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Sample records for cu-based catalyst systems

  1. Cu-based Polyoxometalate Catalyst for Efficient Catalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hongjin; Gao, Yuanzhe; Guo, Weiwei; Lauinger, Sarah M; Chi, Yingnan; Bacsa, John; Sullivan, Kevin P; Wieliczko, Marika; Musaev, Djamaladdin G; Hill, Craig L

    2016-07-01

    Copper-based complexes have been largely neglected as potential water reduction catalysts. This article reports the synthesis and characterization of a tetra-copper-containing polyoxotungstate, Na3K7[Cu4(H2O)2(B-α-PW9O34)2]·30H2O (Na3K7-Cu4P2). Cu4P2 is a water-compatible catalyst for efficient visible-light-driven hydrogen evolution when coupled to (4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-dipyridyl)-bis(2-phenylpyridine(1H))-iridium(III) hexafluorophosphate ([Ir(ppy)2(dtbbpy)][PF6]) as a light absorber and triethanolamine (TEOA) as sacrificial electron donor. Under minimally optimized conditions, a turnover number (TON) of ∼1270 per Cu4P2 catalyst is obtained after 5 h of irradiation (light-emitting diode; λ = 455 nm; 20 mW); a photochemical quantum efficiency of as high as 15.9% is achieved. Both oxidative and reductive quenching pathways are observed by measuring the luminescence intensity of excited state [Ir(ppy)2(dtbbpy)](+*) in the presence of Cu4P2 or TEOA, respectively. Many stability studies (e.g., UV-vis absorption, FT-IR, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) show that catalyst Cu4P2 undergoes slow decomposition under turnover conditions; however, both the starting Cu4P2 as well as its molecular decomposition products are the dominant catalytically active species for H2 evolution not Cu or CuOx particles. Considering the high abundance and low cost of copper, the present work provides considerations for the design and synthesis of efficient, molecular, water-compatible Cu-based water reduction catalysts. PMID:27322394

  2. Heterogeneous Catalytic Conversion of Dry Syngas to Ethanol and Higher Alcohols on Cu-Based Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Mayank; Smith, Miranda L.; Spivey, James J.

    2011-04-19

    Ethanol and higher alcohols have been identified as potential fuel additives or hydrogen carriers for use in fuel cells. One method of ethanol production is catalytic conversion of syngas (a mixture of CO, H₂, CO₂, and H₂O), derived from biomass, coal, or natural gas. Thermodynamics of CO hydrogenation shows that ethanol is favored as the sole product at conditions of practical interest, but if methane is allowed as product in this analysis, essentially no ethanol is formed at equilibrium. The kinetics of ethanol formation must therefore be maximized. Although rhodium-based catalysts give C{sup 2+} oxygenates with high selectivity, their prohibitive cost has spurred research on less expensive copper-based alternatives. Copper-based catalysts require an optimum amount of promoter to suppress undesired reactions and maximize the yields of ethanol and higher alcohols. Common promoters include alkali, transition metals and their oxides, and rare earth oxides. Careful selection of operating variables is also necessary to achieve the desired activity and selectivity. This review describes the effects of promoters, supports, and operating conditions on the performance of copper-based catalysts for conversion of dry syngas to ethanol and higher alcohols. Proposed mechanisms from the literature for ethanol and higher-alcohol synthesis are outlined.

  3. Cu-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks as a Catalyst To Construct a Ratiometric Electrochemical Aptasensor for Sensitive Lipopolysaccharide Detection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wen-Jun; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Ya-Qin; Yuan, Ruo

    2015-11-17

    In this work, we developed a sensitive and efficient ratiometric electrochemical method for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) detection using Cu-based metal-organic frameworks (Cu-MOFs) as a catalyst and target-triggered quadratic cycles for signal amplification. First, in the presence of target LPS, the conformation change of the specifically designed hairpin probes 1 (HP1) triggered the target cyclic-induced polymerization to produce the output DNA with the aid of phi29 DNA polymerase (phi29). Then, the obtained output DNA hybridized with ferrocene-labeled hairpin probes 2 (Fc-HP2, which were immobilized on the electrode) to generate a nicking endonuclease (N.BstNBI) cleavage site. Thus, with N.BstNBI, the original signal molecules of Fc left from the electrode, and the single-stranded capture-probe-modified sensing interface was obtained. At this time, signal probes conducted by Au-nanoparticles-functionalized Cu-MOFs and labeled hairpin probes 3 (HP3/AuNPs/Cu-MOFs) were hybridized with capture probes for hairpin assembly. Herein, AuNPs/Cu-MOFs were not only used as nanocarriers for immobilizing HP3 but also acted as electroactive materials for signal reporting. With the proposed target-triggered quadratic cycles, the cleavage sites of Fc-HP2 were cut, and capture probes were obtained to hybridize with HP3/AuNPs/Cu-MOFs, which caused the signal decrease of Fc. Then Cu-MOFs were closed to the electrode for the signal increase of Cu-MOFs. Furthermore, when glucose was present in the detection solution, AuNPs/Cu-MOFs catalyzed the oxidation of glucose to realize the enzyme-free signal amplification. By measuring the peak currents ratio of the Cu-MOFs and Fc, the proposed aptasenor for LPS detection showed a low detection limit (0.33 fg/mL) and a wide linear range from 1.0 fg/mL to 100 ng/mL with high accuracy and sensitivity. This ratiometric electrochemical approach is expected to be a valuable strategy for detection of other analytes. PMID:26465256

  4. Cu-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks as a Catalyst To Construct a Ratiometric Electrochemical Aptasensor for Sensitive Lipopolysaccharide Detection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wen-Jun; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Ya-Qin; Yuan, Ruo

    2015-11-17

    In this work, we developed a sensitive and efficient ratiometric electrochemical method for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) detection using Cu-based metal-organic frameworks (Cu-MOFs) as a catalyst and target-triggered quadratic cycles for signal amplification. First, in the presence of target LPS, the conformation change of the specifically designed hairpin probes 1 (HP1) triggered the target cyclic-induced polymerization to produce the output DNA with the aid of phi29 DNA polymerase (phi29). Then, the obtained output DNA hybridized with ferrocene-labeled hairpin probes 2 (Fc-HP2, which were immobilized on the electrode) to generate a nicking endonuclease (N.BstNBI) cleavage site. Thus, with N.BstNBI, the original signal molecules of Fc left from the electrode, and the single-stranded capture-probe-modified sensing interface was obtained. At this time, signal probes conducted by Au-nanoparticles-functionalized Cu-MOFs and labeled hairpin probes 3 (HP3/AuNPs/Cu-MOFs) were hybridized with capture probes for hairpin assembly. Herein, AuNPs/Cu-MOFs were not only used as nanocarriers for immobilizing HP3 but also acted as electroactive materials for signal reporting. With the proposed target-triggered quadratic cycles, the cleavage sites of Fc-HP2 were cut, and capture probes were obtained to hybridize with HP3/AuNPs/Cu-MOFs, which caused the signal decrease of Fc. Then Cu-MOFs were closed to the electrode for the signal increase of Cu-MOFs. Furthermore, when glucose was present in the detection solution, AuNPs/Cu-MOFs catalyzed the oxidation of glucose to realize the enzyme-free signal amplification. By measuring the peak currents ratio of the Cu-MOFs and Fc, the proposed aptasenor for LPS detection showed a low detection limit (0.33 fg/mL) and a wide linear range from 1.0 fg/mL to 100 ng/mL with high accuracy and sensitivity. This ratiometric electrochemical approach is expected to be a valuable strategy for detection of other analytes.

  5. System for reactivating catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  6. Plasmatron-catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander; Alexeev, Nikolai

    2004-09-21

    A plasmatron-catalyst system. The system generates hydrogen-rich gas and comprises a plasmatron and at least one catalyst for receiving an output from the plasmatron to produce hydrogen-rich gas. In a preferred embodiment, the plasmatron receives as an input air, fuel and water/steam for use in the reforming process. The system increases the hydrogen yield and decreases the amount of carbon monoxide.

  7. Plasmatron-catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander; Alexeev, Nikolai

    2007-10-09

    A plasmatron-catalyst system. The system generates hydrogen-rich gas and comprises a plasmatron and at least one catalyst for receiving an output from the plasmatron to produce hydrogen-rich gas. In a preferred embodiment, the plasmatron receives as an input air, fuel and water/steam for use in the reforming process. The system increases the hydrogen yield and decreases the amount of carbon monoxide.

  8. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, Robert J.; Gao, Hanrong

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilation, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical.

  9. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Angelici, R.J.; Gao, H.

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilication, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanidation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical. 2 figs.

  10. Catalyst systems and uses thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkan, Umit S.; Holmgreen, Erik M.; Yung, Matthew M.

    2012-07-24

    A method of carbon monoxide (CO) removal comprises providing an oxidation catalyst comprising cobalt supported on an inorganic oxide. The method further comprises feeding a gaseous stream comprising CO, and oxygen (O.sub.2) to the catalyst system, and removing CO from the gaseous stream by oxidizing the CO to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) in the presence of the oxidation catalyst at a temperature between about 20 to about 200.degree. C.

  11. HERFD-XANES and XES as complementary operando tools for monitoring the structure of Cu-based zeolite catalysts during NOx-removal by ammonia SCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günter, T.; Doronkin, D. E.; Carvalho, H. W. P.; Casapu, M.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we demonstrate the potential of hard X-ray techniques to characterize catalysts under working conditions. Operando high energy resolution fluorescence detected (HERFD) XANES and valence to core (vtc) X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) have been used in a spatially-resolved manner to study Cu-zeolite catalysts during the standard-SCR reaction and related model conditions. The results show a gradient in Cu oxidation state and coordination along the catalyst bed as the reactants are consumed. Vtc-XES gives complementary information on the direct adsorption of ammonia at the Cu sites. The structural information on the catalyst shows the suitability of X-ray techniques to understand catalytic reactions and to facilitate catalyst optimization.

  12. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Sopchak, David A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Reynolds, John G.; Satcher, Joseph H.; Gash, Alex E.

    2011-11-15

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  13. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Sopchak, David A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Reynolds, John G.; Satcher, Joseph H.; Gash, Alex E.

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  14. Cu and Cu-Based Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Applications in Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Gawande, Manoj B; Goswami, Anandarup; Felpin, François-Xavier; Asefa, Tewodros; Huang, Xiaoxi; Silva, Rafael; Zou, Xiaoxin; Zboril, Radek; Varma, Rajender S

    2016-03-23

    The applications of copper (Cu) and Cu-based nanoparticles, which are based on the earth-abundant and inexpensive copper metal, have generated a great deal of interest in recent years, especially in the field of catalysis. The possible modification of the chemical and physical properties of these nanoparticles using different synthetic strategies and conditions and/or via postsynthetic chemical treatments has been largely responsible for the rapid growth of interest in these nanomaterials and their applications in catalysis. In addition, the design and development of novel support and/or multimetallic systems (e.g., alloys, etc.) has also made significant contributions to the field. In this comprehensive review, we report different synthetic approaches to Cu and Cu-based nanoparticles (metallic copper, copper oxides, and hybrid copper nanostructures) and copper nanoparticles immobilized into or supported on various support materials (SiO2, magnetic support materials, etc.), along with their applications in catalysis. The synthesis part discusses numerous preparative protocols for Cu and Cu-based nanoparticles, whereas the application sections describe their utility as catalysts, including electrocatalysis, photocatalysis, and gas-phase catalysis. We believe this critical appraisal will provide necessary background information to further advance the applications of Cu-based nanostructured materials in catalysis.

  15. Process of activation of a palladium catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    Improved processes for activating a catalyst system used for the reduction of nitrogen oxides are provided. In one embodiment, the catalyst system is activated by passing an activation gas stream having an amount of each of oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen over the catalyst system and increasing a temperature of the catalyst system to a temperature of at least 180.degree. C. at a heating rate of from 1-20.degree./min. Use of activation processes described herein leads to a catalyst system with superior NOx reduction capabilities.

  16. Supported catalyst systems and method of making biodiesel products using such catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Manhoe; Yan, Shuli; Salley, Steven O.; Ng, K. Y. Simon

    2015-10-20

    A heterogeneous catalyst system, a method of preparing the catalyst system and a method of forming a biodiesel product via transesterification reactions using the catalyst system is disclosed. The catalyst system according to one aspect of the present disclosure represents a class of supported mixed metal oxides that include at least calcium oxide and another metal oxide deposited on a lanthanum oxide or cerium oxide support. Preferably, the catalysts include CaO--CeO.sub.2ZLa.sub.2O.sub.3 or CaO--La.sub.2O.sub.3/CeO.sub.2. Optionally, the catalyst may further include additional metal oxides, such as CaO--La.sub.2O.sub.3--GdOxZLa.sub.2O.sub.3.

  17. 80 HP PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYST SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Slone, Ralph

    2001-08-05

    The US economy is linked to efficient heavy vehicle transportation and diesel remains the fuel of choice for mass transportation of goods and services. Diesel engines remain the most reliable and cost effective system for commerce. Recent deleterious effects of diesel exhaust on health and environment have led to an urgent need for cost effective technologies that would bring about reduction in NOx and PM. CARB estimates on-road diesel mobile source will contribute almost 50% NOx and 78% PM emissions by 2010. As a result recent Federal and State mandates have been adopted to reduce emissions from diesel exhaust to 1 Gm/bhp.-Hr of NOx and 0.05 Gm/bhp-hr of PM by the year 2007. The 2007 standard is to be achieved in a stepwise manner starting with the standards for 2002 namely 2 Gm/bhp-hr NOx and 0.1 Gm/bhp-hr of PM. 2002 standards are likely to be met by most engine manufacturer by some modified form of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system or by employing a sophisticated engine control system. Importance of cost effective technology requirement is further exaggerated by the fact that in recent years diesel engine production have increased dramatically see figure 1 and has out stripped the gasoline engine production almost 4:1 see figure 2. Currently gasoline engine employs a 3-way catalytic system for NOx and HC reduction and in order for the 3-way system to work the engine is run near stoichiometric air : fuel ratio so that exhaust has virtually no oxygen. This strategy has resulted in a poorer efficiency and hence less efficient utilization of our natural resources. By contrast diesel engine operate on a lean burn principals i.e. air rich and currently there are no commercial technologies available for treating NOx and PM. Technologies being considered for reducing NOx from lean burn (diesel) exhaust are; Lean NOx catalyst systems, NOx adsorber system, Selective Catalytic Reduction systems and plasma assisted catalyst system. Of all these technologies Plasma

  18. Multi-stage catalyst systems and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Ozkan, Umit S.; Holmgreen, Erik M.; Yung, Matthew M.

    2009-02-10

    Catalyst systems and methods provide benefits in reducing the content of nitrogen oxides in a gaseous stream containing nitric oxide (NO), hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide (CO), and oxygen (O.sub.2). The catalyst system comprises an oxidation catalyst comprising a first metal supported on a first inorganic oxide for catalyzing the oxidation of NO to nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2), and a reduction catalyst comprising a second metal supported on a second inorganic oxide for catalyzing the reduction of NO.sub.2 to nitrogen (N.sub.2).

  19. CATALYSTS NHI Thermochemical Systems FY 2009 Year-End Report

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar

    2009-09-01

    Fiscal Year 2009 work in the Catalysts project focused on advanced catalysts for the decomposition of sulfuric acid, a reaction common to both the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) cycle and the Hybrid Sulfur cycle. Prior years’ effort in this project has found that although platinum supported on titanium oxide will be an acceptable catalyst for sulfuric acid decomposition in the integrated laboratory scale (ILS) project, the material has short comings, including significant cost and high deactivation rates due to sintering and platinum evaporation. For pilot and larger scale systems, the catalyst stability needs to be improved significantly. In Fiscal Year 2008 it was found that at atmospheric pressure, deactivation rates of a 1 wt% platinum catalyst could be reduced by 300% by adding either 0.3 wt% iridium (Ir) or 0.3 wt% ruthenium (Ru) to the catalyst. In Fiscal Year 2009, work focused on examining the platinum group metal catalysts activity and stability at elevated pressures. In addition, simple and complex metal oxides are known to catalyze the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. These metal oxides could offer activities comparable to platinum but at significantly reduced cost. Thus a second focus for Fiscal Year 2009 was to explore metal oxide catalysts for the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. In Fiscal Year 2007 several commercial activated carbons had been identified for the HI decomposition reaction; a reaction specific to the S-I cycle. Those materials should be acceptable for the pilot scale project. The activated carbon catalysts have some disadvantages including low activity at the lower range of reactor operating temperature (350 to 400°C) and a propensity to generate carbon monoxide in the presence of water that could contaminate the hydrogen product, but due to limited funding, this area had low priority in Fiscal Year 2009. Fiscal Year 2009 catalyst work included five tasks: development, and testing of stabilized platinum based H2SO4 catalysts

  20. Catalyst system for the polymerization of alkenes to polyolefins

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Stephen A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2004-02-17

    The invention provides metallocene catalyst systems for the controlled polymerization of alkenes to a wide variety of polyolefins and olefin coplymers. Catalyst systems are provided that specifically produce isotactic, syndiotactic and steroblock polyolefins. The type of polymer produced can be controlled by varying the catalyst system, specifically by varying the ligand substituents. Such catalyst systems are particularly useful for the polymerization of polypropylene to give elastomeric polypropylenes. The invention also provides novel elastomeric polypropylene polymers characterized by dyad (m) tacticities of about 55% to about 65%, pentad (mmmm) tacticities of about 25% to about 35%, molecular weights (M.sub.W) in the range of about 50,000 to about 2,000,000, and have mmrm+rrmr peak is less than about 5%.

  1. Catalyst system for the polymerization of alkenes to polyolefins

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Stephen A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2002-01-01

    The invention provides metallocene catalyst systems for the controlled polymerization of alkenes to a wide variety of polyolefins and olefin coplymers. Catalyst systems are provided that specifically produce isotactic, syndiotactic and steroblock polyolefins. The type of polymer produced can be controlled by varying the catalyst system, specifically by varying the ligand substituents. Such catalyst systems are particularly useful for the polymerization of polypropylene to give elastomeric polypropylenes. The invention also provides novel elastomeric polypropylene polymers characterized by dyad (m) tacticities of about 55% to about 65%, pentad (mmmm) tacticities of about 25% to about 35%, molecular weights (M.sub.w)in the range of about 50,000 to about 2,000,000, and have mmrm+rrmr peak is less than about 5%.

  2. Low temperature catalyst system for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.

    1984-04-20

    This patent discloses a catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (150/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The catalyst components are used in slurry form and comprise (1) a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-ROH-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms and (2) a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. For the first component, Nic is preferred (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). For the second component, Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is preferred. The mixture is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  3. Styrene synthesis over iron oxide catalysts: from single crystal model system to real catalysts.

    PubMed

    Schüle, Achim; Nieken, Ulrich; Shekhah, Osama; Ranke, Wolfgang; Schlögl, Robert; Kolios, Grigorios

    2007-07-21

    Surface science methods originating from analysis of noble metal catalysts are increasingly applied to metal oxides. These methods provide direct access to fundamental structural properties and phase equilibria governing the catalytic properties of metal oxide surfaces. However, no systematic way existed so far for transferring this knowledge to technical catalysts. The aim of this paper is to combine surface science with chemical engineering methods to bridge this gap. Styrene synthesis over pure and K-doped iron oxides is used as an example to develop and to explain the methodology. Single crystal films (SCF), grown epitaxially on a Pt-carrier are considered as ideal model surfaces. Comprehensive UHV analyses yield the structural properties of SCF as well as their interaction with relevant components of the reaction mixture. Their results are combined with conversion experiments to derive a mechanistic catalyst model along with quantitative information on the reaction rates. The activity of SCF as well as their phase transitions under reactive conditions can be described with a continuum model depending on the macroscopic properties of the system. This model forms the crucial link towards technical catalysts. It is shown that the behaviour of a powder catalyst can be described as a superposition of the above kinetic model and an appropriate porous model. In this paper we review the developed methodology and conclude with the evaluation of the concept.

  4. Oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  5. Catalysts for portable, solid state hydrogen genration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabl, Jason Robert

    Hydrogen and air powered proton exchange membrane fuel cells are a potential alternative to batteries. In portable power systems, the design requirements often focus on cost efficiency, energy density, storability, as well as safety. Ammonia borane (AB), a chemical hydride containing 19.6 wt. % hydrogen, has a high hydrogen capacity and is a stable and non-toxic candidate for storing hydrogen in portable systems. Throughout this work, Department of Energy guidelines for low power portable hydrogen power systems were used as a baseline and comparison with commercially available systems. In order to make this comparison, the system parameters of a system using AB hydrolysis were estimated by developing capacity and cost correlations from the commercial systems and applying them to this work. Supporting experiments were designed to evaluate a system that would use a premixed solid storage bed of AB and a catalyst. This configuration would only require a user input of water in order to initiate the hydrogen production. Using ammonia borane hydrolysis, the hydrogen yield is ˜9 wt. %, when all reactants are considered. In addition to the simplicity of initiating the reaction, hydrolysis of AB has the advantage of suppressing the production of some toxic borazines that are present when AB is thermally decomposed. However, ammonia gas will be formed and this problem must be addressed, as ammonia is damaging to PEM fuel cells. The catalyst focused on throughout this work was Amberlyst - 15; an ion exchange resin with an acid capacity of 4.7 eq/kg and ammonia adsorbent. At less than 0.30/g, this is a cost effective alternative to precious metal catalysts. The testing with this catalyst was compared to a traditional catalyst in literature, 20% platinum in carbon, costing more than 40/g. The Amberlyst catalyst was found to reduce the formation of ammonia in the gas products from ˜3.71 wt. % with the Pt/C catalyst to <0.01 wt. %. Since Amberlyst adsorbs ammonia, it acts as a

  6. Methods of producing epoxides from alkenes using a two-component catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Mayfair C.; Kung, Harold H.; Jiang, Jian

    2013-07-09

    Methods for the epoxidation of alkenes are provided. The methods include the steps of exposing the alkene to a two-component catalyst system in an aqueous solution in the presence of carbon monoxide and molecular oxygen under conditions in which the alkene is epoxidized. The two-component catalyst system comprises a first catalyst that generates peroxides or peroxy intermediates during oxidation of CO with molecular oxygen and a second catalyst that catalyzes the epoxidation of the alkene using the peroxides or peroxy intermediates. A catalyst system composed of particles of suspended gold and titanium silicalite is one example of a suitable two-component catalyst system.

  7. Self-Supported Cu-Based Nanowire Arrays as Noble-Metal-Free Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chun-Chao; Fu, Wen-Fu; Chen, Yong

    2016-08-23

    Crystalline Cu-based nanowire arrays (NWAs) including Cu(OH)2 , CuO, Cu2 O, and CuOx are facilely grown on Cu foil and are found to act as highly efficient, low-cost, and robust electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Impressively, this noble-metal-free 3 D Cu(OH)2 -NWAs/Cu foil electrode shows the highest catalytic activity with a Tafel slope of 86 mV dec(-1) , an overpotential (η) of about 530 mV at ∼10 mA cm(-2) (controlled-potential electrolysis method without iR correction) and almost 100 % Faradic efficiency, paralleling the performance of the state-of-the-art RuO2 OER catalyst in 0.1 m NaOH solution (pH 12.8). To the best of our knowledge, this work represents one of the best results ever reported on Cu-based OER systems. PMID:27440473

  8. Sol-gel based oxidation catalyst and coating system using same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Anthony N. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An oxidation catalyst system is formed by particles of an oxidation catalyst dispersed in a porous sol-gel binder. The oxidation catalyst system can be applied by brush or spray painting while the sol-gel binder is in its sol state.

  9. Reducing fischer-tropsch catalyst attrition losses in high agitation reaction systems

    DOEpatents

    Singleton, Alan H.; Oukaci, Rachid; Goodwin, James G.

    2001-01-01

    A method for reducing catalyst attrition losses in hydrocarbon synthesis processes conducted in high agitation reaction systems; a method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst; a catalyst produced by such method; a method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst support; and a catalyst support produced by such method. The inventive method of reducing catalyst attrition losses comprises the step of reacting a synthesis gas in a high agitation reaction system in the presence of a catalyst. In one aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support including an amount of titanium effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support which has been treated, after calcination, with an acidic, aqueous solution. The acidic aqueous solution preferably has a pH of not more than about 5. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises cobalt on a .gamma.-alumina support wherein the cobalt has been applied to the .gamma.-alumina support by totally aqueous, incipient wetness-type impregnation. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises cobalt on a .gamma.-alumina support with an amount of a lanthana promoter effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support produced from boehmite having a crystallite size, in the 021 plane, in the range of from about 30 to about 55 .ANG.ngstrons. In another aspect, the inventive method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst comprises the step of treating a .gamma.-alumina support, after calcination of and before adding catalytic material to the support, with an acidic solution effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the inventive method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst support comprises the step of treating calcined .gamma.-alumina with an acidic, aqueous

  10. CATALYST ACTIVITY MAINTENANCE FOR THE LIQUID PHASE SYNTHESIS GAS-TO-DIMETHYL ETHER PROCESS PART II: DEVELOPMENT OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE AS THE DEHYDRATION CATALYST FOR THE SINGLE-STEP LIQUID PHASE SYNGAS-TO-DME PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang-Dong Peng

    2002-05-01

    At the heart of the single-step liquid phase syngas-to-DME process (LPDME{trademark}) is a catalyst system that can be active as well as stable. In the Alternative Fuels I program, a dual-catalyst system containing a Cu-based commercial methanol synthesis catalyst (BASF S3-86) and a commercial dehydration material ({gamma}-alumina) was demonstrated. It provided the productivity and selectivity expected from the LPDME process. However, the catalyst system deactivated too rapidly to warrant a viable commercial process [1]. The mechanistic investigation in the early part of the DOE's Alternative Fuels II program revealed that the accelerated catalyst deactivation under LPDME conditions is due to detrimental interaction between the methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst [2,3]. The interaction was attributed to migration of Cu- and/or Zn-containing species from the synthesis catalyst to the dehydration catalyst. Identification of a dehydration catalyst that did not lead to this detrimental interaction while retaining adequate dehydration activity was elusive. Twenty-nine different dehydration materials were tested, but none showed the desired performance [2]. The search came to a turning point when aluminum phosphate was tested. This amorphous material is prepared by precipitating a solution containing Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with NH{sub 4}OH, followed by washing, drying and calcination. The aluminum phosphate catalyst has adequate dehydration activity and good stability. It can co-exist with the Cu-based methanol synthesis catalyst without negatively affecting the latter catalyst's stability. This report documents the details of the development of this catalyst. These include initial leads, efforts in improving activity and stability, investigation and development of the best preparation parameters and procedures, mechanistic understanding and resulting preparation guidelines, and the accomplishments of this work.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION, TEST REPORT OF MOBILE SOURCE EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVICES/CLEAN DIESEL TECHNOLOGIES FUEL BORNE CATALYST WITH CLEANAIR SYSTEM'S DIESEL OXIDATION CATALYST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Fuel-Borne Catalyst with CleanAir System's Diesel Oxidation Catalyst manufactured by Clean Diesel Technologies, Inc. The technology is a fuel-borne catalyst used in ultra low sulfur d...

  12. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  13. Novel catalysts and photoelectrochemical system for solar fuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan

    Solar fuel production from abundant raw chemicals such as CO2 and water is highly desired as a clean renewable energy solution for the future. Developing photoelectrochemical cells is viewed as a promising approach to realize this energy conversion and storage process. Efficient and robust oxygen evolution catalyst made from non-precious materials remains a major challenge for such a system. This thesis basically consists of three parts of work, including studies on enhancing the photocatalytic oxygen evolution activity of cobalt-based spinel nanoparticles by manganese3+ substitution, in situ formation of cobalt oxide nanocubanes as highly active catalyst for photocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction, and development of a photoanode-driven photoelectrochemical cell for CO2 reduction with water. The first part of this thesis work devotes efforts in the development and study on cobalt and other transition metal oxide based oxygen evolution catalyst. Photocatalytic oxygen evolution is a critical step for solar fuel production from abundant sources. It poses a significant challenge because it requires an efficient catalyst to bridge the one-electron photon capture process with the four-electron oxygen reaction. Among all the metal oxides, Co3O4 spinel exhibits a high activity as an oxygen evolution catalyst. The results of this work demonstrate that the photocatalytic oxygen evolution activity of Co3O4 spinel can be further enhanced by substituting Co with Mn in the spinel structure. Using a facile hydrothermal approach, Co3O4 spinel nanoparticles as well as Mn-substituted and Ni-substituted Co3O4 spinel nanoparticles with a typical particle size of 5-7 nm were successfully synthesized. The morphology and crystal structures of the as-synthesized nanoparticle catalysts have been carefully examined using various structural characterization techniques, including powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), gas adsorption, and x-ray absorption

  14. Ruthenium on rutile catalyst, catalytic system, and method for aqueous phase hydrogenations

    DOEpatents

    Elliot, Douglas C.; Werpy, Todd A.; Wang, Yong; Frye, Jr., John G.

    2001-01-01

    An essentially nickel- and rhenium-free catalyst is described comprising ruthenium on a titania support where the titania is greater than 75% rutile. A catalytic system containing a nickel-free catalyst comprising ruthenium on a titania support where the titania is greater than 75% rutile, and a method using this catalyst in the hydrogenation of an organic compound in the aqueous phase is also described.

  15. Non-precious bimetallic catalysts for selective dehydrogenation of an organic chemical hydride system.

    PubMed

    Al-ShaikhAli, Anaam H; Jedidi, Abdesslem; Cavallo, Luigi; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-21

    Methylcyclohexane (MCH)-toluene (TOL) chemical hydride cycles as hydrogen carrier systems are successful with the selective dehydrogenation of MCH to TOL, which has been achieved only using precious Pt-based catalysts. Herein, we report improved selectivity using non-precious metal nickel-based bimetallic catalysts, where the second metal occupies the unselective step sites.

  16. Development of micro-cogeneration system with porous catalyst microcombustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S.; Tanaka, M.; Ieda, N.; Ihara, T.

    2015-10-01

    A self-standing micro-cogeneration system was developed by coupling a microcombustor, thermoelectric (TE) modules, and an air supply device. The microcombustor has a porous monolithic Pt catalyst layer, and a combustion efficiency of 90% was achieved. A microblower is used to supply air to the combustor, and it is driven by electricity from the Bi-Te TE modules through a dc-dc converter. We investigated the optimal point where the output became maximal and the system was self-standing. At the optimal point, the input fuel enthalpy was 13.2 W, and 440 mW of electricity was generated from the TE modules. The microblower consumed 280 mW, and the net generated electricity was 160 mW. Therefore, the final thermal efficiency was 1.21%. The net thermal efficiency of the developed system was the same magnitude as that of TeeDee01 (COX Co. Ltd.), the world’s smallest model plane engine (0.163 cc), even though the magnitude of the output power was less than 1/20 in comparison.

  17. Catalysts, systems and methods to reduce NOX in an exhaust gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Castellano, Christopher R.; Moini, Ahmad; Koermer, Gerald S.; Furbeck, Howard

    2010-07-20

    Catalysts, systems and methods are described to reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. In one embodiment, an emissions treatment system for an exhaust stream is provided having an SCR catalyst comprising silver tungstate on an alumina support. The emissions treatment system may be used for the treatment of exhaust streams from diesel engines and lean burn gasoline engines. An emissions treatment system may further comprise an injection device operative to dispense a hydrocarbon reducing agent upstream of the catalyst.

  18. Development of Micro Cogeneration System with a Porous Catalyst Microcombustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S.; Tanaka, M.; Ieda, N.; Ihara, T.

    2014-11-01

    The self-standing micro cogeneration system by coupling a microcombustor, thermoelectric modules and an air supply device was developed. The microcombustor has a porous monolithic Pt catalyst layer and the combustion efficiency of 90% was attained. A micro-blower was used to supply air to the combustor, and it was driven by a part of the electricity from the Bi-Te TE modules through a DC-DC converter. We investigated the optimal point where the output became maximal and the system stood by itself. At the optimal point, the input fuel enthalpy was 13.2W and the electricity of 403mW was generated from the TE modules. The micro blower used 280mW and the net electricity was 123mW. Therefore the final thermal efficiency was 0.93%. The efficiency was the same magnitude of the world smallest model plane engine TeeDee01 (COX Co. Ltd.) although the thermal input was less than its 1/20.

  19. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-07-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period April 1, 2003 through June 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the seventh full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit, conducting catalyst activity measurements, installing sonic horns for on-line catalyst cleaning, and installing the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek site. CPS began installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter. Laboratory efforts were conducted to support catalyst selection for that second pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  20. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-10-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the eighth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit at the GRE Coal Creek site with all four catalysts in service and sonic horns installed for on-line catalyst cleaning. During the quarter, a catalyst activity measurement trip and mercury SCEM relative accuracy tests were completed, and catalyst pressure drop was closely monitored with the sonic horns in operation. CPS completed the installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter, and the four

  1. Copper/TEMPO-Catalyzed Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation: Mechanistic Assessment of Different Catalyst Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Jessica M.; Ryland, Bradford L.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2013-01-01

    Combinations of homogeneous Cu salts and TEMPO have emerged as practical and efficient catalysts for the aerobic oxidation of alcohols. Several closely related catalyst systems have been reported, which differ in the identity of the solvent, the presence of 2,2′-bipyridine as a ligand, the identity of basic additives, and the oxidation state of the Cu source. These changes have a significant influence on the reaction rates, yields, and substrate scope. In this report, we probe the mechanistic basis for differences among four different Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems and elucidate the features that contribute to efficient oxidation of aliphatic alcohols. PMID:24558634

  2. Copper/TEMPO-Catalyzed Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation: Mechanistic Assessment of Different Catalyst Systems.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jessica M; Ryland, Bradford L; Stahl, Shannon S

    2013-11-01

    Combinations of homogeneous Cu salts and TEMPO have emerged as practical and efficient catalysts for the aerobic oxidation of alcohols. Several closely related catalyst systems have been reported, which differ in the identity of the solvent, the presence of 2,2'-bipyridine as a ligand, the identity of basic additives, and the oxidation state of the Cu source. These changes have a significant influence on the reaction rates, yields, and substrate scope. In this report, we probe the mechanistic basis for differences among four different Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems and elucidate the features that contribute to efficient oxidation of aliphatic alcohols. PMID:24558634

  3. Integrated biodiesel production: a comparison of different homogeneous catalysts systems.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Gemma; Martínez, Mercedes; Aracil, José

    2004-05-01

    The most common catalysts for biodiesel production are homogeneous basic catalysts. In the present paper, a comparison is made of different basic catalysts (sodium methoxide, potassium methoxide, sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide) for methanolysis of sunflower oil. All the reactions were carried out under the same experimental conditions in a batch stirred reactor and the subsequent separation and purification stages in a decanter. The analytical methods included gas chromatography and the determination of fat and oil conventional parameters. The biodiesel purity was near 100 wt.% for all catalysts. However, near 100 wt.% biodiesel yields were only obtained with the methoxide catalysts. According to the material balance of the process, yield losses were due to triglyceride saponification and methyl ester dissolution in glycerol. Obtained biodiesel met the measured specifications, except for the iodine value, according to the German and EU draft standards. Although all the transesterification reactions were quite rapid and the biodiesel layers achieved nearly 100% methyl ester concentrations, the reactions using sodium hydroxide turned out the fastest.

  4. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-05-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time period January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the sixth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the pilot unit with three catalysts, conducting catalyst activity measurements, and procuring the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek pilot unit site. Laboratory efforts were also conducted to support catalyst selection for the second pilot unit site, at CPS' Spruce Plant. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  5. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Rhudy

    2006-06-30

    This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98

  6. Removal of ammonia from urine vapor by a dual-catalyst system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of removing ammonia from urine vapor by a low-temperature dual-catalyst system has been demonstrated. The process is based on the catalytic oxidation of ammonia to a mixture of nitrogen, nitrous oxide, and water, followed by a catalytic decomposition of the nitrous oxide into its elements. Potential ammonia oxidation and nitrous oxide decomposition catalysts were first screened with artificial gas mixtures, then tested with the actual urine vapor produced by boiling untreated urine. A suitable dual-catalyst bed arrangement was found that achieved the removal of ammonia and also organic carbon, and recovered water of good quality from urine vapor.

  7. System and method for determining an ammonia generation rate in a three-way catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Min; Perry, Kevin L; Kim, Chang H

    2014-12-30

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes a rate determination module, a storage level determination module, and an air/fuel ratio control module. The rate determination module determines an ammonia generation rate in a three-way catalyst based on a reaction efficiency and a reactant level. The storage level determination module determines an ammonia storage level in a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst positioned downstream from the three-way catalyst based on the ammonia generation rate. The air/fuel ratio control module controls an air/fuel ratio of an engine based on the ammonia storage level.

  8. Exhaust system having a gold-platinum group metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ragle, Christie Susan; Silver, Ronald G.; Zemskova, Svetlana Mikhailovna; Eckstein, Colleen J.

    2012-08-07

    A method of providing an exhaust treatment device is disclosed. The method includes applying a catalyst including gold and a platinum group metal to a particulate filter. The concentration of the gold and the platinum group metal is sufficient to enable oxidation of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide.

  9. Exhaust system having a gold-platinum group metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ragle, Christie Susan; Silver, Ronald G.; Zemskova, Svetlana Mikhailovna; Eckstein, Colleen J.

    2011-12-06

    A method of providing an exhaust treatment device is disclosed. The method includes applying a catalyst including gold and a platinum group metal to a particulate filter. The concentration of the gold and the platinum group metal is sufficient to enable oxidation of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide.

  10. Alcohol electrooxidation catalysts from degraded polyanionic chelating ligand complexes. The uncertainty for catalyst identification that accompanies a decomposing catalytic system

    SciTech Connect

    Anson, F.C.; Collins, T.J.; Gipson, S.L.; Krafft, T.E.

    1987-03-11

    Electrooxidation of trans-Os(eta/sup 4/-CHBA-Et)(py)/sub 2/, H/sub 4/CHBA-Et = 1,2-bis(3,5-dichloro-2-hydroxybenzamido)ethane, in the presence of alcohols led to the discovery of several catalytic systems for the electrooxidation of alcohols. The catalytic systems are formed via the oxidative and hydrolytic degradation of the ethylene unit of the polyanionic chelating (PAC) ligand (eta/sup 4/-CHBA-Et)/sup 4 -/ in a sequence that involves 15 observable species. The principal species in the catalytically active solutions have been identified. The uncertainty for catalyst identification that is inherent with decomposing catalyst systems is discussed. At high alcohol concentrations, primary alcohols are oxidized to aldehydes. Pure aldehydes are not oxidized. However, it has not been possible to study the catalytic oxidations at high concentrations of both primary alcohols and aldehydes. Cyclohexanol is oxidized to cyclohexanone. All the species in the degradation sequence are closely related. It is suggested that the principal species in the catalytic solutions might be able to carry out rapid inner-sphere oxidations of alcohols because of a higher affinity for alcohols than the noncatalysts in the degradation sequence. 12 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Metal/ceria water-gas shift catalysts for automotive polymer electrolyte fuel cell system.

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. J.; Krebs, J. F.; Carter, J. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    2002-01-11

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems are a leading candidate for replacing the internal combustion engine in light duty vehicles. One method of generating the hydrogen necessary for the PEFC is reforming a liquid fuel, such as methanol or gasoline, via partial oxidation, steam reforming, or autothermal reforming (a combination of partial oxidation and steam reforming). The H{sub 2}-rich reformate can contain as much as 10% carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide has been shown to poison the platinum-based anode catalyst at concentrations as low as 10 ppm,1 necessitating removal of CO to this level before passing the reformate to the fuel cell stack. The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, CO + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}, is used to convert the bulk of the reformate CO to CO{sub 2}. Industrially, the WGS reaction is conducted over two catalysts, which operate in different temperature regimes. One catalyst is a FeCr mixed oxide, which operates at 350-450 C and is termed the high-temperature shift (HTS) catalyst. The second catalyst is a CuZn mixed oxide, which operates at 200-250 C and is termed the low-temperature shift (LTS) catalyst. Although these two catalysts are used industrially in the production of H{sub 2} for ammonia synthesis, they have major drawbacks that make them unsuitable for transportation applications. Both the LTS and the HTS catalysts must first be ''activated'' before being used. For example, the copper in the copper oxide/zinc oxide LTS catalyst must first be reduced to elemental copper in situ before it becomes active for the WGS reaction. This reduction reaction is exothermic and must be carried out under well- controlled conditions using a dilute hydrogen stream (1 vol% H{sub 2}) to prevent high catalyst temperatures, which can result in sintering (agglomeration) of the copper particles and loss of active surface area for the WGS reaction. Also, once the catalyst has been activated by reduction, it must be protected

  12. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-01-21

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  13. Evaluation of Bosch-Based Systems Using Non-Traditional Catalysts at Reduced Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Mansell, J. Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen and water resupply make open loop atmosphere revitalization (AR) systems unfavorable for long-term missions beyond low Earth orbit. Crucial to closing the AR loop are carbon dioxide reduction systems with low mass and volume, minimal power requirements, and minimal consumables. For this purpose, NASA is exploring using Bosch-based systems. The Bosch process is favorable over state-of-the-art Sabatier-based processes due to complete loop closure. However, traditional operation of the Bosch required high reaction temperatures, high recycle rates, and significant consumables in the form of catalyst resupply due to carbon fouling. A number of configurations have been proposed for next-generation Bosch systems. First, alternative catalysts (catalysts other than steel wool) can be used in a traditional single-stage Bosch reactor to improve reaction kinetics and increase carbon packing density. Second, the Bosch reactor may be split into separate stages wherein the first reactor stage is dedicated to carbon monoxide and water formation via the reverse water-gas shift reaction and the second reactor stage is dedicated to carbon formation. A series system will enable maximum efficiency of both steps of the Bosch reaction, resulting in optimized operation and maximum carbon formation rate. This paper details the results of testing of both single-stage and two-stage Bosch systems with alternative catalysts at reduced temperatures. These results are compared to a traditional Bosch system operated with a steel wool catalyst.

  14. Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

    2010-06-30

    This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during

  15. Environmentally-benign catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) from diesel engines: structure-activity relationship and reaction mechanism aspects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fudong; Yu, Yunbo; He, Hong

    2014-08-11

    Selective catalytic reduction of NOx using NH3 or hydrocarbons (NH3-SCR or HC-SCR) in oxygen-rich exhaust from diesel engines remains a major challenge in environmental catalysis. The development of highly efficient, stable and environmentally-benign catalysts for SCR processes is very important for practical use. In this feature article, the structure-activity relationship of vanadium-free catalysts in the NH3-SCR reaction is discussed in detail, including Fe-, Ce-based oxide catalysts and Fe-, Cu-based zeolite catalysts, which is beneficial for catalyst redesign and activity improvement. Based on our research, a comprehensive mechanism contributing to the performance of Ag/Al2O3 in HC-SCR is provided, giving a clue to the design of a catalytic system with high efficiency.

  16. Transmembrane Photoredox in Model Protocellular Systems. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as Plausible Light-harvesting/Electron Transfer Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cape, J. L.; Monnard, P.-A.; Ziock, H.-J.; Boncella, J. M.

    2010-04-01

    Mechanistic studies of transmembrane photoredox in a model protocell system indicate a plausible role for membrane solublized PAH species as primitive ‘photosynthetic' energy transduction catalysts.

  17. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-10-04

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The coprecipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fourth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to completing, installing and starting up the pilot unit, completing laboratory runs to size catalysts, and procuring catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  18. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-31

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and

  19. Characteristics of ethylene oligomerization on a gel-immobilized catalyst system

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, V.G.; Vasil'chenko, S.V.

    1989-02-01

    The characteristics of the oligomerization of ethylene in the presence of a gel-immobilized catalyst system (GCS) based on dicyclopentadienyltitanium dichloride and an alkylaluminum chloride was investigated. 1,2-Polybutadiene was used as support. The reaction rate on the GCS is constant for a long period of time, in contrast to homogeneous catalyst systems. The activity of the GCS is retained when unpurified ethylene is used. The MWD of normal olefins when the GCS is used differs from Schulz-Flory distribution by an increase of the share of the middle fraction. The process takes place in the internal diffusion region.

  20. Catalyst system and process for benzyl ether fragmentation and coal liquefaction

    DOEpatents

    Zoeller, Joseph Robert

    1998-04-28

    Dibenzyl ether can be readily cleaved to form primarily benzaldehyde and toluene as products, along with minor amounts of bibenzyl and benzyl benzoate, in the presence of a catalyst system comprising a Group 6 metal, preferably molybdenum, a salt, and an organic halide. Although useful synthetically for the cleavage of benzyl ethers, this cleavage also represents a key model reaction for the liquefaction of coal; thus this catalyst system and process should be useful in coal liquefaction with the advantage of operating at significantly lower temperatures and pressures.

  1. Highly practical copper(I)/TEMPO catalyst system for chemoselective aerobic oxidation of primary alcohols.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jessica M; Stahl, Shannon S

    2011-10-26

    Aerobic oxidation reactions have been the focus of considerable attention, but their use in mainstream organic chemistry has been constrained by limitations in their synthetic scope and by practical factors, such as the use of pure O(2) as the oxidant or complex catalyst synthesis. Here, we report a new (bpy)Cu(I)/TEMPO catalyst system that enables efficient and selective aerobic oxidation of a broad range of primary alcohols, including allylic, benzylic, and aliphatic derivatives, to the corresponding aldehydes using readily available reagents, at room temperature with ambient air as the oxidant. The catalyst system is compatible with a wide range of functional groups and the high selectivity for 1° alcohols enables selective oxidation of diols that lack protecting groups. PMID:21861488

  2. Effect of plasma-catalyst system on NO removal using M–Cu (M = Mn, Ce, Cr, Co, and Fe) catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Han-Zi; Yang, Bin; Sun, Bao-Min; Xiao, Hai-Ping; Zhang, Yong-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    A series of M–Cu (M = Mn, Ce, Cr, Co, and Fe) bimetal oxide catalysts combined with plasma were prepared for NO x removal at various temperatures. All catalysts combined with plasma exhibited excellent deNO x activity. The Mn–Cu catalyst showed the highest selective catalytic reduction (SCR) activity; the NO removal efficiency of the Mn–Cu catalyst could reach 90% at a gas temperature of 25 °C. E/N increased as gas temperature increased; the mean electron energy and the proportion of high-energy electrons also increased considerably, producing more active radicals. Without any catalyst, the increase in temperature inhibited NO removal owing to O3 consumption. As the temperature increased, NO removal efficiency decreased below 100 °C however, it increased in the range of 100–300 °C, and then decreased above 300 °C in the plasma-catalyst system. NO2 concentration decreased markedly at 150 °C via the fast SCR reaction.

  3. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-07-17

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the third full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to constructing the pilot unit and conducting laboratory runs to help size catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts.

  4. PremAir{trademark} catalyst systems: A new approach to clean air

    SciTech Connect

    Poles, T.; Anderson, D.R.; Durilla, M.; Heck, R.; Hoke, J.; Ober, R.; Rudy, W.

    1996-12-01

    PremAir{trademark} catalyst systems represents a new approach to air pollution control--one that focuses on destroying pollutants already in the air. PremAir is the trademark for a family of developmental catalysts capable of reducing ozone, carbon monoxide and potentially other pollutants in ambient air that comes into contact with catalyst-coated surfaces. The more air that comes into contact with the surface the more pollutants that can be destroyed. For this reason, Engelhard has focused its attention on heat-exchange equipment such as automotive radiators and air-conditioner condensers. It is because of advances in catalysis achieved at Engelhard that PremAir catalysts are active at the low temperatures found in these environments. In Los Angeles, which has the country`s worst smog problem, approximately one trillion cubic feet per day of air pass through car radiators and five trillion cubic feet per day pass through air conditioners. Most of the research, development and testing work performed to date has been on ozone catalysts and their application to car radiators. This paper discusses that work and the potential benefits associated with the PremAir technology. In addition, preliminary work on stationary applications of this new technology is discussed.

  5. Hydrodeoxygenation in low-rank coal liquefaction systems using novel organometallic catalyst precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, S.R.; Song, C.; Schobert, H.H.

    1996-12-31

    Oxygen functionalities, especially phenols, are undesirable components of coal derived liquids. Removal of these compounds from the products of coal liquefaction is required. A beneficial alternative would be the removal of these functionalities, or the prevention of their formation, during the liquefaction process. Organometallic precursors of Co, Ni and Mo have been studied as catalysts. To ascertain the hydrodeoxygenation properties of these catalysts under liquefaction conditions, model compounds were investigated. Anthrone, Dibutylmethyl phenol, dinaphthyl ether and xanthene were studied to provide a comparison of conversions of deoxygenated products. Studies of the deoxygenating abilities of these catalyst precursors in coal liquefaction systems have also been performed. Improvements in conversion and product quality are observed. Both these factors are dependent on the coal used.

  6. NO.sub.x catalyst and method of suppressing sulfate formation in an exhaust purification system

    DOEpatents

    Balmer-Millar, Mari Lou; Park, Paul W.; Panov, Alexander G.

    2007-06-26

    The activity and durability of a zeolite lean-burn NOx catalyst can be increased by loading metal cations on the outer surface of the zeolite. However, the metal loadings can also oxidize sulfur dioxide to cause sulfate formation in the exhaust. The present invention is a method of suppressing sulfate formation in an exhaust purification system including a NO.sub.x catalyst. The NO.sub.x catalyst includes a zeolite loaded with at least one metal. The metal is selected from among an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal, a lanthanide metal, a noble metal, and a transition metal. In order to suppress sulfate formation, at least a portion of the loaded metal is complexed with at least one of sulfate, phosphate, and carbonate.

  7. NO.sub.x catalyst and method of suppressing sulfate formation in an exhaust purification system

    DOEpatents

    Balmer-Millar, Mari Lou; Park, Paul W.; Panov, Alexander G.

    2006-08-22

    The activity and durability of a zeolite lean-bum NOx catalyst can be increased by loading metal cations on the outer surface of the zeolite. However, the metal loadings can also oxidize sulfur dioxide to cause sulfate formation in the exhaust. The present invention is a method of suppressing sulfate formation in an exhaust purification system including a NO.sub.x catalyst. The NO.sub.x catalyst includes a zeolite loaded with at least one metal. The metal is selected from among an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal, a lanthanide metal, a noble metal, and a transition metal. In order to suppress sulfate formation, at least a portion of the loaded metal is complexed with at least one of sulfate, phosphate, and carbonate.

  8. "Catalyst Data": Perverse Systemic Effects of Audit and Accountability in Australian Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingard, Bob; Sellar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the perverse effects of the new accountability regime central to the Labor government's national reform agenda in schooling. The focus is on National Assessment Program -- Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) results that now act as "catalyst data" and are pivotal to school and system accountability. We offer a case…

  9. The synergistic effect in the Fe-Co bimetallic catalyst system for the growth of carbon nanotube forests

    SciTech Connect

    Hardeman, D.; Esconjauregui, S. Cartwright, R.; D'Arsié, L.; Robertson, J.; Bhardwaj, S.; Cepek, C.; Oakes, D.; Clark, J.; Ducati, C.

    2015-01-28

    We report the growth of multi-walled carbon nanotube forests employing an active-active bimetallic Fe-Co catalyst. Using this catalyst system, we observe a synergistic effect by which—in comparison to pure Fe or Co—the height of the forests increases significantly. The homogeneity in the as-grown nanotubes is also improved. By both energy dispersive spectroscopy and in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that the catalyst particles consist of Fe and Co, and this dramatically increases the growth rate of the tubes. Bimetallic catalysts are thus potentially useful for synthesising nanotube forests more efficiently.

  10. Heteroepitaxial praseodymium sesquioxide films on Si(1 1 1): A new model catalyst system for praseodymium oxide based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, A.; Schroeder, T.; Lupina, G.; Borchert, Y.; Dabrowski, J.; Wenger, Ch.; Bäumer, M.

