Looking northeast, foreground Clenny Run Road, duck pond and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Looking northeast, foreground Clenny Run Road, duck pond and Clenny Run, with intersection of State Routes 92 and 100 beyond, Brandywine Creek State Park in background, mixed deciduous trees along top of hill - Winterthur Farms, Intersection State Routes 92 & 100, Intersection State Routes 92 & 100, Winterthur, New Castle County, DE

  1. One University's Strategy for Keeping International Projects Running Smoothly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Karin

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how a university tackled some of the basic challenges of internationalizing its campuses. The University of Washington created the Global Support Project, a one-stop shop for faculty and staff members doing research or running programs abroad. The project is run by senior administrators but relies on designated go-to people…

  2. Acute response to barefoot running in habitually shod males.

    PubMed

    Fleming, N; Walters, J; Grounds, J; Fife, L; Finch, A

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the immediate effects of barefoot (BF) running on lower limb kinematics and muscle activity in a group of habitually shod runners. Ten male runners with no prior BF or minimalist running experience performed 1-min bouts of treadmill running at 3 velocities in both shod and BF conditions. 2D video data were recorded in order to quantify ankle, knee and hip kinematics. Synchronous kinetic data were recorded from a force plate supporting the treadmill in order to quantify spatiotemporal variables. EMG data were collected from 6 lower limb muscles, quantifying recruitment patterns during discrete phases of the gait cycle. BF running resulted in significantly higher stride frequency and shorter ground contact times (P < .001). Additionally, BF running significantly reduced knee and hip range of motion but increased ankle range of motion during the absorptive phase of the stance. Alterations in ankle kinematics during BF running resulted from increased pre-activation of the medial (P < .05) and lateral (P < .01) gastrocnemius in addition to reductions in pre-activation of the tibialis anterior (P < .05). The results highlight that recruitment patterns and kinematics can change in as little as 30-s of BF running in individuals with no previous BF running experience.

  3. RUN OUTS OCCUR WHEN IRON HAS UNSEATED MOLDING SAND AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RUN OUTS OCCUR WHEN IRON HAS UNSEATED MOLDING SAND AND RUN OUT OF THE MOLD UNDER POURING JACKETS AND SPILLS ONTO THE MOLDING PLATFORM. WORKERS GENERALLY WAIT SEVERAL MINUTES FOR THE IRON TO SOLIDIFY AND, WHILE IT IS STILL RED-HOT, REMOVE IT FROM THE PLATFORM AND SCRAP THE MOLD. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  4. A Longitudinal Study of Early Adolescent Precursors to Running Away

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Bersani, Bianca E.

    2008-01-01

    Although previous research has examined correlates of running away among samples of currently homeless and runaway adolescents, little is known about what factors will predict the likelihood that a housed adolescent with no prior history of running away will leave home. As such, the current study uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to…

  5. RUN OUTS OCCUR WHEN IRON HAS UNSEATED MOLDING SAND AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RUN OUTS OCCUR WHEN IRON HAS UNSEATED MOLDING SAND AND RUN OUT OF THE MOLD UNDER POURING JACKETS AND SPILLS ONTO THE MOLDING PLATFORM. WORKERS GENERALLY WAIT SEVERAL MINUTES FOR THE IRON TO SOLIDIFY AND, WHILE IT IS STILL RED-HOT, REMOVE IT FROM THE PLATFORM AND SCRAP THE MOLD. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  6. Status of the CDF Run II Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    S. Nahn

    2003-04-10

    A snapshot of the status of the CDF Run II Silicon Detector is presented, with a summary of commissioning issues since the start of Run II, current performance of the detector, and the use of the data in both the trigger and offline reconstruction.

  7. A Longitudinal Study of Early Adolescent Precursors to Running Away

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Bersani, Bianca E.

    2008-01-01

    Although previous research has examined correlates of running away among samples of currently homeless and runaway adolescents, little is known about what factors will predict the likelihood that a housed adolescent with no prior history of running away will leave home. As such, the current study uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to…

  8. Running Start Annual Progress Report, 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossland, Ron

    The Running Start program was created by the 1990 Washington State Legislature to expand educational options for public school students. Running Start allows eleventh and twelfth grade high school students to take college-level courses, tuition-free, at the 32 community and technical colleges in Washington. This annual progress report for 1996-97…

  9. Running Records: Authentic Instruction in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The most effective way to understand what a child knows about the reading process is to take a running record. In "Running Records", Mary Shea demonstrates how teachers can use this powerful tool to design lessons that decrease reading difficulties, build on strengths, and stimulate motivation, ensuring that children develop self-sustaining…

  10. 40 CFR 86.1237-96 - Dynamometer runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dynamometer runs. 86.1237-96 Section 86.1237-96 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1237-96 Dynamometer runs. Section 86.1237-96 includes text that...

