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Sample records for culex pipiens parva

  1. The distribution of potential West Nile virus vectors, Culex pipiens pipiens and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae), in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Culex spp. mosquitoes are considered to be the most important vectors of West Nile virus (WNV) detected in at least 34 species of mosquitoes in the United States. In North America, Culex pipiens pipiens, Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus, and Culex tarsalis are all competent vectors of WNV, which is considered to be enzootic in the United States and has also been detected in equines and birds in many states of Mexico and in humans in Nuevo Leon. There is potential for WNV to be introduced into Mexico City by various means including infected mosquitoes on airplanes, migrating birds, ground transportation and infected humans. Little is known of the geographic distribution of Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes and hybrids in Mexico City. Culex pipiens pipiens preferentially feed on avian hosts; Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus have historically been considered to prefer mammalian hosts; and hybrids of these two species could theoretically serve as bridge vectors to transmit WNV from avian hosts to humans and other mammalian hosts. In order to address the potential of WNV being introduced into Mexico City, we have determined the identity and spatial distribution of Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes and their hybrids. Results Mosquito larvae collected from 103 sites throughout Mexico City during 2004-2005 were identified as Culex, Culiseta or Ochlerotatus by morphological analysis. Within the genus Culex, specimens were further identified as Culex tarsalis or as belonging to the Culex pipiens complex. Members of the Culex pipiens complex were separated by measuring the ratio of the dorsal and ventral arms (DV/D ratio) of the male genitalia and also by using diagnostic primers designed for the Ace.2 gene. Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus was the most abundant form collected. Conclusions Important WNV vectors species, Cx. p. pipiens, Cx. p. quinquefasciatus and Cx. tarsalis, are all present in Mexico City. Hybrids of Cx. p. pipiens and Cx. p. quinquefasciatus were also

  2. Emergence of Culex pipiens from overwintering hibernacula.

    PubMed

    Ciota, Alexander T; Drummond, Cori L; Drobnack, Jason; Ruby, Meghan A; Kramer, Laura D; Ebel, Gregory D

    2011-03-01

    Overwintering populations of Culex pipiens, the principal enzootic vector of West Nile virus in the northeastern USA, were studied over 3 consecutive winters from 2006 to 2008, using mark-recapture techniques to determine when Cx. pipiens females began to disperse from overwintering hibernacula and how their survival influenced early season populations. In February of each year, Cx. pipiens were aspirated and marked using fluorescent powder; 4,067, 752, and 3,070 diapausing Cx. pipiens were marked in each successive year. Mosquitoes were then trapped from mid-April to early May of each year using 19 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) light traps and 16 CDC gravid traps. A total of 348, 39, and 111 Culex mosquitoes were captured in the spring of 2006, 2007, and 2008, respectively. The number of mosquitoes marked in overwintering habitats is generally positively correlated with the number of mosquitoes recaptured in the early spring (linear regression, R2 = 0.79, P = 0.04), yet results also suggest that seasonal variations beyond overwintering population size are likely important in determining the success of emergent populations. A single marked Cx. pipiens was captured in both 2006 and 2008. In 2006, the mosquito was captured 0.5 km from its overwintering site while in 2008 the mosquito was captured 0.3 km from its overwintering site. In all study years, mosquitoes consistently began exiting overwintering hibernacula the 3rd week of April, yet evidence of earlier exodus was observed in 2007, when outside temperatures were significantly higher in preceding days and months.

  3. Midgut Barrier Imparts Selective Resistance to Filarial Worm Infection in Culex pipiens pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Michelle L.; Erickson, Sara M.; Bartholomay, Lyric C.; Christensen, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    Mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex thrive in temperate and tropical regions worldwide, and serve as efficient vectors of Bancroftian lymphatic filariasis (LF) caused by Wuchereria bancrofti in Asia, Africa, the West Indies, South America, and Micronesia. However, members of this mosquito complex do not act as natural vectors for Brugian LF caused by Brugia malayi, or for the cat parasite B. pahangi, despite their presence in South Asia where these parasites are endemic. Previous work with the Iowa strain of Culex pipiens pipiens demonstrates that it is equally susceptible to W. bancrofti as is the natural Cx. p. pipiens vector in the Nile Delta, however it is refractory to infection with Brugia spp. Here we report that the infectivity barrier for Brugia spp. in Cx. p. pipiens is the mosquito midgut, which inflicts internal and lethal damage to ingested microfilariae. Following per os Brugia exposures, the prevalence of infection is significantly lower in Cx. p. pipiens compared to susceptible mosquito controls, and differs between parasite species with <50% and <5% of Cx. p. pipiens becoming infected with B. pahangi and B. malayi, respectively. When Brugia spp. mf were inoculated intrathoracically to bypass the midgut, larvae developed equally well as in controls, indicating that, beyond the midgut, Cx. p. pipiens is physiologically compatible with Brugia spp. Mf isolated from Cx. p. pipiens midguts exhibited compromised motility, and unlike mf derived from blood or isolated from the midguts of Ae. aegypti, failed to develop when inoculated intrathoracically into susceptible mosquitoes. Together these data strongly support the role of the midgut as the primary infection barrier for Brugia spp. in Cx. p. pipiens. Examination of parasites recovered from the Cx. p. pipiens midgut by vital staining, and those exsheathed with papain, suggest that the damage inflicted by the midgut is subcuticular and disrupts internal tissues. Microscopic studies of these worms

  4. Variation in adult longevity of Culex pipiens f. pipiens, vector of the West Nile Virus.

    PubMed

    Andreadis, S S; Dimotsiou, O C; Savopoulou-Soultani, M

    2014-11-01

    The common house mosquito, Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae), which is considered the primary bridge vector of West Nile Virus (WNV) to humans, is a wide spread insect pest with medical importance and consists of two distinct bioforms, Cx. pipiens f. pipiens and Cx. pipiens f. molestus. Here, we consider the adult lifespan of male and female Cx. pipiens f. pipiens under controlled conditions at five constant temperature regimes (15, 20, 25, 27.5, and 30 °C). Our results show that adult longevity was affected by temperature, as it significantly decreased with increase in temperature. At the highest tested temperature, mean adult longevity did not exceed 12 days for both sexes and thus makes impossible the risk of WNV transmission. On the other hand at the lowest temperature, longevity was extremely high with some individuals surviving up to 129 and 132 days, males and females, respectively, and thus enable them to function as potential vectors of WNV for a prolonged period of time. As far as sex is concerned, adult females displayed a 1.2-1.4-fold longer longevity compared to the male ones. However, this difference was significant only at the lowest and highest tested temperature regime. This information is useful in determining the critical temperatures which may affect the distribution of Cx. pipiens and consequently the risk of WNV transmission. Moreover, the effect of environmental temperature should be considered when evaluating the abundance of these species.

  5. Global Perspective on the Culex pipiens Complex in the 21st Century I

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Culex pipiens complex, including Culex pipiens, Cx. quinquefasciatus, and Cx. molestus are important pest species and vectors of human and animal diseases throughout the world's tropical, temperate, and Holarctic regions. Diseases transmitted by member of the complex include: St. Louis encephali...

  6. Effects of nutrition and density in Culex pipiens.

    PubMed

    Alto, B W; Muturi, E J; Lampman, R L

    2012-12-01

    Mosquito larvae face numerous biotic and abiotic challenges that affect their development and survivorship, as well as adult fitness. We conducted two experiments under semi-natural conditions to evaluate the effects of intraspecific competition, nutrient limitation and sub-lethal doses of malathion on individual life history traits in adult Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae). In the first experiment, larvae of Cx. pipiens were reared at different intraspecific densities and exposed to sub-lethal doses of malathion. In the second experiment, different intraspecific densities of Cx. pipiens larvae were reared under conditions of low or high larval nutrients, and subsequent adults were fed on either water or 10% sucrose solution. Malathion treatment had relatively minor effects compared with density, which had significant negative effects on development rate, survivorship to adulthood, body size (wing length) and longevity. As larval density increased, a sex ratio distortion in survivorship to adulthood emerged, in which a bias towards males was apparent. Nutrient-rich larval environments alleviated, in part, the effects of increasing density and extended the lifespan of mosquitoes fed on water and 10% sucrose. Density-dependent alterations in adult longevity attributable to the larval environment are complex and show contrasting results depending on interactions with other environmental factors. This study suggests that larval resource availability and competition influence Cx. pipiens population growth correlates and have lasting effects on traits that relate to a mosquito's ability to vector pathogens.

  7. Bionomics and control of Culex pipiens fatigans Wied. in Ceylon

    PubMed Central

    Chow, C. Y.; Thevasagayam, E. S.

    1957-01-01

    The climatic and housing conditions which favour the breeding of Culex pipiens fatigans in Ceylon, and its life-cycle and resting-habits, are described. The results of the treatment of breeding-places (mainly catch-pits) and the interior of houses with various insecticides of specific action on larvae or adults, in different preparations and concentrations, are given, and suggestions are made for the control of the mosquito on this island. The fundamental measure for successful control is efficient sanitation, but until this can be achieved, application of larvicides seems to be the method of choice. PMID:13472415

  8. Mom Matters: Diapause Characteristics of Culex pipiens-Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) Hybrid Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Meuti, Megan E; Short, Clancy A; Denlinger, David L

    2015-03-01

    Females of the northern house mosquito, Culex pipiens L., are capable of entering an adult overwintering diapause characterized by arrested ovarian development, enhanced stress tolerance, and elevated lipid stores. In contrast, the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, lacks this capacity and is therefore unable to survive the harsh winters found in northern regions of North America. These two species are capable of forming fertile hybrids in the United States, yet the diapause characteristics of these hybrids have not been extensively investigated. We crossed Cx. pipiens from Columbus, OH, with Cx. quinquefasciatus from Vero Beach, FL, and reared F1 hybrids from all mothers separately under diapause-inducing, short-day conditions (a photoperiod of 8:16 [L:D] h) at 18°C. Egg follicle length and lipid content were used to assess the diapause status of hybrids. Diapause incidence of hybrids varied widely for progeny from different mothers of the same species, but hybrids with Cx. pipiens mothers were consistently more prone to enter diapause than hybrids that had Cx. quinquefasciatus mothers. Our results suggest a strong maternal influence on the diapause phenotype and that a high percentage (45-75%) of Cx. pipiens-Cx. quinquefasciatus hybrids are capable of entering diapause. This implies that many hybrids can successfully overwinter, leading to a possible widening of the hybrid zone of these two species in North America.

  9. Population Genetic and Admixture Analyses of Culex pipiens Complex (Diptera: Culicidae) Populations in California, United States

    PubMed Central

    Kothera, Linda; Nelms, Brittany M.; Reisen, William K.; Savage, Harry M.

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellite markers were used to genetically characterize 19 Culex pipiens complex populations from California. Two populations showed characteristics of earlier genetic bottlenecks. The overall FST value and a neighbor-joining tree suggested moderate amounts of genetic differentiation. Analyses using Structure indicated K = 4 genetic clusters: Cx. pipiens form pipiens L., Cx. quinquefasciatus Say, Cx. pipiens form molestus Forskäl, and a group of genetically similar individuals of hybrid origin. A Discriminant Analysis of Principal Components indicated that the latter group is a mixture of the other three taxa, with form pipiens and form molestus contributing somewhat more ancestry than Cx. quinquefasciatus. Characterization of 56 morphologically autogenous individuals classified most as Cx. pipiens form molestus, and none as Cx. pipiens form pipiens or Cx. quinquefasciatus. Comparison of California microsatellite data with those of Cx. pipiens pallens Coquillett from Japan indicated the latter does not contribute significantly to genotypes in California. PMID:23958909

  10. Lectin Activity in Gut Extract of Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Koosha, Mona; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Abolhasani, Mandan; Charedar, Soroor; Basseri, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: The role of lectins is important in interaction between pathogens and mosquito vectors. This study was performed to identify agglutinin activities of protein molecules on the midgut of Culex pipiens. Methods: Culex pipiens was reared in insectray condition and the midguts of males and females (blood fed and unfed) were dissected separately in Tris-HCl buffer. The extracts of midguts were applied for hemagglutinin assay against red blood cells of rabbit, mouse, rat, dog, horse, sheep, guinea pig, cow, human (A, B, AB, O groups). Then, the RBCs with relatively high agglutinin activity were chosen for carbohydrate inhibition assay. D (+) glucose, D (+) galactose, D (+) mannose, D (−) fructose, D (−) arabinose, L (−) fucose, lactose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, sialic acid were used to specify carbohydrate binding lectin. Results: The highest agglutinin activities were found against sheep and rabbits RBCs. Sexual diversity of agglutinin activities was observed among midgut extraction of males and females. In addition, variation in agglutinin activity of blood fed and unfed female mosquitoes were detected. The lectin activity was inhibited highly with glucose, galactose, fucose and fructose but less inhibitor activities was observed by arabinose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, n-acetyl-d-glucosamine, lactose and mannose. Conclusion: The secretion of hemagglutinins (lectins or lectin-like molecules) in the digestive system depends on the type of food in the gut. This suggests that emptying of the gut in preparation for protein rich food probably starts the secretion of hemagglutinins. PMID:23785692

  11. Comparative analysis of the circadian rhythm genes period and timeless in Culex pipiens Linnaeus, 1758 (Diptera, Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Shaikevich, Elena V.; Karan, Ludmila S.; Fyodorova, Marina V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nucleotide sequences of the circadian rhythm genes, period and timeless, were studied for the first time in mosquitoes Culex pipiens Linnaeus, 1758. In this work we evaluated variations of the studied genome fragments for the two forms of Culex pipiens (forma “pipiens” – mosquitoes common for aboveground habitats, forma “molestus” – underground mosquitoes). We compared Culex pipiens from Russia with transatlantic Culex pipiens and subtropical Culex quinquefasciatus Say, 1823. Our results show that intraspecies variability is higher for the gene period than for the gene timeless. The revealed substitutions in nucleotide sequences and especially in amino acid sequences grouped the individuals of the two forms into distinct clusters with high significance. The detected fixed amino acid substitutions may appear essential for functioning of the circadian rhythm proteins in Culex pipiens, and may be correlated with adaptations of the taxa within the group Culex pipiens. Our results suggest that natural selection favors fixed mutations and the decrease in diversity of the genes period and timeless in mosquitoes of the Culex pipiens f. “molestus” compared with the Culex pipiens f. “pipiens”, is probably correlated with adaptive features of Culex pipiens f. “molestus”. The studied genome regions may be considered as promising molecular-genetic markers for identification, population and phylogenetic analysis of similar species and forms of the Culex pipiens complex. PMID:28123673

  12. Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus: a potential vector to transmit Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Xia; Li, Chun-Xiao; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Xing, Dan; Liu, Qin-Mei; Wu, Qun; Sun, Ai-Juan; Dong, Yan-de; Cao, Wu-Chun; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Zhao, Tong-Yan

    2016-09-07

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has become a threat to global health since the outbreak in Brazil in 2015. Although ZIKV is generally considered an Aedes-transmitted pathogen, new evidence has shown that parts of the virus closely resemble Culex-transmitted viruses. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the competence of Culex species for ZIKV to understand their potential as vectors. In this study, female Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus were orally exposed to ZIKV. Mosquito midguts, salivary glands and ovaries were tested for ZIKV to measure infection and dissemination at 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16 and 18 days post exposure (pe). In addition, saliva was collected from mosquitoes after infection and infant mice were bitten by infected mosquitoes to measure the transmission ability of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus. The results showed that the peak time of virus appearance in the salivary glands was day 8 pe, with 90% infection rate and an estimated virus titer of 3.92±0.49 lg RNA copies/mL. Eight of the nine infant mice had positive brains after being bitten by infected mosquitoes, which meant that Cx. p. quinquefasciatus could be infected with and transmit ZIKV following oral infection. These laboratory results clearly demonstrate the potential role of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus as a vector of ZIKV in China. Because there are quite different vector management strategies required to control Aedes (Stegomyia) species and Cx. p. quinquefasciatus, an integrated approach may be required should a Zika epidemic occur.

  13. Acute toxicity of furazolidone on Artemia salina, Daphnia magna, and Culex pipiens molestus larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Macri, A.; Stazi, A.V.; Dojmi di Delupis, G.

    1988-10-01

    As a result of evidence of the ecotoxicity of nitrofurans, the acute toxicity of furazolidone was tested in vivo on two aquatic organisms, Artemia salina and Daphnia magna, which are both crustaceans. Toxicity studies were also performed on larvae of Culex pipiens molestus. Results indicated a significant toxicity of the compound on Culex pipiens and Daphnia magna, while Artemia salina proved to be the least sensitive.

  14. The susceptibility of Culex pipiens fatigans to residual insecticides*

    PubMed Central

    Smith, A.; Bransby-Williams, W. R.

    1962-01-01

    Observations have been made on Culex pipiens fatigans in the Taveta-Pare area in East Africa from 1954 to 1961, during which time dieldrin was applied to local houses over a 3½-year period as part of an experiment in malaria control. At the end of the period of residual spraying the numbers of C. p. fatigans had been reduced by two-thirds in the Taveta area, but in the South Pare area, only some 160 km away, this mosquito was twice as numerous as before spraying. The results of susceptibility tests carried out in untreated and dieldrin-treated areas showed that the susceptibility of C. p. fatigans in East Africa to chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides was low compared with that of Anopheles gambiae, and varied by at least 20 times in some areas relatively short distances apart. C. p. fatigans from all areas sampled were, however, susceptible to fenthion and malathion. PMID:13993106

  15. Experimental investigation of the susceptibility of Italian Culex pipiens mosquitoes to Zika virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Boccolini, Daniela; Toma, Luciano; Di Luca, Marco; Severini, Francesco; Romi, R; Remoli, Maria Elena; Sabbatucci, Michela; Venturi, Giulietta; Rezza, Giovanni; Fortuna, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the susceptibility of an Italian population of Culex pipiens mosquitoes to Zika virus (ZIKV) infection, tested in parallel with Aedes aegypti, as a positive control. We analysed mosquitoes at 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 20 and 24 days after an infectious blood meal. Viral RNA was detected in the body of Cx. pipiens up to three days post-infection, but not at later time points. Our results indicate that Cx. pipiens is not susceptible to ZIKV infection. PMID:27605056

  16. Experimental investigation of the susceptibility of Italian Culex pipiens mosquitoes to Zika virus infection.

    PubMed

    Boccolini, Daniela; Toma, Luciano; Di Luca, Marco; Severini, Francesco; Romi, R; Remoli, Maria Elena; Sabbatucci, Michela; Venturi, Giulietta; Rezza, Giovanni; Fortuna, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the susceptibility of an Italian population of Culex pipiens mosquitoes to Zika virus (ZIKV) infection, tested in parallel with Aedes aegypti, as a positive control. We analysed mosquitoes at 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 20 and 24 days after an infectious blood meal. Viral RNA was detected in the body of Cx. pipiens up to three days post-infection, but not at later time points. Our results indicate that Cx. pipiens is not susceptible to ZIKV infection.

  17. Structure, Spatial and Temporal Distribution of the Culex pipiens Complex in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Xiong, Chenglong; Su, Fei; Cao, Hui; Zhou, Jianjun; Jiang, Qingwu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Culex pipiens molestus was first reported in Shanghai in 2010. The population structures and seasonal distributions of Culex pipiens subspecies C. p. molestus, Culex pipiens pallens, and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus are not well known. Methods: From late February to November 2013, we conducted daily field surveillance of mosquitoes at eight sites at two green lands and three residential areas in downtown Shanghai. Morphological comparison and DV/D ratios (DV/D is an indicator of mosquito taxonomy) were used to identify adult mosquitoes. Results: The distribution curves of the Culex pipiens complex members indicated seasonal fluctuations. The temperature range of 20–25 °C was the most suitable for adult activity. Micro-environmental factors may differentiate the complex population structures. Hybridization between C. p. pallens and C. p. quinquefasciatus was common and neither “DV/D = 0.40” nor “DV/D = 0.50” can distinguish these subspecies and their hybrids. Conclusion: the population structure of the Culex pipiens complex is complex and characterized by significant hybridization. Measures other than DV/D ratios are needed for the discrimination of subspecies. The C. p. molestus invasion might result in the transmission of novel vector-borne diseases in Shanghai. PMID:27869687

  18. Diversification of Wolbachia endosymbiont in the Culex pipiens mosquito.

    PubMed

    Atyame, Célestine M; Delsuc, Frédéric; Pasteur, Nicole; Weill, Mylène; Duron, Olivier

    2011-10-01

    The α-proteobacteria Wolbachia are among the most common intracellular bacteria and have recently emerged as important drivers of arthropod biology. Wolbachia commonly act as reproductive parasites in arthropods by inducing cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), a type of conditional sterility between hosts harboring incompatible infections. In this study, we examined the evolutionary histories of Wolbachia infections, known as wPip, in the common house mosquito Culex pipiens, which exhibits the greatest variation in CI crossing patterns observed in any insect. We first investigated a panel of 20 wPip strains for their genetic diversity through a multilocus scheme combining 13 Wolbachia genes. Because Wolbachia depend primarily on maternal transmission for spreading within arthropod populations, we also studied the variability in the coinherited Cx. pipiens mitochondria. In total, we identified 14 wPip haplotypes, which all share a monophyletic origin and clearly cluster into five distinct wPip groups. The diversity of Cx. pipiens mitochondria was extremely reduced, which is likely a consequence of cytoplasmic hitchhiking driven by a unique and recent Wolbachia invasion. Phylogenetic evidence indicates that wPip infections and mitochondrial DNA have codiverged through stable cotransmission within the cytoplasm and shows that a rapid diversification of wPip has occurred. The observed pattern demonstrates that a considerable degree of Wolbachia diversity can evolve within a single host species over short evolutionary periods. In addition, multiple signatures of recombination were found in most wPip genomic regions, leading us to conclude that the mosaic nature of wPip genomes may play a key role in their evolution.

  19. Daily blood feeding rhythms of laboratory-reared North American Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood feeding by free-living insect vectors of disease is rhythmic and can be used to predict when infectious bites will occur. These daily rhythms can also be targeted by control measures, as in insecticide-treated nets. Culex pipiens form pipiens and C.p. f. molestus are two members of the Culex pipiens assemblage and vectors of West Nile Virus throughout North America. Although Culex species vector human pathogens and parasites, the daily blood feeding rhythms of C.p. f. molestus, to our knowledge, have not been studied. We described and compared the daily blood feeding rhythms of three laboratory-reared populations of Culex pipiens, one of which has confirmed molestus ancestry. We also examined the plasticity of blood feeding time for these three populations. Results For most (>70%) C.p. f. pipiens and C.p. f. molestus collected from metropolitan Chicago, IL, blood feeding took place during scotophase. Peak blood feeding occurred in mid-scotophase, 3-6 hours after lights off. For C.p. f. pipiens originating from Pennsylvania, most mosquitoes (> 90%) blood fed during late photophase and early scotophase. C.p. f. molestus denied a blood meal during scotophase were less likely to blood feed during early photophase (< 20%) than were C.p. f. pipiens from Chicago (> 50%). C.p. f. pipiens from Pennsylvania were capable of feeding readily at any hour of photo- or scotophase. Conclusions Daily blood feeding rhythms of C.p. f. molestus are similar to those of C.p. f. pipiens, particularly when populations originate from the same geographic region. However, the timing of blood feeding is more flexible for C.p. f. pipiens populations relative to C.p. f. molestus. PMID:24450879

  20. Repellent effect of Lagenaria siceraria extracts against Culex pipiens.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mostafa I; Fouda, Mohamad A; Hammad, Kotb M; Tanani, Mohamad A; Shehata, Ahmed Z

    2014-04-01

    Ethanolic, acetone and petroleum ether extracts from leaves and stems of Lagenaria siceraria (Cucurbitaceae) were screened for their repellency effect against Culex pipiens L. mosquito. The repellent action of the present plant extracts were varied depending on the plant parts and the dose of extract. The petroleum ether extract of leaves showed the same repellency percent (100%) of commercial formulation, N. N.diethyl toulamide (DEET) at the higher dose (3.33 mg/cm2), while petroleum ether extract from stems exhibiting the repellent action (89.6%) at the same dose, respectively. Ethanolic extracts of leaves and stems exhibited the lowest repellent activity as it recorded (81.3% and 69.1%) at (6.67 mg/cm2), respectively. Results of this study may contribute to design an alternative way to control mosquitoes currently based on applications of synthetic insecticides. These extracts could be developed commercially as an effective personal protection measure against mosquito bites and thus to control diseases caused by mosquito-borne pathogens.

  1. Tracking factors modulating cytoplasmic incompatibilities in the mosquito Culex pipiens.

    PubMed

    Duron, Olivier; Bernard, Clotilde; Unal, Sandra; Berthomieu, Arnaud; Berticat, Claire; Weill, Mylène

    2006-09-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited endosymbiotic bacteria that infect many arthropod species and may induce cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), resulting in abortive embryonic development. One Wolbachia host, Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes, displays high levels of variability in both CI crossing types (cytotypes) and DNA markers. We report here an analysis of 14 mosquito strains, containing 13 Wolbachia variants, and with 13 different cytotypes. Cytotypes were Wolbachia-dependent, as antibiotic treatment rendered all strains tested compatible. Cytotype distributions were independent of geographical distance between sampling sites and host subspecies, suggesting that Wolbachia does not promote a reproductive isolation depending on these parameters. Backcross analysis demonstrated a mild restoring effect of the nuclear genome, indicating that CI is mostly cytoplasmically determined for some crosses. No correlation was found between the phenotypic and genotypic variability of 16 WO prophage and transposon markers, except for the WO prophage Gp15 gene, which encodes a protein similar to a bacterial virulence factor. However, Gp15 is partially correlated with CI expression, suggesting that it could be just linked to a CI gene.

  2. The use of morphometric wing characters to discriminate female Culex pipiens and Culex torrentium.

    PubMed

    Börstler, Jessica; Lühken, Renke; Rudolf, Martin; Steinke, Sonja; Melaun, Christian; Becker, Stefanie; Garms, Rolf; Krüger, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    The reliability of the length of wing radial vein r(2/3) as a character for the morphological discrimination of the two potential arbovirus vectors Culex pipiens s.s. and Cx. torrentium from Germany was reassessed, after this character had been neglected for more than 40 years. Additionally, multivariate morphometric analyses were applied to evaluate wing shape variation between both species. Although high-throughput molecular tools are now available to differentiate the two species, a simple, low-cost routine alternative may be useful in the absence of a molecular laboratory, such as under semi-field conditions. A thin-plate splines transformation confirmed that primarily the shrinkage of vein r(2/3) is responsible for the wing differences between the two species. In the bivariate analysis, the r(2/3)/r3 indices of Cx. pipiens s.s. and Cx. torrentium were 0.185 and 0.289, respectively, resulting in a correct classification of more than 91% of all tested specimens. Using the absolute length of vein r(2/3) alone still allowed for more than 90% accurate discrimination. Furthermore, classification accuracy of linear discriminant analysis exceeded 97%.

  3. Trapping biases of Culex torrentium and Culex pipiens revealed by comparison of captures in CDC traps, ovitraps, and gravid traps.

    PubMed

    Hesson, Jenny C; Ignell, Rickard; Hill, Sharon R; Östman, Örjan; Lundström, Jan O

    2015-06-01

    We evaluate three trapping methods for their effectiveness at capturing Culex pipiens and Culex torrentium, both enzootic vectors of bird-associated viruses in Europe. The comparisons, performed in two regions in Sweden, were among CDC traps baited with carbon dioxide, gravid traps, and ovitraps baited with hay infusion. The proportions of the two Culex species in a catch differed between trap types, with CDC traps catching a lower proportion of Cx. torrentium than both gravid traps and ovitraps. Between gravid traps and ovitraps, there was no difference in the proportions of the two species. The results indicate that Cx. torrentium may go undetected or underestimated compared to Cx. pipiens when using carbon dioxide baited CDC traps. The new insight of trap bias presented here adds an important dimension to consider when investigating these vectors of bird-associated viruses in the field.

  4. Energetic cost of insecticide resistance in Culex pipiens mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Rivero, A; Magaud, A; Nicot, A; Vézilier, J

    2011-05-01

    The extensive use of insecticides to control vector populations has lead to the widespread development of different mechanisms of insecticide resistance. Mutations that confer insecticide resistance are often associated to fitness costs that prevent them from spreading to fixation. In vectors, such fitness costs include reductions in preimaginal survival, adult size, longevity, and fecundity. The most commonly invoked explanation for the nature of such pleiotropic effects of insecticide resistance is the existence of resource-based trade-offs. According to this hypothesis, insecticide resistance would deplete the energetic stores of vectors, reducing the energy available for other biological functions and generating trade-offs between insecticide resistance and key life history traits. Here we test this hypothesis by quantifying the energetic resources (lipids, glycogen, and glucose) of larvae and adult females of the mosquito Culex pipiens L. resistant to insecticides through two different mechanisms: esterase overproduction and acetylcholinesterase modification. We find that, as expected from trade-off theory, insecticide resistant mosquitoes through the overproduction of esterases contain on average 30% less energetic reserves than their susceptible counterparts. Acetylcholinesterase-modified mosquitoes, however, also showed a significant reduction in energetic resources (20% less). We suggest that, in acetylcholinesterase-modified mosquitoes, resource depletion may not be the result of resource-based trade-offs but a consequence of the hyperactivation of the nervous system. We argue that these results not only provide a mechanistic explanation for the negative pleiotropic effects of insecticide resistance on mosquito life history traits but also can have a direct effect on the development of parasites that depend on the vector's energetic reserves to fulfil their own metabolic needs.

  5. Larvicidal Activity of Nerium oleander against Larvae West Nile Vector Mosquito Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    El-Akhal, Fouad; Guemmouh, Raja; Ez Zoubi, Yassine; El Ouali Lalami, Abdelhakim

    2015-01-01

    Background. Outbreaks of the West Nile virus infection were reported in Morocco in 1996, 2003, and 2010. Culex pipiens was strongly suspected as the vector responsible for transmission. In the North center of Morocco, this species has developed resistance to synthetic insecticides. There is an urgent need to find alternatives to the insecticides as natural biocides. Objective. In this work, the insecticidal activity of the extract of the local plant Nerium oleander, which has never been tested before in the North center of Morocco, was studied on larval stages 3 and 4 of Culex pipiens. Methods. Biological tests were realized according to a methodology inspired from standard World Health Organization protocol. The mortality values were determined after 24 h of exposure and LC50 and LC90 values were calculated. Results. The extract had toxic effects on the larvae of culicid mosquitoes. The ethanolic extract of Nerium oleander applied against the larvae of Culex pipiens has given the lethal concentrations LC50 and LC90 in the order of 57.57 mg/mL and 166.35 mg/mL, respectively. Conclusion. This investigation indicates that N. oleander could serve as a potential larvicidal, effective natural biocide against mosquito larvae, particularly Culex pipiens. PMID:26640701

  6. Spatial Variation in Host Feeding Patterns of Culex tarsalis and the Culex pipiens complex (Diptera: Culicidae) in California

    PubMed Central

    THIEMANN, T. C.; LEMENAGER, D. A.; KLUH, S.; CARROLL, B. D.; LOTHROP, H. D.; REISEN, W. K.

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, WNV) is now endemic in California across a variety of ecological regions that support a wide diversity of potential avian and mammalian host species. Because different avian hosts have varying competence for WNV, determining the blood-feeding patterns of Culex (Diptera: Culicidae) vectors is a key component in understanding the maintenance and amplification of the virus as well as tangential transmission to humans and horses. We investigated the blood-feeding patterns of Culex tarsalis Coquillett and members of the Culex pipiens L. complex from southern to northern California. Nearly 100 different host species were identified from 1,487 bloodmeals, by using the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I (COI). Cx. tarsalis fed on a higher diversity of hosts and more frequently on nonhuman mammals than did the Cx. pipiens complex. Several WNV-competent host species, including house finch and house sparrow, were common bloodmeal sources for both vector species across several biomes and could account for WNV maintenance and amplification in these areas. Highly competent American crow, western scrub-jay and yellow-billed magpie also were fed upon often when available and are likely important as amplifying hosts for WNV in some areas. Neither species fed frequently on humans (Cx. pipiens complex [0.4%], Cx. tarsalis [0.2%]), but with high abundance, both species could serve as both enzootic and bridge vectors for WNV. PMID:22897051

  7. Contrasting levels of variability between cytoplasmic genomes and incompatibility types in the mosquito Culex pipiens.

    PubMed Central

    Guillemaud, T; Pasteur, N; Rousset, F

    1997-01-01

    Reproductive incompatibilities called cytoplasmic incompatibilities are known to affect a large number of arthropod species and are mediated by Wolbachia, a maternally transmitted microorganism. The crossing relationships between strains of potential hosts define their incompatibility types and it is generally assumed that differences between strains of Wolbachia induce different crossing types. Among all the described host species, the mosquito, Culex pipiens, displays the greatest variability of cytoplasmic incompatibility crossing types. We analysed mitochondrial and bacterial DNA variability in Culex pipiens in order to investigate some possible causes of incompatibility crossing type variability. We sequenced fragments of the ftsZ gene, and the A + T-rich control region of the mtDNA. We also sequenced the second subunit of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COII) gene, in Culex pipiens and a closely related species, C. torrentium, in order to verify the usefulness of the A + T-rich region for the present purposes. No variability was found in the Wolbachia ftsZ gene fragment, and very limited variation of the mitochondrial marker whatever the compatibility type or the origin of the host. A low variability was found in the A + T-rich region and comparison of divergence of the A + T-rich region and COII gene between C. pipiens and C. torrentium did not reveal any special constraints affecting this region. In contrast to observations in other host species, variability of incompatibility crossing types is not due to multiple infections by distantly related Wolbachia strains. PMID:9061971

  8. A Pictorial Key for Culex pipiens Complex (Diptera: Culicidae) In Iran

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Hossein; Sadraei, Javid; Moosa-Kazemi, Seyed Hassan; Abolghasemi, Esmail; Solimani, Hassan; Jaffari Nodoshan, Ahmad; Najafi, Mohammad Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to design pictorial key and taxonomic literature of Culex pipiens complex in Iran. Methods: Larvae were collected using standard dipping methods in 13 randomly selected areas of Bushehr, Hamedan, Kerman, Khorasan-e-Razavi, Khuzistan, Mazandaran, Tehran, Sistan and Baluchistan and Yazd Provinces from April 2009 to October 2010. The data were analyzed using SPSS Ver. 11.5. Results: Culex pipiens larvae were identified based on the Seta 1 of the abdominal segments III–IV in north and central parts of Iran. This diagnostic character had some variation among the Cx. quinquefasciatus collected from south of the country. The identification value of intersection of costa, subcosta and bifurcation of R2+3 of female veins, was calculated as 90–100 % for Cx. pipiens. This diagnostic character was varied among the Cx. quinquefasciatus specimens. The male genitalia found as the main characters to distinguish of Cx. quinquefasciatus from Cx. pipiens. Conclusion: It is necessary more studies on the behavior and genetic variations of Cx. pipiens complex in Iran. PMID:27308288

  9. Highly polluted larval habitats of the Culex pipiens complex in central Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.; Sohn, S.R.

    1987-06-01

    Larvae of the Culex pipiens complex (Cx. pipiens and Cx. torrentium) were abundant in two highly polluted pools receiving sewage sludge in Uppsala, Sweden (early August through late September 1985). The water was characterized by high BOD, and high ion concentration of Cu, Fe, Al and much suspended matter. Maximum larval number at the pool surface area was 26.1/ml. The ratio between species was studied and Cx. torrentium comprised ca. 20% at the peak of abundance. Some egg rafts showed no embryogeny.

  10. Oviposition preferences of Culex restuans and Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) for selected infusions in oviposition traps and gravid traps.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Bryan T; Paulson, Sally L; Youngman, Roger R; Scheffel, Sabra L; Hawkins, Belinda

    2005-12-01

    Field studies were conducted in southwestern Virginia to determine the ovipositional preferences of Culex restuans and Culex pipiens by using ovitraps and gravid traps baited with selected infusions. For the ovitrap collections, 4 different infusions (manure, hay, grass, and rabbit chow) were used. Significant differences among infusions were detected on most sample dates for both species. For 3 of the first 4 wk of collections, the manure infusion collected significantly more Cx. restuans than all the other infusions. The hay and grass infusions collected the majority of the egg rafts during weeks 5-9. Cx. pipiens egg rafts were absent from the first 3 wk of collections. Of the remaining 6 wk, 4 showed significant differences in attractiveness of infusions, with the hay and grass infusions preferred by Cx. pipiens. Two infusions, manure and hay, were used for the gravid trap experiment and both Cx. restuans and Cx. pipiens data were combined for analysis. Only the first 2 wk showed significance, with manure being preferred over hay in both weeks. In later collections, the relative attractiveness of the hay infusion increased. A seasonal shift in infusion preference may be related to incubation temperature during preparation of the infusions. New infusions were prepared each week and incubation was done outside. Increased attractiveness of the hay infusion coincided with higher average temperatures in July and August. Hay infusion was very effective for trapping both Cx. pipiens and Cx. restuans in southwestern Virginia and is more convenient to use than manure. However, cool outside temperatures in the early season may interfere with the fermentation process and thus incubation should be done for a longer time or brought indoors.

  11. Repellency and toxicity of aromatic plant extracts against the mosquito Culex pipiens molestus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, Abdallah F; El-Haj, Samih; Tueni, Marie; Taoubi, Khalil; Nader, Natalie Abi; Mrad, Abir

    2005-06-01

    The insecticidal activities of essential oil extracts from leaves, flowers and roots of aromatic plants against fourth-instar larvae of the mosquito Culex pipiens molestus Forskal were determined. Extracts of Foeniculum vulgare Mill were the most toxic, followed by those of Ferula hermonis Boiss, Citrus sinensis Osbeck, Pinus pinea L, Laurus nobilis L and Eucalyptus spp with LC50 values of 24.5, 44.0, 60.0, 75.0, 117.0 and 120.0 mg litre(-1), respectively. Combination tests between the LC50 and the maximum sub-lethal concentration (MSLC) were determined. Over 20 major components were identified in extracts from each plant species tested. Five essential oils and nine pure components were studied for their repellency against mosquito bites. Terpineol and 1,8-cineole were the most effective against Culex pipiens molestus bites offering complete protection for 1.6 and 2 h, respectively.

  12. Microsatellite primers for Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus, the vector of avian malaria in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fonseca, Dina M.; Atkinson, Carter T.; Fleischer, Robert C.

    1998-01-01

    The southern house mosquito, Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae), was introduced accidentally to Hawaii in 1826 (van Riper et al. 1986). There it eventually became the vector of avian malaria, Plasmodium relictum, a disease that severely limits the size and distribution of endemic forest bird populations in Hawaii (Atkinson et al. 1995). Cx.p. quinquefasciatus has a circumtropical distribution and is also the vector for human diseases such as lymphatic filariasis and several encephalitis.

  13. Testing of UK Populations of Culex pipiens L. for Schmallenberg Virus Vector Competence and Their Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Manley, Robyn; Harrup, Lara E.; Veronesi, Eva; Stubbins, Francesca; Stoner, Jo; Gubbins, Simon; Wilson, Anthony; Batten, Carrie; Koenraadt, Constantianus J. M.; Henstock, Mark; Barber, James; Carpenter, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Background Schmallenberg virus (SBV), an arboviral pathogen of ruminants, emerged in northern Europe during 2011 and has subsequently spread across a vast geographic area. While Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have been identified as a biological transmission agent of SBV, the role of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) as potential vectors has not been defined beyond small-scale field collections in affected areas. Culex pipiens L. are one of the most widespread mosquitoes in northern Europe; they are present on farms across the region and have previously been implicated as vectors of several other arboviruses. We assessed the ability of three colony lines of Cx. pipiens, originating from geographically diverse field populations, to become fully infected by SBV using semi-quantitative real-time RT-PCR (sqPCR). Findings Two colony lines of Cx. pipiens were created in the UK (‘Brookwood’ and ‘Caldbeck’) from field collections of larvae and pupae and characterised using genetic markers. A third strain of Cx. pipiens from CVI Wageningen, The Netherlands, was also screened during experiments. Intrathoracic inoculation of the Brookwood line resulted in infections after 14 days that were characterised by high levels of RNA throughout individuals, but which demonstrated indirect evidence of salivary gland barriers. Feeding of 322 individuals across the three colony lines on a membrane based infection system resulted in no evidence of full dissemination of SBV, although infections did occur in a small proportion of Cx. pipiens from each line. Conclusions/Significance This study established two novel lines of Cx. pipiens mosquitoes of UK origin in the laboratory and subsequently tested their competence for SBV. Schmallenberg virus replication and dissemination was restricted, demonstrating that Cx. pipiens is unlikely to be an epidemiologically important vector of the virus in northern Europe. PMID:26291533

  14. [Sexual receptivity of the female and insemination power of the male Culex pipiens autogenicus (Diptera, Culicidae). The cases of strict monogamy and occasional polygamy].

    PubMed

    Thanh-Xuan-Nguyen; Cabes, J L

    1977-03-14

    Females of Culex pipiens autogenicus generally have two refractory periods: post-emergence refractory period (during the first 48 hrs. after emergence) and post-insemination refractory period. Males of Culex pipiens autogenicus can inseminate 2 to 3 females. After the 4th insemination he can no longer completely fulfill his reproductory role. Therefore the female can inseminated by another male.

  15. European Aedes albopictus and Culex pipiens Are Competent Vectors for Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Desprès, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the causative agent of Japanese encephalitis, the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia. JEV transmission cycle involves mosquitoes and vertebrate hosts. The detection of JEV RNA in a pool of Culex pipiens caught in 2010 in Italy raised the concern of a putative emergence of the virus in Europe. We aimed to study the vector competence of European mosquito populations, such as Cx. pipiens and Aedes albopictus for JEV genotypes 3 and 5. Findings After oral feeding on an infectious blood meal, mosquitoes were dissected at various times post-virus exposure. We found that the peak for JEV infection and transmission was between 11 and 13 days post-virus exposure. We observed a faster dissemination of both JEV genotypes in Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, when compared with Cx. pipiens mosquitoes. We also dissected salivary glands and collected saliva from infected mosquitoes and showed that Ae. albopictus mosquitoes transmitted JEV earlier than Cx. pipiens. The virus collected from Ae. albopictus and Cx. pipiens saliva was competent at causing pathogenesis in a mouse model for JEV infection. Using this model, we found that mosquito saliva or salivary glands did not enhance the severity of the disease. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that European populations of Ae. albopictus and Cx. pipiens were efficient vectors for JEV transmission. Susceptible vertebrate species that develop high viremia are an obligatory part of the JEV transmission cycle. This study highlights the need to investigate the susceptibility of potential JEV reservoir hosts in Europe, notably amongst swine populations and local water birds. PMID:28085881

  16. Culex pipiens Development Is Greatly Influenced by Native Bacteria and Exogenous Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Nieto, Leonardo M.; D´Alessio, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Culex pipiens is the most cosmopolitan mosquito of the Pipiens Assemblage. By studying the nature of interactions between this species and microorganisms common to its breeding environment we can unravel important pitfalls encountered during development. We tested the survival rate of larval stages, pupae and adults of a Cx. pipiens colony exposed to a variety of microorganisms in laboratory conditions and assessed the transmission to offspring (F1) by those organisms that secured development up to adulthood. Three complementary experiments were designed to: 1) explore the nutritional value of yeasts and other microorganisms during Cx. pipiens development; 2) elucidate the transstadial transmission of yeast to the host offspring; and 3) to examine the relevance of all these microorganisms in female choice for oviposition-substratum. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proved to be the most nutritional diet, but despite showing the highest survival rates, vertical transmission to F1 was never confirmed. In addition, during the oviposition trials, none of the gravid females was attracted to the yeast substratum. Notably, the two native bacterial strains, Klebsiella sp. and Aeromonas sp., were the preferred oviposition media, the same two bacteria that managed to feed neonates until molting into 2nd instar larvae. Our results not only suggest that Klebsiella sp. or Aeromonas sp. serve as attractants for oviposition habitat selection, but also nurture the most fragile instar, L1, to assure molting into a more resilient stage, L2, while yeast proves to be the most supportive diet for completing development. These experiments unearthed survival traits that might be considered in the future development of strategies of Cx. pipiens control. These studies can be extended to other members of the Pipiens Assemblage. PMID:27055276

  17. Wolbachia Endobacteria in Natural Populations of Culex pipiens of Iran and Its Phylogenetic Congruence

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Mohsen; Moosa-Kazemi, Seyed Hassan; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Vatandoost, Hasan; Sedaghat, Mohammad Mehdi; Rajabnia, Ramazan; Hosseini, Mostafa; Maleki-Ravasan, Naseh; Yahyapour, Yousef; Ferdosi-Shahandashti, Elaheh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Wolbachia are common intracellular bacteria that infect different groups of arthropods including mosquitoes. These bacteria modify host biology and may induce feminization, parthenogenesis, male killing and cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). Recently Wolbachia is being nominated as a bio-agent and paratransgenic candidate to control mosquito borne diseases. Methods: Here we report the results of a survey for presence, frequency, and phylogenetic congruence of these endosymbiont bacteria in Culex pipiens populations in Northern, Central, and Southern parts of Iran using nested-PCR amplification of wsp gene. Results: Wolbachia DNA were found in 227 (87.3%) out of 260 wild-caught mosquitoes. The rate of infection in adult females ranged from 61.5% to 100%, while in males were from 80% to 100%. The Blast search and phylogenetic analysis of the wsp gene sequence revealed that the Wolbachia strain from Iranian Cx. pipiens was identical to the Wolbachia strains of supergroup B previously reported in members of the Cx. pipiens complex. They had also identical sequence homology with the Wolbachia strains from a group of distinct arthropods including lepidopteran, wasps, flies, damselfly, thrips, and mites from remote geographical areas of the world. Conclusion: It is suggested that Wolbachia strains horizontally transfer between unrelated host organisms over evolutionary time. Also results of this study indicates that Wolbachia infections were highly prevalent infecting all Cx. pipiens populations throughout the country, however further study needs to define Wolbachia inter-population reproductive incompatibility pattern and its usefulness as a bio-agent control measure. PMID:27308293

  18. High Insecticides Resistance in Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) from Tehran, Capital of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Salim-Abadi, Yaser; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Enayati, Ahmad Ali; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Vatandoost, Hassan; Eshraghian, Mohammad Reza; Mirhendi, Hossein; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Gorouhi, Mohammad Amin; Rafi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: During recent years transmission of Dirofilaria immitis (dog heart worm) by Culex pipiens and West Nile virus have been reported from Iran. The present study was preformed for evaluating the susceptibility status of Cx. pipiens collected from capital city of Tehran, Iran. Methods: Four Insecticides including: DDT 4%, Lambdacyhalothrin 0.05%, Deltamethrin 0.05% and Cyfluthrin 0.15 % according to WHO standard methods were used for evaluating the susceptibility status of Cx. pipiens from Tehran moreover For comparison susceptibility status a Laboratory strain also was used. Bioassay data were analyzed using Probit program. The lethal time for 50% and 90% mortality (LT50 and LT90) values were calculated from regression line. Results: The susceptibility status of lab strain of Cx. pipiens revealed that it is susceptible to Lambdacyhalothrin, Deltamethrin, Cyfluthrin and resistant to DDT. Moreover cyfluthrin with LT50=36 seconds and DDT with LT50=3005 seconds had the least and most LT50s. Field population was resistance to all tested insecticides and DDT yielded no mortality. Conclusion: Highly resistance level against all WHO recommended imagicides were detected in field populations. We suggest more biochemical and molecular investigations to detect resistance mechanisms in the field population for further decision of vector control. PMID:28032100

  19. Modeling dynamics of culex pipiens complex populations and assessing abatement strategies for West Nile Virus.

    PubMed

    Pawelek, Kasia A; Niehaus, Patrick; Salmeron, Cristian; Hager, Elizabeth J; Hunt, Gregg J

    2014-01-01

    The primary mosquito species associated with underground stormwater systems in the United States are the Culex pipiens complex species. This group represents important vectors of West Nile virus (WNV) throughout regions of the continental U.S. In this study, we designed a mathematical model and compared it with surveillance data for the Cx. pipiens complex collected in Beaufort County, South Carolina. Based on the best fit of the model to the data, we estimated parameters associated with the effectiveness of public health insecticide (adulticide) treatments (primarily pyrethrin products) as well as the birth, maturation, and death rates of immature and adult Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes. We used these estimates for modeling the spread of WNV to obtain more reliable disease outbreak predictions and performed numerical simulations to test various mosquito abatement strategies. We demonstrated that insecticide treatments produced significant reductions in the Cx. pipiens complex populations. However, abatement efforts were effective for approximately one day and the vector mosquitoes rebounded until the next treatment. These results suggest that frequent insecticide applications are necessary to control these mosquitoes. We derived the basic reproductive number (ℜ0) to predict the conditions under which disease outbreaks are likely to occur and to evaluate mosquito abatement strategies. We concluded that enhancing the mosquito death rate results in lower values of ℜ0, and if ℜ0<1, then an epidemic will not occur. Our modeling results provide insights about control strategies of the vector populations and, consequently, a potential decrease in the risk of a WNV outbreak.

  20. Flushing effect of rain on container-inhabiting mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Koenraadt, C J M; Harrington, L C

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the role of heavy rain on container-inhabiting mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) populations, and how different species may have adapted to such conditions. Rains were created with a rain simulator calibrated to natural rain intensities in the habitats of two important vector species: Aedes aegypti (L.) from northern Thailand and Culex pipiens L. from New York state, USA. Immature stages of Ae. aegypti were able to resist the flushing effect of rain better than Cx. pipiens. This difference was most dramatic during the pupal stage. Fourth instars of Ae. aegypti were not affected by flushing when exposed for longer rain intervals (30 versus 60 min) or at a colder water temperature (24 versus 16 degrees C). In contrast, significantly more Cx. pipiens larvae flushed out with longer rain exposure. Warmer water temperatures also increased the proportion of Cx. pipiens flushed out, but mostly at the longest exposure time. Container position (tilted at a 7 degrees angle or level) did not affect proportions of fourth instars flushed out for both species. More accurate models of vector-borne diseases can be developed by incorporating the described effects of rain on container-breeding mosquito populations. Such models may provide more realistic assessments of disease risk and ensure optimal use of limited financial resources of mosquito control agencies.

  1. High incidence of ace-1 duplicated haplotypes in resistant Culex pipiens mosquitoes from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Alout, Haoues; Labbé, Pierrick; Pasteur, Nicole; Weill, Mylène

    2011-01-01

    The status of genes conferring resistance to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides has been examined in Culex pipiens pipiens mosquitoes sampled in Algeria. Presence of overproduced esterases was sporadic, but acetylcholinesterase-1 resistant alleles were observed in almost all samples. We focused our study on the AChE1 G119S substitution characterized in almost all samples, mostly at the heterozygous state. A genetic test revealed the presence of ace-1 duplication associating a susceptible and a resistant ace-1 copy. Molecular characterization showed a high occurrence of ace-1 duplication with six distinct duplicated alleles out of four samples. The inferred frequency of duplicated allele suggests that it is replacing the single resistant G119S allele. Finally, we discuss the mechanism at the origin of these duplicated haplotypes and their consequences on the management of insecticide resistance.

  2. Laboratory Evaluation of Temephos against Anopheles stephensi and Culex pipiens Larvae in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abai, Mohammad Reza; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Vatandoost, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malaria is still a health problem in Iran. There are several vector control activities, including Indoor Residual spraying, using insecticide treated nets and larviciding including Temephos. In addition nuisance mosquitos are prevalent in the urban areas. So that evaluation of this species to larvicide will provide a clue for management of vector control activities. Methods: Two mosquito species were used in this study: Anopheles stephensi were collected from Kazeroun and Culex pipiens from Tehran, capital of Iran. All the tests were carried out according to the WHO method. All the test kis was provided by WHO. Results: Results showed a LC50= 0.0523 and LC90=0.3822 mg/l for An. stephensi. The figure for Cx. pipiens was 0.1838 and 0.8505 mg/l respectively. Conclusion: monitoring of insecticide resistance to Temephos should be evaluated regularly for management of vector control. PMID:28032103

  3. Phenotypic Variation among Culex pipiens Complex (Diptera: Culicidae) Populations from the Sacramento Valley, California: Horizontal and Vertical Transmission of West Nile Virus, Diapause Potential, Autogeny, and Host Selection

    PubMed Central

    Nelms, Brittany M.; Kothera, Linda; Thiemann, Tara; Macedo, Paula A.; Savage, Harry M.; Reisen, William K.

    2013-01-01

    The vector competence and bionomics of Culex pipiens form pipiens L. and Cx. pipiens f. molestus Forskäl were evaluated for populations from the Sacramento Valley. Both f. pipiens and f. molestus females became infected, produced disseminated infections, and were able to transmit West Nile virus. Form molestus females also transmitted West Nile virus vertically to egg rafts and F1 progeny, whereas f. pipiens females only transmitted to egg rafts. Culex pipiens complex from urban Sacramento blood-fed on seven different avian species and two mammalian species. Structure analysis of blood-fed mosquitoes identified K = 4 genetic clusters: f. molestus, f. pipiens, a group of genetically similar hybrids (Cluster X), and admixed individuals. When females were exposed as larvae to midwinter conditions in bioenvironmental chambers, 85% (N = 79) of aboveground Cx. pipiens complex females and 100% (N = 34) of underground f. molestus females did not enter reproductive diapause. PMID:24043690

  4. Phenotypic variation among Culex pipiens complex (Diptera: Culicidae) populations from the Sacramento Valley, California: horizontal and vertical transmission of West Nile virus, diapause potential, autogeny, and host selection.

    PubMed

    Nelms, Brittany M; Kothera, Linda; Thiemann, Tara; Macedo, Paula A; Savage, Harry M; Reisen, William K

    2013-12-01

    The vector competence and bionomics of Culex pipiens form pipiens L. and Cx. pipiens f. molestus Forskäl were evaluated for populations from the Sacramento Valley. Both f. pipiens and f. molestus females became infected, produced disseminated infections, and were able to transmit West Nile virus. Form molestus females also transmitted West Nile virus vertically to egg rafts and F1 progeny, whereas f. pipiens females only transmitted to egg rafts. Culex pipiens complex from urban Sacramento blood-fed on seven different avian species and two mammalian species. Structure analysis of blood-fed mosquitoes identified K = 4 genetic clusters: f. molestus, f. pipiens, a group of genetically similar hybrids (Cluster X), and admixed individuals. When females were exposed as larvae to midwinter conditions in bioenvironmental chambers, 85% (N = 79) of aboveground Cx. pipiens complex females and 100% (N = 34) of underground f. molestus females did not enter reproductive diapause.

  5. The forms of the Culex pipiens complex in East Asia, with ecological thoughts on their origin and interrelation.

    PubMed

    Mogi, Motoyoshi

    2012-12-01

    In East Asia, 4 forms of the Culex pipiens complex have been confirmed. A form pipiens s. s. (anautogeous pipiens) has been confirmed only in westernmost China. A temperate form pallens and a subtropical and tropical form quinquefasciatus are connected with intermediates in morphology and many aspects of ecology, but their difference is rather clear in climatic adaptation traits. The distribution of a form molestus overlaps with pallens and, in Taiwan, quinquefasciatus, and, in East Asia, this form requires artificial underground habitats for its persistence. The origin and interrelation of 3 forms other than pipiens s. s. are considered from ecological aspects, especially climatic adaptation. A hypothesis is presented that molestus was originally a form having adapted to the Mediterranean climate in the western Palaearctic, secondarily colonized artificial underground habitats, and reached East Asia in the early 20th century by ships from North America. At present, it is difficult to assign pallens with certainty to either the old or new groups of the Manchurian mosquito fauna. Three hypotheses about the interrelation between pallens and quinquefasciatus are compared, and the strengths and problems of each hypothesis are indicated. Finally, a map to show the distribution of the forms of the Culex pipiens complex before it was extensively changed by humans is presented as an initial trial. The Culex pipiens problems now troubling humans are largely human-made problems.

  6. [State resistance of the mosquito Culex pipiens towards temephos central Morocco].

    PubMed

    El Ouali Lalami, A; El-Akhal, F; El Amri, N; Maniar, S; Faraj, C

    2014-08-01

    In Morocco, Culex pipiens plays a role in the high annoyance experienced by most urban cities, suburban and rural areas, especially since it was strongly suspected as the most likely vector in the transmission of West Nile virus epidemics that have hit Morocco in 1996. Chemical insecticides are generally the way in which they use the programs against harmful mosquitoes and disease vectors. However, the repeated and excessive use of these products regularly led to the emergence of the phenomenon of insect resistance. At the center of Morocco, information on the susceptibility or resistance to insecticides in mosquitoes (larvae and adults) vectors of diseases or pests, are almost nonexistent. This article reports the results of studies conducted between 2007 and 2010 with sensitivity tests WHO on larvae local populations of Culex pipiens collected in three lodging in the city of Fez, towards the insecticide mostly used by hygienic services: temephos. Five concentrations of insecticide (0.0025 mg/l, 0.005 mg/l, 0.0125 mg/l, 0.025 mg/l, 0.0625 mg/l) in addition to control, were used to determine the LC50 and LC 90 of Culex pipiens species towards temephos. Sensitivity tests were carried out at the entomology unit and monitoring of insect sensitivity towards insecticides installed at the Regional Diagnostic Laboratory Epidemiological and Environmental Hygiene (LRDEHM), Fez, under the Regional Directorate of Health in Fes Boulemane Region. The LC50 and LC90, concentrations corresponding to 50 and 90% mortality were determined graphically, by the linear relationship between the decimal logarithm of insecticide concentrations (x-axis) and the percentage of mortality transformed into probit values (ordinate) on logarithmic gausso paper. Resistance rates were determined on the basis of the sensitivity of a reference strain (S-Lab). The bioassay results affirmed the presence of resistance in larvae Culex pipiens towards temephos and that this species has also equally

  7. Chemical Composition and Larvicidal Activity of Greek Myrtle Essential Oils against Culex pipiens biotype molestus.

    PubMed

    Koutsaviti, Aikaterini; Lignou, Irene; Bazos, Ioannis; Koliopoulos, George; Michaelakis, Antonios; Giatropoulos, Athanassios; Tzakou, Olga

    2015-10-01

    Fresh leaves of Myrtus communis collected from different localities in Greece, were subjected to hydrodistillation and the oils obtained were analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The analyses showed mainly quantitative differences, with the monoterpenes myrtenyl acetate, α-pinene, 1,8-cineole, and linalool, along with limonene, dominating the majority of the analyzed Myrtle oils. The evaluation of the larvicidal activity of the samples against Culex pipiens biotype molestus mosquito showed that all tested samples exhibited moderate to weak toxicity, with cultivated M. communis subsp. communis oil being the most active.

  8. Hybridization and population structure of the Culex pipiens complex in the islands of Macaronesia

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Bruno; Alves, Joana; Sousa, Carla A; Santa-Ana, Marta; Vieira, Inês; Silva, Teresa L; Almeida, António PG; Donnelly, Martin J; Pinto, João

    2012-01-01

    The Culex pipiens complex includes two widespread mosquito vector species, Cx. pipiens and Cx. quinquefasciatus. The distribution of these species varies in latitude, with the former being present in temperate regions and the latter in tropical and subtropical regions. However, their distribution range overlaps in certain areas and interspecific hybridization has been documented. Genetic introgression between these species may have epidemiological repercussions for West Nile virus (WNV) transmission. Bayesian clustering analysis based on multilocus genotypes of 12 microsatellites was used to determine levels of hybridization between these two species in Macaronesian islands, the only contact zone described in West Africa. The distribution of the two species reflects both the islands' biogeography and historical aspects of human colonization. Madeira Island displayed a homogenous population of Cx. pipiens, whereas Cape Verde showed a more intriguing scenario with extensive hybridization. In the islands of Brava and Santiago, only Cx. quinquefasciatus was found, while in Fogo and Maio high hybrid rates (∼40%) between the two species were detected. Within the admixed populations, second-generation hybrids (∼50%) were identified suggesting a lack of isolation mechanisms. The observed levels of hybridization may locally potentiate the transmission to humans of zoonotic arboviruses such as WNV. PMID:22957190

  9. Repeated bouts of dehydration deplete nutrient reserves and reduce egg production in the mosquito Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Joshua B.; Patrick, Kevin R.; Desai, Karina; Hardesty, Jeffrey J.; Krause, Tyler B.; Denlinger, David L.

    2010-01-01

    In this study of the mosquito, Culex pipiens, we examined the impact of multiple bouts of dehydration and rehydration on survival, depletion of metabolic reserves and egg production in both non-diapausing and diapausing females. Mosquitoes provided with access to sugar during rehydration survived longer than those allowed to rehydrate without sugar, and their survival was similar to that of mosquitoes of the same age that were not dehydrated. Among mosquitoes not provided with sugar, each dehydration bout reduced the mosquito's dry mass – an effect likely to be due to the utilization of carbohydrates and lipid reserves. The toll on glycogen and lipid reserves is likely to be especially costly for diapausing mosquitoes that are dependent on these stored reserves for winter survival. Egg production in both non-diapausing and post-diapausing C. pipiens was also reduced in response to multiple bouts of dehydration. Although egg quality was not compromised, the number of eggs produced was reduced. Both non-diapausing and diapausing females can compensate for the nutrient loss due to dehydration by sugar feeding but the opportunity to feed on sugar is likely to be rarely available in the overwintering habitat of diapausing females, thus the impact of dehydration may be especially pronounced in overwintering populations of C. pipiens. PMID:20675546

  10. Multiple Wolbachia determinants control the evolution of cytoplasmic incompatibilities in Culex pipiens mosquito populations.

    PubMed

    Atyame, Celestine M; Duron, Olivier; Tortosa, Pablo; Pasteur, Nicole; Fort, Philippe; Weill, Mylene

    2011-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited endosymbionts that can invade arthropod populations through manipulation of their reproduction. In mosquitoes, Wolbachia induce embryonic death, known as cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), whenever infected males mate with females either uninfected or infected with an incompatible strain. Although genetic determinants of CI are unknown, a functional model involving the so-called mod and resc factors has been proposed. Natural populations of Culex pipiens mosquito display a complex CI relationship pattern associated with the highest Wolbachia (wPip) genetic polymorphism reported so far. We show here that C. pipiens populations from La Réunion, a geographically isolated island in the southwest of the Indian Ocean, are infected with genetically closely related wPip strains. Crossing experiments reveal that these Wolbachia are all mutually compatible. However, crosses with genetically more distant wPip strains indicate that Wolbachia strains from La Réunion belong to at least five distinct incompatibility groups (or crossing types). These incompatibility properties which are strictly independent from the nuclear background, formally establish that in C. pipiens, CI is controlled by several Wolbachia mod/resc factors.

  11. Latitudinal Diversity of Culex pipiens Biotypes and Hybrids in Farm, Peri-Urban, and Wetland Habitats in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Melsen, Diede; Favia, Guido; Wennergren, Uno; Koenraadt, Constantianus J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presence of Culex (Cx.) pipiens mosquitoes and circulation of West Nile virus (WNV), WNV outbreaks have so far not occurred in northern Europe. The species Cx. pipiens consists of two morphologically identical biotypes, pipiens and molestus, which can form hybrids. Until now, population dynamic studies of Cx. pipiens have not differentiated between biotypes and hybrids at the European scale, nor have they used comparative surveillance approaches. We therefore aimed to elucidate the relative abundance of Cx. pipiens biotypes and hybrids in three habitat types at different latitudes across Europe, using two different surveillance traps. BG-Sentinel and Mosquito-Magnet Liberty Plus traps were placed in three habitat types (farms, peri-urban, wetlands), in three European countries (Sweden, The Netherlands, Italy). Collected Cx. pipiens mosquitoes were identified to biotype with real-time PCR. Both trap types collected equal ratios of the biotypes and their hybrids. From northern to southern latitudes there was a significant decrease of pipiens and an increase of molestus. Habitat types influenced the relative ratios of biotypes and hybrids, but results were not consistent across latitudes. Our results emphasize the need to differentiate Cx. pipiens to the biotype level, especially for proper future WNV risk assessments for Europe. PMID:27870890

  12. Diapause-specific gene expression in the northern house mosquito, Culex pipiens L., identified by suppressive subtractive hybridization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we probe the molecular events underpinning diapause observed in overwintering females of Culex pipiens. Using suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) we have identified 40 genes that are either upregulated or downregulated during this seasonal period of dormancy. Northern blot hybr...

  13. The impact of weather conditions on Culex pipiens and Culex restuans (Diptera: Culicidae) abundance: a case study in Peel Region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiafeng; Ogden, Nick H; Zhu, Huaiping

    2011-03-01

    Mosquito populations are sensitive to long-term variations in climate and short-term variations in weather. Mosquito abundance is a key determinant of outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases, such as West Nile virus (WNV). In this work, the short-term impact of weather conditions (temperature and precipitation) on Culex pipiens L.-Culex restuans Theobald mosquito abundance in Peel Region, Ontario, Canada, was investigated using the 2002-2009 mosquito data collected from the WNV surveillance program managed by Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and a gamma-generalized linear model. There was a clear association between weather conditions (temperature and precipitation) and mosquito abundance, which allowed the definition of threshold criteria for temperature and precipitation conditions for mosquito population growth. A predictive statistical model for mosquito population based on weather conditions was calibrated using real weather and mosquito surveillance data, and validated using a subset of surveillance data. Results showed that WNV vector abundance on any one day could be predicted with reasonable accuracy from relationships with mean degree-days >9 degrees C over the 11 preceding days, and precipitation 35 d previously. This finding provides optimism for the development of weather-generated forecasting for WNV risk that could be used in decision support systems for interventions such as mosquito control.

  14. Comparative transcriptome analyses of deltamethrin-susceptible and -resistant Culex pipiens pallens by RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yuan; Wang, Weijie; Hong, Shanchao; Lei, Zhentao; Fang, Fujin; Guo, Qin; Hu, Shengli; Tian, Mengmeng; Liu, Bingqian; Zhang, Donghui; Sun, Yan; Ma, Lei; Shen, Bo; Zhou, Dan; Zhu, Changliang

    2015-01-01

    The widespread and improper use of pyrethroid insecticides, such as deltamethrin, has resulted in the evolution of resistance in many mosquito species, including Culex pipiens pallens. With the development of high-throughput sequencing, it is possible to massively screen pyrethroid resistance-associated gene. In this study, we used Illumina-Solexa transcriptome sequencing to identify genes that are expressed differently in deltamethrin-susceptible and -resistant strains of Culex pipiens pallens as a critical knowledge base for further studies. A total of 4,961,197,620 base pairs and 55,124,418 reads were sequenced, mapped to the Culex quinquefasciatus genome and assembled into 17,679 known genes. We recorded 1,826 significantly differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Among them, 1,078 genes were up-regulated and 748 genes were down-regulated in the deltamethrin-resistant strain compared to -susceptible strain. These DEGs contained cytochrome P450s, cuticle proteins, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, lipases, serine proteases, heat shock proteins, esterases and others. Among the 1,826 DEGs, we found that the transcriptional levels of CYP6AA9 in the laboratory populations was elevated as the levels of deltamethrin resistance increased. Moreover, the expression levels of the CYP6AA9 were significantly higher in the resistant strains than the susceptible strains in three different field populations. We further confirmed the association between the CYP6AA9 gene and deltamethrin resistance in mosquitoes by RNA interfering (RNAi). Altogether, we explored massive potential pyrethroid resistance-associated genes and demonstrated that CYP6AA9 participated in the pyrethroid resistance in mosquitoes. PMID:26377942

  15. Modeling Dynamics of Culex pipiens Complex Populations and Assessing Abatement Strategies for West Nile Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pawelek, Kasia A.; Hager, Elizabeth J.; Hunt, Gregg J.

    2014-01-01

    The primary mosquito species associated with underground stormwater systems in the United States are the Culex pipiens complex species. This group represents important vectors of West Nile virus (WNV) throughout regions of the continental U.S. In this study, we designed a mathematical model and compared it with surveillance data for the Cx. pipiens complex collected in Beaufort County, South Carolina. Based on the best fit of the model to the data, we estimated parameters associated with the effectiveness of public health insecticide (adulticide) treatments (primarily pyrethrin products) as well as the birth, maturation, and death rates of immature and adult Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes. We used these estimates for modeling the spread of WNV to obtain more reliable disease outbreak predictions and performed numerical simulations to test various mosquito abatement strategies. We demonstrated that insecticide treatments produced significant reductions in the Cx. pipiens complex populations. However, abatement efforts were effective for approximately one day and the vector mosquitoes rebounded until the next treatment. These results suggest that frequent insecticide applications are necessary to control these mosquitoes. We derived the basic reproductive number (ℜ0) to predict the conditions under which disease outbreaks are likely to occur and to evaluate mosquito abatement strategies. We concluded that enhancing the mosquito death rate results in lower values of ℜ0, and if ℜ0<1, then an epidemic will not occur. Our modeling results provide insights about control strategies of the vector populations and, consequently, a potential decrease in the risk of a WNV outbreak. PMID:25268229

  16. Culex pipiens s.l. and Culex torrentium (Culicidae) in Wrocław area (Poland): occurrence and breeding site preferences of mosquito vectors.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, Thomas; Jawień, Piotr; Rydzanicz, Katarzyna; Lonc, Elzbieta; Becker, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Both ornithophilic mosquito species, Culex pipiens s.l. (L.) and Culex torrentium (Martini, 1925), occur sympatric in temperate Europe. They are presumed to be primary vectors of West Nile and Sindbis viruses. Differentiation of these morphologically similar Culex species is essential for evaluation of different vector roles, for mosquito surveillance and integrated control strategies. Cx. torrentium has been neglected or erroneously determined as Cx. pipiens s.l. in some previous studies, because only males of both species can be diagnosed reliably by morphology. Thus, knowledge about species abundance, geographical distribution, breeding site preferences and the zoonotic risk assessment is incomplete also in Poland. In Wrocław area (Silesian Lowland), besides typical urban breeding sites, huge sewage irrigation fields provide suitable breeding conditions for Culex species. They are also inhabited by 180 resident and migratory bird species serving as potential virus reservoirs. In this study, morphology of larvae and males as well as species diagnostic enzyme markers, namely adenylate kinase (AK) and 2-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (HBDH), were used to discriminate Cx. pipiens s.l. and Cx. torrentium. In a total of 650 Culex larvae from 24 natural and artificial breeding sites, Cx. pipiens s.l. had a proportion of 94.0% and Cx. torrentium only 6.0%. It could be shown that both species are well adapted to various breeding site types like ditches, catch basins, flower pots and buckets with diverse water quality. Cx. torrentium preferred more artificial water containers in urban surrounding (12% species proportion), whereas in semi-natural breeding sites, Cx. torrentium was rare (3%). In 12 of 24 breeding sites, larvae of both species have been found associated.

  17. The susceptibility of Culex pipiens fatigans larvae to insecticides in Rangoon, Burma

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Philip

    1967-01-01

    Since April 1963, the susceptibility to insecticides of larvae of Culex pipiens fatigans has been extensively studied by the WHO Filariasis Research Unit in Rangoon, Burma, as part of a programme of research aimed at establishing which compound or group of compounds could be used to control the vector of filariasis. Larvae from various localities in Rangoon showed wide variations in susceptibility to chlorinated hydrocarbons. There were also seasonal variations and it was difficult to standardize test conditions. Nevertheless, resistance to this group of compounds, especially DDT, sufficient to prevent control has been clearly demonstrated. As C. p. fatigans has never been subjected to intensive control by insecticides in Rangoon, the results confirm the findings made elsewhere that this mosquito is naturally resistant to chlorinated hydrocarbons. The larvae are, however, susceptible to organophosphorus compounds, especially fenthion and parathion. PMID:4230023

  18. Microsatellite characterization of subspecies and their hybrids in Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes along a north-south transect in the central United States of America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex, Cx. p. pipiens L. (Cpp) and Cx. p. quinquefasciatus Say (Cpq), are morphologically similar and important vectors of the West Nile and St. Louis Encephalitis viruses in the US. They hybridize when found in sympatry, which could facilitate the transfer of adva...

  19. Temporal changes in mosquito abundance (Culex pipiens), avian malaria prevalence and lineage composition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Knowledge on the temporal dynamics of host/vector/parasite interactions is a pre-requisite to further address relevant questions in the fields of epidemiology and evolutionary ecology of infectious diseases. In studies of avian malaria, the natural history of Plasmodium parasites with their natural mosquito vectors, however, is mostly unknown. Methods Using artificial water containers placed in the field, we monitored the relative abundance of parous females of Culex pipiens mosquitoes during two years (2010–2011), in a population in western Switzerland. Additionally, we used molecular tools to examine changes in avian malaria prevalence and Plasmodium lineage composition in female C. pipiens caught throughout one field season (April-August) in 2011. Results C. pipiens relative abundance varied both between years and months, and was associated with temperature fluctuations. Total Plasmodium prevalence was high and increased from spring to summer months (13.1-20.3%). The Plasmodium community was composed of seven different lineages including P. relictum (SGS1, GRW11 and PADOM02 lineages), P. vaughani (lineage SYAT05) and other Plasmodium spp. (AFTRU5, PADOM1, COLL1). The most prevalent lineages, P. vaughani (lineage SYAT05) and P. relictum (lineage SGS1), were consistently found between years, although they had antagonistic dominance patterns during the season survey. Conclusions Our results suggest that the time window of analysis is critical in evaluating changes in the community of avian malaria lineages infecting mosquitoes. The potential determinants of the observed changes as well as their implications for future prospects on avian malaria are discussed. PMID:24499594

  20. Characterization of Culex pipiens complex (Diptera: Culicidae) populations in Colorado, USA using microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Kothera, Linda; Godsey, Marvin S; Doyle, Michael S; Savage, Harry M

    2012-01-01

    Mosquitoes such as those in the Culex pipiens complex are important vectors of disease. This study was conducted to genetically characterize Cx. pipiens complex populations in the state of Colorado, USA, and to determine the number of genetic clusters represented by the data. Thirteen populations located among four major river basins were sampled (n = 597 individuals) using a panel of 14 microsatellites. The lowest-elevation sites had the highest Expected Heterozygosity (H(E)) values (range 0.54-0.65). AMOVA results indicated the presence of statistically significant amounts of variation within each level when populations were analyzed as one group or when they were grouped either by river basin or by their position on the east or west side of the Rocky Mountains. Most pairwise F(ST) values were significant via permutation test (range 0-0.10), with the highest values from comparisons with Lamar, in southeast CO. A neighbor joining tree based on Cavalli-Sforza and Edwards's chord distances was consistent with the geographic locations of populations, as well as with the AMOVA results. There was a significant isolation by distance effect, and the cluster analysis resolved five groups. Individuals were also assayed with an additional microsatellite marker, Cxpq78, proposed to be monomorphic in Cx. pipiens but polymorphic in the closely related but biologically distinct species Cx. quinquefasciatus. Low frequencies (≤3%) of Cx. quinquefasciatus alleles for this marker were noted, and mostly confined to populations along the Interstate 25 corridor. Pueblo was distinct in that it had 10% Cx. quinquefasciatus alleles, mostly of one allele size. The degree of population genetic structure observed in this study is in contrast with that of Cx. tarsalis, the other major vector of WNV in the western U.S., and likely reflects the two species' different dispersal strategies.