    2007-03-01

    The structure, growth and stoichiometry of heteroepitaxial Pr 2O 3 films on Si(1 1 1) were characterized by a combined RHEED, XRD, XPS and UPS study in view of future applications as a surface science model catalyst system. RHEED and XRD confirm the growth of a (0 0 0 1) oriented hexagonal Pr 2O 3 phase on Si(1 1 1), matching the surface symmetry by aligning the <1 0 1¯ 0> oxide in-plane direction along the <0 1 1¯> Si azimuth. After an initial nucleation stage RHEED growth oscillation studies point to a Frank-van der Merwe growth mode up to a thickness of approximately 12 nm. XPS and UPS prove that the initial growth of the Pr 2O 3 layer on Si up to ˜1 nm thickness is characterized by an interface reaction with Si. Nevertheless stoichiometric Pr 2O 3 films of high crystalline quality form on top of these Pr-silicate containing interlayers.

  11. Method of preparing and utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream

    DOEpatents

    Berry, David A; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Smith, Mark; Haynes, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    The disclosure relates to a method of utilizing a catalyst system for an oxidation process on a gaseous hydrocarbon stream with a mitigation of carbon accumulation. The system is comprised of a catalytically active phase deposited onto an oxygen conducting phase, with or without supplemental support. The catalytically active phase has a specified crystal structure where at least one catalytically active metal is a cation within the crystal structure and coordinated with oxygen atoms within the crystal structure. The catalyst system employs an optimum coverage ratio for a given set of oxidation conditions, based on a specified hydrocarbon conversion and a carbon deposition limit. Specific embodiments of the catalyst system are disclosed.

  12. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-04-26

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period January 1, 2002 through March 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the second full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to pilot unit design and conducting laboratory runs to help select candidate catalysts. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts. A Test Plan for the upcoming pilot-scale evaluations was also prepared and submitted to NETL for review and comment. Since this document was already submitted under separate cover, this

  13. Nanoscale Control of Polymer Assembly on a Synthetic Catalyst-Bilayer System.

    PubMed

    Gorgoll, Ricardo M; Harano, Koji; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2016-08-01

    The use of the interior of self-assembled membrane as a template for polymer synthesis and assembly has long attracted the interest of chemists. However, it is difficult to utilize a lipid membrane as a chemical reactor for controlled assembly for polymers because lipid membrane is easily destabilized by loading of extraneous molecules. We found that a several-nanometer-thick bilayer vesicle made by self-assembly of an organic fullerene amphiphile doped with a metathesis catalyst serves as a nanosized chemical reactor in water, where a polymer is synthesized and assembled, depending on the affinity of the growing polymer to the organic groups on the amphiphile. This catalyst-bilayer system can thus control supramolecular assembly of the ester-functionalized polymer product into different nanoscale structures: a nanoparticle made of a single polymer chain and a nanocapsule made of several tens of polymer chains. PMID:27404736

  14. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-02-22

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the first full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to project initiation and planning. There is no significant technical progress to report for the current period.

  15. Synthesis of dimethyl ether and alternative fuels in the liquid phase from coal-derived synthesis gas. Task 2.2: Definition of preferred catalyst system; Task 2.3: Process variable scans on the preferred catalyst system; Task 2.4: Life-test on the preferred catalyst system

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, B.L.

    1992-09-01

    As part of the DOE-sponsored contract for the Synthesis of Dimethyl Ether (DME) and Alternative Fuels in the Liquid Phase from Coal- Derived Syngas, the single-step, slurry phase DME synthesis process was developed. The development involved screening of catalyst systems, process variable studies, and catalyst life studies in two 300 ml stirred autoclaves. As a spin-off of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH*) process, the new process significantly improves the syngas conversion efficiency of the LPMEOH process. This improvement can be achieved by replacing a portion of methanol catalyst with a dehydration catalyst in the reactor, resulting in the product methanol being converted to DME, thus avoiding the thermodynamic equilibrium constraint of the methanol reaction. Overall, this increases syngas conversion per-pass. The selectivity and productivity of DME and methanol are affected by the catalyst system employed as well as operating conditions. A preferred catalyst system, consisting of a physical mixture of a methanol catalyst and a gamma alumina, was identified. An improvement of about 50% in methanol equivalent productivity was achieved compared to the LPMEOH process. Results from the process variable study indicate that higher pressure and CO{sub 2} removal benefit the process significantly. Limited life studies performed on the preferred catalyst system suggest somewhat higher than expected deactivation rate for the methanol catalyst. Several DME/methanol mixtures were measured for their key properties as transportation fuels. With small amounts of DME added, significant improvements in both flash points and Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) were observed over the corresponding values of methanol alone.

  16. Nanofaceted platinum surfaces: a new model system for nanoparticle catalysts.

    PubMed

    Komanicky, Vladimir; Menzel, Andreas; Chang, Kee-Chul; You, Hoydoo

    2005-12-15

    We present a novel model system for nanoparticle electrocatalysts. A surface consisting of alternating (100) and (111) facets, several nanometers across and nearly 1 microm long, were self-assembled by annealing Pt single crystal surfaces initially cut at the midpoint between [111] and [100] directions, i.e., Pt(1+ square root of 3 1 1). The formation of these self-assembled arrays of nanofacets was monitored by in-situ surface X-ray scattering. These surfaces were further characterized with scanning probe microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. We found that the Pt(1+ square root of 3 1 1) surface is flat with less than 1 nm rms roughness when it was annealed in argon/hydrogen atmosphere. Then the surface forms nanofacets when it is annealed in pure air. This nanofaceting transition was completely reversible and reproducible. We investigated effects of CO adsorption on the voltammetric characteristics of both hydrogen-annealed and air-annealed surfaces. We found that CO-adsorption/desorption cycles in CO containing electrolyte solution result in considerable modification of blank cyclic voltammograms for the both surfaces. We attributed these differences to the electrochemical annealing of surface defects due to the increased mobility during the cycles.

  17. System and method for controlling an engine based on ammonia storage in multiple selective catalytic reduction catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sun, MIn; Perry, Kevin L.

    2015-11-20

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes a storage estimation module and an air/fuel ratio control module. The storage estimation module estimates a first amount of ammonia stored in a first selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst and estimates a second amount of ammonia stored in a second SCR catalyst. The air/fuel ratio control module controls an air/fuel ratio of an engine based on the first amount, the second amount, and a temperature of a substrate disposed in the second SCR catalyst.

  18. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed

  19. Photocatalytic water reduction with copper-based photosensitizers: a noble-metal-free system.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shu-Ping; Mejía, Esteban; Friedrich, Aleksej; Pazidis, Alexandra; Junge, Henrik; Surkus, Annette-Enrica; Jackstell, Ralf; Denurra, Stefania; Gladiali, Serafino; Lochbrunner, Stefan; Beller, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Of noble descent: a fully noble-metal-free system for the photocatalytic reduction of water at room temperature has been developed. This system consists of Cu(I) complexes as photosensitizers and [Fe(3)(CO)(12)] as the water-reduction catalyst. The novel Cu-based photosensitizers are relatively inexpensive, readily available from commercial sources, and stable to ambient conditions, thus making them an attractive alternative to the widely used noble-metal based systems. PMID:23047871

  20. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for treating NOx emissions using a palladium and rhodium or ruthenium catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-07-12

    A process for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in a gas stream (29) in the presence of H.sub.2 is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream with a catalyst system (38) comprising zirconia-silica washcoat particles (41), a pre-sulfated zirconia binder (44), and a catalyst combination (40) comprising palladium and at least one of rhodium, ruthenium, or a mixture of ruthenium and rhodium.

  1. Heteroleptic Cu-Based Sensitizers in Photoredox Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Perez, Augusto C; Collins, Shawn K

    2016-08-16

    Photochemistry is an important tool in organic synthesis that has largely been underdeveloped in comparison to thermal activation. Recent advances in technology have ushered in a new era in synthetic photochemistry. The emergence of photocatalysis, which exploits sensitizers for the absorption of visible light, has provided organic chemists with a new route to the generation of radical intermediates for synthesis. Of particular interest is the development of Cu-based complexes for photocatalysis, which possess variable photophysical properties and can display complementary reactivity with common photocatalysts based on heavier transition metals such as Ru or Ir. Heteroleptic Cu-based sensitizers incorporating the presence of both a bisphosphine and diamine ligand bound to the copper center are a promising class of photocatalysts. Their synthesis is a single step, often involving only precipitation for purification. In addition, it was shown that the sensitizers could be formed in situ in the reaction mixture, simplifying the experimental setup. The heteroleptic nature of the Cu-complexes also affords opportunities to fine-tune properties. For example, structurally rigidified bisphosphines reinforce geometries about the metal center to extend the excited state lifetime. Variation of the diamine ligand can influence the excited state oxidation/reduction potentials and optical absorbances. The heteroleptic complex Cu(XantPhos)(neo)BF4 has demonstrated utility in the synthesis of helical polyaromatic carbocycles. The synthesis of [5]helicene, a relatively simple member of the helicene family, was improved from the existing UV-light mediated method by eliminating the formation of unwanted byproducts. In addition, the Cu-based sensitizers also promoted the formation of novel pyrene/helicene hybrids for materials science applications. The synthetic methods that were developed were augmented when combined with continuous flow technology. The irradiation of reaction

  2. Nanolithographic Fabrication and Heterogeneous Reaction Studies ofTwo-Dimensional Platinum Model Catalyst Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, Anthony Marshall

    2006-05-20

    In order to better understand the fundamental components that govern catalytic activity, two-dimensional model platinum nanocatalyst arrays have been designed and fabricated. These catalysts arrays are meant to model the interplay of the metal and support important to industrial heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Photolithography and sub-lithographic techniques such as electron beam lithography, size reduction lithography and nanoimprint lithography have been employed to create these platinum nanoarrays. Both in-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques and catalytic reaction measurements were used to correlate the structural parameters of the system to catalytic activity.

  3. Manganese(II)/Picolinic Acid Catalyst System for Epoxidation of Olefins.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Ross A; Du Bois, J; Stack, T Daniel P

    2016-06-01

    An in situ generated catalyst system based on Mn(CF3SO3)2, picolinic acid, and peracetic acid converts an extensive scope of olefins to their epoxides at 0 °C in <5 min, with remarkable oxidant efficiency and no evidence of radical behavior. Competition experiments indicate an electrophilic active oxidant, proposed to be a high-valent Mn = O species. Ligand exploration suggests a general ligand sphere motif contributes to effective oxidation. The method is underscored by its simplicity and use of inexpensive reagents to quickly access high value-added products. PMID:27191036

  4. Ab initio investigation on hydrogen adsorption capability in Zn and Cu-based metal organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuwijaya, V. V.; Hidayat, N. N.; Agusta, M. K.; Dipojono, H. K.

    2015-09-01

    One of the biggest challenge in material technology for hydrogen storage application is to increase hydrogen uptake in room temperature and pressure. As a class of highly porous material, Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOF) holds great potential with its tunable structure. However, little is known about the effect of metal cluster to its hydrogen storage capability. Investigation on this matter has been carried out carefully on small cluster of Zn and Cu-based MOF using first principles method. The calculation of two distinct building units of MOFs, namely octahedral and paddle-wheel models, have been done with B3LYP density functional method using 6-31G(d,p) and LANL2DZ basis sets. From geometry optimization of Zn-based MOF linked by benzene-dicarboxylate (MOF-5), it is found that hydrogen tends to keep distance from metal cluster group and stays above benzene ring. In the other hand, hydrogen molecule prefers to stay atop of the exposed Cu atom in Cu-based MOF system linked by the same linker group (Cu-bdc). Calculated hydrogen binding enthalpies for Zn and Cu octahedral cages at ZnO3 sites are 1.64kJ/mol and 2.73kJ/mol respectively, while hydrogen binding enthalpies for Zn and Cu paddle-wheel cages calculated on top of metal atoms are found to be at 6.05kJ/mol and 6.10kJ/mol respectively. Major difference between Zn-MOF-5 and Cu-bdc hydrogen uptake performance might be caused by unsaturated metal sites present in Cu-bdc system and the influence of their geometric structures, although a small difference on binding energy in the type of transition metal used is also observed. The comparison between Zn and Cu-based MOF may contribute to a comprehensive understanding of metal clusters and the importance of selecting best transition metal for design and synthesis of metal-organic frameworks.

  5. Ab initio investigation on hydrogen adsorption capability in Zn and Cu-based metal organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Tanuwijaya, V. V.; Hidayat, N. N. Agusta, M. K. Dipojono, H. K.

    2015-09-30

    One of the biggest challenge in material technology for hydrogen storage application is to increase hydrogen uptake in room temperature and pressure. As a class of highly porous material, Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOF) holds great potential with its tunable structure. However, little is known about the effect of metal cluster to its hydrogen storage capability. Investigation on this matter has been carried out carefully on small cluster of Zn and Cu-based MOF using first principles method. The calculation of two distinct building units of MOFs, namely octahedral and paddle-wheel models, have been done with B3LYP density functional method using 6-31G(d,p) and LANL2DZ basis sets. From geometry optimization of Zn-based MOF linked by benzene-dicarboxylate (MOF-5), it is found that hydrogen tends to keep distance from metal cluster group and stays above benzene ring. In the other hand, hydrogen molecule prefers to stay atop of the exposed Cu atom in Cu-based MOF system linked by the same linker group (Cu-bdc). Calculated hydrogen binding enthalpies for Zn and Cu octahedral cages at ZnO{sub 3} sites are 1.64kJ/mol and 2.73kJ/mol respectively, while hydrogen binding enthalpies for Zn and Cu paddle-wheel cages calculated on top of metal atoms are found to be at 6.05kJ/mol and 6.10kJ/mol respectively. Major difference between Zn-MOF-5 and Cu-bdc hydrogen uptake performance might be caused by unsaturated metal sites present in Cu-bdc system and the influence of their geometric structures, although a small difference on binding energy in the type of transition metal used is also observed. The comparison between Zn and Cu-based MOF may contribute to a comprehensive understanding of metal clusters and the importance of selecting best transition metal for design and synthesis of metal-organic frameworks.

  6. Catalyst by Design

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; DeBusk, Melanie Moses

    2014-01-01

    The development of new catalytic materials is still dominated by trial and error methods. Although it has been successful, the empirical development of catalytic materials is time consuming and expensive with no guarantee of success. In our laboratories, we are developing a comprehensive catalysts by design that involves state-of-the-art first principle density functional theory calculations, experimental design of catalyst sites, and sub- ngstr m resolution imaging with an aberration-corrected electron microscope to characterize the microstructure. In this chapter, we focus on supported platinum cluster catalyst systems which are one of the most important industrial catalysts and attempt to demonstrate the feasibility of the catalyst by design concept.

  7. Catalytic and surface properties of nanocrystalline gold water gas shift catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Hwan

    A series of CeO2 supported gold catalysts were prepared and found to possess a high activities for the water gas shift reaction (WGS), a critical step in the production of H2 for use in petroleum refining, chemicals synthesis, and proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The deposition-precipitation method was employed in synthesizing these highly active, nanocrystalline gold catalysts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic sorption analyses were performed to characterize the gold catalysts. While some of these catalysts were initially four times more active than a commercial Cu-based catalyst, they were susceptible to deactivation. Characterization using techniques including temperature programmed oxidation, XPS, and FT-IR indicated that the deactivation was caused primarily by blockage of the active sites by carbonates and/or formates. Formation of these carbonaceous species appeared to be facilitated by oxygen deficient sites on the ceria surface and may have been associated with hydroxyl groups formed on the nanocrystalline gold particles under the H2 rich conditions. The deactivation could be managed by conditioning the CeO2 surface or adding constituents to minimize oxygen deficiency. The catalytic activity was fully recovered by calcining the deactivated materials in flowing air at elevated temperatures. The gold catalyst was washcoated onto microporous Fe-Al alloy foams for use in a micro-channel WGS reactor. The performance of these coated foams was inferior to that of the powder catalyst; however, a two stage micro-channel WGS reactor employing the gold catalyst was sufficient for a 100 W fuel processor system.

  8. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for treating NOx emissions using a zinc or titanium promoted palladium-zirconium catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    A process and system (18) for reducing NO.sub.x in a gas using hydrogen as a reducing agent is provided. The process comprises contacting the gas stream (29) with a catalyst system (38) comprising sulfated zirconia washcoat particles (41), palladium, a pre-sulfated zirconia binder (44), and a promoter (45) comprising at least one of titanium, zinc, or a mixture thereof. The presence of zinc or titanium increases the resistance of the catalyst system to a sulfur and water-containing gas stream.

  9. Efficient solar-to-fuels production from a hybrid microbial–water-splitting catalyst system

    PubMed Central

    Torella, Joseph P.; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Chen, Janice S.; Bediako, D. Kwabena; Colón, Brendan; Way, Jeffery C.; Silver, Pamela A.; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic cells have considerable potential to satisfy future renewable-energy needs, but efficient and scalable methods of storing the intermittent electricity they produce are required for the large-scale implementation of solar energy. Current solar-to-fuels storage cycles based on water splitting produce hydrogen and oxygen, which are attractive fuels in principle but confront practical limitations from the current energy infrastructure that is based on liquid fuels. In this work, we report the development of a scalable, integrated bioelectrochemical system in which the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha is used to efficiently convert CO2, along with H2 and O2 produced from water splitting, into biomass and fusel alcohols. Water-splitting catalysis was performed using catalysts that are made of earth-abundant metals and enable low overpotential water splitting. In this integrated setup, equivalent solar-to-biomass yields of up to 3.2% of the thermodynamic maximum exceed that of most terrestrial plants. Moreover, engineering of R. eutropha enabled production of the fusel alcohol isopropanol at up to 216 mg/L, the highest bioelectrochemical fuel yield yet reported by >300%. This work demonstrates that catalysts of biotic and abiotic origin can be interfaced to achieve challenging chemical energy-to-fuels transformations. PMID:25675518

  10. Efficient solar-to-fuels production from a hybrid microbial-water-splitting catalyst system.

    PubMed

    Torella, Joseph P; Gagliardi, Christopher J; Chen, Janice S; Bediako, D Kwabena; Colón, Brendan; Way, Jeffery C; Silver, Pamela A; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-02-24

    Photovoltaic cells have considerable potential to satisfy future renewable-energy needs, but efficient and scalable methods of storing the intermittent electricity they produce are required for the large-scale implementation of solar energy. Current solar-to-fuels storage cycles based on water splitting produce hydrogen and oxygen, which are attractive fuels in principle but confront practical limitations from the current energy infrastructure that is based on liquid fuels. In this work, we report the development of a scalable, integrated bioelectrochemical system in which the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha is used to efficiently convert CO2, along with H2 and O2 produced from water splitting, into biomass and fusel alcohols. Water-splitting catalysis was performed using catalysts that are made of earth-abundant metals and enable low overpotential water splitting. In this integrated setup, equivalent solar-to-biomass yields of up to 3.2% of the thermodynamic maximum exceed that of most terrestrial plants. Moreover, engineering of R. eutropha enabled production of the fusel alcohol isopropanol at up to 216 mg/L, the highest bioelectrochemical fuel yield yet reported by >300%. This work demonstrates that catalysts of biotic and abiotic origin can be interfaced to achieve challenging chemical energy-to-fuels transformations.

  11. Efficient solar-to-fuels production from a hybrid microbial-water-splitting catalyst system.

    PubMed

    Torella, Joseph P; Gagliardi, Christopher J; Chen, Janice S; Bediako, D Kwabena; Colón, Brendan; Way, Jeffery C; Silver, Pamela A; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-02-24

    Photovoltaic cells have considerable potential to satisfy future renewable-energy needs, but efficient and scalable methods of storing the intermittent electricity they produce are required for the large-scale implementation of solar energy. Current solar-to-fuels storage cycles based on water splitting produce hydrogen and oxygen, which are attractive fuels in principle but confront practical limitations from the current energy infrastructure that is based on liquid fuels. In this work, we report the development of a scalable, integrated bioelectrochemical system in which the bacterium Ralstonia eutropha is used to efficiently convert CO2, along with H2 and O2 produced from water splitting, into biomass and fusel alcohols. Water-splitting catalysis was performed using catalysts that are made of earth-abundant metals and enable low overpotential water splitting. In this integrated setup, equivalent solar-to-biomass yields of up to 3.2% of the thermodynamic maximum exceed that of most terrestrial plants. Moreover, engineering of R. eutropha enabled production of the fusel alcohol isopropanol at up to 216 mg/L, the highest bioelectrochemical fuel yield yet reported by >300%. This work demonstrates that catalysts of biotic and abiotic origin can be interfaced to achieve challenging chemical energy-to-fuels transformations. PMID:25675518

  12. Incorporation of Water-Oxidation Catalysts into Photoinduced Electron Transfer Systems: Toward Solar Fuel Generation via Artificial Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagnini, Michael Thomas

    mechanisms and probing highly-reactive intermediates, and it also establishes a basis in systems design for photodriving catalytic processes. Covalent dye-catalyst assemblies have been gaining recognition as a useful motif for incorporation into dye-sensitized photoanodes for photoelectrochemical water-splitting cells, and the PMI-Ir catalyst unit is well-poised, both in the energetics and kinetics of its electron transfer properties, to improve upon current solar-driven fuel-forming devices.

  13. Copper(I)/ABNO-catalyzed aerobic alcohol oxidation: alleviating steric and electronic constraints of Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems.

    PubMed

    Steves, Janelle E; Stahl, Shannon S

    2013-10-23

    Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems promote efficient aerobic oxidation of sterically unhindered primary alcohols and electronically activated substrates, but they show reduced reactivity with aliphatic and secondary alcohols. Here, we report a catalyst system, consisting of ((MeO)bpy)Cu(I)(OTf) and ABNO ((MeO)bpy = 4,4'-dimethoxy-2,2'-bipyridine; ABNO = 9-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane N-oxyl), that mediates aerobic oxidation of all classes of alcohols, including primary and secondary allylic, benzylic, and aliphatic alcohols with nearly equal efficiency. The catalyst exhibits broad functional group compatibility, and most reactions are complete within 1 h at room temperature using ambient air as the source of oxidant. PMID:24128057

  14. Surface chemistry and catalytic properties of VOX/Ti-MCM-41 catalysts for dibenzothiophene oxidation in a biphasic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J.; Chen, L. F.; Wang, J. A.; Manríquez, Ma.; Limas, R.; Schachat, P.; Navarrete, J.; Contreras, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    A series of vanadium oxide supported on Ti-MCM-41 catalysts was synthesized via the incipient impregnation method by varying the vanadia loading from 5 wt% to 10, 15, 20 and 25 wt%. These catalysts were characterized by a variety of advanced techniques for investigating their crystalline structure, textural properties, and surface chemistry information including surface acidity, reducibility, vanadium oxidation states, and morphological features. The catalytic activities of the catalysts were evaluated in a biphasic reaction system for oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of a model diesel containing 300 ppm of dibenzothiophene (DBT) where acetonitrile was used as extraction solvent and H2O2 as oxidant. ODS activity was found to be proportional to the V5+/(V4+ + V5+) values of the catalysts, indicating that the surface vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) was the active phase. Reaction temperature would influence significantly the ODS efficiency; high temperature, i.e., 80 °C, would lead to low ODS reaction due to the partial decomposition of oxidant. All the catalysts contained both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites but the former was predominant. The catalysts with low vanadia loading (5 or 10 wt%V2O5) had many Lewis acid sites and could strongly adsorb DBT molecule via the electron donation/acceptance action which resulted in an inhibition for the reaction of DBT with the surface peroxometallic species. The catalyst with high vanadia loading (25wt%V2O5/Ti-MCM-41) showed the highest catalytic activity and could remove 99.9% of DBT at 60 °C within 60 min.

  15. Selective Kumada biaryl cross-coupling reaction enabled by an iron(III) alkoxide-N-heterocyclic carbene catalyst system.

    PubMed

    Chua, Yi-Yuan; Duong, Hung A

    2014-08-01

    A catalyst system comprising Fe2(O(t)Bu)6 and an N-heterocyclic carbene ligand enables efficient syntheses of (hetero)biaryls from the reactions of aryl Grignard reagents with a diverse spectrum of (hetero)aryl chlorides. Amongst the alkoxide and amide counterions investigated, tert-butoxide was the most effective in inhibiting the homocoupling of arylmagnesiums. PMID:24947849

  16. Recent Progress on Nazarov Cyclizations: The Use of Iron Salts as Catalysts in Ionic Liquid Solvent Systems.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Toshiyuki; Nokami, Toshiki; Kawatsura, Motoi

    2016-06-01

    Nazarov cyclization is an important and versatile method for the synthesis of five-membered carbocycles, and extensive studies have been conducted to optimize the reaction. Among recent studies, several trends are recognized. One is the combination of different reactions with Nazarov cyclization in a one-pot reaction system which enables the preparation of unique cyclization products. The second is the use of a transition-metal catalyst, though Lewis or Brønsted acids have generally been used for the reaction. The third is the realization of the asymmetric Nazarov cyclization. The fourth is the base-catalyzed Nazarov cyclization. Furthermore, several useful protocols for realizing Nazarov cyclization have also been developed. The recent progress on Nazarov cyclizations is summarized in Section 2. Section 3 is our chronicle in this field. We focused on the use of iron as the catalyst in Nazarov cyclizations and ionic liquids as solvents: Nazarov cyclization of thiophene derivatives using FeCl3 as the catalyst was accomplished and we succeeded in demonstrating the first example of an iron-catalyzed asymmetric Nazarov reaction. We next established Nazarov cyclization of pyrrole or indole derivatives using Fe(ClO4 )3 ·Al2 O3 as the catalyst with high trans selectivities in excellent yields. Since the cyclized product was reacted with a vinyl ketone in the presence of the same iron salt, the system allowed realization of the sequential type of Nazarov/Michael reaction of pyrrole derivatives. Furthermore, we demonstrated the recyclable use of the iron catalyst and obtained the desired Nazarov/Michael reaction products in good yields for five repetitions of the reactions without any addition of the catalyst using an ionic liquid, [bmim][NTf2 ], as the solvent. We expect that the iron-catalyzed Nazarov cyclization, in particular, in an ionic liquid solvent might become a useful method to synthesize functional molecules that include cycloalkene moieties. PMID:27219324

  17. Reformer assisted lean NO.sub.x catalyst aftertreatment system and method

    DOEpatents

    Kalyanaraman, Mohan; Park, Paul W.; Ragle, Christie S.

    2010-06-29

    A method and apparatus for catalytically processing a gas stream passing therethrough to reduce the presence of NO.sub.x therein, wherein the apparatus includes a first catalyst composed of a silver-containing alumina that is adapted for catalytically processing the gas stream at a first temperature range, a second catalyst composed of a copper-containing zeolite located downstream from the first catalyst, wherein the second catalyst is adapted for catalytically processing the gas stream at a lower second temperature range relative to the first temperature range, a hydrocarbon compound for injection into the gas stream upstream of the first catalyst to provide a reductant, and a reformer for reforming a portion of the hydrocarbon compound into H.sub.2 and/or oxygenated hydrocarbon for injection into the gas stream upstream of the first catalyst. The second catalyst is adapted to facilitate the reaction of reducing NOx into N.sub.2, whereby the intermediates are produced via the first catalyst reacting with NOx and hydrocarbons.

  18. A feasible process for furfural production from the pre-hydrolysis liquor of corncob via biochar catalysts in a new biphasic system.

    PubMed

    Deng, Aojie; Lin, Qixuan; Yan, Yuhuan; Li, Huiling; Ren, Junli; Liu, Chuanfu; Sun, Runcang

    2016-09-01

    A feasible approach was developed to produce furfural from the pre-hydrolysis liquor of corncob via biochar catalysts as the solid acid catalyst in a new biphasic system with dichloromethane (DCM) as the organic phase and the concentrated pre-hydrolysis liquor (CPHL) containing NaCl as the aqueous phase. The biochar catalyst possessing many acidity groups (SO3H, COOH and phenolic OH groups) was prepared by the carbonization and sulfonation process of the corncob hydrolyzed residue. The influence of the catalytic condition on furfural yield and selectivity was comparatively studied. It was found that 81.14% furfural yield and 83.0% furfural selectivity were obtained from CPHL containing 5wt% xylose using this biochar catalyst in the CPHL-NaCl/DCM biphasic system at 170°C for 60min. In addition, with the regeneration process, this catalyst displayed the high performance and excellent recyclability. PMID:27295253

  19. Quality assurance for purchased catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Puls, F.H. )

    1988-09-01

    Petrochemical industries require many different types of catalysts in process operations. A significantly portion of these requirements is being met through purchases from merchant catalyst suppliers. The importance of catalysts and of catalyst quality to these industries cannot be overstated. It is not surprising that in the quest for quality which has affected much of US industry in the last few years, catalysts were among the first products which were singled out for development of quality assurance. Currently, catalyst supplier auditing and certification procedures are being implemented. Primary emphasis is on the implementation of statistical process control procedures in the manufacture of commercially available catalyst. Thus, a trend exists to move from quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) for purchased catalysts to statistical process control (SPC). This development is being supported by audits of the suppliers' manufacturing quality control systems. The keystone of quality management is the concept of customer and supplier working together for their mutual advantage. The focus in this presentation will be on two topics. (1) Fixed bed catalysts: The recognition of lot-to-lot variations led to purchase specifications which then led to quality control procedures for purchased catalysts. (2) Catalyst suppliers: the limitations of quality control for catalysts will be discussed, and the efforts of catalyst suppliers to apply SPC will be mentioned.

  20. Polypyrrole-functionalized ruthenium carbene catalysts as efficient heterogeneous systems for olefin epoxidation.

    PubMed

    Dakkach, Mohamed; Fontrodona, Xavier; Parella, Teodor; Atlamsani, Ahmed; Romero, Isabel; Rodríguez, Montserrat

    2014-07-14

    New Ru complexes containing the bpea-pyr ligand (bpea-pyr stands for N,N-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-3-(1H-pyrrol-1-yl)propan-1-amine), with the formula [RuCl2(bpea-pyr)(dmso)] (isomeric complexes 2a and 2b) or [Ru(CN-Me)(bpea-pyr)X)](n+) (CN-Me = 3-methyl-1-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium-2-ide; X = Cl, 3, or X = H2O, 4), have been prepared and fully characterized. Complexes 3 and 4 have been anchored onto an electrode surface through electropolymerization of the attached pyrrole group, yielding stable polypyrrole films. The electrochemical behaviour of 4, which displays a bielectronic Ru(IV/II) redox pair in solution, is dramatically affected by the electropolymerization process leading to the occurrence of two monoelectronic Ru(IV/III) and Ru(III/II) redox pairs in the heterogeneous system. A carbon felt modified electrode containing complex 4 (C-felt/poly-4) has been evaluated as a heterogeneous catalyst in the epoxidation of various olefin substrates using PhI(OAc)2 as an oxidant, displaying TON values of several thousands in all cases and good selectivity for the epoxide product.

  1. Orthogonal Cu- and Pd-Based Catalyst Systems for the O- and N-Arylation of Aminophenols

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Debabrata; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2009-01-01

    O- or N-arylated aminophenol products constitute a common structural motif in various potentially useful therapeutic agents and/or drug candidates. We have developed a complementary set of Cu- and Pd-based catalyst systems for the selective O- and N-arylation of unprotected aminophenols using aryl halides. Selective O-arylation of 3- and 4-aminophenols is achieved with copper-catalyzed methods employing picolinic acid or CyDMEDA, trans-N,N′-dimethyl-1,2-cyclohexanediamine, respectively, as the ligand. The selective formation of N-arylated products of 3- and 4-aminophenols can be obtained with BrettPhos precatalyst, a biarylmonophosphine-based palladium catalyst. 2-Aminophenol can be selectively N-arylated with CuI, although no system for the selective O-arylation could be found. Coupling partners with diverse electronic properties and a variety of functional groups can be selectively transformed under these conditions. PMID:19899753

  2. Efficient and limiting reactions in aqueous light-induced hydrogen evolution systems using molecular catalysts and quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Gimbert-Suriñach, Carolina; Albero, Josep; Stoll, Thibaut; Fortage, Jérôme; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle; Deronzier, Alain; Palomares, Emilio; Llobet, Antoni

    2014-05-28

    Hydrogen produced from water and solar energy holds much promise for decreasing the fossil fuel dependence. It has recently been proven that the use of quantum dots as light harvesters in combination with catalysts is a valuable strategy to obtain photogenerated hydrogen. However, the light to hydrogen conversion efficiency of these systems is reported to be lower than 40%. The low conversion efficiency is mainly due to losses occurring at the different interfacial charge-transfer reactions taking place in the multicomponent system during illumination. In this work we have analyzed all the involved reactions in the hydrogen evolution catalysis of a model system composed of CdTe quantum dots, a molecular cobalt catalyst and vitamin C as sacrificial electron donor. The results demonstrate that the electron transfer from the quantum dots to the catalyst occurs fast enough and efficiently (nanosecond time scale), while the back electron transfer and catalysis are much slower (millisecond and microsecond time scales). Further improvements of the photodriven proton reduction should focus on the catalytic rate enhancement, which should be at least in the hundreds of nanoseconds time scale.

  3. Advanced cathode materials for polymer electrolyte fuel cells based on pt/ metal oxides: from model electrodes to catalyst systems.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Emiliana; Pătru, Alexandra; Rabis, Annett; Kötz, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    The development of stable catalyst systems for application at the cathode side of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) requires the substitution of the state-of-the-art carbon supports with materials showing high corrosion resistance in a strongly oxidizing environment. Metal oxides in their highest oxidation state can represent viable support materials for the next generation PEFC cathodes. In the present work a multilevel approach has been adopted to investigate the kinetics and the activity of Pt nanoparticles supported on SnO2-based metal oxides. Particularly, model electrodes made of SnO2 thin films supporting Pt nanoparticles, and porous catalyst systems made of Pt nanoparticles supported on Sb-doped SnO2 high surface area powders have been investigated. The present results indicate that SnO2-based supports do not modify the oxygen reduction reaction mechanism on the Pt nanoparticle surface, but rather lead to catalysts with enhanced specific activity compared to Pt/carbon systems. Different reasons for the enhancement in the specific activity are considered and discussed.

  4. Modified Fe3O4- hydroxyapatite nanocomposites as heterogeneous catalysts in three UV, Vis and Fenton like degradation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valizadeh, S.; Rasoulifard, M. H.; Dorraji, M. S. Seyed

    2014-11-01

    The magnetite-hydroxyapatite (M-HAP) nanocomposites were prepared by a chemical co- precipitation procedure and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). The ability of the synthesized catalyst for photocatalytic degradation of Acid Blue 25 (AB25), as an organic dye, under UV irradiation was studied. The catalyst was modified employing transition metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) trying to improve the catalytic performance of HAP in absence of UV irradiation and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide i.e. a Fenton like reaction. The best results obtained for Cu and Co modified M-HAPs and the effect of operational parameters such pH, amount of catalyst and hydrogen peroxide concentration was studied. In order to investigate the performance of HAP based photocatalyst in visible light region, M-HAP was modified with silver ions. At the end, Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic expression used to evaluate and compare the catalytic systems. The strongest degradation activity was observed for Ag-M-HAP/Vis system because of Ag3PO4 formation. Apparent reaction rate constant (Kapp) by Ag-M-HAP/Vis was 63, 36 and 19 times faster than Cu-M-HAP(II)/H2O2, Co-M-HAP(II)/H2O2 and M-HAP (I)/UV systems, respectively.

  5. Transition Metal Catalyzed Hydroarylation of Multiple Bonds: Exploration of Second Generation Ruthenium Catalysts and Extension to Copper Systems

    SciTech Connect

    T. Brent Gunnoe

    2011-02-17

    Catalysts provide foundational technology for the development of new materials and can enhance the efficiency of routes to known materials. New catalyst technologies offer the possibility of reducing energy and raw material consumption as well as enabling chemical processes with a lower environmental impact. The rising demand and expense of fossil resources has strained national and global economies and has increased the importance of accessing more efficient catalytic processes for the conversion of hydrocarbons to useful products. The goals of the research are to develop and understand single-site homogeneous catalysts for the conversion of readily available hydrocarbons into useful materials. A detailed understanding of these catalytic reactions could lead to the development of catalysts with improved activity, longevity and selectivity. Such transformations could reduce the environmental impact of hydrocarbon functionalization, conserve energy and valuable fossil resources and provide new technologies for the production of liquid fuels. This project is a collaborative effort that incorporates both experimental and computational studies to understand the details of transition metal catalyzed C-H activation and C-C bond forming reactions with olefins. Accomplishments of the current funding period include: (1) We have completed and published studies of C-H activation and catalytic olefin hydroarylation by TpRu{l_brace}P(pyr){sub 3}{r_brace}(NCMe)R (pyr = N-pyrrolyl) complexes. While these systems efficiently initiate stoichiometric benzene C-H activation, catalytic olefin hydroarylation is hindered by inhibition of olefin coordination, which is a result of the steric bulk of the P(pyr){sub 3} ligand. (2) We have extended our studies of catalytic olefin hydroarylation by TpRu(L)(NCMe)Ph systems to L = P(OCH{sub 2}){sub 3}CEt. Thus, we have now completed detailed mechanistic studies of four systems with L = CO, PMe{sub 3}, P(pyr){sub 3} and P(OCH{sub 2}){sub 3}CEt

  6. Zr-zeolite beta: a new heterogeneous catalyst system for the highly selective cascade transformation of citral to (+/-)-menthol.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yuntong; Jaenicke, Stephan; Chuah, Gaik-Khuan

    2009-01-01

    The transformation of citral to menthols involves hydrogenation steps as well as cyclisation of the intermediate, citronellal. The ability of Zr-zeolite beta to catalyse the cyclisation with high diastereoselectivity to (+/-)-isopulegol is the critical step in this cascade transformation. Bifunctional catalysts containing nickel or rhodium supported on Zr-zeolite beta gave menthols in yields of 87-89% and an excellent diastereoselectivity of 94% for the desired (+/-)-menthol. Dual catalyst systems of Zr-zeolite beta and nano-dispersed Ni on an MCM-41 support were equally effective and have the added advantage that the rates of the acid- and hydrogenation-catalysed steps can be independently varied. By applying a pressure ramp of 0.2-2 MPa, the yield of menthols could be increased to 95%, with 94% diastereoselectivity for (+/-)-menthol. The low initial pressure minimises the rates of competing hydrogenation reactions to byproducts such as citronellol and 3,7-dimethyloctanol. PMID:19132702

  7. Assessment of microcapsule—catalyst particles healing system in high performance fibre reinforced polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolimowski, P. A.; Wass, D. F.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Autonomous self-healing in carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) is demonstrated using epoxy resin filled microcapsules and a solid-state catalyst. Microcapsules filled with oligomeric epoxy resin (20–450 μm) and particles of Sc(OTf)3 are embedded in an interleave region of a unidirectional CFRP laminate and tested under mode I loading. Double cantilever beam (DCB) test specimens containing variable concentrations of microcapsules and catalyst were prepared, tested and compared to those healed by manual injection with corresponding healing resin formulation. The healing efficiency was evaluated by comparing the maximum peak load recorded on load–displacement curves for pristine and healed specimens. A 44% maximum recovery was observed for specimens containing 10 wt% of solid phase catalyst and 11 wt% of epoxy microcapsules. However, a significant (80%) decrease in initial strain energy release rate (G IC) was observed for specimens with the embedded healing chemistries.

  8. Assessment of microcapsule—catalyst particles healing system in high performance fibre reinforced polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolimowski, P. A.; Wass, D. F.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Autonomous self-healing in carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) is demonstrated using epoxy resin filled microcapsules and a solid-state catalyst. Microcapsules filled with oligomeric epoxy resin (20-450 μm) and particles of Sc(OTf)3 are embedded in an interleave region of a unidirectional CFRP laminate and tested under mode I loading. Double cantilever beam (DCB) test specimens containing variable concentrations of microcapsules and catalyst were prepared, tested and compared to those healed by manual injection with corresponding healing resin formulation. The healing efficiency was evaluated by comparing the maximum peak load recorded on load-displacement curves for pristine and healed specimens. A 44% maximum recovery was observed for specimens containing 10 wt% of solid phase catalyst and 11 wt% of epoxy microcapsules. However, a significant (80%) decrease in initial strain energy release rate (G IC) was observed for specimens with the embedded healing chemistries.

  9. Tuning the properties of copper-based catalysts based on molecular in situ studies of model systems.

    PubMed

    Stacchiola, Darío J

    2015-07-21

    Studying catalytic processes at the molecular level is extremely challenging, due to the structural and chemical complexity of the materials used as catalysts and the presence of reactants and products in the reactor's environment. The most common materials used on catalysts are transition metals and their oxides. The importance of multifunctional active sites at metal/oxide interfaces has been long recognized, but a molecular picture of them based on experimental observations is only recently emerging. The initial approach to interrogate the surface chemistry of catalysts at the molecular level consisted of studying metal single crystals as models for reactive metal centers, moving later to single crystal or well-defined thin film oxides. The natural next iteration consisted in the deposition of metal nanoparticles on well-defined oxide substrates. Metal nanoparticles contain undercoordinated sites, which are more reactive. It is also possible to create architectures where oxide nanoparticles are deposited on top of metal single crystals, denominated inverse catalysts, leading in this case to a high concentration of reactive cationic sites in direct contact with the underlying fully coordinated metal atoms. Using a second oxide as a support (host), a multifunctional configuration can be built in which both metal and oxide nanoparticles are located in close proximity. Our recent studies on copper-based catalysts are presented here as an example of the application of these complementary model systems, starting from the creation of undercoordinated sites on Cu(111) and Cu2O(111) surfaces, continuing with the formation of mixed-metal copper oxides, the synthesis of ceria nanoparticles on Cu(111) and the codeposition of Cu and ceria nanoparticles on TiO2(110). Catalysts have traditionally been characterized before or after reactions and analyzed based on static representations of surface structures. It is shown here how dynamic changes on a catalyst's chemical state

  10. Tuning the properties of copper-based catalysts based on molecular in situ studies of model systems.

    PubMed

    Stacchiola, Darío J

    2015-07-21

    Studying catalytic processes at the molecular level is extremely challenging, due to the structural and chemical complexity of the materials used as catalysts and the presence of reactants and products in the reactor's environment. The most common materials used on catalysts are transition metals and their oxides. The importance of multifunctional active sites at metal/oxide interfaces has been long recognized, but a molecular picture of them based on experimental observations is only recently emerging. The initial approach to interrogate the surface chemistry of catalysts at the molecular level consisted of studying metal single crystals as models for reactive metal centers, moving later to single crystal or well-defined thin film oxides. The natural next iteration consisted in the deposition of metal nanoparticles on well-defined oxide substrates. Metal nanoparticles contain undercoordinated sites, which are more reactive. It is also possible to create architectures where oxide nanoparticles are deposited on top of metal single crystals, denominated inverse catalysts, leading in this case to a high concentration of reactive cationic sites in direct contact with the underlying fully coordinated metal atoms. Using a second oxide as a support (host), a multifunctional configuration can be built in which both metal and oxide nanoparticles are located in close proximity. Our recent studies on copper-based catalysts are presented here as an example of the application of these complementary model systems, starting from the creation of undercoordinated sites on Cu(111) and Cu2O(111) surfaces, continuing with the formation of mixed-metal copper oxides, the synthesis of ceria nanoparticles on Cu(111) and the codeposition of Cu and ceria nanoparticles on TiO2(110). Catalysts have traditionally been characterized before or after reactions and analyzed based on static representations of surface structures. It is shown here how dynamic changes on a catalyst's chemical state

  11. Enhanced High- and Low-Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Catalyst Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Feng; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Currier, Neal; Kamasamudram, Krishna; Kumar, Ashok; Li, Junhui; Luo, Jinyong; Stafford, Randy; Yezerets, Aleksey; Castagnola, Mario; Chen, Hai-Ying; Hess, Howard ..

    2014-12-09

    In this annual CRADA program report, we will briefly highlight results from our recent studies of the stability of candidate K-based high temperature NSR materials, and comparative studies of low temperature performance of SSZ-13 and SAPO-34 CHA catalysts; in particular, recent results comparing Fe- and Cu-based CHA materials.

  12. Plasma-assisted CuO/CeO2/TiO2-γ-Al2O3 catalysts for NO + CH4 reaction and NO temperature programmed desorption studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huijuan; Jiang, Xiaoyuan; Zheng, Xiaoming

    2013-09-01

    The removal of NO and CH4 has been studied with a hybrid system integrating plasma activation and four Cu-based catalysts. The best catalytic performance was observed for catalysts obtained from CuO/CeO2/TiO2/γ-Al2O3.The efficiency of NO removal decreased with the order: 12%CuO/10%CeO2/15%TiO2/γ-Al2O3 > 12%CuO/15%TiO2/γ-Al2O3 > 12%CuO/γ-Al2O3 > 12% CuO/TiO2. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD) Temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and NO temperature-programmed desorption (NO-TPD) experiments were carried out to gain insight into the synergetic effects with the catalysts. The results revealed that copper species existed as bulk CuO crystalline for all the catalysts, H2-TPR suggested that the Cu2+ incorporated TiO2 or CeO2 lattice and crystalline CuO might be the most active component for NO removal, and NO-TPD studies indicated that 12%CuO/10%CeO2/15%TiO2/γ-Al2O3 catalyst had lower NO desorption temperature and larger peak area, which seemed to be responsible for the better catalytic activity over NO + CH4 reactions than other catalysts.

  13. Direct transformation of xylan-type hemicelluloses to furfural via SnCl₄ catalysts in aqueous and biphasic systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenju; Ren, Junli; Li, Huiling; Deng, Aojie; Sun, Runcang

    2015-05-01

    Direct catalytic transformation of xylan-type hemicelluloses to furfural in the aqueous system and the biphasic system were comparatively investigated under mild conditions. Screening of several promising chlorides for conversion of beech xylan in the aqueous system revealed the Lewis acid SnCl4 was the most effective catalyst. Comparing to the single aqueous system, the bio-based 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF)/H2O biphasic system was more conducive to the synthesis of furfural, in which the highest furfural yield of 78.1% was achieved by using SnCl4 as catalysts under the optimized reaction conditions (150°C, 120 min). Additionally, the influences of xylan-type hemicelluloses with different chemical and structural features from beech, corncob and bagasse on the furfural production were studied. It was found that furfural yield to some extent was determined by the xylose content in hemicelluloses and also had relationships with the molecular weight of hemicelluloses and the degree of crystallization.

  14. Direct transformation of xylan-type hemicelluloses to furfural via SnCl₄ catalysts in aqueous and biphasic systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenju; Ren, Junli; Li, Huiling; Deng, Aojie; Sun, Runcang

    2015-05-01

    Direct catalytic transformation of xylan-type hemicelluloses to furfural in the aqueous system and the biphasic system were comparatively investigated under mild conditions. Screening of several promising chlorides for conversion of beech xylan in the aqueous system revealed the Lewis acid SnCl4 was the most effective catalyst. Comparing to the single aqueous system, the bio-based 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF)/H2O biphasic system was more conducive to the synthesis of furfural, in which the highest furfural yield of 78.1% was achieved by using SnCl4 as catalysts under the optimized reaction conditions (150°C, 120 min). Additionally, the influences of xylan-type hemicelluloses with different chemical and structural features from beech, corncob and bagasse on the furfural production were studied. It was found that furfural yield to some extent was determined by the xylose content in hemicelluloses and also had relationships with the molecular weight of hemicelluloses and the degree of crystallization. PMID:25742750

  15. Bimetallic Catalysts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinfelt, John H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical reaction rates can be controlled by varying composition of miniscule clusters of metal atoms. These bimetallic catalysts have had major impact on petroleum refining, where work has involved heterogeneous catalysis (reacting molecules in a phase separate from catalyst.) Experimentation involving hydrocarbon reactions, catalytic…

  16. Oxyhydrochlorination catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    An improved catalyst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HCl and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  17. SU-E-T-350: Verification of Gating Performance of a New Elekta Gating Solution: Response Kit and Catalyst System

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, X; Cao, D; Housley, D; Mehta, V; Shepard, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this work, we have tested the performance of new respiratory gating solutions for Elekta linacs. These solutions include the Response gating and the C-RAD Catalyst surface mapping system.Verification measurements have been performed for a series of clinical cases. We also examined the beam on latency of the system and its impact on delivery efficiency. Methods: To verify the benefits of tighter gating windows, a Quasar Respiratory Motion Platform was used. Its vertical-motion plate acted as a respiration surrogate and was tracked by the Catalyst system to generate gating signals. A MatriXX ion-chamber array was mounted on its longitudinal-moving platform. Clinical plans are delivered to a stationary and moving Matrix array at 100%, 50% and 30% gating windows and gamma scores were calculated comparing moving delivery results to the stationary result. It is important to note that as one moves to tighter gating windows, the delivery efficiency will be impacted by the linac's beam-on latency. Using a specialized software package, we generated beam-on signals of lengths of 1000ms, 600ms, 450ms, 400ms, 350ms and 300ms. As the gating windows get tighter, one can expect to reach a point where the dose rate will fall to nearly zero, indicating that the gating window is close to beam-on latency. A clinically useful gating window needs to be significantly longer than the latency for the linac. Results: As expected, the use of tighter gating windows improved delivery accuracy. However, a lower limit of the gating window, largely defined by linac beam-on latency, exists at around 300ms. Conclusion: The Response gating kit, combined with the C-RAD Catalyst, provides an effective solution for respiratorygated treatment delivery. Careful patient selection, gating window design, even visual/audio coaching may be necessary to ensure both delivery quality and efficiency. This research project is funded by Elekta.

  18. Key structure-activity relationships in the vanadium phosphorus oxide catalyst system

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.R. ); Ebner, J.R. )

    1990-04-01

    The crystal structure of vanadyl pyrophosphate has been redetermined using single crystals obtained from a near solidified melt of a microcrystalline catalyst sample. Crystals that index as vanadyl pyrophosphate obtained from this melt are variable in color. Crystallographic refinement of the single crystal x-ray diffraction data indicates that structural differences among these materials can be described in terms of crystal defects associated with linear disorder of the vanadium atoms. The importance of the disorder is outlined in the context of its effect on the proposed surface topology parallel to (1,0,0). Models of the surface topology simply and intuitively account for the non-stoichometric surface atomic P/V ratio exhibited by selective catalysts of this phase. These models also point to the possible role of the excess phosphorus in providing site isolation of reactive centers at the surface. 33 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Synthetic Catalysts for CO2 Storage: Catalytic Improvement of Solvent Capture Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2010-08-15

    IMPACCT Project: LLNL is designing a process to pull CO2 out of the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants so it can be transported, stored, or utilized elsewhere. Human lungs rely on an enzyme known as carbonic anhydrase to help separate CO2 from our blood and tissue as part of the normal breathing process. LLNL is designing a synthetic catalyst with the same function as this enzyme. The catalyst can be used to quickly capture CO2 from coal exhaust, just as the natural enzyme does in our lungs. LLNL is also developing a method of encapsulating chemical solvents in permeable microspheres that will greatly increase the speed of binding of CO2. The goal of the project is an industry-ready chemical vehicle that can withstand the harsh environments found in exhaust gas and enable new, simple process designs requiring less capital investment.