  11. 40 CFR 86.1237-96 - Dynamometer runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dynamometer runs. 86.1237-96 Section 86.1237-96 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1237-96 Dynamometer runs. Section 86.1237-96 includes text that...

  12. 40 CFR 86.1237-96 - Dynamometer runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dynamometer runs. 86.1237-96 Section 86.1237-96 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1237-96 Dynamometer runs. Section 86.1237-96 includes text that...

  13. 16 CFR 803.10 - Running of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Running of time. 803.10 Section 803.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 TRANSMITTAL RULES § 803.10 Running of time. (a...

  14. 16 CFR 803.10 - Running of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Running of time. 803.10 Section 803.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 TRANSMITTAL RULES § 803.10 Running of time. (a...

  15. 16 CFR 803.10 - Running of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Running of time. 803.10 Section 803.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 TRANSMITTAL RULES § 803.10 Running of time. (a...

  16. 40 CFR 86.1237-96 - Dynamometer runs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dynamometer runs. 86.1237-96 Section 86.1237-96 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1237-96 Dynamometer runs. Section 86.1237-96 includes text that...

  17. 16 CFR 803.10 - Running of time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Running of time. 803.10 Section 803.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 TRANSMITTAL RULES § 803.10 Running of time. (a...

  18. Spontaneous Entrainment of Running Cadence to Music Tempo.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, Edith; Moens, Bart; Buhmann, Jeska; Demey, Michiel; Coorevits, Esther; Dalla Bella, Simone; Leman, Marc

    Since accumulating evidence suggests that step rate is strongly associated with running-related injuries, it is important for runners to exercise at an appropriate running cadence. As music tempo has been shown to be capable of impacting exercise performance of repetitive endurance activities, it might also serve as a means to (re)shape running cadence. The aim of this study was to validate the impact of music tempo on running cadence. Sixteen recreational runners ran four laps of 200 m (i.e. 800 m in total); this task was repeated 11 times with a short break in between each four-lap sequence. During the first lap of a sequence, participants ran at a self-paced tempo without musical accompaniment. Running cadence of the first lap was registered, and during the second lap, music with a tempo matching the assessed cadence was played. In the final two laps, the music tempo was either increased/decreased by 3.00, 2.50, 2.00, 1.50, or 1.00 % or was kept stable. This range was chosen since the aim of this study was to test spontaneous entrainment (an average person can distinguish tempo variations of about 4 %). Each participant performed all conditions. Imperceptible shifts in musical tempi in proportion to the runner's self-paced running tempo significantly influenced running cadence (p < .001). Contrasts revealed a linear relation between the tempo conditions and adaptation in running cadence (p < .001). In addition, a significant effect of condition on the level of entrainment was revealed (p < .05), which suggests that maximal effects of music tempo on running cadence can only be obtained up to a certain level of tempo modification. Finally, significantly higher levels of tempo entrainment were found for female participants compared to their male counterparts (p < .05). The applicable contribution of these novel findings is that music tempo could serve as an unprompted means to impact running cadence. As increases in step rate may prove

  19. Running is the neurogenic and neurotrophic stimulus in environmental enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Kobilo, Tali; Liu, Qing-Rong; Gandhi, Kriti; Mughal, Mohammed; Shaham, Yavin; van Praag, Henriette

    2011-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) increases dentate gyrus (DG) neurogenesis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. However, running is considered an element of EE. To dissociate effects of physical activity and enrichment on hippocampal neurogenesis and BDNF levels, young female C57Bl/6 mice were housed under control, running, enrichment, or enrichment plus running conditions, and injected with bromodeoxyuridine. Cell genesis was assessed after 12 d and differentiation was analyzed 1 mo later. In addition, locomotor activity in the open field and hippocampal mature BDNF peptide levels were measured. Open-field adaptation was improved in all groups, compared to controls, but more so with running. New cell proliferation, survival, neuron number, and neurotrophin levels were enhanced only when running was accessible. We conclude that exercise is the critical factor mediating increased BDNF levels and adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:21878528

