Science.gov

Sample records for cubic sic films

  1. Compensation in epitaxial cubic SiC films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segall, B.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Haugland, E. J.; Matus, L. G.

    1986-01-01

    Hall measurements on four n-type cubic SiC films epitaxially grown by chemical vapor deposition on SiC substrates are reported. The temperature dependent carrier concentrations indicate that the samples are highly compensated. Donor ionization energies, E sub D, are less than one half the values previously reported. The values for E sub D and the donor concentration N sub D, combined with results for small bulk platelets with nitrogen donors, suggest the relation E sub D (N sub D) = E sub D(O) - alpha N sub N sup 1/3 for cubic SiC. A curve fit gives alpha is approx 2.6x10/5 meV cm and E sub D (O) approx 48 meV, which is the generally accepted value of E sub D(O) for nitrogen donors in cubic SiC.

  2. Growth and characterization of cubic SiC single-crystal films on Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Matus, L. G.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    1987-01-01

    Morphological and electrical characterization results are presented for cubic SiC films grown by chemical vapor deposition on single-crystal Si substrates. The films, up to 40 microns thick, were characterized by optical microscopy, (SEM), (TEM), electron channeling, surface profilometry, and Hall measurements. A variety of morphological features observed on the SiC films are described. Electrical measurements showed a decrease in the electron mobility with increasing electron carrier concentration, similar to that observed in Si. Room-temperature electron mobilities up to 520 sq cm/V-s (at an electron carrier concentration of 5 x 10 to the 16th/cu cm) were measured. Finally, a number of parameters believed to be important in the growth process were investigated, and some discussion is given of their possible effects on the film characteristics.

  3. Synchronistic preparation of fibre-like SiC and cubic-ZrO{sub 2}/SiC composite from zircon via carbothermal reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Youguo; Liu, Yangai; Huang, Zhaohui; Fang, Minghao; Hu, Xiaozhi; Yin, Li; Huang, Juntong

    2013-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Zircon carbothermal reduction was carried out in a tailor-made device at high-temperature air atmosphere. ► Fibre-like SiC and cubic-ZrO{sub 2}/SiC composite were obtained synchronically. ► Zirconium and silicon in zircon ore was initial separated. ► [SiO{sub 4}] was mutated to fibre-like SiC, while [ZrO{sub 8}] was transformed to cubic ZrO{sub 2}. ► The SiC were surprisingly enriched in the reducing atmosphere charred coal particles layers by gas–solid reaction. -- Abstract: Fibre-like SiC and cubic-ZrO{sub 2}/SiC composite were prepared respectively from zircon with yttrium oxide addition via carbothermal reduction process at 1600 °C for 4 h in an air atmosphere furnace, where the green samples were immerged in charred coal particles inside a high-temperature enclosed corundum crucible. The reaction products were characterized by XRD, XRF, XPS and SEM. The results indicate that ZrO{sub 2} in the products was mainly existed in the form of cubic phase. The reacted samples mainly contain cubic ZrO{sub 2}, β-SiC and trace amounts of zircon, with the SiC accounting for 14.8 wt%. Furthermore, a large quantity of fibre-like SiC was surprisingly found to concentrate in the charred coal particles layers around the samples. This study obtains fibre-like SiC and cubic-ZrO{sub 2}/SiC composite synchronically from zircon via carbothermal reduction process, which also bring a value-added high-performance application for natural zircon.

  4. Atomic probe microscopy of 3C SiC films grown on 6H SiC substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steckl, A. J.; Roth, M. D.; Powell, J. A.; Larkin, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    The surface of 3C SiC films grown on 6H SiC substrates has been studied by atomic probe microscopy in air. Atomic-scale images of the 3C SiC surface have been obtained by STM which confirm the 111 line type orientation of the cubic 3C layer grown on the 0001 plane type surface of the hexagonal 6H substrate. The nearest-neighbor atomic spacing for the 3C layer has been measured to be 3.29 +/- 0.2 A, which is within 7 percent of the bulk value. Shallow terraces in the 3C layer have been observed by STM to separate regions of very smooth growth in the vicinity of the 3C nucleation point from considerably rougher 3C surface regions. These terraces are oriented at right angles to the growth direction. Atomic force microscopy has been used to study etch pits present on the 6H substrate due to high temperature HCl cleaning prior to CVD growth of the 3C layer. The etch pits have hexagonal symmetry and vary in depth from 50 nm to 1 micron.

  5. Thermal expansion of the cubic (3C) polytype of SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Z.; Bradt, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal expansion of the cubic beta or (3C) polytype of SiC was measured from 20 to 1000 C by the X-ray-diffraction technique. Over that temperature range, the coefficient of thermal expansion can be expressed by a second-order polynomial. It increases continuously from about 3.2 x 10 to the -6th/C at room temperature to 5.1 x 10 to the -6th/C at 1000 C, with an average value of 4.45 x 10 to the -6th/C between room temperature and 1000 C. This trend is compared with other published results and is discussed in terms of structural contributions to the thermal expansion.

  6. Low pressure growth of cubic boron nitride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for forming thin films of cubic boron nitride on substrates at low pressures and temperatures. A substrate is first coated with polycrystalline diamond to provide a uniform surface upon which cubic boron nitride can be deposited by chemical vapor deposition. The cubic boron nitride film is useful as a substitute for diamond coatings for a variety of applications in which diamond is not suitable. any tetragonal or hexagonal boron nitride. The cubic boron nitride produced in accordance with the preceding example is particularly well-suited for use as a coating for ultra hard tool bits and abrasives, especially those intended to use in cutting or otherwise fabricating iron.

  7. Preparation of superhydrophobic nanodiamond and cubic boron nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y. B.; Yang, Y.; Liu, W. M.; Ye, Q.; He, B.; Zou, Y. S.; Wang, P. F.; Pan, X. J.; Zhang, W. J.; Bello, I.; Lee, S. T.

    2010-09-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces were achieved on the hardest and the second hardest materials, diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN) films. Various surface nanostructures of nanocrystalline diamond (ND) and cBN films were constructed by carrying out bias-assisted reactive ion etching in hydrogen/argon plasmas; and it is shown that surface nanostructuring may enhance dramatically the hydrophobicity of ND and cBN films. Together with surface fluorination, superhydrophobic ND and cBN surfaces with a contact angle greater than 150° and a sliding angle smaller than 10° were demonstrated. The origin of hydrophobicity enhancement is discussed based on the Cassie model.

  8. Exciton-polariton state in nanocrystalline SiC films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. V.; Lopin, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    We studied the features of optical absorption in the films of nanocrystalline SiC (nc-SiC) obtained on the sapphire substrates by the method of direct ion deposition. The optical absorption spectra of the films with a thickness less than ~500 nm contain a maximum which position and intensity depend on the structure and thickness of the nc-SiC films. The most intense peak at 2.36 eV is observed in the nc-SiC film with predominant 3C-SiC polytype structure and a thickness of 392 nm. Proposed is a resonance absorption model based on excitation of exciton polaritons in a microcavity. In the latter, under the conditions of resonance, there occurs strong interaction between photon modes of light with λph=521 nm and exciton of the 3С polytype with an excitation energy of 2.36 eV that results in the formation of polariton. A mismatch of the frequencies of photon modes of the cavity and exciton explains the dependence of the maximum of the optical absorption on the film thickness.

  9. Preparation and characterization of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) SiC films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y. H.; Sham, T.-K.; Yang, D.; Xue, L.

    2006-03-01

    Si K-edge XAFS was used to characterize a stoichiometric SiC film prepared by pulsed KrF laser deposition. The film was deposited on a p-type Si(1 0 0) wafer at a substrate temperature of 250 °C in high vacuum with a laser fluence of ˜5 J/cm 2. The results reveal that the film contains mainly a SiC phase with an amorphous structure in which the Si atoms are bonded to C atoms in its first shell similar to that of crystalline SiC powder but with significant disorder.

  10. Ultra-Low-Cost Room Temperature SiC Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faur, Maria

    1997-01-01

    The research group at CSU has conducted theoretical and experimental research on 'Ultra-Low-Cost Room Temperature SiC Thin Films. The effectiveness of a ultra-low-cost room temperature thin film SiC growth technique on Silicon and Germanium substrates and structures with applications to space solar sells, ThermoPhotoVoltaic (TPV) cells and microelectronic and optoelectronic devices was investigated and the main result of this effort are summarized.

  11. Adducing crystalline features from Raman scattering studies of cubic SiC using different excitation wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuai; Wan, Lingyu; Xie, Deng; Qiu, Zhi Ren; Jiang, Xiaodong; Tin, Chin-Che; Feng, Zhe Chuan

    2017-03-01

    A series of cubic 3C–SiC/Si samples with different thicknesses grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was studied by Raman spectroscopy using laser excitation with different wavelengths plus spectral line shape analysis via two theoretical methods. Through comparative UV and visible excitation Raman measurements and theoretical analysis, the TO intensity was mainly affected by laser penetration depth and crystalline quality. The difference spectra were utilized to remove the second-order Raman signal from Si substrate. Using theoretical Raman simulation on LO-phonon and plasmon-coupling (LOPC) mode, the top layer near to the surface has big difference in electrical and optical properties compared to the deeper layer.

  12. Surface characteristics and corrosion behaviour of WE43 magnesium alloy coated by SiC film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Cheng, Y.; Zheng, Y. F.; Zhang, X.; Xi, T. F.; Wei, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous SiC film has been successfully fabricated on the surface of WE43 magnesium alloy by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique. The microstructure and elemental composition were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The immersion test indicated that SiC film could efficiently slow down the degradation rate of WE43 alloy in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 ± 1 °C. The indirect toxicity experiment was conducted using L929 cell line and the results showed that the extraction medium of SiC coated WE43 alloys exhibited no inhibitory effect on L929 cell growth. The in vitro hemocompatibility of the samples was investigated by hemolysis test and blood platelets adhesion test, and it was found that the hemolysis rate of the coated WE43 alloy decreased greatly, and the platelets attached on the SiC film were slightly activated with a round shape. It could be concluded that SiC film prepared by PECVD made WE43 alloy more appropriate to biomedical application.

  13. Elaboration and characterization of luminescent porous SiC microparticles/poly vinyl alcohol thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaci, S.; Mansouri, H.; Bozetine, I.; Keffous, A.; Guerbous, L.; Siahmed, Y.; Aissiou, S.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, Morphological, optical and photoluminescence characterizations of nanostructured SiC micropowder embedded in PVA matrix and deposited as thin films on glass substrates are reported. we prepared the porous SiC microparticles/PVA thin films by spin coating method. The average size of SiC microparticles were 7 μm. An electroless method was used for producing porous silicon carbide powder under UV irradiation. Silver nanoparticles coated SiC powder was formed by polyol process. The etchant was composed of aqueous HF and different oxidants. Various porous morphologies were obtained and studied as a function of oxidant type, etching time, and wavelength of irradiation. We concluded that the chemical etching conditions of SiC powder seems to have a large impact on the resulting properties. We noticed that the best photoluminescence property was achieved when SiC powder was etched in HF/K2S2O8 at reaction temperature of 80 °C for t = 40min and under UV light of 254 nm.

  14. Time-Domain Thermoreflectance Measurements of Thermal Transport in Amorphous SiC Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Brian; Hondongwa, Donald; King, Sean

    2010-03-01

    We present ultrafast optical pump-probe measurements of thermal transport in a series of amorphous SiC samples. The samples were grown on Si wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition utilizing various combinations of methylsilanes and H2 and He diluent gases. The sample films were well characterized and found to have densities (1.3 -- 2.3 g cm-3) and dielectric constants (4.0 -- 7.2) that spanned a wide range of values. Prior to their measurement, the samples were coated with 40-70 nm of polycrystalline Al. The pump-probe measurements were performed at room temperature using a modelocked Ti:sapphire laser that produced sub-picosecond pulses of a few nJ. The pulses heat the Al coating, causing a transient reflectivity change. As the Al film cools into the SiC film, the reflectivity change can be measured, giving a measure of the thermal effusivity of the SiC film. We then extract values for the thermal conductivity of the SiC films and find that it varies from less than half of the thermal conductivity of amorphous SiO2 for the lower density materials to somewhat larger than amorphous SiO2 for the highest density films.

  15. Conformal Thin Film Packaging for SiC Sensor Circuits in Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Karnick, David A.; Ponchak, George E.; Zorman, Christian A.

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation sputtered silicon carbide annealed at 300 C for one hour is used as a conformal thin film package. A RF magnetron sputterer was used to deposit 500 nm silicon carbide films on gold metal structures on alumina wafers. To determine the reliability and resistance to immersion in harsh environments, samples were submerged in gold etchant for 24 hours, in BOE for 24 hours, and in an O2 plasma etch for one hour. The adhesion strength of the thin film was measured by a pull test before and after the chemical immersion, which indicated that the film has an adhesion strength better than 10(exp 8) N/m2; this is similar to the adhesion of the gold layer to the alumina wafer. MIM capacitors are used to determine the dielectric constant, which is dependent on the SiC anneal temperature. Finally, to demonstrate that the SiC, conformal, thin film may be used to package RF circuits and sensors, an LC resonator circuit was fabricated and tested with and without the conformal SiC thin film packaging. The results indicate that the SiC coating adds no appreciable degradation to the circuits RF performance. Index Terms Sputter, silicon carbide, MIM capacitors, LC resonators, gold etchants, BOE, O2 plasma

  16. Effects of thermal annealing on photoluminescence of Si+/C+ implanted SiO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-Yu; Chao, Der-Sheng; Tsai, Hsu-Sheng; Liang, Jenq-Horng

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms of photoluminescence (PL) originating from Si+/C+ implanted SiO2 are still unclear and need to be clarified. Thus, the purpose of this study is to thoroughly investigate the effects of ion implantation and post-annealing temperature on microstructures and PL characteristics of the Si+/C+ implanted SiO2 films. A comparative analysis was also conducted to clarify the different optical properties between the Si+ and Si+/C+ implanted SiO2 films. In this study, thermally-grown SiO2 films on Si substrates were used as the matrix materials. The Si+ ions and C+ ions were separately implanted into the SiO2 films at room temperature. After ion implantation, the post-annealing treatments were carried out using the furnace annealing (FA) method at various temperatures (600-1100 °C) for 1 h in a N2 ambient. The PL characteristics of the implanted SiO2 films were analyzed using a fluorescence spectrophotometer. The results revealed that the distinct PL peaks were observed at approximately 310, 450 and 650 nm in the Si+-implanted SiO2 films, which can be attributed to the defects, the so-called oxygen deficiency centers (ODCs) and non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHCs), in the materials. In contrast to the Si+ ion implantation, the SiO2 films which were sequentially implanted with Si+ and C+ ions and annealed at 1100 °C can emit white light corresponding to the PL peaks located at around 420, 520 and 720 nm, those can be assigned to the Si-C bonding, C-C graphite-like structure (sp2), and Si nanocrystals, respectively. Moreover, a correlation between the optical properties, microstructures, and bonding configurations of the Si+/C+ implanted SiO2 films was also established in this study.

  17. Nanomechanical properties of SiC films grown from C{sub 60} precursors using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, K.; Balooch, M.; Hamza, A.V.; Belak, J.

    1994-12-01

    The mechanical properties of SiC films grown via C{sub 60} precursors were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Conventional silicon nitride and modified diamond cantilever AFM tips were employed to determine the film hardness, friction coefficient, and elastic modulus. The hardness is found to be between 26 and 40 GPa by nanoindentation of the film with the diamond tip. The friction coefficient for the silicon nitride tip on the SiC film is about one third that for silicon nitride sliding on a silicon substrate. By combining nanoindentation and AFM measurements an elastic modulus of {approximately}300 GPa is estimated for these SiC films. In order to better understand the atomic scale mechanisms that determine the hardness and friction of SiC, we simulated the molecular dynamics of a diamond indenting a crystalline SiC substrate.

  18. Comparative studies of monoclinic and orthorhombic WO3 films used for hydrogen sensor fabrication on SiC crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuev, V. V.; Grigoriev, S. N.; Romanov, R. I.; Fominski, V. Y.; Volosova, M. A.; Demin, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    Amorphous WOx films were prepared on the SiC crystal by using two different methods, namely, reactive pulsed laser deposition (RPLD) and reactive deposition by ion sputtering (RDIS). After deposition, the WOx films were annealed in an air. The RISD film possessed a m-WO3 structure and consisted of closely packed microcrystals. Localized swelling of the films and micro-hills growth did not destroy dense crystal packing. RPLD film had layered β-WO3 structure with relatively smooth surface. Smoothness of the films were destroyed by localized swelling and the micro-openings formation was observed. Comparative study of m-WO3/SiC, Pt/m-WO3/SiC, and P-WO3/SiC samples shows that structural characteristics of the WO3 films strongly influence on the voltage/current response as well as on the rate of current growth during H2 detection at elevated temperatures.

  19. Ferroelectric films prepared by laser ablation directly on SiC substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, D.; Linnros, J.; Petersson, C. S.; Rao, K. V.

    1998-11-01

    Because of the common physical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) and lead base ferroelectric films [such as lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and lead titanate (PTO)], it is interesting to investigate ferroelectrics and SiC based integrated devices for potential high radiation environments, high speed, high temperature, and high density memory applications. Here we first report our primary results of depositing lead base ferroelectric films directly onto bare SiC substrates. Ferroelectric films including undoped and doped PZT and PTO were directly deposited on bare 3C-SiC and 4H-SiC substrates. X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that all the PTO films deposited at substrate temperatures from 600 to 650 °C are polycrystalline of the pure perovskite phase. PZT films deposited at a substrate temperature of 570 °C are dominated by the pyrochlore phase and even at a higher substrate temperature of 650 °C both the perovskite and the pyrochlore phases coexist. The pyrochlore phase of the PZT films is able to be converted into the perovskite phase by rapid thermal annealing at 800 °C for 30-60 s. The formation of an interfacial layer of a nonferroelectric phase (Pb2Ti2O6), which is caused by interdiffusion, is one of the most serious problems during the fabrication of lead based ferroelectric films directly onto the Si wafer. However, there is no such interdiffusion observed between the ferroelectric films and the SiC substrates. Capacitance versus voltage (C-V) curves of metal/ferroelectric/semiconductor diode structures demonstrate typical C-V hysteresis loops and the capacitance versus temperature measurements further confirm the ferroelectric properties of the films.

  20. Low-energy SiC2H6+ and SiC3H9+ ion beam productions by the mass-selection of fragments produced from hexamethyldisilane for SiC film formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Satoru; Sugimoto, Satoshi; Murai, Kensuke; Kiuchi, Masato

    2016-12-01

    We have been attempting to produce low-energy ion beams from fragments produced through the decomposition of hexamethyldisilane (HMD) for silicon carbide (SiC) film formations. We mass-selected SiC2H6+ and SiC3H9+ ions from fragments produced from HMD, and finally produced low-energy SiC2H6+ and SiC3H9+ ion beams. The ion energy was approximately 100 eV. Then, the ion beams were irradiated to Si(100) substrates. The temperature of the Si substrate was 800°C during the ion irradiation. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy of the substrates obtained following SiC2H6+ ion irradiation demonstrated the occurrence of 3C-SiC deposition. On the other hand, the film deposited by the irradiation of SiC3H9+ ions included diamond-like carbon in addition to 3C-SiC.

  1. Enhancement of second harmonic generation in nanocrystalline SiC films based natural microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A. V.; Skorik, S. N.; Jedryka, J.; Ozga, K.; Kityk, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    We explore second harmonic generation (SHG) features of nanocrystalline SiC films based natural microcavities (MC) with resonance modes in the vicinity of the fundamental radiation at 1064 nm wavelength for nanocrystalline films of 24R, 27R polytypes characterized by high radiation doubling frequency coefficients. The natural walls of the SiC NC serve a role of cavities. To learn the nonlinear resonance features of the MC near the fundamental wavelength 1064 nm three series of the nc-SiC films indicated as 7495, 7517 and 7522 with thicknesses varying within 250-600 nm were fabricated. The role of the coherent and non-coherent contributions with taking into an account of cavity resonance modes is discussed. The giant increase of the SHG was achieved which may be used for further fabrication of the frequency transducers and nonlinear optical triggers.

  2. Characterization Of Superconducting Samples With SIC System For Thin Film Developments: Status And Recent Results

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, H. Lawrence; Reece, Charles E.; Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie; Xiao, Binping; Eremeev, Grigory V.

    2014-02-01

    Within any thin film development program directed towards SRF accelerating structures, there is a need for an RF characterization device that can provide information about RF properties of small samples. The current installation of the RF characterization device at Jefferson Lab is Surface Impedance Characterization (SIC) system. The data acquisition environment for the system has recently been improved to allow for automated measurement, and the system has been routinely used for characterization of bulk Nb, films of Nb on Cu, MgB{sub 2}, NbTiN, Nb{sub 3}Sn films, etc. We present some of the recent results that illustrate present capabilities and limitations of the system.

  3. Growth and interface phase stability of barium hexaferrite films on SiC(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarov, V. K.; Hasnip, P. J.; Cai, Z.; Ziemer, K. S.; Yoshida, K.

    2011-04-01

    We have studied interface phase stability of the BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} (BaM) thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on SiC(0001). The films were epitaxially grown with the following crystallographic relation: BaM(0001) parallel SiC(0001) and BaM(11-20) parallel SiC(11-20). High resolution TEM reveals the existence of two interfacial bands with different structure than BaM. The first band close to SiC is SiO{sub x} while the second has spinel structure and chemically corresponds to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. These findings suggest that at initial growth stages Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is more favorable than BaM. Density functional theory modeling of the phase stability of BaM compared to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} shows that BaM is only stable at high oxygen partial pressures.

  4. Characterization and photoluminescence of Co-doped SiC films

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xianke; Jin, Xin; Wang, Shiqi; Liu, Huarui; Sun, Peng; An, Yukai; Guo, Ruisong; Liu, Jiwen

    2013-11-15

    Co-doped SiC films are fabricated on Si (100) substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering, and the crystal structure, composition, element valences, local structure, and photoluminescence of the films are studied. Crystal structure analysis identifies the film structure as 3C-SiC and shows that the Co dopant atoms form CoSi secondary phase compounds in the films. The composition and element valence analysis show that the Co dopant atoms substituting for C sites in the SiC lattice exist in the form of Co{sup 2+} ions, and that C clusters are present in the films, which increase in amount with increasing Co dopant concentration. The analysis of local structure reveals that Co clusters, CoO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, are not present in the films, and CoSi secondary phase compounds exist. All of the films show a violet photoluminescence peak located at 413 nm, which becomes stronger with increased Co dopant concentration and annealing temperature, and is found to originate from the C clusters.

  5. Interaction of ? molecules with silicon surfaces and the formation of SiC films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; Chen, Dong

    1996-06-01

    We report on the results of an investigation of the interaction of submonolayers, monolayers, and multilayers of 0957-4484/7/2/009/img2 molecules with Si(111) and Si(100) surfaces at a variety of temperatures. The results shed light on the mechanism of the formation of SiC films from the decomposition of 0957-4484/7/2/009/img2 molecules at elevated temperatures, and the interaction of the released carbon atoms with the silicon substrate.

  6. Effect of SiC interlayer between Ti6Al4V alloy and hydroxyapatite films.

    PubMed

    Azem, Funda Ak; Birlik, Isil; Braic, Viorel; Toparli, Mustafa; Celik, Erdal; Parau, Anca; Kiss, Adrian; Titorencu, Irina; Vladescu, Alina

    2015-04-01

    Bioactive coatings are frequently used to improve the osseointegration of the metallic implants used in dentistry or orthopaedics. Among different types of bioactive coatings, hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is one of the most extensively used due to its chemical similarities to the components of bones and teeth. In this article, production and characterization of hydroxyapatite films deposited on Ti6Al4V alloy prepared by magnetron sputtering were reported. Besides, SiC was deposited on substrate surface to study the interlayer effect. Obtained coatings were annealed at 600 °C for 30 and 120 min in a mixed atmosphere of N2 + H2O vapours with the heating rate of 12 °C min(-1). The effects of SiC interlayer and heat treatment parameters on the structural, mechanical and corrosion properties were investigated. After heat treatment process, the crystalline hydroxyapatite was obtained. Additionally, cell viability tests were performed. The results show that the presence of the SiC interlayer contributes a decrease in surface roughness and improves the mechanical properties and corrosion performance of the hydroxyapatite coatings. Biological properties were not affected by the presence of the SiC interlayer.

  7. Amorphous and excimer laser annealed SiC films for TFT fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, B.; Estrada, M.; Albertin, K. F.; Carreño, M. N. P.; Pereyra, I.; Resendiz, L.

    2006-02-01

    The characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films prepared by PECVD and crystallized by KrF UV excimer laser annealing (ELA), for different annealing conditions, are studied to determine particulate size, surface roughness, band gap and resistivity in order to apply them to TFTs fabrication. Raman spectra for ELA SiC films indicate the presence of 6H-SiC polytype together with Si and C crystallites. We also describe the fabrication process to obtain a-Si 1- xC x:H TFTs and ELA TFTs on the same wafer, comparing their output and transfer characteristics.

  8. Behavior of oxygen doped SiC thin films: An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, A.; Montero, I.; Galán, L.; Ripalda, J. M.; Levy, R.

    2001-01-01

    Thin silicon carbide films have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition on p-type (100) silicon substrates. The composition and bonds formed in these films have been analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy. The native surface oxide on the silicon carbide surface induced by air exposure has also been studied. Several phases are detected in the near-surface region: elemental Si, Si oxides (mainly SiO2), Si carbide (SiC) and Si oxicarbides (SiOxCy). Quantitative XPS analysis results indicate that, for atomic oxygen fractions <0.15, the Si-C phases are dominant in the films. Above this value no silicon oxicarbide is observed, but a multiphase material formed by elemental Si, Si oxides and Si carbides is observed. In spite of the film being a complex phase mixture, a simple relationship is found between the overall carbon and oxygen compositions. The carbon atomic fraction in the film decreases quasilinearly as the oxygen content increases, with a slope of about -1. An overall composition of SiOxC3-x in the 0.5

  9. Cubic Mn2Ga thin films: crossing the spin gap with ruthenium.

    PubMed

    Kurt, H; Rode, K; Stamenov, P; Venkatesan, M; Lau, Y-C; Fonda, E; Coey, J M D

    2014-01-17

    Cubic Mn2Ga films with the half-Heusler C1b structure are grown on V (001) epitaxial films. The phase is a soft ferrimagnet, with Curie temperature TC = 225 K and magnetization Ms=280  kA m(-1), equivalent to 1.65μB per formula. Adding ruthenium leads to an increase of TC up to 550 K in cubic Mn2Ru(x)Ga films with x = 0.33 and a collapse of the net magnetization. The anomalous Hall effect changes sign at x = 0.5, where the sign of the magnetization changes and the magnetic easy direction flips from in plane to perpendicular to the film. The Mn2Ru0.5Ga compound with a valence electron count of 21 is identified as a zero-moment ferrimagnet with high spin polarization, which shows evidence of half-metallicity.

  10. Normal incidence reflectance of ion beam deposited SiC films in the EUV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A. M.; Osantowski, John F.; Herzig, Howard; Gum, Jeffrey S.; Toft, Albert R.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental investigation of the normal-incidence reflectance at 58.4, 92.0, and 121.6 nm wavelength of 30- and 80-nm-thick SiC films produced by ion-beam deposition on unheated 5 x 5-cm microscope slides. The films were deposited in the 2-m evaporator described by Bradford et al. (1969) with chamber base pressure 1 microtorr, operating pressure 40 microtorr, and a 50-62-mA 750-eV Ar ion beam; the reflectance measurements were obtained in the reflector-monochromator system described by Osantowski (1974). Reflectances of over 30 percent were found at 92 and 121.6 nm, almost equal to those of polished CVD films of SiC and degrading only slightly after aging for 4 months. It is suggested that ion-beam deposition may be the best low-temperature technique for coating EUV optics for space astronomy.

  11. Structure and luminescence properties of eu3+-doped cubic mesoporous silica thin films.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qingshan; Wang, Zhongying; Wang, Peiyu; Li, Jiangong

    2010-02-11

    Eu3+ ions-doped cubic mesoporous silica thin films with a thickness of about 205 nm were prepared on silicon and glass substrates using triblock copolymer as a structure-directing agent using sol-gel spin-coating and calcination processes. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analysis show that the mesoporous silica thin films have a highly ordered body-centered cubic mesoporous structure. High Eu3+ ion loading and high temperature calcination do not destroy the ordered cubic mesoporous structure of the mesoporous silica thin films. Photoluminescence spectra show two characteristic emission peaks corresponding to the transitions of5D0-7F1 and 5D0-7F2 of Eu3+ ions located in low symmetry sites in mesoporous silica thin films. With the Eu/Si molar ratio increasing to 3.41%, the luminescence intensity of the Eu3+ ions-doped mesoporous silica thin films increases linearly with increasing Eu3+ concentration.

  12. High temperature ferromagnetism in cubic Mn-doped ZrO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Nguyen Hoa; Park, Chul-Kwon; Raghavender, A. T.; Ruyter, Antoine; Chikoidze, Ekaterina; Dumont, Yves

    2012-09-01

    Theory has predicted that high temperature ferromagnetism (FM) should be found in cubic fake-diamonds, Mn-doped ZrO2. Experimentally, it is shown that Mn-doped ZrO2 ceramics are not ferromagnetic, but the nanosized Mn-doped ZrO2 thin films grown on LaAlO3 substrates can be ferromagnets with TC above 400 K. The largest saturated magnetic moment (Ms) is huge as of about 230 emu/cm3 for the Mn0.05Zr0.95O2 films, and it decreases as the Mn content increases. The intrinsic FM is strongly associated with the cubic structure of Mn-doped ZrO2, and the Mn-Mn interactions via oxygen intermediates are important. No electrical conductivity is observed. Mn-doped ZrO2 thin films can be truly considered as excellent candidates for spintronic applications.

  13. Cluster-assembled cubic zirconia films with tunable and stable nanoscale morphology against thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, F.; Sogne, E.; Lenardi, C.; Podestà, A.; Merlini, M.; Ducati, C.; Milani, P.

    2016-08-01

    Nanostructured zirconium dioxide (zirconia) films are very promising for catalysis and biotechnological applications: a precise control of the interfacial properties of the material at different length scales and, in particular, at the nanoscale, is therefore necessary. Here, we present the characterization of cluster-assembled zirconia films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition possessing cubic structure at room temperature and controlled nanoscale morphology. We characterized the effect of thermal annealing in reducing and oxidizing conditions on the crystalline structure, grain dimensions, and topography. We highlight the mechanisms of film growth and phase transitions, which determine the observed interfacial morphological properties and their resilience against thermal treatments.

  14. Vector magneto-optical sensor based on transparent magnetic films with cubic crystallographic symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogachev, A. E.; Vetoshko, P. M.; Gusev, N. A.; Kozhaev, M. A.; Prokopov, A. R.; Popov, V. V.; Dodonov, D. V.; Shumilov, A. G.; Shaposhnikov, A. N.; Berzhansky, V. N.; Zvezdin, A. K.; Belotelov, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The concept of vector magneto-optical magnetometry is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The key element of the vector magnetometer is a transparent high Faraday activity magnetic film with a cubic crystal lattice. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the film leads to the three dimensional trajectory of the film magnetization when the magnetization is rotated by the control magnetic field. It makes the magnetization sensitive to all three components of the external magnetic field. This field can be found from the harmonic composition of the Faraday rotation dependence on the azimuth angle of the control magnetic field. The demonstrated vector magnetometer is promising for mapping and visualization of ultra small magnetic fields.

  15. Void nucleation in biaxially strained ultrathin films of face-centered cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolluri, Kedarnath; Gungor, M. Rauf; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2007-05-01

    We report an analysis of void nucleation as a relaxation mechanism in freestanding biaxially strained ultrathin films of face-centered cubic metals based on large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations. Above a critical strain level, multiple threading dislocations are emitted from the film surface. The surface step traces formed by gliding dislocations on intersecting and on adjacent parallel glide planes lead to formation and growth of surface pits and grooves, while vacancies form due to gliding of jogged dislocations and dislocation intersections. Coalescence of the surface pits with vacancy clusters is the precursor to the formation of a larger void extending across the film.

  16. Heteroepitaxial growth of single-domain cubic boron nitride films by ion-beam-assisted MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirama, Kazuyuki; Taniyasu, Yoshitaka; Karimoto, Shin-ichi; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kumakura, Kazuhide

    2017-03-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films were grown on diamond (001) substrates by a new ion-beam-assisted molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE) method with the irradiation of Ar+ ions and atomic nitrogen radicals (N*). From X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images, we confirmed the heteroepitaxial growth of single-domain c-BN(001) films on the diamond (001) substrates. Additionally, we revealed the growth phase diagram of BN films in the ion-beam-assisted MBE. This diagram indicates that the flux intensity of Ar+ ions should be higher than that of boron atoms for epitaxial c-BN growth.

  17. Three-dimensional skyrmion states in thin films of cubic helimagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, F. N.; Borisov, A. B.; Bogdanov, A. N.

    2013-03-01

    A direct three-dimensional minimization of the standard energy functional shows that in thin films of cubic helimagnets, chiral skyrmions are modulated along three spatial directions. The structure of such three-dimensional skyrmions can be thought of as a superposition of conical modulations along the skyrmion axis and double-twist rotation in the perpendicular plane. We show that chiral modulations across the layer thickness radically change the skyrmion energetics and provide a thermodynamical stability of a skyrmion lattice in a broad range of applied magnetic fields. These results disclose a basic physical mechanism underlying the formation of skyrmion states recently observed in nanolayers of cubic helimagnets.

  18. Multiple delta doping of single crystal cubic boron nitride films heteroepitaxially grown on (001)diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H.; Ziemann, P.

    2014-06-01

    Phase pure cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films have been epitaxially grown on (001) diamond substrates at 900 °C. The n-type doping of c-BN epitaxial films relies on the sequential growth of nominally undoped (p-) and Si doped (n-) layers with well-controlled thickness (down to several nanometer range) in the concept of multiple delta doping. The existence of nominally undoped c-BN overgrowth separates the Si doped layers, preventing Si dopant segregation that was observed for continuously doped epitaxial c-BN films. This strategy allows doping of c-BN films can be scaled up to multiple numbers of doped layers through atomic level control of the interface in the future electronic devices. Enhanced electronic transport properties with higher hall mobility (102 cm2/V s) have been demonstrated at room temperature as compared to the normally continuously Si doped c-BN films.

  19. First principles-based multiparadigm, multiscale strategy for simulating complex materials processes with applications to amorphous SiC films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naserifar, Saber; Goddard, William A.; Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    Progress has recently been made in developing reactive force fields to describe chemical reactions in systems too large for quantum mechanical (QM) methods. In particular, ReaxFF, a force field with parameters that are obtained solely from fitting QM reaction data, has been used to predict structures and properties of many materials. Important applications require, however, determination of the final structures produced by such complex processes as chemical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition, and formation of ceramic films by pyrolysis of polymers. This requires the force field to properly describe the formation of other products of the process, in addition to yielding the final structure of the material. We describe a strategy for accomplishing this and present an example of its use for forming amorphous SiC films that have a wide variety of applications. Extensive reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to simulate the pyrolysis of hydridopolycarbosilane. The reaction products all agree with the experimental data. After removing the reaction products, the system is cooled down to room temperature at which it produces amorphous SiC film, for which the computed radial distribution function, x-ray diffraction pattern, and the equation of state describing the three main SiC polytypes agree with the data and with the QM calculations. Extensive MD simulations have also been carried out to compute other structural properties, as well the effective diffusivities of light gases in the amorphous SiC film.

  20. First principles-based multiparadigm, multiscale strategy for simulating complex materials processes with applications to amorphous SiC films

    SciTech Connect

    Naserifar, Saber; Goddard, William A.; Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2015-05-07

    Progress has recently been made in developing reactive force fields to describe chemical reactions in systems too large for quantum mechanical (QM) methods. In particular, ReaxFF, a force field with parameters that are obtained solely from fitting QM reaction data, has been used to predict structures and properties of many materials. Important applications require, however, determination of the final structures produced by such complex processes as chemical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition, and formation of ceramic films by pyrolysis of polymers. This requires the force field to properly describe the formation of other products of the process, in addition to yielding the final structure of the material. We describe a strategy for accomplishing this and present an example of its use for forming amorphous SiC films that have a wide variety of applications. Extensive reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to simulate the pyrolysis of hydridopolycarbosilane. The reaction products all agree with the experimental data. After removing the reaction products, the system is cooled down to room temperature at which it produces amorphous SiC film, for which the computed radial distribution function, x-ray diffraction pattern, and the equation of state describing the three main SiC polytypes agree with the data and with the QM calculations. Extensive MD simulations have also been carried out to compute other structural properties, as well the effective diffusivities of light gases in the amorphous SiC film.

  1. Growth and characterization of GaN thin films on Si(111) substrates using SiC intermediate layer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, K.Y.; Lee, K.J.; Park, C.I.; Kim, K.C.; Choi, S.C.; Lee, W.H.; Suh, E.K.; Yang, G.M.; Nahm, K.S.

    2000-07-01

    GaN films have been grown atop Si-terminated 3C-SiC intermediate layer on Si(111) substrates using low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (LP-MOCVD). The SiC intermediate layer was grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using tetramethylsilane (TMS) as the single source precursor. The Si terminated SiC surface was obtained by immediately flow of SiH{sub 4} gas after growth of SiC film. LP-MOCVD growth of GaN on 3C-SiC/Si(111) was carried out with trimethylgallium (TMG) and NH{sub 3}. Single crystalline hexagonal GaN layers can be grown on Si terminated SiC intermediate layer using an AlN or GaN buffer layer. Compared with GaN layers grown using a GaN buffer layer, the crystal qualities of GaN films with AlN buffer layers are extremely improved. The GaN films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of double crystal x-ray diffraction (DCXD) rocking curve for GaN (0002) on 3C-SiC/Si(111) was 890 arcsec. PL near band edge emission peak position and FWHM at room temperature are 3.38 eV and 79.35 meV, respectively.

  2. Thermal crystallization of sputter-deposited amorphous Ge films: Competition of diamond cubic and hexagonal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okugawa, M.; Nakamura, R.; Ishimaru, M.; Yasuda, H.; Numakura, H.

    2016-12-01

    Following our previous studies on crystallization induced by electron irradiation, we have investigated the crystallization of sputter-deposited amorphous germanium films by heat treatments. On continuous heating, samples aged for 3 days and 4 months at room temperature crystallized at 500°C to form coarse spherical particles of a hexagonal structure, of about 100 nm in diameter, whereas samples aged for 7 months turned to homogeneous nanograins of the diamond cubic structure at 600°C. When the films aged for 4 months at room temperature were annealed at 350°C for 2 h and then heated, they crystallized at 550°C to form a mixture of the two microstructures, and those annealed at 350°C and further at 500°C for 1 h crystallized at 600°C mostly to nanograins. Crystallization by electron irradiation at 350°C to 4-month-aged samples has also been studied. With increasing annealing time at 350°C, coarse particles of a hexagonal structure ceased to appear, and were replaced by fine nanograins of the diamond cubic structure. These observations can be understood in terms of structural instability of sputter-deposited amorphous films. Medium-range ordered clusters must initially be present in the films and serve as nuclei of the metastable hexagonal phase. They are unstable, however, and are eliminated by annealing, resulting in the reduction in size and number of coarse particles with a metastable structure.

  3. Growth, nitrogen vacancy reduction and solid solution formation in cubic GaN thin films and the subsequent fabrication of superlattice structures using AIN and InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Robert F.

    1992-02-01

    An atomic layer epitaxy deposition system configured for the growth of thin films of the III-V nitrides of Al, Ga and In has been designed, constructed and commissioned. The system allows the introduction of up to 16 gases without mixing. Self-terminating growth of crystalline GaN films has been achieved on single crystal wafers of (0001) alpha(6H)-SiC. Results of analyses via Auger spectroscopy, electron microscopy and electron diffraction are described. Deposition of AlN and GaN via gas-source MBE was also continued during this period. The principal emphasis concerned the initial stages of growth of both compounds on the substrates of (00001) alpha(6H)-SiC and (0001) sapphire, as determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. An initial layer of silicon nitride formed on the surface of SiC prior to the deposition of either nitride. The deposition of GaN on sapphire followed the Stranski-Krastanov mode of nucleation and growth, while on SiC, characteristics of three-dimensional growth were evident. By contrast, AlN grew initially in a layer-by-layer mode. Deposition of GaN on vicinal (100) Beta-SiC during UV irradiation resulted in the formation of a new 4H polytype of this material. Deposition of BN via gas-source MBE on Cu(110) resulted in nanocrystalline cBN; films grown on (111) Cu resulted in h-BN (graphitic phase). Similar studies using Si(100) substrates also resulted in the occurrence of cBN. The occurrence of the cubic polytype was enhanced while that of h-BN was discouraged with the use of the UV light at 400-500 C.

  4. Suppression of UV photoluminescence in sandwich-structured Si/C composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y.; Yuan, C. L.; Liu, R.; Ong, P. P.

    2002-10-01

    Thin films of composite silicon/carbon (Si/C) were prepared by pulsed-laser ablation alternately on C and Si materials on a rotary target, followed by vacuum deposition of the ablated materials on an ultra-clean glass substrate. The film structure consisted of alternate nanolayers of Si nanocrystals and amorphous C, with a fairly sharp demarcation boundary between adjacent layers forming well-defined sandwich structures. At room temperature, this composite nanolayered structure was found to yield much lower photoluminescent (PL) emission in the ultra violet region (300 390 nm) in comparison with that obtained for pure Si or for Si/Al2O3 thin films (see Zhu Y., Wang H. and Ong P. P. J. Phys. D, 33 (2000) 1965, and Zhu Y. and Ong P. P. J. Phys. Condens. Matter, 13 (2001) L1). The suppression mechanism of the UV PL emission appeared to occur in the interfacial surfaces between adjacent crystalline Si and amorphous C layers. It provides a possible way to selectively filter out the usually undesirable UV component of the PL emission from the silicon nanoparticles.

  5. Electrochemical properties and applications of nanocrystalline, microcrystalline, and epitaxial cubic silicon carbide films.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Hao; Yang, Nianjun; Zhang, Lei; Fuchs, Regina; Jiang, Xin

    2015-05-27

    Microstructures of the materials (e.g., crystallinitiy, defects, and composition, etc.) determine their properties, which eventually lead to their diverse applications. In this contribution, the properties, especially the electrochemical properties, of cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films have been engineered by controlling their microstructures. By manipulating the deposition conditions, nanocrystalline, microcrystalline and epitaxial (001) 3C-SiC films are obtained with varied properties. The epitaxial 3C-SiC film presents the lowest double-layer capacitance and the highest reversibility of redox probes, because of its perfect (001) orientation and high phase purity. The highest double-layer capacitance and the lowest reversibility of redox probes have been realized on the nanocrystalline 3C-SiC film. Those are ascribed to its high amount of grain boundaries, amorphous phases and large diversity in its crystal size. Based on their diverse properties, the electrochemical performances of 3C-SiC films are evaluated in two kinds of potential applications, namely an electrochemical capacitor using a nanocrystalline film and an electrochemical dopamine sensor using the epitaxial 3C-SiC film. The nanocrystalline 3C-SiC film shows not only a high double layer capacitance (43-70 μF/cm(2)) but also a long-term stability of its capacitance. The epitaxial 3C-SiC film shows a low detection limit toward dopamine, which is one to 2 orders of magnitude lower than its normal concentration in tissue. Therefore, 3C-SiC film is a novel but designable material for different emerging electrochemical applications such as energy storage, biomedical/chemical sensors, environmental pollutant detectors, and so on.

  6. Ambient condition laser writing of graphene structures on polycrystalline SiC thin film deposited on Si wafer

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Naili; Zhang, Yong; Tsu, Raphael

    2013-02-18

    We report laser induced local conversion of polycrystalline SiC thin-films grown on Si wafers into multi-layer graphene, a process compatible with the Si based microelectronic technologies. The conversion can be achieved using a 532 nm CW laser with as little as 10 mW power, yielding {approx}1 {mu}m graphene discs without any mask. The conversion conditions are found to vary with the crystallinity of the film. More interestingly, the internal structure of the graphene disc, probed by Raman imaging, can be tuned with varying the film and illumination parameters, resembling either the fundamental or doughnut mode of a laser beam.

  7. Ambient condition laser writing of graphene structures on polycrystalline SiC thin film deposited on Si wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Naili; Zhang, Yong; Tsu, Raphael

    2013-02-01

    We report laser induced local conversion of polycrystalline SiC thin-films grown on Si wafers into multi-layer graphene, a process compatible with the Si based microelectronic technologies. The conversion can be achieved using a 532 nm CW laser with as little as 10 mW power, yielding ˜1 μm graphene discs without any mask. The conversion conditions are found to vary with the crystallinity of the film. More interestingly, the internal structure of the graphene disc, probed by Raman imaging, can be tuned with varying the film and illumination parameters, resembling either the fundamental or doughnut mode of a laser beam.

  8. Surface Chemistry, Microstructure, and Tribological Properties of Cubic Boron Nitride Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, Shuichi; Wheeler, Donald R.; Abel, Phillip B.; Street, Kenneth W.; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Murakawa, Masao; Miyake, Shojiro

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with the surface chemistry, microstructure, bonding state, morphology, and friction and wear properties of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films that were synthesized by magnetically enhanced plasma ion plating. Several analytical techniques - x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and surface profilometry - were used to characterize the films. Sliding friction experiments using a ball-on-disk configuration were conducted for the c-BN films in sliding contact with 440C stainless-steel balls at room temperature in ultrahigh vacuum (pressure, 10(exp -6), in ambient air, and under water lubrication. Results indicate that the boron-to-nitrogen ratio on the surface of the as-deposited c-BN film is greater than 1 and that not all the boron is present as boron nitride but a small percentage is present as an oxide. Both in air and under water lubrication, the c-BN film in sliding contact with steel showed a low wear rate, whereas a high wear rate was observed in vacuum. In air and under water lubrication, c-BN exhibited wear resistance superior to that of amorphous boron nitride, titanium nitride, and titanium carbide.

  9. Effect of post-deposition annealing on the growth and properties of cubic SnS films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalapathi, U.; Poornaprakash, B.; Park, Si-Hyun

    2017-03-01

    We report a detailed investigation of the effect of post-deposition annealing on the growth and physical properties of chemically grown cubic SnS films. Chemically deposited cubic SnS films were subjected to annealing in a graphite box with loaded elemental sulfur under N2 at 150-350 °C for 10, 30, and 60 min in order to understand the grain growth and morphology of the films. Films annealed at 150-250 °C for 10 min showed improved grain size and a more uniform grain morphology. Films annealed at 150-250 °C for 30 and 60 min showed a decrease in the grain size and non-uniform grain morphology for the cubic SnS phase. Films annealed at 300 and 350 °C for 10 min revealed the formation of minor secondary phase SnS2, and the grain morphology changed from round shape to flake-like. Longer annealing at 300 and 350 °C improved the extent of the SnS2 phase, and it was found to be the dominant phase after annealing at 350 °C for 60 min. The direct optical band gap of SnS films is 1.75-1.67 eV, depending on the annealing temperature and time. The films exhibited p-type electrical conductivity. The films annealed at 250 °C for 10 min showed a higher hole mobility of 77.7 cm2V-1s-1. Thus, lower annealing temperatures and shorter annealing times are favorable conditions to produce high-quality cubic SnS films.

  10. Structural and magnetic properties of a chemically ordered face-centered-cubic (111) Mn alloy film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhuowei; Li, Qiangyong; Venus, D.

    2006-04-01

    A 4 ML Ni/W(110) substrate is used to establish a (111) face-centered-cubic (fcc) template upon which 3 ML of Fe is deposited and annealed to 580 K to form a substrate with very good short and long range fcc (111) order, that is Fe rich at the surface. Mn alloy films are formed by annealing a subsequent Mn deposit of 0.3-1.6 ML. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and directional AES show that an ordered alloy is not formed until an annealing temperature of 580 K, upon which a multilayer alloy with a P(23×23)R30° LEED pattern is created. The alloy films formed from 0.3 to 0.5 ML of Mn have magnetic properties similar to the FeNi substrate. Hysteresis loops and ac-susceptibility curves measured using the Kerr effect give square loops with a ferromagnetic moment along the in-plane fcc [-211] direction and a Curie temperature TC of about 460 K. There is an increase in coercive field likely due to the inhomogeneities introduced by the Mn. Alloy films formed from 0.8 to 1.6 ML of Mn show a marked increase in the width of the susceptibility peak, and a decrease in the peak temperature. The hysteresis loop becomes slanted with a reduced coercive field. The measurements are consistent with a paramagnetic or antiferromagnetic Mn alloy forming an uneven interface within the FeNi film, so that the remaining FeNi film has a wide distribution in TC.

  11. A study on various fabrication routes for preparing multilayered cubic boron nitride films and sp(3)-like boron nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Sing Fai

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) has a sp3-bonded structure which leads to excellent mechanical properties. Though cBN-rich films have been successfully fabricated by many techniques, the adhesion of the films is still unsatisfactory due to the high stresses. The maximum sustainable thickness of cBN-rich films with good adhesion is widely reported to be around 200 nm, so many practical applications of cBN coatings are hindered. In this study, we designed a series of deposition schemes in a logical sequence, in order to explore whether stress can be released, or other structural forms of BN with potential applications can be made, and to gain more fundamental understanding on the growth mechanisms of various phases observed in the films. Various fabrication processes were employed according to the following sequence: (1) A single-step process. It was showed that the maximum tolerable thickness of the cBN-rich films prepared by our system (183nm) was compatible with the result in literatures (200nm). (2) A multilayered deposition process. A thick sp2-bonded boron nitride (sP2-BN) buffer layer which was relatively deformable was added, and hence some stresses were released so as to allow a 643nm-thick, 87vol.% cBN-rich layer with acceptable adhesion to grow on top. (3) An advanced multilayer process with subsequent annealing process. A zirconium layer was pre-deposited to remove the soft buffer layer after postannealing. The interface could be strengthened as the zirconium-boride/nitride was formed. (4) Ion assist deposition at unheated condition. Composite BN films containing sp3 nanoclusters embedded in a sp2-BN matrix were fabricated. The IR technique was not sensitive enough to detect spa nanoclusters, but their presence was verified by the results of other measurements. In particular, the sp3 content can be over 30vo1.%, with a hardness 20GPa. The influences of the assist beam energy and substrate temperature on the generation of the sp3 nanoclusters were investigated

  12. CO Oxidation Prefers the Eley-Rideal or Langmuir-Hinshelwood Pathway: Monolayer vs Thin Film of SiC.

    PubMed

    Sinthika, S; Vala, Surya Teja; Kawazoe, Y; Thapa, Ranjit

    2016-03-02

    Using the first-principles approach, we investigated the electronic and chemical properties of wurtzite silicon carbide (2H-SiC) monolayer and thin film structures and substantiated their catalytic activity toward CO oxidation. 2H-SiC monolayer, being planar, is quite stable and has moderate binding with O2, while CO interacts physically; thus, the Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanism prevails over the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanism with an easily cleared activation barrier. Contrarily, 2H-SiC thin film, which exhibits a nonplanar structure, allows moderate binding of both CO and O2 on its surface, thus favoring the LH mechanism over the ER one. Comprehending these results leads to a better understanding of the reaction mechanisms involving structural contrast. Weak overlapping between the 2p(z)(C) and 3p(z)(Si) orbitals of the SiC monolayer system has been found to be the primary reason to revert the active site toward sp(3) hybridization, during interaction with the molecules. In addition, the influences of graphite and Ag(111) substrates on the CO oxidation mechanism were also studied, and it is observed that the ER mechanism is preserved on SiC/G system, while CO oxidation on the SiC/Ag(111) system follows the LH mechanism. The calculated Sabatier activities of the SiC catalysts show that the catalysts are very efficient in catalyzing CO oxidation.

  13. Role of polytypism and degree of hexagonality on the photoinduced optical second harmonic generation in SiC nanocrystalline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, A.; Puziko, V.; Skorik, S.; Wojciechowski, A.; Fedorchuk, A. O.; Maciąg, A.

    2015-05-01

    Photoinduced optiсal second harmonic generation was studied in nanocrystalline SiC films prepared by the method of direct ion deposition. For the studies were chosen three types of polytypes (with different degree of hexagonality) - 24R with degree hexagonality G=25, 27R-G=44, 33R with - G=36. The bicolor photoinduced treatment was performed by the wavelengths 1064nm/532 nm by 15 ns YAG:Nd laser. The efficiency of the output SHG was evaluated by ratio of the corresponding signal intensities with respect to the references and by the time delay between the SHG and the fundamental maxima. Explanation of the observed effect is given within a framework of the occurrence of the nano-trapping levels in the film crystalline interfaces.

  14. Interplay of uniaxial and cubic anisotropy in epitaxial Fe thin films on MgO (001) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, Srijani; Chowdhury, Niru; Bedanta, Subhankar

    2014-09-01

    Epitaxial Fe thin films were grown on annealed MgO(001) substrates at oblique incidence by DC magnetron sputtering. Due to the oblique growth configuration, uniaxial anisotropy was found to be superimposed on the expected four-fold cubic anisotropy. A detailed study of in-plane magnetic hysteresis for Fe on MgO thin films has been performed by Magneto Optic Kerr Effect (MOKE) magnetometer. Both single step and double step loops have been observed depending on the angle between the applied field and easy axis i.e. along ⟨100⟩ direction. Domain images during magnetization reversal were captured by Kerr microscope. Domain images clearly evidence two successive and separate 90° domain wall (DW) nucleation and motion along cubic easy cum uniaxial easy axis and cubic easy cum uniaxial hard axis, respectively. However, along cubic hard axis two 180° domain wall motion dominate the magnetization reversal process. In spite of having four-fold anisotropy it is essential to explain magnetization reversal mechanism in 0°< ϕ < 90° span as uniaxial anisotropy plays a major role in this system. Also it is shown that substrate rotation can suppress the effect of uniaxial anisotropy superimposed on four-fold anisotropy.

  15. Three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of cubic transition metal nitride thin film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, F.; Mastail, C.; Abadias, G.

    2016-02-01

    A three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model has been developed and used to simulate the microstructure and growth morphology of cubic transition metal nitride (TMN) thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. Results are presented for the case of stoichiometric TiN, chosen as a representative TMN prototype. The model is based on a NaCl-type rigid lattice and includes deposition and diffusion events for both N and Ti species. It is capable of reproducing voids and overhangs, as well as surface faceting. Simulations were carried out assuming a uniform flux of incoming particles approaching the surface at normal incidence. The ballistic deposition model is parametrized with an interaction parameter r0 that mimics the capture distance at which incoming particles may stick on the surface, equivalently to a surface trapping mechanism. Two diffusion models are implemented, based on the different ways to compute the site-dependent activation energy for hopping atoms. The influence of temperature (300-500 K), deposition flux (0.1-100 monolayers/s), and interaction parameter r0 (1.5-6.0 Å) on the obtained growth morphology are presented. Microstructures ranging from highly porous, [001]-oriented straight columns with smooth top surface to rough columns emerging with different crystallographic facets are reproduced, depending on kinetic restrictions, deposited energy (seemingly captured by r0), and shadowing effect. The development of facets is a direct consequence of the diffusion model which includes an intrinsic (minimum energy-based) diffusion anisotropy, although no crystallographic diffusion anisotropy was explicitly taken into account at this stage. The time-dependent morphological evolution is analyzed quantitatively to extract the growth exponent β and roughness exponent α , as indicators of kinetic roughening behavior. For dense TiN films, values of α ≈0.7 and β =0.24 are obtained in good agreement with existing experimental data. At this

  16. Phase transitions in two-dimensional monolayer films on the (110) face-centered-cubic crystal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrykiejew, A.; Sokołowski, S.; Zientarski, T.; Binder, K.