  20. Self-Healing of Molecular Catalyst and Photosensitizer on Metal-Organic Framework: Robust Molecular System for Photocatalytic H2 Evolution from Water.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongha; Whang, Dong Ryeol; Park, Soo Young

    2016-07-20

    Inspired by self-repair mechanism of PSII in plants, we report a self-healing system which spontaneously repairs molecular catalyst and photosensitizer during photocatalytic H2 evolution. A bipyridine-embedded UiO-type metal-organic framework (MOF), namely Ptn_Ir_BUiO, which incorporated H2-evolving catalyst and photosensitizer, was synthesized and subject to photocatalytic H2 evolution reaction (HER). Impressively, HER with Pt0.1_Ir_BUiO showed very stable molecular photocatalysis without significant decrease in its activity and colloidal formation for 6.5 days at least; in the homogeneous counterpart, the molecular catalyst became a colloid just after 7.5 h. It was revealed that the arrangement of diimine sites which closely and densely surrounded the H2-evolving catalyst and photosensitizer in the MOF enabled such a highly efficient self-healing. PMID:27356034

  1. Modular o-quinone catalyst system for dehydrogenation of tetrahydroquinolines under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Wendlandt, Alison E; Stahl, Shannon S

    2014-08-27

    Quinolines are common pharmacophores present in numerous FDA-approved pharmaceuticals and other bioactive compounds. Here, we report the design and development of new o-quinone-based catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of tetrahydroquinolines to afford quinolines. Use of a Co(salophen) cocatalyst allows the reaction to proceed efficiently with ambient air at room temperature. The utility of the catalytic method is demonstrated in the preparation of a number of medicinally relevant quinolines. PMID:25109345

  2. Evaluation of PEMFC System Contaminants on the Performance of Pt Catalyst via Cyclic Voltammetry: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Macomber, C.; Dinh, H. N.

    2012-07-01

    Using electrochemical cyclic voltammetry as a quick ex-situ screening tool, the impact of the extracted solution and the individual leachable constituents from prospective BOP component materials on the performance and recoverability of the platinum catalyst were evaluated. Taking an extract from Zytel{trademark} HTN51G35HSLR (PPA) as an example, the major leachable organic components are caprolactam and 1,6 hexanediol. While these organic compounds by themselves do poison the Pt catalyst to some extent, such influence is mostly recoverable by means of potential holding and potential cycling. The extracted solution, however, shows a more drastic poisoning effect and it was not recoverable. Therefore the non-recoverable poisoning effect observed for the extracted solution is not from the two organic species studied. This demonstrates the complexity of such a contaminant study. Inorganic compounds that are known poisons like sulfur even in very low concentrations, may have a more dominant effect on the Pt catalyst and the recoverability.

  3. Design of highly active binary catalyst systems for CO2/epoxide copolymerization: polymer selectivity, enantioselectivity, and stereochemistry control.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Bing; Shi, Lei; Wang, Yi-Ming; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Ying-Ju; Peng, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Li, Bo

    2006-02-01

    Asymmetric, regio- and stereoselective alternating copolymerization of CO(2) and racemic aliphatic epoxides proceeds effectively under mild temperature and pressure by using a binary catalyst system of a chiral tetradentate Schiff base cobalt complex [SalenCo(III)X] as the electrophile in conjunction with an ionic organic ammonium salt or a sterically hindered strong organic base as the nucleophile. The substituent groups on the aromatic rings, chiral diamine backbone, and axial X group of the electrophile, as well as the nucleophilicity, leaving ability, and coordination ability of the nucleophile, all significantly affect the catalyst activity, polymer selectivity, enantioselectivity, and stereochemistry. A bulky chiral cyclohexenediimine backbone complex [SalcyCo(III)X] with an axial X group of poor leaving ability as the electrophile, combined with a bulky nuclephile with poor leaving ability and low coordination ability, is an ideal binary catalyst system for the copolymerization of CO(2) and a racemic aliphatic epoxide to selectively produce polycarbonates with relatively high enantioselectivity, >95% head-to-tail connectivity, and >99% carbonate linkages. A fast copolymerization of CO(2) and epoxides was observed when the concentration of the electrophile or/and the nucleophile was increased, and the number of polycarbonate chains was proportional to the concentration of the nucleophile. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, in combination with a kinetic study, showed that the copolymerization involved the coordination activation of the monomer by the electrophile and polymer chain growth predominately occurring in the nucleophile. Both the enantiomorphic site effect resulting from the chiral electrophile and the polymer chain end effect mainly from the bulky nucleophile cooperatively control the stereochemistry of the CO(2)/epoxide copolymerization.

  4. Hydrogen evolution across nano-Schottky junctions at carbon supported MoS2 catalysts in biphasic liquid systems.

    PubMed

    Ge, Peiyu; Scanlon, Micheál D; Peljo, Pekka; Bian, Xiaojun; Vubrel, Heron; O'Neill, Arlene; Coleman, Jonathan N; Cantoni, Marco; Hu, Xile; Kontturi, Kyösti; Liu, Baohong; Girault, Hubert H

    2012-07-01

    The activities of a series of MoS(2)-based hydrogen evolution catalysts were studied by biphasic reactions monitored by UV/Vis spectroscopy. Carbon supported MoS(2) catalysts performed best due to an abundance of catalytic edge sites and strong electronic coupling of catalyst to support.

  5. Multifunctional catalysts based on carbon nanotubes and titanate nanotubes for oxidation of organic compounds in biphasic systems.

    PubMed

    Santos, S R A; Jardim, I S; Bicalho, H A; Binatti, I; Sousa, E M B; Peres, A M; Resende, R R; Lorençon, E

    2016-12-01

    Amphiphilic catalysts composed of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and titanate nanotubes (TiNTs) have been successfully synthesized by refluxing anatase TiO2 and functionalised CNTs in concentrated NaOH solution. The prepared materials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and N2 physisorption isotherms. The catalytic activity of the synthesized composites was first evaluated in the oxidation of methyl yellow (MY) using H2O2 as oxidant in a single liquid phase system and in a biphasic water/oil mixture. The results of these experiments indicated that the catalytic activities of nanocomposites were very similar in the single liquid-phase oxidation. However, the modification of TiNTs with CNTs led to a substantially enhanced MY oxidation in the biphasic system. The nanocomposites show excellent interaction with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds and thus stabilise emulsions. Under biphasic conditions, the catalysts can be easily separated and recycled, retaining catalytic activity even after eight runs. Additionally, the hybrid materials show superior catalytic activity and selectivity in the biphasic oxidation of benzyl alcohol with H2O2, as compared to pure TiNTs.

  6. Multifunctional catalysts based on carbon nanotubes and titanate nanotubes for oxidation of organic compounds in biphasic systems.

    PubMed

    Santos, S R A; Jardim, I S; Bicalho, H A; Binatti, I; Sousa, E M B; Peres, A M; Resende, R R; Lorençon, E

    2016-12-01

    Amphiphilic catalysts composed of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and titanate nanotubes (TiNTs) have been successfully synthesized by refluxing anatase TiO2 and functionalised CNTs in concentrated NaOH solution. The prepared materials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and N2 physisorption isotherms. The catalytic activity of the synthesized composites was first evaluated in the oxidation of methyl yellow (MY) using H2O2 as oxidant in a single liquid phase system and in a biphasic water/oil mixture. The results of these experiments indicated that the catalytic activities of nanocomposites were very similar in the single liquid-phase oxidation. However, the modification of TiNTs with CNTs led to a substantially enhanced MY oxidation in the biphasic system. The nanocomposites show excellent interaction with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds and thus stabilise emulsions. Under biphasic conditions, the catalysts can be easily separated and recycled, retaining catalytic activity even after eight runs. Additionally, the hybrid materials show superior catalytic activity and selectivity in the biphasic oxidation of benzyl alcohol with H2O2, as compared to pure TiNTs. PMID:27552429

  7. Comprehensive catalyst management

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, S.

    2007-05-15

    From January 2009, as SCR season expands from five months to year-round to meet new US Clean Air Interstate Rule standards, new catalyst strategies are increasingly important. Power plants will need a comprehensive management strategy that accounts for a wide range of old and new issues to achieve peak performance. An optimum plan is necessary for catalyst replacement or addition. SCR systems should be inspected and evaluated at least once a year. Levels of deactivation agents, most often arsenic and calcium oxide, need to match the particular coals used. Tools such as Cormetech's FIELD Guide are available to quantify the effect on catalyst life under various fuel-firing scenarios. Tests should be conducted to evaluate the NH{sub 3}/NOx distribution over time to maximise catalyst performance. The article gives a case study of catalyst management at the Tennessee Valley Authority Allen plant. Recent changes have created new variables to be considered in a catalyst management process, notably the expansion of the operating temperature range, mercury oxidation and SO{sub 3} emission limits. Cormetech has researched these areas. 5 figs., 2 photos.

  8. Stabilized rhodium(0) nanoparticles: a reusable hydrogenation catalyst for arene derivatives in a biphasic water-liquid system.

    PubMed

    Schulz, J; Roucoux, A; Patin, H

    2000-02-18

    A colloidal system based on an aqueous suspension of rhodium(o) nanoparticles proved to be an efficient catalyst for the hydrogenation of arene derivatives under biphasic conditions. The rhodium nanoparticles (2-2.5 nm) were synthesized by the reduction of RhCl3 x 3H2O with sodium borohydride and were stabilized by highly water-soluble N-alkyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ammonium salts (HEA-Cn). These surfactant molecules were characterized by measurements of the surface tension and the aqueous dispersions with rhodium were observed by transmission electron cryomicroscopy. The catalytic system is efficient under ultramild conditions, namely room temperature and 1 atm H2 pressure. The aqueous phase which contains the protected rhodium(0) colloids can be reused without significant loss of activity. The microheterogeneous behavior of this catalytic system was confirmed on a mercury poisoning experiment.

  9. Nanoscale zero-valent iron/AC as heterogeneous Fenton catalysts in three-dimensional electrode system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Lei; Yang, Jie; Yu, Xinmin; Jiang, Yonghai; Zhou, Minghua

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, nanoscale zero-valent iron/activated carbon (NZVI/AC) was investigated as heterogeneous Fenton catalyst in three-dimensional (3D) electrode system for methyl orange (MO) degradation. Some important operating parameters such as cathodic potential, pH, and O₂ flow rate were investigated, exhibiting good decolorization. The mineralization of MO was significantly improved by 20-35% compared to two-dimensional (2D) AC system at the optimum conditions. Although the TOC removal of AC was higher than NZVI/AC due to its good adsorption capacity initially, heterogeneous Fenton catalysis played a more and more important roles in the following test. After eight runs, NZVI/AC still exhibited excellent catalytic properties with low iron leaching. Further, a relatively comprehensive mechanism of NZVI/AC as particle electrodes in 3D system was proposed.

  10. Efficient photocatalytic hydrogen production from water over Pt-Eosin Y catalyst: A systemic study of reaction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Zhao, Hui; Chen, Yong; Sun, Ruimin; Han, Bing

    2016-07-01

    A high efficient homogeneous system for hydrogen production from water consisting of Eosin Y as a photosensitizer, methyl viologen (MV2+) as an electron transfer mediator, triethanolamine (TEOA) as a sacrificial electron donor and colloid Pt as a catalyst, has been systemicly studied. The initial system pH and the concentration of Eosin Y have remarkable effects on the rate of hydrogen evolution. The optimal pH and concentration of Eosin Y are 9 and 7.2×10-5 M. Triethanolamine (TEOA) as an electron donor, can reductively quench the oxidized Eosin Y and the quenching is well modeled by the Stern-Volmer equation. The optimal concentration of TEOA and the concentration of MV2+ are 0.3 M and 3.1×10-4 M, respectively. In addition, the role of colloid Pt has been investigated.

  11. Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harold, Michael; Crocker, Mark; Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Luss, Dan; Choi, Jae-Soon; Dearth, Mark; McCabe, Bob; Theis, Joe

    2013-09-30

    Oxides of nitrogen in the form of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) commonly referred to as NO{sub x}, is one of the two chemical precursors that lead to ground-level ozone, a ubiquitous air pollutant in urban areas. A major source of NO{sub x} is generated by equipment and vehicles powered by diesel engines, which have a combustion exhaust that contains NO{sub x} in the presence of excess O{sub 2}. Catalytic abatement measures that are effective for gasoline-fueled engines such as the precious metal containing three-way catalytic converter (TWC) cannot be used to treat O2-laden exhaust containing NO{sub x}. Two catalytic technologies that have emerged as effective for NO{sub x} abatement are NO{sub x} storage and reduction (NSR) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). NSR is similar to TWC but requires much larger quantities of expensive precious metals and sophisticated periodic switching operation, while SCR requires an on-board source of ammonia which serves as the chemical reductant of the NO{sub x}. The fact that NSR produces ammonia as a byproduct while SCR requires ammonia to work has led to interest in combining the two together to avoid the need for the cumbersome ammonia generation system. In this project a comprehensive study was carried out of the fundamental aspects and application feasibility of combined NSR/SCR. The project team, which included university, industry, and national lab researchers, investigated the kinetics and mechanistic features of the underlying chemistry in the lean NOx trap (LNT) wherein NSR was carried out, with particular focus on identifying the operating conditions such as temperature and catalytic properties which lead to the production of ammonia in the LNT. The performance features of SCR on both model and commercial catalysts focused on the synergy between the LNT and SCR converters in terms of utilizing the upstream-generated ammonia and alternative reductants such as propylene, representing the

  12. Reducing the consumption of microbead cracking catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Khadzhiev, S.N.; Rivkinzon, I.B.; Zyuba, B.I.

    1984-05-01

    This article attempts to determine the degree to which catalyst consumption depends on its physicochemical characteristics and on the efficiency of the dust collection systems. As a result of high dust content, catalyst circulation is hindered, uncontrolled chemical conversions in the stagnant zones of the vessels in the reactor section become more of a factor, the content of catalyst dust in the cracked products increases sharply, unfavorable conditions are created for operation of the main distillation tower, and it may be plugged with catalyst dust. The factors that influence the average catalyst consumption in the USSR petroleum refining industry are identified. It is concluded that reliable methods do exist for curtailing catalyst consumption.

  13. Synthesis of silicon-germanium axial nanowire heterostructures in a solvent vapor growth system using indium and tin catalysts.

    PubMed

    Mullane, E; Geaney, H; Ryan, K M

    2015-03-14

    Here we describe a relatively facile synthetic protocol for the formation of Si-Ge and Si-Ge-Si1-xGex axial nanowire heterostructures. The wires are grown directly on substrates with an evaporated catalytic layer placed in the vapour zone of a high boiling point solvent with the silicon and germanium precursors injected as liquids sequentially. We show that these heterostructures can be formed using either indium or tin as the catalyst seeds which form in situ during the thermal anneal. There is a direct correlation between growth time and segment length allowing good control over the wire composition. The formation of axial heterostructures of Si-Ge-Si1-xGex nanowires using a triple injection is further discussed with the alloyed Si1-xGex third component formed due to residual Ge precursor and its greater reactivity in comparison to silicon. It was found that the degree of tapering at each hetero-interface varied with both the catalyst type and composition of the NW. The report shows the versatility of the solvent vapour growth system for the formation of complex Si-Ge NW heterostructures. PMID:25676188

  14. Versatile Photocatalytic Systems for H2 Generation in Water Based on an Efficient DuBois-Type Nickel Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The generation of renewable H2 through an efficient photochemical route requires photoinduced electron transfer (ET) from a light harvester to an efficient electrocatalyst in water. Here, we report on a molecular H2 evolution catalyst (NiP) with a DuBois-type [Ni(P2R′N2R″)2]2+ core (P2R′N2R″ = bis(1,5-R′-diphospha-3,7-R″-diazacyclooctane), which contains an outer coordination sphere with phosphonic acid groups. The latter functionality allows for good solubility in water and immobilization on metal oxide semiconductors. Electrochemical studies confirm that NiP is a highly active electrocatalyst in aqueous electrolyte solution (overpotential of approximately 200 mV at pH 4.5 with a Faradaic yield of 85 ± 4%). Photocatalytic experiments and investigations on the ET kinetics were carried out in combination with a phosphonated Ru(II) tris(bipyridine) dye (RuP) in homogeneous and heterogeneous environments. Time-resolved luminescence and transient absorption spectroscopy studies confirmed that directed ET from RuP to NiP occurs efficiently in all systems on the nano- to microsecond time scale, through three distinct routes: reductive quenching of RuP in solution or on the surface of ZrO2 (“on particle” system) or oxidative quenching of RuP when the compounds were immobilized on TiO2 (“through particle” system). Our studies show that NiP can be used in a purely aqueous solution and on a semiconductor surface with a high degree of versatility. A high TOF of 460 ± 60 h–1 with a TON of 723 ± 171 for photocatalytic H2 generation with a molecular Ni catalyst in water and a photon-to-H2 quantum yield of approximately 10% were achieved for the homogeneous system. PMID:24320740

  15. Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; White, James F.; Stevens, Don J.

    2007-09-03

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is tasked with obtaining commercially available or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. Commercially available catalysts and the most promising experimental catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. From the standpoint of producing C2+ alcohols as the major product, it appears that the rhodium catalyst is the best choice in terms of both selectivity and space-time yield (STY). However, unless the rhodium catalyst can be improved to provide minimally acceptable STYs for commercial operation, mixed alcohol synthesis will involve significant production of other liquid coproducts. The modified Fischer-Tropsch catalyst shows the most promise for providing both an acceptable selectivity to C2+ alcohols and total liquid STY. However, further optimization of the Fischer-Tropsch catalysts to improve selectivity to higher alcohols is highly desired. Selection of a preferred catalyst will likely entail a decision on the preferred coproduct slate. No other catalysts tested appear amenable to the significant improvements needed for acceptable STYs.

  16. Nano-sized layered Mn oxides as promising and biomimetic water oxidizing catalysts for water splitting in artificial photosynthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Heidari, Sima; Amini, Emad; Khatamian, Masoumeh; Carpentier, Robert; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-04-01

    One challenge in artificial photosynthetic systems is the development of artificial model compounds to oxidize water. The water-oxidizing complex of Photosystem II which is responsible for biological water oxidation contains a cluster of four Mn ions bridged by five oxygen atoms. Layered Mn oxides as efficient, stable, low cost, environmentally friendly and easy to use, synthesize, and manufacture compounds could be considered as functional and structural models for the site. Because of the related structure of these Mn oxides and the catalytic centre of the active site of the water oxidizing complex of Photosystem II, the study of layered Mn oxides may also help to understand more about the mechanism of water oxidation by the natural site. This review provides an overview of the current status of layered Mn oxides in artificial photosynthesis and discuss the sophisticated design strategies for Mn oxides as water oxidizing catalysts.

  17. Development of brazing process for W-EUROFER joints using Cu-based fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Prado, J.; Sánchez, M.; Ureña, A.

    2016-02-01

    A successful joint between W and EUROFER using high temperature brazing technique has been achieved for structural application in future fusion power plants. Cu-based powder alloy mixed with a polymeric binder has been used as filler. Microstructural analysis of the joints revealed that the joint consisted mainly of primary phases and acicular structures in a Cu matrix. Interaction between EUROFER and filler took place at the interface giving rise to several Cu-Ti-Fe rich layers. A loss of hardness at the EUROFER substrate close to the joint due to a diffusion phenomenon during brazing cycle was measured; however, the joints had an adequate shear strength value.

  18. Electronic modification of Cu-based chalcopyrite semiconductors induced by lattice deformation and composition alchemy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, F. D.; Feng, J. Y.

    2008-02-01

    Using first principles calculation, we systematically investigate the electronic modification of Cu-based chalcopyrite semiconductors induced by lattice deformation and composition alchemy. It is shown that the optical band gap Eg is remarkably sensitive to the anion displacement μ, resulting from the opposite shifts of conduction band minimum and valence band maximum. Meanwhile, the dependence of structural parameters of alloyed compounds on alloy composition x is demonstrated for both cation and anion alloying. The d orbitals of group-III cations are found to be of great importance in the calculation. Abnormal changes in the optical band gap Eg induced by anion alloying are addressed.

  19. Method and system for the combination of non-thermal plasma and metal/metal oxide doped .gamma.-alumina catalysts for diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment system

    DOEpatents

    Aardahl, Christopher L.; Balmer-Miller, Mari Lou; Chanda, Ashok; Habeger, Craig F.; Koshkarian, Kent A.; Park, Paul W.

    2006-07-25

    The present disclosure pertains to a system and method for treatment of oxygen rich exhaust and more specifically to a method and system that combines non-thermal plasma with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina catalyst. Current catalyst systems for the treatment of oxygen rich exhaust are capable of achieving only approximately 7 to 12% NO.sub.x reduction as a passive system and only 25 40% reduction when a supplemental hydrocarbon reductant is injected into the exhaust stream. It has been found that treatment of an oxygen rich exhaust initially with a non-thermal plasma and followed by subsequent treatment with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina prepared by the sol gel method is capable of increasing the NO.sub.x reduction to a level of approximately 90% in the absence of SO.sub.2 and 80% in the presence of 20 ppm of SO.sub.2. Especially useful metals have been found to be indium, gallium, and tin.

  20. Sabatier Catalyst Poisoning Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallette, Tim; Perry, Jay; Abney, Morgan; Knox, Jim; Goldblatt, Loel

    2013-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been operational since 2010. The CRA uses a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane by reaction of the metabolic CO2 scrubbed from the cabin air and the hydrogen byproduct from the water electrolysis system used for metabolic oxygen generation. Incorporating the CRA into the overall air revitalization system has facilitated life support system loop closure on the ISS reducing resupply logistics and thereby enhancing longer term missions. The CRA utilizes CO2 which has been adsorbed in a 5A molecular sieve within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, CDRA. There is a potential of compounds with molecular dimensions similar to, or less than CO2 to also be adsorbed. In this fashion trace contaminants may be concentrated within the CDRA and subsequently desorbed with the CO2 to the CRA. Currently, there is no provision to remove contaminants prior to entering the Sabatier catalyst bed. The risk associated with this is potential catalyst degradation due to trace organic contaminants in the CRA carbon dioxide feed acting as catalyst poisons. To better understand this risk, United Technologies Aerospace System (UTAS) has teamed with MSFC to investigate the impact of various trace contaminants on the CRA catalyst performance at relative ISS cabin air concentrations and at about 200/400 times of ISS concentrations, representative of the potential concentrating effect of the CDRA molecular sieve. This paper summarizes our initial assessment results.

  1. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  2. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  3. Development a Cu-based Metal Powder for Selective Laser Micro Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, C.; Zhu, H. H.; Ke, L. D.; Lei, W. J.; Chen, B. J.

    2011-02-01

    A Cu-based metal powder which consists of Cu and Cu-P alloy for selective micro laser sintering has been developed based on the theoretical analysis of the characteristics of the laser micro sintering metal powder. The characteristics of the wetting, capillary force and viscosity have been considered. The preliminary experimental investigation on the selective laser micro sintering Cu-based metal powder has been performed. A 50W CW Nd:YAG laser was employed to sinter the developed metal powder mixture. The sintering mechanism and the effect of the process parameters on the characteristics of the sintering samples have been preliminary investigated. The results show that the mechanism of laser micro sintering this developed metal powder is liquid-phase sintering and Cu-P alloy powder plays an effectively binder in the sintering process. The process parameter has significant effects on the characteristics of the sintering parts. From the SEM image, two different microstructures of samples with different scan spacing parameters were compared and a better binding effect was obtained at a parameter of 0.05mm scan spacing.

  4. Charge transport properties of graphene: Effects of Cu-based gate electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qide; Zhang, C. X.; He, Chaoyu; Tang, Chao; Zhong, Jianxin

    2016-07-01

    Using the first-principles nonequilibrium Green's function method, we study effects of Cu and Ni@Cu used as the Cu-based gate electrode on the charge transport of graphene in the field effect transistors (FET). We find that the transmission of graphene decreases with both Cu and Ni@Cu absorbed in the scatter region. Especially, noticeable transmission gaps are present around the Femi level. The transmission gaps are still effective, and considerable cut-off regions are found under the non-equilibrium environment. The Ni@Cu depresses the transmission of graphene more seriously than the Cu and enlarges the transmission gap in armchair direction. The effects on the charge transport are attributed to the redistribution of electronic states of graphene. Both Cu and Ni@Cu induce the localization of states, so as to block the electronic transport. The Ni@Cu transforms the interaction between graphene and gate electrode from the physisorption to the chemisorption, and then induces more localized states, so that the transmission decreases further. Our results suggest that besides being used to impose gate voltage, the Cu-based gate electrode itself will have a considerable effect on the charge transport of graphene and induces noticeable transmission gap in the FET.

  5. Near-edge band structures and band gaps of Cu-based semiconductors predicted by the modified Becke-Johnson potential plus an on-site Coulomb U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yubo; Zhang, Jiawei; Gao, Weiwei; Abtew, Tesfaye A.; Wang, Youwei; Zhang, Peihong; Zhang, Wenqing

    2013-11-01

    Diamond-like Cu-based multinary semiconductors are a rich family of materials that hold promise in a wide range of applications. Unfortunately, accurate theoretical understanding of the electronic properties of these materials is hindered by the involvement of Cu d electrons. Density functional theory (DFT) based calculations using the local density approximation or generalized gradient approximation often give qualitative wrong electronic properties of these materials, especially for narrow-gap systems. The modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) method has been shown to be a promising alternative to more elaborate theory such as the GW approximation for fast materials screening and predictions. However, straightforward applications of the mBJ method to these materials still encounter significant difficulties because of the insufficient treatment of the localized d electrons. We show that combining the promise of mBJ potential and the spirit of the well-established DFT + U method leads to a much improved description of the electronic structures, including the most challenging narrow-gap systems. A survey of the band gaps of about 20 Cu-based semiconductors calculated using the mBJ + U method shows that the results agree with reliable values to within ±0.2 eV.

  6. Catalyst suppliers consolidate further, offer more catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1995-10-02

    The list of suppliers of catalysts to the petroleum refining industry has decreased by five since Oil and Gas Journal`s survey of refining catalysts and catalytic additives was last published. Despite the consolidation, the list of catalyst designations has grown to about 950 in this latest survey, compared to 820 listed in 1993. The table divides the catalysts by use and gives data on their primary differentiating characteristics, feedstock, products, form, bulk density,catalyst support, active agents, availability, and manufactures.

  7. Iridium(III) 1-Phenylisoquinoline Complexes as a Photosensitizer for Photocatalytic CO2 Reduction: A Mixed System with a Re(I) Catalyst and a Supramolecular Photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, Yusuke; Ishitani, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    An Ir(III) complex with 1-phenylisoquinoline (piq) ligands [Ir(piq)2(dmb)](+) (Ir, dmb = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) exhibited strong absorption in the visible region, and the lifetime of its excited state was very long (τ = 2.8 μs). Photochemical reduction of Ir efficiently proceeded with 1-benzyl-1,4-dihydronicotinamide (BNAH) and 1,3-dimethyl-2-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-benzo[d]imidazole (BIH) as reductants, giving the one-electron-reduced species (OERS), which was stable in solution at ambient temperature. The OERS of the Ir complex possessed strong reductive power, sufficient to supply an electron to fac-Re(dmb)(CO)3Br (Re). The photocatalytic reduction of CO2 proceeded efficiently using a mixed system constructed with Ir as a redox photosensitizer and Re as a catalyst, selectively giving CO (ΦCO = 0.16 using BNAH at λex = 480 nm). Ir was a more suitable photosensitizer for evaluating the activity of the Re catalyst in the photocatalytic reaction compared to [Ru(dmb)3](2+) (Ru) because the Ir complex was more stable in the photocatalytic reaction, and its decomposition products did not function as catalysts for CO2 reduction while the decomposition products of the Ru complex functioned as catalysts for the reduction of CO2 to HCOOH, inducing a drastic perturbation of the product distribution. A supramolecular photocatalyst (Ir-Re), in which the Ir(III) photosensitizer and the Re(I) catalyst were connected by a bridging ligand, was newly synthesized. When using BNAH, Ir-Re possessed a greater photocatalytic ability (ΦCO = 0.21, TONCO = 130) than the corresponding mixed system of the Ir and Re mononuclear complexes. Using BIH as the reductant, both Ir-Re and the mixed system showed very high photocatalytic activity (ΦCO = 0.40-0.41, TONCO = 1700). PMID:27212275

  8. In situ generated highly active copper oxide catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction at low overpotential in alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Cui, Shengsheng; Qian, Manman; Sun, Zijun; Du, Pingwu

    2016-04-25

    Developing efficient water oxidation catalysts made up of earth-abundant elements has attracted much attention as a step toward for future clean energy production. Herein we report a simple one-step method to generate a low cost copper oxide catalyst film in situ from a copper(ii) ethylenediamine complex. The resulting catalyst has excellent activity toward the oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline solutions. A catalytic current density of 1.0 mA cm(-2) and 10 mA cm(-2) for the catalyst film requires the overpotentials of only ∼370 mV and ∼475 mV in 1.0 M KOH, respectively. This catalytic performance shows that the new catalyst is one of the best Cu-based heterogeneous OER catalysts to date. PMID:27020763

  9. In-line localized monitoring of catalyst activity in selective catalytic NO.sub.x reduction systems

    DOEpatents

    Muzio, Lawrence J.; Smith, Randall A.

    2009-12-22

    Localized catalyst activity in an SCR unit for controlling emissions from a boiler, power plant, or any facility that generates NO.sub.x-containing flue gases is monitored by one or more modules that operate on-line without disrupting the normal operation of the facility. Each module is positioned over a designated lateral area of one of the catalyst beds in the SCR unit, and supplies ammonia, urea, or other suitable reductant to the catalyst in the designated area at a rate that produces an excess of the reductant over NO.sub.x on a molar basis through the designated area. Sampling probes upstream and downstream of the designated area draw samples of the gas stream for NO.sub.x analysis, and the catalyst activity is determined from the difference in NO.sub.x levels between the two probes.

  10. Development of a condenser for the dual catalyst water recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinikas, P.; Rasouli, F.; Rabadi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual evaporation/condensation systems suitable for integration with the catalytic water recovery method were evaluated. The primary requirements for each concept were its capability to operate under zero-gravity conditions, condense recovered water from a vapor-noncondensable gas mixture, and integrate with the catalytic system. Specific energy requirements were estimated for concepts meeting the primary requirements, and the concept most suitable for integration with the catalytic system was proposed. A three-man rate condenser capable of integration with the proposed system, condensing water vapor in presence of noncondensables and transferring the heat of condensation to feed urine was designed, fabricated, and tested. It was treated with steam/air mixtures at atmospheric and elevated pressures and integrated with an actual catalytic water recovery system. The condenser has a condensation efficiency exceeding 90% and heat transfer rate of approximately 85% of theoretical value at coolant temperature ranging from 7 to 80 deg C.

  11. Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, P.K.; Rabo, J.A.

    1985-12-03

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C[sub 5][sup +] hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising a SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  12. Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOEpatents

    Coughlin, Peter K.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1985-01-01

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  13. [Catalyst research]. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ian P Rothwell; David R McMillin

    2005-03-14

    Research results are the areas of catalyst precursor synthesis, catalyst fluxionality, catalyst stability, polymerization of {alpha}-olefins as well as the chemistry of Group IV and Group V metal centers with aryloxide and arylsulfide ligands.

  14. Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure

    DOEpatents

    Krumpel, Michael; Liu, Di-Jia

    2009-03-24

    The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

  15. Cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts bearing phosphine ligands.

    PubMed

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-02-28

    The discovery of highly active catalysts and the success of ionic liquid immobilized systems have accelerated attention to a new class of cationic metathesis catalysts. We herein report the facile syntheses of cationic ruthenium catalysts bearing bulky phosphine ligands. Simple ligand exchange using silver(i) salts of non-coordinating or weakly coordinating anions provided either PPh3 or chelating Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2 (n = 2 or 3) ligated cationic catalysts. The structures of these newly reported catalysts feature unique geometries caused by ligation of the bulky phosphine ligands. Their activities and selectivities in standard metathesis reactions were also investigated. These cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts reported here showed moderate activity and very similar stereoselectivity when compared to the second generation ruthenium dichloride catalyst in ring-closing metathesis, cross metathesis, and ring-opening metathesis polymerization assays.

  16. Four-man rated dual catalyst system for the recovery of water from urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.

    1978-01-01

    The catalytic system was integrated with a 4-man rated urine wick evaporator. During operation, urine vapor produced by the wick-evaporator was treated in the catalytic system to remove ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons, and water was recovered by condensation in a water cooled condenser. The system operated completely automatically and required no manual adjustments, except periodic supply of urine and removal of the recovered water. Although the system was designed for treating 0.325 kg urine per hour, this rate could be achieved only with a fresh wick, then gradually decreased as the wick became saturated with urine solids. The average urine treatment rates achieved during each of the three endurance tests were 0.137, 0.217, and 0.235 kg/hr. The quality of the recovered water meets drinking water standards, with the exception of a generally low pH.

  17. Reactor system for conversion of alkanes to alkenes in a external fcc catalyst cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1991-05-28

    This patent describes a fluid catalytic cracking reactor system. It comprises: pressurized regenerator vessel means; first valved conduit means; dehydrogenation reactor means; fluid handling means; second valved conduit means; and third conduit means.

  18. Integrated System in the Malaysian Education Paradigm: A Catalyst for a Holistic Personality Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Othman, Nooraini; Mohamad, Khairul Azmi

    2014-01-01

    This paper intends to describe and analyse the process of education reform that has taken place in Malaysia. Islamisation plays a major role in such reform. The approach is innovative and novel in nature. Historically, Malaysia was under the British colony and the British left a strong impact in the education system. Naturally the position of…

  19. Can main group systems act as superior catalysts for dihydrogen generation reactions? A computational investigation.

    PubMed

    Kuriakose, Nishamol; Vanka, Kumar

    2016-04-14

    The protolytic cleavage of the O-H bond in water and alcohols is a very important reaction, and an important method for producing dihydrogen. Full quantum chemical studies with density functional theory (DFT) reveal that germanium based complexes, such as HC{CMeArB}2GeH (Ar = 2,6-(i)Pr2C6H3), with the assistance of silicon based compounds such as SiF3H, can perform significantly better than the existing state-of-the-art post-transition metal based systems for catalyzing dihydrogen generation from water and alcohols through the protolysis reaction.

  20. Method of treating emissions of a hybrid vehicle with a hydrocarbon absorber and a catalyst bypass system

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Bryan Nathaniel; Gonze, Eugene V; Santoso, Halim G; Spohn, Brian L

    2014-01-14

    A method of treating emissions from an internal combustion engine of a hybrid vehicle includes directing a flow of air created by the internal combustion engine when the internal combustion engine is spinning but not being fueled through a hydrocarbon absorber to collect hydrocarbons within the flow of air. When the hydrocarbon absorber is full and unable to collect additional hydrocarbons, the flow of air is directed through an electrically heated catalyst to treat the flow of air and remove the hydrocarbons. When the hydrocarbon absorber is not full and able to collect additional hydrocarbons, the flow of air is directed through a bypass path that bypasses the electrically heated catalyst to conserve the thermal energy stored within the electrically heated catalyst.

  1. Wet air oxidation of pretreatment of pharmaceutical wastewater by Cu2+ and [PxWmOy]q- co-catalyst system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guowen; Wang, Dong; Xu, Xiaochen; Liu, Lifen; Yang, Fenglin

    2012-05-30

    This study concentrates on the pretreatment of real wastewater using catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO). WO(3-) and PO(4)(3-) contained in fosfomycin pharmaceutical wastewater (FPW) and Cu(2+) contained in berberine pharmaceutical wastewater (BPW) were studied as CWAO influent. Mixture of this two streams were reused to form Cu(2+) and [P(x)W(m)O(y)](q-), namely polyoxometalates (POMs) as co-catalyst system to treat themselves. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the initial oxygen pressure and temperature on the COD (chemical oxygen demand), TOC (total organic carbon) removal and biodegradable enhancement, it was discovered that over 40% of COD and TOC removal can be easily realized in an hour of WAO oxidation at 523 K, 1.4 MPa. The BOD(5)/COD (BOD(5), biochemical oxygen demand in 5 days) of this two pharmaceutical mixture ascended from nonexistent to maximum 0.41 depends on the optimal FPW:BPW volume ratio 4:1, to compose POM co-catalyst system. Organic pollutants were incompletely oxidized to propionic acid and other intermediates. Some properties (e.g., TGA, IR, XRF) of POM catalyst separated from effluent, were obtained to provide additional information. PMID:22494900

  2. Design, fabrication and testing of a dual catalyst ammonia removal system for a urine VCD unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinikas, P.

    1980-01-01

    A three-man capacity catalytic system for the recovery of water from urine was designed, constructed, and tested, it was designed to operate with feed streams containing high concentrations of urine vapor and only 5 to 7% of oxygen for the oxidation of ammonia and volatile organic vapor.It can operate either in a flow-through or a recycle mode and is capable of accepting the urine vapor produced by a vapor compression distillation evaporator. Testing consisted of short preliminary and optimization test, an endurance test of 74 hours continuous operation, and recycle tests using both air and oxygen. The system was designed for a urine processing rate of 0.86 liters/hr; however, it was tested at rates up to 1.2 liter/hr. Untreated urine evaporated by an electrically heated evaporator was used. The quality of the recovered water meets the U.S. Drinking Water Standards, with the exception of a low pH. Accumulation of solids in the urine sludge is reduced to approximately 65% of the anticipated value.

  3. 2D-QSPR/DFT studies of aryl-substituted PNP-Cr-based catalyst systems for highly selective ethylene oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Tang, Siyang; Liu, Zhen; Zhan, Xingwen; Cheng, Ruihua; He, Xuelian; Liu, Boping

    2014-03-01

    1-Hexene and 1-octene are important comonomers for the synthesis of high performance polyolefins. Recently, various N-substituted Cr-bis(diphenylphosphino)amine (PNP-Cr) catalysts show the potential as excellent candidates for highly selective ethylene trimerization/tetramerization. In this work, a series of aryl-substituted PNP-Cr catalysts were studied by two-dimensional quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) method based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The heuristic method (HM) and best multi-linear regression (BMLR) were used to establish the best linear regression models to describe the relationship between selectivities and catalyst structures. Both Cr(I) and Cr(II) active site models for ethylene trimerization/tetramerization were considered. It was found that 1) the relativity and stability of the models were increased by using self-defined descriptors based on DFT calculations; 2) Cr(I)/Cr(III) centers were the most plausible active sites for ethylene trimerization, while Cr(II)/Cr(IV) active sites were most possibly responsible for ethylene tetramerization; and 3) the skeleton structures of the PNP-Cr system with good complanation and symmetry were crucial for achieving excellent catalytic selectivity of 1-octene, while the PNP-Cr backbone with a large steric effect on N atom would benefit ethylene trimerization. Six new PNP ligands with high selectivity toward ethylene trimerization/tetramerization were predicted based on descriptor analysis and the best linear regression models providing a good basis for further development of novel catalyst systems with better performance. PMID:24554126

  4. Systems including catalysts in porous zeolite materials within a reactor for use in synthesizing hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Rolllins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2012-07-24

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  5. Ceria nanoclusters on graphene/Ru(0001): A new model catalyst system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Z.; Netzer, F. P.; Dohnálek, Z.

    2016-10-01

    The growth of ceria nanoclusters on single-layer graphene on Ru(0001) has been examined, with a view towards fabricating a stable system for model catalysis studies. The surface morphology and cluster distribution as a function of oxide coverage and substrate temperature has been monitored by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), whereas the chemical composition of the cluster deposits has been determined by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The ceria nanoparticles are of the CeO2(111)-type and are anchored at the intrinsic defects of the graphene surface, resulting in a variation of the cluster densities across the macroscopic sample surface. The ceria clusters on graphene display a remarkable stability against reduction in ultrahigh vacuum up to 900 K, but some sintering of clusters is observed for temperatures > 450 K. The evolution of the cluster size distribution suggests that the sintering proceeds via a Smoluchowski ripening mechanism, i.e. diffusion and aggregation of entire clusters.

  6. Ceria nanoclusters on graphene/Ru(0001): A new model catalyst system

    DOE PAGES

    Novotny, Z.; Netzer, F. P.; Dohnalek, Z.

    2016-03-22

    In this study, the growth of ceria nanoclusters on single-layer graphene on Ru(0001) has been examined, with a view towards fabricating a stable system for model catalysis studies. The surface morphology and cluster distribution as a function of oxide coverage and substrate temperature has been monitored by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), whereas the chemical composition of the cluster deposits has been determined by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The ceria nanoparticles are of the CeO2(111)-type and are anchored at the intrinsic defects of the graphene surface, resulting in a variation of the cluster densities across the macroscopic sample surface. The ceriamore » clusters on graphene display a remarkable stability against reduction in ultrahigh vacuum up to 900 K, but some sintering of clusters is observed for temperatures > 450 K. The evolution of the cluster size distribution suggests that the sintering proceeds via a Smoluchowski ripening mechanism, i.e. diffusion and aggregation of entire clusters.« less

  7. Polytypic Nanocrystals of Cu-Based Ternary Chalcogenides: Colloidal Synthesis and Photoelectrochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Chen, Shi-You; Fan, Feng-Jia; Zhuang, Tao-Tao; Dai, Chen-Min; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-05-01

    Heterocrystalline polytype nanostructured semiconductors have been attracting more and more attention in recent years due to their novel structures and special interfaces. Up to now, controlled polytypic nanostructures are mostly realized in II-VI and III-V semiconductors. Herein, we report the synthesis and photoelectrochemical properties of Cu-based ternary I-III-VI2 chalcogenide polytypic nanocrystals, with a focus on polytypic CuInS2 (CIS), CuInSe2 (CISe), and CuIn(S0.5Se0.5)2 alloy nanocrystals. Each obtained polytypic nanocrystal is constructed with a wurtzite hexagonal column and a zinc blende/chalcopyrite cusp, regardless of the S/Se ratio. The growth mechanisms of polytypic CIS and CISe nanocrystals have been studied by time-dependent experiments. The polytypic nanocrystals are solution-deposited on indium-tin oxide glass substrate and used as a photoelectrode, thus showing stable photoelectrochemical activity in aqueous solution. Density functional theory calculation was used to study the electronic structure and the band gap alignment. This versatile synthetic method provides a new route for synthesis of novel polytypic nanostructured semiconductors with unique properties. PMID:27063512

  8. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Laura J.; Bray, Lane A.

    1995-01-01

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications.

  9. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    DOEpatents

    Silva, L.J.; Bray, L.A.

    1995-05-30

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: (a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; (b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; (c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and (d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications. 3 figs.

  10. Low-temperature catalytic oxidative coupling of methane in an electric field over a Ce–W–O catalyst system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Kei; Ogo, Shuhei; Iwasaki, Kousei; Yabe, Tomohiro; Sekine, Yasushi

    2016-04-01

    We examined oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) over various Ce–W–O catalysts at 423 K in an electric field. Ce2(WO4)3/CeO2 catalyst showed high OCM activity. In a periodic operation test over Ce2(WO4)3/CeO2 catalyst, C2 selectivity exceeded 60% during three redox cycles. However, Ce2(WO4)3/CeO2 catalyst without the electric field showed low activity, even at 1073 K: CH4 Conv., 6.0%; C2 Sel., 2.1%. A synergetic effect between the Ce2(WO4)3 structure and electric field created the reactive oxygen species for selective oxidation of methane. Results of XAFS, in-situ Raman and periodic operation tests demonstrated that OCM occurred as the lattice oxygen in Ce2(WO4)3 (short W–O bonds in distorted WO4 unit) was consumed. The consumed oxygen was reproduced by a redox mechanism in the electric field.

  11. Nanostructured Catalyst Systems for Fuel Cells: Synthesis and Characterization of Low Platinum Content Electrocatalysts for O{sub 2} Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Adzic, Radoslav

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this project is to synthesize and characterize new O{sub 2} reduction catalysts with enhanced activity and ultra low Pt loading, and to test them in membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) to determine their performance under fuel cell cathode operating conditions.

  12. Low-temperature catalytic oxidative coupling of methane in an electric field over a Ce–W–O catalyst system

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Kei; Ogo, Shuhei; Iwasaki, Kousei; Yabe, Tomohiro; Sekine, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    We examined oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) over various Ce–W–O catalysts at 423 K in an electric field. Ce2(WO4)3/CeO2 catalyst showed high OCM activity. In a periodic operation test over Ce2(WO4)3/CeO2 catalyst, C2 selectivity exceeded 60% during three redox cycles. However, Ce2(WO4)3/CeO2 catalyst without the electric field showed low activity, even at 1073 K: CH4 Conv., 6.0%; C2 Sel., 2.1%. A synergetic effect between the Ce2(WO4)3 structure and electric field created the reactive oxygen species for selective oxidation of methane. Results of XAFS, in-situ Raman and periodic operation tests demonstrated that OCM occurred as the lattice oxygen in Ce2(WO4)3 (short W–O bonds in distorted WO4 unit) was consumed. The consumed oxygen was reproduced by a redox mechanism in the electric field. PMID:27118726

  13. Catalytic asymmetric intramolecular hydroamination of alkynes in the presence of a catalyst system consisting of Pd(0)-methyl Norphos (or tolyl Renorphos)-benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Narsireddy, Meda; Yamamoto, Yoshinori

    2008-12-19

    Enantiomerically pure methyl Norphos (A), tolyl Norphos (B), CF(3) Norphos (C), methyl Renorphos (D), and tolyl Renorphos (E) were synthesized and used as chiral bisphosphine ligands for the catalyst system, Pd(2)(dba)(3) x CHCl(3)/PhCOOH, in an intramolecular hydroamination of aminoalkynes 15. Among the Norphos series, methyl Norphos (A) was the best ligand for the hydroamination, and the corresponding five- and six-membered nitrogen heterocycles 16 were obtained in high yields with high enantioselectivities. Among the Renorphos series, tolyl Renorphos (E) gave the best result; both methyl Norphos (A) and tolyl Renorphos (E) afforded high yields and high enantioselectivities. NMR investigation using Me-Norphos revealed that this ligand was oxidized gradually in the presence of Pd(2)(dba)(3).CHCl(3) in C(6)D(6) even under the conditions using Ar atmosphere to give Me-Norphos oxide, which prevented the intramolecular hydroamination. On the other hand, Me-Norphos was rather stable in C(6)D(6) in the absence of the palladium catalyst under Ar atmosphere and was not converted to its oxide even after 3 days. The gradual oxidation of ligands (A and E) in the presence of the Pd catalyst is perhaps a reason why 20 mol % of A or E was needed to obtain high yields and high ee's of 16. PMID:18855453

  14. Long-Life Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STC Catalysts, Inc. (SCi) manufactures a noble metal reducible oxide catalyst consisting primarily of platinum and tin dioxide deposited on a ceramic substrate. It is an ambient temperature oxidation catalyst that was developed primarily for Carbon Dioxide Lasers.The catalyst was developed by the NASA Langley Research Center for the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder Program (LAWS) which was intended to measure wind velocity on a global basis. There are a number of NASA owned patents covering various aspects of the catalyst.

  15. Method for reactivating catalysts and a method for recycling supercritical fluids used to reactivate the catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2008-08-05

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  16. Combinatorial methods in catalyst development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterbach, Jochen

    2002-03-01

    The discovery of novel catalytic materials has traditionally followed a hypothesize-and-test methodology with limited systematic guidance. In the past few years, a high-throughput approach to catalysis has emerged, which includes efficient sample preparation, parallel processing, and rapid sequential or parallel testing of large diversities of different catalytic materials. A short review of high-throughput screening techniques will be presented. We combine computer-aided materials design techniques with high-throughput screening methodologies for automating and systematizing the catalyst design process. Rapid-scan Fourier transform infrared hyperspectral imaging is used as the main tool for the parallel investigation of multiple member supported catalyst systems. It combines the chemical specificity of infrared spectroscopy with the ability to rapidly analyze multiple samples simultaneously. Using CO oxidation, propylene oxidation, and NO decomposition as model systems, it will be demonstrated that FTIR imaging is well suited to high throughput parallel analysis of reaction products from supported catalyst libraries. A novel, systems-oriented, integrated knowledge architecture that enables the use of high-throughput data for catalyst design will be presented. This new approach involves solving the forward problem of performance prediction using hybrid first principles, rule-based and statistical models and then using that solution to solve the inverse problem: the determination of the optimal catalyst descriptors that meet the target performance.

  17. Direct writing of Cu-based micro-temperature detectors using femtosecond laser reduction of CuO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoshiri, Mizue; Arakane, Shun; Sakurai, Junpei; Hata, Seiichi

    2016-03-01

    Cu-based micro-temperature detectors were fabricated using femtosecond laser reduction of CuO nanoparticles. Cu-based microstructures were directly created by laser scanning on a CuO nanoparticle solution film. Cu-rich and Cu2O-rich microstructures were selectively formed to electrically connect two Cu thin-film electrodes for use in temperature detectors. Cu-rich and Cu2O-rich micro-temperature detectors were fabricated at scanning speeds of 500 and 1000 µm/s, respectively, at a pulse energy of 1.2 nJ. The temperature coefficient of resistance values of the Cu-rich and Cu2O-rich microstructures were positive and negative, respectively; these temperature behaviors are typical of metal and semiconductor materials, respectively.

  18. A hybrid photocatalytic system comprising ZnS as light harvester and an [Fe(2)S(2)] hydrogenase mimic as hydrogen evolution catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fuyu; Wang, Xiuli; Huang, Lei; Ma, Guijun; Yang, Jinhui; Li, Can

    2012-05-01

    Photo opportunity: A highly efficient and stable hybrid artificial photosynthetic H(2) evolution system is assembled by using a semiconductor (ZnS) as light-harvester and an [Fe(2)S(2)] hydrogenase mimic ([(μ-SPh-4-NH(2) )(2) Fe(2) (CO)(6)]) as catalyst for H(2) evolution. Photocatalytic H(2) production is achieved with more than 2607 turnovers (based on [Fe(2)S(2)]) and an initial turnover frequency of 100 h(-1) through the efficient transfer of photogenerated electrons from ZnS to the [Fe(2)S(2)] complex.

  19. General and facile method for exo-methlyene synthesis via regioselective C-C double-bond formation using a copper-amine catalyst system.

    PubMed

    Nishikata, Takashi; Nakamura, Kimiaki; Itonaga, Kohei; Ishikawa, Shingo

    2014-11-01

    In this study, for distal-selective β-hydride elimination to produce exomethylene compounds with a newly formed Csp(3)-Csp(3) bond between tertiary alkyl halides and α-alkylated styrenes, a combination of a Cu(I) salt and a pyridine-based amine ligand (TPMA) is found to be a very efficient catalyst system. The yields and regioselectivities were high, and the regioselectivity was found to be dependent on the structure of the alkyl halide, with bulky alkyl halides showing the highest distal selectivities. PMID:25315319

  20. CO-induced inversion of the layer sequence of a model CoCu catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinge, Greg; Xiang, Yizhi; Barbosa, Roland; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Kruse, Norbert

    2016-06-01

    Experimental X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal the electronic and structural properties of CoCu catalysts before and after CO adsorption. DFT calculations show that, prior to CO adsorption, CoCu has a high tendency to self-assemble into a Co@Cu core-shell structure, which is in accordance with previous atom probe tomography (APT) results for CoCu-based systems and the known mutually low miscibility of Co and Cu. We demonstrate that Co and Cu are electronically immiscible using a density of states (DOS) analysis wherein neither metal's electronic structure is greatly perturbed by the other in "mixed" CoCu. However, CO adsorption on Co is in fact weakened in CoCu compared to CO adsorption on pure Co despite being electronically unchanged in the alloy. Differential charge density analysis suggests that this is likely due to a lower electron density made available to Co by Cu. CO adsorption at coverages up to 1.00 ML are then investigated on a Cu/Co(0001) model slab to demonstrate CO-induced segregation effects in CoCu. Accordingly, a large driving force for a Co surface enrichment is found. At high coverages, CO can completely invert the layer sequence of Co and Cu. This result is echoed by XPS evidence, which shows that the surface Co/Cu ratio of CoCu is much larger in the presence of CO than in H2.

  1. Syngas Conversion to Gasoline-Range Hydrocarbons over Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 and ZSM-5 Composite Catalyst System

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, Robert A.; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Gray, Michel J.; White, James F.; King, David L.; Palo, Daniel R.