  20. Effect of Muscle-Damaging Eccentric Exercise on Running Kinematics and Economy for Running at Different Intensities.

    PubMed

    Satkunskienė, Danguolė; Stasiulis, Arvydas; Zaičenkovienė, Kristina; Sakalauskaitė, Raminta; Rauktys, Donatas

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the changes in running kinematics and economy during running at different intensities 1 and 24 hours after a muscle-damaging bench-stepping exercise. Healthy, physically active adult women were recruited for this study. The subjects' running kinematics, heart rate, gas exchange, minute ventilation, and perceived exertion were continuously recorded during the increasing-intensity running test on a treadmill for different testing conditions: a control condition and 1 and 24 hours after the bench-stepping exercise test. Two muscle damage markers, muscle soreness and blood creatine kinase (CK) activity, were measured before and 24 hours after the stepping exercise. Muscle soreness and blood CK activity were significantly altered (exact p ≤ 0.05, Monte Carlo test) 24 hours after the bench-stepping exercise. The stride length, stride frequency, and support time at different running intensities did not change. Twenty-four hours after the previous step exercise, ankle dorsiflexion in the support phase was significantly higher during severe-intensity running, the range of knee flexion at the stance phase was significantly lower during moderate-intensity running, and knee flexion at the end of the amortization phase was significantly lower during heavy-intensity running compared with the control values (exact p ≤ 0.05, Monte Carlo test). The running economy at moderate and heavy intensities, maximum ventilation, and maximum heart rate did not change. We conclude that, given moderate soreness in the calf muscles 24 hours after eccentric exercise, the running kinematics are slightly but significantly changed without a detectable effect on running economy.

  1. Hip muscle loads during running at various step rates.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Rachel; Thelen, Darryl; Heiderscheit, Bryan

    2014-10-01

    Controlled laboratory study, cross-sectional. Objectives To characterize hip muscle forces and powers during running, and to determine how these quantities change when altering step rate for a given running speed. Hip musculature has been implicated in a variety of running-related injuries and, as such, is often the target of rehabilitation interventions, including resistance exercises and gait retraining. The differential contributions of the hip muscles to the task of running are not well understood, and may be important for recognizing the biomechanical mechanisms of running-related injuries and refining current treatment and prevention strategies. Thirty healthy participants ran at their preferred speed at 3 different step rates: 90%, 100%, and 110% of their preferred step rate. Whole-body kinematics and ground reaction forces were recorded. A 3-D musculoskeletal model was used to estimate muscle forces needed to produce the measured joint accelerations. Forces and powers of each muscle were compared across step-rate conditions. Peak force produced by the gluteus medius during running was substantially greater than that of any other hip muscle, with the majority of muscles displaying a period of negative work immediately preceding positive work. The higher running step rate led to an increase in hip flexor, hamstring, and hip extensor loading during swing, but, conversely, substantially diminished peak force and work during loading response for several hip muscles, including the gluteal muscles and piriformis. Increasing running step rate for a given running speed heightened hamstring and gluteal muscle loading in late swing, while decreasing stance-phase loading in the gluteal muscles and piriformis. These results may enable clinicians to support and refine current treatment strategies, including exercise prescription and gait retraining for running-related injuries.

  2. Considerations for initiating and progressing running programs in obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Heather K; Vincent, Kevin R

    2013-06-01

    Running has rapidly increased in popularity and elicits numerous health benefits, including weight loss. At present, no practical guidelines are available for obese persons who wish to start a running program. This article is a narrative review of the emerging evidence of the musculoskeletal factors to consider in obese patients who wish to initiate a running program and increase its intensity. Main program goals should include gradual weight loss, avoidance of injury, and enjoyment of the exercise. Pre-emptive strengthening exercises can improve the strength of the foot and ankle, hip abductor, quadriceps, and trunk to help support the joints bearing the loads before starting a running program. Depending on the presence of comorbid joint pain, nonimpact exercise or walking (on a flat surface, on an incline, and at high intensity) can be used to initiate the program. For progression to running, intensity or mileage increases should be slow and consistent to prevent musculoskeletal injury. A stepwise transition to running at a rate not exceeding 5%-10% of weekly mileage or duration is reasonable for this population. Intermittent walk-jog programs are also attractive for persons who are not able to sustain running for a long period. Musculoskeletal pain should neither carry over to the next day nor be increased the day after exercising. Rest days in between running sessions may help prevent overuse injury. Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery and are now lean can also run, but special foci such as hydration and energy replacement must be considered. In summary, obese persons can run for exercise, provided they follow conservative transitions and progression, schedule rest days, and heed onset of pain symptoms. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hip Muscle Loads during Running at Various Step Rates