  1. Laboratory and field trials of four repellents with Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Coleman, R E; Richards, A L; Magnon, G J; Maxwell, C S; Debboun, M; Klein, T A; Wirtz, R A

    1994-01-01

    During Operation "Desert Shield," 16 volunteers field-tested four insect repellents (deet, the lactone CIC-4, and the piperidine compounds AI3-37220 and AI3-35765) against biting mosquitoes at King Fahd Airport, Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. CIC-4 and AI3-37220 (25% wt/vol) provided effective (> 90%) protection against bites for 4 h. Deet and AI3-35765 protected for only 2 h. The compounds subsequently were evaluated for repellency against laboratory-reared Culex pipiens L. CIC-4 was more effective than deet, AI3-37220, or AI3-35765 at the ED50 but not at the ED95 level in initial sensitivity tests using human volunteers. At the ED95 level, deet provided significantly better protection than either piperidine compound. In laboratory duration tests, AI3-37220 provided 8 h of effective (> 90%) protection against Cx. pipiens bites, deet and AI3-35765 7 h of protection, and CIC-4 2 h of protection.

  2. Efficiency of Colocasia esculenta leaves extract and histopathological effects on Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    El-Monairy, Olfat M

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the toxicity of Colocasia esculenta leaves extract on 3rd, 4th instars larvae and pupae of Culex pipiens. Bioassays showed that the 3rd instar larvae was the most susceptible to the different concentrations of extract, where the LC50 after 48 hr. post-exposure was 79.41, 109.65 & 141.25 for the 3rd, 4th instars larvae and pupal stage respectively. The histo-pathological effects of C. esculenta leaves extract on midgut regions and gastric caeca of the 3rd instar larvae were studied. When larvae were treated with 100 ppm of C. esculenta extract, all larvae developed dramatic pathological lesions especially Malpighian tubules were extensively affected. The midgut cells showed morphological deviation from normal ones, through slightly apical degenerated (lysis) of epithelial cells. The epithelial cells with extensive cellular microvilli were shrinkage, the nuclei showed pyknotic characteristic and the peritrophic membrane was appeared discontinuation in compared to control. When the 3rd larval instar was exposed to extract 400 ppm, the epithelial cells, adipose fabric and muscles were extensively affected. Also, the gastric caeca was affected obviously. These observation and alterations in cells of Cx. pipiens larvae are related to the dangerous effect of C. esculent leaves extract.

  3. Amblyospora sp. (Microspora, Amblyosporidae) infecting nerve ganglia of Culex pipiens (Diptera, Culicidae) from Egypt.

    PubMed

    Darwish, A; Canning, E U

    1991-09-01

    A species of Amblyospora-infecting neurones of Culex pipiens is described. Diplokaryotic meronts, which divided by binary fission, were distinguished at the electron microscope level by their unthickened plasma membranes. Sporonts with an electron-dense surface coat gave rise to eight uninucleate sporoblasts within a sporophorous vesicle, cytoplasmic division occurring at the quadrinucleate or octonucleate stages. Indications that nuclear fusion and chromosome reorganization occurred in merogony and sporogony were obtained by light microscopy but meiosis was not detected at the ultrastructural level. Spores were typical of Amblyospora, being ovoid when fresh, truncate when stained, and having an exospore of two membranous layers subtended by a thick amorphous layer, an electron-lucent endospore, an anisofilar polar filament, and a polaroplast comprised of an anterior region of close-packed lamellae and a posterior region of expanded sacs. The metabolic products in the sporophorous vesicle took the form of large globules, small globules with electron-dense borders, and fine granules. These were depleted in mature sporophorous vesicles, though a surface layer of fine granules on the spores may have been derived from them. Many stages were degenerate and it is suggested that C. pipiens may be an accidental host in which the parasite could develop suboptimally in nervous tissue only. Infections in larvae hatched from eggs in the laboratory indicate that vertical transmission occurs.

  4. Elevated couch potato transcripts associated with adult diapause in the mosquito Culex pipiens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qirui; Denlinger, David L

    2011-05-01

    The couch potato (cpo) cDNA that we cloned from the northern house mosquito, Culex pipiens, encodes the C-terminus containing a highly conserved RNA recognition motif (RRM). Protein structure prediction indicates a canonical RRM structure with a βαββαβ topological structure. Northern blots indicate a single mRNA band over 9.49 kb, and Southern blot analysis suggests that the cpo gene contains large introns. Highest expression was noted in first instar larvae and pupae. A comparison of nondiapausing (long daylength) and diapausing (short daylength) adult females showed no difference immediately at adult eclosion, but by day 7 and thereafter, expression of cpo was much higher in diapausing adults. When 2-month old diapausing females were transferred from short daylength to diapausing-terminating conditions of long daylength and high temperature, expression of cpo declined. Similarly, when a topical application of JH III was used to terminate diapause abundance of the cpo transcript declined. Consistent with observations in Drosophila melanogaster and several other species levels of cpo in C. pipiens are influenced by the diapause program, although the direction of change is not the same in all species.

  5. Inhibitory Effects of Amorphigenin on the Mitochondrial Complex I of Culex pipiens pallens Coquillett (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Mingshan; Liang, Yaping; Gu, Zumin; Li, Xiuwei

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory found that the extract from seeds of Amorpha fruticosa in the Leguminosae family had lethal effects against mosquito larvae, and an insecticidal compound amorphigenin was isolated. In this study, the inhibitory effects of amorphigenin against the mitochondrial complex I of Culex pipiens pallens (Diptera: Culicidae) were investigated and compared with that of rotenone. The results showed that amorphigenin and rotenone can decrease the mitochondrial complex I activity both in vivo and in vitro as the in vivo IC50 values (the inhibitor concentrations leading to 50% of the enzyme activity lost) were determined to be 2.4329 and 2.5232 μmol/L, respectively, while the in vitro IC50 values were 2.8592 and 3.1375 μmol/L, respectively. Both amorphigenin and rotenone were shown to be reversible and mixed-I type inhibitors of the mitochondrial complex I of Cx. pipiens pallens, indicating that amorphigenin and rotenone inhibited the enzyme activity not only by binding with the free enzyme but also with the enzyme-substrate complex, and the values of KI and KIS for amorphigenin were determined to be 20.58 and 87.55 μM, respectively, while the values for rotenone were 14.04 and 69.23 μM, respectively. PMID:26307964

  6. Sugar feeding improves survival of nondiapausing cold-stored Culex pipiens.

    PubMed

    Rinehart, Joseph P; Yocum, George D; Robich, Rebecca M

    2012-11-01

    The continuous culture of mosquitoes is a costly endeavor for vector biology laboratories. In addition to the resources that must be committed to colony maintenance, biological costs, including genetic drift and accidental colony loss, also can occur. Although alternatives do exist, their application to mosquitoes is limited. Mosquito cryopreservation remains elusive, and many important species lack a well-defined diapause. Previously, we demonstrated that cold storing nondiapausing mated adult females of the northern house mosquito, Culex pipiens L. resulted in a nearly four-fold increase in longevity when measured at the LT50, allowing for cold storage for up to 10 wk. In the current study, we used sugar feeding during cold storage to significantly improve cold storage longevity. At 6 degrees C, the LT50 of cold stored females was 23 wk, and 100% mortality was not realized until 43 wk. Cold-stored females did exhibit reduced fecundity, but egg production returned to normal levels within two generations. These results suggest that cold storage without diapause induction is a viable option for Cx. pipiens, and with the addition of sugar feeding, a colony could be maintained with less than two generations per year.

  7. Population Structure and Distribution Patterns of the Sibling Mosquito Species Culex pipiens and Culex torrentium (Diptera: Culicidae) Reveal Different Evolutionary Paths

    PubMed Central

    Werblow, Antje; Klimpel, Sven; Bolius, Sarah; Dorresteijn, Adriaan W. C.; Sauer, Jan; Melaun, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays a number of endemic mosquito species are known to possess vector abilities for various diseases, as e.g. the sibling species Culex pipiens and Culex torrentium. Due to their morphological similarity, ecology, distribution and vector abilities, knowledge about these species' population structure is essential. Culicidae from 25 different sampling sites were collected from March till October 2012. All analyses were performed with aligned cox1 sequences with a total length of 658 bp. Population structure as well as distribution patterns of both species were analysed using molecular methods and different statistical tests like distance based redundancy analysis (dbDRA), analysis of molecular variances (AMOVA) or McDonald & Kreitman test and Tajima's D. Within both species, we could show a genetic variability among the cox1 fragment. The construction of haplotype networks revealed one dominating haplotype for Cx. pipiens, widely distributed within Germany and a more homogeneous pattern for Cx. torrentium. The low genetic differences within Cx. pipiens could be a result of an infection with Wolbachia which can induce a sweep through populations by passively taking the also maternally inherited mtDNA through the population, thereby reducing the mitochondrial diversity as an outcome of reproductive incompatibility. Pairwise population genetic differentiation (FST) ranged significantly from moderate to very great between populations of Cx. pipiens and Cx. torrentium. Analyses of molecular variances revealed for both species that the main genetic variability exists within the populations (Cx. pipiens [88.38%]; Cx. torrentium [66.54%]). Based on a distance based redundancy analysis geographical origin explained a small but significant part of the species' genetic variation. Overall, the results confirm that Cx. pipiens and Cx. torrentium underlie different factors regarding their mitochondrial differentiation, which could be a result of endosymbiosis, dispersal

  8. Culex pipiens as a potential vector for transmission of Dirofilaria immitis and other unclassified Filarioidea in Southwest Spain.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Barriga, Daniel; Parreira, Ricardo; Almeida, António P G; Calado, Manuela; Blanco-Ciudad, Juan; Serrano-Aguilera, Francisco Javier; Pérez-Martín, Juan Enrique; Sánchez-Peinado, Joaquín; Pinto, João; Reina, David; Frontera, Eva

    2016-06-15

    Dirofilaria immitis is one of the most frequently detected mosquito-transmitted zoonotic filarioid nematode in mammals in Europe, being canine dirofilariosis a major animal health problem, endemic in the Mediterranean area. This study, focused on Southwest Spain, in order to bring new insights into (i) the epidemiology of Dirofilaria spp., (ii) the species of Culicid vectors possibly involved in their transmission and (iii) the genetic variability of those potential vectors. A total of 881 adult female mosquitoes from 11 different species, were captured during 2012-2013, and detection of filarioid DNA was attempted by PCR using specific primers (ITS-2 and COI), followed by DNA sequencing. In a single Culex pipiens specimen D. immitis DNA was detected both in the head-thorax and abdomen sections. Filarioid nematode DNA was also detected in eight additional Cx. pipiens specimens also in both the thorax and the abdomen, but analysis of sequence data did not allow unambiguous assignment of any of the obtained sequences to a previously defined species. All Cx. pipiens with filarioid DNA were individually analysed by CQ11 to discriminate between pipiens, molestus, and hybrid forms. Besides, rDNA ITS-2 sequence analysis revealed the presence of haplotype H1 and H2 of Cx. pipiens. To our knowledge this study revealed, for the first time in Spain, the occurrence of likely mature infection of D. immitis in Cx. pipiens, as well as with other yet uncharacterized nematodes, supporting its role as a potential vector of these filarids.

  9. Attract-and-kill strategy. Laboratory studies on hatched larvae of Culex pipiens.

    PubMed

    Michaelakis, Antonios; Mihou, Anastasia P; Koliopoulos, George; Couladouros, Elias A

    2007-10-01

    The attract-and-kill strategy is a new pest management technique that presupposes the intelligent combination of an attracting agent (e.g. pheromone) and a killing agent (e.g. insecticide). In the present study, the potential combination of the microencapsulated synthetic oviposition pheromone 6-acetoxy-5-hexadecanolide with an insecticide has been tested. Initially, polyurea microcapsules containing 6-acetoxy-5-hexadecanolide, the synthetic mixture of diastereomers of the oviposition pheromone of the mosquito species Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae), were studied. Laboratory bioassays were performed to confirm the bioactivity of the microencapsulated pheromone on the oviposition activity of Culex pipiens L. biotype molestus Førskal (Diptera: Culicidae) with the aim of determining the optimum dose for oviposition response. Its effect was dose dependent, revealing an optimum dose of 300 mg of dried microcapsules. Attractancy over time was also studied. The microencapsulated pheromone was found to be sufficiently attractive to gravid female mosquitoes for a period of 40 days. Finally, the combination of the synthetic pheromone with the control agent temephos showed both an acceptable oviposition activity and sufficient larvicidal effect.

  10. Exposure to West Nile Virus Increases Bacterial Diversity and Immune Gene Expression in Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Zink, Steven D.; Van Slyke, Greta A.; Palumbo, Michael J.; Kramer, Laura D.; Ciota, Alexander T.

    2015-01-01

    Complex interactions between microbial residents of mosquitoes and arboviruses are likely to influence many aspects of vectorial capacity and could potentially have profound effects on patterns of arbovirus transmission. Such interactions have not been well studied for West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) and Culex spp. mosquitoes. We utilized next-generation sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA bacterial genes derived from Culex pipiens Linnaeus following WNV exposure and/or infection and compared bacterial populations and broad immune responses to unexposed mosquitoes. Our results demonstrate that WNV infection increases the diversity of bacterial populations and is associated with up-regulation of classical invertebrate immune pathways including RNA interference (RNAi), Toll, and Jak-STAT (Janus kinase-Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription). In addition, WNV exposure alone, without the establishment of infection, results in similar alterations to microbial and immune signatures, although to a lesser extent. Multiple bacterial genera were found in greater abundance in WNV-exposed and/or infected mosquitoes, yet the most consistent and notable was the genus Serratia. PMID:26516902

  11. The effects of resource type and ratio on competition with Aedes albopictus and Culex pipiens (Diptera:Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Costanzo, K S; Muturi, E J; Lampman, R L; Alto, B W

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) in the United States has been associated with declines in abundance of resident mosquito species, presumably because of resource competition, as larvae of Ae. albopictus have been illustrated as superior competitors under certain resource conditions. We evaluated the hypothesis that varying the type and ratio of two food resources (Foxtail grass: American elm) alters the competitive outcome of Ae. albopictus and Culex pipiens (L.). We measured survivorship, development time, size, and adult longevity, and estimated the population growth index (A') of populations raised both alone and in equal number with the interspecific competitor, across five ratios of the two food resources. Competition was asymmetric with Ae. albopictus, the superior competitor across all resource treatments; however, the competitive advantage Ae. albopictus had over Cx. pipiens was reduced as grass became the predominant resource. With elm as the predominant resource, the population growth index (A') for both Ae. albopictus and Cx. pipiens was lower in intraspecific and interspecific competition treatments, respectively. The treatments also impacted adult life history, as life spans of both Ae. albopictus and Cx. pipiens varied when they emerged from larval conditions with different resource and competition treatments. We discuss the possible differences in the two species' efficiencies in exploiting the two resource types. Despite some resource conditions alleviating the competitive effects of Ae. albopictus on Cx. pipiens, competition remained asymmetric; thus, additional mechanisms are likely operating under field conditions when the two species coexist.

  12. Macrocyclops albidus (Copepoda: cyclopidae) for the Biocontrol of Aedes albopictus and Culex pipiens in Italy.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Rodolfo; Carrieri, Marco; Maccagnani, Bettina; Maini, Stefano; Bellini, Romeo

    2015-03-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the potential of Macrocyclops albidus as a biological control agent against the 1st and 2nd instars of Culex pipiens and Aedes albopictus. Under laboratory conditions of prey saturation (50 1st instars/copepod), an average of 58.98% of Cx. pipiens and 54.99% of Ae. albopictus larvae were killed by 1 copepod in 24 h. Trials run in big drums containing 200 liters of water showed that the M. albidus population, inoculated in April, efficiently controlled the mosquito population for the entire season. The predator was particularly effective against Ae. albopictus, as only 2 larvae of this species were found in the treated drums, compared to 814 larvae in untreated control drums throughout the study period. No difference was observed in the control efficacy between the 2 initial densities of copepods used. The reduction in Ae. albopictus density in the drums with 100 and 500 M. albidus with respect to the control drums was 99.90 ± 0.35% and 100.0 ± 0.0%, respectively. For Cx. pipiens, the reduction in density was 88.69 ± 13.51% and 84.65% in drums inoculated with 100 and 500 copepods, respectively. Macrocyclops albidus populations survived through the winter and continued to keep the mosquito population under control during the 2008 season. The M. albidus population developed very well both in drums placed in sunny and shaded areas and proved to be tolerant to both high (summer) and low (winter) temperatures. Trials performed on M. albidus survival in catch basins showed that after a few weeks, the copepod population dramatically decreased and subsequently disappeared. The main problem for copepod survival in catch basins seemed to be the low oxygen tension and accumulation of toxic substances, rather than copepods being flushed out in heavy rainfall episodes. During the period when copepods were present, they maintained the mosquito population under control; their partial disappearance from the catch basins, however, would

  13. Predicting Culex pipiens/restuans population dynamics by interval lagged weather data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Culex pipiens/restuans mosquitoes are important vectors for a variety of arthropod borne viral infections. In this study, the associations between 20 years of mosquito capture data and the time lagged environmental quantities daytime length, temperature, precipitation, relative humidity and wind speed were used to generate a predictive model for the population dynamics of this vector species. Methods Mosquito population in the study area was represented by averaged time series of mosquitos counts captured at 6 sites in Cook County (Illinois, USA). Cross-correlation maps (CCMs) were compiled to investigate the association between mosquito abundances and environmental quantities. The results obtained from the CCMs were incorporated into a Poisson regression to generate a predictive model. To optimize the predictive model the time lags obtained from the CCMs were adjusted using a genetic algorithm. Results CCMs for weekly data showed a highly positive correlation of mosquito abundances with daytime length 4 to 5 weeks prior to capture (quantified by a Spearman rank order correlation of rS = 0.898) and with temperature during 2 weeks prior to capture (rS = 0.870). Maximal negative correlations were found for wind speed averaged over 3 week prior to capture (rS = −0.621). Cx. pipiens/restuans population dynamics was predicted by integrating the CCM results in Poisson regression models. They were used to simulate the average seasonal cycle of the mosquito abundance. Verification with observations resulted in a correlation of rS = 0.899 for daily and rS = 0.917 for weekly data. Applying the optimized models to the entire 20-years time series also resulted in a suitable fit with rS = 0.876 for daily and rS = 0.899 for weekly data. Conclusions The study demonstrates the application of interval lagged weather data to predict mosquito abundances with a feasible accuracy, especially when related to weekly Cx. pipiens

  14. Modeling the impact of variable climatic factors on the crossover of Culex restauns and Culex pipiens (Diptera: culicidae), vectors of West Nile virus in Illinois.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Kenneth E; Novak, Robert J; Lampman, Richard L; Gu, Weidong

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to model the impact of temperature on the timing of the seasonal shift in relative proportion of Culex restuans Theobald and Culex pipiens L. in Illinois. The temporal pattern of West Nile virus (WNV) and St. Louis encephalitis virus transmission in the midwest exhibits a late summer to early fall peak in activity, which parallels the temporal increase in the abundance of Cx. pipiens. The daily number of egg rafts oviposited by each species has been monitored at multiple surveillance sites in Urbana-Champaign in central Illinois for more than 13 years. The time when the two Culex species are in equal abundance (crossover) varies considerably from year to year. Our investigation of several thermal measures indicated that this variation was related in large part to climatic conditions with warmer (cooler) temperatures correlated to earlier (later) crossover dates. Models based on degree days and the number of days in which the daily maximum temperature exceeded an upper temperature threshold explained more than 60% of the variance in crossover dates. In contrast, models based on the number of days in which the daily minimum temperature exceeded a lower temperature threshold explained no more than 52% of the variance. An evaluation of these models demonstrated that they provide relatively simple and accurate estimates of crossover date from daily temperature data, a necessary component for developing an overall climatic index for the risk of WNV transmission in Illinois.

  15. Solid-state NMR reveals differential carbohydrate utilization in diapausing Culex pipiens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, James; Singh, Jugeshwar; Kim, Sungshil; Hockaday, William C.; Sim, Cheolho; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-11-01

    Culex pipiens is the mosquito that vectors West Nile Virus and other human-pathogenic flavivruses in North America. In response to shortened day length and lower temperatures, female Cx. pipiense prepares for the diapause by actively feeding on carbohydrates to increase the biosynthesis of glycogen and lipid to store energy for overwintering. The effect of feeding different carbohydrates on glycogen and lipid biosynthesis in diapausing mosquitoes was investigated in vivo using 13C solid-state NMR. Diapause-destined adult females and nondiapausing counterparts after adult eclosion were fed with three different carbohydrate sources for 7 days: 1) 10% sucrose, 2) 10% D-[13C6]glucose, and 3) 1% D-[13C6]glucose co-provisioned with 10% sucrose. NMR measurements show that sucrose and glucose are metabolized differently in diapausing mosquitoes. Mosquitoes fed on sucrose primarily accumulate glycogen with increased branching structures, but less of lipids. In contrast, mosquitoes fed exclusively on glucose show accumulation of both glycogen and lipid with increased aliphatic chain length. Glucose is exclusively metabolized for the biosynthesis of triacylglyceride when mosquitoes were co-fed with sucrose. Our findings provide novel insights into the insect carbohydrate metabolism that governs glycogen and lipid biosynthesis during diapause, which is fundamental for the insect survival during inimical environments.

  16. Effect of chlorfenapyr on cypermethrin-resistant Culex pipiens pallens Coq mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, J Z; Li, Q F; Huang, J B; Gao, J F

    2015-03-01

    Chlorfenapyr is a promising pyrrole insecticide with a unique mechanism of action that does not confer cross-resistance to neurotoxic insecticides. The effect of chlorfenapyr on pyrethorid-resistant Culex pipiens pallens Coq (Diptera: Culicidae) has not been fully investigated under laboratory conditions. In this study, cypermethrin-resistant C. p. pallens exhibited 376.79-fold and 395.40-fold increase in resistance to cypermethrin compared with susceptible strains after exposure for 24 and 48h, respectively. Larvae and adults were tested for susceptibility using dipping, topical, and impregnated paper methods as recommended by the WHO. No cross-resistance to chlorfenapyr was found. Increased mortality was apparent between 48 and 72h, indicating a slow rate of toxic activity. Synergism experiments with piperonyl butoxide (PBO) showed an antagonistic effect on chlorfenapyr toxicity. Mixtures of chlorfenapyr and cypermethrin could therefore provide additional benefits over either insecticide used alone. Mixtures of 5ng/ml chlorfenapyr and 500ng/ml cypermethrin exhibited a slight synergistic effect on cypermethrin-resistant mosquitoes (3.33, 6.84 and 2.34% after 24, 48 and 72h exposure, respectively. This activity was lost when the chlorfenapyr concentration was increased to 10 or 20ng/ml. Chlorfenapyr showed quite good results for pyrethroid-resistant C. p. pallens, and could improve public health by reducing the occurrence of mosquito bites and subsequently protecting against transmission of lymphatic filariasis and Japanese encephalitis.

  17. Larvicidal activity of extracts of Ginkgo biloba exocarp for three different strains of Culex pipiens pallens.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lixin; Dong, Huiqin; Guo, Chongxia; Qian, Jin; Sun, Jing; Ma, Lei; Zhu, Changliang

    2006-03-01

    Ethanolic extracts from the Ginkgo biloba L. exocarp from the Chinese ginkgo were assayed against larvae of three strains of Culex pipiens pallens Coquillett. The chemical compositions were detected using a Hewlett-Packard 6890/5973 mass spectrometric detector. The larvicidal bioassay was carried out according to the recommendations of the World Health Organization. The analysis of the essential oil of ginkgo exocarp showed that its major components are ginkgo acid (85.3%) and ginkgo phenolic (5.69%). The larvicidal bioassay showed that extracts of ginkgo exocarp have LC50 of 18.6, 12.7, and 25.0 mg/liter for deltamethrin-susceptible, deltamethrin-resistant, and field strains, respectively. The acute toxicity concentrations of the ginkgo extracts that killed 50% (LD50) of Wistar rats within 2 wk and young carp within 96 h were 4947.2 mg/kg and 557.9 mg/liter, respectively. These results are promising in creating new, effective, and affordable approaches to mosquito control.

  18. Solid-state NMR reveals differential carbohydrate utilization in diapausing Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Chang, James; Singh, Jugeshwar; Kim, Sungshil; Hockaday, William C.; Sim, Cheolho; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Culex pipiens is the mosquito that vectors West Nile Virus and other human-pathogenic flavivruses in North America. In response to shortened day length and lower temperatures, female Cx. pipiense prepares for the diapause by actively feeding on carbohydrates to increase the biosynthesis of glycogen and lipid to store energy for overwintering. The effect of feeding different carbohydrates on glycogen and lipid biosynthesis in diapausing mosquitoes was investigated in vivo using 13C solid-state NMR. Diapause-destined adult females and nondiapausing counterparts after adult eclosion were fed with three different carbohydrate sources for 7 days: 1) 10% sucrose, 2) 10% D-[13C6]glucose, and 3) 1% D-[13C6]glucose co-provisioned with 10% sucrose. NMR measurements show that sucrose and glucose are metabolized differently in diapausing mosquitoes. Mosquitoes fed on sucrose primarily accumulate glycogen with increased branching structures, but less of lipids. In contrast, mosquitoes fed exclusively on glucose show accumulation of both glycogen and lipid with increased aliphatic chain length. Glucose is exclusively metabolized for the biosynthesis of triacylglyceride when mosquitoes were co-fed with sucrose. Our findings provide novel insights into the insect carbohydrate metabolism that governs glycogen and lipid biosynthesis during diapause, which is fundamental for the insect survival during inimical environments. PMID:27853281

  19. West Nile Virus Infection Alters Midgut Gene Expression in Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Smartt, Chelsea T.; Richards, Stephanie L.; Anderson, Sheri L.; Erickson, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in gene expression in the midgut of female Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus exposed to blood meals containing 6.8 logs plaque-forming units/mL of West Nile virus (WNV) were studied by fluorescent differential display. Twenty-six different cDNAs exhibited reproducible differences after feeding on infected blood. Of these, 21 cDNAs showed an increase in expression, and 5 showed a decrease in expression as a result of WNV presence in the blood meal. GenBank database searches showed that one clone with increased expression, CQ G12A2, shares 94% identity with a leucine-rich repeat-containing protein from Cx. p. quinquefasciatus and 32% identity to Toll-like receptors from Aedes aegypti. We present the first cDNA clone isolated from female Cx. p. quinquefasciatus midgut tissue whose expression changes on exposure to WNV. This cDNA represents a mosquito gene that is an excellent candidate for interacting with WNV in Cx. p. quinquefasciatus and may play a role in disease transmission. PMID:19635880

  20. The duration of egg, larval and pupal stages of Culex pipiens fatigans in Rangoon, Burma*

    PubMed Central

    de Meillon, Botha; Sebastian, Anthony; Khan, Z. H.

    1967-01-01

    Laboratory experiments to determine the duration of the immature stages of Culex pipiens fatigans were carried out because such information is important from the point of view of control by larvicides. At a temperature of 25.1°C±0.7°C the mean incubation period is 27.11±0.57 hours. Females spend a longer time in the pupal stage than males (34.16±0.74 hours and 32.95±0.75 hours, respectively, at 28.6°C±0.8°C; there is no 24-hour pupating or emerging rhythm. The duration of larval life is longer for the female (135.3±4.4 hours) than for the male (118.4±2.4 hours). Larvae that take a long time to pupate also take a long time to emerge. Withholding of food for a few hours from first-stage larvae increases the duration of larval life but does not affect that of pupal life. These observations on the differences between the sexes in the duration of larval and pupal life are in agreement with observations made on Aedes aegypti in Uganda. PMID:4227199

  1. Multiple duplications of the rare ace-1 mutation F290V in Culex pipiens natural populations.

    PubMed

    Alout, Haoués; Labbé, Pierrick; Berthomieu, Arnaud; Pasteur, Nicole; Weill, Mylène

    2009-12-01

    Two amino acid substitutions in acetylcholinesterase 1 (AChE1), G119S and F290V, are responsible for resistance to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides in Culex pipiens mosquitoes. These mutations generate very different levels of insensitivity to insecticide inhibitors. We described here a biochemical method that rapidly identifies AChE1 variants (susceptible, G119S and F290V, named S, R and V, respectively) present in individual mosquitoes. We investigated the frequency of AChE1 phenotypes in 41 field samples collected around the Mediterranean Sea. F290V substitution was found only in 15 samples and at low frequency, whereas G119S was highly spread in all samples. However, seven V distinct alleles were identified whereas only one R allele was present. The [V] enzymatic phenotype was never observed alone, and the V allele was always found associated with the susceptible and/or G119S AChE1 ([VS], [VR] or [VRS] phenotypes). Furthermore, we showed the presence of duplicated alleles, associating a susceptible and a V copy of the ace-1 gene, in most individuals analyzed for its presence. Evolutionary forces driving the large number of F290V ace-1 alleles and their low frequency in Mediterranean countries are discussed.

  2. Insecticide resistance in Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes from La Réunion Island.

    PubMed

    Tantely, Michaël Luciano; Tortosa, Pablo; Alout, Haoues; Berticat, Claire; Berthomieu, Arnaud; Rutee, Abdoul; Dehecq, Jean-Sébastien; Makoundou, Patrick; Labbé, Pierrick; Pasteur, Nicole; Weill, Mylène

    2010-04-01

    Resistance to insecticides was monitored on Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus mosquitoes collected in twelve localities of La Réunion, a geographically isolated island of the Indian Ocean. This mosquito is of medical concern in the region as a known vector for filariasis and a potential vector for West Nile and Rift Valley Fever viruses. Our bioassays indicated the presence of resistance to all tested insecticides, i.e. organochlorides, organophosphates and pyrethroids. A molecular investigation revealed a higher frequency of resistance genes in the coastal areas compared to elevated rural sites, probably reflecting the different nature of insecticide pressures together with the genetic cost of resistance alleles. A simple molecular test was developed to detect Rdl allele, encoding a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor resistant to dieldrin. Unexpectedly high Rdl frequencies were recorded over the whole island, despite this insecticide having been banned for over 15 years. This resistant allele was also detected for the first time in two samples of Aedes albopictus, a species recently involved in severe Chikungunya epidemics on the island. Rdl selection in these two mosquito species discloses current insecticide pressures in urban areas, from unknown origins, that should be taken into account to develop vector control strategies.

  3. Studies on the Mechanism of DDT Resistance in Culex pipiens fatigans

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    The mechanism of DDT resistance in Culex pipiens fatigans is poorly understood. Earlier studies indicated that the dehydrochlorination of DDT does not explain resistance in this species. Studies on the role of lipids as a mechanism of resistance included the estimation of lipid content and the determination of the proportions of different classes of lipids in the larvae of susceptible and resistant strains. There was no evidence of any correlation between the lipid content and DDT resistance in this species and the proportions of neutral lipids, phospholipids and fatty acids of different strains did not indicate any consistent correlation with DDT resistance. Within one strain, the larvae containing the higher amount of lipids were able to resist better the toxic effect of DDT. Analysis of fatty acids of the larvae that survived and died as a result of treatment with DDT did not reveal any difference. Neither p,p′-DDT nor o,p′-DDT at sublethal concentration affected the lipids of the larvae of susceptible and resistant strains. PMID:5310957

  4. Effects of sublethal doses of DDT on the reproduction and susceptibility of Culex pipiens L.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, T M; Brown, A W

    1968-01-01

    The effect of non-selecting doses of DDT on the induction of resistance was investigated in the house mosquito, Culex pipiens. Sublethal doses of DDT were applied to the adults in each generation, at levels which just fell short of causing mortality in these adults. A susceptible strain, a DDT-resistant strain, and a slightly DDT-tolerant strain were so treated for 6-7 generations.It was found that the treatment initially caused approximately 25% of the ovaries to degenerate, and reduced the proportion of females that fed and oviposited. This reduction in biotic potential became aggravated in successive generations of the DDT-resistant and DDT-tolerant strains, which failed to show any material increase in resistance level. In the susceptible strain, however, the biotic potential became enhanced, and considerable resistance was developed. It was concluded that the increase of resistance in this strain was due to hidden selection, of eggs in the ovary, and of females which failed to oviposit.

  5. Artificial Selection for Different Host Preferences in Culex pipiens pallens (Diptera: Culicidae) Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Li, Chun-Xiao; Dong, Yan-De; Xue, Rui-De; Zhao, Tong-Yan

    2015-09-01

    Most mosquito species display host preferences that are a crucial determinant of the transmission rate of mosquito-borne pathogens. Although a transgenic approach, based on driving genes for zoophily into vector populations, has been advocated as a malaria control strategy by the World Health Organization since 1982, the genes involved in mosquito host choice remain poorly understood. Culex pipiens pallens Coquillet mosquitoes were artificially selected for two different host preferences in a specially designed experimental enclosure. Of 3,035 mosquitoes obtained from larvae and pupae collected from the wild (the F0 generation), 27% preferentially fed on pigeons and 16% fed on mice. Following artificial selection for these host preferences over successive generations, the percentage of mosquitoes that preferred to feed on pigeons or mice gradually increased, eventually stabilizing at ∼55 and 34%, respectively, after the sixth generation. Intergenerational differences in host preferences were significant (P < 0.001). Furthermore, differences in host preferences between mosquitoes selected to prefer pigeons and those selected to prefer mice were both significant and consistent over almost six generations.

  6. Multi-character approach reveals a discordant pattern of phenotypic variation during ontogeny in Culex pipiens biotypes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Krtinić, B; Ludoški, J; Milankov, V

    2015-02-01

    Culex (Culex) pipiens s.l. (Diptera: Culicidae) comprises two distinct biotypes, pipiens ('rural') and molestus ('urban'), both of which are thought to have differing capacities due to different host preferences. To better understand West Nile encephalitis epidemiology and improve risk assessment, local distinction between these forms is essential. This study assesses phenotypic variation at larval and adult stages of 'urban' and 'rural' biotypes of the species by complementary use of meristic, univariate and multivariate traits analyzed by traditional and geometric morphometrics. Third- and fourth-instar larvae from a broad area of the city of Novi Sad (Serbia) were collected and reared in the laboratory. After adult eclosion, the sex of each larva was recorded based on the sex of the corresponding adult. Examination of the association between variations of larval traits revealed contrasting variations regarding pecten spines vs. siphonal size and siphonal shape in the 'rural' biotype. Siphons of larvae collected in marshes and forest ecosystems outside urban areas were found to be the largest, but possessed the smallest number of pecten spines. In addition, statistically significant female-biased sexual dimorphism was observed in siphonal size, wing size and wing shape. Finally, we propose that an integrative approach is essential in delimitation of Cx. pipiens s.l. biotypes, since their differentiation was not possible based solely on larval and adult traits. Our findings shed light on the phenotypic plasticity important for population persistence in the changing environment of these medically important taxa.

  7. Hypervariable prophage WO sequences describe an unexpected high number of Wolbachia variants in the mosquito Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Duron, Olivier; Fort, Philippe; Weill, Mylène

    2005-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited endosymbiotic bacteria that infect many arthropod species and may induce cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) resulting in abortive embryonic development. Among all the described host species, mosquitoes of the Culex pipiens complex display the highest variability of CI crossing types. Paradoxically, searches for polymorphism in Wolbachia infecting strains and field populations hitherto failed or produced very few markers. Here, we show that an abundant source of the long-sought polymorphism lies in WO prophage sequences present in multiple copies dispersed in the genome of Wolbachia infecting C. pipiens (wPip). We identified up to 66 different Wolbachia variants in C. pipiens strains and field populations and no occurrence of superinfection was observed. At least 49 different Wolbachia occurred in Southern Europe C. pipiens populations, and up to 10 different Wolbachia were even detected in a single population. This is in sharp contrast with North African and Cretan samples, which exhibited only six variants. The WO polymorphism appeared stable over time, and was exclusively transferred maternally. Interestingly, we found that the CI pattern previously described correlates with the variability of Gp15, a prophage protein similar to a bacterial virulence protein. WO prophage sequences thus represent variable markers that now open routes for approaching the molecular basis of CI, the host effects, the structure and dynamics of Wolbachia populations. PMID:16615218

  8. Insecticidal activity of isobutylamides derived from Piper nigrum against adult of two mosquito species, Culex pipiens pallens and Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Park, Il-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    The insecticidal activity of Piper nigrum fruit-derived piperidine alkaloid (piperine) and N-isobutylamide alkaloids (pellitorine, guineensine, pipercide and retrofractamide A) against female adults of Culex pipiens pallens and Aedes aegypti was examined. On the basis of 24-h LD(50) values, the compound most toxic to female C. pipiens pallens was pellitorine (0.4 µg/♀) followed by guineensine (1.9 µg/♀), retrofractamide A (2.4 µg/♀) and pipercide (3.2 µg/♀). LD(50) value of chlorpyrifos was 0.03 µg/♀. Against female A. aegypti, the insecticidal activity was more pronounced in pellitorine (0.17 µg/♀) than in retrofractamide A (1.5 µg/♀), guineensine (1.7 µg/♀), and pipercide (2.0 µg/♀). LD(50) value of chlorpyrifos was 0.0014 µg/♀.

  9. Decapitation Improves Detection of Wolbachia pipientis (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae) in Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) Mosquitoes by the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    BECKMANN, J. F.; FALLON, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is often used to detect microorganisms, pathogens, or both, including the reproductive parasite Wolbachia pipientis (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae), in mosquitoes. Natural populations of Culex pipiens L. (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes are infected with one or more strains of W. pipientis, and crosses between mosquitoes harboring different Wolbachia strains provide one of the best-known examples of cytoplasmic incompatibililty (CI). When we used PCR to monitor Wolbachia in the Buckeye strain of Culex pipiens, and in a Wolbachia-cured sister colony obtained by tetracycline treatment, we noted false negative PCR reactions with DNA samples from infected mosquitoes; these results were inconsistent with direct microscopic observation of Wolbachia-like particles in gonads dissected from mosquitoes in the same population. Assays with diluted template often improved detection of positive samples, suggesting that DNA prepared from whole mosquitoes contained an inhibitor of the PCR reaction. We reconciled discrepancies between PCR and microscopy by systematic measurement of the PCR reaction in the presence of an internal standard. Mosquito decapitation before DNA extraction restored the reliability of the PCR reaction, allowing accurate determination of Wolbachia infection status in infected and tetracycline-cured mosquito populations, consistent with microscopic examination. Using PCR primers based on the Tr1 gene, we confirmed that the Wolbachia infection in the Buckeye strain of Culex pipiens belongs to the genotype designated wPip1. Finally, to explore more widely the distribution of PCR inhibitors, we demonstrated that DNA isolated from the cricket, Acheta domesticus (L.); the beetle, Tenebrio molitor L.; the honey bee, Apis mellifera L.; and the mosquito, Anopheles punctipennis Say also contained PCR inhibitors. These results underscore the importance of measuring the presence of inhibitors in PCR templates by using a known positive

  10. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Key Gene Expression Differences between Diapausing and Non-Diapausing Adults of Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Kang, David S.; Denlinger, David L.; Sim, Cheolho

    2016-01-01

    Diapause is a critical eco-physiological adaptation for winter survival in the West Nile Virus vector, Culex pipiens, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms that distinguish diapause from non-diapause in this important mosquito species. We used Illumina RNA-seq to simultaneously identify and quantify relative transcript levels in diapausing and non-diapausing adult females. Among 65,623,095 read pairs, we identified 41 genes with significantly different transcript abundances between these two groups. Transcriptome divergences between these two phenotypes include genes related to juvenile hormone synthesis, anaerobic metabolism, innate immunity and cold tolerance. PMID:27128578

  11. MiR-278-3p regulates pyrethroid resistance in Culex pipiens pallens

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Zhentao; Lv, Yuan; Wang, Weijie; Guo, Qin; Zou, Feifei; Hu, Shengli; Fang, Fujin; Tian, Mengmeng; Liu, Bingqian; Liu, Xianmiao; Ma, Kai; Ma, Lei; Zhou, Dan; Zhang, Donghui; Sun, Yan; Shen, Bo; Zhu, Changliang

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression and biological processes including embryonic development, innate immunity and infection in many species. Emerging evidence indicates that miRNAs are involved in drug resistance. However, little is known about the relationship between the miRNAs and insecticide resistance in mosquitos. Here, we reported that conserved miR-278-3p and its target gene are critical for pyrethroid resistance in Culex pipiens pallens. We found that CYP6AG11 is the target of miR-278-3p, through bioinformatic analysis and experimental verification. The expression level of miR-278-3p was lower, whereas the level of CYP6AG11 was higher in deltamethrin-resistant strain, which were detected using qRT-PCR. We also found that CYP6AG11 was regulated by miR-278-3p via a specific target site with the 3′UTR by luciferase reporter assay. In addition, overexpression of CYP6AG11 in the mosquito C6/36 cells showed better prolification than the cells with empty vector when treated by deltamethrin at different concentrations. Moreover, the overexpression of miR-278-3p through microinjection led to a significant reduction in the survival rate, and the level of CYP6AG11 was simultaneously reduced. These results indicated that miR-278-3p could regulate the pyrethroid resistance through CYP6AG11. PMID:25420996

  12. High chlorpyrifos resistance in Culex pipiens mosquitoes: strong synergy between resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Alout, H; Labbé, P; Berthomieu, A; Makoundou, P; Fort, P; Pasteur, N; Weill, M

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the genetic determinism of high chlorpyrifos resistance (HCR), a phenotype first described in 1999 in Culex pipiens mosquitoes surviving chlorpyrifos doses ⩾1 mg l−1 and more recently found in field samples from Tunisia, Israel or Indian Ocean islands. Through chlorpyrifos selection, we selected several HCR strains that displayed over 10 000-fold resistance. All strains were homozygous for resistant alleles at two main loci: the ace-1 gene, with the resistant ace-1R allele expressing the insensitive G119S acetylcholinesterase, and a resistant allele of an unknown gene (named T) linked to the sex and ace-2 genes. We constructed a strain carrying only the T-resistant allele and studied its resistance characteristics. By crossing this strain with strains harboring different alleles at the ace-1 locus, we showed that the resistant ace-1R and the T alleles act in strong synergy, as they elicited a resistance 100 times higher than expected from a simple multiplicative effect. This effect was specific to chlorpyrifos and parathion and was not affected by synergists. We also examined how HCR was expressed in strains carrying other ace-1-resistant alleles, such as ace-1V or the duplicated ace-1D allele, currently spreading worldwide. We identified two major parameters that influenced the level of resistance: the number and the nature of the ace-1-resistant alleles and the number of T alleles. Our data fit a model that predicts that the T allele acts by decreasing chlorpyrifos concentration in the compartment targeted in insects. PMID:26463842

  13. "Singing in the Tube"--audiovisual assay of plant oil repellent activity against mosquitoes (Culex pipiens).

    PubMed

    Adams, Temitope F; Wongchai, Chatchawal; Chaidee, Anchalee; Pfeiffer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Plant essential oils have been suggested as a promising alternative to the established mosquito repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide). Searching for an assay with generally available equipment, we designed a new audiovisual assay of repellent activity against mosquitoes "Singing in the Tube," testing single mosquitoes in Drosophila cultivation tubes. Statistics with regression analysis should compensate for limitations of simple hardware. The assay was established with female Culex pipiens mosquitoes in 60 experiments, 120-h audio recording, and 2580 estimations of the distance between mosquito sitting position and the chemical. Correlations between parameters of sitting position, flight activity pattern, and flight tone spectrum were analyzed. Regression analysis of psycho-acoustic data of audio files (dB[A]) used a squared and modified sinus function determining wing beat frequency WBF ± SD (357 ± 47 Hz). Application of logistic regression defined the repelling velocity constant. The repelling velocity constant showed a decreasing order of efficiency of plant essential oils: rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), citronella (Cymbopogon nardus), tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia), clove (Syzygium aromaticum), lemon (Citrus limon), patchouli (Pogostemon cablin), DEET, cedar wood (Cedrus atlantica). In conclusion, we suggest (1) disease vector control (e.g., impregnation of bed nets) by eight plant essential oils with repelling velocity superior to DEET, (2) simple mosquito repellency testing in Drosophila cultivation tubes, (3) automated approaches and room surveillance by generally available audio equipment (dB[A]: ISO standard 226), and (4) quantification of repellent activity by parameters of the audiovisual assay defined by correlation and regression analyses.

  14. Vector competence of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) for West Nile virus isolates from Florida

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Stephanie L.; Anderson, Sheri L.; Lord, Cynthia C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess vector competence (infection, dissemination and transmission) of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus for Florida (FL) West Nile virus (WNV) isolates. METHODS West Nile virus isolates (WN-FL-03: NY99 genotype; WN-FL-05-558, WN-FL-05-2186, WN-FL-05-510: WN02 genotype) collected from different regions of FL were used for vector competence experiments in Cx. p. quinquefasciatus from Alachua County and Indian River County in FL. Mosquitoes from both colonies were fed blood containing 7.9 ± 0.2 log10 plaque-forming units WNV/ml ± SE and incubated at 28 °C for 14 days. Vector competence, including rates of infection, dissemination, and transmission, was compared between colonies for WN-FL-03 using chi-squared. Virus titres in bodies, legs and saliva were compared using ANOVA. Daily measurements of in vitro replication of WNV isolates were evaluated in Vero cells so that a standardised virus dose for each isolate could be delivered to mosquitoes. RESULTS Infection and dissemination rates were high (≥95%) and not affected by isolate or colony (infection, P = 0.679; dissemination, P = 0.799). Transmission rates were low (≤20%), detected in one colony and affected by isolate (P = 0.008). Body and leg titres differed between isolates (body titre, P = 0.031; leg titre, P = 0.044) and colonies (body titre, P = 0.001; leg titre, P = 0.013) while saliva titre did not differ between isolates (P = 0.462). CONCLUSIONS Variation in vector competence of mosquito populations may be attributed, in part, to exposures to WNV with genetic differences leading to different rates of replication in mosquitoes. Evaluation of vector competence for different WNV isolates may help us understand vector–virus interactions and, hence, the role of vectors in complex virus transmission cycles in nature. PMID:24898274

  15. High chlorpyrifos resistance in Culex pipiens mosquitoes: strong synergy between resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Alout, H; Labbé, P; Berthomieu, A; Makoundou, P; Fort, P; Pasteur, N; Weill, M

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the genetic determinism of high chlorpyrifos resistance (HCR), a phenotype first described in 1999 in Culex pipiens mosquitoes surviving chlorpyrifos doses ⩾1 mg l(-1) and more recently found in field samples from Tunisia, Israel or Indian Ocean islands. Through chlorpyrifos selection, we selected several HCR strains that displayed over 10 000-fold resistance. All strains were homozygous for resistant alleles at two main loci: the ace-1 gene, with the resistant ace-1(R) allele expressing the insensitive G119S acetylcholinesterase, and a resistant allele of an unknown gene (named T) linked to the sex and ace-2 genes. We constructed a strain carrying only the T-resistant allele and studied its resistance characteristics. By crossing this strain with strains harboring different alleles at the ace-1 locus, we showed that the resistant ace-1(R) and the T alleles act in strong synergy, as they elicited a resistance 100 times higher than expected from a simple multiplicative effect. This effect was specific to chlorpyrifos and parathion and was not affected by synergists. We also examined how HCR was expressed in strains carrying other ace-1-resistant alleles, such as ace-1(V) or the duplicated ace-1(D) allele, currently spreading worldwide. We identified two major parameters that influenced the level of resistance: the number and the nature of the ace-1-resistant alleles and the number of T alleles. Our data fit a model that predicts that the T allele acts by decreasing chlorpyrifos concentration in the compartment targeted in insects.

  16. Evaluation of Some Plant Fruit Extracts for the Control of West Nile Virus Vector Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Koc, Samed; Evren, Ozay Hasan; Cetin, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The extracts of different parts of plants were found very effective against various pests. The aim of this research was to determine the insecticidal activity of fruit methanol extracts obtained from Melia azedarach (Meliaceae), Phoenix theophrasti (Arecaceae), Styphnolobium japonicum (Fabaceae) and Pyracantha coccinea (Rosaceae) against the larvae of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae). Methods: The fruits of test plants were collected from the Campus of Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey in 2013. A series of concentrations of the extracts ranging from 62.5–1000 ppm were tested against second instar larvae. Results: Only the extracts of Me. azedarach and Ph. theoprasti showed significant larvicidal activity against Cx. pipiens and the LC50 values of these extracts were found to be 169.48 and 220.60 ppm, respectively. This is the first research investigating the insecticidal or larvicidal activity of Ph. theophrasti, St. japonicum and Py. coccinea extracts on mosquitoes. Conclusion: The methanol extract of fruits of Me. azedarach and Ph. theophrasti showed significantly higher larvicidal activity against Cx. pipiens. PMID:28032112

  17. Potential of biologically active plant oils to control mosquito larvae (Culex pipiens, Diptera: Culicidae) from an Egyptian locality.

    PubMed

    Khater, Hanem Fathy; Shalaby, Afaf Abdel-Salam

    2008-01-01

    The insecticidal effect of six commercially available plant oils was tested against 4th larval instars of Culex pipiens. Larvae were originally collected from Meit El-Attar, Qalyubia Governorate, Egypt, and then reared in the laboratory until F1 generation. The LC50 values were 32.42, 47.17, 71.37, 83.36, 86.06, and 152.94 ppm for fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-grecum), earth almond (Cyperus esculentus), mustard (Brassica compestris), olibanum (Boswellia serrata), rocket (Eruca sativa), and parsley (Carum ptroselinum), respectively. The tested oils altered some biological aspects of C. pipiens, for instance, developmental periods, pupation rates, and adult emergences. The lowest concentrations of olibanum and fenugreek oils caused remarkable prolongation of larval and pupal durations. Data also showed that the increase of concentrations was directly proportional to reduction in pupation rates and adult emergences. Remarkable decrease in pupation rate was achieved by mustard oil at 1000 ppm. Adult emergence was suppressed by earth almond and fenugreek oils at 25 ppm. In addition, the tested plant oils exhibited various morphological abnormalities on larvae, pupae, and adult stages. Consequently, fenugreek was the most potent oil and the major cause of malformation of both larval and pupal stages. Potency of the applied plant oils provided an excellent potential for controlling C. pipiens.

  18. Evidence for facilitation of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) life history traits by the nonnative invasive shrub Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii).

    PubMed

    Shewhart, Lauren; McEwan, Ryan W; Benbow, M Eric

    2014-12-01

    Mosquitoes are one of the most globally important insect pests and vectors of human pathogens, and their populations may be facilitated or inhibited by anthropogenic environmental change. Invasive plant species are an important management concern and environmental modifier in many ecosystems; these plant invasions have the potential to exacerbate or diminish mosquito populations. The purpose of this study was to assess potential effects of a highly invasive plant, Lonicera maackii, on a common mosquito species Culex pipiens L., which is an important pathogen vector in the United States. Three microcosm assays were conducted to determine the responses of C. pipiens life history attributes of larval survivorship, growth, and pupation when subjected to leachate from two native plant leaves (Platanus occidentalis and Acer saccharum) and both the leaves and flowers of L. maackii. Only C. pipiens larvae exposed to L. maackii leachate pupated and emerged as adults. However, in all three assays there were statistically significant differences in survivorship and body size change among treatments, and in each assay the highest survivorship and maximum larval size was found in the L. maackii leachate treatments, suggesting positive effects on certain life history traits. This study is one of the first to demonstrate the potential facilitative effect of this invasive plant species on an insect vector and suggests that plant invasion could have positive feedbacks into mosquito population dynamics and, ultimately, human disease.

  19. Survivorship and fecundity of Culex pipiens pallens feeding on flowering plants and seed pods with differential preferences.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bao-Ting; Ding, Yan-Mei; Mo, Xiao-Chang; Liu, Ning; Li, Hong-Jie; Mo, Jian-Chu

    2016-03-01

    Adult mosquitoes rely on ingestion of sugar from plants to survive, swarm and mate. Culex pipiens pallens Coguillett is the primary vector of lymphatic filariasis and epidemic encephalitis. Little is known about the effect of feeding on different sugar sources on the survivorship and fecundity of Cx. pipiens pallens. In the present study, newly emerged mosquitoes were exposed to several flowering plant and seed pod species with different olfactory preferences, and the survival times of mosquitoes exposed to these sugar sources were determined. The proportions of mosquitoes that ingested sugar from host plants were investigated by cold anthrone tests. The numbers of eggs per egg raft laid by mosquitoes were compared when they were provided with different sugar sources and one blood meal. The results revealed that feeding on different kinds of sugar sources significantly affected female and male mosquitoes' survival times. Cold anthrone tests indicated that the proportions of sugar-positive mosquitoes from different nutritional regimes within 24h corresponded to the preference rankings of Cx. pipiens pallens to these sugar sources, and rapid declines in the proportions of surviving individuals might be attributed to their insufficient ingestion of sugar from nutritional regimes. Feeding on different sugar sources strongly affected the proportions of engorged mosquitoes, and females that had fed on their preferred sugar sources laid more eggs than mosquitoes provided with less preferred sugar sources. The results would provide insights in developing mosquito control strategies that target the sugar feeding behavior of mosquitoes.

  20. Upregulation of two actin genes and redistribution of actin during diapause and cold stress in the northern house mosquito, Culex pipiens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two actin genes cloned from Culex pipiens L. are upregulated during adult diapause. Though actins 1 and 2 were expressed throughout diapause, both genes were most highly expressed early in diapause. These changes in gene expression were accompanied by a conspicuous redistribution of polymerized acti...

  1. Host-feeding patterns of Culex pipiens and other potential mosquito vectors (Diptera: Culicidae) of West Nile virus (Flaviviridae) collected in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Osório, Hugo Costa; Zé-Zé, Líbia; Alves, Maria João

    2012-05-01

    The host blood-feeding patterns of mosquito vectors affects the likelihood of human exposure to zoonotic pathogens, including West Nile Virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, WNV). In Portugal, data are unavailable regarding the blood-feeding habits of common mosquito species, including Culex pipiens L., considered the primary vector of WNV to humans. The sources of bloodmeals in 203 blood-fed mosquitoes of nine species collected from June 2007 to November 2010 in 34 Portuguese counties were analyzed by sequencing cytochrome-b partial fragments. Cx. pipiens was the most common species collected and successfully analyzed (n = 135/78). In addition, blood-fed females of the following species were analyzed: Ochlerotatus caspius Pallas (n = 20), Culex theileri Theobald (n = 16), Anopheles maculipennis s.l. Meigen (n = 10), Culiseta longiareolata Macquart (n = 7), Aedes aegypti L. (n = 6), Culex perexiguus Theobald (n = 3), Culiseta annulata Schrank (n = 3), and Ochlerotatus detritus Haliday (n = 3). The Cx. pipiens mosquitoes fed predominantly on birds (n = 55/78, 70.5%), with a high diversity of avian species used as hosts, although human blood was identified in 18 specimens (18/78, 23.1%). No significant differences were found between the host-feeding patterns of blood-fed Cx. pipiens collected in residential and nonresidential habitats. The occurrence of human derived blood meals and the presence of a mix avian-human bloodmeal accordingly suggest this species as a potential vector of WNV. Therefore, in Portugal, Cx. pipiens may play a role both in the avian-to-avian enzootic WNV cycle and in the avian-to-mammal transmission. In this context, the identity of Cx. pipiens (considering the forms molestus and pipiens) and the potential consequence on feeding behavior and WNV transmission are discussed.

  2. A sex-linked Ace gene, not linked to insensitive acetylcholinesterase-mediated insecticide resistance in Culex pipiens.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, C A; Bourguet, D; Ascolillo, A; Rooker, S J; Garvey, C F; Hall, L M; Pasteur, N; Raymond, M

    1998-05-01

    An acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene, Ace.x, showing 93% identity of deduced amino acid sequence to Anopheles stephensi Ace has been cloned from a Culex pipiens strain homozygous for insensitive AChE (iAChE) mediated insecticide resistance. DNA sequence of genomic DNA clones identified exons 2-5. RFLP of six clones indicated four possible alleles. Linkage analysis located Ace.x to chromosome I, less than 0.8 centimorgans from the sex locus, whereas the locus conferring resistance was 2.0 centimorgans from plum-eye on chromosome II. Ace.1 coding for AChE1, which is associated with resistance, is therefore autosomal. We propose that Ace.x is the recently postulated Ace.2 coding for the biochemically distinct AChE2, which is not associated with resistance.

  3. Effect of incubation at overwintering temperatures on the replication of West Nile Virus in New York Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Dohm, D J; Turell, M J

    2001-05-01

    We examined the effect of simulated overwintering temperatures on West Nile (WN) virus replication in Culex pipiens L. derived from mosquitoes collected during the autumn 1999 WN epizootic in New York. The WN virus was a strain isolated from a dead crow also collected during this outbreak. Virus was recovered from most mosquitoes held exclusively at 26 degres C. In contrast, none of the mosquitoes held exclusively at the lower temperatures had detectable infections. When mosquitoes were transferred to 26 degrees C after being held at 10 degrees C for 21-42 d, infection and dissemination rates increased with increased incubation at 26 degrees C. Future studies involving the attempted isolation of WN virus from overwintering mosquitoes may benefit from holding the mosquitoes at 26 degrees C before testing for infectious virus.

  4. Wolbachia and cytoplasmic incompatibility in the California Culex pipiens mosquito species complex: parameter estimates and infection dynamics in natural populations.

    PubMed Central

    Rasgon, Jason L; Scott, Thomas W

    2003-01-01

    Before maternally inherited bacterial symbionts like Wolbachia, which cause cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI; reduced hatch rate) when infected males mate with uninfected females, can be used in a program to control vector-borne diseases it is essential to understand their dynamics of infection in natural arthropod vector populations. Our study had four goals: (1) quantify the number of Wolbachia strains circulating in the California Culex pipiens species complex, (2) investigate Wolbachia infection frequencies and distribution in natural California populations, (3) estimate the parameters that govern Wolbachia spread among Cx. pipiens under laboratory and field conditions, and (4) use these values to estimate equilibrium levels and compare predicted infection prevalence levels to those observed in nature. Strain-specific PCR, wsp gene sequencing, and crossing experiments indicated that a single Wolbachia strain infects Californian Cx. pipiens. Infection frequency was near or at fixation in all populations sampled for 2 years along a >1000-km north-south transect. The combined statewide infection frequency was 99.4%. Incompatible crosses were 100% sterile under laboratory and field conditions. Sterility decreased negligibly with male age in the laboratory. Infection had no significant effect on female fecundity under laboratory or field conditions. Vertical transmission was >99% in the laboratory and approximately 98.6% in the field. Using field data, models predicted that Wolbachia will spread to fixation if infection exceeds an unstable equilibrium point above 1.4%. Our estimates accurately predicted infection frequencies in natural populations. If certain technical hurdles can be overcome, our data indicate that Wolbachia can invade vector populations as part of an applied transgenic strategy for vector-borne disease reduction. PMID:14704183

  5. Culex pipiens, an Experimental Efficient Vector of West Nile and Rift Valley Fever Viruses in the Maghreb Region

    PubMed Central

    Amraoui, Fadila; Krida, Ghazi; Bouattour, Ali; Rhim, Adel; Daaboub, Jabeur; Harrat, Zoubir; Boubidi, Said-Chawki; Tijane, Mhamed; Sarih, Mhammed; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2012-01-01

    West Nile fever (WNF) and Rift Valley fever (RVF) are emerging diseases causing epidemics outside their natural range of distribution. West Nile virus (WNV) circulates widely and harmlessly in the old world among birds as amplifying hosts, and horses and humans as accidental dead-end hosts. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) re-emerges periodically in Africa causing massive outbreaks. In the Maghreb, eco-climatic and entomologic conditions are favourable for WNV and RVFV emergence. Both viruses are transmitted by mosquitoes belonging to the Culex pipiens complex. We evaluated the ability of different populations of Cx. pipiens from North Africa to transmit WNV and the avirulent RVFV Clone 13 strain. Mosquitoes collected in Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia during the summer 2010 were experimentally infected with WNV and RVFV Clone 13 strain at titers of 107.8 and 108.5 plaque forming units/mL, respectively. Disseminated infection and transmission rates were estimated 14–21 days following the exposure to the infectious blood-meal. We show that 14 days after exposure to WNV, all mosquito st developed a high disseminated infection and were able to excrete infectious saliva. However, only 69.2% of mosquito strains developed a disseminated infection with RVFV Clone 13 strain, and among them, 77.8% were able to deliver virus through saliva. Thus, Cx. pipiens from the Maghreb are efficient experimental vectors to transmit WNV and to a lesser extent, RVFV Clone 13 strain. The epidemiologic importance of our findings should be considered in the light of other parameters related to mosquito ecology and biology. PMID:22693557

  6. Culex pipiens, an experimental efficient vector of West Nile and Rift Valley fever viruses in the Maghreb region.

    PubMed

    Amraoui, Fadila; Krida, Ghazi; Bouattour, Ali; Rhim, Adel; Daaboub, Jabeur; Harrat, Zoubir; Boubidi, Said-Chawki; Tijane, Mhamed; Sarih, Mhammed; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2012-01-01

    West Nile fever (WNF) and Rift Valley fever (RVF) are emerging diseases causing epidemics outside their natural range of distribution. West Nile virus (WNV) circulates widely and harmlessly in the old world among birds as amplifying hosts, and horses and humans as accidental dead-end hosts. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) re-emerges periodically in Africa causing massive outbreaks. In the Maghreb, eco-climatic and entomologic conditions are favourable for WNV and RVFV emergence. Both viruses are transmitted by mosquitoes belonging to the Culex pipiens complex. We evaluated the ability of different populations of Cx. pipiens from North Africa to transmit WNV and the avirulent RVFV Clone 13 strain. Mosquitoes collected in Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia during the summer 2010 were experimentally infected with WNV and RVFV Clone 13 strain at titers of 10(7.8) and 10(8.5) plaque forming units/mL, respectively. Disseminated infection and transmission rates were estimated 14-21 days following the exposure to the infectious blood-meal. We show that 14 days after exposure to WNV, all mosquito st developed a high disseminated infection and were able to excrete infectious saliva. However, only 69.2% of mosquito strains developed a disseminated infection with RVFV Clone 13 strain, and among them, 77.8% were able to deliver virus through saliva. Thus, Cx. pipiens from the Maghreb are efficient experimental vectors to transmit WNV and to a lesser extent, RVFV Clone 13 strain. The epidemiologic importance of our findings should be considered in the light of other parameters related to mosquito ecology and biology.

  7. Preparation of Ecofriendly Formulations Containing Biologically Active Monoterpenes with Their Fumigant and Residual Toxicities against Adults of Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Taktak, Nehad E. M.; Awad, Osama M.; Elfiki, Souraya A.; Abou El-Ela, Nadia E.

    2016-01-01

    Different mixtures of monoterpenes (ketone, alcohol, and alkene) were loaded on paper discs and wax and their knockdown activities were evaluated against Culex pipiens adults. Some individual monoterpenes were also evaluated by residual toxicity technique. Citronella oil as a reference was also loaded separately or in combination with monoterpenes on paper discs and wax. The ketone monoterpenes mixture (camphor, menthone, carvone, and fenchone) on paper discs was the most active (KT50 = 17.20 min) followed by ketone monoterpenes with citronella oil (KT50 = 20.79 min) and citronella oil alone (KT50 = 28.72 min). Wax formulations proved that the ketone and alcohol (geraniol, thymol, and menthol) monoterpenes gave the most activity as knockdown (KT50 = 31.79 and 43.39 min, resp.). Alcohol monoterpenes formulation recorded KT50 = 43.39 min. Residual activity of tested individual monoterpenes reported that the menthol was more toxic than camphor and camphene. Generally, this study suggests that the monoterpenes have the properties, which make them used as eco-friendly compounds in the control programs of Cx. pipiens adult. The use of paper discs is more applicable than wax in the adulticidal formulations. PMID:27891154

  8. High Prevalence and Lineage Diversity of Avian Malaria in Wild Populations of Great Tits (Parus major) and Mosquitoes (Culex pipiens)

    PubMed Central

    Glaizot, Olivier; Fumagalli, Luca; Iritano, Katia; Lalubin, Fabrice; Van Rooyen, Juan; Christe, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Avian malaria studies have taken a prominent place in different aspects of evolutionary ecology. Despite a recent interest in the role of vectors within the complex interaction system of the malaria parasite, they have largely been ignored in most epidemiological studies. Epidemiology of the disease is however strongly related to the vector's ecology and behaviour, and there is a need for basic investigations to obtain a better picture of the natural associations between Plasmodium lineages, vector species and bird hosts. The aim of the present study was to identify the mosquito species involved in the transmission of the haemosporidian parasites Plasmodium spp. in two wild populations of breeding great tits (Parus major) in western Switzerland. Additionally, we compared Plasmodium lineages, based on mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b sequences, between the vertebrate and dipteran hosts, and evaluated the prevalence of the parasite in the mosquito populations. Plasmodium spp. were detected in Culex pipiens only, with an overall 6.6% prevalence. Among the six cytochrome b lineages of Plasmodium identified in the mosquitoes, three were also present in great tits. The results provide evidence for the first time that C. pipiens can act as a natural vector of avian malaria in Europe and yield baseline data for future research on the epidemiology of avian malaria in European countries. PMID:22506060

  9. High prevalence and lineage diversity of avian malaria in wild populations of great tits (Parus major) and mosquitoes (Culex pipiens).

    PubMed

    Glaizot, Olivier; Fumagalli, Luca; Iritano, Katia; Lalubin, Fabrice; Van Rooyen, Juan; Christe, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Avian malaria studies have taken a prominent place in different aspects of evolutionary ecology. Despite a recent interest in the role of vectors within the complex interaction system of the malaria parasite, they have largely been ignored in most epidemiological studies. Epidemiology of the disease is however strongly related to the vector's ecology and behaviour, and there is a need for basic investigations to obtain a better picture of the natural associations between Plasmodium lineages, vector species and bird hosts. The aim of the present study was to identify the mosquito species involved in the transmission of the haemosporidian parasites Plasmodium spp. in two wild populations of breeding great tits (Parus major) in western Switzerland. Additionally, we compared Plasmodium lineages, based on mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b sequences, between the vertebrate and dipteran hosts, and evaluated the prevalence of the parasite in the mosquito populations. Plasmodium spp. were detected in Culex pipiens only, with an overall 6.6% prevalence. Among the six cytochrome b lineages of Plasmodium identified in the mosquitoes, three were also present in great tits. The results provide evidence for the first time that C. pipiens can act as a natural vector of avian malaria in Europe and yield baseline data for future research on the epidemiology of avian malaria in European countries.

  10. Irritability Levels of Field and Laboratory Population of Culex pipiens Complex in Tehran to Different Groups of Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Sara; Vatandoost, Hassan; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Raeisi, Ahmad; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Rafi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The irritant effect of some insecticides can cause a proportion of mosquitoes to leave the sprayed rooms before acquiring a lethal dose, so the repeated contact al sub-lethal dose may lead to extent the resistance. Methods: Larvae and pupae of Culex pipiens complex were collected in mass from open canals of waste water in capital city Tehran and reared to obtain the first generation at laboratory. Sugar-fed 2–3 days female mosquitoes were used for the experiments and compared with laboratory strain. The irritability tests of insecticides impregnated papers were measured in plastic conical exposure chambers placed which implemented at controlled conditions according to the method described by WHO. Number of take-offs were counted during 15 minutes of exposure time. Results: DDT had the most irritancy effect against field population of Cx. pipiens. DDT, permethrin and deltamethrin was moderately irritable against laboratory strain, whereas, addition to three previous insecticides, malathion, cyfluthrin and propoxur should be also considered as moderately irritable insecticides for field population of. Irritability level of etofenprox, fenithrothion, bendiocarb, and lambdacyhalothrin did not differ from control group. Conclusion: The irritability response of mosquitoes may have a negative impact on control measures. Periodical execution of irritability tests with insecticides that routinely used in vector control program is highly recommended. PMID:27308276

  11. Functional circadian clock genes are essential for the overwintering diapause of the Northern house mosquito, Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Meuti, Megan E.; Stone, Mary; Ikeno, Tomoko; Denlinger, David L.

    2015-01-01

    The short day lengths of late summer are used to program the overwintering adult diapause (dormancy) of the Northern house mosquito, Culex pipiens. Here, we investigated the role of clock genes in initiating this diapause and asked whether the circadian cycling of clock gene expression persists during diapause. We provide evidence that the major circadian clock genes continue to cycle throughout diapause and after diapause has been terminated. RNA interference (RNAi) was used to knock down the core circadian clock genes and to then assess the impact of the various clock genes on the ability of females to enter diapause. RNAi directed against negative circadian regulators (period, timeless and cryptochrome2) caused females that were reared under diapause-inducing, short day conditions to avert diapause. In contrast, knocking down the circadian-associated gene pigment dispersing factor caused females that were reared under diapause-averting, long day conditions to enter a diapause-like state. Our results implicate the circadian clock in the initiation of diapause in C. pipiens. PMID:25653422

  12. Operational Evaluation Of Vectomax® WSP (Bacillus thuringiensis Subsp. israelensis+Bacillus sphaericus) Against Larval Culex pipiens in Septic Tanks (1).

    PubMed

    Cetin, Huseyin; Oz, Emre; Yanikoglu, Atila; Cilek, James E

    2015-06-01

    The residual effectiveness of VectoMax® WSP (a water-soluble pouch formulation containing a combination of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain AM65-52 and B. sphaericus strain ABTS 1743) when applied to septic tanks against 3rd- and 4th-stage larvae of Culex pipiens L. was evaluated in this study. This formulation was evaluated at operational application rates of 1 pouch (10 g) and 2 pouches (20 g) per septic tank. Both application rates resulted in >96% control of larvae for 24 days. Operationally, VectoMax WSP has proven to be a useful tool for the nonchemical control of Culex species in septic tank environments.

  13. Host-feeding habits of Culex pipiens and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) collected at the urban and suburban residential areas of Japan.

    PubMed

    Sawabe, Kyoko; Isawa, Haruhiko; Hoshino, Keita; Sasaki, Toshinori; Roychoudhury, Sudipta; Higa, Yukiko; Kasai, Shinji; Tsuda, Yoshio; Nishiumi, Isao; Hisai, Nobuo; Hamao, Shoji; Kobayashi, Mutsuo

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate the vectorial capacity of mosquitoes for viruses in Japan, the host-feeding habits of the mosquitoes were analyzed by sequencing polymerase chain reaction-amplified fragments of the cytochrome b and 16S ribosomal RNA regions of the mitochondrial DNA of 516 mosquitoes of 15 species from seven genera that were collected from residential areas during 2003-2006. Culex pipiens L. and Aedes albopictus Skuse were the most commonly collected species in urban and suburban residential areas. Anautogenous Culex pipiens pallens Coquillett was distinguished from the autogenous Cx. pipiens form molestus Forskal using a polymerase chain reaction-based identification method. Both Cx. p. pallens and Cx. p. form molestus exhibited similar host-feeding habits, broadly preferring avian (50.0 and 42.5% of avian, respectively) and mammalian (38.6 and 45.0% of avian, respectively) hosts, such as tree sparrows, ducks, and humans. Conversely, Ae. albopictus exhibited a highly mammalophilic and anthropophilic feeding pattern, with 84.2% feeding on mammalian hosts and 68.5% of these on humans. We concluded that in Japan, Cx. pipiens might play a significant role in the avian-to-mammal transmission of viruses, such as West Nile virus, whereas Ae. albopictus might play a role in the human-human transmission of dengue and Chikungunya viruses.

  14. Evaluation of Isotope 32P Method to Mark Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) in a Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chongxing; Shi, Guihong; Zhao, Yuqiang; Yan, Dongmei; Li, Huaiju; Liu, Hongmei; Wiwatanaratanabutr, Itsanun; Gong, Maoqing

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of the current study was to develop a marking technique as an internal marker to mark post blood meal mosquitoes by using stable phosphate isotope 32P and determine the optimal concentration of it. Methods: An isotonic physiological saline solution, containing different concentration of radioactive isotope 32P-labeled disodium phosphate (Na2H32PO4) was injected into rabbits via the jugular vein in the laboratory. Emerged Cx. pipiens were marked after feeding on rabbit. At the same time, the labeled conditions of emerged Cx. pipiens were also measured by placing feces of No. 6 rabbit into containers with mosquito larvae and pupae inside. Results: According to the label condition of Cx. pipiens after taking blood and the effect of different dosage Na2H32PO4 on rabbit health, the optimal concentration of radioactive isotope was determined, that is, 0.1211 mCi/kg. By placing feces of No. 6 rabbit into containers with mosquito larvae and pupae inside, the emerged mosquitoes were also labeled. Therefore, feeding mosquitoes on the animal injected with radioactive Na2H32PO4 was more practical for detecting and tracing mosquitoes. Conclusion: The method was less time-consuming, more sensitive and safer. This marking method will facilitate post-bloodmeal studies of mosquitoes and other blood-sucking insects. PMID:27308279

  15. Effects of latitude and longitude on the population structure of Culex pipiens s.l., vectors of West Nile virus in North America.

    PubMed

    Edillo, Frances; Kiszewski, Anthony; Manjourides, Justin; Pagano, Marcello; Hutchinson, Michael; Kyle, Andrew; Arias, Jorge; Gaines, David; Lampman, Richard; Novak, Robert; Foppa, Ivo; Lubelcyzk, Charles; Smith, Robert; Moncayo, Abelardo; Spielman, Andrew

    2009-11-01

    We assessed the structure and latitudinal selection that might result in sensitivities to critical day-lengths that trigger diapause between Culex pipiens populations distributed along North-South and East-West axes in eastern North America. Strong population structure between Cx. p. pipiens and Cx. p. quinquefasciatus existed. Among Cx. p. pipiens, a 100-km increase in the latitudinal change resulted in an increased square root of F(ST) by 0.002. A 100-km increase in the longitudinal change caused an increased square root of F(ST) by 0.035. A lack of latitudinal influence on the structure between Cx. p. pipiens populations suggests a uniform signal using the 12 microsatellite markers, which might increase the risk of West Nile virus (WNV) transmission toward northern areas because of longer breeding season, extend host-seeking period, and larger population size. Northern Cx. p. pipiens may have undergone additional generations before diapause is triggered, magnifying population size when WNV amplification is peaking.

  16. Effects of Latitude and Longitude on the Population Structure of Culex pipiens s.l., Vectors of West Nile Virus in North America

    PubMed Central

    Edillo, Frances; Kiszewski, Anthony; Manjourides, Justin; Pagano, Marcello; Hutchinson, Michael; Kyle, Andrew; Arias, Jorge; Gaines, David; Lampman, Richard; Novak, Robert; Foppa, Ivo; Lubelcyzk, Charles; Smith, Robert; Moncayo, Abelardo

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the structure and latitudinal selection that might result in sensitivities to critical day-lengths that trigger diapause between Culex pipiens populations distributed along North-South and East-West axes in eastern North America. Strong population structure between Cx. p. pipiens and Cx. p. quinquefasciatus existed. Among Cx. p. pipiens, a 100-km increase in the latitudinal change resulted in an increased square root of FST by 0.002. A 100-km increase in the longitudinal change caused an increased square root of FST by 0.035. A lack of latitudinal influence on the structure between Cx. p. pipiens populations suggests a uniform signal using the 12 microsatellite markers, which might increase the risk of West Nile virus (WNV) transmission toward northern areas because of longer breeding season, extend host-seeking period, and larger population size. Northern Cx. p. pipiens may have undergone additional generations before diapause is triggered, magnifying population size when WNV amplification is peaking. PMID:19861620

  17. An approach to mosquito control: using the dominant attraction of flowering Tamarix jordanis trees against Culex pipiens.