    2014-07-01

    A composite Pd/ZnO/Al2O3-HZSM-5 (Si/Al=40) catalytic system was evaluated for the synthesis of gasoline-range hydrocarbons directly from synthesis gas. Bifunctional catalyst comprising PdZn metal and acid sites present the required catalytically active sites necessary for the methanol synthesis, methanol dehydration, and methanol-to-gasoline reactions. This system provides a unique catalytic pathway for the production of liquid hydrocarbons directly from syngas. However, selectivity control is difficult and poses many challenges. The composite catalytic system was evaluated under various process conditions. Investigated were the effects of temperature (310-375oC), pressure (300-1000 psig), time-on-stream (50 hrs), and gas-hour space velocity (740-2970 hr-1), using a H2/CO molar syngas ratio of 2.0. By operating at the lower end of the temperature range investigated, liquid hydrocarbon formation was favored, as was decreased amounts of undesirable light hydrocarbons. However, lower operating temperatures also facilitated undesirable CO2 formation via the water-gas shift reaction. Higher operating pressures slightly favored liquid synthesis. Operating at relatively low pressures (e.g. 300 psig) was made possible, whereas for methanol synthesis alone higher pressure are usually required to achieve similar conversion levels (e.g. 1000 psig). Thermodynamic constraints on methanol synthesis are eased by pushing the equilibrium through hydrocarbon formation. Catalytic performance was also evaluated by altering Pd and Zn composition of the Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst. Of the catalysts and conditions tested, selectivity toward liquid hydrocarbon was highest when using a 5% Pd metal loading and Pd/Zn molar ratio of 0.25 and mixed with HZMS-5, operating at 310oC and 300 psig, CO conversion was 43 % and selectivity (carbon weight basis) to hydrocarbons was 49 wt. %. Of the hydrocarbon fraction, 44wt. % was in the C5-C12 liquid product range and consisted primarily of aromatic

  2. Development of industrial catalysts for sustainable chlorine production.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, Cecilia; Amrute, Amol P; Moser, Maximilian; Schmidt, Timm; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The heterogeneously catalyzed gas-phase oxidation of HCl to Cl(2) offers an energy-efficient and eco- friendly route to recover chlorine from HCl-containing byproduct streams in the chemical industry. This process has attracted renewed interest in the last decade due to an increased chlorine demand and the growing excess of byproduct HCl from chlorination processes. Since its introduction (by Deacon in 1868) and till recent times, the industrialization of this reaction has been hindered by the lack of sufficiently active and durable materials. Recently, RuO(2)-based catalysts with outstanding activity and stability have been designed and they are being implemented for large-scale Cl(2) recycling. Herein, we review the main limiting features of traditional Cu-based catalysts and survey the key steps in the development of the new generation of industrial RuO(2)-based materials. As the expansion of this technology would benefit from cheaper, but comparably robust, alternatives to RuO(2)-based catalysts, a nov el CeO(2)-based catalyst which offers promising perspectives for application in this field has been introduced.

  3. Ethanol synthesis and water gas shift over bifunctional sulfide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Richards-Babb, M.

    1992-06-01

    During this quarter, the high pressure (up to 100 atm), high temperature (up to 350{degrees}C) catalyst testing system was rebuilt with clean tubing, etc. A new preparation of MoS{sub 2} catalyst was carried out, and this catalyst will be doped with alkali and tested during the next quarter of research.

  4. Self-organization of Cu-based immiscible alloys under irradiation: An atom-probe tomography study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumphy, Brad D.

    The stability of materials subjected to prolonged irradiation has been a topic of renewed interest in recent years due to the projected growth of nuclear power as an alternative energy source. The irradiating particles impart energy into the material, thereby causing atomic displacements to occur. These displacements result in the creation of point defects and the random ballistic mixing of the atoms. Consequently, the material is driven away from its equilibrium structure. The supersaturation of defects can lead to the degradation of mechanical properties, but a high density of internal interfaces, which act as defect sinks, will suppress the supersaturation and long-range transport of defects. The microstructural evolution of the material is controlled by the ballistic mixing as well as the mobility of the point defects. In immiscible alloys, these two processes compete against one another, as the ballistic mixing acts to solutionize the alloy components, and the thermal diffusion of the large number of defects acts to phase separate the components. The work presented in this dissertation examines the effect of heavy-ion irradiation on immiscible, binary Cu-based alloys. Dilute alloys of Cu-Fe, Cu-V, and V-Cu have been subjected to irradiation, and atom-probe tomography has been utilized in order to better understand the complex nature of the response of these simple model systems to an irradiation environment. The results show that a steady-state, nano-scale patterning structure, with a high density of unsaturable defect sinks, can be maintained under prolonged irradiation. Additionally, precipitation from a supersaturated solid solution is shown to be a function of both the thermal diffusion and the ballistic mixing. Solvent-rich secondary precipitates, termed "cherry-pits," are observed inside of the solute-rich primary precipitates. Through a combination of simulation work and analyzing multiple alloys experimentally, it was determined that this cherry

  5. Tethered catalysts for the hydration of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Lightstone, Felice C; Stolaroff, Joshuah K

    2014-11-04

    A system is provided that substantially increases the efficiency of CO.sub.2 capture and removal by positioning a catalyst within an optimal distance from the air-liquid interface. The catalyst is positioned within the layer determined to be the highest concentration of carbon dioxide. A hydrophobic tether is attached to the catalyst and the hydrophobic tether modulates the position of the catalyst within the liquid layer containing the highest concentration of carbon dioxide.

  6. Characterization of three-way automotive catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kenik, E.A.; More, K.L.; LaBarge, W.

    1995-05-01

    This has been the second year of a CRADA between General Motors - AC Delco Systems (GM-ACDS) and Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES) aimed at improved performance/lifetime of platinum-rhodium based three-way-catalysts (TWC) for automotive emission control systems. While current formulations meet existing emission standards, higher than optimum Pt-Rh loadings are often required. In additionk, more stringent emission standards have been imposed for the near future, demanding improved performance and service life from these catalysts. Understanding the changes of TWC conversion efficiency with ageing is a critical need in improving these catalysts.

  7. A Mechanochemically Triggered "Click" Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Michael, Philipp; Binder, Wolfgang H

    2015-11-16

    "Click" chemistry represents one of the most powerful approaches for linking molecules in chemistry and materials science. Triggering this reaction by mechanical force would enable site- and stress-specific "click" reactions--a hitherto unreported observation. We introduce the design and realization of a homogeneous Cu catalyst able to activate through mechanical force when attached to suitable polymer chains, acting as a lever to transmit the force to the central catalytic system. Activation of the subsequent copper-catalyzed "click" reaction (CuAAC) is achieved either by ultrasonication or mechanical pressing of a polymeric material, using a fluorogenic dye to detect the activation of the catalyst. Based on an N-heterocyclic copper(I) carbene with attached polymeric chains of different flexibility, the force is transmitted to the central catalyst, thereby activating a CuAAC in solution and in the solid state. PMID:26420664

  8. Catalyst regeneration with flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1989-09-19

    This patent describes an integrated once through reactor system for regenerating acidic medium pore zeolite olefin or oxygenate feedstock conversion catalyst with flue gas. It comprises in combination: fluid catalytic cracking catalyst regenerator means for providing the flue gas containing oxygen; at least two fixed bed reactor means for containing the zeolite catalyst, the reactor means receivably connected to the regenerator means for alternately receiving the flue gas therefrom; feedstock conduit means connected to the reactor means for alternately transferring the feedstock thereto; conversion product conduit means receivably connected to the reactor means for alternately transferring the product therefrom; flue gas conduit means receivably connected to the reactor means for alternately transferring flue gas therefrom.

  9. Establishing the Family of Diruthenium Water Oxidation Catalysts Based on the Bis(bipyridyl)pyrazolate Ligand System.

    PubMed

    Neudeck, Sven; Maji, Somnath; López, Isidoro; Dechert, Sebastian; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Llobet, Antoni; Meyer, Franc

    2016-03-01

    A bis(bipyridyl)pyrazolate ((Me)bbp(-)) has recently been introduced as a rugged dinucleating, bis(tridentate) ligand for the formation of efficient diruthenium water oxidation catalysts (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 24-27). Now, detailed protocols for the synthesis of a whole family of such dinuclear ruthenium complexes [{Ru(pyR(2))2}2(μ-(R1)bbp)(X,Y)](2+) based on the bis(bipyridyl)pyrazolate scaffold are reported. The isolation of a synthetic key intermediate allowed the straightforward introduction of different pyridines as axial ligands. Thereby, a set of complexes with different substituents at the pyrazolate backbone (R(1) = Br, H, Me), different pyridines as axial ligand (R(2) = H, NMe2, SO3), and different (non)bridging units in the in,in-position (X,Y = Cl, H2O, OAc) has been prepared and thoroughly characterized. Complexes of the type [{Ru(pyR(2))2}2(μ-(R1)bbp)(μ-OAc)](2+), with an exogenous acetato bridge, have been used as catalyst precursors in catalytic water oxidation experiments with a sacrificial oxidant. The effect of substitution on the pyrazole core of the (R1)bbp(-) ligand as well as on the pyridine ligands on both electrochemistry and catalytic activity has been systematically investigated. The catalyst stability, reflected by the turnover number, is crucially determined by the substituent at the pyrazolate ligand (R(1) = Me > H > Br). In contrast, the axial pyridine ligands modulate the rate of the catalytic process, expressed by the initial turnover frequency (R(2) = H > NMe2H(+)). PMID:26894408

  10. Monopropellant engine investigation for space shuttle reaction control system. Volume 3: Improvement of metal foam for catalyst retention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The retention of granular catalyst in a metal foam matrix was demonstrated to greatly increase the life capability of hydrazine monopropellant reactors. Since nickel foam used in previous tests was found to become degraded after long-term exposure the cause of degradation was examined and metal foams of improved durability were developed. The most durable foam developed was a rhodium-coated nickel foam. An all-platinum foam was found to be incompatible in a hot ammonia (hydrazine) environment. It is recommended to scale up the manufacturing process for the improved foam to produce samples sufficiently large for space shuttle APU gas generator testing.

  11. Metal/metal oxide doped oxide catalysts having high deNOx selectivity for lean NOx exhaust aftertreatment systems

    DOEpatents

    Park, Paul W.

    2004-03-16

    A lean NOx catalyst and method of preparing the same is disclosed. The lean NOx catalyst includes a ceramic substrate, an oxide support material, preferably .gamma.-alumina, deposited on the substrate and a metal promoter or dopant introduced into the oxide support material. The metal promoters or dopants are selected from the group consisting of indium, gallium, tin, silver, germanium, gold, nickel, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chromium, cerium, vanadium, oxides thereof, and combinations thereof. The .gamma.-alumina preferably has a pore volume of from about 0.5 to about 2.0 cc/g; a surface area of between about 80 to 350 m.sup.2 /g; an average pore size diameter of between about 3 to 30 nm; and an impurity level of less than or equal to 0.2 weight percent. In a preferred embodiment the .gamma.-alumina is prepared by a sol-gel method, with the metal doping of the .gamma.-alumina preferably accomplished using an incipient wetness impregnation technique.

  12. Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, R.D.

    1993-10-05

    A process is described for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded. 1 figures.

  13. Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded.

  14. Plasmonic Ag-pillared rectorite as catalyst for degradation of 2,4-DCP in the H2O2-containing system under visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunfang; Fang, Jianzhang; Lu, Shaoyou; Wu, Yan; Chen, Dazhi; Huang, Liyan; Cheng, Cong; Ren, Lu; Zhu, Ximiao; Fang, Zhanqiang

    2015-10-30

    This study aims at photocatalytic degradation of 2,4-DCP with the assistance of H2O2 in aqueous solution by a composite catalyst of Ag-rectorite. The catalysts were prepared via a novel thermal decomposition method followed after the cation-exchange process. The synthesized nano-materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface analyzer, Ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) absorption spectra, field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The different mechanisms of degradation process with or without visible light irradiation were discussed, respectively. Moreover, the degradation efficiency of 2,4-DCP wastewater under Ag-rectorite/H2O2/visible light system was investigated by series of experiments, concerning on effects of major operation factors, such as H2O2 dosage and the initial pH value. The highest degradation rate was observed when adding 0.18 mL H2O2 into 50 mL 2,4-DCP solution, and the optimal pH value was 4 for the reaction. Afterwards, total organic carbon (TOC) experiments were carried out to evaluate the mineralization ratio of 2,4-DCP.

  15. From Molecular Insights to Novel Catalysts Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolla, Eranda; Linic, Suljo

    First-principles methods can be utilized to obtain elementary step mechanisms for chemical reactions on model systems. In this chapter, we will illustrate how this molecular information can be employed to motivate novel heterogeneous catalyst formulations. We will discuss a few examples where first-principles studies on idealized model systems were utilized, along with various experimental tools, to identify alloy catalysts that exhibit improved performance in a number of catalytic processes. We will emphasize the role of molecular approaches in the formulation of these catalysts.

  16. Integrated lipase production and in situ biodiesel synthesis in a recombinant Pichia pastoris yeast: an efficient dual biocatalytic system composed of cell free enzymes and whole cell catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipase-catalyzed biotransformation of acylglycerides or fatty acids into biodiesel via immobilized enzymes or whole cell catalysts has been considered as one of the most promising methods to produce renewable and environmentally friendly alternative liquid fuels, thus being extensively studied so far. In all previously pursued approaches, however, lipase enzymes are prepared in an independent process separated from enzymatic biodiesel production, which would unavoidably increase the cost and energy consumption during industrial manufacture of this cost-sensitive energy product. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel cost-effective biocatalysts and biocatalytic processes with genuine industrial feasibility. Result Inspired by the consolidated bioprocessing of lignocellulose to generate bioethanol, an integrated process with coupled lipase production and in situ biodiesel synthesis in a recombinant P. pastoris yeast was developed in this study. The novel and efficient dual biocatalytic system based on Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase took advantage of both cell free enzymes and whole cell catalysts. The extracellular and intracellular lipases of growing yeast cells were simultaneously utilized to produce biodiesel from waste cooking oils in situ and in one pot. This integrated system effectively achieved 58% and 72% biodiesel yield via concurrent esterified-transesterified methanolysis and stepwise hydrolysis-esterification at 3:1 molar ratio between methanol and waste cooking oils, respectively. Further increasing the molar ratio of methanol to waste cooking oils to 6:1 led to an 87% biodiesel yield using the stepwise strategy. Both water tolerance and methanol tolerance of this novel system were found to be significantly improved compared to previous non-integrated biodiesel production processes using separately prepared immobilized enzymes or whole cell catalysts. Conclusion We have proposed a new concept of integrated biodiesel production

  17. Formation of the thermodeformational properties of Mn-Cu-based alloys having the two-way shape memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosova, G. I.

    2008-08-01

    The specific features of the thermodeformational behavior of Mn-Cu-based alloys with the two-way shape memory effect are revealed, and their connection with the diffusionless fcc → fct phase transition and the forming structure is discussed. The mechanism of the reversible thermal deformation caused by directed internal stresses is considered. The factors that affect the temperature interval of the highest thermal sensitivity and the value of reversible and specific thermal deformation are found, and the possibilities of their change by additional alloying and heat treatment are studied.

  18. Catalyst patterning for nanowire devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nanowire devices may be provided that are based on carbon nanotubes or single-crystal semiconductor nanowires. The nanowire devices may be formed on a substrate. Catalyst sites may be formed on the substrate. The catalyst sites may be formed using lithography, thin metal layers that form individual catalyst sites when heated, collapsible porous catalyst-filled microscopic spheres, microscopic spheres that serve as masks for catalyst deposition, electrochemical deposition techniques, and catalyst inks. Nanowires may be grown from the catalyst sites.

  19. Ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH-responsive ligands: External control of catalyst solubility and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balof, Shawna Lynn

    2011-12-01

    Sixteen novel, Ru-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH responsive ligands were synthesized. The pH-responsive groups employed with these catalysts included dimethylamino (NMe2) modified NHC ligands as well as N-donor dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) and 3-(o-pyridyl)propylidene ligands. These pH-responsive ligands provided the means by which the solubility and/or activity profiles of the catalysts produced could be controlled via acid addition. The main goal of this dissertation was to design catalyst systems capable of performing ring opening metathesis (ROMP) and ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions in both organic and aqueous media. In an effort to quickly gain access to new catalyst structures, a template synthesis for functionalized NHC ligand precursors was designed, in addition to other strategies, to obtain ligand precursors with ancillary NMe2 groups. Kinetic studies for the catalysts produced from these precursors showed external control of catalyst solubility was afforded via protonation of the NMe2 groups of their NHC ligands. Additionally, this protonation afforded external control of catalyst propagation rates for several catalysts. This is the first known independent external control for the propagation rates of ROMP catalysts. The incorporation of pH-responsive N-donor ligands into catalyst structures also provided the means for the external control of metathesis activity, as the protonation of these ligands resulted in an increased initiation rate based on their fast and irreversible dissociation from the metal center. The enhanced external control makes these catalysts applicable to a wide range of applications, some of which have been explored by us and/or through collaboration. Three of the catalysts designed showed remarkable metathesis activity in aqueous media. These catalysts displayed comparable RCM activity in aqueous media to a class of water-soluble catalysts reported by Grubbs et al., considered to be the most active catalyst for

  20. Unraveling a Single-Step Simultaneous Two-Electron Transfer Process from Semiconductor to Molecular Catalyst in a CoPy/CdS Hybrid System for Photocatalytic H2 Evolution under Strong Alkaline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuxing; Ye, Yun; Liu, Taifeng; Wang, Xiuli; Zhang, Bingqing; Wang, Mei; Han, Hongxian; Li, Can

    2016-08-31

    Electron transfer processes from semiconductor to molecular catalysts was studied in a model hybrid photocatalytic hydrogen evolution system composed of [Co((III))(dmgH)2PyCl] (CoPy) and CdS under different pH conditions. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies revealed that photocatalytic H2 evolution under high pH conditions (pH 13.5) can only account for the thermodynamically more favorable single-step simultaneous two-electron transfer from photoirradiated CdS to Co(III)Py to produce unavoidable intermediate Co(I)Py, rather than a two-step successive one-electron transfer process. This finding not only provides new insight into the charge transfer processes between semiconductors and molecular catalysts but also opens up a new avenue for the assembly and optimization of semiconductor-molecular catalyst hybrid systems processed through multielectron transfer processes. PMID:27529565

  1. Enhanced Oxidation Catalysts for Water Reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.

    1999-01-01

    This effort seeks to develop and test high-performance, long operating life, physically stable catalysts for use in spacecraft water reclamation systems. The primary goals are to a) reduce the quantity of expendable water filters used to purify water aboard spacecraft, b) to extend the life of the oxidation catalysts used for eliminating organic contaminants in the water reclamation systems, and c) reduce the weight/volume of the catalytic oxidation systems (e.g. VRA) used. This effort is targeted toward later space station utilization and will consist of developing flight-qualifiable catalysts and long-term ground tests of the catalyst prior to their utilization in flight. Fixed -bed catalytic reactors containing 5% platinum on granular activated carbon have been subjected to long-term dynamic column tests to measure catalyst stability vs throughput. The data generated so far indicate that an order of magnitude improvement can be obtained with the treated catalysts vs the control catalyst, at only a minor loss (approx 10%) in the initial catalytic activity.

  2. Textured catalysts and methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2007-03-06

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  3. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  4. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  5. Hydrotreating catalysts for diesel aromatics saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B.H.; Stanislaus, A.; Hannerup, P.N. )

    1993-06-01

    The aromatics content of diesel feedstocks can vary widely. Straight-run stocks typically contain 20 to 40 vol% aromatics and cracked stocks 40 to 70 vol%. Thus, requirements for aromatics saturation range from moderate to severe depending on refinery location and feedstock availability. Existing middle distillate hydrotreaters designed to reduce sulfur levels can reduce aromatics content only marginally. Considerable attention has, in recent years, been paid to new catalysts and processes for aromatics saturation. The catalyst systems investigated are: (1)Conventional hydrotreating catalysts in single-stage operation; (2)Pt/alumina in two-stage operation; and (3)Sulfur-tolerant noble-metal catalyst in two-stage operation. Which of these systems should be used for a given service depends on many factors, but generally, the NiMo + NiW system is preferred at moderate levels of saturation, while for deep aromatics saturation the system using a sulfur-tolerant noble-metal catalyst is preferred. A comparison of the conditions necessary to obtain given aromatic specifications is made for all four systems. The feedstocks and their properties are summarized in a table. The paper discusses the four catalyst systems mentioned above and operating conditions.

  6. OsO(4) in ionic liquid [Bmim]PF(6): a recyclable and reusable catalyst system for olefin dihydroxylation. remarkable effect of DMAP.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei

    2002-06-27

    [reaction: see text] The combination of the ionic liquid [bmim]PF(6) and DMAP provides a most simple and practical approach to the immobilization of OsO(4) as catalyst for olefin dihydroxylation. Both the catalyst and the ionic liquid can be repeatedly recycled and reused in the dihydroxylation of a variety of olefins with only a very slight drop in catalyst activity. PMID:12074666

  7. OsO(4) in ionic liquid [Bmim]PF(6): a recyclable and reusable catalyst system for olefin dihydroxylation. remarkable effect of DMAP.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingwei

    2002-06-27

    [reaction: see text] The combination of the ionic liquid [bmim]PF(6) and DMAP provides a most simple and practical approach to the immobilization of OsO(4) as catalyst for olefin dihydroxylation. Both the catalyst and the ionic liquid can be repeatedly recycled and reused in the dihydroxylation of a variety of olefins with only a very slight drop in catalyst activity.

  8. Methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  9. First-principles study of the optoelectronic properties and photovoltaic absorber layer efficiency of Cu-based chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmadian, N.; Saniz, R.; Partoens, B.; Lamoen, D.

    2016-08-01

    Cu-based chalcogenides are promising materials for thin-film solar cells with more than 20% measured cell efficiency. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, the optoelectronic properties of a group of Cu-based chalcogenides Cu2-II-IV-VI4 is studied. They are then screened with the aim of identifying potential absorber materials for photovoltaic applications. The spectroscopic limited maximum efficiency (SLME) introduced by Yu and Zunger [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 068701 (2012)] is used as a metric for the screening. After constructing the current-voltage curve, the SLME is calculated from the maximum power output. The role of the nature of the band gap, direct or indirect, and also of the absorptivity of the studied materials on the maximum theoretical power conversion efficiency is studied. Our results show that Cu2II-GeSe4 with II = Cd and Hg, and Cu2-II-SnS4 with II = Cd, Hg, and Zn have a higher theoretical efficiency compared with the materials currently used as absorber layer.

  10. Two-beam Laser Brazing of Thin Sheet Steel for Automotive Industry Using Cu-base Filler Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelstädt, C.; Seefeld, T.; Reitemeyer, D.; Vollertsen, F.

    This work shows the potential of two-beam laser brazing for joining both Zn-coated steel and 22MnB5. Brazing of Zn-coated steel sheets using Cu-Si filler wire is already state of the art in car manufacturing. New press-hardened steels like 22MnB5 are more and more used in automotive industry, offering high potential to save costs and improve structural properties (reduced weight / higher stiffness). However, for joining of these ultra-high strength steels investigations are mandatory. In this paper, a novel approach using a two-beam laser brazing process and Cu-base filler material is presented. The use of Cu-base filler material leads to a reduced heat input, compared to currently applied welding processes, which may result in benefits concerning distortion, post processing and tensile strength of the joint. Reliable processing at desired high speeds is attained by means of laser-preheating. High feed rates prevent significant diffusion of copper into the base material.

  11. Interface Development in Cu-Based Structures Transient Liquid Phase (TLP) Bonded with Thin Al Foil Intermediate Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke; Meng, Wen Jin; Eastman, J. A.

    2014-08-01

    Proper bonding and assembly techniques are essential for fabrication of functional metal-based microdevices. Transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding is a promising technique for making enclosed metallic microchannel devices. In this paper, we report results of TLP bonding of Cu-based structures at temperatures between 823 K and 883 K (550 °C and 610 °C) with thin elemental Al foils as intermediate boding layers. In situ X-ray diffraction was utilized to examine the structure of Cu/Al interface in real time, resulting in a proposed sequence of structural evolution of the Cu/Al/Cu TLP bonding interface region. Three different types of bonding interface structures, the " γ 1 structure," the "eutectoid structure" ("E structure"), and the "E/ γ 1/E structure," were observed through electron microscopy, and related to the proposed sequence of interfacial structural evolution. Tensile fracture tests were conducted on TLP-bonded Cu/Al/Cu coupon assemblies. Hardness of the various phases within the bonding interface region was probed with instrumented nanoindentation. Results of mechanical testing were correlated to the structure of the bonding interface region. The present results provide an understanding of the structural evolution within the Cu/Al/Cu TLP bonding interface region, and offer guidance to future bonding of Cu-based microsystems.

  12. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  13. Functionalization of non-activated C-H bonds of alkanes: an effective and recyclable catalytic system based on fluorinated silver catalysts and solvents.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, M Ángeles; Muñoz, Bianca K; Jacob, Kane; Vendier, Laure; Caballero, Ana; Etienne, Michel; Pérez, Pedro J

    2013-01-21

    The complexes F(n)-Tp(4Bo,3Rf)Ag(L) (F(n)-Tp(4Bo,3Rf)=a perfluorinated hydrotris(indazolyl) borate ligand; L=acetone or tetrahydrofuran) efficiently catalyze the functionalization of non-activated alkanes such as hexane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, or 2-methylpentane by insertion of CHCO(2)Et units (from N(2)CHCO(2)Et, ethyl diazoacetate, EDA) into their C-H bonds. The reactions are quantitative (EDA-based), with no byproducts derived from diazo coupling being formed. In the case of hexane, the functionalization of the methyl C-H bonds has been achieved with the highest regioselectivity known to date with this diazo compound. This catalytic system also operates under biphasic conditions by using fluorous solvents such as Fomblin or perfluorophenanthrene. Several cycles of catalyst recovery and reuse have been performed, with identical chemo- and regioselectivities.

  14. An efficient one-pot two catalyst system in the construction of 2-substituted benzimidazoles: synthesis of benzimidazo[1,2-c]quinazolines.

    PubMed

    Cimarelli, Cristina; Di Nicola, Matteo; Diomedi, Simone; Giovannini, Riccardo; Hamprecht, Dieter; Properzi, Roberta; Sorana, Federico; Marcantoni, Enrico

    2015-12-28

    The benzimidazole core is a common moiety in a large number of natural products and pharmacologically active small molecules. The synthesis of novel benzimidazole derivatives remains a main focus in medicinal research. In continuation of the efforts towards Ce(III) catalysts for organic transformations, we observed for the first time the activity of the iodide ion and copper cation in activating CeCl3·7H2O in the selective formation of prototypical 2-substituted benzimidazoles. The one-pot CeCl3·7H2O-CuI catalytic system procedure includes the cyclo-dehydrogenation of aniline Schiff's bases, generated in situ from the condensation of 1,2-phenylenediamine and aldehydes, followed by the oxidation with iodine, which works as a hydrogen sponge. Mild reaction conditions, good to excellent yields, and clean reactions make the procedure a useful contribution to the synthesis of biologically active fused heterocycles containing benzimidazoquinazolines. PMID:26477673

  15. Catalyst enhances Claus operations

    SciTech Connect

    Dupin, T.; Voizin, R.

    1982-11-01

    An improved Claus catalyst offers superior activity that emphasizes hydrolysis of CS/sub 2/ in the first converter. The catalyst is insensitive to oxygen action at concentrations generally found in Claus gas feeds. It also has an excellent resistance to hydrothermal shocks that may occur during shutdown of the sulfur line. Collectively, these properties make this catalyst the most active formula now available for optimum Claus yields and COS/CS/sub 2/ hydrolysis conversion.

  16. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, John E.; Herzog, Timothy A.

    1998-01-01

    A metallocene catalyst system for the polymerization of .alpha.-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula ##STR1## wherein: R.sup.1, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyls as a substituent, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R.sup.8).sub.3 where R.sup.8 is selected from the group consisting of C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R.sup.1 and R.sup.3 ; R.sup.5 is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E.sup.1, E.sup.2 are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Si(R.sup.9).sub.2 --Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Ge(R.sup.9).sub.2, Sn(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2 --C(R.sup.9).sub.2, where R.sup.9 is C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C.sub.S or C.sub.1 -symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from .alpha.-olefin monomers.

  17. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, J.E.; Herzog, T.A.

    1998-01-13

    A metallocene catalyst system is described for the polymerization of {alpha}-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula shown wherein: R{sup 1}, R{sup 2}, and R{sup 3} are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyls as a substituent, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R{sup 8}){sub 3} where R{sup 8} is selected from the group consisting of C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; R{sup 4} and R{sup 6} are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R{sup 1} and R{sup 3}; R{sup 5} is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E{sup 1}, E{sup 2} are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Ge(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Sn(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, where R{sup 9} is C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C{sub S} or C{sub 1}-symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from {alpha}-olefin monomers.

  18. Cooperation of catalysts and templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Kanavarioti, A.; Nibley, C. W.; Macklin, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    In order to understand how self-reproducing molecules could have originated on the primitive Earth or extraterrestrial bodies, it would be useful to find laboratory models of simple molecules which are able to carry out processes of catalysis and templating. Furthermore, it may be anticipated that systems in which several components are acting cooperatively to catalyze each other's synthesis will have different behavior with respect to natural selection than those of purely replicating systems. As the major focus of this work, laboratory models are devised to study the influence of short peptide catalysts on template reactions which produce oligonucleotides or additional peptides. Such catalysts could have been the earliest protoenzymes of selective advantage produced by replicating oligonucleotides. Since this is a complex problem, simpler systems are also studied which embody only one aspect at a time, such as peptide formation with and without a template, peptide catalysis of nontemplated peptide synthesis, and model reactions for replication of the type pioneered by Orgel.

  19. Polyolefin catalyst manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Inkrott, K.E.; Scinta, J.; Smith, P.D. )

    1989-10-16

    Statistical process control (SPC) procedures are absolutely essential for making new-generation polyolefin catalysts with the consistent high quality required by modern polyolefin processes. Stringent quality assurance is critical to the production of today's high-performance catalysts. Research and development efforts during the last 20 years have led to major technological improvements in the polyolefin industry. New generation catalysts, which once were laboratory curiosities, must now be produced commercially on a regular and consistent basis to meet the increasing requirements of the plastics manufacturing industry. To illustrate the more stringent requirements for producing the new generation polyolefin catalysts, the authors compare the relatively simple, first-generation polypropylene catalyst production requirements with some of the basic requirements of manufacturing a more complex new-generation catalyst, such as Catalyst Resources Inc.'s LYNX 900. The principles which hold true for the new-generation catalysts such as LYNX 900 are shown to apply equally to the scale-up of other advanced technology polyolefin catalysts.

  20. METHOD OF PURIFYING CATALYSTS

    DOEpatents

    Joris, G.G.

    1958-09-01

    It has been fuund that the presence of chlorine as an impurity adversely affects the performance of finely divided platinum catalysts such as are used in the isotopic exchange process for the production of beavy water. This chlorine impurity may be removed from these catalysts by treating the catalyst at an elevated temperature with dry hydrogen and then with wet hydrogen, having a hydrogen-water vapor volume of about 8: 1. This alternate treatment by dry hydrogen and wet hydrogen is continued until the chlorine is largely removed from the catalyst.

  1. Liquefaction with microencapsulated catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Sol W.

    1985-01-01

    A method of dispersing a liquefaction catalyst within coal or other carbonaceous solids involves providing a suspension in oil of microcapsules containing the catalyst. An aqueous solution of a catalytic metal salt is emulsified in the water-immiscible oil and the resulting minute droplets microencapsulated in polymeric shells by interfacial polycondensation. The catalyst is subsequently blended and dispersed throughout the powdered carbonaceous material to be liquefied. At liquefaction temperatures the polymeric microcapsules are destroyed and the catalyst converted to minute crystallites in intimate contact with the carbonaceous material.

  2. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels - Diesel Emissions Project (APBF-DEC): 2,000-Hour Performance of a NOx Adsorber Catalyst and Diesel Particle Filter System for a Medium-Duty, Pick-Up Diesel Engine Platform; Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-03-01

    Presents the results of a 2,000-hour test of an emissions control system consisting of a nitrogen oxides adsorber catalyst in combination with a diesel particle filter, advanced fuels, and advanced engine controls in an SUV/pick-up truck vehicle platform.

  3. Nano-catalysts: Bridging the gap between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Functionalized nanoparticles have emerged as sustainable alternatives to conventional materials, as robust, high-surface-area heterogeneous catalyst supports. We envisioned a catalyst system, which can bridge the homogenous and heterogeneous system. Postsynthetic surface modifica...

  4. Protic acid immobilized on solid support as an extremely efficient recyclable catalyst system for a direct and atom economical esterification of carboxylic acids with alcohols.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Asit K; Singh, Bavneet; Chankeshwara, Sunay V; Patel, Alpesh R

    2009-08-21

    A convenient and clean procedure of esterification is reported by direct condensation of equimolar amounts of carboxylic acids with alcohols catalyzed by an easy to prepare catalyst system of perchloric acid immobilized on silica gel (HClO(4)-SiO(2)). The direct condensation of aryl, heteroaryl, styryl, aryl alkyl, alkyl, cycloalkyl, and long-chain aliphatic carboxylic acids with primary/secondary alkyl/cycloalkyl, allyl, propargyl, and long-chain aliphatic alcohols has been achieved to afford the corresponding esters in excellent yields. Chiral alcohol and N-t-Boc protected chiral amino acid also resulted in ester formation with the representative carboxylic acid or alcohol without competitive N-t-Boc deprotection and detrimental effect on the optical purity of the product demonstrating the mildness and chemoselectivity of the procedure. The esters of long-chain (>C(10)) acids and alcohols are obtained in high yields. The catalyst is recovered and recycled without significant loss of activity. The industrial application of the esterification process is demonstrated by the synthesis of prodrugs of ibuprofen and a few commercial flavoring agents. Other protic acids such as H(2)SO(4), HBr, TfOH, HBF(4), and TFA that were adsorbed on silica gel were less effective compared to HClO(4)-SiO(2) following the order HClO(4)-SiO(2) > H(2)SO(4)-SiO(2) > HBr-SiO(2) > TfOH-SiO(2) > HBF(4)-SiO(2) approximately TFA-SiO(2). When HClO(4) was immobilized on other solid supports the catalytic efficiency followed the order HClO(4)-SiO(2) > HClO(4)-K10 > HClO(4)-Al(2)O(3) (neutral) > HClO(4)-Al(2)O(3) (acidic) > HClO(4)-Al(2)O(3) (basic).

  5. Catalysts and process for liquid hydrocarbon fuel production

    DOEpatents

    White, Mark G.; Ranaweera, Samantha A.; Henry, William P.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides a novel process and system in which a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen synthesis gas, or syngas, is converted into hydrocarbon mixtures composed of high quality distillates, gasoline components, and lower molecular weight gaseous olefins in one reactor or step. The invention utilizes a novel supported bimetallic ion complex catalyst for conversion, and provides methods of preparing such novel catalysts and use of the novel catalysts in the process and system of the invention.

  6. High-temperature catalyst for catalytic combustion and decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor); Jensen, Jeff J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A robust, high temperature mixed metal oxide catalyst for propellant composition, including high concentration hydrogen peroxide, and catalytic combustion, including methane air mixtures. The uses include target, space, and on-orbit propulsion systems and low-emission terrestrial power and gas generation. The catalyst system requires no special preheat apparatus or special sequencing to meet start-up requirements, enabling a fast overall response time. Start-up transients of less than 1 second have been demonstrated with catalyst bed and propellant temperatures as low as 50 degrees Fahrenheit. The catalyst system has consistently demonstrated high decomposition effeciency, extremely low decomposition roughness, and long operating life on multiple test particles.

  7. Recombination Catalysts for Hypersonic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of commercially-viable access to space will require technologies that reduce propulsion system weight and complexity, while extracting maximum energy from the products of combustion. This work is directed toward developing effective nozzle recombination catalysts for the supersonic and hypersonic aeropropulsion engines used to provide such access to space. Effective nozzle recombination will significantly reduce rk=le length (hence, propulsion system weight) and reduce fuel requirements, further decreasing the vehicle's gross lift-off weight. Two such catalysts have been identified in this work, barium and antimony compounds, by developing chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for these materials and determining the engine performance enhancement for a typical flight trajectory. Significant performance improvements are indicated, using only 2% (mole or mass) of these compounds in the combustor product gas.

  8. Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, James H. (Inventor); Taylor, Jesse W. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Catalyst compositions and methods for F-T synthesis which exhibit high CO conversion with minor levels (preferably less than 35% and more preferably less than 5%) or no measurable carbon dioxide generation. F-T active catalysts are prepared by reduction of certain oxygen deficient mixed metal oxides.

  9. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  10. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  11. Improved zeolitic isocracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlberg, A.J.; Habib, M.M.; Moore, R.O.; Law, D.V.; Convery, L.J.

    1995-09-01

    Chevron Research Company introduced the first low pressure, low temperature catalytic hydrocracking process--ISOCRACKING--in 1959. Within the last four years, Chevron has developed and commercialized three new zeolitic ISOCRACKING catalysts. ICR 209 is Chevron`s latest noble metal ISOCRACKING catalyst. It offers improved liquid yield stability, longer life, and superior polynuclear aromatics control compared to its predecessor. ICR 209`s high hydrogenation activity generates the highest yields of superior quality jet fuel of any zeolitic ISOCRACKING catalyst. The second new ISOCRACKING catalyst, ICR 208, is a base metal catalyst which combines high liquid selectivity and high light naphtha octane in hydrocrackers operating for maximum naphtha production. ICR 210 is another new base metal catalyst which offers higher liquid yields and longer life than ICR 208 by virtue of a higher hydrogenation-to-acidity ratio. Both ICR 208 and ICR 210 have been formulated to provide higher liquid yield throughout the cycle and longer cycle length than conventional base metal/zeolite catalysts. This paper will discuss the pilot plant and commercial performances of these new ISOCRACKING catalysts.

  12. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  13. Improved catalysts and method

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.

    1990-12-31

    An improved catalyst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HCl and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride. 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Bismuth - modified supported catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Nadirov, N.K.; Lykova, L.F.; Petrosyan, L.S.

    1985-09-01

    Bismuth was used as an additive to three-component catalysts prepared through modification of an aluminoplatinorhenium catalyst by III and IV nontransition and iron subgroup elements. Since there is conflicting information on bismuth additions, the role of bismuth in polycomponent catalysts and whether it promotes aromatization catalysts was considered. The effect of temperature on the yield of n-hexane conversion products in the presence of Pt-Re-Co-Bi/gamma-A1/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is shown. Conclusive results establish that the addition of 0.5% nickel to a 0.3 Pt-0.3 Re/gamma-A1/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst (in wt.%) increased the yield of benzene from n-hexane by 5.7%. It was also shown that 0.1 to 0.25 wt.% bismuth poisons two- and three-component samples containing 0.25 to 0.3 wt.% platinum.

  15. Use of aluminum phosphate as the dehydration catalyst in single step dimethyl ether process

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Xiang-Dong; Parris, Gene E.; Toseland, Bernard A.; Battavio, Paula J.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a process for the coproduction of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) directly from a synthesis gas in a single step (hereafter, the "single step DME process"). In this process, the synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon oxides is contacted with a dual catalyst system comprising a physical mixture of a methanol synthesis catalyst and a methanol dehydration catalyst. The present invention is an improvement to this process for providing an active and stable catalyst system. The improvement comprises the use of an aluminum phosphate based catalyst as the methanol dehydration catalyst. Due to its moderate acidity, such a catalyst avoids the coke formation and catalyst interaction problems associated with the conventional dual catalyst systems taught for the single step DME process.

  16. Characterisation and tribological investigation on thermally processed nanostructured Fe-based and Cu-based cermet materials.

    PubMed

    Basak, A K; Eddine, W Zein; Celis, J P; Matteazzi, P

    2010-02-01

    The feasibility of achieving a nanostructured material after different thermal processing of nanosized powders is presented. The thermal processing was done by either atmospheric plasma spraying, laser sintering, or extrusion followed by hot isostatic pressing. The structural characterisation of such thermally processed nanostructured Fe-based and Cu-based metallic or Al2O3 reinforced cermets, confirmed the retention of a nanostructure after each of these thermal processes. Hardness measurements confirmed an increased hardness as expected in the case that nanostructuring is achieved. The role of grain boundaries and second phase particles on the retention of the nanostructure after thermal processing is discussed. Finally, the possible benefit of nanostructuring on the friction and wear behaviour of materials in sliding tests against corundum in ambient air is reported and discussed. PMID:20352775

  17. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of Cu-based metal-organic frameworks sensitized solar cell by addition of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Deok Yeon; Shin, Chan Yong; Yoon, Seog Joon; Lee, Haw Young; Lee, Wonjoo; Shrestha, Nabeen K.; Lee, Joong Kee; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2014-02-01

    In the present work, TiO2 nanoparticle and multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite powder is prepared hydrothermally. After doctor blading the paste from composite powder, the resulted composite film is sensitized with Cu-based metal-organic frameworks using a layer-by-layer deposition technique and the film is characterized using FE-SEM, EDX, XRD, UV/Visible spectrophotometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The influence of the carbon nanotubes in photovoltaic performance is studied by constructing a Grätzel cell with I3-/I- redox couple containing electrolyte. The results demonstrate that the introduction of carbon nanotubes accelerates the electron transfer, and thereby enhances the photovoltaic performance of the cell with a nearly 60% increment in power conversion efficiency.

  18. Synthesis and Understanding of Novel Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Stair, Peter C.

    2013-07-09

    The research took advantage of our capabilities to perform in-situ and operando Raman spectroscopy on complex systems along with our developing expertise in the synthesis of uniform, supported metal oxide materials to investigate relationships between the catalytically active oxide composition, atomic structure, and support and the corresponding chemical and catalytic properties. The project was organized into two efforts: 1) Synthesis of novel catalyst materials by atomic layer deposition (ALD). 2) Spectroscopic and chemical investigations of coke formation and catalyst deactivation. ALD synthesis was combined with conventional physical characterization, Raman spectroscopy, and probe molecule chemisorption to study the effect of supported metal oxide composition and atomic structure on acid-base and catalytic properties. Operando Raman spectroscopy studies of olefin polymerization leading to coke formation and catalyst deactivation clarified the mechanism of coke formation by acid catalysts.

  19. Fundamental studies of supported bimetallic catalysts by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Savargaonkar, N.

    1996-10-17

    Various hydrogenation reactions on transition metals are important commercially whereas certain hydrogenolysis reactions are useful from fundamental point of view. Understanding the hydrogen mobility and kinetics of adsorption-desorption of hydrogen is important in understanding the mechanisms of such reactions involving hydrogen. The kinetics of hydrogen chemisorption was studied by means of selective excitation NMR on silica supported Pt, Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. The activation energy of hydrogen desorption was found to be lower on silica supported Pt catalysts as compared to Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. It was found that the rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption on Pt-Rh catalyst were similar to those on Rh catalyst and much higher as compared to Pt catalyst. The Ru-Ag bimetallic system is much simpler to study than the Pt-Rh system and serves as a model system to characterize more complicated systems such as the K/Ru system. Ag was found to decrease the amounts of adsorbed hydrogen and the hydrogen-to-ruthenium stoichiometry. Ag reduced the populations of states with low and intermediate binding energies of hydrogen on silica supported Ru catalyst. The rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption were also lower on silica supported Ru-Ag catalyst as compared to Ru catalyst. This report contains introductory information, the literature review, general conclusions, and four appendices. An additional four chapters and one appendix have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  20. Catalysts and process for liquid hydrocarbon fuel production

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark G; Liu, Shetian

    2014-12-09

    The present invention provides a novel process and system in which a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen synthesis gas, or syngas, is converted into hydrocarbon mixtures composed of high quality gasoline components, aromatic compounds, and lower molecular weight gaseous olefins in one reactor or step. The invention utilizes a novel molybdenum-zeolite catalyst in high pressure hydrogen for conversion, as well as a novel rhenium-zeolite catalyst in place of the molybdenum-zeolite catalyst, and provides for use of the novel catalysts in the process and system of the invention.

  1. Catalyst interaction in a FCCU

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, C.; Glendinning, R.

    1986-01-01

    The FCC process is of major importance in modern refineries and the optimum performance of the unit has a marked effect on overall refinery economics. To meet refiners demand for improved selectivity and metals tolerance developments in cracking catalyst technology have accelerated over the last 3 years. In addition, physical properties, such as attrition resistance, particle size distribution and fluidisation characteristics have now to be controlled and optimised in order to maximise unit performance. The fluid cracking catalyst has three main functions in a FCCU: - to supply active acid sites to the reactor, to crack the feedstock; to contain the effect of contaminants, such as nickel and vanadium etc.; to transfer the necessary heat from the regenerator to the reactor system. The catalytic effect in a unit is evident in two ways: - by altering catalytic coke production and by modifying liquid selectivities.

  2. Catalyst for Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Patricia; Brown, Kenneth; VanNorman, John; Brown, David; Upchurch, Billy; Schryer, David; Miller, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    In many applications, it is highly desirable to operate a CO2 laser in a sealed condition, for in an open system the laser requires a continuous flow of laser gas to remove the dissociation products that occur in the discharge zone of the laser, in order to maintain a stable power output. This adds to the operating cost of the laser, and in airborne or space applications, it also adds to the weight penalty of the laser. In a sealed CO2 laser, a small amount of CO2 gas is decomposed in the electrical discharge zone into corresponding quantities of CO and O2. As the laser continues to operate, the concentration of CO2 decreases, while the concentrations of CO and O2 correspondingly increase. The increasing concentration of O2 reduces laser power, because O2 scavenges electrons in the electrical discharge, thereby causing arcing in the electric discharge and a loss of the energetic electrons required to boost CO2 molecules to lasing energy levels. As a result, laser power decreases rapidly. The primary object of this invention is to provide a catalyst that, by composition of matter alone, contains chemisorbed water within and upon its structure. Such bound moisture renders the catalyst highly active and very long-lived, such that only a small quantity of it needs to be used with a CO2 laser under ambient operating conditions. This object is achieved by a catalyst that consists essentially of about 1 to 40 percent by weight of one or more platinum group metals (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os, Pt being preferred); about 1 to 90 percent by weight of one or more oxides of reducible metals having multiple valence states (such as Sn, Ti, Mn, Cu, and Ce, with SnO2 being preferred); and about 1 to 90 percent by weight of a compound that can bind water to its structure (such as silica gel, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, hydrated alumina, and magnesium perchlorate, with silica gel being preferred). Especially beneficial results are obtained when platinum is present in the

  3. Increasing FCC regenerator catalyst level

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1993-11-01

    A Peruvian FCC unit's operations were improved by increasing the regenerator's catalyst level. This increase resulted in lower stack losses, an improved temperature profile, increased catalyst activity and a lower catalyst consumption rate. A more stable operation saved this Peruvian refiner over $131,000 per year in catalyst alone. These concepts and data may be suitable for your FCC unit as well.

  4. Intercalated clay catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnavaia, T.J.

    1983-04-22

    Recent advances in the intercalation of metal complex cations in smectite clay minerals are leading to the development of new classes of selective heterogeneous catalysts. The selectivity of both metal-catalyzed and proton-catalyzed chemical conversions in clay intercalates can often be regulated by controlling surface chemical equilibria, interlamellar swelling, or reactant pair proximity in the interlayer regions. Also, the intercalation of polynuclear hydroxy metal cations and metal cluster cations in smectites affords new pillared clay catalysts with pore sizes that can be made larger than those of conventional zeolite catalysts.

  5. Intercalated Clay Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnavaia, Thomas J.

    1983-04-01

    Recent advances in the intercalation of metal complex cations in smectite clay minerals are leading to the development of new classes of selective heterogeneous catalysts. The selectivity of both metal-catalyzed and proton-catalyzed chemical conversions in clay intercalates can often be regulated by controlling surface chemical equilibria, interlamellar swelling, or reactant pair proximity in the interlayer regions. Also, the intercalation of polynuclear hydroxy metal cations and metal cluster cations in smectites affords new pillared clay catalysts with pore sizes that can be made larger than those of conventional zeolite catalysts.

  6. Solar-Driven Reduction of Aqueous Protons Coupled to Selective Alcohol Oxidation with a Carbon Nitride–Molecular Ni Catalyst System

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Solar water-splitting represents an important strategy toward production of the storable and renewable fuel hydrogen. The water oxidation half-reaction typically proceeds with poor efficiency and produces the unprofitable and often damaging product, O2. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative approach and couple solar H2 generation with value-added organic substrate oxidation. Solar irradiation of a cyanamide surface-functionalized melon-type carbon nitride (NCNCNx) and a molecular nickel(II) bis(diphosphine) H2-evolution catalyst (NiP) enabled the production of H2 with concomitant selective oxidation of benzylic alcohols to aldehydes in high yield under purely aqueous conditions, at room temperature and ambient pressure. This one-pot system maintained its activity over 24 h, generating products in 1:1 stoichiometry, separated in the gas and solution phases. The NCNCNx–NiP system showed an activity of 763 μmol (g CNx)−1 h–1 toward H2 and aldehyde production, a Ni-based turnover frequency of 76 h–1, and an external quantum efficiency of 15% (λ = 360 ± 10 nm). This precious metal-free and nontoxic photocatalytic system displays better performance than an analogous system containing platinum instead of NiP. Transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that the photoactivity of NCNCNx is due to efficient substrate oxidation of the material, which outweighs possible charge recombination compared to the nonfunctionalized melon-type carbon nitride. Photoexcited NCNCNx in the presence of an organic substrate can accumulate ultralong-lived “trapped electrons”, which allow for fuel generation in the dark. The artificial photosynthetic system thereby catalyzes a closed redox cycle showing 100% atom economy and generates two value-added products, a solar chemical, and solar fuel. PMID:27337491

  7. Solar-Driven Reduction of Aqueous Protons Coupled to Selective Alcohol Oxidation with a Carbon Nitride-Molecular Ni Catalyst System.

    PubMed

    Kasap, Hatice; Caputo, Christine A; Martindale, Benjamin C M; Godin, Robert; Lau, Vincent Wing-Hei; Lotsch, Bettina V; Durrant, James R; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-07-27

    Solar water-splitting represents an important strategy toward production of the storable and renewable fuel hydrogen. The water oxidation half-reaction typically proceeds with poor efficiency and produces the unprofitable and often damaging product, O2. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative approach and couple solar H2 generation with value-added organic substrate oxidation. Solar irradiation of a cyanamide surface-functionalized melon-type carbon nitride ((NCN)CNx) and a molecular nickel(II) bis(diphosphine) H2-evolution catalyst (NiP) enabled the production of H2 with concomitant selective oxidation of benzylic alcohols to aldehydes in high yield under purely aqueous conditions, at room temperature and ambient pressure. This one-pot system maintained its activity over 24 h, generating products in 1:1 stoichiometry, separated in the gas and solution phases. The (NCN)CNx-NiP system showed an activity of 763 μmol (g CNx)(-1) h(-1) toward H2 and aldehyde production, a Ni-based turnover frequency of 76 h(-1), and an external quantum efficiency of 15% (λ = 360 ± 10 nm). This precious metal-free and nontoxic photocatalytic system displays better performance than an analogous system containing platinum instead of NiP. Transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that the photoactivity of (NCN)CNx is due to efficient substrate oxidation of the material, which outweighs possible charge recombination compared to the nonfunctionalized melon-type carbon nitride. Photoexcited (NCN)CNx in the presence of an organic substrate can accumulate ultralong-lived "trapped electrons", which allow for fuel generation in the dark. The artificial photosynthetic system thereby catalyzes a closed redox cycle showing 100% atom economy and generates two value-added products, a solar chemical, and solar fuel.

  8. Solar-Driven Reduction of Aqueous Protons Coupled to Selective Alcohol Oxidation with a Carbon Nitride-Molecular Ni Catalyst System.