    PubMed Central

    Lenhart, Rachel; Thelen, Darryl; Heiderscheit, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, cross-sectional Objectives To characterize hip muscle forces and powers during running, and to determine how these quantities change when altering step rate for a given running speed. Background Hip musculature has been implicated in a variety of running related injuries, and as such is often the target of rehabilitation interventions including resistance exercises and gait retraining. The differential contributions of the hip muscles to the task of running is not well understood, and may be important for recognizing the biomechanical mechanisms of running-related injuries and refining current treatment and prevention strategies. Methods Thirty healthy participants ran at their preferred speed at 3 different step rates: 90%, 100%, and 110% of their preferred step rate. Whole body kinematics and ground reaction forces were recorded. A 3D musculoskeletal model was used to estimate muscle forces needed to produce the measured joint accelerations. Forces and powers of each muscle were compared across step rate conditions. Results Peak force produced by the gluteus medius during running was substantially greater than any other hip muscle, with the majority of muscles displaying a period of negative work immediately preceding positive work. The higher running step rate led to an increase in hip flexor, hamstring, and hip extensor loading during swing, but conversely substantially diminished peak force and work during loading response for several hip muscles including the gluteal muscles and piriformis. Conclusion Increasing running step rate for a given running speed heightened hamstring and gluteal muscle loading in late swing, while decreasing stance phase loading in the gluteal muscles and piriformis. These results may enable clinicians to support and refine current treatment strategies including exercise prescription and gait retraining for running-related injuries. PMID:25156044

  4. Physiological effects of wearing graduated compression stockings during running.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ajmol; Creasy, Robert H; Edge, Johann A

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the effect of wearing different grades of graduated compression stockings (GCS) on physiological and perceptual measures during and following treadmill running in competitive runners. Nine males and one female performed three 40-min treadmill runs (80 +/- 5% maximal oxygen uptake) wearing either control (0 mmHg; CON), low (12-15 mmHg; LO-GCS), or high (23-32 mmHg; HI-GCS) grade GCS in a double-blind counterbalanced order. Oxygen uptake, heart rate and blood lactate were measured. Perceptual scales were used pre- and post-run to assess comfort, tightness and any pain associated with wearing GCS. Changes in muscle function, soreness and damage were determined pre-run, immediately after running and 24 and 48 h post-run by measuring creatine kinase and myoglobin, counter-movement jump height, perceived soreness diagrams, and pressure sensitivity. There were no significant differences between trials for oxygen uptake, heart rate or blood lactate during exercise. HI-GCS was perceived as tighter (P < 0.05) and more pain-inducing (P < 0.05) than the other interventions; CON and LO-GCS were rated more comfortable than HI-GCS (P < 0.05). Creatine kinase (P < 0.05), myoglobin (P < 0.05) and jump height (P < 0.05) were higher and pressure sensitivity was more pronounced (P < 0.05) immediately after running but not after 24 and 48 h. Only four participants reported muscle soreness during recovery from running and there were no differences in muscle function between trials. In conclusion, healthy runners wearing GCS did not experience any physiological benefits during or following treadmill running. However, athletes felt more comfortable wearing low-grade GCS whilst running.

  5. Influence of the Lower Jaw Position on the Running Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Stief, Felix; Jonas, Alexander; Kovac, Andrej; Groneberg, David Alexander; Meurer, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The effects of manipulated dental occlusion on body posture has been investigated quite often and discussed controversially in the literature. Far less attention has been paid to the influence of dental occlusion position on human movement. If human movement was analysed, it was mostly while walking and not while running. This study was therefore designed to identify the effect of lower jaw positions on running behaviour according to different dental occlusion positions. Methods Twenty healthy young recreational runners (mean age = 33.9±5.8 years) participated in this study. Kinematic data were collected using an eight-camera Vicon motion capture system (VICON Motion Systems, Oxford, UK). Subjects were consecutively prepared with four different dental occlusion conditions in random order and performed five running trials per test condition on a level walkway with their preferred running shoes. Vector based pattern recognition methods, in particular cluster analysis and support vector machines (SVM) were used for movement pattern identification. Results Subjects exhibited unique movement patterns leading to 18 clusters for the 20 subjects. No overall classification of the splint condition could be observed. Within individual subjects different running patterns could be identified for the four splint conditions. The splint conditions lead to a more symmetrical running pattern than the control condition. Discussion The influence of an occlusal splint on running pattern can be confirmed in this study. Wearing a splint increases the symmetry of the running pattern. A more symmetrical running pattern might help to reduce the risk of injuries or help in performance. The change of the movement pattern between the neutral condition and any of the three splint conditions was significant within subjects but not across subjects. Therefore the dental splint has a measureable influence on the running pattern of subjects, however subjects individuality has to be