    PubMed

    Schlein, Yosef; Müller, Gunter C

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we identified blossoms that attract Culex pipiens L. s.l. in a Mediterranean habitat by using branches of 26 common plant species as baits for traps. The highest catch, 60.5% of the total, by flowers of Tamarix jordanis Boiss., was approximately 6 times greater than the 10.7% caught by flowering Polygonum equisetiforme Sm., and 10 times higher than the 6.6% caught by flowers of Acacia saligna (Lindle) H. L. Wendl. The catch elicited by the other plants ranged between 4.0 and 0.1%. Plant attraction also was evaluated in a field situation. Experimental and control sites were similar strips of vegetation along water channels with T. jordanis trees in the center. In the experimental site, these trees were sprayed with sucrose solution, food dye, and oral insecticide (Spinosad). Concurrently, patches of plant species and trees in the control site were sprayed with solutions of sucrose and different food dye markers. Cx. pipiens populations in both sites were monitored. The highest proportion (65.2%) of the marked mosquitoes in the control site carried the dye of flowering T. jordanis. The dye of flowering P. equisetiforme and that of A. saligna were found, respectively, in 8.1 and 3.5% of the labeled mosquitoes. The marker of reed groups (Phragmites australis [Cav.] Steudel) above the water was found in 19.4% of mosquitoes, whereas the different marker of dry land reeds was found in only 0.4% of the labeled mosquitoes. In the experimental site, after treatment, the mosquitoes decreased from approximately 255 per trap to approximately 24 mosquitoes per trap, whereas the catch in the control site reached approximately 400 mosquitoes per trap.

  18. Larvicidal activity of selected plant hydrodistillate extracts against the house mosquito, Culex pipiens, a West Nile virus vector.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Huseyin; Yanikoglu, Atila; Cilek, James E

    2011-04-01

    The larvicidal activity of hydrodistillate extracts from Chrysanthemum coronarium L., Hypericum scabrum L., Pistacia terebinthus L. subsp. palaestina (Boiss.) Engler, and Vitex agnus castus L. was investigated against the West Nile vector, Culex pipiens L. (Diptera: Culicidae). Yield and identification of the major essential oils from each distillation was determined by GC-MS analyses. The major essential oil component for each plant species was as follows: α-pinene for P. terebinthus palaestina, and H. scabrum (45.3% and 42.3%, respectively), trans-β-caryophyllene for V. agnus castus (22.1%), and borneol for C. coronarium (20.9%). A series of distillate concentrations from these plants (that ranged from 1 ppm to 500 ppm, depending on plant species) were assessed against late third to early fourth C. pipiens larvae at 1, 6, and 24 h posttreatment. In general, larval mortality to water treated with a distillate increased as concentration and exposure time increased. H. scabrum and P. terebinthus palaestina were most effective against the mosquito larvae and both produced 100% mortality at 250 ppm at 24-h continuous exposure compared with the other plant species. Larval toxicity of the distillates at 24 h (LC(50) from most toxic to less toxic) was as follows: P. terebinthus palaestina (59.2 ppm) > H. scabrum (82.2 ppm) > V. agnus castus (83.3 ppm) > C. coronarium (311.2 ppm). But when LC(90) values were compared, relative toxicity ranking changed as follows: H. scabrum (185.9 ppm) > V. agnus castus (220.7 ppm) > P. terebinthus palaestina (260.7 ppm) > C. coronarium (496.3 ppm). Extracts of native Turkish plants continue to provide a wealth of potential sources for biologically active agents that may be applied against arthropod pests of man and animals.

  19. REPELLENT EFFECT OF OCIMUM BASILICUM AND GLYCYRRHIZA GLABRA EXTRACTS AGAINST THE MOSQUITO VECTOR, CULEX PIPIENS (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE).

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mostafa I; Hammad, Kotb M; Saeed, Saeed M

    2015-08-01

    Essential or volatile oils of plants have been variously reported to have many medicinal applications. Methanol, acetone and petroleum ether extracts of Ocimum basilicum and Glycyrrhiza glabra were screened for their repellency effect against Culex pipiens mosquito. The repellent action of the present plants extracts were varied depending on the solvent used and dose of extract. Methanol extract of O. basilicum exhibited the lowest repellent activity as it recorded 77.4% at 6.7mg/cm2. The petroleum ether and acetone extract of 0. basilicum showed repellency of 98.1 & 84.6% respectively, at dose of 6.7mg/cm2, while methanolic extract of G. glabra recorded 73.8 & 50.3% at dose of 6.7 &1.7mg/cm2 respectively, the petroleum ether and acetone extract of G. glabra showed repellency of 76.3 & 81.6%, respectively at dose of 6.7mg/cm2, compared with the commercial formulation, N.N. diethyl toulamide (DEET) which exhibited 100% repellent action at dose of 1.8mg/cm2, respectively. The results may contribute to design an alternative way to control mosquitoes currently based on applications of synthetic insecticides. These extracts could be developed commercially as an effective personal protection meaure against mosquito bites and thus to control diseases caused by mosquito-borne pathogens.

  20. Enhanced toxicity of binary mixtures of larvicidal constituents from Asarum heterotropoides root to Culex pipiens pallens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Perumalsamy, Haribalan; Kim, Jun-Ran; Kim, Soon-Il; Kwon, Hyung Wook; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of pellitorine alone or in combination with (-)-asarinin, alpha-asarone, methyleugenol, or pentadecane (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 2:1, and 3:1 ratios) to third instars from an insecticide-susceptible KS-CP strain and -resistant DJ-CP colony of Culex pipiens pallens Coquillett was evaluated using a direct-contact mortality bioassay. The binary mixture of pellitorine and (-)-asarinin (3:1 ratio) was significantly more toxic against KS-CP larvae (0.95 mg/liter) and DJ-CP larvae (1.07 mg/liter) than either pellitorine (2.08 mg/liter for KS-CP and 2.33 mg/liter for DJ-CP) or (-)-asarinin (11.45 and 12.61 mg/liter) alone. The toxicity of the other binary mixtures (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, and 2:1 ratios) and pellitorine did not differ significantly from each other. Based on the co-toxicity coefficient (CC) and synergistic factor (SF), the three binary mixtures (1:3, 2:1, and 3:1) operated synergistically (CC, 250-390 and SF, 1.4-2.2 for KS-CP; CC, 257-279 and SF, 1.1-2.1 for DJ-CP). The binary mixtures of pellitorine and (-)-asarinin merit further study as potential larvicides for the control of insecticide-resistant mosquito populations.

  1. The diapause program impacts renal excretion and molecular expression of aquaporins in the northern house mosquito, Culex pipiens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Denlinger, David L; Piermarini, Peter M

    2016-12-27

    Adult females of the mosquito Culex pipiens entering diapause increase sugar water ingestion and reduce evaporative water loss, but how these attributes of the diapause program impact activity of the renal excretory system remains unknown. Here we compared the renal excretory capacity of diapausing and non-diapausing females, as well as the molecular expression of aquaporin (AQP) genes that encode channels involved in transporting water and/or small metabolites. Baseline urine excretion rates in diapausing mosquitoes were higher than in those of their non-diapausing counterparts, possibly a consequence of the intense sugar feeding associated with diapause. But, diapausing mosquitoes exhibited a much lower capacity for diuresis than non-diapausing mosquitoes. The suppressed diuretic capacity likely reflects reduced investment in the energetically-expensive post-prandial diuresis, an event not observed in diapausing mosquitoes. The mRNA expression levels of two genes encoding AQPs, Eglp1 and Aqp12L, in diapausing mosquitoes were down-regulated (on day 14) and up-regulated (on both days 3 and 14), respectively, in whole body samples. These changes were not evident in the excretory system (i.e., Malpighian tubules and hindgut), which showed no differential expression of AQPs as a function of diapause. Several AQP mRNAs were, however, differentially expressed in the midgut, ovaries, and abdominal body wall of diapausing mosquitoes, suggesting that AQPs in these tissues may be playing important non-excretory roles that are unique to diapause physiology.

  2. Weather factors influencing the population dynamics of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Po Plain Valley, Italy (1997-2011).

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Marco; Fariselli, Piero; Maccagnani, Bettina; Angelini, Paola; Calzolari, Mattia; Bellini, Romeo

    2014-04-01

    The impact of weather variables on Culex pipiens L. (Diptera: Culicidae) population dynamics in the Po Valley, Northern Italy, a densely populated region containing the largest industrial and agricultural areas in Italy, was investigated. Monitoring of mosquitoes was carried out by using CO(2)-baited traps without light, collecting data weekly from 1700 to 0900 hours during the period May-September, from 1997 to 2011. Daily minimum, average, and maximum relative humidity; daily minimum, maximum, and average temperature; rainfall; and hydroclimatic balance (rainfall-potential evapotranspiration) were obtained from three weather stations within the surveillance zone. The average population dynamic trend over the 15-yr period showed a bell-shaped curve with a major peak in June and a secondary peak at the end of August in the rural areas, whereas bimodality was not evidenced in the urban areas. The correlation analyses showed that the mosquito seasonal population and the population in the period of maximum West Nile virus circulation (August-September) was mostly affected by the relative humidity registered from March to July, particularly in May, and, to a lower extent, also by hydroclimatic balance registered in April-July, and by the rainfall occurred in June-July. In addition, the rate of increase of the population during the spring months influenced the development of the mosquito population of the following months.

  3. The role of miR-2∼13∼71 cluster in resistance to deltamethrin in Culex pipiens pallens.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qin; Huang, Yun; Zou, Feifei; Liu, Bingqian; Tian, Mengmeng; Ye, Wenyun; Guo, Juxin; Sun, Xueli; Zhou, Dan; Sun, Yan; Ma, Lei; Shen, Bo; Zhu, Changliang

    2017-03-22

    Excessive and continuous application of deltamethrin has resulted in the development of deltamethrin resistance among mosquitoes, which becomes a major obstacle for mosquito control. In a previous study, differentially expressed miRNAs between deltamethrin-susceptible (DS) strain and deltamethrin-resistant (DR) strain using illumina sequencing in Culex pipiens pallens were identified. In this study, we applied RNAi and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) bottle bioassay to investigate the relationship between miR-2∼13∼71 cluster (miR-2, miR-13 and miR-71) and deltamethrin resistance. We used quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to measure expression levels of miR-2∼13∼71 clusters. MiR-2∼13∼71 cluster was down regulated in adult female mosquitoes from the DR strain and played important roles in deltamethrin resistance through regulating target genes, CYP9J35 and CYP325BG3. Knocking down CYP9J35 and CYP325BG3 resulted in decreased mortality of DR mosquitoes. This study provides the first evidence that miRNA clusters are associated with deltamethrin resistance in mosquitoes. Moreover, we investigated the regulatory networks formed between miR-2∼13∼71 cluster and its target genes, which provide a better understanding of the mechanism involved in deltamethrin resistance.

  4. The Effect of West Nile Virus Infection on the Midgut Gene Expression of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Smartt, Chelsea T.; Shin, Dongyoung; Anderson, Sheri L.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of the mosquito and the invading virus is complex and can result in physiological and gene expression alterations in the insect. The association of West Nile virus (WNV) and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus mosquitoes results in measurable changes in gene expression; 22 gene products were shown previously to have altered expression. Sequence analysis of one product, CQ G1A1, revealed 100% amino acid identity to gram negative bacteria binding proteins (CPQGBP) in Cx. p. quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti (70%) and Anopheles gambiae (63%) that function in pathogen recognition. CQ G1A1 also was differentially expressed following WNV infection in two populations of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus colonized from Florida with known differences in vector competence for WNV and showed spatial and temporal gene expression differences in midgut, thorax, and carcass tissues. These data suggest gene expression of CQ G1A1 is influenced by WNV infection and the WNV infection-controlled expression differs between populations and tissues. PMID:27999244

  5. Preoviposition activation of cathepsin-like proteinases in degenerating ovarian follicles of the mosquito Culex pipiens pallens.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Ohmori, D; Ueno, T; Nishizuka, M; Eshita, Y; Fukunaga, A; Kominami, E

    2001-09-01

    Within developing ovaries of many insects, some developing follicles or oocytes usually degenerate (follicular atresia or oosorption), while the others may continue to grow to maturity, thus maintaining the balance between the number of eggs and reproductive circumstances such as available nutrients. To help clarify the phenomenon of follicular atresia during ovarian development, we examined cysteine proteinases stored in mosquito Culex pipiens pallens ovaries. First, analysis using synthesized substrates showed that cathepsin B- and L-like proteinases gradually accumulated in the developing ovaries after a blood meal, which required more than 10 min of preincubation under acidic conditions to reach their maximum activities. However, homogenates of degenerating follicles 3 days after feeding showed proteolytic activities without acid treatment, suggesting that the proteinases had already been activated, while the extract of normally developing follicles collected from the same ovaries required more than 10 min of acid preincubation to reach the optimum activities, suggesting that the enzymes remained as inactive forms. Chemical and immunohistochemical analyses showed that more proteinases are located in the cytoplasm, rather than being associated with yolk granules. Ovarian proteinases, which are believed to become activated at the onset of embryogenesis, should also be activated during oogenesis, presumably to enhance oosorption.

  6. Evaluation of temephos and chlorpyrifos-methyl against Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae in septic tanks in Antalya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cetin, H; Yanikoglu, A; Kocak, O; Cilek, J E

    2006-11-01

    The larvicidal activity of chlorpyrifos-methyl and temephos was evaluated against Culex pipiens L. (Diptera: Culicidae) in septic tanks in Antalya, Turkey. Chlorpyrifos-methyl (Pyrifos MT 25 emulsifiable concentrate [EC] ) was evaluated at application rates of 0.04, 0.08, and 0.12 mg active ingredient (AI)/liter, and temephos (Temeguard 50 EC) was evaluated at 0.02, 0.04, and 0.06 mg (AI)/liter during a 21-d study. Generally, overall larval reduction in septic tanks from single- and multifamily dwellings treated with either larvicide was significantly greater than pretreatment levels and control tanks for the duration of the study. At 14 d posttreatment, duration of control was greatest in multifamily tanks treated with chlorpyrifos-methyl at the highest application rate with similar levels of control through 21 d for single-family dwellings (range 97-100%). Septic tanks from both types of family dwellings treated at the highest application rate of temephos resulted in >90% reduction through day 21 (range 91-100%). Laboratory bioassays of septic tank water treated at field application rates, without daily dilution, revealed that complete larval mortality was achieved for 21 d at each application rate and formulation. It is thought that daily addition of water and organic matter to the septic tanks in the single and multifamily dwellings influenced the duration of effectiveness of the larvicides.

  7. Effects of combined diethylcarbamazine and albendazole treatment of bancroftian filariasis on parasite uptake and development in Culex pipiens L.

    PubMed

    Farid, Hoda A; Hammad, Ragaa E; Hassan, Marah M; Ramzy, Reda M R; El Setouhy, Maged; Weil, Gary J

    2005-07-01

    We studied effects of combined diethylcarbamazine (DEC) and albendazole (ALB) treatment on Wuchereria bancrofti microfilaria (MF) uptake and development of infective larvae (L3) in Culex pipiens. Consenting Egyptian adults with microfilaremia (MF > 300/mL) were treated with one or seven daily doses of DEC/ALB. Laboratory-reared mosquitoes were fed on subjects before and after treatment. MF uptake and infectivity (assessed by mosquito dissection) were reduced by 89.6% and 82.9%, respectively, 12 months after single-dose treatment and by 96.2% and 99.7%, respectively, after multi-dose treatment. The L3:mosquito ratio decreased by 88% to 0.082 after single-dose treatment and by 99.8% to 0.001 after multi-dose treatment. If high coverage rates can be achieved for several annual cycles, mass drug administration (MDA) with DEC/ALB has the potential to decrease transmission to unsustainable levels and eliminate filariasis in populations. Multi-dose MDA (especially in the first year) might interrupt transmission with fewer cycles than single-dose treatment.

  8. Fecundity reduction in the second gonotrophic cycle of Culex pipiens infected with the apicomplexan blood parasite, Hepatozoon sipedon.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Laura V; Smith, Todd G

    2014-08-01

    Fecundity reduction is a well-recognized phenomenon of parasite infection in insects. Reduced production of eggs might increase longevity of a host and release nutrients to both host and parasite that would otherwise be used for oogenesis. The objective of this study was to assess effects on fecundity caused by Hepatozoon sipedon, an apicomplexan blood parasite of snakes, in its invertebrate host, the mosquito Culex pipiens. In the first gonotrophic cycle, the mean number of eggs laid by mosquitoes infected with H. sipedon did not differ significantly from those laid by uninfected mosquitoes. However, in the second gonotrophic cycle infected mosquitoes laid significantly fewer eggs than did uninfected mosquitoes, and fecundity was reduced by 100% in mosquitoes with parasite burdens of more than 60 oocysts. There was a significant negative correlation between parasite burden, or the number of oocysts, and the number of eggs produced in the second gonotrophic cycle. Significantly fewer viable larvae hatched from eggs laid by infected compared to uninfected mosquitoes in the second gonotrophic cycle. These data indicate that fecundity reduction occurs in this system, although the physiological mechanisms driving this phenotype are not yet known.

  9. The effects of forced-egg retention on the blood-feeding behavior and reproductive potential of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brian J; Fonseca, Dina M

    2014-07-01

    High rates of West Nile virus (WNV) transmission to humans are associated with exceptionally hot and dry summers. This is paradoxical since the eggs of Culex vectors of WNV depend on the persistence of containers with water, which decline during droughts. We examined the effects of forced-egg retention on the reproductive success of female Culex pipiens as well as behavioral responses, such as likelihood of secondary blood meals. As controls we examined the effects of female age and delayed mating. We found that early mating is essential to achieve reproductive success and, consistent with an "all-or-none" ovipositing strategy, C. pipiens females are able to retain considerable reproductive potential while searching for oviposition sites. Specifically, although forced-egg retention resulted in significant decreases in fitness, the decline was moderate for 5 weeks and most can be accounted for by increases in female age. Consequently, no females took blood more than once per gonotrophic cycle, which eliminates the possibility that heightened vectorial capacity due to multiple blood-feedings increases WNV transmission during periods of drought. Instead, our findings suggest that during droughts populations of C. pipiens have time to locate the remaining water holes, which are associated with human populations and WNV-competent bird species.

  10. Chemical composition and larvicidal evaluation of Mentha, Salvia, and Melissa essential oils against the West Nile virus mosquito Culex pipiens.

    PubMed

    Koliopoulos, George; Pitarokili, Danae; Kioulos, Elias; Michaelakis, Antonios; Tzakou, Olga

    2010-07-01

    The volatile metabolites of wild-growing Mentha spicata, M. longifolia, M. suaveolens, Melissa officinalis, Salvia fruticosa, S. pomifera subsp. calycina, and S. pomifera subsp. pomifera from Greece were determined by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The insecticidal properties of the analyzed essential oils were screened on Culex pipiens larvae. Additionally two of the main components of the essential oils, piperitenone oxide and 1,8-cineole were assayed against C. pipiens in order to define the affiliation between them and the larvicidal properties of the oils. The most effective oils were M. suaveolens (major constituent piperitenone oxide, 62.4%), M. spicata (piperitenone oxide, 35.7% and 1,8-cineole, 14.5%) and M. longifolia--Central Greece (piperitenone oxide, 33.4%; 1,8-cineole, 24.5% and trans-piperitone epoxide, 17.4%), which exhibited LC(50) values ranging from 47.88 to 59.33 mg l(-1). Medium activity revealed the oils of M. officinalis (terpin-4-ol, 15.8%; caryophyllene oxide, 13.2%; sabinene, 12.9%; beta-pinene, 12.1%; and trans-caryophyllene, 10.2%), M. longifolia--Southern Greece (carvone, 54.7% and limonene 20.0%), S. pomifera subsp. pomifera (trans-caryophyllene, 22.5% and trans-thujone, 21.0%), S. pomifera subsp. calycina--West Southern Greece (trans-thujone, 56.1% and 1,8-cineole, 10.4%), and S. fruticosa--population 2 (camphor, 23.1%; alpha-pinene, 12.7%; and borneol, 12.6%), with LC(50) values ranging from 78.28 to 91.45 mg l(-1). S. pomifera subsp. calycina (Central Greece) essential oil (trans-thujone, 26.5% and cis-thujone, 12.0%) presented rather low activity (LC(50) values 140.42 mg l(-1)), while S. fruticosa--population 1 (1,8-cineole, 31.4% and camphor, 22.6%) was the only inactive oil. Additionally, the constituent piperitenone oxide was found to be highly active (LC(50) values 9.95 mg l(-1)), whereas 1,8-cineole revealed no toxicity.

  11. Structure and expression strategy of the genome of Culex pipiens densovirus, a mosquito densovirus with an ambisense organization.

    PubMed

    Baquerizo-Audiot, Elizabeth; Abd-Alla, Adly; Jousset, Françoise-Xavière; Cousserans, François; Tijssen, Peter; Bergoin, Max

    2009-07-01

    The genome of all densoviruses (DNVs) so far isolated from mosquitoes or mosquito cell lines consists of a 4-kb single-stranded DNA molecule with a monosense organization (genus Brevidensovirus, subfamily Densovirinae). We previously reported the isolation of a Culex pipiens DNV (CpDNV) that differs significantly from brevidensoviruses by (i) having a approximately 6-kb genome, (ii) lacking sequence homology, and (iii) lacking antigenic cross-reactivity with Brevidensovirus capsid polypeptides. We report here the sequence organization and transcription map of this virus. The cloned genome of CpDNV is 5,759 nucleotides (nt) long, and it possesses an inverted terminal repeat (ITR) of 285 nt and an ambisense organization of its genes. The nonstructural (NS) proteins NS-1, NS-2, and NS-3 are located in the 5' half of one strand and are organized into five open reading frames (ORFs) due to the split of both NS-1 and NS-2 into two ORFs. The ORF encoding capsid polypeptides is located in the 5' half of the complementary strand. The expression of NS proteins is controlled by two promoters, P7 and P17, driving the transcription of a 2.4-kb mRNA encoding NS-3 and of a 1.8-kb mRNA encoding NS-1 and NS-2, respectively. The two NS mRNAs species are spliced off a 53-nt sequence. Capsid proteins are translated from an unspliced 2.3-kb mRNA driven by the P88 promoter. CpDNV thus appears as a new type of mosquito DNV, and based on the overall organization and expression modalities of its genome, it may represent the prototype of a new genus of DNV.

  12. Synthesis, crystal structure and larvicidal activity of novel diamide derivatives against Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Culex is an important mosquito as vectors for the transmission of serious diseases, such as filariasis, West Nile virus, dengue, yellow fever, chikungunya and other encephalitides. Nearly one billion people in the developing countries are at risk. In order to discover new bioactive molecules and pesticides acting on mosquito, we designed active amide structure and synthesized a series of novel diamide derivatives. Results A series of novel diamide derivatives were designed and synthesized. Their structures were characterized by 1 H NMR, FTIR and HRMS. The single crystal structure of compound 6n was determined to further elucidate the structure. Biological activities of these compounds were tested. Most of them exhibited higher mosquito larvicidal activity. Especially compound 6r displayed relatively good activity to reach 70% at 2 μg/mL. Conclusion A practical synthetic route to amide derivatives by the reaction of amide with another acid is presented. This study suggests that the diamide derivatives exhibited good effective against mosquito. PMID:22963735

  13. Host-seeking heights, host-seeking activity patterns, and West Nile virus infection rates for members of the Culex pipiens complex at different habitat types within the hybrid zone, Shelby County, TN, 2002 (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Savage, Harry M; Anderson, Michael; Gordon, Emily; McMillen, Larry; Colton, Leah; Delorey, Mark; Sutherland, Genevieve; Aspen, Stephen; Charnetzky, Dawn; Burkhalter, Kristen; Godsey, Marvin

    2008-03-01

    Host-seeking heights, host-seeking activity patterns, and West Nile virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, WNV) infection rates were assessed for members of the Culex pipiens complex from July to December 2002, by using chicken-baited can traps (CT) at four ecologically different sites in Shelby County, TN. Host-seeking height was assessed by CT placed at elevations of 3.1, 4.6, and 7.6 m during one 24-h period per month. Host-seeking activity was assessed by paired CT placed at an elevation of 4.6 m. Can traps were sampled at one 10-h daytime interval and at seven 2-h intervals during the evening, night, and morning. Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes accounted for 87.1% of collected mosquitoes. Culex (Melanoconion) erraticus (Dyar & Knab) accounted for 11.9% of specimens. The average number of Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes collected per 24-h CT period from July to September was lowest at a rural middle income site (1.7), intermediate at an urban middle income site (11.3), and highest at an urban low income site (47.4). Can traps at the forested site failed to collect Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes. From July to September at urban sites, Culex pipiens pipiens L. was the rarest of the three complex members accounting for 11.1-25.6% of specimens. At the rural site, Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say was the rarest member of the complex. Cx. p. pipiens was not collected after September. Mean abundance of Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes was higher in traps at 7.6 m than in traps at 4.6 m. Abundances at 3.1 m were intermediate and not significantly different from abundances at the other heights. Initiation of host-seeking activity was associated with the end of civil twilight and activity occurred over an extended nighttime period lasting 8-10 h. All 11 WNV-positive mosquitoes were Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes collected from urban sites in traps placed at elevations of 4.6 and 7.6 m. Infection rates were marginally nonsignificant by height. Infection rates, host

  14. Attraction of Culex pipiens/restuans (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes to bird uropygial gland odors at two elevations in the Niagara region of Ontario.

    PubMed

    Russell, Curtis B; Hunter, Fiona F

    2005-05-01

    In an effort to determine whether female Culex pipiens L. and Culex restuans Theobald mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are attracted to crow, Corvus brachyrhynchus, uropygial gland secretions, CDC miniature light traps (baited with CO2 but with the lights removed) were placed at approximately 1.5- and 5-m elevations, in 10 trees in awoodlot near Niagara Falls, Canada. These traps were assigned either a bird odor or a blank control. Bird odors were created by attaching cotton swabs coated with crow uropygial gland secretions to the trap intake. A significantly greater number of Cx. pipiens/ restuans were found in the 5-m traps compared with 1.5-m traps, with a significant number attracted to the bird odor over the no odor traps at the 5-m elevation, but not at 1.5 m. We also found more Aedes vexans (Meigen) in the 1.5-m traps than the 5-m traps; however, presence or absence of bird odor did not influence the distribution of Ae. vexans.

  15. Haematophageous vector monitoring in Djibouti city from 2008 to 2009: first records of Culex pipiens ssp. torridus (IGLISCH), and Anopheles sergentii (theobald).

    PubMed

    Faulde, Michael K; Ahmed, Ammar A

    2010-08-01

    The Horn of Africa represents a region formerly known to be highly susceptible to mosquito-borne infectious diseases. In order to monitor and analyze the current presence and threat of vector mosquitoes, continuous and standardized trapping using CDC light traps without an additional CO2-generator has been carried out at six selected monitoring sites located in Djibouti City, from August 2008 until December 2009. An overall of 620 haematophageous Diptera were trapped, 603 (97.3%) were mosquitoes, 10 (1.6%) were sand flies, and 7 (1.1%) were biting midges, respectively. Genus distribution of mosquitoes revealed that 600 (99.5%) were Culex spp., 2 (0.3%) were Anopheles sergentii, and 1 (0.2%) was Aedes aegypti. Culex species were represented by Cx. quinquefasciatus (78.5%), and Cx. pipiens ssp. torridus (21.5%). The later species was first detected focally in early December 2009 showing a strongly increasing population density resulting in a maximum trap rate of 25 mosquitoes per trap night. Sand flies were all Sergentomyia antennata, and biting midges of the genus Culicoides were represented by C. nubeculosus (71.4%) and C. vexans (28.6 %). The findings included the first records for Cx. pipiens ssp. torridus and An. sergentii in Djibouti. However, none of the captured female Culex spp, the known vector for West Nile Virus, showed positive results for viral nucleic acids using WNV RT-real time PCR system. Also, females An. sergentii were Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax circumsporozoite protein negative.

  16. Determinants of the population growth of the West Nile virus mosquito vector Culex pipiens in a repeatedly affected area in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent spread of West Nile Virus in temperate countries has raised concern. Predicting the likelihood of transmission is crucial to ascertain the threat to Public and Veterinary Health. However, accurate models of West Nile Virus (WNV) expansion in Europe may be hampered by limited understanding of the population dynamics of their primary mosquito vectors and their response to environmental changes. Methods We used data collected in north-eastern Italy (2009–2011) to analyze the determinants of the population growth rate of the primary WNV vector Culex pipiens. A series of alternative growth models were fitted to longitudinal data on mosquito abundance to evaluate the strength of evidence for regulation by intrinsic density-dependent and/or extrinsic environmental factors. Model-averaging algorithms were then used to estimate the relative importance of intrinsic and extrinsic variables in describing the variations of per-capita growth rates. Results Results indicate a much greater contribution of density-dependence in regulating vector population growth rates than of any environmental factor on its own. Analysis of an average model of Cx. pipiens growth revealed that the most significant predictors of their population dynamics was the length of daylight, estimated population size and temperature conditions in the 15 day period prior to sampling. Other extrinsic variables (including measures of precipitation, number of rainy days, and humidity) had only a minor influence on Cx. pipiens growth rates. Conclusions These results indicate the need to incorporate density dependence in combination with key environmental factors for robust prediction of Cx. pipiens population expansion and WNV transmission risk. We hypothesize that detailed analysis of the determinants of mosquito vector growth rate as conducted here can help identify when and where an increase in vector population size and associated WNV transmission risk should be expected. PMID:24428887

  17. Modeling the distribution of the West Nile and Rift Valley Fever vector Culex pipiens in arid and semi-arid regions of the Middle East and North Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Middle East North Africa (MENA) region is under continuous threat of the re-emergence of West Nile virus (WNV) and Rift Valley Fever virus (RVF), two pathogens transmitted by the vector species Culex pipiens. Predicting areas at high risk for disease transmission requires an accurate model of vector distribution, however, most Cx. pipiens distribution modeling has been confined to temperate, forested habitats. Modeling species distributions across a heterogeneous landscape structure requires a flexible modeling method to capture variation in mosquito response to predictors as well as occurrence data points taken from a sufficient range of habitat types. Methods We used presence-only data from Egypt and Lebanon to model the population distribution of Cx. pipiens across a portion of the MENA that also encompasses Jordan, Syria, and Israel. Models were created with a set of environmental predictors including bioclimatic data, human population density, hydrological data, and vegetation indices, and built using maximum entropy (Maxent) and boosted regression tree (BRT) methods. Models were created with and without the inclusion of human population density. Results Predictions of Maxent and BRT models were strongly correlated in habitats with high probability of occurrence (Pearson’s r = 0.774, r = 0.734), and more moderately correlated when predicting into regions that exceeded the range of the training data (r = 0.666,r = 0.558). All models agreed in predicting high probability of occupancy around major urban areas, along the banks of the Nile, the valleys of Israel, Lebanon, and Jordan, and southwestern Saudi Arabia. The most powerful predictors of Cx. pipiens habitat were human population density (60.6% Maxent models, 34.9% BRT models) and the seasonality of the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) (44.7% Maxent, 16.3% BRT). Maxent models tended to be dominated by a single predictor. Areas of high probability corresponded with sites of

  18. The effect of shade on the container index and pupal productivity of the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens breeding in artificial containers.

    PubMed

    Vezzani, D; Albicócco, A P

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether certain attributes of larval breeding sites are correlated with pupal productivity (i.e. numbers of pupae collected per sampling period), so that these could be used as the focus for control measures to enhance control efficiency. Therefore, the objectives were to identify the months of highest pupal productivity of Aedes aegypti (L.) and Culex pipiens L. (Diptera: Culicidae) in an urban temperate cemetery in Argentina where artificial containers of < 6 L (flower vases) were the predominant breeding habitats, to compare various measures of the productivity of sunlit and shaded containers and to determine whether the composition of the containers affected pupal productivity. Over a period of 9 months, 200 randomly chosen water-filled containers (100 sunlit and 100 shaded), out of approximately 3738 containers present (approximately 54% in shade), were examined each month within a cemetery (5 ha) in Buenos Aires (October 2006 to June 2007). In total, 3440 immatures of Cx pipiens and 1974 of Ae. aegypti were collected. The larvae : pupae ratio was 10 times greater for the former, indicating that larval mortality was greater for Cx pipiens. Both mosquito species showed a higher container index (CI) in shaded than in sunlit containers (Ae. aegypti: 12.8% vs. 6.9% [chi(2) = 17.6, P < 0.001]; Cx pipiens: 6.3% vs. 1.8% [chi(2) = 24, P < 0.001]). However, the number and the density of immatures per infested container and the number of pupae per pupa-positive container did not differ significantly between sunlit and shaded containers for either species. Therefore, the overall relative productivity of pupae per ha of Ae. aegypti and Cx pipiens was 2.3 and 1.8 times greater, respectively, in shaded than in sunlit areas as a result of the greater CIs of containers in shaded areas. Neither the CI nor the number of immatures per infested container differed significantly among container types of different materials in either lighting

  19. Total salivary gland proteins of female Culex pipiens and Aedes caspius (Diptera: Culicidae) and their fractionation during adult development and after blood sucking.

    PubMed

    Soliman, M A; Abdel-Hamid, M E; Mansour, M M; Seif, A I; Kamel, K I; el Hamshary, E M

    1999-08-01

    Salivary glands of Culex pipiens and Aedes caspius were analyzed to determine total protein content and its fractionation during adult female development and after blood sucking. In both species, the molecular weight of proteins ranged between 26.000 and 84.000 Daltons. These proteins were not identical in the two species. In Cx. pipiens, the total protein level increased during the first 3 days of adult development from 4.94 +/- 0.84 to 6.6 +/- 0.37 micrograms/gland. During this period, the salivary gland proteins were separated into 35, 34 and 37 fractions respectively. Cx. pipiens released in the human host 64% of the total proteins while taking a blood meal compared to unfed females. This decrease in protein level was proportional to protein fractions. Over the next 6 days, the protein level increased again to attain values comparable to those obtained prior to blood sucking. In Ae. caspius, the total protein level of the salivary glands did not change during the first 4 days of adult development (range between 3.13 +/- 0.27 and 3.91 +/- 0.36 micrograms gland), but on the fifth day, 2-fold increase was observed. The total salivary gland protein increased during the next 3 days after blood sucking to reach 15.5 +/- 0.98 micrograms/gland. During this period, a tremendous change in protein patterns was observed. After oviposition, on the fourth day, a significant reduction in the total protein level was observed (4.13 +/- 0.56 micrograms/gland), but over the next 3 days the level increased again (range between 4.13 +/- 0.66 and 7.13 +/- 0.66 micrograms/gland).

  20. Evaluation of halofenozide against prey mosquito larvae Culex pipiens and the predator fish Gambusia affinis: impact on growth and enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Soltani, N; Chouahda, S; Smagghe, G

    2008-01-01

    Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) is the most widely distributed mosquito species in Algeria and many other countries in the world. Mosquitoes are generally controlled by conventional insecticides but these may pose strong secondary effects on the environment. In this context, the insect growth regulators (IGRs) have shown promise in controlling pest insects. Halofenozide (23% EC) is a novel IGRs belonging to the class of non-steroidal ecdysone agonists, and it was found toxic for larvae of C. pipiens. In addition biological methods constitute an alternative to chemical control. Several fish species have been tested against mosquitoes, and Gambusia affinis was found very efficient. In the present study we evaluated the impact of this new potent insecticide (halofenozide) on growth and metric indexes in the larvivorous fish G. affinis under laboratory conditions. In addition, the effects were evaluated on the enzymatic activities of acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). The insecticide was added in water at two concentrations (12.6 and 28.6 microg/L) corresponding to the LC50 and LC90 obtained against fourth instar larvae of C. pipiens, and adult females of G. affinis were exposed to halofenozide for 30 days. At different exposure times we measured the length and weight of fishes, the index of condition (K), the gonado-somatic ratio (GSR) and the hepato-somatic ratio (HSR). The results showed that halofenozide had no significant (p>0.05) effects on growth, metric indexes and AChE activities. However, treatment caused a significant induction (p<0.05) in GST activities at days 15 and 30 with the highest dose. Our results indicate that this ecdysteroid agonist presented only minor secondary effects on the non-target fish species, and so it has potential for controlling of mosquitoes in an integrated manner.

  1. Essential oils of indigenous in Greece six Juniperus taxa: chemical composition and larvicidal activity against the West Nile virus vector Culex pipiens.

    PubMed

    Vourlioti-Arapi, F; Michaelakis, A; Evergetis, E; Koliopoulos, G; Haroutounian, S A

    2012-05-01

    The chemical composition of 14 essential oils (EOs), obtained from various parts (leaves, fruits, wood) of the six indigenous in Greece Juniperus family taxa, was determined by GC and GC/MS analysis. The insecticidal properties of these EOs were evaluated against Culex pipiens L. larvae of 3rd and early 4th instars, in order to delineate the relationship between the phytochemical content of the EOs and their larvicidal activities. The analytical data indicated that the EOs mainly consisted of monoterpenes, mostly cyclic and only occasionally aliphatic, and to a lesser percent, of diterpenes. The larvicidal bioassays against C. pipiens larvae revealed that the most active EO was derived from the wood of Juniperus drupacea and contains mainly non-oxygenated monoterpenes and a significant amount of diterpenes, displaying the highest chemodiversity. Its initial LC(50) value was 26.47 mg L(-1). On the contrary, the EO isolated from J. phoenicea berries, which consisted of monoterpenes (non-oxygenated, cyclic), was the less active displaying an LC(50) value of 96.69 mg L(-1). In respect to the contained phytochemicals, myrcene was assayed as the most toxic, displaying an LC(50) value of 33.83 mg L(-1), while the four isomers of pinene abundant in all EOs were less active exhibiting LC(50) values ranging from 70.40 to 94.88 mg L(-1). Results herein reveal that the EOs isolated from the studied Juniperus family taxa represent an inexpensive source of natural mosquito control mixtures.

  2. The Role of Climatic and Density Dependent Factors in Shaping Mosquito Population Dynamics: The Case of Culex pipiens in Northwestern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Giacobini, Mario; Pugliese, Andrea; Merler, Stefano; Rosà, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Culex pipiens mosquito is a species widely spread across Europe and represents a competent vector for many arboviruses such as West Nile virus (WNV), which has been recently circulating in many European countries, causing hundreds of human cases. In order to identify the main determinants of the high heterogeneity in Cx. pipiens abundance observed in Piedmont region (Northwestern Italy) among different seasons, we developed a density-dependent stochastic model that takes explicitly into account the role played by temperature, which affects both developmental and mortality rates of different life stages. The model was calibrated with a Markov chain Monte Carlo approach exploring the likelihood of recorded capture data gathered in the study area from 2000 to 2011; in this way, we disentangled the role played by different seasonal eco-climatic factors in shaping the vector abundance. Illustrative simulations have been performed to forecast likely changes if temperature or density–dependent inputs would change. Our analysis suggests that inter-seasonal differences in the mosquito dynamics are largely driven by different temporal patterns of temperature and seasonal-specific larval carrying capacities. Specifically, high temperatures during early spring hasten the onset of the breeding season and increase population abundance in that period, while, high temperatures during the summer can decrease population size by increasing adult mortality. Higher densities of adult mosquitoes are associated with higher larval carrying capacities, which are positively correlated with spring precipitations. Finally, an increase in larval carrying capacity is expected to proportionally increase adult mosquito abundance. PMID:27105065

  3. The effects of laboratory Hepatozoon gracilis infection on the fecundity, mortality and longevity of Culex (Culex) pipiens Linneaus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Adham, Fatma K; Gabre, Refaat M; Ayaad, Tahany H; Galal, Fatma H

    2003-08-01

    Laboratory observations on the effect of Hepatozoon gracilis on the egg production of the mosquito Cx. (Cx.) pipiens Linneaus under laboratory conditions revealed that H. gracilis infected mosquitoes produced significantly fewer eggs than uninfected ones. The egg production decreased as parasite burdens increased. Reduction in blood meal size in infected females did not reduce fecundity. No size differences was detected between oocyst-infected and uninfected females although sporozoite positive females were significantly large. Preoviposition period was affected significantly, while incubation period and percentage of egg hatching showed no significant changes. The longevity of female infected mosquitoes decreased insignificantly than in uninfected ones.

  4. Insecticide resistance and cytochrome-P450 activation in unfed and blood-fed laboratory and field populations of Culex pipiens pallens.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kyu-Sik; Kim, Heung-Chul; Klein, Terry A; Ju, Young Ran

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of insecticide resistance to vector mosquitoes is critical for the implementation of effective control measures. A nulliparous susceptible Culex pipiens pallens (KSCP) laboratory colony and two field strains from Paju (PAJ) and Jeonju (JEO) Korea were evaluated for susceptibility to five pesticides by microapplication techniques. Unfed PAJ and JEO females demonstrated increased resistance compared to unfed KSCP females, respectively. While blood-fed KSCP females demonstrated <10-fold decreased susceptibility to pesticides compared to unfed KSCP females, blood-fed PAJ and JEO females demonstrated 25.0-50.0- and 16.0-38.6-fold increased resistance compared to unfed PAJ and JEO females, respectively. Unfed and blood-fed groups were assayed for α- and β-esterase, glutathione S-transferases, and cytochrome P-450 (P450) enzyme activity assays. P450 activity was 58.8- and 72.8-fold higher for unfed PAJ and JEO females, respectively, than unfed KSCP females. P450 enzyme activity of KSCP females assayed 1 and 7 days after a blood meal increased by 14.5- and 11.8-fold, respectively, compared to unfed KSCP females, while PAJ and JEO females demonstrated 164.9- and 148.5- and 170.7- and 160.4-fold increased activity, respectively, compared to unfed females of each population. However, other three resistance-related metabolic enzymes showed low activation at <10-fold after a blood meal. The data demonstrate that P450 acts on elevated insecticide resistance after blood meals in resistant field populations. Our findings might reveal that suppressing of the P450 protein by artificial gene mutation increases insecticidal susceptibility of Cx. pipiens and will promise effective vector mosquito control.

  5. Cytoplasmic incompatibility as a means of controlling Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus mosquito in the islands of the south-western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Atyame, Célestine M; Pasteur, Nicole; Dumas, Emilie; Tortosa, Pablo; Tantely, Michaël Luciano; Pocquet, Nicolas; Licciardi, Séverine; Bheecarry, Ambicadutt; Zumbo, Betty; Weill, Mylène; Duron, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    The use of the bacterium Wolbachia is an attractive alternative method to control vector populations. In mosquitoes, as in members of the Culex pipiens complex, Wolbachia induces a form of embryonic lethality called cytoplasmic incompatibility, a sperm-egg incompatibility occurring when infected males mate either with uninfected females or with females infected with incompatible Wolbachia strain(s). Here we explore the feasibility of the Incompatible Insect Technique (IIT), a species-specific control approach in which field females are sterilized by inundative releases of incompatible males. We show that the Wolbachia wPip(Is) strain, naturally infecting Cx. p. pipiens mosquitoes from Turkey, is a good candidate to control Cx. p. quinquefasciatus populations on four islands of the south-western Indian Ocean (La Réunion, Mauritius, Grande Glorieuse and Mayotte). The wPip(Is) strain was introduced into the nuclear background of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes from La Réunion, leading to the LR[wPip(Is)] line. Total embryonic lethality was observed in crosses between LR[wPip(Is)] males and all tested field females from the four islands. Interestingly, most crosses involving LR[wPip(Is)] females and field males were also incompatible, which is expected to reduce the impact of any accidental release of LR[wPip(Is)] females. Cage experiments demonstrate that LR[wPip(Is)] males are equally competitive with La Réunion males resulting in demographic crash when LR[wPip(Is)] males were introduced into La Réunion laboratory cages. These results, together with the geographic isolation of the four south-western Indian Ocean islands and their limited land area, support the feasibility of an IIT program using LR[wPip(Is)] males and stimulate the implementation of field tests for a Cx. p. quinquefasciatus control strategy on these islands.

  6. Larvicidal, Biological and Genotoxic Effects, and Temperature-Toxicity Relationship of Some Leaf Extracts of Nerium oleander (Apocynaceae) on Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Shaurub H; El-Bassiony, Ghada M

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study was undertaken to study the larvicidal activity of different extracts of Nerium oleander leaves, and post-treatment temperature- toxicity relationship of these extracts against Culex pipiens. Further, the most potent extract was used to evaluate its biological and genotoxic activities. Methods: Crude extracts of N. oleander leaves were prepared using water, chloroform, acetone and diethyl ether as solvents. Extraction was carried out using soxhlet apparatus. Bioassay test was carried out on the larvae, and the LC50 of each extract was determined. Thus, newly hatched first instar larvae were treated, and the mortality count was recorded daily till pupation (accumulated mortality). The LC50 of diethyl ether extract, as the most potent extract, was used for the further biological and genotoxic studies. Results: The results obtained indicated that diethyl ether extract of N. oleander leaves was the most potent extract, with LC50 of 10500 mg/l. The toxicity of the four extracts, using the LC50, at 10 °C was higher than that at 35 °C. The LC50 of diethyl ether extract significantly decreased the larval duration, pupal duration, percentage of pupation, percentage of adult emergence, longevity of females, fecundity, and oviposition activity index, whereas the growth index and the percentage of development per day of larvae and pupae were significantly increased compared to non-treated insects. Moreover, treatment with this extract induced significant dominant lethality in both male and female adults. Conclusion: It appears that diethyl ether extract of N. oleander leaves is potential control agent to Cx. pipiens. PMID:27047967

  7. Early warning of West Nile virus mosquito vector: climate and land use models successfully explain phenology and abundance of Culex pipiens mosquitoes in north-western Italy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background West Nile Virus (WNV) is an emerging global health threat. Transmission risk is strongly related to the abundance of mosquito vectors, typically Culex pipiens in Europe. Early-warning predictors of mosquito population dynamics would therefore help guide entomological surveillance and thereby facilitate early warnings of transmission risk. Methods We analysed an 11-year time series (2001 to 2011) of Cx. pipiens mosquito captures from the Piedmont region of north-western Italy to determine the principal drivers of mosquito population dynamics. Linear mixed models were implemented to examine the relationship between Cx. pipiens population dynamics and environmental predictors including temperature, precipitation, Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and the proximity of mosquito traps to urban areas and rice fields. Results Warm temperatures early in the year were associated with an earlier start to the mosquito season and increased season length, and later in the year, with decreased abundance. Early precipitation delayed the start and shortened the length of the mosquito season, but increased total abundance. Conversely, precipitation later in the year was associated with a longer season. Finally, higher NDWI early in the year was associated with an earlier start to the season and increased season length, but was not associated with abundance. Proximity to rice fields predicted higher total abundance when included in some models, but was not a significant predictor of phenology. Proximity to urban areas was not a significant predictor in any of our models. Predicted variations in start of the season and season length ranged from one to three weeks, across the measured range of variables. Predicted mosquito abundance was highly variable, with numbers in excess of 1000 per trap per year when late season temperatures were low (average 21°C) to only 150 when late season temperatures were high (average 30°C). Conclusions Climate data collected early in

  8. Upregulation of two actin genes and redistribution of actin during diapause and cold stress in the northern house mosquito, Culex pipiens.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mijung; Robich, Rebecca M.; Rinehart, Joseph P.; Denlinger, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Two actin genes cloned from Culex pipiens L. are upregulated during adult diapause. Though actins 1 and 2 were expressed throughout diapause, both genes were most highly expressed early in diapause. These changes in gene expression were accompanied by a conspicuous redistribution of polymerized actin that was most pronounced in the midguts of diapausing mosquitoes that were exposed to low temperature. In nondiapausing mosquitoes reared at 25°C and in diapausing mosquitoes reared at 18°C, polymerized actin was clustered at high concentrations at the intersections of the muscle fibers that form the midgut musculature. When adults 7–10 days post-eclosion were exposed to low temperature (-5°C for 12h), the polymerized actin was evenly distributed along the muscle fibers in both nondiapausing and diapausing mosquitoes. Exposure of older adults (1month post-eclosion) to low temperature (−5°C for 12h) elicited an even greater distribution of polymerized actin, an effect that was especially pronounced in diapausing mosquitoes. These changes in gene expression and actin distribution suggest a role for actins in enhancing survival of diapausing adults during the low temperatures of winter by fortification of the cytoskeleton. PMID:17078965

  9. Influence of warming tendency on Culex pipiens population abundance and on the probability of West Nile fever outbreaks (Israeli Case Study: 2001-2005).

    PubMed

    Paz, Shlomit; Albersheim, Iris

    2008-03-01

    Climate change and West Nile fever (WNV) are both subjects of global importance. Many mosquitoes and the diseases they carry, including West Nile virus (WNV), are sensitive to temperature increase. The current study analyzes the lag correlations between weather conditions (especially air temperature) and 1) Culex pipiens mosquito population abundance, and 2) WNF frequency in humans, between 2001 and 2005 in Israel. These 5 years follow a long period with a documented tendency for temperature increase in the hot season in the country. Monthly anomalies of minimum and maximum temperatures, relative seasonal rainfall contribution, mosquito samplings (hazard level), and WNF cases (hospital admission dates and patients' addresses) were analyzed. Logistic regression was calculated between the climatic data and the mosquito samples, as Spearman correlations and Pearson cross-correlations were calculated between daily temperature values (or daily precipitation amounts) and the hospital admission dates. It was found that the disease appearance reflects the population distribution, while the risk tends to escalate around the metropolis characterized by an urban heat island. Positive anomalies of the temperature during the study period appear to have facilitated the mosquito abundance and, consequently, the disease emergence in humans. An important finding is the potential influence of extreme heat in the early spring on the vector population increase and on the disease's appearance weeks later. Awareness of such situations at the beginning of the spring may help authorities to reduce the disease risk before it becomes a real danger.

  10. Evaluation of Culex pipiens Populations in a Residential Area with a High Density of Catch Basins in a Suburb of Chicago, Illinois.

    PubMed

    Harbison, Justin E; Henry, Marlon; Xamplas, Christopher; Dugas, Lara R

    2014-09-01

    The North Shore Mosquito Abatement District applies extended release larvicides including methoprene-based Altosid® XR Extended Residual Briquets to approximately 40,000 catch basins in the southern half of the District's operational area at the beginning of each season. Treatments begin in May and typically again 9 to 10 wk later when larvicide efficacy appears to wane. In 2013 spinosad-based Natular™ XRT tablets were applied to basins, and a subset were monitored for larvae and pupae weekly with a standard dipper. When setting the threshold for retreatment as 12 juveniles per dip sample it was observed that basins required a second application 9 wk after the initial application, a time period similar to Altosid despite utilizing a different active ingredient. Average counts of weekly larval samples appeared to be positively associated with average numbers of Culex pipiens collected the following week in a gravid trap located among catch basins, highlighting the importance of basins as sources of these mosquitoes.

  11. Molecular structure of the prothoracicotropic hormone gene in the northern house mosquito, Culex pipiens, and its expression analysis in association with diapause and blood feeding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Denlinger, D L

    2011-04-01

    We cloned the gene that encodes prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) in the northern house mosquito, Culex pipiens, and investigated its expression profile in short-day (diapause-destined) and long-day (nondiapause-destined) individuals from the fourth-instar larval stage to 2 months of adulthood, as well as after a blood meal. The deduced C. pipiens PTTH (Cupip-PTTH) amino acid sequence contains seven cysteines with a specific spacing pattern. Sequence alignment suggests that Cupip-PTTH is 23% identical to Drosophila melanogaster PTTH, but is ≥59% identical to the PTTHs of other mosquitoes. Cupip-PTTH has structural characteristics similar to those of Bombyx mori PTTH and some vertebrate nerve growth factors with cysteine-knot motifs. PTTH transcripts exhibit a daily cycling profile during the final (fourth) larval instar, with peak abundance occurring late in the scotophase. The fourth-larval instar stage is one day longer in short-day larvae than in long-day larvae, resulting in larger larvae and adults. This additional day of larval development is associated with one extra PTTH cycle. No cycling was observed in pupae, but PTTH transcripts were slightly higher in short-day pupae than in long-day pupae throughout much of the pupal stage. PTTH expression persisted at a nearly constant level in diapausing adult females for the first month but then dropped by ∼50%, while expression decreased at the beginning of adulthood in nondiapausing females and then remained at a low level as long as the females were denied a blood meal. However, when nondiapausing females were offered a blood meal, PTTH transcripts rose approximately 7 fold in 2 h and remained elevated for 24 h. A few diapausing females (∼10%) will take a blood meal when placed in close proximity to a host, but much of the blood is ejected and such meals do not result in mature eggs. Yet, elevated PTTH mRNA expression was also observed in diapausing females that were force fed. Our results thus point to

  12. The effects of Nosema algerae Vavra and undeen (Microsporida: Nosematidae) pathogen of Culex pipiens L.(Diptera: Culicidae) from Egypt on fecundity and longevity of the host.

    PubMed

    Seif, A I

    2000-12-01

    A microsporidian, Nosema algerae Vavra and undeen, was found parasitizing larvae and adults of a laboratory colony of Culex pipiens L. originated from Gharbia Governorate. A detailed examination of the developmental stages of the pathogen under light and electron microscopes showed that they are typical of the original characteristics of N. algerae. Other observations on the infected individuals revealed that spores of the pathogen were found in all organs of the infected mosquitoes except the nervous system. The most heavily infected organ was the alimentary canal, particularly the mid gut. The susceptibility of the different larval instars of a laboratory maintained Cx. pipiens colony to infection by N. algerae was determined. Using 24 hours exposure to a range of doses between 40 and 5 x 10(5) spores per cm, larvae of the 1st and 2nd instars were more susceptible to infection than 3rd and 4th instar larvae as indicated by the differences in the estimated IC50 dosages. The dosages of N. algerae which produced 50% mortality (LC50) in each group of treated larvae was approximately 25-30 times higher than the doses that caused 50% infection. When a sublethal dose of 1.2 x 10(3) spores per cm2 of N. algerae was used to induce infection in each of the different larval instars infection rates of 100% were obtained in all exposed larval instars and in adults developed from them. Females from larvae infected with N. algerae had significantly reduced fecundity, fertility, and longevity regardless the larval instar in which infection was initiated. However, the reduction was obviously high when 1st and 2nd instars were exposed. The accumulative effects of reduced survival and fecundity on the reproductive potential of the infected females derived from larvae that were infected as 1st and 2nd instars probably serve to limit the natural increase of mosquito populations. Further studies are necessary, however, to determine the efficacy of this pathogen on target species in

  13. Diurnal resting behavior of adult Culex pipiens in an arid habitat in Israel and possible control measurements with toxic sugar baits.

    PubMed

    Schlein, Yosef; Müller, Günter C

    2012-10-01

    The distribution of resting Culex pipiens s.l., L. in vegetation at the margins of breeding sites and the effects of a narrow, surrounding, sprayed belt of sugar, food dye and toxin on adult mosquitoes were studied near two pairs of control and experimental sewage ponds close to human habitation in the Judean hills. Control belts were without toxin. A sprayed belt of sugar and toxin 0.5 m from the water gradually reduced the population to an average of 38.3 mosquitoes per trap, 7.6% of the highest catch, which was 504.6 mosquitoes per trap in the control site. In the second experiment, in which bait belts were 5 m from the water, the toxic bait spraying was followed by a rise in catches from 207.9 to 274.9 mosquitoes. This was 41% of the 670.2 mosquitoes per trap in the parallel control site. In areas without toxin treatment, diurnal catches by net amounted to 20,705 mosquitoes. Of these, 86.1% (17,825) were caught within 1m of the water while only 8.2% (1701) were caught at a distance of 3 m. The remainders were caught up to 20 m away. Parity status was determined for female samples caught by net. In areas without toxin, parous females accounted for 37% of the catch and 13.2% were young, meconium containing specimens. The population diminished following spraying of toxic bait 1m from the water and included 13% parous females and 17.6% had meconium in the gut.

  14. Predation and control efficacies of Misgurnus mizolepis (Cypriniformes: Cobitidae) toward Culex pipiens molestus (Diptera: Culicidae) and fish toxicity of temephos in laboratory and septic tank conditions.

    PubMed

    Chae, Seong Chun; Kwon, Young Hyun; Min, Kyung Il; Kim, Hyung Soo; Kim, Nam-Jin; Kim, Jun-Ran; Son, Bong Gi; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2014-07-01

    Culex pipiens molestus Forskal (Diptera: Culicidae) is the dominant mosquito species in septic tanks in South Korea. An assessment was made of the biological control potential of mud loaches, Misgurnus mizolepis Günther (Cypriniformes: Cobitidae), toward Cx. p. molestus larvae in laboratory and septic tanks. Results were compared with those of temephos 20% emulsifiable concentrate. In laboratory tests, all mud loaches survived on sedimentation chamber- and effluent chamber-collected water of aerobic septic tanks (ASTs), whereas all mud loaches died within 3-12 h after introduction into sedimentation chamber- and effluent chamber-collected water of anaerobic septic tanks, Gill hyperplasia and hemorrhages at the bases of pectoral fins were detected in all dead mud loaches. These appeared to have been caused by bacterial disease, rather than the physical and chemical characteristics of the septic tank water. A mud loach consumed an average range of 1,072-1,058 larvae of Cx. p. molestus in the AST water at 24 h. At the manufacturer's recommended rate (10 ml/ton) in the AST water, the temephos formulation did not cause fish mortality. In the AST experiment, predation of mosquito larvae by mud loaches at a release rate of one fish per 900 mosquito larvae resulted in complete mosquito control from the third day after treatment throughout the 18-wk survey period, compared with temephos 20% emulsifiable concentrate-treated AST water (reduction rate, 40% at 28 days after treatment). Reasonable mosquito control in aerobic septic tanks can be achieved by mosquito breeding season stocking of a rate of one mud loach per 900 mosquito larvae.

  15. Digestive enzyme as benchmark for insecticide resistance development in Culex pipiens larvae to chemical and bacteriologic insecticides.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Nashwa H; Bahgat, Iman M; El Kady, Gamal A

    2013-04-01

    This work monitored changes in some digestive enzymes (trypsin and aminopeptidase) associated with the building up of resistance in Cx. pipiens larvae to two chemical insecticides (methomyl and/or malathion) and one biological insecticide (Bacillus thuringiensis-H14 or B.t H 14). The LC50 value of methomyl for both field- and the 12th generation (F12) of the selected strain was 1.789 ppm and 8.925 ppm respectively. The LC50 value of malathion for both field and the F12 of the selected strain was 0.082 ppm and 0.156 ppm respectively, and those of B.t H14 of field strain and the F12 was 2.550ppm & 2.395ppm respectively. The specific activity of trypsin enzyme in control susceptible colony was 20.806 +/- 0.452micromol/min/mg protein; but at F4 and F8 for malathion and methomyl treated larvae were 10.810 +/- 0.860 & 15.616+/-0.408 micromol/min/mg protein, respectively. Trypsin activity of F12 in treated larvae with B.t.H14 was 2.097 +/- 0.587 microiol/min/mg protein. Aminopeptidase specific activity for susceptible control larvae was 173.05 +/- 1.3111 micromol/min/mg protein. This activity decreased to 145.15 +/- 4.12, 152.497 +/- 6.775 & 102.04 +/- 3.58a micromol/min/mg protein after larval (F 12) treatment with methomyl, malathion and B.t H 14 respectively.

  16. Some considerations relating to the role of Culex pipiens fatigans Wiedemann in the transmission of human filariasis*

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, P. F.

    1962-01-01

    This paper is concerned mainly with the relationship between microfilarial periodicity and vector periodicity. The so-called ”non-periodic” Pacific form of Wuchereria bancrofti in fact shows a well-marked and relatively constant periodicity. The amplitude of this periodicity is low, which may account for the difficulty of detecting it in small clinical samples. The periodicity is well adapted to the biting cycle of Aëdes polynesiensis, though less so than that of the ”semi-periodic” Brugia malayi to forest Mansonioides. Microfilarial periodicity is discussed in the light of recent work on circadian rhythms in other animals and it is suggested that certain possibilities have been given insufficient weight. The use of the term ”migration” to describe microfilarial translocation within the host may have given rise to misunderstanding but it is in good agreement with current concepts of migration. Recent work suggests some behavioural heterogeneity in Culex fatigans which could render it a useful mosquito for elucidating certain important but little-understood problems. PMID:13933891

  17. Laboratory Transmission of Japanese Encephalitis and West Nile Viruses by Molestus Form of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) Collected in Uzbekistan in 2004

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    298 JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY Vol. 43, no. 2 at transmitting JEV than were Culex nigripalpus Theobald , Culex quinquefasciatus Say, and Culex sali...Lanciotti, R. S., J. T. Roehrig, V. Deubel, J. Smith ,M. Parker, K. Steele, B. Crise, K. E. Volpe, M. B. Crabtree, J. H. Scherret, et al. 1999. Origin of

  18. Laboratory and Simulated Field Bioassays to Evaluate Larvicidal Activity of Pinus densiflora Hydrodistillate, Its Constituents and Structurally Related Compounds against Aedes albopictus, Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens pallens in Relation to Their Inhibitory Effects on Acetylcholinesterase Activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Chan; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2013-05-30

    The toxicity of Pinus densiflora (red pine) hydrodistillate, its 19 constituents and 28 structurally related compounds against early third-instar larvae of Aedes albopictus (Ae. albopictus), Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti) and Culex pipiens palles (Cx. p. pallens) was examined using direct-contact bioassays. The efficacy of active compounds was further evaluated in semi-field bioassays using field-collected larval Cx. p. pallens. Results were compared with those of two synthetic larvicides, temephos and fenthion. In laboratory bioassays, Pinus densiflora hydrodistillate was found to have 24 h LC50 values of 20.33, 21.01 and 22.36 mg/L against larval Ae. albopictus, Ae. aegypti and Cx. p. pallens respectively. Among the identified compounds, thymol, δ-3-carene and (+)-limonene exhibited the highest toxicity against all three mosquito species. These active compounds were found to be nearly equally effective in field trials as well. In vitro bioassays were conducted to examine the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity of 10 selected compounds. Results showed that there is a noticeable correlation between larvicidal activity and AChE inhibitory activity. In light of global efforts to find alternatives for currently used insecticides against disease vector mosquitoes, Pinus densiflora hydrodistillate and its constituents merit further research as potential mosquito larvicides.

  19. The Mosquitoes of the Subgenus Culex in Southwestern Asia and Egypt (Diptera: Culicidae) (Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. Volume 24, Number 1, 1988)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Synonymy with pipiens by Edwards, 1932a: 210. luteus Meigen, 1804: 6. Type locality: Europe. Type(s) (female) non-extant. Synonymy with pipiens by...lividocostalis (Culex),45,48, 236 longefurcatus (Culex) , 23, 230 longiareolata (Culiseta), 71,81, 228 luteoannula tus (Cu lex) , 233 luteus (Culex

  20. Characterization of a new Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae)-Wolbachia pipientis (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae) symbiotic association generated by artificial transfer of the wPip strain from Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Calvitti, Maurizio; Moretti, Riccardo; Lampazzi, Elena; Bellini, Romeo; Dobson, Stephen L

    2010-03-01

    Wolbachia is a maternally inherited endosymbiont inducing various effects in insects and other invertebrate hosts that facilitate the invasion of naive host populations. One of the effects is a form of sterility known as cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) through which females are effectively sterilized when they mate with males harboring a different Wolbachia strain. The repeated mass release of cytoplasmically incompatible males can be a tool to suppress insect populations. Here, we attempt to infect an Aedes albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae) strain, artificially deprived of the natural Wolbachia infection, with a new Wolbachia strain from Culex pipiens (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae). Further experiments were designed to study the effects of the new infection on Ae. albopictus fitness and evaluate key parameters that affect infection dynamics, including CI level and maternal inheritance. Using embryonic microinjection, the new Wolbachia strain was successfully established in Ae. albopictus. Crosses demonstrated a pattern of bidirectional CI between naturally infected and transinfected individuals. Specifically, egg hatch was essentially absent (i.e., CI was very high) in all crosses between the transinfected males and females with a different infection status. Furthermore, naturally infected Ae. albopictus males were incompatible with the transinfected females. Maternal inheritance was close to 100%. Moreover, the new infection did not affect immature and adult survivorship, but it significantly reduced female fecundity and egg hatch rate. The results are discussed in relation to the potential use of the new Ae. albopictus-Wolbachia symbiotic association as a suitable system for the study and development of CI-based strategies for suppressing populations of this important pest and disease vector.

  1. Culex mosquitoes are experimentally unable to transmit Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Amraoui, Fadila; Atyame-Nten, Célestine; Vega-Rúa, Anubis; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Vazeille, Marie; Failloux, Anna Bella

    2016-09-01

    We report that two laboratory colonies of Culex quinquefasciatus and Culex pipiens mosquitoes were experimentally unable to transmit ZIKV either up to 21 days post an infectious blood meal or up to 14 days post intrathoracic inoculation. Infectious viral particles were detected in bodies, heads or saliva by a plaque forming unit assay on Vero cells. We therefore consider it unlikely that Culex mosquitoes are involved in the rapid spread of ZIKV.

  2. Culex mosquitoes are experimentally unable to transmit Zika virus

    PubMed Central

    Amraoui, Fadila; Atyame-Nten, Célestine; Vega-Rúa, Anubis; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Vazeille, Marie; Failloux, Anna Bella

    2016-01-01

    We report that two laboratory colonies of Culex quinquefasciatus and Culex pipiens mosquitoes were experimentally unable to transmit ZIKV either up to 21 days post an infectious blood meal or up to 14 days post intrathoracic inoculation. Infectious viral particles were detected in bodies, heads or saliva by a plaque forming unit assay on Vero cells. We therefore consider it unlikely that Culex mosquitoes are involved in the rapid spread of ZIKV. PMID:27605159

  3. Emerging Vectors in the Culex pipiens Complex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-05

    Ecologia , Atti I Congr. Naz. Soc. Ital. Ecol., A. Moroni, O. Ravera, A. Anelli, Eds. (Zara, Parma, Italy, 1981), pp. 305–316. 27. C. Chevillon, R...providing invaluable mosquito samples; J. Smith , M. Matrone, T. Ganguly, and the DNA Sequencing Facility, Uni- versity of Pennsylvania, for technical

  4. Medical Entomology Studies - III. A Revision of the Subgenus Culex in the Oriental Region (Diptera: Culicidae) (Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. Volume 12, Number 2)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    fatigans Wiedemann 1828 of authors), huangae Meng 1958, hutchinsoni Barraud 1924, ficscocephalu Theobald 1907, theileri Theobald 1903, univittatus...Sirivanakarn: Subgenus Culex in the Oriental Region 29 Theobald 1901 and vagans Wiedemann 1828. It is also possible that pipiens molestus Forskal 1775...of Pipiens, recognized a pipiens complex to include quinquefasciutus Say (or fatigans Wiedemann ) and australicus Dobrot- worsky and Drummond as

  5. Control of Culex quinquefasciatus in a storm drain system in Florida with attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSB)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mosquitoes of the Culex pipiens group, including Culex quinquefasciatus, are important vectors of West Nile virus and other viruses around the world. Control of these mosquitoes in urban areas is often difficult because of the use of storm drains and other man-made structures as larval habitats. I...

  6. Occurrence of avian Plasmodium and West Nile virus in culex species in Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, T.; Irwin, P.; Hofmeister, E.; Paskewitz, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of multiple pathogens in mosquitoes and birds could affect the dynamics of disease transmission. We collected adult Culex pipiens and Cx. restuans (Cx. pipiens/restuans hereafter) from sites in Wisconsin and tested them for West Nile virus (WNV) and for avian malaria (Plasmodium). Gravid Cx. pipiens/restuans were tested for WNV using a commercial immunoassay, the RAMP?? WNV test, and positive results were verified by reverse transcriptasepolymerase chain reaction. There were 2 WNV-positive pools of Cx. pipiens/restuans in 2006 and 1 in 2007. Using a bias-corrected maximum likelihood estimation, the WNV infection rate for Cx. pipiens/restuans was 5.48/1,000 mosquitoes in 2006 and 1.08/1,000 mosquitoes in 2007. Gravid Cx. pipiens or Cx. restuans were tested individually for avian Plasmodium by a restriction enzymebased assay. Twelve mosquitoes were positive for avian Plasmodium (10.0), 2 were positive for Haemoproteus, and 3 were positive for Leucocytozoon. There were 4 mixed infections, with mosquitoes positive for >1 of the hemosporidian parasites. This work documents a high rate of hemosporidian infection in Culex spp. and illustrates the potential for co-infections with other arboviruses in bird-feeding mosquitoes and their avian hosts. In addition, hemosporidian infection rates may be a useful tool for investigating the ecological dynamics of Culex/avian interactions. ?? 2010 by The American Mosquito Control Association, Inc.

  7. Immunization with Theileria parva parasites from buffaloes results in generation of cytotoxic T cells which recognize antigens common among cells infected with stocks of T. parva parva, T. parva bovis, and T. parva lawrencei.

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, T M; Grootenhuis, J G; Dolan, T T; Bishop, R P; Baldwin, C L

    1990-01-01

    Immunity to infection by the protozoan parasite Theileria parva in cattle is partially attributable to cytotoxic T cells, which kill lymphocytes infected with the schizont stage of the parasite. Here we evaluated five stocks of buffalo-derived T. parva lawrencei parasites and two stocks of cattle-derived T. parva parva parasites for their ability to induce in vivo cytotoxic T cells which can kill lymphocytes infected with a wide variety of strains of T. parva parasites. A group of seven full-sibling cattle, produced by embryo transfer and matched for at least one major histocompatibility complex class I haplotype, were immunized by infection and treatment with the parasite stocks. Target cells used in in vitro cytotoxicity assays were infected with five buffalo-derived parasite stocks and five cattle-derived parasite stocks, including T. parva parva and T. parva bovis. Immunization with any of the seven parasite stocks resulted in the generation of cytotoxic T cells which recognized parasite antigens on most if not all of the target cell lines tested, although the T. parva bovis stock was the least effective at doing so. Further in-depth analyses performed with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from one of the cattle immunized with T. parva lawrencei parasites showed that the pattern of killing of the panel of target cells was altered when either cells infected with different parasite stocks or clones of infected cells were used as stimulator cells in vitro, suggesting the presence of more than one population of parasite-specific cytotoxic effector cells in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, clones of these cytotoxic effector cells recognized common or cross-reactive antigen epitopes expressed by the entire panel of infected target cells. These T-cell clones will be useful for identifying common T-cell antigen epitopes of T. parva and the parasite genes encoding them. Images PMID:1699896

  8. The abundance and seasonal distribution of Culex mosquitoes in Iowa during 1995-97.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Rowley, W A

    2000-12-01

    The abundance and seasonal distribution of Culex mosquitoes were monitored by measuring oviposition activity during the summers of 1995, 1996, and 1997. Five species of culicine mosquitoes laid egg rafts in ovitraps. Egg rafts of 4 Culex species-Cx. restuans (54.98%), Cx. pipiens (25.41%), Cx. salinarius (12.18%), and Cx. tarsalis (0.14%)-constituted more than 92% of the total egg rafts collected. Culiseta inornata (0.1%) was the only other species to lay viable egg rafts in the ovitraps. A small percentage (7.19%) of egg rafts did not hatch; thus identification was not possible. Compared with New Jersey light trap data in a nearby area, the abundance of Cx. tarsalis and Cs. inornata was markedly underestimated with ovitraps. These data may also reflect differences in the specific location of the 2 trap sites rather than attractiveness of ovitraps for Cx. tarsalis and Cs. inornata. In general, Cx. restuans oviposition activity began in late May, and it was the dominant Culex species through June. After July 1, the number of egg rafts laid by Cx. restuans decreased continually until the end of the summer. Culex pipiens and Cx. salinarius oviposition began in early June and increased gradually during the summer. Over the course of a summer, there were about twice as many Cx. pipiens as there were Cx. salinarius. A crossover in the number of Cx. pipiens and Cx. restuans egg rafts occurred in late July or early August, depending on the year. By late August each year, Cx. pipiens was the most abundant species. At this time, Cx. restuans and Cx. salinarius populations were similar, but each was about half of the Cx. pipiens population. Differences in the abundance of all 3 species could not be explained by changes in ambient temperature (both minimum and maximum) or relative humidity, either within or among years.

  9. Cold storage of Culex pipiens in the absence of diapause

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major expenditure in vector biology laboratories is the rearing of mosquitoes. Most mosquito colonies require substantial effort to maintain, including frequent blood meals for optimal performance. Successful cryopreservation of mosquitoes continues to be elusive. Although using diapause as a s...

  10. Sugar feeding improves survival of nondiapausing cold stored Culex pipiens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The continuous culture of mosquitoes is a costly endeavor for vector biology laboratories. In addition to the resources that must be committed to colony maintenance, biological costs including genetic drift and accidental colony loss can also occur. While alternatives do exist, their application t...

  11. Distribution and abundance of host-seeking Culex species at three proximate locations with different levels of West Nile virus activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rochlin, I.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Campbell, S.R.

    2009-01-01

    Culex species were monitored at three proximate sites with historically different West Nile virus (WNV) activities. The site with human WNV transmission (epidemic) had the lowest abundance of the putative bridge vectors, Culex pipiens and Cx. salinarius. The site with horse cases but not human cases (epizootic) had the highest percent composition of Cx. salinarius, whereas the site with WNV-positive birds only (enzootic) had the highest Cx. pipiens abundance and percent composition. A total of 29 WNV-positive Culex pools were collected at the enzootic site, 17 at the epidemic site, and 14 at the epizootic site. Published models of human risk using Cx. pipiens and Cx. salinarius as the primary bridge vectors did not explain WNV activity at our sites. Other variables, such as additional vector species, environmental components, and socioeconomic factors, need to be examined to explain the observed patterns of WNV epidemic activity.

  12. Elthusa nierstraszi nom. n., the replacement name for Elthusa parva (Nierstrasz, 1915), a junior secondary homonym of Elthusa parva (Richardson, 1910) (Isopoda, Cymothoidae)

    PubMed Central

    Hadfield, Kerry A.; Bruce, Niel L.; Smit, Nico J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The recent transfer of Elthusa parva (Richardson, 1910) from Ceratothoa created a homonymy with Elthusa parva (Nierstrasz, 1915). Elthusa parva (Richardson, 1910) has priority and Elthusa nierstraszi nom. n. is proposed as the new replacement name for the junior secondary homonym Elthusa parva (Nierstrasz, 1915). PMID:27829793

  13. Climate-based models for West Nile Culex mosquito vectors in the Northeastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Hongfei; Degaetano, Arthur T.; Harrington, Laura C.

    2011-05-01

    Climate-based models simulating Culex mosquito population abundance in the Northeastern US were developed. Two West Nile vector species, Culex pipiens and Culex restuans, were included in model simulations. The model was optimized by a parameter-space search within biological bounds. Mosquito population dynamics were driven by major environmental factors including temperature, rainfall, evaporation rate and photoperiod. The results show a strong correlation between the timing of early population increases (as early warning of West Nile virus risk) and decreases in late summer. Simulated abundance was highly correlated with actual mosquito capture in New Jersey light traps and validated with field data. This climate-based model simulates the population dynamics of both the adult and immature mosquito life stage of Culex arbovirus vectors in the Northeastern US. It is expected to have direct and practical application for mosquito control and West Nile prevention programs.