    1998-03-01

    The results of Monte Carlo simulation of two-dimensional films formed on the (110) face of a face-centered-cubic crystal are presented. Systems with different corrugation of the gas-solid potential and different size of adsorbed atoms are discussed. It is demonstrated that even small changes in the gas-solid potential corrugation considerably affect the inner structure of the low-temperature ordered phases and the location of the order-disorder phase transition.

  17. Current-direction dependence of the transport properties in single-crystalline face-centered-cubic cobalt films

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.; Liang, J. H.; Chen, B. L.; Li, J. X.; Ding, Z.; Wu, Y. Z.; Ma, D. H.

    2015-07-28

    Face-centered-cubic cobalt films are epitaxially grown on insulating LaAlO{sub 3}(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Transport measurements are conducted in different current directions relative to the crystal axes. We find that the temperature dependent anisotropic magnetoresistance ratio strongly depends on the current direction. However, the anomalous Hall effect shows isotropic behavior independent of the current direction. Our results demonstrate the interplay between the current direction and the crystalline lattice in single-crystalline ferromagnetic films. A phenomenological analysis is presented to interpret the experimental data.

  18. "Un-annealed and Annealed Pd Ultra-Thin Film on SiC Characterized by Scanning Probe Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, W. J.; Shi, D. T.; Elshot, K.; Bryant, E.; Lafate, K.; Chen, H.; Burger, A.; Collins, W. E.

    1998-01-01

    Pd/SiC has been used as a hydrogen and a hydrocarbon gas sensor operated at high temperature. UHV (Ultra High Vacuum)-Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) techniques were applied to study the relationship between the morphology and chemical compositions for Pd ultra-thin films on SiC (less than 30 angstroms) at different annealing temperatures. Pd ultra-thin film on 6H-SiC was prepared by the RF sputtering method. The morphology from UHV-STM and AFM shows that the Pd thin film was well deposited on SiC substrate, and the Pd was partially aggregated to round shaped participates at an annealing temperature of 300 C. At 400 C, the amount of surface participates decreases, and some strap shape participates appear. From XPS, Pd2Si was formed on the surface after annealing at 300 C, and all Pd reacted with SiC to form Pd2Si after annealing at 400 C. The intensity of the XPS Pd peak decreases enormously at 400 C. The Pd film diffused into SiC, and the Schottky barrier height has almost no changes. The work shows the Pd sicilides/SiC have the same electronic properties with Pd/SiC, and explains why the Pd/SiC sensor still responds to hydrogen at high operating temperatures.

  19. Binary-collision modeling of ion-induced stress relaxation in cubic BN and amorphous C thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Abendroth, B.; Jaeger, H. U.; Moeller, W.; Bilek, M.

    2007-04-30

    It is demonstrated that ion-bombardment-induced stress release during physical vapor deposition of cubic boron nitride (cBN) and amorphous carbon (aC) films is related to collisional relocation of atoms. A model based on TRIM and molecular dynamics computer simulations is presented. Experimental results obtained using pulsed substrate bias are in good agreement with the model predictions at adequately chosen threshold energies of atomic relocation. The collisional relaxation model describes the experimental data significantly better than the widely applied thermal spike model.

  20. Methods for growth of relatively large step-free SiC crystal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G. (Inventor); Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method for growing arrays of large-area device-size films of step-free (i.e., atomically flat) SiC surfaces for semiconductor electronic device applications is disclosed. This method utilizes a lateral growth process that better overcomes the effect of extended defects in the seed crystal substrate that limited the obtainable step-free area achievable by prior art processes. The step-free SiC surface is particularly suited for the heteroepitaxial growth of 3C (cubic) SiC, AlN, and GaN films used for the fabrication of both surface-sensitive devices (i.e., surface channel field effect transistors such as HEMT's and MOSFET's) as well as high-electric field devices (pn diodes and other solid-state power switching devices) that are sensitive to extended crystal defects.

  1. Stable protein device platform based on pyridine dicarboxylic acid-bound cubic-nanostructured mesoporous titania films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwajeong; Park, Sung Soo; Seo, Jooyeok; Ha, Chang-Sik; Moon, Cheil; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2013-08-14

    Here we shortly report a protein device platform that is extremely stable in a buffer condition similar to human bodies. The protein device platform was fabricated by covalently attaching cytochrome c (cyt c) protein molecules to organic coupler molecules (pyridine dicarboxylic acid, PDA) that were already covalently bound to an electron-transporting substrate. A cubic nanostructured mesoporous titania film was chosen as an electron-transporting substrate because of its large-sized cubic holes (∼7 nm) and highly crystalline cubic titania walls (∼0.4 nm lattice). Binding of PDA molecules to the mesoporous titania surface was achieved by esterification reaction between carboxylic acid groups (PDA) and hydroxyl groups (titania) in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) mediator, whereas the immobilization of cyt c to the PDA coupler was carried out by the EDC-mediated amidation reaction between carboxylic acid groups (PDA) and amine groups (cyt c). Results showed that the 2,4-position isomer among several PDAs exhibited the highest oxidation and reduction peak currents. The cyt c-immobilized PDA-bound titania substrates showed stable and durable electrochemical performances upon continuous current-voltage cycling for 240 times (the final current change was less than 3%) and could detect superoxide that is a core indicator for various diseases including cancers.

  2. Structural and optical characteristics of the hexagonal ZnO films grown on cubic MgO (001) substrates.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiangqian; Zhou, Hua; Li, Yaping; Kang, Junyong; Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Ke, Shanming; Wang, Qingkang; Wang, Hui-Qiong

    2016-11-01

    In this Letter, we report on the structural and optical characteristics of ZnO films with a wurtzite structure grown on MgO (001) substrates with cubic structures. The ZnO films were prepared through the molecular beam epitaxy method, and growth orientation transformation from [0001] to [10-10] direction was observed with the change of growth temperature and thickness. The x-ray diffraction pole figures and in situ RHEED patterns demonstrated that the rotational relationship among grains within the ZnO films appeared in a typical two-fold rotation of about 30° for the [0001] growth orientation and four-fold rotation of about 30° or 60° for the [10-10] growth orientation, respectively. Last, we investigated their optical properties through measuring the transmission and photoluminescence spectra of the ZnO films, which showed the bulk-like bandgap feature of the ZnO films in spite of the existing growth orientation transformation.

  3. Static and dynamic magnetic properties of cubic Mn-Co-Ga Heusler films

    SciTech Connect

    Demiray, A. S. Iihama, S.; Naganuma, H.; Oogane, M.; Ando, Y.; Kubota, T.; Mizukami, S. Miyazaki, T.

    2014-05-07

    We investigated the static and dynamic magnetic properties of thin films of Mn-Co-Ga Heusler compound. Gilbert damping and exchange stiffness constants of the films were evaluated by using the ferromagnetic resonance technique in the X-band regime (f = 9.4 GHz). By analyzing the experimental spectra, magnetic parameters of the films such as the line width and the Gilbert damping were deduced, and the exchange stiffness constant was estimated from the perpendicular standing spin-wave resonance. The Gilbert damping constant was estimated to be 0.017 in a specific film composition. The exchange stiffness constant showed a linear dependence on the film composition.

  4. Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and Solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin Films and the Subsequent Fabrication of Superlattice Structures Using AIN and InN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    AD-A258 804 Final Technical Report Ii Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and Solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin Films and the Subsequent...Technical 6/1/86-12/31/92 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin...According to the structural and chemical analyses, there is no reason to believe that a homogeneous solid solution close to this composition had

  5. Deposition of epitaxially oriented films of cubic silicon carbide on silicon by laser ablation: Microstructure of the silicon-silicon- carbide interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimai, L.; Ager, R.; Weber, W. H.; Hangas, J.; Samman, A.; Zhu, W.

    1995-06-01

    Excimer laser ablation has been used to deposit epitaxial films of β-SiC on single-crystal Si wafers, in a vacuum, at substrate temperatures between 1050 and 1250 °C. Such films can be grown by ablating ceramic SiC, carbon, or alternating silicon and carbon targets at a range of growth rates. X-ray θ-2θ diffraction shows the presence of strong, sharp reflections from crystal planes parallel to the substrate, 200 and 400 for [100] substrates and 111 and 222 for [111] oriented substrates. Wrong reflections, such as 111 for [100] substrates, are extremely weak or absent, indicating alignment with the substrates. The characterization of these films by a number of techniques is discussed. In all cases the film-substrate interface shows a characteristic microstructure of cavities in the Si substrate, similar to that observed for the carbonization layer initially formed as a precursor for chemical-vapor deposition of SiC films on Si. This implies that the initial film growth, for all cases, involves chemical reaction of the Si substrate with the carbon in the plume as well as transport through the growing film.

  6. Tricontinuous Cubic Nanostructure and Pore Size Patterning in Mesostructured Silica Films Templated with Glycerol Monooleate.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Darren R; Garcia, Fred L; Kaehr, Bryan; Khripin, Constantine Y; Collord, Andrew D; Baca, Helen K; Tate, Michael P; Hillhouse, Hugh W; Strzalka, Joseph W; Jiang, Zhang; Wang, Jin; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2011-04-26

    The fabrication of nanostructured films possessing tricontinuous minimal surface mesophases with well-defined framework and pore connectivity remains a difficult task. As a new route to these structures, we introduce glycerol monooleate (GMO) as a template for evaporation-induced self-assembly. As deposited, a nanostructured double gyroid phase is formed, as indicated by analysis of grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering data. Removal of GMO by UV/O(3) treatment or acid extraction induces a phase change to a nanoporous body-centered structure which we tentatively identify as based on the IW-P surface. To improve film quality, we add a co-surfactant to the GMO in a mass ratio of 1:10; when this co-surfactant is cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, we find an unusually large pore size (8-12 nm) in acid extracted films, while UV/O(3) treated films yield pores of only ca. 4 nm. Using this pore size dependence on film processing procedure, we create a simple method for patterning pore size in nanoporous films, demonstrating spatially-defined size-selective molecular adsorption.

  7. Pure Cubic-Phase Hybrid Iodobismuthates AgBi2 I7 for Thin-Film Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younghoon; Yang, Zhenyu; Jain, Ankit; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Liu, Min; Quan, Li Na; García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Comin, Riccardo; Fan, James Z; Sargent, Edward H

    2016-08-08

    Bismuth-based hybrid perovskites are candidates for lead-free and air-stable photovoltaics, but poor surface morphologies and a high band-gap energy have previously limited these hybrid perovskites. A new materials processing strategy to produce enhanced bismuth-based thin-film photovoltaic absorbers by incorporation of monovalent silver cations into iodobismuthates is presented. Solution-processed AgBi2 I7 thin films are prepared by spin-coating silver and bismuth precursors dissolved in n-butylamine and annealing under an N2 atmosphere. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the pure cubic structure (Fd3m) with lattice parameters of a=b=c=12.223 Å. The resultant AgBi2 I7 thin films exhibit dense and pinhole-free surface morphologies with grains ranging in size from 200-800 nm and a low band gap of 1.87 eV suitable for photovoltaic applications. Initial studies produce solar power conversion efficiencies of 1.22 % and excellent stability over at least 10 days under ambient conditions.

  8. Single-crystal cubic boron nitride thin films grown by ion-beam-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hirama, Kazuyuki Taniyasu, Yoshitaka; Karimoto, Shin-ichi; Krockenberger, Yoshiharu; Yamamoto, Hideki

    2014-03-03

    We investigated the formation of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) thin films on diamond (001) and (111) substrates by ion-beam-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The metastable c-BN (sp{sup 3}-bonded BN) phase can be epitaxially grown as a result of the interplay between competitive phase formation and selective etching. We show that a proper adjustment of acceleration voltage for N{sub 2}{sup +} and Ar{sup +} ions is a key to selectively discriminate non-sp{sup 3} BN phases. At low acceleration voltage values, the sp{sup 2}-bonded BN is dominantly formed, while at high acceleration voltages, etching dominates irrespective of the bonding characteristics of BN.

  9. Etching characteristics and mechanisms of SiC thin films in inductively-coupled HBr-Ar, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, Alexander; Kang, Sungchil; Kwon, Kwang-Ho; Seok Choi, Won

    2011-11-15

    Etch characteristics and mechanisms of SiC thin films in HBr-Ar, HBr-N{sub 2}, and HBr-O{sub 2} inductively-coupled plasmas were studied using a combination of experimental and modeling methods. The etch rates of SiC thin films were measured as functions of the additive gas fraction in the range of 0-100% for Ar, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} at a fixed gas pressure (6 mTorr), input power (700 W), bias power (200 W), and total gas flow rate (40 sccm). The plasma chemistry was analyzed using Langmuir probe diagnostics and a global (zero-dimensional) plasma model. The good agreement between the behaviors of the SiC etch rate and the H atom flux could suggest that a chemical etch pathway is rather controlled by the gasification of carbon through the CH{sub x} or CH{sub x}Br{sub y} compounds.

  10. The Improvement of Ion Plated Ag and Au Film Adherence to Si3N4 and SiC Surfaces for Increased Tribological Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1998-01-01

    A modified dc-diode plating system, utilizing a metallic screen cage as a cathode and referred as SCREEN CAGE ION PLATING (SCIP), is used to deposit Ag and Au lubricating films on Si3N4 and SiC surfaces. When deposition is performed in Ar or N2, glow discharge, the surface displays poor adhesive strength (less than 5 MPa). A dramatic increase in adhesive strength (less than 80 MPa) is achieved when plating is performed in a reactive 50% 02 + 50% Ar glow discharge. The excited/ionized oxygen species (O2(+)/O(+) in the glow discharge contribute to the oxidation of the Si3N4 or SiC surfaces as determined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XTS) depth profiling. The reactively sputter-oxidized S3N4 or SiC surfaces and the activated-oxidized-metastable Ag or Au species formed in the plasma cooperatively contribute to the increased adherence. As a result, the linear thermal expansion coefficient mismatch at the interface is reduced. These lubricating Ag and Au films under sliding conditions reduce the friction coefficient by a factor of 2-1/2 to 4.

  11. Effect of different thickness crystalline SiC buffer layers on the ordering of MgB{sub 2} films probed by extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Putri, W. B. K.; Tran, D. H.; Kang, B.; Lee, O. Y.; Kang, W. N.; Miyanaga, T.; Yang, D. S.

    2014-03-07

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy is a powerful method to investigate the local structure of thin films. Here, we have studied EXAFS of MgB{sub 2} films grown on SiC buffer layers. Crystalline SiC buffer layers with different thickness of 70, 100, and 130 nm were deposited on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) substrates by using a pulsed laser deposition method, and then MgB{sub 2} films were grown on the SiC buffer layer by using a hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition technique. Transition temperature of MgB{sub 2} film decreased with increasing thickness of SiC buffer layer. However, the T{sub c} dropping went no farther than 100 nm-thick-SiC. This uncommon behavior of transition temperature is likely to be created from electron-phonon interaction in MgB{sub 2} films, which is believed to be related to the ordering of MgB{sub 2} atomic bonds, especially in the ordering of Mg–Mg bonds. Analysis from Mg K-edge EXAFS measurements showed interesting ordering behavior of MgB{sub 2} films. It is noticeable that the ordering of Mg–B bonds is found to decrease monotonically with the increase in SiC thickness of the MgB{sub 2} films, while the opposite happens with the ordering in Mg–Mg bonds. Based on these results, crystalline SiC buffer layers in MgB{sub 2} films seemingly have evident effects on the alteration of the local structure of the MgB{sub 2} film.

  12. Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and Solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin Films and the Subsequent Fabrication of Superlattice Structures Using AlN and InN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    p PTIC (AD-A238 521 Semi-Annual Letter Report Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and Solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin Films and the...SUBTITLE Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and S. FUNDING NUMBERS solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin Films and the R&T:s40000lsrqO5 Subsequent

  13. Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and Solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin Films and the Subsequent Fabrication of Superlattice Structures Using AlN and InN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    AD-A243 524 Annual Letter Report Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and Solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin Films and the Subsequent...12/31/91II 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and S. FUNDING NUMBERS Solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin Films and the R

  14. Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and Solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin Films and the Subsequent Fabrication of Superlattice Structures Using AIN and InN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    IK AD-A248 058 - - H Final Technical ReportI I Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and Solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin Films and the...structural and chemical analyses, there is no reason to believe that a homogeneous solid solution close to this composition had formed. Moreover

  15. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of 4-aminothiophenol adsorbed on silver nanosheets deposited onto cubic boron nitride films.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanli; Zhi, Jinfang; Zhao, Jianwen; Xu, Maotian

    2010-01-01

    A simple method was found for the fabrication of silver nanosheets (AgNS) by the catalysis of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) on an amine-terminated cubic boron nitride (cBN) surface deposited on a Si(001) substrate in the presence of reductant. The morphology of the AgNS/AuNP/NH(2)-cBN/Si(001) sample was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The performance of the AgNS/AuNP/NH(2)-cBN/Si(001) sample as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active substrate was evaluated by using 4-aminothiophenol (PATP) as the probe molecule. The SERS measurements showed that the maximum intensity was obtained on the AgNS/AuNP/NH(2)-cBN/Si(001) sample for 5 min silver deposition. Compared with the AuNP/NH(2)-cBN/Si(001) sample and a silver film/cBN/Si(001) prepared by the mirror reaction, the SERS signal of PATP was obviously improved on the above AgNS/AuNP/NH(2)-cBN/Si(001) film. The sensitivity and the stability of the AgNS/AuNP/NH(2)-cBN/Si(001) sample were also investigated.

  16. Nano-cubic structured titanium nitride particle films as cathodes for the effective electrocatalytic debromination of BDE-47.

    PubMed

    Su, Jingyang; Lu, Na; Zhao, Jujiao; Yu, Hongtao; Huang, Hao; Dong, Xinglong; Quan, Xie

    2012-09-15

    An energetic TiN cathode was fabricated for effective electrocatalytic debromination of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ethers (BDE-47); this was achieved by placing Ti foils in an aqueous suspension of TiN nanoparticles, then drying the system at 50 °C for 12 h. TEM and SEM characterization showed that the TiN nanoparticles-whose average size was approximately 50 nm-were ideal nano-cubic structures and distributed uniformly on the Ti substrate. When applied as a cathode in cyclic voltammetry measurements, the TiN electrode exhibited stable electrochemical performance over 20 cycles, in the ∼1-10 pH range. The overpotential of the TiN cathode for electrochemical reduction of water (the main side reaction during the electrocatalytic reduction of pollutants in aqueous solution) was determined as 0.54 V, which was much higher than the values for either a Pt wafer (0.12 V), or a Pt film (0.07 V). The TiN electrodes displayed superior electrocatalytic activity for the electrocatalytic debromination of BDE-47. The kinetic constant of BDE-47 degradation on TiN cathode is 0.65 h(-1), which was 2, 4 and 17 times as much as those on Pt film, Pt wafer and graphite cathodes, respectively. A pathway was proposed for the degradation of BDE-47, based on measurements of the intermediate products resulting from the removal of BDE-47 by GC-MS.

  17. Cubic nitride templates

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi; Mueller, Alexander H; Luo, Hongmei

    2013-04-30

    A polymer-assisted deposition process for deposition of epitaxial cubic metal nitride films and the like is presented. The process includes solutions of one or more metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for the one or more metal precursor. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere to yield metal nitride films and the like. Such films can be used as templates for the development of high quality cubic GaN based electronic devices.

  18. Chemical vapor deposition of Si:C and Si:C:P films-Evaluation of material quality as a function of C content, carrier gas and doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhayalan, Sathish Kumar; Loo, Roger; Hikavyy, Andriy; Rosseel, Erik; Bender, Hugo; Richard, Olivier; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2015-09-01

    Incorporation of source-drain stressors (S/D) for FinFETs to boost the channel mobility is a promising scaling approach. Typically SiGe:B S/D stressors are used for p FinFETs and Si:C:P S/D stressors for n FinFETs. The deposition of such Si:C:P S/D stressors requires a low thermal budget to freeze the C in substitutional sites and also to avoid problems associated with surface reflow of Si fins. In this work, we report the material properties of Si:C and Si:C:P epitaxial layers grown by chemical vapor deposition, in terms of their defectivity and C incorporation as a function of different process conditions. The undoped Si:C layers were found to be defect free for total C contents below 1%. Above this concentration defects were incorporated and the defect density increased with increasing C content. Abrupt epitaxial breakdown occurred beyond a total C content of 2.3% resulting in amorphous layers. P doping of Si:C layers brought down the resistivity and also thicker Si:C:P films underwent epitaxial breakdown. Additionally, the use of nitrogen instead of hydrogen as carrier gas resulted in an increase of the growth rate and substitutional C incorporation both by a factor of two, while the surface defect density reduced.

  19. Photoelectron decay kinetics of cubic silver chloride microcrystal film adsorbing plentiful dye excited by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongxiang; Zhang, Jixian; Lai, Weidong; Hu, Yanxia; Dai, Xiuhong; Han, Li; Li, Xiaowei

    2007-12-01

    There will be large numbers of carriers coming into being in the interior of silver chloride microcrystals when illumination acts on it. Microwave absorption and dielectric spectrum detection technology with high temporal resolution (1ns) can detect instantaneous decay process of photoelectrons. In this work, the photoelectron decay action of spectral sensitized silver chloride emulsion is measured by microwave absorption and dielectric spectrum detection technology. By analyzing the measured results, it is found that when plentiful dye adsorb on silver chloride microcrystals film, the photoelectron decay of silver chloride emulsion becomes faster than that of pure emulsion. However it is not that the more the dye is adsorbed, the faster the photoelectron decay will be. When the adsorbed dye reaches a certain level, the photoelectron decay becomes slower than the fastest instance. Combining with photoelectron decay kinetics theory it is found that the above results are induced by two kinds of effect from dye adsorption.

  20. Ion-beam-induced magnetic and structural phase transformation of Ni-stabilized face-centered-cubic Fe films on Cu(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Gloss, Jonas; Shah Zaman, Sameena; Jonner, Jakub; Novotny, Zbynek; Schmid, Michael; Varga, Peter; Urbánek, Michal

    2013-12-23

    Metastable face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe/Cu(100) thin films are good candidates for ion-beam magnetic patterning due to their magnetic transformation upon ion-beam irradiation. However, pure fcc Fe films undergo spontaneous transformation when their thickness exceeds 10 ML. This limit can be extended to approximately 22 ML by deposition of Fe at increased CO background pressures. We show that much thicker films can be grown by alloying with Ni for stabilizing the fcc γ phase. The amount of Ni necessary to stabilize nonmagnetic, transformable fcc Fe films in dependence on the residual background pressure during the deposition is determined and a phase diagram revealing the transformable region is presented.

  1. Morphology of Poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) (PEDOT) Thin Films, Crystals, Cubic Phases, Fibers and Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinghang

    Poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is a chemically stable, conjugated polymer that is of considerable interest for a variety of organic electronic devices including microfabricated neural electrodes that interface with living cortical tissue. The properties of conducting polymers are strongly dependent on the morphology and structure of the material in the solid-state. The rigid pi-pi conjugated conformation of PEDOT facilitates charge transport and favors crystallization that reduces solubility and processability, making detailed studies of PEDOT morphology difficult. This has also made it hard to control the microstructure at a variety of length scales. In this dissertation the morphology of PEDOT has been studied and controlled at several different length scales from manometers to micrometers. On the nanoscale, the primary intermolecular (100) d-spacing in PEDOT crystals has been controlled from 1.15 nm to 1.52 nm by using different counter-ions as dopants. The surface morphology and crystallinity of electrochemically deposited PEDOT films have been controlled by changing deposition conditions. A highly ordered, crystalline PEDOT-Br phase was formed during electrochemical deposition in the presence of bromine counterions. On the tens of nanometers scale, isotropic PEDOT bicontinuous cubic structures with extremely large surface areas were developed using ternary non-ionic surfactant, water and oil systems. On the micrometer scale, aligned PEDOT fibers and tubes were prepared by electrospinning blends of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and EDOT monomer onto a rotating wheel or a dielectric gap in a metal substrate. These aligned fibers and tubes were shown to precisely direct neural regeneration in specific directions in vitro. These developments help understand the structure and properties of conjugated polymers for use in organic electronic devices.

  2. Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and Solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin Films and the Subsequent Fabrication of Superlattice Structures Using AlN and InN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    AD-A253 331 Semiannual Report Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and Solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin Films and the Subsequent Fabrication...Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and Solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin Films and the Subsequent Fabrication of Superlattice Structures Using...34 substrates, such as using a graded AlxGal-xN solid solution as a buffer layer. E. Conclusion We have shown that in the use of our modified gas source MBE

  3. The competitive growth of cubic domains in Ti(1-x)AlxN films studied by diffraction anomalous near-edge structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pinot, Y; Tuilier, M-H; Pac, M-J; Rousselot, C; Thiaudière, D

    2015-11-01

    Titanium and aluminium nitride films deposited by magnetron sputtering generally grow as columnar domains made of oriented nanocrystallites with cubic or hexagonal symmetry depending on Al content, which are embedded in more disordered grain boundaries. The substitution of Al atoms for Ti in the cubic lattice of the films improves their resistance to wear and oxidation, allowing their use as protective coatings. Ti K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, which probes both crystallized and more disordered grain boundaries, and X-ray diffraction anomalous fine structure, which is sensitive to short- and long-range order within a given crystallized domain, are carried out on a set of Ti(1-x)AlxN films deposited by magnetron sputtering on Si substrates. Attention is paid to the shape of the pre-edge region, which is sensitive to the symmetry of the site occupied by Ti atoms, either octahedral in face-centred-cubic Ti-rich (TiN, Ti0.54Al0.46N) samples or tetrahedral in hexagonal-close-packed Al-rich (Ti0.32Al0.68N) films. In order to obain information on the titanium environment in the well crystallized areas, subtraction of the smooth part of the energy-dependent structure factor for the Bragg reflections is applied to the pre-edge region of the diffraction anomalous data in order to restore their spectroscopic appearance. A flat pre-edge is related to the typical octahedral environment of Ti atoms for cubic reflections. The difference observed between pre-edge spectra associated with face-centred-cubic 200 and 111 Bragg reflections of Ti0.54Al0.46N is assigned to Ti enrichment of 111 large well ordered domains compared with the more disordered 200 ones. The sharp peak observed in the spectrum recorded from the hexagonal 002 peak of Ti0.32Al0.68N can be regarded as a standard for the pure tetrahedral Ti environment in hexagonal-close-packed nitride.

  4. Hetero-epitaxial growth of the cubic single crystalline HfO 2 film as high k materials by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinqiang; Tu, Hailing; Wang, Xiaona; Xiong, Yuhua; Yang, Mengmeng; Wang, Lei; Du, Jun

    2010-10-01

    We report a hetero-epitaxial growth of cubic single crystalline HfO 2 film on Si substrates as high k materials by pulse laser ablation (PLA) at 820 °C. To eliminate the interfacial defects, the HfO 2 film has then been annealed at 900 °C for 5 min in N 2. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) results indicate orientation of the HfO 2 film on Si substrates corresponding to (∥( and [∥[. An interface layer has been revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Through capacitance-voltage ( C- V) and current-voltage ( I- V), it has been obtained that the leakage current of the HfO 2 gate insulator with dielectric constant of 26 is 5×10 -6 A/cm 2 at -1 V.

  5. The resonance susceptibility of two-layer exchange-coupled ferromagnetic film with a combined uniaxial and cubic anisotropy in the layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shul'ga, N. V.; Doroshenko, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    A numerical investigation of the resonance dynamic susceptibility of ferromagnetic exchange-coupled two-layer films with a combined cubic and uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of the layers has been performed. It has been found that the presence of cubic anisotropy leads to the fact that much of the off-diagonal components of the dynamic susceptibility are nonzero. The change of the ferromagnetic resonance frequencies and dynamic susceptibility upon the magnetization along the [100], [010], and [011] directions have been calculated. The evolution of the profile of the dynamic susceptibility occurring during the magnetization has been described. The impact of changes in the distribution of equilibrium and dynamic components of the magnetization on the dependences of the components of the dynamic susceptibility and the ferromagnetic resonance frequency on the external magnetic fields has been discussed.

  6. Postdeposition annealing induced transition from hexagonal Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3} to cubic PrO{sub 2} films on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Weisemoeller, T.; Bertram, F.; Gevers, S.; Greuling, A.; Deiter, C.; Tobergte, H.; Neumann, M.; Wollschlaeger, J.; Giussani, A.; Schroeder, T.

    2009-06-15

    Films of hexagonal praseodymium sesquioxide (h-Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were deposited on Si(111) by molecular beam epitaxy and thereafter annealed in 1 atm oxygen at different temperatures, ranging from 100 to 700 deg. C. The films of the samples annealed at 300 deg. C or more were transformed to PrO{sub 2} with B-oriented Fm3m structure, while films annealed at lower temperatures kept the hexagonal structure. The films are composed of PrO{sub 2} and PrO{sub 2-d}elta species, which coexist laterally and are tetragonally distorted due to the interaction at the interface between oxide film and Si substrate. Compared to PrO{sub 2}, PrO{sub 2-d}elta has the same cubic structure but with oxygen vacancies. The oxygen vacancies are partly ordered and increase the vertical lattice constant of the film, whereas the lateral lattice constant is almost identical for both species and on all samples. The latter lattice constant matches the lattice constant of the originally crystallized hexagonal praseodymium sesquioxide. That means that no long range reordering of the praseodymium atoms takes place during the phase transformation.

  7. Thermo-Mechanical Optimization of a Gold Thick-film based SiC Die-attach Assembly using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shun-Tien; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A parametric study of the thermomechanical reliability of a Au thick-film based Sic-die- attach assembly using nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to optimize the die-attach thermo-mechanical performance for operation at temperatures from room temperature to 500 "C. This parametric study centered on material selection, structure design and process control. The die-attach assembly is composed of a 1 mm x 1 mm S i c die attached to a ceramic substrate (either 96% aluminum oxide (A1203) or aluminum nitride (AlN)) with a gold (Au) thick-film attach layer. The effects of die-size, Au attach layer thickness, substrate material, and stress relaxing temperature on the stress/strain distribution and relative fatigue lifetime of the die-attach assembly were numerically analyzed. By comparing the calculated permanent strain in the thick-film attach layer, FEA results indicate that AlN is superior to Al2O3. Thicker Au attach layers and smaller die sizes are recommended to reduce the permanent strain in thick-film die attach layer. Thicker S i c die also reduces the stress near the (top) surface region of the die. A stress relaxing temperature close to the midpoint of the operating temperature range further reduces the maximum stress/strain, thereby improving die-attach thermo-mechanical reliability. These recommendations present guidelines to optimize the thermo-mechanical performance of the die-attach assembly and are valid for a wide range of thermal environments.

  8. 3D interconnected ionic nano-channels formed in polymer films: self-organization and polymerization of thermotropic bicontinuous cubic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Takahiro; Yoshio, Masafumi; Hamasaki, Atsushi; Kagimoto, Junko; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Kato, Takashi

    2011-02-23

    Thermotropic bicontinuous cubic (Cub(bi)) liquid-crystalline (LC) compounds based on a polymerizable ammonium moiety complexed with a lithium salt have been designed to obtain lithium ion-conductive all solid polymeric films having 3D interconnected ionic channels. The monomer shows a Cub(bi) phase from -5 to 19 °C on heating. The complexes retain the ability to form the Cub(bi) LC phase. They also form hexagonal columnar (Col(h)) LC phases at temperatures higher than those of the Cub(bi) phases. The complex of the monomer and LiBF(4) at the molar ratio of 4:1 exhibits the Cub(bi) and Col(h) phases between -6 to 19 °C and 19 to 56 °C, respectively, on heating. The Cub(bi) LC structure formed by the complex has been successfully preserved by in situ photopolymerization through UV irradiation in the presence of a photoinitiator. The resultant nanostructured film is optically transparent and free-standing. The X-ray analysis of the film confirms the preservation of the self-assembled nanostructure. The polymer film with the Cub(bi) LC nanostructure exhibits higher ionic conductivities than the polymer films obtained by photopolymerization of the complex in the Col(h) and isotropic phases. It is found that the 3D interconnected ionic channels derived from the Cub(bi) phase function as efficient ion-conductive pathways.

  9. Core-shell Si/C nanospheres embedded in bubble sheet-like carbon film with enhanced performance as lithium ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyue; Tang, Yongbing; Kang, Wenpei; Zhang, Zhenyu; Yang, Xia; Zhu, Yu; Zhang, Wenjun; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-03-18

    Due to its high theoretical capacity and low lithium insertion voltage plateau, silicon has been considered one of the most promising anodes for high energy and high power density lithium ion batteries (LIBs). However, its rapid capacity degradation, mainly caused by huge volume changes during lithium insertion/extraction processes, remains a significant challenge to its practical application. Engineering Si anodes with abundant free spaces and stabilizing them by incorporating carbon materials has been found to be effective to address the above problems. Using sodium chloride (NaCl) as a template, bubble sheet-like carbon film supported core-shell Si/C composites are prepared for the first time by a facile magnesium thermal reduction/glucose carbonization process. The capacity retention achieves up to 93.6% (about 1018 mAh g(-1)) after 200 cycles at 1 A g(-1). The good performance is attributed to synergistic effects of the conductive carbon film and the hollow structure of the core-shell nanospheres, which provide an ideal conductive matrix and buffer spaces for respectively electron transfer and Si expansion during lithiation process. This unique structure decreases the charge transfer resistance and suppresses the cracking/pulverization of Si, leading to the enhanced cycling performance of bubble sheet-like composite.

  10. Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and Solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin Films and the Subsequent Fabrication of Superlattice Structures Using AlN and InN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    that the BGaN film remained predominantly single crystal, but shows both a normal cubic [110] pattern and a second hexagonal pattern [0110]. By contrast...27 Transmission electron microscopy (iEM) was used (Hitachi H-800) to more closely examine the microstructural evolution of the BN/ BGaN /GaN epitaxial...area diffraction (SAD) also showed the BGaN layer to be a mixture of cubic and wurtzitic phases. This layer was heavily faulted. The latter phenomenon

  11. Atomistic mechanisms of strain relaxation due to ductile void growth in ultrathin films of face-centered-cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gungor, M. Rauf; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2005-06-01

    A comprehensive computational analysis is reported of the atomistic mechanisms of strain relaxation and failure in free-standing Cu thin films under applied biaxial tensile strain for strain levels up to 6%. The analysis focuses on nanometer-scale-thick films with a preexisting void extending across the film thickness and the film plane oriented normal to the [111] crystallographic direction. Our computational study is based on isothermal-isostrain large-scale molecular-dynamics simulations within an embedded-atom-method parametrization for Cu. Our analysis has revealed various regimes in the film's mechanical response as the applied strain level increases. Within the considered strain range, after an elastic response at a low strain (<2%), void growth is the major strain relaxation mechanism mediated by the emission of perfect screw dislocation pairs from the void surface and subsequent dislocation propagation; as a result, a plastic zone forms around the void. Plastic deformation is accompanied by the glide motion of the dislocations emitted from the void surface, void surface morphological transitions, formation of a step pattern on the film's surfaces, dislocation jogging, vacancy generation due to gliding jogged dislocations, dislocation-vacancy interactions, vacancy pipe diffusion along dislocation cores, as well as dislocation-dislocation interactions. The increase in film surface roughness with increasing strain eventually leads to nucleation and propagation from the film surfaces of threading dislocation loops, which ultimately break up when they reach the opposite free surface of the thin film.

  12. Method for Simulating the Thickness Distribution of a Cubic Boron Nitride Film Deposited on a Curved Substrate using Ion-beam-assisted Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Valizadeh, R.; Colligon, J. S.; Kanematsu, H.; Morisato, K.

    A method for simulating the thickness distribution of cubic boron nitride (cBN) films deposited on a curved substrate using ion-beam-assisted vapor deposition (IBAD) is established and discussed. The deposition conditions are (i) boron arriving rate is 3.2 Å/s, (ii) ion current density is in the range 600-1600 μA/cm2, and (iii) gas composition fed into the ion source is 36% N2 + Ar. It was found that, due to simultaneous deposition and sputtering, the boron resputtering yield (which depends on the ion incident angle during cBN deposition) estimated from experimental data was higher than that of the boron sputtering yield of the BN films with a density of 3.482 g/cm3 calculated by the TRIM code. Using the above empirical boron resputtering yield, it is estimated that in the case of static coating, cBN films would not be formed when the incident angle is more than 40°. However, with continuous waving, the distribution of film thickness improves and the results are consistent with the experimental results. This estimation also agrees with the experimental results of discrete waving deposition within an allowable margin of error

  13. Characterization of amorphous SIC:H thin films grown by RF plasma enhanced CVD on annealing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, M. G.; Choi, W. S.; Boo, J.-H.; Kim, Y. T.; Yoon, D. H.; Hong, B.

    2002-06-01

    n this work, we investigated the dependence of optical and electrical properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiCa:H) films on annealing temperature (T_a) and radio frquency (RF) power. The substrate temperature (T_s was 250 °C, the RF power was varied from 30 W to 400 W, and the range of T_s, was from 400 °C to 600 °C. The a-SiC:H films were deposited by using PECVD (plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition) system on Coming glass and p-type Si (100) wafer with a SiH4+CH4 gas tnudiue. The experimental results have shown that the optical band gap energy (E_g) of the aSiC:H thin films changed little with the annealing temperature while Eg increased with the RF power. The Raman spectnrn of the thin films annealed at high temperatures showed that graphitization of carbon clusters and rnicrocrystalline silicon occurs. The current voltage characteristics have shown good electrical properties in relation to the annealed films.

  14. Transparent conducting Si-codoped Al-doped ZnO thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering using Al-doped ZnO powder targets containing SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Nomoto, Jun-ichi; Miyata, Toshihiro; Minami, Tadatsugu

    2009-07-15

    Transparent conducting Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films codoped with Si, or Si-codoped AZO (AZO:Si), were prepared by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering using a powder mixture of ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and SiC as the target; the Si content (Si/[Si+Zn] atomic ratio) was varied from 0 to 1 at. %, but the Al content (Al/[Al+Zn] atomic ratio) was held constant. To investigate the effect of carbon on the electrical properties of AZO:Si thin films prepared using the powder targets containing SiC, the authors also prepared thin films using a mixture of ZnO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and SiO{sub 2} or SiO powders as the target. They found that when AZO:Si thin films were deposited on glass substrates at about 200 degree sign C, both Al and Si doped into ZnO acted as effective donors and the atomic carbon originating from the sputtered target acted as a reducing agent. As a result, sufficient improvement was obtained in the spatial distribution of resistivity on the substrate surface in AZO:Si thin films prepared with a Si content (Si/[Si+Zn] atomic ratio) of 0.75 at. % using powder targets containing SiC. The improvement in resistivity distribution was mainly attributed to increases in both carrier concentration and Hall mobility at locations on the substrate corresponding to the target erosion region. In addition, the resistivity stability of AZO: Si thin films exposed to air for 30 min at a high temperature was found to improve with increasing Si content.

  15. Effect of radio-frequency electric power applied to a boron nitride unbalanced magnetron sputter target on the deposition of cubic boron nitride thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Ji-Sun; Park, Jong-Keuk; Lee, Wook-Seong; Huh, Joo-Youl; Baik, Young-Joon

    2013-11-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films were deposited by an unbalanced magnetron sputtering method. A (100) Si wafer with a nanocrystalline diamond thin film as a surface coating layer or that without it was used as a substrate. The target power was varied from 100 to 400 W. A boron nitride target was used, which was connected to a radio frequency power supply. High frequency power connected to a substrate holder was used for self-biasing. The deposition pressure was 0.27 MPa with a flow of Ar (18 sccm) — N2 (2 sccm) mixed gas. The existence of threshold bias voltages for c-BN formation and resputtering were observed irrespective of target power. The bias voltage window for c-BN formation broadened with increased target power. The deposition rate decreased with enhanced bias voltage and decreased target power. Residual stresses of the films did not vary noticeably with target power within the target power range of c-BN formation. A parameter space for c-BN formation according to the target power and the bias voltage, as two variables, was suggested.

  16. Growth, Nitrogen Vacancy Reduction and Solid Solution Formation in Cubic GaN Thin Films and Subsequent Fabrication of Superlattice Structures Using AlN and InN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    Laboratories, Inc. 3. Structural Analysis Reflection high-energy electron diffraction performed during growth indicated that the BGaN film remained...was used (Hitachi H-800) to more closely examine the microstructural evolution of the BN/ BGaN /GaN epitaxial films. Cross-section TEM specimens were... BGaN layer to be a mixture of cubic and wurtzitic phases. This layer was heavily faulted. The latter phenomenon is to be expected given the high

  17. Ionic Conductivity of Mesostructured Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thin Films with Cubic Pore Symmetry—On the Influence of Water on the Surface Oxygen Ion Transport.

    PubMed

    Elm, Matthias T; Hofmann, Jonas D; Suchomski, Christian; Janek, Jürgen; Brezesinski, Torsten

    2015-06-10

    Thermally stable, ordered mesoporous thin films of 8 mol % yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were prepared by solution-phase coassembly of chloride salt precursors with an amphiphilic diblock copolymer using an evaporation-induced self-assembly process. The resulting material is of high quality and exhibits a well-defined three-dimensional network of pores averaging 24 nm in diameter after annealing at 600 °C for several hours. The wall structure is polycrystalline, with grains in the size range of 7 to 10 nm. Using impedance spectroscopy, the total electrical conductivity was measured between 200 and 500 °C under ambient atmosphere as well as in dry atmosphere for oxygen partial pressures ranging from 1 to 10(-4) bar. Similar to bulk YSZ, a constant ionic conductivity is observed over the whole oxygen partial pressure range investigated. In dry atmosphere, the sol-gel derived films have a much higher conductivity, with different activation energies for low and high temperatures. Overall, the results indicate a strong influence of the surface on the transport properties in cubic fluorite-type YSZ with high surface-to-volume ratio. A qualitative defect model which includes surface effects (annihilation of oxygen vacancies as a result of water adsorption) is proposed to explain the behavior and sensitivity of the conductivity to variations in the surrounding atmosphere.

  18. Bare and boron-doped cubic silicon carbide nanowires for electrochemical detection of nitrite sensitively

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Liqin; Hou, Xinmei; Chen, Junhong; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of eletrochemical sensors based on wide bandgap compound semiconductors has attracted increasing interest in recent years. Here we report for the first time electrochemical nitrite sensors based on cubic silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires (NWs) with smooth surface and boron-doped cubic SiC NWs with fin-like structure. Multiple techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to characterize SiC and boron-doped SiC NWs. As for the electrochemical behavior of both SiC NWs electrode, the cyclic voltammetric results show that both SiC electrodes exhibit wide potential window and excellent electrocatalytic activity toward nitrite oxidation. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) determination reveals that there exists a good linear relationship between the oxidation peak current and the concentration in the range of 50–15000 μmoL L−1 (cubic SiC NWs) and 5–8000 μmoL L−1 (B-doped cubic SiC NWs) with the detection limitation of 5 and 0.5 μmoL L−1 respectively. Compared with previously reported results, both as-prepared nitrite sensors exhibit wider linear response range with comparable high sensitivity, high stability and reproducibility. PMID:27109361

  19. Bare and boron-doped cubic silicon carbide nanowires for electrochemical detection of nitrite sensitively.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Liqin; Hou, Xinmei; Chen, Junhong; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2016-04-25

    Fabrication of eletrochemical sensors based on wide bandgap compound semiconductors has attracted increasing interest in recent years. Here we report for the first time electrochemical nitrite sensors based on cubic silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires (NWs) with smooth surface and boron-doped cubic SiC NWs with fin-like structure. Multiple techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to characterize SiC and boron-doped SiC NWs. As for the electrochemical behavior of both SiC NWs electrode, the cyclic voltammetric results show that both SiC electrodes exhibit wide potential window and excellent electrocatalytic activity toward nitrite oxidation. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) determination reveals that there exists a good linear relationship between the oxidation peak current and the concentration in the range of 50-15000 μmoL L(-1) (cubic SiC NWs) and 5-8000 μmoL L(-1) (B-doped cubic SiC NWs) with the detection limitation of 5 and 0.5 μmoL L(-1) respectively. Compared with previously reported results, both as-prepared nitrite sensors exhibit wider linear response range with comparable high sensitivity, high stability and reproducibility.

  20. Bare and boron-doped cubic silicon carbide nanowires for electrochemical detection of nitrite sensitively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Liqin; Hou, Xinmei; Chen, Junhong; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Fabrication of eletrochemical sensors based on wide bandgap compound semiconductors has attracted increasing interest in recent years. Here we report for the first time electrochemical nitrite sensors based on cubic silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires (NWs) with smooth surface and boron-doped cubic SiC NWs with fin-like structure. Multiple techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to characterize SiC and boron-doped SiC NWs. As for the electrochemical behavior of both SiC NWs electrode, the cyclic voltammetric results show that both SiC electrodes exhibit wide potential window and excellent electrocatalytic activity toward nitrite oxidation. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) determination reveals that there exists a good linear relationship between the oxidation peak current and the concentration in the range of 50-15000 μmoL L-1 (cubic SiC NWs) and 5-8000 μmoL L-1 (B-doped cubic SiC NWs) with the detection limitation of 5 and 0.5 μmoL L-1 respectively. Compared with previously reported results, both as-prepared nitrite sensors exhibit wider linear response range with comparable high sensitivity, high stability and reproducibility.

  1. Nanolabyrinthine ZrAlN thin films by self-organization of interwoven single-crystal cubic and hexagonal phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoor, Naureen; Johnson, Lars J. S.; Klenov, Dmitri O.; Demeulemeester, Jelly; Desjardins, Patrick; Petrov, Ivan; Hultman, Lars; Odén, Magnus

    2013-08-01

    Self-organization on the nanometer scale is a trend in materials research. Thermodynamic driving forces may, for example, yield chessboard patterns in metal alloys [Y. Ni and A. G. Khachaturyan, Nature Mater. 8, 410-414 (2009)], 10.1038/nmat2431 or nitrides [P. H. Mayrhofer, A. Hörling, L. Karlsson, J. Sjölén, T. Larsson, and C. Mitterer, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 2049 (2003)], 10.1063/1.1608464 during spinodal decomposition. Here, we explore the ZrN-AlN system, which has one of the largest positive enthalpies of mixing among the transition metal aluminum nitrides [D. Holec, R. Rachbauer, L. Chen, L. Wang, D. Luefa, and P. H. Mayrhofer, Surf. Coat. Technol. 206, 1698-1704 (2011), 10.1016/j.surfcoat.2011.09.019; B. Alling, A. Karimi, and I. Abrikosov, Surf. Coat. Technol. 203, 883-886 (2008)], 10.1016/j.surfcoat.2008.08.027. Surprisingly, a highly regular superhard (36 GPa) two-dimensional nanolabyrinthine structure of two intergrown single crystal phases evolves during magnetron sputter thin film synthesis of Zr0.64Al0.36N/MgO(001). The self-organization is surface driven and the synergistic result of kinetic limitations, where the enthalpy reduction balances both investments in interfacial and elastic energies.

  2. C60 on SiC nanomesh.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Hong Liang; Xu, Hai; Tok, Eng Soon; Loh, Kian Ping; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2006-11-02

    A SiC nanomesh is used as a nanotemplate to direct the epitaxy of C60 molecules. The epitaxial growth of C60 molecules on SiC nanomesh at room temperature is investigated by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy, revealing a typical Stranski-Krastanov mode (i.e., for the first one or two monolayers, it is a layer-by-layer growth or 2-D nucleation mode; at higher thicknesses, it changes to island growth or a 3-D nucleation mode). At submonolayer (0.04 and 0.2 ML) coverage, C60 molecules tend to aggregate to form single-layer C60 islands that mainly decorate terrace edges, leaving the uncovered SiC nanomesh almost free of C60 molecules. At 1 ML C60 coverage, a complete wetting layer of hexagonally close-packed C60 molecules forms on top of the SiC nanomesh. At higher coverage from 4.5 ML onward, the C60 stacking adopts a (111) oriented face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure. Strong bright and dim molecular contrasts have been observed on the first layer of C60 molecules, which are proposed to originate from electronic effects in a single-layer C60 island or the different coupling of C60 molecules to SiC nanomesh. These STM molecular contrast patterns completely disappear on the second and all the subsequent C60 layers. It is also found that the nanomesh can be fully recovered by annealing the C60/SiC nanomesh sample at 200 degrees C for 20 min.

  3. Measurement of Transient Tool Internal Temperature Fields by Novel Micro Thin Film Sensors Embedded in Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride Cutting Inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werschmoeller, Dirk

    Monitoring and control of thermomechanical phenomena in tooling are imperative for advancing fundamental understanding, enhancing reliability, and improving workpiece quality in material removal processes. Polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) tools are being used heavily in numerous machining processes, e.g., machining of hardened low carbon steel and superalloys. These processes are very sensitive to variations in local cutting conditions at, or close to, the tool-workpiece interface, but lack a thorough understanding of fundamental transient thermo-mechanical phenomena present. As a result, abrupt catastrophic tool failures and degraded machined surfaces frequently occur. Existing sensors are not suitable for process control and monitoring, as they are either destructively embedded and/or do not possess the necessary spatial and temporal resolution to provide relevant data during machining. This research presents a novel approach for obtaining thermomechanical data from the close vicinity (i.e., 10s of micrometers) of the tool-workpiece interface. Arrays of micro thin film thermocouples with junction size 5 x 5 mum were fabricated by standard microfabrication methods and have been successfully embedded into PCBN using diffusion bonding. Electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy were employed to examine material interactions at the bonding interface and to determine optimal bonding parameters. Static and dynamic sensor performances have been characterized. The sensors exhibit excellent linearity up to 1300 °C, fast rise time of 150 ns, and possess good sensitivity. The inserts instrumented with embedded thin film C-type thermocouples were successfully applied to measure internal tool temperatures as close as 70 mum to the cutting edge while machining aluminum and hardened steel workpieces at industrially relevant cutting parameters. Acquired temperature data follow theoretical trends very well. Correlations between temperature and cutting parameters have

  4. In Situ Analysis of the Tribochemical Films Formed by SiC Sliding Against Mo in Partial Pressures of SO2, O2, and H2S Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-02-01

    MoO3 or one of the substoichiometric MoOx ~2 ,x, 3! compounds—formed, although MoO2 is the first to crystal- lize from the chemisorbed state with...increasing thermal activity.31,32 We therefore designate the oxide to be MoOx . In SO2 , mixtures of MoS2 and MoOx would be expected. On the SiC wear scar...from Auger data. ~2<xɛ y , z51 or 2.! Gas Solid Mo SiC Tribofilm Transfer Tribofilm Transfer SO2 MoOx /MoS2 None SiOy/SiSz , C MoOx /MoS2 O2 MoOx None

  5. Embedded SIC-POVMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Hoan; Blanchfield, Kate; Bengtsson, Ingemar; Appleby, Marcus

    2013-03-01

    Symmetric informationally complete (SIC) sets of quantum states have applications in foundational studies of quantum mechanics, quantum tomography, quantum communication, quantum cryptography, and classical signal processing. However, their existence in every dimension has not been proven, and no general construction has been known. During our study of linear dependencies in Weyl-Heisenberg orbits, we discovered 2-dimensional SICs embedded in a 6-dimensional Hilbert space. This offers a robust construction for 2-dimensional SICs, and may potentially impact the SIC existence problem. In this talk, I will explain how this construction works, and present numerical results for some other dimensions. This work was supported in part by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and by the U. S. Office of Naval Research (Grant No. N00014-09-1-0247).

  6. Influences of residual oxygen impurities, cubic indium oxide grains and indium oxy-nitride alloy grains in hexagonal InN crystalline films grown on Si(111) substrates by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yodo, T.; Nakamura, T.; Kouyama, T.; Harada, Y.

    2005-05-01

    We investigated the influences of residual oxygen (O) impurities, cubic indium oxide (-In2O3) grains and indium oxy-nitride (InON) alloy grains in 200 nm-thick hexagonal ()-InN crystalline films grown on Si(111) substrates by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Although -In2O3 grains with wide band-gap energy were formed in In film by N2 annealing, they were not easily formed in N2-annealed InN films. Even if they were not detected in N2-annealed InN films, the as-grown films still contained residual O impurities with concentrations of less than 0.5% ([O]0.5%). Although [O]1% could be estimated by investigating In2O3 grains formed in N2-annealed InN films, [O]0.5% could not be measured by it. However, we found that they can be qualitatively measured by investigating In2O3 grains formed by H2 annealing with higher reactivity with InN and O2, using X-ray diffraction and PL spectroscopy. In this paper, we discuss the formation mechanism of InON alloy grains in InN films.

  7. SiC Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1998-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC)-based semiconductor electronic devices and circuits are presently being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot adequately perform. Silicon carbide's ability to function under such extreme conditions is expected to enable significant improvements to a far-ranging variety of applications and systems. These range from greatly improved high-voltage switching [1- 4] for energy savings in public electric power distribution and electric motor drives to more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications [5-7] to sensors and controls for cleaner-burning more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. In the particular area of power devices, theoretical appraisals have indicated that SiC power MOSFET's and diode rectifiers would operate over higher voltage and temperature ranges, have superior switching characteristics, and yet have die sizes nearly 20 times smaller than correspondingly rated silicon-based devices [8]. However, these tremendous theoretical advantages have yet to be realized in experimental SiC devices, primarily due to the fact that SiC's relatively immature crystal growth and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for reliable incorporation into most electronic systems [9]. This chapter briefly surveys the SiC semiconductor electronics technology. In particular, the differences (both good and bad) between SiC electronics technology and well-known silicon VLSI technology are highlighted. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are highlighted for several large-scale applications. Key crystal growth and device-fabrication issues that presently limit the performance and capability of high temperature and/or high power SiC electronics are identified.

  8. Thermal expansion and thermal expansion anisotropy of SiC polytypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Z.; Bradt, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    The principal axial coefficients of thermal expansion for the (3C), (4H), and (6H) polytypes of SiC are considered to identify the structural role of the stacking layer sequence as it affects the thermal expansion. A general equation based on the fractions of cubic and hexagonal layer stacking is developed that expresses the principal axial thermal expansion coefficients of all of the SiC polytypes. It is then applied to address the thermal expansion anisotropy of the noncubic SiC structures.

  9. Optical waveguide formed by cubic silicon carbide on sapphire substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Xiao; Wongchotigul, Kobchat; Spencer, Michael G.

    1991-01-01

    Optical confinement in beta silicon carbide (beta-SiC) thin films on sapphire substrate is demonstrated. Measurements are performed on waveguides formed by the mechanical transfer of thin beta-SiC films to sapphire. Recent results of epitaxial films of SiC on sapphire substrates attest to the technological viability of optoelectronic devices made from silicon carbide. Far-field mode patterns are shown. It is believed that this is the first step in validating a silicon carbide optoelectronic technology.