  6. A public dataset of running biomechanics and the effects of running speed on lower extremity kinematics and kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Fukuchi, Claudiane A.; Duarte, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Background The goals of this study were (1) to present the set of data evaluating running biomechanics (kinematics and kinetics), including data on running habits, demographics, and levels of muscle strength and flexibility made available at Figshare (DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.4543435); and (2) to examine the effect of running speed on selected gait-biomechanics variables related to both running injuries and running economy. Methods The lower-extremity kinematics and kinetics data of 28 regular runners were collected using a three-dimensional (3D) motion-capture system and an instrumented treadmill while the subjects ran at 2.5 m/s, 3.5 m/s, and 4.5 m/s wearing standard neutral shoes. Results A dataset comprising raw and processed kinematics and kinetics signals pertaining to this experiment is available in various file formats. In addition, a file of metadata, including demographics, running characteristics, foot-strike patterns, and muscle strength and flexibility measurements is provided. Overall, there was an effect of running speed on most of the gait-biomechanics variables selected for this study. However, the foot-strike patterns were not affected by running speed. Discussion Several applications of this dataset can be anticipated, including testing new methods of data reduction and variable selection; for educational purposes; and answering specific research questions. This last application was exemplified in the study’s second objective. PMID:28503379

  7. The Effects of Running Club Membership on Fourth Graders' Achievement of Connecticut State Standard for the Mile Run

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foshay, John D.; Patterson, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a running club on the mile run times of fourth grade students. The study was conducted in a suburban elementary school setting in central Connecticut with a student body of 400. The participants for the study included 59 fourth grade students, 30 of whom were boys and 29 of whom were…

  8. A public dataset of running biomechanics and the effects of running speed on lower extremity kinematics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Reginaldo K; Fukuchi, Claudiane A; Duarte, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    The goals of this study were (1) to present the set of data evaluating running biomechanics (kinematics and kinetics), including data on running habits, demographics, and levels of muscle strength and flexibility made available at Figshare (DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.4543435); and (2) to examine the effect of running speed on selected gait-biomechanics variables related to both running injuries and running economy. The lower-extremity kinematics and kinetics data of 28 regular runners were collected using a three-dimensional (3D) motion-capture system and an instrumented treadmill while the subjects ran at 2.5 m/s, 3.5 m/s, and 4.5 m/s wearing standard neutral shoes. A dataset comprising raw and processed kinematics and kinetics signals pertaining to this experiment is available in various file formats. In addition, a file of metadata, including demographics, running characteristics, foot-strike patterns, and muscle strength and flexibility measurements is provided. Overall, there was an effect of running speed on most of the gait-biomechanics variables selected for this study. However, the foot-strike patterns were not affected by running speed. Several applications of this dataset can be anticipated, including testing new methods of data reduction and variable selection; for educational purposes; and answering specific research questions. This last application was exemplified in the study's second objective.

  9. Low-severity catalytic two-stage liquefaction process: Illinois coal conceptual commercial plant design and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, L.M.; Comolli, A.G.; Popper, G.A.; Wang, C.; Wilson, G.

    1988-09-01

    Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. (HRI) is conducting a program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate a Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) Process. This program which runs through 1987, is a continuation of an earlier DOE sponsored program (1983--1985) at HRI to develop a new technology concept for CTSL. The earlier program included bench-scale testing of improved operating conditions for the CTSL Process on Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal and Wyoming sub-bituminous coal, and engineering screening studies to identify the economic incentive for CTSL over the single-stage H-Coal/reg sign/ Process for Illinois No. 6 coal. In the current program these engineering screening studies are extended to deep-cleaned Illinois coal and use of heavy recycle. The results from this comparison will be used as a guide for future experiments with respect to selection of coal feedstocks and areas for further process optimization. A preliminary design for CTSL of Illinois deep-cleaned coal was developed based on demonstrated bench-scale performance in Run No. 227-47(I-27), and from HRI's design experience on the Breckinridge Project and H-Coal/reg sign/ Process pilot plant operations at Catlettsburg. Complete conceptual commercial plant designs were developed for a grassroots facility using HRI's Process Planning Model. Product costs were calculated and economic sensitivities analyzed. 14 refs., 11 figs., 49 tabs.