    PubMed

    Kasap, Hatice; Caputo, Christine A; Martindale, Benjamin C M; Godin, Robert; Lau, Vincent Wing-Hei; Lotsch, Bettina V; Durrant, James R; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-07-27

    Solar water-splitting represents an important strategy toward production of the storable and renewable fuel hydrogen. The water oxidation half-reaction typically proceeds with poor efficiency and produces the unprofitable and often damaging product, O2. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative approach and couple solar H2 generation with value-added organic substrate oxidation. Solar irradiation of a cyanamide surface-functionalized melon-type carbon nitride ((NCN)CNx) and a molecular nickel(II) bis(diphosphine) H2-evolution catalyst (NiP) enabled the production of H2 with concomitant selective oxidation of benzylic alcohols to aldehydes in high yield under purely aqueous conditions, at room temperature and ambient pressure. This one-pot system maintained its activity over 24 h, generating products in 1:1 stoichiometry, separated in the gas and solution phases. The (NCN)CNx-NiP system showed an activity of 763 μmol (g CNx)(-1) h(-1) toward H2 and aldehyde production, a Ni-based turnover frequency of 76 h(-1), and an external quantum efficiency of 15% (λ = 360 ± 10 nm). This precious metal-free and nontoxic photocatalytic system displays better performance than an analogous system containing platinum instead of NiP. Transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that the photoactivity of (NCN)CNx is due to efficient substrate oxidation of the material, which outweighs possible charge recombination compared to the nonfunctionalized melon-type carbon nitride. Photoexcited (NCN)CNx in the presence of an organic substrate can accumulate ultralong-lived "trapped electrons", which allow for fuel generation in the dark. The artificial photosynthetic system thereby catalyzes a closed redox cycle showing 100% atom economy and generates two value-added products, a solar chemical, and solar fuel. PMID:27337491

  9. Catalysts and method

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    An improved catlayst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HC1 and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  10. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    DOEpatents

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  11. Catalyst for Change: A Case Report of a Campus-wide Student Information System Software Implementation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stivers, Jan; Garrity, N. B.

    2004-01-01

    When a mid-sized public college made a politically unpopular decision to purchase new student information system software, a team of fourteen people from across campus was assembled and charged with facilitating the transition from the home-grown system. This case report describes the challenges they faced as they worked to understand their…

  12. Process and catalyst for carbonylating olefins

    DOEpatents

    Zoeller, J.R.

    1998-06-02

    Disclosed is an improved catalyst system and process for preparing aliphatic carbonyl compounds such as aliphatic carboxylic acids, alkyl esters of aliphatic carboxylic acids and anhydrides of aliphatic carboxylic acids by carbonylating olefins in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (1) a first component selected from at least one Group 6 metal, i.e., chromium, molybdenum, and/or tungsten and (2) a second component selected from at least one of certain halides and tertiary and quaternary compounds of a Group 15 element, i.e., nitrogen, phosphorus and/or arsenic, and (3) as a third component, a polar, aprotic solvent. The process employing the improved catalyst system is carried out under carbonylating conditions of pressure and temperature discussed herein. The process constitutes and improvement over known processes since it can be carried out at moderate carbonylation conditions without the necessity of using an expensive noble metal catalyst, volatile, toxic materials such as nickel tetracarbonyl, formic acid or a formate ester. Further, the addition of a polar, aprotic solvent to the catalyst system significantly increases, or accelerates, the rate at which the carbonylation takes place.

  13. Characterization of three-way automotive catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kenik, E.A.; More, K.L.; LaBarge, W.

    1997-04-01

    The CRADA between Delphi Automotive Systems (Delphi; formerly General Motors - AC Delco, Systems) and Lockheed Martin Energy Research (LMER) on automotive catalysts was completed at the end of FY96, after a ten month, no-cost extension. The CRADA was aimed at improved performance and lifetime of noble metal based three-way-catalysts (TWC), which are the primary catalytic system for automotive emission control systems. While these TWC can meet the currently required emission standards, higher than optimum noble metal loadings are often required to meet lifetime requirements. In addition, more stringent emission standards will be imposed in the near future, demanding improved performance and service life from these catalysts. Understanding the changes of TWC conversion efficiency with ageing is a critical need in improving these catalysts. Initially in a fresh catalyst, the active material is often distributed on a very fine scale, approaching single atoms or small atomic clusters. As such, a wide range of analytical techniques have been employed to provide high spatial resolution characterization of the evolving state of the catalytic material.

  14. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Rayford G.; Dosch, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  15. Crystalline titanate catalyst supports

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

    1993-01-05

    A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

  16. Catalysts from synthetic genetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alexander I; Pinheiro, Vitor B; Smola, Matthew J; Morgunov, Alexey S; Peak-Chew, Sew; Cozens, Christopher; Weeks, Kevin M; Herdewijn, Piet; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-02-19

    The emergence of catalysis in early genetic polymers such as RNA is considered a key transition in the origin of life, pre-dating the appearance of protein enzymes. DNA also demonstrates the capacity to fold into three-dimensional structures and form catalysts in vitro. However, to what degree these natural biopolymers comprise functionally privileged chemical scaffolds for folding or the evolution of catalysis is not known. The ability of synthetic genetic polymers (XNAs) with alternative backbone chemistries not found in nature to fold into defined structures and bind ligands raises the possibility that these too might be capable of forming catalysts (XNAzymes). Here we report the discovery of such XNAzymes, elaborated in four different chemistries (arabino nucleic acids, ANA; 2'-fluoroarabino nucleic acids, FANA; hexitol nucleic acids, HNA; and cyclohexene nucleic acids, CeNA) directly from random XNA oligomer pools, exhibiting in trans RNA endonuclease and ligase activities. We also describe an XNA-XNA ligase metalloenzyme in the FANA framework, establishing catalysis in an entirely synthetic system and enabling the synthesis of FANA oligomers and an active RNA endonuclease FANAzyme from its constituent parts. These results extend catalysis beyond biopolymers and establish technologies for the discovery of catalysts in a wide range of polymer scaffolds not found in nature. Evolution of catalysis independent of any natural polymer has implications for the definition of chemical boundary conditions for the emergence of life on Earth and elsewhere in the Universe.

  17. Catalysts from synthetic genetic polymers

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexander I.; Pinheiro, Vitor B.; Smola, Matthew J.; Morgunov, Alexey S.; Peak-Chew, Sew; Cozens, Christopher; Weeks, Kevin M.; Herdewijn, Piet; Holliger, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of catalysis in early genetic polymers like RNA is considered a key transition in the origin of life1, predating the appearance of protein enzymes. DNA also demonstrates the capacity to fold into three-dimensional structures and form catalysts in vitro2. However, to what degree these natural biopolymers comprise functionally privileged chemical scaffolds3 for folding or the evolution of catalysis is not known. The ability of synthetic genetic polymers (XNAs) with alternative backbone chemistries not found in nature to fold into defined structures and bind ligands4 raises the possibility that these too might be capable of forming catalysts (XNAzymes). Here we report the discovery of such XNAzymes, elaborated in four different chemistries (ANA (arabino nucleic acids)5, FANA (2′-fluoroarabino nucleic acids)6, HNA (hexitol nucleic acids) and CeNA (cyclohexene nucleic acids)7 directly from random XNA oligomer pools, exhibiting in trans RNA endonuclease and ligase activities. We also describe an XNA-XNA ligase metalloenzyme in the FANA framework, establishing catalysis in an entirely synthetic system and enabling the synthesis of FANA oligomers and an active RNA endonuclease FANAzyme from its constituent parts. These results extend catalysis beyond biopolymers and establish technologies for the discovery of catalysts in a wide range of polymer scaffolds not found in nature8. Evolution of catalysis independent of any natural polymer has implications for the definition of chemical boundary conditions for the emergence of life on earth and elsewhere in the universe9. PMID:25470036

  18. DYNAMOMETER EVALUATION OF PLASMA-CATALYST FOR DIESEL NOX REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Hoard, J; Schmieg, S; Brooks, D; Peden, C; Barlow, S; Tonkyn, R

    2003-08-24

    A three-stage plasma-catalyst system was developed and tested on an engine dynamometer. Previous laboratory testing suggested high NOx efficiency could be obtained. With hexene reductant added to the exhaust, over 90% NOx reduction was observed. However, with diesel or Fischer-Tropsch reductant the catalyst efficiency rapidly dropped off. Heating the catalyst in air removed brown deposit from the surface and restored conversion efficiency. Following the engine tests, the used catalysts were evaluated. BET surface area decreased, and TPD revealed significant storage. This storage appears to be partly unburned diesel fuel that can be removed by heating to around 250-300 C, and partly hydrocarbons bonded to the surface that remain in place until 450-500 C. Laboratory testing with propene reductant demonstrated that the catalyst regains efficiency slowly even when operating temperature does not exceed 300 C. This suggests that control strategies may be able to regenerate the catalyst by occasional moderate heating.

  19. Magnetic and dendritic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Deraedt, Christophe; Ruiz, Jaime; Astruc, Didier

    2015-07-21

    The recovery and reuse of catalysts is a major challenge in the development of sustainable chemical processes. Two methods at the frontier between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis have recently emerged for addressing this problem: loading the catalyst onto a dendrimer or onto a magnetic nanoparticle. In this Account, we describe representative examples of these two methods, primarily from our research group, and compare them. We then describe new chemistry that combines the benefits of these two methods of catalysis. Classic dendritic catalysis has involved either attaching the catalyst covalently at the branch termini or within the dendrimer core. We have used chelating pyridyltriazole ligands to insolubilize catalysts at the termini of dendrimers, providing an efficient, recyclable heterogeneous catalysts. With the addition of dendritic unimolecular micelles olefin metathesis reactions catalyzed by commercial Grubbs-type ruthenium-benzylidene complexes in water required unusually low amounts of catalyst. When such dendritic micelles include intradendritic ligands, both the micellar effect and ligand acceleration promote faster catalysis in water. With these types of catalysts, we could carry out azide alkyne cycloaddition ("click") chemistry with only ppm amounts of CuSO4·5H2O and sodium ascorbate under ambient conditions. Alternatively we can attach catalysts to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), essentially magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), offering the opportunity to recover the catalysts using magnets. Taking advantage of the merits of both of these strategies, we and others have developed a new generation of recyclable catalysts: dendritic magnetically recoverable catalysts. In particular, some of our catalysts with a γ-Fe2O3@SiO2 core and 1,2,3-triazole tethers and loaded with Pd nanoparticles generate strong positive dendritic effects with respect to ligand loading, catalyst loading, catalytic activity and

  20. The Information Ecology of Personal Health Record Systems: Secure Messaging as Catalyst and Its Evolving Impact on Use and Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazi, Kim M.

    2012-01-01

    Personal Health Records (PHRs) and PHR systems have been designed as consumer-oriented tools to empower patients and improve health care. Despite significant consumer interest and anticipated benefits, adoption remains low. Understanding the consumer perspective is necessary, but insufficient by itself. Consumer PHR use also has broad implications…

  1. CERES AuTomAted job Loading SYSTem (CATALYST): An automated workflow manager for satellite data production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, J. L.; Hillyer, T. N.; Wilkins, J.

    2012-12-01

    The CERES Science Team integrates data from 5 CERES instruments onboard the Terra, Aqua and NPP missions. The processing chain fuses CERES observations with data from 19 other unique sources. The addition of CERES Flight Model 5 (FM5) onboard NPP, coupled with ground processing system upgrades further emphasizes the need for an automated job-submission utility to manage multiple processing streams concurrently. The operator-driven, legacy-processing approach relied on manually staging data from magnetic tape to limited spinning disk attached to a shared memory architecture system. The migration of CERES production code to a distributed, cluster computing environment with approximately one petabyte of spinning disk containing all precursor input data products facilitates the development of a CERES-specific, automated workflow manager. In the cluster environment, I/O is the primary system resource in contention across jobs. Therefore, system load can be maximized with a throttling workload manager. This poster discusses a Java and Perl implementation of an automated job management tool tailored for CERES processing.

  2. Ruthenium-Aryloxide Catalysts for Olefin Metathesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfette, Sebastien; Blacquiere, Johanna M.; Conrad, Jay C.; Beach, Nicholas J.; Fogg, Deryn E.

    : Advances in design of ruthenium aryloxide catalysts for olefin metathesis are described. The target complexes are accessible on reaction of RuCl2(NHC)(py)2 (CHPh) (NHC - N-heterocyclic carbene) with electron-deficient, monodentate aryl- oxides, or aryloxides that yield small, rigid chelate rings. The best of these catalysts offer activity comparable to or greater than that of the parent chloride (Grubbs) systems in ring-closing metathesis (RCM). Preliminary studies of the electronic nature of the Ru-X bond suggest that the metal center is more electropositive in the aryloxide complexes than in the Grubbs systems.

  3. Characterization of Free Volume Changes Associated with Shear Band Formation in Zr- and Cu-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, K M; Glade, S C; Asoka-Kumar, P; Kanungo, B

    2003-11-14

    The free volume model for flow in metallic glasses predicts a significant increase in free volume at the onset of plastic deformation. The details of these structural changes are unclear, however, particularly during strain localization in shear bands. In this study, the free volume changes associated with inhomogeneous plastic deformation of a Cu-based bulk metallic glass were examined using positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). PAS results indicated that there was a distribution of free volume site sizes in both the as-quenched and rolled glasses, and that the concentration of larger sites increased with deformation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was also used to observe the glass transition behaviors of Cu- and Zr-based glasses after rolling and annealing. Annealing resulted in an increase in the height of the endothermic glass transition peak, consistent with structural relaxation relative to the as-quenched material. Deformation resulted in both a lower endothermic peak height and an earlier and deeper exothermic peak associated with structural relaxation, indicating a more disordered structure with more free volume.

  4. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts having improved selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Miller, James G.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1989-01-01

    A cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst having an improved steam treated, acid extracted LZ-210 support is taught. The new catalyst system demonstrates improved product selectivity at Fischer-Tropsch reaction conditions evidenced by lower methane production, higher C.sub.5.sup.+ yield and increased olefin production.

  5. Low Temperature Oxidation Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    One day soon homeowners everywhere may be protected from deadly carbon monoxide fumes, thanks to a device invented at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. It uses a new class of low-temperature oxidation catalysts to convert carbon monoxide to non-toxic carbon dioxide at room temperature. It can also remove formaldehyde from the air. The catalysts initially were developed for research involving carbon dioxide lasers. Industry already has shown an interest. Rochester Gas and Electric Co., of Rochester, N.Y., has an agreement with NASA Langley to develop a product for habitable spaces such as homes, cars and aircraft. The Mantic Corp., of Salt Lake City, Utah, plans to use them in breathing apparatus, such as firefighter masks. The catalysts also have applications as trace-gas detectors, and in cold-engine emission control. To work, the catalysts - tin oxide and platinum - are applied to a surface. Air passing over the surface reacts with the catalysts, transforming carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. The device requires no energy for operation, doesn't need to be plugged in, has no moving parts and lasts a long time.

  6. Reforming using erionite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Liers, J.; Meusinger, J.; Moesch, A. ); Reschetilowski, W. )

    1993-08-01

    The advantage of reforming on erionite catalysts is a product with high octane numbers and low amounts of aromatics. This advantage seems to be slight at reaction pressures lower than 25 bar. But it is possible to compensate for the influence of pressure by varying the erionite content within the catalyst and the reaction temperature. When reforming on Pt/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalysts, the following reactions take place: dehydrocyclization of paraffins to naphthenes, dehydrogenation of naphthenes to aromatics, isomerication of normal paraffins remains in the product, lowering its octane number. By using a Ni/H-erionite catalyst, the octane rating can be increased by 3 to 7 numbers through selective hydrocracking of n-alkanes in the reformate. Erionite catalysts favor shape-selective hydrocracking of normal paraffins and the formation of cyclopentane derivatives lowering the content of aromatics during reforming reactions. Reducing the reaction pressure decreases hydrocracking activity and cyclopentane formation. These results can be interpreted in terms of thermodynamic restrictions and deactivation.

  7. MicroChannel Reactors for ISRU Applications Using Nanofabricated Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, Susana; Makel, Darby B.; Vander Wal, Randall L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Pushkarev, Vladimir V.

    2006-01-01

    With the new direction of NASA to emphasize the exploration of the Moon, Mars and beyond, quick development and demonstration of efficient systems for In-Situ Resources Utilization (ISRU) is more critical and timely than ever before. Affordable planning and execution of prolonged manned space missions depend upon the utilization of local resources and the waste products which are formed in manned spacecraft and surface bases. This paper presents current development of miniaturized chemical processing systems that combine microchannel reactor design with nanofabricated catalysts. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are used to produce a nanostructure within microchannel reactors, as support for catalysts. By virtue of their nanoscale dimensions, nanotubes geometrically restrict the catalyst particle size that can be supported upon the tube walls. By confining catalyst particles to sizes smaller than the CNT diameter, a more uniform catalyst particle size distribution may be maintained. The high dispersion permitted by the vast surface area of the nanoscale material serves to retain the integrity of the catalyst by reducing sintering or coalescence. Additionally, catalytic efficiency increases with decreasing catalyst particle size (reflecting higher surface area per unit mass) while chemical reactivity frequently is enhanced at the nanoscale. Particularly significant is the catalyst exposure. Rather than being confined within a porous material or deposited upon a 2-d surface, the catalyst is fully exposed to the reactant gases by virtue of the nanofabricated support structure. The combination of microchannel technology with nanofabricated catalysts provides a synergistic effect, enhancing both technologies with the potential to produce much more efficient systems than either technology alone. The development of highly efficient microchannel reactors will be applicable to multiple ISRU programs. By selection of proper nanofabricated catalysts, the microchannel reactors can be

  8. Taming catalysts in quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypczyk, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Auxiliary quantum systems which can be borrowed to help facilitate thermodynamic processes but must be returned almost undisturbed—i.e. catalysts—are very powerful objects in quantum thermodynamics. In fact, they appear almost too powerful, since they allow for any state transformation to be carried out while being disturbed by an arbitrarily small amount. In their recent paper Ng et al (2015 New J. Phys. 17 085004) show how to tame catalysts in quantum thermodynamics by placing additional physical constraints on them, in terms of dimension and energy.

  9. In –Situ Spectroscopic Investigation of Immobilized Organometallic Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Robert, J.

    2007-11-14

    Immobilized organometallic catalysts, in principle, can give high rates and selectivities like homogeneous catalysts with the ease of separation enjoyed by heterogeneous catalysts. However, the science of immobilized organometallics has not been developed because the field lies at the interface between the homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis communities. By assembling an interdisciplinary research team that can probe all aspects of immobilized organometallic catalyst design, the entire reacting system can be considered, where the transition metal complex, the complex-support interface and the properties of the support can all be considered simultaneously from both experimental and theoretical points of view. Researchers at Georgia Tech and the University of Virginia are studying the fundamental principles that can be used to understand and design future classes of immobilized organometallic catalysts. In the framework of the overall collaborative project with Georgia Tech, our work focused on (a) the X-ray absorption spectroscopy of an immobilized Pd-SCS-O complex (b) the mode of metal leaching from supported Pd catalysts during Heck catalysis and (c) the mode of deactivation of Jacobsen’s Co-salen catalysts during the hydrolytic kinetic resolution of terminal epoxides. Catalysts containing supported Pd pincer complexes, functionalized supports containing mercapto and amine groups, and oligomeric Co-salen catalysts were synthesized at Georgia Tech and sent to the University of Virginia. Incorporation of Pd onto several different kinds of supports (silica, mercapto-functionalized silica, zeolite Y) was performed at the University of Virginia.

  10. Efficient electrochemical water oxidation in neutral and near-neutral systems with a nanoscale silver-oxide catalyst.

    PubMed

    Joya, Khurram S; Ahmad, Zahoor; Joya, Yasir F; Garcia-Esparza, Angel T; de Groot, Huub J M

    2016-08-11

    In electrocatalytic water splitting systems pursuing for renewable energy using sunlight, developing robust, stable and easily accessible materials operating under mild chemical conditions is pivotal. We present here a unique nanoparticulate type silver-oxide (AgOx-NP) based robust and highly stable electrocatalyst for efficient water oxidation. The AgOx-NP is generated in situ in a HCO3(-)/CO2 system under benign conditions. Micrographs show that they exhibit a nanoscale box type squared nano-bipyramidal configuration. The oxygen generation is initiated at low overpotential, and a sustained O2 evolution current density of >1.1 mA cm(-2) is achieved during prolonged-period water electrolysis. The AgOx-NP electrocatalyst performs exceptionally well in metal-ion free neutral or near-neutral carbonate, phosphate and borate buffers relative to recently reported Co-oxide and Ni-oxide based heterogeneous electrocatalysts, which are unstable in metal-ion free electrolytes and tend to deactivate with time and lose catalytic performance during long-term experimental tests. PMID:27472834

  11. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  12. Optimization of furfural production from D-xylose with formic acid as catalyst in a reactive extraction system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wandian; Li, Pingli; Bo, Dechen; Chang, Heying; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Tao

    2013-04-01

    Furfural is one of the most promising platform chemicals derived from biomass. In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to determine four important parameters including reaction temperature (170-210°C), formic acid concentration (5-25 g/L), o-nitrotoluene volume percentage (20-80 vt.%), and residence time (40-200 min). The maximum furfural yield of 74% and selectivity of 86% were achieved at 190°C for 20 g/L formic acid concentration and 75 vt.% o-nitrotoluene by 75 min. The high boiling solvent, o-nitrotoluene, was recommended as extraction solvent in a reactive extraction system to obtain high furfural yield and reduce furfural-solvent separation costs. Although the addition of halides to the xylose solutions enhanced the furfural yield and selectivity, the concentration of halides was not an important factor on the furfural yield and selectivity.

  13. A General, Efficient and Functional-Group-Tolerant Catalyst System for the Palladium-Catalyzed Thioetherification of Aryl Bromides and Iodides

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Manuel A.; Hartwig, John F.

    2010-01-01

    The cross-coupling reaction of aryl bromides and iodides with aliphatic and aromatic thiols catalyzed by palladium complexes of the bisphosphine ligand CyPF-tBu (1) is reported. Reactions occur in excellent yields, broad scope, high tolerance of functional groups and with turnover numbers that exceed those of previous catalysts by two or three orders of magnitude. These couplings of bromo- and iodoarenes are more efficient than the corresponding reactions of chloroarenes and could be conducted with less catalyst loading and/or milder reaction conditions. Consequently, limitations regarding scope and functional group tolerance previously reported in the coupling of aryl chlorides are now overcome. PMID:19154131

  14. A simple, efficient and environmentally benign synthetic protocol for the synthesis of spirooxindoles using choline chloride-oxalic acid eutectic mixture as catalyst/solvent system.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Sarita; Rajawat, Anshu; Tailor, Yogesh Kumar; Kumar, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    An efficient and environmentally benign domino protocol has been presented for the synthesis of structurally diverse spirooxindoles spiroannulated with pyranopyridopyrimidines, indenopyridopyrimidines, and chromenopyridopyrimidines involving three-component reaction of aminouracils, isatins and cyclic carbonyl compounds in deep eutectic solvent (choline chloride-oxalic acid: 1:1) which acts as efficient catalyst and environmentally benign reaction medium. The present protocol offers several advantages such as operational simplicity with easy workup, shorter reaction times excellent yields with superior atom economy and environmentally benign reaction conditions with the use of cost-effective, recyclable, non-toxic and bio-degradable DES as catalyst/solvent.

  15. A simple, efficient and environmentally benign synthetic protocol for the synthesis of spirooxindoles using choline chloride-oxalic acid eutectic mixture as catalyst/solvent system.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Sarita; Rajawat, Anshu; Tailor, Yogesh Kumar; Kumar, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    An efficient and environmentally benign domino protocol has been presented for the synthesis of structurally diverse spirooxindoles spiroannulated with pyranopyridopyrimidines, indenopyridopyrimidines, and chromenopyridopyrimidines involving three-component reaction of aminouracils, isatins and cyclic carbonyl compounds in deep eutectic solvent (choline chloride-oxalic acid: 1:1) which acts as efficient catalyst and environmentally benign reaction medium. The present protocol offers several advantages such as operational simplicity with easy workup, shorter reaction times excellent yields with superior atom economy and environmentally benign reaction conditions with the use of cost-effective, recyclable, non-toxic and bio-degradable DES as catalyst/solvent. PMID:25329839

  16. Oxide Nanocrystal Model Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weixin

    2016-03-15

    Model catalysts with uniform and well-defined surface structures have been extensively employed to explore structure-property relationships of powder catalysts. Traditional oxide model catalysts are based on oxide single crystals and single crystal thin films, and the surface chemistry and catalysis are studied under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. However, the acquired fundamental understandings often suffer from the "materials gap" and "pressure gap" when they are extended to the real world of powder catalysts working at atmospheric or higher pressures. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis have realized controlled synthesis of catalytic oxide nanocrystals with uniform and well-defined morphologies. These oxide nanocrystals consist of a novel type of oxide model catalyst whose surface chemistry and catalysis can be studied under the same conditions as working oxide catalysts. In this Account, the emerging concept of oxide nanocrystal model catalysts is demonstrated using our investigations of surface chemistry and catalysis of uniform and well-defined cuprous oxide nanocrystals and ceria nanocrystals. Cu2O cubes enclosed with the {100} crystal planes, Cu2O octahedra enclosed with the {111} crystal planes, and Cu2O rhombic dodecahedra enclosed with the {110} crystal planes exhibit distinct morphology-dependent surface reactivities and catalytic properties that can be well correlated with the surface compositions and structures of exposed crystal planes. Among these types of Cu2O nanocrystals, the octahedra are most reactive and catalytically active due to the presence of coordination-unsaturated (1-fold-coordinated) Cu on the exposed {111} crystal planes. The crystal-plane-controlled surface restructuring and catalytic activity of Cu2O nanocrystals were observed in CO oxidation with excess oxygen. In the propylene oxidation reaction with O2, 1-fold-coordinated Cu on Cu2O(111), 3-fold-coordinated O on Cu2O(110), and 2-fold-coordinated O on Cu2O(100) were identified

  17. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  18. Catalyst, method of making, and reactions using the catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA

    2002-08-27

    The present invention includes a catalyst having a layered structure with, (1) a porous support, (2) a buffer layer, (3) an interfacial layer, and optionally (4) a catalyst layer. The invention also provides a process in which a reactant is converted to a product by passing through a reaction chamber containing the catalyst.

  19. Catalyst, Method Of Making, And Reactions Using The Catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y.; Wang, Yong; Gao, Yufei

    2004-07-13

    The present invention includes a catalyst having a layered structure with, (1) a porous support, (2) a buffer layer, (3) an interfacial layer, and optionally (4) a catalyst layer. The invention also provides a process in which a reactant is converted to a product by passing through a reaction chamber containing the catalyst.

  20. Catalyst, method of making, and reactions using the catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA

    2009-03-03

    The present invention includes a catalyst having a layered structure with, (1) a porous support, (2) a buffer layer, (3) an interfacial layer, and optionally (4) a catalyst layer. The invention also provides a process in which a reactant is converted to a product by passing through a reaction chamber containing the catalyst.

  1. Dual-component system dimethyl sulfoxide/LiCl as a solvent and catalyst for homogeneous ring-opening grafted polymerization of ε-caprolactone onto xylan.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Qin; Chen, Ming-Jie; Liu, Chuan-Fu; Sun, Run-Cang

    2014-01-22

    The preparation of xylan-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) (xylan-g-PCL) copolymers was investigated by homogeneous ring-opening polymerization (ROP) in a dual-component system containing Lewis base LiCl and strong polar aprotic solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). DMSO/LiCl acted as solvent, base, and catalyst for the ROP reaction. The effects of the parameters, including the reaction temperature, molar ratio of ε-caprolactone (ε-CL) to anhydroxylose units (AXU) in xylan, and reaction time, on the degree of substitution (DS) and weight percent of PCL side chain (WPCL) were investigated. The results showed that xylan-g-PCL copolymers with low DS in the range of 0.03-0.39 were obtained under the given conditions. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), (13)C NMR, (1)H-(1)H correlation spectroscopy (COSY), and (1)H-(13)C correlation two-dimensional (2D) NMR [heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC)] characterization provided more evidence of the attachment of side chains onto xylan. Only one ε-CL was confirmed to be attached onto xylan with each side chain. Integration of resonances assigned to the substituted C2 and C3 in the HSQC spectrum also indicated 69.23 and 30.77% of PCL side chains attached to AXU at C3 and C2 positions, respectively. Although the attachment of PCL onto xylan led to the decreased thermal stability of xylan, the loss of unrecovered xylan fractions with low molecular weight because of the high solubility of xylan in DMSO/LiCl resulted in the increased thermal stability of the samples. This kind of xylan derivative has potential application in environmentally friendly and biodegradable materials considering the good biodegradability of xylan and PCL. PMID:24387806

  2. Secret Lives of Catalysts Revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor

    2008-01-01

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division discuss the first-ever glimpse of nanoscale catalysts in action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/10/21/catalysts/

  3. Engelhard expands oxidation catalysts portfolio

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1997-02-26

    Engelhard says its agreement earlier this month to market Amoco Chemical`s proprietary maleic anhydride catalyst reflects an effort to expand its speciality catalysts business (CW, Feb. 19, p.5). In particular, the company says it is looking for additional alliances to bolster its oxidation catalysts portfolio. {open_quotes}There are some areas of oxidation catalysis that are reasonably attractive,{close_quotes} says Paul Lamb, marketing director/chemical catalysts. He says that while Engelhard is not interested in commodity oxidation catalysts, such as those used to make sulfuric acid, it does want to boost offerings for higher-value oxidation catalysts. Engelhard is collaborating with Geon to offer oxychlorination catalysts for making ethylene dichloride. It also markets oxidation catalysts for vinyl acetate production.

  4. Passivating metals on cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mckay, D.L.

    1980-01-15

    Metals such as nickel, vanadium and iron contaminating a cracking catalyst are passivated by contacting the cracking catalyst under elevated temperature conditions with antimony selenide, antimony sulfide, antimony sulfate, bismuth selenide, bismuth sulfide, or bismuth phosphate.

  5. Aerogel derived catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J. G., LLNL

    1996-12-11

    Aerogels area class of colloidal materials which have high surface areas and abundant mesoporous structure. SiO{sub 2} aerogels show unique physical, optical and structural properties. When catalytic metals are incorporated in the aerogel framework, the potential exists for new and very effective catalysts for industrial processes. Three applications of these metal-containing SiO{sub 2} aerogels as catalysts are briefly reviewed in this paper--NO{sub x} reduction, volatile organic compound destruction, and partial oxidation of methane.

  6. Process of making supported catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, James A.; Subramanian, Somasundaram

    1992-01-01

    Oxide supported metal catalysts have an additional metal present in intimate association with the metal catalyst to enhance catalytic activity. In a preferred mode, iridium or another Group VIII metal catalyst is supported on a titania, alumina, tungsten oxide, silica, or composite oxide support. Aluminum ions are readsorbed onto the support and catalyst, and reduced during calcination. The aluminum can be added as aluminum nitrate to the iridium impregnate solution, e.g. chloroiridic acid.

  7. Catalyst cartridge for carbon dioxide reduction unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A catalyst cartridge, for use in a carbon dioxide reducing apparatus in a life support system for space vehicles, is described. The catalyst cartridge includes an inner perforated metal wall, an outer perforated wall space outwardly from the inner wall, a base plate closing one end of the cartridge, and a cover plate closing the other end of the cartridge. The cover plate has a central aperture through which a supply line with a heater feeds a gaseous reaction mixture comprising hydrogen and carbon dioxide at a temperature from about 1000 to about 1400 F. The outer surfaces of the internal wall and the inner surfaces of the outer wall are lined with a ceramic fiber batting material of sufficient thickness to prevent carbon formed in the reaction from passing through it. The portion of the surfaces of the base and cover plates defined within the inner and outer walls are also lined with ceramic batting. The heated reaction mixture passes outwardly through the inner perforated wall and ceramic batting and over the catalyst. The solid carbon product formes is retained within the enclosure containing the catalyst. The solid carbon product formed is retained within the enclosure containing the catalyst. The water vapor and unreacted carbon dioxide and any intermediate products pass through the perforations of the outer wall.

  8. Fabrication of TiB2-Cu based functionally gradient material by SHS process. [Self-propagating High-temperature Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sata, Nobuhiro

    1992-08-01

    A series of producing process of a functionally gradient material (FGM) by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) process have been developed, and TiB2-Cu based FGM was fabricated by the process. Using the automatic powder spraying and stacking device, raw material powders were sprayed and stacked on Cu substrate so that the compositional profile can be graded as nonlinear as fitting the material design after synthesis. This stacked body was compressed and vacuum-sealed into the capsule for the synthesis. The FGM sample was ignited and compressed with synthesizing simultaneously under high-hydropressure of 58 MPa. As a result of this process, TiB2-Cu based FGM of 1 mm thickness and 30 MM diameter can be produced on Cu substrate. 8 refs.

  9. Catalytic Destruction of a Surrogate Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant as a Potential Co-benefit for Coal-fired Selective Catalyst Reduction Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Catalytic destruction of benzene (C6H6), a surrogate for organic hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) produced from coal combustion, was investigated using a commercial selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst for evaluating the potential co-benefit of the SCR technology for reduc...

  10. PHENANTHROLINE-STABILIZED PALLADIUM NANOPARTICLES IN POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL—AN ACTIVE AND RECYCLABLE CATALYST SYSTEM FOR THE SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF OLEFINS USING MOLECULAR HYDROGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    1,10-Phenanthroline-stabilized palladium nanoparticles dispersed in a polyethylene glycol (PEG) matrix is synthesized which is found to be a stable and active catalyst for the selective hydrogenation of olefins using molecular hydrogen under mild reaction conditions. A variety of...

  11. Effect of iron-manganese-sepiolite as heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst on the performance and microbial community of anaerobic granular sludge treatment system.

    PubMed

    Su, Chengyuan; Li, Weiguang; Chen, Menglin; Huang, Zhi; Wu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Both short-term and long-term exposure experiments have been carried out to investigate the influence of iron (Fe)-manganese (Mn)-sepiolite, as a heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst, on the performance and microbial community of anaerobic granular sludge. During the short-term exposure experiments, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency decreased from 73.1% to 64.1% with the presence of 100mg/L of catalyst. However, long-term exposure to the catalyst did not significantly affect the COD removal efficiency (81.8%) as compared to the control (83.5%). Meanwhile, the absorption peaks of coenzyme F420 in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of sludge samples were remarkable by excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectra. After long-term exposure, the presence of the catalyst increased secretions of EPS from 83.7mg/g VSS to 89.1mg/g VSS. Further investigations with high throughput sequencing indicated that the abundance of Methanosaeta increased from 57.7% to 70.4% after long-term exposure. In bacterial communities, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Synergistetes were predominant.

  12. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.13 ), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  13. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1991-02-12

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.-), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  14. Protein Scaffolding for Small Molecule Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, David

    2014-09-14

    We aim to design hybrid catalysts for energy production and storage that combine the high specificity, affinity, and tunability of proteins with the potent chemical reactivities of small organometallic molecules. The widely used Rosetta and RosettaDesign methodologies will be extended to model novel protein / small molecule catalysts in which one or many small molecule active centers are supported and coordinated by protein scaffolding. The promise of such hybrid molecular systems will be demonstrated with the nickel-phosphine hydrogenase of DuBois et. al.We will enhance the hydrogenase activity of the catalyst by designing protein scaffolds that incorporate proton relays and systematically modulate the local environment of the catalyticcenter. In collaboration with DuBois and Shaw, the designs will be experimentally synthesized and characterized.

  15. Computational Design of Lignin Depolymerization Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Sturgeon, M.; Katahira, R.; Paton, R. S.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major component of plant cell walls that is typically underutilized in selective conversion strategies for renewable fuels and chemicals. The mechanisms by which thermal and catalytic treatments deconstruct lignin remain elusive, for which quantum mechanical calculations can offer fundamental insights. In this work, a computational approach has been used to elucidate the reductive deconstruction pathway of a ruthenium-catalyzed system. Transition states have been computed to determine the rate-limiting steps for a catalyst that cleaves arylether linkages. Our calculations are supported by experimental synthesis and kinetic and thermodynamic measurements of the deconstruction of model lignin dimers by a ruthenium catalyst with the ultimate objective of designing new catalysts to eventually utilize lignin in biorefineries.

  16. Ship-in-a-bottle catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Haw, James F.; Song, Weiguo

    2006-07-18

    In accordance with the present invention there is provided a novel catalyst system in which the catalytic structure is tailormade at the nanometer scale using the invention's novel ship-in-a-bottle synthesis techniques. The invention describes modified forms of solid catalysts for use in heterogeneous catalysis that have a microporous structure defined by nanocages. Examples include zeolites, SAPOs, and analogous materials that have the controlled pore dimensions and hydrothermal stability required for many industrial processes. The invention provides for modification of these catalysts using reagents that are small enough to pass through the windows used to access the cages. The small reagents are then reacted to form larger molecules in the cages.

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: Nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Luo, Jin; Fang, Bin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Njoki, Peter N.; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Yin, Jun

    2010-02-01

    One of the most important challenges for the ultimate commercialization of fuel cells is the preparation of active, robust, and low-cost catalysts. This review highlights some findings of our investigations in the last few years in developing advanced approaches to nanostructured catalysts that address this challenge. Emphasis is placed on nanoengineering-based fabrication, processing, and characterization of multimetallic nanoparticles with controllable size (1-10 nm), shape, composition (e.g. MlnM2100-n, M1nM2mM3100-n-m, M1@M2, where M (1 or 2) = Pt, Co, Ni, V, Fe, Cu, Pd, W, Ag, Au etc) and morphology (e.g. alloy, core@shell etc). In addition to an overview of the fundamental issues and the recent progress in fuel cell catalysts, results from evaluations of the electrocatalytic performance of nanoengineered catalysts in fuel cell reactions are discussed. This approach differs from other traditional approaches to the preparation of supported catalysts in the ability to control the particle size, composition, phase, and surface properties. An understanding of how the nanoscale properties of the multimetallic nanoparticles differ from their bulk-scale counterparts, and how the interaction between the nanoparticles and the support materials relates to the size sintering or evolution in the thermal activation process, is also discussed. The fact that the bimetallic gold-platinum nanoparticle system displays a single-phase character different from the miscibility gap known for its bulk-scale counterpart serves as an important indication of the nanoscale manipulation of the structural properties, which is useful for refining the design and preparation of the bimetallic catalysts. The insight gained from probing how nanoparticle-nanoparticle and nanoparticle-substrate interactions relate to the size evolution in the activation process of nanoparticles on planar substrates serves as an important guiding principle in the control of nanoparticle sintering on different

  18. Testing zinc chloride as a new catalyst for direct synthesis of cellulose di- and tri-acetate in a solvent free system under microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    El Nemr, Ahmed; Ragab, Safaa; El Sikaily, Amany

    2016-10-20

    This research demonstrates the effect of ZnCl2 as a catalyst on the esterification of commercial cotton cellulose using acetic anhydride in order to obtain di- and tri-cellulose acetates under microwave irradiation. It was discovered that microwave irradiation significantly increased the yield and reduced the reaction time. It was found that the maximum yield for cellulose triacetates was 95.83% under the reaction conditions that were as follows: 3min reaction time, 200mg of ZnCl2 catalyst and 20ml of Ac2O for 5g cellulose. However, the cellulose acetate obtained in this manner had the highest DS (2.87). The cellulose di-acetate was produced with the maximum yield of 89.97% and with the highest DS (2.69) using 25ml Ac2O, 200mg of ZnCl2 for 5g cellulose and in 3min reaction time. The effect of some factors such as the amount of used catalyst, the quantity of acetic acid anhydride and the reaction time of the esterification process have been investigated. The production of di- and tri-cellulose acetate and the degree of substitution were confirmed using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The thermal stability was investigated using thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The molecular weight and the degree of polymerization were obtained using Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC). The analysis confirmed the successful synthesis of di- and tri-cellulose acetate without degradation during the reaction; these results were found to be in contrast to some recent studies. The present study reveals that ZnCl2 is a new catalyst; it is effective as well as inexpensive and is a low toxicity catalyst for usage in cellulose esterification. PMID:27474655

  19. Testing zinc chloride as a new catalyst for direct synthesis of cellulose di- and tri-acetate in a solvent free system under microwave irradiation.

    PubMed

    El Nemr, Ahmed; Ragab, Safaa; El Sikaily, Amany

    2016-10-20

    This research demonstrates the effect of ZnCl2 as a catalyst on the esterification of commercial cotton cellulose using acetic anhydride in order to obtain di- and tri-cellulose acetates under microwave irradiation. It was discovered that microwave irradiation significantly increased the yield and reduced the reaction time. It was found that the maximum yield for cellulose triacetates was 95.83% under the reaction conditions that were as follows: 3min reaction time, 200mg of ZnCl2 catalyst and 20ml of Ac2O for 5g cellulose. However, the cellulose acetate obtained in this manner had the highest DS (2.87). The cellulose di-acetate was produced with the maximum yield of 89.97% and with the highest DS (2.69) using 25ml Ac2O, 200mg of ZnCl2 for 5g cellulose and in 3min reaction time. The effect of some factors such as the amount of used catalyst, the quantity of acetic acid anhydride and the reaction time of the esterification process have been investigated. The production of di- and tri-cellulose acetate and the degree of substitution were confirmed using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The thermal stability was investigated using thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The molecular weight and the degree of polymerization were obtained using Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC). The analysis confirmed the successful synthesis of di- and tri-cellulose acetate without degradation during the reaction; these results were found to be in contrast to some recent studies. The present study reveals that ZnCl2 is a new catalyst; it is effective as well as inexpensive and is a low toxicity catalyst for usage in cellulose esterification.

  20. Catalyst increases COS conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Goodboy, K.P.

    1985-02-18

    Increasingly stringent air quality legislation is placing greater emphasis on conversion of COS and CS/sub 2/ in Claus plants for the maximum sulfur recovery. Overall sulfur recovery goals are dependent upon outstanding service from the Claus catalyst in each reactor because catalyst activity is a major factor influencing plant performance. Today's catalyst are much improved over those used 10 years ago for the Claus (H/sub 2/S/SO/sub 2/) reaction. Recent technical efforts have focused on the conversion of COS and CS/sub 2/. These carbon-sulfur compounds can account for as much as 50% of the sulfur going to the incinerator, which essentially converts all remaining sulfur species to SO/sub 2/ for atmospheric dispersion. Previously, the mechanism of Claus COS conversion, i.e., hydrolysis or oxidation by SO/sub 2/, was studied and the conclusion was that oxidation by SO/sub 2/ appears to be the predominate mode of COS conversion on sulfated alumina catalysts.

  1. Nanopore and nanoparticle catalysts.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J M; Raja, R

    2001-01-01

    The design, atomic characterization, performance, and relevance to clean technology of two distinct categories of new nanocatalysts are described and interpreted. Exceptional molecular selectivity and high activity are exhibited by these catalysts. The first category consists of extended, crystallographically ordered inorganic solids possessing nanopores (apertures, cages, and channels), the diameters of which fall in the range of about 0.4 to about 1.5 nm, and the second of discrete bimetallic nanoparticles of diameter 1 to 2 nm, distributed more or less uniformly along the inner walls of mesoporous (ca. 3 to 10 nm diameter) silica supports. Using the principles and practices of solid-state and organometallic chemistry and advanced physico-chemical techniques for in situ and ex situ characterization, a variety of powerful new catalysts has been evolved. Apart from those that, inter alia, simulate the behavior of enzymes in their specificity, shape selectivity, regio-selectivity, and ability to function under ambient conditions, many of these new nanocatalysts are also viable as agents for effecting commercially significant processes in a clean, benign, solvent-free, single-step fashion. In particular, a bifunctional, molecular sieve nanopore catalyst is described that converts cyclohexanone in air and ammonia to its oxime and caprolactam, and a bimetallic nanoparticle catalyst that selectively converts cyclic polyenes into desirable intermediates. Nanocatalysts in the first category are especially effective in facilitating highly selective oxidations in air, and those in the second are well suited to effecting rapid and selective hydrogenations of a range of organic compounds.

  2. Catalyst, 2000-01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Barbara E., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    "Catalyst" is a publication designed to assist higher education in developing alcohol and other drug prevention polices and programs that will foster students' academic and social development and promote campus and community safety. Issue 1 of volume 6 introduces a series of "Presidential Profiles" in which university presidents describe their…

  3. Octane boosting catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.G.; Pellet, R.J.; Shamshoun, E.S.; Rabo, J.A

    1989-02-07

    The invention provides petroleum cracking and octane boosting catalysts containing a composite of an intermediate pore NZMS in combination with another non-zeolitic molecular sieve having the same framework structure, and processes for cracking of petroleum for the purpose of enhancing the octane rating of the gasoline produced.

  4. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1984-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  5. Synergistic removal of nitrogen monoxide by non-thermal plasma and catalyst simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Yu, Qi; Zeng, Ke-si; Zhai, Xiao-dong

    2005-01-01

    An experimental system of De-NO with plasma-catalyst(Cu zeolite) was established to investigate the differences between De-NO with plasma-catalyst and De-NO only with plasma, to provide the instruction for selecting appropriate catalyst and operating condition. The characteristics of De-NO with plasma and De-NO with plasma-catalyst were investigated comparatively by experiments. The experimental results show that De-NO with plasma-catalyst has high NO removal rate; Cu zeolite is an effective catalyst which can promote NO removal rate in plasma remarkably; De-NO with plasma-catalyst should be operated at low temperature and the temperature has opposite effects on the function of catalyst and plasma; water vapor and O2 can increase the NO removal rate.

  6. Noble metal ionic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hegde, M S; Madras, Giridhar; Patil, K C

    2009-06-16

    Because of growing environmental concerns and increasingly stringent regulations governing auto emissions, new more efficient exhaust catalysts are needed to reduce the amount of pollutants released from internal combustion engines. To accomplish this goal, the major pollutants in exhaust-CO, NO(x), and unburned hydrocarbons-need to be fully converted to CO(2), N(2), and H(2)O. Most exhaust catalysts contain nanocrystalline noble metals (Pt, Pd, Rh) dispersed on oxide supports such as Al(2)O(3) or SiO(2) promoted by CeO(2). However, in conventional catalysts, only the surface atoms of the noble metal particles serve as adsorption sites, and even in 4-6 nm metal particles, only 1/4 to 1/5 of the total noble metal atoms are utilized for catalytic conversion. The complete dispersion of noble metals can be achieved only as ions within an oxide support. In this Account, we describe a novel solution to this dispersion problem: a new solution combustion method for synthesizing dispersed noble metal ionic catalysts. We have synthesized nanocrystalline, single-phase Ce(1-x)M(x)O(2-delta) and Ce(1-x-y)Ti(y)M(x)O(2-delta) (M = Pt, Pd, Rh; x = 0.01-0.02, delta approximately x, y = 0.15-0.25) oxides in fluorite structure. In these oxide catalysts, Pt(2+), Pd(2+), or Rh(3+) ions are substituted only to the extent of 1-2% of Ce(4+) ion. Lower-valent noble metal ion substitution in CeO(2) creates oxygen vacancies. Reducing molecules (CO, H(2), NH(3)) are adsorbed onto electron-deficient noble metal ions, while oxidizing (O(2), NO) molecules are absorbed onto electron-rich oxide ion vacancy sites. The rates of CO and hydrocarbon oxidation and NO(x) reduction (with >80% N(2) selectivity) are 15-30 times higher in the presence of these ionic catalysts than when the same amount of noble metal loaded on an oxide support is used. Catalysts with palladium ion dispersed in CeO(2) or Ce(1-x)Ti(x)O(2) were far superior to Pt or Rh ionic catalysts. Therefore, we have demonstrated that the

  7. Regeneration of LOHC dehydrogenation catalysts: In-situ IR spectroscopy on single crystals, model catalysts, and real catalysts from UHV to near ambient pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amende, Max; Kaftan, Andre; Bachmann, Philipp; Brehmer, Richard; Preuster, Patrick; Koch, Marcus; Wasserscheid, Peter; Libuda, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier (LOHC) concept offers an efficient route to store hydrogen using organic compounds that are reversibly hydrogenated and dehydrogenated. One important challenge towards application of the LOHC technology at a larger scale is to minimize degradation of Pt-based dehydrogenation catalysts during long-term operation. Herein, we investigate the regeneration of Pt/alumina catalysts poisoned by LOHC degradation. We combine ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) studies on Pt(111), investigations on well-defined Pt/Al2O3 model catalysts, and near-ambient pressure (NAP) measurements on real core-shell Pt/Al2O3 catalyst pellets. The catalysts were purposely poisoned by reaction with the LOHC perhydro-dibenzyltoluene (H18-MSH) and with dicyclohexylmethane (DCHM) as a simpler model compound. We focus on oxidative regeneration under conditions that may be applied in real dehydrogenation reactors. The degree of poisoning and regeneration under oxidative reaction conditions was quantified using CO as a probe molecule and measured by infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) and diffuse reflectance Fourier transform IR spectroscopy (DRIFTS) for planar model systems and real catalysts, respectively. We find that regeneration strongly depends on the composition of the catalyst surface. While the clean surface of a poisoned Pt(111) single crystal is fully restored upon thermal treatment in oxygen up to 700 K, contaminated Pt/Al2O3 model catalyst and core-shell pellet were only partially restored under the applied reaction conditions. Whereas partial regeneration on facet-like sites on supported catalysts is more facile than on Pt(111), carbonaceous deposits adsorbed at low-coordinated defect sites impede full regeneration of the Pt/Al2O3 catalysts.

  8. Sulfur condensation in Claus catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schoffs, G.R.

    1985-02-01

    The heterogeneous reactions in which catalyst deactivation by pore plugging occur are listed and include: coke formation in petroleum processing, especially hydrocracking and hydrodesulfurization catalysts; steam reforming and methnation catalysts; ammonia synthesis catalyst; and automobile exhause catalysts. The authors explain how the Claus process converts hydrogen sulfide produced by petroleum desulfurization units and gas treatment processes into elemental sulfur and water. More than 15 million tons of sulfur are recovered annually by this process. Commercial Claus plants appear to operate at thermodynamic equilibrium. Depending on the H2S content of the feed and the number of reactors, total H2S conversion to elemental sulfur can exceed 95%.

  9. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  10. Green heterogeneous Pd(II) catalyst produced from chitosan-cellulose micro beads for green synthesis of biaryls.

    PubMed

    Baran, Talat; Sargin, Idris; Kaya, Murat; Menteş, Ayfer

    2016-11-01

    In green catalyst systems, both the catalyst and the technique should be environmentally safe. In this study we designed a green palladium(II) catalyst for microwave-assisted Suzuki CC coupling reactions. The catalyst support was produced from biopolymers; chitosan and cellulose. The catalytic activity of the catalyst was tested on 16 substrates in solvent-free media and compared with those of commercial palladium salts. Reusability tests were done. The catalyst was also used in conventional reflux-heating system to demonstrate the efficiency of microwave heating method. We recorded high activity, selectivity and excellent TONs (6600) and TOFs (82500) just using a small catalyst loading (1.5×10(-3)mol%) in short reaction time (5min). The catalyst exhibited a long lifetime (9 runs). The findings indicated that both green chitosan/cellulose-Pd(II) catalyst and the microwave heating are suitable for synthesis of biaryl compounds by using Suzuki CC coupling reactions.

  11. Apparatus and Process for Controlled Nanomanufacturing Using Catalyst Retaining Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the controlled fabrication of nanostructures using catalyst retaining structures is disclosed. The apparatus includes one or more modified force microscopes having a nanotube attached to the tip portion of the microscopes. An electric current is passed from the nanotube to a catalyst layer of a substrate, thereby causing a localized chemical reaction to occur in a resist layer adjacent the catalyst layer. The region of the resist layer where the chemical reaction occurred is etched, thereby exposing a catalyst particle or particles in the catalyst layer surrounded by a wall of unetched resist material. Subsequent chemical vapor deposition causes growth of a nanostructure to occur upward through the wall of unetched resist material having controlled characteristics of height and diameter and, for parallel systems, number density.

  12. Application of a mixed metal oxide catalyst to a metallic substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor); Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Wisner, Daniel L. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for applying a mixed metal oxide catalyst to a metallic substrate for the creation of a robust, high temperature catalyst system for use in decomposing propellants, particularly hydrogen peroxide propellants, for use in propulsion systems. The method begins by forming a prepared substrate material consisting of a metallic inner substrate and a bound layer of a noble metal intermediate. Alternatively, a bound ceramic coating, or frit, may be introduced between the metallic inner substrate and noble metal intermediate when the metallic substrate is oxidation resistant. A high-activity catalyst slurry is applied to the surface of the prepared substrate and dried to remove the organic solvent. The catalyst layer is then heat treated to bind the catalyst layer to the surface. The bound catalyst layer is then activated using an activation treatment and calcinations to form the high-activity catalyst system.