  10. SiC protective coating for photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xin; Kane, Sheryl; Cogan, Stuart; Lorach, Henri; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Theodore; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Objective. To evaluate plasma-enhanced, chemically vapor deposited (PECVD) amorphous silicon carbide (α-SiC:H) as a protective coating for retinal prostheses and other implantable devices, and to study their failure mechanisms in vivo. Approach. Retinal prostheses were implanted in rats sub-retinally for up to 1 year. Degradation of implants was characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Dissolution rates of SiC, SiN x and thermal SiO2 were measured in accelerated soaking tests in saline at 87 °C. Defects in SiC films were revealed and analyzed by selectively removing the materials underneath those defects. Main results. At 87 °C SiN x dissolved at 18.3 ± 0.3 nm d-1, while SiO2 grown at high temperature (1000 °C) dissolved at 0.104 ± 0.008 nm d-1. SiC films demonstrated the best stability, with no quantifiable change after 112 d. Defects in thin SiC films appeared primarily over complicated topography and rough surfaces. Significance. SiC coatings demonstrating no erosion in accelerated aging test for 112 d at 87 °C, equivalent to about 10 years in vivo, can offer effective protection of the implants. Photovoltaic retinal prostheses with PECVD SiC coatings exhibited effective protection from erosion during the 4 month follow-up in vivo. The optimal thickness of SiC layers is about 560 nm, as defined by anti-reflective properties and by sufficient coverage to eliminate defects.

  11. Atomistic aspects of ductile responses of cubic silicon carbide during nanometric cutting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cubic silicon carbide (SiC) is an extremely hard and brittle material having unique blend of material properties which makes it suitable candidate for microelectromechanical systems and nanoelectromechanical systems applications. Although, SiC can be machined in ductile regime at nanoscale through single-point diamond turning process, the root cause of the ductile response of SiC has not been understood yet which impedes significant exploitation of this ceramic material. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to investigate the atomistic aspects of ductile response of SiC during nanometric cutting process. Simulation results show that cubic SiC undergoes sp3-sp2 order-disorder transition resulting in the formation of SiC-graphene-like substance with a growth rate dependent on the cutting conditions. The disorder transition of SiC causes the ductile response during its nanometric cutting operations. It was further found out that the continuous abrasive action between the diamond tool and SiC causes simultaneous sp3-sp2 order-disorder transition of diamond tool which results in graphitization of diamond and consequent tool wear. PMID:22078069

  12. Effect of oxygen on ion-beam induced synthesis of SiC in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, V. V.; Valakh, M. Ya.; Klyui, N. I.; Melnik, V. P.; Romanyuk, A. B.; Romanyuk, B. N.; Yuhimchuk, V. A.

    1999-01-01

    The properties of Si-structures with a buried silicon carbide (SiC) layer created by high-dose carbon implantation into Cz-Si or Fz-Si wafers followed by high-temperature annealing were studied by Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The effect of additional oxygen implantation on the peculiarities of SiC layer formation was also studied. It was shown that under the same implantation and post-implantation annealing conditions the buried SiC layer is more effectively formed in Cz-Si or in Si (Cz-or Fz-) subjected to additional oxygen implantation. So we can conclude that oxygen in silicon promotes the SiC layer formation due to SiO x precipitate creation and accommodation of the crystal volume in the region where SiC phase is formed. Carbon segregation and amorphous carbon film formation on SiC grain boundaries were revealed.

  13. Accurate monotone cubic interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1991-01-01

    Monotone piecewise cubic interpolants are simple and effective. They are generally third-order accurate, except near strict local extrema where accuracy degenerates to second-order due to the monotonicity constraint. Algorithms for piecewise cubic interpolants, which preserve monotonicity as well as uniform third and fourth-order accuracy are presented. The gain of accuracy is obtained by relaxing the monotonicity constraint in a geometric framework in which the median function plays a crucial role.

  14. Stress Analysis of SiC MEMS Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, Stanley J.; Marciniak, M. A.; Lott, J. A.; Starman, L. A.; Busbee, J. D.; Melzak, J. M.

    2003-03-01

    During the fabrication of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), residual stress is often induced in the thin films that are deposited to create these systems. These stresses can cause the device to fail due to buckling, curling, or fracture. Industry is looking for ways to characterize the stress during the deposition of thin films in order to reduce or eliminate device failure. Micro-Raman spectroscopy has been successfully used to characterize poly-Si MEMS devices made with the MUMPS® process. Raman spectroscopy was selected because it is nondestructive, fast and has the potential for in situ stress monitoring. This research attempts to use Raman spectroscopy to analyze the stress in SiC MEMS made with the MUSiC® process. Raman spectroscopy is performed on 1-2-micron-thick SiC thin films deposited on silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon oxide substrates. The most common poly-type of SiC found in thin film MEMS made with the MUSiC® process is 3C-SiC. Research also includes baseline spectra of 6H, 4H, and 15R poly-types of bulk SiC.

  15. Coherent Fe-rich nano-scale perovskite oxide phase in epitaxial Sr2FeMoO6 films grown on cubic and scandate substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz, Hakan; Preziosi, Daniele; Alexe, Marin; Hesse, Dietrich

    2017-01-01

    We report the growth of high-quality epitaxial Sr2FeMoO6 (SFMO) thin films on various unconventional oxide substrates, such as TbScO3, DyScO3, and Sr2Al0.3Ga0.7TaO6 (SAGT) as well as on the most commonly used one, SrTiO3 (STO), by pulsed laser deposition. The films were found to contain a foreign nano-scale phase coherently embedded inside the SFMO film matrix. Through energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy, we identified the foreign phase to be Sr2-xFe1+yMo1-yO6, an off-stoichiometric derivative of the SFMO compound with Fe rich content (y ≈ 0.6) and a fairly identical crystal structure to SFMO. The films on STO and SAGT exhibited very good magnetic properties with high Curie temperature values. All the samples have fairly good conducting behavior albeit the presence of a foreign phase. Despite the relatively large number of items of the foreign phase, there is no significant deterioration in the properties of the SFMO films. We discuss in detail how magneto-transport properties are affected by the foreign phase.

  16. Moment mapping of body-centered-cubic Fe{sub x}Mn{sub 1−x} alloy films on MgO(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Idzerda, Y. U. Bhatkar, H.; Arenholz, E.

    2015-05-07

    The alloy composition and elemental magnetic moments of bcc single crystal films of compositionally graded Fe{sub x}Mn{sub 1−x} films (20 nm thick films with 0.8 ≤ x ≤ 0.9) grown on MgO(001) are spatially mapped using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic circular dichroism. Electron diffraction measurements on single composition samples confirmed that the structure of Fe{sub x}Mn{sub 1−x} films remained epitaxial and in the bcc phase from 0.65 ≤ x ≤ 1, but rotated 45° with respect to the MgO(001) surface net. This is beyond the bulk bcc stability limit of x = 0.88. The Fe moment is found to gradually reduce with increasing Mn content with a very abrupt decline at x = 0.85, a slightly higher composition than observed in the bulk. Surprisingly, the Mn exhibits a very small net moment (<0.1 μ{sub B}) at all compositions, suggesting a complex Mn spin structure.

  17. Microstructure comparison of transparent and opaque CVD SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Zangvil, A.; Goela, J.S.; Taylor, R.L.

    1995-06-01

    Transparent, translucent, and opaque regions of high-purity bulk SiC, produced by CVD, have been characterized for physical properties as well as microstructure and chemical purity to correlate degree of transparency with other material characteristics. A good correlation was obtained between SiC vis-a-vis IR transmission and its microstructure. The transparent material is highly oriented toward the {l_angle}111{r_angle} direction and is characterized by pure, essentially defect-free, cubic {beta}-SiC columnar grains of size 5--10 {micro}m. The translucent material of various colors is mostly cubic in structure but contains large amounts of twins, usually as complex mixtures of several twinning variants and secondary twinning within a single grain. Opaque CVD SiC is randomly oriented, does not exhibit columnar grains, and contains one directional disorder with hexagonal ({alpha}-SiC) symmetry in a majority of grains and high density of dislocations elsewhere.

  18. Growth and oxidization stability of cubic Zr{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x}N solid solution thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Höglund, C.; Alling, B.; Jensen, J.; Hultman, L.; Birch, J.; Hall-Wilton, R.

    2015-05-21

    We report Zr{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x}N thin films deposited by magnetron sputter deposition. We show a solid solubility of the highly neutron absorbing GdN into ZrN along the whole compositional range, which is in excellent agreement with our recent predictions by first-principles calculations. An oxidization study in air shows that Zr{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x}N with x reaching from 1 to close to 0 fully oxidizes, but that the oxidization is slowed down by an increased amount of ZrN or stopped by applying a capping layer of ZrN. The crystalline quality of Zr{sub 0.5}Gd{sub 0.5}N films increases with substrate temperatures increasing from 100 °C to 900 °C.

  19. Microstructure characterization of SiC nanowires as reinforcements in composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Ronghua; Yang, Wenshu; Wu, Ping; Hussain, Murid; Xiu, Ziyang; Wu, Gaohui; Wang, Pingping

    2015-05-15

    SiC nanowires have been rarely investigated or explored along their axial direction by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Here we report the investigation of the cross-section microstructure of SiC nanowires by embedding them into Al matrix. Morphology of SiC nanowires was cylindrical with smooth surface or bamboo shape. Cubic (3C-SiC) and hexagonal structure (2H-SiC) phases were detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. High density stacking faults were observed in both the cylindrical and bamboo shaped nanowires which were perpendicular to their axial direction. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns of the cylindrical and bamboo shaped SiC nanowires both in the perpendicular and parallel direction to the axial direction were equivalent in the structure. After calculation and remodeling, it has been found that the SAED patterns were composed of two sets of diffraction patterns, corresponding to 2H-SiC and 3C-SiC, respectively. Therefore, it could be concluded that the SiC nanowires are composed of a large number of small fragments that are formed by hybrid 3C-SiC and 2H-SiC structures. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Cross-section microstructure of SiC nanowires was observed in Al composite. • Cylindrical with smooth surface or bamboo shape SiC nanowires were found. • The cylindrical and bamboo shaped SiC nanowires were equivalent in structure. • Structure of SiC nanowires was remodeled. • SiC nanowires are composed of hybrid 3C-SiC and 2H-SiC structures.

  20. Diffusion of helium in SiC and implications for retention of cosmogenic He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Trappisch, R.; Thomas, J. B.; Chaussende, D.

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion of helium has been characterized in silicon carbide of cubic and hexagonal (4H and 6H) forms. Polished sections of SiC were implanted with 3He at 100 keV at a dose of 1 × 1015/cm2. The implanted SiC samples were sealed under vacuum in silica glass ampoules, and annealed in 1-atm furnaces. 3He distributions following all experiments were measured with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the reaction 3He(d,p)4He. For He diffusion in cubic SiC and 4H hexagonal SiC we obtain the following Arrhenius relations: Dcubic = 1.83 ×10-6 exp (- 254 ± 10kJmol-1 /RT)m2s-1 . D4H = 4.78 ×10-7 exp (- 255 ± 29kJmol-1 /RT)m2s-1 . While He diffusion is considerably slower in SiC than in many silicate phases, He retentivity may be limited under some conditions. For example, helium will be lost from SiC grains over much shorter timescales than potential survival times of SiC presolar grains in the solar nebula. When exposed to impact heating followed by slow cooling, nearly complete loss of He from SiC grains near the site of impact will occur within several hours to a few days. For SiC grains at greater distance from impact sites, He would be better retained, depending on the rapidity of cooling. At tens of km away from a large impactor, where peak T would be ∼800 K, SiC grains would lose about 50% of their He if the grains cooled within a few thousand years, and 5% if they cooled within a few tens of years. At greater distances where heating is more modest (500 K and lower), SiC grains would be quite retentive of He even for cases of very slow cooling. Helium would also be retained in cases of impact heating followed by very rapid cooling. For these short heating pulses, 10 μm diameter SiC grains would retain more than 50% of their He for peak heating temperatures of 2173, 1973 and 1773 K for durations of 3, 10 and 60 s, respectively.

  1. Hysteresis in the Active Oxidation of SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Harder, Bryan J.; Myers, Dwight L.

    2011-01-01

    Si and SiC show both passive oxidation behavior where a protective film of SiO2 forms and active oxidation behavior where a volatile suboxide SiO(g) forms. The active-to-passive and passive-to-active oxidation transitions are explored for both Si and SiC. Si shows a dramatic difference between the P(O2) for the two transitions of 10-4 bar. The active-to-passive transition is controlled by the condition for SiO2/Si equilibrium and the passive-to-active transition is controlled by the decomposition of SiO2. In the case of SiC, the P(O2) for these transitions are much closer. The active-to-passive transition appears to be controlled by the condition for SiO2/SiC equilibrium. The passive-to-active transition appears to be controlled by the interfacial reaction of SiC and SiO2 and subsequent generation of gases at the interface which leads to scale breakdown.

  2. Deposition Of Cubic BN On Diamond Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P.; Shing, Yuh-Han

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of polycrystalline, pure, cubic boron nitride (c-BN) formed on various substrates, according to proposal, by chemical vapor deposition onto interlayers of polycrystalline diamond. Substrate materials include metals, semiconductors, and insulators. Typical substrates include metal-cutting tools: polycrystalline c-BN coats advantageous for cutting ferrous materials and for use in highly oxidizing environments-applications in which diamond coats tend to dissolve in iron or be oxidized, respectively.

  3. Room temperature quantum emission from cubic silicon carbide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, Stefania; Johnson, Brett C; Zachreson, Cameron; Beke, David; Balogh, István; Ohshima, Takeshi; Aharonovich, Igor; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-26

    The photoluminescence (PL) arising from silicon carbide nanoparticles has so far been associated with the quantum confinement effect or to radiative transitions between electronically active surface states. In this work we show that cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles with diameters in the range 45-500 nm can host other point defects responsible for photoinduced intrabandgap PL. We demonstrate that these nanoparticles exhibit single photon emission at room temperature with record saturation count rates of 7 × 10(6) counts/s. The realization of nonclassical emission from SiC nanoparticles extends their potential use from fluorescence biomarker beads to optically active quantum elements for next generation quantum sensing and nanophotonics. The single photon emission is related to single isolated SiC defects that give rise to states within the bandgap.

  4. Active Oxidation of SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Myers,Dwight L.; Harder, Bryan J.

    2011-01-01

    The high temperature oxidation of silicon carbide occurs in either a passive or active mode, depending on temperature and oxygen potential. Passive oxidation forms a protective oxide film which limits attack of the SiC:SiC(s) + 3/2 O2(g) = SiO2(s) + CO(g.) Active oxidation forms a volatile oxide and leads to extensive attack of the SiC: SiC(s) + O2(g) = SiO(g) + CO(g). The transition points and rates of active oxidation are a major issue. Previous studies are reviewed and the leading theories of passive/active transitions summarized. Comparisons are made to the active/passive transitions in pure Si, which are relatively well-understood. Critical questions remain about the difference between the active-to-passive transition and passive-to-active transition. For Si, Wagner [2] points out that the active-to-passive transition is governed by the criterion for a stable Si/SiO2 equilibria and the passive-to-active transition is governed by the decomposition of the SiO2 film. This suggests a significant oxygen potential difference between these two transitions and our experiments confirm this. For Si, the initial stages of active oxidation are characterized by the formation of SiO(g) and further oxidation to SiO2(s) as micron-sized rods, with a distinctive morphology. SiC shows significant differences. The active-to-passive and the passive-to-active transitions are close. The SiO2 rods only appear as the passive film breaks down. These differences are explained in terms of the reactions at the SiC/SiO2 interface. In order to understand the breakdown of the passive film, pre-oxidation experiments are conducted. These involve forming dense protective scales of 0.5, 1, and 2 microns and then subjecting the samples with these scales to a known active oxidation environment. Microstructural studies show that SiC/SiO2 interfacial reactions lead to a breakdown of the scale with a distinct morphology.

  5. SiC nanofibers grown by high power microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Shin-ichi; Baek, Yang-Gyu; Ikuno, Takashi; Kohara, Hidekazu; Katayama, Mitsuhiro; Oura, Kenjiro; Hirao, Takashi

    2003-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanofibers have been synthesized on Si substrates covered by Ni thin films using high power microwave chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with electron energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) revealed that the resultant fibrous nanostructures were assigned to β-SiC with high crystallinity. The formation of SiC nanofibers can be explained by the vapor liquid solid (VLS) mechanism in which precipitation of SiC occurs from the supersaturated Ni nanoparticle containing Si and C.

  6. STM characterization of a graphitized SiC(0001)surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, Victor; Zhang, Yuanbo; Yayon, Yossi; Ohta, Taisuke; McChesney, Jessica; Rotenberg, Eli; Crommie, Mike

    2007-03-01

    The two-dimensional electron gas in a single graphene sheet exhibits unique properties due the cone-shaped electron band structure near the Fermi energy. Recently the growth of a single layer of graphene on SiC(0001) has been demonstrated, opening new possibilities for fabricating large scale graphene-based devices. We have performed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy of single and bi-layer graphene films on SiC(0001). Atomically resolved topographs and dI/dV maps show clear differences between the single and bi-layer surfaces at different length scales. We have characterized the energy dependence and spatial distribution of the electron local density of states in these single and bi-layer films.

  7. SiC multi-layer protective coating on carbon obtained by thermionic vacuum arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciupina, V.; Lungu, C. P.; Vladoiu, R.; Epure, T.-D.; Prodan, G.; Roşca, C.; Porosnicu, C.; Jepu, I.; Belc, M.; Prodan, M.; Stanescu, I. M.; Stefanov, C.; Contulov, M.; Mandes, A.; Dinca, V.; Vasile, E.; Zarovschi, V.; Nicolescu, V.

    2013-09-01

    SiC single-layer or multi-layer on C used to improve the oxidation resistance and tribological properties of C have been obtained by Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) method. The 200nm thickness carbon thin films was deposed on glass or Si substrate and then 100÷500 nm thickness SiC successively layers on carbon thin film was deposed. The microstructure and mechanical characteristics of as-prepared SiC coating were investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, STEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Electron Scattering Chemical Analysis (ESCA) and tribological techniques. Samples containing SiC single-layer or multi-layer coating on carbon were investigated up to 1000°C. The results of thermal treatments reveals the increase of oxidation resistance with increase of the number of SiC layers. The mechanism of oxidation protection is based on the reaction between SiC and elemental oxygen resulting SiO2 and CO. The tribological behavior of SiC coatings was evaluated with a tribometer with ball-on-disk configuration from CSM device with 6mm diameter sapphire ball, sliding speed in dry conditions being 0.2m/s, with normal contact loads of 0.5N, 1N, 1.5N and 2N, under unlubricated conditions. The friction coefficient on SiC was compared with the friction coefficient on uncoated carbon layer. Electrical surface resistance of SiC coating on carbon at different temperatures was measured comparing the potential drop on the sample with the potential drop on a series standard resistance in constant mode.

  8. Low damage, highly anisotropic dry etching of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.J.; Hong, J.; Lambers, E.S.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Ostling, M.; Zetterling, C.M.; Grow, J.M.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-03-01

    A parametric study of the etching characteristics of 6H p{sup +} and n{sup +} SiC and thin film SiC{sub 0.5}N{sub 0.5} in Inductively Coupled Plasma NF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} and NF{sub 3}/Ar discharges has been performed. The etch rates in both chemistries increase monotonically with NF{sub 3} percentage and rf chuck power. The etch rates go through a maximum with increasing ICP source power, which is explained by a trade-off between the increasing ion flux and the decreasing ion energy. The anisotropy of the etched features is also a function of ion flux, ion energy and atomic fluorine neutral concentration. Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) masks display relatively good etch selectivity over SiC (maximum of {approximately} 70:1), while photoresist etches more rapidly than SiC. The surface roughness of SiC is essentially independent of plasma composition for NF3/O2 discharges, while extensive surface degradation occurs for SiCN under high NF{sub 3}:O{sub 2} conditions.

  9. Evidence for interstellar SiC in the Murray carbonaceous meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas; Wopenka, Brigitte; Fraundorf, Gail; Ming, Tang; Anders, Edward

    1987-01-01

    Silicon carbide has been identified in two separates from the Murray carbonaceous chondrite that are enriched 20,000-fold in isotopically anomalous neon and xenon. The SiC is present in the form of crystalline grains 0.1-1 micron in size. Cubic and 111-plane-twinned cubic are the most common ordered polytypes observed so far. The anomalous isotopic composition of its carbon, nitrogen, and silicon indicates a presolar origin, probably in the atmospheres of red giants. An additional silicon- and oxygen-rich phase shows large isotropic anomalies in nitrogen and silicon, also associated with a presolar origin.

  10. Pd/CeO2/SiC Chemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Weijie; Collins, W. Eugene

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of nanostructured interfacial layers of CeO2 has been proposed to enhance the performances of Pd/SiC Schottky diodes used to sense hydrogen and hydrocarbons at high temperatures. If successful, this development could prove beneficial in numerous applications in which there are requirements to sense hydrogen and hydrocarbons at high temperatures: examples include monitoring of exhaust gases from engines and detecting fires. Sensitivity and thermal stability are major considerations affecting the development of high-temperature chemical sensors. In the case of a metal/SiC Schottky diode for a number of metals, the SiC becomes more chemically active in the presence of the thin metal film on the SiC surface at high temperature. This increase in chemical reactivity causes changes in chemical composition and structure of the metal/SiC interface. The practical effect of the changes is to alter the electronic and other properties of the device in such a manner as to degrade its performance as a chemical sensor. To delay or prevent these changes, it is necessary to limit operation to a temperature <450 C for these sensor structures. The present proposal to incorporate interfacial CeO2 films is based partly on the observation that nanostructured materials in general have potentially useful electrical properties, including an ability to enhance the transfer of electrons. In particular, nanostructured CeO2, that is CeO2 with nanosized grains, has shown promise for incorporation into hightemperature electronic devices. Nanostructured CeO2 films can be formed on SiC and have been shown to exhibit high thermal stability on SiC, characterized by the ability to withstand temperatures somewhat greater than 700 C for limited times. The exchanges of oxygen between CeO2 and SiC prevent the formation of carbon and other chemical species that are unfavorable for operation of a SiC-based Schottky diode as a chemical sensor. Consequently, it is anticipated that in a Pd

  11. Design and fabrication of large-scale lightweight SiC space mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianhan; Zhang, Yumin; Han, Jiecai; He, Xiaodong; Yao, Wang

    2006-02-01

    Silicon carbide is a new type of optics material developed in recent years because it offered some advantages over other traditional optical substrate materials such as low density, low thermal expansion coefficient, high thermal conductivity, big special heat, big modulus of elasticity and potential cost and schedule. So in this paper, the silicon carbide space mirror was fabricated by both reaction bonded (RB) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The green body of the space mirror was prepared by silicon carbide powder, carbon powder, dilution and solidified agent using slip casting method. The space mirror blank was prepared by green body and pure silicon powder. They were laid in vacuum sintering furnace and sintered at 1500°C. In this temperature, silicon was melting then infiltrated in SiC green body and reacted with carbon to generate the new SiC, at the same time, bonded original SiC powder, in the end, the nonporous SiC/Si space mirror blank was fabricated. The reaction bonded silicon carbide (RBSiC) was consistent with original SiC powder, new generated SiC and unreacted Si. Because RBSiC was SiC/Si two-phase structure, the hardness difference between SiC and Si made the space mirror difficult to achieve precision optical surface by grinding. So a full density SiC thin film was coated on the surface of space mirror blank with RBSiC by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The raw material was CH3SiCl3. The hydrogen (H2) was catalyst. The deposition temperature was 1300°C. The cooling rate could be controlled. The SiC space mirror was honeycomb open back lightweight structure. The honeycomb cellar could be triangle, rectangle, hexogen and sector. The biggest diameter of SiC space mirror blank which has been fabricated is approach one meter by forgoing process. In order to the forgoing process was feasible, a flat round SiC space mirror with 250mm diameter. The space mirror was composed of a 4mm thick round plane faceplate and hexagonal cellar

  12. Formation of a Buffer Layer for Graphene on C-Face SiC{0001}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guowei; Srivastava, N.; Feenstra, R. M.

    2014-04-01

    Graphene films prepared by heating the SiC surface (the C-face of the {0001} surface) in a Si-rich environment have been studied using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and low-energy electron microscopy. Upon graphitization, an interface with symmetry is observed by in situ LEED. After oxidation, the interface displays symmetry. Electron reflectivity measurements indicate that these interface structures arise from a graphene-like "buffer layer" that forms between the graphene and the SiC, similar to that observed on Si-face SiC. From a dynamical LEED structure calculation for the oxidized C-face surface, it is found to consist of a graphene layer sitting on top of a silicate (Si2O3) layer, with the silicate layer having the well-known structure as previously studied on bare SiC surfaces. Based on this result, the structure of the interface prior to oxidation is discussed.

  13. Molten salt corrosion of SiC: Pitting mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Smialek, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Thin films of Na2SO4 and Na2CO3 at 1000 C lead to severe pitting of sintered alpha-SiC. These pits are important as they cause a strength reduction in this material. The growth of product layers is related to pit formation for the Na2CO3 case. The early reaction stages involve repeated oxidation and dissolution to form sodium silicate. This results in severe grain boundary attack. After this a porous silica layer forms between the sodium silicate melt and the SiC. The pores in this layer appear to act as paths for the melt to reach the SiC and create larger pits.

  14. Chemical reactions of atomic hydrogen at SiC surface and heterogeneous chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styrov, V. V.; Tyutyunnikov, V. I.; Sergeev, O. T.; Oya, Y.; Okuno, K.

    2005-02-01

    In studies of the surface properties of SiC polytypes and chemical reactions of hydrogen atoms at SiC surfaces the surface (chemi)luminescence of SiC has been applied excited in the reaction of hydrogen atoms due to chemical energy released (heterogeneous chemiluminescence, HCL). The bulk photoluminescence (PL) have also been used for comparison with surface HCL. All the samples showed HCL, but only α-SiC (6H, 15R), technologically or specially doped (predominantly by N, B, Al), exhibited PL (λex=365 nm). Cubic polycrystalline β-SiC (or 3C SiC) did not show PL. The general luminescence band of α-SiC (6H, 15R) and B and Al doped SiC (6H) was a broad yellow band with λmax ranged from 620 to 650 nm for PL (110 K). Another less intensive luminescence band is a blue one, which has been observed only at low temperatures for α-SiC (6H,15R) and B and Al doped SiC (6H) in PL spectra and as a shoulder in HCL spectra (λmax=477 nm at 110 K for 15R SiC). The green band near 540 nm was also observed sometimes in PL spectra for α-SiC. The heat of adsorption of hydrogen atoms at polycrystalline β-SiC estimated from HCL data was found to be in the range from 2 to 3 eV.

  15. SiC Deep Ultraviolet Avalanche Photodetectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    filters and SEM cross-section of dielectric stack filter. • GE SiC Solar blind detector demonstrated the best response in deep UV spectral region...Bolotnikov, A., Frechette, J., Verghese, S., Grossmann, P., Shaw, G.A. SiC APDs and arrays for UV and solar blind detection (2009) Conference Proceedings...optimized using optical and electrical device simulations , and associated fabrication methods for solar - blind SiC APD arrays have been developed

  16. Interaction Of Water Molecules With SiC(001) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cicero, G; Catellani, A; Galli, G

    2004-08-10

    We have investigated the interaction of water molecules with the polar Si- and C- terminated surfaces of cubic Silicon Carbide by means of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at finite temperature. Different water coverages were considered, from {1/4} to a complete monolayer. Irrespective of coverage, we find that water dissociates on the silicon terminated surfaces, leading to important changes in both its structural and electronic properties. On the contrary, the carbon terminated surface remains inert when exposed to water. We propose experiments to reveal the ionic and electronic structure of wet Si-terminated surfaces predicted by our calculations, which at full coverage are notably different from those of hydrated Si(001) substrates. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for SiC surface functionalization.

  17. In situ toughened SiC ceramics with Al-B-C additions and oxide-coated SiC platelet/SiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, J. |

    1996-12-01

    This work aimed at fabrication and characterization of high toughness SiC ceramics through the applications of in situ toughening and SiC platelet reinforcement. The processing-microstructure-property relations of hot pressed SiC with Al, B, and C additions (designated as ABC-SiC) were investigated. Through a liquid phase sintering mechanism, dense SiC was obtained by hot pressing at a temperature as low as 1,700 C with 3 wt% Al, 0.6 wt% B, and 2 wt% C additions. These sintering aids also enhanced the {beta}-to-{alpha} (3C-to-4H) phase transformation, which promoted SiC grains to grow into plate-like shapes. Under optimal processing conditions, the microstructure exhibited high-aspect-ratio plate-shaped grains with a thin (< 1 nm) Al-containing amorphous grain boundary film. The mechanical properties of the toughened SiC and the composites were evaluated in comparison with a commercial Hexoloy SiC under identical test conditions. The C-curve behavior was examined using the strength-indentation load relationship and compared with that directly measured using precracked compact tension specimens. The in situ toughened ABC-SiC exhibited much improved flaw tolerance and a significantly rising R-curve behavior. A steady-state toughness in excess of 9 MPam{sup 1/2} was recorded for the ABC-SiC in comparison to a single valued toughness below 3 MPam{sup 1/2} for the Hexoloy. Toughening in the ABC-SiC was mainly attributed to grain bridging and subsequent pullout of the plate-shaped grains. The high toughness ABC-SiC exhibited a bend strength of 650 MPa with a Weibull modulus of 19; in comparison, the commercial SiC showed a bend strength of 400 MPa with a Weibull modulus of 6. Higher fracture toughness was also achieved by the reinforcement of SiC platelets, encapsulated with alumina, yttria, or silica, in a SiC matrix.

  18. Effect of SiC particles on microarc oxidation process of magnesium matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, X. J.; Gong, W. X.; Wu, K.; Wang, F. H.

    2013-10-01

    SiC particles are an important reinforced phase in metal matrix composites. Their effect on the microarc oxidation (MAO, also named plasma electrolytic oxidation-PEO) process of SiCp/AZ91 Mg matrix composites (MMCs) was studied and the mechanism was revealed. The corrosion resistance of MAO coating was also investigated. Voltage-time curves during MAO were recorded to study the barrier film status on the composites. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the existing state of SiC particles in MAO. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to analyze the chemical composition of the coating. Corrosion resistance of the bare and coated composites was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization curves in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the integrality and electrical insulation properties of the barrier film on the composites were destroyed by the SiC particles. Consequently, the sparking discharge at the early stage of MAO was inhibited, and the growth efficiency of the MAO coating decreased with the increase in the volume fraction of SiC particles. SiC particles did not exist stably during MAO; they were oxidized or partially oxidized into SiO2 before the overall sparking discharge. The transformation from semi-conductive SiC to insulating SiO2 by oxidation restrained the current leakage at the original SiC positions and then promoted sparking discharge and coating growth. The corrosion current density of SiCp/AZ91 MMCs was reduced by two orders of magnitude after MAO treatment. However, the corrosion resistances of the coated composites were lower than that of the coated alloy.

  19. A new approach for fabrications of SiC based photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Aldalbahi, Ali; Li, Eric; Rivera, Manuel; Velazquez, Rafael; Altalhi, Tariq; Peng, Xiaoyan; Feng, Peter X

    2016-03-18

    We report on a new approach to quickly synthesize high-quality single crystalline wide band gap silicon carbide (SiC) films for development of high-performance deep ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors. The fabricated SiC based UV photodetectors exhibited high response while maintaining cost-effectiveness and size miniaturization. Focus of the experiments was on studies of electrical and electronic properties, as well as responsivity, response and recovery times, and repeatability of the deep UV photodetectors. Raman scattering spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to characterize the SiC materials. Analyses of the SEM data indicated that highly flat SiC thin films have been obtained. Based on the synthesized SiC, deep UV detectors are designed, fabricated, and tested with various UV wavelength lights at different radiation intensities. Temperature effect and bias effect on the photocurrent strength and signal-to-noise ratio, humidity effect on the response time and recovery time of the fabricated detectors have been carefully characterized and discussed. The detectors appear to have a very stable baseline and repeatability. The obtained responsivity is more than 40% higher compared to commercial detectors. The good performance of the photodetectors at operating temperature up to 300 °C remains nearly unchanged.

  20. A new approach for fabrications of SiC based photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Aldalbahi, Ali; Li, Eric; Rivera, Manuel; Velazquez, Rafael; Altalhi, Tariq; Peng, Xiaoyan; Feng, Peter X.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a new approach to quickly synthesize high-quality single crystalline wide band gap silicon carbide (SiC) films for development of high-performance deep ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors. The fabricated SiC based UV photodetectors exhibited high response while maintaining cost-effectiveness and size miniaturization. Focus of the experiments was on studies of electrical and electronic properties, as well as responsivity, response and recovery times, and repeatability of the deep UV photodetectors. Raman scattering spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to characterize the SiC materials. Analyses of the SEM data indicated that highly flat SiC thin films have been obtained. Based on the synthesized SiC, deep UV detectors are designed, fabricated, and tested with various UV wavelength lights at different radiation intensities. Temperature effect and bias effect on the photocurrent strength and signal-to-noise ratio, humidity effect on the response time and recovery time of the fabricated detectors have been carefully characterized and discussed. The detectors appear to have a very stable baseline and repeatability. The obtained responsivity is more than 40% higher compared to commercial detectors. The good performance of the photodetectors at operating temperature up to 300 °C remains nearly unchanged. PMID:26988399

  1. Post-growth thermal oxidation of wurtzite InN thin films into body-center cubic In{sub 2}O{sub 3} for chemical/gas sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.F.; Yakovlev, N.L.; Chi, D.Z.; Liu, W.

    2014-06-01

    Post-growth thermal oxidations of InN have been studied using high-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and secondary ion-mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The InN thin films, having relative high crystal quality, were grown by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on c-sapphire substrates using InGaN/GaN buffer layers. HRXRD reveals that oxidation of wurtzite InN into body-center cubic In{sub 2}O{sub 3} occurred at elevated temperatures. A Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} encapsulation improves the crystal quality of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxidized by using conventional rapid thermal annealing (RTA) but it results in the presence of undesired metallic indium. Cycle-RTA not only improves the crystal quality but also avoids the byproduct of metallic indium. SIMS depth profile, using contaminate elements as the ‘interface markers,’ provide evidence that the oxidation of InN is dominated by oxygen inward diffusion mechanism. Together with the HRXRD results, we conclude that the crystal quality of the resultant In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InN heterostructure is mainly controlled by the balance between the speeds of oxygen diffusion and InN thermal dissociation, which can be effectively tuned by cycle-RTA. The obtained In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InN heterostructures can be fundamental materials for studying high speed chemical/gas sensing devices. - Graphical abstract: Oxidation of h-InN into bcc-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been realized at elevated temperatures. A Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} cap improves the crystal quality of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxidized by conventional RTA but it results in the presence of undesired metallic indium. Cycle-RTA not only improves the crystal quality but also avoids the byproduct of metallic indium. SIMS depth profiles provide evidence that the oxidation of InN is dominated by oxygen inward diffusion mechanism. The crystal quality of the resultant In{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InN heterostructure is mainly controlled by the balance between the speeds of oxygen diffusion and InN thermal

  2. 29 CFR 510.21 - SIC codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false SIC codes. 510.21 Section 510.21 Labor Regulations Relating... Classification of Industries § 510.21 SIC codes. (a) The Conference Report specifically cites Puerto Rico's... stated that data “should be at a level of specificity comparable to the four digit Standard Industry...

  3. Combustion synthesis as a novel method for production of 1-D SiC nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Huczko, Andrzej; Bystrzejewski, Michał; Lange, Hubert; Fabianowska, Agnieszka; Cudziło, Stanisław; Panas, Andrzej; Szala, Mateusz

    2005-09-01

    1-D nanostructures of cubic phase silicon carbide (beta-SiC) were efficiently produced by combustion synthesis of mixtures containing Si-containing compounds and halocarbons in a calorimetric bomb. The influence of the operating parameters on 1-D SiC formation yield was studied. The heat release, the heating rate, and the chamber pressure increase were monitored during the process. The composition and structural features of the products were characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis/ thermogravimetric technique, Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. This self-induced growth process can produce SiC nanofibers and nanotubes ca. 20-100 nm in diameter with the aspect ratio higher than 1000. Bulk scale Raman studies showed the product to be comprised of mostly cubic polytype of SiC and that finite size effects are present. We believe that the nucleation mechanism involving radical gaseous species is responsible for 1-D nanostructures growth. The present study has enlarged the family of nanofibers and nanotubes available and offers a possible, new general route to 1-D crystalline materials.

  4. Body-centered-cubic Ni and its magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Tian, C S; Qian, D; Wu, D; He, R H; Wu, Y Z; Tang, W X; Yin, L F; Shi, Y S; Dong, G S; Jin, X F; Jiang, X M; Liu, F Q; Qian, H J; Sun, K; Wang, L M; Rossi, G; Qiu, Z Q; Shi, J

    2005-04-08

    The body-centered-cubic (bcc) phase of Ni, which does not exist in nature, has been achieved as a thin film on GaAs(001) at 170 K via molecular beam epitaxy. The bcc Ni is ferromagnetic with a Curie temperature of 456 K and possesses a magnetic moment of 0.52+/-0.08 micro(B)/atom. The cubic magnetocrystalline anisotropy of bcc Ni is determined to be +4.0x10(5) ergs x cm(-3), as opposed to -5.7x10(4) ergs x cm(-3) for the naturally occurring face-centered-cubic (fcc) Ni. This sharp contrast in the magnetic anisotropy is attributed to the different electronic band structures between bcc Ni and fcc Ni, which are determined using angle-resolved photoemission with synchrotron radiation.

  5. Precise control of epitaxy of graphene by microfabricating SiC substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukidome, H.; Kawai, Y.; Fromm, F.; Kotsugi, M.; Handa, H.; Ide, T.; Ohkouchi, T.; Miyashita, H.; Enta, Y.; Kinoshita, T.; Seyller, Th.; Suemitsu, M.

    2012-07-01

    Epitaxial graphene (EG) on SiC is promising owing to a capability to produce high-quality film on a wafer scale. One of the remaining issues is microscopic thickness variation of EG near surface steps, which induces variations in its electronic properties and device characteristics. We demonstrate here that the variations of layer thickness and electronic properties are minimized by using microfabricated SiC substrates which spatially confines the epitaxy. This technique will contribute to the realization of highly reliable graphene devices.

  6. Thermal expansion and elastic anisotropy in single crystal Al2O3 and SiC reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Li, Zhuang; Bradt, Richard C.

    1994-01-01

    In single crystal form, SiC and Al2O3 are attractive reinforcing components for high temperature composites. In this study, the axial coefficients of thermal expansion and single crystal elastic constants of SiC and Al2O3 were used to determine their coefficients of thermal expansion and Young's moduli as a function of crystallographic orientation and temperature. SiC and Al2O3 exhibit a strong variation of Young's modulus with orientation; however, their moduli and anisotropies are weak functions of temperature below 1000 C. The coefficients of thermal expansion exhibit significant temperature dependence, and that of the non-cubic Al2O3 is also a function of crystallographic orientation.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of the Thermal Conductivity of Irradiated SiC as a Function of Cascade Overlap

    SciTech Connect

    Crocombette, J.-P.; Dumazer, Guillaume; Hoang, Nguyen Q.; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2007-01-15

    SiC thermal conductivity is known to decrease under irradiation. To understand this effect, we study the variation of the thermal conductivity of cubic SiC with defect accumulation induced by displacement cascades. We use an empirical potential of the Tersoff type in the framework of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics. The conductivity of SiC is found to decrease with dose, in very good quantitative agreement with low temperature irradiation experiments. The results are analyzed in view of the amorphization states that are created by the cascade accumulation simulations. The calculated conductivity values at lower doses are close to the smallest measured values after high temperature irradiation, indicating that the decrease of the conductivity observed at lower doses is related to the creation of point defects. A subsequent decrease takes place upon further cascade accumulation. It is characteristic of the amorphization of the material and is experimentally observed for low temperature irradiation only.

  8. Large-area SiC membrane produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at relatively high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yu; Xie, Changqing

    2015-09-15

    Advances in the growth of silicon carbide (SiC) thin films with outstanding thermal and mechanical properties have received considerable attention. However, the fabrication of large-area free-standing SiC membrane still remains a challenge. Here, the authors report a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at a relatively high temperature to improve the free-standing SiC membrane area. A systematic study on the microstructural, mechanical, and optical properties of hydrogenated polycrystalline silicon carbide (poly-SiC{sub x}:H) thin films deposited at 600 °C with different annealing temperatures has been performed. In the as-deposited state, SiC{sub x}:H thin films show a polycrystalline structure. The crystallinity degree can be further improved with the increase of the postdeposition annealing temperature. The resulting process produced free-standing 2-μm-thick SiC membranes up to 70 mm in diameter with root mean square roughness of 3.384 nm and optical transparency of about 70% at 632.8 nm wavelength. The large-area SiC membranes made out of poly-SiC{sub x}:H thin films deposited at a relatively high temperature can be beneficial for a wide variety of applications, such as x-ray diffractive optical elements, optical and mechanical filtering, lithography mask, lightweight space telescopes, etc.

  9. High Cubic-Phase Purity InN on MgO (001) Using Cubic-Phase GaN as a Buffer Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanorpim, S.; Kuntharin, S.; Parinyataramas, J.; Yaguchi, H.; Iwahashi, Y.; Orihara, M.; Hijikata, Y.; Yoshida, S.

    2011-12-23

    High cubic-phase purity InN films were grown on MgO (001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy with a cubic-phase GaN buffer layer. The cubic phase purity of the InN grown layers has been analyzed by high resolution X-ray diffraction, {mu}-Raman scattering and transmission electron microscopy. It is evidenced that the hexagonal-phase content in the InN overlayer much depends on hexagonal-phase content in the cubic-phase GaN buffer layer and increases with increasing the hexagonal-phase GaN content. From Raman scattering measurements, in addition, the InN layer with lowest hexagonal component (6%), only Raman characteristics of cubic TO{sub InN} and LO{sub InN} modes were observed, indicating a formation of a small amount of stacking faults, which does not affect on vibrational property.

  10. Multiple CubicBezier Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khonsari, Michael M.; Horn, Douglas

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm is described for generating smooth curves of first-order continuity. The algorithm is composed of several cubic Bezier curves joined together at the user defined control points. Introduced is a tension control parameter which can be set thus providing additional flexibility in the design of free-form curves. (KR)

  11. Cubic Unit Cell Construction Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Bruce

    2000-01-01

    Presents instructions for building a simple interactive unit-cell construction kit that allows for the construction of simple, body-centered, and face-centered cubic lattices. The lit is built from inexpensive and readily available materials and can be built in any number of sizes. (WRM)

  12. Cubication of Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belendez, Augusto; Alvarez, Mariela L.; Fernandez, Elena; Pascual, Immaculada

    2009-01-01

    A cubication procedure of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force, and this allows us to approximate the original nonlinear differential equation by a Duffing equation in which the coefficients for the linear…

  13. Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia Board of Education, PA. Div. of Instructional Materials.

    The Affective Curriculum Research Project produced five films and two records during a series of experimental summer programs. The films and records form part of a curriculum designed to teach to the concerns of students. The films were an effort to describe the Philadelphia Cooperative Schools Program, to explain its importance, and to…

  14. Ultrafast Optical Measurements of Thermal Conductivity and Sound Velocity of Amorphous SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondongwa, Donald; Olasov, Lauren; Daly, Brian; King, Sean; Bielefeld, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    We present ultrafast optical measurements of longitudinal sound velocity and thermal transport in hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-SiC:H) films. The films were grown on Si wafers by PECVD using combinations of methylsilanes and H2 and He diluent gases. The films were well characterized and found to have densities (1.0 -- 2.5 g cm-3) and dielectric constants (2.8 -- 7.2) that spanned a wide range of values. Prior to their measurement, the a-SiC:H films were coated with 40-70 nm of polycrystalline Al. The pump-probe measurements were performed at room temperature using a modelocked Ti:sapphire laser. Transient reflectivity changes that are associated with very high frequency sound waves (picosecond ultrasonics) and the cooling rate of the SiC sample (Time Domain Thermorerflectance (TDTR)) were measured. We extract values for the thermal conductivity and sound velocity of the SiC films, and analyze the results in terms of rigidity percolation effects within the SiC layers. This work was supported by NSF award DMR-0906753.

  15. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Sic Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Miller, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon carbide with a refractory oxide coating is potentially a very attractive ceramic system. It offers the desirable mechanical and physical properties of SiC and the environmental durability of a refractory oxide. The development of a thermal shock resistant plasma-sprayed mullite coating on SiC is discussed. The durability of the mullite/SiC in oxidizing, reducing, and molten salt environments is discussed. In general, this system exhibits better behavior than uncoated SiC. Areas for further developments are discussed.

  16. Absorption and emission of silicon nanocrystals embedded in SiC: Eliminating Fabry-Pérot interference

    SciTech Connect

    Schnabel, M.; Summonte, C.; Canino, M.; Dyakov, S. A.; López-Conesa, L.; Löper, P.; Janz, S.; Wilshaw, P. R.

    2015-01-28

    Silicon nanocrystals embedded in SiC are studied by spectrophotometry and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Absorptivities are found to be affected by residual Fabry-Pérot interference arising from measurements of reflection and transmission at locations of different film thickness. Multiple computational and experimental methods to avoid these errors in thin film measurements, in general, are discussed. Corrected absorptivity depends on the quantity of Si embedded in the SiC but is independent of the Si crystallinity, indicating a relaxation of the k-conservation criterion for optical transitions in the nanocrystals. Tauc gaps of 1.8–2.0 and 2.12 eV are determined for Si nanoclusters and SiC, respectively. PL spectra exhibit a red-shift of ∼100 nm per nm nominal Si nanocluster diameter, which is in agreement with quantum confinement but revealed to be an artifact entirely due to Fabry-Pérot interference. Several simple experimental methods to diagnose or avoid interference in PL measurements are developed that are applicable to all thin films. Corrected PL is rather weak and invariant with passivation, indicating that non-paramagnetic defects are responsible for rapid non-radiative recombination. They are also responsible for the broad, sub-gap PL of the SiC, and can wholly account for the form of the PL of samples with Si nanoclusters. The PL intensity of samples with Si nanoclusters, however, can only be explained with an increased density of luminescent defects in the SiC due to Si nanoclusters, efficient tunneling of photogenerated carriers from Si nanoclusters to SiC defects, or with emission from a-Si nanoclusters. Films prepared on Si exhibit much weaker PL than the same films prepared on quartz substrates.

  17. Development of Sic Gas Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Okojie, R. S.; Beheim, G. M.; Thomas, V.; Chen, L.; Lukco, D.; Liu, C. C.; Ward, B.; Makel, D.

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) based gas sensors have significant potential to address the gas sensing needs of aerospace applications such as emission monitoring, fuel leak detection, and fire detection. However, in order to reach that potential, a range of technical challenges must be overcome. These challenges go beyond the development of the basic sensor itself and include the need for viable enabling technologies to make a complete gas sensor system: electrical contacts, packaging, and transfer of information from the sensor to the outside world. This paper reviews the status at NASA Glenn Research Center of SiC Schottky diode gas sensor development as well as that of enabling technologies supporting SiC gas sensor system implementation. A vision of a complete high temperature microfabricated SiC gas sensor system is proposed. In the long-term, it is believed that improvements in the SiC semiconductor material itself could have a dramatic effect on the performance of SiC gas sensor systems.

  18. Process for the controlled growth of single-crystal films of silicon carbide polytypes on silicon carbide wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, David J. (Inventor); Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for the controlled growth of single-crystal semiconductor-device-quality films of SiC polytypes on vicinal (0001) SiC wafers with low tilt angles is presented. Both homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial SiC films can be produced on the same wafer. In particular, 3C-SiC and 6H-SiC films can be produced within selected areas of the same 6H-SiC wafer.

  19. Process for the controlled growth of single-crystal films of silicon carbide polytypes on silicon carbide wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    This invention is a method for the controlled growth of single-crystal semiconductor device quality films of SiC polytypes on vicinal (0001) SiC wafers with low tilt angles. Both homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial SiC films can be produced on the same wafer. In particular, 3C-SiC and 6H-SiC films can be produced within selected areas of the same 6H-SiC wafer.

  20. Cubic Icosahedra? A Problem in Assigning Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    There is a standard convention that the icosahedral groups are classified separately from the cubic groups, but these two symmetry types have been conflated as "cubic" in some chemistry textbooks. In this note, the connection between cubic and icosahedral symmetries is examined, using a simple pictorial model. It is shown that octahedral and…

  1. Solving Cubic Equations by Polynomial Decomposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra G.

    2011-01-01

    Several mathematicians struggled to solve cubic equations, and in 1515 Scipione del Ferro reportedly solved the cubic while participating in a local mathematical contest, but did not bother to publish his method. Then it was Cardano (1539) who first published the solution to the general cubic equation in his book "The Great Art, or, The Rules of…

  2. Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Shao, Yayun; Zeng, Min; Zhang, Zhang; Gao, Xingsen; Lu, Xubing; Liu, J.-M.; Ishiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we investigated the microstructure and electrical properties of Bi2SiO5 (BSO) doped SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT) films deposited by chemical solution deposition. X-ray diffraction observation indicated that the crystalline structures of all the BSO-doped SBT films are nearly the same as those of a pure SBT film. Through BSO doping, the 2Pr and 2Ec values of SBT films were changed from 15.3 μC/cm2 and 138 kV/cm of pure SBT to 1.45 μC/cm2 and 74 kV/cm of 10 wt.% BSO-doped SBT. The dielectric constant at 1 MHz for SBT varied from 199 of pure SBT to 96 of 10 wt.% BSO-doped SBT. The doped SBT films exhibited higher leakage current than that of non-doped SBT films. Nevertheless, all the doped SBT films still had small dielectric loss and low leakage current. Our present work will provide useful insights into the BSO doping effects to the SBT films, and it will be helpful for the material design in the future nonvolatile ferroelectric memories.

  3. Cryogenic Performance of Trex SiC Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, Colby; Kane, Dave; Bray, Donald; Hadaway, James

    2005-01-01

    Low cost, high performance lightweight Silicon Carbide (Sic) mirrors provide an alternative to Beryllium mirrors. A Trex Enterprises 0.25m diameter lightweight Sic mirror using its patented Chemical Vapor Composites (CVC) technology was evaluated for its optical performance. CVC Sic is chemically pure, thermally stable, and mechanically stiff. CVC technology yields higher growth rate than that of CVD Sic. NASA has funded lightweight optical materials technology development efforts involving Sic mirrors for future space based telescope programs. As part of these efforts, a Trex Sic was measured interferometrically from room temperature to 30 degrees Kelvin. This paper will discuss the test goals, the test instrumentation, test results, and lessons learned.

  4. Weighted cubic and biharmonic splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvasov, Boris; Kim, Tae-Wan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the design of algorithms for interpolating discrete data by using weighted cubic and biharmonic splines in such a way that the monotonicity and convexity of the data are preserved. We formulate the problem as a differential multipoint boundary value problem and consider its finite-difference approximation. Two algorithms for automatic selection of shape control parameters (weights) are presented. For weighted biharmonic splines the resulting system of linear equations can be efficiently solved by combining Gaussian elimination with successive over-relaxation method or finite-difference schemes in fractional steps. We consider basic computational aspects and illustrate main features of this original approach.

  5. Characterization of Liquid Phase Sitered sic and Sic/sic Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moon Hee; Lee, Sang Pill; Hur, Kwan Do

    The characterization of liquid phase sintered(LPS) SiC based materials has been investigated with the analysis of microstructure and flexural strength. Especially, LPS-SiC materials were examined for the variation of test temperature and composition ratios (Al2O3,/Y2O3) of sintering additives. LPS-SiC based materials were fabricated by hot pressing(HP) associated with the liquid phase formation of sintering additives(Al2O3,Y2O3). LPS-SiCf/SiC composites were also fabricated with plane-woven(PW) Tyranno-SA fibers without an interfacial layer. LPS-SiC materials showed a dense morphology with the creation of the secondary phase like YAG. The composition ratio of sintering additives led to the variation of sintered density and flexural strength. The flexural strength of LPS-SiC materials was greatly decreased at the temperature higher than 1000°C. LPS-SiCf/SiC composites represented an average flexural strength of about 260 MPa, accompanying the catastrophic fracture behavior without any full-out phenomena.

  6. Hardness of cubic solid solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Faming

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that a hardening rule exists in cubic solid solutions with various combinations of ionic, covalent and metallic bonding. It is revealed that the hardening stress ∆τFcg is determined by three factors: shear modulus G, the volume fraction of solute atoms fv, and the size misfit degree δb. A simple hardening correlation in KCl-KBr solid-solution is proposed as ∆τFcg = 0.27 G. It is applied to calculate the hardening behavior of the Ag-Au, KCl-KBr, InP-GaP, TiN-TiC, HfN-HfC, TiC-NbC and ZrC-NbC solid-solution systems. The composition dependence of hardness is elucidated quantitatively. The BN-BP solid-solution system is quantitatively predicted. We find a hardening plateau region around the x = 0.55–0.85 in BNxP1−x, where BNxP1−x solid solutions are far harder than cubic BN. Because the prediction is quantitative, it sets the stage for a broad range of applications. PMID:28054659

  7. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-03-17

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions.

  8. Vacancy Relaxation in Cubic Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girifalco, L. A.; Weizer, V. G.

    1960-01-01

    The configuration of the atoms surrounding a vacancy in four face-centered cubic and three body-centered cubic metals has been computed, using a pairwise, central-force model in which the energy of interaction between two atoms was taken to have the form of a Morse function. Only radial relaxations were considered. The first and second nearest-neighbor relaxations for the face-centered systems were found to be: Pb (1.42,-0.43), Ni (2.14,-0.39), Cu(2.24,-0.40) and Ca (2.73,-0.41, expressed in percentages of normal distances. For the body-centered systems the relaxations out to the fourth nearest neighbors to the vacancy were: Fe (6.07,-2.12, -0.25, -), Ba (7.85, -2.70, 0.70, -0.33) and Na (10.80, -3.14, 3.43, -0.20). The positive signs indicate relaxation toward the vacancy and the negative signs indicate relaxation away from the vacancy. The energies of relaxation (eV) are: Pb (0.162), Ni (0.626), Cu (0.560), Ca (0.400), Fe (1.410), Ba (0.950) and Na (0.172).

  9. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-03-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions.