  10. During Running in Place, Grid Cells Integrate Elapsed Time and Distance Run.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Benjamin J; Brandon, Mark P; Robinson, Robert J; Connerney, Michael A; Hasselmo, Michael E; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2015-11-04

    The spatial scale of grid cells may be provided by self-generated motion information or by external sensory information from environmental cues. To determine whether grid cell activity reflects distance traveled or elapsed time independent of external information, we recorded grid cells as animals ran in place on a treadmill. Grid cell activity was only weakly influenced by location, but most grid cells and other neurons recorded from the same electrodes strongly signaled a combination of distance and time, with some signaling only distance or time. Grid cells were more sharply tuned to time and distance than non-grid cells. Many grid cells exhibited multiple firing fields during treadmill running, parallel to the periodic firing fields observed in open fields, suggesting a common mode of information processing. These observations indicate that, in the absence of external dynamic cues, grid cells integrate self-generated distance and time information to encode a representation of experience.

  11. Building a health program run by women, in a community run by men.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, R

    1995-01-01

    The author is a psychiatric nurse from the US working upon primary health education with community health promoters in Oaxaca, Mexico. Women worked to establish pharmacies in Zaragoza and Miramar. Since the health program was run by women, efforts were made to secure the approval of men. The husbands of health promoters, male town officials, and male leaders of the local coffee growers organization were courted for the better part of a month. Although many men were won over, the president of the Miramar local coffee growers organization posed resistance to the women's plans. Training sessions were held on prenatal and postnatal care, concentrating upon mental health and pregnancy, diagnosing dangerous illnesses during pregnancy, and postpartum infections. The author discusses the need for and efforts to bolster women's rights in these communities.

  12. Spent Fuel Drying System Test Results (Dry-Run in Preparation for Run 8)

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, George S.; Oliver, Brian M.; Abrefah, John; Marschman, Steven C.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Ritter, Greg A.

    1999-08-11

    The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of a test ''dry-run'' conducted prior to the eighth and last of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister 6513U. The system used for the dry-run test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 4.0 and discussed Section 5.0.

  13. Optimization of insulin pump therapy based on high order run-to-run control scheme.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Jianyong; Sun, Huiling; Shen, Dong; Wang, Hui; Wang, Youqing

    2015-07-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) pump is widely considered a convenience and promising way for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) subjects, who need exogenous insulin infusion. In the standard insulin pump therapy, there are two modes for insulin infusion: basal and bolus insulin. The basal-bolus therapy should be individualized and optimized in order to keep one subject's blood glucose (BG) level within the normal range; however, the optimization procedure is troublesome and it perturb the patients a lot. Therefore, an automatic adjustment method is needed to reduce the burden of the patients, and run-to-run (R2R) control algorithm can be used to handle this significant task. In this study, two kinds of high order R2R control methods are presented to adjust the basal and bolus insulin simultaneously. For clarity, a second order R2R control algorithm is first derived and studied. Furthermore, considering the differences between weekdays and weekends, a seventh order R2R control algorithm is also proposed and tested. In order to simulate real situation, the proposed method has been tested with uncertainties on measurement noise, drifts, meal size, meal time and snack. The proposed method can converge even when there are ±60 min random variations in meal timing or ±50% random variations in meal size. According to the robustness analysis, one can see that the proposed high order R2R has excellent robustness and could be a promising candidate to optimize insulin pump therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Spent Fuel Drying System Test Results (Dry-Run in Preparation for Run 8)

    SciTech Connect

    BM Oliver; GS Klinger; J Abrefah; SC Marschman; PJ MacFarlan; GA Ritter

    1999-08-11

    The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a)on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of a test ''dry-run'' conducted prior to the eighth and last of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister6513U. The system used for the dry-run test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 4.0 and discussed Section 5.0.