  13. LaRC-developed catalysts for CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Kielin, Erik J.; Miller, Irvin M.

    1990-01-01

    Pulsed CO2 lasers have many remote sensing applications from space, airborne, and ground platforms. The NASA Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) system will be designed to measure wind velocities from polar earth orbit for a period of up to three years. Accordingly, this and other applications require a closed-cycle pulsed CO2 laser which necessitates the use of an efficient CO-O2 recombination catalyst for these dissociation products which otherwise would degrade the laser operation. The required catalyst must not only operate at low temperatures but also must operate efficiently for long time periods. The research effort at NASA LaRC has centered around development and testing of CO oxidation catalysts for closed-cycle, pulsed, common and rare-isotope CO2 lasers. Researchers examined available commercial catalysts both in a laser and under simulated closed-cycle laser conditions with efforts aimed toward a thorough understanding of the fundamental catalytic reaction. These data were used to design and synthesize new catalyst compositions to better meet the catalyst requirements for closed-cycle pulsed CO2 lasers. Syntheses and test results for catalysts developed at Langley Research Center which have significantly better long-term decay characteristics than previously available catalysts and at the same time operate quite well under lower temperature conditions are discussed.

  14. SCALEUP OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE CATALYST FOR PILOT PLANT LPDMEtm RUN

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew W. Wang

    2002-05-15

    The Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) process converts synthesis gas to dimethyl ether in a single slurry bubble column reactor. A mixed slurry of methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst in a neutral mineral oil simultaneously synthesizes methanol from syngas and converts some of it to dimethyl ether and water. The reaction scheme is: 2H{sub 2} + CO = CH{sub 3}OH 2CH{sub 3}OH = CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}O + CO = CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. Most of the water produced in this reaction is converted to hydrogen by reduction with carbon monoxide (water gas shift reaction). This synergy permits higher per pass conversion than methanol synthesis alone. The enhancement in conversion occurs because dehydration of the methanol circumvents the equilibrium constraint of the syngas-to-methanol step. The slurry bubble column reactor provides the necessary heat transfer capacity to handle the greater heat duty associated with high conversion. In order to improve the stability of the catalyst system, non-stoichiometric aluminum phosphate was proposed as the dehydration catalyst for the LPDME{trademark} process. This aluminum phosphate material is a proprietary catalyst. This catalyst system of a standard methanol catalyst and the aluminum phosphate provided stable process performance that met the program targets under our standard test process conditions in the laboratory. These targets are (1) an initial methanol equivalent productivity of 28 gmol/kg/hr, (2) a CO{sub 2}-free, carbon selectivity of 80% to dimethyl ether and (3) stability of both catalysts equivalent to that of the methanol catalyst in the absence of the aluminum phosphate. A pilot plant trial of the LPDME{trademark} process using the aluminum phosphate catalyst was originally planned for March 1998 at the DOE-owned, Air Products (APCI)-operated facility at LaPorte, Texas. Because the aluminum phosphate catalyst is not commercially available, we initiated a scaleup project

  15. SCALEUP OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE CATALYST FOR PILOT PLANT LPDMEtm RUN

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew W. Wang

    2002-01-01

    The Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) process converts synthesis gas to dimethyl ether in a single slurry bubble column reactor. A mixed slurry of methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst in a neutral mineral oil simultaneously synthesizes methanol from syngas and converts some of it to dimethyl ether and water. The reaction scheme is shown below: 2H{sub 2} + CO = CH{sub 3}OH; 2CH{sub 3}OH = CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O; H{sub 2}O + CO = CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. Most of the water produced in this reaction is converted to hydrogen by reduction with carbon monoxide (water gas shift reaction). This synergy permits higher per pass conversion than methanol synthesis alone. The enhancement in conversion occurs because dehydration of the methanol circumvents the equilibrium constraint of the syngas-to-methanol step. The slurry bubble column reactor provides the necessary heat transfer capacity to handle the greater heat duty associated with high conversion. In order to improve the stability of the catalyst system, non-stoichiometric aluminum phosphate was proposed as the dehydration catalyst for the LPDME{trademark} process. This aluminum phosphate material is a proprietary catalyst. This catalyst system of a standard methanol catalyst and the aluminum phosphate provided stable process performance that met the program targets under our standard test process conditions in the laboratory. These targets are (1) an initial methanol equivalent productivity of 28 gmol/kg/hr, (2) a CO{sub 2}-free, carbon selectivity of 80% to dimethyl ether and (3) stability of both catalysts equivalent to that of the methanol catalyst in the absence of the aluminum phosphate. A pilot plant trial of the LPDME{trademark} process using the aluminum phosphate catalyst was originally planned for March 1998 at the DOE-owned, Air Products (APCI)-operated facility at LaPorte, Texas. Because the aluminum phosphate catalyst is not commercially available, we initiated a

  16. Nature of coupling and origin of coercivity in giant magnetoresistance NiO-Co-Cu-based spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Harsh Deep; Yang, David X.; Chen, P. J.; Parks, D. C.; Egelhoff, W. F.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of various couplings on the switching field and coercivity in NiO-Co-Cu-based giant magnetoresistance (GMR) bottom spin valves is investigated. Bottom spin valves as well as different layer permutations that make up a bottom spin valve, viz., Co single films, Co/Cu/Co trilayers, and Co/NiO bilayers (deposited under similar growth conditions), were investigated for their magnetic, crystal, and interfacial structure. As-deposited bottom spin valves exhibit a large GMR of ~16.5%, and a small net ferromagnetic coupling (+0.36 mT) between the ``free'' Co layer and the NiO-pinned Co layer. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on spin valves and trilayers show that the average grain size in these films is ~20 nm and average roughness ~ 0.3 nm. Using these values, the observed ferromagnetic coupling in spin valves could largely be accounted for by Néel's so-called ``orange-peel'' coupling. Results also show that the ``free'' Co layer exhibits an enhanced coercivity (HFree-Coc=6.7 mT) with respect to Co single films of comparable thickness (HCoc=2.7 mT). The TEM studies did not reveal the presence of any pin-holes, and ``orange-peel'' or oscillatory exchange coupling mechanisms cannot adequately account for this observed coercivity enhancement in the ``free'' Co layer of spin valves. The present study shows that the often observed and undesirable coercivity enhancement in the ``free'' Co layer results from magnetostatic coupling between domain walls in the ``free'' Co layer and high coercivity NiO-pinned Co layer (HPinned-Coc~45 mT); without NiO, the coercivity of Co layers in the corresponding Co/Cu/Co trilayer remains largely unchanged (HCo/Cu/Coc=3.0 mT) with respect to Co single films. Evidence of magnetostatically coupled domain walls was confirmed by direct observation of magnetization reversal, which revealed that domain walls in the ``free'' Co layer are magnetostatically

  17. On the performance of low pressure die-cast Al-Cu based automotive alloys: Role of additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, Gergis Adel

    The present study focuses on the effect of alloying elements, namely, strontium (Sr), titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), scandium (Sc) and silver(Ag) individually or in combination, on the performance of a newly developed Al-2%Cu based alloy. A total of thirteen alloy compositions were used in the study. Tensile test bar castings were prepared employing the low pressure die casting (LPDC) technique. The test bars were solution heat treated at 495°C for 8 hours, followed by quenching in warm water, and then subjected to different isochronal aging treatments using an aging time of 5 hours and aging temperatures of 155°C, 180°C, 200°C, 240°C and 300°C. Tensile testing of as-cast and heat-treated test bars was carried out at room temperature using a strain rate of 4 x 10-4s-1. Five test bars were used per alloy composition/condition. Hardness measurements were also carried out on these alloys using a Brinell hardness tester. The microstructures of selected samples were examined using optical microscopy and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The results showed that adding Ti in the amount of 0.15 wt% in the form of Al-5%Ti-1%B master alloy is sufficient to refine the grains in the cast structure in the presence of 200 ppm Sr (0.02 wt%). Addition of Zr and Sc did not contribute further to the grain refining effect. The main role of addition of these two elements appeared in the formation of complex compounds with Al and Ti. Their presence resulted in extending the aging temperature range before the onset of softening. Mathematical analysis of the hardness and tensile data was carried out using the Minitab statistical software program. It was determined that the alloy containing (0.5wt% Zr + 0.15wt% Ti) is the most effective in maximizing the alloy tensile strength over the range of aging temperatures, from 155°C to 300°C. Addition of Ag is beneficial at high aging temperatures, in the range of 240°C-300°C. However, it is less effective compared to the (Zr + Ti

  18. Removal of disinfection by-products from contaminated water using a synthetic goethite catalyst via catalytic ozonation and a biofiltration system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Kuan-Chung

    2014-09-01

    The effects of synthetic goethite (α-FeOOH) used as the catalyst in catalytic ozonation for the degradation of disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors are investigated. A biofiltration column applied following the catalytic ozonation process is used to evaluate the efficiency of removing DBP precursors via biotreatment. Ozone can rapidly react with aromatic compounds and oxidize organic compounds, resulting in a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of dissolved organic matter (DOM). In addition, catalytic ozonation can break down large organic molecules, which causes a blue shift in the emission-excitation matrix spectra. Water treated with catalytic ozonation is composed of low-molecular structures, including soluble microbial products (SMPs) and other aromatic proteins (APs). The DOM in SMPs and APs is removed by subsequent biofiltration. Catalytic ozonation has a higher removal efficiency for dissolved organic carbon and higher ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm compared to those of ozonation without a catalyst. The use of catalytic ozonation and subsequent biofiltration leads to a lower DBP formation potential during chlorination compared to that obtained using ozonation and catalytic ozonation alone. Regarding DBP species during chlorination, the bromine incorporation factor (BIF) of trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids increases with increasing catalyst dosage in catalytic ozonation. Moreover, the highest BIF is obtained for catalytic ozonation and subsequent biofiltration. PMID:25211774

  19. Removal of Disinfection By-Products from Contaminated Water Using a Synthetic Goethite Catalyst via Catalytic Ozonation and a Biofiltration System·

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Kuan-Chung

    2014-01-01

    The effects of synthetic goethite (α-FeOOH) used as the catalyst in catalytic ozonation for the degradation of disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors are investigated. A biofiltration column applied following the catalytic ozonation process is used to evaluate the efficiency of removing DBP precursors via biotreatment. Ozone can rapidly react with aromatic compounds and oxidize organic compounds, resulting in a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of dissolved organic matter (DOM). In addition, catalytic ozonation can break down large organic molecules, which causes a blue shift in the emission-excitation matrix spectra. Water treated with catalytic ozonation is composed of low-molecular structures, including soluble microbial products (SMPs) and other aromatic proteins (APs). The DOM in SMPs and APs is removed by subsequent biofiltration. Catalytic ozonation has a higher removal efficiency for dissolved organic carbon and higher ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm compared to those of ozonation without a catalyst. The use of catalytic ozonation and subsequent biofiltration leads to a lower DBP formation potential during chlorination compared to that obtained using ozonation and catalytic ozonation alone. Regarding DBP species during chlorination, the bromine incorporation factor (BIF) of trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids increases with increasing catalyst dosage in catalytic ozonation. Moreover, the highest BIF is obtained for catalytic ozonation and subsequent biofiltration. PMID:25211774

  20. Nitrogen enriched mesoporous organic polymer anchored copper(II) material: an efficient and reusable catalyst for the synthesis of esters and amides from aromatic systems.

    PubMed

    Molla, Rostam Ali; Iqubal, Md Asif; Ghosh, Kajari; Kamaluddin; Islam, Sk Manirul

    2015-04-14

    A new copper-grafted mesoporous poly-melamine-formaldehyde (Cu-mPMF) has been synthesized from melamine and paraformaldehyde in DMSO medium, followed by grafting of Cu(ii) at its surface. Cu-mPMF has been characterized by elemental analysis, powder XRD, HR TEM, FE-SEM, N2 adsorption study, FT-IR, UV-vis DRS, TGA-DTA, EPR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Cu-grafted mesoporous material showed very good catalytic activity in methyl esterification of benzylic alcohols and amidation of nitriles. Moreover, the catalyst is easily recoverable and can be reused seven times without appreciable loss of catalytic activity in the above reactions. The highly dispersed and strongly bound Cu(ii) sites in the Cu-grafted mesoporous polymer could be responsible for the observed high activities of the Cu-mPMF catalyst. Due to strong binding with the functional groups of the polymer, no evidence of leached copper from the catalyst during the course of reaction emerged, suggesting true heterogeneity in the catalytic process.

  1. Fluorination process using catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Hochel, Robert C.; Saturday, Kathy A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3, AgF.sub.2 and NiF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3 and AgF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  2. Fluorination process using catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Hochel, R.C.; Saturday, K.A.

    1983-08-25

    A process is given for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/, AgF/sub 2/ and NiF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/ and AgF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  3. New microbead cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Nefedov, S.K.; Guseinov, A.M.; Il'ina, L.M.; Melik-Akhnazarov, T.K.; Stankevich, V.A.

    1984-05-01

    This article reports on the preparation and testing of an experimental batch of KMTsU catalysts using a cocurrent-flow fluid-bed reactor. The proposed manufacturing process is based on the regulation of the density and pore structure of an aluminosilicate matrix by varying the conditions of syneresis and wet treatment in the activation stage. It is recommended that the medium should be at a lower pH in obtaining the gel, that the temperature and pH of the medium should be lower in the activation stage, and that additional dispersion of the gel should be accomplished before spray-drying. The results of the tests on the KMTsU catalyst demonstrate its sufficiently high stable activity, high density (900-920 kg/m/sup 3/), and attrition resistance (92-94%).

  4. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Gerald P.; Zhao, Jianmin; Feng, Zhen

    1996-01-01

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered.

  5. Binary ferrihydrite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, G.P.; Zhao, J.; Feng, Z.

    1996-12-03

    A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered. 3 figs.

  6. FCC catalyst selection

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, G.D.L. ); McElhiney, G. )

    1989-09-01

    This paper discusses a commonly used technique for comparing FCC catalytic selectivities based on the ASTM microactivity test (MAT) procedure, ASTM D-3907-80. In its original form the ASTM test provides only very limited information on selectivity. However, extension of the ASTM MAT procedure by using additional product analyses gives a microselectivity test capable of providing detailed yield structure information. This modified MAT procedure thus provides a cost-effective and rapid means of comparing many catalysts.

  7. Steam reforming catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Kramarz, Kurt W.; Bloom, Ira D.; Kumar, Romesh; Ahmed, Shabbir; Wilkenhoener, Rolf; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel. A vapor of the hydrocarbon fuel and steam is brought in contact with a two-part catalyst having a dehydrogenation powder portion and an oxide-ion conducting powder portion at a temperature not less than about 770.degree.C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich. The H.sub.2 content of the hydrogen gas is greater than about 70 percent by volume. The dehydrogenation portion of the catalyst includes a group VIII metal, and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide from the group crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure and mixtures thereof. The oxide-ion conducting portion of the catalyst is a ceramic powder of one or more of ZrO.sub.2, CeO.sub.2, Bi.sub.2 O.sub.3, (BiVO).sub.4, and LaGaO.sub.3.

  8. Scoping economics for the commercial manufacture of metallocene catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmeier, N.F.

    1994-05-26

    This study assumes that commercial-scale production of propylene-based isotactic polymers with metallocene catalyst systems will become a reality. The challenge that must be overcome for commercial success with these propylene polymers is to discover a metallocene system recipe that will give sufficient catalyst activity along with the requisite stereo-selectivity at reasonable cost. Anticipating such a discovery, it is assumed here that the economics are well-represented by a catalyst system that consists in part of a silylene-bridged cyclopentadienyl zirconocene made in a batchwise process having an annual capacity of 15,000 pounds. Activation will be achieved with a cocatalyst such as methylaluminoxane (MAO), coated in conjunction with the catalyst on a support such as silica. The MAO at an estimated $100/lb contributes $1800/lb cost to the finished catalyst with an assumed recipe of 18:1 mass ratio of MAO to zirconocene. Based on a 20% return on investment, the selling price for the supported zirconocene system is estimated to be $2915/lb. The required capital investment to make 735,000 lb/yr of the total supported system is 9 million dollars. These estimates have {plus_minus}50% range of uncertainty. Payback period for this plant in a sold-out condition is three years. The catalyst system cost in ethylene-propylene copolymer is 3.9 cents per pound with a productivity of 75,000 lb polymer/lb of zirconocene. An Appendix includes some economic details.

  9. Novel Intermetallic Catalysts to Enhance PEM Membrane Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Francis J. DiSalvo

    2009-01-06

    The research examined possible sources of degradation of platinum based anode catalysts under long term use. Scientists at the United Technologies Research Center had shown that the anode as well as the cathode catalysts degrade in hydrogen fuel cells. This goal of this research was to see if mechanisms of anode degradation could be understood using forefront electrochemical techniques in an aqueous system. We found that this method is limited by the very low levels of impurities (perhaps less than a part per trillion) in the electrolyte. This limitation comes from the relatively small catalyst surface area (a few sq cm or less) compared to the electrolyte volume of 10 to 25 ml. In real fuel cells this ratio is completelyreversed: high catalyst surface area and low electrolyte violume, making the system much less sensitive to impurities in the electrolyte. We conclude that degradation mechanisms should be studied in real fuel cell systems, rather than in ex-situ, large electrolyte volume experiments.

  10. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.; Tzou, Ming-Shin; Jiang, Hui-Jong

    1987-01-01

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  11. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  12. Routes for deactivation of different autothermal reforming catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasel, Joachim; Wohlrab, Sebastian; Kreft, Stefanie; Rotov, Mikhail; Löhken, Katrin; Peters, Ralf; Stolten, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    Fuel cell systems with integrated autothermal reforming units require active and robust catalysts for H2 production. In pursuit of this, an experimental screening of catalysts utilized in the autothermal reforming of commercial diesel fuels is performed. The catalysts incorporate a monolithic cordierite substrate, an oxide support (γ-Al2O3, La-Al2O3, CeO2, Gd-CeO2, ZrO2, Y-ZrO2) and Rh as the active phase. Experiments are run by widely varying the O2/C and H2O/C molar ratios at different gas hourly space velocities. In most cases, this provokes accelerated catalyst deactivation and permits an informative comparison of the catalysts. Fresh and aged catalysts are characterized by temperature-programmed methods, thermogravimetry and transmission electron microscopy to find correlations with catalytic activity and stability. Using this approach, routes for catalyst deactivation are identified, together with causes of different catalytic activities. Suitable reaction conditions can be derived from our results for the operation of reactors for autothermal reforming at steady-state and under transient reaction conditions, which helps improve the efficiency and the stability of fuel cell systems.

  13. Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening 2007 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; White, J. F.; Gray, Michel J.; Stevens, Don J.

    2007-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are researching the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is obtaining commercially available mixed alcohol or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. The most promising catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. After a review of the literature in 2006 and conversations with companies that produce catalysts, it was determined that no commercial mixed-alcohol synthesis catalysts were available. One manufacturer supplied a modified methanol catalyst that was tested in the PNNL laboratory-scale system and provided to NREL for further testing. PNNL also prepared and tested the behavior of 10 other catalysts representing the distinct catalyst classes for mixed alcohol syntheses. Based on those results,testing in 2007 focused on the performance of the rhodium-based catalysts. The effects of adding promoters to the rhodium catalysts in addition to the manganese already being used were examined. The iron and rhenium promoters both stood out as achieving higher carbon selectivities , followed by Cu. Iridium and Li, on the other hand, had low carbon selectivity ratios of 0.27 and 0.22, respectively. Although testing of candidate promoters is not complete, it appears that Ir and Li promoters warrant further optimization and possibly combination to further improve STYs and carbon selectivities to C2+ oxygenates. However, using these promoters, it will be necessary to incorporate a separate hydrogenation catalyst to improve the yield of C2+ alcohols with respect to the other oxygenates. Fe, Re, and Cu stand out as possible candidates in this respect, but additional research is needed to examine whether they can be combined with the other promoters on the Rh-based catalyst or need to be optimized on a separate catalyst

  14. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhichao; Benavides, Pahola T.; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Cronauer, Donald C.

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of five different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5], Mo/Co/ γ-Al2O3, and Pt/ γ-Al2O3) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module.

  15. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Dennis P.; Schmoeckel, Alison K.; Vernstrom, George D.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Wood, Thomas E.; Yang, Ruizhi; Easton, E. Bradley; Dahn, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, David G.

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  16. Catalyst for producing lower alcohols

    DOEpatents

    Rathke, Jerome W.; Klingler, Robert J.; Heiberger, John J.

    1987-01-01

    A process and system for the production of the lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol and propanol involves the reaction of carbon monoxide and water in the presence of a lead salt and an alkali metal formate catalyst combination. The lead salt is present as solid particles such as lead titanate, lead molybdate, lead vanadate, lead zirconate, lead tantalate and lead silicates coated or in slurry within molten alkali metal formate. The reactants, carbon monoxide and steam are provided in gas form at relatively low pressures below 100 atmospheres and at temperatures of 200-400.degree. C. The resulted lower alcohols can be separated into boiling point fractions and recovered from the excess reactants by distillation.

  17. Magnesium molybdate catalyst for oxidation of butane

    SciTech Connect

    Khazai, B.; Vrieland, G.E.; Murchison, C.B.

    1993-12-31

    Magnesia supported molybdenum oxide has been shown to exhibit catalytic activity in the partial oxidation of butane to 1,3-butadiene. This reaction is carried out in the absence of gaseous oxygen and the catalyst is regenerated by contacting with air in a separate step. The authors have been investigating the use of transport bed technology for this reaction as the relatively short time intervals involved between regenerations (order of seconds) require rapid cycling of the reaction/reoxidation steps for a continuous process. To meet the attrition criteria the authors have developed a multiphase catalyst system based on a dispersion of molybdenum oxide on a magnesia/magnesium aluminate substrate. Hardness is provided by a gamma alumina matrix which displays Davison attrition numbers of 1-5. The catalyst which shows conversions of 35-40% and selectivities to C4 olefins of approximately 80% in a pulsed reactor has been characterized by a variety of techniques. This paper will present data on the catalyst properties and will discuss phase development during synthesis.

  18. Use of ionic liquids as coordination ligands for organometallic catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Li, Zaiwei; Tang, Yongchun; Cheng; Jihong

    2009-11-10

    Aspects of the present invention relate to compositions and methods for the use of ionic liquids with dissolved metal compounds as catalysts for a variety of chemical reactions. Ionic liquids are salts that generally are liquids at room temperature, and are capable of dissolving a many types of compounds that are relatively insoluble in aqueous or organic solvent systems. Specifically, ionic liquids may dissolve metal compounds to produce homogeneous and heterogeneous organometallic catalysts. One industrially-important chemical reaction that may be catalyzed by metal-containing ionic liquid catalysts is the conversion of methane to methanol.

  19. Results of catalyst testing using iron-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.

    1993-03-01

    As coal liquefaction catalysts, iron-based products are generally inferior to the more expensive molybdenum, cobalt, or nickel-based materials. However, the lower costs of production and recovery (or in the case of some iron catalysts, non-recovery) give the iron-based materials a potential economic advantage over the more efficient precious and semi-precious metal catalysts for this application. Recent research has shown that a number of different iron-containing materials can be successfully utilized as coal liquefaction catalysts or as catalyst. Pyrrhotite (Fe[sub 1-x]S) or a similar iron-sulfide phase is commonly believed to be the active catalyst in coal liquefaction and model compound pyrolysis reactions, although no specific phase has been yet been isolated as the actual catalyst species. The active iron-containing catalyst is usually generated in situ from an iron-oxide precursor and an elemental sulfur source under reducing conditions in the reactor vessel. Most research has concentrated on the use of common iron-oxide phases such as hematite or goethite (and their derivatives) as the iron-bearing precursor, or on non-specific iron materials produced by the reaction of various iron salts and compounds in the coal or liquefaction reactor. To our knowledge there has been no systematic effort to determine the optimum iron-containing precursor phase for producing active coal liquefaction catalysts, despite the fact that there are over ten iron-(hydroxy)oxide phases which can be easily synthesized in the laboratory. We have undertaken a systematic study to identify the most active iron-oxide catalyst precursor phases, the co-catalysts, and the coal pretreatments which will provide optimum yields in coal liquefaction processes.

  20. Results of catalyst testing using iron-based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.

    1993-03-01

    As coal liquefaction catalysts, iron-based products are generally inferior to the more expensive molybdenum, cobalt, or nickel-based materials. However, the lower costs of production and recovery (or in the case of some iron catalysts, non-recovery) give the iron-based materials a potential economic advantage over the more efficient precious and semi-precious metal catalysts for this application. Recent research has shown that a number of different iron-containing materials can be successfully utilized as coal liquefaction catalysts or as catalyst. Pyrrhotite (Fe{sub 1-x}S) or a similar iron-sulfide phase is commonly believed to be the active catalyst in coal liquefaction and model compound pyrolysis reactions, although no specific phase has been yet been isolated as the actual catalyst species. The active iron-containing catalyst is usually generated in situ from an iron-oxide precursor and an elemental sulfur source under reducing conditions in the reactor vessel. Most research has concentrated on the use of common iron-oxide phases such as hematite or goethite (and their derivatives) as the iron-bearing precursor, or on non-specific iron materials produced by the reaction of various iron salts and compounds in the coal or liquefaction reactor. To our knowledge there has been no systematic effort to determine the optimum iron-containing precursor phase for producing active coal liquefaction catalysts, despite the fact that there are over ten iron-(hydroxy)oxide phases which can be easily synthesized in the laboratory. We have undertaken a systematic study to identify the most active iron-oxide catalyst precursor phases, the co-catalysts, and the coal pretreatments which will provide optimum yields in coal liquefaction processes.

  1. Nano Catalysts for Diesel Engine Emission Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Yang, Xiaofan; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Mullins, David R; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Wu, Zili

    2012-06-01

    conditions were provided by our collaborators at John Deere Power Systems. Among various zeolites reported here, CuFe-SSZ-13 offers the best NO{sub x} conversion activity in 150-650 C range and is hydrothermally stable when tested under accelerated aging conditions. It is important to note that Cu-SSZ-13 is now a commercial catalyst for NO{sub x} treatment on diesel passenger vehicles. Thus, our catalyst performs better than the commercial catalyst under fast SCR conditions. We initially focused on fast SCR tests to enable us to screen catalysts rapidly. Only the catalysts that exhibit high NO{sub x} conversion at low temperatures are selected for screening under varying NO{sub 2}:NO{sub x} ratio. The detailed tests of CuFe-SSZ-13 show that CuFe-SSZ-13 is more effective than commercial Cu-SSZ-13 even at NO{sub 2}:NO{sub x} ratio of 0.1. The mechanistic studies, employing stop-flow diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy (DRIFTS), suggest that high concentration of NO{sup +}, generated by heterobimetallic zeolites, is probably responsible for their superior low temperature NO{sub x} activity. The results described in this report clearly show that we have successfully completed the first step in a new emission treatment catalyst which is synthesis and laboratory testing employing simulated exhaust. The next step in the catalyst development is engine testing. Efforts are in progress to obtain follow-on funding to carry out scale-up and engine testing to facilitate commercialization of this technology.

  2. Extended Catalyst Longevity Via Supercritical Isobutane Regeneration of a Partially Deactivated USY Alkylation Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar; David N. Thompson; Kyle C. Burch; David J. Zalewski

    2005-05-01

    Off-line, in situ activity recovery of a partially deactivated USY zeolite catalyst used for isobutane/butene alkylation was examined in a continuous-flow reaction system employing supercritical isobutane. Catalyst samples were deactivated in a controlled manner by running them to either to a fixed butene conversion level of 95% or a fixed time on stream of three hours, and then exposing the catalyst to supercritical isobutane to restore activity. Activity recovery was determined by comparing alkylation activity before and after the regeneration step. Both single and multiple regenerations were performed. Use of a 95% butene conversion level criterion to terminate the reaction step afforded 86% activity recovery for a single regeneration and provided nine sequential reaction steps for the multiple regeneration studies. Employing a fixed 3 h time on stream criterion resulted in nearly complete activity recovery for a single regeneration, and 24 reaction steps were demonstrated in sequence for the multiple regeneration process, producing only minor product yield declines per step. This resulted in a 12-fold increase in catalyst longevity versus unregenerated catalyst.

  3. Understanding of martensitic (TiCu)-based bulk metallic glasses through deformation behavior of a binary Ti{sub 50}Cu{sub 50} martensitic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K. B.; Song, K. A.; Zhang, X. F.; Yi, S.

    2008-06-16

    A binary Ti{sub 50}Cu{sub 50} martensitic alloy having similar atomic clusters to (TiCu)-based martensitic bulk metallic glasses presents a large plastic strain of 18.04% with high fracture strength of 1705 MPa. Detailed microstructural investigations point out that martensite embedded in {gamma}-TiCu matrix is effective to dissipate localization of the shear stress thus leading to rotational propagation, interaction, and multiplication of the shear bands. Furthermore, the propagation of microcracks formed by local stress transition during deformation is hindered by the martensite.

  4. Vapor phase oxidation of benzoic acid to phenol over a novel catalyst system consisting of NiO and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, Jun; Asanuma, Minoru; Tachibana, Yakudo

    1995-02-01

    NiO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were found to show the catalytic activities for the vapor phase oxidation of benzoic acid to form phenol. Furthermore, the enhancement of the activity and phenol selectivity were achieved by combined Ni and Fe components prepared by precipitation. The calcination temperature and the atomic ratio of Ni to Fe were found to be important for the enhancement of activity. The homogeneous distribution profile of NiO and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} on the surface and in the bulk of the catalyst is essential for the optimization of phenol formation. 32 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. DEHYDROGENATION CATALYST FOR PRODUCTION OF MTBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this project were to better understand the effect of different catalyst preparation parameters, the effect of different catalyst treatment parameters, and the mechanism of deactivation. Accordingly, catalysts were made using various preparation methods and with...

  6. Optimization of Single and Bimetallic Noble Metal Catalysts by Strong Electrostatic Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Sean E.

    Heterogeneous catalysts are used in over 90% of chemical processes today. These small metal particles maximize the number of active sites present, which leads to cheaper, more effective catalysts. However, the preparation of heterogeneous catalysts is still a "dark art". An alternate to dry impregnation is the method of Strong Electrostatic Adsorption (SEA). In this method the surface hydroxyl groups of the support can either protonate or deprotonate depending on the pH of the contacting solution. These surface groups then can then attract oppositely charged metal precursors. Preparation of catalysts by SEA leads to the anchoring of small, well dispersed, highly active metal particles. The aim of this work is to optimize the preparation via SEA of various supported catalysts systems, particularly Pt/carbon, Au supported on a variety of materials, and Au-Pd/carbon. Carbon supported metal catalysts are becoming increasingly important not just as electro catalyst in fuel cells, but for many aqueous phase biomass conversion reactions.

  7. Aqueous phase reforming of glycerol over Ni-based catalysts for hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Cho, Su Hyun; Moon, Dong Ju

    2011-08-01

    Aqueous phase reforming of glycerol over Ni-based catalysts for hydrogen production was carried out at 225 degrees C, 23 bar and LHSV = 4 h(-1). The Ni-based catalyst was prepared by an incipient wetness impregnation method. The catalysts before and after the reaction were characterized by N2 physisorption, CO chemisorption, XRD, TPR, SEM and TEM techniques. It was found that Ni(20 wt%)-Co(3 wt%)/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst showed higher glycerol conversion and hydrogen selectivity than Ni(20 wt%)/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst. There are no major changes in Ni particles after the reaction over Ni-Co/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst. The results suggest that the Ni-Co/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst can be applied to the hydrogen production system using APR of glycerol. PMID:22103184

  8. Catalyst for cracking kerosene

    SciTech Connect

    Hsie, C. H.

    1985-06-04

    A catalyst capable of cracking kerosene under lower pressure and temperature comprising kerosene; metal powder mixture of chromium powder, copper powder, lead powder, zinc powder, nickel powder, manganese powder in an amount of 12 to 13 parts by weight per 100 parts by weight of said kerosene; sulfuric acid in an amount of 15 to 30 parts by weight per 100 parts by weight of said kerosene; inorganic powder mixture of aluminum oxide powder, serpentine powder, alum powder, magnesium oxide powder, limestone powder, slake lime powder, silica powder, and granite powder in an amount of 150 to 170 parts by weight per 100 parts by weight of said kerosene.

  9. Molecular water oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gratzel, Michael; Munavalli, Shekhar; Pern, Fu-Jann; Frank, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A dimeric composition of the formula: ##STR1## wherein L', L", L'", and L"" are each a bidentate ligand having at least one functional substituent, the ligand selected from bipyridine, phenanthroline, 2-phenylpyridine, bipyrimidine, and bipyrazyl and the functional substituent selected from carboxylic acid, ester, amide, halogenide, anhydride, acyl ketone, alkyl ketone, acid chloride, sulfonic acid, phosphonic acid, and nitro and nitroso groups. An electrochemical oxidation process for the production of the above functionally substituted bidentate ligand diaqua oxo-bridged ruthenium dimers and their use as water oxidation catalysts is described.

  10. Novel Reforming Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Pfefferle, Lisa D; Haller, Gary L

    2012-10-16

    Aqueous phase reforming is useful for processing oxygenated hydrocarbons to hydrogen and other more useful products. Current processing is hampered by the fact that oxide based catalysts are not stable under high temperature hydrothermal conditions. Silica in the form of structured MCM-41 is thermally a more stable support for Co and Ni than conventional high surface area amorphous silica but hydrothermal stability is not demonstrated. Carbon nanotube supports, in contrast, are highly stable under hydrothermal reaction conditions. In this project we show that carbon nanotubes are stable high activity/selectivity supports for the conversion of ethylene glycol to hydrogen.

  11. Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis on Ceramic Monolith-Structured Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Wei

    2009-04-19

    This paper reports recent research results about impact of different catalyst bed configurations on FT reaction product distribution. A CoRe/γ-alumina catalyst is prepared in bulk particle form and tested in the packed bed reactor at a size of 60 to 100 mesh. The same catalyst is ball milled and coated on a ceramic monolith support structure of channel size about 1mm. The monolith catalyst module is tested in two different ways, as a whole piece and as well-defined channels. Steady-state reaction conversion is measured at various temperatures under constant H2/CO feed ratio of 2 and reactor pressure of 25 bar. Detailed product analysis is performed. Significant formation of wax is evident with the packed particle bed and with the monolith catalyst that is improperly packed. By contrast, the wax formation is not detected in the liquid product by confining the reactions inside the monolith channel. This study presents an important finding about the structured catalyst/reactor system that the product distribution highly depends on the way how the structured reactor is set up. Even if the same catalyst and same reaction conditions (T, P, H2/oil ratio) are used, hydrodynamics (or flow conditions) inside a structured channel can have a significant impact on the product distribution.

  12. The generation of efficient supported (Heterogeneous) olefin metathesis catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Grubbs, Robert H

    2013-04-05

    Over the past decade, a new family of homogeneous metathesis catalysts has been developed that will tolerate most organic functionalities as well as water and air. These homogeneous catalysts are finding numerous applications in the pharmaceutical industry as well as in the production of functional polymers. In addition the catalysts are being used to convert seed oils into products that can substitute for those that are now made from petroleum products. Seed oils are unsaturated, contain double bonds, and are a ready source of linear hydrocarbon fragments that are specifically functionalized. To increase the number of applications in the area of biomaterial conversion to petrol chemicals, the activity and efficiency of the catalysts need to be as high as possible. The higher the efficiency of the catalysts, the lower the cost of the conversion and a larger number of practical applications become available. Active supported catalysts were prepared and tested in the conversion of seed oils and other important starting materials. The outcome of the work was successful and the technology has been transferred to a commercial operation to develop viable applications of the discovered systems. A biorefinery that converts seed oils is under construction in Indonesia. The catalysts developed in this study will be considered for the next generation of operations.

  13. Electrochemical Catalyst-Support Effects and Their Stabilizing Role for IrOx Nanoparticle Catalysts during the Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyung-Suk; Nong, Hong Nhan; Reier, Tobias; Bergmann, Arno; Gliech, Manuel; Ferreira de Araújo, Jorge; Willinger, Elena; Schlögl, Robert; Teschner, Detre; Strasser, Peter

    2016-09-28

    Redox-active support materials can help reduce the noble-metal loading of a solid chemical catalyst while offering electronic catalyst-support interactions beneficial for catalyst durability. This is well known in heterogeneous gas-phase catalysis but much less discussed for electrocatalysis at electrified liquid-solid interfaces. Here, we demonstrate experimental evidence for electronic catalyst-support interactions in electrochemical environments and study their role and contribution to the corrosion stability of catalyst/support couples. Electrochemically oxidized Ir oxide nanoparticles, supported on high surface area carbons and oxides, were selected as model catalyst/support systems for the electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction (OER). First, the electronic, chemical, and structural state of the catalyst/support couple was compared using XANES, EXAFS, TEM, and depth-resolved XPS. While carbon-supported oxidized Ir particle showed exclusively the redox state (+4), the Ir/IrOx/ATO system exhibited evidence of metal/metal-oxide support interactions (MMOSI) that stabilized the metal particles on antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) in sustained lower Ir oxidation states (Ir(3.2+)). At the same time, the growth of higher valent Ir oxide layers that compromise catalyst stability was suppressed. Then the electrochemical stability and the charge-transfer kinetics of the electrocatalysts were evaluated under constant current and constant potential conditions, where the analysis of the metal dissolution confirmed that the ATO support mitigates Ir(z+) dissolution thanks to a stronger MMOSI effect. Our findings raise the possibility that MMOSI effects in electrochemistry-largely neglected in the past-may be more important for a detailed understanding of the durability of oxide-supported nanoparticle OER catalysts than previously thought. PMID:27549910

  14. Electrochemical Catalyst-Support Effects and Their Stabilizing Role for IrOx Nanoparticle Catalysts during the Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyung-Suk; Nong, Hong Nhan; Reier, Tobias; Bergmann, Arno; Gliech, Manuel; Ferreira de Araújo, Jorge; Willinger, Elena; Schlögl, Robert; Teschner, Detre; Strasser, Peter

    2016-09-28

    Redox-active support materials can help reduce the noble-metal loading of a solid chemical catalyst while offering electronic catalyst-support interactions beneficial for catalyst durability. This is well known in heterogeneous gas-phase catalysis but much less discussed for electrocatalysis at electrified liquid-solid interfaces. Here, we demonstrate experimental evidence for electronic catalyst-support interactions in electrochemical environments and study their role and contribution to the corrosion stability of catalyst/support couples. Electrochemically oxidized Ir oxide nanoparticles, supported on high surface area carbons and oxides, were selected as model catalyst/support systems for the electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction (OER). First, the electronic, chemical, and structural state of the catalyst/support couple was compared using XANES, EXAFS, TEM, and depth-resolved XPS. While carbon-supported oxidized Ir particle showed exclusively the redox state (+4), the Ir/IrOx/ATO system exhibited evidence of metal/metal-oxide support interactions (MMOSI) that stabilized the metal particles on antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) in sustained lower Ir oxidation states (Ir(3.2+)). At the same time, the growth of higher valent Ir oxide layers that compromise catalyst stability was suppressed. Then the electrochemical stability and the charge-transfer kinetics of the electrocatalysts were evaluated under constant current and constant potential conditions, where the analysis of the metal dissolution confirmed that the ATO support mitigates Ir(z+) dissolution thanks to a stronger MMOSI effect. Our findings raise the possibility that MMOSI effects in electrochemistry-largely neglected in the past-may be more important for a detailed understanding of the durability of oxide-supported nanoparticle OER catalysts than previously thought.

  15. Catalysts to reduce NO.sub.x in an exhaust gas stream and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Castellano, Christopher R.; Moini, Ahmad; Koermer, Gerald S.; Furbeck, Howard; Schmieg, Steven J.; Blint, Richard J.

    2011-05-17

    Catalysts, systems and methods are described to reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. In one embodiment, an emissions treatment system for an exhaust stream is provided having a catalyst comprising silver and a platinum group metal on a particulate alumina support, the atomic fraction of the platinum group metal being less than or equal to about 0.25. Methods of manufacturing catalysts are described in which silver is impregnated on alumina particles.

  16. Catalysts to reduce NO.sub.x in an exhaust gas stream and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Koermer, Gerald S.; Moini, Ahmad; Furbeck, Howard; Castellano, Christopher R.

    2012-05-08

    Catalysts, systems and methods are described to reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. In one embodiment, an emissions treatment system for an exhaust stream is provided having a catalyst comprising silver on a particulate alumina support, the silver having a diameter of less than about 20 nm. Methods of manufacturing catalysts are described in which ionic silver is impregnated on particulate hydroxylated alumina particles.

  17. Catalysts for electrochemical generation of oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagans, P.; Yeager, E.

    1978-01-01

    Single crystal surfaces of platinum and gold and transition metal oxides of the spinel type were studied to find more effective catalysts for the electrolytic evolution of oxygen and to understand the mechanism and kinetics for the electrocatalysis in relation to the surface electronic and lattice properties of the catalyst. The single crystal studies involve the use of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy as complementary tools to the electrochemical measurements. Modifications to the transfer system and to the thin-layer electrochemical cell used to facilitate the transfer between the ultrahigh vacuum environment of the electron surface physics equipment and the electrochemical environment with a minimal possibility of changes in the surface structure, are described. The electrosorption underpotential deposition of Pb onto the Au(111), (100) and (110) single crystal surfaces with the thin-layer cell-LEED-Auger system is discussed as well as the synthesis of spinels for oxygen evolution studies.

  18. Successfully cope with FCC catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, T.H.; Hashemi, R.

    1993-08-01

    The fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) process converts straight-run atmospheric gas oil, vacuum gas oils, certain atmospheric residues, and heavy stocks recovered from other operations into high-octane gasoline, light fuel oils, and olefin-rich light gases. The main features of the FCC processes are long-term reliability and operating adjustability, allowing the refinery to easily adapt their product yields to an ever changing market. The produced gasoline, for example, has an excellent front-end octane number and good overall octane characteristics. The cracking reactions are carried out in a vertical reactor vessel in which vaporized oil rises and carries along with it in intimate contact small fluidized catalyst particles. The reactions are very rapid, and a contact time of only a few seconds is enough for most applications. During the cracking a carbonaceous material of low hydrogen-to-carbon ratio, coke, forms and deposits on the catalyst. The coke blocks the access to the internal structure of the catalyst particle and thus reduces its activity. The spent catalyst is separated from the cracking products in a catalyst stripper/disengager, and the catalyst is transported to a separate vessel, the regenerator, where the coke is burned off reactivating the catalyst. The regenerated catalyst is then transported to the bottom of the reactor riser, where the cycle begins again.

  19. Doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2014-02-18

    A supported oxidation catalyst includes a support having a metal oxide or metal salt, and mixed metal particles thereon. The mixed metal particles include first particles including a palladium compound, and second particles including a precious metal group (PMG) metal or PMG metal compound, wherein the PMG metal is not palladium. The oxidation catalyst may also be used as a gas sensor.

  20. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

    1994-04-26

    A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  1. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  2. Catalysts for low temperature oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Toops, Todd J.; Parks, III, James E.; Bauer, John C.

    2016-03-01

    The invention provides a composite catalyst containing a first component and a second component. The first component contains nanosized gold particles. The second component contains nanosized platinum group metals. The composite catalyst is useful for catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, and other pollutants at low temperatures.

  3. Catalysts for hydrocarbon oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, K.C.; Paffett, M.T.; Earl, W.L.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The focus of this project was elucidating structural aspects of a titanosilicate TS-1 that is an oxidation catalyst. The authors have prepared samples of TS-1 and used scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy to examine the samples of TS-1 for amorphous titanium-containing phases that may confound the analysis of the neutron scattering data. They observed that the volume fraction of titanium-containing impurity phases(s) determined from electron microscopy did not correlate well with that amount determined by ultraviolet-visible diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy. The authors also designed, constructed and tested a flow reactor that can be placed into the neutron flight path at the High Intensity Powder Diffractometer line at the Manual Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center. This reactor will allow for the observation of crystallographic changes of catalysts and other materials under reaction conditions.

  4. Catalysts Encapsulated in Molecular Machines.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tiezheng; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-06-17

    Smart catalysts offer the control of chemical processes and sequences of transformations, and catalysts with unique catalytic behavior can afford chiral products or promote successive polymerization. To meet advanced demands, the key to constructing smart catalysts is to incorporate traditional catalytic functional groups with trigger-induced factors. Molecular machines with dynamic properties and particular topological structures have typical stimulus-responsive features. In recent years, scientists have made efforts to utilize molecular machines (molecular switches, rotaxanes, motors, etc.) as scaffolds to develop smart catalysts. This Minireview focuses on the achievements of developing catalysts encapsulated in molecular machines and their remarkable specialties. This strategy is believed to provide more potential applications in switchable reactions, asymmetric synthesis, and processive catalysis.

  5. HDS catalysts performance and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Panarello, F.; Guanziroli, S.

    1995-12-31

    The European refiners are being asked to produce cleaner diesel fuel which might reduce engine emissions. To meet this requirement they have to increase the hydrotreatment capacity and to use the best catalysts in terms of activity and deactivation performances. In particular, Co-Mo on gamma-alumina catalysts are currently in use to reduce diesel sulfur content. In the past, different chemical-physical modifications have been studied in order to improve the catalysts performances, many theoretical correlations between one or more chemical-physical properties and activity have been suggested. We tested different Co-Mo catalysts in pilot plant units with various refinery streams and run length up to two thousand hours. We performed on fresh, exhausted and regenerated catalysts samples, elemental composition, surface properties, metal dispersion and metal distribution analyses. Among the various chemical-physical properties the metal distribution is the parameter that correlates in the most satisfactory way with the catalytic performances.

  6. Supported molten-metal catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Ravindra; Singh, Ajeet; Halasz, Istvan; Serban, Manuela

    2001-01-01

    An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (<600.degree. C.), inexpensive, and abundant metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

  7. Emission Abatement System

    DOEpatents

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander

    2003-05-13

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  8. Solid catalysts for multistep reactions: one-pot synthesis of 2,3-dihydro-1,5-benzothiazepines with solid acid and base catalysts.

    PubMed

    Climent, Maria J; Corma, Avelino; Iborra, Sara; Martí, Laura

    2014-04-01

    1,5-Benzothiazepines derivatives were obtained first by starting from 1,3-diphenylpropenone derivatives (chalcones) and 2-aminothiophenol by using aluminosilicate solid catalysts. However, diffusional limitations and the strong adsorption of products on the catalyst are deleterious for catalyst activity and life. Then a structured amorphous mesoporous catalyst with large pores and mild acidity that works at higher temperatures allowed us to obtain high conversions (99 %) and selectivities (98 %) of the desired product. A one-pot synthesis of 1,5-benzothiazepines that starts from benzaldehyde, acetophenone, and 2-aminothiophenol with 95 % yield was performed by combining optimized solid base and acid catalysts in batch mode as well as in a continuous-flow reactor system. Much better conversion and selectivity as well as process intensification has been achieved with the structured mesoporous materials by avoiding intermediate and final neutralization and purification steps required in the synthesis reported previously that uses homogeneous catalysts.

  9. Iridium-Doped Ruthenium Oxide Catalyst for Oxygen Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Narayan, Sri R.; Billings, Keith J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA requires a durable and efficient catalyst for the electrolysis of water in a polymer-electrolyte-membrane (PEM) cell. Ruthenium oxide in a slightly reduced form is known to be a very efficient catalyst for the anodic oxidation of water to oxygen, but it degrades rapidly, reducing efficiency. To combat this tendency of ruthenium oxide to change oxidation states, it is combined with iridium, which has a tendency to stabilize ruthenium oxide at oxygen evolution potentials. The novel oxygen evolution catalyst was fabricated under flowing argon in order to allow the iridium to preferentially react with oxygen from the ruthenium oxide, and not oxygen from the environment. Nanoparticulate iridium black and anhydrous ruthenium oxide are weighed out and mixed to 5 18 atomic percent. They are then heat treated at 300 C under flowing argon (in order to create an inert environment) for a minimum of 14 hours. This temperature was chosen because it is approximately the creep temperature of ruthenium oxide, and is below the sintering temperature of both materials. In general, the temperature should always be below the sintering temperature of both materials. The iridium- doped ruthenium oxide catalyst is then fabricated into a PEM-based membrane- electrode assembly (MEA), and then mounted into test cells. The result is an electrolyzer system that can sustain electrolysis at twice the current density, and at the same efficiency as commercial catalysts in the range of 100-200 mA/sq cm. At 200 mA/sq cm, this new system operates at an efficiency of 85 percent, which is 2 percent greater than commercially available catalysts. Testing has shown that this material is as stable as commercially available oxygen evolution catalysts. This means that this new catalyst can be used to regenerate fuel cell systems in space, and as a hydrogen generator on Earth.

  10. Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of nanostructured copper substituted ZnM2O4 (M = Al, Ga) spinels as precursors for thermally stable Cu catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Franziska; Massue, Cyriac; Kühl, Stefanie; Kunkes, Edward; Girgsdies, Frank; Kasatkin, Igor; Zhang, Bingsen; Friedrich, Matthias; Luo, Yuan; Armbrüster, Marc; Patzke, Greta R.; Behrens, Malte

    2012-03-01

    Nanostructured CuxZn1-xAl2O4 with a Cu : Zn ratio of ¼ : ¾ has been prepared by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis at 150 °C and used as a precursor for Cu/ZnO/Al2O3-based catalysts. The spinel nanoparticles exhibit an average size of approximately 5 nm and a high specific surface area (above 250 m2 g-1). Cu nanoparticles of an average size of 3.3 nm can be formed by reduction of the spinel precursor in hydrogen and the accessible metallic Cu(0) surface area of the reduced catalyst was 8 m2 g-1. The catalytic performance of the material in CO2 hydrogenation and methanol steam reforming was compared with conventionally prepared Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 reference catalysts. The observed lower performance of the spinel-based samples is attributed to a lack of synergetic interaction of the Cu nanoparticles with ZnO due to the incorporation of Zn2+ in the stable spinel lattice. Despite its lower performance, however, the nanostructured nature of the spinel catalyst was stable after thermal treatment up to 500 °C in contrast to other Cu-based catalysts. Furthermore, a large fraction of the re-oxidized copper migrates back into the spinel upon calcination of the reduced catalyst, thereby enabling a regeneration of sintered catalysts after prolonged usage at high temperatures. Similarly prepared samples with Ga instead of Al exhibit a more crystalline catalyst with a spinel particle size around 20 nm. The slightly decreased Cu(0) surface area of 3.2 m2 g-1 due to less copper incorporation is not a significant drawback for the methanol steam reforming.Nanostructured CuxZn1-xAl2O4 with a Cu : Zn ratio of ¼ : ¾ has been prepared by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis at 150 °C and used as a precursor for Cu/ZnO/Al2O3-based catalysts. The spinel nanoparticles exhibit an average size of approximately 5 nm and a high specific surface area (above 250 m2 g-1). Cu nanoparticles of an average size of 3.3 nm can be formed by reduction of the spinel precursor in hydrogen

  11. Evaluation of Regenerated Catalyst for Mercury Speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Laudal

    2007-06-01

    In March of 2005, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR). Mercury from coal-fired power plants was to be reduced from the current 48 to 38 tons/yr by 2010 and then 15 tons/yr by 2018. It is expected that the first phase reduction of {approx}21% will be achieved by cobenefits that will occur as a result of installing additional selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to meet the new Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). Detroit Edison (DTE) is installing SCR at all four units at its Monroe Station and will eventually install wet-FGD systems. As such, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and DTE have contracted with the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to determine the extent of mercury oxidation that occurs at Monroe Station. The EERC originally did mercury speciation sampling at Monroe Station in 2004 and then went back in 2005 to determine if any changes occurred as a result of catalyst aging. During the second test, in addition to measuring the mercury speciation at the inlet and outlet of the SCR, the EERC also completed sampling at a location between the catalyst layers. The results are shown in Table 1. In Table 1, the results show that {approx}40% of the Hg was in oxidized form (Hg{sup 2+}) at the inlet and nearly 100% Hg{sup 2+} at the outlet. The results at the midpoint were between 40% and 100%. As part of their overall strategy to reduce SCR costs, utilities and SCR vendors are attempting to regenerate catalyst layers that have degenerated over time. If these regenerated catalysts are used, the question remains as to the effect this process will have on the ability of these catalysts to oxidize mercury as well as reduce NO{sub x}. The current project is designed to measure the Hg speciation across an SCR using a regenerated catalyst. The results were compared to previous results to determine what, if any, changes

  12. Elucidation of the inorganic chemistry of hydrotreating catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    DeCanio, E.C.; Edwards, J.C.; Storm, D.A.; Bruno, J.W.