  10. Transparent polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Norimasa; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kim, Byung-Nam; Yoshida, Hidehiro; Masuno, Atsunobu; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kulik, Eleonora; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Wakai, Fumihiro; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Glasses and single crystals have traditionally been used as optical windows. Recently, there has been a high demand for harder and tougher optical windows that are able to endure severe conditions. Transparent polycrystalline ceramics can fulfill this demand because of their superior mechanical properties. It is known that polycrystalline ceramics with a spinel structure in compositions of MgAl2O4 and aluminum oxynitride (γ-AlON) show high optical transparency. Here we report the synthesis of the hardest transparent spinel ceramic, i.e. polycrystalline cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4). This material shows an intrinsic optical transparency over a wide range of wavelengths below its band-gap energy (258 nm) and is categorized as one of the third hardest materials next to diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN). Since the high temperature metastability of c-Si3N4 in air is superior to those of diamond and cBN, the transparent c-Si3N4 ceramic can potentially be used as a window under extremely severe conditions. PMID:28303948

  11. Hardness of cubic solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Faming

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that a hardening rule exists in cubic solid solutions with various combinations of ionic, covalent and metallic bonding. It is revealed that the hardening stress ∆τFcg is determined by three factors: shear modulus G, the volume fraction of solute atoms fv, and the size misfit degree δb. A simple hardening correlation in KCl-KBr solid-solution is proposed as ∆τFcg = 0.27 G. It is applied to calculate the hardening behavior of the Ag-Au, KCl-KBr, InP-GaP, TiN-TiC, HfN-HfC, TiC-NbC and ZrC-NbC solid-solution systems. The composition dependence of hardness is elucidated quantitatively. The BN-BP solid-solution system is quantitatively predicted. We find a hardening plateau region around the x = 0.55–0.85 in BNxP1‑x, where BNxP1‑x solid solutions are far harder than cubic BN. Because the prediction is quantitative, it sets the stage for a broad range of applications.

  12. Smooth cubic commensurate oxides on gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, Elizabeth A.; Gaddy, Benjamin E.; LeBeau, James M.; Shelton, Christopher T.; Losego, Mark D.; Mita, Seiji; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Irving, Douglas L.; Maria, Jon-Paul; Biegalski, Michael D.; Christen, Hans M.

    2014-02-14

    Smooth, commensurate alloys of 〈111〉-oriented Mg{sub 0.52}Ca{sub 0.48}O (MCO) thin films are demonstrated on Ga-polar, c+ [0001]-oriented GaN by surfactant-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and pulsed laser deposition. These are unique examples of coherent cubic oxide|nitride interfaces with structural and morphological perfection. Metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor structures were fabricated on n-type GaN. A comparison of leakage current density for conventional and surfactant-assisted growth reveals a nearly 100× reduction in leakage current density for the surfactant-assisted samples. HAADF-STEM images of the MCO|GaN interface show commensurate alignment of atomic planes with minimal defects due to lattice mismatch. STEM and DFT calculations show that GaN c/2 steps create incoherent boundaries in MCO over layers which manifest as two in-plane rotations and determine consequently the density of structural defects in otherwise coherent MCO. This new understanding of interfacial steps between HCP and FCC crystals identifies the steps needed to create globally defect-free heterostructures.

  13. Packaging Technology Designed, Fabricated, and Assembled for High-Temperature SiC Microsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu

    2003-01-01

    A series of ceramic substrates and thick-film metalization-based prototype microsystem packages designed for silicon carbide (SiC) high-temperature microsystems have been developed for operation in 500 C harsh environments. These prototype packages were designed, fabricated, and assembled at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Both the electrical interconnection system and the die-attach scheme for this packaging system have been tested extensively at high temperatures. Printed circuit boards used to interconnect these chip-level packages and passive components also are being fabricated and tested. NASA space and aeronautical missions need harsh-environment, especially high-temperature, operable microsystems for probing the inner solar planets and for in situ monitoring and control of next-generation aeronautical engines. Various SiC high-temperature-operable microelectromechanical system (MEMS) sensors, actuators, and electronics have been demonstrated at temperatures as high as 600 C, but most of these devices were demonstrated only in the laboratory environment partially because systematic packaging technology for supporting these devices at temperatures of 500 C and beyond was not available. Thus, the development of a systematic high-temperature packaging technology is essential for both in situ testing and the commercialization of high-temperature SiC MEMS. Researchers at Glenn developed new prototype packages for high-temperature microsystems using ceramic substrates (aluminum nitride and 96- and 90-wt% aluminum oxides) and gold (Au) thick-film metalization. Packaging components, which include a thick-film metalization-based wirebond interconnection system and a low-electrical-resistance SiC die-attachment scheme, have been tested at temperatures up to 500 C. The interconnection system composed of Au thick-film printed wire and 1-mil Au wire bond was tested in 500 C oxidizing air with and without 50-mA direct current for over 5000 hr. The Au thick-film

  14. SiC for Space Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellman, John

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes SiC mirrors that are large, ultra-lightweight, and actively controlled, for use in space telescopes. "Advanced Hybrid Mirrors” (AHMs) utilize SiC substrates, with embedded solid-state actuators, bonded to Nanolaminate metal foil reflective surfaces. They use replication techniques for high optical quality as well as rapid, low cost manufacturing. AHMs up to 1.35m in size have been made and tested, demonstrating wavefront error to better than the visible diffraction limit. AHMs can be fabricated at production rates after the first unit delivery as fast as 48 day intervals. "Superpolished Si/SiC Active Mirrors” (SSAMs) are similar to AHMs but the SiC mirror substrates have a layer of Si deposited on them to enable direct superpolishing. SSAMs can be much larger, can operate over a wider temperature range, and are better suited to UV astronomy. To make SSAMs larger than 1.8 m, multiple substrates can be joined together, using brazing techniques. Using wavefront sensing and control technology to command the embedded solid-state actuators, final mirror figure will be set after launch. This gives the active SiC mirror the ability to correct nearly any optical error, occurring anywhere in the optical system. As a result, active SiC mirrors can be made to relaxed figure requirements, enabling optical replication, or speeding up polishing, while assuring excellent final performance. Active SiC mirrors will reduce cost, risk and schedule for future astrophysics missions. Their high control authority allows relaxation of fabrication and assembly tolerances from optical to mechanical levels, speeding I & T. They enable rapid system testing to within required performance levels, even in 1 G, lowering mission risk. They are lighter weight and more durable than glass mirrors.

  15. Saturn V S-IC (First) Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This cutaway illustration shows the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage with detailed callouts of the components. The S-IC Stage is 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, producing 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through five F-1 engines that are powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines are mounted on an outer ring and gimbal for control purposes. The fifth engine is rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equals the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.

  16. Microwave joining of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Silberglitt, R.; Ahmad, I.; Tian, Y.L.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to optimize the properties of SiC-SiC joints made using microwave energy. The current focus is on identification of the most effective joining methods for scale-up to large tube assemblies, including joining using SiC produced in situ from chemical precursors. During FY 1996, a new microwave applicator was designed, fabricated and tested that provides the capability for vacuum baking of the specimens and insulation and for processing under inert environment. This applicator was used to join continuous fiber-reinforced (CFCC) SiC/SiC composites using a polymer precursor to form a SiC interlayer in situ.

  17. Saturn V S-IC (First) Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This illustration shows a cutaway drawing with callouts of the major components for the S-IC (first) stage of the Saturn V launch vehicle. The S-IC stage is 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, producing more than 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through five F-1 engines powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines are mounted on an outer ring and gimball for control purposes. The fifth engine is rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equals the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.

  18. Saturn V S-IC (First) Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    This is a cutaway view of the Saturn V first stage, known as the S-IC, detailing the five F-1 engines and fuel cells. The S-IC stage is 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, producing more than 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through the five F-1 engines that are powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines are mounted on an outer ring and gimbal for control purposes. The fifth engine is rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equals the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.

  19. SiC MEMS For Harsh Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    allowed for high g shock loading of a functioning SiC MEMS accelerometer , with published results [1]. 2 2 HIGH TEMPERATURE TESTING OF SiC Measuring...2800 °C, thus capable of being operated in the temperature range of 600-1000 °C [4,5]. The need for the mechanical properties (modulus) of these SiC...VOR-MELT rheometers used for mechanical modulus measurements had a solids fixture, which held both ends of a vertically oriented rectangular cross

  20. Automated reasoning about cubic curves.

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, R.; McCune, W.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Manitoba

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that the n-ary morphisms defined on projective algebraic curves satisfy some strong local-to-global equational rules of derivation not satisfied in general by universal algebras. For example, every rationally defined group law on a cubic curve must be commutative. Here we extract from the geometry of curves a first order property (gL) satisfied by all morphisms defined on these curves such that the equational consequences known for projective curves can be derived automatically from a set of six rules (stated within the first-order logic with equality). First, the rule (gL) is implemented in the theorem-proving program Otter. Then we use Otter to automatically prove some incidence theorems on projective curves without any further reference to the underlying geometry or topology of the curves.

  1. Strong visible electroluminescence from silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon carbide film

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, Chul Kim, Tae-Youb; Ahn, Chang-Geun; Kim, Bong Kyu

    2015-05-25

    We report the strong visible light emission from silicon (Si) nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in a Si carbide (SiC) film. Compared to Si NC light-emitting diode (LED) by employing the Si nitride (SiN{sub x}) film as a surrounding matrix, the turn-on voltage of the Si NC LED with the SiC film was significantly decreased by 4 V. This was attributed to a smaller barrier height for injecting the electrons into the Si NCs due to a smaller band gap of SiC film than a SiN{sub x} film. The electroluminescence spectra increases with increasing forward voltage, indicating that the electrons are efficiently injected into the Si NCs in the SiC film. The light output power shows a linear increase with increasing forward voltage. The light emission originated from the Si NCs in a SiC film was quite uniform. The power efficiency of the Si NC LED with the SiC film was 1.56 times larger than that of the Si NC LED with the SiN{sub x} film. The Si NCs in a SiC film show unique advantages and are a promising candidate for application in optical devices.

  2. Microwave joining of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Silberglitt, R.; Ahmad, I.; Black, W.M.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to optimize the properties of SiC-SiC joints made using microwave energy. The current focus is on optimization of time-temperature profiles, production of SiC from chemical precursors, and design of new applicators for joining of long tubes.

  3. Universal Converter Using SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Dallas Marckx; Brian Ratliff; Amit Jain; Matthew Jones

    2007-01-01

    The grantee designed a high power (over 1MW) inverter for use in renewable and distributed energy systems, such as PV cells, fuel cells, variable speed wind turbines, micro turbines, variable speed gensets and various energy storage methods. The inverter uses 10,000V SiC power devices which enable the use of a straight-forward topology for medium voltage (4,160VAC) without the need to cascade devices or topologies as is done in all commercial, 4,160VAC inverters today. The use of medium voltage reduces the current by nearly an order of magnitude in all current carrying components of the energy system, thus reducing size and cost. The use of SiC not only enables medium voltage, but also the use of higher temperatures and switching frequencies, further reducing size and cost. In this project, the grantee addressed several technical issues that stand in the way of success. The two primary issues addressed are the determination of real heat losses in candidate SiC devices at elevated temperature and the development of high temperature packaging for SiC devices.

  4. Passive SiC irradiation temperature monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.

    1996-04-01

    A new, improved passive irradiation temperature monitoring method was examined after an irradiation test at 627{degrees}C. The method is based on the analysis of thermal diffusivity changes during postirradiation annealing of polycrystalline SiC. Based on results from this test, several advantages for using this new method rather than a method based on length or lattice parameter changes are given.

  5. Development of SiC Large Tapered Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Phil

    2010-01-01

    Majority of very large potential benefits of wide band gap semiconductor power electronics have NOT been realized due in large part to high cost and high defect density of commercial wafers. Despite 20 years of development, present SiC wafer growth approach is yet to deliver majority of SiC's inherent performance and cost benefits to power systems. Commercial SiC power devices are significantly de-rated in order to function reliably due to the adverse effects of SiC crystal dislocation defects (thousands per sq cm) in the SiC wafer.

  6. Cubic scaling G W : Towards fast quasiparticle calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peitao; Kaltak, Merzuk; Klimeš, Jiří; Kresse, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Within the framework of the full potential projector-augmented wave methodology, we present a promising low-scaling G W implementation. It allows for quasiparticle calculations with a scaling that is cubic in the system size and linear in the number of k points used to sample the Brillouin zone. This is achieved by calculating the polarizability and self-energy in the real-space and imaginary-time domains. The transformation from the imaginary time to the frequency domain is done by an efficient discrete Fourier transformation with only a few nonuniform grid points. Fast Fourier transformations are used to go from real space to reciprocal space and vice versa. The analytic continuation from the imaginary to the real frequency axis is performed by exploiting Thiele's reciprocal difference approach. Finally, the method is applied successfully to predict the quasiparticle energies and spectral functions of typical semiconductors (Si, GaAs, SiC, and ZnO), insulators (C, BN, MgO, and LiF), and metals (Cu and SrVO3). The results are compared with conventional G W calculations. Good agreement is achieved, highlighting the strength of the present method.

  7. Cubic zirconia as a high-quality facet coating for semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, A. K.; Satyanarayan, A.; Zarrabi, J. H.; Vetterling, W.

    1988-08-01

    In this paper we describe the properties of high-quality, semiconductor laser facet coatings based on yttria-stabilizied cubic zirconia (90-m% ZrO2/10-m% Y2O3). We have found that cubic zirconia films can be reproducibly deposited by electron-beam evaporation with an index of refraction of 1.98 at 6328 Å, almost ideal for use as a single-layer antireflection coating for GaAs/GaAlAs-based lasers. ZrO2 has a monoclinic crystal structure at room temperature, but changes to tetragonal, hexagonal, and cubic phases upon heating to higher temperatures. However, the addition of the Y2O3 stabilizes ZrO2 in the cubic form, thus allowing electron-beam deposition of thin films of this material to be more controllable and reproducible without the usual addition of oxygen into the vacuum chamber during deposition. Preliminary aging tests of high-power GaAs/GaAlAs lasers show that cubic zirconia films suppress the photo-enhanced oxidation of laser facets that degrades device performance.

  8. Cubic spline functions for curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    FORTRAN cubic spline routine mathematically fits curve through given ordered set of points so that fitted curve nearly approximates curve generated by passing infinite thin spline through set of points. Generalized formulation includes trigonometric, hyperbolic, and damped cubic spline fits of third order.

  9. Low energy metastable states and immiscibility in (SiC)1-X-(AlN)X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Benjamin; van de Walle, Axel; Davydov, Albert; Vinograd, Victor

    2009-03-01

    A cluster expansion Hamiltonian was fit to VASP/PAW calculated supercell formation energies, δEf, and first principles based phase diagrams (miscibility gaps) were calculated for the wurtzite-structure pseudobinary system SiC1-XAlNX. An unusually wide range of 3 δEf 125 kJ/mole MX (M= Al, Si; X= N, C) was calculated and all supercells with δEf 8 kJ/mole exhibited characteristic (SiC)m(AlN)n crystallography, in which (SiC)m indicates m SiC-double layers to the hexagonal c-axis, and similarly for (AlN)n. The prediction of (SiC)m(AlN)n low-energy metastable states, may explain why one can synthesize SiC1-XAlNX films, or single crystals of arbitrary bulk composition, in spite of the very strong tendency toward immiscibility. Specifically, one expects that metastable films or single crystals will be dominated by a disordered stacking of SiC- and AlN-double layers.

  10. Multilayer epitaxial graphene grown on the SiC (000- 1) surface; structure and electronic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinkle, M.; Hicks, J.; Tejeda, A.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Le Fevre, P.; Bertran, F.; Tinkey, H.; Clark, M.C.; Soukiassian, P.; Martinotti, D.; Hass, J.; Conrad, E.H.

    2010-10-22

    We review the progress towards developing epitaxial graphene as a material for carbon electronics. In particular, we discuss improvements in epitaxial graphene growth, interface control and the understanding of multilayer epitaxial graphene's (MEG's) electronic properties. Although graphene grown on both polar faces of SiC will be discussed, our discussions will focus on graphene grown on the (000{bar 1}) C-face of SiC. The unique properties of C-face MEG have become apparent. These films behave electronically like a stack of nearly independent graphene sheets rather than a thin Bernal stacked graphite sample. The origins of multilayer graphene's electronic behaviour are its unique highly ordered stacking of non-Bernal rotated graphene planes. While these rotations do not significantly affect the inter-layer interactions, they do break the stacking symmetry of graphite. It is this broken symmetry that leads to each sheet behaving like isolated graphene planes.

  11. Ultrahard nanotwinned cubic boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yongjun; Xu, Bo; Yu, Dongli; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Jiang, Yingbing; Hu, Wentao; Tang, Chengchun; Gao, Yufei; Luo, Kun; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wang, Li-Min; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan

    2013-01-17

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) is a well known superhard material that has a wide range of industrial applications. Nanostructuring of cBN is an effective way to improve its hardness by virtue of the Hall-Petch effect--the tendency for hardness to increase with decreasing grain size. Polycrystalline cBN materials are often synthesized by using the martensitic transformation of a graphite-like BN precursor, in which high pressures and temperatures lead to puckering of the BN layers. Such approaches have led to synthetic polycrystalline cBN having grain sizes as small as ∼14 nm (refs 1, 2, 4, 5). Here we report the formation of cBN with a nanostructure dominated by fine twin domains of average thickness ∼3.8 nm. This nanotwinned cBN was synthesized from specially prepared BN precursor nanoparticles possessing onion-like nested structures with intrinsically puckered BN layers and numerous stacking faults. The resulting nanotwinned cBN bulk samples are optically transparent with a striking combination of physical properties: an extremely high Vickers hardness (exceeding 100 GPa, the optimal hardness of synthetic diamond), a high oxidization temperature (∼1,294 °C) and a large fracture toughness (>12 MPa m(1/2), well beyond the toughness of commercial cemented tungsten carbide, ∼10 MPa m(1/2)). We show that hardening of cBN is continuous with decreasing twin thickness down to the smallest sizes investigated, contrasting with the expected reverse Hall-Petch effect below a critical grain size or the twin thickness of ∼10-15 nm found in metals and alloys.

  12. The (3 × 2) β -SiC(001) surface reconstruction investigated by photoelectron diffraction in the backscattering regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, E. G.; Dunham, D.; Tejeda, A.; Soukiassian, P.; Rotenberg, E.; Denlinger, J. D.

    2006-03-01

    The atomic positions of the (3× 2) reconstruction of the cubic polytype of SiC(001) are determined by using photoelectron diffraction in the backscattering regime. The comparison of multiple scattering spherical wave calculations with experimental data favours a modified version of the two-adlayer asymmetric dimer model. The atomic positions in the reconstructed layers are obtained from an R-factor refinement analysis. Atoms in the outermost layer form asymmetric dimers with a corrugation of (0.25 ± 0.10) Å. The second layer is also dimerized and originates rows of long and short dimers.

  13. Cubical Sets and Trace Monoid Actions

    PubMed Central

    Husainov, Ahmet A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is devoted to connections between trace monoids and cubical sets. We prove that the category of trace monoids is isomorphic to the category of generalized tori and it is a reflective subcategory of the category of cubical sets. Adjoint functors between the categories of cubical sets and trace monoid actions are constructed. These functors carry independence preserving morphisms in the independence preserving morphisms. This allows us to build adjoint functors between the category of weak asynchronous systems and the category of higher dimensional automata. PMID:24453827

  14. Optical characterization of SiC wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J.C.; Pophristic, M.; Long, F.H.; Ferguson, I.

    1999-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate wafers of both 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC. The two-phonon Raman spectra from both 4H- and 6H-SiC have been measured and found to be polytype dependent, consistent with changes in the vibrational density of states. They have observed electronic Raman scattering from nitrogen defect levels in both 4H- and 6H-SiC at room temperature. They have found that electronic Raman scattering from the nitrogen defect levels is significantly enhanced with excitation by red or near IR laser light. These results demonstrate that the laser wavelength is a key parameter in the characterization of SiC by Raman scattering. These results suggest that Raman spectroscopy can be used as a noninvasive, in situ diagnostic for SiC wafer production and substrate evaluation. They also present results on time-resolved photoluminescence spectra of n-type SiC wafers.

  15. Polyimide nanocomposites based on cubic zirconium tungstate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasubramanian Sharma, Gayathri

    2009-12-01

    In this research, cubic zirconium tungstate (ZrW2O8) was used as a filler to reduce the CTE of polyimides (PI), and the effect of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles on the bulk polymer properties was studied. Polyimides are high performance polymers with exceptional thermal stability, and there is a need for PIs with low CTEs for high temperature applications. The nanofiller, cubic ZrW2O8, is well known for its isotropic negative thermal expansion (NTE) over a wide temperature range from -272.7 to 777°C. The preparation of nanocomposites involved the synthesis of ZrW 2O8 nanofiller, engineering the polymer-filler interface using linker groups and optimization of processing strategies to prepare free-standing PI nanocomposite films. A hydrothermal method was used to synthesize ZrW 2O8 nanoparticles. Polyimide-ZrW2O8 interface interaction was enhanced by covalently bonding linker moieties to the surface of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles. Specifically, ZrW 2O8 nanoparticles were functionalized with two different linker groups: (1) a short aliphatic silane, and (2) low molecular weight PI. The surface functionalization was confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Reprecipitation blending was used to prepare the freestanding PI-ZrW2O8 nanocomposite films with up to 15 volume% filler loading. SEM images showed the improvements in polymer-filler wetting behavior achieved using interface engineering. SEM images indicated that there was better filler dispersion in the PI matrix using reprecipitation blending, compared to the filler dispersion achieved in the nanocomposites prepared using conventional blending technique. The structure-property relationships in PI-ZrW2O8 nanocomposites were investigated by studying the thermal degradation, glass transition, tensile and thermal expansion properties of the nanocomposites. The properties were studied as a function of filler loading and interface linker groups. Addition of ZrW2O8 nanoparticles did not

  16. Biomechanical Analysis with Cubic Spline Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Thomas M.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Results of experimentation suggest that the cubic spline is a convenient and consistent method for providing an accurate description of displacement-time data and for obtaining the corresponding time derivatives. (MJB)

  17. Ultralight, Strong, Three-Dimensional SiC Structures.

    PubMed

    Chabi, Sakineh; Rocha, Victoria G; García-Tuñón, Esther; Ferraro, Claudio; Saiz, Eduardo; Xia, Yongde; Zhu, Yanqiu

    2016-02-23

    Ultralight and strong three-dimensional (3D) silicon carbide (SiC) structures have been generated by the carbothermal reduction of SiO with a graphene foam (GF). The resulting SiC foams have an average height of 2 mm and density ranging between 9 and 17 mg cm(-3). They are the lightest reported SiC structures. They consist of hollow struts made from ultrathin SiC flakes and long 1D SiC nanowires growing from the trusses, edges, and defect sites between layers. AFM results revealed an average flake thickness of 2-3 nm and lateral size of 2 μm. In-situ compression tests in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) show that, compared with most of the existing lightweight foams, the present 3D SiC exhibited superior compression strengths and significant recovery after compression strains of about 70%.

  18. Great Plains makes 100 billion cubic feet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    The Great Plains coal gasification plant on January 18, 1987 produced its 100 billionth cubic foot of gas since start-up July 28, 1984. Owned by the Department of Energy and operated by ANG Coal Gasification Company, the plant uses the Lurgi process to produce about 50 billion cubic feet per year of gas from five million tons per year of lignite. The plant has been performing at well above design capacity.

  19. Structural and magnetic properties of irradiated SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yutian; Helm, Manfred; Chen, Xuliang; Yang, Zhaorong; Li, Lin; Shalimov, Artem; Prucnal, Slawomir; Munnik, Frans; Skorupa, Wolfgang; Zhou, Shengqiang; Tong, Wei

    2014-05-07

    We present a comprehensive structural characterization of ferromagnetic SiC single crystals induced by Ne ion irradiation. The ferromagnetism has been confirmed by electron spin resonance, and possible transition metal impurities can be excluded to be the origin of the observed ferromagnetism. Using X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectroscopy, we estimate the damage to the crystallinity of SiC, which mutually influences the ferromagnetism in SiC.

  20. Corrosion resistance of sintered NdFeB coated with SiC/Al bilayer thin films by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yiqin; Li, Heqin; Zuo, Min; Tao, Lei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Tang, Qiong; Bai, Peiwen

    2016-07-01

    The poor corrosion resistance of sintered NdFeB imposes a great challenge in industrial applications. In this work, the SiC/Al bilayer thin films with the thickness of 510 nm were deposited on sintered NdFeB by magnetron sputtering to improve the corrosion resistance. A 100 nm Al buffer film was used to reduce the internal stress between SiC and NdFeB and improve the surface roughness of the SiC thin film. The morphologies and structures of SiC/Al bilayer thin films and SiC monolayer film were investigated with FESEM, AFM and X-ray diffraction. The corrosion behaviors of sintered NdFeB coated with SiC monolayer film and SiC/Al bilayer thin films were analyzed by polarization curves. The magnetic properties were measured with an ultra-high coercivity permanent magnet pulse tester. The results show that the surface of SiC/Al bilayer thin films is more compact and uniform than that of SiC monolayer film. The corrosion current densities of SiC/Al bilayer films coated on NdFeB in acid, alkali and salt solutions are much lower than that of SiC monolayer film. The SiC/Al bilayer thin films have little influence to the magnetic properties of NdFeB.

  1. SiC Power MOSFET with Improved Gate Dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Sbrockey, Nick M; Tompa, Gary S; Spencer, Michael G; Chandrashekhar, Chandra MVS

    2010-08-23

    In this STTR program, Structured Materials Industries (SMI), and Cornell University are developing novel gate oxide technology, as a critical enabler for silicon carbide (SiC) devices. SiC is a wide bandgap semiconductor material, with many unique properties. SiC devices are ideally suited for high-power, highvoltage, high-frequency, high-temperature and radiation resistant applications. The DOE has expressed interest in developing SiC devices for use in extreme environments, in high energy physics applications and in power generation. The development of transistors based on the Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) structure will be critical to these applications.

  2. Paralinear Oxidation of CVD SiC in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Hann, Raiford E., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of CVD SiC were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in a 50% H2O/50% O2 gas mixture flowing at 4.4 cm/s for temperatures between 1200 and 1400 C. Paralinear weight change kinetics were observed as the water vapor oxidized the SiC and simultaneously volatilized the silica scale. The long-term degradation rate of SiC is determined by the volatility of the silica scale. Rapid SiC surface recession rates were estimated from these data for actual aircraft engine combustor conditions.

  3. Formation of cubic boron-nitride by the reactive sputter deposition of boron

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Hayes, J.P.; Makowiecki, D.W.; McKeman, M.A.

    1997-03-01

    Boron-nitride films are synthesized by RF magnetron sputtering boron targets where the deposition parameters of gas pressure, flow and composition are varied along with substrate temperature and applied bias. The films are analyzed using Auger electron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, nanoindentation, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. These techniques provide characterization of film composition, crystalline structure, hardness and chemical bonding, respectively. Reactive, rf-sputtering process parameters are established which lead to the growth of crystalline BN phases. The deposition of stable and adherent boron nitride coatings consisting of the cubic phase requires 400 `C substrate heating and the application of a 300 V negative bias.

  4. Wetting of polycrystalline SiC by molten Al and Al-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Xiao-Shuang; Shen, Ping; Wang, Yi; Jiang, Qichuan

    2014-10-01

    The wetting of α-SiC by molten Al and Al-Si alloys was investigated using a dispensed sessile drop method in a high vacuum. In the Al-SiC system, representative wetting stages were identified. The liquid spreading was initially controlled by the deoxidation of the SiC surface and then by the formation of Al4C3 at the interface. The intrinsic contact angle for molten Al on the polycrystalline α-SiC surface was suggested to be lower than 90̊ provided that the oxide films covering the Al and SiC surfaces were removed, i.e., the system is partial wetting in nature. An increase in the Si concentration in liquid Al weakened the interfacial reaction but improved the final wettability. The role of the Si addition on the wetting was presumably attributed to its segregation at the interface and the formation of strong chemical bonds with the SiC surface.

  5. SIC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2003-12-01

    A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. SiC macro-porous membranes have been successfully fabricated via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder. Also, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was prepared via our CVD/I technique. This composite membrane demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers and sol-gel techniques. Building upon the positive progress made in the membrane development study, we conducted an optimization study to develop an H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment. In addition, mathematical simulation has been performed to compare the performance of the membrane reactor (MR) vs conventional packed bed reactor for WGS reaction. Our result demonstrates that >99.999% conversion can be accomplished via WGS-MR using the hydrogen selective membrane developed by us. Further, water/CO ratio can be reduced, and >97% hydrogen recovery and <200 ppm CO can be accomplished according to the mathematical simulation. Thus, we believe that the operating economics of WGS can be improved significantly based upon the proposed MR concept. In parallel, gas separations and hydrothermal and long-term-storage stability of the

  6. Electronic structure of epitaxial graphene layers on SiC: effects of the substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Varchon, F.; Feng, R.; Hass, J.; Li, X.; Nguyen, B. Ngoc; Naud, C.; Mallet, P.; Veuillen, J.-Y.; Berger, C.; Conrad, E.H.; Magaud, L.

    2008-10-17

    A strong substrate-graphite bond is found in the first all-carbon layer by density functional theory calculations and x-ray diffraction for few graphene layers grown epitaxially on SiC. This first layer is devoid of graphene electronic properties and acts as a buffer layer. The graphene nature of the film is recovered by the second carbon layer grown on both the (0001) and (0001{sup -}) 4H-SiC surfaces. We also present evidence of a charge transfer that depends on the interface geometry. Hence the graphene is doped and a gap opens at the Dirac point after three Bernal stacked carbon layers are formed.

  7. Single-crystal cubic silicon carbide: an in vivo biocompatible semiconductor for brain machine interface devices.

    PubMed

    Frewin, Christopher L; Locke, Christopher; Saddow, Stephen E; Weeber, Edwin J

    2011-01-01

    Single crystal silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide band-gap semiconductor which has shown both bio- and hemo-compatibility [1-5]. Although single crystalline SiC has appealing bio-sensing potential, the material has not been extensively characterized. Cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) has superior in vitro biocompatibility compared to its hexagonal counterparts [3, 5]. Brain machine interface (BMI) systems using implantable neuronal prosthetics offer the possibility of bi-directional signaling, which allow sensory feedback and closed loop control. Existing implantable neural interfaces have limited long-term reliability, and 3C-SiC may be a material that may improve that reliability. In the present study, we investigated in vivo 3C-SiC biocompatibility in the CNS of C56BL/6 mice. 3C-SiC was compared against the known immunoreactive response of silicon (Si) at 5, 10, and 35 days. The material was examined to detect CD45, a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) expressed by activated microglia and macrophages. The 3C-SiC surface revealed limited immunoresponse and significantly reduced microglia compared to Si substrate.

  8. Superhard BC3 in cubic diamond structure

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Miao; Liu, Hanyu; Li, Quan; ...

    2015-01-06

    We solve the crystal structure of recently synthesized cubic BC3 using an unbiased swarm structure search, which identifies a highly symmetric BC3 phase in the cubic diamond structure (d–BC3) that contains a distinct B-B bonding network along the body diagonals of a large 64-atom unit cell. Simulated x-ray diffraction and Raman peaks of d–BC3 are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Calculated stress-strain relations of d–BC3 demonstrate its intrinsic superhard nature and reveal intriguing sequential bond-breaking modes that produce superior ductility and extended elasticity, which are unique among superhard solids. Here, the present results establish the first boron carbide inmore » the cubic diamond structure with remarkable properties, and these new findings also provide insights for exploring other covalent solids with complex bonding configurations.« less

  9. Nano-Engineered Cubic Zirconia for Orthopaedic Implant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namavar, F.; Rubinstein, A.; Sabirianov, R.; Thiele, G.; Sharp, J.; Pokharel, U.; Namavar, R.; Garvin, K.

    2012-02-01

    Osseointegration failure of the prosthesis prevents long-term stability, which contributes to pain, implant loosening, and infection that usually necessitates revision surgery. Cell attachment and spreading in vitro is generally mediated by adhesive proteins such as fibronectin and vitronectin. We designed and produced pure cubic zirconia (ZrO2) ceramic coatings by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) with nanostructures comparable to the size of proteins. Our ceramic coatings exhibit high hardness and a zero contact angle with serum. In contrast to Hydroxyapatite (HA), nano-engineered zirconia films possess excellent adhesion to all orthopaedic materials. Adhesion and proliferation experiments were performed with a bona fide mesenchymal stromal cells cell line (OMA-AD). Our experimental results indicated that nano-engineered cubic zirconia is superior in supporting growth, adhesion, and proliferation. We performed a comparative analysis of adsorption energies of the FN fragment using quantum mechanical calculations and Monte Carlo simulation on both types of surfaces: smooth and nanostructured. We have found that the initial FN fragment adsorbs significantly stronger on the nanostructured surface than on the smooth surface.

  10. Porous silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A semiconductor device employs at least one layer of semiconducting porous silicon carbide (SiC). The porous SiC layer has a monocrystalline structure wherein the pore sizes, shapes, and spacing are determined by the processing conditions. In one embodiment, the semiconductor device is a p-n junction diode in which a layer of n-type SiC is positioned on a p-type layer of SiC, with the p-type layer positioned on a layer of silicon dioxide. Because of the UV luminescent properties of the semiconducting porous SiC layer, it may also be utilized for other devices such as LEDs and optoelectronic devices.

  11. Three-dimensional crystalline SiC nanowire flowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ghim Wei; Weng Wong, Andrew See; Kang, Dae-Joon; Welland, Mark E.

    2004-08-01

    Several techniques have already been developed for synthesizing silicon carbide (SiC) material in the form of nanospheres and nanowires/rods. Here, we report the synthesis of a distinctly different kind of SiC nanostructure in the form of three-dimensional crystalline nanowire-based flower-like structures. Interest in such structures centres around the combination of a simple growth process based on SiC nanowire formation, with a resultant structure having potentially complex mechanical and optical properties, the latter a consequence of the wide band gap of bulk SiC. The synthesis of these SiC nanowire flowers is via a vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) process, on which a detailed study of both the chemical and structural composition has been carried out.

  12. Purely cubic action for string field theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, G. T.; Lykken, J.; Rohm, R.; Strominger, A.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that Witten's (1986) open-bosonic-string field-theory action and a closed-string analog can be written as a purely cubic interaction term. The conventional form of the action arises by expansion around particular solutions of the classical equations of motion. The explicit background dependence of the conventional action via the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin operator is eliminated in the cubic formulation. A closed-form expression is found for the full nonlinear gauge-transformation law.

  13. Electrical transport in three-dimensional cubic Skyrmion crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional magnetic Skyrmions have been well confirmed via various experimental techniques in the bulk or on epitaxial thin films. Besides, a topologically nontrivial three-dimensional cubic Skyrmion crystal in the bulk, which is essentially a hedgehog-antihedgehog pair texture predicted theoretically, has also been tentatively observed. Equipped with a sophisticated spectral analysis program, we adopt Matsubara Green's function technique to study electrical transport, especially diagonal conductivity, in such system. We consider conduction electrons interacting with spinwaves via the strong Hund's rule coupling, wherein fluctuation of monopolar emergent electromagnetic field exits within adiabatic approximation. We describe in detail the influence of temperature and Skyrmion number on both dc and ac conductivities. Possible deviation from Fermi liquid behavior will also be discussed.

  14. Effects of silicon-on-insulator substrate on the residual stress within 3C-SiC/Si thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.-H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.-T.; Jang, S.-J.; Moon, C.-K.; Song, H.-J.

    2003-09-01

    Single-crystalline 3C-SiC heteroepitaxial layers were grown on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and Si wafers, to investigate effects of SOI substrates on the film quality. Residual stress measurement using a laser scan method and the Raman scattering spectroscopy indicated that internal stress within SiC films on SOI were indeed reduced, when compared with that of SiC films on Si.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of adherent hexagonal/cubic boron nitride layer systems at high growth rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weißmantel, Steffen; Reiße, Günter

    2002-09-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films were prepared by ion-beam-assisted pulsed laser deposition (IAPLD) using a KrF excimer laser for ablation. The c-BN growth rates of 50 nm/min at relatively low substrate temperatures of 250 °C were achieved by using high laser energy densities of more than 30 J/cm 2 and at ion beam energies of 600-700 eV. Main advantage of IAPLD for the deposition of c-BN films is that at high laser energy densities the ratio of ions from the ion beam to ablated atoms and ions necessary for cubic film growth can be reduced to 0.14, since the ablated boron and nitrogen species themselves have high mean kinetic energies of 130-180 eV. By using pulsed laser deposited h-BN intermediate layers, 300-420 nm thick well-adherent c-BN films can be prepared on Si and WC hard metal substrates. The maximum c-BN film thickness of some 0.5 μm is limited by the accumulation of particulates, formed during the ablation process, in the films. The microstructure, stress, hardness and adhesion of such layer systems deposited at high growth rates are presented.

  16. A monotonicity conjecture for real cubic maps

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, S.P.; Galeeva, R.; Milnor, J.; Tresser, C.

    1993-12-01

    This will be an outline of work in progress. We study the conjecture that the topological entropy of a real cubic map depends ``monotonely`` on its parameters, in the sense that each locus of constant entropy in parameter space is a connected set. This material will be presented in more detail in a later paper.

  17. Bottom-up engineering of the surface roughness of nanostructured cubic zirconia to control cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Singh, A V; Ferri, M; Tamplenizza, M; Borghi, F; Divitini, G; Ducati, C; Lenardi, C; Piazzoni, C; Merlini, M; Podestà, A; Milani, P

    2012-11-30

    Nanostructured cubic zirconia is a strategic material for biomedical applications since it combines superior structural and optical properties with a nanoscale morphology able to control cell adhesion and proliferation. We produced nanostructured cubic zirconia thin films at room temperature by supersonic cluster beam deposition of nanoparticles produced in the gas phase. Precise control of film roughness at the nanoscale is obtained by operating in a ballistic deposition regime. This allows one to study the influence of nanoroughness on cell adhesion, while keeping the surface chemistry constant. We evaluated cell adhesion on nanostructured zirconia with an osteoblast-like cell line using confocal laser scanning microscopy for detailed morphological and cytoskeleton studies. We demonstrated that the organization of cytoskeleton and focal adhesion formation can be controlled by varying the evolution of surface nanoroughness.

  18. Fabrication of large aperture SiC brazing mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ang; Wang, Peipei; Dong, Huiwen; Wang, Peng

    2016-10-01

    The SiC brazing mirror is the mirror whose blank is made by assembling together smaller SiC pieces with brazing technique. Using such kinds of joining techniques, people can manufacture large and complex SiC assemblies. The key technologies of fabricating and testing SiC brazing flat mirror especially for large aperture were studied. The SiC brazing flat mirror was ground by smart ultrasonic-milling machine, and then it was lapped by the lapping smart robot and measured by Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM). After the PV of the surface below 4um, we did classic coarse polishing to the surface and studied the shape of the polishing tool which directly effects removal amount distribution. Finally, it was figured by the polishing smart robot and measured by Fizeau interferometer. We also studied the influence of machining path and removal functions of smart robots on the manufacturing results and discussed the use of abrasive in this process. At last, an example for fabricating and measuring a similar SiC brazing flat mirror with the aperture of 600 mm made by Shanghai Institute of Ceramics was given. The mirror blank consists of 6 SiC sectors and the surface was finally processed to a result of the Peak-to-Valley (PV) 150nm and Root Mean Square (RMS) 12nm.

  19. Compatibility of SiC and SiC Composites with Molten Lead

    SciTech Connect

    H Tunison

    2006-03-07

    The choice of structural material candidates to contain Lead at 1000 C are limited in number. Silicon carbide composites comprise one choice of possible containment materials. Short term screening studies (120 hours) were undertaken to study the behavior of Silicon Carbide, Silicon Nitride, elemental Silicon and various Silicon Carbide fiber composites focusing mainly on melt infiltrated composites. Isothermal experiments at 1000 C utilized graphite fixtures to contain the Lead and material specimens under a low oxygen partial pressure environment. The corrosion weight loss values (grams/cm{sup 2} Hr) obtained for each of the pure materials showed SiC (monolithic CVD or Hexoloy) to have the best materials compatibility with Lead at this temperature. Increased weight loss values were observed for pure Silicon Nitride and elemental Silicon. For the SiC fiber composite samples those prepared using a SiC matrix material performed better than Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} as a matrix material. Composites prepared using a silicon melt infiltration process showed larger corrosion weight loss values due to the solubility of silicon in lead at these temperatures. When excess silicon was removed from these composite samples the corrosion performance for these material improved. These screening studies were used to guide future long term exposure (both isothermal and non-isothermal) experiments and Silicon Carbide composite fabrication work.

  20. Characterisation of SiC by IBIC and other IBA techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, M.; Bošnjak, Ž.; Gracin, D.; Medunić, Z.; Pastuović, Ž.; Vittone, E.; Nava, F.

    2002-04-01

    Several new technological applications of silicon carbide have attracted significant attention in recent years. As a wide gap semiconductor it has the capability to be used as a room temperature radiation detector. For most applications, material properties like homogeneity of charge transport, presence of defects, resistance to radiation damage, influence of light impurities (such as hydrogen) are of prime importance. Two different kinds of samples, crystalline (4H-SiC) and thin, amorphous (a-Si 1- xC x:H) films, were studied using ion beam techniques. In the case of SiC single crystal radiation detectors, Li and proton beams with a wide range of energies were used to probe the charge collection efficiency at different device depths using the ion beam induced charge technique. Thin, amorphous and microcrystalline Si 1- xC x:H films with a different stoichiometry and different degrees of structural ordering were examined using RBS and ERDA.

  1. ICP Etching of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Grow, J.M.; Lambers, E.S.; Ostling, M.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Wang, J.J.; Zetterling, C.-M.

    1999-02-04

    A number of different plasma chemistries, including NF{sub 3}/O{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}/Ar, ICl, IBr, Cl{sub 2}/Ar, BCl{sub 3}/Ar and CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar, have been investigated for dry etching of 6H and 3C-SiC in a Inductively Coupled Plasma tool. Rates above 2,000 {angstrom} cm{sup {minus}1} are found with fluorine-based chemistries at high ion currents. Surprisingly, Cl{sub 2}-based etching does not provide high rates, even though the potential etch products (SiCi{sub 4} and CCl{sub 4}) are volatile. Photoresist masks have poor selectivity over SiC in F{sub 2}-based plasmas under normal conditions, and ITO or Ni are preferred.

  2. Growth and electrical characterization of two-dimensional layered MoS{sub 2}/SiC heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Edwin W.; Nath, Digbijoy N.; Lee, Choong Hee; Arehart, Aaron; Ma, Lu; Wu, Yiying; Rajan, Siddharth

    2014-11-17

    The growth and electrical characterization of the heterojunction formed between two-dimensional (2D) layered p-molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) and nitrogen-doped 4H silicon carbide (SiC) are reported. The integration of 2D semiconductors with the conventional three-dimensional (3D) substrates could enable semiconductor heterostructures with unprecedented properties. In this work, direct growth of p-type MoS{sub 2} films on SiC was demonstrated using chemical vapor deposition, and the MoS{sub 2} films were found to be high quality based on x-ray diffraction and Raman spectra. The resulting heterojunction was found to display rectification and current-voltage characteristics consistent with a diode for which forward conduction in the low-bias region is dominated by multi-step recombination tunneling. Capacitance-voltage measurements were used to determine the built-in voltage for the p-MoS{sub 2}/n-SiC heterojunction diode, and we propose an energy band line up for the heterostructure based on these observations. The demonstration of heterogeneous material integration between MoS{sub 2} and SiC enables a promising new class of 2D/3D heterostructures.

  3. SiC Composite Turbine Vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Verilli, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Turbine inlet guide vanes have been fabricated from composites of silicon carbide fibers in silicon carbide matrices. A unique design for a cloth made from SiC fibers makes it possible to realize the geometric features necessary to form these vanes in the same airfoil shapes as those of prior metal vanes. The fiber component of each of these vanes was made from SiC-fiber cloth coated with boron nitride. The matrix was formed by chemical-vapor infiltration with SiC, then slurry-casting of SiC, followed by melt infiltration with silicon. These SiC/SiC vanes were found to be capable of withstanding temperatures 400 F (222 C) greater than those that can be withstood by nickel-base-superalloy turbine airfoils now in common use in gas turbine engines. The higher temperature capability of SiC/SiC parts is expected to make it possible to use them with significantly less cooling than is used for metallic parts, thereby enabling engines to operate more efficiently while emitting smaller amounts of NOx and CO. The SiC/SiC composite vanes were fabricated in two different configurations. Each vane of one of the configurations has two internal cavities formed by a web between the suction and the pressure sides of the vane. Each vane of the other configuration has no web (see Figure 1). It is difficult to fabricate components having small radii, like those of the trailing edges of these vanes, by use of stiff stoichiometric SiC fibers currently preferred for SiC/SiC composites. To satisfy the severe geometric and structural requirements for these vanes, the aforementioned unique cloth design, denoted by the term Y-cloth, was conceived (see Figure 2). In the regions away from the trailing edge, the Y-cloth features a fiber architecture that had been well characterized and successfully demonstrated in combustor liners. To form a sharp trailing edge (having a radius of 0.3 mm), the cloth was split into two planes during the weaving process. The fiber tows forming the trailing

  4. REVIEW ARTICLE: SiC sensors: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, N. G.; Horsfall, A. B.

    2007-10-01

    Silicon carbide has attracted considerable attention in recent years as a potential material for sensor devices. This paper reviews the current status of SiC technology for a wide range of sensor applications. It is shown that SiC MEMs devices are well-established with operational devices demonstrated at high temperatures (up to 500 °C) for the sensing of motion, acceleration and gas flow. SiC sensors devices using electrical properties as the sensing mechanism have also been demonstrated principally for gas composition and radiation detection and have wide potential use in scientific, medical and combustion monitoring applications.

  5. Polymer precursors for SiC ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Morton H.

    1986-01-01

    Work on precursor polymers to SiC was performed, concentrating on polymers made from decamethyl cyclohexasilyene units. The initial approach was to synthesize mixed diphenyl decamethyl cyclohexasilane, dephenylate, and polymerize. This produced polymers which had yields of up to 50 percent SiC. (Theoretical yield is 75 percent). The present approach is to make the polymer through the intermediate trans-1,4-diphenyl decamethyl cyclohexasilane. This should produce a crystalline polymer and high strength fibers. These will be thermally decomposed to SiC fibers. This requires new chemistry which is currently being studied.

  6. Bubble formation in oxide scales on SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mieskowski, D. M.; Mitchell, T. E.; Heuer, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation of alpha-SiC single crystals and sintered alphaand beta-SiC polycrystals has been investigated at elevated temperatures. Bubble formation is commonly observed in oxide scales on polycrystalline SiC, but is rarely found on single-crystal scales; bubbles result from the preferential oxidation of C inclusions, which are abundant in SiC polycrystals. The absence of bubbles on single crystals, in fact, implies that diffusion of the gaseous species formed on oxidation, CO (or possibly SiO), controls the rate of oxidation of SiC.

  7. Quantification Of 4H- To 3C-Polymorphism In Silicon Carbide (SiC) Epilayers And An Investigation Of Recombination-Enhanced Dislocation Motion In SiC By Optical Emission Microscopy (Oem) Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speer, Kevin M.

    2004-01-01

    Environments that impose operational constraints on conventional silicon-(Si) based semiconductor devices frequently appear in military- and space-grade applications. These constraints include high temperature, high power, and high radiation environments. Silicon carbide (SiC), an alternative type of semiconductor material, has received abundant research attention in the past few years, owing to its radiation-hardened properties as well as its capability to withstand high temperatures and power levels. However, the growth and manufacture of SiC devices is still comparatively immature, and there are severe limitations in present crystal growth and device fabrication processes. Among these limitations is a variety of crystal imperfections known as defects. These imperfections can be point defects (e.g., vacancies and interstitials), line defects (e.g., edge and screw dislocations), or planar defects (e.g., stacking faults and double-positioning boundaries). All of these defects have been experimentally shown to be detrimental to the performance of electron devices made from SiC. As such, it is imperative that these defects are significantly reduced in order for SiC devices to become a viable entity in the electronics world. The NASA Glenn High Temperature Integrated Electronics & Sensors Team (HTIES) is working to identify and eliminate these defects in SiC by implementing improved epitaxial crystal growth procedures. HTIES takes two-inch SiC wafers and etches patterns, producing thousands of mesas into each wafer. Crystal growth is then carried out on top of these mesas in an effort to produce films of improved quality-resulting in electron devices that demonstrate superior performance-as well as fabrication processes that are cost-effective, reliable, and reproducible. In this work, further steps are taken to automate HTIES' SiC wafer inspection system. National Instruments LabVIEW image processing and pattern recognition routines are developed that are capable of

  8. Ytterbium: Transition at High Pressure from Face-Centered Cubic to Body-Centered Cubic Structure.

    PubMed

    Hall, H T; Barnett, J D; Merrill, L

    1963-01-11

    Pressure of 40,000 atmospheres at 25 degrees C induces a phase transformation in ytterbium metal; the face-centered cubic structure changes to body-centered cubic. The radius of the atom changes from 1.82 to 1.75 A. At the same time the atom's volume decreases by 11 percent and the volume, observed macroscopically, decreases 3.2 percent.

  9. Characteristics of Commercial SiC and Synthetic SiC as an Aggregate in Geopolymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfanita, R.; Afifah, K. N.; Asrianti; Subaer

    2017-03-01

    This main objective of this study is to investigate the effect silicon carbide (SiC) as an aggregate on the mechanical strength and microstructure of the geopolymer composites. The geopolymers binder were produced by using alkaline activation method of metakaolin and cured at 70oC for 2 hours. In this study commercial and synthetic SiC were used as aggregate to produce composite structure. Synthetic SiC was produced from rice husk ash and coconut shell carbon calcined at 750oC for 2 hours. The addition of SiC in geopolymers paste was varied from 0.25g, 0.50g to 0.75g to form geopolymers composites. The chemical compositions and crystallinity level of SiC and the resulting composites were measured by means of Rigaku MiniFlexII X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The microstructure of SiC and the composites were examined by using Tescan Vega3SB Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The physical and mechanical properties of the samples were determined based on apparent porosity, bulk density, and three bending flexural strength measurements. The results showed that the commercial and synthetic SiC were effectively produced geopolymers composites with different microstructure, physical and mechanical strength.

  10. Grain growth and phase stability of nanocrystalline cubic zirconia under ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwen; Jiang, Weilin; Wang, Chong M.; Namavar, Fereydoon; Edmondson, Philip D.; Zhu, Zihua; Gao, Fei; Lian, Jie; Weber, William J.

    2010-11-10

    Grain growth, oxygen stoichiometry and phase stability of nanostructurally-stabilized zirconia (NSZ) in pure cubic phase are investigated under 2 MeV Au ion bombardment at 160 and 400 K to doses up to 35 displacements per atom (dpa). The NSZ films are produced by ion-beam-assisted deposition technique at room temperature with an average grain size of 7.7 nm. The grain size increases with dose, and follows a power law (n=6) to a saturation value of ~30 nm that decreases with temperature. Slower grain growth is observed under 400 K irradiations, as compared to 160 K irradiations, indicating that thermal grain growth is not activated and defect-stimulated grain growth is the dominating mechanism. While cubic phase is perfectly retained and no new phases are identified after the high-dose irradiations, reduction of oxygen in the irradiated NSZ films is detected. The ratio of O to Zr decreases from ~2.0 for the as-deposited films to ~1.65 after irradiation to ~35 dpa. Significant increase of oxygen vacancies in nanocrystalline zirconia suggests substantially enhanced oxygen diffusion under ion irradiation, a materials behavior far from equilibrium. The oxygen deficiency may be essential in stabilizing cubic phase to larger grain sizes.

  11. SiC formation for a solar cell passivation layer using an RF magnetron co-sputtering system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a method of amorphous silicon carbide film formation for a solar cell passivation layer. The film was deposited on p-type silicon (100) and glass substrates by an RF magnetron co-sputtering system using a Si target and a C target at a room-temperature condition. Several different SiC [Si1-xCx] film compositions were achieved by controlling the Si target power with a fixed C target power at 150 W. Then, structural, optical, and electrical properties of the Si1-xCx films were studied. The structural properties were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The optical properties were achieved by UV-visible spectroscopy and ellipsometry. The performance of Si1-xCx passivation was explored by carrier lifetime measurement. PMID:22221730

  12. 193 nm deep-ultraviolet solar-blind cubic boron nitride based photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, A.; Barkad, H. A.; Mattalah, M.; Benbakhti, B.; De Jaeger, J.-C.; Chong, Y. M.; Zou, Y. S.; Zhang, W. J.; Lee, S. T.; BenMoussa, A.; Giordanengo, B.; Hochedez, J.-F.

    2008-02-01

    Deep-ultraviolet (DUV) solar-blind photodetectors based on high-quality cubic boron nitride (cBN) films with a metal/semiconductor/metal configuration were fabricated. The design of interdigitated circular electrodes enables high homogeneity of electric field between pads. The DUV photodetectors present a peak responsivity at 180nm with a very sharp cutoff wavelength at 193nm and a visible rejection ratio (180 versus 250nm) of more than four orders of magnitude. The characteristics of the photodetectors present extremely low dark current, high breakdown voltage, and high responsivity, suggesting that cBN films are very promising for DUV sensing.

  13. Liquid water in the domain of cubic crystalline ice Ic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Banham, S. F.; Blake, D. F.; McCoustra, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    Vapor-deposited amorphous water ice when warmed above the glass transition temperature (120-140 K), is a viscous liquid which exhibits a viscosity vs temperature relationship different from that of liquid water at room temperature. New studies of thin water ice films now demonstrate that viscous liquid water persists in the temperature range 140-210 K. where it coexists with cubic crystalline ice. The liquid character of amorphous water above the glass transition is demonstrated by (1) changes in the morphology of water ice films on a nonwetting surface observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at around 175 K during slow warming, (2) changes in the binding energy of water molecules measured in temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies, and (3) changes in the shape of the 3.07 micrometers absorption band observed in grazing angle reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) during annealing at high temperature. whereby the decreased roughness of the water surface is thought to cause changes in the selection rules for the excitation of O-H stretch vibrations. Because it is present over such a wide range of temperatures, we propose that this form of liquid water is a common material in nature. where it is expected to exist in the subsurface layers of comets and on the surfaces of some planets and satellites.

  14. Liquid water in the domain of cubic crystalline ice Ic.

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, P; Banham, S F; Blake, D F; McCoustra, M R

    1997-07-22

    Vapor-deposited amorphous water ice when warmed above the glass transition temperature (120-140 K), is a viscous liquid which exhibits a viscosity vs temperature relationship different from that of liquid water at room temperature. New studies of thin water ice films now demonstrate that viscous liquid water persists in the temperature range 140-210 K. where it coexists with cubic crystalline ice. The liquid character of amorphous water above the glass transition is demonstrated by (1) changes in the morphology of water ice films on a nonwetting surface observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at around 175 K during slow warming, (2) changes in the binding energy of water molecules measured in temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies, and (3) changes in the shape of the 3.07 micrometers absorption band observed in grazing angle reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) during annealing at high temperature. whereby the decreased roughness of the water surface is thought to cause changes in the selection rules for the excitation of O-H stretch vibrations. Because it is present over such a wide range of temperatures, we propose that this form of liquid water is a common material in nature. where it is expected to exist in the subsurface layers of comets and on the surfaces of some planets and satellites.