  15. Inverted pendular running: a novel gait predicted by computer optimization is found between walk and run in birds.

    PubMed

    Usherwood, James Richard

    2010-12-23

    Idealized models of walking and running demonstrate that, energetically, walking should be favoured up to, and even somewhat over, those speeds and step lengths that can be achieved while keeping the stance leg under compression. Around these speeds, and especially with relatively long step lengths, computer optimization predicts a third, 'hybrid', gait: (inverted) pendular running (Srinivasan & Ruina 2006 Nature 439, 72-75 (doi:10.1038/nature04113)). This gait involves both walking-like vaulting mechanics and running-like ballistic paths. Trajectories of horizontal versus vertical centre of mass velocities-'hodographs'-over the step cycle are distinctive for each gait: anticlockwise for walk; clockwise for run; figure-of-eight for the hybrid gait. Both pheasants and guineafowl demonstrate each gait at close to the predicted speed/step length combinations, although fully aerial ballistic phases are never achieved during the hybrid or 'Grounded Inverted Pendular Running' gait.

  16. Effects of Heavy Strength Training on Running Performance and Determinants of Running Performance in Female Endurance Athletes.

    PubMed

    Vikmoen, Olav; Raastad, Truls; Seynnes, Olivier; Bergstrøm, Kristoffer; Ellefsen, Stian; Rønnestad, Bent R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of adding strength training to normal endurance training on running performance and running economy in well-trained female athletes. We hypothesized that the added strength training would improve performance and running economy through altered stiffness of the muscle-tendon complex of leg extensors. Nineteen female endurance athletes [maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max): 53±3 ml∙kg-1∙min-1, 5.8 h weekly endurance training] were randomly assigned to either normal endurance training (E, n = 8) or normal endurance training combined with strength training (E+S, n = 11). The strength training consisted of four leg exercises [3 x 4-10 repetition maximum (RM)], twice a week for 11 weeks. Muscle strength, 40 min all-out running distance, running performance determinants and patellar tendon stiffness were measured before and after the intervention. E+S increased 1RM in leg exercises (40 ± 15%) and maximal jumping height in counter movement jump (6 ± 6%) and squat jump (9 ± 7%, p < 0.05). This was accompanied by increased muscle fiber cross sectional area of both fiber type I (13 ± 7%) and fiber type II (31 ± 20%) in m. vastus lateralis (p < 0.05), with no change in capillary density in m. vastus lateralis or the stiffness of the patellar tendon. Neither E+S nor E changed running economy, fractional utilization of VO2max or VO2max. There were also no change in running distance during a 40 min all-out running test in neither of the groups. Adding heavy strength training to endurance training did not affect 40 min all-out running performance or running economy compared to endurance training only.

  17. Fitness Assessment Comparison Between the "Jackie Chan Action Run" Videogame, 1-Mile Run/Walk, and the PACER.

    PubMed

    Haddock, Bryan; Siegel, Shannon; Costa, Pablo; Jarvis, Sarah; Klug, Nicholas; Medina, Ernie; Wilkin, Linda

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a correlation existed among the scores of the "Jackie Chan Studio Fitness(™) Action Run" active videogame (XaviX(®), SSD Company, Ltd., Kusatsu, Japan), the 1-mile run/walk, and Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER) aerobic fitness tests of the FITNESSGRAM(®) (The Cooper Institute, Dallas, TX) in order to provide a potential alternative testing method for days that are not environmentally desirable for outdoor testing. Participants were a convenience sample from physical education classes of students between the ages of 10 and 15 years. Participants (n=108) were randomly assigned to one of three groups with the only difference being the order of testing. The tests included the "Jackie Chan Action Run" active videogame, the 1-mile run/walk, and the PACER. Testing occurred on three different days during the physical education class. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was reported. Significant correlations (r=-0.598 to 0.312) were found among the three aerobic fitness tests administered (P<0.05). The RPE for the "Jackie Chan Action Run" was lower than the RPE for the 1-mile run/walk and the PACER (3.81±1.89, 5.93±1.77, and 5.71±2.14, respectively). The results suggest that the "Jackie Chan Action Run" test could be an alternative to the 1-mile run/walk and PACER, allowing physical education teachers to perform aerobic fitness testing in an indoor setting that requires less space. Also, children may be more willing to participate in the "Jackie Chan Action Run" based on the lower RPE.