  14. Climate-based models for West Nile Culex mosquito vectors in the Northeastern US.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hongfei; DeGaetano, Arthur T; Harrington, Laura C

    2011-05-01

    Climate-based models simulating Culex mosquito population abundance in the Northeastern US were developed. Two West Nile vector species, Culex pipiens and Culex restuans, were included in model simulations. The model was optimized by a parameter-space search within biological bounds. Mosquito population dynamics were driven by major environmental factors including temperature, rainfall, evaporation rate and photoperiod. The results show a strong correlation between the timing of early population increases (as early warning of West Nile virus risk) and decreases in late summer. Simulated abundance was highly correlated with actual mosquito capture in New Jersey light traps and validated with field data. This climate-based model simulates the population dynamics of both the adult and immature mosquito life stage of Culex arbovirus vectors in the Northeastern US. It is expected to have direct and practical application for mosquito control and West Nile prevention programs.

  15. La Crosse Virus Field Detection and Vector Competence of Culex Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Harris, M. Camille; Yang, Fan; Jackson, Dorian M.; Dotseth, Eric J.; Paulson, Sally L.; Hawley, Dana M.

    2015-01-01

    La Crosse virus (LACV), a leading cause of arboviral pediatric encephalitis in the United States, is emerging in Appalachia. Here, we report field and laboratory evidence that suggest LACV may be using Culex mosquitoes as additional vectors in this region. This bunyavirus was detected by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in two pools of Culex mosquitoes in southwestern Virginia and in six pools in West Virginia. To assess vector competence, we offered LACV blood meals to field-collected Culex restuans Theobald, Cx. pipiens L., and Aedes triseriatus (Say). Both Culex species were susceptible to infection. LACV-positive salivary expectorate, indicative of the ability to transmit, was detected in a small proportion of Cx. restuans (9%) and Cx. pipiens (4%) compared with Ae. triseriatus (40%). In a companion study of Cx. restuans only, we found that adults derived from nutritionally stressed larvae were significantly more likely to disseminate and transmit LACV. Our results indicate a potential role of Culex spp. in LACV dynamics that should be explored further in endemic areas. PMID:26175029

  16. Effects of Wolbachia on fitness of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera; Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Almeida, Fábio de; Moura, Alexandre S; Cardoso, André F; Winter, Carlos E; Bijovsky, A Tania; Suesdek, Lincoln

    2011-12-01

    Wolbachia are α-proteobacteria that were first reported in Culex pipiens mosquitoes early in the twentieth century. Since then, the effect of Wolbachia on their host's reproduction has drawn attention and has been increasingly investigated. Given the extreme complexity of this interaction, new study cases are welcomed to enhance its understanding. The present work addressed the influence of Wolbachia on Cx. quinquefasciatus, the cosmopolitan member of the Cx. pipiens complex. Samples of a Cx. quinquefasciatus colony (wPip(+)) originated from individuals naturally infected by Wolbachiapipientis B strain, were cured with tetracycline, yielding a Wolbachia-free colony (wPip(-)). Both the presence of bacteria and the efficiency of bacterial elimination were checked by PCR of the wsp gene. Total reproductive unidirectional incompatibility occurred when wPip(-) females were crossed with wPip(+) males, whereas the other three types of reciprocal crosses were viable. Reproductive aspects were also comparatively evaluated between colonies. Concerning oviposition time during the first gonotrophic cycle, wPip(+) females developed and laid eggs earlier than did wPip(-) females. Reproductive fitness was higher among wPip(-) than wPip(+) females regarding the following parameters: fertility: egg rafts/fed females; fecundity: eggs/raft, and viability: larvae/eggs. Conversely, longevity of wPip(-) females was lower. Summarising, although the infected mosquitoes have the advantage of a higher longevity, they have lower reproductive fitness. Our results are partly distinct from all other reports on Aedes and Culex mosquitoes previously published.

  17. Distribution of the members of the Pipiens Assemblage in the sympatric area from Argentina: which is where and when?

    PubMed

    Cardo, María V; Rubio, Alejandra; Junges, Melania; Vezzani, Darío; Carbajo, Aníbal E

    2016-11-01

    Given their medical and veterinary relevance, the members of the Pipiens Assemblage are a worldwide target of ecological research. The distribution of Culex pipiens s.s. and Cx. quinquefasciatus converge in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where hybrids have been detected. Each member of the assemblage exhibits a distinct eco-physiological behaviour that can affect its efficiency in pathogen transmission. Our aim was to identify the environmental drivers for the spatio-temporal distribution of each member, focusing on latitudinal and urbanisation gradients. Immatures of mosquitoes were surveyed in artificial containers found within 11 public cemeteries, raised up to the adult stage and identified by their male genitalia. The distribution of each member was associated with the environment in a Generalized Linear Model. The variable accounting for most of the heterogeneity was latitude; Cx. quinquefasciatus was collected more frequently at northern cemeteries, whereas Cx. pipiens and hybrids were more likely at the southern extreme. The urbanisation gradient was also associated with the occurrence of Cx. quinquefasciatus and hybrids at the high and low end, respectively. Other relevant variables were cemetery total area, the proportion with graves and the presence of plastic flowers in the containers. The spatial distribution of the members of the Pipiens Assemblage within the sympatric region in South America is driven by environmental features. The information presented herein provides essential baseline data for surveillance programs and control activities.

  18. Distribution of the members of the Pipiens Assemblage in the sympatric area from Argentina: which is where and when?

    PubMed Central

    Cardo, María V; Rubio, Alejandra; Junges, Melania; Vezzani, Darío; Carbajo, Aníbal E

    2016-01-01

    Given their medical and veterinary relevance, the members of the Pipiens Assemblage are a worldwide target of ecological research. The distribution of Culex pipiens s.s. and Cx. quinquefasciatus converge in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where hybrids have been detected. Each member of the assemblage exhibits a distinct eco-physiological behaviour that can affect its efficiency in pathogen transmission. Our aim was to identify the environmental drivers for the spatio-temporal distribution of each member, focusing on latitudinal and urbanisation gradients. Immatures of mosquitoes were surveyed in artificial containers found within 11 public cemeteries, raised up to the adult stage and identified by their male genitalia. The distribution of each member was associated with the environment in a Generalized Linear Model. The variable accounting for most of the heterogeneity was latitude; Cx. quinquefasciatus was collected more frequently at northern cemeteries, whereas Cx. pipiens and hybrids were more likely at the southern extreme. The urbanisation gradient was also associated with the occurrence of Cx. quinquefasciatus and hybrids at the high and low end, respectively. Other relevant variables were cemetery total area, the proportion with graves and the presence of plastic flowers in the containers. The spatial distribution of the members of the Pipiens Assemblage within the sympatric region in South America is driven by environmental features. The information presented herein provides essential baseline data for surveillance programs and control activities. PMID:27783720

  19. COI barcode versus morphological identification of Culex ( Culex ) (Diptera: Culicidae) species: a case study using samples from Argentina and Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Laurito, Magdalena; de Oliveira, Tatiane MP; Almirón, Walter Ricardo; Sallum, Maria Anice Mureb

    2013-01-01

    Sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) mitochondrial gene from adults of 22 Culex ( Culex ) species from Argentina and Brazil were employed to assess species identification and to test the usefulness of COI for barcoding using the best close match (BCM) algorithm. A pairwise Kimura two-parameter distance matrix including the mean intra and interspecific distances for 71 COI barcode sequences was constructed. Of the 12 COI lineages recovered in the Neighbour-joining topology, five confirmed recognised morphological species ( Cx. acharistus , Cx. chidesteri , Cx. dolosus , Cx. lygrus and Cx. saltanensis ) with intraspecific divergences lower than 1.75%. Cx. bilineatus is formally resurrected from the synonymy of Cx. dolosus . Cx. maxi , Cx. surinamensis and the Coronator group species included were clustered into an unresolved lineage. The intraspecific distance of Cx. pipiens (3%) was almost twice the interspecific between it and Cx. quinquefasciatus (1.6%). Regarding the BCM criteria, the COI barcode successfully identified 69% of all species. The rest of the sequences, approximately 10%, 18% and 3%, remained as ambiguously, mis and unidentified, respectively. The COI barcode does not contain enough information to distinguish Culex ( Cux. ) species. PMID:24473810

  20. Morphological and fecundity traits of Culex mosquitoes caught in gravid traps in urban and rural Berkshire, UK.

    PubMed

    Townroe, S; Callaghan, A

    2015-10-01

    Culex pipiens s.l. is one of the primary vectors of West Nile Virus in the USA and Continental Europe. The seasonal abundance and eco-behavioural characteristics of the typical form, Cx. pipiens pipiens, make it a key putative vector in Britain. Surveillance of Culex larvae and adults is essential to detect any changes to spatial and seasonal activity or morphological traits that may increase the risk of disease transmission. Here we report the use of the modified Reiter gravid box trap, which is commonly used in the USA but scarcely used in the UK, to assess its suitability as a tool for British female Culex mosquito surveillance. Trapping was carried out at 110 sites in urban and rural gardens in Berkshire in May, July and September 2013. We tested if reproductively active adult female Culex are more abundant in urban than rural gardens and if wing characteristic traits and egg raft size are influenced by location and seasonal variations. Gravid traps were highly selective for Culex mosquitoes, on average catching significantly more per trap in urban gardens (32.4 ± 6.2) than rural gardens (19.3 ± 4.0) and more in July than in May or September. The majority of females were caught alive in a good condition. Wing lengths were measured as an indicator of size. Females flying in September were significantly smaller than females in May or July. Further non-significant differences in morphology and fecundity between urban and rural populations were found that should be explored further across the seasons.

  1. Approaches to vaccination against Theileria parva and Theileria annulata.

    PubMed

    Nene, V; Morrison, W I

    2016-12-01

    Despite having different cell tropism, the pathogenesis and immunobiology of the diseases caused by Theileria parva and Theileria annulata are remarkably similar. Live vaccines have been available for both parasites for over 40 years, but although they provide strong protection, practical disadvantages have limited their widespread application. Efforts to develop alternative vaccines using defined parasite antigens have focused on the sporozoite and intracellular schizont stages of the parasites. Experimental vaccination studies using viral vectors expressing T. parva schizont antigens and T. parva and T. annulata sporozoite antigens incorporated in adjuvant have, in each case, demonstrated protection against parasite challenge in a proportion of vaccinated animals. Current work is investigating alternative antigen delivery systems in an attempt to improve the levels of protection. The genome architecture and protein-coding capacity of T. parva and T. annulata are remarkably similar. The major sporozoite surface antigen in both species and most of the schizont antigens are encoded by orthologous genes. The former have been shown to induce species cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies, and comparison of the schizont antigen orthologues has demonstrated that some of them display high levels of sequence conservation. Hence, advances in development of subunit vaccines against one parasite species are likely to be readily applicable to the other.

  2. Unexpected spatiotemporal abundance of infected Culex restuans suggest a greater role as a West Nile virus vector for this native species.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brian J; Robson, Mark G; Fonseca, Dina M

    2015-04-01

    Difficulties in correctly differentiating Culex restuans mosquitoes from Culex pipiens have left the spatiotemporal mechanisms underlying the epidemiology of West Nile virus (WNV) in the northeastern United States largely unresolved. We performed weekly surveys across a natural to urban gradient of sites in central New Jersey (USA) and used a rapid and cheap DNA extraction and a species-specific PCR assay to create single species pools for WNV testing. To assess seasonal trends we combined these results with WNV surveillance records generated from grouped Cx. restuans/Cx. pipiens pools tested in 2011-2012. Cx.restuans was found to be highly abundant within all sites and reached especially high abundance in urban wetland habitats greatly disturbed by human action. In contrast, the seasonal presence of Cx. pipiens was greatest in residential and urban habitats and its presence in natural areas was minimal throughout the season. WNV infection rates in both species were similar but Cx. restuans was consistently found infected first and more frequently, even as early as May, whereas WNV was first detected in Cx. pipiens in late July. WNV activity peaked during the month of August when WNV was commonly isolated from both species. The peak in WNV activity in August observed for both species was consistent with data from 2011 to 2012 when Cx. restuans and Cx. pipiens were grouped, although analyzing single species pools increased overall predicted infection levels. Our results support the preeminence of Cx. restuans as an enzootic vector of WNV and strongly suggest this species has become a "native invasive" exploiting human modified habitats and reaching very high abundance there. Importantly, high infection rates in disturbed wetland sites with high populations of Cx. restuans suggest this species may enable the introduction of WNV to urbanized environments where both Culex contribute to transmission potentiating disease risk.

  3. MDM2 regulates a novel form of incomplete neoplastic transformation of Theileria parva infected lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Kyoko; Kajino, Kiichi; Hattori, Masakazu; Wallace, Maura; Morrison, Ivan; Greene, Mark I; Sugimoto, Chihiro

    2013-02-01

    Our efforts are concerned with identifying features of incomplete malignant transformation caused by non viral pathogens. Theileria parva (T. parva) is a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite that can cause a fatal lymphoproliferative disease in cattle. The T. parva-infected lymphocytes display a transformed phenotype and proliferate in culture media like the other tumor cells, however those cells will return to normal after antiprotozoal treatment reflecting the incomplete nature of transformation. To identify signaling pathways involved in this form of transformation of T. parva-infected cells, we screened a library of anticancer compounds. Among these, TIBC, a specific inhibitor of MDM2, markedly inhibited proliferation of T. parva-infected lymphocytes and promoted apoptosis. Therefore we analyzed MDM2 function in T. parva-infected cells. Several T. parva-infected cell lines showed increased expression level of MDM2 with alternatively spliced isoforms compared to the lymphoma cells or ConA blasts. In addition, buparvaquone affected MDM2 expression in T. parva transformed cells. Moreover, p53 protein accumulation and function were impaired in T. parva-infected cells after cisplatin induced DNA damage despite the increased p53 transcription level. Finally, the treatment of T. parva-infected cells with boronic-chalcone derivatives TIBC restored p53 protein accumulation and induced Bax expression. These results suggest that the overexpression of MDM2 is closely linked to the inhibition of p53-dependent apoptosis of T. parva-infected lymphocytes. Aberrant expression of host lymphocyte MDM2 induced by cytoplasmic existence of T. parva, directly and/or indirectly, is associated with aspects of this type of transformation of T. parva-infected lymphocytes. This form of transformation shares features of oncogene induced malignant phenotype acquisition.

  4. The effect of temperature on life history traits of Culex mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Ciota, Alexander T; Matacchiero, Amy C; Kilpatrick, A Marm; Kramer, Laura D

    2014-01-01

    Climatic changes forecasted in the coming years are likely to result in substantial alterations to the distributions and populations of vectors of arthropod-borne pathogens. Characterization of the effect of temperature shifts on the life history traits of specific vectors is needed to more accurately define how such changes could impact the epidemiological patterns of vector-borne disease. Here, we determined the effect of temperatures including 16, 20, 24, 28, and 32 degreeC on development time, immature survival, adult survival, mosquito size, blood feeding, and fecundity of both field and colonized populations of the Culex mosquitoes Culex pipiens L, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, and Culex restuans Theobald. Our results demonstrate that temperature significantly affects all of these traits, yet also that the extent of this effect is at times incongruent among temperatures, as well as being population and species-specific. Comparisons of colonized mosquitoes with field populations generally demonstrate decreased adult and immature survival, increased blood feeding and egg production, and significant variation in the effects of temperature, indicating that such colonies are not fully representative of natural populations. Results with field populations in general indicate that increases in temperature are likely to accelerate mosquito development, and that this effect is greater at temperatures below 24 degreeC, but also that temperature significantly increases mortality. Among field populations, Cx. restuans were most affected by temperature increases, with decreased longevity relative to other species and significant increases in adult and immature mortality measured with each incremental temperature increase. Despite the unique climates characteristic of the geographic ranges ofCx. quinquefasciatus and Cx. pipiens, evidence of significant species-specific adaptation to temperature ranges was not seen. Taken together, these results indicate that geographic region

  5. Transcriptional profiling of inflammatory cytokine genes in African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) infected with Theileria parva.

    PubMed

    Okagawa, Tomohiro; Konnai, Satoru; Mekata, Hirohisa; Githaka, Naftaly; Suzuki, Saori; Kariuki, Edward; Gakuya, Francis; Kanduma, Esther; Shirai, Tatsuya; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2012-08-15

    Theileria parva (T. parva) causes East Coast fever (ECF), which is of huge economic importance to Eastern and Southern African countries. In a previous bovine model, inflammatory cytokines were closely associated with disease progression in animals experimentally infected with T. parva. The African Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer), the natural reservoir for T. parva, is completely resistant to ECF despite a persistently high parasitaemia following infection with T. parva. Characterizing basic immunological interactions in the host is critical to understanding the mechanism underlying disease resistance in the African Cape buffalo. In this study, the expression level of several cytokines was analyzed in T. parva-infected buffaloes. There were no significant differences in the expression profiles of inflammatory cytokines between the infected and uninfected animals despite a remarkably high parasitaemia in the former. However, the expression level of IL-10 was significantly upregulated in the infected animals. These results indicate a correlation between diminished inflammatory cytokines response and disease resistance in the buffalo.

  6. Development time of Culex mosquitoes in stormwater management structures in California.

    PubMed

    Henn, Jennifer B; Metzger, Marco E; Kwan, Jonathan A; Harbison, Justin E; Fritz, Curtis L; Riggs-Nagy, Jamie; Shindelbower, Mitch; Kramer, Vicki L

    2008-03-01

    A widely recommended strategy to minimize mosquito production in structural stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs) is to ensure they hold captured water for no more than 72 h. However, this standard may be overly conservative for many mosquito species found in urban environments and may impede or prevent the capacity of BMPs to fulfill more stringent water quality standards in environmentally sensitive areas. Egg-to-pupa development of Culex tarsalis, Cx. pipiens, and Cx. quinquefasciatus were examined during July, August, and September 2006 in stormwater management basins and in water collected from these basins in 3 climatically distinct regions of California: the Lake Tahoe Basin, Sacramento Valley, and Los Angeles Basin. The observed minimum times to pupal development were 6 days for Cx. tarsalis and Cx. quinquefasciatus and 8 days for Cx. pipiens. Multiple linear regression models were used to estimate minimum predicted development times under optimal conditions for each region. The results suggest that water residence times of up to 96 h will not significantly increase the potential for Culex mosquito production in stormwater BMPs in the 3 regions included in this study.

  7. Ovicidal activity of three insect growth regulators against Aedes and Culex mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Suman, Devi S; Wang, Yi; Bilgrami, Anwar L; Gaugler, Randy

    2013-10-01

    Interspecific variations in the susceptibility of freshly and embryonated eggs of Aedes albopictus, Ae. aegypti, Ae. atropalpus and Culex pipiens were tested against three classes of insect growth regulators (IGRs) including ecdysone agonist (azadirachtin), chitin synthesis inhibitor (diflubenzuron) and juvenile hormone analog (pyriproxyfen) at 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0ppm concentrations. Egg hatching inhibition was dose dependent, the highest being at 1.0ppm concentration for freshly laid eggs of Ae. albopictus (pyriproxyfen: 80.6%, azadirachtin: 42.9% and diflubenzuron: 35.8%). Aedes aegypti showed lower egg hatching inhibition when exposed to pyriproxyfen (47.3%), azadirachtin (15.7%) and diflubenzuron (25.5%). Freshly laid eggs of Cx. pipiens were most susceptible to diflubenzuron. Aedes atropalpus eggs were tolerant to all three classes of IGRs. Embryonated eggs of Ae. albopictus, Ae. aegypti, Ae. atropalpus and Cx. pipiens were resistant to pyriproxyfen, azadirachtin and diflubenzuron than freshly laid eggs. The median desiccation time (DT50) of Ae. atropalpus eggs was maximum (5.1h) as compared to Ae. aegypti (4.9h), Ae. albopictus (3.9h) or Cx. pipiens (1.7h) eggs. Insignificant relationship between the rates of desiccation and egg hatching inhibition suggests other factors than physical providing eggs the ability to tolerate exposures to various IGRs. Egg hatching inhibition was due to the alteration in embryonic development caused by IGRs. Changes in the egg shell morphology and abnormal egg hatching from the side of the egg wall instead of operculum, was observed at higher concentrations of diflubenzuron. Morphological and physiological variations in eggs may be the key factor to influence the ovicidal efficacy of IGRs. The present data provide a base line for the improvement of the ovicidal efficacy of the insecticide and its formulation.

  8. First record of a mosquito iridescent virus in Culex pipiens L. (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mosquito iridescent viruses (MIVs) are large icosahedral DNA viruses that replicate and assemble in the cytoplasm of the host. Paracrystalline arrangements of virions that accumulate in the cytoplasm produce an iridescent color that is symptomatic of acute infections. In August 2010, we found ...

  9. Cold storage of the northern house mosquito, Culex pipiens, in the absence of diapause

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One major obstacle in vector biology experimentation is the rearing of mosquitoes. Most mosquito colonies require substantial effort to maintain, including a blood meal at least once a month for optimal performance. While the induction of diapause can be used to reduce the amount of work required ...

  10. The vortex wake of the free-swimming larva and pupa of Culex pipiens (Diptera).

    PubMed

    Brackenbury, J

    2001-06-01

    The kinematics and hydrodynamics of free-swimming pupal and larval (final-instar) culicids were investigated using videography and a simple wake-visualisation technique (dyes). In both cases, swimming is based on a technique of high-amplitude, side-to-side (larva) or up-and-down (pupa) bending of the body. The pupa possesses a pair of plate-like abdominal paddles; the larval abdominal paddle consists of a fan of closely spaced bristles which, at the Reynolds numbers involved, behaves like a continuous surface. Wake visualisation showed that each half-stroke of the swimming cycle produces a discrete ring vortex that is convected away from the body. Consecutive vortices are produced first to one side then to the other of the mean swimming path, the convection axis being inclined at approximately 25 degrees away from dead aft. Pupal and larval culicids therefore resemble fish in using the momentum injected into the water to generate thrust. Preliminary calculations for the pupa suggest that each vortex contains sufficient momentum to account for that added to the body with each half-stroke. The possibility is discussed that the side-to-side flexural technique may allow an interaction between body and tail flows in the production of vorticity.

  11. Natural vertical transmission of Ndumu virus in Culex pipiens (Diptera; Culicidae) mosquitoes collected as larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ndumu virus (NDUV) is a member of the Family: Togaviridae and Genus: Alphavirus. In Kenya the virus has been isolated from a range of mosquito species but has not been associated with human or animal morbidity. Little is know about the transmission dynamics or vertebrate reservoirs of this virus. We...

  12. Generation and Transmission of Rift Valley Fever Viral Reassortants by the Mosquito ’Culex pipiens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Reassortant viruses replicat- < Valley fever (RVF) virus . The origin of the S and M ed efficiently in mosquitoes and were readily transmis- RNA segments...epidemiology and evolution of RVF parental viruses by interrupted feeding on two infected virus . Introduction between spontaneous mutants arising in an infected...of RVF virus , in mosquitoes that fed on a vertebrate host 1990). As is well documented with other viruses infected with two different strains of RVF

  13. Theileria parva seroprevalence in traditionally kept cattle in southern Zambia and El Nino.

    PubMed

    Fandamu, P; Duchateau, L; Speybroeck, N; Marcotty, T; Mbao, V; Mtambo, J; Mulumba, M; Berkvens, D

    2005-04-01

    Sero-epidemiological surveys involving 27,526 cattle over a period of 8 years show that Theileria parva, the parasite causing East Coast fever (ECF) is found throughout southern Zambia. Higher values of T. parva sero-prevalence were observed in the plateau districts of Monze, Choma and Mazabuka than in the valley districts of Siavonga and Sinazongwe. Our results reveal a strong association between high T. parva sero-prevalence and the presence of the periodic climatic phenomenon known as the El Nino Southern Oscillation. More T. parva sero-positive samples were recorded during El Nino years (1997/98) (P<0.001) than other years in the study period. From this association, we conclude that Multiple El Nino Southern Oscillation Indices can be used to predict years with high or low ECF infection prevalence thereby contributing to the improved control of ECF in the area.

  14. Dietary heavy metal uptake by the least shrew, Cryptotis parva

    SciTech Connect

    Brueske, C.C.; Barrett, G.W. )

    1991-12-01

    Heavy metals from sewage sludge have been reported to concentrate in producers, in primary consumers, and in detritivores. Little research, however, has focused on the uptake of heavy metals from sewage sludge by secondary consumers. The Family Soricidae represents an ideal mammalian taxonomic group to investigate rates of heavy metal transfer between primary and secondary consumers. The least shrew (Cryptotis parva) was used to evaluate the accumulation of heavy metals while maintained on a diet of earthworms collected from long-term sludge-treated old-field communities. This secondary consumer is distributed widely through the eastern United States and its natural diet includes earthworms which makes it a potentially good indicator of heavy metal transfer in areas treated with municipal sludge.

  15. Exposure of vaccinated and naive cattle to natural challenge from buffalo-derived Theileria parva

    PubMed Central

    Sitt, Tatjana; Poole, E. Jane; Ndambuki, Gideon; Mwaura, Stephen; Njoroge, Thomas; Omondi, George P.; Mutinda, Matthew; Mathenge, Joseph; Prettejohn, Giles; Morrison, W. Ivan; Toye, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Integrative management of wildlife and livestock requires a clear understanding of the diseases transmitted between the two populations. The tick-borne protozoan parasite Theileria parva causes two distinct diseases in cattle, East Coast fever and Corridor disease, following infection with parasites derived from cattle or buffalo, respectively. In this study, cattle were immunized with a live sporozoite vaccine containing three T. parva isolates (the Muguga cocktail), which has been used extensively and successfully in the field to protect against cattle-derived T. parva infection. The cattle were exposed in a natural field challenge site containing buffalo but no other cattle. The vaccine had no effect on the survival outcome in vaccinated animals compared to unvaccinated controls: nine out of the 12 cattle in each group succumbed to T. parva infection. The vaccine also had no effect on the clinical course of the disease. A combination of clinical and post mortem observations and laboratory analyses confirmed that the animals died of Corridor disease. The results clearly indicate that the Muguga cocktail vaccine does not provide protection against buffalo-derived T. parva at this site and highlight the need to evaluate the impact of the composition of challenge T. parva populations on vaccine success in areas where buffalo and cattle are present. PMID:26005635

  16. Redescription of the pupa of Culex salinarius Coquillett and comparison with Culex nigripalpus Theobald.

    PubMed

    Darsie, Richard F; Day, Jonathan F

    2006-09-01

    The pupa of Culex salinarius is redescribed with updated chaetotaxal nomenclature and a full illustration. The pupal chaetotaxy of Cx. salinarius and the similar species Culex nigripalpus is compared.

  17. Culex (Culex) declarator, a mosquito species new to Florida.

    PubMed

    Darsie, Richard F; Shroyer, Donald A

    2004-09-01

    One specimen of a mosquito new to Florida, Culex declarator, was first found in 1998 in Indian River County. A 2nd specimen was collected in 2002. Beginning in September 2003, Cx. declarator adults were regularly encountered in routine mosquito surveillance sampling, with more than 300 specimens appearing in 45 collections. Prior to our find, the U.S. distrubution was thought to be restricted to south Texas. The full extent of this species' distribution in Florida has yet to be determined.

  18. First field evidence for natural vertical transmission of West Nile virus in Culex univittatus complex mosquitoes from Rift Valley province, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Miller, B R; Nasci, R S; Godsey, M S; Savage, H M; Lutwama, J J; Lanciotti, R S; Peters, C J

    2000-02-01

    West Nile virus is a mosquito borne flavivirus endemic over a large geographic area including Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. Although the virus generally causes a mild, self-limiting febrile illness in humans, it has sporadically caused central nervous system infections during epidemics. An isolate of West Nile virus was obtained from a pool of four male Culex univittatus complex mosquitoes while we were conducting an investigation of Rift Valley fever along the Kenya-Uganda border in February-March 1998. This represents the first field isolation of West Nile virus from male mosquitoes and strongly suggests that vertical transmission of the virus occurs in the primary maintenance mosquito vector in Kenya. A phylogenetic analysis of the complete amino acid sequence of the viral envelope glycoprotein demonstrated a sister relationship with a Culex pipiens mosquito isolate from Romania made in 1996. This unexpected finding probably reflects the role of migratory birds in disseminating West Nile virus between Africa and Europe.

  19. Population genetic structure of Theileria parva field isolates from indigenous cattle populations of Uganda.

    PubMed

    Muwanika, Vincent; Kabi, Fredrick; Masembe, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Theileria parva causes East Coast Fever (ECF) a protozoan infection which manifests as a non-symptomatic syndrome among endemically stable indigenous cattle populations. Knowledge of the current genetic diversity and population structure of T. parva is critical for predicting pathogen evolutionary trends to inform development of effective control strategies. In this study the population genetic structure of 78 field isolates of T. parva from indigenous cattle (Ankole, n=41 and East African shorthorn Zebu (EASZ), n=37) sampled from the different agro ecological zones (AEZs) of Uganda was investigated. A total of eight mini- and micro-satellite markers encompassing the four chromosomes of T. parva were used to genotype the study field isolates. The genetic diversity of the surveyed T. parva populations was observed to range from 0.643±0.55 to 0.663±0.41 among the Central and Western AEZs respectively. The overall Wright's F index showed significant genetic variation between the surveyed T. parva populations based on the different AEZs and indigenous cattle breeds (FST=0.133, p<0.01) and (FST=0.101, p<0.01) respectively. Significant pairwise population genetic differentiations (p<0.05) were observed with FST values ranging from 0.048 to 0.173 between the eastern and northern, eastern and western populations respectively. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed a high level of genetic and geographic sub-structuring among populations. Linkage disequilibrium was observed when populations from all the study AEZs were treated as a single population and when analysed separately. On the overall, the significant genetic diversity and geographic sub-structuring exhibited among the study T. parva isolates has critical implications for ECF control.

  20. Effects of warm winter temperature on the abundance and gonotrophic activity of Culex (Diptera: Culicidae) in California.

    PubMed

    Reisen, William K; Thiemann, Tara; Barker, Christopher M; Lu, Helen; Carroll, Brian; Fang, Ying; Lothrop, Hugh D

    2010-03-01

    Culex tarsalis Coquillett, Cx. quinquefasciatus Say, and Cx. pipiens L. were collected during the warm winter of 2009 using dry ice-baited and gravid traps and walk-in red boxes positioned in desert, urban, and agricultural habitats in Riverside, Los Angeles, Kern, and Yolo Counties. Temperatures exceeded the preceding 50 yr averages in all locations for most of January, whereas rainfall was absent or below average. Abundance of Culex species in traps during January ranged from 83 to 671% of the prior 5 yr average in all locations. Few females collected resting were in diapause during January based on follicular measurements. Evidence for early season gonotrophic activity included the detection of freshly bloodfed, gravid, and parous females in resting collections, gravid oviposition site-seeking females in gravid female traps, and nulliparous and parous host-seeking females at dry ice-baited traps. Female Culex seemed to employ multiple overwintering strategies in California, including larval and adult quiescence, adult female diapause, and an intermediate situation with adult females collected with enlarged follicles, but without evident vitellogenesis. West Nile, St. Louis, or western equine encephalitis viruses were not detected in 198 pools of adults or 56 pools of adults reared from field-collected immatures collected during January and February 2009. Our preliminary data may provide insight into how climate change may extend the mosquito season in California.

  1. Chemotherapy of East Coast fever: parvaquone treatment of clinical disease induced by isolates of Theileria parva.

    PubMed

    Dolan, T T; Young, A S; Leitch, B L; Stagg, D A

    1984-08-01

    Two experiments were carried out in which parvaquone was used to treat experimentally-induced acute clinical East Coast fever infections. In the first experiment, infections with Theileria parva parva (Kiambu 5) were induced by applying infected Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks or by inoculation of triturated infected-tick stabilate. The character of the disease was similar with both methods of infection and following a single treatment with parvaquone at 20 mg kg-1, 5 of 7 cattle in each group recovered. All untreated control cattle died. In the second experiment, 5 stabilate isolates from different locations within East Africa, and representative of the challenge likely to be met in the field, were used. Treatment was administered in 2 X 10 mg kg-1 doses 48 h apart. The isolates used were T. p. parva (Mbita), T. p. parva (Pugu), T. p. parva (Entebbe), T. p. lawrencei (Mara) and T. p. lawrencei/(Manyara); following treatment 3/7, 6/6, 6/7, 5/7 and 6/7 animals recovered, respectively. All untreated control cattle died. There was evidence of a difference in susceptibility of isolates to treatment, and some animals showed prolonged disease episodes. The nature of the response to treatment and the problems in treating a lympho-destructive disease are discussed.

  2. East coast fever caused by Theileria parva is characterized by macrophage activation associated with vasculitis and respiratory failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infect...

  3. Molecular detection of Wolbachia pipientis in natural populations of mosquito vectors of Dirofilaria immitis from continental Portugal: first detection in Culex theileri.

    PubMed

    DE Pinho Mixão, V; Mendes, A M; Maurício, I L; Calado, M M; Novo, M T; Belo, S; Almeida, A P G

    2016-09-01

    Wolbachia pipientis (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae) protects mosquitoes from infections with arboviruses and parasites. However, the effect of its co-infection on vector competence for Dirofilaria immitis (Spirurida: Onchocercidae) in the wild has not been investigated. This study aimed to screen vectors of D. immitis for wPip, to characterize these, and to investigate a possible association between the occurrence of W. pipientis and that of the nematode. The presence of W. pipientis was assessed in the five mosquito potential vectors of D. immitis in Portugal. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products were sequenced, and wPip haplotypes were determined by PCR-restricted fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Results showed that wPip was detected in 61.5% of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) pools and 6.3% of Culex theileri pools. wPip 16s rRNA sequences found in Cx. theileri exactly match those from Cx. pipiens, confirming a mosquito origin, rather than a nematode origin, as some specimens were infected with D. immitis. Only wPip haplotype I was found. No association was found between the presence of wPip and D. immitis in mosquitoes and hence a role for this endosymbiont in influencing vectorial competence is yet to be identified. This study contributes to understanding of wPip distribution in mosquito populations and, to the best of the authors' knowledge, is the first report of natural infections by wPip in Cx. theileri.

  4. Genome sequence of the free-living aerobic spirochete Turneriella parva type strain (HT), and emendation of the species Turneriella parva

    PubMed Central

    Stackebrandt, Erko; Chertkov, Olga; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Pan, Chongle; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Turneriella parva Levett et al. 2005 is the only species of the genus Turneriella which was established as a result of the reclassification of Leptospira parva Hovind-Hougen et al. 1982. Together with Leptonema and Leptospira, Turneriella constitutes the family Leptospiraceae, within the order Spirochaetales. Here we describe the features of this free-living aerobic spirochete together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Turneriella and the 13th member of the family Leptospiraceae for which a complete or draft genome sequence is now available. The 4,409,302 bp long genome with its 4,169 protein-coding and 45 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:23991255

  5. Genome sequence of the free-living aerobic spirochete Turneriella parva type strain (HT), and emendation of the species Turneriella parva

    SciTech Connect

    Stackebrandt, Erko; Chertkov, Olga; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Pan, Chongle; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Turneriella parva Levett et al. 2005 is the only species of the genus Turneriella which was es- tablished as a result of the reclassification of Leptospira parva Hovind-Hougen et al. 1982. Together with Leptonema and Leptospira, Turneriella constitutes the family Leptospiraceae, within the order Spirochaetales. Here we describe the features of this free-living aerobic spi- rochete together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first com- plete genome sequence of a member of the genus Turneriella and the 13th member of the family Leptospiraceae for which a complete or draft genome sequence is now available. The 4,409,302 bp long genome with its 4,169 protein-coding and 45 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Genome sequence of the free-living aerobic spirochete Turneriella parva type strain (H(T)), and emendation of the species Turneriella parva.

    PubMed

    Stackebrandt, Erko; Chertkov, Olga; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Pan, Chongle; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Turneriella parva Levett et al. 2005 is the only species of the genus Turneriella which was established as a result of the reclassification of Leptospira parva Hovind-Hougen et al. 1982. Together with Leptonema and Leptospira, Turneriella constitutes the family Leptospiraceae, within the order Spirochaetales. Here we describe the features of this free-living aerobic spirochete together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Turneriella and the 13(th) member of the family Leptospiraceae for which a complete or draft genome sequence is now available. The 4,409,302 bp long genome with its 4,169 protein-coding and 45 RNA genes is part of the G enomic E ncyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  7. Four p67 alleles identified in South African Theileria parva field samples.

    PubMed

    Sibeko, Kgomotso P; Geysen, Dirk; Oosthuizen, Marinda C; Matthee, Conrad A; Troskie, Milana; Potgieter, Frederick T; Coetzer, Jacobus A W; Collins, Nicola E

    2010-02-10

    Previous studies characterizing the Theileria parva p67 gene in East Africa revealed two alleles. Cattle-derived isolates associated with East Coast fever (ECF) have a 129bp deletion in the central region of the p67 gene (allele 1), compared to buffalo-derived isolates with no deletion (allele 2). In South Africa, Corridor disease outbreaks occur if there is contact between infected buffalo and susceptible cattle in the presence of vector ticks. Although ECF was introduced into South Africa in the early 20th century, it has been eradicated and it is thought that there has been no cattle to cattle transmission of T. parva since. The variable region of the p67 gene was amplified and the gene sequences analyzed to characterize South African T. parva parasites that occur in buffalo, in cattle from farms where Corridor disease outbreaks were diagnosed and in experimentally infected cattle. Four p67 alleles were identified, including alleles 1 and 2 previously detected in East African cattle and buffalo, respectively, as well as two novel alleles, one with a different 174bp deletion (allele 3), the other with a similar sequence to allele 3 but with no deletion (allele 4). Sequence variants of allele 1 were obtained from field samples originating from both cattle and buffalo. Allele 1 was also obtained from a bovine that tested T. parva positive from a farm near Ladysmith in the KwaZulu-Natal Province. East Coast fever was not diagnosed on this farm, but the p67 sequence was identical to that of T. parva Muguga, an isolate that causes ECF in Kenya. Variants of allele 2 were obtained from all T. parva samples from both buffalo and cattle, except Lad 10 and Zam 5. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that alleles 3 and 4 are monophyletic and diverged early from the other alleles. These novel alleles were not identified from South African field samples collected from cattle; however allele 3, with a p67 sequence identical to those obtained in South African field samples from

  8. Mitotic activity in dorsal epidermis of Rana pipiens.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Arce, H.; Mizell, S.

    1972-01-01

    Study of statistically significant rhythms of mitotic division in dorsal epidermis of frogs, Rana pipiens, exposed to a 12:12 light:dark environment for 14 days. The results include the findings that (1) male animals have a primary period of 22 hr in summer and 18 hr in winter, (2) female animals have an 18 hr period, and (3) parapinealectomy and blinding abolish the rhythm.

  9. A mild Theileria parva parasite with potential for immunisation against East Coast fever.

    PubMed

    Mbogo, S K; Kariuki, D P; Ngumi, P N; McHardy, N

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-three Friesian cattle were inoculated subcutaneously anterior to the left prescapular lymph node with 1 ml of a mild isolate of Theileria parva. The cattle developed low macroschizont parasitosis but no clinical reaction was observed. Thirty-five days later the cattle were grouped into five groups and challenged with five different Theileria parva isolates (four cattle-derived Theileria and one buffalo-derived Theileria). The cattle were all solidly immune to challenge with the cattle-derived Theileria isolates but three out of five of the cattle challenged with the buffalo-derived parasite died of theileriosis. All ten non-immunised control cattle developed severe theileriosis and were treated with buparvaquone (Butalex; Pitman-Moore).

  10. Influence of the microencapsulated pheromone from aged infusion as an oviposition medium of the West Nile virus vector Culex pipiens.

    PubMed

    Michaelakis, Antonios; Mihou, Anastasia P; Koliopoulos, George; Couladouros, Elias A

    2009-04-01

    The main tendency for the control of West Nile virus vectors, without the presence of disease, is to perform integrated programs minimizing chemicals by using environmentally friendly substances which act as oviposition attractants such as oviposition pheromones and infusions. This is the first time that an aged infusion is combined with aged pheromone (microencapsulated). Initially, three common plants in Greece were evaluated as a potential oviposition medium: Oxalis pes-carpae, Jasminum polyanthum, and Avena barbata. All revealed an excellent oviposition attractancy which was more than 80%. O. pes-carpae was used for further investigation and attractancy over time was also studied. Finally, the combination of the synthetic pheromone (6-acetoxy-5-hexadecanolide) with the O. pes-carpae infusion revealed a synergistic effect only for the first day. This project was a first detection for the potential use of microencapsulated synthetic pheromone with infusion and results are discussed.

  11. Effects of a Red Marker Dye on Aedes and Culex Larvae: Are There Implications for Operational Mosquito Control?

    PubMed

    Unlu, Isik; Leisnham, Paul T; Williams, Gregory M; Klingler, Kim; Dow, Garrett W; Kirchoff, Nicole; Jin, Sophie; Delisi, Nicholas; Montenegro, Katherine; Faraji, Ary

    2015-12-01

    Marker dyes are often mixed with liquid insecticide formulations prior to field applications to accurately determine the characteristics and penetration of droplets into targeted habitats. We have been using FD&C Red 40 Granular DM food dye at the rate of 20 g/liter in liquid solutions of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) for area-wide larvicide applications against the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus. The Bti and dye mix ratio has been recommended by pesticide manufacturers for testing under operational conditions, but no data exist on the effects of the dye itself on mosquito larvae. We tested the effects of the FD&C Red 40 food dye in laboratory bioassays against different strains of Ae. albopictus (New Jersey and Maryland) and Culex pipiens pipiens (Utah) at rates of 0.039 to 80.0 g/liter. We also conducted field application trials to measure dye concentrations up to 100 m downwind when mixed and applied according to manufacturer instructions. In laboratory bioassays, we found that mean survival in cups with dye were significantly different from the controls beginning at 10.0 g/liter for New Jersey Ae. albopictus and at 20.0 g/liter for Maryland Ae. albopictus and Utah Cx. p. pipiens. In field application trials, we recorded a maximum volume density of 1,152.8 nl/cm(2) and calculated the maximum concentration of dye at 9.09 × 10(-3) g/liter. Our results showed that although we detected greater effects of dye on Ae. albopictus in New Jersey experiments than Ae. albopictus in Maryland and Cx. p. pipiens from Utah, concentrations of the dye during operational applications were at least 1,100 times below concentrations that exhibited toxic effects for either species in the laboratory, suggesting that the dye will not interfere with accuracy of field bioassays. Our results conclusively demonstrate that the addition of the FD&C Red 40 marker dye does not alter the efficacy of the pesticide formulation by skewing results, but rather provides a valuable

  12. Analyses of genes encoding Theileria parva p104 and polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) reveal evidence of the presence of cattle-type alleles in the South African T. parva population.

    PubMed

    Sibeko, Kgomotso P; Collins, Nicola E; Oosthuizen, Marinda C; Troskie, Milana; Potgieter, Frederick T; Coetzer, Jacobus A W; Geysen, Dirk

    2011-09-27

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of PCR products (PCR-RFLP) and sequencing of the variable region of the p104 and PIM genes was performed on samples obtained from South African T. parva parasites originating from cattle on farms with suspected theileriosis and from buffalo. p104 and PIM PCR-RFLP profiles similar to those of the T. parva Muguga stock, an isolate that causes ECF in Kenya, were obtained from three of seven cattle samples collected on a farm near Ladysmith in KwaZulu-Natal Province. Amino acid sequences of the p104 and PIM genes from two of these samples were almost identical to the T. parva Muguga p104 and PIM sequences. This result supports findings from a recent p67 study in which p67 alleles similar to those of the T. parva Muguga stock were identified from the same samples. While these results suggest the presence of a cattle-derived T. parva parasite, reports of cattle-to-cattle transmission could not be substantiated and ECF was not diagnosed on this farm. Although extensive diversity of p104 and PIM gene sequences from South African T. parva isolates was demonstrated, no sequences identical to known cattle-type p104 and PIM alleles were identified from any of the buffalo T. parva samples analyzed. 'Mixed' PIM alleles containing both cattle- and buffalo-type amino acid motifs were identified for the first time, and there appeared to be selection of cattle-type and 'mixed'-type PIM sequences in the cattle samples examined.

  13. Isolation and characterization of a virus infecting the freshwater algae Chrysochromulina parva

    SciTech Connect

    Mirza, S.F.; Staniewski, M.A.; Short, C.M.; Long, A.M.; Chaban, Y.V.; Short, S.M.

    2015-12-15

    Water samples from Lake Ontario, Canada were tested for lytic activity against the freshwater haptophyte algae Chrysochromulina parva. A filterable lytic agent was isolated and identified as a virus via transmission electron microscopy and molecular methods. The virus, CpV-BQ1, is icosahedral, ca. 145 nm in diameter, assembled within the cytoplasm, and has a genome size of ca. 485 kb. Sequences obtained through PCR-amplification of DNA polymerase (polB) genes clustered among sequences from the family Phycodnaviridae, whereas major capsid protein (MCP) sequences clustered among sequences from either the Phycodnaviridae or Mimiviridae. Based on quantitative molecular assays, C. parva's abundance in Lake Ontario was relatively stable, yet CpV-BQ1's abundance was variable suggesting complex virus-host dynamics. This study demonstrates that CpV-BQ1 is a member of the proposed order Megavirales with characteristics of both phycodnaviruses and mimiviruses indicating that, in addition to its complex ecological dynamics, it also has a complex evolutionary history. - Highlights: • A virus infecting the algae C. parva was isolated from Lake Ontario. • Virus characteristics demonstrated that this novel virus is an NCLDV. • The virus's polB sequence suggests taxonomic affiliation with the Phycodnaviridae. • The virus's capsid protein sequences also suggest Mimiviridae ancestry. • Surveys of host and virus natural abundances revealed complex host–virus dynamics.

  14. Theileria annulata and T. parva infect and transform different bovine mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Spooner, R L; Innes, E A; Glass, E J; Brown, C G

    1989-01-01

    Bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were labelled with monoclonal antibodies recognizing bovine MHC class II, sIgM, monocyte, T-helper and T-cytotoxic cell phenotypes. They were sorted into positive and negative populations with a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). The cell populations were infected in vitro with sporozoites of either Theileria annulata or T. parva, and the degree of infection and transformation determined. The results showed that despite the many similarities between these two parasites, they infected different cells of the immune system. T. annulata preferentially infected MHC class II-positive cells but did not infect T cells. Monocytes were infected very efficiently by T. annulata but were uninfectable with T. parva. B cells were infected much more efficiently by T. annulata than T. parva. Cell lines derived from infections with T. annulata were analysed phenotypically. Virtually all reactivity was lost for the anti-sIgM and the anti-monocyte monoclonal antibodies post-infection and no T-cell markers were detected. PMID:2784413

  15. Prevalence and spatial distribution of Theileria parva in cattle under crop-livestock farming systems in Tororo District, Eastern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tick-borne diseases (TBDs) present a major economic burden to communities across East Africa. Farmers in East Africa must use acaracides to target ticks and prevent transmission of tick-borne diseases such as anaplasmosis, babesiosis, cowdriosis and theileriosis; the major causes of cattle mortality and morbidity. The costs of controlling East Coast Fever (ECF), caused by Theileria parva, in Uganda are significant and measures taken to control ticks, to be cost-effective, should take into account the burden of disease. The aim of the present work was to estimate the burden presented by T. parva and its spatial distribution in a crop-livestock production system in Eastern Uganda. Methods A cross sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence and spatial distribution of T. parva in Tororo District, Uganda. Blood samples were taken from all cattle (n: 2,658) in 22 randomly selected villages across Tororo District from September to December 2011. Samples were analysed by PCR and T. parva prevalence and spatial distribution determined. Results The overall prevalence of T. parva was found to be 5.3%. Herd level prevalence ranged from 0% to 21% with majority of the infections located in the North, North-Eastern and South-Eastern parts of Tororo District. No statistically significant differences in risk of infection were found between age classes, sex and cattle breed. Conclusions T. parva infection is widely distributed in Tororo District, Uganda. The prevalence and distribution of T. parva is most likely determined by spatial distribution of R. appendiculatus, restricted grazing of calves and preferential tick control targeting draft animals. PMID:24589227

  16. Redescription of the adults and new descriptions of the previously unknown immature stages of Culex (Culex) articularis Philippi, 1865 (Diptera: Culicidae) from central Chile.

    PubMed

    González, Christian R; Reyes, Carolina; Rada, Viviana

    2015-05-05

    Male and female adults of Culex (Culex) articularis Philippi are redescribed, and the 4th-instar larva and pupa are described and illustrated for the first time. Culex articularis is compared with other species of the subgenus Culex. Illustrations of diagnostic characters of the female, male genitalia, 4th-instar larva, and pupa are also provided.

  17. Redescription of the pupa of Culex (Culex) declarator Dyar and Knab (Diptera, Culicidae), with amendments to key to the Culex pupae of the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Darsie, Richard F; Day, Jonathan F

    2005-06-01

    The pupa of Culex declarator was partially described and illustrated by Lane. This species was recently discovered in Florida for the first time and a series of individual rearings have resulted in a number of pupae and an opportunity to redescribe it fully, with a complete illustration. Amendment to the key to the Culex pupae of the eastern United States is provided.

  18. Incremental effect of natural tick challenge on the infection and treatment method-induced immunity against T. parva in cattle under agro-pastoral systems in Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kazungu, Yvette E M; Mwega, Elisa; Neselle, Moses Ole; Sallu, Raphael; Kimera, Sharadhuli I; Gwakisa, Paul

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to assess the incremental effect of natural tick challenge on the infection and treatment method-induced immunity against T. parva under agro-pastoral systems in Simanjiro district, Northern Tanzania. T. parva specific antibody percent positivity and prevalence of T. parva parasites were studied in relation to duration post vaccination and proximity to Tarangire National park. A total of 381 cattle were included in this study, of which 127 were unvaccinated and 254 had been vaccinated at different time points between 2008 and 2014. Antibody percent positivity (PP) determined by the PIM-based T. parva ELISA and the prevalence of T. parva parasites detected by a nested PCR based on the p104 gene were used to compare vaccinated and unvaccinated cattle. Results showed that seroprevalence was significantly higher in vaccinated than unvaccinated cattle (OR 10.89, p = 0.0341). Only 1.6% (6/381) of all cattle were seronegative and 5/6 of these were unvaccinated. Prevalence of T. parva parasites was significantly higher in vaccinated (50.39%) than unvaccinated (19.69%) cattle (OR 2.03, p = 0.0144). While there was a positive association between PP and duration post vaccination but the latter was inversely associated with T. parva parasite prevalence. This study also showed that cattle which were closer to the park had higher antibody PP and T. parva prevalence. It is concluded that duration post vaccination as well as proximity from the wildlife in Tarangire National park together may exert an incremental effect on the outcome of ECF vaccination by influencing stronger antibody immunity of cattle and ability to withhold high T. parva infection pressure under constant field tick challenge. Further, the high seroprevalence in vaccinated and unvaccinated cattle suggests a likely state of endemic stability to T. parva in the study area.

  19. Tick burden and prevalence of Theileria parva infection in Tarime zebu cattle in the lake zone of Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Laisser, Emmanuel Levillal Katamboi; Kipanyula, Maulilio John; Msalya, George; Mdegela, Robinson Hammerthon; Karimuribo, Esron Daniel; Mwilawa, Anjello Joseph; Mwega, Elisa Daniel; Kusiluka, Lughano; Chenyambuga, Sebastian Wilson

    2014-12-01

    This study was carried out to assess the distribution, abundance of different tick genera and prevalence of Theileria parva infection in Tarime zebu cattle kept in selected wards of Serengeti and Tarime districts in Mara region. Adult ticks were identified and counted from half body parts of 360 animals which were extensively managed in communal land with natural pastures. Concurrently, blood samples were collected and thereafter DNA extracted and a nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) was done using primers specific for p104 gene to detect the presence of T. parva DNA. Ticks were identified into four groups: Amblyomma genus, Boophilus sub-genus of Rhipicephalus genus, other species of Rhipicephalus, and Hyalomma genus. Rhipicephalus genus accounted for 71.8 % of the total ticks, whereas Amblyomma, Boophilus sub-genus of Rhipicephalus genus and Hyalomma constituted 14.1, 14.0 and 0.1 %, respectively. There were more animals (p < 0.05) infested with ticks in Tarime district (96.1 %) than in Serengeti (61.7 %). The average counts of ticks were higher in adult animals (p < 0.05) than in young animals. The overall prevalence of T. parva was 27.7 % and was higher (p < 0.05) in Serengeti (38.3 %) than in Tarime district (16.7 %). However, all animals tested positive for T. parva did not show any clinical signs of East Coast fever (ECF), suggesting the existence of subclinical infection in Tarime zebu. These results suggest that Tarime cattle can tolerate ECF infection and are likely to serve as potential carriers of T. parva to other less-tolerant cattle breeds in mixed herds. Since Tarime cattle are preferred by most farmers with mixed herds, routine screening for T. parva is highly recommended to minimize introduction of infected cattle into an immunologically naive population.

  20. Characterization of the gene encoding the polymorphic immunodominant molecule, a neutralizing antigen of Theileria parva

    SciTech Connect

    Toye, P.G.; Metzelaar, M.J.; Wijngaard, P.L.J.

    1995-08-01

    Theileria parva, a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite related to Plasmodium spp., causes the disease East Coast fever, an acute and usually fatal lymphoproliferative disorder of cattle in Africa. Previous studies using sera from cattle that have survived infection identified a polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) that is expressed by both the infective sporozoite stage of the parasite and the intracellular schizont. Here we show that mAb specific for the PIM Ag can inhibit sporozoite invasion of lymphocytes in vitro. A cDNA clone encoding the PIM Ag of the T. parva (Muguga) stock was obtained by using these mAb in a novel eukaryotic expression cloning system that allows isolation of cDNA encoding cytoplasmic or surface Ags. To establish the molecular basis of the polymorphism of PIM, the cDNA of the PIM Ag from a buffalo-derived T. parva stock was isolated and its sequence was compared with that of the cattle-derived Muguga PIM. The two cDNAs showed considerable identity in both the 5{prime} and 3{prime} regions, but there was substantial sequence divergence in the central regions. Several types of repeated sequences were identified in the variant regions. In the Muguga form of the molecule, there were five tandem repeats of the tetrapeptide, QPEP, that were shown, by transfection of a deleted version of the PIM gene, not to react with several anti-PIM mAbs. By isolating and sequencing the genomic version of the gene, we identified two small introns in the 3{prime} region of the gene. Finally, we showed that polyclonal rat Abs against recombinant PIM neutralize sporozoite infectivity in vitro, suggesting that the PIM Ag should be evaluated for its capacity to immunize cattle against East Coast Fever.

  1. Culex genome is not just another genome for comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B P Niranjan; Labbé, Pierrick; Corbel, Vincent

    2012-03-30

    Formal publication of the Culex genome sequence has closed the human disease vector triangle by meeting the Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti genome sequences. Compared to these other mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus possesses many specific hallmark characteristics, and may thus provide different angles for research which ultimately leads to a practical solution for controlling the ever increasing burden of insect-vector-borne diseases around the globe. We argue the special importance of the cosmopolitan species- Culex genome sequence by invoking many interesting questions and the possible of potential of the Culex genome to answer those.

  2. Chemoprophylaxis of Theileria annulata and Theileria parva infections of calves with buparvaquone.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, G M; Brown, C G; Kirvar, B E; Thomas, M; Williamson, S M; Bell-Sakyi, L J; Sparagano, O

    1998-07-17

    A clinical trial testing the prophylactic effect of a 5 mg kg-1 dose of buparvaquone on either Theileria annulata or Theileria parva experimental infections of calves demonstrated its efficacy for periods of at least seven days. The drug given 1 h or seven days before 50% lethal T. annulata sporozoite infection protected all eight calves, but prophylaxis was insufficient after 14 days to protect two out of four calves from severe reaction. When immunity was challenged by a lethal second parasite dose a month after the first, all these calves were immune. In the T. parva trial, calves given drug 1 h or seven days before a 25% lethal infection underwent minimal reaction, but some were over-protected and were susceptible to a similar challenge sporozoite dose. Although drug levels remaining 14 days after prophylaxis protected these calves from the mild challenge, some parameters measured were within the range of the 'no drug' control group. These results indicated the effectiveness of a single 5 mg kg-1 dose of buparvaquone for more than seven days but also the potential risk of its use in the infection and treatment method of immunisation. It is suggested that there may be circumstances where simple field prophylactic treatment with buparvaquone may be beneficial.

  3. A generic weather-driven model to predict mosquito population dynamics applied to species of Anopheles, Culex and Aedes genera of southern France.

    PubMed

    Ezanno, P; Aubry-Kientz, M; Arnoux, S; Cailly, P; L'Ambert, G; Toty, C; Balenghien, T; Tran, A

    2015-06-01

    An accurate understanding and prediction of mosquito population dynamics are needed to identify areas where there is a high risk of mosquito-borne disease spread and persistence. Simulation tools are relevant for supporting decision-makers in the surveillance of vector populations, as models of vector population dynamics provide predictions of the greatest risk periods for vector abundance, which can be particularly helpful in areas with a highly variable environment. We present a generic weather-driven model of mosquito population dynamics, which was applied to one species of each of the genera Anopheles, Culex, and Aedes, located in the same area and thus affected by similar weather conditions. The predicted population dynamics of Anopheles hyrcanus, Culex pipiens, and Aedes caspius were not similar. An. hyrcanus was abundant in late summer. Cx. pipiens was less abundant but throughout the summer. The abundance of both species showed a single large peak with few variations between years. The population dynamics of Ae. caspius showed large intra- and inter-annual variations due to pulsed egg hatching. Predictions of the model were compared to longitudinal data on host-seeking adult females. Data were previously obtained using CDC-light traps baited with carbon dioxide dry ice in 2005 at two sites (Marais du Viguerat and Tour Carbonnière) in a favourable temperate wetland of southern France (Camargue). The observed and predicted periods of maximal abundance for An. hyrcanus and Cx. pipiens tallied very well. Pearson's coefficients for these two species were over 75% for both species. The model also reproduced the major trends in the intra-annual fluctuations of Ae. caspius population dynamics, with peaks occurring in early summer and following the autumn rainfall events. Few individuals of this species were trapped so the comparison of predicted and observed dynamics was not relevant. A global sensitivity analysis of the species-specific models enabled us to

  4. Photoinduced toxicity of fluoranthene to northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens)

    SciTech Connect

    Monson, P.D.; Call, D.J.; Cox, D.A.; Liber, K.; Ankley, G.T.

    1999-02-01

    Rana pipiens larvae were exposed for 48 h in a flow-through system to clean water or five concentrations of the phototoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fluoranthene. Following this uptake period, the larvae were divided into four groups: one for immediate tissue residue analysis, a second for residue analysis following 48 h of depuration in clean water, and two for a 48-h exposure in clean water to ultraviolet (UV) light at two different levels. At the highest treatment, mean intensity was 8.12 {+-} 0.19 {times} 10{sup 2} {micro}W/cm{sup 2}, whereas at a lower treatment the UVA intensity was 4.45 {+-} 0.05 {times} 10{sup 2} {micro}W/cm{sup 2}. Larval frogs bioaccumulated fluoranthene in direct proportion to the water exposure concentrations, with initial whole-body PAH concentrations of 1.48, 3.53, 4.85, 11.3, and 18.7 {micro}g/g at the five treatment levels. No mortality of the animals occurred during the 48-h uptake phase. When the frogs were placed in clean water, the fluoranthene was rapidly depurated, with up to 80% lost in 48 h. Exposure to UV light following fluoranthene exposure significantly enhanced toxicity of the PAH. Median time to death decreased as the product of UVA light intensity and fluoranthene body residue increased. For larval R. Pipiens, sufficient tissue residues of fluoranthene were bioaccumulated within 48 h, at water exposure concentrations in the range of 2 to 10 {micro}g/L, to be lethal when combined with a UVA exposure simulating a fraction of summertime, midday sunlight in northern latitudes.

  5. A Babesia bovis gene syntenic to Theileria parva p67 is expressed in blood and tick stage parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Completion of the Babesia bovis (T2Bo strain) genome provides detailed data concerning the predicted proteome of this parasite, and allows for a bioinformatics approach to gene discovery. Comparative genomics of the hemoprotozoan parasites B. bovis and Theileria parva revealed a highly conserved syn...

  6. Absolute quantification of the host-to-parasite DNA ratio in theileria parva-infected lymphocyte cell lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theileria parva is a tick-transmitted intracellular apicomplexan pathogen of cattle in sub-Saharan Africa that causes East Coast fever (ECF). ECF is an acute fatal disease that kills over one million cattle annually, imposing a tremendous burden on African small-holder cattle farmers. The pathology ...

  7. Theileria parva genetic diversity and haemoparasite prevalence in cattle and wildlife in and around Lake Mburo National Park in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Oura, Chris A L; Tait, Andy; Asiimwe, Benon; Lubega, George W; Weir, William

    2011-06-01

    Wildlife, especially Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer), are thought to act as a reservoir for many of the important tick-borne pathogens of cattle. In this study, we have determined the prevalence of the most significant tick-borne haemoparasites in wildlife (buffalo, impala, eland and bushbuck) as well as in cattle grazing inside and neighbouring Lake Mburo National Park (LMNP) in Uganda. A high percentage of buffalo were carriers of Theileria parva, Theileria mutans, Theileria velifera, Theileria buffeli and Theileria sp. (buffalo) as well as Anaplasma marginale and Anaplasma centrale. The majority of impala sampled were carriers of A. centrale, and all were carriers of an unidentified Babesia/Theileria species. The eland and bushbuck sampled were all carriers of Theileria taurotragi and Theileria buffeli, and the majority were carriers of T. mutans. The bushbuck sampled were also carriers for Erhlichia bovis. There were some differences in the prevalence of haemoparasites between the calves sampled inside and neighbouring LMNP. In order to address the question of whether there is evidence for interbreeding between buffalo-associated and cattle-associated T. parva populations, multi-locus genotypes (MLGs) of T. parva (based on micro-satellite markers) from buffalo and from calves grazing inside and outside LMNP were compared, and the results revealed that buffalo and cattle gene pools were distinct, showing no evidence for transmission of buffalo-derived T. parva genotypes to the cattle population.

  8. Redescription of the pupa of Culex restuans and a comparison with Culex nigripalpus.

    PubMed

    Darsie, Richard F; Day, Jonathan F

    2007-06-01

    The pupa of Culex restuans is redescribed in detail with a chaetotaxal table and a full illustration. The chaetotaxy of the pupa of Cx. restuans is compared with that of Cx. nigripalpus, the primary vector of St. Louis encephalitis and West Nile virus in Florida.

  9. Genetic diversity of Wolbachia endosymbionts in Culex quinquefasciatus from Hawai`i, Midway Atoll, and Samoa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, Carter T.; Watcher-Weatherwax, William; Lapointe, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Incompatible insect techniques are potential methods for controlling Culex quinquefasciatus and avian disease transmission in Hawai‘i without the use of pesticides or genetically modified organisms. The approach is based on naturally occurring sperm-egg incompatibilities within the Culex pipiens complex that are controlled by different strains of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis (wPip). Incompatibilities can be unidirectional (crosses between males infected with strain A and females infected with strain B are fertile, while reciprocal crosses are not) or bidirectional (reciprocal crosses between sexes with different wPip strains are infertile). The technique depends on release of sufficient numbers of male mosquitoes infected with an incompatible wPip strain to suppress mosquito populations and reduce transmission of introduced avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) and Avipoxvirus in native forest bird habitats. Both diseases are difficult to manage using more traditional methods based on removal and treatment of larval habitats and coordination of multiple approaches may be needed to control this vector. We characterized the diversity of Wolbachia strains in C. quinquefasciatus from Hawai‘i, Kaua‘i, Midway Atoll, and American Samoa with a variety of genetic markers to identify compatibility groups and their distribution within and between islands. We confirmed the presence of wPip with multilocus sequence typing, tested for local genetic variability using 16 WO prophage genes, and identified similarities to strains from other parts of the world with a transposable element (tr1). We also tested for genetic differences in ankyrin motifs (ank2 and pk1) which have been used to classify wPip strains into five worldwide groups (wPip1–wPip5) that vary in compatibility with each other based on experimental crosses. We found a mixture of both widely distributed and site specific genotypes based on presence or absence of WO prophage and transposable

  10. Molecular characterization of live Theileria parva sporozoite vaccine stabilates reveals extensive genotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ekta H; Lubembe, Donald M; Gachanja, James; Mwaura, Stephen; Spooner, Paul; Toye, Philip

    2011-06-30

    The current Infection and Treatment Method of vaccination against East Coast fever comprises an inoculation of live Theileria parva sporozoites and simultaneous administration of oxytetracycline. Immunization with a combination of parasite types has been shown to provide broader protection than inoculation of individual strains. In this study, we used a high-throughput capillary electrophoresis system to determine the genotypic composition of the Muguga Cocktail, a widely used vaccine stabilate derived from three seed stabilates-Muguga, Serengeti-transformed and Kiambu 5. Five satellite markers were used to genotype the vaccine and reference stabilates from two commercial-scale preparations of the vaccine. In addition, 224 cloned cell lines established by infection of bovine lymphocytes with T. parva parasites from the component stabilates were genotyped. The results indicate that, for the recently prepared batch, there are at least eight genotypes in each of the Muguga and the Serengeti-transformed stabilates, while parasites from the Kiambu 5 stabilate showed no diversity at the five loci. The Serengeti-transformed stabilate contained parasites of the Kiambu 5 genotype and of two genotypes present in the Muguga stabilate, whereas there were no genotypes common to the Muguga and Kiambu 5 stabilates. When stabilates from the two vaccine batches were compared, no allelic variations were identified between the Muguga and Kiambu 5 parasites, while lack of sufficient clones prevented a full comparison of the Serengeti-transformed stabilates. The findings will facilitate examination of the extent to which the vaccine strains become resident in areas under vaccination, the identification of 'breakthrough' strains and the establishment of the quality assurance protocols to detect variations in the production of the vaccine. The cloned cell lines will be useful for further understanding the antigenic diversity of parasites in the vaccine.

  11. Local impact of temperature and precipitation on West Nile virus infection in Culex species mosquitoes in northeast Illinois, USA

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Models of the effects of environmental factors on West Nile virus disease risk have yielded conflicting outcomes. The role of precipitation has been especially difficult to discern from existing studies, due in part to habitat and behavior characteristics of specific vector species and because of differences in the temporal and spatial scales of the published studies. We used spatial and statistical modeling techniques to analyze and forecast fine scale spatial (2000 m grid) and temporal (weekly) patterns of West Nile virus mosquito infection relative to changing weather conditions in the urban landscape of the greater Chicago, Illinois, region for the years from 2004 to 2008. Results Increased air temperature was the strongest temporal predictor of increased infection in Culex pipiens and Culex restuans mosquitoes, with cumulative high temperature differences being a key factor distinguishing years with higher mosquito infection and higher human illness rates from those with lower rates. Drier conditions in the spring followed by wetter conditions just prior to an increase in infection were factors in some but not all years. Overall, 80% of the weekly variation in mosquito infection was explained by prior weather conditions. Spatially, lower precipitation was the most important variable predicting stronger mosquito infection; precipitation and temperature alone could explain the pattern of spatial variability better than could other environmental variables (79% explained in the best model). Variables related to impervious surfaces and elevation differences were of modest importance in the spatial model. Conclusion Finely grained temporal and spatial patterns of precipitation and air temperature have a consistent and significant impact on the timing and location of increased mosquito infection in the northeastern Illinois study area. The use of local weather data at multiple monitoring locations and the integration of mosquito infection data from

  12. Recognition of Culex Bidens Dyar and Culex Interfor Dyar (Diptera: Culicidae) as Separate Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    male genitalia of these species are described and distinguished. Bram (1967) synonymized Culex (Cu7exJ interfor Dyar, 1928, with Cx. (Cux. J bidens...Dyar, 1922, on the basis of similarity in the male genitalia. The lectotype was the only male of interfor available to Bram, and he apparently...properly assess the status of interfor . In 1983 we notice !! that males of bidens collected in Santa Fe Province, Argentina could be separated into two

  13. Seasonal abundance of Culex nigripalpus Theobald and Culex salinarius Coquillett in north Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Zyzak, Michael; Loyless, Tom; Cope, Stanton; Wooster, Mark; Day, Jonathan F

    2002-06-01

    North Florida is a transition zone between widespread Culex nigripalpus populations to the south and focal Culex salinarius populations to the north. Culex nigripalpus is a vector of St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) and eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) viruses in south Florida, while Cx. salinarius is a suspected New World vector of West Nile (WN) virus. Abundant vector populations are often a prerequisite for epidemic and epizootic transmission of arboviruses. Extensive SLE transmission has never been reported from north Florida, but sporadic WN transmission was reported there during the summer of 2001. The disparate flavivirus transmission patterns observed in north and south Florida may be due, in part, to the local geographical and seasonal distribution of Culex vectors. Here we report that from May 1991 to April 1994, Cx. salinarius was most commonly observed during the winter and spring in northeast Florida (Duval County), whereas Cx. nigripalpus was most abundant during the summer and autumn. An unusually mild spring in 1991 allowed Cx. nigripalpus to reproduce early in the year, resulting in a summer population that emerged more than 8 wks earlier than in 1992 and 1993. The 1991 Cx. nigripalpus population persisted through October, when SLE transmission was detected by sentinel chickens. Transmission of SLE was not detected in Duval County during 1992 or 1993. These data indicate that mild winter and spring conditions in north Florida may favor increased abundance and survival of Cx. nigripalpus in a region where this species is normally not abundant. A seasonal shift in population structure may increase the transmission risk of arboviruses for which Cx. nigripalpus is a competent vector, including SLE, WN, and EEE.

  14. Potential for North American Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) to Transmit Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine which biting insects should be targeted for control should Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) be detected in North America, we evaluated Culex erraticus, Culex erythrothorax, Culex pipiens, Culex quinquefasciatus, Culex tarsalis, Aedes dorsalis, Aedes vexans, Anopheles quadrimaculatus, and ...

  15. Nucleotide diversity of the colorless green alga Polytomella parva (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta): high for the mitochondrial telomeres, surprisingly low everywhere else.

    PubMed

    Smith, David Roy; Lee, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Silent-site nucleotide diversity data (π(silent)) can provide insights into the forces driving genome evolution. Here we present π(silent) statistics for the mitochondrial and nuclear DNAs of Polytomella parva, a nonphotosynthetic green alga with a highly reduced, linear fragmented mitochondrial genome. We show that this species harbors very little genetic diversity, with the exception of the mitochondrial telomeres, which have an excess of polymorphic sites. These data are compared with previously published π(silent) values from the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of the model species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri, which are close relatives of P. parva, and are used to understand the modes and tempos of genome evolution within green algae.

  16. Detection of Theileria parva antibodies in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in the livestock-wildlife interface areas of Zambia.

    PubMed

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Siamudaala, Victor; Matandiko, Wigganson; Mulumba, Misheck; Nambota, Andrew; Munyeme, Musso; Mutoloki, Stephen; Nonga, Hezron

    2009-12-03

    A serolocigical survey was conducted for the detection of Theileria parva antibodies in 176 African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer) sampled between 1996 and 2005 in livestock-wildlife interface areas of Zambia. Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, Rhipicephalus species, and Amblyomma variegatum were the most abundant tick species identified on buffaloes. T. parva sero-positives were reported in buffaloes sampled from game management areas at Mlanga and Nanzhila bordering the Kafue National Parks and in the Lochnivar National Park while buffaloes sampled from Lower Zambezi National Park were sero-negative. Given that Game Management Areas serve as interface areas that permit the co-existence of livestock and wildlife in similar ecological habitats our findings suggest that buffaloes could play a significant role in the epidemiology of theileriosis in livestock-wildlife interface areas. Thus far, the disease has only been reported in livestock and is herein being reported in the African buffalo for the first time in Zambia.

  17. Jun NH2-terminal kinase is constitutively activated in T cells transformed by the intracellular parasite Theileria parva.

    PubMed

    Galley, Y; Hagens, G; Glaser, I; Davis, W; Eichhorn, M; Dobbelaere, D

    1997-05-13

    When T cells become infected by the parasite Theileria parva, they acquire a transformed phenotype and no longer require antigen-specific stimulation or exogenous growth factors. This is accompanied by constitutive interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-2 receptor expression. Transformation can be reversed entirely by elimination of the parasites using the specific drug BW720c. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase and jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) are members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family, which play a central role in the regulation of cellular differentiation and proliferation and also participate in the regulation of IL-2 and IL-2 receptor gene expression. T. parva was found to induce an unorthodox pattern of mitogen-activated protein kinase expression in infected T cells. JNK-1 and JNK-2 are constitutively active in a parasite-dependent manner, but have altered properties. In contrast, extracellular signal-regulated kinase-2 is not activated even though its activation pathway is functionally intact. Different components of the T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent signal transduction pathways also were examined. The TCRzeta or CD3epsilon chains were found not to be phosphorylated and T. parva-transformed T cells were resistant to inhibitors that block the early steps of T cell activation. Compounds that inhibit the progression of T cells to proliferation, however, were inhibitory. Our data provide the first example, to our knowledge, for parasite-mediated JNK activation, and our findings strongly suggest that T. parva not only lifts the requirement for antigenic stimulation but also entirely bypasses early TCR-dependent signal transduction pathways to induce continuous proliferation.

  18. Selective toxicity of persian gulf sea cucumber holothuria parva on human chronic lymphocytic leukemia b lymphocytes by direct mitochondrial targeting.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Ahmad; Motallebi, Abbasali; Ayatollahi, Maryam; Seydi, Enayatollah; Mohseni, Ali Reza; Nazemi, Melika; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2017-04-01

    Natural products isolated from marine environment are well known for their pharmacodynamic potential in diversity of disease treatments such as cancer or inflammatory conditions. Sea cucumbers are one of the marine animals of the phylum Echinoderm. Many studies have shown that the sea cucumber contains antioxidants and anti-cancer compounds. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a disease characterized by the relentless accumulation of CD5(+) B lymphocytes. CLL is the most common leukemia in adults, about 25-30% of all leukemias. In this study B lymphocytes and their mitochondria (cancerous and non-cancerous) were obtained from peripheral blood of human subjects and B lymphocyte cytotoxicity assay, and caspase 3 activation along with mitochondrial upstream events of apoptosis signaling including reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mitochondrial swelling were determined following the addition of Holothuria parva extract to both cancerous and non-cancerous B lymphocytes and their mitochondria. Our in vitro finding showed that mitochondrial ROS formation, MMP collapse, and mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release were significantly (P < 0.05) increased after addition of different concentrations of H. parva only in cancerous BUT NOT normal non-cancerous mitochondria. Consistently, different concentrations of H. parva significantly (P < 0.05) increased cytotoxicity and caspase 3 activation only in cancerous BUT NOT normal non-cancerous B lymphocytes. These results showed that H. parva methanolic extract has a selective mitochondria mediated apoptotic effect on chronic lymphocytic leukemia B lymphocytes hence may be promising in the future anticancer drug development for treatment of CLL. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1158-1169, 2017.