  15. Wavelets based on Hermite cubic splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvejnová, Daniela; Černá, Dana; Finěk, Václav

    2016-06-01

    In 2000, W. Dahmen et al. designed biorthogonal multi-wavelets adapted to the interval [0,1] on the basis of Hermite cubic splines. In recent years, several more simple constructions of wavelet bases based on Hermite cubic splines were proposed. We focus here on wavelet bases with respect to which both the mass and stiffness matrices are sparse in the sense that the number of nonzero elements in any column is bounded by a constant. Then, a matrix-vector multiplication in adaptive wavelet methods can be performed exactly with linear complexity for any second order differential equation with constant coefficients. In this contribution, we shortly review these constructions and propose a new wavelet which leads to improved Riesz constants. Wavelets have four vanishing wavelet moments.

  16. Face-Centered-Cubic Nanostructured Polymer Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, C.; Baughman, R. H.; Liu, L. M.; Zakhidov, A. A.; Khayrullin, I. I.

    1998-03-01

    Beautifully iridescent polymer foams having Fm-3m cubic symmetry and periodicities on the scale of the wavelength of light have been synthesized by the templating of porous synthetic opals. These fabrication processes involve the filling of porous SiO2 opals (with typical cubic lattice parameters of 250 nm) with either polymers or polymer precursors, polymerization of the precursors if necessary, and removal of the fcc array of SiO2 balls to provide an all-polymer structure. The structures of these foams are similar to periodic minimal surfaces, although the Gaussian curvature can have both positive and negative values. Depending upon whether the internal surfaces of the opal are polymer filled or polymer coated, the polymer replica has either one or two sets of independent channels. We fill these channels with semiconductors, metals, or superconductors to provide electronic and optical materials with novel properties dependent on the nanoscale periodicity.

  17. Microwave joining of SiC ceramics and composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Silberglitt, R.; Tian, Y.L.; Katz, J.D.

    1997-04-01

    Potential applications of SiC include components for advanced turbine engines, tube assemblies for radiant burners and petrochemical processing and heat exchangers for high efficiency electric power generation systems. Reliable methods for joining SiC are required in order to cost-effectively fabricate components for these applications from commercially available shapes and sizes. This manuscript reports the results of microwave joining experiments performed using two different types of SiC materials. The first were on reaction bonded SiC, and produced joints with fracture toughness equal to or greater than that of the base material over an extended range of joining temperatures. The second were on continuous fiber-reinforced SiC/SiC composite materials, which were successfully joined with a commercial active brazing alloy, as well as by using a polymer precursor.

  18. Development of SiC Large Tapered Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Phil

    2011-01-01

    Research Focus Area: Power Electronics, Temperature Tolerant Devices. Demonstrate initial feasibility of totally new "Large Tapered Crystal" (LTC) process for growing vastly improved large-diameter wide-band gap wafers. Addresses Targets: The goal of this research is to experimentally investigate and demonstrate feasibility of the key unproven LTC growth processes in SiC. Laser-assisted growth of long SiC fiber seeds. Radial epitaxial growth enlargement of seeds into large SiC boules. Uniqueness and Impacts open a new technology path to large-diameter SiC and GaN wafers with 1000-fold defect density improvement at 2-4 fold lower cost. Leapfrog improvement in wide band gap power device capability and cost.

  19. Observations of Ag diffusion in ion implanted SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Leng, Bin; Sridharan, Kumar; Hunter, Jerry L.; Giordani, Andrew J.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-06-01

    The nature and magnitude of Ag diffusion in SiC has been a topic of interest in connection with the performance of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Ion implantation diffusion couples have been revisited to continue developing a more complete understanding of Ag fission product diffusion in SiC. Ion implantation diffusion couples fabricated from single crystal 4H-SiC and polycrystalline 3C-SiC substrates and exposed to 1500-1625 °C, were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The high dynamic range of SIMS allowed for multiple diffusion régimes to be investigated, including enhanced diffusion by implantation-induced defects and grain boundary (GB) diffusion in undamaged SiC. Estimated diffusion coefficients suggest GB diffusion in bulk SiC does not properly describe the release observed from TRISO fuel.

  20. Observations of Ag diffusion in ion implanted SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Leng, Bin; Sridharan, Kumar; Jerry L. Hunter, Jr.; Giordani, Andrew J.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-17

    The nature and magnitude of Ag diffusion in SiC has been a topic of interest in connection with the performance of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Ion implantation diffusion couples have been revisited to continue developing a more complete understanding of Ag fission product diffusion in SiC. Ion implantation diffusion couples fabricated from single crystal 4H-SiC and polycrystalline 3C-SiC substrates and exposed to 1500–1625°C, were investigated in this study by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The high dynamic range of SIMS allowed for multiple diffusion régimes to be investigated, including enhanced diffusion by implantation-induced defects and grain boundary (GB) diffusion in undamaged SiC. Lastly, estimated diffusion coefficients suggest GB diffusion in bulk SiC does not properly describe the release observed from TRISO fuel.

  1. Use of Pom Pons to Illustrate Cubic Crystal Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Susan G.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a method that uses olefin pom pons to illustrate cubic crystal structure. Facilitates hands-on examination of different packing arrangements such as hexagonal close-packed and cubic close-packed structures. (JRH)

  2. Cubic Polynomials with Rational Roots and Critical Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Shiv K.; Szymanski, Waclaw

    2010-01-01

    If you want your students to graph a cubic polynomial, it is best to give them one with rational roots and critical points. In this paper, we describe completely all such cubics and explain how to generate them.

  3. Packaging Technologies for 500 C SiC Electronics and Sensors: Challenges in Material Science and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Behelm, Glenn M.; Spry, David J.; Meredith, Roger D.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents ceramic substrates and thick-film metallization based packaging technologies in development for 500C silicon carbide (SiC) electronics and sensors. Prototype high temperature ceramic chip-level packages and printed circuit boards (PCBs) based on ceramic substrates of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum nitride (AlN) have been designed and fabricated. These ceramic substrate-based chip-level packages with gold (Au) thick-film metallization have been electrically characterized at temperatures up to 550C. The 96 alumina packaging system composed of chip-level packages and PCBs has been successfully tested with high temperature SiC discrete transistor devices at 500C for over 10,000 hours. In addition to tests in a laboratory environment, a SiC junction field-effect-transistor (JFET) with a packaging system composed of a 96 alumina chip-level package and an alumina printed circuit board was tested on low earth orbit for eighteen months via a NASA International Space Station experiment. In addition to packaging systems for electronics, a spark-plug type sensor package based on this high temperature interconnection system for high temperature SiC capacitive pressure sensors was also developed and tested. In order to further significantly improve the performance of packaging system for higher packaging density, higher operation frequency, power rating, and even higher temperatures, some fundamental material challenges must be addressed. This presentation will discuss previous development and some of the challenges in material science (technology) to improve high temperature dielectrics for packaging applications.

  4. Performance Limiting Defects in SiC Based Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    1 PERFORMANCE LIMITING DEFECTS IN SIC BASED TRANSISTORS P.M. Lenahan*, M.S. Dautrich, C.J. Cochrane, Pennsylvania State University University...oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) and SiC based bipolar junction transistors (BJTs). The focus has been upon those defects which...of transistors (Lenahan, Jupina, 1990). SDR exploits the fact that recombination in semiconductors is spin dependent (Lepine, 1972; Kaplan et al

  5. Synthesis of micro-sized interconnected Si-C composites

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Donghai; Yi, Ran; Dai, Fang

    2016-02-23

    Embodiments provide a method of producing micro-sized Si--C composites or doped Si--C and Si alloy-C with interconnected nanoscle Si and C building blocks through converting commercially available SiO.sub.x (0

  6. Temperature behavior of the conduction electrons in the nitrogen-doped 3C SiC monocrystals as studied by electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, D.; Kalabukhova, E.; Prokhorov, A.; Lančok, J.; Shanina, B.

    2017-01-01

    The temperature behavior of the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of nitrogen donors in n-type bulk 3C SiC monocrystals with (ND - NA) ≈ 1017 cm-3 was studied at T = 10-50 K. The triplet lines due to the hyperfine (hf) interaction with 14N nuclei (I = 1, 99.6%) along with a single line with similar isotropic g values of 2.0050(3) were observed in the ESR spectrum of n-type 3C SiC monocrystals in the temperature interval from 10 to 35 K. The observed reduction of the hf splitting for the nitrogen donor residing cubic position (Nk) in the temperature interval from 15 to 35 K was attributed to the motion narrowing effect of the hf splitting. With further increase of the temperature up to 35 K, only one single line with a Lorentzian lineshape was observed in the ESR spectrum of n-type 3C SiC, which was previously assigned in the literature to the unknown deeper donor center. Based on the temperature behavior of the ESR linewidth, integral intensity, and g-value, we have attributed this signal to the conduction electrons (CEs). The temperature dependence of the CE ESR linewidth was described by an exponential law (Orbach process) with the value of the activation energy ΔE ≈ 40 meV close to the energy separation between 1 s(E) excited energy level and conduction band for nitrogen donors. The nitrogen donor pairs were found in the ESR spectrum of n-type 3C SiC. The electrical characteristics of 3C SiC sample were studied by using the contact-free microwave conductivity. The energy ionization of nitrogen donor Ei = 51.4 meV was obtained from the fitting of the experimental data with the theory.

  7. UV-induced SiC nanowire sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Gang; Zhou, Yingqiu; He, Yanlan; Yu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xue A.; Li, Gong Y.; Haick, Hossam

    2015-02-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-induced sensors based on a single SiC nanowire (NW) were fabricated and the photoelectric properties including I-V characteristics and time response of the UV sensors were studied. SiC NWs (NWs) were prepared through pyrolyzing a polymer precursor with ferrocene as the catalyst by a CVD route. To elucidate the physical mechanism giving rise to the photoelectrical response in SiC NW sensors, three kinds of contacts between electrodes and SiC NW were prepared, i.e. Schottky contact, p-n junction contact, and Ohmic contact. The photoelectric measurements of the device with Schottky contact indicates the lowest dark current and the largest photocurrent. The results suggest that photocurrent generated at SiC NW-electrode contacts is a result of the photovoltaic effect, in which a built-in electric field accelerates photo generated charge carriers to the electronic contacts. The UV sensors based on SiC NWs could be applied in a harsh environment due to the excellent physical stability and photoelectric properties.

  8. 46 CFR 160.035-9 - Cubic capacity of lifeboats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cubic capacity of lifeboats. 160.035-9 Section 160.035-9...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Lifeboats for Merchant Vessels § 160.035-9 Cubic capacity of... its cubic capacity. (1) Length (L). The length is the distance in feet from the inside of the...

  9. 46 CFR 160.035-9 - Cubic capacity of lifeboats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cubic capacity of lifeboats. 160.035-9 Section 160.035-9...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Lifeboats for Merchant Vessels § 160.035-9 Cubic capacity of... its cubic capacity. (1) Length (L). The length is the distance in feet from the inside of the...

  10. Degree of disorder in cubic mesophases in thermotropics: thermodynamic study of a liquid crystal showing two cubic mesophases.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuya; Shinhara, Takashi; Nakamoto, Tadahiro; Kutsumizu, Shoichi; Yano, S; Sorai, Michio

    2002-03-01

    Heat capacity of a thermotropic mesogen ANBC(22) (4(')-alkoxy-3(')-nitrobiphenyl-4-carboxylic acid with 22 carbon atoms in alkyl chain) showing two cubic mesophases was measured by adiabatic calorimetry between 13 and 480 K. Excess enthalpies and entropies due to phase transitions were determined. A small thermal anomaly due to the cubic Im3m-->cubic Ia3d phase transition was successfully detected. Through an analysis of chain-length dependence of the entropy of transition, the sequence of two cubic mesophases (with space groups Ia3d and Im3m) is deduced for thermotropic mesogens ANBC(n). It is shown that the disorder of the core arrangement decreases in the order of Sm-C-->cubic (Im3m)-->cubic (Ia3d) while that of the chain in the reverse order cubic (Ia3d)-->cubic (Im3m)-->Sm C.

  11. Preparation of oriented silicon carbide films by laser ablation of ceramic silicon carbide targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimai, L.; Ager, R.; Logothetis, E. M.; Weber, W. H.; Hangas, J.

    1991-10-01

    Stoichiometric films of SiC, 60-150 nm thick, were deposited on 001-line and 111-line Si wafers by laser ablation of ceramic stoichiometric SiC targets. Films grown at substrate temperatures above 1050 C show orientation epitaxial to the Si substrate along the film normal. Depending on the deposition conditions, the oriented crystalline dimension along this direction ranges from 20 nm up to the film thickness. The crystallite dimensions in the film plane range from 20 to 70 nm. Raman spectra indicate that the films often contain material other than crystalline SiC. Some of that is in the form of small (3-5 nm) graphitic inclusions.

  12. /SiC Composite to Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, X.; Jiménez, C.; Mergia, K.; Yialouris, P.; Messoloras, S.; Liedtke, V.; Wilhelmi, C.; Barcena, J.

    2014-08-01

    In view of aerospace applications, an innovative structure for joining a Ti alloy to carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide has been developed. This is based on the perforation of the CMC material, and this procedure results in six-fold increase of the shear strength of the joint compared to the unprocessed CMC. The joint is manufactured using the active brazing technique and TiCuAg as filler metal. Sound joints without defects are produced and excellent wetting of both the composite ceramic and the metal is observed. The mechanical shear tests show that failure occurs always within the ceramic material and not at the joint. At the CMC/filler, Ti from the filler metal interacts with the SiC matrix to form carbides and silicides. In the middle of the filler region depletion of Ti and formation of Ag and Cu rich regions are observed. At the filler/Ti alloy interface, a layered structure of the filler and Ti alloy metallic elements is formed. For the perforation to have a significant effect on the improvement of the shear strength of the joint appropriate geometry is required.

  13. Thin films in silicon carbide semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostling, Mikael; Koo, Sang-Mo; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Zetterling, Carl-Mikael; Grishin, Alexander

    2004-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor devices have been established during the last decade as very useful high power, high speed and high temperature devices because of their inherent outstanding semiconductor materials properties. Due to its large band gap, SiC possesses a very high breakdown field and low intrinsic carrier concentration, which accordingly makes high voltage and high temperature operation possible. SiC is also suitable for high frequency device applications, because of the high saturation drift velocity and low permittivity. Thin film technology for various functions in the devices has been heavily researched. Suitable thin film technologies for Ohmic and low-resistive contact formation, passivation and new functionality utilizing ferroelectric materials have been developed. In ferroelectrics, the spontaneous polarization can be switched by an externally applied electric field, and thus are attractive for non-volatile memory and sensor applications. A novel integration of Junction-MOSFETs (JMOSFETs) and Nonvolatile FETs (NVFETs) on a single 4H-SiC substrate is realized. SiC JMOSFET controls the drain current effectively from the buried junction gate thereby allowing for a constant current level at elevated temperatures. SiC NVFET has similar functions with non-volatile memory capability due to ferroelectric gate stack, which operated up to 300°C with memory function retained up to 200°C.

  14. Two-layer tubes from cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, R. V.; Gorodtsov, V. A.; Lisovenko, D. S.; Volkov, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Effective Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios of two-layer tubes from cubic crystals have been analyzed theoretically. It is shown (using derived formulas for numerical estimates) that the mechanical properties of two-layer tube composites from auxetics and nonauxetics are not described by the mixture rule. It is demonstrated that the deviation of the effective modulus from the mixture rule predictions rapidly increases with an increase in Young's modulus of the nonauxetic components of a composite. It is established that, combining auxetics and nonauxetics in layered tubes, one can obtain, depending on the packing order in layers, either a strong increase or a decrease in auxeticity.

  15. Craniofacial Reconstruction Using Rational Cubic Ball Curves

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R. U.; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  16. Cherenkov and Scintillation Properties of Cubic Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M.J.; Adams, J.H.; Parnell, T.A.; Kuznetsov, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Cubic zirconium (CZ) is a high index of refraction (n =2.17) material that we have investigated for Cherenkov counter applications. Laboratory and proton accelerator tests of an 18cc sample of CZ show that the expected fast Cherenkov response is accompanied by a longer scintillation component that can be separated by pulse shaping. This presents the possibility of novel particle spectrometers which exploits both properties of CZ. Other high index materials being examined for Cherenkov applications will be discussed. Results from laboratory tests and an accelerator exposure will be presented and a potential application in solar energetic particle instruments will be discussed

  17. Near-field radiative heat transfer between metamaterials coated with silicon carbide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Soumyadipta Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2015-01-19

    In this letter, we study the near-field radiative heat transfer between two metamaterial substrates coated with silicon carbide (SiC) thin films. It is known that metamaterials can enhance the near-field heat transfer over ordinary materials due to excitation of magnetic plasmons associated with s polarization, while strong surface phonon polariton exists for SiC. By careful tuning of the optical properties of metamaterial, it is possible to excite electrical and magnetic resonances for the metamaterial and surface phonon polaritons for SiC at different spectral regions, resulting in the enhanced heat transfer. The effect of the SiC film thickness at different vacuum gaps is investigated. Results obtained from this study will be beneficial for application of thin film coatings for energy harvesting.

  18. Size-dependent electroluminescence from Si quantum dots embedded in amorphous SiC matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Yunjun; Li, Shuxin; Xu, Jun; Song, Chao; Jiang, Xiaofan; Li, Wei; Chen, Kunji; Wang, Qimin; Zuo, Yuhua

    2011-09-01

    Si quantum dots (QDs) were formed by thermal annealing the hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films (a-SiCx:H) with different C/Si ratio x, which were controlled by using a different gas ratio R of methane to silane during the deposition process. By adjusting x and post annealing temperature, the QD size can be changed from 1.4 to 4.2 nm accordingly, which was verified by the Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy images. Size-dependent electroluminescence (EL) was observed, and the EL intensity was higher for the sample containing small-sized Si QDs due to the quantum confinement effect (QCE). The EL peak energy as a function of the Si QDs size was in good agreement with a modified effective mass approximation (EMA) model. The calculated finite barrier potential of the Si QDs embedded in SiC matrix is 0.4 and 0.8 eV for conduction and valence band, respectively. Moreover, the current-voltage properties and the linear relationship between the integrated EL intensity and injection current indicate that the carrier transport is dominated by Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and the EL mechanism is originated from the bipolar recombination of electron-hole pairs at Si QDs. Our results demonstrate Si QDs embedded in amorphous SiC matrix has the potential application in Si-based light emitting devices and the third-generation solar cells.

  19. Fundamentals of Passive Oxidation In SiC and Si3N4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U.

    1998-01-01

    The very slow oxidation kinetics of silicon carbide and silicon nitride, which derive from their adherent and passivating oxide films, has been explored at length in a broad series of studies utilizing thermogravimetric analysis, electron and optical micrography, energy dispersive spectrometry, x-ray diffractometry, micro-analytical depth profiling, etc. Some interesting microstructural phenomena accompanying the process of oxidation in the two materials will be presented. In Si3N4 the oxide is stratified, with an SiO2 topscale (which is relatively impervious to O2)underlain by a coherent subscale of silicon oxynitride which is even less permeable to O2- Such "defence in depth" endows Si3N4 with what is perhaps the highest oxidation resistance of any material, and results in a unique set of oxidation processes. In SiC the oxidation reactions are much simpler, yet new issues still emerge; for instance, studies involving controlled devitrification of the amorphous silica scale confirmed that the oxidation rate of SiC drops by more than an order of magnitude when the oxide scale fully crystallizes.

  20. Growth protocols and characterization of epitaxial graphene on SiC elaborated in a graphite enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B.; Baraket, M.; Paillet, M.; Huntzinger, J.-R.; Tiberj, A.; Jansen, A. G. M.; Vila, L.; Cubuku, M.; Vergnaud, C.; Jamet, M.; Lapertot, G.; Rouchon, D.; Zahab, A.-A.; Sauvajol, J.-L.; Dubois, L.; Lefloch, F.; Duclairoir, F.

    2016-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of graphene by the sublimation of Si-terminated silicon carbide (SiC) is studied inside a graphite enclosure in a radio-frequency furnace by comparing different in situ processes involving hydrogen etching or not and different growth conditions. For the growth under vacuum, even with the surface preparation of hydrogen etching, the morphology of the synthesized graphene is found full of voids and defects in the form of a multilayer graphene film. For the growth under Ar, the hydrogen etching plays a vital role to improve the graphene quality in terms of surface roughness, the number of graphene layers and the domain size. For the graphene samples grown with the proposed protocol, the original combination of micro-probe Raman spectroscopy and simultaneous optical transmission and reflection measurements reveals a detailed spatially resolved image of the graphene domains with monolayer domain size of ~5×5 μm2 on about 2/3 of the total sample surface. The magnetotransport data yield charge-carrier mobilities up to 2900 cm2/Vs as found for high quality graphene on the Si-face of SiC. The observed magnetoquantum oscillations in the magnetoresistance confirm the expected behavior of single-layer graphene.

  1. Amorphous SiC layers for electrically conductive Rugate filters in silicon based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janz, S.; Peters, M.; Künle, M.; Gradmann, R.; Suwito, D.

    2010-05-01

    The subject of this work is the development of an electrically conductive Rugate filter for photovoltaic applications. We think that the optical as well as the electrical performance of the filter can be adapted especially to the requirements of crystalline Si thin-film and amorphous/crystalline silicon tandem solar cells. We have deposited amorphous hydrogenated Silicon Carbide layers (a-SixC1-x:H) with the precursor gases methane (CH4), silane (SiH4) and diborane (B2H6) applying Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD). Through changing just the precursor flows a floating refractive index n from 1.9 to 3.5 (at 633 nm) could be achieved quite accurately. Different complex layer stacks (up to 200 layers) with a sinusoidal refractive index variation normal to the incident light were deposited in just 80 min on 100x100 mm2. Transmission measurements show good agreement between simulation and experiment which proofs our ability to control the deposition process, the good knowledge of the optical behaviour of the different SiC single layers and the advanced stage of our simulation model. The doped single layers show lateral conductivities which were extremely dependent on the Si/C ratio.

  2. Transformation of Sintered CsPbBr3 Nanocrystals to Cubic CsPbI3 and Gradient CsPbBrxI3-x through Halide Exchange.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jacob B; Schleper, A Lennart; Kamat, Prashant V

    2016-07-13

    All-inorganic cesium lead halide (CsPbX3, X = Br(-), I(-)) perovskites could potentially provide comparable photovoltaic performance with enhanced stability compared to organic-inorganic lead halide species. However, small-bandgap cubic CsPbI3 has been difficult to study due to challenges forming CsPbI3 in the cubic phase. Here, a low-temperature procedure to form cubic CsPbI3 has been developed through a halide exchange reaction using films of sintered CsPbBr3 nanocrystals. The reaction was found to be strongly dependent upon temperature, featuring an Arrhenius relationship. Additionally, film thickness played a significant role in determining internal film structure at intermediate reaction times. Thin films (50 nm) showed only a small distribution of CsPbBrxI3-x species, while thicker films (350 nm) exhibited much broader distributions. Furthermore, internal film structure was ordered, featuring a compositional gradient within film. Transient absorption spectroscopy showed the influence of halide exchange on the excited state of the material. In thicker films, charge carriers were rapidly transferred to iodide-rich regions near the film surface within the first several picoseconds after excitation. This ultrafast vectorial charge-transfer process illustrates the potential of utilizing compositional gradients to direct charge flow in perovskite-based photovoltaics.

  3. Local structures surrounding Zr in nanostructurally stabilized cubic zirconia: Structural origin of phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, Y. L.; Chen, P. J.; Huang, S. H.; Shiu, T. J.; Tsai, T. Y.; Chow, Y. H.; Lin, Y. C.; Weng, S. C.; Chang, S. L.; Wang, G.; Cheung, C. L.; Sabirianov, R. F.; Mei, W. N.; Namavar, F.; Haider, H.; Garvin, K. L.; Lee, J. F.; Lee, H. Y.; Chu, P. P.

    2008-12-01

    Local environment surrounding Zr atoms in the thin films of nanocrystalline zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) has been investigated by using the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique. These films prepared by the ion beam assisted deposition exhibit long-range structural order of cubic phase and high hardness at room temperature without chemical stabilizers. The local structure around Zr probed by EXAFS indicates a cubic Zr sublattice with O atoms located on the nearest tetragonal sites with respect to the Zr central atoms, as well as highly disordered locations. Similar Zr local structure was also found in a ZrO{sub 2} nanocrystal sample prepared by a sol-gel method. Variations in local structures due to thermal annealing were observed and analyzed. Most importantly, our x-ray results provide direct experimental evidence for the existence of oxygen vacancies arising from local disorder and distortion of the oxygen sublattice in nanocrystalline ZrO{sub 2}. These oxygen vacancies are regarded as the essential stabilizing factor for the nanostructurally stabilized cubic zirconia.

  4. Growth and Doping of SiC-Thin Films on Low-Stress, Amorphous Si3N4/Si Substrates for Robust Microelectromechanical Systems Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    111) peak as a function of 3MS flow rate. Growth temperature: 1200°C, and N2 flow rate: 1 sccm. Fig. 5. Resistivity and sheet resistance of SiC films...at 300 K as a function of growth temperature. Flow rates: 30 sccm 3MS and 1 sccm N2. Fig. 6. Resistivity and sheet resistance of SiC films at 300 K...as a function of 3MS flow rate. Growth temperature: 1200°C, and N2 flow rate: 1 sccm. Fig. 7. Resistivity and sheet resistance of SiC films at 300 K as

  5. Atomic scale control and understanding of cubic silicon carbide surface reconstructions, nanostructures and nanochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukiassian, Patrick G.; Enriquez, Hanna B.

    2004-05-01

    The atomic scale ordering and properties of cubic silicon carbide (bgr-SiC) surfaces and nanostructures are investigated by atom-resolved room and high-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS), synchrotron radiation-based valence band and core level photoelectron spectroscopy (VB-PES, CL-PES) and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD). In this paper, we review the latest results on the atomic scale understanding of (i) the structure of bgr-SiC(100) surface reconstructions, (ii) temperature-induced metallic surface phase transition, (iii) one dimensional Si(C) self-organized nanostructures having unprecedented characteristics, and on (iv) nanochemistry at SiC surfaces with hydrogen. The organization of these surface reconstructions as well as the 1D nanostructures' self-organization are primarily driven by surface stress. In this paper, we address such important issues as (i) the structure of the Si-rich 3 × 2, the Si-terminated c (4 × 2), the C-terminated c (2 × 2) reconstructions of the bgr-SiC(100) surface, (ii) the temperature-induced reversible {\\mathrm {c}}(4\\times 2) \\Leftrightarrow 2\\times 1 metallic phase transition, (iii) the formation of highly stable (up to 900 °C) Si atomic and vacancy lines, (iv) the temperature-induced sp to sp3 diamond like surface transformation, and (v) the first example of H-induced semiconductor surface metallization on the bgr-SiC (100) 3 × 2 surface. The results are discussed and compared to other experimental and theoretical investigations.

  6. Multiply charged monopoles in cubic dimer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh Jaya, Sreejith; Powell, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    The classical cubic dimer model is a 3D statistical mechanical system whose degrees of freedom are dimers that occupy the edges between nearest neighbour vertices of a cubic lattice. Dimer occupancies are subject to the local constraint that every vertex is associated with exactly one dimer. In the presence of an aligning interaction, it is known that the system exhibits an unconventional continuous thermal phase transition from a symmetry broken columnar phase to a Coulomb-phase. The transition is in the NCCP1 universality class, which also describes the Neel-VBS transition in the JQ model and the S =1/2 Heisenberg model with suppression of hedgehog defects. Using Monte-Carlo simulations of a pair of defects in a background of fluctuating dimers, we calculate the scaling exponents for fugacities of monopole defects of charge Q = 2 and 3 at this critical point. Our estimates suggest that Q = 3 monopoles are relevant and could therefore drive the JQ model away from the NCCP1 critical point on a hexagonal lattice.

  7. Rheological properties of Cubic colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao

    2016-11-01

    Colloidal and non-colloidal suspensions are ubiquitous in many industrial application. There are numerous studies on these systems to understand and relate their complex rheological properties to their microstructural evolution under deformation. Although most of the experimental and simulation studies are centered on spherical particles, in most of the industrial applications the geometry of the colloidal particles deviate from the simple hard sphere and more complex geometries exist. Recent advances in microfabrication paved the way to fabricate colloidal particles with complex geometries for applications in different areas such as drug delivery where the fundamental understanding of their dynamics has remained unexplored. In this study, using dissipative particle dynamics, we investigate the rheological properties of cubic (superball) particles which are modeled as the cluster of core-modified DPD particles. Explicit representation of solvent particles in the DPD scheme will conserve the full hydrodynamic interactions between colloidal particles. Rheological properties of these cubic suspensions are investigated in the dilute and semi-dilute regimes. The Einstein and Huggins coefficients for these particles with different superball exponent will be calculate which represent the effect of single particle's geometry and multibody interactions on viscosity, respectively. The response of these suspensions is investigated under simple shear and oscillatory shear where it is shown that under oscillation these particles tend to form crystalline structure giving rise to stronger shear-thinning behavior recently measured experimentally.

  8. X-ray fluorescence microtomography of SiC shells

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G.E.; Chung, J.S.; Nagedolfeizi, M.

    1997-04-01

    TRISCO coated fuel particles contain a small kernel of nuclear fuel encapsulated by alternating layers of C and SiC. The TRISCO coated fuel particle is used in an advanced fuel designed for passive containment of the radioactive isotopes. The SiC layer provides the primary barrier for radioactive elements in the kernel. The effectiveness of this barrier layer under adverse conditions is critical to containment. The authors have begun the study of SiC shells from TRISCO fuel. They are using the fluorescent microprobe beamline 10.3.1. The shells under evaluation include some which have been cycled through a simulated core melt-down. The C buffer layers and nuclear kernels of the coated fuel have been removed by laser drilling through the SiC and then exposing the particle to acid. Elements of interest include Ru, Sb, Cs, Ce and Eu. The radial distribution of these elements in the SiC shells can be attributed to diffusion of elements in the kernel during the melt-down. Other elements in the shells originate during the fabrication of the TRISCO particles.

  9. Amorphization of SiC under ion and neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, L. L.; Zinkle, S. J.; Hay, J. C.; Osborne, M. C.

    1998-05-01

    This paper presents results on the microstructure and physical properties of SiC amorphized by both ion and neutron irradiation. Specifically, 0.56 MeV Si ions have been implanted in single crystal 6H-SiC from ambient through >200°C and the critical threshold for amorphization was measured as a function of the irradiation temperature. From a high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study of the crystalline to amorphous transition region in these materials, elongated pockets of amorphous material oriented parallel to the free surface are observed. Single crystal 6H-SiC and hot pressed and sintered 6H and 3C SiC were neutron irradiated at approximately 70°C to a dose of ˜2.56 dpa causing complete amorphization. Property changes resulting from the crystal to amorphous transition in SiC include a density decrease of 10.8%, a hardness decrease from 38.7 to 21.0 GPa, and a decrease in elastic modulus from 528 to 292 GPa. Recrystallization of the amorphized, single crystal 6H-SiC appears to occur in two stages. In the temperature range of ˜800-1000°C, crystallites nucleate and slowly grow. In the temperature range of 1125-1150°C spontaneous nucleation and rapid growth of crystallites occur. It is further noted that amorphized 6H (alpha) SiC recrystallizes to highly faulted fcc (beta) SiC.

  10. Study of deposition of YBa2Cu3O7-x on cubic zirconia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Joseph D.; Meola, Joseph E.; Jenkins, Kimberly A.

    1989-01-01

    Films of YBa2Cu3O7-x were grown on (100) cubic zirconia with 8 percent yttria by laser ablation from sintered targets of YBa2Cu3O7-x. The temperature of the zirconia substrate during growth was varied between 700 and 780 C. The atmosphere during growth was 170 mtorr of O2. The films were subsequently slowly cooled in-situ in 1 atm of O2. The best films were c-axis aligned and had a transition temperature of 87.7 K. The superconducting transition temperature and the X-ray diffraction analysis is reported as a function of the substrate temperature and of the angle between the laser beam and the target's normal.

  11. Analysis of Hard Thin Film Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Dashen

    1998-01-01

    MSFC is interested in developing hard thin film coating for bearings. The wearing of the bearing is an important problem for space flight engine. Hard thin film coating can drastically improve the surface of the bearing and improve the wear-endurance of the bearing. However, many fundamental problems in surface physics, plasma deposition, etc, need further research. The approach is using electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition (ECRCVD) to deposit hard thin film an stainless steel bearing. The thin films in consideration include SiC, SiN and other materials. An ECRCVD deposition system is being assembled at MSFC.

  12. Analysis of Hard Thin Film Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Dashen

    1998-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is interested in developing hard thin film coating for bearings. The wearing of the bearing is an important problem for space flight engine. Hard thin film coating can drastically improve the surface of the bearing and improve the wear-endurance of the bearing. However, many fundamental problems in surface physics, plasma deposition, etc, need further research. The approach is using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECRCVD) to deposit hard thin film on stainless steel bearing. The thin films in consideration include SiC, SiN and other materials. An ECRCVD deposition system is being assembled at MSFC.

  13. Atomistic structures of nano-engineered SiC and radiation-induced amorphization resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, Kenta; Ishimaru, Manabu; Sato, Kazuhisa; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Shannon, Steven; Weber, William J.

    2015-06-18

    In this paper, nano-engineered 3C–SiC thin films, which possess columnar structures with high-density stacking faults and twins, were irradiated with 2 MeV Si ions at cryogenic and room temperatures. From cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy observations in combination with Monte Carlo simulations based on the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter code, it was found that their amorphization resistance is six times greater than bulk crystalline SiC at room temperature. High-angle bright-field images taken by spherical aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy revealed that the distortion of atomic configurations is localized near the stacking faults. Finally, the resultant strain field probably contributes to the enhancement of radiation tolerance of this material.

  14. Anodized Ti3SiC2 As an Anode Material for Li-ion Microbatteries.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Alexander T; Mashtalir, Olha; Naguib, Michael; Barsoum, Michel W; Gogotsi, Yury; Djenizian, Thierry

    2016-07-06

    We report on the synthesis of an anode material for Li-ion batteries by anodization of a common MAX phase, Ti3SiC2, in an aqueous electrolyte containing hydrofluoric acid (HF). The anodization led to the formation of a porous film containing anatase, a small quantity of free carbon, and silica. By varying the anodization parameters, various oxide morphologies were produced. The highest areal capacity was achieved by anodization at 60 V in an aqueous electrolyte containing 0.1 v/v HF for 3 h at room temperature. After 140 cycles performed at multiple applied current densities, an areal capacity of 380 μAh·cm(-2) (200 μA·cm(-2)) has been obtained, making this new material, free of additives and binders, a promising candidate as a negative electrode for Li-ion microbatteries.

  15. Atomistic structures of nano-engineered SiC and radiation-induced amorphization resistance

    DOE PAGES

    Imada, Kenta; Ishimaru, Manabu; Sato, Kazuhisa; ...

    2015-06-18

    In this paper, nano-engineered 3C–SiC thin films, which possess columnar structures with high-density stacking faults and twins, were irradiated with 2 MeV Si ions at cryogenic and room temperatures. From cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy observations in combination with Monte Carlo simulations based on the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter code, it was found that their amorphization resistance is six times greater than bulk crystalline SiC at room temperature. High-angle bright-field images taken by spherical aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy revealed that the distortion of atomic configurations is localized near the stacking faults. Finally, the resultant strain fieldmore » probably contributes to the enhancement of radiation tolerance of this material.« less

  16. Chemical reactivity of SiC fibre-reinforced SiC with beryllium and lithium ceramic breeder materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleykamp, H.

    2000-12-01

    SiC fibre-reinforced SiC fabrics (f-SiC/SiC) are considered for structural materials of advanced fusion blanket concepts. Priority tasks are compatibility studies of SiC with Li breeder ceramics and the Be neutron multiplier. Isothermal and anisothermal powder reactions by DTA up to 1220°C were examined between Li 4SiO 4, Li 2ZrO 3 and Li 2TiO 3, respectively, and SiC and SiC/SiO 2 mixtures, respectively. The SiC/SiO 2 mixture simulated the chemical state of Nicalon fibres. Solid state reactions between SiC and Be pellets were studied by capsule experiments. The reaction products Be 2C and Si were observed between the initial phases after annealing at 800°C and 900°C. A parabolic time law with a chemical diffusion coefficient D˜=2.6×10 -15 m 2/s of Be in the products was deduced at 900°C. Additional oxygen released from SiO 2 as a component of the simulated fibres oxidised the reaction products via the gas phase by formation of a Be 2SiO 4 layer. All reactions are kinetically hindered below 700°C.

  17. Selective epitaxial growth of graphene on SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camara, N.; Rius, G.; Huntzinger, J.-R.; Tiberj, A.; Mestres, N.; Godignon, P.; Camassel, J.

    2008-09-01

    We present a method of selective epitaxial growth of few layers graphene (FLG) on a "prepatterned" silicon carbide (SiC) substrate. The methods involves, successively, the sputtering of a thin aluminium nitride (AlN) layer on top of a monocrystalline SiC substrate and, then, patterning it with e-beam lithography and wet etching. The sublimation of few atomic layers of Si from the SiC substrate occurs only through the selectively etched AlN layer. The presence of the Raman G-band at ˜1582cm-1 in the AlN-free areas is used to validate the concept. It gives absolute evidence of selective FLG growth.

  18. Selective epitaxial growth of graphene on SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Camara, N.; Rius, G.; Godignon, P.; Huntzinger, J.-R.; Tiberj, A.; Camassel, J.

    2008-09-22

    We present a method of selective epitaxial growth of few layers graphene (FLG) on a ''prepatterned'' silicon carbide (SiC) substrate. The methods involves, successively, the sputtering of a thin aluminium nitride (AlN) layer on top of a monocrystalline SiC substrate and, then, patterning it with e-beam lithography and wet etching. The sublimation of few atomic layers of Si from the SiC substrate occurs only through the selectively etched AlN layer. The presence of the Raman G-band at {approx}1582 cm{sup -1} in the AlN-free areas is used to validate the concept. It gives absolute evidence of selective FLG growth.

  19. SIC-POVMS and MUBS: Geometrical Relationships in Prime Dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Appleby, D. M.

    2009-03-10

    The paper concerns Weyl-Heisenberg covariant SIC-POVMs (symmetric informationally complete positive operator valued measures) and full sets of MUBs (mutually unbiased bases) in prime dimension. When represented as vectors in generalized Bloch space a SIC-POVM forms a d{sup 2}-1 dimensional regular simplex (d being the Hilbert space dimension). By contrast, the generalized Bloch vectors representing a full set of MUBs form d+1 mutually orthogonal d-1 dimensional regular simplices. In this paper we show that, in the Weyl-Heisenberg case, there are some simple geometrical relationships between the single SIC-POVM simplex and the d+1 MUB simplices. We go on to give geometrical interpretations of the minimum uncertainty states introduced by Wootters and Sussman, and by Appleby, Dang and Fuchs, and of the fiduciality condition given by Appleby, Dang and Fuchs.

  20. SiC IR emitter design for thermophotovoltaic generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, Lewis M.; Ferguson, Luke; McCoy, Larry G.; Pernisz, Udo C.

    1996-02-01

    An improved ceramic spine disc burner/emitter for use in a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generator is described. A columnar infrared (IR) emitter consisting of a stack of silicon carbide (SiC) spine discs provides for both high conductance for the combustion gases and efficient heat transfer from the hot combustion gases to the emitter. Herein, we describe the design, fabrication, and testing of this SiC burner as well as the characterization of the IR spectrum it emits. We note that when the SiC column is surrounded with fused silica heat shields, these heat shields suppress the emitted power beyond 4 microns. Thus, a TPV generator using GaSb photovoltaic cells covered by simple dielectric filters can convert over 30% of the emitted IR radiation to DC electric power.

  1. Advanced SiC composites for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Schwarz, O.J.

    1995-04-01

    This is a short review of the motivation for and progress in the development of ceramic matrix composites for fusion. Chemically vapor infiltrated silicon carbide (SiC) composites have been fabricated from continuous fibers of either SiC or graphite and tested for strength and thermal conductivity. Of significance is the the Hi-Nicalon{trademark} SiC based fiber composite has superior unirradiated properties as compared to the standard Nicalon grade. Based on previous results on the stability of the Hi-Nicalon fiber, this system should prove more resistant to neutron irradiation. A graphite fiber composite has been fabricated with very good mechnical properties and thermal conductivity an order of magnitude higher than typical SiC/SiC composites.

  2. Deposition of hydroxyapatite on SiC nanotubes in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Tomitsugu; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Iikubo, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    SiC nanotubes can become candidate reinforcement materials for dental and orthopedic implants due to their light weight and excellent mechanical properties. However, the development of bioactive SiC materials has not been reported. In this study, hydroxyapatites were found on SiC nanotubes treated with NaOH and subsequently HCl solution after soaking in simulated body fluid. On the other hand, hydroxyapatites did not deposit on as-received SiC nanotubes, the SiC nanotubes with NH4OH solution treatment and SiC bulk materials with NaOH and subsequently HCl solution treatment. Therefore, we succeeded in the development of bioactive SiC nanotubes by downsizing SiC materials to nanometer size and treating with NaOH and subsequently HCl solutions for the first time.

  3. Polarization conversion in cubic Raman crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Aaron; Sabella, Alexander; Mildren, Richard P.

    2017-02-01

    Nonlinear conversion of unpolarized beams to lower frequencies is generally inefficient in c(2) materials, as it is challenging to achieve phase-matching for input ordinary and extraordinary beams simultaneously in the normal dispersion regime. Here, we show that cubic Raman crystals having doubly and triply degenerate (E and F type) modes provide a method for efficient nonlinear frequency downconversion of an unpolarized beam and yield a linearly polarized output state. Using Mueller calculus, optimal crystal directions for such polarization conversion are determined. Using diamond, an example of an F-class Raman crystal, we have verified that such conversion is possible with near quantum-defect-limited slope efficiency and a linear polarization contrast of more than 23.9 dB.

  4. Cubic meter volume optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Potsaid, Benjamin; Chen, Long; Doerr, Chris; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Nielson, Torben; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Cable, Alex E; Swanson, Eric; Fujimoto, James G

    2016-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful three-dimensional (3D) imaging modality with micrometer-scale axial resolution and up to multi-GigaVoxel/s imaging speed. However, the imaging range of high-speed OCT has been limited. Here, we report 3D OCT over cubic meter volumes using a long coherence length, 1310 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser and silicon photonic integrated circuit dual-quadrature receiver technology combined with enhanced signal processing. We achieved 15 µm depth resolution for tomographic imaging at a 100 kHz axial scan rate over a 1.5 m range. We show 3D macroscopic imaging examples of a human mannequin, bicycle, machine shop gauge blocks, and a human skull/brain model. High-bandwidth, meter-range OCT demonstrates new capabilities that promise to enable a wide range of biomedical, scientific, industrial, and research applications.

  5. Polarization conversion in cubic Raman crystals

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Aaron; Sabella, Alexander; Mildren, Richard P.

    2017-01-01

    Nonlinear conversion of unpolarized beams to lower frequencies is generally inefficient in c(2) materials, as it is challenging to achieve phase-matching for input ordinary and extraordinary beams simultaneously in the normal dispersion regime. Here, we show that cubic Raman crystals having doubly and triply degenerate (E and F type) modes provide a method for efficient nonlinear frequency downconversion of an unpolarized beam and yield a linearly polarized output state. Using Mueller calculus, optimal crystal directions for such polarization conversion are determined. Using diamond, an example of an F-class Raman crystal, we have verified that such conversion is possible with near quantum-defect-limited slope efficiency and a linear polarization contrast of more than 23.9 dB. PMID:28169327

  6. Cubic meter volume optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    WANG, ZHAO; POTSAID, BENJAMIN; CHEN, LONG; DOERR, CHRIS; LEE, HSIANG-CHIEH; NIELSON, TORBEN; JAYARAMAN, VIJAYSEKHAR; CABLE, ALEX E.; SWANSON, ERIC; FUJIMOTO, JAMES G.

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful three-dimensional (3D) imaging modality with micrometer-scale axial resolution and up to multi-GigaVoxel/s imaging speed. However, the imaging range of high-speed OCT has been limited. Here, we report 3D OCT over cubic meter volumes using a long coherence length, 1310 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser and silicon photonic integrated circuit dual-quadrature receiver technology combined with enhanced signal processing. We achieved 15 µm depth resolution for tomographic imaging at a 100 kHz axial scan rate over a 1.5 m range. We show 3D macroscopic imaging examples of a human mannequin, bicycle, machine shop gauge blocks, and a human skull/brain model. High-bandwidth, meter-range OCT demonstrates new capabilities that promise to enable a wide range of biomedical, scientific, industrial, and research applications. PMID:28239628

  7. A smoothing algorithm using cubic spline functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E., Jr.; Price, J. M.; Howser, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two algorithms are presented for smoothing arbitrary sets of data. They are the explicit variable algorithm and the parametric variable algorithm. The former would be used where large gradients are not encountered because of the smaller amount of calculation required. The latter would be used if the data being smoothed were double valued or experienced large gradients. Both algorithms use a least-squares technique to obtain a cubic spline fit to the data. The advantage of the spline fit is that the first and second derivatives are continuous. This method is best used in an interactive graphics environment so that the junction values for the spline curve can be manipulated to improve the fit.

  8. Direct observation of porous SiC formed by anodization in HF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S.; Grimberg, Ilana; Weiss, Ben-Zion; Kurtz, Anthony D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for forming porous SiC from single-crystal SiC wafers has been demonstrated. Porous SiC can be fabricated by anodizing n-type 6H-SiC in HF under UV illumination. TEM reveals pores of sizes 10-30 nm with interpore spacings ranging from roughly 5 to 150 nm. This is the first reported direct observation of porous SiC formation.

  9. Development of CVD Mullite Coatings for SiC Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V.K.; Varadarajan, S.

    2000-03-15

    A process for depositing CVD mullite coatings on SiC fibers for enhanced oxidation and corrosion, and/or act as an interfacial protective barrier has been developed. Process optimization via systematic investigation of system parameters yielded uniform crystalline mullite coatings on SiC fibers. Structural characterization has allowed for tailoring of coating structure and therefore properties. High temperature oxidation/corrosion testing of the optimized coatings has shown that the coatings remain adherent and protective for extended periods. However, preliminary tests of coated fibers showed considerable degradation in tensile strength.

  10. Saturn V S-IC (First Stage) Structural Arrangement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    This illustration, with callouts, shows the structural arrangement of the major components for the S-IC (first) stage of the Saturn V launch vehicle. The S-IC stage was 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, and produced more than 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through five F-1 engines that were powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines were mounted on an outer ring and gimbal for control purposes. The fifth engine was rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equaled the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.

  11. Curvature and Tangency Handles for Control of Convex Cubic Shapes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    looked at A-splines constructed with segments of singular al- gebraic cubics, which are just rational cubics, with new, geometrically more meaningful...contact interpolation , and curvatures at three prescribed points, see Figures 1-4. Curve and Surface Design: Saint-Malo 1999 91 Pierre-Jean Laurent...curvature at one contact point. §2. Barycentric Coordinates and Curvature at the Endpoints The general algebraic cubic in cartesian coordinates x, y is

  12. Thin films for material engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasa, Kiyotaka

    2016-07-01

    Thin films are defined as two-dimensional materials formed by condensing one by one atomic/molecular/ionic species of matter in contrast to bulk three-dimensional sintered ceramics. They are grown through atomic collisional chemical reaction on a substrate surface. Thin film growth processes are fascinating for developing innovative exotic materials. On the basis of my long research on sputtering deposition, this paper firstly describes the kinetic energy effect of sputtered adatoms on thin film growth and discusses on a possibility of room-temperature growth of cubic diamond crystallites and the perovskite thin films of binary compound PbTiO3. Secondly, high-performance sputtered ferroelectric thin films with extraordinary excellent crystallinity compatible with MBE deposited thin films are described in relation to a possible application for thin-film MEMS. Finally, the present thin-film technologies are discussed in terms of a future material science and engineering.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of diamond thin films on titanium silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Songlan

    2008-10-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been the main method for synthesizing diamond thin films on hetero substrate materials since 1980s. It has been well acknowledged that both nucleation and growth of diamond on non-diamond surfaces without pre-treatment are very difficult and slow. Furthermore, the weak adhesion between the diamond thin films and substrates has been a major problem for widespread application of diamond thin films. Up to now, Si has been the most frequently used substrate for the study of diamond thin films and various methods, including bias and diamond powder scratching, have been applied to enhance diamond nucleation density. In the present study, nucleation and growth of diamond thin films on Ti3SiC2, a newly developed ceramic-metallic material, using Microwave Plasma Enhanced (MPE) and Hot- Filament (HF) CVD reactors were carried out. In addition, synchrotron-based Near Edge Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (NEXAFS) was used to identify the electronic and chemical structures of various NCD films. The results from MPECVD showed that a much higher diamond nucleation density and a much higher film growth rate can be obtained on Ti3SiC2 compared with on Si. Consequently, nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films were feasibly synthesized on Ti3SiC2 under the typical conditions for microcrystalline diamond film synthesis. Furthermore, the diamond films on Ti3SiC 2 exhibited better adhesion than on Si. The early stage growth of diamond thin films on Ti3SiC2 by HFCVD indicated that a nanowhisker-like diamond-graphite composite layer, different from diamond nucleation on Si, initially formed on the surface of Ti3SiC2, which resulted in high diamond nucleation density. These results indicate that Ti3SiC 2 has great potentials to be used both as substrates and interlayers on metals for diamond thin film deposition and application. This research may greatly expand the tribological application of both Ti3SiC 2 and diamond thin films

  14. The Commercialization of the SiC Flame Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedison, Jeffrey B.

    2002-03-01

    The technical and scientific steps required to produce large quantities of SiC flame sensors is described. The technical challenges required to understand, fabricate, test and package SiC photodiodes in 1990 were numerous since SiC device know how was embryonic. A sense of urgency for a timely replacement of the Geiger Muller gas discharge tube soon entered the scene. New dual fuel GE Power Systems gas turbines, which were designed to lean burn either natural gas or oil for low NOx emissions required a much higher sensitivity sensor. Joint work between GE CRD and Cree Research sponsored by the GE Aircraft Engine Division developed the know how for the fabrication of high sensitivity, high yield, reliable SiC photodiodes. Yield issues were uncovered and overcome. The urgency for system insertion required that SiC diode and sensor circuitry development needed to be carried out simultaneously with power plant field tests of laboratory or prototype sensor assemblies. The sensor and reliability specifications were stringent since the sensors installed on power plant turbine combustor walls are subjected to high levels of vibration, elevated temperatures, and high pressures. Furthermore a fast recovery time was required to sense flame out in spite of the fact that the amplifier circuit needed have high gain and high dynamic range. SiC diode technical difficulties were encountered and overcome. The science of hydrocarbon flames will also be described together with the fortunate overlap of the strong OH emission band with the SiC photodiode sensitivity versus wavelength characteristic. The extremely low dark current (<1pA/cm^2) afforded by the wide band gap and the 3eV sensitivity cutoff at 400nm made if possible to produce low amplifier offsets, high sensitivity and high dynamic range along with immunity to black body radiation from combustor walls. Field tests at power plants that had experienced turbine tripping, whenever oil fuel and/or oil with steam injection for

  15. Expanding the versatility of silicon carbide thin films and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Lunet

    Silicon carbide (SiC) based electronics and sensors hold promise for pushing past the limits of current technology to achieve small, durable devices that can function in high-temperature, high-voltage, corrosive, and biological environments. SiC is an ideal material for such conditions due to its high mechanical strength, excellent chemical stability, and its biocompatibility. Consequently, SiC thin films and nanowires have attracted interest in applications such as micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, biological sensors, field emission cathodes, and energy storage devices. However to fully realize SiC in such technologies, the reliability of metal contacts to SiC at high temperatures must be improved and the nanowire growth mechanism must be understood to enable strict control of nanowire crystal structure and orientation. Here, we present a novel metallization scheme, utilizing solid-state graphitization of SiC, to improve the long-term reliability of Pt/Ti contacts to polycrystalline n-type SiC films at high temperature. The metallization scheme includes an alumina protection layer and exhibits low, stable contact resistivity even after long-term (500 hr) testing in air at 450 ºC. We also report the crystal structure and growth mechanism of Ni-assisted silicon carbide nanowires using single-source precursor, methyltrichlorosilane. The effects of growth parameters, such as substrate and temperature, on the structure and morphology of the resulting nanowires will also be presented. Overall, this study provides new insights towards the realization of novel SiC technologies, enabled by advanced electron microscopy techniques located in the user facilities at the Molecular Foundry in Berkeley, California. This work was performed in part at the Molecular Foundry, supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  16. Second harmonic conversion in cubic silicon carbide at 1.06 micron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, G. L.; Jones, E. W.; Spencer, M. G.; Jackson, K. H.

    1991-01-01

    This letter describes second harmonic conversion in cubic silicon carbide (beta-SiC) at a wavelength of 1.06 micron. Epitaxial layers of beta-SiC formed by vapor phase growth on silicon are indeed birefringent, and thus phase matchable. Phase-matched films of beta-SiC have respectable conversion efficiencies even in the presence of adsorption at 532 nm. The measured value of the effective second order nonlinear susceptibility for beta-SiC is chi super (2) eff = 1.05 +/- 0.3 x 10 exp -9 esu.

  17. Distorted asymmetric cubic nanostructure of soluble fullerene crystals in efficient polymer:fullerene solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngkyoo; Nelson, Jenny; Zhang, Tong; Cook, Steffan; Durrant, James R; Kim, Hwajeong; Park, Jiho; Shin, Minjung; Nam, Sungho; Heeney, Martin; McCulloch, Iain; Ha, Chang-Sik; Bradley, Donal D C

    2009-09-22

    We found that 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)propyl-1-phenyl-(6,6)C(61) (PCBM) molecules make a distorted asymmetric body-centered cubic crystal nanostructure in the bulk heterojunction films of reigoregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) and PCBM. The wider angle of distortion in the PCBM nanocrystals was approximately 96 degrees , which can be assigned to the influence of the attached side group to the fullerene ball of PCBM to bestow solubility. Atom concentration analysis showed that after thermal annealing the PCBM nanocrystals do preferentially distribute above the layer of P3HT nanocrystals inside devices.

  18. Saturn V Stage I (S-IC) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objectives include: a) Become familiar with the Saturn V Stage I (S-IC) major structural components: Forward Skirt, Oxidizer Tank, Intertank, Fuel Tank, and Thrust Structure. b) Gain a general understanding of the Stage I subsystems: Fuel, Oxidizer, Instrumentation, Flight Control, Environmental Control, Electrical, Control Pressure, and Ordinance.

  19. Passivation of SiC device surfaces by aluminum oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallén, A.; Usman, M.; Suvanam, S.; Henkel, C.; Martin, D.; Linnarsson, M. K.

    2014-03-01

    A steady improvement in material quality and process technology has made electronic silicon carbide devices commercially available. Both rectifying and switched devices can today be purchased from several vendors. This successful SiC development over the last 25 years can also be utilized for other types of devices, such as light emitting and photovoltaic devices, however, there are still critical problems related to material properties and reliability that need to be addressed. This contribution will focus on surface passivation of SiC devices. This issue is of utmost importance for further development of SiC MOSFETs, which so far has been limited by reliability and low charge carrier surface mobilities. Also bipolar devices, such as BJTs, LEDs, or PV devices will benefit from more efficient and reliable surface passivation techniques in order to maintain long charge carrier lifetimes. Silicon carbide material enables the devices to operate at higher electric fields, higher temperatures and in more radiation dense applications than silicon devices. To be able to utilize the full potential of the SiC material, it is therefore necessary to develop passivation layers that can sustain these more demanding operation conditions. In this presentation it will also be shown that passivation layers of Al2O3 deposited by atomic layer deposition have shown superior radiation hardness properties compared to traditional SiO2-based passivation layers.