    1993-12-31

    New environmental regulations are making it necessary to developed improved hydrotreating catalysts for the removal of sulfur, nitrogen and aromatics from refinery streams. In order to develop better catalysts, the authors must gain a more detailed understanding of the inorganic chemistry of these catalysts. Commercial catalysts typically contain ca. 15 wt% molybdenum or tungsten oxides and ca. 4 wt% nickel or cobalt. Additives, such as phosphate and fluoride, are often added to improve the catalytic activity. However, the role of these additives is not fully understood. The authors have, therefore, carried out studies on alumina supported phosphate and flouride materials using FT-IR, powder x-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR ({sup 31}P, {sup 27}Al, and {sup 1}H). The results of this work have enabled the authors to determine the structures of the various compounds formed on the alumina system when fluoride or phosphate is present.

  13. Full Scale Alternative Catalyst Testing for Bosch Reactor Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Katherine; Abney, Morgan B.

    2011-01-01

    Current air revitalization technology onboard the International Space Station (ISS) cannot provide complete closure of the oxygen and hydrogen loops. This makes re-supply necessary, which is possible for missions in low Earth orbit (LEO) like the ISS, but unviable for long term space missions outside LEO. In comparison, Bosch technology reduces carbon dioxide with hydrogen, traditionally over a steel wool catalyst, to create water and solid carbon. The Bosch product water can then be fed to the oxygen generation assembly to produce oxygen for crew members and hydrogen necessary to reduce more carbon dioxide. Bosch technology can achieve complete oxygen loop closure, but has many undesirable factors that result in a high energy, mass, and volume system. Finding a different catalyst with an equal reaction rate at lower temperatures with less catalyst mass and longer lifespan would make a Bosch flight system more feasible. Developmental testing of alternative catalysts for the Bosch has been performed using the Horizontal Bosch Test Stand. Nickel foam, nickel shavings, and cobalt shavings were tested at 500 C and compared to the original catalyst, steel wool. This paper presents data and analysis on the performance of each catalyst tested at comparable temperatures and recycle flow rates.

  14. Catalyst deactivation in residue hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect

    Oballa, M.C.; Wong, C.; Krzywicki, A.

    1994-12-31

    The existence of a computer-controlled bench scale hydrocracking units at the authors site has made cheaper the non-stop running of experiments for long periods of time. It was, therefore possible to show, at minimal costs, when three hydrocracking catalysts in service reach their maximum lifetime. Different parameters which are helpful for catalyst life and activity predictions were calculated, e.g., relative catalyst age and the effectiveness factor. Experimental results compared well with model, giving them the minimum and maximum catalyst lifetime, as well as the deactivation profile with regard to sulfur and metals removal. Reaction rate constants for demetallization and desulfurization were also determined. Six commercial catalysts were evaluated at short term runs and the three most active were used for long term runs. Out of three catalysts tested for deactivation at long term runs, it was possible to choose one whose useful life was higher than the others. All runs were carried out in a Robinson-Mahoney continuous flow stirred tank reactor, using 50/50 volumetric mixture of Cold Lake/Lloydminster atmospheric residue and NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst.

  15. Catalysts for a cleaner environment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Pollution-abatement catalysts remain a challenging area for process development. That`s because the pollutants themselves often poison the catalysts, and the new catalytic processes are now required to capture pollutants from very dilute waste streams. A case in point in the US is how severely low-level emissions of halogenated hydrocarbons are regulated through Title III regulations on toxic compounds. While common oxidation catalysts may be quite effective at eliminating most VOC [volatile organic compound] emissions, the presence of halogenated hydrocarbons can adversely affect catalyst performance. Only recently have catalysts become available that will be effective at oxidizing the halogenated hydrocarbons. The items described below illustrate the variety and scope of recently introduced catalysts that have proved themselves by increasing yields and reducing emissions. The offerings include catalysts for: improving yield in the production of acrylic acid, ammonia, styrene, phthalic anhydride and alcohol; reducing the sulfur and aromatic content of fuels; curtailing byproduct production in fluid-catalytic cracking units; oxidizing emissions of chlorinated hydrocarbons; and reducing NOx in combustion gas using hydrogen or carbon monoxide.

  16. Ceramic catalyst materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J.; Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K.

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  17. Less is more for catalyst users

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The environmental-catalyst business is booming. Sales of catalytic equipment to treat volatile organic compounds (VOC) totaled [dollar sign]550 million in the U.S. last year. That figure is expected to reach [dollar sign]1 billion by 1996. Regulations are driving the expansion. The U.S. Clean Air Act of 1990 mandates reduced emissions levels of 189 air toxics, 150 of which are VOCs. This is good new for equipment vendors, but not for operating companies, which rarely see returns on their investments in catalytic systems. Environmental compliance can't be turned into profits. All you get in return is permission to run your plant. As a result, CPI companies are looking for ways to operate catalyst systems more cheaply. And they're asking catalyst manufactures to come up with more-efficient and cost-effective products. Vendors are responding. They have developed a variety of new products that offer higher surface areas and more active sites than past materials. This paper briefly review these new products.

  18. Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jared W. Cannon; Thomas K. Gale

    2005-06-30

    Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. The testing was performed at Southern Research's Catalyst Test Facility, a bench-scale reactor capable of simulating gas-phase reactions occurring in coal-fired utility pollution-control equipment. Three different SCR catalysts are currently being studied in this project--honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts were manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Parametric testing was performed to investigate the contribution of flue-gas chemistry on mercury oxidation via SCR catalysts. Methods and procedures for experimental testing continue to be developed to produce the highest quality mercury-oxidation data. During this past quarter, it was discovered that long periods (12 - 24 hours) are required to equilibrate the catalysts in the system. In addition, after the system has been equilibrated, operational changes to temperature, gas concentration, or flow rate shifts the equilibrium, and steady-state must be reestablished, which can require as much as twelve additional hours per condition change. In the last quarter of testing, it was shown that the inclusion of ammonia had a strong effect on the oxidation of mercury by SCR catalysts, both in the short-term (a transitional period of elemental and oxidized mercury off gassing) and the long-term (less steady-state mercury oxidation). All experiments so far have focused on testing the catalysts in a simulated Powder River Basin (PRB) flue-gas environment, which contains lower sulfur and chlorine than produced by other coals. In the next quarter, parametric testing will be expanded to include flue gases simulating power plants burning

  19. Green chemistry: biodiesel made with sugar catalyst.

    PubMed

    Toda, Masakazu; Takagaki, Atsushi; Okamura, Mai; Kondo, Junko N; Hayashi, Shigenobu; Domen, Kazunari; Hara, Michikazu

    2005-11-10

    The production of diesel from vegetable oil calls for an efficient solid catalyst to make the process fully ecologically friendly. Here we describe the preparation of such a catalyst from common, inexpensive sugars. This high-performance catalyst, which consists of stable sulphonated amorphous carbon, is recyclable and its activity markedly exceeds that of other solid acid catalysts tested for 'biodiesel' production. PMID:16281026

  20. Chemical interactions in multimetal/zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sachtler, W.M.H.

    1992-02-07

    This report treats four subject areas: PtCu/NaY and Pd/Cu/NaY catalysts; reducibility of Ni in PdNi/NaY catalysts; CO hydrogenation over PdNi/NaY catalysts; and PdFe/NaY, Ga/H-ZSM5 and PtGa/H-ZSM5 catalysts.

  1. Chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Choi, Jong-Ho; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas; Wieckowski, Andrzej; Cao, Dianxue

    2010-08-24

    A methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst and a membrane electrode assembly for fuel cells that includes such a cathode catalyst. The cathode catalyst includes a support having at least one transition metal in elemental form and a chalcogen disposed on the support. Methods of making the cathode catalyst and membrane electrode assembly are also described.

  2. Chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Alonso-Vante, Nicolas; Zelenay, Piotr; Choi, Jong-Ho; Wieckowski, Andrzej; Cao, Dianxue

    2009-09-15

    A methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst and a membrane electrode assembly for fuel cells that includes such a cathode catalyst. The cathode catalyst includes a support having at least one transition metal in elemental form and a chalcogen disposed on the support. Methods of making the cathode catalyst and membrane electrode assembly are also described.

  3. Green chemistry: Biodiesel made with sugar catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Masakazu; Takagaki, Atsushi; Okamura, Mai; Kondo, Junko N.; Hayashi, Shigenobu; Domen, Kazunari; Hara, Michikazu

    2005-11-01

    The production of diesel from vegetable oil calls for an efficient solid catalyst to make the process fully ecologically friendly. Here we describe the preparation of such a catalyst from common, inexpensive sugars. This high-performance catalyst, which consists of stable sulphonated amorphous carbon, is recyclable and its activity markedly exceeds that of other solid acid catalysts tested for `biodiesel' production.

  4. Textured catalysts, methods of making textured catalysts, and methods of catalyzing reactions conducted in hydrothermal conditions

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2003-12-30

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  5. A Robust, Air-Stable, Reusable Ruthenium Catalyst for Dehydrogenation of Ammonia Borane

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Brian L.; Guess, Denver; Williams, Travis J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe an efficient homogeneous ruthenium catalyst for the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB). This catalyst liberates greater than 2 equivalents of H2 and up to 4.6 system wt% H2 from concentrated AB suspensions under air. Importantly, this catalyst is robust, delivering several cycles of dehydrogenation at high [AB] without loss of catalytic activity, even with exposure to air and water. PMID:21827173

  6. A robust, air-stable, reusable ruthenium catalyst for dehydrogenation of ammonia borane.

    PubMed

    Conley, Brian L; Guess, Denver; Williams, Travis J

    2011-09-14

    We describe an efficient homogeneous ruthenium catalyst for the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB). This catalyst liberates more than 2 equiv of H(2) and up to 4.6 system wt % H(2) from concentrated AB suspensions under air. Importantly, this catalyst is robust, delivering several cycles of dehydrogenation at high [AB] without loss of catalytic activity, even with exposure to air and water. PMID:21827173

  7. Tetranuclear Zn/4f coordination clusters as highly efficient catalysts for Friedel-Crafts alkylation.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Kieran; Kumar, Prashant; Akien, Geoffrey R; Chilton, Nicholas F; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Tizzard, Graham J; Coles, Simon J; Kostakis, George E

    2016-06-14

    A series of custom-designed, high yield, isoskeletal tetranuclear Zn/4f coordination clusters showing high efficiency as catalysts with low catalytic loadings in Friedel-Crafts alkylation are described for the first time. The possibility of altering the 4f centers in these catalysts without altering the core topology allows us to further confirm their stability via EPR and NMR, as well to gain insights into the plausible reaction mechanism, showcasing the usefulness of these bimetallic systems as catalysts. PMID:27248829

  8. High Temperature Membrane & Advanced Cathode Catalyst Development

    SciTech Connect

    Protsailo, Lesia

    2006-04-20

    Current project consisted of three main phases and eighteen milestones. Short description of each phase is given below. Table 1 lists program milestones. Phase 1--High Temperature Membrane and Advanced Catalyst Development. New polymers and advanced cathode catalysts were synthesized. The membranes and the catalysts were characterized and compared against specifications that are based on DOE program requirements. The best-in-class membranes and catalysts were downselected for phase 2. Phase 2--Catalyst Coated Membrane (CCM) Fabrication and Testing. Laboratory scale catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) were fabricated and tested using the down-selected membranes and catalysts. The catalysts and high temperature membrane CCMs were tested and optimized. Phase 3--Multi-cell stack fabrication. Full-size CCMs with the down-selected and optimized high temperature membrane and catalyst were fabricated. The catalyst membrane assemblies were tested in full size cells and multi-cell stack.

  9. The selective hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde over bimetallic catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeb, A.M.

    1997-02-01

    The selective hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde has been investigated over a monometallic Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalyst and platinum bimetallic catalysts where the second metal was either silver, copper, or tin. The effects of addition of a second metal to the Pt/SiO{sub 2} system on the selectivity to crotyl alcohol were investigated. The Pt-Sn bimetallic catalysts were characterized by hydrogen chemisorption, {sup 1}H NMR and microcalorimetry. The Pt-Ag/SiO{sub 2} and Pt-Cu/SiO{sub 2} catalysts were characterized by hydrogen chemisorption. Pt-Sn/SiO{sub 2} catalysts selectively hydrogenated crotonaldehyde to crotyl alcohol and the method of preparation of these catalysts affected the selectivity. The most selective Pt-Sn/SiO{sub 2} catalysts for the hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde to crotyl alcohol were those in which the Sn precursor was dissolved in a HCl solution. Sn increased both the rate of formation of butyraldehyde and the rate of formation of crotyl alcohol. The Pt/SiO{sub 2}, Pt-Ag/SiO{sub 2} and Pt-Cu/SiO{sub 2} catalysts produced only butyraldehyde. Initial heats of adsorption ({approximately}90 kJ/mol) measured using microcalorimetry were not affected by the presence of Sn on Pt. We can conclude that there is no through metal electronic interaction between Pt and Sn at least with respect to hydrogen surface bonds since the Pt and Pt-Sn at least with respect to hydrogen surface bonds since the Pt and Pt-Sn had similar initial heats of adsorption coupled with the invariance of the {sup 1}H NMR Knight shift.

  10. Organometallic catalysts for primary phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Fraser

    1987-01-01

    A continuing effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to improve the competitiveness of the phosphoric acid fuel cell by improving cell performance and/or reducing cell cost is discussed. Cathode improvement, both in performance and cost, available through the use of a class of organometallic cathode catalysts, the tetraazaannulenes (TAAs), was investigated. A new mixed catalyst was identified which provides improved cathode performance without the need for the use of a noble metal. This mixed catalyst was tested under load for 1000 hr. in full cell at 160 to 200 C in phosphoric acid H3PO4, and was shown to provide stable performance. The mixed catalyst contains an organometallic to catalyze electroreduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and a metal to catalyze further electroreduction of the hydrogen peroxide to water. Cathodes containing an exemplar mixed catalyst (e.g., Co bisphenyl TAA/Mn) operate at approximately 650 mV vs DHE in 160 C, 85% H3PO4 with oxygen as reactant. In developing this mixed catalyst, a broad spectrum of TAAs were prepared, tested in half-cell and in a rotating ring-disk electrode system. TAAs found to facilitate the production of hydrogen peroxide in electroreduction were shown to be preferred TAAs for use in the mixed catalyst. Manganese (Mn) was identified as a preferred metal because it is capable of catalyzing hydrogen peroxide electroreduction, is lower in cost and is of less strategic importance than platinum, the cathode catalyst normally used in the fuel cell.

  11. Investigation of Mixed Oxide Catalysts for NO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Szanyi, Janos; Karim, Ayman M.; Pederson, Larry R.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Mei, Donghai; Tran, Diana N.; Herling, Darrell R.; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Qi, Gongshin; Li, Wei

    2014-12-09

    The oxidation of engine-generated NO to NO2 is an important step in the reduction of NOx in lean engine exhaust because NO2 is required for the performance of the LNT technology [2], and it enhances the activities of ammonia selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts [1]. In particular, for SCR catalysts an NO:NO2 ratio of 1:1 is most effective for NOx reduction, whereas for LNT catalysts, NO must be oxidized to NO2 before adsorption on the storage components. However, NO2 typically constitutes less than 10% of NOx in lean exhaust, so catalytic oxidation of NO is essential. Platinum has been found to be especially active for NO oxidation, and is widely used in DOC and LNT catalysts. However, because of the high cost and poor thermal durability of Pt-based catalysts, there is substantial interest in the development of alternatives. The objective of this project, in collaboration with partner General Motors, is to develop mixed metal oxide catalysts for NO oxidation, enabling lower precious metal usage in emission control systems. [1] M. Koebel, G. Madia, and M. Elsener, Catalysis Today 73, 239 (2002). [2] C. H. Kim, G. S. Qi, K. Dahlberg, and W. Li, Science 327, 1624 (2010).

  12. Investigation of syngas interactions in alcohol synthesis catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Akundi, M.A.

    1998-04-15

    The primary objectives of the project are to (a) synthesize, by controlled sequential and co-impregnation techniques, three distinct composition metal clusters (consisting of Cu-Co-Cr and Cu-Fe-Zn): rich in copper (Methanol selective), rich in ferromagnetic metal (Co or Fe-Hydrocarbon selective) and intermediate range (mixed alcohol catalysts); (b) investigate the changes in the magnetic character of the systems due to interaction with CO, through Zero-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ZFNMR) study of cobalt and Magnetic character (saturation magnetization and coercive field) analysis of the composite catalyst of Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM); (c) examine the changes in syngas adsorption character of the catalyst as the composition changes, by FTIR Spectroscopic analysis of CO stretching frequencies; (d) determine the nature and size of these intermetallic clusters by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM); and (e) perform catalytic runs on selected samples and analyze the correlations between the physical and chemical characteristics. The catalysts chosen have a greater promise for industrial application than the Rh and Mo based catalysts. Several groups preparing catalysts by synthetic routes have reported divergent results for activity and selectivity. Generally the research has followed an empirical path and less effort is devoted to analyze the mechanisms and the scientific basis. The primary intent of this study is to analyze the nature of the intermetallic and gas-metal interactions and examine the correlations to catalytic properties.

  13. The electron is a catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, Armido; Curran, Dennis P.

    2014-09-01

    The electron is an efficient catalyst for conducting various types of radical cascade reaction that proceed by way of radical and radical ion intermediates. But because electrons are omnipresent, catalysis by electrons often passes unnoticed. In this Review, a simple analogy between acid/base catalysis and redox catalysis is presented. Conceptually, the electron is a catalyst in much the same way that a proton is a catalyst. The 'electron is a catalyst' paradigm unifies mechanistically an assortment of synthetic transformations that otherwise have little or no apparent relationship. Diverse radical cascades, including unimolecular radical substitution reactions (SRN1-type chemistry), base-promoted homolytic aromatic substitutions (BHAS), radical Heck-type reactions, radical cross-dehydrogenative couplings (CDC), direct arene trifluoromethylations and radical alkoxycarbonylations, can all be viewed as electron-catalysed reactions.

  14. Catalyst for sodium chlorate decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Production of oxygen by rapid decomposition of cobalt oxide and sodium chlorate mixture is discussed. Cobalt oxide serves as catalyst to accelerate reaction. Temperature conditions and chemical processes involved are described.

  15. Secret Lives of Catalysts Revealed

    ScienceCinema

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai

    2010-01-08

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division discuss the first-ever glimpse of nanoscale catalysts in action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  16. Secret Lives of Catalysts Revealed

    SciTech Connect

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai

    2008-10-15

    Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division discuss the first-ever glimpse of nanoscale catalysts in action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

  17. Dichloromethane photodegradation using titanium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, J.F.; Suib, S.L.; Coughlin, R.W. )

    1989-06-01

    The use of titanium dioxide and titanium aluminosilicates in the photocatalytic destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbons is investigated. Titanium-exchanged clays, titanium-pillared clays, and titanium dioxide in the amorphous, anatase, and rutile forms are used to photocatalytically degrade dichloromethane to hydrochloric acid and carbon dioxide. Bentonite clays pillared by titanium dioxide are observed to be more catalytically active than titanium-exchanged clays. Clays pillared by titanium aluminum polymeric cations display about the same catalytic activity as that of titanium-exchanged clays. The rutile form of titanium dioxide is the most active catalyst studied for the dichloromethane degradation reaction. The anatase form of titanium dioxide supported on carbon felt was also used as a catalyst. This material is about five times more active than titanium dioxide-pillared clays. Degradation of dichloromethane using any of these catalysts can be enhanced by oxygen enrichment of the reaction solution or by preirradiating the catalyst with light.

  18. Mechanistic insight into sonochemical biodiesel synthesis using heterogeneous base catalyst.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Hanif A; Chakma, Sankar; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effect of ultrasound on transesterification reaction is well known. Heterogeneous (or solid) catalysts for biodiesel synthesis have merit that they do not contaminate the byproduct of glycerol. In this paper, we have attempted to identify the mechanistic features of ultrasound-enhanced biodiesel synthesis with the base-catalyst of CaO. A statistical design of experiments (Box-Behnken) was used to identify the influence of temperature, alcohol to oil molar ratio and catalyst loading on transesterification yield. The optimum values of these parameters for the highest yield were identified through Response Surface Method (with a quadratic model) and ANOVA. These values are: temperature=62 °C, molar ratio=10:1 and catalyst loading=6 wt.%. The activation energy was determined as 82.3 kJ/mol, which is higher than that for homogeneous catalyzed system (for both acidic and basic catalyst). The experimental results have been analyzed vis-à-vis simulations of cavitation bubble dynamics. Due to 3-phase heterogeneity of the system, the yield was dominated by intrinsic kinetics, and the optimum temperature for the highest yield was close to boiling point of methanol. At this temperature, the influence of cavitation bubbles (in terms of both sonochemical and sonophysical effect) is negligible, and ultrasonic micro-streaming provided necessary convection in the system. The influence of all parameters on the reaction system was found to be strongly inter-dependent. PMID:23742888

  19. Mechanistic insight into sonochemical biodiesel synthesis using heterogeneous base catalyst.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Hanif A; Chakma, Sankar; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effect of ultrasound on transesterification reaction is well known. Heterogeneous (or solid) catalysts for biodiesel synthesis have merit that they do not contaminate the byproduct of glycerol. In this paper, we have attempted to identify the mechanistic features of ultrasound-enhanced biodiesel synthesis with the base-catalyst of CaO. A statistical design of experiments (Box-Behnken) was used to identify the influence of temperature, alcohol to oil molar ratio and catalyst loading on transesterification yield. The optimum values of these parameters for the highest yield were identified through Response Surface Method (with a quadratic model) and ANOVA. These values are: temperature=62 °C, molar ratio=10:1 and catalyst loading=6 wt.%. The activation energy was determined as 82.3 kJ/mol, which is higher than that for homogeneous catalyzed system (for both acidic and basic catalyst). The experimental results have been analyzed vis-à-vis simulations of cavitation bubble dynamics. Due to 3-phase heterogeneity of the system, the yield was dominated by intrinsic kinetics, and the optimum temperature for the highest yield was close to boiling point of methanol. At this temperature, the influence of cavitation bubbles (in terms of both sonochemical and sonophysical effect) is negligible, and ultrasonic micro-streaming provided necessary convection in the system. The influence of all parameters on the reaction system was found to be strongly inter-dependent.

  20. Structural studies of hydrodesulfurization catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, A.

    1983-01-01

    Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) is a catalytic process used to remove sulfur from S-containing compounds by converting it to hdyrogen sulfide in the presence of dihydrogen. Catalysts used in HDS are mainly made of molybdenum and cobalt sulfides supported on ..gamma..-alumina. The objective of this work was to correlate changes in the HDS activity of these catalysts with structural information obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Two series of catalysts were prepared, one by incipient wetness impregnation and the other by bulk impregnation. The catalysts had approximately the same Mo content and varying Co content, and were tested for thiophene HDS in a fixed bed reactor at 573 K and atmospheric pressure. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption edge spectroscopy (XAES) were used at the Mo and Co K-edges. The catalysts were treated in a mixture of hydrogen sulfide/dihydrogen. For both series of catalysts, HDS activity increased with atomic ratio r = Co/(Co + Mo), reached a maximum and declined with further increase in r. Catalysts prepared by incipient wetness impregnation showed higher HDS activity. From EXAFS and XAES, it appears that molybdenum has a local environment similar to that of molybdenum disulfide, very dispersed on the surface of the alumina. Cobalt has sulfur atoms as nearest neighbors. The number N(S) of sulfur neighbors of Mo, determined from EXAFS, depends on r like HDS activity, and shows a linear correlation with HDS activity that holds for both series of catalysts. It seems reasonable that as r increases, the sulfur binding energy of Mo increases until the maximum value of N(S) is reached, and then declines.

  1. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Vannorman, John D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A catalyst for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2 which includes a platinum group metal, e.g., platinum; a reducible metal oxide having mulitple valence states, e.g., SnO2; and a compound which can bind water to its structure, e.g., silica gel. This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high powered, pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed cycle condition.

  2. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Vannorman, John D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A catalyst is disclosed for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2, which includes a platinum group metal (e.g., platinum); a reducable metal oxide having multiple valence states (e.g., SnO2); and a compound which can bind water to its structure (e.g., silica gel). This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high-powered pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed-cycle condition.

  3. Low Temperature Catalyst for NH3 Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar; Melendez, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Air revitalization technologies maintain a safe atmosphere inside spacecraft by the removal of C02, ammonia (NH3), and trace contaminants. NH3 onboard the International Space Station (ISS) is produced by crew metabolism, payloads, or during an accidental release of thermal control refrigerant. Currently, the ISS relies on removing NH3 via humidity condensate and the crew wears hooded respirators during emergencies. A different approach to cabin NH3 removal is to use selective catalytic oxidation (SCO), which builds on thermal catalytic oxidation concepts that could be incorporated into the existing TCCS process equipment architecture on ISS. A low temperature platinum-based catalyst (LTP-Catalyst) developed at KSC was used for converting NH3 to H20 and N2 gas by SCO. The challenge of implementing SCO is to reduce formation of undesirable byproducts like NOx (N20 and NO). Gas mixture analysis was conducted using FTIR spectrometry in the Regenerable VOC Control System (RVCS) Testbed. The RVCS was modified by adding a 66 L semi-sealed chamber, and a custom NH3 generator. The effect of temperature on NH3 removal using the LTP-Catalyst was examined. A suitable temperature was found where NH3 removal did not produce toxic NO, (NO, N02) and N20 formation was reduced.

  4. Selective catalyst reduction light-off strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Gonze, Eugene V

    2011-10-18

    An emissions control system includes a temperature determination module and an emissions control module. The temperature determination module determines a first temperature of a heater element of a diesel particulate filter (DPF) assembly in an exhaust system and determines a second temperature of a catalyst of the DPF assembly. The emissions control module selectively activates the heater element, selectively initiates a predefined combustion process in an engine based upon the first temperature, and selectively starts a reductant injection process based upon the second temperature.

  5. Electrically heated particulate filter using catalyst striping

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore, Jr., Michael J; Ament, Frank

    2013-07-16

    An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system generally includes a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine. A grid of electrically resistive material is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF and selectively heats exhaust passing through the grid to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF. A catalyst coating is applied to the PF that increases a temperature of the combustion of the particulates within the PF.

  6. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    SciTech Connect

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  7. New approaches in catalyst manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Lostaglio, V.J.; Carruthers, J.D.

    1986-03-01

    Changes in both petroleum refinery feedstocks and refinery product slates during the past 10 years have necessitated new approaches in catalyst manufacture. New hydrotreating catalysts are expected to improve polynuclear aromatic saturation, and to increase cetane index, mild hydrocracking, asphaltene conversion, and contaminant metal removal. Sulfur and nitrogen removal were once considered the sole benefits of hydroprocessing. To accommodate these needs, catalyst manufacturers have focused added attention on defining and achieving rigorous physical and chemical specifications for each new catalyst. It is considered essential to continually improve quality and process control in each manufacturing step. In addition, manufacturers have introduced new technology both in the process and in the evaluation of product. The importance of pore size distribution (PSD), for example, has been appreciated for 20 years or more but it is only within the past 10 years that routine measurement of PSD by mercury and/or nitrogen porosimetry has been applied throughout the entire manufacturing process. A greater emphasis on heavy oil hydrotreating has spurred demands for wide pore catalysts of small external dimensions to overcome the problems of diffusion-limited reactions. In turn, however, these properties may create problems with crush strength and catalyst attrition.

  8. Waste catalysts for waste polymer.

    PubMed

    Salmiaton, A; Garforth, A

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic cracking of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) over fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts (1:6 ratio) was carried out using a laboratory fluidized bed reactor operating at 450 degrees C. Two fresh and two steam deactivated commercial FCC catalysts with different levels of rare earth oxide (REO) were compared as well as two used FCC catalysts (E-Cats) with different levels of metal poisoning. Also, inert microspheres (MS3) were used as a fluidizing agent to compare with thermal cracking process at BP pilot plant at Grangemouth, Scotland, which used sand as its fluidizing agent. The results of HDPE degradation in terms of yield of volatile hydrocarbon product are fresh FCC catalysts>steamed FCC catalysts approximately used FCC catalysts. The thermal cracking process using MS3 showed that at 450 degrees C, the product distribution gave 46 wt% wax, 14% hydrocarbon gases, 8% gasoline, 0.1% coke and 32% nonvolatile product. In general, the product yields from HDPE cracking showed that the level of metal contamination (nickel and vanadium) did not affect the product stream generated from polymer cracking. This study gives promising results as an alternative technique for the cracking and recycling of polymer waste. PMID:17084608

  9. Catalysts possessing augmented C-O and C-N hydrogenolysis activity. Preliminary progress report, August-September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Massoth, F.E.; Shabtai, J.S.

    1983-10-31

    The aim of the proposed research is to synthesize and investigate new sulfided catalyst systems having higher carbon-heteroatom hydrogenolysis activity as compared to ring hydrogenation activity. A fundamental approach is planned to gain understanding of the basic catalytic properties which relate to hydrogenolysis, hydrogenation and cracking functions of the catalysts. This will involve preparation of new catalysts, characterization of their properties and model compound reactivity studies. In another part of the project, selected catalysts will be applied in studies of more complex O- and N-containing model compounds with the objective of providing fundamental data on the stereochemistry of HDO and HDN reactions. These data will be used to develop steric surface-reactant models for sulfided catalysts. These new catalysts should be of particular importance for upgrading of coal-derived liquids and solids, as well as other heavy feedstocks. The research is divided into four tasks: (1) catalyst preparation and activity testing; (2) catalyst characterization; (2) study of catalyst activity under hydroprocessing conditions; and (4) stereochemical studies. This report covers a period of only one month. Work was initiated on catalyst preparation. A brief literature search was made to ascertain what different preparation methods can be applied to supported sulfide catalysts besides the standard wetness method. Several Cr/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts containing Co or Ni were prepared by the standard impregnation method. 3 references.

  10. Evaluation of different catalysts and development of a new catalyst for the reduction of CO2 to graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschekalinskij, Alexander; Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    We present an evaluation of different catalysts, methods and parameters for the catalytic reduction of CO2 for 14C-AMS graphite targets for radiocarbon measurement at the Physical Institute of the University Erlangen-Nuremberg in Germany. Currently 10 μm iron powder is used as a catalyst to reduce carbon dioxide to graphite following our standard protocol. An optimal catalyst should provide a short reduction time, no additional fractionation effects, a good reduction yield, lack sintering and should not contain any amounts of both "dead" and "modern" carbon. Seven purchasable catalysts have been evaluated regarding this criteria. Further, the method using zinc and titanium hydride instead of hydrogen gas and the water-trap has been applied to our system and the effect of the water-trap temperature on the reduction time has been tested. A self-made catalyst was produced using aluminum oxide impregnated with iron nitrate. The results of this study indicate three good catalysts and show the success of the applied methods on standard samples like Ox II and Alfa graphite.

  11. Low-Temperature CO Oxidation over a Ternary Oxide Catalyst with High Resistance to Hydrocarbon Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Binder, Andrew J; Toops, Todd J; Unocic, Raymond R; Parks, James E; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-01

    Platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts are the current standard for control of pollutants in automotive exhaust streams. Aside from their high cost, PGM catalysts struggle with CO oxidation at low temperatures (<200 °C) due to inhibition by hydrocarbons in exhaust streams. Here we present a ternary mixed oxide catalyst composed of copper oxide, cobalt oxide, and ceria (dubbed CCC) that outperforms synthesized and commercial PGM catalysts for CO oxidation in simulated exhaust streams while showing no signs of inhibition by propene. Diffuse reflectance IR (DRIFTS) and light-off data both indicate low interaction between propene and the CO oxidation active site on this catalyst, and a separation of adsorption sites is proposed as the cause of this inhibition resistance. This catalyst shows great potential as a low-cost component for low temperature exhaust streams that are expected to be a characteristic of future automotive systems.

  12. Biphasic catalysis using amphiphilic polyphenols-chelated noble metals as highly active and selective catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Hui; Yu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Liao, Xuepin

    2013-01-01

    In the field of catalysis, it is highly desired to develop novel catalysts that combine the advantages of both homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts. Here we disclose that the use of plant pholyphenol as amphiphilic large molecule ligand/stabilizer allows for the preparation of noble metal complex and noble metal nanoparticle catalysts. These catalysts are found to be highly selective and active in aqueous-organic biphasic catalysis of cinnamaldehyde and quinoline, and can be reused at least 3 times without significant loss of activity. Moreover, the catalytic activity and reusability of the catalysts can be rationally controlled by simply adjusting the content of polyphenols in the catalysts. Our strategy may be extended to design a wide range of aqueous-organic biphasic catalysis system. PMID:23863916

  13. Molecular co-catalyst accelerating hole transfer for enhanced photocatalytic H2 evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Wentuan; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Lei; Jin, Tao; Zhang, Lidong; Zhang, Qun; Luo, Yi; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2015-01-01

    In artificial photocatalysis, sluggish kinetics of hole transfer and the resulting high-charge recombination rate have been the Achilles' heel of photocatalytic conversion efficiency. Here we demonstrate water-soluble molecules as co-catalysts to accelerate hole transfer for improved photocatalytic H2 evolution activity. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), by virtue of its reversible redox couple TFA·/TFA−, serves as a homogeneous co-catalyst that not only maximizes the contact areas between co-catalysts and reactants but also greatly promotes hole transfer. Thus K4Nb6O17 nanosheet catalysts achieve drastically increased photocatalytic H2 production rate in the presence of TFA, up to 32 times with respect to the blank experiment. The molecular co-catalyst represents a new, simple and highly effective approach to suppress recombination of photogenerated charges, and has provided fertile new ground for creating high-efficiency photosynthesis systems, avoiding use of noble-metal co-catalysts. PMID:26486863

  14. Low-temperature CO oxidation over a ternary oxide catalyst with high resistance to hydrocarbon inhibition

    DOE PAGES

    Binder, Andrew J.; Toops, Todd J.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Parks, II, James E.; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-11

    Platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts are the current standard for control of pollutants in automotive exhaust streams. Aside from their high cost, PGM catalysts struggle with CO oxidation at low temperatures (<200 °C) due to inhibition by hydrocarbons in exhaust streams. Here we present a ternary mixed oxide catalyst composed of copper oxide, cobalt oxide, and ceria (dubbed CCC) that outperforms synthesized and commercial PGM catalysts for CO oxidation in simulated exhaust streams while showing no signs of inhibition by propene. Diffuse reflectance IR (DRIFTS) and light-off data both indicate low interaction between propene and the CO oxidation active sitemore » on this catalyst, and a separation of adsorption sites is proposed as the cause of this inhibition resistance. In conclusion, this catalyst shows great potential as a low-cost component for low temperature exhaust streams that are expected to be a characteristic of future automotive systems.« less

  15. Low-temperature CO oxidation over a ternary oxide catalyst with high resistance to hydrocarbon inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Andrew J.; Toops, Todd J.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Parks, II, James E.; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-11

    Platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts are the current standard for control of pollutants in automotive exhaust streams. Aside from their high cost, PGM catalysts struggle with CO oxidation at low temperatures (<200 °C) due to inhibition by hydrocarbons in exhaust streams. Here we present a ternary mixed oxide catalyst composed of copper oxide, cobalt oxide, and ceria (dubbed CCC) that outperforms synthesized and commercial PGM catalysts for CO oxidation in simulated exhaust streams while showing no signs of inhibition by propene. Diffuse reflectance IR (DRIFTS) and light-off data both indicate low interaction between propene and the CO oxidation active site on this catalyst, and a separation of adsorption sites is proposed as the cause of this inhibition resistance. In conclusion, this catalyst shows great potential as a low-cost component for low temperature exhaust streams that are expected to be a characteristic of future automotive systems.

  16. Molecular co-catalyst accelerating hole transfer for enhanced photocatalytic H2 evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Wentuan; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Lei; Jin, Tao; Zhang, Lidong; Zhang, Qun; Luo, Yi; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2015-10-01

    In artificial photocatalysis, sluggish kinetics of hole transfer and the resulting high-charge recombination rate have been the Achilles' heel of photocatalytic conversion efficiency. Here we demonstrate water-soluble molecules as co-catalysts to accelerate hole transfer for improved photocatalytic H2 evolution activity. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), by virtue of its reversible redox couple TFA./TFA-, serves as a homogeneous co-catalyst that not only maximizes the contact areas between co-catalysts and reactants but also greatly promotes hole transfer. Thus K4Nb6O17 nanosheet catalysts achieve drastically increased photocatalytic H2 production rate in the presence of TFA, up to 32 times with respect to the blank experiment. The molecular co-catalyst represents a new, simple and highly effective approach to suppress recombination of photogenerated charges, and has provided fertile new ground for creating high-efficiency photosynthesis systems, avoiding use of noble-metal co-catalysts.

  17. Ionic Liquids as Solvents for Rhodium and Platinum Catalysts Used in Hydrosilylation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Witold; Kukawka, Rafal; Maciejewski, Hieronim; Smiglak, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    A group of imidazolium and pyridinium based ionic liquids has been synthetized, and their ability to dissolve and activate the catalysts used in hydrosilylation reaction of 1-octane and 1,1,1,3,5,5,5-heptamethyltrisiloxane was investigated. An organometallic catalyst as well as inorganic complexes of platinum and rhodium dissolved in ionic liquids were used, forming liquid solutions not miscible with the substrates or with the products of the reaction. The results show that application of such a simple biphasic catalytic system enables reuse of ionic liquid phase with catalysts in multiple reaction cycles reducing the costs and decreasing the amount of catalyst needed per mole of product. PMID:27563869

  18. [Study on the surface diffuse reflectance ultraviolet-visible spectra of the multicomponent metal catalysts].

    PubMed

    Tang, B; Jiang, Q; He, X; Shen, H

    1999-02-01

    In this paper, the surface diffuse reflectance ultraviolet-visible spectra (DRUVS) of two and three components supported metal catalysts for methanation of CO2 by hydrogenation were studied, and the relationship between the activity of catalytic-hydrogenation and the interaction among the components of the catalysts was revealed. Based on the analysis of the DRUVS of the catalysts with defferent amount of promoters in two component catalysts system, the dependence relationship between the characteristic strength of the DRUVS and the catalytic activity was worked out. PMID:15818931

  19. The innovation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them.

  20. The innovation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them. PMID:21714388

  1. Catalyst suppliers further consolidate business units

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1993-10-11

    The petroleum-refining catalyst industry sustained significant reorganization in 1993. A joint venture between two previous competitors and the consolidated of two sister companies reflect general trends in the global market-place. The Journal's latest survey lists more than 820 unique catalysts. This reduction of some 220 catalysts since the last complete catalyst compilation is partially the result of the deletion of some of the more specialized catalysts from this year's survey. Other factors contributing to this decrease include industry rationalization and the listing of catalyst families instead of individual products--especially in the fluid catalytic cracking category. The Journal's international refining-catalyst compilation lists catalysts manufactured for all major catalytic refinery processes by essentially all the world's petroleum catalyst producers and suppliers. The objective of the survey is two-fold: first, to list each catalyst by its specific designation or supplier identification in its process application category (for instance, hydrocracking); and second, to differentiate each catalyst from the others in that category. These differentiations can be made in terms of either the catalyst's application (for example, feedstock characteristics) or its physical characteristics (for instance, particle size or activity). The compilation is designed to provide a ready reference for both refiners and catalyst manufacturers. In the process, it may also help sort out the sometimes confusing nomenclature used to describe these catalysts.

  2. Catalyst for coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Huibers, Derk T. A.; Kang, Chia-Chen C.

    1984-01-01

    An improved catalyst for a coal liquefaction process; e.g., the H-Coal Process, for converting coal into liquid fuels, and where the conversion is carried out in an ebullated-catalyst-bed reactor wherein the coal contacts catalyst particles and is converted, in addition to liquid fuels, to gas and residual oil which includes preasphaltenes and asphaltenes. The improvement comprises a catalyst selected from the group consisting of the oxides of nickel molybdenum, cobalt molybdenum, cobalt tungsten, and nickel tungsten on a carrier of alumina, silica, or a combination of alumina and silica. The catalyst has a total pore volume of about 0.500 to about 0.900 cc/g and the pore volume comprises micropores, intermediate pores and macropores, the surface of the intermediate pores being sufficiently large to convert the preasphaltenes to asphaltenes and lighter molecules. The conversion of the asphaltenes takes place on the surface of micropores. The macropores are for metal deposition and to prevent catalyst agglomeration. The micropores have diameters between about 50 and about 200 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 50 to about 80% of the pore volume, whereas the intermediate pores have diameters between about 200 and 2000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume, and the macropores have diameters between about 2000 and about 10,000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume. The catalysts are further improved where they contain promoters. Such promoters include the oxides of vanadium, tungsten, copper, iron and barium, tin chloride, tin fluoride and rare earth metals.

  3. Pretreatment of CO oxidation catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannorman, John D.

    1988-01-01

    CO oxidation catalysts with high activity in the range of 25 C to 100 C are important for long-life, closed-cycle operation of pulsed carbon dioxide 2 lasers. A reductive pretreatment with either CO or H sub 2 was shown to significantly enhance the activity of a commerically-available platinum on tin (IV) oxide (Pt/SnO2) catalyst relative to an oxidative or inert pretreatment or no pretreatment. Pretreatment at temperatures of 175 C and above caused an initial dip in observed CO or O sub 2 loss or CO sub 2 formation in a test gas mixture of 1 percent CO and 0.5 percent O sub 2 in a He gas matrix before a steady-state yield was obtained. This dip was found to be caused by dehydration of the surface of the catalyst and was readily eliminated by humidifying the catalyst or the test gas mixture. It was also found that too much moisture resulted in a lower overall yield of CO sub 2. Under similar conditions, it is hypothesized that the effect of the humidification is to increase the concentration of OH groups on the surface of the catalyst. The effect of having high concentration of CO sub 2 in the test gas mixture upon the loss of CO and O sub 2 as well as the effect of periods of relaxation of the catalyst under non-test gas conditions was studied. The purpose of these studies was to gain an insight into the mechanism of CO oxidation on this type of catalyst.

  4. A pentanuclear iron catalyst designed for water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, Masaya; Kondo, Mio; Kuga, Reiko; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi; Hayami, Shinya; Praneeth, Vijayendran K. K.; Yoshida, Masaki; Yoneda, Ko; Kawata, Satoshi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki

    2016-02-01

    Although the oxidation of water is efficiently catalysed by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (refs 1 and 2), it remains one of the main bottlenecks when aiming for synthetic chemical fuel production powered by sunlight or electricity. Consequently, the development of active and stable water oxidation catalysts is crucial, with heterogeneous systems considered more suitable for practical use and their homogeneous counterparts more suitable for targeted, molecular-level design guided by mechanistic understanding. Research into the mechanism of water oxidation has resulted in a range of synthetic molecular catalysts, yet there remains much interest in systems that use abundant, inexpensive and environmentally benign metals such as iron (the most abundant transition metal in the Earth’s crust and found in natural and synthetic oxidation catalysts). Water oxidation catalysts based on mononuclear iron complexes have been explored, but they often deactivate rapidly and exhibit relatively low activities. Here we report a pentanuclear iron complex that efficiently and robustly catalyses water oxidation with a turnover frequency of 1,900 per second, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that of other iron-based catalysts. Electrochemical analysis confirms the redox flexibility of the system, characterized by six different oxidation states between FeII5 and FeIII5; the FeIII5 state is active for oxidizing water. Quantum chemistry calculations indicate that the presence of adjacent active sites facilitates O-O bond formation with a reaction barrier of less than ten kilocalories per mole. Although the need for a high overpotential and the inability to operate in water-rich solutions limit the practicality of the present system, our findings clearly indicate that efficient water oxidation catalysts based on iron complexes can be created by ensuring that the system has redox flexibility and contains adjacent water-activation sites.

  5. Methods and catalysts for making biodiesel from the transesterification and esterification of unrefined oils

    DOEpatents

    Yan, Shuli; Salley, Steven O.; Ng, K. Y. Simon

    2012-04-24

    A method of forming a biodiesel product and a heterogeneous catalyst system used to form said product that has a high tolerance for the presence of water and free fatty acids (FFA) in the oil feedstock is disclosed. This catalyst system may simultaneously catalyze both the esterification of FAA and the transesterification of triglycerides present in the oil feedstock. The catalyst system according to one aspect of the present disclosure represents a class of zinc and lanthanum oxide heterogeneous catalysts that include different ratios of zinc oxide to lanthanum oxides (Zn:La ratio) ranging from about 10:0 to 0:10. The Zn:La ratio in the catalyst is believed to have an effect on the number and reactivity of Lewis acid and base sites, as well as the transesterification of glycerides, the esterification of fatty acids, and the hydrolysis of glycerides and biodiesel.

  6. Study of removal of ammonia from urine vapor by dual catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budininkas, P.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of ammonia removal from urine vapor by a low temperature dual-catalyst system was investigated. The process is based on the initial catalytic oxidation of ammonia present in urine vapor to nitrogen and nitrous oxide, followed by a catalytic decomposition of the nitrous oxide formed into its elements. The most active catalysts for the oxidation of ammonia and for the decomposition of N2O, identified in screening tests, were then combined into dual catalyst systems and tested to establish their overall efficiencies for the removal of ammonia from artificial gas mixtures. Dual catalyst systems capable of ammonia removal from the artificial gas mixtures were then tested with the actual urine vapor produced by boiling untreated urine. A suitable dual catalyst bed arrangement was found that achieved the removal of ammonia and organic carbon, and recovered water of good quality from urine vapor.

  7. Recent Progress on Transition Metal Catalyst Separation and Recycling in ATRP.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mingqiang; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Lifen; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2015-10-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) is a versatile and robust tool to synthesize a wide spectrum of monomers with various designable structures. However, it usually needs large amounts of transition metal as the catalyst to mediate the equilibrium between the dormant and propagating species. Unfortunately, the catalyst residue may contaminate or color the resultant polymers, which limits its application, especially in biomedical and electronic materials. How to efficiently and economically remove or reduce the catalyst residue from its products is a challenging and encouraging task. Herein, recent advances in catalyst separation and recycling are highlighted with a focus on (1) highly active ppm level transition metal or metal free catalyzed ATRP; (2) post-purification method; (3) various soluble, insoluble, immobilized/soluble, and reversible supported catalyst systems; and (4) liquid-liquid biphasic catalyzed systems, especially thermo-regulated catalysis systems.

  8. 40 CFR 85.1512 - Admission of catalyst and O2 sensor-equipped vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... system and/or O2 sensor; (iii) Is labeled in accordance with 40 CFR part 86, subpart A or subpart S, or... CFR 12.73 unless it is included in a catalyst and O2 sensor control program approved by the... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Admission of catalyst and O2...

  9. Iodination of organic substrates with halide salts and H2O2 using an organotelluride catalyst.

    PubMed

    Higgs, D E; Nelen, M I; Detty, M R

    2001-02-01

    [figure: see text] Organotelluride 1 is a water-soluble catalyst for the oxidation of iodide with hydrogen peroxide in pH 6 phosphate buffer. In two-phase systems, organic substrates are efficiently iodinated using 0.8 mol % of catalyst. Water-soluble substrates are iodinated without an organic cosolvent.

  10. 40 CFR 85.1512 - Admission of catalyst and O2 sensor-equipped vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... system and/or O2 sensor; (iii) Is labeled in accordance with 40 CFR part 86, subpart A or subpart S, or... CFR 12.73 unless it is included in a catalyst and O2 sensor control program approved by the... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Admission of catalyst and O2...

  11. 40 CFR 85.1512 - Admission of catalyst and O2 sensor-equipped vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... system and/or O2 sensor; (iii) Is labeled in accordance with 40 CFR part 86, subpart A or subpart S, or... CFR 12.73 unless it is included in a catalyst and O2 sensor control program approved by the... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Admission of catalyst and O2...

  12. 40 CFR 85.1512 - Admission of catalyst and O2 sensor-equipped vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... system and/or O2 sensor; (iii) Is labeled in accordance with 40 CFR part 86, subpart A or subpart S, or... CFR 12.73 unless it is included in a catalyst and O2 sensor control program approved by the... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Admission of catalyst and O2...

  13. 40 CFR 85.1512 - Admission of catalyst and O2 sensor-equipped vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... system and/or O2 sensor; (iii) Is labeled in accordance with 40 CFR part 86, subpart A or subpart S, or... CFR 12.73 unless it is included in a catalyst and O2 sensor control program approved by the... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Admission of catalyst and O2...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL CATALYST FOR NO DECOMPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2004-05-01

    } catalysts having different noble metal concentrations and pretreated under different conditions. It is also proposed to perform NO decomposition tests in a laboratory-size packed-bed reactor to obtain long-term deactivation data. In the current reporting period first the GC-MS system was calibrated. Then the TPD runs for the 15% Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalyst after treatment with NO and subsequent treatments with NO and O{sub 2} were done. For these runs the catalyst was pretreated with dry helium for 2 hours at 40 C.

  15. Search for new catalysts for the oxidation of SO₂.

    PubMed

    Loskyll, J; Stöwe, K; Maier, W F

    2013-09-01

    The focus of this paper is the search and characterization of novel catalysts for the gas phase oxidation of concentrated SO₂ for the production of sulfuric acid. Modern high-throughout (HT) methods such as emissivity corrected Infrared Thermography (ecIRT) and automated synthesis techniques were used for the synthesis and activity measurements of the samples. In addition a plug flow reactor that uses UV-vis online analytics for the quantification of the SO₂ conversion was designed, built and used for validation of the HT results. The study started with a highly diverse search space of elemental compositions designed for potential discovery. About a thousand samples were synthesized using sol-gel recipes and screened for catalytic SO₂ oxidation activity over a temperature range of 330-450 °C. Several novel catalyst systems were discovered during the screening process and the most interesting systems were further characterized. The most important doping effects on activity found were the influence of bismuth and selenium doping on standard sulfuric acid catalysts, the activity gain of chromium based catalysts caused by the doping with antimony and the activity gain of chromium as well as iron and vanadium based catalysts caused by the doping with tin. PMID:23838612

  16. Pine Pyrolysis Vapor Phase Upgrading Over ZSM-5 Catalyst: Effect of Temperature, Hot Gas Filtration, and Hydrogen Donor Molecule on the Rate of Deactivation of Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Mukarakate, C.; Zhang, X.; Nimlos, M.; Robichaud, D.; Donohoe, B.

    2013-01-01

    The conversion of primary vapors from pine pyrolysis over a ZSM-5 catalyst was characterized using a micro-reactor coupled to a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) to allow on-line measurement of the upgraded vapors. This micro-reacor-MBMS system was used to investigate the effects of hot gas filtration, temperature and hydrogen donor molecules on the rate of deactivation of the UPV2 catalyst. Our results show that the life of catalyst is significantly improved by using better filtration. Temperature had an effect on both product distribution and catalyst deactivation. The hydrogen donor molecules (HDM) used in this study show better reduction in catalyst deactivation rates at high temperatures.