  19. Culex (Melanoconion) panocossa from peninsular Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Blosser, Erik M; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D

    2017-03-01

    Culex (Melanoconion) panocossa is a suspected vector of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus in Central America. Prior to this report, Cx. panocossa was known from Central America (Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, southern Mexico, Panama), northern South America (Colombia, Venezuela) and the Greater Antilles (Cuba and Jamaica). Larvae (n=5) and adults (n=4286) of Cx. panocossa were collected at two locations near Homestead, FL, which indicates substantial established populations of this probable vector species in the continental US. Since larvae of Cx. panocossa are associated with Pistia spp. (water lettuce), the distribution of this mosquito is likely to expand in Florida, where water lettuce is a major invasive plant in freshwater ecosystems. The putative establishment of Cx. panocossa in Florida is of significant concern from a public health perspective, as its proliferation in developed areas could link historically sylvatic transmission foci of Everglades virus with populated centers such as the greater Miami Metropolitan area.

  20. East Coast Fever Caused by Theileria parva Is Characterized by Macrophage Activation Associated with Vasculitis and Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David A.; Frevert, Charles W.; Nelson, Danielle D.; Morrison, W. Ivan; Knowles, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infected cattle revealed large numbers of CD3- and CD20-negative intralesional mononuclear cells. Due to this finding, we hypothesized that macrophages play an important role in Theileria parva disease pathogenesis. Data presented here demonstrates that terminal ECF in both Holstein and Boran cattle is largely due to multisystemic histiocytic responses and resultant tissue damage. Furthermore, the combination of these histologic changes with the clinical findings, including lymphadenopathy, prolonged pyrexia, multi-lineage leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia is consistent with macrophage activation syndrome. All animals that succumbed to infection exhibited lymphohistiocytic vasculitis of small to medium caliber blood and lymphatic vessels. In pulmonary, lymphoid, splenic and hepatic tissues from Holstein cattle, the majority of intralesional macrophages were positive for CD163, and often expressed large amounts of IL-17. These data define a terminal ECF pathogenesis in which parasite-driven lymphoproliferation leads to secondary systemic macrophage activation syndrome, mononuclear vasculitis, pulmonary edema, respiratory failure and death. The accompanying macrophage phenotype defined by CD163 and IL-17 is presented in the context of this pathogenesis. PMID:27195791

  1. Stable, germ-line transformation of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Allen, M L; O'Brochta, D A; Atkinson, P W; Levesque, C S

    2001-09-01

    A Hermes-based transposable element transformation system incorporating an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) marker was used to produce two transgenic lines of Culex quinquefasciatus (Say). The transformation frequency was approximately 12% and transformation of Culex was shown to be dependent on the presence of Hermes transposase. Injected Culex embryos were treated with four different heat shock regimes, two of which produced transformed individuals. These individuals were mated with wild-type mosquitoes and produced offspring which expressed the dominant EGFP gene in Mendelian ratios predicted for the stable integration of a gene at a single locus. The two transformed lines displayed distinct patterns of phenotypic expression, the expression of which has remained stable after fifteen generations. In these transgenic lines both the Hermes element and flanking plasmid DNA integrated into the Culex genome, as has been previously seen in Hermes-mediated transgenic strains of Aedes aegypti (L.). The high frequency of Culex transformation together with the dependence on the presence of Hermes transposase suggests that, as for Ae. aegypti, this mode of transposition into the germ-line genome occurs by an alternate mechanisms to the cut and paste type of transposition seen for this element in other insect species and in the somatic nuclei of mosquitoes. This is the first report of the genetic transformation of a species in the genus Culex and demonstrates that this medically important mosquito species can now, along with several other Culicine and Anopheline mosquito species, be genetically manipulated.

  2. The African buffalo parasite Theileria. sp. (buffalo) can infect and immortalize cattle leukocytes and encodes divergent orthologues of Theileria parva antigen genes

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, R.P.; Hemmink, J.D.; Morrison, W.I.; Weir, W.; Toye, P.G.; Sitt, T.; Spooner, P.R.; Musoke, A.J.; Skilton, R.A.; Odongo, D.O.

    2015-01-01

    African Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is the wildlife reservoir of multiple species within the apicomplexan protozoan genus Theileria, including Theileria parva which causes East coast fever in cattle. A parasite, which has not yet been formally named, known as Theileria sp. (buffalo) has been recognized as a potentially distinct species based on rDNA sequence, since 1993. We demonstrate using reverse line blot (RLB) and sequencing of 18S rDNA genes, that in an area where buffalo and cattle co-graze and there is a heavy tick challenge, T. sp. (buffalo) can frequently be isolated in culture from cattle leukocytes. We also show that T. sp. (buffalo), which is genetically very closely related to T. parva, according to 18s rDNA sequence, has a conserved orthologue of the polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) that forms the basis of the diagnostic ELISA used for T. parva serological detection. Closely related orthologues of several CD8 T cell target antigen genes are also shared with T. parva. By contrast, orthologues of the T. parva p104 and the p67 sporozoite surface antigens could not be amplified by PCR from T. sp. (buffalo), using conserved primers designed from the corresponding T. parva sequences. Collectively the data re-emphasise doubts regarding the value of rDNA sequence data alone for defining apicomplexan species in the absence of additional data. ‘Deep 454 pyrosequencing’ of DNA from two Theileria sporozoite stabilates prepared from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks fed on buffalo failed to detect T. sp. (buffalo). This strongly suggests that R. appendiculatus may not be a vector for T. sp. (buffalo). Collectively, the data provides further evidence that T. sp. (buffalo). is a distinct species from T. parva. PMID:26543804

  3. Sentinel site-enhanced near-real time surveillance documenting West Nile virus circulation in two Culex mosquito species indicating different transmission characteristics, Djibouti City, Djibouti.

    PubMed

    Faulde, Michael K; Spiesberger, Michael; Abbas, Babiker

    2012-08-01

    The Horn of Africa represents a region formerly known to be highly susceptible to mosquito-borne infectious diseases. In order to investigate whether autochthonous WNV transmission occurs in the Djibouti City area, in how far, and which of, the endemic Culex mosquito species are involved in WNV circulation activity,and whether sentinel site-enhanced near-real time surveillance (SSE-NRTS) may increase WNV detection sensitivity, mosquito vector monitoring was conducted from January 2010 to June 2012. Six monitoring locations, including two identified sentinel sites, considered most probable for potential anthroponotic and zoonotic virus circulation activity, have been continuously employed. Among the 20431 mosquitoes collected, 19069 (93.4%) were Cx. quinquefasciatus, and 1345 (6.6%) Cx. pipiens ssp. torridus. WNV lineage 2 circulation activity was detected between December 20th, 2010 and January 7th, 2011. Overall, 19 WNV RNA-positive mosquito pools were detected. Generally, urban environment-specific WNV-RNA circulation took place in Cx. pipiens ssp. torridus, whereas periurban and rural area-linked circulation was detected only in Cx. quinquefasciatus. Serological investigation data from 10 volunteers employed at the dislocated zoonotic WNV transmission sentinel site suggest that six persons (60%) had an acute, or recent, WNV infection. Results show that WNV should be considered endemic for Djibouti and sentinel site-enhanced near-real time surveillance is an elegant and highly effective epidemiological tool. In Djibouti, the endemicity level, public health impact and transmission modes of vector-borne diseases in concordance with locally optimized monitoring and control regimen deserve further investigation.

  4. Identification of Theileria parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) 18S rRNA gene sequence variants in the African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Chaisi, Mamohale E; Sibeko, Kgomotso P; Collins, Nicola E; Potgieter, Fred T; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2011-12-15

    Theileria parva is the causative agent of Corridor disease in cattle in South Africa. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is the reservoir host, and, as these animals are important for eco-tourism in South Africa, it is compulsory to test and certify them disease free prior to translocation. A T. parva-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test based on the small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene is one of the tests used for the diagnosis of the parasite in buffalo and cattle in South Africa. However, because of the high similarity between the 18S rRNA gene sequences of T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo), the latter is also amplified by the real-time PCR primers, although it is not detected by the T. parva-specific hybridization probes. Preliminary sequencing studies have revealed a small number of sequence differences within the 18S rRNA gene in both species but the extent of this sequence variation is unknown. The aim of the current study was to sequence the 18S rRNA genes of T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo), and to determine whether all identified genotypes can be correctly detected by the real-time PCR assay. The reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was used to identify T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) positive samples from buffalo blood samples originating from the Kruger National Park, Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, the Greater Limpopo Transfrontier Park, and a private game ranch in the Hoedspruit area. T. parva and Theileria sp. (buffalo) were identified in 42% and 28%, respectively, of 252 samples, mainly as mixed infections. The full-length 18S rRNA gene of selected samples was amplified, cloned and sequenced. From a total of 20 sequences obtained, 10 grouped with previously published T. parva sequences from GenBank while 10 sequences grouped with a previously published Theileria sp. (buffalo) sequence. All these formed a monophyletic group with known pathogenic Theileria species. Our phylogenetic analyses confirm the

  5. Ovicidal activity of neem products (azadirachtin) against Culex tarsalis and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Su, T; Mulla, M S

    1998-06-01

    Bioactive compounds contained in the seed kernel and other parts of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) have been found to show insecticidal activities and other effects in many species of insects. These activities include antifeedancy, growth regulation, fecundity suppression, male sterility, oviposition repellency, changes in biological fitness such as loss of flying ability, immunodepression, enzyme inhibition, splitting of biological rhythms, and so forth. We investigated the ovicidal effects of various formulations of azadrirachtin (AZ) against the mosquitoes Culex tarsalis Coquillett and Culex quinquefasciatus Say. The formulations tested were wettable powder Azad WP10, emulsifiable concentrate Azad EC4.5, and technically pure AZ. The ovicidal activity of the test neem products was influenced by concentration of AZ, age of the egg rafts, and age of the neem preparations. Other factors such as formulation and mosquito species were also involved in the degree of ovicidal activity. When the egg rafts were deposited directly in fresh neem suspension and left there for 4 h before transfer to untreated water, 1 ppm of AZ produced almost 100% mortality in eggs. When egg rafts aged for 0, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h were exposed to 10 ppm neem suspensions for 36 h, the ovicidal activity was only attained in the egg rafts deposited directly (0 h old) in the neem suspension, not in those with ages of 4-24 h. On aging, depending on the formulations and mosquito species, the neem suspensions at 1 ppm completely lost ovicidal activity within 7-20 days. The egg rafts of Cx. quinquefasciatus were more susceptible to the test neem products than those of Cx. tarsalis. The formulated neem products were more persistent and effective than the technical AZ. The wettable powder (WP) formulation was slightly more persistent and effective than the emulsifiable concentrate (EC). The ovicidal activity of the neem products against mosquitoes from the current research clearly demonstrated

  6. The Developmental Effects Of A Municipal Wastewater Effluent On The Northern Leopard Frog, Rana pipiens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wastewater effluents are complex mixtures containing a variety of anthropogenic compounds, many of which are known endocrine disruptors. In order to characterize the development and behavorial effects of such a complex mixture, northern leopard frogs, Rana pipiens, were e...

  7. Insight Into Genomic Changes Accompanying Divergence: Genetic Linkage Maps and Synteny of Lucania goodei and L. parva Reveal a Robertsonian Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Berdan, Emma L.; Kozak, Genevieve M.; Ming, Ray; Rayburn, A. Lane; Kiehart, Ryan; Fuller, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    Linkage maps are important tools in evolutionary genetics and in studies of speciation. We performed a karyotyping study and constructed high-density linkage maps for two closely related killifish species, Lucania parva and L. goodei, that differ in salinity tolerance and still hybridize in their contact zone in Florida. Using SNPs from orthologous EST contigs, we compared synteny between the two species to determine how genomic architecture has shifted with divergence. Karyotyping revealed that L. goodei possesses 24 acrocentric chromosomes (1N) whereas L. parva possesses 23 chromosomes (1N), one of which is a large metacentric chromosome. Likewise, high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism−based linkage maps indicated 24 linkage groups for L. goodei and 23 linkage groups for L. parva. Synteny mapping revealed two linkage groups in L. goodei that were highly syntenic with the largest linkage group in L. parva. Together, this evidence points to the largest linkage group in L. parva being the result of a chromosomal fusion. We further compared synteny between Lucania with the genome of a more distant teleost relative medaka (Oryzias latipes) and found good conservation of synteny at the chromosomal level. Each Lucania LG had a single best match with each medaka chromosome. These results provide the groundwork for future studies on the genetic architecture of reproductive isolation and salinity tolerance in Lucania and other Fundulidae. PMID:24898707

  8. Novel phlebovirus detected in Haemaphysalis parva ticks in a Greek island.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Kontana, Anastasia; Tsioka, Katerina; Saratsis, Anastasios; Sotiraki, Smaragda

    2017-01-01

    During the last decade the number of novel tick-borne phleboviruses has increased rapidly, especially after the identification of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome and Heartland viruses which can cause severe disease in humans. A novel virus, Antigone virus was recently detected in ticks collected from the mainland of Greece. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of tick-borne phleboviruses in an island in Greece. During November 2015, 31 ticks were collected from sheep in Lesvos island. Phleboviral RNA was detected in 12/22 adult Haemaphysalis parva ticks. The virus was provisionally named Lesvos virus after the name of the island. Phylogenetic analysis of a 1108-bp L RNA fragment revealed that the Lesvos virus sequences cluster together with Dabieshan and Yongjia tick viruses detected in China in H. longicornis and H. hystricis ticks, respectively. Further studies are needed to investigate its exact distribution, epidemiology and virulence. It is expected that the research studies on tick biology and pathogen-tick-host interactions will allow a better understanding of the virus life cycle and the elucidation of the possible role of the novel tick-borne phleboviruses in public health.

  9. Ionic currents underlying the action potential of Rana pipiens oocytes.

    PubMed

    Schlichter, L C

    1989-07-01

    Ionic currents in immature, ovulated Rana pipiens oocytes (metaphase I) were studied using the voltage-clamp technique. At this stage of maturity the oocyte can produce action potentials in response to depolarizing current or as an "off response" to hyperpolarizing current. Reducing external Na+ to 1/10 normal (choline substituted) eliminated the action potentials and both the negative-slope region and zero-crossing of the I-V relation. Reducing external Cl- to 1/10 or 1/100 normal (methanesulfonate substituted) lengthened the action potential. The outward current was reduced and a net inward current was revealed. By changing external Na+, Cl-, and K+ concentrations and using blocking agents (SITS, TEA), three voltage- and time-dependent currents were identified, INa, IK and ICl. The Na+ current activated at about 0 mV and reversed at very positive values which decreased during maturation. Inward Na+ current produced the upstroke of the action potential. During each voltage-clamp step the Na+ current activated slowly (seconds) and did not inactivate within many minutes. The Na+ current was not blocked by TTX at micromolar concentrations. The K+ current was present only in the youngest oocytes. Because IK was superimposed on a large leakage current, it appeared to reverse at the resting potential. When leakage currents were subtracted, the reversal potential for IK was more negative than -110 mV in Ringer's solution. IK was outwardly rectifying and strongly activated above -50 mV. The outward K+ current produced an after hyperpolarization at the end of each action potential. IK was blocked completely and reversibly by 20 mM external TEA. The Cl- current activated at about +10 mV and was outwardly rectifying. ICl was blocked completely and reversibly by 400 microM SITS added to the bathing medium. This current helped repolarize the membrane following an action potential in the youngest oocytes and was the only repolarizing current in more mature oocytes that had lost

  10. Environment and farm factors associated with exposure to Theileria parva infection in cattle under traditional mixed farming system in Mbeere District, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Gachohi, John M; Kitala, Phillip M; Ngumi, Priscilla N; Skilton, Rob A

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between seroprevalence to Theileria parva infection in cattle and potential environmental and farm-level effects in 80 farms under traditional crop-livestock system in Mbeere District, Kenya. A standardized questionnaire was used to collect the effects characteristics as related to T. parva infection epidemiology. Serum samples were collected from 440 cattle of all ages for detection of T. parva antibodies by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. The association between the variables was assessed using a generalized estimation equation logistic regression model. The overall T. parva seroprevalence, accounting for correlation of responses, was 19.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) 14%, 25%). Two variables, "administrative division" and "presence of the vector tick on the farm", were significantly associated with the T. parva seroresponse. Respectively, cattle from farms in Gachoka, Evurore, and Mwea divisions were (and their 95% CI) 1.3 (0.36, 4.8), 4.4 (1.2, 15.9), and 15.2 (4.9, 47.1) times more likely to be seropositive relative to those from Siakago Division (P = 0.000). Cattle from farms in which the vector tick was present were 2.9 (1.2, 6.7) times more likely to be seropositive (P = 0.011). Results of this study suggested that both environmental and farm factors may be associated with T. parva infection epidemiology in Mbeere District. Under such circumstances, characterization of environmental suitability for the vector tick and corresponding environment-specific farm management practices in the district is required both for improved understanding of the disease and in planning disease control programs.

  11. Theileria parva-transformed T cells show enhanced resistance to Fas/Fas ligand-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Küenzi, Peter; Schneider, Pascal; Dobbelaere, Dirk A E

    2003-08-01

    Lymphocyte homeostasis is regulated by mechanisms that control lymphocyte proliferation and apoptosis. Activation-induced cell death is mediated by the expression of death ligands and receptors, which, when triggered, activate an apoptotic cascade. Bovine T cells transformed by the intracellular parasite Theileria parva proliferate in an uncontrolled manner and undergo clonal expansion. They constitutively express the death receptor Fas and its ligand, FasL but do not undergo apoptosis. Upon elimination of the parasite from the host cell by treatment with a theilericidal drug, cells become increasingly sensitive to Fas/FasL-induced apoptosis. In normal T cells, the sensitivity to death receptor killing is regulated by specific inhibitor proteins. We found that anti-apoptotic proteins such as cellular (c)-FLIP, which functions as a catalytically inactive form of caspase-8, and X-chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) as well as c-IAP, which can block downstream executioner caspases, are constitutively expressed in T. parva-transformed T cells. Expression of these proteins is rapidly down-regulated upon parasite elimination. Antiapoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 family such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L) are also expressed but, in contrast to c-FLIP, c-IAP, and X-chromosome-linked IAP, do not appear to be tightly regulated by the presence of the parasite. Finally, we show that, in contrast to the situation in tumor cells, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway is not essential for c-FLIP expression. Our findings indicate that by inducing the expression of antiapoptotic proteins, T. parva allows the host cell to escape destruction by homeostatic mechanisms that would normally be activated to limit the continuous expansion of a T cell population.

  12. Population genetic analysis of Theileria parva isolated in cattle and buffaloes in Tanzania using minisatellite and microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Rukambile, Elpidius; Machuka, Eunice; Njahira, Moses; Kyalo, Martina; Skilton, Robert; Mwega, Elisa; Chota, Andrew; Mathias, Mkama; Sallu, Raphael; Salih, Diaeldin

    2016-07-15

    A population genetic study of Theileria parva was conducted on 103 cattle and 30 buffalo isolates from Kibaha, Lushoto, Njombe Districts and selected National parks in Tanzania. Bovine blood samples were collected from these study areas and categorized into 5 populations; Buffalo, Cattle which graze close to buffalo, Kibaha, Lushoto and Njombe. Samples were tested by nested PCR for T. parva DNA and positives were compared for genetic diversity to the T. parva Muguga vaccine reference strain, using 3micro and 11 minisatellite markers selected from all 4 chromosomes of the parasite genome. The diversity across populations was determined by the mean number of different alleles, mean number of effective alleles, mean number of private allele and expected heterozygosity. The mean number of allele unique to populations for Cattle close to buffalo, Muguga, Njombe, Kibaha, Lushoto and Buffalo populations were 0.18, 0.24, 0.63, 0.71, 1.63 and 3.37, respectively. The mean number of different alleles ranged from 6.97 (Buffalo) to 0.07 (Muguga). Mean number of effective alleles ranged from 4.49 (Buffalo) to 0.29 (Muguga). The mean expected heterozygosity were 0.07 0.29, 0.45, 0.48, 0.59 and 0.64 for Muguga, cattle close to buffalo, Kibaha, Njombe, Lushoto and Buffalo populations, respectively. The Buffalo and Lushoto isolates possessed a close degree of diversity in terms of mean number of different alleles, effective alleles, private alleles and expected heterozygosity. The study revealed more diversity in buffalo isolates and further studies are recommended to establish if there is sharing of parasites between cattle and buffaloes which may affect the effectiveness of the control methods currently in use.

  13. DsRed2 transient expression in Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Wilke, André Barretto Bruno; Scaife, Sarah; Alphey, Luke; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2013-06-01

    Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes have been successfully genetically modified only once, despite the efforts of several laboratories to transform and establish a stable strain. We have developed a transient gene expression method, in Culex, that delivers plasmid DNA directly to the mosquito haemolymph and additional tissues. We were able to express DsRed2 fluorescent protein in adult Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes by injecting plasmids directly into their thorax. The expression of DsRed2 in adult Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes is an important stepping stone to genetic transformation and the potential use of new control strategies and genetic interactions.

  14. Physical and Cognitive Performance of the Least Shrew (Cryptotis parva) on a Calcium-Restricted Diet

    PubMed Central

    Czajka, Jessica L.; McCay, Timothy S.; Garneau, Danielle E.

    2012-01-01

    Geological substrates and air pollution affect the availability of calcium to mammals in many habitats, including the Adirondack Mountain Region (Adirondacks) of the United States. Mammalian insectivores, such as shrews, may be particularly restricted in environments with low calcium. We examined the consequences of calcium restriction on the least shrew (Cryptotis parva) in the laboratory. We maintained one group of shrews (5 F, 5 M) on a mealworm diet with a calcium concentration comparable to beetle larvae collected in the Adirondacks (1.1 ± 0.3 mg/g) and another group (5 F, 3 M) on a mealworm diet with a calcium concentration almost 20 times higher (19.5 ± 5.1 mg/g). Animals were given no access to mineral sources of calcium, such as snail shell or bone. We measured running speed and performance in a complex maze over 10 weeks. Shrews on the high-calcium diet made fewer errors in the maze than shrews on the low-calcium diet (F1,14 = 12.8, p < 0.01). Females made fewer errors than males (F1,14 = 10.6, p < 0.01). Running speeds did not markedly vary between diet groups or sexes, though there was a trend toward faster running by shrews on the high calcium diet (p = 0.087). Shrews in calcium-poor habitats with low availability of mineral sources of calcium may have greater difficulty with cognitive tasks such as navigation and recovery of food hoards. PMID:25379219

  15. Larvicidal, repellent, and ovicidal activity of marine actinobacteria extracts against Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Culex gelidus.

    PubMed

    Karthik, L; Gaurav, K; Rao, K V Bhaskara; Rajakumar, G; Rahuman, A Abdul

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of crude extracts of marine actinobacteria on larvicidal, repellent, and ovicidal activities against Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Culex gelidus (Diptera: Culicidae). The early fourth instar larvae of C. tritaeniorhynchus and C. gelidus, reared in the laboratory, were used for larvicidal, ovicidal, and repellent assay with crude extracts of actinobacteria. Saccharomonospora spp. (LK-1), Streptomyces roseiscleroticus (LK-2), and Streptomyces gedanensis (LK-3) were identified as potential biocide producers. Based on the antimicrobial activity, three strains were chosen for larvicidal activity. The marine actinobacterial extracts showed moderate to high larvicidal effects after 24 h of exposure at 1,000 ppm and the highest larval mortality was found in extract of LK-3 (LC(50) = 108.08 ppm and LC(90) = 609.15 ppm) against the larvae of C. gelidus and (LC(50) = 146.24 ppm and LC(90) = 762.69 ppm) against the larvae of C. tritaeniorhynchus. Complete protections for 240 min were found in crude extract of LK-2 and LK-3 at 1,000 ppm, against mosquito bites of C. tritaeniorhynchus and C. gelidus, respectively. After 24-h treatment, mean percent hatchability of the ovicidal activity was observed. The percent hatchability was inversely proportional to the concentration of extract and directly proportional to the eggs. Crude extracts of LK-1 and LK-3 showed no hatchability at 1,000 ppm against C. tritaeniorhynchus and C. gelidus, respectively. This is an ideal ecofriendly approach for the control of Japanese encephalitis vectors, C. tritaeniorhynchus and C. gelidus.

  16. ACTIVITY OF FREE AND CLAY-BOUND INSECTICIDAL PROTEINS FROM BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS SUBSP. ISRAELENSIS AGAINST THE MOSQUITO, CULEX PIPIENS. (R826107)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  17. Summary of field trials in 1964-69 in Rangoon, Burma, of organophosphorus larvicides and oils against Culex pipiens fatigans larvae in polluted water

    PubMed Central

    Self, L. S.; Tun, M. M.

    1970-01-01

    In tests in Rangoon, Burma, of the larvicidal activity of various organophosphorus compounds against C. p. fatigans, it was found that the activity usually lasted much longer in septic tanks and pit latrines than in open drains. Dursban, Abate, fenthion and several other emulsifiable concentrates caused high larval mortality at a concentration of 0.05 ppm but 0.5 ppm was normally required to obtain a minimum of 1-2 weeks of complete larval control. For the desired residual activity, dosages about 40-400 times the laboratory LC95 values were normally required, depending on the compound used. The most effective formulation was Dursban emulsifiable concentrate, which, at a concentration of 0.5 ppm, was effective for 3, 7 and 12 weeks in concrete drains, pit latrines and septic tanks, respectively. Petroleum oils applied at rates of 25-40 US gal/ac (approx. 237 l/ha—380 l/ha) and a pyrethrum derivative at a concentration of 1.0 ppm were toxic to larvae but not highly residual. Some emulsifiable-concentrate/oil mixtures appeared to be outstandingly effective, although inconsistent results also occurred. Granular formulations were normally less effective than the emulsifiable concentrates. PMID:4253561

  18. Clinical efficacy and plasma concentrations of two formulations of buparvaquone in cattle infected with East Coast fever (Theileria parva infection).

    PubMed

    Muraguri, G R; Ngumi, P N; Wesonga, D; Ndungu, S G; Wanjohi, J M; Bang, K; Fox, A; Dunne, J; McHardy, N

    2006-08-01

    East Coast fever, caused by the protozoan parasite Theileria parva, kills about 600,000 cattle annually in Africa. The hydroxynaphthoquinone compound buparvaquone (BPQ) is curative. Sixteen calves were infected with T. parva. On manifestation of disease symptoms, eight were injected with the original (pioneer) BPQ product and eight with a test product containing BPQ. All 16 calves were cured by one injection of 2.5 mg BPQ/kg bodyweight. The concentration of BPQ in blood plasma was monitored by HPLC. The mean observed C(max) of BPQ was 0.229 and 0.253 microg/mL of plasma, the mean observed time to reach this concentration (T(max)) was 2.62 and 2.12 h and the AUC (area under curve) was 4.785 and 4.156 microg h/mL, respectively, for the pioneer and test product. Considerable variations occurred in the plasma concentration of BPQ within each group. They showed no relationship with either clinical or parasitological parameters following treatment.

  19. Acute toxicity of the pesticide methomyl on the topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva): mortality and effects on four biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Li, Huixian; Jiang, Hui; Gao, Xiwu; Wang, Xiaojun; Qu, Weigang; Lin, Ronghua; Chen, Jiao

    2008-09-01

    In this study, the acute toxicity of the pesticide methomyl on the topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva) was evaluated using mortality and the activity of the enzymes acetylcholinesterase (AChE), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) as endpoints. LC50 values were 1.228, 0.782, 0.538, and 0.425 mg/l at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h of exposure, respectively. Methomyl caused a sharp decrease in specific activity of brain AChE around 48% at concentrations between 0.043 and 0.213 mg/l. A reduction higher than 40% in liver GST activity at concentrations between 0.085 and 0.213 mg/l was found, whereas no significant effects were observed in intestinal GST. A significant concentration-dependent decrease of GOT activity was found after 24 h of exposure to the pesticide but not after 96 h. No significant effects on GPT activity were observed. These results indicate that at the concentrations tested, methomyl is acutely toxic to the species P. parva, causing mortality, neurotoxic effects, and changes in some hepatic enzymes.

  20. Vector competence of Anopheles and Culex mosquitoes for Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Brittany L; Rasgon, Jason L

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus is a newly emergent mosquito-borne flavivirus that has caused recent large outbreaks in the new world, leading to dramatic increases in serious disease pathology including Guillain-Barre syndrome, newborn microcephaly, and infant brain damage. Although Aedes mosquitoes are thought to be the primary mosquito species driving infection, the virus has been isolated from dozens of mosquito species, including Culex and Anopheles species, and we lack a thorough understanding of which mosquito species to target for vector control. We exposed Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes to blood meals supplemented with two Zika virus strains. Mosquito bodies, legs, and saliva were collected five, seven, and 14 days post blood meal and tested for infectious virus by plaque assay. Regardless of titer, virus strain, or timepoint, Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes were refractory to Zika virus infection. We conclude that Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes likely do not contribute significantly to Zika virus transmission to humans. However, future studies should continue to explore the potential for other novel potential vectors to transmit the virus.

  1. Spectral sensitivity of the nocturnal mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nocturnal mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus,as a vector of West Nile virus is the target of many surveillance and control efforts. Surveillance of this species primarily consists of light traps baited with a variety of chemical lures. While much research has focused on optimization of the olfa...

  2. Behavioral response of Culex quinquefasciatus to DUET(TM) insecticide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DuetTM insecticide contains the active ingredients prallethrin, sumithrin, and piperonyl butoxide. The excitatory effects of prallethrin reportedly cause resting mosquitoes to take flight and contact more droplets, thus improving insecticide efficacy. This premise was tested with female Culex quin...

  3. Vector competence of Anopheles and Culex mosquitoes for Zika virus

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Brittany L.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus is a newly emergent mosquito-borne flavivirus that has caused recent large outbreaks in the new world, leading to dramatic increases in serious disease pathology including Guillain-Barre syndrome, newborn microcephaly, and infant brain damage. Although Aedes mosquitoes are thought to be the primary mosquito species driving infection, the virus has been isolated from dozens of mosquito species, including Culex and Anopheles species, and we lack a thorough understanding of which mosquito species to target for vector control. We exposed Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes to blood meals supplemented with two Zika virus strains. Mosquito bodies, legs, and saliva were collected five, seven, and 14 days post blood meal and tested for infectious virus by plaque assay. Regardless of titer, virus strain, or timepoint, Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes were refractory to Zika virus infection. We conclude that Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes likely do not contribute significantly to Zika virus transmission to humans. However, future studies should continue to explore the potential for other novel potential vectors to transmit the virus. PMID:28316896

  4. Complex spatial dynamics maintain northern leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens) genetic diversity in a temporally varying landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mushet, David M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Chen, Yongjiu; Stockwell, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to most local amphibian populations, northeastern populations of the Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens) have displayed uncharacteristically high levels of genetic diversity that have been attributed to large, stable populations. However, this widely distributed species also occurs in areas known for great climatic fluctuations that should be reflected in corresponding fluctuations in population sizes and reduced genetic diversity. To test our hypothesis that Northern Leopard Frog genetic diversity would be reduced in areas subjected to significant climate variability, we examined the genetic diversity of L. pipiens collected from 12 sites within the Prairie Pothole Region of North Dakota. Despite the region's fluctuating climate that includes periods of recurring drought and deluge, we found unexpectedly high levels of genetic diversity approaching that of northeastern populations. Further, genetic structure at a landscape scale was strikingly homogeneous; genetic differentiation estimates (Dest) averaged 0.10 (SD = 0.036) across the six microsatellite loci we studied, and two Bayesian assignment tests (STRUCTURE and BAPS) failed to reveal the development of significant population structure across the 68 km breadth of our study area. These results suggest that L. pipiens in the Prairie Pothole Region consists of a large, panmictic population capable of maintaining high genetic diversity in the face of marked climate variability.

  5. Development of a Multiplexed Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) Assay to Identify Common Members of the Subgenera Culex (Culex) and Culex (Phenacomyia) in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Rebekah J.; Deus, Stephen; Williams, Martin; Savage, Harry M.

    2010-01-01

    Morphological differentiation of mosquitoes in the subgenera Culex (Culex) and Culex (Phenacomyia) in Guatemala is difficult, with reliable identification ensured only through examination of larval skins from individually reared specimens and associated male genitalia. We developed a multiplexed polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay to identify common Cx. (Cux.) and Cx. (Phc.). Culex (Cux.) chidesteri, Cx. (Cux.) coronator, Cx. (Cux.) interrogator, Cx. (Cux.) quinquefasciatus, Cx. (Cux.) nigripalpus/Cx. (Cux.) thriambus, and Cx. (Phc.) lactator were identified directly with a multiplexed primer cocktail comprising a conserved forward primer and specific reverse primers targeting ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Culex nigripalpus and Cx. thriambus were differentiated by restriction digest of homologous amplicons. The assay was developed and optimized using well-characterized specimens from Guatemala and the United States and field tested with unknown material from Guatemala. This assay will be a valuable tool for mosquito identification in entomological and arbovirus ecology studies in Guatemala. PMID:20682869

  6. Linkage disequilibrium between alleles at highly polymorphic mini- and micro-satellite loci of Theileria parva isolated from cattle in three regions of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Odongo, D O; Oura, C A L; Spooner, P R; Kiara, H; Mburu, D; Hanotte, O H; Bishop, R P

    2006-07-01

    Theileria parva schizont-infected lymphocyte culture isolates from western, central and coastal Kenya were analysed for size polymorphism at 30 T. parva-specific variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci using a panel of mini- and micro-satellite markers. The mean number of alleles ranged from 3 to 11 at individual loci and 183 distinct alleles were observed in total, indicating high genetic diversity within the T. parva gene pool in Kenyan cattle. The frequency distribution of the length variation of specific alleles among isolates ranged from normal to markedly discontinuous. Genetic relationships between isolates were analysed using standard indices of genetic distance. Genetic distances and dendrograms derived from these using neighbour-joining algorithms did not indicate significant clustering on a geographical basis. Analysis of molecular variance demonstrated that the genetic variation between individual isolates was 72%, but only 2.3% when isolates from different regions were pooled. Both these observations suggest minimal genetic sub-structuring relative to geographical origin. Linkage disequilibrium was observed between pairs of loci within populations, as in certain Ugandan T. parva populations. A novel observation was that disequilibrium was also detected between alleles at three individual pairs of VNTR loci when isolates from the three regional meta-populations were pooled for analysis.

  7. Molecular Genetic Variation in Emmonsia crescens and Emmonsia parva, Etiologic Agents of Adiaspiromycosis, and Their Phylogenetic Relationship to Blastomyces dermatitidis (Ajellomyces dermatitidis) and Other Systemic Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Stephen W.; Sigler, Lynne

    1998-01-01

    Emmonsia crescens, an agent of adiaspiromycosis, Blastomyces dermatitidis, the agent of blastomycosis, and Histoplasma capsulatum, the agent of histoplasmosis, are known to form meiotic (sexual) stages in the ascomycete genus Ajellomyces (Onygenaceae, Onygenales), but no sexual stage is known for E. parva, the type species of the genus Emmonsia. To evaluate relationships among members of the putative Ajellomyces clade, large-subunit ribosomal and internal transcribed spacer region DNA sequences were determined from PCR-amplified DNA fragments. Sequences were analyzed phylogenetically to evaluate the genetic variation within the genus Emmonsia and evolutionary relationships to other taxa. E. crescens and E. parva are distinct species. E. crescens isolates are placed into two groups that correlate with their continents of origin. Considerable variation occurred among isolates previously classified as E. parva. Most isolates are placed into two closely related groups, but the remaining isolates, including some from human sources, are phylogenetically distinct and represent undescribed species. Strains of B. dermatitidis are a sister species of E. parva. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Histoplasma capsulatum are ancestral to most Emmonsia isolates, and P. brasiliensis, which has no known teleomorph, falls within the Ajellomyces clade. PMID:9738044

  8. Lead levels of Culex mosquito larvae inhabiting lead utilizing factory

    PubMed Central

    Kitvatanachai, S; Apiwathnasorn, C; Leemingsawat, S; Wongwit, W; Overgaard, HJ

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine lead level primarily in Culex quinquefasciatus (Cx. quinquefasciatus), and Culex gelidus (Cx. gelidus) larvae inhabiting lead consuming factories, and to putatively estimate eco-toxicological impact of effluents from the firms. Methods Third instars larvae were sampled by standard dipping method and lead concentrations in the larvae and their respective surrounding factory aquatic environments were determined through standard atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Results Cx. quinquefasciatus was the most abundant species followed by Cx. gelidus. The levels of lead were higher in the Cx. quinquefasciatus (1.08-47.47 µg/g), than in the wastewaters surface (0.01-0.78 µg/mL) from the factories or closer areas around factories. Other species were not reaching the criteria for lead determination. Conclusions The Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae can bio-accumulate the metal and can potentially serve as a biomarker of lead contamination, to complemente conventional techniques. PMID:23569727

  9. Phylogenetic relationships of leopard frogs (Rana pipiens complex) from an isolated coastal mountain range in southern Sonora, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pfeiler, E; Markow, T A

    2008-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequence data from the control region and 12S rRNA in leopard frogs from the Sierra El Aguaje of southern Sonora, Mexico, together with GenBank sequences, were used to infer taxonomic identity and provide phylogenetic hypotheses for relationships with other members of the Rana pipiens complex. We show that frogs from the Sierra El Aguaje belong to the Rana berlandieri subgroup, or Scurrilirana clade, of the R. pipiens group, and are most closely related to Rana magnaocularis from Nayarit, Mexico. We also provide further evidence that Rana magnaocularis and R. yavapaiensis are close relatives.

  10. Molecular identification of two Culex (Culex) species of the neotropical region (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Almirón, Walter R.; Gardenal, Cristina N.

    2017-01-01

    Culex bidens and C. interfor, implicated in arbovirus transmission in Argentina, are sister species, only distinguishable by feature of the male genitalia; however, intermediate specimens of the species in sympatry have been found. Fourth-instar larvae and females of both species share apomorphic features, and this lack of clear distinction creates problems for specific identification. Geometric morphometric traits of these life stages also do not distinguish the species. The aim of the present study was to assess the taxonomic status of C. bidens and C. interfor using two mitochondrial genes and to determine the degree of their reproductive isolation using microsatellite loci. Sequences of the ND4 and COI genes were concatenated in a matrix of 993 nucleotides and used for phylogenetic and distance analyses. Bayesian and maximum parsimony inferences showed a well resolved and supported topology, enclosing sequences of individuals of C. bidens (0.83 BPP, 73 BSV) and C. interfor (0.98 BPP, 97 BSV) in a strong sister relationship. The mean K2P distance within C. bidens and C. interfor was 0.3% and 0.2%, respectively, and the interspecific variation was 2.3%. Bayesian clustering also showed two distinct mitochondrial lineages. All sequenced mosquitoes were successfully identified in accordance with the best close match algorithm. The low genetic distance values obtained indicate that the species diverged quite recently. Most morphologically intermediate specimens of C. bidens from Córdoba were heterozygous for the microsatellite locus GT51; the significant heterozygote excess observed suggests incomplete reproductive isolation. However, C. bidens and C. interfor should be considered good species: the ventral arm of the phallosome of the male genitalia and the ND4 and COI sequences are diagnostic characters. PMID:28235083

  11. Molecular identification of two Culex (Culex) species of the neotropical region (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Laurito, Magdalena; Ayala, Ana M; Almirón, Walter R; Gardenal, Cristina N

    2017-01-01

    Culex bidens and C. interfor, implicated in arbovirus transmission in Argentina, are sister species, only distinguishable by feature of the male genitalia; however, intermediate specimens of the species in sympatry have been found. Fourth-instar larvae and females of both species share apomorphic features, and this lack of clear distinction creates problems for specific identification. Geometric morphometric traits of these life stages also do not distinguish the species. The aim of the present study was to assess the taxonomic status of C. bidens and C. interfor using two mitochondrial genes and to determine the degree of their reproductive isolation using microsatellite loci. Sequences of the ND4 and COI genes were concatenated in a matrix of 993 nucleotides and used for phylogenetic and distance analyses. Bayesian and maximum parsimony inferences showed a well resolved and supported topology, enclosing sequences of individuals of C. bidens (0.83 BPP, 73 BSV) and C. interfor (0.98 BPP, 97 BSV) in a strong sister relationship. The mean K2P distance within C. bidens and C. interfor was 0.3% and 0.2%, respectively, and the interspecific variation was 2.3%. Bayesian clustering also showed two distinct mitochondrial lineages. All sequenced mosquitoes were successfully identified in accordance with the best close match algorithm. The low genetic distance values obtained indicate that the species diverged quite recently. Most morphologically intermediate specimens of C. bidens from Córdoba were heterozygous for the microsatellite locus GT51; the significant heterozygote excess observed suggests incomplete reproductive isolation. However, C. bidens and C. interfor should be considered good species: the ventral arm of the phallosome of the male genitalia and the ND4 and COI sequences are diagnostic characters.

  12. Variation in Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase I DNA Can Successfully Identify Culex (Melanoconion) pedroi (Diptera: Culicidae) and Culex (Melanoconion) ribeirensis (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Araki, A S; Maia, D A; Gil-Santana, H R; de Mello, C F; Martins, A de J; Alencar, J

    2016-12-22

    Culex (Melanoconion) pedroi Sirivanakarn & Belkin 1980 and Culex (Melanoconion) ribeirensis Forattini & Sallum 1985 are two morphologically very similar species of the Pedroi subgroup of mosquitoes in the Spissipes section of the subgenus Melanoconion of the genus Culex L. 1758. We carried out an analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) DNA variation between these two species. The recent observation of sympatric coexistence in a forested area of Rio de Janeiro State (Brazil) triggered the need to validate these two species previously identified based on morphology. We concluded that the COI is a useful tool for identification of Cx. pedroi and Cx. ribeirensis.

  13. Amino acids in nectar enhance longevity of female Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Culex mosquitoes feed on a wide range of nectars consisting of mostly carbohydrates and amino acids, however, little is known about the utilization and effects of these different carbohydrates and their accompanying amino acids on longevity. Culex quinquefasciatus larvae were reared on high and low...

  14. A comparison of seroprevalence and risk factors for Theileria parva and T. mutans in smallholder dairy cattle in the Tanga and Iringa regions of Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Swai, Emmanuel S; Karimuribo, Esrony D; Kambarage, Dominic M; Moshy, Winford E; Mbise, Adam N

    2007-09-01

    A cross sectional serological survey was carried out in two geographical small-scale dairying areas of Tanzania to determine the distribution and prevalence and to quantify risk factors for Theileria parva and T. mutans during the period January to April 1999. The prevalence of serum antibodies to these two Theileria parasites was determined using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. The results suggest that the parasites are widely distributed through out the two study sites and seroprevalence of 23% and 48% for T. parva were obtained for Tanga and Iringa regions, respectively. Seroprevalence of T. mutans ranged from 17% in the Tanga region to 40% in the Iringa region. Farm and animal data were collected and analysed by multiple logistic regression models to explore the risk factors associated with seroprevalence to T. parva and T. mutans pathogens. In both regions, seroprevalence for the two Theileria spp. pathogens increased significantly with age. Pasture grazed animals were more likely to be seropositive than those that were zero-grazed. Among individual animal characteristics, seropositivity was higher in cash-bought and charity gifted animals compared to cattle obtained using a formal credit agreement. Further studies on the relative role of risk factors for theileriosis found in this study may assist in the development of an effective control package.

  15. Status of RNAs, localized in Xenopus laevis oocytes, in the frogs Rana pipiens and Eleutherodactylus coqui.

    PubMed

    Nath, Kimberly; Boorech, Jamie L; Beckham, Yvonne M; Burns, Mary M; Elinson, Richard P

    2005-01-15

    Early development in the frog model, Xenopus laevis, is governed by RNAs, localized to the vegetal cortex of the oocyte. These RNAs include Xdazl RNA, which is involved in primordial germ cell formation, and VegT RNA, which specifies the mesoderm and endoderm. In order to determine whether orthologues of these RNAs are localized and have similar functions in other frogs, we cloned RpDazl and RpVegT from Rana pipiens, a frog that is phylogenetically distant from X. laevis. RNAs from both genes are localized to the vegetal cortex of the R. pipiens oocyte, indicating that the vegetal localization is likely the basal state. The animal location of EcVegT RNA in Eleutherodactylus coqui that we found previously (Beckham et al., 2003) is then a derived state, probably due to the great increase in egg size required for direct development of this species. To answer the question of function, we injected RpVegT or EcVegT RNAs into X. laevis embryos, and assayed animal caps for gene expression. Both of these RNAs induced the expression of endodermal, mesodermal, and organizer genes, showing that the function of RpVegT and EcVegT as meso-endodermal determinants is conserved in frogs. The RNA localizations and the function of VegT orthologues in germ layer specification may be synapomorphies for anuran amphibians.

  16. Vitellogenic cycles in laboratory-maintained females of the leopard frog, Rana pipiens.

    PubMed

    Smalley, K N; Nace, G W

    1983-05-01

    As a part of studies on the reproduction of laboratory maintained frogs, wild-caught Rana pipiens were ovulated and maintained at 22-27 degrees C for up to 18 months. Vitellogenic oocytes were periodically staged and counted, and a "maturity index" was calculated to assess the progress of the vitellogenic cycle. The initial cycle was similar to that of wild frogs except that the first oocytes to reach stage 5 (mature eggs) usually began to degenerate before later starting oocytes became mature. In addition, a second cycle began before the first was completed. After more than 1 year at room temperature, abnormal cycles were common. Ovaries of such animals contained very few mature eggs. Many of their oocytes were in early stages of vitellogenesis or, if pigmented, had begun to degenerate. These deficiencies were partially corrected in females placed in 4 degrees C for 4-6 weeks. The average number of mature eggs increased 15-fold and ovary weights more than doubled. Oviduct weights almost doubled. Although the rates of cooling, photoperiod, and nutritional status could be important influences, the results imply that cold treatment alone increases estrogen secretion. We suggest that low estrogen secretion may account for the reproductive deficiencies seen in R. pipiens cultured at room temperature.

  17. Effects of gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-2 on infection and proliferation of Theileria parva-infected bovine lymphoblasts and production of interferon by parasitized cells.

    PubMed Central

    DeMartini, J C; Baldwin, C L

    1991-01-01

    Theileria parva is a protozoan parasite that infects bovine B cells and alpha beta and gamma delta T cells and transforms them into continually proliferating cells. CD4+ T. parva-antigen-specific immune T cells have been shown to produce cytokines in response to stimulation with parasitized cells, and T. parva-infected lymphocytes produce and consume T-cell growth factors and interleukin-2 (IL-2). To ascertain the role of T-cell cytokines on T. parva infections, we evaluated recombinant gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma), rIL-2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (rTNF-alpha) for their effects on establishment, proliferation, and survival of parasitized cells. The results indicate that neither rIFN-gamma nor rTNF-alpha had an enhancing or inhibitory effect on the growth of established T. parva-infected T-cell clones, whereas bovine rIL-2 increased the proliferation of infected B-cell and alpha beta T-cell clones but not that of gamma delta T-cell clones. To evaluate the effects of the cytokines on establishment of parasitized cell lines, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cultured in their presence immediately following infection with T. parva sporozoites. Neither rIFN-gamma nor rIL-2 altered the proportion of cells initially developing schizonts, but both enhanced establishment of infected cell lines by about twofold. In contrast, rTNF-alpha resulted in about a 33% decrease in the proportion of schizont-infected cells. Inhibitory effects on establishment of parasitized cell lines by rTNF-alpha were no longer apparent by 12 days following infection. Tests conducted during this study indicated that T. parva-infected lymphocytes also spontaneously produce IFN that is neutralized by acidic pH treatment. In conclusion, we speculate that none of these T-cell cytokines are likely to have a profound inhibitory effect in vivo on T. parva infections. Instead, IFN-gamma and IL-2 may facilitate the establishment of infection by T. parva. PMID:1937812

  18. Modulation of enzymatic activity of Src-family kinases in bovine T cells transformed by Theileria parva.

    PubMed

    Fich, C; Klauenberg, U; Fleischer, B; Bröker, B M

    1998-08-01

    After infection with sporozoites of the protozoon Theileria parva (Tp) bovine T cells are readily transformed to permanent growth in vivo and in vitro. Their transformed state depends on the constant presence of the parasite but membrane signals remain important. Non-receptor tyrosine kinases play a critical role in the transduction of membrane signals in haematopoietic cells. We have investigated Src-family kinases in bovine T cells transformed by Tp. The T cell receptor-associated tyrosine kinase p60fyn had high activity in all cell lines tested. In addition, weak phosphorylation of 2 novel bands was observed associated with Fyn. In contrast to Fyn, enzymatic activity of p56lck, which in T cells has an essential role in signalling, was low. Furthermore, 1 of 3 Tp transformed cell lines was completely devoid of p56lck indicating that the enzyme is not necessary for the Tp dependent growth of the T cells. In addition to p60fyn and p56lck weak enzymatic activity of 1 splice variant of p53/56lyn was observed after infection of T cells with Tp. These data show that growth transformation by Tp influences kinase activity in bovine T cells. However, they also prove that p56lck does not play an essential role in the transformation mechanism.

  19. RNA splicing in a new rhabdovirus from Culex mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Ryusei; Isawa, Haruhiko; Hoshino, Keita; Tsuda, Yoshio; Yanase, Tohru; Sasaki, Toshinori; Kobayashi, Mutsuo; Sawabe, Kyoko

    2011-07-01

    Among members of the order Mononegavirales, RNA splicing events have been found only in the family Bornaviridae. Here, we report that a new rhabdovirus isolated from the mosquito Culex tritaeniorhynchus replicates in the nuclei of infected cells and requires RNA splicing for viral mRNA maturation. The virus, designated Culex tritaeniorhynchus rhabdovirus (CTRV), shares a similar genome organization with other rhabdoviruses, except for the presence of a putative intron in the coding region for the L protein. Molecular phylogenetic studies indicated that CTRV belongs to the family Rhabdoviridae, but it is yet to be assigned a genus. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that the CTRV virion is extremely elongated, unlike virions of rhabdoviruses, which are generally bullet shaped. Northern hybridization confirmed that a large transcript (approximately 6,500 nucleotides [nt]) from the CTRV L gene was present in the infected cells. Strand-specific reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analyses identified the intron-exon boundaries and the 76-nt intron sequence, which contains the typical motif for eukaryotic spliceosomal intron-splice donor/acceptor sites (GU-AG), a predicted branch point, and a polypyrimidine tract. In situ hybridization exhibited that viral RNAs are primarily localized in the nucleus of infected cells, indicating that CTRV replicates in the nucleus and is allowed to utilize the host's nuclear splicing machinery. This is the first report of RNA splicing among the members of the family Rhabdoviridae.

  20. Effects of exposure to ultraviolet light on the development of Rana pipiens, the northern leopard frog

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.J.; Wofford, H.W.

    1996-10-01

    The increase in ultraviolet light intensity levels due to ozone depletion recently has been linked to the decline in amphibian population. In this experiment, eggs and larvae of Rana pipiens were subjected to differing amounts of ultraviolet radiation to determine the effects of ultraviolet light on the development of amphibian tadpoles. The total length, length of body without tail, and maximum width of each specimen was recorded for a month of the tadpoles` development, including several measurements after the ultraviolet exposures were concluded. It was found that ultraviolet exposure significantly reduced the size of the organisms in comparison with the control group in all three measured areas. Ultraviolet radiation altered the health and appearance of the exposed organisms and was lethal at large amounts. This experiment showed that ultraviolet radiation could cause many problems in developing amphibians. By slowing their development and physically weakening predation, thus contributing to a decline in overall population levels.

  1. Electrical Signs of New Membrane Production during Cleavage of Rana pipiens Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Donald J.

    1968-01-01

    Rana pipiens eggs dividing normally in diluted Ringer's solution show an increase in transmembrane potential inside negative, a decrease in resistance, and no change in total surface membrane capacitance at the appearance of a division furrow. Furrows of eggs in solutions with the tonicity of full Ringer develop partially, then regress so that the surface is again spherical. The potential and resistance changes are greater and substantial increases in capacitance occur when furrowing is so inhibited. It is proposed that the electrical changes at division are due to the introduction of new plasma membrane, between the blastomeres, having selective permeability to K and a low resistance compared to the outer spherical membrane. A narrow gap between blastomeres limits current flow through new membrane during normal division. A direct exposure of new membrane to the bathing medium when furrowing is disrupted results in larger changes in potential and resistance and permits the capacitance of new membrane to be detected. PMID:5691712

  2. Occurrence of Culex (Culiciomyia) Spathifurca (Edwards) (Diptera: Culicidae) in India--new country record.

    PubMed

    Rajavel, A R; Natarajan, R; Munirathinam, A

    1998-09-01

    Culex (Culiciomyia) spathifurca (Edwards) is recorded for the 1st time in India. Immature specimens of this species were collected from tree holes in a mangrove forest. Notes on the larval habitat are given.

  3. Insights into host-finding by Culex mosquitoes: New tools for surveillance?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Culex mosquitoes are important vectors of pathogens and parasites causing diseases such as West Nile virus, St. Louis encephalitis, Japanese encephalitis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis and bancroftian filariasis. Surveillance of these species is based on traps using conventional mosquito attractan...

  4. Evaluation of larvicidal activity of biogenic nanoparticles against filariasis causing Culex mosquito vector

    PubMed Central

    Dhanasekaran, Dharumadurai; Thangaraj, Ramasamy

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the larvicidal activity of biogenic nanoparticles against filariasis causing Culex mosquito vector. Methods The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV-vis. spectrum, Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. Larvae were exposed to varying concentrations of aqueous extract of synthesized AgNPs for 10 min. The different concentrations of 5, 2.5, 1.25, 0.625 and 0.312 mg/L silver nanoparticles were tested against the Culex larvae. Results The mortality rate of Agaricus bisporus biogenic nanoparticles against Culex larvae are 5 mg/L (100%), 2.5 mg/L (81%), 1.25 mg/L (62%), 0.625 mg/L (28%) and 0.312 mg/L (11%). Conclusions These results suggest that the synthesized biogenic AgNPs have the potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for controlling Culex larvae.

  5. Wing geometry of Culex coronator (Diptera: Culicidae) from South and Southeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Coronator Group encompasses Culex coronator Dyar & Knab, Culex camposi Dyar, Culex covagarciai Forattini, Culex ousqua Dyar, Culex usquatissimus Dyar, Culex usquatus Dyar and Culex yojoae Strickman. Culex coronator has the largest geographic distribution, occurring in North, Central and South America. Moreover, it is a potential vector-borne mosquito species because females have been found naturally infected with several arboviruses, i.e., Saint Louis Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus and West Nile Virus. Considering the epidemiological importance of Cx. coronator, we investigated the wing shape diversity of Cx. coronator from South and Southeast Brazil, a method to preliminarily estimate population diversity. Methods Field-collected immature stages of seven populations from a large geographical area in Brazil were maintained in the laboratory to obtain both females and males linked with pupal and/or larval exuviae. For each individual female, 18 landmarks of left wings were marked and digitalized. After Procrustes superimposition, discriminant analysis of shape was employed to quantify wing shape variation among populations. The isometric estimator centroid size was calculated to assess the overall wing size and allometry. Results Wing shape was polymorphic among populations of Cx. coronator. However, dissimilarities among populations were higher than those observed within each population, suggesting populational differentiation in Cx. coronator. Morphological distances between populations were not correlated to geographical distances, indicating that other factors may act on wing shape and thus, determining microevolutionary patterns in Cx. coronator. Despite the population differentiation, intrapopulational wing shape variability was equivalent among all seven populations. Conclusion The wing variability found in Cx. coronator populations brings to light a new biological problem to be investigated: the population genetics of

  6. Effects of neem products containing azadirachtin on blood feeding, fecundity, and survivorship of Culex tarsalis and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Su, T; Mulla, M S

    1999-12-01

    When late 3rd or early 4th-instar larvae of Culex tarsalis Coquillett and Culex quinquefasciatus Say mosquitoes were treated with sublethal dosages of neem insecticide until pupation, the blood-feeding activity of the resulting adults was essentially the same as that of untreated controls. In contrast, blood-feeding activity was suppressed when newly emerged adults were fed continuously on 10 parts per million (ppm) or 50 ppm azadirachtin (AZ) in 10% sucrose solution for seven days. Fecundity was also reduced by the various neem treatments. When late 3rd or early 4th-instar larvae were treated with 0.010 ppm AZ to pupation, the resultant females had a lower rate of oviposition than did the untreated controls after a full blood meal. When late instar larvae were treated at 0.005 ppm and 0.010 ppm AZ, the resultant females produced smaller egg rafts after a full blood meal, as compared to the controls, but egg viability was not affected. In newly emerged adults feeding continuously on 10 ppm and 50 ppm AZ in 10% sucrose for seven days (before blood feeding), the oviposition rate, size of egg raft, and hatching rate of the eggs after a full blood meal were all reduced. When newly blood-fed adults were fed continuously on 10 ppm and 50 ppm AZ in 10% sucrose for five days, their oviposition rate was lower than controls in most cases, but the egg raft size and viability of eggs were not affected. In freshly blood-fed females topically treated with AZ with 1 or 5 micrograms/female, the oviposition rate and size of egg rafts were generally reduced. The females receiving topical treatment laid eggs and their hatching was not affected. The longevity of adult females feeding continuously on 10 ppm and 50 ppm AZ in 10% sucrose solution after emergence was reduced, whereas, the longevity of males was only affected at the higher concentration.

  7. The persistence of component Theileria parva stocks in cattle immunized with the 'Muguga cocktail' live vaccine against East Coast fever in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Oura, C A L; Bishop, R; Wampande, E M; Lubega, G W; Tait, A

    2004-07-01

    The 'Muguga cocktail' live vaccine comprises three Theileria parva stocks (Muguga, Kiambu 5 and the buffalo-derived Serengeti-transformed) and has been used extensively in Eastern, Central and Southern Africa with an infection and treatment protocol to protect cattle against East Coast fever. We report the characterization of the three component vaccine stocks using a panel of polymorphic micro-satellite and mini-satellite markers and the development of a stock-derived PCR method that distinguishes two of the vaccine stocks. These markers, with the use of a recently developed Reverse Line Blot assay, have enabled us to address four important questions in relation to vaccination. First, how closely related are the vaccine stocks, secondly do all three stocks persist post-vaccination and induce a carrier state, thirdly is there evidence for the transmission of the vaccine stocks and fourthly does vaccination prevent infection with local genotypes? The results show that Muguga and Serengeti-transformed stocks are highly related but very distinct from Kiambu 5 that persists in vaccinated cattle establishing a carrier state. No evidence was obtained for the transmission of vaccine stocks to co-grazed animals, although these animals were infected with up to 8 different T. parva genotypes showing there was a significant level of tick challenge. Some of the vaccinated animals become infected with a subset of local genotypes providing evidence for limited vaccine 'breakthrough'.

  8. Haematoloechus sp. infection in wild-caught northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens).

    PubMed

    Hsu, Charlie; Carter, D Bart; Williams, Donna; Besch-Williford, Cynthia

    2004-11-01

    Three male, wild-caught northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) died over a 1-week period with no previous history of clinical illness or disease. Noteworthy necropsy findings in one of the three frogs included depleted fat bodies in the coelomic cavity, indicating a poor nutritional condition, and a heavy parasite burden in the lungs. The location of infection and morphologic characteristics of the parasite were consistent with infection by the common lung fluke, Haematoloechus sp. In contrast to the heavy fluke load, only minor microscopic changes were observed in the lungs. Lesions included mild hypertrophy of the bronchiolar epithelium, with few submucosal inflammatory cells consisting predominantly of lymphocytes. Subsequent review of the literature revealed little about the pathologic effects of these parasites except that small numbers are thought to cause the host little harm. Our findings suggest that even with a large number of parasites, there is minimal pathologic impact in the lungs. We conclude that heavy lung-fluke infection should not be diagnosed as the sole or major etiology of death or illness in leopard frogs.

  9. Syritta pipiens (Diptera: Syrphidae), a new species associated with human cadavers.

    PubMed

    Magni, Paola A; Pérez-Bañón, Celeste; Borrini, Matteo; Dadour, Ian R

    2013-09-10

    The analyses of necrophagous insects feeding on a corpse can be successfully used to estimate the minimum time since death. A minimum time frame is sometimes an underestimate, but it is actually the only method that can provide such information when decomposed remains are found at a crime scene. Many insects are known to be colonisers of a corpse, but because there is an endless spectrum of crime scene environments, the development data bases for necrophagous insects is incomplete. The two cases detailed in this paper show different entomological patterns due to the different environments (well and burial) and locations (south and central Italy) where the two cadavers were found. Common to both of these cases' was the discovery of the corpse in the same period of the year (January) and the presence of Syritta pipiens (Diptera: Syrphidae), a species that has never been associated with deceased humans. The ecological information concerning this insect was used in combination with the more typical entomofauna found on the corpse to provide a minimum post mortem interval.

  10. Clinal patterns in genetic variation for northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens): Conservation status and population histories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockwell, Craig A.; Fisher, Justin D.L.; McLean, Kyle I.

    2016-01-01

    The security of the northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens) varies spatially with populations east and west of North Dakota considered as secure and at risk, respectively. We used genetic markers to characterize the conservation status of northern leopard frog populations across North Dakota. We used multiple regression analyses and model selection to evaluate correlations of expected heterozygosity (HE) with the direct and additive effects of: i) geographic location,ii) wetland density and iii) average annual precipitation. There was lower genetic diversity in the western portion of the state due to lower levels of diversity for populations southwest of the Missouri River. This may reflect a refugial/colonization signature for the only non-glaciated area of North Dakota. Genetic diversity was also positively associated with wetland densities which is consistent with the reliance of this species on a mosaic of wetlands. Our findings suggest that populations in the southwestern part of North Dakota are of higher conservation concern, a finding consistent with the higher risk noted for northern leopard frog populations in most states west of North Dakota. Our findings also pose the hypothesis that climate change induced changes in wetland densities will reduce genetic diversity of northern leopard frog populations.

  11. Effects of exposure to cold on metabolic characteristics in gastrocnemius muscle of frog (Rana pipiens).

    PubMed Central

    Ohira, M; Ohira, Y

    1988-01-01

    1. Responses of enzymic characteristics of gastrocnemius muscle were studied when frogs (Rana pipiens) were exposed to cold environment (4 degrees C). 2. The content of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) decreased significantly after cold exposure. This decrease was greater in starved than in fed frogs. 3. Although the glycogen content did not change, lactate levels were lower in cold-exposed than room-temperature (control) frogs. No change was observed in glycogen and lactate between fed and unfed frogs kept at 4 degrees C for 2 months. Lactate dehydrogenase activity tended to increase during chronic cold exposure, but not significantly. 4. The activities of citrate synthase, cytochrome oxidase, and beta-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase were higher in gastrocnemius of chronically cold-exposed frogs than in room-temperature controls. This increase was statistically significant only in the muscles of starved frogs; these muscles had the greatest decrease in ATP. 5. It was suggested that chronic cold exposure decreases skeletal muscle ATP content but may not affect glycolysis. The data also suggested that the decrease in ATP content stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis which increases enzyme activities. PMID:3261790

  12. Insecticide resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus from Zanzibar: implications for vector control programmes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Zanzibar has a long history of lymphatic filariasis (LF) caused by the filarial parasite Wuchereria bancrofti, and transmitted by the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus Say. The LF Programme in Zanzibar has successfully implemented mass drug administration (MDA) to interrupt transmission, and is now in the elimination phase. Monitoring infections in mosquitoes, and assessing the potential role of interventions such as vector control, is important in case the disease re-emerges as a public health problem. Here, we examine Culex mosquito species from the two main islands to detect W. bancrofti infection and to determine levels of susceptibility to the insecticides used for vector control. Methods Culex mosquitoes collected during routine catches in Vitongoji, Pemba Island, and Makadara, Unguja Island were tested for W. bancrofti infection using PCR. Insecticide bioassays on Culex mosquitoes were performed to determine susceptibility to permethrin, deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, DDT and bendiocarb. Additional synergism assays with piperonyl butoxide (PBO) were used for lambda-cyhalothrin. Pyrosequencing was used to determine the kdr genotype and sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) subunit performed to identify ambiguous Culex species. Results None of the wild-caught Culex mosquitoes analysed were found to be positive for W. bancrofti. High frequencies of resistance to all insecticides were found in Wete, Pemba Island, whereas Culex from the nearby site of Tibirinzi (Pemba) and in Kilimani, Unguja Island remained relatively susceptible. Species identification confirmed that mosquitoes from Wete were Culex quinquefasciatus. The majority of the Culex collected from Tibirinzi and all from Kilimani could not be identified to species by molecular assays. Two alternative kdr alleles, both resulting in a L1014F substitution were detected in Cx. quinquefasciatus from Wete with no homozygote susceptible detected. Metabolic resistance to

  13. Efficacy of female Culex quinquefasciatus with entomopathogenic fungus Fusarium pallidoroseum.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Suman Sundar; Raghavendra, Kamaraju; Rai, Usha; Dash, Aditya Prasad

    2008-06-01

    This study was conducted to isolate and identify natural entomopathogenic fungi from female Culex quinquefasciatus and to test their adulticidal activity. Field-collected female C. quinquefasciatus died early and were placed on a Saboraud's dextrose agar plates for growth and isolation of natural entomopathogenic fungi. The plates were maintained in an incubator at 24+/-2 degrees C for 3 days. Four fungal species were isolated in two genera namely, Aspergillus and Fusarium. The identified fungal species were A. niger, A. flavus, A. nidulans var acristatus (ITCC-6327.04), and F. pallidoroseum (ITCC-6324.06). Adult bioassays were carried out using spore-impregnated paper in WHO-holding tubes. F. pallidoroseum was found to be more effective than the others. Exposure of C. quinquefasciatus to spores of A. flavus and A. niger for 4 h caused 5.53% and 5.51% mortality in the mosquitoes within a week, respectively. All the female C. quinquefasciatus were killed within 4 days of exposure to F. pallidoroseum at a concentration of 1.11 x 10(10) conidia per m2. Significant difference of longevity was observed between the F. pallidoroseum-treated C. quinquefasciatus and control mosquitoes. The LT50 of F. pallidoroseum was 2.08 days for 4 h exposure to C. quinquefasciatus. Results of the present study confirm that F. pallidoroseum is one of the alternative biological control agents of adult mosquitoes.

  14. Dynamics of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus in septic tanks.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Andrew J; Amador, Manuel; Diaz, Annette; Smith, Josh; Barrera, Roberto

    2009-12-01

    Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus were found in large numbers emerging from septic tanks in southern Puerto Rico during the dry season. Previous studies suggested that Ae. aegypti uses subterranean aquatic habitats only during dry periods when surface containers do not have water. This research investigated whether septic tanks are alternative aquatic habitats that this mosquito uses during unfavorable times of the year, or whether Ae. aegypti uses this aquatic habitat throughout the year. To assess temporal change, exit traps were used to collect mosquitoes emerging from septic tanks in Playa/Playita, southern Puerto Rico, from November 2006 to October 2007. We also investigated the hypotheses that (1) the production of Ae. aegypti in septic tanks was larger than in surface containers and (2) adult mosquitoes emerging from septic tanks were larger than those emerging from surface containers. This study demonstrated that unsealed septic tanks produced large numbers of Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus throughout the year, without any significant relationship with rainfall. The number of adult Ae. aegypti emerging per day from septic tanks in each community was 3 to 9 times larger than those produced in surface containers. It was also demonstrated that Ae. aegypti emerging from septic tanks were significantly larger than those emerging from surface container habitats. It is recommended that dengue prevention programs include regular inspection and maintenance of septic tanks in communities lacking sewerage.

  15. Effects of rainfall on Culex mosquito population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Valdez, L D; Sibona, G J; Diaz, L A; Contigiani, M S; Condat, C A

    2017-03-27

    The dynamics of a mosquito population depends heavily on climatic variables such as temperature and precipitation. Since climate change models predict that global warming will impact on the frequency and intensity of rainfall, it is important to understand how these variables affect the mosquito populations. We present a model of the dynamics of a Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito population that incorporates the effect of rainfall and use it to study the influence of the number of rainy days and the mean monthly precipitation on the maximum yearly abundance of mosquitoes Mmax. Additionally, using a fracturing process, we investigate the influence of the variability in daily rainfall on Mmax. We find that, given a constant value of monthly precipitation, there is an optimum number of rainy days for which Mmax is a maximum. On the other hand, we show that increasing daily rainfall variability reduces the dependence of Mmax on the number of rainy days, leading also to a higher abundance of mosquitoes for the case of low mean monthly precipitation. Finally, we explore the effect of the rainfall in the months preceding the wettest season, and we obtain that a regimen with high precipitations throughout the year and a higher variability tends to advance slightly the time at which the peak mosquito abundance occurs, but could significantly change the total mosquito abundance in a year.

  16. Selective Toxicity of Persian Gulf Sea Cucumber (Holothuria parva) and Sponge (Haliclona oculata) Methanolic Extracts on Liver Mitochondria Isolated from an Animal Model of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Seydi, Enayatollah; Motallebi, Abbasali; Dastbaz, Maryam; Dehghan, Sahar; Salimi, Ahmad; Nazemi, Melika; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Natural products isolated from marine environments are well known for their pharmacodynamic potential in diverse disease treatments, such as for cancer or inflammatory conditions. Sea cucumbers are marine animals of the phylum Echinoderm and the class Holothuroidea, with leathery skin and gelatinous bodies. Sponges are important components of Persian Gulf animal communities, and the marine sponges of the genus Haliclona have been known to display broad-spectrum biological activity. Many studies have shown that sea cucumbers and sponges contain antioxidants and anti-cancer compounds. Objectives: This study was designed to determine the selective toxicity of Persian Gulf sea cucumber (Holothuria parva) and sponge (Haliclona oculata) methanolic extracts on liver mitochondria isolated from an animal model of hepatocellular carcinoma, as part of a national project that hopes to identify novel potential anticancer candidates among Iranian Persian Gulf flora and fauna. Materials and Methods: To induce hepatocarcinogenesis, rats were given diethylnitrosamine (DEN) injections (200 mg/kg i.p. by a single dose), and then the cancer was promoted with 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) (0.02 w/w) for two weeks. Histopathological evaluations were performed, and levels of liver injury markers and a specific liver cancer marker (alpha-fetoprotein), were determined for confirmation of hepatocellular carcinoma induction. Finally, mitochondria were isolated from cancerous and non-cancerous hepatocytes. Results: Our results showed that H. parva methanolic extracts (250, 500, and 1000 µg/mL) and H. oculata methanolic extracts (200, 400, and 800 µg/mL) increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), mitochondrial swelling, and cytochrome c release in the mitochondria obtained from cancerous hepatocytes, but not in mitochondria obtained from non-cancerous liver hepatocytes. These extracts also induced caspase-3 activation, which is

  17. Light-dependent toxicity of α-terthienyl and anthracene toward late embryonic stages ofRana pipiens.

    PubMed

    Kagan, J; Kagan, P A; Buhse, H E

    1984-07-01

    Alpha-terthienyl is toxic to late embryonic stages ofRana pipiens in the presence of sunlight. Neither α-terthienyl alone in the dark nor a previously photolyzed solution of α-terthienyl has comparable activity. The LC50 was 0.11 ppm with 30 min of exposure and 0.018 ppm with 2 hr of exposure to sunlight. Anthracene, a representative example of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons widely distributed in the environment, also showed similar phototoxicity, with an LC50 of 0.065 ppm after 30 min of exposure and 0.025 ppm after 5 hr.

  18. Evaluation of Bacillus sphaericus bioinsecticide produced with white soybean meal as culture medium for the control of Culex (Culex) quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Melo, André L A; Soccol, Carlos R; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Nogueira, Miodeli

    2009-03-01

    Bioinsecticides are shown to be useful in control programs to prevent several diseases, based on their specificity and efficiency against insect vectors. In the current study a bioinsecticide based on Bacillus sphaericus was produced using a white soybean culture medium and applied to larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, the susceptible species, and Aedes aegypti, the refractory species used as the negative control. Efficacy was compared with that of the product fermented with the Luria Bertani (LB) reference medium. The experiments showed that C. quinquefasciatus was highly susceptible to the product prepared with white soybean meal, reaching 100% larval mortality even at 10mg/L, while A. aegypti failed to reach 70% mortality at a concentration of 1g/L. By comparison with the reference medium, the proposed culture medium showed high larvicidal power, reaching a LD90 of 2.26 mg/L, while 4.37 mg/L was needed for the LB medium to achieve the same mortality rate. Cost comparison between the formulations favored the use of the bioinsecticide produced with white soybean meal. After factoring in the LD90 value, the cost ratio favored the new raw material by nearly 1:220.

  19. Larval habitat dynamics and diversity of Culex mosquitoes in rice agro-ecosystem in Mwea, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Muturi, Ephantus J; Shililu, Josephat I; Gu, Weidong; Jacob, Benjamin G; Githure, John I; Novak, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Introduction of irrigation projects in developing nations has often been blamed for aggravating the problem of mosquito-borne diseases by creating ideal larval habitats for vector mosquitoes. However, whereas several studies have demonstrated the relationship between malaria vectors and irrigation, little work has been done on culicine mosquitoes despite their potential in transmission of filariasis and arboviruses and their significant biting nuisance in these areas. This study examined the diversity of Culex mosquito fauna and their larval habitats at two sites (Murinduko and Kiamachiri) in Mwea, Kenya over a 12-month period. The habitat types present at each site within a 200-meter radius around the study village, including randomly selected paddies and canals, were sampled every two weeks to examine the relationship between vegetation cover, water depth, turbidity, and Culex larval counts. Ten culicine species belonging to four genera were identified, with 73.1% of the total collection comprising of Culex duttoni and Cx. quinquefasciatus. Other species collected included Cx. annulioris, Cx. poicilipes, Cx. cinereus, Cx. tigripes, Cx. trifilatus, Aedes spp., Coquilettidia fuscopennata, and Ficalbia splendens. Murinduko was more diverse than Kiamachiri in terms of species richness (10 versus 7 species) and larval habitat diversity (11 versus 8 habitat types). Paddies, canals, and rain pools were the most diverse habitats in terms of species richness, and ditches, rock pools, and tree holes were the least diverse. Principal component and correlation analyses showed a strong association between three Culex species and the measured habitat characteristics. Culex poicilipes was strongly associated with floating vegetation, Cx. annulioris with clean water containing emergent vegetation, and Cx. quinquefasciatus was associated with turbid water. Seasonal changes in larval counts in water reservoirs and pool and ditch habitats were closely associated with rainfall

  20. Effects of wetland vs. landscape variables on parasite communities of Rana pipiens: links to anthropogenic factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schotthoefer, Anna M.; Rohr, Jason R.; Cole, Rebecca A.; Koehler, Anson V.; Johnson, Catherine M.; Johnson, Lucinda B.; Beasley, Val R.