  20. Observations of Ag diffusion in ion implanted SiC

    DOE PAGES

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Leng, Bin; Sridharan, Kumar; ...

    2015-03-17

    The nature and magnitude of Ag diffusion in SiC has been a topic of interest in connection with the performance of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Ion implantation diffusion couples have been revisited to continue developing a more complete understanding of Ag fission product diffusion in SiC. Ion implantation diffusion couples fabricated from single crystal 4H-SiC and polycrystalline 3C-SiC substrates and exposed to 1500–1625°C, were investigated in this study by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The high dynamic range of SIMS allowed for multiple diffusion régimes to be investigated,more » including enhanced diffusion by implantation-induced defects and grain boundary (GB) diffusion in undamaged SiC. Lastly, estimated diffusion coefficients suggest GB diffusion in bulk SiC does not properly describe the release observed from TRISO fuel.« less

  1. Towards SiC Surface Functionalization: An Ab Initio Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cicero, G; Catellani, A

    2005-01-28

    We present a microscopic model of the interaction and adsorption mechanism of simple organic molecules on SiC surfaces as obtained from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our results open the way to functionalization of silicon carbide, a leading candidate material for bio-compatible devices.

  2. First principle identification of SiC monolayer as an efficient catalyst for CO oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Sinthika, S. E-mail: sinthika90@gmail.com; Thapa, Ranjit E-mail: sinthika90@gmail.com; Reddy, C. Prakash

    2015-06-24

    Using density functional theory, we investigated the electronic properties of SiC monolayer and tested its catalytic activity toward CO oxidation. The planar nature of a SiC monolayer is found to stable and is a high band gap semiconductor. CO interacts physically with SiC surface, whereas O{sub 2} is adsorbed with moderate binding. CO oxidation on SiC monolayer prefers the Eley Rideal mechanism over the Langmuir Hinshelwood mechanism, with an easily surmountable activation barrier during CO{sub 2} formation. Overall metal free SiC monolayer can be used as efficient catalyst for CO oxidation.

  3. Role of atomic terraces and steps in the electron transport properties of epitaxial graphene grown on SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramochi, H.; Odaka, S.; Morita, K.; Tanaka, S.; Miyazaki, H.; Lee, M. V.; Li, S.-L.; Hiura, H.; Tsukagoshi, K.

    2012-03-01

    Thermal decomposition of vicinal SiC substrates with self-organized periodic nanofacets is a promising method to produce large graphene sheets toward the commercial exploitation of graphene's superior electronic properties. The epitaxial graphene films grown on vicinal SiC comprise two distinct regions of terrace and step; and typically exhibit anisotropic electron transport behavior, although limited areas in the graphene film showed ballistic transport. To evaluate the role of terraces and steps in electron transport properties, we compared graphene samples with terrace and step regions grown on 4H-SiC(0001). Arrays of field effect transistors were fabricated on comparable graphene samples with their channels parallel or perpendicular to the nanofacets to identify the source of measured reduced mobility. Minimum conductivity and electron mobility increased with the larger proportional terrace region area; therefore, the terrace region has superior transport properties to step regions. The measured electron mobility in the terrace region, ˜1000 cm2/Vs, is 10 times larger than that in the step region, ˜100 cm2/Vs. We conclusively determine that parasitic effects originate in regions of graphene that grow over step edges in 4H-SiC(0001).

  4. Cubic Polynomials with Real or Complex Coefficients: The Full Picture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardell, Nicholas S.

    2016-01-01

    The cubic polynomial with real coefficients has a rich and interesting history primarily associated with the endeavours of great mathematicians like del Ferro, Tartaglia, Cardano or Vieta who sought a solution for the roots (Katz, 1998; see Chapter 12.3: The Solution of the Cubic Equation). Suffice it to say that since the times of renaissance…

  5. PhySIC: a veto supertree method with desirable properties.

    PubMed

    Ranwez, Vincent; Berry, Vincent; Criscuolo, Alexis; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Guillemot, Sylvain; Scornavacca, Celine; Douzery, Emmanuel J P

    2007-10-01

    This paper focuses on veto supertree methods; i.e., methods that aim at producing a conservative synthesis of the relationships agreed upon by all source trees. We propose desirable properties that a supertree should satisfy in this framework, namely the non-contradiction property (PC) and the induction property (PI). The former requires that the supertree does not contain relationships that contradict one or a combination of the source topologies, whereas the latter requires that all topological information contained in the supertree is present in a source tree or collectively induced by several source trees. We provide simple examples to illustrate their relevance and that allow a comparison with previously advocated properties. We show that these properties can be checked in polynomial time for any given rooted supertree. Moreover, we introduce the PhySIC method (PHYlogenetic Signal with Induction and non-Contradiction). For k input trees spanning a set of n taxa, this method produces a supertree that satisfies the above-mentioned properties in O(kn(3) + n(4)) computing time. The polytomies of the produced supertree are also tagged by labels indicating areas of conflict as well as those with insufficient overlap. As a whole, PhySIC enables the user to quickly summarize consensual information of a set of trees and localize groups of taxa for which the data require consolidation. Lastly, we illustrate the behaviour of PhySIC on primate data sets of various sizes, and propose a supertree covering 95% of all primate extant genera. The PhySIC algorithm is available at http://atgc.lirmm.fr/cgi-bin/PhySIC.

  6. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of November 20, 1963.

  7. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph, taken May 7, 1963, gives a close look at the four concrete tower legs of the S-IC test stand at their completed height.

  8. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of October 22, 1963. Spherical liquid hydrogen tanks can be seen to the left. Just to the lower front of those are the cylindrical liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks.

  9. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph taken February 25, 1963, gives a close up look at two of the ever-growing four towers of the S-IC Test Stand.

  10. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of October 10, 1963. Kerosene storage tanks can be seen to the left.

  11. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph taken March 29, 1963, gives a close up look at two of the ever-growing four towers of the S-IC Test Stand.

  12. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph, taken April 4, 1963, gives a close up look at the ever-growing four towers of the S-IC Test Stand.

  13. Construction Progress of S-IC Test Stand Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph taken April 17, 1963, gives a look at the four tower legs of the S-IC test stand at their completed height.

  14. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Tower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph, taken from ground level on May 7, 1963, gives a close look at one of the four towers legs of the S-IC test stand nearing its completed height.

  15. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of October 10, 1963. Spherical liquid hydrogen tanks can be seen to the left.

  16. Investigation of solution-processed bismuth-niobium-oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Satoshi; Ariga, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Shin; Onoue, Masatoshi; Miyasako, Takaaki; Tokumitsu, Eisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya; Chinone, Norimichi; Cho, Yasuo

    2014-10-21

    The characteristics of bismuth-niobium-oxide (BNO) films prepared using a solution process were investigated. The BNO film annealed at 550°C involving three phases: an amorphous phase, Bi₃NbO₇ fluorite microcrystals, and Nb-rich cubic pyrochlore microcrystals. The cubic pyrochlore structure, which was the main phase in this film, has not previously been reported in BNO films. The relative dielectric constant of the BNO film was approximately 140, which is much higher than that of a corresponding film prepared using a conventional vacuum sputtering process. Notably, the cubic pyrochlore microcrystals disappeared with increasing annealing temperature and were replaced with triclinic β-BiNbO₄ crystals at 590°C. The relative dielectric constant also decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Therefore, the high relative dielectric constant of the BNO film annealed at 550°C is thought to result from the BNO cubic pyrochlore structure. In addition, the BNO films annealed at 500°C contained approximately 6.5 atm.% carbon, which was lost at approximately 550°C. This result suggests that the carbon in the BNO film played an important role in the formation of the cubic pyrochlore structure.

  17. Radiation damage in cubic-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Beuneu, Francois; Weber, William J

    2013-01-01

    Cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) can be used for nuclear applications as an inert matrix for actinide immobilization or transmutation. Indeed, the large amount of native oxygen vacancies leads to a high radiation tolerance of this material owing to defect recombination occurring in the atomic displacements cascades induced by fast neutron irradiation or ion implantations, as showed by Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Amorphization cannot be obtained in YSZ either by nuclear-collision or electronic-excitation damage, just like in urania. A kind of polygonization structure with slightly disoriented crystalline domains is obtained in both cases. In the first steps of damage, specific isolated point defects (like F+-type color centers) and point-defect clusters are produced by nuclear collisions with charged particles or neutrons. Further increase of damage leads to dislocation-loop formation, then to collapse of the dislocation network into a polygonization structure. For swift heavy ion irradiations, a similar polygonization structure is obtained above a threshold stopping power value of about 20-30 keV nm-1.

  18. Topological oxide insulator in cubic perovskite structure.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hosub; Rhim, Sonny H; Im, Jino; Freeman, Arthur J

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of topologically protected conducting states with the chiral spin texture is the most prominent feature at the surface of topological insulators. On the application side, large band gap and high resistivity to distinguish surface from bulk degrees of freedom should be guaranteed for the full usage of the surface states. Here, we suggest that the oxide cubic perovskite YBiO3, more than just an oxide, defines itself as a new three-dimensional topological insulator exhibiting both a large bulk band gap and a high resistivity. Based on first-principles calculations varying the spin-orbit coupling strength, the non-trivial band topology of YBiO3 is investigated, where the spin-orbit coupling of the Bi 6p orbital plays a crucial role. Taking the exquisite synthesis techniques in oxide electronics into account, YBiO3 can also be used to provide various interface configurations hosting exotic topological phenomena combined with other quantum phases.

  19. Formation of hexagonal and cubic ice during low-temperature growth.

    PubMed

    Thürmer, Konrad; Nie, Shu

    2013-07-16

    From our daily life we are familiar with hexagonal ice, but at very low temperature ice can exist in a different structure--that of cubic ice. Seeking to unravel the enigmatic relationship between these two low-pressure phases, we examined their formation on a Pt(111) substrate at low temperatures with scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy. After completion of the one-molecule-thick wetting layer, 3D clusters of hexagonal ice grow via layer nucleation. The coalescence of these clusters creates a rich scenario of domain-boundary and screw-dislocation formation. We discovered that during subsequent growth, domain boundaries are replaced by growth spirals around screw dislocations, and that the nature of these spirals determines whether ice adopts the cubic or the hexagonal structure. Initially, most of these spirals are single, i.e., they host a screw dislocation with a Burgers vector connecting neighboring molecular planes, and produce cubic ice. Films thicker than ~20 nm, however, are dominated by double spirals. Their abundance is surprising because they require a Burgers vector spanning two molecular-layer spacings, distorting the crystal lattice to a larger extent. We propose that these double spirals grow at the expense of the initially more common single spirals for an energetic reason: they produce hexagonal ice.

  20. The distribution of elements in sequentially prepared MgB2 on SiC buffered Si substrate and possible pinning mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chromik, Š.; Nishida, A.; Štrbík, V.; Gregor, M.; Espinós, J. P.; Liday, J.; Durný, R.

    2013-03-01

    MgB2 thin films are prepared by sequential evaporation of boron and magnesium bilayers on SiC buffered Si substrates followed by an in situ annealing. Precursor Mg-B bilayers are deposited by electron beam evaporation at room temperature. The amount of B is varied so as to result in different thickness (15 nm and 50 nm) of stoichiometric MgB2 final film after an in situ reaction with the excess Mg top layer in the vacuum. We show the distribution of the elements through the film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses have shown that carbon is not free in the films (except the surface of the film) and silicon is in the compound form, too. In the case of the 15 nm thick films we see a strong interdiffusion of the elements (C, B) and we observe a suppression of TC of the film to 20 K. We register different slope of the H(T) dependence - the lowest temperature value of H for the 15 nm thick film exceeds the one for the 50 nm thick film in spite of lower TC. We suppose that δl pinning mechanism is dominant for the 15 nm thick film.

  1. On the existence of Si-C double bonded graphene-like layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Muhammad N.; Yan, Yanfa; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.

    2009-09-01

    Upon analyzing an earlier experimental study by density-functional theory we have shown that graphene-like SiC layers can exist. We found that, for a particular stacking sequence, Si dbnd C double bond was responsible for the much larger interlayer distances observed in synthesized multi-walled SiC nanotubes. The Si/C ratios in SiC layers determine the extent of interlayer distances and bonding nature. It has been also shown that for some intermediate ratios of Si:C and/or with other stacking sequences, a collapse of SiC layers to tetrahedrally bonded system is possible. We have argued that these synthesized Si dbnd C double-bonded multi-wall silicon-carbide nanotubes may provide a pathway for future realization of SiC graphene-like materials.

  2. Chemical reactivity of CVC and CVD SiC with UO2 at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Chinthaka M.; Katoh, Yutai; Voit, Stewart L.; Snead, Lance L.

    2015-05-01

    Two types of silicon carbide (SiC) synthesized using two different vapor deposition processes were embedded in UO2 pellets and evaluated for their potential chemical reaction with UO2. While minor reactivity between chemical-vapor-composited (CVC) SiC and UO2 was observed at comparatively low temperatures of 1100 and 1300 °C, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) SiC did not show any such reactivity. However, both CVD and CVC SiCs showed some reaction with UO2 at a higher temperature (1500 °C). Elemental maps supported by phase maps obtained using electron backscatter diffraction indicated that CVC SiC was more reactive than CVD SiC at 1500 °C. Furthermore, this investigation indicated the formation of uranium carbides and uranium silicide chemical phases such as UC, USi2, and U3Si2 as a result of SiC reaction with UO2.

  3. LOW ACTIVATION JOINING OF SIC/SIC COMPOSITES FOR FUSION APPLICATIONS: MODELING DUAL-PHASE MICROSTRUCTURES AND DISSIMILAR MATERIAL JOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kurtz, Richard J.; Ferraris, M.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-03-31

    Finite element continuum damage models (FE-CDM) have been developed to simulate and model dual-phase joints and cracked joints for improved analysis of SiC materials in nuclear environments. This report extends the analysis from the last reporting cycle by including results from dual-phase models and from cracked joint models.

  4. Electron affinity of cubic boron nitride terminated with vanadium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yu; Sun, Tianyin; Shammas, Joseph; Hao, Mei; Nemanich, Robert J.; Kaur, Manpuneet

    2015-10-28

    A thermally stable negative electron affinity (NEA) for a cubic boron nitride (c-BN) surface with vanadium-oxide-termination is achieved, and its electronic structure was analyzed with in-situ photoelectron spectroscopy. The c-BN films were prepared by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition employing BF{sub 3} and N{sub 2} as precursors. Vanadium layers of ∼0.1 and 0.5 nm thickness were deposited on the c-BN surface in an electron beam deposition system. Oxidation of the metal layer was achieved by an oxygen plasma treatment. After 650 °C thermal annealing, the vanadium oxide on the c-BN surface was determined to be VO{sub 2}, and the surfaces were found to be thermally stable, exhibiting an NEA. In comparison, the oxygen-terminated c-BN surface, where B{sub 2}O{sub 3} was detected, showed a positive electron affinity of ∼1.2 eV. The B{sub 2}O{sub 3} evidently acts as a negatively charged layer introducing a surface dipole directed into the c-BN. Through the interaction of VO{sub 2} with the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer, a B-O-V layer structure would contribute a dipole between the O and V layers with the positive side facing vacuum. The lower enthalpy of formation for B{sub 2}O{sub 3} is favorable for the formation of the B-O-V layer structure, which provides a thermally stable surface dipole and an NEA surface.

  5. Growth of Low Defect Density Gallium Nitride (GaN) Films on Novel Tantalum Carbide (TaC) Substrates for Improved Device Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    on SiC substrates by pulse laser deposition (PLD) (10) and on magnesium oxide ( MgO ) substrates by electron beam evaporation (11), using TaC films...matched to GaN than currently used substrates. We created the TaC substrate, using pulse laser deposition (PLD) of TaC onto (0001) SiC substrates at...films grown on SiC or sapphire, and they contained more than an order of magnitude fewer dislocations compared to a typical value of 4 x 109 cm–2

  6. Oxidation of Membrane Curvature-Regulating Phosphatidylethanolamine Lipid Results in Formation of Bilayer and Cubic Structures.

    PubMed

    Sankhagowit, Shalene; Lee, Ernest Y; Wong, Gerard C L; Malmstadt, Noah

    2016-03-15

    Oxidation is associated with conditions related to chronic inflammations and aging. Cubic structures have been observed in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial membranes of cells under oxidative stress (e.g., tumor cells and virus-infected cells). It has been previously suspected that oxidation can result in the rearrangement of lipids from a fluid lamellar phase to a cubic structure in organelles containing membranes enriched with amphiphiles that have nonzero intrinsic curvature, such as phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and cardiolipin. This study focuses on the oxidation of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE), a lipid that natively forms an inverted hexagonal phase at physiological conditions. The oxidized samples contain an approximately 3:2 molar ratio of nonoxidized to oxidized DOPE. Optical microscopy images collected during the hydration of this mixture from a dried film suggest that the system evolves into a coexistence of a stable fluid lamellar phase and transient square lattice structures with unit cell sizes of 500-600 nm. Small-angle X-ray scattering of the same lipid mixture yielded a body-centered Im3m cubic phase with the lattice parameter of 14.04 nm. On average, the effective packing parameter of the oxidized DOPE species was estimated to be 0.657 ± 0.069 (standard deviation). This suggests that the oxidation of PE leads to a group of species with inverted molecular intrinsic curvature. Oxidation can create amphiphilic subpopulations that potently impact the integrity of the membrane, since negative Gaussian curvature intrinsic to cubic phases can enable membrane destabilization processes.

  7. Homoepitaxial and Heteroepitaxial Growth on Step-Free SiC Mesas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the initial discovery and development of new approaches to SiC homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial growth. These approaches are based upon the previously unanticipated ability to effectively supress two-dimensional nucleation of 3C-SiC on large basal plane terraces that form between growth steps when epitaxy is carried out on 4H- and 6H-SiC nearly on-axis substrates. After subdividing the growth surface into mesa regions, pure stepflow homoeptixay with no terrace nucleation was then used to grow all existing surface steps off the edges of screw-dislocation-free mesas, leaving behind perfectly on-axis (0001) basal plane mesa surfaces completely free of atomic-scale steps. Step-free mesa surfaces as large as 0.4 mm x 0.4 mm were experimentally realized, with the yield and size of step-free mesas being initally limited by substrate screw dislocations. Continued epitaxial growth following step-free surface formation leads to the formation of thin lateral cantilevers that extend the step-free surface area from the top edge of the mesa sidewalls. By selecting a proper pre-growth mesa shape and crystallographic orientation, the rate of cantilever growth can be greatly enhanced in a web growth process that has been used to (1) enlarge step-free surface areas and (2) overgrow and laterally relocate micropipes and screw dislocations. A new growth process, named step-free surface heteroepitaxy, has been developed to achieve 3C-SiC films on 4H- and 6H-SiC substrate mesas completely free of double positioning boundary and stacking fault defects. The process is based upon the controlled terrace nucleation and lateral expansion of a single island of 3C-SiC across a step-free mesa surface. Experimental results indicate that substrateepilayer lattice mismatch is at least partially relieved parallel to the interface without dislocations that undesirably thread through the thickness of the epilayer. These results should enable realization of improved SiC

  8. Technological state of the art of SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyc, Stdphane

    1993-10-01

    In a recent paper [1], Locatelli and Gamal describe the technological state of the art of SiC compared with Si. I would like to bear witness to the rapid advancement of SiC technology by giving a slighty updated account of SiC technology. The boule growth of SiC now achieves diameters up to 60 mm. One of the most problematic standing issues is the presence of micropipes in the wafers with a density of the order of 100 cm^{-2} or more [2]. The doping range available in epilayers is now wider. CAFE Research [3] accepts orders for doping densities from 5 × 10^{15} cm^{-3} to 1 × 10^{19} cm^{-3} in both N and P type. However their state of the art is better (we have received P type with doping 4 × 10^{14} cm^{-3} and N type with doping over 2 × 10^{19} cm^{-3} and they have also delivered [4] N type doping of 5 × 10^{14} cm^{-3}). As for large P dopings, Dmitriev has published [5] dopings over 10^{20} cm^{-3} The specific resistance of contacts on N type layers has also rapidly improved. Kelner has published results of 3 × 10^{-6} Ohm.cm2 with Ni contacts [6]. We have obtained with molybdenum [7] specific resistances of 2 × 10^{-5} Ohm.cm2 on epitaxies doped to 5 × 10^{18} cm^{-3} This value should be rapidly lowered as higher doped layers are used. In sum, I do agree with the authors of [1] that the technology of 6H SiC is rapidly advancing, thanks to breakthroughs in material growth and to a wide ranging renewed interest in this material. The pace may actually be higher than hitherto realized. References: [1] Locatelli and Gamal, J. Phys. III France 3 (1993) 1101. [2] Barret D. L. et al., Tenth Int. Conf. on Crystal Growth, San Diego, CA, USA 16-21 (August 1992). [3] CREE Research Inc., 2810 Meridian Parkway, Durham, NC 27713, USA. [4] Parrish M., private communication. [5] Dmitriev et al., Ext. Abstracts of the Electrochemical Soc. Meeting, 4, 89-2 (1989) 711. [6] Workshop on SiC Material and Devices (Charlottesville, September 10-11 1992) VA 22901. [7] Tyc

  9. Structural Changes of Amorphous GeTe2 Films by Annealing (Formation of Metastable Crystalline GeTe2 Films)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Hirofumi; Tsunetomo, Keiji; Imura, Takeshi; Osaka, Yukio

    1987-01-01

    Amorphous GeTe2 films with the thickness ˜0.5 μm, prepared by sputtering technique, transform into the crystalline GeTe2 films with the isomorphic structure to β-cristobalite, cubic SiO2, at Ta(annealing temperature){=}200°C. The cubic phase of GeTe2 is metastable and decomposes into the mixed crystal of GeTe and Te at Ta{=}250°C.

  10. The Role of Ligand Packing Frustration in Body-Centered Cubic (bcc) Superlattices of Colloidal Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Brian W; Yu, Yixuan; Bosoy, Christian A; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Korgel, Brian A

    2015-07-02

    This paper addresses the assembly of body centered-cubic (bcc) superlattices of organic ligand-coated nanocrystals. First, examples of bcc superlattices of dodecanethiol-capped Au nanocrystals and oleic acid-capped PbS and PbSe nanocrystals are presented and examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). These superlattices tend to orient on their densest (110) superlattice planes and exhibit a significant amount of {112} twinning. The same nanocrystals deposit as monolayers with hexagonal packing, and these thin films can coexist with thicker bcc superlattice layers, even though there is no hexagonal plane in a bcc lattice. Both the preference of bcc in bulk films over the denser face-centered cubic (fcc) superlattice structure and the transition to hexagonal monolayers can be rationalized in terms of packing frustration of the ligands. A model is presented to calculate the difference in entropy associated with capping ligand packing frustration in bcc and fcc superlattices.

  11. Formation and stability of cubic ice in water droplets.

    PubMed

    Murray, Benjamin J; Bertram, Allan K

    2006-01-07

    There is growing evidence that a metastable phase of ice, cubic ice, plays an important role in the Earth's troposphere and stratosphere. Cubic ice may also be important in diverse fields such as cryobiology and planetary sciences. Using X-ray diffraction, we studied the formation of cubic ice in pure water droplets suspended in an oil matrix as a function of droplet size. The results show that droplets of volume median diameter 5.6 microm froze dominantly to cubic ice with stacking faults. These results support previous suggestions that cubic ice is the crystalline phase that nucleates when pure water droplets freeze homogeneously at approximately 235 K. It is also shown that as the size of the water droplets increased from 5.6 to 17.0 microm, the formation of the stable phase of ice, hexagonal ice, was favoured. This size dependence can be rationalised with heat transfer calculations. We also investigated the stability of cubic ice that forms in water droplets suspended in an oil matrix. We observe cubic ice up to 243 K, much higher in temperature than observed in many previous studies. This result adds to the existing literature that shows bulk ice I(c) can persist up to approximately 240 K. The transformation of cubic ice to hexagonal ice also showed a complex time and temperature dependence, proceeding rapidly at first and then slowing down and coming to a halt. These combined results help explain why cubic ice forms in some experiments described in the literature and not others.

  12. The compressibility of cubic white and orthorhombic, rhombohedral, and simple cubic black phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Simon M; Zaug, Joseph

    2010-03-10

    The effect of pressure on the crystal structure of white phosphorus has been studied up to 22.4 GPa. The ?alpha phase was found to transform into the alpha' phase at 0.87 +- 0.04 GPa with a volume change of 0.1 +- 0.3 cc/mol. A fit of a second order Birch- Murnaghan equation to the data gave Vo = 16.94 ? 0.08 cc/mol and Ko = 6.7 +- 0.5 GPa for the alpha phase and Vo = 16.4 +- 0.1 cc/mol and Ko = 9.1 +- 0.3 GPa for the alpha' phase. The alpha' phase was found to transform to the A17 phase of black phosphorus at 2.68 +- 0.34 GPa and then with increasing pressure to the A7 and then simple cubic phase of black phosphorus. A fit of a second order Birch-Murnaghan equation to our data combined with previous measurements gave Vo = 11.43 +- 0.05 cc/mol and Ko = 34.7 +- 0.5 GPa for the A17 phase, Vo = 9.62 +- 0.01 cc/mol and Ko = 65.0 +- 0.6 GPa for the A7 phase and , Vo = 9.23 +- 0.01 cc/mol and Ko = 72.5 +- 0.3 GPa for the simple cubic phase.

  13. Strain tuning of topological band order in cubic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, wanxiang; Zhu, Wenguang; Weitering, Hanno; Stocks, George Malcolm; Yao, yugui; Xiao, Di

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically explore the possibility of tuning the topological order of cubic diamond/zinc-blende semi- conductors with external strain. Based on a simple tight-binding model, we analyze the evolution of the cubic semiconductor band structure under hydrostatic or biaxial lattice expansion, by which a generic guiding princi- ple is established that biaxial lattice expansion can induce a topological phase transition of small band-gap cubic semiconductors via a band inversion and symmetry breaking at point. Using density functional theory cal- culations, we demonstrate that a prototype topological trivial semiconductor, InSb, is converted to a nontrivial topological semiconductor with a 2% 3% biaxial lattice expansion.

  14. Effects of SiC on Properties of Cu-SiC Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efe, G. Celebi; Altinsoy, I.; Ipek, M.; Zeytin, S.; Bindal, C.

    2011-12-01

    This paper was focused on the effects of particle size and distribution on some properties of the SiC particle reinforced Cu composites. Copper powder produced by cementation method was reinforced with SiC particles having 1 and 30 μm particle size and sintered at 700 °C. SEM studies showed that SiC particles dispersed in copper matrix homogenously. The presence of Cu and SiC components in composites were verified by XRD analysis technique. The relative densities of Cu-SiC composites determined by Archimedes' principle are ranged from 96.2% to 90.9% for SiC with 1 μm particle size, 97.0 to 95.0 for SiC with 30 μm particle size. Measured hardness of sintered compacts varied from 130 to 155 HVN for SiC having 1 μm particle size, 188 to 229 HVN for SiC having 1 μm particle size. Maximum electrical conductivity of test materials was obtained as 80.0% IACS (International annealed copper standard) for SiC with 1 μm particle size and 83.0% IACS for SiC with 30 μm particle size.

  15. Astrocyte-Dependent Slow Inward Currents (SICs) Participate in Neuromodulatory Mechanisms in the Pedunculopontine Nucleus (PPN)

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Adrienn; Pál, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Slow inward currents (SICs) are known as excitatory events of neurons caused by astrocytic glutamate release and consequential activation of neuronal extrasynaptic NMDA receptors. In the present article we investigate the role of these astrocyte-dependent excitatory events on a cholinergic nucleus of the reticular activating system (RAS), the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN). It is well known about this and other elements of the RAS, that they do not only give rise to neuromodulatory innervation of several areas, but also targets neuromodulatory actions from other members of the RAS or factors providing the homeostatic drive for sleep. Using slice electrophysiology, optogenetics and morphological reconstruction, we revealed that SICs are present in a population of PPN neurons. The frequency of SICs recorded on PPN neurons was higher when the soma of the given neuron was close to an astrocytic soma. SICs do not appear simultaneously on neighboring neurons, thus it is unlikely that they synchronize neuronal activity in this structure. Occurrence of SICs is regulated by cannabinoid, muscarinic and serotonergic neuromodulatory mechanisms. In most cases, SICs occurred independently from tonic neuronal currents. SICs were affected by different neuromodulatory agents in a rather uniform way: if control SIC activity was low, the applied drugs increased it, but if SIC activity was increased in control, the same drugs lowered it. SICs of PPN neurons possibly represent a mechanism which elicits network-independent spikes on certain PPN neurons; forming an alternative, astrocyte-dependent pathway of neuromodulatory mechanisms. PMID:28203147

  16. Operating procedure for SiC defect detection: Data support document

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, C.C.; Partain, K.E.

    1989-09-29

    The feasibility of the Hg Intrusion QC method for measuring SiC coating defects for the MHTGR was conducted as a potential improvement for the Burn/Leach (B/L) QC method currently used. The purpose for evaluating the Hg Intrusion QC method as an alternative method was to determine if B/L QC method underestimated SiC coating defects. Some evidence in work conducted earlier, indicated that TRISO-coated fuel particles with low SiC coating defects measured by the B/L QC method showed higher releases of metallic fission products. These data indicated that the SiC coating defect fractions were higher than the B/L measured data indicated. Sample sizes used in the current study were too small to conclusively demonstrate that the B/L QC method under estimate SiC coating defects. However, observations made during this study indicated a need for an additional QC method to the B/L QC method to measure SiC coating defects for the higher quality MHTGR fuels. The B/L QC method is the best method for measuring SiC coating defects with missing SiC layers or broken SiC coatings (gross SiC defects). However, SiC coating defects with microcracks and other SiC defects not detected by the B/L method may contribute to the release of metallic fission products in-service. For these type of SiC coating defects, the Hg Intrusion QC method investigated in this study is feasible, but particle sample size should be increased to a much larger sample size (100,000 particles per test) for the MHTGR. 7 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Creep behavior for advanced polycrystalline SiC fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Kohyama, Akira

    1997-04-01

    A bend stress relaxation (BSR) test has been utilized to examine irradiation enhanced creep in polycrystalline SiC fibers which are under development for use as fiber reinforcement in SiC/SiC composite. Qualitative, S-shaped 1hr BSR curves were compared for three selected advanced SiC fiber types and standard Nicalon CG fiber. The temperature corresponding to the middle of the S-curve (where the BSR parameter m = 0.5) is a measure of a fiber`s thermal stability as well as it creep resistance. In order of decreasing thermal creep resistance, the measured transition temperatures were Nicalon S (1450{degrees}C), Sylramic (1420{degrees}C), Hi-Nicalon (1230{degrees}C) and Nicalon CG (1110{degrees}C).

  18. Laser synthesis of carbon-rich SiC nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, I. A.; Quick, N. R.; Kar, A.

    2003-06-01

    A nanosecond pulsed laser direct-write and doping (LDWD) technique is used for the fabrication of carbon-rich silicon carbide nanoribbons heterostructure in a single crystal 4H-SiC wafer. Characterization by high-resolution transmission electron microscope and selected area electron diffraction pattern revealed the presence of nanosize crystalline ribbons with hexagonal graphite structure in the heat-affected zone below the decomposition temperature isotherm in the SiC epilayer. The nanoribbons exist in three layers each being approximately 50-60 nm thick, containing 15-17 individual sheets. The layers are self-aligned on the (0001) plane of the SiC epilayer with their c axis at 87° to the incident laser beam. The LDWD technique permits synthesis of heterostructured nanoribbons in a single step without additional material or catalyst, and effectively eliminates the need for nanostructure handling and transferring processes.

  19. Mid-ultraviolet pulsed laser micromachining of SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Litao; Li, Mingxing; Lin, Haipeng; Hu, Jinping; Tang, Qingju; Liu, Chunsheng

    2014-11-01

    This paper provides an investigation of the ablation behavior of single crystal 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC wafer to improve the manufacturability and high-temperature performance of SiC using laser applications. 266nm pulsed laser micromachining of SiC was investigated. The purpose is to establish suitable laser parametric regime for the fabrication of high accuracy, high spatial resolution and thin diaphragms for high-temperature MEMS pressure sensor applications. Etch rate, ablation threshold and quality of micromachined features were evaluated. The governing ablation mechanisms, such as thermal vaporization, phase explosion, and photomechanical fragmentation, were correlated with the effects of pulse energy. The ablation threshold is obtained with ultraviolet pulsed laser ablation. The results suggested ultraviolet pulsed laser's potential for rapid manufacturing. Excellent quality of machined features with little collateral thermal damage was obtained in the lower pulse energy range. The leading material removal mechanisms under these conditions were discussed.

  20. Research on microwave joining of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this research project are to identify optimum time-temperature profiles for the microwave joining of silicon carbide and to develop new microwave joining methods that can be applied to accomplish in situ formation of silicon carbide interlayers and to join larger samples required for industrial applications. Work during this reporting period was focused on investigation of the effect of specimen preparation on joining of SiC using polymer precursors to form SiC in situ at the interface. During this period, LANL also completed the evaluation of joints that were made by FMT using four different joining temperatures, as part of an effort to determine optimum joining temperature.

  1. Surface engineering of SiC via sublimation etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokubavicius, Valdas; Yazdi, Gholam R.; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Niu, Yuran; Zakharov, Alexei; Iakimov, Tihomir; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Yakimova, Rositsa

    2016-12-01

    We present a technique for etching of SiC which is based on sublimation and can be used to modify the morphology and reconstruction of silicon carbide surface for subsequent epitaxial growth of various materials, for example graphene. The sublimation etching of 6H-, 4H- and 3C-SiC was explored in vacuum (10-5 mbar) and Ar (700 mbar) ambient using two different etching arrangements which can be considered as Si-C and Si-C-Ta chemical systems exhibiting different vapor phase stoichiometry at a given temperature. The surfaces of different polytypes etched under similar conditions are compared and the etching mechanism is discussed with an emphasis on the role of tantalum as a carbon getter. To demonstrate applicability of such etching process graphene nanoribbons were grown on a 4H-SiC surface that was pre-patterned using the thermal etching technique presented in this study.

  2. Nucleation and growth of polycrystalline SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, M.; Schimmel, S.; Jokubavicius, V.; Linnarsson, M. K.; Ou, H.; Syväjärvi, M.; Wellmann, P.

    2014-03-01

    The nucleation and bulk growth of polycrystalline SiC in a 2 inch PVT setup using isostatic and pyrolytic graphite as substrates was studied. Textured nucleation occurs under near-thermal equilibrium conditions at the initial growth stage with hexagonal platelet shaped crystallites of 4H, 6H and 15R polytypes. It is found that pyrolytic graphite results in enhanced texturing of the nucleating gas species. Reducing the pressure leads to growth of the crystallites until a closed polycrystalline SiC layer containing voids with a rough surface is developed. Bulk growth was conducted at 35 mbar Ar pressure at 2250°C in diffusion limited mass transport regime generating a convex shaped growth form of the solid-gas interface leading to lateral expansion of virtually [001] oriented crystallites. Growth at 2350°C led to the stabilization of 6H polytypic grains. The micropipe density in the bulk strongly depends on the substrate used.

  3. The SiC Direct Target Prototype for SPES

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzi, Valentina; Andrighetto, Alberto; Antonucci, C.; Barbui, Marina; Biasetto, Lisa; Carturan, S.; Celona, L.; Cevolani, S.; Chines, Francesco; Cinausero, Marco; Colombo, P.; Cuttone, G.; Di Bernardo, P.; Giacchini, Mauro; Gramegna, Fabiana; Lollo, M.; Maggioni, G.; Manzolaro, Mattia; Meneghetti, G.; Messina, G. Esteban; Petrovich, C.; Piga, L.; Prete, Gianfranco; Re, Maurizio; Rizzo, D.; Stracener, Daniel W; Tonezzer, Michele; Zanonato, P.

    2007-01-01

    A R&D study for the realization of a Direct Target is in progress within the SPES project for RIBs production at the Laboratori Nazionali of Legnaro. A proton beam (40 MeV energy, 0.2 niA current) is supposed to impinge directly on a UCx multiple thin disks target, the power released by the proton beam is dissipated mainly through irradiation. A SiC target prototype with a 1:5 scale has been developed and tested. Thermal, mechanical and release calculations have been performed to fully characterize the prototype. An online test has been performed at the HRIBF facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), showing that our Sic target can sustain a proton beam current considerably higher than the maximum beam current used with the standard HRIBF target configuration.

  4. The SiC Direct Target Prototype for SPES

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzi, V.; Andrighetto, A.; Barbui, M.; Carturan, S.; Cinausero, M.; Giacchini, M.; Gramegna, F.; Lollo, M.; Maggioni, G.; Prete, G.; Tonezzer, M.; Antonucci, C.; Cevolani, S.; Petrovich, C.; Biasetto, L.; Colombo, P.; Manzolaro, M.; Meneghetti, M.; Celona, L.; Chines, F.

    2007-10-26

    A R and D study for the realization of a Direct Target is in progress within the SPES project for RIBs production at the Laboratori Nazionali of Legnaro. A proton beam (40 MeV energy, 0.2 mA current) is supposed to impinge directly on a UCx multiple thin disks target, the power released by the proton beam is dissipated mainly through irradiation. A SiC target prototype with a 1:5 scale has been developed and tested. Thermal, mechanical and release calculations have been performed to fully characterize the prototype. An online test has been performed at the HRIBF facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), showing that our SiC target can sustain a proton beam current considerably higher than the maximum beam current used with the standard HRIBF target configuration.

  5. EBSD investigation of SiC for HTR fuel particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helary, D.; Dugne, O.; Bourrat, X.; Jouneau, P. H.; Cellier, F.

    2006-05-01

    Electron back-scattering diffraction (EBSD) can be successfully performed on SiC coatings for HTR fuel particles. EBSD grain maps obtained from thick and thin unirradiated samples are presented, along with pole figures showing textures and a chart showing the distribution of grain aspect ratios. This information is of great interest, and contributes to improving the process parameters and ensuring the reproducibility of coatings.

  6. SiC device development for high temperature sensor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, J. S.; Goldstein, David; Kurtz, A. D.; Osgood, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Progress made in the processing and characterization of 3C-SiC for high temperature sensor applications is reviewed. Piezoresistance properties of silicon carbide and the temperature coefficient of resistivity of n-type beta-SiC are presented. In addition, photoelectrical etching and dopant selective etch-stops in SiC and high temperature Ohmic contacts for n-type beta-SiC sensors are discussed.

  7. Bilateral comparison of an IPRT between KRISS and SIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, I.; Sánchez, C. A.

    2013-09-01

    As a follow-up of a memorandum of understanding signed in 2009 between KRISS of Korea and SIC of Colombia, the two national metrology institutes carried out a bilateral comparison of calibration of an industrial platinum resistance thermometer (IPRT). A protocol that was similar to that of APMP.T-S6 has been agreed and followed in the comparison. The method of the calibration at each laboratory was calibration by comparison against calibrated reference thermometers. The nominal temperatures of the comparison were nine temperatures, including the ice point, between -50 °C and 500 °C. One commercially-available IPRT with α ˜ 0.00385 °C-1 that was prepared by KRISS was calibrated by comparison firstly at KRISS, and then at SIC, and finally at KRISS to assess the drift of the artifact during the comparison. At KRISS, an ice-point bath, three liquid baths and a salt bath were used to provide isothermal environment for the comparison. At SIC, an ice-point bath, two liquid baths and a vertical furnace with a metal equalizing block were used. The claimed uncertainty with k=2 of the calibration at KRISS, excluding the longterm instability and hysteresis of the traveling IPRT, was 30 mK, and that at SIC was 120 mK. The capability of the calibration of the two laboratories from -50 °C to 500 °C showed a good agreement within the claimed uncertainty of the calibration. The largest deviation of the two calibration results was 75 mK at 500 °C.

  8. Role of the Cdk Inhibitor Sic 1 in Start

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Cold Spring Harbor , New York 11724 REPORT DATE: August 1998 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR...AND ADDRESS(ES) Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Cold Spring Harbor , New York 11724 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING f...Meeting at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Futcher, B., Yang, Q.-H., Sherlock, G., Marshak, D. and Schneider, B. SIC1 and other

  9. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken September 5, 1961, shows pumps used for extracting water emerging form a disturbed natural spring that occurred during the excavation of the site. The pumping became a daily ritual and the site is still pumped today.

  10. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In this photo, taken June 24, 1963, the four tower legs of the test stand can be seen at their maximum height.

  11. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, depicts the progress of the stand as of January 14, 1963, with its four towers prominently rising.

  12. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This construction photo depicts the progress of the stand site as of October 8, 1962.

  13. Research on microwave joining of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Silberglitt, R.

    1995-07-31

    Results: identification of optimum joining temperature range for reaction bonded Si carbide at 1420-1500 C; demonstration that specimens joined within this range have fracture roughness greater than as-received material; and demonstration of ability to use SiC formed in situ from the decomposition of polycarbosilane as a joining aid for sintered Si carbide. In the latter case, the interlayer material was also shown to fill any pores in the joining specimens near the interlayer. Together with the demonstration of leaktight joints between tube sections of reaction bonded and sintered SiC under the previous contract, these results provide the foundation for scaleup to joining of the larger and longer tubes needed for radiant burner and heat exchanger tube assemblies. The formation of SiC in situ is important because maintaining roundness of these large tubes is a technical challenge for the tube manufacturer, so that formation of a leaktight joint may require some degree of gap filling.

  14. SiC X-ray detectors for harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. E.; Barnett, A. M.; Bassford, D. J.; Stevens, R. C.; Horsfall, A. B.

    2011-01-01

    We have characterised a number of SiC Schottky Diodes as soft X-ray photon counting detectors over the temperature range -30°C to +80°C. We present the spectroscopic performance, as measured over the energy range ~ 6 keV-30 keV and correlate the data with measurements of the temperature dependence of the device leakage current. The results show that these detectors can be used for X-ray photon counting spectroscopy over a wide temperature range. Measurement of the radiation tolerance of Semi Transparent SiC Schottky Diodes (STSSD) has shown that these devices can still operate as photon counting X-ray spectrometers after proton irradiation (total dose of 1013 cm-2, 50 MeV). We present measurements on proton irradiated STSSDs that indicate that radiation induced traps, located in the upper half of the bandgap, have reduced the mobility and concentration of charge carriers. X-ray spectra predicted using a Monte Carlo model for SiC diodes are compared with measured spectra.

  15. The influence of SiC particle size and volume fraction on the thermal conductivity of spark plasma sintered UO2-SiC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Sunghwan; Baney, Ronald; Subhash, Ghatu; Tulenko, James

    2013-11-01

    This study examines the influence of Silicon Carbide (SiC) particle addition on thermal conductivity of UO2-SiC composite pellets. UO2 powder and β-SiC particles of different sizes and of different volume fractions were mechanically mixed and sintered at 1350-1450 °C for 5 min by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The particle size (0.6-55 μm diameter) and volume fraction (5-20%) of SiC were systematically varied to investigate their influence on the resulting UO2-SiC composite pellet microstructure and the thermal properties. It was found that SiC particle size less than 16.9 μm with larger volume fraction is more effective for improving the thermal conductivity of the fuel pellets. Scanning Electron Microscopy examination revealed micro-cracking and interfacial debonding in the composites containing larger size SiC particles (16.9 and 55 μm) which resulted in reduced thermal conductivity. For the UO2-SiC composite pellets containing 1 μm diameter SiC particles, the thermal conductivity increased almost linearly with volume fraction of particles. However, the addition of a larger volume fraction of SiC reduces the amount of heavy metal in the composite pellet and therefore a higher U-235 enrichment is necessary to compensate for the heavy metal loss. The experimental thermal conductivity values of the UO2-SiC composite pellets are in good agreement with the theoretical values based on the available model in the literature.

  16. March 20, 2012 Space Station Briefing: Cubic Satellite Deploy (Narrated)

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation, presented by Expedition 32 Lead Flight Director Dina Contella during the March 20, 2012 ISS Program and Science Overview Briefing, shows the deploy of small cubic satellites (often ...

  17. The Coulombic Lattice Potential of Ionic Compounds: The Cubic Perovskites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francisco, E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents coulombic models representing the particles of a system by point charges interacting through Coulomb's law to explain coulombic lattice potential. Uses rubidium manganese trifluoride as an example of cubic perovskite structure. Discusses the effects on cluster properties. (CW)

  18. March 20, 2012 Space Station Briefing: Cubic Satellite Deploy

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation, presented by Expedition 32 Lead Flight Director Dina Contella during the March 20, 2012 ISS Program and Science Overview Briefing, shows the deploy of small cubic satellites (often ...

  19. Late-time attractor for the cubic nonlinear wave equation

    SciTech Connect

    Szpak, Nikodem

    2010-08-15

    We apply our recently developed scaling technique for obtaining late-time asymptotics to the cubic nonlinear wave equation and explain the appearance and approach to the two-parameter attractor found recently by Bizon and Zenginoglu.

  20. On the role of cubic structure in ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tōru

    1982-10-01

    To clarify the formation mechanism of snow polycrystals the possibility of formation of a cubic ice embryo is discussed on the basis of the homogeneous nucleation theory for supercooled water formed from ambient water molecules in the phase of supersaturated vapour. In this connection, attention is paid to a finding from a model of broken hydrogen bonds that the plane {111} of a cubic ice crystal has a smaller specific interfacial energy than each of the {0001} or {10ovbar|10} planes of a hexagonal ice crystal. Hence, it follows that a critical cubic embryo has a smaller activation energy than a critical hexagonal embryo below a critical temperature; namely, Ostwald's step rule (Stufenregel) holds for a change from cubic ice to hexagonal ice below a critical temperature. This discussion is reinforced by examining, from the viewpoint of this step rule, the observed misorientation of the c-axis of natural snow polycrystals and the results of experiments using frozen water droplets.

  1. 19. 1500 CUBIC FEET CAPACITY SCRAP STEEL CHARGING BOX ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. 1500 CUBIC FEET CAPACITY SCRAP STEEL CHARGING BOX ON THE CHARGING AISLE OF THE BOP SHOP LOOKING NORTHWEST. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  2. Influence of SiC surface polarity on the wettability and reactivity in an Al/SiC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ping; Wang, Yi; Ren, Lihua; Li, Shixin; Liu, Yuhua; Jiang, Qichuan

    2015-11-01

    The wetting of (0 0 0 1) 6H-SiC single crystals by molten Al was investigated using a dispensed sessile drop method in a high vacuum at 973-1173 K. The wettability and reactivity in this system are sensitive to the surface polarity of SiC. The interfacial reaction on the Si-terminated surface is rapid. The formation of a continuous Al4C3 product layer at the interface leads to an equilibrium contact angle of 56 ± 1° at 1173 K. In comparison, the interfacial reaction on the C-terminated surface is sluggish. The interface is only partially covered by discrete Al4C3 platelets even after dwelling at 1173 K for 2 h. The final wettability, however, is much better (θF = 41 ± 1°) than that of the Si-terminated surface which was covered by a dense Al4C3 layer, suggesting that the formation of Al4C3 should not always contribute to the wetting in the Al/SiC system. A plausible explanation is that the clean (i.e., deoxidized) C-terminated surface should be well wetted by molten Al in nature, owing to the strong chemical interactions between liquid Al and the surface atoms of the C-terminated SiC. It is likely that the presence of the oxide film at the surface of the molten Al drop or the SiC substrate and the rapid formation of Al4C3, which prevent the establishment of a real Al/SiC interface, conceal the intrinsic wettability of this system.

  3. Fractographic Analysis of HfB2-SiC and ZrB2-SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecholsky, J.J., Jr.; Ellerby, D. T.; Johnson, S. M.; Stackpoole, M. M.; Loehman, R. E.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Hafnium diboride-silicon carbide and zirconium diboride-silicon carbide composites are potential materials for high temperature leading edge applications on reusable launch vehicles. In order to establish material constants necessary for evaluation of in-situ fracture, bars fractured in four point flexure were examined using fractographic principles. The fracture toughness was determined from measurements of the critical crack sizes and the strength values, and the crack branching constants were established to use in forensic fractography of materials for future flight applications. The fracture toughnesses range from about 13 MPam (sup 1/2) at room temperature to about 6 MPam (sup 1/2) at 1400 C for ZrB2-SiC composites and from about 11 MPam (sup 1/2) at room temperature to about 4 MPam (sup 1/2) at 1400 C for HfB2-SiC composites.

  4. AlGaN HEMTs on patterned resistive/conductive SiC templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prystawko, Pawel; Sarzynski, Marcin; Nowakowska-Siwinska, Anna; Crippa, Danilo; Kruszewski, Piotr; Wojtasiak, Wojciech; Leszczynski, Mike

    2017-04-01

    High performance GaN-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) on SiC require low-miscut ( 0.45°), resistive substrates, which are very expensive. A cost-effective solution is to use resistive SiC template i.e., grow a thick resistive SiC epitaxial layer on cheap, conductive SiC substrate. However, this approach requires much higher miscut (2-8°). In the present work we show a lateral patterning technology capable to locally decrease the high miscut of the resistive SiC template, down to a level acceptable for GaN epitaxy. On such patterned SiC templates we grew smooth AlGaN/GaN structures. The maximum width of flat regions available for device fabrication was nearly 100 μm. In these flat regions AlGaN-based HEMTs were fabricated and characterized.

  5. SiC Optically Modulated Field-Effect Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabib-Azar, Massood

    2009-01-01

    An optically modulated field-effect transistor (OFET) based on a silicon carbide junction field-effect transistor (JFET) is under study as, potentially, a prototype of devices that could be useful for detecting ultraviolet light. The SiC OFET is an experimental device that is one of several devices, including commercial and experimental photodiodes, that were initially evaluated as detectors of ultraviolet light from combustion and that could be incorporated into SiC integrated circuits to be designed to function as combustion sensors. The ultraviolet-detection sensitivity of the photodiodes was found to be less than desired, such that it would be necessary to process their outputs using high-gain amplification circuitry. On the other hand, in principle, the function of the OFET could be characterized as a combination of detection and amplification. In effect, its sensitivity could be considerably greater than that of a photodiode, such that the need for amplification external to the photodetector could be reduced or eliminated. The experimental SiC OFET was made by processes similar to JFET-fabrication processes developed at Glenn Research Center. The gate of the OFET is very long, wide, and thin, relative to the gates of typical prior SiC JFETs. Unlike in prior SiC FETs, the gate is almost completely transparent to near-ultraviolet and visible light. More specifically: The OFET includes a p+ gate layer less than 1/4 m thick, through which photons can be transported efficiently to the p+/p body interface. The gate is relatively long and wide (about 0.5 by 0.5 mm), such that holes generated at the body interface form a depletion layer that modulates the conductivity of the channel between the drain and the source. The exact physical mechanism of modulation of conductivity is a subject of continuing research. It is known that injection of minority charge carriers (in this case, holes) at the interface exerts a strong effect on the channel, resulting in amplification

  6. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photo of the S-IC test stand, taken October 2, 1963, the flame deflector can be seen in the bottom center portion

  7. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photo of the S-IC test stand, taken September 25, 1963, the flame deflector can be seen rotated to the outside on

  8. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In the early stages of excavation, a natural spring was disturbed that caused a water problem which required constant pumping from the site and is even pumped to this day. Behind this reservoir of pumped water is the S-IC test stand boasting its ever-growing four towers as of March 29, 1963.

  9. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photo, taken September 5, 1963, the flame deflector is being installed in the S-IC test stand.

  10. SiC (SCS-6) Fiber Reinforced-Reaction Formed SiC Matrix Composites: Microstructure and Interfacial Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Dickerson, R. M.; Olmstead, Forrest A.; Eldridge, J. I.

    1997-01-01

    Microstructural and interfacial characterization of unidirectional SiC (SCS-6) fiber reinforced-reaction formed SiC (RFSC) composites has been carried out. Silicon-1.7 at.% molybdenum alloy was used as the melt infiltrant, instead of pure silicon, to reduce the activity of silicon in the melt as well as to reduce the amount of free silicon in the matrix. Electron microprobe analysis was used to evaluate the microstructure and phase distribution in these composites. The matrix is SiC with a bi-modal grain-size distribution and small amounts of MoSi2, silicon, and carbon. Fiber push-outs tests on these composites showed that a desirably low interfacial shear strength was achieved. The average debond shear stress at room temperature varied with specimen thickness from 29 to 64 MPa, with higher values observed for thinner specimens. Initial frictional sliding stresses showed little thickness dependence with values generally close to 30 MPa. Push-out test results showed very little change when the test temperature was increased to 800 C from room temperature, indicating an absence of significant residual stresses in the composite.

  11. a Sexafs Study of Ultrathin cr Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J. C.; Dowling, M.; Schwarzacher, W.; McCash, E. M.

    Three types of Cr films were grown on Pd(100) at different substrate temperatures. The film thickness was found to be the crucial parameter in determining the film structure; substrate temperature was found to make little difference to the surface EXAFS pattern observed. Films with a thickness greater than 6 monolayers (ML) of Cr were body-centered-cubic (bcc); those with a thickness less than 3 ML Cr appear to be face-centered-cubic (fcc) and those in between were initially bcc but after annealing to ~500 K produced an fcc-like SEXAFS pattern. The SEXAFS of both thin and medium films can be interpreted in terms of a Cr-Pd alloy on the surface.

  12. Structural Consequences of Hydrogen Intercalation of Epitaxial Graphene on SiC(0001)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-23

    Structural consequences of hydrogen intercalation of epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) Jonathan D. Emery,1,a) Virginia H. Wheeler,2 James E. Johns,1...the interface between epitaxial graphene (EG) and its SiC substrate is known to significantly influence the electronic properties of the graphene ...from that of the overlying graphene layers. This newly formed graphene layer becomes decoupled from the SiC substrate and, along with the other graphene

  13. Scanning tunneling microscopy study of the superconducting properties of three-atomic-layer Pb films

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yilin; Li, Zhi; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Chen, Mu; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2013-12-09

    Ultrathin Pb films with a thickness of three monolayers (ML) were prepared on α-√(3)×√(3)Pb/Si(111) (Pb-SIC) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. Despite significant defect scattering, low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy reveals a high superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} of 6.9 K, compared with the bulk T{sub c} (7.2 K). By applying external magnetic field, magnetic vortices were directly imaged, which demonstrates the robustness of superconductivity. By comparing to nearly free-standing Pb films on graphitized SiC (0001) substrate, we suggest that the higher T{sub c} of 3 ML Pb films on Pb-SIC originates from the combined effects of quantum confinement and substrate-enhanced electron-phonon coupling.

  14. Symmetry breaking in few layer graphene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Aaron; Ohta, Taisuke; McChesney, Jessica L.; Emtsev, Konstantin V.; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; Rotenberg, Eli

    2007-10-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that the quasiparticle dynamics, the layer-dependent charge and potential, and the c-axis screening coefficient could be extracted from measurements of the spectral function of few layer graphene films grown epitaxially on SiC using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In this paper we review these findings, and present detailed methodology for extracting such parameters from ARPES. We also present detailed arguments against the possibility of an energy gap at the Dirac crossing ED.