  18. Effects of Heavy Strength Training on Running Performance and Determinants of Running Performance in Female Endurance Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Vikmoen, Olav; Raastad, Truls; Seynnes, Olivier; Bergstrøm, Kristoffer; Ellefsen, Stian; Rønnestad, Bent R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of adding strength training to normal endurance training on running performance and running economy in well-trained female athletes. We hypothesized that the added strength training would improve performance and running economy through altered stiffness of the muscle-tendon complex of leg extensors. Methods Nineteen female endurance athletes [maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max): 53±3 ml∙kg-1∙min-1, 5.8 h weekly endurance training] were randomly assigned to either normal endurance training (E, n = 8) or normal endurance training combined with strength training (E+S, n = 11). The strength training consisted of four leg exercises [3 x 4–10 repetition maximum (RM)], twice a week for 11 weeks. Muscle strength, 40 min all-out running distance, running performance determinants and patellar tendon stiffness were measured before and after the intervention. Results E+S increased 1RM in leg exercises (40 ± 15%) and maximal jumping height in counter movement jump (6 ± 6%) and squat jump (9 ± 7%, p < 0.05). This was accompanied by increased muscle fiber cross sectional area of both fiber type I (13 ± 7%) and fiber type II (31 ± 20%) in m. vastus lateralis (p < 0.05), with no change in capillary density in m. vastus lateralis or the stiffness of the patellar tendon. Neither E+S nor E changed running economy, fractional utilization of VO2max or VO2max. There were also no change in running distance during a 40 min all-out running test in neither of the groups. Conclusion Adding heavy strength training to endurance training did not affect 40 min all-out running performance or running economy compared to endurance training only. PMID:26953893

  19. Biomechanics and Physiology of Uphill and Downhill Running.

    PubMed

    Vernillo, Gianluca; Giandolini, Marlène; Edwards, W Brent; Morin, Jean-Benoît; Samozino, Pierre; Horvais, Nicolas; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2017-04-01

    Most running studies have considered level running (LR), yet the regulation of locomotor behaviour during uphill (UR) and downhill (DR) running is fundamental to increase our understanding of human locomotion. The purpose of this article was to review the existing literature regarding biomechanical, neuromuscular and physiological adaptations during graded running. Relative to LR, UR is characterized by a higher step frequency, increased internal mechanical work, shorter swing/aerial phase duration, and greater duty factor, while DR is characterized by increased aerial time, reduced step frequency and decreased duty factor. Grade also modifies foot strike patterns, with a progressive adoption of a mid- to fore-foot strike pattern during UR, and rear-foot strike patterns during DR. In UR, lower limb muscles perform a higher net mechanical work compared to LR and DR to increase the body's potential energy. In DR, energy dissipation is generally prevalent compared to energy generation. The increased demands for work as running incline increases are met by an increase in power output at all joints, particularly the hip. This implies that UR requires greater muscular activity compared to LR and DR. Energy cost of running (C r) linearly increases with positive slope but C r of DR decreases until a minimum slope is reached at -20 %, after which C r increases again. The effects of slope on biomechanics, muscle contraction patterns and physiological responses have important implications for injury prevention and success of athletes engaged in graded running competitions.

  20. Is midsole thickness a key parameter for the running pattern?

    PubMed

    Chambon, Nicolas; Delattre, Nicolas; Guéguen, Nils; Berton, Eric; Rao, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have highlighted differences in foot strike pattern comparing habitually shod runners who ran barefoot and with running shoes. Barefoot running results in a flatter foot landing and in a decreased vertical ground reaction force compared to shod running. The aim of this study was to investigate one possible parameter influencing running pattern: the midsole thickness. Fifteen participants ran overground at 3.3 ms(-1) barefoot and with five shoes of different midsole thickness (0 mm, 2 mm, 4 mm, 8 mm, 16 mm) with no difference of height between rearfoot and forefoot. Impact magnitude was evaluated using transient peak of vertical ground reaction force, loading rate, tibial acceleration peak and rate. Hip, knee and ankle flexion angles were computed at touch-down and during stance phase (range of motion and maximum values). External net joint moments and stiffness for hip, knee and ankle joints were also observed as well as global leg stiffness. No significant effect of midsole thickness was observed on ground reaction force and tibial acceleration. However, the contact time increased with midsole thickness. Barefoot running compared to shod running induced ankle in plantar flexion at touch-down, higher ankle dorsiflexion and lower knee flexion during stance phase. These adjustments are suspected to explain the absence of difference on ground reaction force and tibial acceleration. This study showed that the presence of very thin footwear upper and sole was sufficient to significantly influence the running pattern. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.