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of several diseases affecting amphibian populations worldwide has prompted investigations into determinants of the occurrence and abundance of parasites in frogs. To understand the spatial scales and identify specific environmental factors that determine risks of parasitism in frogs, helminth communities in metamorphic frogs of the northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens) were examined in relation to wetland and landscape factors at local (1 km) and regional (10 km) spatial extents in an agricultural region of Minnesota (USA) using regression analyses, ordination, and variance partitioning techniques. Greater amounts of forested and woody wetland habitats, shorter distances between woody wetlands, and smaller-sized open water patches in surrounding landscapes were the most consistently positive correlates with the abundances, richness, and diversity of helminths found in the frogs. Wetland and local landscape variables were suggested as most important for larval trematode abundances, whereas local and regional landscape variables appeared most important for adult helminths. As previously reported, the sum concentration of atrazine and its metabolite desethylatrazine, was the strongest predictor of larval trematode communities. In this report, we highlight the additional influences of landscape factors. In particular, our data suggest that anthropogenic activities that have resulted in the loss of the availability and connectivity of suitable habitats in the surrounding landscapes of wetlands are associated with declines in helminth richness and abundance, but that alteration of wetland water quality through eutrophication or pesticide contamination may facilitate the transmission of certain parasite taxa when they are present at wetlands. Although additional research is needed to quantify the negative effects of parasitism on frog populations, efforts to reduce inputs of agrochemicals into wetlands to limit larval trematode infections may be warranted

  1. Evaluation of metomidate hydrochloride as an anesthetic in leopard frogs (Rana pipiens).

    PubMed

    Doss, Grayson A; Nevarez, Javier G; Fowlkes, Natalie; da Cunha, Anderson F

    2014-03-01

    Metomidate hydrochloride is an imidazole-based, nonbarbiturate hypnotic drug primarily used as an immersion sedation and anesthetic agent in freshwater and marine finfish. To the authors' knowledge, there is no documentation in the literature of its use in amphibians. In this study, 7 male and 4 female leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) were induced with metomidate hydrochloride via immersion bath at a concentration of 30 mg/L for 60 min. The pH of the induction solution ranged from 7.63 to 7.75. Each frog was then removed from the induction solution, rinsed, and recovered in 26.6 degrees C amphibian Ringer's solution. After 210 min in the Ringer's solution, the frogs were transferred to moist paper towels for recovery. Heart rate, gular and abdominal respiration rates, righting reflex, superficial and deep pain withdrawal reflexes, corneal and palpebral reflexes, and escape response were monitored and recorded at defined intervals during both induction and recovery. The average time to loss of righting reflex and escape response was 17.36 min and 17.82 min, respectively. Metomidate produced clinical sedation in all frogs (n = 11). Surgical anesthesia was achieved in only 27% (3/11), with an anesthetic duration that ranged from 9 to 20 min. Recovery times were extremely prolonged and varied, with a range from 313 min to longer than 600 min. The findings of this study indicate that metomidate hydrochloride is unsuitable as a sole anesthetic agent in leopard frogs, and further research is needed to evaluate its suitability in other amphibians.

  2. Oxidative stress induced in PCB 126-exposed northern leopard frogs, Rana pipiens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Y.-W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Karasov, W.H.

    2007-01-01

    Northern leopard frogs Rana pipiens exposed to PCB 126 (3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl) were examined for hepatic oxidative stress. In a dose-response study, northern leopard frogs were injected intraperitoneally with either PCB 126 in corn oil (0.2, 0.7, 2.3, or 7.8 mg/kg body weight) or corn oil alone. In a time-course study, frogs received 7.8 mg/kg or corn oil alone, and were examined at 1, 2, 3, and 4 wk after dosing. Hepatic concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and total sulfhydryls (total SH), as well as activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-P), GSSG reductase (GSSG-R), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH), and glutathione S-transferase (GSH-S-T) were measured. In the dose-response experiment, few effects were apparent 1 wk after dosing. In the time-course experiment, significant changes were observed in the 7.8-mg/kg group at 2 wk or more posttreatment. Hepatic concentrations of GSH and TBARS were higher than in corresponding controls at wk 3 and 4; the activities of GSSG-R and GSH-S-T were higher than in controls at wk 2 and 4; and the activity of G-6-PDH was increased at wk 2 and 4. These data collectively indicate that altered glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress occurred and were indicative of both toxicity and induction of protective mechanisms in frogs exposed to PCB. A similar delay in response was reported in fish and may relate to lower metabolic rate and physiological reactions in ectothermic vertebrates

  3. Distribution and postbreeding environmental relationships of Northern leopard frogs (Rana [Lithobates] pipiens) in Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Germaine, S.S.; Hays, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Northern leopard frogs (Rana [Lithobates] pipiens) are considered sensitive, threatened, or endangered in all western states and western Canadian provinces. Historically present in eastern Washington in 6 major river drainages, leopard frogs are now only known to occur at 2 localized areas in the Crab Creek drainage in Grant County. During the summers of 2002-2005, we surveyed both areas to document extent of leopard frog distributions and to describe habitat and vertebrate community characteristics associated with leopard frog site occupancy. At Gloyd Seeps, 2 juvenile leopard frogs were observed in a total of 8.2 person-days of searching along a 5-km stream reach. At Potholes Reservoir, we surveyed 243 wetland sites in 7 management units known to have been occupied by leopard frogs during the 1980s. We confirmed leopard frog presence at only 87 sites (36%) in 4 management units. Site occupancy models for individual ponds indicated that, compared to unoccupied sites, occupied sites had slightly greater pond depths, less tall emergent vegetation, more herbaceous vegetative cover, and fewer neighboring ponds containing nonnative predatory fish. Models developed at the 1-km2 scale indicated that occupied areas had greater average midsummer pond depths, fewer ponds occupied by bullfrogs (Rana [Lithobates] catesbeiana) and carp (Cyprinus carpio), and more herbaceous vegetation surrounding ponds. The Gloyd Seeps population now appears defunct, and the Potholes Reservoir population is in sharp decline. Unless management actions are taken to reduce nonnative fish and bullfrogs and to enhance wetland vegetation, leopard frogs may soon be extirpated from both sites and possibly, therefore, from Washington.

  4. Arbovirus Transmission by Culex nigripalpus in Florida, 2005

    PubMed Central

    Vitek, Christopher J.; Richards, Stephanie L.; Mores, Christopher N.; Day, Jonathan F.; Lord, Cynthia C.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the transmission patterns of West Nile and St. Louis encephalitis viruses (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, WNV and SLEV) could result in an increased ability to predict transmission risk to humans. To examine transmission patterns between vector and host, we trapped mosquitoes in three Florida counties from June to November 2005 by using chicken-baited lard can mosquito traps. These traps were used to monitor for presence of WNV and SLEV in mosquitoes and subsequent transmission of these viruses to chickens. In total, 166,615 female mosquitoes were sorted into 4,009 pools based on species and bloodfed status, and they were tested for presence of WNV and SLEV. Sera from 209 chickens were tested for WNV and SLEV antibodies. We detected eight WNV-positive Culex nigripalpus Theobald mosquito pools; SLEV was not detected in any pools. Six positive pools were collected in August and September from Duval County, one pool in September from Manatee County, and one pool in November from Indian River County. Of the eight chickens potentially exposed to WNV, antibodies were detected in only one chicken, indicating a low rate of transmission relative to the observed mosquito infection rates. Low virus transmission rates relative to infection rates would suggest that using sentinel chicken seroconversion data as a means of arbovirus surveillance may underestimate the prevalence of WNV in the mosquito population. However, using mosquito infection rates may overestimate the risk of arboviral transmission. A variety of factors might account for the observed low level of transmission including a lack of viral dissemination in mosquito vectors. PMID:18533444

  5. Midgut Microbial Community of Culex quinquefasciatus Mosquito Populations from India

    PubMed Central

    Chandel, Kshitij; Mendki, Murlidhar J.; Parikh, Rasesh Y.; Kulkarni, Girish; Tikar, Sachin N.; Sukumaran, Devanathan; Prakash, Shri; Parashar, Brahma D.; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Veer, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    The mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus is a ubiquitous species that serves as a major vector for west nile virus and lymphatic filariasis. Ingestion of bloodmeal by females triggers a series of physiological processes in the midgut and also exposes them to infection by these pathogens. The bacteria normally harbored in the midgut are known to influence physiology and can also alter the response to various pathogens. The midgut bacteria in female Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes collected over a large geographical area from India was studied. Examination of 16S ribosomal DNA amplicons from culturable microflora revealed the presence of 83 bacterial species belonging to 31 bacterial genera. All of these species belong to three phyla i.e. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Phylum Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum (37 species), followed by Firmicutes (33 species) and Actinobacteria (13 species). Phylum Proteobacteria, was dominated by members of γ-proteobacteria class. The genus Staphylococcus was the largest genus represented by 11 species whereas Enterobacter was the most prevalent genus and recovered from all the field stations except Leh. Highest bacterial prevalence was observed from Bhuj (22 species) followed by Nagrota (18 species), Masimpur (18 species) and Hathigarh (16 species). Whereas, least species were observed from Leh (8 species). It has been observed that individual mosquito harbor extremely diverse gut bacteria and have very small overlap bacterial taxa in their gut. This variation in midgut microbiota may be one of the factors responsible for variation in disease transmission rates or vector competence within mosquito population. The present data strongly encourage further investigations to verify the potential role of the detected bacteria in mosquito for the transmission of lymphatic filariasis and west nile virus. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study on midgut microbiota of wild Cx. quinquefasciatus from over a

  6. West Nile virus infection decreases fecundity of Culex tarsalis females.

    PubMed

    Styer, Linda M; Meola, Mark A; Kramer, Laura D

    2007-11-01

    West Nile virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, WNV) persistently infects many mosquito tissues, and it has been associated with cytopathological changes in midgut muscles and salivary glands. However, the effects of WNV infection on mosquito fitness (survival and reproduction) are not known. We conducted a life table study of individually housed female Culex tarsalis Coquillett. After an initial bloodmeal from a WNV-infected or uninfected chicken, mosquitoes were provided sucrose and offered weekly opportunities to feed on a hanging blood drop. WNV transmission status was determined by testing the remaining blood drop for virus after mosquito feeding. Dead mosquitoes and eggs were collected daily. Mosquito legs and bodies were tested for WNV, and eggs were counted and allowed to hatch. Two replicates of this experiment were performed, with a total of 62 mosquitoes that fed on a WNV-infected chicken (of which 21 became infected) and 43 mosquitoes that fed on an uninfected chicken. Fecundity of WNV-infected mosquitoes was significantly lower than that of uninfected mosquitoes, especially during the first oviposition. WNV infection was associated with smaller egg rafts, whereas increasing wing length and WNV titer in the legs had a positive effect on egg raft size. Additionally, infected mosquitoes had lower egg hatch rates than did uninfected mosquitoes. There were no significant differences in survival between infected and uninfected mosquitoes. Blood feeding rates were higher in infected mosquitoes than in uninfected mosquitoes. A small amount of virus (average, 378; range, 5-5000 plaque-forming units) was transmitted to the blood drops fed upon by infected mosquitoes. Although WNV infection negatively impacts mosquito reproduction, facets of mosquito biology that are critical to virus transmission success were either not affected (survival) or changed in such a way as to result in enhanced vectorial capacity (blood feeding).

  7. Larval development of Culex quinquefasciatus in water with low to moderate.

    PubMed

    Noori, Navideh; Lockaby, B Graeme; Kalin, Latif

    2015-12-01

    Population growth and urbanization have increased the potential habitats, and consequently the abundance of Culex quinquefasciatus, the southern house mosquito, a vector of West Nile Virus in urban areas. Water quality is critical in larval habitat distribution and in providing microbial food resources for larvae. A mesocosm experiment was designed to demonstrate which specific components of water chemistry are conducive to larval Culex mosquitoes. Dose-response relationships between larval development and NO3 , NH4 , and PO4 concentrations in stream water were developed through this experiment to describe the isolated effects of each nutrient on pre-adult development. The emergence pattern of Culex mosquitoes was found to be strongly related to certain nutrients, and results showed that breeding sites with higher PO4 or NO3 concentrations had higher larval survival rates. High NO3 concentrations favor the development of male mosquitoes and suppress the development of female mosquitoes, but those adult females that do emerge develop faster in containers with high NO3 levels compared to the reference group. The addition of PO4 in the absence of nitrogen sources to the larval habitat slowed larval development, however, it took fewer days for larvae to reach the pupal stage in containers with combinations of NO3 and PO4 or NH4 and PO4 nutrients. Results from this study may bolster efforts to control WNV in urban landscapes by exploring water quality conditions of Culex larval habitats that produce adult mosquitoes.

  8. Susceptibility of a North American Culex quinquefasciatus to Japanese encephalitis virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a flavivirus that is transmitted by Culex (Cx.) tritaeniorhynchus in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia. The endemic transmission cycle involves domestic pigs and avian species that serve as amplification hosts; humans are incidental hosts that cannot devel...

  9. Laboratory and field evaluation of medicinal plant extracts against filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, chemical extracts of Jatropha curcas, Hyptis suaveolens, Abutilon indicum, and Leucas aspera were tested for toxicity to larvae of the filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus. Respective median lethal concentrations (LC50) for hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts...

  10. Age modifies effect of body size on fecundity in Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fecundity of mosquitoes can vary with many factors, and can have a strong effect on population growth. This study reports the effects of body size, blood meal size and age on reproductive output of nulliparous Culex quinquefasciatus, a vector of arboviruses and other pathogens. Mated adult female m...

  11. Identification and expression profile of multiple genes in response to magnesium exposure in Culex quinquefasciatus larvae.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Magnesium is crucial for baculovirus transmission in Culex nigripalpus (Theobald) and Cx. quinquefasciatus (Say) larvae, both in the field and in the laboratory. However, the mechanistic role of magnesium in baculovirus transmission is unknown. To investigate the possible role of a host response fac...

  12. Age modifies effect of body size on fecundity in Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Culex quinquefasciatus is one of the most important mosquito species in North America due to its status as a vector of arboviruses such as West Nile virus and its often close association with agricultural activities. A better understanding of the physiological attributes of these mosquitoes is crit...

  13. SR450 and Superhawk XP applications of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis de Barjac against Culex quinquefasciatus Say

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sprayer comparisons and larval morality assays were conducted following SR450 backpack mist blower and Superhawk XP thermal fogger applications of Vectobac® WDG Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) de Barjac against Culex quinquefasciatus Say. Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis was applied at m...

  14. Impact of Topical Application Site Efficacy of Permethrin and Malathion on Culex quinquefasciatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concentrations of permethrin and malathion found in droplets generated from ultra-low volume and low volume sprays used to control adult mosquito populations were evaluated for efficacy against Culex quinquefasciatus Say using a topical application bioassay. Although insecticide droplets will imping...

  15. Laboratory evaluation of lactic acid on attraction of Culex spp. (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Allan, Sandra A; Bernier, Ulrich R; Kline, Daniel L

    2010-12-01

    The role of lactic acid was evaluated for attraction of Culex nigripalpus, Culex quinquefasciatus, Culex tarsalis, and Aedes aegypti in the laboratory using a dual-port olfactometer. When lactic acid was combined with chicken odor, attraction was increased for Cx. quinquefasciatus compared to chicken odor alone but not for Cx. nigripalpus, Cx. tarsalis, and Ae. aegypti. Lactic acid combined with hand odor did not change attraction of Cx. tarsalis and Ae. aegypti but decreased attraction of Cx. nigripalpus and Cx. quinquefasciatus. The addition of lactic acid to CO(2) increased attraction of Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus but reduced attraction of Cx. nigripalpus and Cx. tarsalis. Use of commercial lactic acid baits with CO(2) resulted in a similar trend except for Cx. nigripalpus which showed no difference. A blend of lactic acid, acetone, and dimethyl disulfide was attractive to Ae. aegypti (63.4%) but elicited low responses by all Culex spp. (1.3-26.8%). Addition of the blend to CO(2) increased attraction of Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus but reduced attraction of Cx. nigripalpus and Cx. tarsalis. The mixture of compounds plus CO(2) was as attractive as a hand for Cx. quinquefasciatus, Cx. tarsalis, and Ae. aegypti.

  16. Genome sequence of a baculovirus pathogenic for Culex nigripalpus.

    PubMed

    Afonso, C L; Tulman, E R; Lu, Z; Balinsky, C A; Moser, B A; Becnel, J J; Rock, D L; Kutish, G F

    2001-11-01

    In this report we describe the complete genome sequence of a nucleopolyhedrovirus that infects larval stages of the mosquito Culex nigripalpus (CuniNPV). The CuniNPV genome is a circular double-stranded DNA molecule of 108,252 bp and is predicted to contain 109 genes. Although 36 of these genes show homology to genes from other baculoviruses, their orientation and order exhibit little conservation relative to the genomes of lepidopteran baculoviruses. CuniNPV genes homologous to those from other baculoviruses include genes involved in early and late gene expression (lef-4, lef-5, lef-8, lef-9, vlf-1, and p47), DNA replication (lef-1, lef-2, helicase-1, and dna-pol), and structural functions (vp39, vp91, odv-ec27, odv-e56, p6.9, gp41, p74, and vp1054). Auxiliary genes include homologues of genes encoding the p35 antiapoptosis protein and a novel insulin binding-related protein. In contrast to these conserved genes, CuniNPV lacks apparent homologues of baculovirus genes essential (ie-1 and lef-3) or stimulatory (ie-2, lef-7, pe38) for DNA replication. Also, baculovirus genes essential or stimulatory for early-late (ie-1, ie-2), early (ie-0 and pe-38), and late (lef-6, lef-11, and pp31) gene transcription are not identifiable. In addition, CuniNPV lacks homologues of genes involved in the formation of virogenic stroma (pp31), nucleocapsid (orf1629, p87, and p24), envelope of occluded virions (odv-e25, odv-e66, odv-e18), and polyhedra (polyhedrin/granulin, p10, pp34, and fp25k). A homologue of gp64, a budded virus envelope fusion protein, was also absent, although a gene related to the other category of baculovirus budded virus envelope proteins, Ld130, was present. The absence of homologues of occlusion-derived virion (ODV) envelope proteins and occlusion body (OB) protein (polyhedrin) suggests that both CuniNPV ODV and OB may be structurally and compositionally different from those found in terrestrial lepidopteran hosts. The striking difference in genome

  17. Genes encoding two Theileria parva antigens recognized by CD8+ T-cells exhibit sequence diversity in South Sudanese cattle populations but the majority of alleles are similar to the Muguga component of the live vaccine cocktail

    PubMed Central

    Pelle, Roger; Mwacharo, Joram M.; Njahira, Moses N.; Marcellino, Wani L.; Kiara, Henry; Malak, Agol K.; EL Hussein, Abdel Rahim M.; Bishop, Richard; Skilton, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    East Coast fever (ECF), caused by Theileria parva infection, is a frequently fatal disease of cattle in eastern, central and southern Africa, and an emerging disease in South Sudan. Immunization using the infection and treatment method (ITM) is increasingly being used for control in countries affected by ECF, but not yet in South Sudan. It has been reported that CD8+ T-cell lymphocytes specific for parasitized cells play a central role in the immunity induced by ITM and a number of T. parva antigens recognized by parasite-specific CD8+ T-cells have been identified. In this study we determined the sequence diversity among two of these antigens, Tp1 and Tp2, which are under evaluation as candidates for inclusion in a sub-unit vaccine. T. parva samples (n = 81) obtained from cattle in four geographical regions of South Sudan were studied for sequence polymorphism in partial sequences of the Tp1 and Tp2 genes. Eight positions (1.97%) in Tp1 and 78 positions (15.48%) in Tp2 were shown to be polymorphic, giving rise to four and 14 antigen variants in Tp1 and Tp2, respectively. The overall nucleotide diversity in the Tp1 and Tp2 genes was π = 1.65% and π = 4.76%, respectively. The parasites were sampled from regions approximately 300 km apart, but there was limited evidence for genetic differentiation between populations. Analyses of the sequences revealed limited numbers of amino acid polymorphisms both overall and in residues within the mapped CD8+ T-cell epitopes. Although novel epitopes were identified in the samples from South Sudan, a large number of the samples harboured several epitopes in both antigens that were similar to those in the T. parva Muguga reference stock, which is a key component in the widely used live vaccine cocktail. PMID:28231338

  18. Distribution of Culex species in vegetation bands of a constructed wetland undergoing integrated mosquito management.

    PubMed

    Walton, William E; Popko, David A; Van Dam, Alex R; Merrill, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    The distribution and abundance of emerging Culex spp. were assessed within narrow (width: 3 m) and wide (width: 20 m) bands of California bulrush (Schoenoplectus californicus) and in the open water adjacent to emergent vegetation in 2 marshes of an ammonia-dominated wastewater treatment wetland in southern California. Emerging mosquitoes were collected along transects perpendicular to the path of water flow at 3 distances (1.5, 5, and 10 m) from the vegetation-open water interface in the wide bands of emergent vegetation, at the center of narrow bands of emergent vegetation, and at 1.5 m from the edge of emergent vegetation in the open water. The width of vegetation bands (3 vs. 20 m) influenced the effectiveness of integrated mosquito management practices, especially the application of mosquito control agents. Mosquito production from the 2 marshes also differed up to 14-fold, suggesting that the distance between the shorelines (62 vs. 74 m) of each marsh also influenced the efficacy of mosquito control agents applied from the shore and boats. Hot spots of mosquito production (75424 female Culex/m2/day) were found within the wide bands of bulrush. During summer, the relative abundance of Culex stigmatosoma among emerging mosquitoes increased from the periphery to the center of wide bands of emergent vegetation. Culex erythrothorax emergence rates were comparatively similar among the transects in the wide bands of emergent vegetation. Culex tarsalis adults increased in number from the periphery to the center of wide bands of bulrush and, in May, were > 95% of emerged mosquitoes.

  19. Impact of application site on the efficacy of two topically-applied insecticides to Culex quinquefasciatus Say

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ultra-low volume and low volume insecticide treatments commonly used to control mosquito populations were evaluated for efficacy against Culex quinquefasciatus using a topical bioassay technique. Traditional topical bioassays focus pesticide application to the mesothoracic pleural area. Although, in...

  20. Atrazine-induced hermaphroditism at 0.1 ppb in American leopard frogs (Rana pipiens): laboratory and field evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Tyrone; Haston, Kelly; Tsui, Mable; Hoang, Anhthu; Haeffele, Cathryn; Vonk, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    Atrazine is the most commonly used herbicide in the United States and probably the world. Atrazine contamination is widespread and can be present in excess of 1.0 ppb even in precipitation and in areas where it is not used. In the current study, we showed that atrazine exposure (> or = to 0.1 ppb) resulted in retarded gonadal development (gonadal dysgenesis) and testicular oogenesis (hermaphroditism) in leopard frogs (Rana pipiens). Slower developing males even experienced oocyte growth (vitellogenesis). Furthermore, we observed gonadal dysgenesis and hermaphroditism in animals collected from atrazine-contaminated sites across the United States. These coordinated laboratory and field studies revealed the potential biological impact of atrazine contamination in the environment. Combined with reported similar effects in Xenopus laevis, the current data raise concern about the effects of atrazine on amphibians in general and the potential role of atrazine and other endocrine-disrupting pesticides in amphibian declines. PMID:12676617

  1. Immunization of cattle using varying infective doses of Theileria parva lawrencei sporozoites derived from an African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) and treatment with buparvaquone.

    PubMed

    Mutugi, J J; Young, A S; Maritim, A C; Linyonyi, A; Mbogo, S K; Leitch, B L

    1988-04-01

    A Theileria parva lawrencei isolate in the form of a sporozoite stabilate, derived by feeding clean Rhipicephalus appendiculatus nymphal ticks on an African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) captured in the Laikipia District, Kenya, was inoculated into groups of cattle at dilutions between 10(0) and 10(-3). Groups of 3 cattle infected with 1 ml inocula at 10(0), 10(-1) and 10(-2) dilutions were treated with 2.5 mg/kg body weight of buparvaquone on day 0 and similar groups were left untreated to act as controls. An additional group, given 10(0) dilution of the stabilate, was treated with buparvaquone on day 8 post-inoculation. It was found that all control cattle inoculated with the stabilate at dilutions between 10(0) and 10(-2) became infected, but only 2 out of 3 cattle developed patent infections at 10(-3) dilution. All 3 control cattle receiving 10(0) dilution died of theileriosis, 2 at 10(-1) and 10(-2) dilutions, and 1 at 10(-3) dilution died. Buparvaquone treatment on day 0 at 10(0) dilution resulted in the survival of 2 of 3 cattle and all the cattle at 10(-1) and 10(-2) dilutions. All the surviving cattle eventually developed a significant serological response against T. parva in the indirect fluorescent antibody test, except 1 in the 10(-3) dilution group, and were immune to homologous challenge when tested 3 months later with a lethal inoculum of stabilate, except 2 cattle in the 10(-3) dilution group. As a result of a theileriosis problem at about day 60 after inoculation in 2 cattle given 10(-2) dilution of stabilate and buparvaquone treatment on day 0, an additional 5 cattle were given 10(-2) dilution of stabilate and developed a good immunity after buparaquone treatment. None was shown to develop the carrier state. Treatment with buparvaquone on day 8 after infection with 10(0) dilution of stabilate was not successful since 2 died. The stabilate used was shown to produce reproducible infection in cattle at different dilutions.

  2. The disappearing northern leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens): conservation genetics and implications for remnant populations in western Nevada

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Serena D; Peacock, Mary M

    2012-01-01

    Global amphibian declines suggest a major shift in the amount and quality of habitat for these sensitive taxa. Many species that were once widespread are now experiencing declines either in part of or across their historic range. The northern leopard frog (Rana [Lithobates] pipiens] has undergone significant declines particularly in the western United States and Canada. Leopard frog population losses in Nevada are largely due to habitat fragmentation and the introduction of nonnative fish, amphibian, and plant species. Only two populations remain in the Truckee and Carson River watersheds of western Nevada which represents the western boundary of this species range. We used sequence data for an 812 base pair fragment of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) gene to support a native origin for western Nevada populations. All frogs had a single haplotype (W07) from the distinct western North America ND1 haplotype clade. Data from seven polymorphic microsatellite loci show that Truckee and Carson River populations are highly differentiated from each other and from leopard frogs collected from eastern Nevada sites. Lack of gene flow among and distinct color morphs among the western Nevada populations likely predates the current geographical isolation. Comparisons with other peripheral L. pipiens populations show western Nevada populations have similar levels of gene diversity despite their contemporary isolation (HE 0.411, 0.482). Restoration of leopard frog populations in these watersheds will be challenging given well-entrenched nonnative bullfrog populations and major changes to the riparian zone over the past century. Declines of once common amphibian species has become a major conservation concern. Contemporary isolation of populations on a species range periphery such as the leopard frog populations in the Truckee and Carson rivers further exacerbate extirpation risk as these populations are likely to have fewer genetic resources to adaptively respond to

  3. Genetic Diversity and Population Genetics of Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae: Culex spp.) from the Sonoran Desert of North America

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiler, Edward; Flores-López, Carlos A.; Mada-Vélez, Jesús Gerardo; Escalante-Verdugo, Juan; Markow, Therese A.

    2013-01-01

    The population genetics and phylogenetic relationships of Culex mosquitoes inhabiting the Sonoran Desert region of North America were studied using mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite molecular markers. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) from mosquitoes collected over a wide geographic area, including the Baja California peninsula, and mainland localities in southern Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico, showed several well-supported partitions corresponding to Cx. quinquefasciatus, Cx. tarsalis, and two unidentified species, Culex sp. 1 and sp. 2. Culex quinquefasciatus was found at all localities and was the most abundant species collected. Culex tarsalis was collected only at Tucson, Arizona and Guaymas, Sonora. The two unidentified species of Culex were most abundant at Navojoa in southern Sonora. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities in the COI gene segment were substantially lower in Cx. quinquefasciatus compared with the other three species. Analysis of molecular variance revealed little structure among seven populations of Cx. quinquefasciatus, whereas significant structure was found between the two populations of Cx. tarsalis. Evidence for an historical population expansion beginning in the Pleistocene was found for Cx. tarsalis. Possible explanations for the large differences in genetic diversity between Cx. quinquefasciatus and the other species of Culex are presented. PMID:24302868

  4. Receptor-Selective Agonists Induce Emesis and Fos Expression in the Brain and Enteric Nervous System of the Least Shrew (Cryptotis parva)

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Andrew P.; Chebolu, Seetha; Darmani, Nissar A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on the mechanisms of emesis has implicated multiple neurotransmitters via both central (dorsal vagal complex) and peripheral (enteric neurons and enterochromaffin cells) anatomical substrates. Taking advantage of advances in receptor-specific agonists, and utilizing Fos expression as a functional activity marker, this study demonstrates a strong, but incomplete, overlap in anatomical substrates for a variety of emetogens. We used cisplatin and specific agonists to 5-HT3 serotonergic, D2/D3 dopaminergic, and NK1 tachykininergic receptors to induce vomiting in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva), and quantified the resulting Fos expression. The least shrew is a small mammal whose responses to emetic challenges are very similar to its human counterparts. In all cases, the enteric nervous system, nucleus of the solitary tract, and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus demonstrated significantly increased Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-IR). However, Fos-IR induction was notably absent from the area postrema following the dopaminergic and NK1 receptor-specific agents. Two brain nuclei not usually discussed regarding emesis, the dorsal raphe nucleus and paraventricular thalamic nucleus, also demonstrated increased emesis-related Fos-IR. Taken together, these data suggest the dorsal vagal complex is part of a common pathway for a variety of distinct emetogens, but there are central emetic substrates, both medullary and diencephalic, that can be accessed without directly stimulating the area postrema. PMID:19699757

  5. System development for linked-fermentation production of solvents from algal biomass. [Dunaliella tertiolecta, D. primolecta, D. parva, D. bardawil, D. salina

    SciTech Connect

    Nakas, J.P.; Schaedele, M.; Parkinsan, C.M.; Coonley, C.E.; Tanenbaum, S.W.

    1983-11-01

    Five species of the genus Dunaliella (D. tertiolecta, D. primolecta, D. parva, D. bardawil, and D. salina) were examined for glycerol accumulation, growth rate, cell density, and protein and chlorophyll content. The suitability of each algal species for use as a fermentation substrate was judged according to glycerol accumulation and quantities of neutral solvents produced after sequential bacterial fermentations. When grown in 2 M NaCl, with 24 mM NaHCO3 or 3% CO2 at 28 degrees C and with 10,000 to 15,000 lx of incident light on two sides of a glass aquarium, four of the five species tested produced ca. 10 to 20 mg of glycerol per liter of culture. Clostridium pasteurianum was found to convert an algal biomass mixture supplemented with 4% glycerol to ca. 16 g of mixed solvents (n-butanol, 1,3-propanediol, and ethanol) per liter. Acetone was not detected. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that Dunaliella concentrates of up to 300-fold can be directly fermented to an identical pattern of mixed solvents. Overall solvent yields were reduced by more than 50% when fermentations were performed in the presence of 2% NaCl. These results are discussed in terms of practical application in tropical coastal zones.

  6. Repellent activity of herbal essential oils against Aedes aegypti (Linn.) and Culex quinquefasciatus (Say.)

    PubMed Central

    Sritabutra, Duangkamon; Soonwera, Mayura

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the mosquito repellent activity of herbal essential oils against female Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. Methods On a volunteer's forearm, 0.1 mL of each essential oil was applied to 3 cm×10 cm of exposed skin. The protection time was recorded for 3 min after every 30 min. Results Essential oil from clove oil in olive oil and in coconut oil gave the longest lasting period of 76.50 min and 96.00 min respectively against Aedes aegypti. The citronella grass oil in olive oil, citronella grass oil in coconut oil and lemongrass oil in coconut oil exhibited protection against Culex quinquefasciatus at 165.00, 105.00, and 112.50 min respectively. Conclusions The results clearly indicated that clove, citronella and lemongrass oil were the most promising for repellency against mosquito species. These oils could be used to develop a new formulation to control mosquitoes.

  7. Vertical Transmission of West Nile Virus by culex and aedes Species Mosquitoes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    strains of Aedes albopictus. Ae. aegypti, and Culex tritaeniorhynchus. Female mosquitoes were infected by intrathoracic inoculation with WN virus , and the...of Cx. tritae- periment. West Nile virus infection of the pa- niorhYnchus.Ae. albopcwtus, and Ae. aeg’ypi was rental female mosquitoes in all... females in experiment no. i we e infected with stock virus that had received 16 intracerebral passailes in mice and four intsthoeiaeie pauffiie in Cx

  8. DDT-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus: the effect of DDT on the mosquito's size, fecundity and survival.

    PubMed

    Kerdpibule, V; Sucharit, S; Deesin, T

    1981-03-01

    Resistant strains of Culex quinquefasciatus were selected in the larval stage by exposure to sublethal doses of DDT. The size, body weight and fecundity of DDT-resistant mosquitoes were significantly decreased. There was no significant difference between the longevity of females in the original strain and the DDT selected strains, however, there was a significant difference in the males of the DDT-resistant strains than those of the original strain.

  9. Effect of Trapping Methods, Weather, and Landscape on Estimates of the Culex Vector Mosquito Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Surendra; Hamer, Gabriel L.; Anderson, Tavis K.; Goldberg, Tony L.; Kitron, Uriel D.; Krebs, Bethany L.; Walker, Edward D.; Ruiz, Marilyn O.

    2016-01-01

    The local abundance of Culex mosquitoes is a central factor adding to the risk of West Nile virus transmission, and vector abundance data influence public health decisions. This study evaluated differences in abundance estimates from mosquitoes trapped using two common methods: CO2-baited CDC light traps and infusion-baited gravid traps in suburban, Chicago, Illinois. On a weekly basis, the two methods were modestly correlated (r = 0.219) across 71 weeks over 4 years. Lagged weather conditions of up to four weeks were associated with the number of mosquitoes collected in light and gravid traps. Collections in light traps were higher with higher temperature in the same week, higher precipitation one, two, and four weeks before the week of trapping, and lower maximum average wind speed. Collections in gravid traps were higher with higher temperature in the same week and one week earlier, lower temperature four weeks earlier, and with higher precipitation two and four weeks earlier. Culex abundance estimates from light traps were significantly higher in semi-natural areas compared to residential areas, but abundance estimates from gravid traps did not vary by the landscape type. These results highlight the importance of the surveillance methods used in the assessment of local Culex abundance estimates. Measures of risk of exposure to West Nile virus should assess carefully how mosquito abundance has been estimated and integrated into assessments of transmission risk. PMID:27375359

  10. Analysis of Culex and Aedes mosquitoes in southwestern Nigeria revealed no West Nile virus activity

    PubMed Central

    Sule, Waidi Folorunso; Oluwayelu, Daniel Oladimeji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Amplification and transmission of West Nile virus (WNV) by mosquitoes are driven by presence and number of viraemic/susceptible avian hosts. Methods In order to predict risk of WNV infection to humans, we collected mosquitoes from horse stables in Lagos and Ibadan, southwestern Nigeria. The mosquitoes were sorted and tested in pools with real-time RT-PCR to detect WNV (or flavivirus) RNA using WNV-specific primers and probes, as well as, pan-flavivirus-specific primers in two-step real-time RT-PCR. Minimum infection rate (MIR) was used to estimate mosquito infection rate. Results Only two genera of mosquitoes were caught (Culex, 98.9% and Aedes, 1.0%) totalling 4,112 females. None of the 424 mosquito pools tested was positive for WNV RNA; consequently the MIR was zero. Sequencing and BLAST analysis of amplicons detected in pan-flavivirus primer-mediated RT-PCR gave a consensus sequence of 28S rRNA of Culex quinquefasciatus suggesting integration of flaviviral RNA into mosquito genome. Conclusion While the latter finding requires further investigation, we conclude there was little or no risk of human infection with WNV in the study areas during sampling. There was predominance of Culex mosquito, a competent WNV vector, around horse stables in the study areas. However, mosquito surveillance needs to continue for prompt detection of WNV activity in mosquitoes. PMID:27279943

  11. Melanotaenia duboulayi influence oviposition site selection by Culex annulirostris (Diptera: Culicidae) and Aedes notoscriptus (Diptera: Culicidae) but not Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Hurst, Timothy P; Kay, Brian H; Brown, Michael D; Ryan, Peter A

    2010-04-01

    Some species of mosquito can detect the presence of larvivorous fish and select against ovipositing in pools supporting them. The effect of kairomones released by the crimson-spotted rainbowfish Melanotaenia duboulayi (Castelnau) on the oviposition behavior of the freshwater mosquitoes Culex annulirostris Skuse, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, and Aedes notoscriptus Skuse was evaluated in both laboratory and outdoor artificial pool experiments. In the laboratory, colony-reared Cx. annulirostris selected against ovipositing in water that had contained M. duboulayi at densities of one fish per 5, 30, 180, and 1,080 liters. In contrast, gravid Ae. notoscriptus showed a preference for water that had contained the highest density of M. duboulayi (1 in 5 liters). Gravid Cx. quinquefasciatus were neither repelled nor attracted to water that had previously contained M. duboulayi. In outdoor artificial pool experiments, wild Cx. annulirostris females selected against ovipositing in pools containing caged M. duboulayi stocked at rates of 1, 4, and 10 g per 1,000 liters. When fish were removed from the pools, the repellent effect persisted for at least 24 h, whereas at the lower stocking rate, an avoidance response was not noted until 48 h after fish were placed in pools. This suggests a volatile substance, however, the exact nature of the kairomone/s has not been identified.

  12. Octylphenol and UV-B radiation alter larval development and hypothalamic gene expression in the leopard frog (Rana pipiens).

    PubMed Central

    Crump, Douglas; Lean, David; Trudeau, Vance L

    2002-01-01

    We assessed octylphenol (OP), an estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemical, and UV-B radiation, a known stressor in amphibian development, for their effects on hypothalamic gene expression and premetamorphic development in the leopard frog Rana pipiens. Newly hatched tadpoles were exposed for 10 days to OP alone at two different dose levels; to subambient UV-B radiation alone; and to two combinations of OP and UV-B. Control animals were exposed to ethanol vehicle (0.01%) exposure, a subset of tadpoles from each treatment group was raised to metamorphosis to assess differences in body weight and time required for hindlimb emergence. Tadpoles from one of the OP/UV-B combination groups had greater body weight and earlier hindlimb emergence (p < 0.05), but neither OP nor UV-B alone produced significant changes in body weight or hindlimb emergence, indicating a potential mechanism of interaction between OP and UV-B. We hypothesized that the developing hypothalamus might be a potential environmental sensor for neurotoxicologic studies because of its role in the endocrine control of metamorphosis. We used a differential display strategy to identify candidate genes differentially expressed in the hypothalamic region of the exposed tadpoles. Homology cloning was performed to obtain R. pipiens glutamate decarboxylases--GAD65 and GAD67, enzymes involved in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). cDNA expression profiles revealed that OP and UV-B affected the levels of several candidate transcripts in tadpole (i.e., Nck, Ash, and phospholipase C gamma-binding protein 4 and brain angiogenesis inhibitor-3) and metamorph (i.e., GAD67, cytochrome C oxidase, and brain angiogenesis inhibitor-2 and -3) brains. This study represents a novel approach in toxicology that combines physiologic and molecular end points and indicates that levels of OP commonly found in the environment and subambient levels of UV-B alter the expression of important hypothalamic

  13. Temporal gene expression profiles of pre blood-fed adult females Immediately following eclosion in the southern house mosquito culex quinquefasciatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prior to acquisition of the first host blood meal, the anautogenous mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus requires a period of time in order to prepare for the blood feeding and, later, vitellogenesis. In the current study, we conducted whole transcriptome analyses of adult female Culex mosquitoes to iden...

  14. Further evaluation of the use of buparvaquone in the infection and treatment method of immunizing cattle against Theileria parva derived from African buffalo (Syncerus caffer).

    PubMed

    Ngumi, P N; Young, A S; Lampard, D; Mining, S K; Ndungu, S G; Lesan, A C; Williamson, S M; Linyonyi, A; Kariuki, D P

    1992-06-01

    Three experiments were undertaken to determine the efficacy of different doses of buparvaquone in the infection and treatment immunization of cattle against Theileria parva derived from African buffalo (Syncerus caffer). Two of these experiments also compared buparvaquone with standard doses of long- and short-acting formulations of oxytetracycline. In addition, different dilutions of stabilates were used in the experiments. In the first experiment, a 10(-1.0) dilution of stabilate was used to infect groups of cattle treated with buparvaquone at doses of between 5 and 0.625 mg kg-1 body weight (bwt) on Day 0 after infection. All control cattle developed severe theileriosis and none of the treatment regimes (including those utilizing long-acting oxytetracycline) prevented the development of theileriosis. Treatment with buparvaquone at 2.5 mg kg-1 bwt or oxytetracycline gave the most satisfactory results. In the second experiment when the sporozoite dose was reduced to 10(-2.0) dilution, buparvaquone treatment at 5 and 2.5 mg kg-1 bwt and short- and long-acting formulations of oxytetracycline reduced reactions greatly. While all the oxytetracycline treated animals produced a serological response and were immune to a 50-fold higher challenge with the immunizing stabilate, several animals in the buparvaquone groups did not show a serological response and were not immune to challenge. In the third experiment, groups of cattle were infected with 10(-1.2), 10(-1.4) and 10(-1.6) dilutions of stabilate and were treated with 2.5 mg kg-1 bwt of buparvaquone. No animals developed severe theileriosis and all seroconverted. On homologous challenge, however, two out of 14 cattle showed severe reactions. It was concluded that further work on immunization using buparvaquone treatment at 2.5 mg kg-1 bwt and 10(-1.6) dilution of the stabilate would have to be carried out before such a system could be used in the field.

  15. Infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Theileria parva induces constitutively high levels of NF-kappa B in bovine T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, V; Stein, B; Baumann, I; Dobbelaere, D A; Herrlich, P; Williams, R O

    1989-01-01

    The intracellular protozoan parasite Theileria parva causes a lymphoproliferative disease of T cells in cattle and uncontrolled lymphocyte proliferation in culture. We have identified and characterized in infected cells the transcriptional activator, NF-kappa B, whose recognition motifs have been identified in several gene enhancers important for lymphocyte-specific gene expression. NF-kappa B is normally constitutively activated in nuclear extracts derived from B cells and can be induced in T cells and nonlymphoid cells by phorbol esters. Theileria-infected lymphocytes contained constitutively high levels of activated NF-kappa B in nuclear fractions and inactive NF-kappa B in cytoplasmic fractions. The inactive cytoplasmic precursor could be activated by treatment of extracts with deoxycholate, which was shown previously to dissociate NF-kappa B from an inhibitor, I kappa B. Treatment of lymphocyte extracts with 3 mM GTP stimulated NF-kappa B binding to its recognition motif in vitro, thereby distinguishing it from a related nuclear factor, H2-TF1. Selective killing of the parasite, which left the host cells intact, resulted in a rapid loss of NF-kappa B from the nuclear fractions and a slower loss from the cytoplasmic fractions. In parasitized cells, NF-kappa B could not be further stimulated by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate whereas in cells treated to remove the parasite, this compound stimulated elevated levels of NF-kappa B. We propose that high levels of activated NF-kappa B are maintained by the presence of the parasite in infected T cells. Similarly, we propose that the high levels of inactive cytoplasmic precursor are a result of increased synthesis due to the presence of the parasite. Images PMID:2513476

  16. Acid-base physiology response to ocean acidification of two ecologically and economically important holothuroids from contrasting habitats, Holothuria scabra and Holothuria parva.

    PubMed

    Collard, Marie; Eeckhaut, Igor; Dehairs, Frank; Dubois, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    Sea cucumbers are dominant invertebrates in several ecosystems such as coral reefs, seagrass meadows and mangroves. As bioturbators, they have an important ecological role in making available calcium carbonate and nutrients to the rest of the community. However, due to their commercial value, they face overexploitation in the natural environment. On top of that, occurring ocean acidification could impact these organisms, considered sensitive as echinoderms are osmoconformers, high-magnesium calcite producers and have a low metabolism. As a first investigation of the impact of ocean acidification on sea cucumbers, we tested the impact of short-term (6 to 12 days) exposure to ocean acidification (seawater pH 7.7 and 7.4) on two sea cucumbers collected in SW Madagascar, Holothuria scabra, a high commercial value species living in the seagrass meadows, and H. parva, inhabiting the mangroves. The former lives in a habitat with moderate fluctuations of seawater chemistry (driven by day-night differences) while the second lives in a highly variable intertidal environment. In both species, pH of the coelomic fluid was significantly negatively affected by reduced seawater pH, with a pronounced extracellular acidosis in individuals maintained at pH 7.7 and 7.4. This acidosis was due to an increased dissolved inorganic carbon content and pCO2 of the coelomic fluid, indicating a limited diffusion of the CO2 towards the external medium. However, respiration and ammonium excretion rates were not affected. No evidence of accumulation of bicarbonate was observed to buffer the coelomic fluid pH. If this acidosis stays uncompensated for when facing long-term exposure, other processes could be affected in both species, eventually leading to impacts on their ecological role.

  17. Observations on Culex quinquefasciatus Say in relation to transmission of filariasis due to subperiodic Wuchereria bancrofti in Samoa.

    PubMed

    Samarawickrema, W A; Sone, F; Paulson, G S; Kimura, E; Uchida, K; Cummings, R F

    1992-10-01

    Observations on Culex quinquefasciatus Say in Samoa during a study of the epidemiology and control of subperiodic bancroftian filariasis are reported. The man-biting rate of C. quinquefasciatus was comparable with that of Aedes (Finlaya) samoanus Gruenberg in one indicator village and lower in another. The house-frequenting behaviour of the two species was similar. Culex quinquefasciatus was active throughout the night with peak biting during midnight hours, and its survivorship, estimated by two methods, was higher than those of the main vectors, A. (Stegomyia) polynesiensis Marks and A. samoanus. Culex quinquefasciatus showed low susceptibility to subperiodic Wuchereria bancrofti, compared with the two main vectors, in laboratory feeding experiments on volunteers with three levels of microfilaraemia. This agrees with the observed very low natural infection rate, suggesting that C. quinquefasciatus is an inefficient vector of subperiodic W. bancrofti in Samoa.

  18. The effects of four arthropod diets on the body and organ weights of the leopard frog, Rana pipiens, during vitellogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lehman, G C

    1978-12-01

    Wild-caught adult Rana pipiens females were captured in midsummer and fed diets of crickets, flies sowbugs or wax moth larvae during a three-month period of active vitellogenesis. The cricket diet supported the most extensive body weight gain during this time and promoted a prolonged period of weight increase in an additional long-term study. Synchronous growth of the oocytes occurred in all four groups, but the ovaries and oviducts of cricket-fed animals were significantly larger than those of frogs on the other three diets. The significantly higher liver weights of frogs fed wax moth larvae may have reflected an augmentation of hepatic energy stores. Fat body weights were also highest in this group of animals. Frogs fed crickets and wax moth larvae possessed larger fat bodies than did the midsummer control animals killed immediately after their arrival in the laboratory. In contrast, frogs fed flies and sowbugs had smaller fat bodies than did the initial controls, suggesting that animals on these diets had utilized fat body lipid during vitellogenesis. Gastrocnemius and final body weights were lowest in frogs fed wax moth larvae. These findings may have reflected the nutritional content of the diet or the reduction in appetite frequently noted in these animals during observations of feeding behavior.

  19. Effects of agricultural pesticides on the immune system of Rana pipiens and on its resistance to parasitic infection.

    PubMed

    Christin, Marie-Soleil; Gendron, Andrée D; Brousseau, Pauline; Ménard, Lucie; Marcogliese, David J; Cyr, Daniel; Ruby, Sylvia; Fournier, Michel

    2003-05-01

    In the past 30 years, many amphibian species have suffered population declines throughout the world. Mass mortality have been frequently reported, and in several instances, infectious diseases appear to be the cause of death. The role that contaminants could play in these die-offs through immunotoxic effects has been poorly investigated. In this study, juvenile leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) were exposed for 21 d to a mixture of six pesticides (atrazine, metribuzin, aldicarb, endosulfane, lindane, and dieldrin) and subsequently challenged with a parasitic nematode, Rhabdias ranae. Exposure to the mixture at environmentally realistic concentrations significantly reduced lymphocyte proliferation. Three weeks after the end of the exposure, lymphocyte proliferation had recovered and was stimulated in frogs challenged with parasites with the exception of those previously exposed to the highest concentration. No pesticide effects on phagocytosis and splenocyte numbers were detectable at the end of the exposure period, but these two parameters were diminished 21 d after the infection challenge in frogs previously exposed to the highest levels of pesticides. In these animals, the prevalence of lung infection by R. ranae also tended to be higher. These results suggest that agricultural pesticides can alter the immune response of frogs and affect their ability to deal with parasitic infection.

  20. Surface ultrastructure of the cornea and adjacent epidermis during metamorphosis of Rana pipiens: a scanning electron microscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltenbach, J.C.; Harding, C.V.; Susan, S.

    1980-01-01

    The external surface of the cornea and adjacent epidermis of larvae in representative developmental stages and of adult frogs, Rana pipiens, was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Surface cells are polygonal, usually hexagonal, in outline and covered with microprojections. During larval development prior to metamorphic stages, neither eyelids nor Harderian glands have developed; microprojections on the corneal surface are high and branched, and cell boundaries are elevated. On the anterior portion of the cornea and on the epidermis near the eye, the surface pattern is less dense, and ciliated cells are present. During metamorphic stages, corneal cell boundaries become less prominent and the pattern of microprojections more variable and markedly different from that of larvae of earlier stages. Corneal cells have a spongy appearance, are covered by a coating material, or are characterized as light or dark based on their brightness and surface texture. As eyelids develop in metamorphic stages XX-XXI, the numbers of ciliated cells increase dramatically, both on the corneal surface and on the edges of the developing lids. In later metamorphic stages XXII to XXV, lids and Harderian glands become well-developed, and cilia are no longer observed. The adjacent epidermal surface becomes devoid of cilia but perforated by openings of cutaneous glands. Its spongy appearance is similar to that of both the cornea and neighboring epidermis of the mature frog. Changes in corneal surface features are probably metamorphic events associated with development of lids and Harderian glands and a shift from an aqueous to an air environment.

  1. Effects of polychlorinated biphenyl 126 on green frog (Rana clamitans) and leopard frog (Rana pipiens) hatching success, development, and metamorphosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenshield, M.L.; Jofre, M.B.; Karasov, W.H.

    1999-11-01

    Although increasing evidence links plana chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), to decreases in survival and reproduction of fish, mammals, and birds near Green Bay, Wisconsin, and the Great Lakes, USA, relatively little is known of their bioaccumulation or of their possible effects in amphibians. The authors exposed embryos and larvae of two ranid species commonly occurring in the Green Bay ecosystem, the green frog (Rana clamitans) and the leopard frog (Rana pipiens), to PCB 126, a model coplanar PCB compound. Nominal concentrations ranged from 0.005 to 50 {micro}g/L, and exposure lasted through metamorphosis. Tissue concentrations of PCB 126 in tadpoles that did not metamorphose by the end of the experiment ranged from 1.2 to 9,600 ng/g wet mass. No significant mortality of embryos occurred before hatching; however, survival of larvae was significantly reduced at the highest concentration for both species. Few deformities were observed, but the incidence of edema was significantly higher in tadpoles exposed to 50 {micro}g/L. Swimming speed and growth of tadpoles was also significantly reduced in this treatment. The percent of tadpoles that reached metamorphosis was significantly lower in green frogs at the highest concentration, and no leopard frogs survived past day 47 of the experiment in this treatment. At high concentrations, PCB 126 affected both ranid species; however, sublethal effects were not apparent for the parameters the authors measured at concentrations that occur in water in the Green Bay ecosystem.

  2. Hind limb malformations in free-living northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) from Maine, Minnesota, and Vermont suggest multiple etiologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meteyer, C.U.; Loeffler, I.K.; Fallon, J.F.; Converse, K.A.; Green, E.; Helgen, J.C.; Kersten, S.; Levey, R.; Eaton-Poole, L.; Burkhart, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    Background Reports of malformed frogs have increased throughout the North American continent in recent years. Most of the observed malformations have involved the hind limbs. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the hind limb malformations in wild frogs as an important step toward understanding the possible etiologies. Methods During 1997 and 1998, 182 recently metamorphosed northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) were collected from Minnesota, Vermont, and Maine. Malformed hind limbs were present in 157 (86%) of these frogs, which underwent necropsy and radiographic evaluation at the National Wildlife Health Center. These malformations are described in detail and classified into four major categories: (1) no limb (amelia); (2) multiple limbs or limb elements (polymelia, polydactyly, polyphalangy); (3) reduced limb segments or elements (phocomelia, ectromelia, ectrodactyly, and brachydactyly; and (4) distally complete but malformed limb (bone rotations, bridging, skin webbing, and micromelia). Results Amelia and reduced segments and/or elements were the most common finding. Frogs with bilateral hind limb malformations were not common, and in only eight of these 22 frogs were the malformations symmetrical. Malformations of a given type tended to occur in frogs collected from the same site, but the types of malformations varied widely among all three states, and between study sites within Minnesota. Conclusions Clustering of malformation type suggests that developmental events may produce a variety of phenotypes depending on the timing, sequence, and severity of the environmental insult. Hind limb malformations in free-living frogs transcend current mechanistic explanations of tetrapod limb development.

  3. First report on adulticide susceptibility status of Aedes albopictus, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Culex vishnui from a pig farm in Tanjung Sepat, Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chee Dhang; Low, Van Lun; Lau, Koon Weng; Lee, Han Lim; Nazni, Wasi Ahmad; Heo, Chong Chin; Azidah, Abdul Aziz; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd

    2013-09-01

    The present study aims to investigate the susceptibility status of Aedes albopictus, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Cx. vishnui collected from a pig farm in Tanjung Sepat, Selangor, toward 11 insecticides representing the classes of organochlorines, carbamates, organophosphates, and pyrethroids. The results of a World Health Organization adult mosquito bioassay revealed that Ae. albopictus, Cx. quinquefasciatus, and Cx. vishnui exhibited different susceptibility toward various insecticides. Overall, pyrethroids were able to induce rapid knockdown for all test mosquito species. The pyrethroids lambdacyhalothrin and etofenprox were able to cause high mortality (> 80%) of all 3 species. The findings of the present study will benefit local authorities in selecting appropriate dosage of insecticides to be used in mosquito control in this area.

  4. Bionomics and Vector Potential of Culex thriambus (Diptera: Culicidae) Mosquitoes in Lake County, California

    PubMed Central

    Nelms, Brittany M.; Thiemann, Tara C.; Bridges, Danielle N.; Williams, Alan E.; Koschik, Michelle L.; Ryan, Bonnie M.; Scott, Jamesina J.

    2016-01-01

    California statewide West Nile virus (WNV) minimum infection rates in Culex thriambus Dyar mosquitoes are high; however, few specimens are submitted and tested each year, as their distribution seems limited to larval habitats along riparian systems. To evaluate the role of Cx. thriambus in the amplification, maintenance, and overwintering of WNV in Lake County, CA, the bionomics and vector potential of the species was investigated during 2014 and 2015. Culex thriambus was the most abundant mosquito species, with 1,153 adults and 7,624 immatures collected by vacuum aspiration and dip sampling, respectively, at the primary study site. Detection of WNV in four mosquito pools during September through November coincided with peak seasonality. Females entered and maintained a reproductive diapause during winter under field and seminatural conditions. Diapause was initiated in the majority of Cx. thriambus females by October and was terminated by 30 March. Some parous females (7.1%) and those in host-seeking arrest (7.1%) were collected throughout the winter period. An accrual of 679.51 degree-days (°D) was necessary for diapause termination under seminatural conditions. Culex thriambus females fed on 16 different avian species during spring and summer, and no mammalian feeds were detected. West Nile viral RNA was detected in four of 42 Cx. thriambus pools tested during June through November and infection rates ranged from 3.53–28.15/1,000 tested. In summary, WNV transmission may be increased along riparian corridors throughout California where Cx. thriambus mosquitoes remain relatively abundant. PMID:27493251

  5. Mitochondrial COI gene as a tool in the taxonomy of mosquitoes Culex subgenus Melanoconion.

    PubMed

    Torres-Gutierrez, Carolina; Bergo, Eduardo Sterlino; Emerson, Kevin J; de Oliveira, Tatiane M P; Greni, Susan; Sallum, Maria Anice Mureb

    2016-12-01

    The subgenus Melanoconion is the second largest subgenus within the genus Culex, with 160 described species. Several of the species are proven vectors of arboviruses, including West Nile virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus complex and Eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus. Species of Melanoconion are well distributed from southern North America to most countries of South America and display the highest species diversity in tropical regions. Taxonomical identification within this group has been primarily based on morphological characters, with the male genitalia as the source of the most solid diagnostic features. The difficulty in reaching accurate species determinations when studying specimens of Culex (Melanoconion) has been extensively documented as a real limitation to expand knowledge of these insects. We tested the utility of the mitochondrial gene COI as a complementary tool in the taxonomy of Melanoconion. Using a data set of 120 COI sequences from Culex specimen captured in several localities in Brazil, the utility of COI barcodes for species delimitation is discussed through the evaluation of genetic divergences among specimens and the clustering patterns of species in three topologies obtained with Neighbor Joining, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic inference. For all specimens included in this study a previous morphological examination was performed, and most of the taxonomical determinations were corroborated using the COI barcode. We generated COI sequences that belong to 48 species of Melanoconion, with a mean intraspecific K2P genetic divergence of 3%; and all interspecific divergence values higher than the intraspecific divergence values. This is the first comprehensive study of subgenus Melanoconion, with evidence of COI as a useful and accessible DNA barcode.

  6. Flight muscle-specific expression of act88F: GFP in transgenic Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Allen, Margaret L; Christensen, Bruce M

    2004-12-01

    A strategy to engineer a strain of Culex mosquitoes refractory to filarial transmission is described. A requirement for success of the strategy is identification of a flight muscle-specific promoter that functions in the mosquito. A GFP marker gene under the control of the promoter region of the Drosophila melanogaster act88F gene was inserted into the genome of Culex quinquefasciatus. Transformation was confirmed by Mendelian genetics. Hybridization of a genomic Southern blot to a radiolabeled probe verified that the entire donor plasmid integrated into the mosquito genome. GFP expression in the transgenic mosquitoes was restricted to the flight muscles.

  7. Efficacy of 10 commercially available household permethrin products against Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Qualls, Whitney A; Xue, Rui-De; Ali, Arshad

    2011-09-01

    Ten commercial household permethrin products in aerosol formulations were evaluated for knockdown (KD) and mortality of female Culex quinquefasciatus. The permethrin concentrations of these products ranged from 0.05% to 0.50%. Eight of the 10 products produced significant KD (%) and mortality (%) posttreatment. At 15 min posttreatment, 3 household permethrin products provided 100% mortality. At 60 min posttreatment, 8 products provided 100% mortality. At 120 min, only 2 products resulted in less than 100% mortality with permethrin concentrations of 0.05% and 0.10%. A linear regression analysis shows a significant relationship between the mortality and times posttreatment.

  8. Vector competence of selected North American Culex and Coquillettidia mosquitoes for West Nile virus.

    PubMed Central

    Sardelis, M. R.; Turell, M. J.; Dohm, D. J.; O'Guinn, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    To control West Nile virus (WNV), it is necessary to know which mosquitoes are able to transmit this virus. Therefore, we evaluated the WNV vector potential of several North American mosquito species. Culex restuans and Cx. salinarius, two species from which WNV was isolated in New York in 2000, were efficient laboratory vectors. Cx. quinquefasciatus and Cx. nigripalpus from Florida were competent but only moderately efficient vectors. Coquillettidia perturbans was an inefficient laboratory vector. As WNV extends its range, exposure of additional mosquito species may alter its epidemiology. PMID:11747732

  9. Effects of methoprene on oviposition by Aedes japonicus and Culex spp

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, M.; Suom, C.; LeBrun, R.A.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Gettman, A.D.

    2006-01-01

    The mosquito larvicide methoprene is a juvenile growth hormone mimic that is widely used to control mosquitoes. This chemical disrupts normal mosquito development, drastically inhibiting emergence from the pupal to the adult stage. If the presence of methoprene attracts or deters mosquitoes from ovipositing it could have implications for mosquito control. This study evaluates whether methoprene attracts or deters mosquitoes likely to oviposit in catch basins. In a field experiment, methoprene formulated as liquid larvicide did not affect oviposition of either Culex spp. or Aedes japonicus in 19 liter plastic buckets.

  10. Potential endocrine disruption of sexual development in free ranging male northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) and green frogs (Rana clamitans) from areas of intensive row crop agriculture.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Tana V; Martin, Pamela A; Struger, John; Sherry, Jim; Marvin, Chris H; McMaster, Mark E; Clarence, Stacey; Tetreault, Gerald

    2008-07-30

    Intensive row crop agriculture (IRCA) for corn and soybean production is predominant in eastern and central North America. IRCA relies heavily on pesticide and nutrient inputs to maximize production under conventional systems. In 2003-2005, we assessed the occurrence of a suite of potential endocrine effects in amphibians inhabiting farm ponds and agricultural drains in IRCA areas of southwestern Ontario. Effects were compared to amphibians from two agricultural reference sites as well as four non-agricultural reference sites. Pesticide and nutrient concentrations were also determined in water samples from those sites. Atrazine and metolachlor were detected in most samples, exceeding 1 microg L(-1) at some sites. Blood samples were taken from northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) and green frogs (Rana clamitans) for analysis of circulating sex steroids and vitellogenin-like protein (Vtg-lp), a biomarker of exposure to environmental estrogens. Gonads were histologically examined for evidence of abnormalities. Some evidence of exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds was apparent from the data. The occurrence of testicular ovarian follicles (TOFS) in male R. pipiens was significantly higher (42%; p<0.05) at agricultural sites, particularly those in Chatham county compared to frogs from reference sites (7%). There was no difference in circulating sex steroid levels between frogs from agricultural and reference sites and sex steroid levels did not correlate with pesticide concentrations in the environment. No differences were detected in the gonadosomatic indices or stage of spermatogenesis between frogs from agricultural and non-agricultural regions (p>0.05). Plasma Vtg-lp was detected in only one male R. pipiens from an agricultural site. Neither gonad size, gonad maturity nor sex steroid levels differed between normal males and those with testicular oocytes. Although the proportion of testicular oocytes did not correlate directly with atrazine concentrations, it

  11. Evaluation of oviposition substrates and organic infusions on collection of Culex in Florida.

    PubMed

    Allan, Sandra A; Bernier, Ulrich R; Kline, Daniel L

    2005-09-01

    Gravid mosquito traps are commonly used for both arbovirus surveillance and population surveillance of mosquitoes of the genus Culex. Oviposition substrates, used as baits in these traps, were tested against Culex under laboratory and field conditions. In the laboratory all substrates tested as 1% and 10% dilutions in 2-choice bioassays against female Cx. quinquefasciatus were significantly more effective than well water controls in eliciting oviposition. Strongest responses were to dilutions of dairy effluent, followed by larval water and infusions of alfalfa hay, alfalfa pellets, Bermuda hay, oak leaves, and Typha leaves, with lowest responses to cow manure infusion. In the field, few significant differences in collections were obtained between traps baited with different infusions. Significantly more Cx. quinquefasciatus and Cx. nigripalpus were collected in traps baited with cow manure infusion (highest) compared to alfalfa hay infusion (lowest). Responses of Cx. quinquefasciatus to dairy effluent and infusions of Bermuda hay, oak leaves, and Typha leaves were not significantly different from either cow manure infusion or alfalfa hay infusion. Responses of Cx. nigripalpus were highest to cow manure infusion and equally low to infusions of alfalfa hay and Typha leaves; moderate responses were observed to dairy effluent and infusions of Bermuda hay and oak leaves. Gravid females comprised 66.7-81.9% of the collections for each infusion type, with no significant difference among infusions in the proportion of gravid females collected.

  12. Studies on effects of indigenous plant extracts on filarial vector Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles.

    PubMed

    Elango, G; Rahuman, A Abdul; Kamaraj, C; Zahir, A Abduz; Bagavan, A

    2010-06-01

    Mosquito control is facing a threat because of the emergence of resistance to synthetic insecticides. Insecticides of botanical origin may serve as suitable alternative biocontrol techniques in the future. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of leaf ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol extracts of Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa ex Roxb (Rutaceae), Andrographis lineata Wallich ex Nees. (Acanthaceae), Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall. ex Nees. (Acanthaceae), Cocculus hirsutus (L.) Diels (Menispermaceae), Eclipta prostrata L. (Asteraceae) and Tagetes erecta L. (Compositae) on ovicidal and oviposition-deterrent activities against Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles (Diptera: Culicidae). The percentage of egg hatching in methanol extracts of Andrographis lineata, Cocculus hirsutus and T. erecta were 16, 12 and 16 exerted at 500 ppm, respectively. The percentage of effective oviposition repellency was 97.77 at 500 ppm and the lowest repellency was 42.06 at 31.25 ppm in methanol and acetone extracts of Andrographis lineata and Andrographis paniculata, respectively. The oviposition activity index values revealed that the solvent plant extracts have deterrent effect, and they caused a remarkable negative response resulting in oviposition of very few eggs. These results suggest that the leaf solvent plant extracts have the potential to be used as an ideal ecofriendly approach for the control of the Culex tritaeniorhynchus.

  13. An impossible journey? The development of Plasmodium falciparum NF54 in Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Knöckel, Julia; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Fischer, Elizabeth; Muratova, Olga; Haile, Ashley; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Miller, Louis H

    2013-01-01

    Although Anopheles mosquitoes are the vectors for human Plasmodium spp., there are also other mosquito species-among them culicines (Culex spp., Aedes spp.)-present in malaria-endemic areas. Culicine mosquitoes transmit arboviruses and filarial worms to humans and are vectors for avian Plasmodium spp., but have never been observed to transmit human Plasmodium spp. When ingested by a culicine mosquito, parasites could either face an environment that does not allow development due to biologic incompatibility or be actively killed by the mosquito's immune system. In the latter case, the molecular mechanism of killing must be sufficiently powerful that Plasmodium is not able to overcome it. To investigate how human malaria parasites develop in culicine mosquitoes, we infected Culex quinquefasciatus with Plasmodium falciparum NF54 and monitored development of parasites in the blood bolus and midgut epithelium at different time points. Our results reveal that ookinetes develop in the midgut lumen of C. quinquefasciatus in slightly lower numbers than in Anopheles gambiae G3. After 30 hours, parasites have invaded the midgut and can be observed on the basal side of the midgut epithelium by confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Very few of the parasites in C. quinquefasciatus are alive, most of them are lysed. Eight days after the mosquito's blood meal, no oocysts can be found in C. quinquefasciatus. Our results suggest that the mosquito immune system could be involved in parasite killing early in development after ookinetes have crossed the midgut epithelium and come in contact with the mosquito hemolymph.

  14. Epoxide hydrolase activities and epoxy fatty acids in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiawen; Morisseau, Christophe; Yang, Jun; Mamatha, Dadala M.

    2015-01-01

    Culex mosquitoes have emerged as important model organisms for mosquito biology, and are disease vectors for multiple mosquito-borne pathogens, including West Nile virus. We characterized epoxide hydrolase activities in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus, which suggested multiple forms of epoxide hydrolases were present. We found EH activities on epoxy eicosatrienoic acids (EETs). EETs and other eicosanoids are well-established lipid signaling molecules in vertebrates. We showed EETs can be synthesized in vitro from arachidonic acids by mosquito lysate, and EETs were also detected in vivo both in larvae and adult mosquitoes by LC-MS/MS. The EH activities on EETs can be induced by blood feeding, and the highest activity was observed in the midgut of female mosquitoes. The enzyme activities on EETs can be inhibited by urea-based inhibitors designed for mammalian soluble epoxide hydrolases (sEH). The sEH inhibitors have been shown to play diverse biological roles in mammalian systems, and they can be useful tools to study the function of EETs in mosquitoes. Besides juvenile hormone metabolism and detoxification, insect epoxide hydrolases may also play a role in regulating lipid signaling molecules, such as EETs and other epoxy fatty acids, synthesized in vivo or obtained from blood feeding by female mosquitoes. PMID:25686802

  15. Mosquito larvicidal activity of seaweeds extracts against Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohamed Yacoob Syed; Ravikumar, Sundaram; Beula, Johanson Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the larvicidal activity of the seaweed extracts against Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus Methods Seaweed extracts of Ulva lactuca, Caulerpa racemosa (C. racemosa), Sargassum microystum, Caulerpa scalpelliformis, Gracilaria corticata, Turbinaria decurrens, Turbinaria conoides and Caulerpa toxifolia were dissolved in DMSO to prepare a graded series of concentration. The test for the larvicidal effect of seaweeds against mosquitos larvae was conducted in accordance with the WHO standard method. Batches of 25 early 4th instar larvae of three mosquitoes were transferred to 250 mL enamel bowl containing 199 mL of distilled water and 1 mL of plant extracts (10-100 µg). Each experiment was conducted with triplicate with concurrent a control group. Results Among the seaweeds extract, C. racemosa showed toxicity against 4th instar larvae of Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles stephensi with equivalent LC50 value (0.055 6±0.010 3) µg/mL, (0.067 5±0.136 0) µg/mL and (0.066 1±0.007 6) µg/mL, respectively. Conclusions The present study concluded that, the mosquito larvicidal property of C. racemosa might be the prospective alternative source to control the mosquitoes.

  16. Host use and seasonality of Culex (Melanoconion) iolambdis (Diptera: Culicidae) from eastern Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Blosser, Erik M; Stenn, Tanise; Acevedo, Carolina; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D

    2016-12-01

    Culex (Melanoconion) iolambdis (Dyar, 1918) is a mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) species found throughout much of tropical America, including southern Florida. Relatively few reports are available regarding the ecology of Cx. iolambdis, despite its widespread distribution and putative involvement in transmission of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. To quantify habitat and host utilization, adults of Cx. iolambdis were sampled from resting shelters at a field site in Vero Beach, Florida, over a 12-month period. Culex iolambdis (1109 males, 3072 females) constituted more than half (56.76%) of all mosquitoes sampled (24 species) and was active year-round. Unfed females and gravid females of Cx. iolambdis were significantly more abundant in mangrove habitat, while males and blood-fed females were not. PCR-based bloodmeal analysis of 305 females revealed that Cx. iolambdis has very wide host breadth, feeding on birds (37.0% overall), reptiles (26.6%), amphibians (23.3%) and mammals (13.1%). Green heron (Butorides virescens), Southern leopard frog (Lithobates sphenocephala) and American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) were the most commonly fed upon hosts. Bloodmeals from different host classes varied significantly with season, suggesting that Cx. iolambdis may play a role in the amplification and epidemic transmission of zoonotic arboviruses affecting human health.

  17. Comparative Genomics of Odorant Binding Proteins in Anopheles gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Manoharan, Malini; Ng Fuk Chong, Matthieu; Vaïtinadapoulé, Aurore; Frumence, Etienne; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan; Offmann, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    About 1 million people in the world die each year from diseases spread by mosquitoes, and understanding the mechanism of host identification by the mosquitoes through olfaction is at stake. The role of odorant binding proteins (OBPs) in the primary molecular events of olfaction in mosquitoes is becoming an important focus of biological research in this area. Here, we present a comprehensive comparative genomics study of OBPs in the three disease-transmitting mosquito species Anopheles gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus starting with the identification of 110 new OBPs in these three genomes. We have characterized their genomic distribution and orthologous and phylogenetic relationships. The diversity and expansion observed with respect to the Aedes and Culex genomes suggests that the OBP gene family acquired functional diversity concurrently with functional constraints posed on these two species. Sequences with unique features have been characterized such as the “two-domain OBPs” (previously known as Atypical OBPs) and “MinusC OBPs” in mosquito genomes. The extensive comparative genomics featured in this work hence provides useful primary insights into the role of OBPs in the molecular adaptations of mosquito olfactory system and could provide more clues for the identification of potential targets for insect repellants and attractants. PMID:23292137

  18. RNA Splicing in a New Rhabdovirus from Culex Mosquitoes▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kuwata, Ryusei; Isawa, Haruhiko; Hoshino, Keita; Tsuda, Yoshio; Yanase, Tohru; Sasaki, Toshinori; Kobayashi, Mutsuo; Sawabe, Kyoko

    2011-01-01

    Among members of the order Mononegavirales, RNA splicing events have been found only in the family Bornaviridae. Here, we report that a new rhabdovirus isolated from the mosquito Culex tritaeniorhynchus replicates in the nuclei of infected cells and requires RNA splicing for viral mRNA maturation. The virus, designated Culex tritaeniorhynchus rhabdovirus (CTRV), shares a similar genome organization with other rhabdoviruses, except for the presence of a putative intron in the coding region for the L protein. Molecular phylogenetic studies indicated that CTRV belongs to the family Rhabdoviridae, but it is yet to be assigned a genus. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that the CTRV virion is extremely elongated, unlike virions of rhabdoviruses, which are generally bullet shaped. Northern hybridization confirmed that a large transcript (approximately 6,500 nucleotides [nt]) from the CTRV L gene was present in the infected cells. Strand-specific reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analyses identified the intron-exon boundaries and the 76-nt intron sequence, which contains the typical motif for eukaryotic spliceosomal intron-splice donor/acceptor sites (GU-AG), a predicted branch point, and a polypyrimidine tract. In situ hybridization exhibited that viral RNAs are primarily localized in the nucleus of infected cells, indicating that CTRV replicates in the nucleus and is allowed to utilize the host's nuclear splicing machinery. This is the first report of RNA splicing among the members of the family Rhabdoviridae. PMID:21507977

  19. Cryptic invasion of Northern Leopard Frogs (Rana pipiens) across phylogeographic boundaries and a dilemma for conservation of a declining amphibian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, Ryan P.; Drost, Charles A.; Mock, Karen E.

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic introduction of species is a major contributor to loss of biodiversity. Translocations within the range of a species are less frequently recognized, but have the potential for negative effects as well. Genetic mixing may lead to loss of local adaptations or further decline through outbreeding depression. These cryptic invasions may be quite difficult to recognize, but genetic tools can be used to recognize and monitor such intraspecific introductions. Conversely, translocations within species can be an important conservation tool to reduce inbreeding depression and replace lost genetic diversity. Thus, cryptic invasions can be either an aid or a hindrance to conservation efforts. We tested for the presence of non-native genotypes and assessed the extent and nature of introgression in populations of Northern Leopard Frog (Rana pipiens) in the southwestern US, where populations have declined to a few remnant populations. The most abundant and diverse complex of populations in the region contained a mitochondrial haplotype that was not native to the western US, probably resulting from the introduction of released pets, laboratory animals, or release during fish stocking. These non-native haplotypes were well integrated into a large complex of ponds and lakes, contributing to high genetic diversity in this area. Logistically, the geographic extent of non-native genetic influence within this population precludes eliminating or controlling the non-native component of this population. We recommend assessing the progress and fate of the introgression over time—along with population fitness parameters—to determine whether this introduction is beneficial or detrimental to population persistence. Meanwhile, translocations from nearby locations with similar environmental conditions have the best prospects for avoiding problems with outbreeding depression in other declining populations and will also most effectively preserve regional genetic diversity.