  15. PVD Silicon Carbide as a Thin Film Packaging Technology for Antennas on LCP Substrates for Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Stanton, John W.; Ponchak, George E.; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Zorman, Christian A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an effort to develop a thin film packaging technology for microfabricated planar antennas on polymeric substrates based on silicon carbide (SiC) films deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The antennas are coplanar waveguide fed dual frequency folded slot antennas fabricated on liquid crystal polymer (LCP) substrates. The PVD SiC thin films were deposited directly onto the antennas by RF sputtering at room temperature at a chamber pressure of 30 mTorr and a power level of 300 W. The SiC film thickness is 450 nm. The return loss and radiation patterns were measured before and after the SiC-coated antennas were submerged into perchloric acid for 1 hour. No degradation in RF performance or physical integrity of the antenna was observed.

  16. SiC optics for EUV, UV, and visible space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, Joseph L.

    2003-02-01

    An overview of silicon carbide (SiC) materials is provided, focusing on reaction bonded (RB) SiC and its properties. The Miniature Infrared Camera and Spectrometer (MICAS) and Advanced Land Imager (ALI) SiC space instruments produced by SSGPO and flown under NASA's New Millennium Program are described, and some of the mission requirements associated with UV and extreme UV (EUV) applications are reviewed. Manufacturing options associated with SiC reflectors are reviewed and the optical performance demonstrated with these materials is presented. In order to review the suitability of these materials to UV and EUV missions microroughness and surface scatter results are shown.

  17. High quality SiC microdisk resonators fabricated from monolithic epilayer wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Magyar, Andrew P.; Bracher, David; Lee, Jonathan C.; Hu, Evelyn L.; Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-02-03

    The exquisite mechanical properties of SiC have made it an important industrial material with applications in microelectromechanical devices and high power electronics. Recently, the optical properties of SiC have garnered attention for applications in photonics, quantum information, and spintronics. This work demonstrates the fabrication of microdisks formed from a p-N SiC epilayer material. The microdisk cavities fabricated from the SiC epilayer material exhibit quality factors of as high as 9200 and the approach is easily adaptable to the fabrication of SiC-based photonic crystals and other photonic and optomechanical devices.

  18. Review of data on irradiation creep of monolithic SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Youngblood, G.E.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1996-04-01

    An effort is now underway to design an irradiation creep experiment involving SiC composites to SiC fibers. In order to successfully design such an experiment, it is necessary to review and assess the available data for monolithic SiC to establish the possible bounds of creep behavior for the composite. The data available show that monolithic SiC will indeed creep at a higher rate under irradiation compared to that of thermal creep, and surprisingly, it will do so in a temperature-dependant manner that is typical of metals.

  19. Effects of stacking disorder on thermal conductivity of cubic ice.

    PubMed

    Johari, G P; Andersson, Ove

    2015-08-07

    Cubic ice is said to have stacking disorder when the H2O sequences in its structure (space group Fd3̄m) are interlaced with hexagonal ice (space group P6(3)/mmc) sequences, known as stacking faults. Diffraction methods have shown that the extent of this disorder varies in samples made by different methods, thermal history, and the temperature T, but other physical properties of cubic and hexagonal ices barely differ. We had found that at 160 K, the thermal conductivity, κ, of cubic ice is ∼20% less than that of hexagonal ice, and this difference varies for cubic ice samples prepared by different methods and/or subjected to different thermal history. After reviewing the methods of forming cubic ice, we report an investigation of the effects of stacking disorder and other features by using new data, and by analyzing our previous data on the dependence of κ on T and on the pressure. We conclude that the lower κ of cubic ice and its weaker T-dependence is due mainly to stacking disorder and small crystal sizes. On in situ heating at 20-50 MPa pressure, κ increases and cubic ice irreversibly transforms more sharply to ice Ih, and at a higher T of ∼220 K, than it does in ex situ studies. Cooling and heating between 115 and 130 K at 0.1 K min(-1) rate yield the same κ value, indicating that the state of cubic ice in these conditions does not change with time and T. The increase in κ of cubic ice observed on heat-annealing before its conversion to hexagonal ice is attributed to the loss of stacking faults and other types of disorders, and to grain growth. After discussing the consequences of our findings on other properties, we suggest that detailed studies of variation of a given property of cubic ice with the fraction of stacking faults in its structure may reveal more about the effect of this disorder. A similar disorder may occur in the mono-layers of H2O adsorbed on a substrate, in bulk materials comprised of two dimensional layers, in diamond and in

  20. Effects of stacking disorder on thermal conductivity of cubic ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, G. P.; Andersson, Ove

    2015-08-01

    Cubic ice is said to have stacking disorder when the H2O sequences in its structure (space group F d 3 ¯ m ) are interlaced with hexagonal ice (space group P63/mmc) sequences, known as stacking faults. Diffraction methods have shown that the extent of this disorder varies in samples made by different methods, thermal history, and the temperature T, but other physical properties of cubic and hexagonal ices barely differ. We had found that at 160 K, the thermal conductivity, κ, of cubic ice is ˜20% less than that of hexagonal ice, and this difference varies for cubic ice samples prepared by different methods and/or subjected to different thermal history. After reviewing the methods of forming cubic ice, we report an investigation of the effects of stacking disorder and other features by using new data, and by analyzing our previous data on the dependence of κ on T and on the pressure. We conclude that the lower κ of cubic ice and its weaker T-dependence is due mainly to stacking disorder and small crystal sizes. On in situ heating at 20-50 MPa pressure, κ increases and cubic ice irreversibly transforms more sharply to ice Ih, and at a higher T of ˜220 K, than it does in ex situ studies. Cooling and heating between 115 and 130 K at 0.1 K min-1 rate yield the same κ value, indicating that the state of cubic ice in these conditions does not change with time and T. The increase in κ of cubic ice observed on heat-annealing before its conversion to hexagonal ice is attributed to the loss of stacking faults and other types of disorders, and to grain growth. After discussing the consequences of our findings on other properties, we suggest that detailed studies of variation of a given property of cubic ice with the fraction of stacking faults in its structure may reveal more about the effect of this disorder. A similar disorder may occur in the mono-layers of H2O adsorbed on a substrate, in bulk materials comprised of two dimensional layers, in diamond and in

  1. Unraveling the (3 ×3)-SiC(1 1 1) reconstruction and its role as an interface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Lydia; Lazarevic, Florian; Rinke, Patrick; Blum, Volker; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-03-01

    To refine the growth quality of epitaxial graphene on the C-side of SiC and improving the resulting electronic character of these films, it is important to understand the atomic and electronic-structure of the interface. A phase mixture of different surface phases is observed just when surface graphitization first sets in. However, the atomic structure of some of the competing surface phases as well as of the SiC-graphene interface is unknown. We performed a density functional theory study on the C-side of the polar SiC(1 1 1) surface using the all-electron numeric atom-centered basis function code FHI-aims. The formation energy of different reconstructions and model systems for the interface is presented within the thermodynamically allowed range. The surface energies of the known (2 ×2) phase is compared with several structural models of the (3 ×3) phase proposed in the literature. Inorian comparison all the previously suggested (3 ×3) models are higher in energy than the known (2 ×2) phase. We present a new model for the (3 ×3) reconstruction. Its formation energy crosses that of the (2 ×2) phase just at the carbon rich limit of the chemical potential, which explains the observed phase mixture. Present address: AQcomputare GmbH, Business Unit MATcalc, Annabergerstr. 240, 09125 Chemnitz, Germany.

  2. Liquid polycarbosilane derived SiC coating on silicon (1 1 1) wafer for enhanced mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Jonaki; Ranjan, Ashok; Saxena, A. K.; Das, Probal Kumar; Banerjee, Rajat

    2013-04-01

    Silicon carbide coating on silicon (1 1 1) wafer was deposited by modified chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using liquid polycarbosilane (LPCS) as precursor at three different moderately high temperatures in presence of Argon gas. Glancing angle X-ray diffractometer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy reveals smooth β-SiC coating and its subsequent transformation into α-SiC on silicon substrate. In all the temperature the film was found to be uniform with a thickness ranging from 0.6-1.2 μm. The average particle size as can be seen from FESEM ranges from 7 to 385 nm approximately, the lowest range being (7-20 nm) which hitherto has not yet been reported using LPCS as precursor for SiC. Moreover the coated samples show substantial increment of hardness (∼18.8 GPa) and toughness (∼1.51 MPa m1/2), both of which increases with increase in deposition temperature. The smooth and thin SiC coating on silicon formed in three different moderate temperatures compared to very high temperature for other CVD assisted coating along with enhanced hardness and toughness makes this a promising material in critically harsh environment required for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) application.

  3. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: SiC based Si/SiC heterojunction and its rectifying characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feng; Chen, Zhi-Ming; Li, Lian-Bi; Zhao, Shun-Feng; Lin, Tao

    2009-11-01

    The Si on SiC heterojunction is still poorly understood, although it has a number of potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices, for example, light-activated SiC power switches where Si may play the role of an light absorbing layer. This paper reports on Si films heteroepitaxially grown on the Si face of (0001) n-type 6H-SiC substrates and the use of B2H6 as a dopant for p-Si grown at temperatures in a range of 700-950 °C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tests have demonstrated that the samples prepared at the temperatures ranged from 850 °C to 900 °C are characterized as monocrystalline silicon. The rocking XRD curves show a well symmetry with FWHM of 0.4339° Omega. Twin crystals and stacking faults observed in the epitaxial layers might be responsible for widening of the rocking curves. Dependence of the crystal structure and surface topography on growth temperature is discussed based on the experimental results. The energy band structure and rectifying characteristics of the Si/SiC heterojunctions are also preliminarily tested.

  4. Comment on "Adsorption of hydrogen and hydrocarbon molecules on SiC(001)" by Pollmann et al. (Surf. Sci. Rep. 69 (2014) 55-104)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, E.; Celasco, E.; Vattuone, L.; Savio, L.; Tejeda, A.; Silly, M.; D'angelo, M.; Sirotti, F.; Rocca, M.; Catellani, A.; Galli, G.; Douillard, L.; Semond, F.; Aristov, V. Yu.; Soukiassian, P.

    2016-02-01

    This comment clarifies two issues related to the (001) surface reconstructions of cubic SiC, namely: (i) The failure of the bridge-bond model for H atoms interacting with the 3C-SiC(001) 3 × 2 reconstruction to explain all the experimental data based on different techniques, while a recent model has reconciled theory and experimental results. This model has not been discussed or even mentioned in the review by Pollmann et al.; and (ii) In their review, two models of the Si-terminated c(4 × 2) 3C-SiC(001) surface reconstruction are presented as equally probable. This is clearly not the case and the reasons are explained in this comment.

  5. RF-MBE growth of cubic AlN on MgO (001) substrates via 2-step c-GaN buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuda, M.; Morikawa, S.; Kuboya, S.; Katayama, R.; Yaguchi, H.; Onabe, K.

    2013-09-01

    We fabricated cubic AlN (c-AlN) films on MgO (001) substrates via 2-step c-GaN buffer layer by radio-frequency-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (RF-MBE). The effect of low temperature c-GaN buffer layer on the surface flatness and crystal quality of c-AlN was investigated by AFM and XRD reciprocal space mapping analysis. We examined optical properties of the c-AlN film by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The absorption edge by the direct transition of the c-AlN film was 5.95 eV caused by the hexagonal phase incorporation.

  6. Cs and Ag co-incorporation in cubic silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono-Hurtado, Alejandro; Heim, Andrew J.; Kim, Sungtae; Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane

    2013-08-01

    Understanding the diffusion of fission products Cs and Ag through the SiC layer of TRISO particles is of particular interest for the progress and improvement of the High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technologies. Although the SiC layer acts as a barrier for fission products, there is experimental evidence of Cs and Ag diffusion through this layer. Previous considerations of Ag and Cs in SiC have focused on the element interacting with SiC, but have not considered the possibility of co-incorporation with another species. This paper presents a ab initio study on the co-incorporation of Cs and Ag with an anion (Iodine (I) or Oxygen (O)) into SiC as an alternative incorporation mechanism. It is found that for crystalline SiC, Ag co-incorporation with Iodine (I) and Oxygen (O) into SiC is not energetically favorable, while Cs co-incorporation with O is a preferred mechanism under some oxygen partial pressures of interest. However, Cs-O co-incorporation into the crystalline portion of SiC is not sufficiently strong to enable a Cs solubility that accounts for the Cs release observed in some experiments. Formation energies are a function of the chemical potential of Si and C. Calculations in this paper are performed for Si-rich and C-rich conditions, which constitute the boundaries for which the formation energies are allowed to vary. Calculation of the electronic potential shift is required in order to ensure that the Fermi level in a defected cell is defined with respect to the same valence band level in the undefected cell [21,23]. The potential shift is calculated by aligning low energy levels in the total density of states (DOS) [24]. Spurious interactions between images of the charged defects make it necessary to correct for unphysical electrostatic interactions. Both the monopole-monopole and monopole-quadrupole Makov Payne corrections are used for this purpose. However, strain and incompletely corrected electrostatic interactions can still lead to significant

  7. The effect of structural defects in SiC particles on the static & dynamic mechanical response of a 15 volume percent SiC/6061-Al matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, R.U.; Song, S.G.; Zurek, A.K.; Gray, G.T. III

    1995-09-01

    Static and Dynamic mechanical tests, and microstructural examinations performed on a SiC particle reinforced 6061-Al matrix composite indicated that particle cracking significantly affected the strength, strain hardening, and failure mechanism of the composite. Cracks were observed to nucleate and propagate on stacking faults and interfaces between the various phases within the reinforcing SiC particles. Planar defects were the predominant artifacts seen in the SiC particles. Partial dislocations were also observed bounding the stacking faults within the reinforcement phase.

  8. Structural investigation of nanocrystalline graphene grown on (6√3 × 6√3)R30°-reconstructed SiC surfaces by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, T.; Dubslaff, M.; Oliveira, M. H., Jr.; Hanke, M.; Fromm, F.; Seyller, T.; Nemec, L.; Blum, V.; Scheffler, M.; Lopes, J. M. J.; Riechert, H.

    2013-12-01

    Growth of nanocrystalline graphene films on (6√3 × 6√3)R30°-reconstructed SiC surfaces was achieved by molecular beam epitaxy, enabling the investigation of quasi-homoepitaxial growth. The structural quality of the graphene films, which is investigated by Raman spectroscopy, increases with growth time. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy proves that the SiC surface reconstruction persists throughout the growth process and that the synthesized films consist of sp2-bonded carbon. Interestingly, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements show that the graphene domains possess one single in-plane orientation, are aligned to the substrate, and offer a noticeably contracted lattice parameter of 2.450 Å. We correlate this contraction with theoretically calculated reference values (all-electron density functional calculations based on the van der Waals corrected Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional) for the lattice parameter contraction induced in ideal, free-standing graphene sheets by: substrate-induced buckling, the edges of limited-size flakes and typical point defects (monovacancies, divacancies, Stone-Wales defects).

  9. Growth mechanism of silicon carbide films on silicon substrates using C 60 carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Workman, Richard; Sarid, Dror

    1995-12-01

    Silicon carbide films were grown on silicon substrates using C 60 molecules as a carbon source. The grown films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and infrared spectroscopy (IRS). Also, using SiO 2 as a mask on the Si substrate, a patterned SiC film was grown. Growth and defect mechanisms are discussed and compared with conventional CVD carbidizing methods.

  10. Atomic Layer Epitaxy of Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin Films, Devices and their Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    U AD-A274 325 Semiannual Technical Report U Atomic Layer Epitaxy of Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin Films, Devices and Their... Group IV Materials: Surface Processes, Thin 414v001---01 Films, Devices and Their Characterization 1114SS S. AUTHOS) N00179 Robert F. Davis, Salah... Conformal deposition of SiC has been demonstrated within trenches etched into Si(100) wafers. P-type films have also been achieved using Al as a

  11. Injection Laser Using Rare Earth Doped GaN Thin Films for Visible and Infrared Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    GaN and AlN thin films on sapphire and silicon carbide ( SiC ) substrates. The methyl derivatives of the elements, namely trimethylgallium (TMGa) and...molecular beam epitaxy and electrical characterization of Si-doped zinc blende GaN films deposited on ? SiC coated (001) Si substrates," Appl. Phys. Lett...34InGaN Multi-Quantum-Well-Structure Laser Diodes with Cleaved Mirror Cavity Facets," Jpn. J. Appl. Phy., vol. 35, p. 15, 1996. [32] M. A. Khan, J. N

  12. Processing of laser formed SiC powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, J. S.; Bowen, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Superior SiC characteristics can be achieved through the use of ideal constituent powders and careful post-synthesis processing steps. High purity SiC powders of approx. 1000 A uniform diameter, nonagglomerated and spherical were produced. This required major revision of the particle formation and growth model from one based on classical nucleation and growth to one based on collision and coalescence of Si particles followed by their carburization. Dispersions based on pure organic solvents as well as steric stabilization were investigated. Although stable dispersions were formed by both, subsequent part fabrication emphasized the pure solvents since fewer problems with drying and residuals of the high purity particles were anticipated. Test parts were made by the colloidal pressing technique; both liquid filtration and consolidation (rearrangement) stages were modeled. Green densities corresponding to a random close packed structure (approx. 63%) were achieved; this highly perfect structure has a high, uniform coordination number (greater than 11) approaching the quality of an ordered structure without introducing domain boundary effects. After drying, parts were densified at temperatures ranging from 1800 to 2100 C. Optimum densification temperatures will probably be in the 1900 to 2000 C range based on these preliminary results which showed that 2050 C samples had experienced substantial grain growth. Although overfired, the 2050 C samples exhibited excellent mechanical properties. Biaxial tensile strengths up to 714 MPa and Vickers hardness values of 2430 kg/sq mm 2 were both more typical of hot pressed than sintered SiC. Both result from the absence of large defects and the confinement of residual porosity (less than 2.5%) to small diameter, uniformly distributed pores.

  13. Corrosion Behavior of SiC Reinforced Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-25

    observed for AA- 7075 -T6. Microscopic examination of the sur- faces showed that pitting behavior was nearly identical to that observed for the 6061...of the MMC was a dark grey which may indicate that the surface oxide was thicker. The anodic behavior of SiC/AA- 7075 -T6 and AA- 7075 -T6 sug- gested...m-- - osION BEHAVIOR OF SIC REINFORCED ALUMINUM ALLOYS (N) 0 BY J. F. MulNTYRE A. H. LE . GOLLEDGE R. CONRAD RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT 25

  14. Ultra High Temperature (UHT) SiC Fiber (Phase 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, James A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Lizcano, Maricela; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon-carbide fiber-reinforced silicon-carbide ceramic matrix composites (SiCSiC CMC) are emerginglightweight re-usable structural materials not only for hot section components in gas turbine engines, but also for controlsurfaces and leading edges of reusable hypersonic vehicles as well as for nuclear propulsion and reactor components. Ithas been shown that when these CMC are employed in engine hot-section components, the higher the upper usetemperature (UUT) of the SiC fiber, the more performance benefits are accrued, such as higher operating temperatures,reduced component cooling air, reduced fuel consumption, and reduced emissions. The first generation of SiCSiC CMC with a temperature capability of 2200-2400F are on the verge of being introduced into the hot-section components ofcommercial and military gas turbine engines.Today the SiC fiber type currently recognized as the worlds best in terms ofthermo-mechanical performance is the Sylramic-iBN fiber. This fiber was previously developed by the PI at NASA GRC using patented processes to improve the high-cost commercial Sylramic fiber, which in turn was derived from anotherlow-cost low-performance commercial fiber. Although the Sylramic-iBN fiber shows state-of-the art creep and rupture resistance for use temperatures above 2550oF, NASA has shown by fundamental creep studies and model developmentthat its microstructure and creep resistance could theoretically be significantly improved to produce an Ultra HighTemperature (UHT) SiC fiber.This Phase II Seedling Fund effort has been focused on the key objective of effectively repeating the similar processes used for producing the Sylramic-iBN fiber using a design of experiments approach to first understand the cause of the less than optimum Sylramic-iBN microstructure and then attempting to develop processconditions that eliminate or minimize these key microstructural issues. In so doing, it is predicted that that theseadvanced process could result in an UHT SiC

  15. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the construction progress of the test stand as of August 14, 1961. Water gushing in from the disturbance of a natural spring contributed to constant water problems during the construction process. It was necessary to pump water from the site on a daily basis and is still pumped from the site today. The equipment is partially submerged in the water emerging from the spring.

  16. Plastic deformation of alumina reinforced with SiC whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    DeArellano-Lopez, A.R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

    1993-06-01

    Addition of small amounts of stiff reinforcement (SiC whiskers) to a polycrystalline AL{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix partially inhibits grain boundary sliding because of an increase in threshold stress. When the concentration of whiskers is high enough, a pure diffusional mechanism takes over the control of plastic deformation of the composites. For higher whisker loadings, the materials creep properties depend on a microstructural feature different from the nominal grain size. A tentative correlation of this effective microstructural parameter with the spacing between the whiskers was established through a model.

  17. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken September 5, 1961, shows the construction of forms which became the concrete foundation for the massive stand. The lower right hand corner reveals a pump used for extracting water emerging from a disturbed natural spring that occurred during excavation of the site. The pumping became a daily ritual and the site is still pumped today.

  18. Construction Progress of S-IC Test Stand Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast east was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. This photograph of the Pump House area was taken August 13, 1963. The massive round water storage tanks can be seen to the left of

  19. Construction Progress S-IC Test Stand Block House Interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. This photograph, taken August 12, 1963, offers a view of the Block House interior.

  20. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. After a six month delay in construction due to size reconfiguration of the Saturn booster, the site was revisited for modifications in March 1962. The original foundation walls built in the prior year were torn down and re-poured to accommodate the larger boosters. This photo depicts that modification progress as of June 13,1962.

  1. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. After a 6 month delay in construction due to size reconfiguration of the Saturn booster, the site was revisited for modifications. The original foundation walls built in the prior year had to be torn down and re-poured to accommodate the larger booster. The demolition can be seen in this photograph taken on May 21, 1962.

  2. Surface passivation of nano-textured fluorescent SiC by atomic layer deposited TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Fadil, Ahmed; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Petersen, Paul Michael; Ou, Haiyan

    2016-07-01

    Nano-textured surfaces have played a key role in optoelectronic materials to enhance the light extraction efficiency. In this work, morphology and optical properties of nano-textured SiC covered with atomic layer deposited (ALD) TiO2 were investigated. In order to obtain a high quality surface for TiO2 deposition, a three-step cleaning procedure was introduced after RIE etching. The morphology of anatase TiO2 indicates that the nano-textured substrate has a much higher surface nucleated grain density than a flat substrate at the beginning of the deposition process. The corresponding reflectance increases with TiO2 thickness due to increased surface diffuse reflection. The passivation effect of ALD TiO2 thin film on the nano-textured fluorescent 6H-SiC sample was also investigated and a PL intensity improvement of 8.05% was obtained due to the surface passivation.

  3. Study on aluminium-based single films.

    PubMed

    Vinod Kumar, G S; García-Moreno, F; Babcsán, N; Brothers, A H; Murty, B S; Banhart, J

    2007-12-28

    In the present paper the authors studied isolated metallic films made from the same material used for making metallic foams, and then characterised their properties. Metal films were made from a liquid aluminium alloy reinforced with ceramic particles of known concentration. Melts without such particles were also investigated. It is shown that stable films could not be made from Al-Si alloy having no particles, and just extremely thin and fragile films could be made from commercially-pure Al. In contrast, aluminium alloys containing particles such as SiC and TiB(2) allowed pulling thin, stable films, which did not rupture. Significant thinning of films was observed when the particle concentration in the melt decreased. By in situ X-ray monitoring of liquid films during pulling, film thickness and drainage effects within the liquid film could be studied. The morphology and microstructure of films was characterised after solidification. Our work shows that the question of how foams are stabilised can be studied using a simplified system such as a film, instead of having to deal with the multitude of different structural elements present in a foam.

  4. Ferromagnetic Ground States in Face-Centered Cubic Hubbard Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Souza, T. X. R.; Macedo, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the ground state energies of face-centered cubic Hubbard clusters are analyzed using the Lanczos method. Examination of the ground state energy as a function of the number of particle per site n showed an energy minimum for face-centered cubic structures. This energy minimum decreased in n with increasing coulombic interaction parameter U. We found that the ground state energy had a minimum at n = 0.6, when U = 3W, where W denotes the non-interacting energy bandwidth and the face-centered cubic structure was ferromagnetic. These results, when compared with the properties of nickel, shows strong similarity with other finite temperature analyses in the literature and supports the Hirsh’s conjecture that the interatomic direct exchange interaction dominates in driving the system into a ferromagnetic phase. PMID:27583653

  5. Superconductivity in cubic noncentrosymmetric PdBiSe Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, B.; Thamizhavel, A.; Ramakrishnan, S.

    2015-03-01

    Mixing of spin singlet and spin triplet superconducting pairing state is expected in noncentrosymmetric superconductors (NCS) due to the inherent presence of Rashba-type antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling. Unlike low symmetry (tetragonal or monoclinic) NCS, parity is isotropicaly broken in space for cubic NCS and can additionally lead to the coexistence of magnetic and superconducting state under certain conditions. Motivated with such enriched possibility of unconventional superconducting phases in cubic NCS we are reporting successful formation of single crystalline cubic noncentrosymmetric PdBiSe with lattice parameter a = 6.4316 Å and space group P21 3 (space group no. 198) which undergoes to superconducting transition state below 1.8 K as measured by electrical transport and AC susceptibility measurements. Significant strength of Rashba-type antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling can be expected for PdBiSe due to the presence of high Z (atomic number) elements consequently making it potential candidate for unconventional superconductivity.

  6. Superhard cubic BC2N compared to diamond.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Sun, Hong; Chen, Changfeng

    2004-11-05

    Recent experiments claimed successful synthesis of cubic boron-carbonitride compounds BC2N with an extreme hardness second only to diamond. In the present Letter, we examine the ideal strength of cubic BC2N using first-principles calculations. Our results reveal that, despite the large elastic parameters, compositional anisotropy and strain dependent bonding character impose limitation on their strength. Consequently, the hardness of the optimal BC2N structure is predicted to be lower than that of cubic BN, the second hardest material known. The measured extreme hardness of BC2N nanocomposites is most likely due to the nanocrystalline size effect and the bonding to the surrounding amorphous carbon matrix. This may prove to be a general rule useful in the quest for new superhard covalent materials.

  7. Tetragonal and cubic zirconia multilayered ceramic constructs created by EPD.

    PubMed

    Mochales, Carolina; Frank, Stefan; Zehbe, Rolf; Traykova, Tania; Fleckenstein, Christine; Maerten, Anke; Fleck, Claudia; Mueller, Wolf-Dieter

    2013-02-14

    The interest in electrophoretic deposition (EPD) for nanomaterials and ceramics production has widely increased due to the versatility of this technique to effectively combine different materials in unique shapes and structures. We successfully established an EPD layering process with submicrometer sized powders of Y-TZP with different mol percentages of yttrium oxide (3 and 8%) and produced multilayers of alternating tetragonal and cubic phases with a clearly defined interface. The rationale behind the design of these multilayer constructs was to optimize the properties of the final ceramic by combining the high mechanical toughness of the tetragonal phase of zirconia together with the high ionic conductivity of its cubic phase. In this work, a preliminary study of the mechanical properties of these constructs proved the good mechanical integrity of the multilayered constructs obtained as well as crack deflection in the interface between tetragonal and cubic zirconia layers.

  8. Iron and Nickel Isotope Measurements on SiC X Grains with CHILI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodolányi, J.; Stephan, T.; Trappitsch, R.; Hoppe, P.; Pignatari, M.; Davis, A. M.; Pellin, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    New measurements with CHILI on SiC X grains provide more detailed Fe and Ni isotope data than previous NanoSIMS analyses. The new data suggest that Fe-Ni fractionation may occur in supernova ejecta before SiC condensation.

  9. First-principles prediction of stable SiC cage structures and their synthesis pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochet, Pascal; Genovese, Luigi; Caliste, Damien; Rousseau, Ian; Goedecker, Stefan; Deutsch, Thierry

    2010-07-01

    In this paper we use density functional theory calculations to investigate the structure and the stability of different SiC cagelike clusters. In addition to the fullerene family and the mixed four and six membered ring family, we introduce a family based on reconstructed nanotube slices. We propose an alternative synthesis pathway starting from SiC nanotubes.

  10. Highly flexible, nonflammable and free-standing SiC nanowire paper.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianjun; Liao, Xin; Wang, Mingming; Liu, Zhaoxiang; Zhang, Judong; Ding, Lijuan; Gao, Li; Li, Ye

    2015-04-14

    Flexible paper-like semiconductor nanowire materials are expected to meet the criteria for some emerging applications, such as components of flexible solar cells, electrical batteries, supercapacitors, nanocomposites, bendable or wearable electronic or optoelectronic components, and so on. As a new generation of wide-bandgap semiconductors and reinforcements in composites, SiC nanowires have advantages in power electronic applications and nanofiber reinforced ceramic composites. Herein, free-standing SiC nanowire paper consisting of ultralong single-crystalline SiC nanowires was prepared through a facile vacuum filtration approach. The ultralong SiC nanowires were synthesized by a sol-gel and carbothermal reduction method. The flexible paper composed of SiC nanowires is ∼100 nm in width and up to several hundreds of micrometers in length. The nanowires are intertwisted with each other to form a three-dimensional network-like structure. SiC nanowire paper exhibits high flexibility and strong mechanical stability. The refractory performance and thermal stability of SiC nanowire paper were also investigated. The paper not only exhibits excellent nonflammability in fire, but also remains well preserved without visible damage when it is heated in an electric oven at a high temperature (1000 °C) for 3 h. With its high flexibility, excellent nonflammability, and high thermal stability, the free-standing SiC nanowire paper may have the potential to improve the ablation resistance of high temperature ceramic composites.

  11. Porous SiC nanowire arrays as stable photocatalyst for water splitting under UV irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hailong; She, Guangwei; Mu, Lixuan; Shi, Wensheng

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arrays of porous SiC nanowires prepared by a facile in situ carbonizing method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Utilizing the SiC nanowire arrays as photocatalysis for water splitting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excellent photocatalytic performance under the UV irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very high stability of the SiC nanowire photocatalyst. -- Abstract: In this study, we report the fabrication and photocatalytic properties of the oriented arrays of SiC nanowires on the Si substrate. The SiC nanowire arrays were prepared by carbonizing the Si nanowire arrays with the graphite powder at 1250 Degree-Sign C. The as-prepared SiC nanowires are highly porous, which endows them with a high surface-to-volume ratio. Considering the large surface areas and the high stability, the porous SiC nanowire arrays were used as photocatalyst for water splitting under UV irradiation. It was found that such porous SiC structure exhibited an enhanced and extremely stable photocatalytic performance.

  12. Simple adaptive cubic spline interpolation of fluorescence decay functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuśba, J.; Czuper, A.

    2007-05-01

    Simple method allowing for adaptive cubic spline interpolation of fluorescence decay functions is proposed. In the first step of the method, the interpolated function is integrated using the known adaptive algorithm based on Newton-Cotes quadratures. It is shown that, in this step, application of the Simpson's rule provides the smallest number of calls of the interpolated function. In the second step of the method, a typical cubic spline approximation is used to find values of the interpolated function between the points evaluated in the first step.

  13. Surface enhanced Raman study of cubic boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu

    2003-05-01

    Surface enhancement for Raman scattering of single crystal cubic boron nitride (c-BN) (1 1 1) and polycrystalline cubic BN was observed by depositing silver nanoparticles on the substrate surface. The c-BN samples were subjected to hydrogen plasma, as well as deuterium plasma treatment to observe the isotopic shift of surface binding species. Characteristic Raman peaks corresponding to the molecular vibrational modes of surface chemisorbed hydrogen and deuterium could be observed for the first time and were assigned according to ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

  14. Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J. Birch; Kingman, deceased, Donald D.; Bianchini, Gregory M.

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

  15. Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J.B.; Kingman, D.D.; Bianchini, G.M.

    1992-04-28

    Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

  16. Stationary phase analysis of generalized cubic phase mask wavefront coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Hui, Mei; Jia, Wei

    2013-07-01

    The modified generalized cubic phase mask (GCPM) has recently been applied in wavefront coding systems including infrared imaging and microscopy. In this paper, the stationary phase method is employed to analyze the GCPM characteristics. The SPA of the modulation transfer function (MTF) under misfocus aberration is derived for a wavefront coding system with a GCPM. The approximation corresponds with the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach. On the basis of this approximation, we compare the characteristics of GCPM and cubic phase masks (CPM). A GCPM design approach based on stationary phase approximation is presented which helps to determine the initial parameter of phase mask, significantly decreasing the computational time required for numerical simulation.

  17. Optical spectroscopy of cubic GaN in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, J.; Tourbot, G.; Sam-Giao, D.; Bougerol, C.; Daudin, B.; Gayral, B.

    2010-08-01

    We show that highly homogeneous cubic GaN can be grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on wurtzite GaN nanowires. The line width of the donor bound exciton is below 3 meV and can reach 1.6 meV in the best parts of the studied sample. This allows to perform a detailed spectroscopy of cubic GaN, and, in particular, to determine the precise spectral positions of the donor bound exciton, the fundamental free exciton and the split-off exciton in a photoluminescence experiment.

  18. The singular cubical set of a topological space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolini, Rosa; Wiest, Bert

    1999-01-01

    For any topological space X let C(X) be the realization of the singular cubical set of X; let * be the topological space consisting of one point. In [1] Antolini proves, as a corollary to a general theorem about cubical sets, that C(X) and X×C(*) are homotopy equivalent, provided X is a CW-complex. In this note we give a short geometric proof that for any topological space X there is a natural weak homotopy equivalence between C(X) and X×C(*).

  19. Well-orientated cubic boron nitride nanocrystals as studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tsiaoussis, I; Frangis, N

    2006-09-01

    In a boron nitride thin film, grown on a Si (100) substrate by radio frequency magnetron sputtering, a striking nanostructure is observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It consists of cubic boron nitride nanocrystals with a rather good triangular shape, pointing always to the substrate. The nanocrystals are usually highly defected and present their own interesting internal structure. Texture formation is observed within a nanocrystal, with all the subgrains observed to have a common <011> axis, which is also approximately parallel to a <011> axis of the Si substrate, i.e. the nanocrystals are very well structurally orientated in relation to the Si substrate (self-organized). Dislocations and stacking faults are also found in the nanocrystals.

  20. High pressure phases produced by low energy ion implantation with reference to cubic boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, D. R.; McFall, W. D.; Smith, H.; Higgins, B.; Boswell, R. W.; Durandet, A.; James, B. W.; Falconer, I. S.

    1995-12-01

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) is a high quality abrasive material with hardness second only to diamond and with good oxidation and solubility properties. A new ion plating technique using the helicon wave plasma source combined with electron beam evaporation has been developed for the large area, high rate deposition of this material. The apparatus is fitted with a multiwavelength in situ ellipsometer for monitoring growth. The optical properties of both c-BN and h-BN films have been measured in situ and the operating conditions which produce a high growth rate of c-BN have been determined. A simple model for the movement of boron through the system has been developed and compared to experiment.

  1. Structural and electronic properties of cubic boron nitride doped with zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yubo; Cheng, Tianyuan; Wang, Xiao; Jiang, Huaxing; Yang, Hangsheng; Nose, Kenji

    2014-07-28

    Structural and electronic properties of Zn-doped cubic boron nitride (cBN) were investigated via first principle calculation based on density functional theory. Our simulation suggests that Zn can substitute for both B (Zn{sub B}) and N (Zn{sub N}) atom; Zn{sub B} is energetically favorable, and Zn{sub N} can only be prepared under B-rich conditions. Zn{sub B} induced a shallow acceptor level; however, the large difference in electronegativity between Zn and N makes the acceptor level strongly localized, which reduces effective carrier density. In the case of Zn{sub N}, both deep acceptor levels within band gap and shallow acceptor levels at the top of valence band were induced, which produced more free carriers than Zn{sub B}. The calculated results account for experimental results of enhanced electric conductivity of Zn-doped cBN films prepared under B-rich conditions.

  2. On the impact of the plasma jet energy on the product of plasmadynamic synthesis in the Si-C system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, D.; Sivkov, A.

    2015-10-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles can be used for ceramics reinforcement, creation of nanostructured ceramics, microelectromechanical systems. The paper presents the results of plasmadynamic synthesis of silicon carbide nanopowders. This method was realized by the synthesis in an electrodischarge plasma jet generated by a high-current pulsed coaxial magnetoplasma accelerator. Powdered carbon and silicon were used as precursors for the reaction. Four experiments with different energy levels (from 10.0 to 30.0 kJ) were carried out. The synthesized products were analysed by several modern techniques including X-ray diffractometry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. According to analysis results all the products mainly composed of cubic silicon carbide (b-SiC) with a small amount of unreacted precursors. Silicon carbide particles have a clear crystal structure, a triangular shape and sizes to a few hundred nanometers. Comparison of the results of experiments with different energy levels made it possible to draw conclusions on ways to control product phase composition and dispersion. The silicon carbide content and particles sizes increase with increasing the energy level.

  3. Dynamical stabilization of solitons in cubic-quintic nonlinear Schroedinger model

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullaev, Fatkhulla Kh.; Garnier, Josselin

    2005-09-01

    We consider the existence of a dynamically stable soliton in the one-dimensional cubic-quintic nonlinear Schroedinger model with strong cubic nonlinearity management for periodic and random modulations. We show that the predictions of the averaged cubic-quintic nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS) equation and modified variational approach for the arrest of collapse coincide. The analytical results are confirmed by numerical simulations of a one-dimensional cubic-quintic NLS equation with a rapidly and strongly varying cubic nonlinearity coefficient.

  4. Synthesis of Freestanding Graphene on SiC by a Rapid-Cooling Technique.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jianfeng; Norimatsu, Wataru; Iwata, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Keita; Ito, Takahiro; Kusunoki, Michiko

    2016-11-11

    Graphene has a negative thermal expansion coefficient; that is, when heated, the graphene lattice shrinks. On the other hand, the substrates typically used for graphene growth, such as silicon carbide, have a positive thermal expansion coefficient. Hence, on cooling graphene on SiC, graphene expands but SiC shrinks. This mismatch will physically break the atomic bonds between graphene and SiC. We have demonstrated that a graphenelike buffer layer on SiC can be converted to a quasifreestanding monolayer graphene by a rapid-cooling treatment. The decoupling of graphene from the SiC substrate was actually effective for reducing the electric carrier scattering due to interfacial phonons. In addition, the rapidly cooled graphene obtained in this way was of high-quality, strain-free, thermally stable, and strongly hole doped. This simple, classical, but quite novel technique for obtaining quasifreestanding graphene could open a new path towards a viable graphene-based semiconductor industry.

  5. Synthesis of Freestanding Graphene on SiC by a Rapid-Cooling Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jianfeng; Norimatsu, Wataru; Iwata, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Keita; Ito, Takahiro; Kusunoki, Michiko

    2016-11-01

    Graphene has a negative thermal expansion coefficient; that is, when heated, the graphene lattice shrinks. On the other hand, the substrates typically used for graphene growth, such as silicon carbide, have a positive thermal expansion coefficient. Hence, on cooling graphene on SiC, graphene expands but SiC shrinks. This mismatch will physically break the atomic bonds between graphene and SiC. We have demonstrated that a graphenelike buffer layer on SiC can be converted to a quasifreestanding monolayer graphene by a rapid-cooling treatment. The decoupling of graphene from the SiC substrate was actually effective for reducing the electric carrier scattering due to interfacial phonons. In addition, the rapidly cooled graphene obtained in this way was of high-quality, strain-free, thermally stable, and strongly hole doped. This simple, classical, but quite novel technique for obtaining quasifreestanding graphene could open a new path towards a viable graphene-based semiconductor industry.

  6. The first muon beam from a new highly-intense DC muon source, MuSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Nam Hoai; MuSIC Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    A new DC muon source, MuSIC, is now under construction at Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Japan. The MuSIC adopts a new pion/muon collection system and a curved transport solenoid. These techniques are important in realization of future muon programs such as the muon to electron conversion experiments (COMET/Mu2e), neutrino factories, and muon colliders. The pion capture magnet and a part of the transport solenoid have been built and beam tests were carried out to assess the MuSIC's performance. Muon lifetime measurements and muonic X-ray measurements have been used for estimation of muon yield of the MuSIC. The result indicates that the MuSIC would be one of the most intense DC muon beams in the world.

  7. The role of Pd in the transport of Ag in SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, E. J.; Neethling, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results in support of a newly proposed transport mechanism to account for the release of Ag from intact TRISO particles during HTR reactor operation. The study reveals that the migration of Ag in polycrystalline SiC can occur in association with Pd, a relatively high yield metallic fission product. The migration takes place primarily along grain boundary routes, seen in the form of distinct Pd, Ag and Si containing nodules. Pd is known to rapidly migrate to the SiC and iPyC interface within TRISO particles during operation. It has been shown to chemically corrode the SiC to form palladium silicides. These palladium silicides are found present along SiC grain boundaries in nodule like form. It is suggested that Ag penetrates these nodules together with the palladium silicide, to form a Pd, Ag and Si solution capable of migrating along SiC grain boundaries over time.

  8. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of Al7075/SiC nanocomposites fabricated by dynamic compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atrian, A.; Majzoobi, G. H.; Enayati, M. H.; Bakhtiari, H.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of Al7075 metal matrix composites reinforced with SiC, and the characterization of their microstructure and mechanical behavior. The mechanically milled Al7075 micron-sized powder and SiC nanoparticles are dynamically compacted using a drop hammer device. This compaction is performed at different temperatures and for various volume fractions of SiC nanoparticles. The relative density is directly related to the compaction temperature rise and indirectly related to the content of SiC nanoparticle reinforcement, respectively. Furthermore, increasing the amount of SiC nanoparticles improves the strength, stiffness, and hardness of the compacted specimens. The increase in hardness and strength may be attributed to the inherent hardness of the nanoparticles, and other phenomena such as thermal mismatch and crack shielding. Nevertheless, clustering of the nanoparticles at aluminum particle boundaries make these regions become a source of concentrated stress, which reduces the load carrying capacity of the compacted nanocomposite.

  9. A NEW TYPE OF SIC COMPOSITE FOR FUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Jones, Russell H.

    2001-04-01

    A new type of SiC composite called Tyrannohex™ is potentially suitable as a fusion reactor structural material. Tyrannohex™ composite plates are made by hot-pressing layups of Tyranno™ SA precursor fibers into various 1D and 2D configurations. The fiber-bonded composite plates contain nearly 100% fiber volume, so take advantage of the outstanding high temperature strength and creep properties of the Tyranno™ SA fiber, a nearly stoichiometric SiC fiber. The hot-pressed plates are dense, strong, rigid, tough, thermally conductive and have high temperature stability. The microstructure and thermal conductivity of a SA-Tyrannohex™ material with a 2D-woven configuration was evaluated prior to irradiation testing. The microstructure contained some small, flat interlaminar pores and intrabundle needle-like pores, and the transverse thermal conductivity was 25 and 21 W/mK at ambient and 1000°C, respectively. These results suggest that careful control of the fiber-bonded interlayers and the fiber architecture are critical to achieve both high thermal conductivity and toughness in Tyrannohex™ type materials.

  10. Cohort profile: the Social Inequality in Cancer (SIC) cohort study.

    PubMed

    Nordahl, Helene; Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur; Diderichsen, Finn; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Osler, Merete; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Prescott, Eva; Tjønneland, Anne; Lange, Theis; Keiding, Niels; Andersen, Per Kragh; Andersen, Ingelise

    2014-12-01

    The Social Inequality in Cancer (SIC) cohort study was established to determine pathways through which socioeconomic position affects morbidity and mortality, in particular common subtypes of cancer. Data from seven well-established cohort studies from Denmark were pooled. Combining these cohorts provided a unique opportunity to generate a large study population with long follow-up and sufficient statistical power to develop and apply new methods for quantification of the two basic mechanisms underlying social inequalities in cancer-mediation and interaction. The SIC cohort included 83 006 participants aged 20-98 years at baseline. A wide range of behavioural and biological risk factors such as smoking, physical inactivity, alcohol intake, hormone replacement therapy, body mass index, blood pressure and serum cholesterol were assessed by self-administered questionnaires, physical examinations and blood samples. All participants were followed up in nationwide demographic and healthcare registries. For those interested in collaboration, further details can be obtained by contacting the Steering Committee at the Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, at inan@sund.ku.dk.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of SiC whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Wada, H. ); Allard, L.F. )

    1992-01-01

    SiC whiskers were synthesized by the carbothermal reduction of silica with an addition of halide (3NaF{center dot}AlF{sub 3} or NaF) as an auxiliary bath. The whiskers were {beta} phase (3C) and grew in the (111) direction. Three distinctive morphologies were observed: (1) Type A: thin and straight; (2) Type B: thick and bamboo-like; and (3) Type C: thick, straight, and smooth. Type A whiskers contained a high density of basal plane (111) stacking faults along their entire length, whereas Type B whiskers showed periodic changes between stacking faults and well-defined single crystals. Type C whiskers showed stacking faults on the other {l brace}111{r brace} planes instead of on the basal (111) plane. Silica formed molten fluorosilicate with halide and SiC grew via a vapor-solid reaction mechanism through gaseous SiO. These reactions can be expressed as (SiO{sub 2})+C(s)=SiO(g)+CO(g) and SiO(g)+3CO(g)=SiC(s)+2CO{sub 2}(g). The effects of processing parameters on the morphology and size of the whiskers were examined and the relationship between the morphological development of the whiskers and the stacking fault energy was determined.

  12. Processing of laser formed SiC powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, J. S.; Bowen, H. K.

    1987-01-01

    Processing research was undertaken to demonstrate that superior SiC characteristics could be achieved through the use of ideal constituent powders and careful post-synthesis processing steps. Initial research developed the means to produce approximately 1000 A uniform diameter, nonagglomerated, spherical, high purity SiC powders. Accomplishing this goal required major revision of the particle formation and growth model from one based on classical nucleation and growth to one based on collision and coalescence of Si particles followed by their carburization. Dispersions based on pure organic solvents as well as steric stabilization were investigated. Test parts were made by the colloidal pressing technique; both liquid filtration and consolidation (rearrangement) stages were modeled. Green densities corresponding to a random close packed structure were achieved. After drying, parts were densified at temperatures ranging from 1800 to 2100 C. This research program accomplished all of its major objectives. Superior microstructures and properties were attained by using powders having ideal characteristics and special post-synthesis processing procedures.

  13. Creep behavior for advanced polycrystalline SiC fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.; Jones, R.H.; Kohyama, Akira

    1997-08-01

    A bend stress relaxation (BSR) test is planned to examine irradiation enhanced creep in polycrystalline SiC fibers which are under development for use as fiber reinforcement in SiC/SiC composite. Baseline 1 hr and 100 hr BSR thermal creep {open_quotes}m{close_quotes} curves have been obtained for five selected advanced SiC fiber types and for standard Nicalon CG fiber. The transition temperature, that temperature where the S-shaped m-curve has a value 0.5, is a measure of fiber creep resistance. In order of decreasing thermal creep resistance, with the 100 hr BSR transition temperature given in parenthesis, the fibers ranked: Sylramic (1261{degrees}C), Nicalon S (1256{degrees}C), annealed Hi Nicalon (1215{degrees}C), Hi Nicalon (1078{degrees}C), Nicalon CG (1003{degrees}C) and Tyranno E (932{degrees}C). The thermal creep for Sylramic, Nicalon S, Hi Nicalon and Nicalon CG fibers in a 5000 hr irradiation creep BSR test is projected from the temperature dependence of the m-curves determined during 1 and 100 hr BSR control tests.

  14. Improved Method of Manufacturing SiC Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    The phrase, "common-layered architecture for semiconductor silicon carbide" ("CLASSiC") denotes a method of batch fabrication of microelectromechanical and semiconductor devices from bulk silicon carbide. CLASSiC is the latest in a series of related methods developed in recent years in continuing efforts to standardize SiC-fabrication processes. CLASSiC encompasses both institutional and technological innovations that can be exploited separately or in combination to make the manufacture of SiC devices more economical. Examples of such devices are piezoresistive pressure sensors, strain gauges, vibration sensors, and turbulence-intensity sensors for use in harsh environments (e.g., high-temperature, high-pressure, corrosive atmospheres). The institutional innovation is to manufacture devices for different customers (individuals, companies, and/or other entities) simultaneously in the same batch. This innovation is based on utilization of the capability for fabrication, on the same substrate, of multiple SiC devices having different functionalities (see figure). Multiple customers can purchase shares of the area on the same substrate, each customer s share being apportioned according to the customer s production-volume requirement. This makes it possible for multiple customers to share costs in a common foundry, so that the capital equipment cost per customer in the inherently low-volume SiC-product market can be reduced significantly. One of the technological innovations is a five-mask process that is based on an established set of process design rules. The rules provide for standardization of the fabrication process, yet are flexible enough to enable multiple customers to lay out masks for their portions of the SiC substrate to provide for simultaneous batch fabrication of their various devices. In a related prior method, denoted multi-user fabrication in silicon carbide (MUSiC), the fabrication process is based largely on surface micromachining of poly SiC

  15. Synthesis of silicon carbide films by combined implantation with sputtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaobao; Zhang, Jizhong; Meng, Qingli; Li, Wenzhi

    2007-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) films were synthesized by combined metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion implantation with ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) techniques. Carbon ions with 40 keV energy were implanted into Si(1 0 0) substrates at ion fluence of 5 × 10 16 ions/cm 2. Then silicon and carbon atoms were co-sputtered on the Si(1 0 0) substrate surface, at the same time the samples underwent assistant Ar-ion irradiation at 20 keV energy. A group of samples with substrate temperatures ranging from 400 to 600 °C were used to analyze the effect of temperature on formation of the SiC film. Influence of the assistant Ar-ion irradiation was also investigated. The structure, morphology and mechanical properties of the deposited films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nanoindentation, respectively. The bond configurations were obtained from IR absorption and Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results indicate that microcrystalline SiC films were synthesized at 600 °C. The substrate temperature and assistant Ar-ion irradiation played a key role in the process. The assistant Ar-ion irradiation also helps increasing the nanohardness and bulk modulus of the SiC films. The best values of nanohardness and bulk modulus were 24.1 and 282.6 GPa, respectively.

  16. Rheology of cubic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid.

    PubMed

    Cwalina, Colin D; Harrison, Kelsey J; Wagner, Norman J

    2016-05-18

    Many real-world industrial processes involve non-spherical particles suspended in a fluid medium. Knowledge of the flow behavior of these suspensions is essential for optimizing their transport properties and designing processing equipment. In the present work, we explore and report on the rheology of concentrated suspensions of cubic-shaped colloidal particles under steady and dynamic shear flow. These suspensions exhibit a rich non-Newtonian rheology that includes shear thickening and normal stress differences at high shear stresses. Scalings are proposed to connect the material properties of these suspensions of cubic particle to those measured for suspensions of spherical particles. Negative first normal stress differences indicate that lubrication hydrodynamic forces dominate the stress in the shear-thickened state. Accounting for the increased lubrication hydrodynamic interactions between the flat surfaces of the cubic particles allows for a quantitative comparison of the deviatoric stress in the shear-thickened state to that of spherical particles. New semi-empirical models for the viscosity and normal stress difference coefficients are presented for the shear-thickened state. The results of this study indicate that cubic particles offer new and unique opportunities to formulate colloidal dispersions for field-responsive materials.

  17. Tangent Lines without Derivatives for Quadratic and Cubic Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, William J.

    2009-01-01

    In the quadratic equation, y = ax[superscript 2] + bx + c, the equation y = bx + c is identified as the equation of the line tangent to the parabola at its y-intercept. This is extended to give a convenient method of graphing tangent lines at any point on the graph of a quadratic or a cubic equation. (Contains 5 figures.)

  18. An effective packing density of binary cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, I. E.; Eremina, V. V.; Sychev, M. S.; Moiseenko, V. G.

    2015-04-01

    The methodology of effective macroscopic calculation of numerical values of internuclear distances in binary crystals of a cubic crystal system is based on the use of coefficients of the structural packing density of the crystal lattice. The possibility of combining the reference data on the main physicochemical parameters of the substance is implemented by synthesis of the corresponding mathematical models.

  19. Connecting the Dots Parametrically: An Alternative to Cubic Splines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrand, Wilbur J.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses a method of cubic splines to determine a curve through a series of points and a second method for obtaining parametric equations for a smooth curve that passes through a sequence of points. Procedures for determining the curves and results of each of the methods are compared. (YP)

  20. Cubic surfaces and their invariants: Some memories of Raymond Stora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Michel

    2016-11-01

    Cubic surfaces embedded in complex projective 3-space are a classical illustration of the use of old and new methods in algebraic geometry. Recently, they made their appearance in physics, and in particular aroused the interest of Raymond Stora, to the memory of whom these notes are dedicated, and to whom I'm very much indebted.

  1. Assessing Inquiry Learning: How Much Is a Cubic Metre?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Kym

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Kym Fry uses the "Programme for International Student Assessment" (PISA) assessment framework to break down what her Year 6 students learned as they explored the inquiry question, "How much is a cubic metre?" First, an overview of the lessons in the unit is provided. Quality assessment opportunities are…

  2. Lattice Green's Function for the Body-Centered Cubic Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaji, A. J.

    2002-05-01

    An expression for the Green's function (GF) of Body-Centered Cubic (BCC) lat tice is evaluated analytically and numerically for a single impurity lattice. Th e density of states (DOS), phase shift, and scattering cross section are express ed in terms of complete elliptic integrals of the first kind.

  3. History of the ISS/SIC: Antoine Depage, one of the founders of the ISS/SIC.

    PubMed

    Van Hee, R

    2002-10-01

    Antoine Depage, born near Brussels in 1862, was one of the founders and first Secretary General of the Société Internationale de Chirurgie (ISS-SIC). After an excellent medical education at the Free Brussels University, he became professor at the same university at the age of 27. Surgically trained by Prof. Thiriar, he became one of the leading Belgian surgeons at the end of the nineteenth century, and he published more than 100 articles in national and international journals. In 1907 he founded a school for nurses in Brussels, to be directed by Edith Cavell. He also vigorously transformed the organization of the public hospitals in the Belgian capital. During World War I Queen Elisabeth appointed him surgeon-in-chief of the Océan-hospital in De Panne, where more than 50,000 soldiers with wounds, fractures, cerebral trauma, nitrous gas intoxication, and infectious diseases, among other problems were treated. The results he and his team obtained were excellent, and mortality was low. Many surgeons, including Alexis Carrel, as well as distinguished political leaders came to visit him in the hospital barracks. After the war he was honored by many political and scientific organizations, including the Société Internationale de Chirurgie. He served our Society not only as Secretary General from 1902 to 1912 but became President of the 4th Congress of the ISS-SIC in New York. Antoine Depage died after a long illness in 1925.