  17. Heterogeneous base catalysts for edible palm and non-edible Jatropha-based biodiesel production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transesterification catalyzed by solid base catalyst is a brilliant technology for the noble process featuring the fast reaction under mild reacting condition in biodiesel production. Heterogeneous base catalysts are generally more reactive than solid acid catalysts which require extreme operating condition for high conversion and biodiesel yield. In the present study, synthesis of biodiesel was studied by using edible (palm) or non-edible (Jatropha) feedstock catalyzed by heterogeneous base catalysts such as supported alkali metal (NaOH/Al2O3), alkaline-earth metal oxide (MgO, CaO and SrO) and mixed metal oxides catalysts (CaMgO and CaZnO). Results The chemical characteristic, textural properties, basicity profile and leaching test of synthesized catalysts were studied by using X-ray diffraction, BET measurement, TPD-CO2 and ICP-AES analysis, respectively. Transesterification activity of solid base catalysts showed that > 90% of palm biodiesel and > 80% of Jatropha biodiesel yield under 3 wt.% of catalyst, 3 h reaction time, methanol to oil ratio of 15:1 under 65°C. This indicated that other than physicochemical characteristic of catalysts; different types of natural oil greatly influence the catalytic reaction due to the presence of free fatty acids (FFAs). Conclusions Among the solid base catalysts, calcium based mixed metal oxides catalysts with binary metal system (CaMgO and CaZnO) showed capability to maintain the transesterification activity for 3 continuous runs at ~ 80% yield. These catalysts render high durability characteristic in transesterification with low active metal leaching for several cycles. PMID:24812574

  18. Catalysts for upgrading coal-derived liquids. Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Crynes, B L

    1981-04-15

    Run ZBF was conducted to determine the amount of sulfur and nitrogen removal from SRC-I/process solvent mixture in the absence of a hydrotreating catalyst. Negligible nitrogen and sulfur removal resulted from this experiment. The hydrogen content of the coal liquid increased slightly over that of the feedstock. In similar studies using other coal liquids some sulfur removal (10 to 40%) was noted under non-catalyzed conditions. Several commercial NiMo supported catalysts were analyzed for silica contents using atomic absorption. These results revealed that catalysts with large micropore size structures also contain high silica content (up to 22.5 weight percent). Several short duration runs (12 to 110 hours) were conducted in the CLTU to gather data on catalyst coking mechanisms. Using the SRC material mixed with a process solvent or creosote oil (30 weight percent SRC), solid materials were observed to form and precipitate in the latter portions of the reactor bed. The reactor system was modified to prevent the accumulation of these incompatible solids which would result in premature termination of the experimental runs. In the catalyst regeneration study (HDN-30, NiMo), a spent catalyst was regenerated and then used to hydrotreat a coal liquid consisting of 10% Synthoil II liquid mixed with raw anthracene oil. This regenerated catalyst gave equal and somewhat superior performance with respect to heteroatom removal compared to that of the fresh catalyst. A second regeneration of this same catalyst loading has been conducted and the regenerated catalyst is being prepared for a third cycle. The spent catalyst lost approximately 33% of its total surface area, yet regeneration recovered 97% of the fresh catalyst area.

  19. Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts. Topical report, September 8, 1992--September 7, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this research was to selectively oxidize methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol, in high space time yields using air at the oxidant under milder reaction conditions that heretofore employed over industrially practical oxide catalysts. The research carried out under this US DOE-METC contract was divided into the following three tasks: Task 1, maximizing selective methane oxidation to C{sub 2}{sup +} products over promoted SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts; Task 2, selective methane oxidation to oxygenates; and Task 3, catalyst characterization and optimization. Principal accomplishments include the following: the 1 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}/SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} promoted catalyst developed here produced over 2 kg of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons/kg catalyst/hr at 550 C; V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts have been prepared that produce up to 1.5 kg formaldehyde/kg catalyst/hr at 630 C with low CO{sub 2} selectivities; and a novel dual bed catalyst system has been designed and utilized to produce over 100 g methanol/kg catalyst/hr at 600 C with the presence of steam in the reactant mixture.

  20. Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by High Melting Point Metal Oxide Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yang; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    We report on the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from Co oxide catalysts. The concept is using the relatively lower mobility of metal oxide (than metal) to suppress catalyst aggregation at high temperatures. Compared to the SWNTs grown by pre-reduced catalysts, SWNTs grown from oxidized Co catalysts have shown narrower diameter distribution and smaller average diameter. Different growth parameters are discussed regarding the resulting morphology of SWNTs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations reveal the information that Co catalysts are transformed to Co3O4 after reduction-calcination process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigations indicate that Co3O4 has decomposed to CoO before growth at a typical growth temperature (800 ºC) in Ar atmosphere. We propose that CoO has higher melting point than Co and thus is more stable during the growth. Our results indicate that besides the bimetallic catalysts, monometallic catalytic system could also be useful in stabilizing the catalysts to grow chirality-specific SWNTs by transforming the relatively low melting point metal catalysts to high melting point metal oxide catalysts. Yang Qian was supported through ``Global Leader Program for Social Design and Management''.

  1. Ring Opening of Naphthenic Molecules Over Metal Containing Mesoporous Y Zeolite Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lee, You-Jin; Kim, Eun Sang; Kim, Tae-Wan; Kim, Chul-Ung; Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Lee, Chang-Ha; Jeong, Soon-Yong

    2015-07-01

    Mesoporous Y zeolite (Meso-Y) with a uniform mesopore was synthesized via pseudomorphic syn- thesis. The Meso-Y supported Ni-W catalyst (NiW/Meso-Y) was introduced as a catalyst for the selective ring opening of naphthenic rings. The catalytic test for the ring opening of naphthalene as a model compound of multi-ring aromatics was performed using a batch-type reaction system with both sulfided 20 wt% NiW/Meso-Y and NiW/Y catalysts under different reaction conditions. The catalytic results reveal that the Meso-Y supported NiW catalyst experiences a naphthalene conversion similar to the NiW/Y catalyst, but the NiW/Meso-Y catalyst has higher product yields for BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene) and the middle distillate than those of the NiW/Y catalyst at a low reaction temperature. These results suggest that the mesoporosity of the NiW/Meso-Y catalyst is more advantageous for the ring opening reaction of multi-ring aromatics due to the easier access for the bulky molecules compared to the NiW/Y catalyst.

  2. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

    1999-09-30

    Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare-earth exchanged

  3. Catalysts for improved fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, R.L.; Inbody, M.A.

    2000-09-01

    This report covers our technical progress on fuel processing catalyst characterization for the specific purpose of hydrogen production for proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells. These development efforts support DOE activities in the development of compact, transient capable reformers for on-board hydrogen generation starting from candidate fuels. The long-term objective includes increased durability and lifetime, in addition to smaller volume, improved performance, and other specifications required meeting fuel processor goals. The technical barriers of compact fuel processor size, transient capability, and compact, efficient thermal management all are functions of catalyst performance. Significantly, work at LANL now tests large-scale fuel processors for performance and durability, as influenced by fuels and fuel constituents, and complements that testing with micro-scale catalyst evaluation which is accomplished under well controlled conditions.

  4. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  5. Silver as acrolein hydrogenation catalyst: intricate effects of catalyst nature and reactant partial pressures.

    PubMed

    Bron, Michael; Teschner, Detre; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Jentoft, Friederike C; Kröhnert, Jutta; Hohmeyer, Jens; Volckmar, Claudia; Steinhauer, Bernd; Schlögl, Robert; Claus, Peter

    2007-07-21

    The hydrogenation of acrolein over pure and supported silver has been investigated with a focus on the influence of catalyst structure and reaction pressure (mbar to 20 bar range) on activity and selectivity. An onset of formation of allyl alcohol beyond 100 mbar reaction pressure (at 250 degrees C) is ascribed to a change in adsorption geometry upon increasing coverage. Smaller silver particles (in the nanometer range), the proximity of a reducible oxide component as well as high pressure lead to enhanced allyl alcohol formation; the selectivity to the other main product propionaldehyde is reduced. The silver dispersion changed depending on the reaction pressure. Moreover, the presence of oxygen, most likely as subsurface oxygen, and the presence of defects are of paramount importance for the catalytic behaviour. The considerable changes of the silver catalysts under reaction conditions and the pressure dependence call for in situ measurements to establish true structure-activity/selectivity relationships for this system. PMID:17612721

  6. Determination of the dominant catalyst derived from the classic [RhCp*Cl₂]₂ precatalyst system: Is it single-metal Rh₁Cp*-based, subnanometer Rh₄ cluster-based, or Rh(0)n nanoparticle-based cyclohexene hydrogenation catalysis at room temperature and mild pressures?

    SciTech Connect

    Bayram, Ercan; Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Szymczak, Nathaniel K.; Finke, Richard G.

    2015-05-27

    Determining the kinetically dominant catalyst in a given catalytic system is a forefront topic in catalysis. The [RhCp*Cl₂]₂ (Cp* =[η⁵-C₅(CH₃)₅]) system pioneered by Maitlis and co-workers is a classic precatalyst system from which homogeneous mononuclear Rh₁, subnanometer Rh₄ cluster, and heterogeneous polymetallic Rh(0)n nanoparticle have all arisen as viable candidates for the true hydrogenation catalyst, depending on the precise substrate, H₂ pressure, temperature, and catalyst concentration conditions. Addressed herein is the question of whether the prior assignment of homogeneous, mononuclear Rh₁Cp*-based catalysis is correct, or are trace Rh₄ subnanometer clusters or possibly Rh(0)n nanoparticles the dominant, actual cyclohexene hydrogenation catalyst at 22 °C and 2.7 atm initial H₂ pressure? The observation herein of Rh₄ species by in operando-X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, at the only slightly more vigorous conditions of 26 °C and 8.3 atm H₂ pressure, and the confirmation of Rh₄ clusters by ex situ mass spectroscopy raises the question of the dominant, room temperature, and mild pressure cyclohexene hydrogenation catalyst derived from the classic [RhCp*Cl₂]₂ precatalyst pioneered by Maitlis and co-workers. Ten lines of evidence are provided herein to address the nature of the true room temperature and mild pressure cyclohexene hydrogenation catalyst derived from [RhCp*Cl₂]₂. Especially significant among those experiments are quantitative catalyst poisoning experiments, in the present case using 1,10-phenanthroline. Those poisoning studies allow one to distinguish mononuclear Rh₁, subnanometer Rh₄ cluster, and Rh(0)n nanoparticle catalysis hypotheses. The evidence obtained provides a compelling case for a mononuclear, Rh₁Cp*-based cyclohexene hydrogenation catalyst at 22 °C and 2.7 atm H₂ pressure. The resultant methodology, especially the quantitative

  7. Effect of reinforcing particle type on morphology and age-hardening behavior of Al–4.5 wt.% Cu based nanocomposites synthesized through mechanical milling

    SciTech Connect

    Mostaed, A.; Saghafian, H.; Mostaed, E.; Shokuhfar, A.; Rezaie, H.R.

    2013-02-15

    The effects of reinforcing particle type (SiC and TiC) on morphology and precipitation hardening behavior of Al–4.5%Cu based nanocomposites synthesized via mechanical milling were investigated in the current work. In order to study the microstructure and morphology of mechanically milled powder, X-ray diffraction technique, scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were utilized. Results revealed that at the early stages of mechanical milling, when reinforcing particles are polycrystal, the alloying process is enhanced more in the case of using the TiC particles as reinforcement. But, at the final stages of mechanical milling, when reinforcing particles are single crystal, the alloying process is enhanced more in the case of using the SiC ones. Transmission electron microscopy results demonstrated that Al–4.5 wt.%Cu based nanocomposite powders were synthesized and confirmed that the mutual diffusion of aluminum and copper occurs through the interfacial plane of (200). The hardness results showed that not only does introducing 4 vol.% of reinforcing particles (SiC or TiC) considerably decrease the porosity of the bulk composite samples, but also it approximately doubles the hardness of Al–4.5 wt.%Cu alloy (53.4 HB). Finally, apart from TEM and scanning electron microscopy observation which are localized, a decline in hardness in the TiC and SiC contained samples, respectively, after 1.5 and 2 h aging time at 473 K proves the fact that the size of SiC particles is smaller than the size of the TiC ones. - Highlights: ► HRTEM results show mutual diffusion of Al and Cu occurs through the (200) planes. ► TiC particles enhance alloying process more than the SiC ones at the early stages of MM. ► SiC particles enhance alloying process more than the TiC ones at the final stages of MM.

  8. Long-Term Testing of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis – 2013 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Thompson, Becky L.

    2013-09-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research since 2005 to develop a catalyst for the conversion of synthesis gas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) into mixed alcohols for use in liquid transportation fuels. Initially, research involved screening possible catalysts based on a review of the literature, because at that time, there were no commercial catalysts available. The screening effort resulted in a decision to focus on catalysts containing rhodium and manganese. Subsequent research identified iridium as a key promoter for this catalyst system. Since then, research has continued to improve rhodium/manganese/iridium-based catalysts, optimizing the relative and total concentrations of the three metals, examining baseline catalysts on alternative supports, and examining effects of additional promoters. Testing was continued in FY 2013 to evaluate the performance and long-term stability of the best catalysts tested to date. Three tests were conducted. A long-term test of over 2300 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was conducted with the best carbon-supported catalyst. A second test of about 650 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed for comparison using the same catalyst formulation on an alternative carbon support. A third test of about 680 hr duration at a single set of operating conditions was performed using the best silica-supported catalyst tested to date.

  9. Catalyst for Decomposition of Nitrogen Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Ates (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Jale (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a platinized tin oxide-based catalyst. It relates particularly to an improved platinized tin oxide-based catalyst able to decompose nitric oxide to nitrogen and oxygen without the necessity of a reducing gas.

  10. Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. [DOE patent

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Perkins, P.

    Novel compounds are described which are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO + H/sub 2/ to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

  11. Catalysts for carbon and coal gasification

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Douglas W.; Spiro, Clifford L.; Kosky, Philip G.

    1985-01-01

    Catalyst for the production of methane from carbon and/or coal by means of catalytic gasification. The catalyst compostion containing at least two alkali metal salts. A particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used.

  12. Metal nanoparticle catalysts beginning to shape-up.

    PubMed

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz

    2013-08-20

    The field of heterogeneous catalysis has received a remarkable amount of interest from scientific and industrial perspectives because of its enormous impact on the world's economy: more than 90% of chemical manufacturing processes use catalysts. Catalysts are also essential in converting hazardous waste into less harmful products (car exhaust) and in generating power (fuel cells). Yet in all applications, it remains a challenge to design long lasting, highly active, selective, and environmentally friendly catalytic materials and processes, ideally based on Earth-abundant elements. In addition, the field needs more satisfactory experimental and theoretical approaches to minimize trial and error experiments in catalyst development. Nanocatalysis is one area that is developing rapidly. Researchers have reported striking novel catalytic properties, including greatly enhanced reactivities and selectivities, for nanocatalysts compared to their bulk counterparts. Fully harnessing the power of nanocatalysts requires detailed understanding of the origin of their enhanced performance at the atomic level, which in turn requires fundamental knowledge of the geometric and electronic structures of these complex systems. Numerous studies report on the properties that affect the catalytic performance of metal naoparticles (NPs) such as their size, interaction with their support, and their oxidation state. Much less research elucidates the role played by the NP shape. Complicating the analysis is that the preceding parameters are not independent, since NP size and support will affect which NP shapes are most stable. In addition, we must consider the dynamic nature of NP catalysts and their response to the environment, since the working state of a NP catalyst might not be the state in which the catalyst was prepared, but rather a structural and/or chemical isomer that responded to the particular reaction conditions. In order to address the complexity of real-world catalysts

  13. Bismuth catalysts in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shū; Ueno, Masaharu; Kitanosono, Taku

    2012-01-01

    Several bismuth-catalyzed synthetic reactions, which proceed well in aqueous media, are discussed. Due to increasing demand of water as a solvent in organic synthesis, catalysts that can be used in aqueous media are becoming more and more important. Although bismuth Lewis acids are not very stable in water, it has been revealed that they can be stabilized by basic ligands. Chiral amine and related basic ligands combined with bismuth Lewis acids are particularly useful in asymmetric catalysis in aqueous media. On the other hand, bismuth hydroxide is stable and works as an efficient catalyst for carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions in water. PMID:21769719

  14. On-line regeneration of hydrodesulfurization catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Preston, Jr., John L.

    1980-01-01

    A hydrotreating catalyst is regenerated as it concurrently hydrotreats a hydrocarbon fuel by introducing a low concentration of oxygen into the catalyst bed either continuously or periodically. At low oxygen concentrations the carbon deposits on the catalyst are burned off without harming the catalyst and without significantly affecting the hydrotreating process. In a preferred embodiment the hydrotreating process is hydrodesulfurization, and regenerating is done periodically with oxygen concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 volume percent.

  15. Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, S.; Jothimurugesan, K.

    1999-07-27

    A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption process, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gases from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or passivating the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

  16. Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh; Jothimurugesan, Kandaswamy

    1999-01-01

    A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption processes, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gasses from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or "passivating" the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

  17. Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, C H

    1991-02-14

    Progress is reported for a four-year fundamental investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for FT synthesis, the objectives of which were to (1) determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation and (2) model the global rates of deactivation at the surface of the catalyst for the same catalysts. A computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was designed, constructed and tested. Kinetic data for CO hydrogenation on unsupported, unpromoted iron, 99% Fe/1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and K-promoted 99% Fe/1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were obtained as functions of temperature, reactant particle pressures and time. The activity/selectivity and kinetic data are consistent with those previously reported for supported, unpromoted and promoted iron. Two kinds of deactivation were observed during FT synthesis on these samples: (1) loss of surface area after reduction of unsupported, unpromoted iron at 400{degree}C and (2) loss of activity with time due to carbon deposition, especially in the case of K-promoted 99% Fe/1% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Deactivation rate data were obtained for CO hydrogenation on promoted Fe as a function of time, temperature, and H{sub 2}/CO ratio. 50 refs., 24 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Highly efficient and robust molecular ruthenium catalysts for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lele; Araujo, Carlos Moyses; Ahlquist, Mårten S G; Sun, Licheng

    2012-09-25

    Water oxidation catalysts are essential components of light-driven water splitting systems, which could convert water to H(2) driven by solar radiation (H(2)O + hν → 1/2O(2) + H(2)). The oxidation of water (H(2)O → 1/2O(2) + 2H(+) + 2e(-)) provides protons and electrons for the production of dihydrogen (2H(+) + 2e(-) → H(2)), a clean-burning and high-capacity energy carrier. One of the obstacles now is the lack of effective and robust water oxidation catalysts. Aiming at developing robust molecular Ru-bda (H(2)bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid) water oxidation catalysts, we carried out density functional theory studies, correlated the robustness of catalysts against hydration with the highest occupied molecular orbital levels of a set of ligands, and successfully directed the synthesis of robust Ru-bda water oxidation catalysts. A series of mononuclear ruthenium complexes [Ru(bda)L(2)] (L = pyridazine, pyrimidine, and phthalazine) were subsequently synthesized and shown to effectively catalyze Ce(IV)-driven [Ce(IV) = Ce(NH(4))(2)(NO(3))(6)] water oxidation with high oxygen production rates up to 286 s(-1) and high turnover numbers up to 55,400.

  19. REDUCTION OF NO{sub x} VIA COAL COMBUSTION CATALYSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Hare; George Ford; Stephanie Black; Bing Zhou; Stan Harding

    2004-02-13

    Air pollution is a growing concern for both the US government and its citizens. Current legislation is moving in the direction of lower emissions standards for the major pollutants, SO{sub x} and NO{sub x}. The work performed under this DOE grant focused on finding a catalyst that, when added to coal, will effectively reduce the amount of NO{sub x} produced during combustion. The test program was divided into four major tasks: (1) evaluating the impact of a combustion catalyst on nitrogen release; (2) optimizing catalyst formulation; (3) preparing a preliminary economic evaluation; and (4) outlining future test plans, costs and schedule. More than 100 bench-scale, proof-of-concept tests were completed with more than 30 different catalysts, using two different coal types, River Hill Pittsburgh 8 (River Hill) and PRB, under oxidizing and reducing conditions. The results showed that catalysts were effective in increasing, by more than 30%, the nitrogen gas (N{sub 2}) release in River Hill Pittsburgh 8 coal and more than 20% in the PRB coal. Preliminary economics suggest this technology is comparable with current combustion NO{sub x} control technologies such as overfire air addition, SNCR and reburning. Pilot-scale tests are planned in a system with low-NO{sub x} burners to further evaluate the technology.

  20. SIMS image processing methods for petroleum cracking catalyst characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Leta, D.P.; Lamberti, W.A.; Disko, M.M.; Kugler, E.L.; Varady, W.A. )

    1990-08-01

    The technique of Imaging Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) has proven to be very well suited to the characterization of fluidized petroleum cracking catalysts (FCC). The ability to view elemental distributions with 0.5 micron spatial resolution at concentrations in the ppm range mates well with the submicron phases and low concentration contaminants present in commercial multi-component FCC particles. The use of ultra-low light level imaging systems with the intrinsically sensitive SIMS technique makes real time viewing of many of the elements important in FCC catalysts possible. Aluminum, silicon and the rare earth elements serve to define the major phases present within each catalyst particle, while the transition row elements and all of the alkali and alkaline elements may be seen at trace concentrations. Of particular importance is the use of the technique to study the distributions of nickel and vanadium which are the most deleterious of the contaminant metals. Modern image processing computers and software now allow the rapid quantitative analysis of SIMS elemental images in order to more clearly reveal the locations of the catalyst phases and the quantitative distributions of the contaminant metals on those phases. Although the analysis techniques discussed in this study may be applied to any of the contaminant elements, for simplicity the authors will limit their examples to the major catalyst elements, and the nickel and vanadium contaminants.

  1. STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Michael T. Klein

    2000-01-01

    There are several aspects of the Direct Coal Liquefaction process which are not fully understood and which if better understood might lead to improved yields and conversions. Among these questions are the roles of the catalyst and the solvent. While the solvent is known to act by transfer of hydrogen atoms to the free radicals formed by thermal breakdown of the coal in an uncatalyzed system, in the presence of a solid catalyst as is now currently practiced, the yields and conversions are higher than in an uncatalyzed system. The role of the catalyst in this case is not completely understood. DOE has funded many projects to produce ultrafine and more active catalysts in the expectation that better contact between catalyst and coal might result. This approach has met with limited success probably because mass transfer between two solids in a fluid medium i.e. the catalyst and the coal, is very poor. It is to develop an understanding of the role of the catalyst and solvent in Direct Liquefaction that this project was initiated. Specifically it was of interest to know whether direct contact between the coal and the catalyst was important. By separating the solid catalyst in a stainless steel basket permeable to the solvent but not the coal in the liquefaction reactor, it was shown that the catalyst still maintains a catalytic effect on the liquefaction process. There is apparently transfer of hydrogen atoms from the catalyst through the basket wall to the coal via the solvent. Strong hydrogen donor solvents appear to be more effective in this respect than weak hydrogen donors. It therefore appears that intimate contact between catalyst and coal is not a requirement, and that the role of the catalyst may be to restore the hydrogen donor strength to the solvent as the reaction proceeds. A range of solvents of varying hydrogen donor strength was investigated. Because of the extensive use of thermogravimetric analysis in this laboratory in was noted that the peak

  2. 40 CFR 721.9665 - Organotin catalysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Organotin catalysts. 721.9665 Section... Substances § 721.9665 Organotin catalysts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as organotin catalysts (PMNs P-93-853,...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9665 - Organotin catalysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Organotin catalysts. 721.9665 Section... Substances § 721.9665 Organotin catalysts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as organotin catalysts (PMNs P-93-853,...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9665 - Organotin catalysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organotin catalysts. 721.9665 Section... Substances § 721.9665 Organotin catalysts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as organotin catalysts (PMNs P-93-853,...

  5. Sulfate as a precursor of catalyst poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Mador, I.L.; Rosan, A.M.; Crissey, R.K.

    1984-05-01

    The poisoning of noble metal catalysts of hydrogenation reactions by sulfur in various forms is discussed. The specific reaction investigated was the hydrogenation of phenol to cyclohexanone over palladium. Catalyst pretreatments with NaHSO/sub 4/, PdSO/sub 4/, H/sub 2/, and He produced catalyst activities varying from inactive to unimpaired.

  6. Silver doped catalysts for treatment of exhaust

    DOEpatents

    Park, Paul Worn; Hester, Virgil Raymond; Ragle, Christie Susan; Boyer, Carrie L.

    2009-06-02

    A method of making an exhaust treatment element includes washcoating a substrate with a slurry that includes a catalyst support material. At least some of the catalyst support material from the slurry may be transferred to the substrate, and silver metal (Ag) is dispersed within the catalyst support material.

  7. 40 CFR 721.9665 - Organotin catalysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organotin catalysts. 721.9665 Section... Substances § 721.9665 Organotin catalysts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as organotin catalysts (PMNs P-93-853,...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9665 - Organotin catalysts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Organotin catalysts. 721.9665 Section... Substances § 721.9665 Organotin catalysts. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as organotin catalysts (PMNs P-93-853,...

  9. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; Frye, John G.; Bowman, Lawrence E.; Fulton, John L.; Silva, Laura J.; Wai, Chien M.

    1999-09-30

    Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil.

  10. The Harvard Catalyst Common Reciprocal IRB Reliance Agreement

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Sabune J.; Witte, Elizabeth; Bierer, Barbara E.

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of duplicative Institutional Review Board (IRB) review for multi-institutional studies is a desirable goal to improve IRB efficiency while enhancing human subject protections. Here we describe the Harvard Catalyst Master Reciprocal Common IRB Reliance Agreement (MRA), a system that provides a legal framework for IRB reliance, with the potential to streamline IRB review processes and reduce administrative burden and barriers to collaborative, multi-institutional research. The MRA respects the legal autonomy of the signatory institutions while offering a pathway to eliminate duplicative IRB review when appropriate. The Harvard Catalyst MRA provides a robust and flexible model for reciprocal reliance that is both adaptable and scalable. PMID:25196592

  11. Photocatalytic water oxidation by molecular assemblies based on cobalt catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xu; Li, Fei; Li, Hua; Zhang, Biaobiao; Yu, Fengshou; Sun, Licheng

    2014-09-01

    Chromophore-catalyst molecular assemblies towards visible light-driven water oxidation were synthesized by covalent integration of a light-harvesting complex [Ru(bpy)3](2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) and a Co4O4 cubane water oxidation catalyst. The two components were assembled either in linear or macrocyclic configurations. In the presence of the sacrificial reagent, the Ru-Co metallocycle exhibits remarkable photocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution, which is one order of magnitude higher than that of a multicomponent system and exceeds that of a linear assembly by a factor of five, offering access to highly active photocatalyst through molecular design. PMID:25111070

  12. Liquid-phase oxidation of cyclohexanone over cerium oxide catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, H.C. ); Weng, H.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Catalytic oxidation of cyclohexanone in the liquid phase with glacial acetic acid as the solvent over cerium oxide was studied between 5 and 15 atm and 98 and 118 {degrees} C in a batch reactor. The products were adipic acid, glutaric acid, succinic acid, caprolactone, carbon oxides, etc. The reaction undergoes a short induction period prior to a rapid reaction regime. In both regimes, the reaction is independent of oxygen pressure when the system pressure is above 10 atm. The induction period is inversely proportional to both of the catalyst weight and cyclohexanone concentration.During the rapid reaction regime, the reaction rate was found to be proportional to the 0.5 power of the catalyst weight and to the 1.5 power of the cyclohexanone concentration. Reaction mechanisms and rate expressions are proposed. The carbon oxides produced in this study were much lower than those previously reported. The cerium oxide catalyst is stable during the reaction.

  13. Operando characterization of catalysts through use of a portable microreactor

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Shen; Li, Yuanyuan; Stavitski, Eli; Tappero, Ryan; Crowley, Stephen; Castaldi, Marco J.; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Stach, Eric A.

    2015-10-09

    To provide new understandings of the mechanisms of catalytic reactions, improved methods are needed than can monitor changes in the electronic, structural and chemical properties of catalysts, doing so in the operando conditions in which catalysts work. We describe here a microreactor-based approach that integrates the capabilities of advanced x-ray, electron, optical and gas-phase compositional analysis techniques in operando conditions. For several exemplary catalytic systems, we demonstrate how this approach enables characterization of three major factors contributing to structure-property correlations evidenced in heterogeneously catalyzed reactions, namely: the atomic structure and elemental compositions of nanocatalysts; the physiochemical properties of the supportmore » and catalyst-support interfaces; and the gas and surface-phase chemistry occurring under operando conditions. We highlight the generality of the approach as well as outline opportunities for future developments.« less

  14. Focussing the view on Nature's water-splitting catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Messinger, Johannes; Yano, Junko

    2008-01-01

    About 3 billion years ago Nature invented a catalyst that splits water with highefficiency into molecular oxygen and hydrogen equivalents (protons and electrons). This reaction is energetically driven by sun light and the active centre contains relatively cheap and abundant metals: manganese and calcium. This biological system therefore forms the paradigm for all man made attempts for direct solar fuel production and several studies are underway to determine the electronic and geometric structures of this catalyst. In this report we briefly summarize the problems and the current status of these efforts, and propose a DFT-based strategy for obtaining a reliable high resolution structure of this unique catalyst that includes both the inorganic core and the first ligand sphere.

  15. HNO/NO Conversion Mechanisms of Cu-Based HNO Probes with Implications for Cu,Zn-SOD

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    HNO has broad biological effects and pharmacological activities. Direct HNO probes for in vivo applications were recently reported, which are CuII-based complexes having fluorescence reporters with reaction to HNO resulting in CuI systems and the release of NO. Their coordination environments are similar to that in Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), which plays a significant role in cellular HNO/NO conversion. However, none of these conversion mechanisms are known. A quantum chemical investigation was performed here to provide structural, energetic, and electronic profiles of HNO/NO conversion pathways via the first CuII-based direct HNO probe. Results not only are consistent with experimental observations but also provide numerous structural and mechanistic details unknown before. Results also suggest the first HNO/NO conversion mechanism for Cu,Zn-SOD, as well as useful guidelines for future design of metal-based HNO probes. These results shall facilitate development of direct HNO probes and studies of HNO/NO conversions via metal complexes and metalloproteins. PMID:24803995

  16. Reduced-Temperature Transient-Liquid-Phase Bonding of AluminaUsing a Ag-Cu-Based Brazing Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung Moo; Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2005-12-19

    The mechanical properties and microstructural evolution ofmetal-ceramic bonds produced using a transient liquid phase (TLP) aredescribed. Alumina (Al2O3) was joined at 500 degrees C, 600 degrees C,and 700 degrees C using a multilayer In/Cusil-ABA (R) (commercialcopper-silver eutectic brazing alloy)/In interlayer. The introduction ofthin In cladding layers allows the system to bond at much lowertemperatures than those typically used for brazing with Cusil-ABA (R),thereby protecting temperature-sensitive components. After chemicalhomogenization, the interlayers retain an operating temperature rangesimilar to that of the brazed joints. TLP bonds made at 500 degrees C,600 degrees C, and 700 degrees C with holding times ranging from as lowas 1.5 h to 24 h had average fracture strengths above 220 MPa. Theeffects of bonding temperature and time on fracture strength aredescribed. Preliminary analysis of the interlayers shows that the Ag-Inor Cu-In intermetallic phases do not form. Considerations unique tosystems with two-phase core layers are discussed. Experiments usingsingle-crystal sapphire indicate rapid formation of a reaction layer at700 degrees C, suggesting the possibility of making strong bonds usinglower temperatures and/or shorter processing times.

  17. Catalysts for coal liquefaction processes

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.

    1986-10-14

    Improved catalysts for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprise a combination of zinc or copper, or a compound thereof, and a Group VI or non-ferrous Group VIII metal, or a compound thereof.

  18. Catalyst. Issue 2, Fall 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, B. Denise, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Catalyst, a quarterly newsletter from the Institute's Communications Office, contains news, information, and features about the programs and services of the National Institute for Literacy. Contents of this issue include: (1) Shanahan on the National Early Literacy Panel Report: What's in Store; (2) Director's Message; (3) Representative Fattah to…

  19. Catalyst. Issue 1, Spring 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, B. Denise, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Catalyst, a quarterly newsletter from the Institute's Communications Office, contains news, information, and features about the programs and services of the National Institute for Literacy. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Spanish-Language Publication for Parents of Young Readers Among the Institute's New Titles; (2) Director's…

  20. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, K.D.

    1991-06-25

    Perovskites of the structure A[sub 2]B[sub 2]C[sub 3]O[sub 10] are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  1. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  2. Coal liquefaction with molybdenum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, P.L.

    1983-01-01

    Coal liquefaction experiments were carried out in a stirred autoclave under nitrogen. Tetralin was employed as solvent, and the catalyst, when used, was ammonium heptamolybdate (impregnated on coal) or stannous chloride (powdered). Production of pentane soluble oil was higher in the runs with catalyst, but net hydrogen transfer from tetralin to coal was less when catalyst was used. Coal and powdered stannous chloride exhibited a marked synergistic effect on the dehydrogenation of tetralin. A free radical mechanism was suggested to explain this effect, and model experiments with bibenzyl (but no coal) gave results that were consistent with this mechanism. An apparent synergistic effect of coal and impregnated ammonium heptamolybdate was shown to be attributed simply to improved distribution (higher surface area) of the impregnated catalyst, the coal acting as a high-area support. Comparison of the results from autoclave experiments (under nitrogen) with those from tubing bomb experiments (under air) indicated major differences in coal conversion and hydrogen transfer. The conversion was 62% in the autoclave and 81% in the tubing bomb, and the hydrogen transfer was 0.7% in the autoclave and 2.93% in the tubing bomb, when 1% of Mo (based on coal) was impregnated on coal in a preliminary step.

  3. Catalysts for coal liquefaction processes

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1986-01-01

    Improved catalysts for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprise a combination of zinc or copper, or a compound thereof, and a Group VI or non-ferrous Group VIII metal, or a compound thereof.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and evaluation of CO-oxidation catalysts for high repetition rate CO2 TEA lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, Thomas P.

    1990-01-01

    An extremely active class of noble metal catalysts supported on titania was developed and fabricated at Hughes for the recombination of oxygen (O2) and carbon monoxide (CO) in closed-cycle CO2 TEA lasers. The incipient wetness technique was used to impregnate titania and alumina pellets with precious metals including platinum and palladium. In particular, the addition of cerium (used as an oxygen storage promoter) produced an extremely active Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst. By comparison, the complementary Pt/Ce/ gamma-Al2O3 catalyst was considerably less active. In general, chloride-free catalyst precursors proved critical in obtaining an active catalyst while also providing uniform metal distributions throughout the support structure. Detailed characterization of the Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst demonstrated uniform dendritic crystal growth of the metals throughout the support. Electron spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) analysis was used to characterize the oxidation states of Pt, Ce and Ti. The performance of the catalysts was evaluated with an integral flow reactor system incorporating real time analysis of O2 and CO. With this system, the transient and steady-state behavior of the catalysts were evaluated. The kinetic evaluation was complemented by tests in a compact, closed-cycle Hughes CO2 TEA laser operating at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz with a catalyst temperature of 75 to 95 C. The Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst was compatible with a C(13)O(16)2 gas fill.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and evaluation of CO-oxidation catalysts for high repetition rate CO2 TEA lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Thomas P.

    1990-06-01

    An extremely active class of noble metal catalysts supported on titania was developed and fabricated at Hughes for the recombination of oxygen (O2) and carbon monoxide (CO) in closed-cycle CO2 TEA lasers. The incipient wetness technique was used to impregnate titania and alumina pellets with precious metals including platinum and palladium. In particular, the addition of cerium (used as an oxygen storage promoter) produced an extremely active Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst. By comparison, the complementary Pt/Ce/ gamma-Al2O3 catalyst was considerably less active. In general, chloride-free catalyst precursors proved critical in obtaining an active catalyst while also providing uniform metal distributions throughout the support structure. Detailed characterization of the Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst demonstrated uniform dendritic crystal growth of the metals throughout the support. Electron spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) analysis was used to characterize the oxidation states of Pt, Ce and Ti. The performance of the catalysts was evaluated with an integral flow reactor system incorporating real time analysis of O2 and CO. With this system, the transient and steady-state behavior of the catalysts were evaluated. The kinetic evaluation was complemented by tests in a compact, closed-cycle Hughes CO2 TEA laser operating at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz with a catalyst temperature of 75 to 95 C. The Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst was compatible with a C(13)O(16)2 gas fill.

  6. A structural and thermodynamic basis for the catalytic behavior of single phase and multiphase bismuth cerium molybdate ammoxidation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Brazdil, J.F.; Glaeser, L.C.; Grasselli, R.K.; Teller, R.G.

    1983-09-01

    The vast majority of fundamental studies of metal oxide selective oxidation catalysts have been performed with single phase systems. These investigations established the basic tenents of the redox mechanism of selective oxidation and ammoxidation catalysis. By comparison, structural and kinetic investigations of multiphase oxide catalysts are less numerous because of the inherent difficulties in understanding the relative contributions of separate phases to the catalytic behavior of the composite catalyst. Some attempts have been made in the past to understand the complex chemistry of multiphase catalysts and additional important insights have been realized more recently. However, a clear understanding of the most significant catalytic interactions between individual phases of a multiphase multicomponent redox catalyst is still lacking. In an effort to provide an understanding and a physical basis for the observed synergism in multiphase oxide catalysts, the structural and chemical features which dictate the catalytic behavior of bismuth cerium molybdate catalysts were assessed. Bismuth cerium molybdates are known to be active catalysts for the selective oxidation and ammoxidation of olefins. Compositions with superior catalytic performance have been identified in both the single phase and two phase regions of the Bi/sub 2/(MoO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ - Ce/sub 2/(MoO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ phase diagram. Hence, this catalyst system serves as a useful model for determining key structural and thermodynamic aspects of the catalytic behavior of multicomponent single phase and multiphase redox catalysts.

  7. A series of copper-free ternary oxide catalysts ZnAlCex used for hydrogen production via dimethyl ether steam reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijie; Meng, Ming; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhou, Shuang; Yang, Lijuan; Zhang, Tianyong; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Tiandou

    2014-12-01

    Ce-substituted ternary oxide catalysts ZnAlCex were prepared and employed in dimethyl ether steam reforming (DME SR) to produce hydrogen. XRD, XAFS (XANES & EXAFS), H2O-TPD, CH3OH-TPD and TPSR techniques were used for catalyst characterization. It is found that the catalytic performance of these catalysts is dependent on Ce content. The catalyst containing 20 wt% CeO2 exhibits the best catalytic performance. Its calculated TOF (0.034 s-1) is nearly three times to that of ZnAlO. The kinetic results reveal that the addition of 20 wt% CeO2 to ZnAlCex greatly decreases the apparent activation energy (Ea) of DME SR, due to the formation of new reaction sites such as Ce4+-O-Zn2+ linkages. XRD and EXAFS analyses indicate that Ce addition can not only decrease the crystallite size of ZnO and ZnAl2O4, but also tune the relative contents of them. The results of H2O-TPD and CH3OH-TPD show that Ce addition can lower H2 desorption temperature, which accounts well for the better catalytic performance of ZnAlCex. It is worth noting that the Zn-based catalysts display much lower CO selectivity than the Cu-based one, especially the Ce-substituted ZnAlCex. Start-off durability tests demonstrate that this series of catalysts also possess high catalytic stability.

  8. Toward Molecular Catalysts by Computer

    SciTech Connect

    Raugei, Simone; DuBois, Daniel L.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Chen, Shentan; Ho, Ming-Hsun; Bullock, R. Morris; Dupuis, Michel

    2015-02-17

    Rational design of molecular catalysts requires a systematic approach to designing ligands with specific functionality and precisely tailored electronic and steric properties. It then becomes possible to devise computer protocols to predict accurately the required properties and ultimately to design catalysts by computer. In this account we first review how thermodynamic properties such as oxidation-reduction potentials (E0), acidities (pKa), and hydride donor abilities (ΔGH-) form the basis for a systematic design of molecular catalysts for reactions that are critical for a secure energy future (hydrogen evolution and oxidation, oxygen and nitrogen reduction, and carbon dioxide reduction). We highlight how density functional theory allows us to determine and predict these properties within “chemical” accuracy (~ 0.06 eV for redox potentials, ~ 1 pKa unit for pKa values, and ~ 1.5 kcal/mol for hydricities). These quantities determine free energy maps and profiles associated with catalytic cycles, i.e. the relative energies of intermediates, and help us distinguish between desirable and high-energy pathways and mechanisms. Good catalysts have flat profiles that avoid high activation barriers due to low and high energy intermediates. We illustrate how the criterion of a flat energy profile lends itself to the prediction of design points by computer for optimum catalysts. This research was carried out in the Center for Molecular Electro-catalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the DOE by Battelle.

  9. Microbial recovery of metals from spent catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sperl, P.L.; Sperl, G.T.

    1990-01-01

    This project was initiated on October 1, 1989, for the purpose of recovering metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Two catalyst types are the subject of the contract. The first is a Ni-Mo catalyst supported on alumina (Shell 324) as is used in a pilot scale coal liquefaction facility at Wilsonville, Alabama. The object of the contract is to treat these spent catalysts with microorganisms, especially Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, but also other Thiobacillus sp., to leach and remove the metals (Ni and Mo) from the spent catalysts into a form which can be readily recovered by conventional techniques.

  10. The History of Current State of the Art of Propylene Polymerization Catalysts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodall, Brian L.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines the development of the modern catalysts for propylene polymerization, considering the historical background; structure of titanium chloride catalysts; first-generation catalysts; cocatalysts; second-generation catalysts; catalysts morphology; and third-generation (supported catalysts). (JN)

  11. Synthesis and characterization of catalysts for the selective transformation of biomass-derived materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghampson, Isaac Tyrone

    The experimental work in this thesis focuses on generating catalysts for two intermediate processes related to the thermal conversion of lignocellulosic biomass: the synthesis and characterization of mesoporous silica supported cobalt catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, and an exploration of the reactivity of bulk and supported molybdenum-based nitride catalysts for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of guaiacol, a lignin model compound. The first section of the work details the synthesis of a series of silica-supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts with pore diameters ranging from 2-23 nm. Detailed X-ray diffraction measurements were used to determine the composition and particle diameters of the metal fraction, analyzed as a three-phase system containing Cofcc, Cohcp and CoO particles. Catalyst properties were determined at three stages in catalyst history: (1) after the initial calcination step to thermally decompose the catalyst precursor into Co3O4, (2) after the hydrogen reduction step to activate the catalyst to Co and (3) after the FT reaction. From the study, it was observed that larger pore diameters supported higher turnover frequency; smaller pore diameters yielded larger mole fraction of CoO; XRD on post-reduction and post-FTS catalyst samples indicated significant changes in dispersivity after reduction. In the next section, the catalytic behaviors of unsupported, activated carbon-, alumina-, and SBA-15 mesoporous silica-supported molybdenum nitride catalysts were evaluated for the hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol (2-methoxy phenol) at 300°C and 5 MPa. The nitride catalysts were prepared by thermal decomposition of bulk and supported ammonium heptamolybdate to form MoO 3 followed by nitridation in either flowing ammonia or a nitrogen/hydrogen mixture. The catalytic properties were strongly affected by the nitriding and purging treatment as well as the physical and chemical properties of support. The overall reaction was influenced by the

  12. Semisynthetic and Biomolecular Hydrogen Evolution Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kandemir, Banu; Chakraborty, Saikat; Guo, Yixing; Bren, Kara L

    2016-01-19

    There has been great interest in the development of stable, inexpensive, efficient catalysts capable of reducing aqueous protons to hydrogen (H2), an alternative to fossil fuels. While synthetic H2 evolution catalysts have been in development for decades, recently there has been great progress in engineering biomolecular catalysts and assemblies of synthetic catalysts and biomolecules. In this Forum Article, progress in engineering proteins to catalyze H2 evolution from water is discussed. The artificial enzymes described include assemblies of synthetic catalysts and photosynthetic proteins, proteins with cofactors replaced with synthetic catalysts, and derivatives of electron-transfer proteins. In addition, a new catalyst consisting of a thermophilic cobalt-substituted cytochrome c is reported. As an electrocatalyst, the cobalt cytochrome shows nearly quantitative Faradaic efficiency and excellent longevity with a turnover number of >270000.

  13. Efficient catalyst removal and recycling in copolymerization of epoxides with carbon dioxide via simple liquid-liquid phase separation.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Koji; Fujie, Ryuhei; Shintani, Ryo; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2013-10-18

    A simple and efficient catalyst removal system has been developed in the cobalt-salen-catalyzed copolymerization of propylene oxide with carbon dioxide. The present system requires no prior modification of the catalyst, and the removal is achieved by simple addition of myristic acid, followed by organic liquid-liquid phase separation.

  14. Renewable and metal-free carbon nanofibre catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bijandra; Asadi, Mohammad; Pisasale, Davide; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Rosen, Brian A.; Haasch, Richard; Abiade, Jeremiah; Yarin, Alexander L.; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2013-12-01

    The development of an efficient catalyst system for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide into energy-rich products is a major research topic. Here we report the catalytic ability of polyacrylonitrile-based heteroatomic carbon nanofibres for carbon dioxide reduction into carbon monoxide, via a metal-free, renewable and cost-effective route. The carbon nanofibre catalyst exhibits negligible overpotential (0.17 V) for carbon dioxide reduction and more than an order of magnitude higher current density compared with the silver catalyst under similar experimental conditions. The carbon dioxide reduction ability of carbon nanofibres is attributed to the reduced carbons rather than to electronegative nitrogen atoms. The superior performance is credited to the nanofibrillar structure and high binding energy of key intermediates to the carbon nanofibre surfaces. The finding may lead to a new generation of metal-free and non-precious catalysts with much greater efficiency than the existing noble metal catalysts.

  15. Progress in the Development of Oxygen Reduction Reaction Catalysts for Low-Temperature Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongguo; Lv, Haifeng; Kang, Yijin; Markovic, Nenad M; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R

    2016-06-01

    We present a brief summary on the most recent progress in the design of catalysts for electrochemical reduction of oxygen. The main challenge in the wide spread of fuel cell technology is to lower the content of, or even eliminate, Pt and other precious metals in catalysts without sacrificing their performance. Pt-based nanosized catalysts with novel and refined architectures continue to dominate in catalytic performance, and formation of Pt-skin-like surfaces is key to achieving the highest values in activity. Moreover, durability has also been improved in Pt-based systems with addition of Au, which plays an important role in stabilizing the Pt topmost layers against dissolution. However, various carbon-based materials without precious metal have shown improvement in activity and durability and have been explored to serve as catalyst supports. Understanding how the doped elements interact with each other and/or carbon is challenging and necessary in the design of robust fuel cell catalysts.

  16. Synthesis of methyl esters from waste cooking oil using construction waste material as solid base catalyst.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, K; Olutoye, M A; Hameed, B H

    2013-01-01

    The current research investigates synthesis of methyl esters by transesterification of waste cooking oil in a heterogeneous system, using barium meliorated construction site waste marble as solid base catalyst. The pretreated catalyst was calcined at 830 °C for 4h prior to its activity test to obtained solid oxide characterized by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy, BET surface area and pore size measurement. It was found that the as prepared catalyst has large pores which contributed to its high activity in transesterification reaction. The methyl ester yield of 88% was obtained when the methanol/oil molar ratio was 9:1, reaction temperature at 65 °C, reaction time 3h and catalyst/oil mass ratio of 3.0 wt.%. The catalyst can be reused over three cycles, offer low operating conditions, reduce energy consumption and waste generation in the production of biodiesel.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of Fe-Co catalyst prepared via reverse microemulsion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Zabidi, Noor Asmawati; Abdul Aziz, Muhammad Nur Azizi; Ali, Sardar; Taha, Mohd Faisal

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports the characterization of bimetallic catalyst systems comprising cobalt and iron on CNTs support prepared via reverse microemulsion method. The properties of the bimetallic catalyst were characterized using TEM, FESEM and N2 adsorption. Based on TEM analyses, the calculated average particle sizes ranged from 4.6 nm to 5.2 nm for the various catalyst compositions. The performance of the Co-based catalyst in a Fischer-Tropsch reaction was evaluated in a fixed-bed reactor at 220°C, 1 atm and H2/CO v/v ratio of 2:1 v/v and space velocity of 12 L/g.h. Amongst the catalysts tested, the 90Co10Fe/CNTs resulted in the highest CO conversion of 14.1% whereas the 100Co/CNTs resulted in the highest C5+ hydrocarbon selectivity.

  18. A trinuclear ruthenium complex as a highly efficient molecular catalyst for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L L; Gao, Y; Liu, Z; Ding, X; Yu, Z; Sun, L C

    2016-03-01

    A trinuclear ruthenium complex, 3, was designed and synthesized with the ligand 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid (bda) and we found that this complex could function as a highly efficient molecular catalyst for water oxidation in homogeneous systems. This trinuclear molecular water oxidation catalyst, 3, displayed much higher efficiencies in terms of turnover numbers and initial oxygen evolution rate than its counterparts, a binuclear catalyst, 2, and a mononuclear catalyst, 1, in both chemically driven and photochemically driven water oxidation based on either the whole catalytic molecules or just the active Ru centers. The reasons for the superior performance of catalyst 3 were discussed and we believe that multiple Ru centers in a single molecule are indeed beneficial for increasing the probability of the formation of O-O bonds through an intramolecular radical coupling pathway.

  19. Development of new transition metal oxide catalysts for the destruction of PCDD/Fs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ming-Feng; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Xiao-Dong; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Tong; Yan, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Various transition metal oxide and vanadium-containing multi-metallic oxide catalysts were developed for the destruction of PCDD/Fs (polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans). A stable PCDD/Fs generating system was installed to support the catalytic destruction tests in this study. Nano-titania supported vanadium catalyst (VOx/TiO2) showed the highest activity, followed by CeOx, MnOx, WOx and finally MoOx. Multi-metallic oxide catalysts, prepared by doping WOx, MoOx, MnOx and CeOx into VOx/TiO2 catalysts, showed different activities on the decomposition of PCDD/Fs. The highest destruction efficiency of 92.5% was observed from the destruction test over VOxCeOx/TiO2 catalyst. However, the addition of WOx and MoOx even played a negative role in multi-metallic VOx/TiO2 catalysts. Characterizations of transition metal oxides and multi-metallic VOx/TiO2 catalysts were also investigated with XRD and TPR. After the catalysts were used, the conversion from high valent metals to low valence states was observed by XPS.

  20. Evaluation of some new zeolite-supported metal catalysts for synthesis gas conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Melson, G.A.; Crawford, J.E.; Crites, J.W.; Mbadcam, K.J.; Rao, V.U.S.; Stencel, J.M.

    1982-03-01

    The use of bifunctional zeolite-based catalysts for the conversion of synthesis gas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) to gasoline range hydrocarbons has recently attracted much attention. For example, the combination of metal oxides with the medium pore (about 6A) zeolite ZSM-5 and the use of a metal nitrate impregnated ZSM-5 catalyst have been shown to produce gasoline range hydrocarbons containing a high percentage of aromatics from synthesis gas. The production of gasoline range hydrocarbons which have a high olefin content has also been reported by using iron or cobalt impregnated ZSM-5 catalysts. The efficiency and selectivity of supported metal heterogeneous catalysts is closely related to the dispersion and particle size of the metal component and to the nature of the interaction between the metal and the support. For a particular metal, catalytic activity may be varied by changing the metal dispersion and the support, thus, the method of synthesis and any pre-treatment of the catalyst is important in the overall process of catalyst evaluation. Supported metal catalysts have traditionally been prepared by impregnation techniques that involve treatment of a support with an aqueous solution of a metal salt followed by calcination. In the Fe/ZSM-5, system, the decomposition of the iron nitrate during calcination usually produces iron oxides of relatively large crystallite size. This work was initiated in an attempt to produce highly dispersed, thermally stable supported metal catalysts which may be effective for synthesis gas conversion.