  20. Development of a high-throughput microsphere-based molecular assay to identify fifteen common bloodmeal hosts of Culex mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Thiemann, TC; Brault, AC; Ernest, HB; Reisen, WK

    2011-01-01

    For vectorborne infections, host selection by bloodfeeding arthropods dictates the interaction between host and pathogen. Because Culex mosquitoes that transmit West Nile virus (WNV) feed both on mammalian and avian hosts with varying competence, understanding the bloodfeeding patterns of these mosquitoes is important for understanding the transmission dynamics of WNV. Herein, we describe a new microsphere-based assay using Luminex xMAP® technology to rapidly identify 15 common hosts of Culex mosquitoes at our California study sites. The assay was verified with over 100 known vertebrate species samples and was used in conjunction with DNA sequencing to identify over 125 avian and mammalian host species from unknown Culex bloodmeals, more quickly and with less expense than sequencing alone. In addition, with multiplexed labeled probes, this microsphere array identified mixed bloodmeals that were difficult to discern with traditional sequencing. The microsphere set was easily expanded or reduced according to host range in a specific area, and this assay has made it possible to rapidly screen thousands of Culex spp. bloodmeals to extend our understanding of WNV transmission patterns. PMID:22136215

  1. Occurrence and phylogenetic characterization of a baculovirus isolated from Culex quinquefasciatus in São Paulo State, Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of baculovirus infections in mosquitoes and characterize them by using molecular tools. Fortnightly collections were made of mosquito larvae in the city of Caraguatatuba. Six larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus were isolated that had white cysts (nodul...

  2. Induction of an IAP antagonist in Culex quinquefasciatus larvae in response to infection by the baculovirus CuniNPV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CuniNPV is a member of the Dipteran–specific baculoviruses in the genus Deltabaculovirus that specifically infects mosquito larvae within the genus Culex while species of Aedes and Anopheles are refractory. Infections are restricted to the nuclei of larval midgut epithelial cells with transmission...

  3. Efficacy of Two Larvasonic™ Units Against Culex Larvae and Effects on Common Aquatic Nontarget Organisms in Harris County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Fredregill, Chris L; Motl, Greg C; Dennett, James A; Bueno, Rudy; Debboun, Mustapha

    2015-12-01

    The Larvasonic™ Field Arm Mobile Wetlands Unit and SD-Mini were tested for efficacy against Culex larvae, and effects on aquatic nontarget organisms (NTO). The Field Arm provided 84.61% to 100% control of caged Culex larvae out to 0.91-m distance in shallow ditches and 60.45% control of Culex larvae at 0.61-m without any effects to caged NTO. Slow ditch treatment achieved 77.35% control compared to fast treatment (20.42%), whereas 77.65% control was obtained along edges of a neglected swimming pool, compared to near the middle (23.97%). In bucket tests, the SD-Mini provided >97% control of Culex and 85.35% reduction of immature giant water bugs, which decreased slightly (83.45%) over the monitoring period, which was not significantly different from cannibalistic damselflies (62.80%), with reduction of both being significantly higher than other NTO tested. There was a small (0.37%) reduction of dragonflies (naiads), due to cannibalism. Both Larvasonic units could effectively augment conventional larvicide operations in smaller areas without causing resistance within mosquito populations or harming NTO when used properly.

  4. Influence of Ribeiroia ondatrae (Trematoda: Digenea) infection on limb development and survival of northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens): effects of host stage and parasite-exposure level

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schotthoefer, Anna M.; Koehler, Anson V.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Cole, Rebecca A.

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that infection by larvae of the trematode Ribeiroia ondatrae accounts for a significant proportion of limb malformations currently observed in amphibian populations of North America. However, the effects of R. ondatrae infection on northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens), one of the species most frequently reported with malformations, have not been adequately explored. Moreover, the risk factors associated with R. ondatrae-induced malformations have not been clearly identified. We examined the effects of timing of infection on tadpole survival and limb development. Rana pipiens tadpoles were individually exposed to R. ondatrae cercariae at the pre-limb-bud (Gosner stages 24 and 25), limb-bud (Gosner stages 27 and 28), or paddle (Gosner stages 31–33) stages of development and monitored through metamorphosis. The effects of infection were stage-specific. Infections acquired at the pre-limb-bud stage resulted in a high mortality rate (47.5–97.5%), whereas tadpoles infected at the limb-bud stage displayed a high malformation rate (16% overall), and the magnitude of effects increased with the level of exposure to cercariae. In contrast, infections acquired at the paddle stage had no effect on limb development or tadpole survival, which suggests that the timing of R. ondatrae infection in relation to the stage structure of tadpole populations in the wild is an important determinant of the degree to which populations are affected by R. ondatrae.

  5. Mosquito larvicidal properties of Orthisiphon thymiflorus (Roth) Sleesen. (Family: Labiatae) against mosquito vectors, Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To determine the larvicidal activity of hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone, and methanol extracts of Orthosiphon thymiflorus leaves against Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti. Methods: Larvicidal activity was determined in laboratory bioassays using var...

  6. Larvicidal activity of synthetic disinfectants and antibacterial soaps against mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Xue, Rui-De; Qualls, Whitney A

    2013-01-01

    Seven commercial synthetic disinfectant and antibacterial soap products were evaluated as mosquito larvicides against Culex quinquefasciatus Say in the laboratory. Three aerosol disinfectant products, at 0.01% concentration resulted in 58-76% mortality of laboratory-reared fourth instar mosquito larvae at 24 h posttreatment. Four antibacterial soap products at 0.0001% concentration resulted in 88-100% larval mortality at 24 h posttreatment. The active ingredient of the antibacterial soap products, triclosan (0.1%) resulted in 74% larval mortality. One of the antibacterial soap products, Equate caused the highest mosquito larval mortality in the laboratory. Equate antibacterial soap at the application rate of 0.000053 ppm resulted in 90% mortality of the introduced fourth instar larvae of Cx. quinquesfasicatus in the outdoor pools. In laboratory and field bioassays, the antibacterial soap resulted in significant larval mosquito mortality.

  7. Larvicidal and Histopathological Effects of Cassia siamea Leaf Extract against Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Jiraungkoorskul, Kanitta; Jiraungkoorskul, Wannee

    2015-01-01

    A traditional Thai medicinal extract from Cassia siamea was evaluated with respect to its larvicidal properties by determining the median lethal concentration (LC50) at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h against the fourth instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, which is a carrier of mosquito-borne diseases, by studying the histopathological alterations. The 24, 48, 72 and 96 h LC50 values were 394.29, 350.24, 319.17 and 272.42 ppm, respectively. The histopathological lesions after exposure to 25% of the 24-h LC50 were observed primarily in the midgut of the larva. Lesions with edema, swelling, and deformation or elongation of the epithelial cells were observed. Moreover, cells protruding into the lumen and absent microvilli were also found in some areas. The present study reveals that aqueous C. siamea leaf extracts have natural biopesticide properties. PMID:26868707

  8. Comparative efficacy and pathogenicity of keratinophilic soil fungi against Culex quinquefasciatus larvae.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Suman Sundar; Prakash, Soam

    2010-09-01

    Out of seven fungal species belonging to four genera isolated from pond and wallow soils using feathers of Pavo cristatus as bait, four species viz., Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Chrysosporium pseudomerdarium and Trichophyton ajelloi were most frequent. Chrysosporium and Trichophyton spp. were more pathogenic on Culex quinquefasciatus larvae than Aspergillus and Penicillium. The bioefficacy tests conducted as per the protocol of World Health Organization and the LC(50) values calculated by the Probit analysis showed that 3(rd)-instar C. quinquefasciatus were more susceptible to the conidia of above fungi. Highest mortality was observed in the larvae of C. quinquefasciatus when exposed to T. ajelloi. The density of fungal conidia was greatest on the ventral brush, palmate hair and anal region of the mosquito larvae after exposing for 72 hours. The potentiality of these fungi for use in the control of C. quinquefasciatus is discussed which can be exploited as a suitable biocontrol agent in the tropics.

  9. Insecticidal and Repellent Activity of Siparuna guianensis Aubl. (Negramina) against Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Raimundo Wagner Souza; dos Santos, Suetonio Fernandes; da Silva Morgado, Fabricio; Ascencio, Sergio Donizeti; de Mendonça Lopes, Magnólia; Viana, Kelvinson Fernandes; Didonet, Julcemar; Ribeiro, Bergmann Morais

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the toxic effects of essential oils isolated from Siparuna guianensis against Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus (eggs, larvae, pupae, and adult) and Aedes albopictus (C6/36) cells. The oviposition-deterring activity, egg viability, and repellence activity in the presence of different essential oils concentrations were determined. The essential oils showed high toxicity to all developmental stages of A. aegypti and C. quinquefasciatus. Furthermore, the oils also showed high repellent activity towards the adult stage of mosquitoes (0.025 to 0.550 μg/cm2 skin conferred 100% repellence up to 120 min) and in contact with cultured insect cells (C6/36) induced death possibly by necrosis. The results presented in this work show the potential of S. guianensis essential oils for the development of an alternative and effective method for the natural control of mosquitoes in homes and urban areas. PMID:25646797

  10. Repellency effect of forty-one essential oils against Aedes, Anopheles, and Culex mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Amer, Abdelkrim; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2006-09-01

    Since ancient times, plant products were used in various aspects. However, their use against pests decreased when chemical products became developed. Recently, concerns increased with respect to public health and environmental security requiring detection of natural products that may be used against insect pests. In this study, 41 plant extracts and 11 oil mixtures were evaluated against the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus), the malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi (Liston), and the filariasis and encephalitis vector, Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) (Diptera: Culicidae) using the skin of human volunteers to find out the protection time and repellency. The five most effective oils were those of Litsea (Litsea cubeba), Cajeput (Melaleuca leucadendron), Niaouli (Melaleuca quinquenervia), Violet (Viola odorata), and Catnip (Nepeta cataria), which induced a protection time of 8 h at the maximum and a 100% repellency against all three species. This effect needs, however, a peculiar formulation to fix them on the human skin.

  11. Larvicidal activity of a few plant extracts against Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles stephensi.

    PubMed

    Pushpalatha, E; Muthukrishnan, J

    1995-03-01

    Larvicidal activity of partially purified extracts of leaves of Vitex negundo, Nerium oleander and seeds of Syzygium jambolanum on different instars of Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles stephensi was estimated. Petroleum ether (PE): Ethyl acetate (EA) 3:1 fraction of V. negundo, 1:1 fractions of N. oleander and S. jambolanum inflicted considerable larval mortality and interfered with pupal-adult metamorphosis. At very low concentration the active fractions of these plant extracts extended the duration of the various larval instars and of pupation. In general, I and II instar larvae were more susceptible to the active fractions. Species and stage specific differences in the susceptibility of the mosquitoes to the active fractions of the plant extracts were observed.

  12. Larvicidal potential of Asteraceae family endophytic actinomycetes against Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito larvae.

    PubMed

    Tanvir, Rabia; Sajid, Imran; Hasnain, Shahida

    2014-01-01

    Pakistan is blessed with plants of Asteraceae family with known medicinal background used for centuries by Hakims (traditional physicians). Keeping in mind the background of their anti-larval potential, a total of 21 endophytic actinomycetes were isolated from four Asteraceae plants and screened against the first and fourth instar stages of Culex quinquefasciatus Say mosquito larvae. Of the 21 isolates, 6 of them gave strong larvicidal activity (80-100% mortality) in the screening results and 4 isolates gave a potent larvicidal activity (100% mortality) at the fourth instar stage. These isolates belonged to different species within the actinomycetes group, namely Streptomyces albovinaceus and Streptomyces badius. This communication reports the larvicidal potential of endophytic actinomycetes residing within the native Asteraceae plants in Pakistan. The study suggests further exploration through large-scale productions leading to the identification of the larvicidal compounds.

  13. Mosquito larvicidal activity of linear alkane hydrocarbons from Excoecaria agallocha L. against Culex quinquefasciatus Say.

    PubMed

    Satyan, R S; Sakthivadivel, M; Shankar, S; Dinesh, M G

    2012-01-01

    Excoecaria agallocha Linn. the blinding mangrove tree of historical significance, is well known for its curative properties. In this investigation, crude hexane extract from the dried roots of E. agallocha inhibited 50% of the growth of third instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus Say. within 24 h (LC(50): 315 ppm). SiO(2) (60-120) column chromatography purification of the extract yielded four fractions, of which fractions 3 (LC(50): 61.2 ppm) and 4 (LC(50): 74.5 ppm) exhibited 100% larvicidal activity within 18-24 h. Bioactive fraction 3 contained sub-fractions R1 and R2. R1 was characterised by (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and FAB mass spectrometry techniques as the acyclic hydrocarbon n-triacontane (C(30)H(62)).

  14. Meteorological effects on adult mosquito (Culex) populations in metropolitan New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Degaetano, Arthur T

    2005-05-01

    For two metropolitan New Jersey counties, monthly average adult mosquito (Culex) catch from New Jersey light trap data sets covering multiple decades is related to a number of meteorological factors. From June through August climatological conditions accounted for between 40% and 50% of the variation in average catch. In general, high monthly precipitation totals both in the month corresponding to the catch and the previous month were associated with increased trap catch. However, individual heavy rainfall events tended to reduce catch. Warm temperatures exerted a positive influence on mosquito abundance in June, but were associated with a low catch in August. Linear meteorological relationships explained only a small percentage of the variations in mosquito catch during May and September. During July, and particularly August, antecedent monthly catch also explained a significant portion of the variance in the contemporaneous catch. Over 60% of the variability in August catch could be attributed to the July population.

  15. Blood feeding patterns of potential arbovirus vectors of the genus Culex targeting ectothermic hosts

    PubMed Central

    Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D.; Graham, Sean P.; Hassan, Hassan K.; Guyer, Craig; Eubanks, Micky D.; Katholi, Charles R.; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles and amphibians constitute a significant portion of vertebrate biomass in terrestrial ecosystems and may be important arbovirus reservoirs. To investigate mosquito preference for ectothermic hosts, feeding indices were calculated from data collected in Tuskegee National Forest, Alabama, USA. Four mosquito species fed upon ectothermic hosts, with Cx. peccator and Cx. territans feeding primarily upon ectotherms. These two species appeared to target distinct species with little overlap in host choice. Culex peccator was a generalist in its feeding patterns within ectotherms, while Cx. territans appeared to be a more specialized feeder. Six of eleven ectotherm species fed upon by Cx. territans were fed upon more often than predicted based upon abundance. Spring Peepers were highly preferred over other host species by Cx. territans. Blood meals taken from each host species varied temporally, with some hosts being targeted fairly evenly throughout the season and others being fed upon in seasonal peaks. PMID:18981528

  16. Temporal analysis of feeding patterns of Culex erraticus in central Alabama.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana; Katholi, Charles R; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan; Hassan, Hassan K; Kristensen, Sibylle; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2011-04-01

    Host blood meals in seven mosquito species previously shown to be infected with eastern equine encephalitis virus at a site in the Tuskegee National Forest in southcentral Alabama were investigated. Of 1374 blood meals derived from 88 different host species collected over 6 years from these seven mosquito species, 1099 were derived from Culex erraticus. Analysis of the temporal pattern of Cx. erraticus meals using a Runs test revealed that the patterns of feeding upon avian and mammalian hosts from March to September of each year were not randomly distributed over time. Similarly, meals taken from the three most commonly targeted host species (yellow-crowned night heron, great blue heron, and white-tailed deer) were not randomly distributed. A Tukey's two-way analysis of variance test demonstrated that although the temporal pattern of meals taken from avian hosts were consistent over the years, the patterns of meals taken from the individual host species were not consistent from year to year.

  17. Associative learning of odor with food- or blood-meal by Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K.; Rains, Glen C.; Allan, Sandy A.; Sanford, Michelle R.; Lewis, W. Joe

    2006-11-01

    The ability of many insects to learn has been documented. However, a limited number of studies examining associative learning in medically important arthropods has been published. Investigations into the associative learning capabilities of Culex quinquefasciatus Say were conducted by adapting methods commonly used in experiments involving Hymenoptera. Male and female mosquitoes were able to learn a conditioned stimulus that consisted of an odor not normally encountered in nature (synthetic strawberry or vanilla extracts) in association with an unconditioned stimulus consisting of either a sugar (males and females) or blood (females) meal. Such information could lead to a better understanding of the ability of mosquitoes to locate and select host and food resources in nature.

  18. Genetic Variations in Bionomics of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) Mosquito Population in Minna, North Central Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ukubuiwe, Azubuike C.; Olayemi, Israel K.; Jibrin, Aisha I.

    2016-01-01

    The need to have an improved knowledge on the bioecology of Culex quinquefasciatus, a prerequisite in the development of cost-effective control strategies, has informed the present preliminary investigation to put in better perspective variations that exist in the egg rafts of the species. Freshly laid egg rafts were collected and incubated at ambient temperature in well-labeled plastic trays. The results showed overall inconsistency in all indices monitored for the egg rafts. Generally, survivorship was high for the species. All immature stage and adult parameters measured varied significantly among the egg rafts and between/within sexes of the species. Therefore, this study suggests the presence of inherent variation in the bionomics of egg rafts of C. quinquefasciatus, probably influenced by the environment and hence underscores the need for additional studies to further elucidate the roles of genetics and environment in vectorial competence of the species, in order to develop robust sustainable mosquito vector control protocols. PMID:27013900

  19. Altitudinal genetic and morphometric variation among populations of Culex theileri Theobald (Diptera: Culicidae) from northeastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Berna; Lee, Yoosook; Lanzaro, Gregory C; Alten, Bulent

    2012-06-01

    Enviromental conditions, including such important climatic variables as temperature and precipitation, change with altitude; thus, elevation plays a significant role in determining population and community structure in a variety of organisms. Using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and geometric morphometrics, nine populations of Culex theileri Theobald occurring in different ecological subregions at altitudes between 808-2,130 m in northeastern Turkey were compared. The wing size and shape data indicate that there are significant phenotypic differences among them, while Cx theileri populations are not genetically differentiated in the northeast part of Turkey. The size and shape variation analysis of wings showed that there is a positive correlation between wing (body) size/shape and altitude.

  20. Bovine leukocyte antigen major histocompatibility complex class II DRB3*2703 and DRB3*1501 alleles are associated with variation in levels of protection against Theileria parva challenge following immunization with the sporozoite p67 antigen.

    PubMed

    Ballingall, Keith T; Luyai, Anthony; Rowlands, G John; Sales, Jill; Musoke, Anthony J; Morzaria, Subash P; McKeever, Declan J

    2004-05-01

    Initial laboratory trials of an experimental subunit vaccine against Theileria parva based on the 67-kDa major sporozoite surface antigen revealed a range of responses to challenge. We have analyzed convergence in seven sets of monozygotic twins which suggests that genetic factors may have an influence in determining the degree of protection provided by p67 immunization. In addition, we have examined whether allelic diversity at major histocompatibility complex class II loci influences protection. Analysis of bovine leukocyte antigen DRB3 diversity in 201 animals identified significant associations with vaccine success (DRB3*2703; P = 0.027) and vaccine failure (DRB3*1501; P = 0.013). Furthermore, DRB3*2703 was associated with the likelihood of immunized animals showing little to no clinical signs of disease following challenge. We discuss the acquired and innate immune mechanisms that may be behind the associations described here.

  1. Culex quinquefasciatus from Rio de Janeiro Is Not Competent to Transmit the Local Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-de-Brito, Anielly; de Miranda, Rafaella Moraes; Barbosa da Silva, Keli Antunes; de Castro, Marcia Gonçalves; Raphael, Lidiane M. S.; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Bonaldo, Myrna C.; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background The Americas have suffered a dramatic epidemic of Zika since May in 2015, when Zika virus (ZIKV) was first detected in Brazil. Mosquitoes belonging to subgenus Stegomyia of Aedes, particularly Aedes aegypti, are considered the primary vectors of ZIKV. However, the rapid spread of the virus across the continent raised several concerns about the transmission dynamics, especially about potential mosquito vectors. The purpose of this work was to assess the vector competence of the house mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus from an epidemic Zika area, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for local circulating ZIKV isolates. Methodology/Principal Findings Culex quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti (positive control of ZIKV infection) from Rio de Janeiro were orally exposed to two ZIKV strains isolated from human cases from Rio de Janeiro (Rio-U1 and Rio-S1). Fully engorged mosquitoes were held in incubators at 26 ± 1°C, 12 h:12 h light:dark cycle and 70 ± 10% humidity. For each combination mosquito population—ZIKV strain, 30 specimens were examined for infection, dissemination and transmission rates, at 7, 14 and 21 days after virus exposure by analyzing body (thorax plus abdomen), head and saliva respectively. Infection rates were minimal to completely absent in all Cx. quinquefasciatus-virus combinations and were significantly high for Ae. aegypti. Moreover, dissemination and transmission were not detected in any Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes whatever the incubation period and the ZIKV isolate. In contrast, Ae. aegypti ensured high viral dissemination and moderate to very high transmission. Conclusions/Significance The southern house mosquito Cx. quinquefasciatus from Rio de Janeiro was not competent to transmit local strains of ZIKV. Thus, there is no experimental evidence that Cx. quinquefasciatus likely plays a role in the ZIKV transmission. Consequently, at least in Rio, mosquito control to reduce ZIKV transmission should remain focused on Ae. aegypti. PMID

  2. Functional and Nonfunctional Forms of CquiOR91, an Odorant Selectivity Subunit of Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David T; Pelletier, Julien; Rahman, Suhaila; Chen, Sisi; Leal, Walter S; Luetje, Charles W

    2017-03-03

    In Culex quinquefasciatus, CquiOR91 is the ortholog of 2 larvae-specific odorant receptors (ORs) from Anopheles gambiae (Agam\\Or40, previously shown to respond to several odorant ligands including the broad-spectrum repellent N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide, DEET) and Aedes aegypti (Aaeg\\Or40). When we cloned full-length CquiOR91 from a Culex quinquefasciatus larval head RNA sample, we found 2 alleles of this OR, differing at 9 residues. Functional analysis using the Xenopus oocyte expression system and 2-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology revealed one allele (CquiOR91.1) to be nonfunctional, whereas the other allele (CquiOR91.2) was functional. Receptors formed by CquiOR91.2 and Cqui\\Orco responded to (-)-fenchone, (+)-fenchone, and DEET, similar to what has been reported for Agam\\Or40. We also identified 5 novel odorant ligands for the CquiOR91.2 + Cqui\\Orco receptor: 2-isobutylthiazole, veratrole, eucalyptol, d-camphor, and safranal, with safranal being the most potent. To explore possible reasons for the lack of function for CquiOR91.1, we generated a series of mutant CquiOR91.2 subunits, in which the residue at each of the 9 polymorphic residue positions was changed from what occurs in CquiOR91.2 to what occurs in CquiOR91.1. Eight of the 9 mutant versions of CquiOR91.2 formed functional receptors, responding to (-)-fenchone. Only the CquiOR91.2 Y183C mutant was nonfunctional. The reverse mutation (C183Y) conferred function on CquiOR91.1 , which became responsive to (-)-fenchone and safranal. These results indicate that the "defect" in CquiOR91.1 that prevents function is the cysteine at position 183.

  3. Reproductive Biology and Susceptibility of Florida Culex coronator to Infection with West Nile Virus

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, C. Roxanne; O'Meara, George F.; Hickman, Dustin; Karr, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Ornithophilic Culex species are considered the primary amplification vectors of West Nile virus (WNV) in bird hosts as well as vectors responsible for epidemic transmission. Culex coronator was first collected from Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, Walton, and Washington Counties in Florida in 2005 and has since spread throughout the state. The vector competence of Cx. coronator for WNV, known to be infected in nature, has not been assessed. Without this knowledge, we are unable to assess this species' potential as an enzootic and epidemic vector of WNV in Florida. In the current study, we investigate the reproductive biology and susceptibility to WNV infection, dissemination, and transmission by Cx. coronator. We show that Cx. coronator is capable of delaying oviposition for several weeks after blood feeding and that the number of eggs laid is greater for avian than mammalian hosts. Cx. coronator were highly susceptible to infection (∼80–100%) and dissemination (∼65–85% by 18 days since exposure) with lower rates of transmission (0–17% at 25°C and 28–67% at 28°C), suggesting that it is a competent vector of WNV under some conditions. The proportion of mosquitoes with disseminated infections related to the time since exposure and was higher at 28°C than at 25°C. The rapid and statewide distribution of Cx. coronator throughout Florida poses as a potential public health risk. This baseline knowledge is essential information for mosquito control and public health agencies to assess current and future disease risk to Southeastern United States. PMID:25072992

  4. Larvicidal potential of carvacrol and terpinen-4-ol from the essential oil of Origanum vulgare (Lamiaceae) against Anopheles stephensi, Anopheles subpictus, Culex quinquefasciatus and Culex tritaeniorhynchus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Rajeswary, Mohan; Hoti, S L; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases represent a deadly threat for millions of people worldwide. However, the use of synthetic insecticides to control Culicidae may lead to resistance, high operational costs and adverse non-target effects. Nowadays, plant-borne mosquitocides may serve as suitable alternative in the fight against mosquito vectors. In this study, the mosquito larvicidal activity of Origanum vulgare (Lamiaceae) leaf essential oil (EO) and its major chemical constituents was evaluated against the malaria vectors Anopheles stephensi and An. subpictus, the filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus and the Japanese encephalitis vector Cx. tritaeniorhynchus. The chemical composition of the EO was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. GC-MS revealed that the essential oil of O. vulgare contained 17 compounds. The major chemical components were carvacrol (38.30%) and terpinen-4-ol (28.70%). EO had a significant toxic effect against early third-stage larvae of An. stephensi, An. subpictus, Cx. quinquefasciatus and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus, with LC50 values of 67.00, 74.14, 80.35 and 84.93 μg/ml. The two major constituents extracted from the O. vulgare EO were tested individually for acute toxicity against larvae of the four mosquito vectors. Carvacrol and terpinen-4-ol appeared to be most effective against An. stephensi (LC50=21.15 and 43.27 μg/ml, respectively) followed by An. subpictus (LC50=24.06 and 47.73 μg/ml), Cx. quinquefasciatus (LC50=26.08 and 52.19 μg/ml) and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus (LC50=27.95 and 54.87 μg/ml). Overall, this research adds knowledge to develop newer and safer natural larvicides against malaria, filariasis and Japanese encephalitis mosquito vectors.

  5. Discovery and characterisation of a new insect-specific bunyavirus from Culex mosquitoes captured in northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Hobson-Peters, Jody; Warrilow, David; McLean, Breeanna J; Watterson, Daniel; Colmant, Agathe M G; van den Hurk, Andrew F; Hall-Mendelin, Sonja; Hastie, Marcus L; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Harrison, Jessica J; Prow, Natalie A; Barnard, Ross T; Allcock, Richard; Johansen, Cheryl A; Hall, Roy A

    2016-02-01

    Insect-specific viruses belonging to significant arboviral families have recently been discovered. These viruses appear to be maintained within the insect population without the requirement for replication in a vertebrate host. Mosquitoes collected from Badu Island in the Torres Strait in 2003 were analysed for insect-specific viruses. A novel bunyavirus was isolated in high prevalence from Culex spp. The new virus, provisionally called Badu virus (BADUV), replicated in mosquito cells of both Culex and Aedes origin, but failed to replicate in vertebrate cells. Genomic sequencing revealed that the virus was distinct from sequenced bunyavirus isolates reported to date, but phylogenetically clustered most closely with recently discovered mosquito-borne, insect-specific bunyaviruses in the newly proposed Goukovirus genus. The detection of a functional furin cleavage motif upstream of the two glycoproteins in the M segment-encoded polyprotein suggests that BADUV may employ a unique strategy to process the virion glycoproteins.

  6. Rotational application of bioinsecticide with deltamethrin-An antilarval measure for the control of filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus (Culicidae: Diptera).

    PubMed

    Gayathri, V; Jeyalakshmi, T; Shanmugasundaram, R; Murthy, P Balakrishna

    2004-10-01

    A laboratory investigation was undertaken to study the cyclic usage of field recommended doses of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), Bacillus sphaericus (Bsp) and combination of Bti and Bsp (half the recommended dose of each) with deltamethrin 2.8 EC to attain better control of mosquito larvae. To understand the susceptibility status of the Culex quinquefasciatus larvae in the field, early fourth instar field collected larvae were exposed to the above treatments of biopesticides and were monitored for their persistency till 50% mortality was obtained. The larvae those survived in each treatment were transferred to the concentration of deltamethrin that gave 50% mortality. Observations on larval mortality after the treatment with deltamethrin were recorded after 24 h. The results revealed that Bti excels Bsp, as it recorded 54% mortality only on 17th day after application. The other salient finding of this study is LC50 of deltamethrin is sufficient to follow the biopesticides application for an effective control of Culex larvae.

  7. Culex (Acallyntrum) miyagii (Diptera: Culicidae): new species from Seram Island, Indonesia, with keys to the species of the subgenus.

    PubMed

    Mogi, M; Toma, T

    1999-07-01

    Culex (Acallyntrum) miyagii is described as a new species from Seram Island, Indonesia. The adult male, female, pupa, and larva are described in detail, and illustrations of the male genitalia, pupa, and larva are provided. Cx. miyagii is a forest species breeding in inflorescences of Costus sp. (Costaceae). Keys are provided for identifying the females and 4th-instar larvae of the species of Acallyntrum.

  8. Efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis var. Kurstaki in the control of two mosquito species (Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus).

    PubMed

    Kumar, A Senthil; Moorthi, M; Ramakrishnan, N; Dhanapakiam, P; Ramasamy, V K; Rajeswari, A Raja

    2009-05-01

    Bioinsecticide Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Btk) was used for controlling the mosquito species (Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus) which gave a significant (p<0.05) mortality in both species. The higher concentration of Btk was highly effective compared to the control ones. The controlling effect was dose and time dependent. Among the studied mosquitoes the C. quinquefasciatus (LC5 0.154%) was more susceptible than A. stephensi (LC50 0.372%) towards the bioinsecticide Btk.

  9. Sugar-deprivation following a blood meal does not reduce yolk formation and fertility in Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Van Handel, E

    1991-03-01

    Adult Culex quinquefasciatus, maintained from emergence on sugar, were fed blood and then fed either sugar (control) or water (starving) for 7 days. Analysis of ovaries and egg rafts for protein, lipids and glycogen showed that only glycogen levels were diminished by starvation. Eggs from both control and starving females, however, were equally viable. Nonbloodfed starving females lived longer than bloodfed starving females. These results suggest that the blood meal maximizes fertility, not longevity.

  10. Evaluation of four sampling techniques for surveillance of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) and other mosquitoes in African rice agroecosystems.

    PubMed

    Muturi, Ephantus J; Mwangangi, Joseph; Shililu, Josephat; Muriu, Simon; Jacob, Benjamin; Mbogo, Charles M; John, Githure; Novak, Robert

    2007-05-01

    Field studies were conducted in a rice, Oryza sativa L., agroecosystem in Mwea Kenya to compare the efficiency of CO2-baited Centers for Disease Control (CDC) light traps against nonbaited CDC light traps and gravid traps against oviposition traps in outdoor collection of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) and other mosquitoes. Collectively, 21 mosquito species from the genera Culex, Anopheles, Mansonia, Ficalbia, and Aedes were captured during the 10-wk study period. Cx. quinquefasciatus was the predominant species in all trap types with proportions ranging from 57% in the nonbaited CDC light traps to 95% in the gravid traps. Significantly higher numbers of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Culex annulioris Theobald were collected in the CO2-baited CDC light traps than in the nonbaited CDC light traps, but the numbers of other mosquito species, including malaria vectors Anopheles arabiensis Patton and Anopheles funestus Giles did not differ significantly between the two trap types. More Cx. quinquefasciatus females were collected in grass infusion-baited gravid traps than egg rafts of this species in oviposition traps containing the same infusion. Although most mosquitoes captured in CO,-baited and nonbaited CDC light traps were unfed, most of those collected in gravid traps were gravid. From these findings, it is concluded that at least in the rice-growing area of Mwea Kenya, CO2-baited CDC light traps in conjunction with gravid traps can be used in monitoring of Cx. quinquefasciatus both for control and disease surveillance.

  11. Toxicity of the conventional energetics TNT and RDX relative to new insensitive munitions constituents DNAN and NTO in Rana pipiens tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Jacob K; Lotufo, Guilherme R; Biedenbach, James M; Chappell, Pornsawan; Gust, Kurt A

    2015-04-01

    An initiative within the US military is targeting the replacement of traditional munitions constituents with insensitive munitions to reduce risk of accidental detonation. The purpose of the present study was to comparatively assess toxicity of the traditional munitions constituents 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) with the new insensitive munitions constituents 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) and 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO). The following exposure durations were performed with Rana pipiens (leopard frog) tadpoles: TNT and DNAN, 96 h and 28 d; RDX, 10 d and 28 d; NTO, 28 d. The 96-h 50% lethal concentration (LC50) values and 95% confidence intervals for TNT and DNAN were 4.4 mg/L (4.2 mg/L, 4. 7 mg/L) and 24.3 mg/L (21.3 mg/L, 27.6 mg/L), respectively. No significant impacts on survival were observed in the 10-d exposure to RDX up to 25.3 mg/L. Effects on tadpole swimming distance were observed with a lowest-observed-effect concentration (LOEC) of 5.9 mg/L RDX. In the 28-d exposures, the LOECs for survival for TNT, DNAN, and NTO were 0.003 mg/L, 2.4 mg/L, and 5.0 mg/L, respectively. No significant mortality was observed in the RDX chronic 28-d exposure up to the highest treatment level tested of 28.0 mg/L. Neither tadpole developmental stage nor growth was significantly affected in any of the 28-d exposures. Rana pipiens were very sensitive to chronic TNT exposure, with an LOEC 3 orders of magnitude lower than those for insensitive munitions constituents DNAN and NTO.

  12. [Sensitivity and specificity of prick skin test with two concentrations of standardized extract of Culex quinquefasciatus in allergic children].

    PubMed

    Castro-Almarales, Raúl Lázaro; Álvarez-Castelló, Mirta; Ronquillo-Díaz, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Canosa, José S; González-León, Mayda; Navarro-Viltre, Bárbara I; Betancourt-Mesia, Daniel; Enríquez-Domínguez, Irene; Reyes-Zamora, Mary Carmen; Oliva-Díaz, Yunia; Mateo-Morejón, Maytee; Labrada-Rosado, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Antecedentes: las opciones diagnósticas de las reacciones inmunológicas a la picadura del mosquito son limitadas. En Cuba, las reacciones mediadas por IgE más frecuentes son por picadura de Culex quinquefasciatus. Objetivo: determinar la sensibilidad y especificidad de la prueba cutánea por punción con dos dosis del extracto estandarizado en unidades de nitrógeno proteico (UNP) de Culex quinquefasciatus (BIOCEN, Cuba). Material y método: estudio analítico efectuado en 100 niños entre 2 y 15 años de edad: 50 pacientes atópicos con antecedentes de alergia a la picadura de mosquito e IgE sérica específica positiva a Culex quinquefasciatus y 50 pacientes atópicos sin antecedentes de alergia a la picadura de mosquito e IgE sérica específica negativa a Culex quinquefasciatus. La prueba cutánea por punción se realizó por duplicado en los antebrazos de los pacientes. Las dosis investigadas fueron 100 y 10 UNP/mL. Resultados: en la prueba cutánea por punción con el extracto de mayor concentración se obtuvo un tamaño del área del habón de 22.09 mm2 y con la menor concentración de 8.19 mm2; una diferencia estadísticamente significativa (p=0.001, prueba t de Student). La prueba cutánea positiva se correlacionó en el 100% de los pacientes con la existencia de IgE específica. La prueba con ambas dosis mostró 94% de especificidad y 88% de sensibilidad. Conclusión: la alta coincidencia en el resultado de la prueba cutánea nos muestra que puede sustituirse la concentración del extracto a 100 UNP/mL por la de menor concentración, sin perder confiabilidad en el diagnóstico de sensibilización al mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus, utilizando ese método in vivo.

  13. Development of permethrin resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus Say in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Wan-Norafikah, Othman; Nazni, Wasi Ahmad; Lee, Han Lim; Zainol-Ariffin, Pawanchee; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The resistance status towards permethrin among the laboratory strain, the permethrin-selected strain and four field strains of Culex quinquefasciatus collected in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia was determined using three standard laboratory methods: WHO larval bioassay, WHO adult bioassay and biochemical microplate assay. Cx. quinquefasciatus permethrin-selected strain larvae were the least susceptible to permethrin with a resistance ratio of 47.28-folds, whereas all field strain larvae of the same species were tolerant to permethrin with resistance ratios of more than 3-folds. In contrast, in adult stage, the permethrin exposed permethrin-selected strain (resistance ratio = 1.27) was found to be more susceptible to permethrin than all permethrin-exposed field strains (resistance ratios = 2.23–2.48). Complete mortalities for all strains of Cx. quinquefasciatus adults proved the effectiveness of the synergist; piperonyl butoxide (PBO). For the biochemical microplate assay, the reduction of the mean optical density of elevated oxidase activity of three field strains upon exposure to PBO confirmed the association between oxidase activity and permethrin tolerance. On the other hand, irregular patterns of the mean optical density of elevated oxidase activity in the laboratory strain, permethrin-selected strain and Jalan Fletcher strain illustrated the gene variation within these mosquito colonies as well as the involvement of other enzyme activities in the permethrin resistance occurred. PMID:23961241

  14. Culex tarsalis Vitellogenin Gene Promoters Investigated In Silico and In Vivo Using Transgenic Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Song; Rasgon, Jason L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Genetic modification, or transgenesis, is a powerful technique to investigate the molecular interactions between vector-borne pathogens and their arthropod hosts, as well as a potential novel approach for vector-borne disease control. Transgenesis requires the use of specific regulatory regions, or promoters, to drive expression of genes of interest in desired target tissues. In mosquitoes, the vast majority of described promoters are from Anopheles and Aedes mosquitoes. Results Culex tarsalis is one of the most important vectors of arboviruses (including West Nile virus) in North America, yet it has not been the subject of molecular genetic study. In order to facilitate molecular genetic work in this important vector species, we isolated four fat body-specific promoter sequences located upstream of the Cx. tarsalis vitellogenin genes (Vg1a, Vg1b, Vg2a and Vg2b). Sequences were analyzed in silico to identify requisite cis-acting elements. The ability for promoter sequences to drive expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in vivo was investigated using transgenic Drosophila melanogaster. All four promoters were able to drive GFP expression but there was dramatic variation between promoters and between individual Drosophila lines, indicating significant position effects. The highest expression was observed in line Vg2bL3, which was >300-fold higher than the lowest line Vg1aL2. Conclusions These new promoters will be useful for driving expression of genes of interest in transgenic Cx. tarsalis and perhaps other insects. PMID:24586476

  15. Nanoemulsion of eucalyptus oil and its larvicidal activity against Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Sugumar, S; Clarke, S K; Nirmala, M J; Tyagi, B K; Mukherjee, A; Chandrasekaran, N

    2014-06-01

    Filariasis is a mosquito-borne disease that causes lymphedema and the main vector is Culex quinquefasciatus. A simple measure was taken to eradicate the vector using nanoemulsion. Eucalyptus oil nanoemulsion was formulated in various ratios comprising of eucalyptus oil, tween 80 and water by ultrasonication. The stability of nanoemulsion was observed over a period of time and 1:2 ratios of eucalyptus oil (6%) and surfactant (12%) was found to be stable. The formulated eucalyptus oil nanoemulsion was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The nanoemulsion droplets were found to have a Z-average diameter of 9.4 nm and were spherical in shape. The larvicidal activity of eucalyptus oil nanoemulsion and bulk emulsion was tested and compared. Our nanoemulsion showed higher activity when compared to bulk emulsion. The histopathology of larvae-treated and untreated nanoemulsion was analyzed. Furthermore, biochemical assays were carried out to examine the effect of nanoemulsion on biochemical characteristics of larvae. The treated larval homogenate showed decrease in total protein content and a significant reduction in the levels of acetylcholinesterase. The levels of acid and alkaline phosphatase also showed reduction as compared to control larval homogenate.

  16. Characterization of a novel flavivirus isolated from Culex (Melanoconion) ocossa mosquitoes from Iquitos, Peru.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Julio; Cruz, Cristhopher; Guevara, Carolina; Astete, Helvio; Carey, Cristiam; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Morrison, Amy C; Williams, Maya; Halsey, Eric S; Forshey, Brett M

    2013-06-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a novel flavivirus, isolated from a pool of Culex (Melanoconion) ocossa Dyar and Knab mosquitoes collected in 2009 in an urban area of the Amazon basin city of Iquitos, Peru. Flavivirus infection was detected by indirect immunofluorescent assay of inoculated C6/36 cells using polyclonal flavivirus antibodies (St. Louis encephalitis virus, yellow fever virus and dengue virus type 1) and confirmed by RT-PCR. Based on partial sequencing of the E and NS5 gene regions, the virus isolate was most closely related to the mosquito-borne flaviviruses but divergent from known species, with less than 45 and 71 % pairwise amino acid identity in the E and NS5 gene products, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of E and NS5 amino acid sequences demonstrated that this flavivirus grouped with mosquito-borne flaviviruses, forming a clade with Nounané virus (NOUV). Like NOUV, no replication was detected in a variety of mammalian cells (Vero-76, Vero-E6, BHK, LLCMK, MDCK, A549 and RD) or in intracerebrally inoculated newborn mice. We tentatively designate this genetically distinct flavivirus as representing a novel species, Nanay virus, after the river near where it was first detected.

  17. Modeling the population dynamics of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae), along an elevational gradient in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Ahumada, Jorge A; Lapointe, Dennis; Samuel, Michael D

    2004-11-01

    We present a population model to understand the effects of temperature and rainfall on the population dynamics of the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, along an elevational gradient in Hawaii. We use a novel approach to model the effects of temperature on population growth by dynamically incorporating developmental rate into the transition matrix, by using physiological ages of immatures instead of chronological age or stages. We also model the effects of rainfall on survival of immatures as the cumulative number of days below a certain rain threshold. Finally, we incorporate density dependence into the model as competition between immatures within breeding sites. Our model predicts the upper altitudinal distributions of Cx. quinquefasciatus on the Big Island of Hawaii for self-sustaining mosquito and migrating summer sink populations at 1,475 and 1,715 m above sea level, respectively. Our model predicts that mosquitoes at lower elevations can grow under a broader range of rainfall parameters than middle and high elevation populations. Density dependence in conjunction with the seasonal forcing imposed by temperature and rain creates cycles in the dynamics of the population that peak in the summer and early fall. The model provides a reasonable fit to the available data on mosquito abundance for the east side of Mauna Loa, Hawaii. The predictions of our model indicate the importance of abiotic conditions on mosquito dynamics and have important implications for the management of diseases transmitted by Cx. quinquefasciatus in Hawaii and elsewhere.

  18. Genetic and anatomic determinants of enzootic Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection of Culex (Melanoconion) taeniopus.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Joan L; Adams, A Paige; Gorchakov, Rodion; Leal, Grace; Weaver, Scott C

    2012-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) is a re-emerging, mosquito-borne viral disease with the potential to cause fatal encephalitis in both humans and equids. Recently, detection of endemic VEE caused by enzootic strains has escalated in Mexico, Peru, Bolivia, Colombia and Ecuador, emphasizing the importance of understanding the enzootic transmission cycle of the etiologic agent, VEE virus (VEEV). The majority of work examining the viral determinants of vector infection has been performed in the epizootic mosquito vector, Aedes (Ochlerotatus) taeniorhynchus. Based on the fundamental differences between the epizootic and enzootic cycles, we hypothesized that the virus-vector interaction of the enzootic cycle is fundamentally different from that of the epizootic model. We therefore examined the determinants for VEEV IE infection in the enzootic vector, Culex (Melanoconion) taeniopus, and determined the number and susceptibility of midgut epithelial cells initially infected and their distribution compared to the epizootic virus-vector interaction. Using chimeric viruses, we demonstrated that the determinants of infection for the enzootic vector are different than those observed for the epizootic vector. Similarly, we showed that, unlike A. taeniorhynchus infection with subtype IC VEEV, C. taeniopus does not have a limited subpopulation of midgut cells susceptible to subtype IE VEEV. These findings support the hypothesis that the enzootic VEEV relationship with C. taeniopus differs from the epizootic virus-vector interaction in that the determinants appear to be found in both the nonstructural and structural regions, and initial midgut infection is not limited to a small population of susceptible cells.

  19. Larvicidal activity of some Euphorbiaceae plant extracts against Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Rahuman, A Abdul; Gopalakrishnan, Geetha; Venkatesan, P; Geetha, Kannappan

    2008-04-01

    Larvicidal activity of ethyl acetate, butanol, and petroleum ether extracts of five species of Euphorbiaceae plants, Jatropha curcas, Pedilanthus tithymaloides, Phyllanthus amarus, Euphorbia hirta, and Euphorbia tirucalli, were tested against the early fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti L. and Culex quinquefasciatus (Say). The larval mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. All extracts showed low larvicidal effects; however, the highest larval mortality was found in petroleum ether extract. The LC50 value of petroleum ether extracts of J. curcas, P. tithymaloides, P. amarus, E. hirta, and E. tirucalli were 8.79, 55.26, 90.92, 272.36, and 4.25 ppm, respectively, against A. aegypti and 11.34, 76.61, 113.40, 424.94, and 5.52 ppm, respectively, against C quinquefasciatus. Of the various ratios tested, the petroleum ether extracts of J. curcas and E. tirucalli were observed to be more efficient than the other plant extracts. It is, therefore, suggested that E. tirucalli can be applied as an ideal potential larvicide against A. aegypti and C. quinquefasciatus. This is an ideal ecofriendly approach for the control of the dengue vector, A. aegypti, and the lymphatic filariasis vector, C. quinquefasciatus.

  20. Evaluation of indigenous plant extracts against larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Rahuman, A Abdul; Bagavan, A; Kamaraj, C; Vadivelu, M; Zahir, A Abduz; Elango, G; Pandiyan, G

    2009-02-01

    This study investigates the larvicidal potential of indigenous plant extracts from commonly used medicinal herbs as an environmentally safe measure to control the filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae). The early fourth-instar larvae of C. quinquefasciatus, reared in the laboratory, were used for larvicidal assay with water, hot water, acetone, chloroform, and methanol leaf, stem-bark, and flower extracts of Acacia arabica Willd. Sans, Cedrus deodara Roxb, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L., Mangifera indica L., Nerium indicum Mill., Nicotiana tabacum Linn., Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre, and Solanum nigrum Linn. All plant extracts showed moderate larvicidal effects after 24 h of exposure at 1,000 ppm; however, the highest larval mortality was found in stem-bark hot water, acetone, and methanol extracts of C. deodara (LC50 = 133.85, 141.60, and 95.19 ppm, LC90 = 583.14, 624.19, and 639.99 ppm) and leaf hot water, acetone, methanol, and chloroform extracts of N. tabacum (LC50 = 76.27, 163.81, 83.38, and 105.85 ppm, LC90 = 334.72, 627.38, 709.51, and 524.39 ppm) against the larvae of C. quinquefasciatus, respectively. This is an ideal ecofriendly approach for the control of lymphatic filariasis vector, C. quinquefasciatus.

  1. Stormwater Drains and Catch Basins as Sources for Production of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Arana-Guardia, Roger; Baak-Baak, Carlos M.; Loroño-Pino, María Alba; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Beaty, Barry J.; Eisen, Lars; García-Rejón, Julián E.

    2014-01-01

    We present data showing that structures serving as drains and catch basins for stormwater are important sources for production of the mosquito arbovirus vectors Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus in Mérida City, México. We examined 1,761 stormwater drains – located in 45 different neighborhoods spread across the city – over dry and wet seasons from March 2012–March 2013. Of the examined stormwater drains, 262 (14.9%) held water at the time they were examined and 123 yielded mosquito immatures. In total, we collected 64,560 immatures representing nine species. The most commonly encountered species were Cx. quinquefasciatus (n=39,269) and Ae. aegypti (n=23,313). Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus were collected during all 11 months when we found water-filled stormwater drains, and both were found in stormwater drains located throughout Mérida City. We also present data for associations between structural characteristics of stormwater drains or water-related characteristics and the abundance of mosquito immatures. In conclusion, stormwater drains produce massive numbers of Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus across Mérida City, both in the wet and dry seasons, and represent non-residential development sites that should be strongly considered for inclusion in the local mosquito surveillance and control program. PMID:24582840

  2. Functional response analysis of Anisops sardea (Hemiptera: Notonectidae) against Culex quinquefasciatus in laboratory condition

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Rajendra Prasad; Ghosh, Anupam; Bandyopadhyay, Subhasis; Chandra, Goutam

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Culex quinquefasciatus is the principal vector of lymphatic filariasis (LF). Application of alternative vector control methodologies are aimed at reduction of mosquito breeding sites and biting activity through the use of biological control methods. In the present study, functional response of aquatic Hemipteran backswimmer, Anisops sardea was assessed against Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae in laboratory bioassay. Methods: The functional respons of A. sardea was assessed against IIIrd instar larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Respective handling times and coefficient of attack rates were determined by a non linear polynomeal regression equation. Results: The results of rates of predation in variable prey densities exhibited a ‘linear rise to plateau curve’, associated with ‘Type -II’ functional response. The logistic regression estimated a significant negative linear parameter (P1<0) which also supported the same observation. Associated ‘attack rates’ and ‘handling times’ were also calculated using the Holling Disc Equation. Interpretation & conclusions: The results of present experiments indicate that A. sardea can be used as a biocontrol agent against the larval forms of Cx. quinquefasciatus in temporarily available breeding places of mosquito with relatively clear water. However, a detailed field study has to be done to confirm these findings. PMID:25488451

  3. Larvicidal activity of essential extract of Rosmarinus officinalis against Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Liu, Xiang-Yi; Yang, Bin; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Feng, Zi-Liang; Wang, Chen-Zhu; Fan, Quan-Shui

    2013-03-01

    Constituents in rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) have been shown to have larvicidal activity against invertebrates. In order to explore the properties of crude extract of rosemary further, we studied the chemical composition and its activity against dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)-susceptible, DDT-resistant, and field strains of Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. The major components of R. officinalis were found to be eucalyptol and camphor, with relative percentages of 10.93% and 5.51%, respectively. Minor constituents included limonene, (+)-4-carene, isoborneol, 1-methyl-4-(1-methylethylidene)-cyclohexene, and pinene. The median lethal concentration (LC50) values of the essential oil of R. officinalis against DDT-susceptible, DDT-resistant, and field strains of larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus were 30.6, 26.4, and 38.3 mg/liter, respectively. The single median lethal dose (LD50) in Kunming mice was 4752 mg/kg. Essential oils from R. officinalis may, therefore, provide an effective natural plant product for use in mosquito prevention and control.

  4. Culex quinquefasciatus larval microbiomes vary with instar and exposure to common wastewater contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, Marcus J.; Prager, Sean M.; Walton, William E.; Trumble, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Like many insects, mosquitoes, rely on endosymbionts to grow and develop. These can be acquired from the environment. We used next generation 454 pyrosequencing to discern the whole-body microbiome of the mosquito species Culex quinquefasciatus in various larval stadia and following exposure to common pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) found in wastewater. PPCP treatments included environmentally-relevant concentrations; 1) a combination of common antibiotics, 2) a combination of mammalian hormones, 3) a mixture of the antibiotic and hormone treatments plus acetaminophen and caffeine and, 4) an untreated control. Within control groups, the predominant families of bacterial symbionts change with each larval instar despite consistent diets and rearing conditions. This trend was also seen in hormone treatments but not in the antibiotic or the mixture treatments. Richness and evenness were reduced in both antibiotic and mixture treatments, suggesting that antibiotics remove certain bacteria or inhibit them from increasing to proportions seen in the control treatment. Interestingly, the mixture treatments had greater richness and evenness compared to antibiotic alone treatments, possibly due to the other contaminants facilitating growth of different bacteria. These findings illuminate the complexity of the microbiome of C. quinquefasciatus and may have implications for more effective control strategies. PMID:26912375

  5. Mitochondrial DNA analyses reveal low genetic diversity in Culex quinquefasciatus from residential areas in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Low, V L; Lim, P E; Chen, C D; Lim, Y A L; Tan, T K; Norma-Rashid, Y; Lee, H L; Sofian-Azirun, M

    2014-06-01

    The present study explored the intraspecific genetic diversity, dispersal patterns and phylogeographic relationships of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) in Malaysia using reference data available in GenBank in order to reveal this species' phylogenetic relationships. A statistical parsimony network of 70 taxa aligned as 624 characters of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene and 685 characters of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene revealed three haplotypes (A1-A3) and four haplotypes (B1-B4), respectively. The concatenated sequences of both COI and COII genes with a total of 1309 characters revealed seven haplotypes (AB1-AB7). Analysis using tcs indicated that haplotype AB1 was the common ancestor and the most widespread haplotype in Malaysia. The genetic distance based on concatenated sequences of both COI and COII genes ranged from 0.00076 to 0.00229. Sequence alignment of Cx. quinquefasciatus from Malaysia and other countries revealed four haplotypes (AA1-AA4) by the COI gene and nine haplotypes (BB1-BB9) by the COII gene. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that Malaysian Cx. quinquefasciatus share the same genetic lineage as East African and Asian Cx. quinquefasciatus. This study has inferred the genetic lineages, dispersal patterns and hypothetical ancestral genotypes of Cx. quinquefasciatus.

  6. West Nile Virus Vector Competency of Culex quinquefasciatus Mosquitoes in the Galápagos Islands

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Gillian; Kramer, Laura D.; Goodman, Simon J.; Cunningham, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    The mosquito-transmitted pathogen West Nile virus (WNV) is not yet present in the Galápagos Archipelago of Ecuador. However, concern exists for fragile endemic island fauna after population decreases in several North American bird species and pathology in certain reptiles. We examined WNV vector competency of a Galápagos strain of mosquito (Culex quinquefasciatus Say). Field specimens were tested for their capacity to transmit the WN02-1956 strain of WNV after incubation at 27°C or 30°C. Rates of infection, dissemination, and transmission all increased with days post-exposure to WNV, and the highest rates were observed at 28 days. Infection rates peaked at 59% and transmission rates peaked at 44% (of mosquitoes tested). Vector efficiency increased after day 14. Rates of infection but not of transmission were significantly influence by temperature. No vertical transmission was detectable. We demonstrate that Galápagos Cx. quinquefasciatus are competent WNV vectors, and therefore should be considered an animal and public health risk for the islands and controlled wherever possible. PMID:21896799

  7. Control of Culex quinquefasciatus in pit latrines, using shredded, waste polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Nathan, M B; Toney, S; Bramble, S; Reid, V

    1996-04-01

    As an alternative to the use of commercially available, expanded-polystyrene beads, a study was made of the effectiveness of shredded, waste polystyrene (SWAP) for the control of Culex quinquefasciatus. The relevant physical properties of the SWAP were first investigated in the laboratory. Then, under field conditions in wet pit latrines, mosquito emergence rates were measured before and after application of the material. In the laboratory, when compared with the commercial product, the irregular shape of the SWAP particles greatly reduced their capacity to spread over the water surface and the interstitial air spaces also permitted respiration and development of mosquito larvae. Nevertheless, under field conditions, with careful application of the SWAP over the water surfaces in wet pit latrines, almost complete control of mosquito breeding was observed within a few days. This was sustained for 60 days, at which time observations were discontinued. SWAP appears to offer an effective, cheap and readily available alternative to the commercial product for the control of C. quinquefasciatus. The practicality of using it in community-based, mosquito-control programmes warrants further study.

  8. Nocturnal microhabitat distribution of adult Culex tarsalis (Diptera: Culicidae) impacts control effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Lothrop, Hugh D; Lothrop, Branka; Reisen, William K

    2002-07-01

    Suction traps (30 cm diameter) were more effective for non-attractant sampling of flying adult Culex tarsalis Coquillett than were smaller CDC (5.5 cm diameter), Malaise or ramp traps. Comparative catch in suction traps operated in a variety of vegetation types indicated that females congregated along elevated ecotones and were significantly less abundant flying over low vegetation or under and over elevated vegetation. Most females taken at upland orchards or Tamarisk tree lines were unfed (97%, n = 5,278) and similar in reproductive condition to host-seeking females. Blood fed and gravid females and males were only abundant near emergence sites. Pyrocide 7396 (Pyrethrin 5%, PBO 25%) was applied at the label rate of 5 oz/min by truck mounted Pro-Mist ultra low volume (ULV) equipment and particle drift measured by bioassay. ULV particles dispersed well downwind over low vegetation, between citrus orchard rows, and under date orchard canopy, but did not penetrate citrus orchards or vineyards when rows were perpendicular to wind direction. Particles did move up and over vegetation contacting sentinel mosquitoes placed above the canopy. The congregation of adult mosquitoes at vegetative ecotones and within orchard vegetation may afford protection from ground applied ULV particles, negatively impacting control. These data may explain why repeated applications often fail to interrupt encephalitis virus transmission.

  9. Gonotrophic cycle and survivorship of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) using sticky ovitraps in Monterrey, northeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Elizondo-Quiroga, Armando; Flores-Suarez, Adriana; Elizondo-Quiroga, Darwin; Ponce-Garcia, Gustavo; Blitvich, Bradley J; Contreras-Cordero, Juan Francisco; Gonzalez-Rojas, Jose Ignacio; Mercado-Hernandez, Roberto; Beaty, Barry J; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso

    2006-03-01

    Mark-release-recapture experiments were conducted to determine the length of the gonotrophic cycle and rate of survivorship of Culex quinquefasciatus Say in Monterrey, northeastern Mexico. A total of 2,352 field-caught Cx. quinquefasciatus females were marked and released at 8-12 h postemergence in 2 field trials. Sticky ovitraps were used to recapture marked gravid females. One hundred and ten (4.6%) marked females were recaptured during a 12-day sampling period. Recapture rates for the 2 individual trials were 6.4% and 3.5%. The length of the gonotrophic cycle, calculated as the average time between the initial blood meal and the time of recapture of gravid females, was 2-3 days. The first blood-fed mosquitoes were recaptured on the 2nd day postrelease. Gravid egg-laying females were most commonly recaptured at 2-3 days postfeeding. Daily survival estimates for the 2 release dates were of 0.871 and 0.883, respectively.

  10. Laboratory development of permethrin resistance and cross-resistance pattern of Culex quinquefasciatus to other insecticides.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Govindaraju; Shivakumar, Muthugoundar S

    2015-07-01

    Resistance of mosquitoes to insecticides is a growing concern in India. Since only a few insecticides are used for public health and limited development of new molecules is expected in the next decade, maintaining the efficacy of control programs mostly relies on resistance management strategies. Developing such strategies requires a deep understanding of factors influencing resistance together with characterizing the mechanisms involved. Among factors likely to influence insecticide resistance in mosquitoes, agriculture and urbanization have been implicated but rarely studied in detail. In the present study, we evaluate the permethrin resistance and cross-resistance pattern of several insecticides in Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes. After 10 generation of selection with permethrin, the LC50 value for both larvae and adult Cx. quinquefasciatus was increased by 17.3- and 17.1-folds compared with susceptible strain. Detoxification enzyme profiles and native PAGE electrophoresis of esterase isoenzyme further revealed that esterase and CytP450 may be involved in permethrin resistance (PerRes) strain compared with susceptible strain. In addition to cross-resistance, study revealed that high resistance to cypermethrin (RR = 6.3, 8.8-folds). This study provided important information for understanding permethrin resistance and facilitating a better strategy for the management of resistance. These studies conclude that a strong foundation for further study of permethrin resistance mechanisms observed in Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes.

  11. Winter severity predicts the timing of host shifts in the mosquito Culex erraticus

    PubMed Central

    Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D.; Hassan, Hassan K.; Eubanks, Micky D.; Cupp, Eddie W.; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    In temperate regions, seasonal epidemics of many mosquito-borne viruses are triggered when mosquito populations shift from feeding on avian to mammalian hosts. We investigated effects of temperature on the timing of bird-to-mammal shifts using an 8 year dataset of blood-meals from a mosquito (Culex erraticus) in Alabama, USA. As expected, Cx. erraticus shifted from avian to mammalian hosts each year. The timing of the shift, however, varied considerably among years. Harshness of the preceding winter (chill accumulation) explained 93 per cent of the variation in the timing of bird-to-mammal shifts, with shifts occurring later in years following harsher winters. We hypothesize that winter temperatures drive the timing of bird-to-mammal shifts through effects on host reproductive phenology. Because mosquitoes target birds during the nesting season, and bird nesting occurs later in years following colder winters, later nesting dates result in a concomitant delay in the timing of bird-to-mammal host shifts. Global increases in winter temperatures could cause significant changes in the timing of seasonal host shifts by mosquitoes, with prolonged periods of epidemic transmission of mosquito-borne diseases. PMID:22399787

  12. Host-feeding preference of the mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, in Yucatan State, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rejon, Julian E; Blitvich, Bradley J; Farfan-Ale, Jose A; Loroño-Pino, Maria A; Chi Chim, Wilberth A; Flores-Flores, Luis F; Rosado-Paredes, Elsy; Baak-Baak, Carlos; Perez-Mutul, Jose; Suarez-Solis, Victor; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso; Beaty, Barry J

    2010-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the host-feeding preference of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) in relation to the availability of human and domestic animals in the city of Merida, Yucatan State, Mexico. Mosquitoes were collected in the backyards of houses using resting wooden boxes. Collections were made five times per week from January to December 2005. DNA was extracted from engorged females and tested by PCR using universal avian- and mammalian-specific primers. DNA extracted from avian-derived blood was further analyzed by PCR using primers that differentiate among the birds of three avian orders: Passeriformes, Columbiformes and Galliformes. PCR products obtained from mammalian-derived blood were subjected to restriction enzyme digestion to differentiate between human-, dog-, cat-, pig-, and horse-derived blood meals. Overall, 82% of engorged mosquitoes had fed on birds, and 18% had fed on mammals. The most frequent vertebrate hosts were Galliformes (47.1%), Passeriformes (23.8%), Columbiformes (11.2%) birds, and dogs (8.8%). The overall human blood index was 6.7%. The overall forage ratio for humans was 0.1, indicating that humans were not a preferred host for Cx. quinquefasciatus in Merida.

  13. Larvicidal activities of three plants against filarial vector Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Rawani, Anjali; Haldar, Koyel Mallick; Ghosh, Anupam; Chandra, Goutam

    2009-10-01

    The present study was carried out to establish the larvicidal properties of crude extracts of three plants, viz. Carica papaya, Murraya paniculata and Cleistanthus collinus against Culex quinquefasciatus as target species. The relative efficacy of the plant extracts in vector control was as follows: C. papaya seed extract > M. paniculata fruit extract > M. paniculata leaf extract > C. collinus leaf extract. Result of log-probit analysis (at 95% confidence level) revealed that LC(50) and LC(95) values gradually decreased with the exposure periods similar to the result in bioassay experiment for each of the plant extract. The results of preliminary qualitative phytochemical analysis of all the plants revealed the presence of many bioactive principles such as steroids, alkaloids, terpenes, saponins, etc. that may be responsible for their biocontrol potentiality. The appropriate lethal concentrations at 24 h for each of the extracts were also studied on non-target organisms such as Diplonychus annulatum and Chironomus circumdatus, and no change in the swimming behaviour and survivality was noticed, which indicates that all the extracts are safe for the aquatic ecosystem.

  14. Molecular and kinetic evidence for allelic variants of esterase Estbeta1 in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Small, G J; Karunaratne, S H; Chadee, D D; Hemingway, J

    1999-07-01

    Elevated esterase Estbeta1 was purified from larvae of newly isolated strains of the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus from Colombia (COL) and Trinidad (TRI) with resistance to organophosphate (OP) insecticides. Insecticide interactions were compared with those of elevated Estbeta1(2) from the OP-resistant Habana strain and the non-elevated Estbeta1(3) from the susceptible PelSS strain. On the basis of insecticide binding efficiency, all elevated Estbeta1 esterases were readily distinguishable. Differences between the EcoRI restriction fragment patterns of the amplified estbeta1 gene in COL and TRI strains compared with each other, and between amplified estbeta1(1), estbeta1(2) and the non-amplified estbeta1(3), suggest differences in their nucleotide sequence. Considering their variable insecticide binding efficiencies, these genetic differences would imply that, in contrast to estalpha2 and estbeta2, amplification of estbeta1 has occurred several times independently. Generally, the elevated Estbeta1s were more reactive with insecticides than the non-elevated Estbeta1(3). This supports the hypothesis that the elevated esterase-based mechanism confers resistance through amplification of alleles coding for esterases which have a greater specificity for the insecticides they sequester than the esterases coded by their non-amplified counterparts.

  15. Larval and adult nutrition effects on blood/nectar choice of Culex nigripalpus mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Hancock, R G; Foster, W A

    1997-04-01

    The impact of nutritional variables on the development of host-seeking and biting behaviours after emergence by female Culex nigripalpus mosquitoes were studied using air-flow olfactometer and close-range biting assays, respectively. Unfed females failed to develop resting stage ovarian follicles. When offered a bird host in the absence of competing stimuli, sugar-fed mosquitoes were significantly more responsive in both host-seeking and biting than unfed controls. In a choice olfactometer assay using nectar odours (honey scented with artificial apple-blossom oil) versus host odours (a bird), unfed females preferred honey over bird odours except when honey odour was weak. After sucrose feeding, females switched from honey to bird preference. This change in behaviour was accompanied by significant accumulation of lipid and by follicular growth to the resting stage. Elevation of host responsiveness after sugar feeding was reversible; starvation ultimately resulted in females preferring honey over bird odours. When the larval diet was restricted by crowding, the wing-length and total lipid of resultant adult females were reduced. Although differences were subtle, unfed bird-responding females tended to have longer wings and more lipid than their honey-responding counterparts.

  16. Mosquitoes LTR Retrotransposons: A Deeper View into the Genomic Sequence of Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Marsano, Renè Massimiliano; Leronni, Daniela; D'Addabbo, Pietro; Viggiano, Luigi; Tarasco, Eustachio; Caizzi, Ruggiero

    2012-01-01

    A set of 67 novel LTR-retrotransposon has been identified by in silico analyses of the Culex quinquefasciatus genome using the LTR_STRUC program. The phylogenetic analysis shows that 29 novel and putatively functional LTR-retrotransposons detected belong to the Ty3/gypsy group. Our results demonstrate that, by considering only families containing potentially autonomous LTR-retrotransposons, they account for about 1% of the genome of C. quinquefasciatus. In previous studies it has been estimated that 29% of the genome of C. quinquefasciatus is occupied by mobile genetic elements. The potential role of retrotransposon insertions strictly associated with host genes is described and discussed along with the possible origin of a retrotransposon with peculiar Primer Binding Site region. Finally, we report the presence of a group of 38 retrotransposons, carrying tandem repeated sequences but lacking coding potential, and apparently lacking “master copy” elements from which they could have originated. The features of the repetitive sequences found in these non-autonomous LTR retrotransposons are described, and their possible role discussed. These results integrate the existing data on the genomics of an important virus-borne disease vector. PMID:22383973

  17. A rapid knockdown effect of Penicillium citrinum for control of the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Maketon, Monchan; Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn; Kaysorngup, Achirayar

    2014-02-01

    Twenty local isolates of entomopathogenic fungi were determined for control of the larvae and adults of Culex quinquefasciatus. In a laboratory experiment, a Penicillium sp. CM-010 caused 100% mortality of third-instar larvae within 2 h using a conidial suspension of 1 × 10⁶ conidia ml⁻¹. Its LC₅₀ was 3 × 10⁵ conidia ml⁻¹, and the lethal time (LT₅₀) was 1.06 h. Cloning and sequencing of its internal transcribed spacer region indicated that this Penicillium species is Penicillium citrinum (100% identity in 434 bp). Mortality of the adult was highest with Aspergillus flavus CM-011 followed with Metarhizium anisopliae CKM-048 from 1 × 10⁹ conidia ml⁻¹. P. citrinum CM-010 at 1 × 10⁶ conidia ml⁻¹ killed 100% larvae within 2 h while Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis at 5 ITU ml⁻¹ required 24 h. This P. citrinum CM-010 also greatly reduced survival of C. quinquefasciatus larvae in an unreplicated field test. Light and transmission electron micrographs showed that the fungal conidia were ingested by the larvae and deposited in the gut. The metabolite patulin was produced by P. citrinum CM-010 instead of citrinin.

  18. Toxicity of 25 synthetic insecticides to the field population of Culex quinquefasciatus Say.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rizwan Mustafa; Alam, Mahbob; Ahmad, Daniyal; Waqas, Muhammad; Ali, Qasim; Binyamin, Muhammad; Shad, Sarfraz Ali

    2016-11-01

    The Culex quinquefaciatus Say, commonly known as the southern house mosquito, is well known for biting nuisance and vectoring of some fatal diseases. Synthetic chemicals have been relied upon as the major control measure to control mosquitoes. Therefore, we have evaluated 21 insecticides belonging to different chemical classes for their toxicity to C. quinquefaciatus females. Chlorfenapyr was the most toxic adulticide among all the tested insecticides. Among pyrethroids, deltamethrin was the least toxic adulticide, and all other have same toxicity. In case of organophosphates, the chlorpyrifos was the most toxic insecticide. Neonicotinoids such as acetamiprid, nitenpyram, and clothianidin have similar toxicity based on overlapping of 95 % confidence intervals (CI) and were more toxic when compared with the imidacloprid. The spinetoram was more toxic as compared with the spinosad (based on non-overlapping 95 % Cl). In case of ketoenoles, spirotetrament was more toxic as compared with the spiromesifen. Emamectin benzoate was the most toxic insecticide when compared with fipronil and indoxacarb. We also have tested four insect growth regulators (IGRS) including lufenuron, methoxyfenozide, pyriproxyfen, and cyromazine as larvicides. The lufenuron and pyriproxyfen have similar toxicity based upon their overlapping 95 % CI and were more toxic as compared with the methoxyfenozide and cyromazine. The methoxyfenozide was the moderately toxic among all the tested IGRS, and cyromazine was the least toxic among all the tested IGRS. These results will prove helpful in effectuating an effective integrated vector management program for C. quinquefaciatus.

  19. Diel biting activity of Culex (Melanoconion) caudelli in Trinidad, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Chadee, D D; Tikasingh, E S

    1989-07-01

    The diel biting periodicity of the arbovirus vector Culex (Melanoconion) caudelli Dyar and Knab (Diptera; Culicidae) in the Aripo-Wallerfield forest, Trinidad, was studied by collecting mosquitoes attracted to mouse-baited traps at 2-hourly intervals during eight 24 h periods. Biting females of Cx caudelli were collected during all night-time hours, 18.00-06.00 hours, with an overall unimodal pattern, i.e. one well-defined peak between 22.00 and 04.00 hours. This contrasts with previous reports that Cx caudelli is diurnally active. During the four moon phases, the period of peak biting activity varied from 22.00 to 24.00 hours at fullmoon, from 22.00 to 04.00 hours at first quarter, and from 24.00 to 02.00 hours at new moon and last quarter phases. The number of mosquitoes collected varied significantly with moon phases, the highest (152/24 h) being collected in the first lunar quarter and the lowest (71/24 h) in the last lunar quarter. Cloud cover and rainfall had no significant effect on the diel biting periodicity of Cx caudelli.

  20. Dicer-2-dependent activation of Culex Vago occurs via the TRAF-Rel2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Paradkar, Prasad N; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard; Voysey, Rhonda; Walker, Peter J

    2014-04-01

    Despite their importance as vectors of human and livestock diseases, relatively little is known about innate antiviral immune pathways in mosquitoes and other insects. Previous work has shown that Culex Vago (CxVago), which is induced and secreted from West Nile virus (WNV)-infected mosquito cells, acts as a functional homolog of interferon, by activating Jak-STAT pathway and limiting virus replication in neighbouring cells. Here we describe the Dicer-2-dependent pathway leading to WNV-induced CxVago activation. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we show that a NF-κB-like binding site in CxVago promoter region is conserved in mosquito species and is responsible for induction of CxVago expression following WNV infection. Using dsRNA-based gene knockdown, we show that the NF-κB ortholog, Rel2, plays significant role in the signaling pathway that activates CxVago in mosquito cells in vitro and in vivo. Using similar approaches, we also show that TRAF, but not TRAF-3, is involved in activation of Rel2 after viral infection. Overall the study shows that a conserved signaling pathway, which is similar to mammalian interferon activation pathway, is responsible for the induction and antiviral activity of CxVago.

  1. Delayed mortality and morphogenetic anomalies induced in Culex quinquefasciatus by the microbial control agent Bacillus sphaericus.

    PubMed

    Mulla, M S; Singh, N; Darwazeh, H A

    1991-09-01

    Two preparations of Bacillus sphaericus 2362 were studied for their biological activity, delayed mortality and the induction of morphogenetic aberrations in larvae, pupae and adults of Culex quinquefasciatus. Longevity and fecundity of adult mosquitoes were also assessed. A dosage response line for B. sphaericus was established against 4th-instar larvae and sublethal concentrations (48 h LC50 and lower) were used against these larvae. Sublethal concentrations of B. sphaericus induced delayed mortality in larvae, pupae and adults. The magnitude of mortality increased in succeeding cohorts and developmental stages resulting from the surviving larvae. Only 10 and 25% overall emergence of viable adults occurred in the sublethal treatments (LC25) of 2 B. sphaericus preparations. The range of successful adult emergence was over 94% in the controls. A wide range of external morphogenetic aberrations in dead larvae, pupae and adults were noted. These aberrations and gross morphological features were quite similar to those reported for certain insect growth regulators. Sublethal concentrations had no marked effect on longevity of adults, egg deposition and hatch.

  2. West Nile virus vector competency of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes in the Galapagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Gillian; Kramer, Laura D; Goodman, Simon J; Cunningham, Andrew A

    2011-09-01

    The mosquito-transmitted pathogen West Nile virus (WNV) is not yet present in the Galápagos Archipelago of Ecuador. However, concern exists for fragile endemic island fauna after population decreases in several North American bird species and pathology in certain reptiles. We examined WNV vector competency of a Galápagos strain of mosquito (Culex quinquefasciatus Say). Field specimens were tested for their capacity to transmit the WN02-1956 strain of WNV after incubation at 27°C or 30°C. Rates of infection, dissemination, and transmission all increased with days post-exposure to WNV, and the highest rates were observed at 28 days. Infection rates peaked at 59% and transmission rates peaked at 44% (of mosquitoes tested). Vector efficiency increased after day 14. Rates of infection but not of transmission were significantly influence by temperature. No vertical transmission was detectable. We demonstrate that Galápagos Cx. quinquefasciatus are competent WNV vectors, and therefore should be considered an animal and public health risk for the islands and controlled wherever possible.

  3. Host-Feeding Preference of the Mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, in Yucatan State, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.; Blitvich, Bradley J.; Farfan-Ale, Jose A.; Loroño-Pino, Maria A.; Chi Chim, Wilberth A.; Flores-Flores, Luis F.; Rosado-Paredes, Elsy; Baak-Baak, Carlos; Perez-Mutul, Jose; Suarez-Solis, Victor; Fernandez-Salas, Ildefonso; Beaty, Barry J.