  4. Silicon carbide thin films with different processing growth as an alternative for energetic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouadfel, A. M.; Keffous, A.; Kheloufi, A.; Cheriet, A.; Yaddaden, C.; Gabouze, N.; Kechouane, M.; Belkacem, Y.; Boukezzata, A.; Kaci, S.; Talbi, L.; Ouadah, Y.; Bozetine, I.; Rezgui, B.; Guerbous, L.; Menari, H.; Mahmoudi, B.; Menous, I.

    2017-03-01

    Different SiC thin film structures were obtained depending on the deposition techniques. Crystalline films were grown using a Pulsed laser deposition (PLD), in contrary the sputtering DC magnetron method allow to have an amorphous films (a-SiC:H and a-Si1-xCx:H). A comparative study of the structural and optical characteristics of the elaborated films has been performed. The energetic application possibilities such as blue or multicolor LEDs have been explored. Different techniques have been used to investigate the elaborated films such as SEM-EDS, SIMS, photoluminescence and spectral response.

  5. Strength and conductivity of unidirectional copper composites reinforced by continuous SiC fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmig, S.; Allen, I.; You, J. H.

    2013-09-01

    beneficial outcome of the Sigma fiber may be attributed to its smaller radius leading to a larger total interface area for a given fiber content. The fractographic images after tensile rupture and fiber push-out test manifested a solid interfacial bonding via the thin TiC film. The weakest site was identified to be the internal interface between the outer carbon coating and the inner SiC layer. Numerous voids were observed in the plastically ruptured matrix after tensile fracture. The density of the voids was larger at 300 °C than RT. The distributed voids are the evidence of ductile damage affecting the plastic work of the composite.

  6. Process and film characterization of chemical-bath-deposited ZnS thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dona, J.M.; Herrero, J.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical-bath deposition of ZnS thin films from NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 2}-NH{sub 2}/SC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}/ZnSO{sub 4} solutions has been studied. The effect of various process parameters on the growth and the film quality is presented. A first approach to a mechanistic interpretation of the chemical process is reported. The structural, optical, chemical, and electrical properties of the ZNS thin films deposited by this method have been studied. The electron diffraction (EDS) analysis shows that the films are microcrystalline with a cubic structure. EDS analysis has demonstrated that the films are highly stoichiometric. Scanning electron microscopy studies of the ZnS thin films deposited by this method show that the films are continuous and homogeneous. Electrical conductivity measurements have shown the highly resistivity nature of these films ({sigma} = 10{sup {minus}9} S/cm).

  7. Silicon Carbide Epitaxial Films Studied by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) holds great potential as an electronic material because of its wide band gap energy, high breakdown electric field, thermal stability, and resistance to radiation damage. Possible aerospace applications of high-temperature, high-power, or high-radiation SiC electronic devices include sensors, control electronics, and power electronics that can operate at temperatures up to 600 C and beyond. Commercially available SiC devices now include blue light-emitting diodes (LED's) and high-voltage diodes for operation up to 350 C, with other devices under development. At present, morphological defects in epitaxially grown SiC films limit their use in device applications. Research geared toward reducing the number of structural inhomogeneities can benefit from an understanding of the type and nature of problems that cause defects. The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has proven to be a useful tool in characterizing defects present on the surface of SiC epitaxial films. The in-house High-Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensors (HTIES) Program at the NASA Lewis Research Center not only extended the dopant concentration range achievable in epitaxial SiC films, but it reduced the concentration of some types of defects. Advanced structural characterization using the AFM was warranted to identify the type and structure of the remaining film defects and morphological inhomogeneities. The AFM can give quantitative information on surface topography down to molecular scales. Acquired, in part, in support of the Advanced High Temperature Engine Materials Technology Program (HITEMP), the AFM had been used previously to detect partial fiber debonding in composite material cross sections. Atomic force microscopy examination of epitaxial SiC film surfaces revealed molecular-scale details of some unwanted surface features. Growth pits propagating from defects in the substrate, and hillocks due, presumably, to existing screw dislocations in the substrates, were

  8. Nanocrystalline diamond films as UV-semitransparent Schottky contacts to 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadjer, Marko J.; Hobart, Karl D.; Caldwell, Joshua D.; Butler, James E.; Liu, Kendrick X.; Eddy, Charles R.; Gaskill, D. Kurt; Lew, K. K.; VanMil, Brenda L.; Myers-Ward, Rachael L.; Ancona, Mario G.; Kub, Fritz J.; Feygelson, Tatyana I.

    2007-10-01

    A heterojunction between thin films of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) and 4H-SiC has been developed. Undoped and B-doped NCDs were deposited on both n- and p- SiC epilayers. I-V measurements on p + NCD /n- SiC indicated Schottky rectifying behavior with a turn-on voltage of around 0.2V. The current increased over eight orders of magnitude with an ideality factor of 1.17 at 30°C. Ideal energy-band diagrams suggested a possible conduction mechanism for electron transport from the SiC conduction band to either the valence band or acceptor level of the NCD film. Applications as an UV semitransparent electrical contact to 4H-SiC are discussed.

  9. The effect of MgO(111) interlayer on the interface phase stability and structure of BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/SiC(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarov, V. K.; Hasnip, P. J.; Cai, Z.; Ziemer, K. S.; Yoshida, K.

    2012-04-01

    We present a study on the effect of an interlayer of thin MgO(111) film on SiC(0001) on the interface phase stability and structure of the BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} (BaM). The 10 nm MgO(111) interlayer followed by the BaM film were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on 6H-SiC. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy shows the formation of a magnesium ferrite spinel phase at the interface, and after 25 nm, a well structured BaM film was observed. In addition to the two main phases (Mg-ferrite and BaM), a thin layer of SiOx (2-3 nm) is formed at the SiC interface. In spite of the formation of this amorphous layer, the diffraction studies show that the BaM film is epitaxially grown and it has a single crystal structure. The energy dispersive x-ray analysis from the interface region shows that the MgO layer prevents significant outdiffusion of the Si into the film. Total energy calculations by density functional theory were used to investigate the stability of the various phases and to explain the observed interfacial phases in the studied system.

  10. Probing the electronic properties of graphene on C-face SiC down to single domains by nanoresolved photoelectron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razado-Colambo, I.; Avila, J.; Chen, C.; Nys, J.-P.; Wallart, X.; Asensio, M.-C.; Vignaud, D.

    2015-07-01

    Graphene samples with thicknesses ranging from monolayer to few layer graphene grown on the C-face of SiC by Si flux-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied to understand their stacking structure. Particular attention was put on determining the size, thickness, spatial distribution, and orientation relative to the SiC of the graphene domains. A complete electronic characterization of the graphene films down to submicrometer grains was obtained by using synchrotron-based conventional and nanoresolved photoelectron spectroscopies. These measurements were completed with scanning probe techniques like atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopies. By probing exactly the same region of the samples using angular-resolved and core-level photoelectron spectroscopy imaging and point modes, we were able to identify two types of grains constituting the graphene films with radically different thickness, stacking and orientation. The size, distribution, and registry with the substrate for each type of grain were determined. Most interestingly, we have evidenced that multilayer graphene grains with Bernal stacking coexist with areas composed of twisted bilayer graphene grains.

  11. Chemical reactivity of CVC and CVD SiC with UO2 at high temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Silva, Chinthaka M.; Katoh, Yutai; Voit, Stewart L.; ...

    2015-02-11

    Two types of silicon carbide (SiC) synthesized using two different vapor deposition processes were embedded in UO2 pellets and evaluated for their potential chemical reaction with UO2. While minor reactivity between chemical-vapor-composited (CVC) SiC and UO2 was observed at comparatively low temperatures of 1100 and 1300 C, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) SiC did not show any such reactivity, according to microstructural investigations. But, both CVD and CVC SiCs showed some reaction with UO2 at a higher temperature (1500 C). Elemental maps supported by phase maps obtained using electron backscatter diffraction indicated that CVC SiC was more reactive than CVD SiC at 1500more » C. Moreover, this investigation indicated the formation of uranium carbides and uranium silicide chemical phases such as UC, USi2, and U3Si2 as a result of SiC reaction with UO2.« less

  12. Synthesis of SiC nanowires with in-situ deposition of carbon coating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Araki, Hiroshi; Tang, Chengchun; Hu, Quanli; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Noda, Tetsuji

    2005-02-01

    SiC nanowires are effective reinforcement materials in ceramic matrix composites. A compliant coating such as carbon on nanowires is necessary in order to moderate the nanowire/matrix interfacial bounding for taking the most advantages of SiC nanowires. SiC nanowires with an in-situ deposition of carbon shell coating were fabricated by a novel chemical vapor growth process. Highresolution transmission electron microscopy examinations showed that the nanowires consisted of a single crystal beta-SiC core with an amorphous carbon shell 2-5 nm in thickness. The nanowires were straight with a length generally over 10 microm and a diameter 15-150 nm. The growth direction of the core SiC nanowires is (111). A simple three-step growth model for SiC nanowires was proposed based on a vapor-solid growth mechanism. Because the carbon-coated nanowires were grown directly on continuous Tyranno-SA SiC fibers, in-situ application of the present technique on the fabrication of SiC nanowire-reinforced SiC/SiC composites is expected.

  13. Comparing SiC switching power devices: MOSFET, NPN transistor and GTO thyristor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Alex Q.; Zhang, Bo

    2000-02-01

    This paper for the first time systematically analyzed the operation mechanism of SiC NPN transistors. Theoretical device figure-of-merits for switching power devices based on the conduction loss and switching loss were developed. The on-state loss and the switching loss of 4.5-kV SiC switching power devices (MOSFET, NPN transistor and GTO thyristor) were then compared by using theoretical and numerical calculations. Special emphasis is placed on comparing the total power loss of the devices at a given current density. Theoretical analyses and simulation results show that GTO thyristors have a large switching loss due to the long current tail at turn-off, hence restricting its maximum operation frequency. High voltage SiC MOSFETs have a large on-state power dissipation at high current levels due to the resistive nature of the drift region, restricting their applications at high current densities. SiC NPN transistors have a comparable switching loss as that of SiC MOSFETs, but at the same time, SiC NPN transistors have the lowest on-state loss. This study indicates that SiC NPN transistor is the most attractive switching power device at 4.5 kV.

  14. Additive Manufacturing of SiC Based Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael Charles; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics and SiC fiber reinforcedSiC ceramic matrix composites (SiCSiC CMCs) offer high payoff as replacements for metals in turbine engine applications due to their lighter weight, higher temperature capability, and lower cooling requirements. Additive manufacturing approaches can offer game changing technologies for the quick and low cost fabrication of parts with much greater design freedom and geometric complexity. Four approaches for developing these materials are presented. The first two utilize low cost 3D printers. The first uses pre-ceramic pastes developed as feed materials which are converted to SiC after firing. The second uses wood containing filament to print a carbonaceous preform which is infiltrated with a pre-ceramic polymer and converted to SiC. The other two approaches pursue the AM of CMCs. The first is binder jet SiC powder processing in collaboration with rp+m (Rapid Prototyping+Manufacturing). Processing optimization was pursued through SiC powder blending, infiltration with and without SiC nano powder loading, and integration of nanofibers into the powder bed. The second approach was laminated object manufacturing (LOM) in which fiber prepregs and laminates are cut to shape by a laser and stacked to form the desired part. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted on materials from all approaches with select approaches also characterized with XRD, TGA, and bend testing.

  15. Near-surface and bulk behavior of Ag in SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Haiyan; Zhang, Yanwen; Snead, Lance Lewis; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Xue, Haizhou; Weber, William J

    2012-01-01

    The diffusive release of fission products, such as Ag, from TRISO particles at high temperatures has raised concerns regarding safe and economic operation of advanced nuclear reactors. Understanding the mechanisms of Ag diffusion is thus of crucial importance for effective retention of fission products. Two mechanisms, i.e., grain boundary diffusion and vapor or surface diffusion through macroscopic structures such as nano-pores or nano-cracks, remain in debate. In the present work, an integrated computational and experimental study of the near-surface and bulk behavior of Ag in silicon carbide (SiC) has been carried out. The ab initio calculations show that Ag prefers to adsorb on the SiC surface rather than in the bulk, and the mobility of Ag on the surface is high. The energy barrier for Ag desorption from the surface is calculated to be 0.85-1.68 eV, and Ag migration into bulk SiC through equilibrium diffusion process is not favorable. Experimentally, Ag ions are implanted into SiC to produce Ag profiles buried in the bulk and peaked at the surface. High-temperature annealing leads to Ag release from the surface region instead of diffusion into the interior of SiC. It is suggested that surface diffusion through mechanical structural imperfection, such as vapor transport through cracks in SiC coatings, may be a dominating mechanism accounting for Ag release from the SiC in the nuclear reactor.

  16. Near-surface and bulk behavior of Ag in SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Zhang, Yanwen; Snead, Lance L.; Shutthanandan, V.; Xue, Haizhou; Weber, William J.

    2012-01-01

    The diffusive release of fission products, such as Ag, from TRISO particles at high temperatures has raised concerns regarding safe and economic operation of advanced nuclear reactors. Understanding the mechanisms of Ag diffusion is thus of crucial importance for effective retention of fission products. Two mechanisms, i.e., grain boundary diffusion and vapor or surface diffusion through macroscopic structures such as nano-pores or nano-cracks, remain in debate. In the present work, an integrated computational and experimental study of the nearsurface and bulk behavior of Ag in silicon carbide (SiC) has been carried out. The ab initio calculations show that Ag prefers to adsorb on the SiC surface rather than in the bulk, and the mobility of Ag on the surface is high. The energy barrier for Ag desorption from the surface is calculated to be 0.85~1.68 eV, and Ag migration into bulk SiC through equilibrium diffusion process is not favorable. Experimentally, Ag ions are implanted into SiC to produce Ag profiles buried in the bulk and peaked at the surface. High-temperature annealing leads to Ag release from the surface region instead of diffusion into the interior of SiC. It is suggested that surface diffusion through mechanical structural imperfection, such as vapor transport through cracks in 2 SiC coatings, may be a dominating mechanism accounting for Ag release from the SiC in the nuclear reactor.

  17. SiC: Polar properties and their influence on technology and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbig, R.; Engelbrecht, F.

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) is one of the tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductor materials with a wide band gap E g. Due to the strong asymmetric valence charge density distribution along the `Si-C' bond, nearly the complete bond charge is closely located at the carbon atom. Therefore, SiC is piezoelectric and shows a strong `Reststrahl' absorption which allows the investigation of optical transitions due to impurities (vibrational and electronic transitions) only in a narrow band in the infrared spectral region. The polar character of the `Si-C' bond also strongly influences the physico-chemical properties of SiC which are of fundamental importance for the successful development of process technologies for to electronic devices. The state of the art and new developments in the fields crystal growth, oxidation and reactive ion etching of SiC are reported. In addition to the polar properties of the SiC, also the anisotropic properties have to be taken into account for the design and the processing of electronic devices.

  18. Microwave absorbability of unidirectional SiC fiber composites as a function of the constituents’ properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Guangchao; Jiang, Jianjun; He, Yun; Bie, Shaowei

    2016-06-01

    The electromagnetic properties of unidirectional SiC fibre composites can be efficiently tailored by adjusting the properties of the composite’s constituents making these composites potential microwave absorbers. In this study, the microwave absorbing properties of unidirectional SiC fibre composites were investigated based on the electromagnetic properties of the constituents at frequencies ranging from 8 to 18 GHz. The composite was composed of two types of SiC fibres that individually exhibit relatively high and low electrical conductivity. The matrix together with the low-conductivity SiC fibres were characterized by effective permittivity and conductivity which provided a theoretical calculation of the microwave reflectivity. The theoretical calculation was based on formulas about anisotropic unidirectional composites and was compared to the results obtained from numerical simulations. There was good agreement in the results obtained from both methods. It was found that the intensity of microwave absorption of the composite was dependent primarily on the properties of the high-conductivity SiC fibres. The absorption band appeared to be dependent on the effective permittivity of the matrix and the low-conductivity SiC fibres and the conductivity of the high-conductivity SiC fibres.

  19. Creep of chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The creep, thermal expansion, and elastic modulus properties for chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers were measured between 1000 and 1500 C. Creep strain was observed to increase logarithmically with time, monotonically with temperature, and linearly with tensile stress up to 600 MPa. The controlling activation energy was 480 + or - 20 kJ/mole. Thermal pretreatments near 1200 and 1450 C were found to significantly reduce fiber creep. These results coupled with creep recovery observations indicate that below 1400 C fiber creep is anelastic with neglible plastic component. This allowed a simple predictive method to be developed for describing fiber total deformation as a function of time, temperature, and stress. Mechanistic analysis of the property data suggests that fiber creep is the result of beta-SiC grain boundary sliding controlled by a small percent of free silicon in the grain boundaries.

  20. Graphene nanoribbons anchored to SiC substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Nam B.; Woods, Lilia M.

    2016-09-01

    Graphene nanoribbons are quasi-one-dimensional planar graphene allotropes with diverse properties dependent on their width and types of edges. Graphene nanoribbons anchored to substrates is a hybrid system, which offers novel opportunities for property modifications as well as experimental control. Here we present electronic structure calculations of zigzag graphene nanoribbons chemically attached via the edges to the Si or C terminated surfaces of a SiC substrate. The results show that the edge characteristics are rather robust and the properties are essentially determined by the individual nanoribbon. While the localized spin polarization of the graphene nanoribbon edge atoms is not significantly affected by the substrate, secondary energy gaps in the highest conduction and lowest valence region may emerge in the anchored structures. The van der Waals interaction together with the electrostatic interactions due to the polarity of the surface bonds are found to be important for the structure parameters and energy stability.

  1. Demonstration of SiC Pressure Sensors at 750 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Lukco, Dorothy; Nguyen, Vu; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    We report the first demonstration of MEMS-based 4H-SiC piezoresistive pressure sensors tested at 750 C and in the process confirmed the existence of strain sensitivity recovery with increasing temperature above 400 C, eventually achieving near or up to 100% of the room temperature values at 750 C. This strain sensitivity recovery phenomenon in 4H-SiC is uncharacteristic of the well-known monotonic decrease in strain sensitivity with increasing temperature in silicon piezoresistors. For the three sensors tested, the room temperature full-scale output (FSO) at 200 psig ranged between 29 and 36 mV. Although the FSO at 400 C dropped by about 60%, full recovery was achieved at 750 C. This result will allow the operation of SiC pressure sensors at higher temperatures, thereby permitting deeper insertion into the engine combustion chamber to improve the accurate quantification of combustor dynamics.

  2. Electronic structure of Si vacancy centers in SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soykal, Oney; Dev, Pratibha; Economou, Sophia

    2015-03-01

    The spin state of silicon vacancies in SiC is a promising candidate for applications in solid state quantum information technologies due to its long coherence time at room temperature, its technological availability and wide range of polytypism. Until recently, the electronic structure of this vacancy was not well understood. We have developed a group theoretical model that correctly predicts the spin 3/2 structure seen in recent experiments for the 4H-SiC defect. We have included several different mechanisms involved in the mixing of its spin states, such as crystal field splitting, spin-orbit coupling, spin-spin coupling, strain and Jahn-Teller interactions. We have also carried out DFT calculations that support and complement our analytical results.

  3. Comparative study of SiC- and Si-based photovoltaic inverters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Yuji; Oku, Takeo; Yasuda, Masashi; Shirahata, Yasuhiro; Ushijima, Kazufumi; Murozono, Mikio

    2017-01-01

    This article reports comparative study of 150-300 W class photovoltaic inverters (Si inverter, SiC inverter 1, and SiC inverter 2). In these sub-kW class inverters, the ON-resistance was considered to have little influence on the efficiency. The developed SiC inverters, however, have exhibited an approximately 3% higher direct current (DC)-alternating current (AC) conversion efficiency as compared to the Si inverter. Power loss analysis indicated a reduction in the switching and reverse recovery losses of SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors used for the DC-AC converter is responsible for this improvement. In the SiC inverter 2, an increase of the switching frequency up to 100 kHz achieved a state-of-the-art combination of the weight (1.25 kg) and the volume (1260 cm3) as a 150-250 W class inverter. Even though the increased switching frequency should cause the increase of the switching losses, the SiC inverter 2 exhibited an efficiency comparable to the SiC inverter 1 with a switching frequency of 20 kHz. The power loss analysis also indicated a decreased loss of the DC-DC converter built with SiC Schottky barrier diodes led to the high efficiency for its increased switching frequency. These results clearly indicated feasibility of SiC devices even for sub-kW photovoltaic inverters, which will be available for the applications where compactness and efficiency are of tremendous importance.

  4. Detection and analysis of particles with failed SiC in AGR-1 fuel compacts

    DOE PAGES

    Hunn, John D.; Baldwin, Charles A.; Gerczak, Tyler J.; ...

    2016-04-06

    As the primary barrier to release of radioactive isotopes emitted from the fuel kernel, retention performance of the SiC layer in tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles is critical to the overall safety of reactors that utilize this fuel design. Most isotopes are well-retained by intact SiC coatings, so pathways through this layer due to cracking, structural defects, or chemical attack can significantly contribute to radioisotope release. In the US TRISO fuel development effort, release of 134Cs and 137Cs are used to detect SiC failure during fuel compact irradiation and safety testing because the amount of cesium released by a compactmore » containing one particle with failed SiC is typically ten or more times higher than that released by compacts without failed SiC. Compacts with particles that released cesium during irradiation testing or post-irradiation safety testing at 1600–1800 °C were identified, and individual particles with abnormally low cesium retention were sorted out with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Irradiated Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA). X-ray tomography was used for three-dimensional imaging of the internal coating structure to locate low-density pathways through the SiC layer and guide subsequent materialography by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, all three cesium-releasing particles recovered from as-irradiated compacts showed a region where the inner pyrocarbon (IPyC) had cracked due to radiation-induced dimensional changes in the shrinking buffer and the exposed SiC had experienced concentrated attack by palladium; SiC failures observed in particles subjected to safety testing were related to either fabrication defects or showed extensive Pd corrosion through the SiC where it had been exposed by similar IPyC cracking.« less

  5. Detection and analysis of particles with failed SiC in AGR-1 fuel compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D.; Baldwin, Charles A.; Gerczak, Tyler J.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Morris, Robert N.; Silva, Chinthaka M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Harp, Jason M.; Ploger, Scott A.

    2016-04-06

    As the primary barrier to release of radioactive isotopes emitted from the fuel kernel, retention performance of the SiC layer in tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles is critical to the overall safety of reactors that utilize this fuel design. Most isotopes are well-retained by intact SiC coatings, so pathways through this layer due to cracking, structural defects, or chemical attack can significantly contribute to radioisotope release. In the US TRISO fuel development effort, release of 134Cs and 137Cs are used to detect SiC failure during fuel compact irradiation and safety testing because the amount of cesium released by a compact containing one particle with failed SiC is typically ten or more times higher than that released by compacts without failed SiC. Compacts with particles that released cesium during irradiation testing or post-irradiation safety testing at 1600–1800 °C were identified, and individual particles with abnormally low cesium retention were sorted out with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Irradiated Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA). X-ray tomography was used for three-dimensional imaging of the internal coating structure to locate low-density pathways through the SiC layer and guide subsequent materialography by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, all three cesium-releasing particles recovered from as-irradiated compacts showed a region where the inner pyrocarbon (IPyC) had cracked due to radiation-induced dimensional changes in the shrinking buffer and the exposed SiC had experienced concentrated attack by palladium; SiC failures observed in particles subjected to safety testing were related to either fabrication defects or showed extensive Pd corrosion through the SiC where it had been exposed by similar IPyC cracking.

  6. Thermostructural Properties Of Sic/Sic Panels With 2.5d And 3d Fiber Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; DeCarlo, J. A.; Bhatt, R. H.; Jaskowiak, M. H.

    2005-01-01

    CMC hot-section components in advanced engines for power and propulsion will typically require high cracking strength, high ultimate strength and strain, high creep- rupture resistance, and high thermal conductivity in all directions. In the past, NASA has demonstrated fabrication of a variety of SiC/SiC flat panels and round tubes with various 2D fiber architectures using the high-modulus high-performance Sylramic-iBN Sic fiber and Sic-based matrices derived by CVI, MI, and/or PIP processes. The thermo- mechanical properties of these CMC have shown state-of-the-art performance, but primarily in the in-plane directions. Currently NASA is extending the thermostructural capability of these SiC/SiC systems in the thru-thickness direction by using various 2.5D and 3D fiber architectures. NASA is also using specially designed fabrication steps to optimize the properties of the BN-based interphase and Sic-based matrices. In this study, Sylramic-iBN/SiC panels with 2D plain weave, 2.5D satin weave, 2.5D ply-to-ply interlock weave, and 3D angle interlock fiber architectures, all woven at AITI, were fabricated using matrix densification routes previously established between NASA and GEPSC for CVI-MI processes and between NASA and Starfire-Systems for PIP processes. Introduction of the 2.5 D fiber architecture along with an improved matrix process was found to increase inter-laminar tensile strength from 1.5 -2 to 3 - 4 ksi and thru-thickness thermal conductivity from 15-20 to 30-35 BTU/ft.hr.F with minimal reduction in in-plane strength and creep-rupture properties. Such improvements should reduce thermal stresses and increase the thermostructural operating envelope for SiC/SiC engine components. These results are analyzed to offer general guidelines for selecting fiber architectures and constituent processes for high-performance SiC/SiC engine components.

  7. Similarities and differences in sublimation growth of SiC and AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epelbaum, B. M.; Bickermann, M.; Nagata, S.; Heimann, P.; Filip, O.; Winnacker, A.

    2007-07-01

    The similarities and differences in development of crystal growth of bulk silicon carbide (SiC) and aluminum nitride (AlN) are discussed. It is concluded that AlN is going to become the second crystal grown in production scale using PVT technique. The growth technology of AlN may take advantage of learning from SiC technology as the latter is based on significant advances achieved in the course of last 20 years. The main differences between two materials are in incongruent evaporation of SiC and in poor compatibility of AlN with regular high-temperature crucible materials.

  8. Electrical Impact of SiC Structural Crystal Defects on High Electric Field Devices (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1999-01-01

    As illustrated by the invited paper at this conference and other works, SiC wafers and epilayers contain a variety of crystallographic imperfections, including micropipes, closed-core screw dislocations, grain boundaries, basal plane dislocations, heteropolytypic inclusions, and surfaces that are often damaged and contain atomically rough features like step bunching and growth pits or hillocks. Present understanding of the operational impact of various crystal imperfections on SiC electrical devices is reviewed, with an emphasis placed on high-field SiC power devices and circuits.

  9. Atomistic simulation of free transverse vibration of graphene, hexagonal SiC, and BN nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Danh-Truong; Le, Minh-Quy; Bui, Thanh-Lam; Bui, Hai-Le

    2017-02-01

    Free transverse vibration of monolayer graphene, boron nitride (BN), and silicon carbide (SiC) sheets is investigated by using molecular dynamics finite element method. Eigenfrequencies and eigenmodes of these three sheets in rectangular shape are studied with different aspect ratios with respect to various boundary conditions. It is found that aspect ratios and boundary conditions affect in a similar way on natural frequencies of graphene, BN, and SiC sheets. Natural frequencies in all modes decrease with an increase of the sheet's size. Graphene exhibits the highest natural frequencies, and SiC sheet possesses the lowest ones. Missing atoms have minor effects on natural frequencies in this study.

  10. Ab initio prediction of SiC nanotubes with negative strain energy

    SciTech Connect

    Alfieri, G.; Kimoto, T.

    2014-01-20

    Single-layer SiC nanotubes (SiCNTs) are known to be metastable structures that is why only nanotubular fibers or polygrained nanotubes have been obtained experimentally. In this study, we report on how hydrogen helps to overcome the metastability of SiCNTs. Starting from SiC graphitic sheets, we analyzed the impact of either partial or full hydrogenation on the electronic properties and structural stability of SiCNTs. It is shown that, in general, hydrogenation widens the band gap of both SiC graphitic sheets and nanotubes and, irrespective of the difference in chirality and diameter, leads to the formation of energetically stable SiCNTs.

  11. A New Method to Grow SiC: Solvent-Laser Heated Floating Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodworth, A. A.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Sayir, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The solvent-laser heated floating zone (solvent-LHFZ) growth method is being developed to grow long single crystal SiC fibers. The technique combines the single crystal fiber growth ability of laser heated floating zone with solvent based growth techniques (e.g. traveling solvent method) ability to grow SiC from the liquid phase. Initial investigations reported in this paper show that the solvent-LHFZ method readily grows single crystal SiC (retains polytype and orientation), but has a significant amount of inhomogeneous strain and solvent rich inclusions.

  12. Graphene growth by molecular beam epitaxy on the carbon-face of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, E.; Godey, S.; Ferrer, F. J.; Vignaud, D.; Wallart, X.; Avila, J.; Asensio, M. C.; Bournel, F.; Gallet, J.-J.

    2010-12-13

    Graphene layers have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on the (0001) C-face of SiC and have been characterized by atomic force microscopy, low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and UV photoelectron spectroscopy. Contrary to the graphitization process, the step-terrace structure of SiC is fully preserved during the MBE growth. LEED patterns show multiple orientation domains which are characteristic of graphene on SiC (0001), indicating non-Bernal rotated graphene planes. Well-defined Dirac cones, typical of single-layer graphene, have been observed in the valence band for few graphene layers by synchrotron spectroscopy, confirming the electronic decoupling of graphene layers.

  13. Effect of Low-Energy Ions on Plasma-Enhanced Deposition of Cubic Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torigoe, M.; Fukui, S.; Teii, K.; Matsumoto, S.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of low-energy ions on deposition of cubic boron nitride (cBN) films in an inductively coupled plasma with the chemistry of fluorine is studied in terms of ion energy, ion flux, and ion to boron flux ratio onto the substrate. The ion energy and the ion to boron flux ratio are determined from the sheath potential and the ratio of incident ion flux to net deposited boron flux, respectively. For negative substrate biases where sp2-bonded BN phase only or no deposit is formed, both the ion energy and the ion to boron flux ratio are high. For positive substrate biases where cBN phase is formed, the ion energy and the ion to boron flux ratio are estimated in the range of a few eV to 35 eV and 100 to 130, respectively. The impact of negative ions is presumed to be negligible due to their low kinetic energy relative to the sheath potential over the substrate surface. The impact of positive ions with high ion to boron flux ratios is primarily responsible for reduction of the ion energy for cBN film deposition. Work supported in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B), a Funding Program for Next Generation World-Leading Researchers, and an Industrial Technology Research Grant Program 2008.

  14. Effects of SiC Particle Size and Process Parameters on the Microstructure and Hardness of AZ91/SiC Composite Layer Fabricated by FSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, P.; Givi, M. K. Besharati; Abrinia, K.; Taherishargh, M.; Salekrostam, R.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, friction stir processing (FSP) was employed to develop a composite layer on the surface of as-cast AZ91 magnesium alloy using SiC particles (5 μm and 30 nm). The effects of the rotational and traverse speeds and the FSP pass number on the microstructure and microhardness of the friction stir processed (FSPed) layer with and without SiC particles were investigated. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed for microstructural analysis. FSP produces a homogeneous microstructure by eliminating the precipitates near the grain boundaries. The analyses showed that the effects of the rotational and traverse speeds on the microstructure of specimens produced without nano-sized SiC particles are considerable; however, they are negligible in the specimens with particles. While the second FSP pass enhances the microstructure and microhardness of the samples with SiC particles, it has no significant effect on such properties in the samples without SiC particles.

  15. Extreme values of the Poisson's ratio of cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epishin, A. I.; Lisovenko, D. S.

    2016-10-01

    The problem of determining the extrema of Poisson's ratio for cubic crystals is considered, and analytical expressions are derived to calculate its extreme values. It follows from the obtained solution that, apart from extreme values at standard orientations, extreme values of Poisson's ratio can also be detected at special orientations deviated from the standard ones. The derived analytical expressions are used to calculate the extreme values of Poisson's ratio for a large number of known cubic crystals. The extremely high values of Poisson's ratio are shown to be characteristic of metastable crystals, such as crystals with the shape memory effect caused by martensitic transformation. These crystals are mainly represented by metallic alloys. For some crystals, the absolute extrema of Poisson's ratio can exceed the standard values, which are-1 for a standard minimum and +2 for a standard maximum.

  16. Nonlinear optical imaging of defects in cubic silicon carbide epilayers.

    PubMed

    Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, Stefan G; Tranca, Denis E; Matei, Alecs; Stanciu, George A

    2014-06-11

    Silicon carbide is one of the most promising materials for power electronic devices capable of operating at extreme conditions. The widespread application of silicon carbide power devices is however limited by the presence of structural defects in silicon carbide epilayers. Our experiment demonstrates that optical second harmonic generation imaging represents a viable solution for characterizing structural defects such as stacking faults, dislocations and double positioning boundaries in cubic silicon carbide layers. X-ray diffraction and optical second harmonic rotational anisotropy were used to confirm the growth of the cubic polytype, atomic force microscopy was used to support the identification of silicon carbide defects based on their distinct shape, while second harmonic generation microscopy revealed the detailed structure of the defects. Our results show that this fast and noninvasive investigation method can identify defects which appear during the crystal growth and can be used to certify areas within the silicon carbide epilayer that have optimal quality.

  17. Cubic ideal ferromagnets at low temperature and weak magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Christoph P.

    2017-04-01

    The low-temperature series for the free energy density, pressure, magnetization and susceptibility of cubic ideal ferromagnets in weak external magnetic fields are discussed within the effective Lagrangian framework up to three loops. The structure of the simple, body-centered, and face-centered cubic lattice is taken into account explicitly. The expansion involves integer and half-integer powers of the temperature. The corresponding coefficients depend on the magnetic field and on low-energy effective constants that can be expressed in terms of microscopic quantities. Our formulas may also serve as efficiency or consistency check for other techniques like Green's function methods, where spurious terms in the low-temperature expansion have appeared. We explore the sign and magnitude of the spin-wave interaction in the pressure, magnetization and susceptibility, and emphasize that our effective field theory approach is fully systematic and rigorous.

  18. Infinite geometric frustration in a cubic dipole cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönke, Johannes; Schneider, Tobias M.; Rehberg, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The geometric arrangement of interacting (magnetic) dipoles is a question of fundamental importance in physics, chemistry, and engineering. Motivated by recent progress concerning the self-assembly of magnetic structures, the equilibrium orientation of eight interacting dipoles in a cubic cluster is investigated in detail. Instead of discrete equilibria we find a type of ground state consisting of infinitely many orientations. This continuum of energetically degenerate states represents a yet unknown form of magnetic frustration. The corresponding dipole rotations in the flat potential valley of this Goldstone mode enable the construction of frictionless magnetic couplings. Using computer-assisted algebraic geometry methods, we moreover completely enumerate all equilibrium configurations. The seemingly simple cubic system allows for exactly 9536 unstable discrete equilibria falling into 183 distinct energy families.

  19. Data reduction using cubic rational B-splines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Jin J.; Piegl, Les A.

    1992-01-01

    A geometric method is proposed for fitting rational cubic B-spline curves to data that represent smooth curves including intersection or silhouette lines. The algorithm is based on the convex hull and the variation diminishing properties of Bezier/B-spline curves. The algorithm has the following structure: it tries to fit one Bezier segment to the entire data set and if it is impossible it subdivides the data set and reconsiders the subset. After accepting the subset the algorithm tries to find the longest run of points within a tolerance and then approximates this set with a Bezier cubic segment. The algorithm uses this procedure repeatedly to the rest of the data points until all points are fitted. It is concluded that the algorithm delivers fitting curves which approximate the data with high accuracy even in cases with large tolerances.

  20. Circular dichroism in biological photonic crystals and cubic chiral nets.

    PubMed

    Saba, M; Thiel, M; Turner, M D; Hyde, S T; Gu, M; Grosse-Brauckmann, K; Neshev, D N; Mecke, K; Schröder-Turk, G E

    2011-03-11

    Nature provides impressive examples of chiral photonic crystals, with the notable example of the cubic so-called srs network (the label for the chiral degree-three network modeled on SrSi2) or gyroid structure realized in wing scales of several butterfly species. By a circular polarization analysis of the band structure of such networks, we demonstrate strong circular dichroism effects: The butterfly srs microstructure, of cubic I4(1)32 symmetry, shows significant circular dichroism for blue to ultraviolet light, that warrants a search for biological receptors sensitive to circular polarization. A derived synthetic structure based on four like-handed silicon srs nets exhibits a large circular polarization stop band of a width exceeding 30%. These findings offer design principles for chiral photonic devices.

  1. Hermite cubic spline multi-wavelets on the cube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvejnová, Daniela; Černá, Dana; Finěk, Václav

    2015-11-01

    In 2000, W. Dahmen et al. proposed a construction of Hermite cubic spline multi-wavelets adapted to the interval [0, 1]. Later, several more simple constructions of wavelet bases based on Hermite cubic splines were proposed. We focus here on wavelet basis with respect to which both the mass and stiffness matrices are sparse in the sense that the number of non-zero elements in each column is bounded by a constant. Then, a matrix-vector multiplication in adaptive wavelet methods can be performed exactly with linear complexity for any second order differential equation with constant coefficients. In this contribution, we shortly review these constructions, use an anisotropic tensor product to obtain bases on the cube [0, 1]3, and compare their condition numbers.

  2. Alpha decay self-damage in cubic and monoclinic zirconolite

    SciTech Connect

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Land, C.C.; Peterson, D.E.; Rohr, D.L.; Roof, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Samples of primarily-monoclinic /sup 238/Pu-doped zirconolite were stored at ambient temperature to allow accumulation of alpha decay self-damage to a dose of 1 x 10/sup 24/ ..cap alpha../m/sup 3/ (equivalent to a SYNROC age of approx. 10/sup 3/y). Bulk swelling reached 2.3 vol% with no tendency toward saturation, a damage response similar to that observed for cubic Pu-doped zirconolite. X-ray volumetric swelling at 4 x 10/sup 24/ ..cap alpha../m/sup 3/ was 1 vol%, considerably less than that for the cubic material. Changes in cell dimensions differed significantly from those reported by others for a monoclinic natural mineral. Extensive microcracking was observed, and is attributed at least partially to swelling differences between the matrix and minor phases.

  3. Silicon carbide thin films on insulating substrates for robust MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lin

    MEMS applications require that large area of uniform SiC films is formed on insulating substrates or sacrificial layers. For electrically controlled MEMS devices, in-situ N2-doped 3C-SiC thin-films have been grown by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) on low-stress, amorphous Si3N4/p-Si(111) substrate using the single organosilane precursor trimethylsilane [(CH3)3SiH]. The effects of N2 flow rate and growth temperature on the electrical properties of SiC films were investigated by Hall Effect measurements. The electron carrier concentration is between 1017˜10 18/cm3. The lowest resistivities at 400 K and 300 K are 1.12 x 10-2 and 1.18 x 10-1 O·cm, respectively. The corresponding sheet resistances are 75.02 and 790.36 O/□. The SiC film structure was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The 3C-SiC films oriented in the <111> direction with a 2theta peak at 35.5° and line widths between 0.18°˜0.25° were obtained. The SiC-Si3N4 interface is very smooth and free of voids. To pattern the SiC films into the desired structural shapes, selective etching is required. The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching of 3C-SiC films was then examined in both NF3/Ar and Cl2/Ar mixtures. Two different mask materials (ITO and Shipley 1818 photo-resist) were compared. The effects of RF power, DC bias, ICP power and gas flow ratio on etch rates have been discussed. Furthermore, a novel fiber-optic temperature sensor, which is rugged, compact, stable, and can be easily fabricated, has been developed by using the SiC thin-film grown on sapphire substrate. The film thickness was optimized to 2˜3 mum, while the optimal 3MS flow rate ranged from 35˜40 sccm to produce an optically flat SiC film. The sensors were operated at temperature from 22°C to 540°C. The shifts in resonance minima versus temperature from the reflection spectra fit a linear function, giving a relative temperature sensitivity of 1.9 x 10-5/°C. The capability of providing a +/-3°C accuracy was

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Point and Line Defects in Cubic Lattices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    and discli- nations with finite micropolar elastoplasticity . Int. J. Plasticity. 22:210–256, 2006. 56. Menzel, A., and Steinmann, P., On the contin...Voyiadjis, G. Z., A finite strain plastic- damage model for high velocity impact using combined viscosity and gradient localization limiters: Part I...Theoretical for- mulation. Int. J. Damage Mech. 15:293–334, 2006. 58. Milstein, F., and Chantasiriwan, S,. Theoretical study of the response of 12 cubic

  5. Quadratic and Cubic Nonlinear Oscillators with Damping and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jibin; Feng, Zhaosheng

    We apply the qualitative theory of dynamical systems to study exact solutions and the dynamics of quadratic and cubic nonlinear oscillators with damping. Under certain parametric conditions, we also consider the van der Waals normal form, Chaffee-Infante equation, compound Burgers-KdV equation and Burgers-KdV equation for explicit representations of kink-profile wave solutions and unbounded traveling wave solutions.

  6. Why GPCRs behave differently in cubic and lamellar lipidic mesophases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recent successes in the crystallographic determination of structures of transmembrane proteins in the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family have established the lipidic cubic phase (LCP) environment as the medium of choice for growing structure-grade crystals by the method termed “in meso”. The understanding of in meso crystallogenesis is currently at a descriptive level. To enable an eventual quantitative, energy-based description of the nucleation and crystallization mechanism, we have examined the properties of the lipidic cubic phase system and the dynamics of the GPCR rhodopsin reconstituted into the LCP with coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the Martini force-field. Quantifying the differences in the hydrophobic/hydrophilic exposure of the GPCR to lipids in the cubic and lamellar phases, we found that the highly curved geometry of the cubic phase provides more efficient shielding of the protein from unfavorable hydrophobic exposure, which leads to a lesser hydrophobic mismatch and less unfavorable hydrophobic–hydrophilic interactions between the protein and lipid–water interface in the LCP, compared to the lamellar phase. Since hydrophobic mismatch is considered a driving force for oligomerization, the differences in exposure mismatch energies between the LCP and the lamellar structures suggest that the latter provide a more favorable setting in which GPCRs can oligomerize as a prelude to nucleation and crystal growth. These new findings lay the foundation for future investigations of in meso crystallization mechanisms related to the transition from the LCP to the lamellar phase and studies aimed at an improved rational approach for generating structure-quality crystals of membrane proteins. PMID:22931253

  7. Cubic lattice nanosheets: thickness-driven light emission.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Dmitri; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Zhi

    2014-07-22

    Silicon has a diamond-like cubic crystal lattice for which two-dimensional (2D) nanometer thickness nanosheet crystallization appears not to be trivial. However, in this issue of ACS Nano, the group led by Heon-Jin Choi demonstrates the gas-phase dendritic growth of Si nanosheets, only 1 to 13 nm thick. Moreover, such nanosheets display strong thickness-dependent photoluminescence in a visible range with red, green, and blue emission each documented.

  8. Photon-pair generation in arrays of cubic nonlinear waveguides.

    PubMed

    Solntsev, Alexander S; Sukhorukov, Andrey A; Neshev, Dragomir N; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2012-11-19

    We study photon-pair generation in arrays of cubic nonlinear waveguides through spontaneous four-wave mixing. We analyze numerically the quantum statistics of photon pairs at the array output as a function of waveguide dispersion and pump beam power. We show flexible spatial quantum state control such as pump-power-controlled transition between bunching and anti-bunching correlations due to nonlinear self-focusing.

  9. A resurgence analysis for cubic and quartic anharmonic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahramanov, Ilmar; Tezgin, Kemal

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we explicitly show resurgence relations between perturbative and one instanton sectors of the resonance energy levels for cubic and quartic anharmonic potentials in one-dimensional quantum mechanics. Both systems satisfy the Dunne-Ünsal relation and hence we are able to derive one-instanton nonperturbative contributions with the fluctuation terms to the energy merely from the perturbative data. We confirm our results with previous results obtained in the literature.

  10. Distribution coefficients of rare earth ions in cubic zirconium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, H.; Luther, K.-D.; Assmus, W.

    1994-08-01

    Cubic zirconium dioxide crystals are grown with the skull melting technique. The effective distribution coefficients for Nd(exp 3+), Sm(exp 3+) and Er(sup 3+) as dopants are determined experimentally as a function of the crystal growth velocity. With the Burton-Prim-Slichter theory, the equilibrium distribution coefficients can be calculated. The distribution coefficients of all other trivalent rare earth ions can be estimated by applying the correlation towards the ionic radii.

  11. Higher-order numerical solutions using cubic splines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, S. G.; Khosla, P. K.

    1976-01-01

    A cubic spline collocation procedure was developed for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. This spline procedure is reformulated so that the accuracy of the second-derivative approximation is improved and parallels that previously obtained for lower derivative terms. The final result is a numerical procedure having overall third-order accuracy of a nonuniform mesh. Solutions using both spline procedures, as well as three-point finite difference methods, are presented for several model problems.

  12. Study of Critical Behaviour in Diluted Ferromagnetic:. Thin Films and Semi-Infinites Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masrour, R.; Hamedoun, M.; Benyoussef, A.

    By using the high-temperature series expansion technique, we have analyzed the phase transition and the critical phenomena of a ferromagnetic thin film and ferromagnetic semi-infinite film, through three models: Ising, XY and Heisenberg. The critical reduced temperature τC(v) is studied as a function of the thickness of the film. In the case of the magnetic film and semi-infinite film, on the simple cubic lattice and the face-centered cubic lattice, τC(v) is studied as a function of the exchange interactions in the bulk, and on the surface. A critical value of the surface exchange interaction in the film above which the surface and the interface magnetism appears is obtained. The dependence of the reduced critical temperature on the thickness of the film has been investigated. These shifts of the critical temperatures TC(L) from the bulk value can be described by a power law. The obtained values for the simple cubic lattice and face centered cubic ferromagnetic thin film are in qualitative accordance with the universality class hypothesis. The critical exponent associated with the magnetic susceptibility is studied as a function of interactions. In a defined range of the exchange interactions, the obtained values for Heisenberg, XY and Ising models, for simple cubic thin film are comparable to the universal ones and are independent of the film thickness. The asymmetry of the structure and the competition of the effects of the exchange coupling, are important for the magnetic properties of the system. A critical value of the surface exchange interaction above which the surface magnetism appears is obtained. For the dependence of the critical parameter of surface reduced coupling R2C as a function of the dilution x and the ratio of the exchange interaction between the surface and nearest neighbour layer to the bulk one R1 for the three studied models has been investigated. The magnetic phase diagrams are obtained for two structures. The percolation threshold is

  13. Packing of nonoverlapping cubic particles: Computational algorithms and microstructural characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmir, Hessam; Sahimi, Muhammad; Tabar, M. Reza Rahimi

    2016-12-01

    Packing of cubic particles arises in a variety of problems, ranging from biological materials to colloids and the fabrication of new types of porous materials with controlled morphology. The properties of such packings may also be relevant to problems involving suspensions of cubic zeolites, precipitation of salt crystals during CO2 sequestration in rock, and intrusion of fresh water in aquifers by saline water. Not much is known, however, about the structure and statistical descriptors of such packings. We present a detailed simulation and microstructural characterization of packings of nonoverlapping monodisperse cubic particles, following up on our preliminary results [H. Malmir et al., Sci. Rep. 6, 35024 (2016), 10.1038/srep35024]. A modification of the random sequential addition (RSA) algorithm has been developed to generate such packings, and a variety of microstructural descriptors, including the radial distribution function, the face-normal correlation function, two-point probability and cluster functions, the lineal-path function, the pore-size distribution function, and surface-surface and surface-void correlation functions, have been computed, along with the specific surface and mean chord length of the packings. The results indicate the existence of both spatial and orientational long-range order as the the packing density increases. The maximum packing fraction achievable with the RSA method is about 0.57, which represents the limit for a structure similar to liquid crystals.

  14. Lattice dynamics of cubic PbTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomeno, Izumi; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A.; Marty, Karol J.; Tsunoda, Yorihiko; Oka, Kunihiko

    2012-02-01

    The lattice dynamics of cubic PbTiO3 has been investigated using inelastic neutron scattering. We found four kinds of soft modes in cubic PbTiO3: (1) the TO modes toward the γ point, (2) the TA λ3 mode toward the R point, (3) the TA λ3 mode around the midpoint (1/4,1/4,1/4), and (4) the TA branches in the entire range. Moreover, the TO σ4 branch becomes flat away from the zone center. The steep dispersion of the TO modes toward γ is isotropic and confined to the region ξ<0.2. The temperature dependence of the γ15 mode up to 1173 K is explained by a combination of the Lydanne-Sachs-Taller relation and the Curie-Weiss law. In contrast, the TA λ3 modes at the midpoint and R point are weakly temperature dependent. The coexistence of the soft γ15 and R25 modes is in agreement with the predicted phonon instability. The midpoint softening suggests the tendency toward forming a fourfold periodicity along the [1,1,1] direction. The energy of the TO δ5 branch for cubic PbTiO3 is considerably higher than that for Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)O3. This indicates that the TO modes are dominated by the B-site atom motion.

  15. Cubic and Hexagonal Liquid Crystals as Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulin; Ma, Ping; Gui, Shuangying

    2014-01-01

    Lipids have been widely used as main constituents in various drug delivery systems, such as liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, and lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals. Among them, lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals have highly ordered, thermodynamically stable internal nanostructure, thereby offering the potential as a sustained drug release matrix. The intricate nanostructures of the cubic phase and hexagonal phase have been shown to provide diffusion controlled release of active pharmaceutical ingredients with a wide range of molecular weights and polarities. In addition, the biodegradable and biocompatible nature of lipids demonstrates the minimum toxicity and thus they are used for various routes of administration. Therefore, the research on lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystalline phases has attracted a lot of attention in recent years. This review will provide an overview of the lipids used to prepare cubic phase and hexagonal phase at physiological temperature, as well as the influencing factors on the phase transition of liquid crystals. In particular, the most current research progresses on cubic and hexagonal phases as drug delivery systems will be discussed. PMID:24995330

  16. Dry Powder Precursors of Cubic Liquid Crystalline Nanoparticles (cubosomes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Patrick T.; Small, William B.; Small, William B.; Lynch, Matthew L.; Burns, Janet L.

    2002-08-01

    Cubosomes are dispersed nanostructured particles of cubic phase liquid crystal that have stimulated significant research interest because of their potential for application in controlled-release and drug delivery. Despite the interest, cubosomes can be difficult to fabricate and stabilize with current methods. Most of the current work is limited to liquid phase processes involving high shear dispersion of bulk cubic liquid crystalline material into sub-micron particles, limiting application flexibility. In this work, two types of dry powder cubosome precursors are produced by spray-drying: (1) starch-encapsulated monoolein is produced by spray-drying a dispersion of cubic liquid crystalline particles in an aqueous starch solution and (2) dextran-encapsulated monoolein is produced by spray-drying an emulsion formed by the ethanol-dextran-monoolein-water system. The encapsulants are used to decrease powder cohesion during drying and to act as a soluble colloidal stabilizer upon hydration of the powders. Both powders are shown to form (on average) 0.6 μm colloidally-stable cubosomes upon addition to water. However, the starch powders have a broader particle size distribution than the dextran powders because of the relative ease of spraying emulsions versus dispersions. The developed processes enable the production of nanostructured cubosomes by end-users rather than just specialized researchers and allow tailoring of the surface state of the cubosomes for broader application.

  17. Micromechanisms of creep-fatigue crack growth in a silicide-matrix composite with SiC particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ramamurty, U.; Kim, A.S.; Suresh, S. ); Petrovic, J.J. )

    1993-08-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to examine the cyclic fatigue crack growth characteristics in 1,200 C air of a MoSi[sub 2]-50 mol% WSi[sub 2] alloy in the unreinforced condition and with 30 vol% SiC particles. For comparison purposes, crack growth experiments under sustained loads were also carried out in the silicide-matrix composite. Particular attention is devoted to developing an understanding of the micromechanism of subcritical crack growth by recourse to optical and electron microscopy, including transmission electron microscopy of crack-tip damage. The results indicate that enhanced viscous flow of glass films along interfaces and grain boundaries imparts pronounced levels of subcritical crack growth in the composite material; the composite exhibits a higher fatigue fracture threshold and a more extended range of stable fracture than the unreinforced alloy. The effects of glass phase in influencing fatigue crack growth in the silicide-based material are compared to the influence of in situ-formed and preexisting glass films on high-temperature cyclic fatigue crack growth in ceramics and ceramic composites. The paper concludes with a comparison of present results with the high-temperature damage tolerance of a variety of intermetallic alloys and ceramic materials.

  18. Fabrication of mullite-bonded porous SiC ceramics from multilayer-coated SiC particles through sol-gel and in-situ polymerization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimpour, Omid

    In this work, mullite-bonded porous silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics were prepared via a reaction bonding technique with the assistance of a sol-gel technique or in-situ polymerization as well as a combination of these techniques. In a typical procedure, SiC particles were first coated by alumina using calcined powder and alumina sol via a sol-gel technique followed by drying and passing through a screen. Subsequently, they were coated with the desired amount of polyethylene via an in-situ polymerization technique in a slurry phase reactor using a Ziegler-Natta catalyst. Afterward, the coated powders were dried again and passed through a screen before being pressed into a rectangular mold to make a green body. During the heating process, the polyethylene was burnt out to form pores at a temperature of about 500°C. Increasing the temperature above 800°C led to the partial oxidation of SiC particles to silica. At higher temperatures (above 1400°C) derived silica reacted with alumina to form mullite, which bonds SiC particles together. The porous SiC specimens were characterized with various techniques. The first part of the project was devoted to investigating the oxidation of SiC particles using a Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) apparatus. The effects of particle size (micro and nano) and oxidation temperature (910°C--1010°C) as well as the initial mass of SiC particles in TGA on the oxidation behaviour of SiC powders were evaluated. To illustrate the oxidation rate of SiC in the packed bed state, a new kinetic model, which takes into account all of the diffusion steps (bulk, inter and intra particle diffusion) and surface oxidation rate, was proposed. Furthermore, the oxidation of SiC particles was analyzed by the X-ray Diffraction (XRD) technique. The effect of different alumina sources (calcined Al2O 3, alumina sol or a combination of the two) on the mechanical, physical, and crystalline structure of mullite-bonded porous SiC ceramics was studied in the

  19. Low-temperature production of silicon carbide films of different polytypes

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, A. V. Puzikov, V. M.; Golubova, E. P.; Baumer, V. N.; Dobrotvorskaya, M. V.

    2009-05-15

    The study is concerned with the effect of temperature on the structure of SiC films formed by deposition of the C and Si ions with the energy 120 eV. On the basis of the X-ray structural studies, it is unambiguously established that the structure of the growing polytype is finely dependent on the substrate temperature. In the temperature range from 1080 deg. C to 1510 deg. C, the sequence of films involving the 21R, 51R, 27R, and 6H polytypes is produced for the first time. The effect of temperature on the silicon-carbon atomic content ratio [Si]/[C] in the deposited films is determined. At optimized parameters of deposition the film structured as the 51R rhombohedral polytype is grown.

  20. Film Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Larry M.; Atwater, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Reviews four Human Sexuality films and videos. These are: "Personal Decisions" (Planned Parenthood Federation of America, 1985); "The Touch Film" (Sterling Production, 1986); "Rethinking Rape" (Film Distribution Center, 1985); "Not A Love Story" (National Film Board of Canada, 1981). (AEM)