    2010-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the host-feeding preference of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) in relation to the availability of human and domestic animals in the city of Merida, Yucatan State, Mexico. Mosquitoes were collected in the backyards of houses using resting wooden boxes. Collections were made five times per week from January to December 2005. DNA was extracted from engorged females and tested by PCR using universal avian- and mammalian-specific primers. DNA extracted from avian-derived blood was further analyzed by PCR using primers that differentiate among the birds of three avian orders: Passeriformes, Columbiformes and Galliformes. PCR products obtained from mammalian-derived blood were subjected to restriction enzyme digestion to differentiate between human-, dog-, cat-, pig-, and horse-derived blood meals. Overall, 82% of engorged mosquitoes had fed on birds, and 18% had fed on mammals. The most frequent vertebrate hosts were Galliformes (47.1%), Passeriformes (23.8%), Columbiformes (11.2%) birds, and dogs (8.8%). The overall human blood index was 6.7%. The overall forage ratio for humans was 0.1, indicating that humans were not a preferred host for Cx. quinquefasciatus in Merida. PMID:20578953

  4. Salt marsh as Culex salinarius larval habitat in coastal New York.

    PubMed

    Rochlin, Ilia; Dempsey, Mary E; Campbell, Scott R; Ninivaggi, Dominick V

    2008-09-01

    Culex salinarius is considered one of the most likely bridge vectors involved in the human transmission cycle of West Nile virus (WNV) and eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus (EEEV) in the northeastern USA. The larval habitats of this species in the coastal region of New York State are currently poorly known. Between 2005 and 2007, a larval survey was carried out to identify and characterize possible larval habitats in Suffolk County, encompassing natural and man-made freshwater wetlands, artificial containers, and salt marshes. Only relatively undisturbed salt marsh yielded Cx. salinarius larvae in considerable numbers from several sites over a period of 2 years. The immature stages of this species were found associated with Spartina patens and S. alterniflora of the upper marsh at salinities ranging from 4.3 to 18.8 parts per thousand. Both heavily impacted and relatively undisturbed salt marshes produced several hundreds of adult Cx. salinarius per Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) light trap per night, an order of magnitude higher than CDC light traps deployed at upland sites. The ability of Cx. salinarius to use both heavily impacted and relatively undisturbed salt marshes for reproduction has significant repercussions for marsh restoration and vector control practices.

  5. Tolerance to individual and joint effects of arsenic and Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis or Lysinibacillus sphaericus in Culex mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Mogren, Christina L; Walton, William E; Trumble, John T

    2014-08-01

    Arsenic contamination of global water supplies has come to the forefront in policy decisions in recent decades. However, the effects of arsenic on lower trophic levels of insects inhabiting contaminated ecosystems are not well understood. One approach to document both acute and sublethal effects of toxicants like arsenic is to assay them in combination with microbial pathogens to evaluate shifts in survival curves of the test organisms. Larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus and Culex tarsalis were reared in water containing 0 or 1 000 μg/L of arsenate or arsenite. Fourth instars were then exposed to a range of doses of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) or Lysinibacillus sphaericus (Ls), with shifts in lethal concentrations determined. Arsenic accumulation in 4th instars was also quantified, and a relative growth index (RGI) calculated for the treatments and compared to controls. Larvae of both species accumulated between 4 447 ± 169 ng As/g and 6 983 ± 367 ng As/g, though RGI values indicated accumulation did not affect growth and development. In all cases, the LC50 's and LC90 's of Cx. quinquefasciatus exposed jointly with arsenic and Bti/Ls were higher than Cx. tarsalis. Cx. tarsalis reared in arsenite showed a significant reduction in their Bti LC90 values compared to the control, indicating a sublethal effect of Bti. When exposed jointly with Ls, arsenite was more toxic than arsenate in Cx. tarsalis. Overall, these results indicate tolerance of these Culex species to arsenic exposures, and why this may occur is discussed.

  6. Oviposition deterrent activity from the ethanolic extract of Pongamia pinnata, Coleus forskohlii, and Datura stramonium leaves against Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefaciatus.

    PubMed

    Swathi, S; Murugananthan, G; Ghosh, S K

    2010-10-01

    Mosquitoes are responsible for spread of many diseases than any other group of arthropods. Diseases such as malaria, filariasis, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and chikunguinya are real threat to mankind. In the present study, ethanolic extracts of leaves of Pongamia pinnata, Coleus forskohlii, and Datura stramonium were evaluated for oviposition deterrent activity against Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. The oviposition deterrent tests of ethanolic extract of Pongamia pinnata, Coleus forskohlii, and Datura stramonium leaves reduced egg laying by 97.62%, 77.3%, 100% against Aedes aegypti and 59.10%, 39.22%, 82% against Culex quinquefasciatus at higher concentration (0.1%).

  7. LABORATORY STUDIES ON THE POSSIBILITY OF CULEX QUINQUEFASCIATUS TO HARBOR HEPATOZOON SP. INFECTING CERASTES CERASTES CERASTES VIPER IN EGYPT.

    PubMed

    Rashdan, Nagwa A; Galal, Fatma H; Gad-Allah, Alaa F

    2015-12-01

    A successful experimental infection of Culex quinquefasciatus with Hepatozoon sp. infecting Cerastes cerastes cerastes viper was carried out under laboratory conditions of 24 +/- 3 degrees C and 60-70% R. H. The period monitored for complete sporogonic cycle was 21 days. The effect of high parasitimic blood meal was nonsignificant (P>0.05) on preoviposition period and hatchability. Meanwhile a highly significant reduction was observed in oviposition rate, number of deposited eggs, number of hatched larvae and longevity (P<0.01). On the contrary moderate infection with Hepatozoon revealed a great significant increase in fecundity (P<0.01) and a nonsignificant decrease in longevity (P>0.05)

  8. Dispersal of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) in a Hawaiian rain forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapointe, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduced mosquito-borne pathogens avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum Grassi and Feletti) and avian pox virus (Avipoxvirus) have been implicated in the past extinctions and declines of Hawaiian avifauna and remain significant obstacles to the recovery and restoration of endemic Hawaiian birds. Effective management of avian disease will require extensive mosquito control efforts that are guided by the local ecology of the vector Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae). During October and November 1997 and September through November 1998 five mark-release-recapture experiments with laboratory-reared Cx. quinquefasciatus were conducted in a native rain forest on Hawaii Island. Of the overall 66,047 fluorescent dye-marked and released females, 1,192 (1.8%) were recaptured in 43-52 CO2-baited traps operated for 10-12-d trapping periods. Recaptured mosquitoes were trapped in all directions and at distances up to 3 km from the release site. The cumulative mean distance traveled (MDTs) over the trapping period ranged from a high of 1.89 km after 11 d (September 1998) to a low of 0.81 km after 11 d (November 1998). Released mosquitoes moved predominately in a downwind direction and they seemed to use forestry roads as dispersal corridors. Applying an estimated MDT of 1.6 km to a geographical information system-generated map of the Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge clearly demonstrated that the effective refuge area could be reduced 60% by mosquitoes infiltrating into managed refuge lands. These findings should have significant implications for the design of future refuges and development of effective mosquito-borne avian disease control strategies.

  9. Modeling the population dynamics of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culcidae), along an elevational gradient in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahumada, Jorge A.; LaPointe, Dennis; Samuel, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    We present a population model to understand the effects of temperature and rainfall on the population dynamics of the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, along an elevational gradient in Hawaii. We use a novel approach to model the effects of temperature on population growth by dynamically incorporating developmental rate into the transition matrix, by using physiological ages of immatures instead of chronological age or stages. We also model the effects of rainfall on survival of immatures as the cumulative number of days below a certain rain threshold. Finally, we incorporate density dependence into the model as competition between immatures within breeding sites. Our model predicts the upper altitudinal distributions of Cx. quinquefasciatus on the Big Island of Hawaii for self-sustaining mosquito and migrating summer sink populations at 1,475 and 1,715 m above sea level, respectively. Our model predicts that mosquitoes at lower elevations can grow under a broader range of rainfall parameters than middle and high elevation populations. Density dependence in conjunction with the seasonal forcing imposed by temperature and rain creates cycles in the dynamics of the population that peak in the summer and early fall. The model provides a reasonable fit to the available data on mosquito abundance for the east side of Mauna Loa, Hawaii. The predictions of our model indicate the importance of abiotic conditions on mosquito dynamics and have important implications for the management of diseases transmitted by Cx. quinquefasciatus in Hawaii and elsewhere.

  10. Evaluation of the pyrrole insecticide chlorfenapyr for the control of Culex quinquefasciatus Say.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, K; Barik, T K; Bhatt, R M; Srivastava, H C; Sreehari, U; Dash, A P

    2011-04-01

    Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) is a widely distributed mosquito vector species in India and also in other tropical regions of the world. This species is implicated in the transmission of lymphatic filariasis in many countries. This species is reported to be widely resistant to insecticides of different classes in current use. In the present study, bio-efficacy of chlorfenapyr, an insecticide of pyrrole class with a novel mode of action was tested for the control of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Studies were performed to determine the diagnostic dosage; residual efficacy on different artificially fabricated substrates, namely wood, mud, mud+lime, cement and cement+distemper; to assess cross-resistance with different insecticides; and synergism/antagonism using piperonyl butoxide (PBO). A dosage of 5.0% chlorfenapyr was determined as diagnostic dosage with 2 h exposure and 48 h holding period for assessing the susceptibility of mosquitoes. The residual efficacy was observed up to 34 weeks on wood and mud+lime substrates while on other substrates, it was about 15 weeks at a dosage of 400mg a.i./m(2). Laboratory-reared strains of Cx. quinquefasciatus showed cross-resistance, whereas field-collected mosquitoes showed absence of cross-resistance to chlorfenapyr. Potentiation bioassays showed antagonistic effect of PBO to chlorfenapyr toxicity owing to the involvement of oxidases in the initial step of a conversion of pro-insecticide chlorfenapyr to toxic form CL 303268. The present study results have shown that chlorfenapyr can be a potential insecticide for the control of multiple insecticide resistant strains of Cx. quinquefasciatus. However, in countries where indoor residual spray (IRS) is not targeted for the control of this species, like in India, chlorfenapyr used in IRS for the control of malaria vectors in rural and peri-urban areas can additionally provide control of Cx. quinquefasciatus also.

  11. Insecticide Susceptibility of Field-Collected Populations of Culex tritaeniorhynchus in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Dae-Hyun; Shin, E-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Ahn, Young Joon; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Seong-Yoon; Park, Chan

    2013-01-01

    The toxicities of 10 insecticides were examined against late third instar Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles (Diptera: Culicidae) using the direct-contact mortality bioassay. Six geospatially-distant field mosquitoes were collected from Chuncheon-si, Hwaseong, Seosan. Jeonju, Daegu, and Busan in the Republic of Korea. Marked regional variations of insecticide susceptibility were observed. Field populations of Seosan, Jeonju, and Daegu from agricultural areas showed higher to extremely higher insecticide susceptibility to pyrethroids than those of Chuncheon-si, Hwaseong, and Busan strains from non-agricultural areas. Extremely high to low levels of susceptibility were measured: bifenthrin, susceptible ratio (SR) = 2.7–896.3; β-cyfluthrin, SR = 1.8–633.3; α-cypermethrin, SR = 1.2–1,051.9; deltamethrin, SR = 1.3–711.1; permethrin, SR = 1.5–1,053.4; etofenprox, SR = 2.2–29.3; chlorfenapyr, SR = 5.1–103.6; chlorpyrifos, SR = 2.3– 337.0; fenitrothion, SR = 2.0–142.3; and fenthion, SR = 1.4–186.2. Cx. tritaeniorhynchus populations from rice paddies had been under heavy selection pressure due to the agricultural insecticides, and that's why the mosquito species demonstrated high resistance to pyrethroids, which were used for a long time to control agricultural pests in the localities. These results indicate that careful selection and rotational use of these insecticides may result in continued satisfactory control against field populations of Japanese encephalitis vector mosquitoes. PMID:23879898

  12. Dispersal of male and female Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes using stable isotope enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Roark, E. Brendan; Hamer, Gabriel L.

    2017-01-01

    The dispersal patterns of mosquito vectors are important drivers of vector-borne infectious disease dynamics and understanding movement patterns is pivotal to devise successful intervention strategies. Here, we investigate the dispersal patterns of two globally important mosquito vectors, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus, by marking naturally-occurring larvae with stable isotopes (13C or 15N). Marked individuals were captured with 32 CDC light trap, 32 gravid trap, and 16 BG Sentinel at different locations within two-kilometer radii of six larval habitats enriched with either 13C or 15N. In total, 720 trap nights from July to August 2013 yielded a total of 32,140 Cx. quinquefasciatus and 7,722 Ae. albopictus. Overall, 69 marked female mosquitoes and 24 marked male mosquitoes were captured throughout the study period. The distance that Cx. quinquefasciatus females traveled differed for host-seeking and oviposition-seeking traps, with females seeking oviposition sites traveling further than those seeking hosts. Our analysis suggests that 41% of Cx. quinquefasciatus females that were host-seeking occurred 1–2 kilometer from their respective natal site, while 59% remained within a kilometer of their natal site. In contrast, 59% of Cx. quinquefasciatus females that were seeking oviposition sites occurred between 1–2 kilometer away from their larval habitat, while 15% occurred > 2 kilometer away from their natal site. Our analysis estimated that approximately 100% of Ae. albopictus females remained within 1 km of their respective natal site, with 79% occurring within 250m. In addition, we found that male Ae. albopictus dispersed farther than females, suggesting male-biased dispersal in this Ae. albopictus population. This study provides important insights on the dispersal patterns of two globally relevant vector species, and will be important in planning next generation vector control strategies that mitigate mosquito-borne disease through sterile insect

  13. Aqueous Neem Extract Versus Neem Powder on Culex quinquefasciatus: Implications for Control in Anthropogenic Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Kudom, Andreas A.; Mensah, Ben A.; Botchey, Mary A.

    2011-01-01

    Control programs using conventional insecticides to target anthropogenic mosquito habitats are very expensive because these habitats are widespread, particularly in cities of most African countries. Additionally, there are serious environmental concerns regarding large-scale application of most conventional insecticides. Clearly there is a need for alternative methods that are more effective, less expensive, and environmentally friendly. One such method would be the application of preparations made from parts of the neem tree, Azadirachta indica A. Jussieu (Sapindales: Meliaceae). In this study, aqueous crude extracts and crude powder were prepared from different parts of neem, and the efficacies of the preparations on juvenile stages of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) were evaluated in the laboratory. When larvae were exposed to a concentration of 0.1 g/mL extract for 24 hours, percent mean mortality (± SE) was 72.7 plusmn; 1.8 for the bark, 68.7 ± 1.6 for fruits and 60 ± 1.6 for leaves. These means were not significantly different (χ2 = 4.12; df = 2; p = 0.127). At a concentration of 0.01 g/mL, > 95% of the larvae died within 24 hours of exposure to powdered neem leaf, but it took 120 hours to reach the same level of larval mortality in aqueous leaf extract. The crude extract slowly inhibited the growth and development of mosquitoes while the crude powder acted more as a barrier; the mosquitoes probably died from suffocation. However, both types of preparations can be made and used by local people to control mosquito breeding in anthropogenic habitats, especially in urbanized areas. PMID:22233153

  14. A novel biopesticide PONNEEM to control human vector mosquitoes Anopheles stephensi L. and Culex quinquefasciatus Say.

    PubMed

    Maheswaran, Rajan; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2015-09-01

    Organophosphate pesticides are widely used in vector mosquito management and agricultural pest management. These chemicals enter into natural water bodies and soil and cause hazards to the environment. The objective of this study was to prepare a natural pesticide which will not harm the environment and yet control vector mosquitoes. PONNEEM, a novel biopesticide, patented and prepared from the oils of Azadirachta indica and Pongamia glabra, was tested against Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus. One hundred percent larvicidal and ovicidal activities were observed at 0.1-ppm concentration of PONNEEM against the two mosquito species under laboratory and sunlight conditions up to 12 months from the date of manufacture. Very high oviposition reduction of 26.46 and 32.16 % is also recorded. Reductions in α-esterase level (0.0818 ± 0.340 and 0.2188 ± 0.003), β-esterase level (0.0866 ± 0.026 and 0.0398 ± 0.010 μg naphthol produced/min/mg larval protein), glutathione S-transferase enzyme (14.2571 ± 0.51 and 15.3326 ± 0.51 μmol/min/mg larval protein) and total protein levels (0.0390 ± 0.008 and 0.1975 ± 0.029 mg/individual larva in treated groups of A. stephensi and C. quinquefasciatus at 0.1-ppm concentration, respectively. The non-target organisms such as Gambusia affinis and Diplonychus indicus were not affected. Biopesticides are good alternatives to synthetic pesticides. PONNEEM can be effectively used for the management of human vector mosquitoes. Since it has a biodegradable nature and does not alter the environmental condition of water and soil.

  15. Larvicidal activity of medicinal plant extracts against Anopheles subpictus & Culex tritaeniorhynchus

    PubMed Central

    Kamaraj, C.; Bagavan, A.; Elango, G.; Zahir, A. Abduz; Rajakumar, G.; Marimuthu, S.; Santhoshkumar, T.; Rahuman, A. Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Mosquitoes transmit serious human diseases, causing millions of deaths every year and the development of resistance to chemical insecticides resulting in rebounding vectorial capacity. Plants may be alternative sources of mosquito control agents. The present study assessed the role of larvicidal activities of hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, acetone, and methanol dried leaf and bark extracts of Annona squamosa L., Chrysanthemum indicum L., and Tridax procumbens L. against the fourth instar larvae of malaria vector, Anopheles subpictus Grassi and Japanese encephalitis vector, Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles (Diptera: Culicidae). Methods: Larvicidal activities of three medicinal plant extracts were studied in the range of 4.69 to 1000 mg/l in the laboratory bioassays against early 4th instar larvae of An. subpictus and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus. The mortality data were subjected to probit analysis to determine the lethal concentrations (LC50 and LC90) to kill 50 and 90 per cent of the treated larvae of the respective species. Results: All plant extracts showed moderate effects after 24 h of exposure; however, the highest toxic effect of bark methanol extract of A. squamosa, leaf ethyl acetate extract of C. indicum and leaf acetone extract of T. procumbens against the larvae of An. subpictus (LC50 = 93.80, 39.98 and 51.57 mg/l) and bark methanol extract of A. squamosa, leaf methanol extract of C. indicum and leaf ethyl acetate extract of T. procumbens against the larvae of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus (LC50 =104.94, 42.29 and 69.16 mg/l) respectively. Interpretation & Conclusions: Our data suggest that the bark ethyl acetate and methanol extract of A. squamosa, leaf ethyl acetate and methanol extract of C. indicum, acetone and ethyl acetate extract of T. procumbens have the potential to be used as an ecofriendly approach for the control of the An. subpictus, and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus. PMID:21808141

  16. Adulticidal and repellent properties of indigenous plant extracts against Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Sivakumar, Rajamohan

    2012-05-01

    Several diseases are associated to the mosquito-human interaction. Mosquitoes are the carriers of severe and well-known illnesses such as malaria, arboviral encephalitis, dengue fever, chikunguniya fever, West Nile virus, and yellow fever. These diseases produce significant morbidity and mortality in humans and livestock around the world. The adulticidal and repellent activities of crude hexane, ethyl acetate, benzene, chloroform, and methanol extracts of leaf of Eclipta alba and Andrographis paniculata were assayed for their toxicity against two important vector mosquitoes, viz., Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). The adult mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. All extracts showed moderate adulticide effects; however, the highest adult mortality was found in methanol extract of A. paniculata against the adults of C. quinquefasciatus and A. aegypti with the LC(50) and LC(90) values were 149.81, 172.37 ppm and 288.12, 321.01 ppm, respectively. The results of the repellent activity of hexane, ethyl acetate, benzene, chloroform, and methanol extract of E. alba and A. paniculata plants at three different concentrations of 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/cm(2) were applied on skin of forearm in man and exposed against adult female mosquitoes. In this observation, these two plant crude extracts gave protection against mosquito bites without any allergic reaction to the test person, and also, the repellent activity is dependent on the strength of the plant extracts. These results suggest that the leaf solvent plant extracts have the potential to be used as an ideal ecofriendly approach for the control of mosquitoes. This is the first report on the mosquito adulticidal and repellent activities of the reported E. alba and A. paniculata plants.

  17. Profiles of Amino Acids and Acylcarnitines Related with Insecticide Exposure in Culex quinquefasciatus (Say).

    PubMed

    Martin-Park, Abdiel; Gomez-Govea, Mayra A; Lopez-Monroy, Beatriz; Treviño-Alvarado, Víctor Manuel; Torres-Sepúlveda, María Del Rosario; López-Uriarte, Graciela Arelí; Villanueva-Segura, Olga Karina; Ruiz-Herrera, María Del Consuelo; Martinez-Fierro, Margarita de la Luz; Delgado-Enciso, Ivan; Flores-Suárez, Adriana E; White, Gregory S; Martínez de Villarreal, Laura E; Ponce-Garcia, Gustavo; Black, William C; Rodríguez-Sanchez, Irám Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Culex quinquefasciatus Say is a vector of many pathogens of humans, and both domestic and wild animals. Personal protection, reduction of larval habitats, and chemical control are the best ways to reduce mosquito bites and, therefore, the transmission of mosquito-borne pathogens. Currently, to reduce the risk of transmission, the pyrethroids, and other insecticide groups have been extensively used to control both larvae and adult mosquitoes. In this context, amino acids and acylcarnitines have never been associated with insecticide exposure and or insecticide resistance. It has been suggested that changes in acylcarnitines and amino acids profiles could be a powerful diagnostic tool for metabolic alterations. Monitoring these changes could help to better understand the mechanisms involved in insecticide resistance, complementing the strategies for managing this phenomenon in the integrated resistance management. The purpose of the study was to determine the amino acids and acylcarnitines profiles in larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus after the exposure to different insecticides. Bioassays were performed on Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae exposed to the diagnostic doses (DD) of the insecticides chlorpyrifos (0.001 μg/mL), temephos (0.002 μg/mL) and permethrin (0.01 μg/mL). In each sample, we analyzed the profile of 12 amino acids and 31 acylcarnitines by LC-MS/MS. A t-test was used to determine statistically significant differences between groups and corrections of q-values. Results indicates three changes, the amino acids arginine (ARG), free carnitine (C0) and acetyl-carnitine (C2) that could be involved in energy production and insecticide detoxification. We confirmed that concentrations of amino acids and acylcarnitines in Cx. quinquefasciatus vary with respect to different insecticides. The information generated contributes to understand the possible mechanisms and metabolic changes occurring during insecticide exposure.

  18. Effects of temperature on the transmission of west nile virus by Culex tarsalis (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Reisen, William K; Fang, Ying; Martinez, Vincent M

    2006-03-01

    Culex tarsalis Coquillett females were infected with the NY99 strain of West Nile virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, WNV) and then incubated under constant temperatures of 10-30 degrees C. At selected time intervals, transmission was attempted using an in vitro capillary tube assay. The median time from imbibing an infectious bloodmeal until infected females transmitted WNV (median extrinsic incubation period, EIP50) was estimated by probit analysis. By regressing the EIP rate (inverse of EIP50) as a function of temperature from 14 to 30 degrees C, the EIP was estimated to require 109 degree-days (DD) and the point of zero virus development (x-intercept) was estimated to be 14.3 degrees C. The resulting degree-day model showed that the NY99 WNV strain responded to temperature differently than a lineage II strain of WNV from South Africa and approximated our previous estimates for St. Louis encephalitis virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, SLEV). The invading NY99 WNV strain therefore required warm temperatures for efficient transmission. The time for completion of the EIP was estimated monthly from temperatures recorded at Coachella Valley, Los Angeles, and Kern County, California, during the 2004 epidemic year and related to the duration of the Cx. tarsalis gonotrophic cycle and measures of WNV activity. Enzootic WNV activity commenced after temperatures increased, the duration of the EIP decreased, and virus potentially was transmitted in two or less gonotrophic cycles. Temperatures in the United States during the epidemic summers of 2002-2004 indicated that WNV dispersal and resulting epicenters were linked closely to above-average summer temperatures.

  19. Efficacy of two formulations of the bioinsecticide spinosad against Culex quinquefasciatus in India.

    PubMed

    Sadanandane, C; Boopathi Doss, P S; Jambulingam, P; Zaim, M

    2009-03-01

    Spinosad 12% suspension concentrate (SC) and 0.5% granular (G) formulations were tested against Culex quinquefasciatus immatures at 3 dosages--50, 100, and 150 mg active ingredient (AI)/m2--in cesspits, street drains, and disused wells in comparison with temephos 1% G at 1 part per million. The 2 formulations reduced the density of pupae of Cx. quinquefasciatus by 80-100% for 7-14 days in cesspits, 7-18 days in drains, and 33-69 days in disused wells at the 3 dosages tested. The 12% SC and 0.5% G formulations were equally effective in suppressing the larval and pupal populations of Cx. quinquefasciatus in all the habitats treated. At 100 mg AI/m2 in drains and cesspits, the efficacy of spinosad 0.5% G was greater than that of temephos (1% G) and that of spinosad 12% SC was comparable to that of temephos (1% G) applied to the 2 habitats. In disused wells, both the formulations lasted longer than temephos. Based on the small-scale trial, the rate of 150 mg AI/m2 of spinosad was selected for field application to cesspits and drains and 50 mg AI/m2 for application to disused wells. The efficacy observed in medium-scale trials was in agreement with that of small-scale trials. The trial showed that the 2 formulations of spinosad can be used for larval control of Cx. quinquefasciatus, at 50 mg AI/m2, applied at weekly intervals to cesspits and street drains and at monthly intervals to disused wells. At the higher dose of 150 mg AI/m2, the 2 formulations were effective in suppressing the pupal population for 2 wk in cesspits and street drains and for 2 months in disused wells.

  20. Profiles of Amino Acids and Acylcarnitines Related with Insecticide Exposure in Culex quinquefasciatus (Say)

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Park, Abdiel; Gomez-Govea, Mayra A.; Lopez-Monroy, Beatriz; Treviño-Alvarado, Víctor Manuel; Torres-Sepúlveda, María del Rosario; López-Uriarte, Graciela Arelí; Villanueva-Segura, Olga Karina; Ruiz-Herrera, María del Consuelo; Martinez-Fierro, Margarita de la Luz; Delgado-Enciso, Ivan; Flores-Suárez, Adriana E.; White, Gregory S.; Martínez de Villarreal, Laura E.; Ponce-Garcia, Gustavo; Black, William C.; Rodríguez-Sanchez, Irám Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Culex quinquefasciatus Say is a vector of many pathogens of humans, and both domestic and wild animals. Personal protection, reduction of larval habitats, and chemical control are the best ways to reduce mosquito bites and, therefore, the transmission of mosquito-borne pathogens. Currently, to reduce the risk of transmission, the pyrethroids, and other insecticide groups have been extensively used to control both larvae and adult mosquitoes. In this context, amino acids and acylcarnitines have never been associated with insecticide exposure and or insecticide resistance. It has been suggested that changes in acylcarnitines and amino acids profiles could be a powerful diagnostic tool for metabolic alterations. Monitoring these changes could help to better understand the mechanisms involved in insecticide resistance, complementing the strategies for managing this phenomenon in the integrated resistance management. The purpose of the study was to determine the amino acids and acylcarnitines profiles in larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus after the exposure to different insecticides. Bioassays were performed on Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae exposed to the diagnostic doses (DD) of the insecticides chlorpyrifos (0.001 μg/mL), temephos (0.002 μg/mL) and permethrin (0.01 μg/mL). In each sample, we analyzed the profile of 12 amino acids and 31 acylcarnitines by LC-MS/MS. A t-test was used to determine statistically significant differences between groups and corrections of q-values. Results indicates three changes, the amino acids arginine (ARG), free carnitine (C0) and acetyl-carnitine (C2) that could be involved in energy production and insecticide detoxification. We confirmed that concentrations of amino acids and acylcarnitines in Cx. quinquefasciatus vary with respect to different insecticides. The information generated contributes to understand the possible mechanisms and metabolic changes occurring during insecticide exposure. PMID:28085898

  1. Aqueous neem extract versus neem powder on Culex quinquefasciatus: implications for control in anthropogenic habitats.

    PubMed

    Kudom, Andreas A; Mensah, Ben A; Botchey, Mary A

    2011-01-01

    Control programs using conventional insecticides to target anthropogenic mosquito habitats are very expensive because these habitats are widespread, particularly in cities of most African countries. Additionally, there are serious environmental concerns regarding large-scale application of most conventional insecticides. Clearly there is a need for alternative methods that are more effective, less expensive, and environmentally friendly. One such method would be the application of preparations made from parts of the neem tree, Azadirachta indica A. Jussieu (Sapindales: Meliaceae). In this study, aqueous crude extracts and crude powder were prepared from different parts of neem, and the efficacies of the preparations on juvenile stages of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) were evaluated in the laboratory. When larvae were exposed to a concentration of 0.1 g/mL extract for 24 hours, percent mean mortality (± SE) was 72.7 plusmn; 1.8 for the bark, 68.7 ± 1.6 for fruits and 60 ± 1.6 for leaves. These means were not significantly different (χ(2) = 4.12; df = 2; p = 0.127). At a concentration of 0.01 g/mL, > 95% of the larvae died within 24 hours of exposure to powdered neem leaf, but it took 120 hours to reach the same level of larval mortality in aqueous leaf extract. The crude extract slowly inhibited the growth and development of mosquitoes while the crude powder acted more as a barrier; the mosquitoes probably died from suffocation. However, both types of preparations can be made and used by local people to control mosquito breeding in anthropogenic habitats, especially in urbanized areas.

  2. Identification of the Temperature Induced Larvicidal Efficacy of Agave angustifolia against Aedes, Culex, and Anopheles Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Kajla, Mithilesh; Bhattacharya, Kurchi; Gupta, Kuldeep; Banerjee, Ujjwal; Kakani, Parik; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic insecticides are generally employed to control the mosquito population. However, their injudicious over usage and non-biodegradability are associated with many adverse effects on the environment and mosquitoes. The application of environment-friendly mosquitocidals might be an alternate to overcome these issues. In this study, we found that organic or aqueous extracts of Agave angustifolia leaves exhibited a strong larvicidal activity (LD50 28.27 μg/ml) against Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Anopheles stephensi larvae within a short exposure of 12 h. The larvicidal activity of A. angustifolia is inherited and independent of the plants vegetative growth. Interestingly, the plant larvicidal activity was observed exclusively during the summer season (April–August, when outside temperature is between 30 and 50°C) and it was significantly reduced during winter season (December–February, when the outside temperature falls to ~4°C or lower). Thus, we hypothesized that the larvicidal components of A. angustifolia might be induced by the manipulation of environmental temperature and should be resistant to the hot conditions. We found that the larvicidal activity of A. angustifolia was induced when plants were maintained at 37°C in a semi-natural environment against the controls that were growing outside in cold weather. Pre-incubation of A. angustifolia extract at 100°C for 1 h killed 60% larvae in 12 h, which gradually increased to 100% mortality after 24 h. In addition, the dry powder formulation of A. angustifolia, also displayed a strong larvicidal activity after a long shelf life. Together, these findings revealed that A. angustifolia is an excellent source of temperature induced bioactive metabolites that may assist the preparedness for vector control programs competently. PMID:26793700

  3. Dispersal of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) in a Hawaiian rain forest.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, D A

    2008-07-01

    Introduced mosquito-borne pathogens avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum Grassi and Feletti) and avian pox virus (Avipoxvirus) have been implicated in the past extinctions and declines of Hawaiian avifauna and remain significant obstacles to the recovery and restoration of endemic Hawaiian birds. Effective management of avian disease will require extensive mosquito control efforts that are guided by the local ecology of the vector Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae). During October and November 1997 and September through November 1998 five mark-release-recapture experiments with laboratory-reared Cx. quinquefasciatus were conducted in a native rain forest on Hawaii Island. Of the overall 66,047 fluorescent dye-marked and released females, 1,192 (1.8%) were recaptured in 43-52 CO2-baited traps operated for 10-12-d trapping periods. Recaptured mosquitoes were trapped in all directions and at distances up to 3 km from the release site. The cumulative mean distance traveled (MDTs) over the trapping period ranged from a high of 1.89 km after 11 d (September 1998) to a low of 0.81 km after 11 d (November 1998). Released mosquitoes moved predominately in a downwind direction and they seemed to use forestry roads as dispersal corridors. Applying an estimated MDT of 1.6 km to a geographical information system-generated map of the Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge clearly demonstrated that the effective refuge area could be reduced 60% by mosquitoes infiltrating into managed refuge lands. These findings should have significant implications for the design of future refuges and development of effective mosquito-borne avian disease control strategies.

  4. Larval Habitat Substrates Could Affect the Biology and Vectorial Capacity of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Shah, Rizwan Mustafa; Ali, Qasim; Alam, Mehboob; Shad, Sarfraz Ali; Majeed, Shahid; Riaz, Muhammad; Binyameen, Muhammad

    2016-12-25

    Culex quinquefasciatus Say is an important disease vector throughout much of the world. Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of different larval habitat substrates on the fitness and biting efficiency of Cx. quinquefasciatus adults. Our findings indicate that the development time (egg to adult) of larvae reared in irrigation water was 8.63 d while that of larvae reared in distilled water was 17.10 d (Effect size = 0.95). However, the rate of adult emergence was similar for all the tested treatments. Furthermore, the mean weight of an egg raft varied between larval habitats: distilled water (1.83 mg), rainfall water (1.25 mg), irrigation water (1.52 mg), and sewerage water (2.52 mg) (Effect size = 0.91). But, the fecundity (eggs per female) and hatchability (%) were statistically similar in all the rearing mediums (Effect size = 0.79). Longevity of females in all the tested populations did not differ significantly (Effect size = 0.91). The mean relative growth rates of larvae reared in tap water (0.80) and distilled water (0.86) habitats were lower than growth rates in all other rearing habitats (Effect size = 0.96). The intrinsic rate of natural increase in tap water (0.27) and irrigation water (0.35) was significantly higher than that in distilled water (0.09) and sewerage water (0.16) (Effect size = 0.84). Adults reared in rain water had the highest biting efficiency among all the tested populations. These results provide useful information for the management of Cx. quinquefasciatus.

  5. Bioaccumulation kinetics of the conventional energetics TNT and RDX relative to insensitive munitions constituents DNAN and NTO in Rana pipiens tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Lotufo, Guilherme R; Biedenbach, James M; Sims, Jerre G; Chappell, Pornsawan; Stanley, Jacob K; Gust, Kurt A

    2015-04-01

    The manufacturing of explosives and their loading, assembling, and packing into munitions for use in testing on training sites or battlefields has resulted in contamination of terrestrial and aquatic sites that may pose risk to populations of sensitive species. The bioaccumulative potential of the conventional explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and of the insensitive munitions (i.e., less shock sensitive) compound 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) were assessed using the Northern leopard frog, Rana pipiens. Trinitrotoluene entering the organism was readily biotransformed to aminodinitrotoluenes, whereas no transformation products were measured for RDX or DNAN. Uptake clearance rates were relatively slow and similar among compounds (1.32-2.19 L kg(-1) h(-1) ). Upon transfer to uncontaminated water, elimination rate was very fast, resulting in the prediction of fast time to approach steady state (5 h or less) and short elimination half-lives (1.2 h or less). A preliminary bioconcentration factor of 0.25 L kg(-1) was determined for the insensitive munitions compound 3-nitro-1,2,4-trizole-5-one (NTO) indicating negligible bioaccumulative potential. Because of the rapid elimination rate for explosives, tadpoles inhabiting contaminated areas are expected to experience harmful effects only if under constant exposure conditions given that body burdens can rapidly depurate preventing tissue concentrations from persisting at levels that may cause detrimental biological effects.

  6. Induction of cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenases in northern leopard frogs, Rana pipiens, by 3,3{prime},4,4{prime},5-pentachlorobiphenyl

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.; Jung, R.E.; Karasov, W.H.; Melancon, M.J.

    1998-08-01

    In the past decade, biochemical and physiological characteristics such as hepatic detoxifying system. DNA adducts, thyroid malfunction, and acetylcholinesterase inhibition have been used extensively as biomarkers for contaminant exposure. Northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) were injected intraperitoneally either with a solution of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 m corn oil at a concentration of 0.2, 0.7, 2.3, or 7.8 mg/kg body weight or with corn oil alone. Appropriate assay conditions with hepatic microsomes were determined for four cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenases: ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD), methoxy-ROD (MROD), benzyloxy-ROD (BROD), and pentoxy-ROD (PROD). One week after PCB administration, the specific activities of EROD, MROD, BROD, and PROD were not elevated at doses {le}0.7 mg/kg (p > 0.05) but were significantly increased at doses {ge}2.3 mg/kg compared to the control groups (p < 0.05). The increased activities of these four enzymes were 3 to 6.4 times those in the control groups. The increased activities were maintained for at least 4 weeks. Because of a lack of induction at low doses of PCB 126, which were still relatively high compared to currently known environmental concentration, the authors suspect that EROD, MROD, BROD, and PROD activities are not sensitive biomarkers for coplanar PCB exposure in leopard frogs.

  7. Induction of cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenases in northern leopard frogs, Rana pipiens, by 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Y.-W.; Melancon, M.J.; Jung, R.E.; Karasov, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    Northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) were injected intraperitoneally either with a solution of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 in corn oil at a concentration of 0.2, 0.7, 2.3 and 7.8 mg/kg body weight or with corn oil alone. Appropriate assay conditions with hepatic microsomes were determined for four cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenases: ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD), methoxy-ROD (MROD), benzyloxy-ROD (BROD) and pentoxy-ROD (PROD). One week after PCB administration, the specific activities of EROD, MROD, BROD and PROD were not elevated at doses ? 0.7 mg/kg (p > 0.05), but were significantly increased at doses ? 2.3 mg/kg compared to the control groups (p < 0.05). The increased activity of these four enzymes ranged from 3to 6.4fold relative to control levels. The increased activities were maintained for at least four weeks. Due to a lack of induction at low doses of PCB 126, which were still relatively high compared to currentlyknown environmental concentrations, we suspect that EROD, MROD, BROD, and PROD activities are not sensitive biomarkers for coplanar PCB exposure in leopard frogs.

  8. Culex mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) egg laying in traps loaded with Bacillus thuringiensis variety israelensis and baited with skatole.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Rosângela M R; Regis, Lêda; Vasconcelos, Roberto; Leal, Walter S

    2010-05-01

    The Southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, is an important human health pest as a vector of several pathogens, including agents of lymphatic filariasis and arboviruses like West Nile virus. We conducted preliminary experiments in Recife, Brazil, to explore applications of Culex oviposition attractants in combination with Bacillus thuringiensis variety israelensis (Bti) in an attract-and-kill approach. Simple, cost-effective oviposition traps, BR-OVT, loaded with Bti and baited with or without attractant, were deployed in 10 homes for 30 d in 2 consecutive yr. Significantly higher numbers of egg rafts were deposited in traps baited with skatole or infusion than the control water traps. In the first year, 2006, significantly higher numbers of eggs were deposited in infusion-baited traps, particularly in the first 15 d of the experiment, than in skatole traps, but in the following year no significant difference was observed between synthetic and natural attractants. The tests strongly demonstrate that skatole or infusion can be used to enhance the number of egg rafts deposited on Bti-treated oviposition traps.

  9. Culex Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) Egg Laying in Traps Loaded With Bacillus thuringiensis Variety israelensis and Baited With Skatole

    PubMed Central

    BARBOSA, ROSÂNGELA M. R.; REGIS, LÊDA; VASCONCELOS, ROBERTO; LEAL, WALTER S.

    2010-01-01

    The Southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, is an important human health pest as a vector of several pathogens, including agents of lymphatic filariasis and arboviruses like West Nile virus. We conducted preliminary experiments in Recife, Brazil, to explore applications of Culex oviposition attractants in combination with Bacillus thuringiensis variety israelensis (Bti) in an attract- and-kill approach. Simple, cost-effective oviposition traps, BR-OVT, loaded with Bti and baited with or without attractant, were deployed in 10 homes for 30 d in 2 consecutive yr. Significantly higher numbers of egg rafts were deposited in traps baited with skatole or infusion than the control water traps. In the first year, 2006, significantly higher numbers of eggs were deposited in infusion-baited traps, particularly in the first 15 d of the experiment, than in skatole traps, but in the following year no significant difference was observed between synthetic and natural attractants. The tests strongly demonstrate that skatole or infusion can be used to enhance the number of egg rafts deposited on Bti-treated oviposition traps. PMID:20496581

  10. Multiple resistance of Culex vishnui Theobald against four major classes of insecticides in an agricultural area in Sekinchan, Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Leong, C S; Chen, C D; Low, V L; Karen-Chia, H M; Azidah, A A; Sofian-Azirun, M

    2014-06-01

    The resistance status of riceland Culex vishnui against four major groups of insecticides (i.e., organochlorines, carbamates, organophosphates and pyrethroids) was investigated. Biochemical assays (ESTα, ESTβ, MFO and GST) were also conducted to detect the resistance levels. Throughout a 12-month study period, multiple insecticide resistance was observed in both larvae and adult Cx vishnui. Culex vishnui larvae exhibited low resistance against malathion, temephos and permethrin with resistance ratio (RR) values < 5. In adult bioassay, Cx. vishnui were highly resistant against all tested adulticides with 24h post-treatment mortality < 70%. Correlations between permethrin and malathion resistance, as well as between deltamethrin and cyfluthrin resistance were found in Cx. vishnui. The results indicated that mixed function oxidases activity of Cx. vishnui was the highest compared to ESTα, ESTβ and GST. Spearman rank-order analysis showed that ESTα, ESTβ and GST were involved in multiple resistances in Cx. vishnui. The findings of this study established a baseline of insecticide susceptibility and revealed the effects of agricultural insecticide pressure on the vectors of Japanese encephalitis in Malaysia.

  11. Vector Competence and Capacity of Culex erraticus (Diptera: Culicidae) for Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus in the Southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Andrea M; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; Hassan, Hassan K; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2016-03-01

    Field studies of the ecology of eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV; family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus) in the southeastern United States have demonstrated that Culex erraticus (Dyar and Knab) is the most common mosquito at many enzootic sites and is often infected with the virus. However, the competence of Cx. erraticus for EEEV has not been explored in detail. Culex erraticus females were collected from the field and fed upon EEEV-infected chicks. The infected mosquitoes were provided honey for nutrition and to monitor for time to infectiveness. Of the mosquitoes that survived the 14-d postfeeding period, 89% were infected and 84% had evidence of a disseminated infection, though titers were generally low. EEEV was first detected in honey 6 d postinfection and was detected in samples collected from 94% of the mosquitoes with a disseminated infection overall. These data and others were then employed to estimate the relative vectorial capacity of Cx. erraticus at an EEEV enzootic site in Alabama. The vectorial capacity of Cx. erraticus at this site was 44% of Culiseta melanura (Coquillett), the accepted enzootic vector, suggesting Cx. erraticus may play a role in transmitting EEEV in areas where it is abundant and Cs. melanura rare.

  12. Larvicidal and pupicidal properties of Acalypha alnifolia Klein ex Willd. (Euphorbiaceae) leaf extract and the microbial insecticide Metarhizium anisopliae (Metsch.) against lymphatic filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus..

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was made to determine the mosquitocidal properties of Acalypha alnifolia leaf extract combined with the use of Metarizhium anisopliae spores for control of the lymphatic filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus. The methanolic leaf extract showed larvicidal and pupicidal effects after 24...

  13. Efficacy of larvividal and pupicidal properties of Acalypha alnifolia Klen ex Willd. (Euphorbiaceae) leaf extract and Metarhisium anisopilae (Metsch.) against Culex quinquefasciatus Say. (Diptera: Cuclicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was made to determine the lethal effects of Acalypha alnifolia leaf extract and the microbial insecticide Metarizhium anisopliae against larvae and pupae of the filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus. Methanol extracts of A. alnifolia were most effective in this regard with LC50 values...

  14. Larvicidal and pupicidal properties of Acalypha alnifolia Klein ex willd.(Euphorbiaceae) leaf extract and the microbial insecticide Metarhizium anisopliae (Metsch.) against lymphatic filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus Sa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was made to determine the mosquitocidal properties of Acalypha alnifolia leaf extract combined with the use of Metarizhium anisopliae spores for control of the lymphatic filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus. The methanolic leaf extract showed larvicidal and pupicidal effects after 24...

  15. Efficacy of agnique (mmf) monomolecular surface film against immature stages of Anopheles arabiensis patton and Culex spp (diptera: culicidae) in Khartoum, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Al; Hassan, A Abu; Salmah, M R Che; Rahman, W A

    2008-03-01

    The efficacy of the larvicidal and pupicidal agent (Agnique) MMF was evaluated against larvae of An. arabiensis and Culex (Diptera: Culicidae) under field conditions in Bahary Locality, Khartoum, Sudan. At an applied dosage of 0.25 ml/m2, MMF resulted in 89.4, 79.8 and 88.2% reductions in L3-L4 instars An. arabiensis and 63.5% in Culex larvae (all stages) 24 to 72 hours post-treatment. Pupae were completely eliminated (100%) within 24 hours posttreatment. The earlier instars (L1-L2) of An. arabiensis were more tolerant with a 62.5% reduction at 72 hours post-treatment compared to (L3-L4) instars and pupae. At 7-days post-treatment Agnique gave a 57.5% reduction in L1-L2 and 92.6% in L3-L4 instar larvae of An. arabiensis and 57.3% and 86.4% in Culex larvae and pupae, respectively. We conclude that Agnique can perform effectively against L3-L4 instars and pupae of An. arabiensis for only 1 week, and 3 to 4 days against L1-L2 instars of Culex spp.

  16. Functional expression and molecular characterization of Culex quinquefasciatus salivary α-glucosidase (MalI).

    PubMed

    Suthangkornkul, Rungarun; Sirichaiyakul, Phanthila; Sungvornyothin, Sungsit; Thepouyporn, Apanchanid; Svasti, Jisnuson; Arthan, Dumrongkiet

    2015-06-01

    Salivary α-glucosidases (MalI) have been much less characterized when compared with midgut α-glucosidases, which have been studied in depth. Few studies have been reported on the partial characterization of MalI, but no clear function has been ascribed. The aim of this study is to purify and characterize the recombinant Culex quinquefasciatus (CQ) α-glucosidase expressed in Pichia pastoris. The cDNA encoding mature Cx. quinquefasciatus α-glucosidase gene with polyhistidine tag (rCQMalIHis) was successfully cloned into the expression vector, pPICZαB, designated as pPICZαB/CQMalIHis. The activity of recombinant rCQMalIHis expressed in P. pastoris could be detected at 3.75U/ml, under optimal culture conditions. The purified rCQMalIHis showed a single band of molecular weight of approximately 92kDa on SDS-PAGE. After Endoglycosidase H digestion, a single band at 69kDa was found on SDS-PAGE analysis, suggesting that rCQMalIHis is a glycoprotein. Additionally, tryptic digestion and LC-MALDI MS/MS analysis suggested that the 69kDa band corresponds to the Cx. quinquefasciatus α-glucosidase. Thus, rCQMalIHis is a glycoprotein. The rCQMalIHis exhibited optimum pH and temperature at 5.5 and 35°C, respectively. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of the purified rCQMalIHis for maltotriose is higher than those for sucrose, maltotetraose, maltose and p-nitrophenyl-α-glucoside, indicating that the enzyme prefers maltotriose. Additionally, the rCQMalIHis is significantly inhibited by d-gluconic acid δ-lactone, but not by Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and EDTA. The rCQMalIHis is strongly inhibited by acarbose with IC50 67.8±5.6nM, but weakly inhibited by glucose with IC50 115.9±7.3mM.

  17. Insecticides resistance in the Culex quinquefasciatus populations from northern Thailand and possible resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yanola, Jintana; Chamnanya, Saowanee; Lumjuan, Nongkran; Somboon, Pradya

    2015-09-01

    The mosquito vector Culex quinquefasciatus is known to be resistant to insecticides worldwide, including Thailand. This study was the first investigation of the insecticide resistance mechanisms, involving metabolic detoxification and target site insensitivity in C. quinquefasciatus from Thailand. Adult females reared from field-caught larvae from six provinces of northern Thailand were determined for resistant status by exposing to 0.05% deltamethrin, 0.75% permethrin and 5% malathion papers using the standard WHO susceptibility test. The overall mortality rates were 45.8%, 11.4% and 80.2%, respectively. A fragment of voltage-gated sodium channel gene was amplified and sequenced to identify the knock down resistance (kdr) mutation. The ace-1 gene mutation was determined by using PCR-RFLP. The L1014F kdr mutation was observed in all populations, but the homozygous mutant F/F1014 genotype was found only in two of the six provinces where the kdr mutation was significantly correlated with deltamethrin resistance. However, none of mosquitoes had the G119S mutation in the ace-1 gene. A laboratory deltamethrin resistant strain, Cq_CM_R, has been established showing a highly resistant level after selection for a few generations. The mutant F1014 allele frequency was significantly increased after one generation of selection. A synergist assay was performed to assess the metabolic detoxifying enzymes. Addition of bis(4-nitrophenyl)-phosphate (BNPP) and diethyl maleate (DEM), inhibitors of esterases and glutathione S-transferases (GST), respectively, into the larval bioassay of the Cq_CM strain with deltamethrin showed no significant reduction. By contrast, addition of piperonyl butoxide (PBO), an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, showed a 9-fold reduction of resistance. Resistance to pyrethroids in C. quinquefasciatus is widely distributed in northern Thailand. This study reports for the first time for the detection of the L1014F kdr mutation in wild populations

  18. Insecticidal and genotoxic activity of Psoralea corylifolia Linn. (Fabaceae) against Culex quinquefasciatus Say, 1823

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Indiscriminate use of synthetic insecticides to eradicate mosquitoes has caused physiological resistance. Plants provide a reservoir of biochemical compounds; among these compounds some have inhibitory effect on mosquitoes. In the present study the larvicidal, adulticidal and genotoxic activity of essential oil of Psoralea corylifolia Linn. against Culex quinquefasciatus Say was explored. Methods Essential oil was isolated from the seeds of P. corylifolia Linn. Larvicidal and adulticidal bioassay of Cx. quinquefasciatus was carried out by WHO method. Genotoxic activity of samples was determined by comet assay. Identification of different compounds was carried out by gas chromatography- mass spectrometry analysis. Results LC50 and LC90 values of essential oil were 63.38±6.30 and 99.02±16.63 ppm, respectively against Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae. The LD50 and LD90 values were 0.057±0.007 and 0.109±0.014 mg/cm2 respectively against adult Cx. quinquefasciatus,. Genotoxicity of adults was determined at 0.034 and 0.069 mg/cm2. The mean comet tail length was 6.2548±0.754 μm and 8.47±0.931 μm and the respective DNA damage was significant i.e. 6.713% and 8.864% in comparison to controls. GCMS analysis of essential oil revealed 20 compounds. The major eight compounds were caryophyllene oxide (40.79%), phenol,4-(3,7-dimethyl-3-ethenylocta-1,6-dienyl) (20.78%), caryophyllene (17.84%), α-humulene (2.15%), (+)- aromadendrene (1.57%), naphthalene, 1,2,3,4-tetra hydro-1,6-dimethyle-4-(1-methyl)-, (1S-cis) (1.53%), trans- caryophyllene (0.75%), and methyl hexadecanoate (0.67%). Conclusion Essential oil obtained from the seeds of P. corylifolia showed potent toxicity against larvae and adult Cx. quinquefasciatus. The present work revealed that the essential oil of P. corylifolia could be used as environmentally sound larvicidal and adulticidal agent for mosquito control. PMID:23379981

  19. Variations in life tables of geographically isolated strains of the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Suman, D S; Tikar, S N; Mendki, M J; Sukumaran, D; Agrawal, O P; Parashar, B D; Prakash, S

    2011-09-01

    Variations in the life tables and other biological attributes of four strains of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) from geographically isolated regions of India that had been reared to the fifth generation in the laboratory were assessed under a standardized rearing regime under constant laboratory conditions. Two strains from arid habitats [Jodhpur (JD) and Bikaner (BKN)], one from a semi-arid inland habitat [Bathinda (BTH)], one from a semi-arid coastal habitat [Jamnagar (JMN)] and a standard laboratory strain (LAB) were compared. Horizontal life-table parameters were measured for each strain. Egg mortality ranged from 4.4% (JD and BTH) to 19.5% (BKN). The lowest rate of adult emergence and highest female : male ratio were found in BKN, and the highest rate of adult emergence and lowest female : male ratio were recorded in BTH. The egg-hatching period was longest in BTH and shortest in LAB. The duration from oviposition to adult emergence was longest in JD and shortest in LAB. Females lived longer than males in all strains. The net reproductive rates (R(0) ) of all field-derived strains (122.9-162.2) differed significantly between strains and were significantly greater than that of LAB (107.6). Similarly, both the intrinsic rate of increase (r(m) ) and finite rate of increase (λ) were found to be lower in LAB than in the field strains, but the mean generation time (T) and doubling time (DT) were longest in LAB. For several life-table attributes, JD and BTH clustered together and were more similar to JMN than to BKN and LAB. The results indicate that BTH, BKN and JD can be characterized as r-strategists, more so than JMN. Overall fecundity increased with age. Differences in annual temperature ranges and mean annual rainfall between locations were positively correlated (r = 0.46-0.97) with egg production, female life expectancy, R(0) , r(m) , λ and T. The results suggest that strains of Cx. quinquefasciatus from different geographical areas with

  20. Insecticidal potency of bacterial species Bacillus thuringiensis SV2 and Serratia nematodiphila SV6 against larvae of mosquito species Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Patil, Satish V; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Salunkhe, Rahul B

    2012-05-01

    The tremendous worldwide efforts to isolate novel mosquito larvicidal bacteria with improved efficacy present significant promise to control vector-borne diseases of public health importance. In the present study, two native bacterial isolates, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt SV2) and Serratia species (SV6) were evaluated for mosquito larvicidal potential against the early fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus with reference to B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) H 14. The native Gram-positive, spore-forming Bt SV2 isolate showed 100% mortality against early fourth instars of Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus, in parallel to Bti H14 strain. After 24 h, Bt SV2 showed 98%, 89%, and 80.67%, and Bti H14 showed 92%, 98.33%, and 60% mortality against Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus, respectively. Serratia SV6 showed highest activity against Culex quinquefasciatus (100%) followed by Anopheles stephensi (95%) and Aedes aegypti (91%) after 48 h of exposure. The Gram-negative Serratia SV6 showed delayed toxicity compared to Bti H14 and Bt SV2 against early fourth instars of Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus. The relative mortality of all treatments after 12-h exposures showed the varied toxicity with respect to exposure time, bacterial treatment, and mosquito species. Genetic relatedness of the strains was confirmed on the basis of phylogenetic reconstructions based on alignment of 16S rRNA gene sequences which indicated a strong clustering of the strain SV2 with B. thuringiensis and the strain SV6 with Serratia nematodiphila. In conclusion, the native isolate B. thuringiensis SV2 showed significant toxicity while Serratia SV6 showed less and delayed toxicity against several mosquito species compared with BtiH14. They may be used as novel bacterial insecticidal agents in mosquito vector-borne disease control. To our knowledge, this is the

  1. Avian Plasmodium in Culex and Ochlerotatus Mosquitoes from Southern Spain: Effects of Season and Host-Feeding Source on Parasite Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ferraguti, Martina; Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Muñoz, Joaquín; Roiz, David; Ruiz, Santiago; Soriguer, Ramón; Figuerola, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Haemosporidians, a group of vector-borne parasites that include Plasmodium, infect vertebrates including birds. Although mosquitoes are crucial elements in the transmission of avian malaria parasites, little is known of their ecology as vectors. We examined the presence of Plasmodium and Haemoproteus lineages in five mosquito species belonging to the genera Culex and Ochlerotatus to test for the effect of vector species, season and host-feeding source on the transmission dynamics of these pathogens. We analyzed 166 blood-fed individually and 5,579 unfed mosquitoes (grouped in 197 pools) from a locality in southern Spain. In all, 15 Plasmodium and two Haemoproteus lineages were identified on the basis of a fragment of 478 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Infection prevalence of blood parasites in unfed mosquitoes varied between species (range: 0–3.2%) and seasons. The feeding source was identified in 91 mosquitoes where 78% were identified as bird. We found that i) several Plasmodium lineages are shared among different Culex species and one Plasmodium lineage is shared between Culex and Ochlerotatus genera; ii) mosquitoes harboured Haemoproteus parasites; iii) pools of unfed females of mostly ornithophilic Culex species had a higher Plasmodium prevalence than the only mammophylic Culex species studied. However, the mammophylic Ochlerotatus caspius had in pool samples the greatest Plasmodium prevalence. This relative high prevalence may be determined by inter-specific differences in vector survival, susceptibility to infection but also the possibility that this species feeds on birds more frequently than previously thought. Finally, iv) infection rate of mosquitoes varies between seasons and reaches its maximum prevalence during autumn and minimum prevalence in spring. PMID:23823127

  2. Avian Plasmodium in Culex and Ochlerotatus Mosquitoes from Southern Spain: Effects of Season and Host-Feeding Source on Parasite Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ferraguti, Martina; Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Muñoz, Joaquín; Roiz, David; Ruiz, Santiago; Soriguer, Ramón; Figuerola, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Haemosporidians, a group of vector-borne parasites that include Plasmodium, infect vertebrates including birds. Although mosquitoes are crucial elements in the transmission of avian malaria parasites, little is known of their ecology as vectors. We examined the presence of Plasmodium and Haemoproteus lineages in five mosquito species belonging to the genera Culex and Ochlerotatus to test for the effect of vector species, season and host-feeding source on the transmission dynamics of these pathogens. We analyzed 166 blood-fed individually and 5,579 unfed mosquitoes (grouped in 197 pools) from a locality in southern Spain. In all, 15 Plasmodium and two Haemoproteus lineages were identified on the basis of a fragment of 478 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Infection prevalence of blood parasites in unfed mosquitoes varied between species (range: 0-3.2%) and seasons. The feeding source was identified in 91 mosquitoes where 78% were identified as bird. We found that i) several Plasmodium lineages are shared among different Culex species and one Plasmodium lineage is shared between Culex and Ochlerotatus genera; ii) mosquitoes harboured Haemoproteus parasites; iii) pools of unfed females of mostly ornithophilic Culex species had a higher Plasmodium prevalence than the only mammophylic Culex species studied. However, the mammophylic Ochlerotatus caspius had in pool samples the greatest Plasmodium prevalence. This relative high prevalence may be determined by inter-specific differences in vector survival, susceptibility to infection but also the possibility that this species feeds on birds more frequently than previously thought. Finally, iv) infection rate of mosquitoes varies between seasons and reaches its maximum prevalence during autumn and minimum prevalence in spring.

  3. Blood-feeding patterns of Culex quinquefasciatus and other culicines and implications for disease transmission in Mwea rice scheme, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Muturi, Ephantus J; Muriu, Simon; Shililu, Josephat; Mwangangi, Joseph M; Jacob, Benjamin G; Mbogo, Charles; Githure, John; Novak, Robert J

    2008-05-01

    Studies were conducted in Mwea Rice Scheme, Kenya during the period April 2005 and January 2007 to determine the host-feeding pattern of culicine mosquitoes. Mosquitoes were collected indoors and outdoors and tested for human, bovine, goat, and donkey blood meals by an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. A total of 1,714 blood-engorged samples comprising Culex quinquefasciatus Say (96.1%), Culex annulioris Theobald (1.8%), Culex poicilipes Theobald (0.9%), Aedes cuminsi Theobald (1.0%), Aedes taylori Edwards (0.1%), and Mansonia africana Theobald (0.1%) were tested. Except for A. taylori, in which the single blood meal tested was of bovine origin, the other species fed mostly on both bovine (range 73.3-100%) and goats (range 50-100%). Donkeys were also common hosts for all species (range 19.4-23.5%) except A. taylori and M. africana. C. quinquefasciatus was the only species containing human blood meals (0.04), and indoor collected populations of this species had significantly higher frequency of human blood meals (9.8%) compared with outdoor-collected populations (3.0%). Mixed blood feeding was dominant among culicine species comprising 50.0%, 73.3%, 73.5%, 80.6%, and 94.1% of the samples for M. africana, C. poicilipes, C. quinquefasciatus, C. annulioris, and A. cuminsi, respectively. Ten mixed blood meal combinations including a mixture of all the four hosts were observed in C. quinquefasciatus, compared to one blood meal combination for M. Africana, and two combinations for C. poicilipes, C. annulioris, and A. cuminsi. Mixed bovine and goat blood meal was the most common combination among the five culicine species followed by a mixture of donkey, bovine, and goat blood meals. We conclude that culicine species in Mwea are least likely to be vectors of lymphatic filariasis due to their high "preference" for livestock over human hosts, but they present an increased risk for arbovirus transmission particularly Rift Valley Fever virus, in which domestic animals serve

  4. Mosquito larvicidal, ovicidal, and repellent properties of botanical extracts against Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, M; Mathivanan, T; Elumalai, K; Krishnappa, K; Anandan, A

    2011-08-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases have an economic impact, including loss in commercial and labor outputs, particularly in countries with tropical and subtropical climates; however, no part of the world is free from vector-borne diseases. In mosquito control programs, botanical origin may have the potential to be used successfully as eggs, larvae, and adult. The larvicidal, ovicidal, and repellent activities of crude benzene and ethyl acetate extracts of leaf of Ervatamia coronaria and Caesalpinia pulcherrima were assayed for their toxicity against three important vector mosquitoes, viz., Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae). The larval mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. All extracts showed moderate larvicidal effects; however, the highest larval mortality was found in benzene extract of E. coronaria against the larvae of Anopheles Stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus with the LC(50) and LC(90) values were 79.08, 89.59, and 96.15 ppm and 150.47, 166.04, and 174.10 ppm, respectively. Mean percent hatchability of the ovicidal activity was observed 48 h posttreatment. The percent hatchability was inversely proportional to the concentration of extract and directly proportional to the eggs. The leaf extract of E. coronaria was found to be most effective than Caesalpinia pulcherrima against eggs/egg rafts of three vector mosquitoes. For E. coronaria, the benzene extract exerted 300, 250, and 200 ppm against Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus, respectively. The results of the repellent activity of benzene and ethyl acetate extract of E. coronaria and Caesalpinia pulcherrima plants at three different concentrations of 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/cm(2) were applied on skin of fore arm in man and exposed against adult female mosquitoes. In this observation, these two plant crude extracts gave protection against mosquito bites without any allergic reaction to the test person, and also, the

  5. Effects of Local Anthropogenic Changes on Potential Malaria Vector Anopheles hyrcanus and West Nile Virus Vector Culex modestus, Camargue, France

    PubMed Central

    Ponçon, Nicolas; Balenghien, Thomas; Toty, Céline; Ferré, Jean Baptiste; Thomas, Cyrille; Dervieux, Alain; L’Ambert, Grégory; Schaffner, Francis; Bardin, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Using historical data, we highlight the consequences of anthropogenic ecosystem modifications on the abundance of mosquitoes implicated as the current most important potential malaria vector, Anopheles hyrcanus, and the most important West Nile virus (WNV) vector, Culex modestus, in the Camargue region, France. From World War II to 1971, populations of these species increased as rice cultivation expanded in the region in a political context that supported agriculture. They then fell, likely because of decreased cultivation and increased pesticide use to control a rice pest. The species increased again after 2000 with the advent of more targeted pest-management strategies, mainly the results of European regulations decisions. An intertwined influence of political context, environmental constraints, technical improvements, and social factors led to changes in mosquito abundance that had potential consequences on malaria and WNV transmission. These findings suggest that anthropogenic changes should not be underestimated in vectorborne disease recrudescence. PMID:18258028

  6. Comparative Study of the Pathological Effects of Western Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus in Four Strains of Culex tarsalis Coquillett (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Neira, Marco V.; Mahmood, Farida; Reisen, William K.; James, Calvin B. L.; Romoser, William S.

    2014-01-01

    Early reports suggested that mosquito cells infected with arboviruses remain viable and undamaged. However, more recent experimental evidence suggests that arboviral infection of mosquito tissues might indeed result in pathological changes, with potential implications for vector survival and virus transmission. Here, we compare the pathological effects of western equine encephalomyelitis virus (WEEV) infection in four strains of Culex tarsalis previously reported to differ in their competence as WEEV vectors. Pathological effects were observed in cells of the midgut epithelium, salivary glands, and eggs. Cell rounding and sloughing of midgut epithelial cells was associated with those strains reported to be the least susceptible to WEEV infection, whereas midgut necrosis and vacuolation upon infection were associated with strains showing higher susceptibility. Although pathological effects were sporadically observed in infected salivary glands, further studies are required to evaluate their impact on vector competence. Additionally, the potential implications of observed C. tarsalis egg infection with WEEV are discussed. PMID:25346928

  7. Efficacy of encapsulated Lagenidium giganteum (Oomycetes: Lagenidiales) against Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti larvae in artificial containers.

    PubMed

    Rueda, L M; Patel, K J; Axtell, R C

    1990-12-01

    Presporangial mycelia of Lagenidium giganteum cultured on sunflower seed extract were encapsulated in calcium alginate and added once (July 18) to outdoor (Raleigh, NC) caged tires, wood and concrete containers populated with first instars of Culex quinquefasciatus or Aedes aegypti. First instars were added twice weekly (for 10 wk) to simulate natural oviposition. The fungus persisted for 10 wk and recycled in the mosquito larvae of both species. The overall reductions of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti immatures were higher in tires (55 and 45%, respectively) and wood (67 and 38%) than in concrete containers (17 and 14%). There were low correlations of the numbers of mosquito immatures with measurements of water quality (chemical oxygen demand, ammonia nitrogen and conductivity) in the containers.

  8. Gene structure and expression of nanos (nos) and oskar (osk) orthologues of the vector mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Juhn, J.; Marinotti, O.; Calvo, E.; James, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    The products of the maternal-effect genes, nanos (nos) and oskar (osk), are important for the development of germ cells in insects. Furthermore, these genes have been proposed as candidates for donating functional DNA regulatory sequences for use in gene drive systems to control transmission of mosquito-borne pathogens. The nos and osk genes of the cosmopolitan vector mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, encode proteins with domains common to orthologues found in other mosquitoes. Expression analyses support the conclusion that the role of these genes is conserved generally among members of the nematocera. Hybridization in situ analyses reveal differences in mRNA distribution in early embryos in comparison with the cyclorraphan, Drosophila melanogaster, highlighting a possible feature in the divergence of the clades each insect represents. PMID:18828840

  9. Mtx toxins from Lysinibacillus sphaericus enhance mosquitocidal cry-toxin activity and suppress cry-resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Margaret C; Berry, Colin; Walton, William E; Federici, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of Mtx toxins from Lysinibacillus sphaericus (formerly Bacillus sphaericus) with Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry toxins and the influence of such interactions on Cry-resistance were evaluated in susceptible and Cry-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Mtx-1 and Mtx-2 were observed to be active against both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes; however varying levels of cross-resistance toward Mtx toxins were observed in the resistant mosquitoes. A 1:1 mixture of either Mtx-1 or Mtx-2 with different Cry toxins generally showed moderate synergism, but some combinations were highly toxic to resistant larvae and suppressed resistance. Toxin synergy has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for enhancing activity and managing Cry-resistance in mosquitoes, thus Mtx toxins may be useful as components of engineered bacterial larvicides.

  10. Efficacy of herbal essential oils as insecticide against Aedes aegypti (Linn.), Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) and Anopheles dirus (Peyton and Harrison).

    PubMed

    Phasomkusolsil, Siriporn; Soonwera, Mayura

    2011-09-01

    The essential oils of Cananga odorata (ylang ylang), Citrus sinensis (orange), Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass), Cymbopogon nardus (citronella grass), Eucalyptus citriodora (eucalyptus), Ocimum basilicum (sweet basil) and Syzygium aromaticum (clove), were tested for their insecticide activity against Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles dirus using the WHO standard susceptibility test. These were applied in soybean oil at dose of 1%, 5% and 10% (w/v). C. citratus had the KT, values against the three mosquito species tested but the knockdown rates (at 10, 30 and 60 minutes) were lower than some essential oils. C. citratus oil had high insecticidal activity against Ae. aegypti, Cx. quinquefasciatus and An. dirus, with LC50 values of < 0.1, 2.22 and < 0.1%, respectively. Ten percent C. citratus gave the highest mortality rates (100%) 24 hours after application. This study demonstrates the potential for the essential oil of C. citratus to be used as an insecticide against 3 species of mosquitoes.

  11. A laboratory study of cyromazine on Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus and its activity on selected predators of mosquito larvae.

    PubMed

    Nelson, F R; Holloway, D; Mohamed, A K

    1986-09-01

    In a laboratory study, the insect growth regulator, cyromazine, exerted a high level of biological activity on Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus treated in the 4th larval instar. At 1.5 and 1.0 ppm this IGR produced 97 and 99% inhibition of emergence in adult Ae. aegypti, respectively. In Cx. quinquefasciatus, there was 99% inhibition at 1 ppm and complete inhibition at 1.5 ppm. The overall pupal mortality was higher than larval or adult stages of both species. This material induced different types of morphogenetic abnormalities in pupae and adults of the 2 species similar to those induced by other IGRs. However, most abnormalities were observed in the pupal stage. Adverse effects were not detected on the 4 mosquito predator species during the acute or posttreatment tests.

  12. Secreted Vago restricts West Nile virus infection in Culex mosquito cells by activating the Jak-STAT pathway.

    PubMed

    Paradkar, Prasad N; Trinidad, Lee; Voysey, Rhonda; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard; Walker, Peter J

    2012-11-13

    Although West Nile virus (WNV) and other arthropod-borne viruses are a major public health problem, the mechanisms of antiviral immunity in mosquitoes are poorly understood. Dicer-2, responsible for the RNAi-mediated response through the C-terminal RNase-III domain, also contains an N-terminal DExD/H-box helicase domain similar to mammalian RIG-I/MDA5 which, in Drosophila, was found to be required for activation of an antiviral gene, Vago. Here we show that the Culex orthologue of Vago (CxVago) is up-regulated in response to WNV infection in a Dicer-2-dependent manner. Further, our data show that CxVago is a secreted peptide that restricts WNV infection by activation of the Jak-STAT pathway. Thus, Vago appears to function as an IFN-like antiviral cytokine in mosquitoes.

  13. Comparative susceptibility of Culex tarsalis, a Nopheles franciscanus, and Culiseta inornata (Diptera: Culicidae) to Plasmodium relictum (Haemosporidia: Plasmodiidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Washino, Robert K.; van Riper, Charles

    1990-01-01

    Repeated laboratory attempts failed to infect Culiseta inornata (Williston) and Anopheles franciscanus McCracken with Plasmodium relictum as efficiently as Culex tarsalis Coquillett controls. Of 210 An. franciscanus that imbibed a replete meal from a parasitemic canary, two were found with oocysts and none with sporozoites. Of 112 Cs. inornata similarly fed, seven contained oocysts and one contained sporozoites. In contrast, of 94 Cx. tarsalis tested, 80 (85%) were found with oocysts, thus confirming that this mosquito is a suitable host of P. relictum . Lack of An. franciscanus and Cs. inornata with sporozoites precluded transmission studies and indicated that these species do not play a major role in the maintenance of P. relictum during fall and winter in the Sacramento Valley, Calif.

  14. Predatory efficiency of the water bug Sphaerodema annulatum on mosquito larvae (Culex quinquefasciatus) and its effect on the adult emergence.

    PubMed

    Aditya, G; Bhattacharyya, S; Kundu, N; Saha, G K; Raut, S K

    2004-11-01

    The daily number of IV instar larva of Culex quinquefasciatus killed, rate of pupation and adult emergence was noted in presence of the predatory water bug Sphaerodema annulatum for a period of seven consecutive days, experimentally, in the laboratory. The rate of IV instar larva killed by the water bugs on an average was 65.17 per day. The rate of pupation ranged between 7.6 and 48 in control while in presence of water bugs it ranged between 6 and 35. The rate of adult emergence in control experiments varied between 1.4 and 4.8 per day, which was reduced to only 0.4-28.8 per day in case of the water bugs. The results clearly indicate that the water bugs on its way of predation reduces the rate of pupation and adult emergence of Cx. quinquefasciatus significantly which calls for an extensive field trials.

  15. Sampling Design Influences the Observed Dominance of Culex tritaeniorhynchus: Considerations for Future Studies of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Transmission.

    PubMed

    Lord, Jennifer S; Al-Amin, Hasan Mohammad; Chakma, Sumit; Alam, Mohammad Shafiul; Gurley, Emily S; Pulliam, Juliet R C

    2016-01-01

    Mosquito sampling during Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV)-associated studies, particularly in India, has usually been conducted via aspirators or light traps to catch mosquitoes around cattle, which are dead-end hosts for JEV. High numbers of Culex tritaeniorhynchus, relative to other species, have often been caught during these studies. Less frequently, studies have involved sampling outdoor resting mosquitoes. We aimed to compare the relative abundance of mosquito species between these two previously used mosquito sampling methods. From September to December 2013 entomological surveys were undertaken in eight villages in a Japanese encephalitis (JE) endemic area of Bangladesh. Light traps were used to collect active mosquitoes in households, and resting boxes and a Bina Pani Das hop cage were used near oviposition sites to collect resting mosquitoes. Numbers of humans and domestic animals present in households where light traps were set were recorded. In five villages Cx. tritaeniorhynchus was more likely to be selected from light trap samples near hosts than resting collection samples near oviposition sites, according to log odds ratio tests. The opposite was true for Cx. pseudovishnui and Armigeres subalbatus, which can also transmit JEV. Culex tritaeniorhynchus constituted 59% of the mosquitoes sampled from households with cattle, 28% from households without cattle and 17% in resting collections. In contrast Cx. pseudovishnui constituted 5.4% of the sample from households with cattle, 16% from households with no cattle and 27% from resting collections, while Ar. subalbatus constituted 0.15%, 0.38%, and 8.4% of these samples respectively. These observations may be due to differences in timing of biting activity, host preference and host-seeking strategy rather than differences in population density. We suggest that future studies aiming to implicate vector species in transmission of JEV should consider focusing catches around hosts able to transmit JEV.

  16. Sampling Design Influences the Observed Dominance of Culex tritaeniorhynchus: Considerations for Future Studies of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Jennifer S.; Al-Amin, Hasan Mohammad; Chakma, Sumit; Alam, Mohammad Shafiul; Gurley, Emily S.; Pulliam, Juliet R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Mosquito sampling during Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV)-associated studies, particularly in India, has usually been conducted via aspirators or light traps to catch mosquitoes around cattle, which are dead-end hosts for JEV. High numbers of Culex tritaeniorhynchus, relative to other species, have often been caught during these studies. Less frequently, studies have involved sampling outdoor resting mosquitoes. We aimed to compare the relative abundance of mosquito species between these two previously used mosquito sampling methods. From September to December 2013 entomological surveys were undertaken in eight villages in a Japanese encephalitis (JE) endemic area of Bangladesh. Light traps were used to collect active mosquitoes in households, and resting boxes and a Bina Pani Das hop cage were used near oviposition sites to collect resting mosquitoes. Numbers of humans and domestic animals present in households where light traps were set were recorded. In five villages Cx. tritaeniorhynchus was more likely to be selected from light trap samples near hosts than resting collection samples near oviposition sites, according to log odds ratio tests. The opposite was true for Cx. pseudovishnui and Armigeres subalbatus, which can also transmit JEV. Culex tritaeniorhynchus constituted 59% of the mosquitoes sampled from households with cattle, 28% from households without cattle and 17% in resting collections. In contrast Cx. pseudovishnui constituted 5.4% of the sample from households with cattle, 16% from households with